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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03412
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 4, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03412

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(


[hp


IRegitered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage conceionm within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL Iv f w I I


Saturday, August 4, 1973.


PM HOLDS OUT BAHAMAS AS 'SHINING EXAMPLE'

& TELLS COMMONWEALTH HEADS OF STATE -


Achievement


of social


change without disorder






is our best contribution'


THE MAJOR CONTRIBUTION THE BAHAMAS can make to international affairs and world peace is its
experience in achieving social change without disorder or bloodshed and in the example of stable economic and
social development at home, Prime Minister Lynden Pindling said at Thursday's opening of the Commowealth
Heads of Government meeting in Ottawa.


4'4


PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING of the
Bahamas and Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau of Canada chat
together before entering another session of the
Commonwealth heads of governments conference being
held in Ottawa.


TODD DAVID HALL


CORAL HARBOUR

BOY (4) KILLED


A FOUR-year-old (oral
Harbour boy became Nassau's
twenty-second road fatality of
the year when ihe died in a
traffic accident in ('Coral
Harbour's Western Subdivision
at about 5 30 p.in. Friday.
Little Todd David Hall
would have celebrated his
fourth birthday on August 24.
lie is the son of Mr Mike Ilall.
a pilot with Bahamasair, and
his wife, Brenda.
Todd, a pedestrian was
involved in an accident witli
car N3789 reported being
driven at the time by a
16-year-old juvenile who
police said is employed in tIhe
area.
Police reported that "the
child is said to have crossed the
road in the path of the car.
Police are investigating."
Todd was pronounced dead
on arrival at the .yford ('ay
Medical Centre.
Funeral arrangements will be
Nassau's twenty-first traffic
fatality was recorded on Jul\
27, when Flaine Claton, 18, of
California, died in a
scooter-tree collision on the
Eastern Road.
At this time last year there
had been 20 traffic fatalities.

EYE CONTACT
TESTS LENSES

ROBERT T. HIRST
Optometrist
Savoy Bldg.
FREEPORT
Telephone 352-5906


INDEPENDENCE

SECRETARIAT

IS NOW CLOSED
TIll INDP) I P DNI)IC:N(
Secretariat closes today, it was
announced bh its chairman,
Mr. George A. Smith, M.P.,
Parliamentary Secretary to the
Prime Minister
"Wheni Sir Milo Butler was
sworn in ais (Gover'nor generall
rf tie ('Commonwealth of' the
Bahimas.'" Mr. Smith said, "it
dramiatised the end of colonial
rule in our Bahlamas.
"Thi planning aind
preparation of the ceremony
and the evening reception at
Government House marked the
last function of the
11 t' C ndep d ence s Secretariat.
Friday the Secretariat will be
offciilly c closed and the
emploll yees will return to their
respective d epar t ime n ts.
although a Ie w will remain tor
another r week or so clearing up
fhi's and preparing information
,ibout the celebrations for the
archives.
"I \would like to thank all
those people who have worked
so third in rmlakinig ouir
inrdepJendence celebrations so
impressive. Special thanks go
to the energetic statf of tile
Secretariat leaded by tlhe
capable Permarnent' Secretari.
Mr Ilarold Munnint's, swho
serv ed 'as coo0 d11,1 1, the
,ivisoi' council, the Bahamas
('Christian Council. tlie Ros al
Balhamas Police Folrce. the
v ar ious h a r d w o r k i n g
commit lees in New Providence
and ttle :Faminily Islands. the
local and foreign press, the
Nat ional t Secretaries
Associatiolln iiad all those
groups and individuals who
contributed in any way to
make the celebrations such an
outstanding success.
"I 1Il t also thai.nk

hbeih.i d inl sicli an appreciative
I1mall ntiii lii 1oight l the
celebrations. Flhat too, was a
contribution, for it showed
pride in self, country, goodwill
and love for our beautiful
islands.


Mr. Pindling, as leader of the
newest member of the
Commonwealth, was replying
to the opening remarks of
Canadian Prime Minister Pierre
Tnrudeau.
He said that as a small
country and a novice in
international affairs, the
Bahamas were grateful for the
advantages of such meetings

P.M. TO TAKE

MONTH OFF AFTER

CONFERENCE ?

PRIME Minister Lyndcn
Pindling, his goal of leading the
Bahamas into nationhood
achieved, may begin a
month-long vacation with his
wife, Marguerite, after the
Commonwealth heads of
government conference in
Ottawa ends next Friday, The
Tribune confirmed today.
There were reports that Mr.
Pindling and his wife planned
to leave on vacation as soon as
the conference was over, not
returning to Nassau until
sometime in September.
Director of Government
Information Services William
Kalis said this morning.
the Prime Minister is "thinking
about it lie's to let me know. 1
should hear from him
sometime next week as to what
his plans are."


DONALD PRATT

PROMOTED TO

ACTING DIRECTOR
MR. IONALD MERVIN
PRATT, formerly acting
Deputy l)irector Local
Government, has been
promoted to acting Director
effective June 1.
A former Out Island teacher
and commissioner, Mr. Pratt
served as head teacher in the
Out Islands from 1949 to 1959
when he became a
commissioner and performed
in that capacity in various
islands, including Cat Island.
San Salvador. Crooked Island
and Exuma.
tie attended courses in
public administration held
locally for senior public
officers in 1967 and 1968, and
in September 1969 was
promoted to the post of Senior
Out Island Commissioner.


BAHAMAS MUSICIANS

'SALUTE TO

INDEPENDENCE'
TillE BAIIAMAS Musicians
and I entertainers Union will
present a "Salute to Bahamian
Independence" tomorrow at 9
p.m. at the Sheraton British
coloniall lotel.
The two part musical
programme will include:
Ronnie Butler and the
Ramblers. Gladstone Adderley,
Bradley Stuart's Orchestra,
Charles ('arey, Miss Veronica
Roach and the Union's Big
Dance Band, directed by
Freddie Munnings.
The programme, which is
under the patronage of the
lHon. Livingston Coakley and
Mrs. Coakley, will honour
Timothy Gibson.
George Moxey, who is
co-ordinator of the show, will
he master of ceremonies..


where it was hoped the
necessary experience in
international debate would be
gained to participate with some
confidence in wider
discussions.
"But we feel that our best
contribution to international
affairs and world peace lies
firstly in our experience in
human relations in effecting
change without disorder,
revolution without bloodshed,
and secondly in stable
economic and social
development at home which
would stand out as a shining
example of the efficient
management of difficult racial
and physical circumstances,"
Mr. Pindling said.
Noting that techniques of
gov e r n ment and
Commonwealth functional
cooperation were on the
agenda, the Prime Minister said
this suggested attention to the
practical domestic features of
each country's development
and to association with other
countries.
ADJUSTMENT
"The change from ,colonial
status to sovereignty though
relatively smooth in my
country, nevertheless presents
a certain need for adjustment
and accommodation," he
pointed out.
The Bahamas hoped
therefore to learn from the
experience of older members
of the Commonwealth who, he
was sure, had found practical
answers to a number of
problems which might appear
formidable to this country in
these early stages."
Mr. Pindling expressed
pleasure that the
Commonwealth Heads (f
governmentt meeting was being
held in Canada as strong links
had been forged between that
country and the Bahamas in
recent years. He noted also
that Prime Minister Trudeau
had visited the Bahamas
privately on more than one
occasion.
The heads of government
conference will end August 10.


7/


PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING of the
Bahamas and Prime Minister Errol Barrow of Barbados ar
pictured listening attentively to a speaker during a session
of the Commonwealth heads of governments conference
being held in Ottawa, Canada. It is the first international
conference at which the Bahamas has been represented a
an independent state.



Alfred Maycock MP& Dev



chairman, now director o0


multi-million $ Andros fir


/


e
n
e
s




Cc



f


m


FORT FINCASTLE M.P. Alfred Maycock, chairman of the
Bahamas Development Corporation, has been elected a director
of San Andros (Bahamas) Limited, a new company which
recently bought the North Andros Development Company and
announced plans for over S14 million worth of improvements.
The Tribune wails today forest.
unable to ascertain whether TI Ie ne w o i ne Ii r's
Mr. Maycock was elected as a development plans call tor the
private individual or in his expenditure of S 5 million in
capacity as a representative of road construction. S5.5 million
the Government's BDC. in utilities. S1.054.000 for .a
All of the San Andros golf course and clubhouse.
(Bahamas) development S125.000 tor tennis courts.
activities will have to be S100.000 for tmodell villas:in,
approved by the Ministry of $5 Inillion for olhel
DevelopmLent in which Mr. developments or a total (s
Maycock. as chairnr an 'r the S .1 n Iilic.'
BDC. is a high-ranking official. Thie plans call for thi
The Tribune was unable to spending of SI 25 million on
contact any spokesman for the improvements in ithe first \ear.
Development Ministr\. the
BDC. Sail Andros (Bahamras) or
the firm's public relations{, "
consultants for clarification. '
A press release froni
Management Communilications
Services announced that NMr 0
Maycock and Mr. VWa5 ine 5k
Bazzle. president-elect of the .
Bank of Virginia. hadl beel,
elected: to the board of
directors of San Andros
(Bahamas) at a board meeting
held Thursday at the Bank of
Nassau.
A Telex message from Miinn
on July 17 announced that Sai
Andros (Bahaima) had
purchased the assets of the

Company.
Those assets included lthe
24-unit San Andros Iotel, the
San Andros airport and
terminal, a deep water harbour j
facility, five residential
subdivisions, 1,000 acres of
irrigated agricultural land and
5,000 acres of virgin pIne I


Commonwealth nations


mention the unmentionable:


'US Watergate scandal'

OTTAWA (AP) The great unmentionable at the 32-nation
Commonwealth summit conference has been mentioned:


Watergate.
Prime Minister Lee Kuan
Yew of Singapore said the
bugging scandal has so snarled
relationships between President
Nixon and Congress that
developments in Southeast
Asia are uncertain after U.S
bombing stops in Cambodia.
To some delegates, tlhe
outspoken Singapore leader
appeared to break one of the
association's unspoken rules:
avoid discussing in public the
internal affairs of a fellow
member or friendly nation.
But some other ministers
attending the nine-day
conference say privately that
Watergate is at the centre of
American politics. They say it
is a key factor conditioning
Washinton's approach to issues
that affect the Commnonwealth
nations, a loose union of
Britain's former Empire.
"All of us at this conference
know American thinking and
American action are crucial to
the settlement of problems
facing the whole world and the


non-Colnmmunist world inI
particular." said a ministli r oI
an important 'Coimmonwiealth
nation with close ties tor the
unitedd States.
"All of us know. too, the
capacity of President Ni\onsi
administration to think, to act
and to lead swill remain
circumscribed so long as
disclosures of Watergate remainI
unresolved," he added.
U.S. NO LEAD R
And an Asian leader said
privately, "as one surprising
revelation follows another at
the Senate hearings on
Watergate it becomes
increasingly clear that
Washington today is iin no
position to offer the moral or
strong political and ecoonrlc
leadership for which its friends
and allies are yearning."
The ministers are spending a
private weekend at Prime
Minister Pierre Elliott
Trudeau's retreat on M\ont
Tremblant 166 miles northeast
of Ottawa.


SAN ANDROS
(BAHAMAS) LTD. BOARD
MEMBERS (Front row, from
left): Ronald G. Crandell,
Corporate Secretary-Treasurer-
Peter J. Porath, Chairman and
President of San Andros
(Bahamas) Ltd., and J. B.


Pride Products Ltd.
I.xclusm'e Agent for
LEGO
CONSTRUCTION
TOY S, Ph


For detail Phone 2-4766


Prir,,- 90 r ent


SNO REPLY FROM PUBLIC

SERVICE PRESIDENT, SO ."



'Suspended' BaTelCo union


appeals directly chief



to Minister of Labour

By NICKI KELLY
MRS. WILLAMAE BRIDGEWATER. suspended as mIember of
the Public Services Union and chairman of the Batelco branch,


has appealed her case directly
Darling.
"I wrote a letter directly to
tle Minister I riday: and I have
c:n appointment to see him
) 30 a.m. Wednesday." MNrs.
Bridgewater confirmed today.
Shlie said slie decided to
approach the Minister directly
when she failed to receive a
repl I from Public Services
Union president 'Thaddeus
t irling, to whom she appealed
the suspension on Jul 3 1 .
I he Ba Tel(o branch
chairman was suspended for a
year by resolution passed at a
meeting of the P.S.1'. executive
on July 20.
Mrs. Brdgeswater. a member
of the executive, was not
invited to the meeting, and
onl\ learned ot her suspension
by letter four da\ s later.
SHOW I)OWN
IThe executive action against
the BTelC(o chairman appears
likely to produce a major
showdown between the parent
body and its affiliate, some of
Slwhose Imembers a!re nom
agitating to split from the
P.S.U.
The confrontation between
the two bodies was sparked by
a general meeting called by
union president Darling on
July 25 to serve notice of
proposed amendments to the
union's constitution.
When Mrs. Bridgewater
Is hed for details oi [th,
amendments she was allegedly
told by Mr. Darling that the
matter concerned only the


to Labour Minister Clifford

Public Services Union and had
nothing to do with the
BaTel(o branch.
The reply antagonized
branch members who wanted
to know why they were then
pa ing dues to the parent
bod \.
Mrs. Bridgewater's
suspension followed the next
night at a private meeting of
the union executive.
Neither this meeting nor the
general meeting comply with
the terms of the constitution
which prescribe the number of
days notice that nust be given
for such meetings.
APPEAL
Mrs. Bridgewater appealed
the suspension to Mr. Darling
as did other branch chairmen
and members of the union.
To date there has been no
reply to the appeals. Mrs.
Bridgewater said.
She has claimed that the
office of branch chairman is an
elected one and not by
appointment. Therefore the
right to remove a branch
chairman rested with those
who elected the officer.
The P.S.U. executive has
claimed that Mrs. Bridgewater's
conduct and behaviour was not
conducive and in keeping with
the Public Services Union.
Although the ye::r's term of
,ffiTce for members of the
P.S.U. executive ended in July,
new elections have yet to be
called by the president.


Campbell, Vice-President, Bank Stehlin Jr., Corporate
of Virginia International. (Back Vice-President, Wayne Bazzle,
row, from left): Earl Short, President-Elect, Bank of
President-Elect, Bank o' Virginia; and (inset.) Alfred
Nassau; John Dickinson, Maycock, M.P. and Chairman,
Vice-Presiden' Bank of Bahamas Development
Virginia Comp- siy Joseph C. Corporation.


YELLOW BIRDS OFFERING

NURSING SCHOLARSHIP


IIII 1 LLO t)\BIRI)S, a
volsu nthi er a .i \Ii" .i\ rh uit s
Pri [s1s' Nia'I .J Is' I I A I \ ') It .
Prince Margi. re i Hospiial. i to
olI'sl .1 nursI ng scholarship 1to
post-giIllu at c sttlud 'es ,abhiu l
I'h l "Y1ell5 itbl \tli!'.Il
S 'c 1 o l a l sli I p i' s ,
.commemorate t itis he Bahamas
yea, oi l l i t Id C 111'ridel 1i and is
oplen to all 1Iah111a1111,1 iegiStlel d
nu ,rse1 s e with an leasI t t\lv) \ rs.
nursing r \pe'i iinces'
\lApplicantis should plan to
attend s art accredited inst itutill i
appi ) ed i thlie Ministri ol
Ilealthl and hie prepared io
return to the Bahamas tos
i.ssur iCe nursing duties c willth ie
Miniisti ol IHealth and the
Princess Mairgaiet Hlospital tor
a tune at least C tiual to lthat
speni ilt oni e .ti IS
S he ell o w bi r d
ai n o i ncemenlit saiLd lle
scholarship s\ ill be awm aided lor
either a si\ nmonthls or one \ ear
cou rse.
The Yellowbirds are working
closely with the Ministry of
Health on this project, it was


sI 't i dn l h Is, ) r" ') r 5 'C1hbers ()f
the M\ inl!\n w i" ^i! >,n the
Mt'ola ;iin ,n n ii tlt c, .liotn:. w ith
it I 1 l :,'i b;id r and a

~ ~; ';. ,rIC t l e1 I t n I
I, i' ; 1 i ? ' !i ll N uiLrsin'
.l li ol lh' It l' ; '. .'ss \lti arll 's
Hospital r1 Iion \ Mrs Jack
S I 1r h h d hi a i r il a l ,
Y el lo w I' i tid Nu t rsi1 ng
Sc holarshrp Coninittee. IP ) .
B.\ \N1053, Na,ss.auI
I'F 1iiis shouldI e completed
i:nid returnried to the above
address hb I'Lay. September
28 at ihie latest.
It is hoped that the
candidate selected will be able
to stait a course in the early
part of 1 i74.
NO TRIBUNE
MONDAY
FIll TRIBINI will nol be
published on Monday,
Emancipation Day. which is a
public holiday in the Bahamas.
The next issue of The Tribune
will be on Tuesday.


COL. CHAPMAN

LEAVING AS ADC
COLONFI. Lionel Chapman,
\\ h lias ,served as A.D.C. to
tw \ L loMnial governors, is
i\pe'ted t( leave the Bahamas
\wihin the l n\t two or three
lmmlonths
( clonel ('hapmii n confirmed
tola\ that ihei will he replaced
as \ 1).(. to the
(;ov rnor-( generall by A.S.P.
('harles Fernander who served
as equerry to the Prince of
Wales duriiing his visit to the
Bahamas for the independence
celebrations
The Colonel first came to
the Bahamas as A.D.C. to Lord
Thurlow and stayed on
through the tenure of
Governor Sir John Paul who
left Nassau on July 31.




LS 'iMl


SINK- SMEARED


I Iiu~~ c~v vvrr


oDUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST & MT. ROYAL AVE.
P.O. BOX 5850 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237

FANS-FANS-FANS 4


. LXX, No. 211


~ribunp


I











Saturday, August 4, 1973
------------


-~ ~hr UAibuIU


iEt W? .,


GRAY SAYS HE WARNED PRESIDENT NIXON
WASHINGTON (AP)--Former acting F1BI Director Patrick Gray testified
Friday he warned President Nixon less than three weeks after the
Watergate break-in that people on his staff were trying to mnortallt wound
him. Gray said he told Nixon persons on the White House staff would hurt
him Nixon by using the CIA and the I-Bl. But Gray said he didn't
know the full details about efforts by White Ilouse officials to draw the
agencies into the Watergate coverup.
Gray's account to the Senate Watergate Committee differs with tliat
of Deputy CIA Director Army Lieutenant General Fernon Walters on
several accounts. Walters told the Committee earlier he felt former White
House counsel John Dean was acting improperly by asking him, Walters, it
the CIA could furnish bail money and salaries for the Watergate
defendants. Gray said he hadn't known about that incident and other
aspects of the cover up. but Gray also said he was confused by conflicting
reports he received from several sides (* SlII. STORY THIS PAGE)
MAJOR CHANGES IN U.S. FINANCIAL STRUCTURE TO COME
WASHINGTON (AP)--President Nixon proposed major changes I`riday
in the nation's financial structure They include phasing out over a five and
a half-year period the ceilings on interest rates that can be paid by banks.
Savings and Loan Associations and other thrift institutions
Deputy Secretary of the Treasury William Simon said he hopes the
proposal will be ready for presentation to Congress this fall.
DOUBLE AMPUTATION FOR CRASH'S SOLE SURVIVOR
BOSTON (AP)--The only survivor of Tuesda 's plane crash at Boston's
Logan airport had both legs amputed today in an effort to increase his
chances of survival. A spokesman for Massachusetts General Hospital said
Air Force Sergeant Leopold Chouinard remained in critical condition
following surgery. The spokesman said the 20 year-old Chouinard had
tolerated surgery very well. lie suffered burns over 80 per cent of his body.
CONGRESS ACCUSED OF ABANDONING FRIEND
WASHINGTON (AP)--President Nixon accused Congress today of what
he called abandonment of a friend by cutting off funds for U.S.
bombing of Cambodia by August 15. In a letter to Congress, Nixon said he
wants Cambodia to know the U.S. will continue to provide all possible
support permitted under the law. The President's letter also warned North
Vietnam that if would be making a dangerous error if it uses the end of the
bombing as an indication for fresh aggression.
The President's letter also said the bombing halt had undermined his
efforts to negotiate a cease-fire in Cambodia.
Meanwhile, the Pentagon says it advised six Congressmen of the secret
bombing of Cambodia in 1969 and 1970 although they weren't briefed on
a continuing basis The Pentagon said the total cost of the secret bombing
and the bombing of the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos was one and a half
billion dollars.
COURT DECISION ON CAMBODIA BOMBING %IOND \Y
YAKIMA. WASHINGTON (AP)-Supreme Court Justice William l)ouglas
heard one hour of arguments today on whether he should issue an order
effectively halting U.S. bombing of Cambodia. Douglas then returned to
his mountain retreat in Yakima. Washington to ponder his decision in the
case.
Douglas said he probably will issue a decision Monday through the
Supreme Court in Washington D-C. Douglas heard arguments on a request
to put into effect a U.S. District Court order declaring the bombing of
Cambodia unconstitutional.
RESCUE OR NO RESCUE OF ASTRONAUTS STILL OPEN
SPACE CENTRE, HOUSTON (AP)--Space Agency officials have
expressed guarded confidence that the Apollo taxi ship of the Skylab 2
crew can bring the astronauts safely home after 59 days in orbit. thus
avoiding a rescue mission
Engineering detective work continued in an effort to pinpoint what
caused two Apollo jet engines to spring leaks. If the problem is not
understood thoroughly, a rescue ship might have to be launched about
Sept. 10 to retrieve the three astronauts.
But it another jet engine fails or the laboratory has a major problem in
the meantime. Alan L. Bean. Dr. Owen K. Garriott and Jack R Lousma
would make a quick trip home in their Apollo, officials said Fridas.
Bean, Garriott and Lousma remained safe and calm in their orbiting
laboratory, pursuing their heavy experiment schedule a.s if nothing sere
wrong.
Throughout the day Friday they made no mention of the problem with
the Apollo ship. In fact, with their motion sickness cured, they seemed to
be enjoying themselves.
Garriott, a solar psysicist. planned a long session todas study ing the sun
with a battery of telescopes. Bean and Lousma were to aim earth resources
sensors and cameras at a 9.000-mile stretch of earth from the northwest
coast of the United States, across the Mountain States. Texas, the Gulf of
Mexico and northern South America.
PROBE INTO KENT STATE SHOOTING REOPENED
WASHINGTON (AP)--U.S. Attorney Gen. llliot L. Richardson I riday
ordered a new Justice Department investigation of the deaths of four Kent
State University students shot by National Guardsmen in 19O70
Richardson said his decision was based on "the need to exhaust ever
potential for acquiring facts related to this tragedy "
lie gave no indication whether a federal grand jury would he convened
to assist in the probe.
SAVAGE FIGHTING OUTSIDE PHNOM PENH
PHNOM PENIl. CAMBODIA (API--Government counterattacks have
failed to dislodge rebel forces from a village three miles southeast of here.
American fighter-bombers were almost constantly in action over the
battle zone in support of government forces, arid radio messages from
pilots indicated they had inflicted easy losses on tlie insurgents.
Col. Am Rong, chief military spokesman tor the Phniom Ptenh
Command, reported savage fighting at the village of Veal Sbau on Hifghway
I, three miles from the capital. Ih village was occupied hb rebel
infiltrators Thursday.
Reinforcements rushed from the city failed to clear thie village uo an
estimated 500 rebels, the largest force to get so close to Phnom Penih
VIOLENCE CAUSE OF MAJOR POPULATION SHIFT
BELFAST (AP)--Fear of violence has caused nearly a sixth of Belfast's
population to change neigbourhoodds since civil strife erupted in Northern
Ireland in 1969, an official report said I rida,.
Of the estimated 60.000 who fled their homes to more friendly districts.
the report cited "conclusive evidence" that 8.000 were forced ,aut by
direct threats.
Others were coerced in a variety of ways. but physical violence or the
fear of it was the most common form, the investigators found Parents.
children and even pets have been attacked.
Gasoline bombs, stones and eggs were hurled through uitndnoss and
masked men appeared late at night. Roman Catholics were the most
frequent targets, the study found.
The report, drawn up for the Northern Ireland Communit Reclations
Commission, found few signs ,f a let up in this city of 385.000. the
provincial capital. In February of this year, evacuations were running at a
higher rate than in late 1972. it said.
The report focused on Belfast and made no mention of the situation in
Londonderry, the province's second largest city also hard hlit bh sectarian
violence.

POP IDOL FAITH IN SERIOUS CAR CRASH
CRAWLEY, ENGLANI) (APl') 1 ormer pop idoi Adam laith. now a
television actor was seriously injured Saturday wshen his car crashed into ai
tree.
A Crawley hospital spokesman said the 33- ear "Id star suftcred serrinius
abdominal injuries, a broken leg and multiple cuts and bruises.
Faith had 23 hit records in the charts over eight years during the 1%I)os,
but five years ago he quit the pop music business to become an .icftor.
He was alone at the time on the ,rash in the early hours ',f the nmirning..










"White Label"


WARNED PRESIDENT, BUT.-


Former FBI chief


admits he read, lied


& burned secret files

By Dick Barnes
WASHINGTON (AP) Former FBI iief L. Patrick Gray
admitted Friday he read secret documt ts before he burned
then, then lied about the event for months nidst the Watergate


cover-up.
(ray also told the Senate
WatergaIte ('Connittee he
warned President Nixon 19
days after the Watergate
break-in that "people on your
staff are trying to mortally
\ ound you bi using the CIA
and the FBI."
But the former acting tBI
Director contradicted nuch
testimony given earlier in the
day by It. Gen. Vernon R.
Walters, the deputy director of
the (CIA, who told the
conmnittee he fended off White
IHouse efforts to bring the
intelligence agency into the
Watergate affair.
The Gray-Walters conflicts
concerned whether there was
danger that the FBI's
Watergate investigation could
reveal (CIA operations in
Mexico, and who was trying to
promote that theory.
IThe papers Gray burned
were given to him June 28 in
the office of John I)
Fhrlichinan, top domestic
advisor to President Nixon.
They had been taken from the
safe of l Iloward Hunt, a
former White Iouse consultant
since convicted in the
Watergate break-in.
Gray acknowledged in his
51-page prepared statement to
the Senate Committee that he
was never directly ordered to
destroy the two envelopes of
pape rs.
NO DOUBT
"But there was, and is, no
doubt in my mind that
destruction was intended." he
said.
I hrlichnian and former
White House counsel John W.
Dean Ill have each testified he
did not intend for Gray to
burn the papers. (ray.
however, said they told him
"that these files were 'political
dynamite,' and 'clearly should
not see the light of day."'
Gray said the documents
followed a route from under
his shirts in an apartment
closet to his personal safe and
then to a chest of drawers at
his Stonington. ('onnecticut,
home.
"I distinctly recall that -1
burned them during Christmas
week with the ('hristmas and
household paper trash," he
said.
"Irnlrnediately before putting
them in the fire I opened one
ot the files. It contained what
appeared to be copies of 'top
secret' State Department
cablegrains.
SIIAKEN
"The text of the cable
unplicated officials of the
Kenned) administration in the
assassination of President Diem
of South Vietnam. I had no
reason then to doubt the
authenticity of the 'cable' and
was shaken at what I read."
Gray did not know the
cables had been taked by Hunt.
The burned papers came to
haunt (ray during his Senate
hearings in March on his
nomination to be FBI Director.
lie said he talked to Dean
about the papers early that
nionth, but did not tell Dean
he had burned them and was
concerned that Dean had told
assistant attorney general
Henry F. Petersen something
about the papers.
(;ray said he lied to Petersen
April 16 when he denied ever
receiving the files from Dean.
The next day. Gray said, he
told Petersen he had received
the papers but had not read
them. And a week later, he
told his old friend, Senator
Lowell P. Weicker Jr.. a
Watergate committee member.
that he had received the
papers, not read them and tore
them up in July. 1972.
MISJUDGI)(;MI N
Gray said until April n, "I
believed tlat I was acting
faithfully, loyally, properly
and legally pursuant to
instructions given me by top
assistants to the President of
the United States."
But now, he said, he realizes
his "acceptance of the


documents in the first place,
and my keeping them out of
the normal FBI files, was a
grievous niisiudgment. My
destroying them and resistance
of disclosure only compounded
the error ... I permitted myself
to he used to perform a niere
political chore."
(ray's call to Nixon, which
has been previously disclosed,
came at one point of climax in
the confusion over whether the
FBI's probe of a Mexican
money angle of the Watergate
affair would blow the CIA's


cover on an, operations in
Mexico.
Gray said he first called
('lark Macgregor, newly
ensconced as chairman of the
Nixon Re-election Committee
and told him he and Walters
"were uneasy and concerned
about the confusion ... whether
there was or was not (IA
interest in people that the FBI
wishes to interview."
NIXON CALLS
Thirty-seven minutes later,
Nixon himself called Gray back
from San Clemente, California.
Gray recalled the
conversation this way:
"'Mr. President, there is
something I want to speak to
you about. Dick Walters and I
feel that people on your staff
are trying to mortally wound
you by using the CIA and FBI
and by confusing the question
of (IA interest in, or not in,
people the FBI wishes to
interview. I have just talked to
(lark Macgregor and asked him
to speak to you about this.'
"There was a slight pause
and the President said 'Pat.
you just continue to conduct
your aggressive and thorough
investigation.' Following this
conversation I experienced no
further concerns of this kind."
Gray's differences with
Walters, who had testified for
21,- hours before Gray took the
witness table, concerned in one
respect just what Walters told
Gras.
Generally echoing testimony
Thursday from former CIA
Director Richard Helms.
Walters told the committee he
and iHelms were called to meet
Ehrlichman and top White
House aide II. R. Haldeman on
June 23, 1972, six days after
the break-in
There. Haldeman directed
him to tell Gray that CIA
operations in Mexico might be
exposed by the FBI probe,
Walters said.
Walters and Helms both said
they'knew of no operations
that might be jeopardized, but
he passed the message on to
Gray.
Walters said he told Gray he
had just come from a meeting
with senior White House
officials. Gray says he recalls
no such reference, and he
assumed Walters was speaking
solely for the CIA.

NIXON REPLY TO

WATERGATE SOON?
WASHINGTON (AP)- Members
of the Senate Watergate committee
have quickened the pace of their
questioning in hopes of joining
their Congressional colleagues by
midweek in their month-long
vacation.
With three more witnesses to go,
Committee sources were hopeful
Saturday of winding up the first
phase of the investigation
Wednesday.
The dramatic shift in the pace of
questioning by the seven Senators
twice caught the Committee staff
unprepared to begin questioning
witnesses whose turn came earlier
than expected.
Lt. (;en. Vernon A. Waiters,
Deputy Director of the Central
Intelligence Agency, was ready to
take the stand Thursday afternoon
but had to wait until Friday. L.
Patrick Gray III, former Acting
I)irector of the IFBI, followed
Walters Friday, read his prepared
statement, and then was told to
return Monday for questioning by
committee staff and members.
After (;ray, the Committee plans
to hear former Atty. Gen. Richard
G. Kleindienst and former Assistant
Atty. Gen. Henry Petersen.
Meanwhile. President Nixon was
spending a secluded weekend at his
mountain retreat at Camp David.
MDU.
iDeputy press secretary Gerald
spending some of the time thinking
about his public response to the
Watergate investigation. Warren said
a presidential statement on the
affair could be expected within two
weeks.
In related developments:
SRObert W. Meserve, president
of the American Bar Association,
said Att). (en. Elliot L.
Richardson has agreed to cooperate
with an ABA study into ways of
removing politics from the Justice
I)Department.
Meserve, a Boston lawyer, said
the ABA sIans not plan to conduct
an investigation of Watergate or
the Justice Departmnent's role in it,
but would examine the role of


politics in all government
investigative and prosecuting
agencies.
A federal judge in New York
has under consideration a defense
motion to postpone the Sept. 11
trial of former Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell and former Commerce
Secretary Maurice H. Stans.
Judge Lee P. Gagliardi said he
would seriously consider the
request but warned lawyers for
Mitchell and Stans to be ready to
go ahead as scheduled in the U.S.
district court trial on charges of
conspiracy, perjury and obstruction
of justice in connection with a
secret 5200.000 contribution from
Robert Vesco to President Nixon's
re-election drive.


commissioned as a second officer
following her graduation today as
the first woman pilot among the
airline's more than 4,000 male
flight officers. She will be part of
the regular cockpit crew on -astem



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WASHINGiTON (AP)- President Nixon Friday recommended
an end to liniitations on the amounts of interest that banks and
savings and loan associations can pay on savings deposits.


SUPREME COURT

ORDERS CAMBODIA

BOMBING TO STOP
WASHINGTON (AP) U.S.
Supreme Court Justice William
O. Douglas on Saturday
ordered a halt to U.S. bombing
in Cambodia.
The Nixon government
immediately asked the entire
court to revoke the action.
A spokesman for the U.S.
Defense Department said it is
awaiting guidance from the
U.S. Justice Department and
no military orders have been
changed.
The Supreme Court is in
recess until Oct. 1 Presumably,
the next step will be a poll of
the Justices to determine
whether they wish to hold a
special session of the court or
otherwise deal with the
motion.
The bombing is to stop Aug.
15 in any event.
In a brief opinion, Douglas
said he was not determining
whether American involvement
in war actions against
Cambodia were constitutional,
but was rather acting the way a
judge in a capital case does in
issuing a stay of execution.
Douglas' order gives force to
a U.S. District court decision
last month which found the
bombing unconstitutional and
ordered it halted. That order
was blocked by the U.S. circuit
court in New York.
Douglas erased the circuit
court action.
Michael Rodak Jr.. Supreme
Court clerk, said the
government motion requests
that the high court stay the
district court order. This would
have the effect of reversing
Douglas.

CAMBODIAN REBELS

K.O. GOVT. TROOPS

WITH NERVE GAS
PHNOM PENII (AP)
Khmer Communists lanced a
gas attack against Cambodian
government troops on Phnomn
Penh's southern defense
preimeter six miles from the
city Saturday, the military
command announced.
Forty soliders were reported
to have been knocked out by
the unidentified gas fire from
B40 rocket launchers.
Chief military spokesman
Col. Am Rong said the gas has
a paralyzing effect but was
fatal only in large doses.
Communist-led forces have
several times been reported to
have used gas in fighting
around the capital but never
before so extensively.
Newsmen have been stopped
from visiting the fighting area
after the reported gas attack,
and there was no means of
verifying the government
claim.
"This is not tear gas, but we
have not yet been able to
identify it." said Am Rong.
"One breath is sufficient to
knock a man out."
U.S. fighter-bombers
meanwhile launched day-long
strikes against rebel infiltrators
entrenched in the village of
Veal Sbau, only three miles
southeast of Phnom Penh on
Highway One.
The highway is cut for about
two miles and government
troops have made little
progress in clearing it. Moving
cautiously behind the U.S. air
strikes, they retook about 200
yards of highway Saturday.
Am Rong said government
troops are hampered in their
movements by monsoon
flooding on two sides of the
village.
EASTERN'S SLOGAN 'THE
WINGS OF MAN' MAY CHANGE
MIAMI, FLA (AP)- Eastern Air
Lines may have to add a postscript
to its slogan "The Wings of Man."
It just graduated its first woman
pilot.
Barbara Barrett, 23, has been


The re-sult of the
recommendati on, if approved
by Congress -, would mean
higher intere~at payments on
passbook savirags held by many
Americans.
The President proposed
phasing out interest ceilings,
which nowralnge from 5 to 5'
per cent on passbook savings,
over a 5'/2-year- period.
He also recommended
permitting savings and loan
associations to provide
checking acco unt services, and
he propose sed approving
so-called NO~.W account service
for both bank sand savings and
loan association ns,
The propos-als are part of a
planned reorg-.anization of the
country's financial system that
the adrinistr-ation hopes to
send to Congreessin September.
The mairr purpose of
eliminating interest rate
ceilings on sa-vings deposits is
to maintain a consistent flow
of money i-rnto banks and
savings and Moan institutions
during periods; of high interest
rates.

Skylab 2 has more

electrical! problems
SPACE CF- NTRE, TEXAS
(AP)--The Skyl. ab 2 astronauts
wrestled with some electrical
problems Salur ay, including one
which triggered a master alarm
buzzer and rout-ted them out of
their beds.
The problenrrs were quickly
overcome, and .-Alan L. Bean, Dr.
Owen K. Garri oil and Jack R.
Lousma settled down to a heavy
day of earth resources, solar
astronomy and medical
experiments.
Space agency officials expressed
guarded confderace that the Apollo
taxi ship attachec1dtothe laboratory
can bring the astronauts safely
home on Sept. 25 ifter 59 days in
orbit, thus av--oiding a rescue
mission.
Engineering detective work
continued in an effort to pinpoint
what caused two Apollo jet engines
to spring leaks. If the problem is
not understoo.dL thoroughly, a
rescue ship mi ghlt have to be
launched about S3ept. 10 to retrieve
the astronauts.
Preparations ic-ontinued at Cape
Kennedy. 'lorld-i in case a rescue
flight has to be made using the
Skylab 3 rocket aund Apollo ship.
If another jet engine should fail
or the pace station has a major
problem the astronauts would make
a quick trip hon-irein their Apollo
craft, officialssaicad Friday.
When the alarmn buzzer sounded
during the night, Bean, Garriott and
Lousma left th=li ir separate sleep
compartments to search for
possible trouble.
"Everything lo-oks normal to us,"
they said.
Mission Contr-ol examined its
instrumentation and could discover
nothing wrong.
"Go back to tbied and we'll keep
an eye on it --or you," capsule
communicator Rc- _bert Crippen told
them.
On waking tl1is morning, the
astronauts were told that analysis
of data shoved the alarm
apparently had b-een triggered by a
three-second sho -rt circuit in the
solar telescope power system.
Mission Control said it may have
disabled one o-f two television
cameras in thesys-stem.
Ii


Although the proposals have
been under study since 1970,
Deputy Secretary of the
Treasury William E. Simon said
they have been announced at
an opportune time. "We are in
a period that could be
classified this moment as an
interest rate crunch," Simon
said at a White House briefing
on the proposals.
He said a major
consideration has been assuring
adequate funds for home
mortgages.
He said the plan would be
"the first major restructuring
of our financial system since
1865 without a crisis being
present."
The financial package
includes the following
proposals, all of which go to
Congress for consideration:
o Removing the interest rate
ceilings on all types of deposits
at commercial banks and thrift
institutions- including savings
and loan associations -- over a
51/2 year period.
Authorizing Negotiable
Order of Withdrawal (NOW)
accounts for both banks and
thrift institutions. These
provide that institutions can
negotiate interest payments on
checking accounts at the time
of withdrawal.
Establishing tax credits for
banks and thrift institutions as
an inducement to invest in
home mortgages.
Authorizing thrift
institutions to increase their
loan activity, into consumer
loans, real estate loans,
construction loans and
community rehabilitation
loans. At present, these
institutions are restricted to
loans for housing purposes.
Removing interest rate
ceilings on mortgage loans by
the Federal ofome
Administration and Veterans
Administration, These ceilings
are judged to have failed in
their purpose of holding down
home mortgage rates.
Giving credit unions wider
access to laon funds.
The proposals were
criticized by the savings and
loan industry. Gilbert G.
Roessner, vice president of the
National League of Insured
Savings Associations, said the
loan associations would be
turned into "underfed
commercial banks."


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ALLENDE CABINET

RESIGNS IN MORE

CHILEAN TROUBLES
SANTIAGO, CHILI (AP,
President Salvador Allende, already,
faced with a transportation strike
meets today with his politis-a
advisers to deal with the resignatii
of his Cabinet.
His 15 ministers handed in their
resignations Friday night during
meeting with Allende regarding the
near total strike by owners ,,
trucks, buses and taxis throughout
Chile.
They did so to give I)r. Allende a
free hand in resolving the transport
crisis and also to pave the way fr
him to possibly acceed t,,
opposition demands that he form a
military Cabinet.
The opposition, led by the
Christian Democrats, say tih-
entrance of the armed forces into
the Cabinet is the only way the
nation's grave political and
economic difficulties can be eased
At first, the presidential press5
office said Allende had flat
rejected the Cabinet resignations.
But later, a high official within
Allende's popular unity coalition
said the President decided to put
off a decision until Monday or
Tuesday, after having met with his
advisers.
Allende declared on Thursda-
that he was not going to bring in
the military, especially since he
reshuffled the present Cabinet onl\
last July 5.
Tlhe week-long truckers' strike
has forced the government to ration
gasoline and organize volunteer
crews of government drivers and
students to transport ended
foodstuffs.
A great number of bus and taxi
owners went out on strike earl
1Friday in sympathy with the
truckers, leaving nen ., rin i,.
private buses and the state bus line
to carry commuters.
The strikes are connected with
the opposition demands that
Allende form a military Cabinet.
The strike leaders claim the
civilians in his government have iin
responded to their petitions for
higher tariffs and increased imports
of spare parts.
Allende Friday refused to bow to
an ultimatum by the strikers that
transport undersecretary Jaimn
Faivovich, be removed from his joh.
I' aivovich has ordered
confiscations of the trucks )ii
strikers. In one incident. several
truckers were wounded when
.trucks were being guarded by
striking truckers.
Allende named Friday (;enr
Herman Brady. director of the
army's war academy. as
'interventor' of the striking buse,
and taxis.
This made the 52-year-old
general the President's personal
troubleshooter and gave him wide
powers to confiscate vehicles and
even place soldiers or police on
board to protect non striking
drivers.
Brady has been transportation
interventor before during labour
troubles, however. and prefers
persuasion to force.
Allende charged Friday that the
trucking strike has resulted in two
deaths and nearly 200 incidents of
violence. A passenger buslnot in tlhe
strike was shot uo earlier in the day
and that a 19 year-old girl lost her
right eye as result of a bullet
wound.

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mpse of the island


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
GEORGETOWN, Cayman Islands, July 19:- When 1 flew in to
this island from Miami yesterday I didn't have a single thought
for an article but I woke up during the night full of thoughts and
did three articles before going back to bed.
Now here 1 am just after lunch doing a fourth after a visit in
the town where I talked with a number of people and got the
information I needed to report back to readers of this column.
But before I write about what I have learned here about this
island .... its plans and future prospects .... let me say that I was
pleasantly surprised to receive a copy of today's Miami Herald
with two news articles about the Bahamas on its "Around The
Americas" page.
One of these news stories was out of the United Nations in
New York reporting that the Security Council had unanimously
approved the application of the Bahamas to join the United
Nations.
But featured across the top of the page above the U.N. report
was a story out of Toronto, Canada under the caption "Ottawa
Frets Over Stability In the Bahamas".
This was a blunt story expressing the misgivings felt in Ottawa
about the Bahamas .... and, for that matter, the entire Caribbean.
I feel sure The Tribune staff must have picked up these stories
and already fed the information to readers of this newspaper and
so I won't go into any detail.
In any event, I am sending my office the clipping of the
Canadian story so that, if it has not been published already, it can
be published along with this article. If they have the space I think
it should be republished for the purpose of emphasis.
*>*********
Now let me tell you what has happened here this morning.
When we went down to breakfast a young man came up and
introduced himself. He had lived in Abaco. Now he is on the staff
of the hotel here.
"Do you like it better here than in the Bahamas?", 1 asked
him.
"It is peaceful," was his simple reply. In those three words he
told the whole story.
I picked out the people from whom I felt I could get an
accurate picture of life in the island.
The first two were a lawyer and a banker.
The lawyer said that they thought they had reached peak
business here last year but there was a tremendous rush from the
Bahamas during the pre-iridependence period and from Bermuda
following the assassination of the Governor of that island and his
A.D.C.
From the banker I learned that land prices had sky-rocketed.
Within a few years values had come from practically nothing to a
thousand dollar a foot frontage in certain areas.
The report of the lawyer confirms what a lawyer friend of
mine in Rotary back in Coral Gables told me. He said his firm was
very busy helping clients settle their affairs in the Bahamas. They
are trying to get out of this place.
I also talked with a Cayman merchant. He said that they were
determined to control the economy of the island and not let it
get out of hand. They were not allowing multi-million dollar
corporations to come in here and exercise a dominant place in the
economy.
In the first rush of development they had brought in some
skilled labour from the West Indies. They had now stopped that
for fear of introducing a disturbing element. The population of
the island was small .... everybody who wanted to work had a
good job .... they were not in a hurry to get rich quick. They
wanted the island to develop at a stable pace.
You know .... this attitude recalls the advice 1 often gave to Sir
Stafford Sands. I warned him about making the economy of the
island so big that it would get out of control one day. It is
certainly out of control now and the people who were in a great
haste to make it a giant, have been swept into discard.
The policy on the introduction of West Indian elements in the
island is also interesting. A large West Indian community was
built up in the Bahamas through the importation of policemen
from West Indian islands. Prime Minister Pindling is the son of a
Jamaican who was recruited for the Bahamas Police Force.
When the old Flagler Colonial Hotel was destroyed by fire in
the 1920's, the social group in Nassau were anxious to have a new
hotel built and opened in time for the next winter tourist season.
The Colonial had been the main social outlet for members of
ruling families in Nassau during the winter season in the island. At
that time the island had a short three to four months winter
season climaxing with the Washington Birthday Ball at the
Colonial Hotel on February 22nd .
In order to get a new hotel built they brought in a large
contingent of West Indian skilled labour. Many of these men
came from a West Indian colony in Cuba. Most of them stayed in
Nassau and brought their families to join them. Some of them
cast off their wives and shacked up with Bahamian sweethearts.
This combination of events changed the whole character of the
gentle Bahamian people and today it is largely the descendants of
the West Indian elements that control the government of the
independent Bahamas.
I also talked with a couple of taxi men. The lawyer, the
banker, the merchant, the taxi men all were very emphatic in
saying that the island does not want to become an independent
state.
One of the taxi drivers said that he knew the man who would
probably be Prime Minister if the islands became independent ....
and this man doesn't want it. The island will break its ties with
Britain only if it is forced out.
He told me that there are a few people who talk about
independence but they are irresponsible men who have not made
a success of anything and are looking for a way to get an easy job.
Does this statement remind you of anything in the Bahamas?
And so no one is paying any attention to them.
********
Now for a look at the town.
It is still small with a touch of a Bahamian Out Island
atmosphere about it. The roads are in poor shape.
The most impressive evidence of a growing prosperity are the


new banks and office buildings that have been erected in the
centre of the town .... the modem hotels along the seven-mile
beach area .... and an exclusive residential section; made exclusive
only because of the spectacular increase in the cost of land. A
new and impressive parliament building and a new court building
complete the picture.
In this one day I have found out all I wanted to know about
this island and we could leave for another island this evening but
we are going to stay here for a few days.
We like the quiet atmosphere and sense of security to be found
here. It is like Nassau was when I first brought my wife to the
island from the U.S. 45 years ago and I told her that. although
she was now among a people who might seem strange to her she
had nothing to fear ... she could go to any part of the island
alone, any hour of the day or night, without fear of being
molested.
Oh yes, I asked about crime here. My infonnant said that,
apart from petty offences, crime certainly violent crime was
non-existent here. No one locked his house at night. This is the
way it used to be in the Bahamas and we feel comfortable here
because, apart from people who lived in the Bahamas and knew
us there, Cayman island people stop to speak to us on the street
and to ask if we belong to the island. They say we look like


- I I -~~~~~I ------- -


Do we not have some tears to spare?


EDITORIAL

Agli


HAMMURABI, MOSES and Napoleon had the same
problem: to write laws for the establishment or
preservation of order among their fellow humans who just
happen to be the most intelligent and the most wayward
beings created by God.
The legislators of yesterday and today, whether they sit
in the most glorious of parliaments or the humblest of
tribal councils, have all faced that problem. They have
known that for every law-maker there are a thousand
law-breakers and many who would try to circumvent a law
as soon as it is made.
That is why it is necessary to make so many laws in the
first place. Some historians measure the worth of societies
by the degree of sophistication evident in their codes and,
indeed, great credit is due for that.
But certainly that society which achieves order and
justice with a minimum of written laws could claim to
possess a powerful essence of civilization. Surely the
constant expanding of the body of law is as much a
testimony to man's weakness as to his genius?
Just suppose that somewhere in this great universe there
exists a society of many races and the people of that
society have had the principles of love and justice
programmed into their genes or, as Clarence Bain used to
put it, written on the fleshy tablets of their hearts.
How perplexed they would be over some of our laws!
"We first stumbled across a law these people (meaning
us) had enacted providing punishment for acts of cruelty to
animals. We concluded that they must have been the
victims of some rare disorder which caused them to have an
inordinate fear of creatures and that that fear sometimes
tempted them to abuse dumb animals. Perhaps these people

Caymanians .... and so, there you are, we have been made to feel
at home in a new country and I move easily into the groove
because I regard myself as a citizen of the world.
Nothing here is as elaborate or as professional as in Nassau and
the people like it so. This place is charming in its simplicity.
I told you about the wealthy woman who spoke to us last
night and said she missed T.V. The people I talked with today
said there is an amateur radio station here and there is talk about
installing TV but they don't want it .... they like the island
peaceful and quiet just as it is now.
I forgot to mention that one of the taxi drivers with whom I
talked told me that he had been in the Merchant Marine and had
travelled all over the world in tankers transporting oil and iron
ore to and from centres in South America, North America,
Europe and the East. Now he was satisfied to settle back in his
island behind the wheel of a taxi and raise a young Caymanian
family.
**********
Although Caymanians are seafaring people they have had very
little contact with the Bahamas. Before I came here 1 had met
only two natives of this island and that was soon after the first
world war. They were both sea captains.
A Captain Watler brought his family to Nassau during the
"bootleg" period and stayed there. When his son grew up he
married Dolly Clarke, only daughter of Audley Spooner Clarke,
Superintendent of Prisons in Nassau, and sister of Attorney
Foster Clarke and Audley Clarke. The senior Clarke had come
from Barbados as a young man to serve on the Bahamas Police
Force. The young Watler couple moved to the U.S. where Dolly
died a few years ago.
The other Caymanian captain was Dick McLaughlin who
owned a fine schooner. He married Effie Barbes of Inagua who
now lives in Nassau with their two daughters, Aline and Renee.
Captain McLaughlin, his brother, and entire crew were lost at sea
when his schooner disappeared in a hurricane.

Now people are coming to the Cayman Islands in search of the
human elements that attracted them to the Bahamas and
Bermuda in former years ... peace, quiet and, most of all,
security of person and property.
It will be interesting to return to this area in future years and
see whether Satan had succeeded in tempting the happy
people of these islands with the destructive fruit of human greed.
**********
I thought I would stop this article here but as I write new
thoughts come to the level of consciousness.
Tipping is a plague that travellers would like to be freed from.
In many places today hotels add 15% for a service charge. In
England they have added another charge which I believe is a state
tax that runs the cost of hotel service up sky high. In Buenos
Aires, Argentina the added charge is 30 percent.
In a hotel in Trinidad some years ago the management posted a
sign warning guests not to tip staff because anyone found
accepting a tip would be dismissed.
But in spite of all this .... waiters and other staff still hang
around looking for a hand out from the customer who has
already been bled white by all the extra charges.
It is only in Japan that a no-tipping policy has been
successfully established in the hotels. The Japs have pride. They
refuse to accept tips.
An interesting system has been introduced to the hotel here. A
15 percent charge is added to the bill but the amount of the tip is
shown and circled to emphasize that no tip is required. It was
interesting because I intended to give a $2 tip at my first meal
here. The 15 percent charged showed that I was being taken for
$2.30 which I considered adequate.
This 15 percent service charge would work if hotels showed on
their bills how much the customer is being charged extra for
service.
*********
I think I should add that I was fooling myself when I thought I
could slip into this island for a day or two ... find out what was
happening here .... and leave quietly.
Today representatives of foreign newspapers here phoned ;me
for an interview.


went s> fi .oa, s anirn!\ to destroy them. we thought.
"TIhen V e ",ie furtherr confused and fascinated when we
discovered ilat our1 strange brothers had fouiId it necessary
to pass laws to the effect that no persons should be
discrimiiiatcd against because of their colour.
DIVISIONS
'It appeal; tt thhey actually created divisions among
themselses based or the colour of their skin. They even
came tu lia!e one another and to discriminate ;ag.cist one
another because of this superficiality, as incredible as that
might sound to us. That is as far as we have got in
discovering their laws.
"The tlstory of these people must be terrifying. One
volume we hrae loIked at suggests that they might even
have tried to exterminate entire races and tribes. Whether
that was before or after the laws were written we do not
know. Probably before, since it is reasonable to assume that
the laws w re a result of some horrible experiences.


W.


"Some intriguing questions are to be answered. Were
these people capable of civilization'. At the point of our
discovery were tiey on the way up to civilization or
degenerating from a civilized state?"
Intriguiing questions indeed. From time to time
individual human beings and even groups seem to have
those ..1.1..I; qualities so written into their being that they
are able to climb the ladder of nobility even to the heights
where they could touch divinity. It seems, then, that no
thought is too great to be encompassed by the mind of man
and no ideal so perfect that it cannot be implemented by
his v ii!
But alas. How quickly man slips off the ladder and how
difficult it seems for humanity to get back on the very
lowest rungs to begin again the ascent. Venomous hatred
and that curious arrogance which is so often found where
genuine pride has no reason' to abide, these make of
humanity savage beasts and create for man his own inferno.


No interviews.
As I have told you before, I say what I believe in this column
because it is my duty to keep the Bahamian people informed of
the truth as I know it, but I will not make any statements abroad.

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: The shareholders of St. Andrew's
School will meet on Tuesday evening.
Friends of John Chaplin are wondering what will be the
decision in this affair.
1 am a friend of John Chaplin and I am concerned for his
welfare. But I am also concerned about the school, especially
because seven of my grandchildren are enrolled there for the
September term.
I feel that everyone who is involved should be concerned for
the school because I am convinced that a wrong decision by the
shareholders will sound the death knell of another fine Bahamian
institution.
It has been argued that the ten Directors -- all good men and
women could not be wrong.
There is no doubt about it that these are all fine citizens ... but
don't lose sight of the fact that a whole nation - Germany
went wrong under the leadership of a single man.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Behaviour is the theory of manners practically applied.
MME. NECKER


Saturday, August 4, 1973.


So it was that Bertrand Russell, after holding .,rth high
hopes despaired in the face of general wars and persecutions
that man would ever ascend to any permanent level of
civilization.
ROTTEN APPLE
Brother John, the character played by Sidney Poitier in
the movie, saw it worse than that: The earth was a rotten
like maggots and getting ready to jump off into space and
so extend their miserable existence throughout the
universe.
Martin Luther King was like a worrisome twitching
muscle in the body of a humanity so fallen. He was a
muscle which struggled to transform the snarling face into
the friendly countenance the clenched first into the
embracing arm. Humanity hypocritically praised him and
promptly cut him out so human beings could get on with
their savage ways unrestrained.
Man will make laws from high motivation and break
them with low intent. And it does not seem to matter what
torturous experiences lead to the writing of these good
laws. Even if the laws are originally written in the streets
and fields with the comingled blood of slave and tyrant it
makes no difference. The ultimate lesson of equality taught
by death and the restorative action of justice are soon
forgotten and the painful process starts all over again.
Flip the pages of hisotry and there it is: the torture
chambers of Spain, the gas chambers of Germany and now
the savage genocide in Burundi.
All of us in the Bahamas will condemn these things. We
might even take part in a demonstration outside the United
Nations building in New York if we become really worked
up over the tragedy of Burundi. We might weep for the
sufferers in that far-away land.
But will any of us take along a little placard, an ever so
small one, with print just big enough for our Ambassador to
the U.N. to see, a placard which says something like:
"Return the exiled fathers to their children at Inagua"?
Could we spare a tear for them? Or better sill, say a word'
Listen to some answers:
Mr. PLP: "Well, no. There is no comparison between
Burundi and Inagua.
There are a lot of fatherless children in this country so
why make an issue over those few. No, it's not because I do
not particularly like Turks Island people. That's not it. The
whole thing is political and you know how that is. The UBP
used to do the same thing."
Mr. FN\\ 'lNv. you know who I'm working for. If I
open my mouth I'll be out of a job tomorrow and I have
my own children to think about. Furthermore, you all
should raise those issues in the House."
Church Leader: "You know the Church cannot become
involved in partisan politics. If it looks like we want to
embarrass the Government, particularly at this time, it
might limit our effectiveness in our work. And you know
the problems we have with the young people with
marijuana and sexuality. And many of them won't come to
church. Incidentally, did you hear that the Government is
re-arranging Church leaders in the Order of Precedence?"
So we in the Bahamas keep silent while we make our
own contribution to the chronicle of man's inhumanity to
man. We might say a word of praise for the tyrant later on
he finds it good politics to withdraw the dagger from the
gaping wound. But for the time being we must keep our
peace. And our tears? We must save them for ourselves
finds it good politics to withdraw the dagger from the
gaping wound. But for the time being we must keep our
peace. And our tears? We must save them for ourselves.


.-~ .~--I~-- -* ----


I _I


L L _-- --~- -- ---'~ --' - ...- I-,- ___, ~-I -


hep Tribune


I









Saturday_August 4, 1973.


- - ----


i( fl I E.W
A DELEGATION FROM THE CHURCH OF GOD is to participate in the first
International Church of God Evangelism Congress in Mexico this month. From left are:
Bishop William Johnson, National Overseer; Asa A. Sargent, National Secretary; Mary
Nairn, member and secretary of the public relations committee; Ronald Jones, National
photographer; Mrs. Helen McPhee, educational director and the Rev. H.M. Pinder, pastor
East Street Cathedral.


Special Speaker Sunday, AUG. 5TH 1973
DR TOM FREENEY Chatanooga Tenn.


NOTICE


THE LAND TITLE (CARMICHAEL VILLAGE)
ACT 1968


i' ..'ii f'i c herchb notifies all o ieclf rs \Slifl
:.,' i !..Ii,;cs lunlter the ;.lbovC'lslleme titloncd \ct tlIt
it. S. i "'=': i hearing such objections oin thI s"C'C nIld
J i \ ', 73, ;it 10 :00 .1.

*,., .. ',sns w ill take place. iii tihe tune li' i 1g. in
* '. 's I *..ti'ld 'n the lmain loor o t le Supremeilic c
x** i t the I lbticp c 11 Sq tlreI in llt c ( itI ,i


5,,, 5.' .,', f .l "- l,.\e b 'teen i n iformcL lf th;it Ithe\ lit s
'... ,i it lef vti t the prM, f sisnt s ni the *\,t n\ l
d fi. lr. I I' ,este c11 1 11 lt 'I I I l 111ll c 11i

if f' rs aire .ilso notilt ed f liui t in spile of
,i .' the itl ersiL' nei, will fipios,' if SulL, i
5" :i tle hK isis ft fie i i ito li titli 5" f ] \\ ll e i lifis





S.1 .1 I I()\ I'St (\
( Ik Alllll\PSllc\.
1 w i i' l 1 tic i (,tir i hl l \'ilhlii l Act I h.S


CHURCH OF GOD
DELEGATES TO
MEXICO CONGRESS
F 1 l ( ;1 IFS from the
Church of (Iod intif ltihe a iiamit,
will particip.itc in thle Fir'
International churchh ot (hoid
i-aigchsIn (oitgrecss t o be field
in M\L'!c' ( it\ \iugust S to 1 2.
lifu'1fl" tithe delegatiion will
be the \.ilini il Overseer
Bisdlhop k \i Johnslon. OtltiL
church I ,: ti.is tending will
be HBishop \s,. A Sargenti
\'ati t'iiil Scirctf it Pastor of
the ( lihu ch If ( God
\ilfitoiLinu I F\ lic' Street the
Re, 11 P1 Iii tCI. National
(C nci l l e.i tiil'c ieLt I nttild pastor o i
the I1ast StIcet C'athedral.Miss
Iar\ N'air!. timeLiber and
"si-ei.ir rt tl thl ptubl c
relations cit0'! ttiell and Mr.
Ron t alId JlIons. National
Photograplhi anid member oi
the p blibfc tel.tilons cloilnititee
Ihe group will take part iI
se nars ,)IckhLu tc d h% to ficer,
1 1 ll i i t c e 1 itcrnatitiinall
fc.'tfqu.artc ers i1n Clevelandi.
\tillnig s,;hic 't to be
iA '.ssd \ill !e (hurc' andi
m( i i 1 1t ni l- v Lngelism .
Represented at the Congress
ssI!l e "2 couititries. including
thi e i,, .
The Chirch of (1od a i"o
aiitti ili. ed that tlie first
vacation Bible School to be
,Inducterd at thie church
he1adLquiarteii Yamacraw Road,
\\iOl conve e \Augutl 7 in g..li
-7. Mrs leleln t\1 l bee.
edL tic iti,'I.t1 l direcLtlor will
c<'ndLIcI tlle sessionIS.
he afi ruitia futind uaistitg
drit l the C(hurch ot (lod.
ik''io '1 ', "'IYouti AciieL'velentClt
\ai.i' l .I1 ,t p.m f 'htf c ie
Is "i '. r tif e ati,,'ice,,s Il tlie
Y lt L )f'epa tL i 'cnt oIl the
,hitr1lh hcidcd .i\ tlhe National
Y )ilfh l)D ectlit l ile' Rev.
S.itltucl 'indcr


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.- ^r


TOURISM MINISTER SPEAKS

AT BAPTIST CONVENTION
THE HON. CLEMENT T. MAYNARD, Minister of tourism,
told delegates to the annual United Baptist Convention that never
before in the history of the Bahamas has it been so important for
people to become adapted to ever changing situations.
Mr. Maynard spoke during "What can we do in this era
the morning divine service ot of new horizons'" lie asked
/ion Baptist Church. the "We lan adjust e can
headquarters of the week-long chlantge to accommodate the
convention which was attended changing Bahamas ... indeed
by hundreds of delegates from the changing world."
Nassau and the Family Islands. sing as his topic the
Mr. Maynard, who brought "o etion 's theme :
greetings from the Government ict, trirg *Nes horizons",
and Prime Minister L.O \r Mai nard said. "In the
Pindling, told a packed church process of learning and
that the only constant thing in cou""Iten new horizons
the world today was "change-. somle o uts will adjust more
he conditions around asll.. some w ill work harder
lhe conditions around imore
are changing," he said. "Outr stce wi \vllh a icele more
siL ess others swll wonder
institutions are changing, jobuh
requirements are changing: jobs r i b
I IL reritinded thletit that
in many cases are radical l ren th that
different some are beiin nothing can sLcceed without
eliminated altogether." God s help
Slh Minister stresseti. On Sa turday evening
however, that all these change, delegates attended a banquet at
.,o. ...i ..., :; .i the Sonesta Beach Ilotil.


o11cre1 opportunities.

FULL HOI
ALL PACKED to go thil
week'
It you'ree not, then you'll h'
missing the fun that
hundreds of Bahamians.
mostly Nassau residents, will
enjoy during the next tes\
da\s when they all branch
out to various Famll\
Islands for a weekend ,o!
frolic and relaxation during
the August holiday.
And speaking of frolic, there'!l
he lots of action to keep


At
SIR
surrou
the g
House
Gover
He is
Andre


.IDAY WEEKEND A


them on their toes a regatta
at Rollcville in the i Lumas:
a Saillishi regatta joft tlhe
pi nk saLIndy beach iof
11a r bou r Island with
members of the Nassau
Sailing ('Club taking part, the
.annual. August Monday
regatta at Mangrove Cay,
*\ndros and the annual All
\.tive Bimiini Fishing
Tournament at that island
are only a few of the "in"
th ings happening this


reception BAPTIST BIBLE CHUCK
MIcO BU ESoldier Road & id T'rail
MILO BUTLER
nded by well-wishers in
;ardens at Government NASSAU'S MOST UNUSUAL
after he was sworn in as CHURCH
nor General on August 1. ,,, ,
shown chatting with Dr. S.S. 10 a.m. Preaching I I a.m. & 7.30 p.m.
w Esfakis. Wed. Power Hr 7.30 p.m.
PHOTO: Jack Hall. Fri. Youth Time 8 p.m.
As t COME & DISCOVER THE DIFFERENCE
HFA Pastor H. Mills Ph. 5-1339 P. 0. Box N3622


Il ma"


holiday weekend in the Out
Islands.
The sponsors of domestic
tourism promotion, the
Ministry of Tourism, the
Bahamas Out Island
Association and Bahamasair,
are interested in getting
more people to visit the
Family Islands this summer.
This year's domestic tourism
programme started last
month


H


'r-
i

t-~
tr,' ,


SUNDAY, JULY 29, 1973
Nassau Christian and Missionary
U1- ALLIANCE CHURCH
l Temporarily Meeting At Y.W.C.A. Building
Dolphin Drive at John F. Kenneay Drive.
Rev. Weldon B. Blackford, Minister

Worship Hour 11 a.m. Gospel Hour 7:30 p.m.
VISITING (;GUL.STS Wil I II I'l ti'R( 1 1 (1 I I 1 I \NS'()RO I 1()
I' ('AII iN(; ( 111 MI'S N'S) 2-8241.
A IRII-NIH I k \ ,I((tMI *\\5 .\ IS A I.I \, I(i)()MI


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LLENCI-




II '


Saturday. August 4, 1973.


_______ ________________ _____ ___ _______5


THE BAHAMAS



MONETARY AUTHORITY



OFFICIAL NOTICE


Struck in pure gold (916.66 1,000) by
the Royal Canadian Mint, the coins
shown here are beautiful masterworks
sculpted by Arnold Machin of the
British Royal Mint. Of the 3,500 sets
available, only 1,250 will be proof
finish.
These sets are destined to be treasured
as fine and rare collectors' items, not
only because of their historic signif
icance but because this issue is one of
the truly unique modern gold current
cies in circulation. An exceptionally
low minting limit was authorized for
this final issue prior to independence.
The number authorized for the past
issue (1971) was almost double the
limit for this issue and it was sold out
in a very few months.


This remarkable collection of pure
gold (916.66/1,000) legal tender coins
may be purchased as a complete set,
mounted in a leather case bearing the
coat of arms of the Commonwealth
of the Bahama Islands.
A Mini-Set (one each of the S10B and
S20B BU coins) is also available in a
miniature version of the large case.
Single brilliant uncirculated $10 and
$20 coins are also available in individ-
ual wallets.
Illustrations sculpted on the coins are:
100B Dollar Bahamas Coat of Arms
50B Dollar Columbus' "Santa Maria"
20B Dollar Lighthouse, Hope Town
10B Dollar- Fort Montagu, New
Providence
All coins display on the obverse a portrait
of H.M. Queen Elizabeth II.


Common reverse


D. Former Bahamian Coat of Arms


C. Columbus' "Santa Matril


B. Lighthouse, Hope Town


All coins enlarged to show detail


Available from:
BANK OF MONTREAL
BARCLAYS BANK INTERNATIONAL
CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA


FOR MAIL ORDERS, WRITE:


ITALCAMBIO, C.A
(exclusive world agent)


P.O. Box N-4014 / Nassau, N.P.


(Tel. 2-4292)


0 ITALCAMBIO, C.A. 1973


m- ---- -- -- --- m --- - -

I OFFICIAL RESERVATION FORM: 1972 COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
SPECIMEN GOLD 916/1000 LEGAL TENDER
For your convenience, make your selections and present this form with your order
at the locations listed. For mail orders, send to Italcambio, C.A.
Box N 4014 Nassau, N.P. Mail orders outside Nassau add $5.00.

S A. Fort Montagu (BU) 10 B Dollars 19mrm; 3.19 grams (No Limit) @ $23 $
0 B.- Lighthouse (BU) 20 B Dollars 22mm; 6.38 grams (No Limit) @ $ 46 $
C. "Santa Maria" (PROOF) 50 B Dollars 28mm; 15.97 grams (Singles not available)
D. Coat of Arms (PROOF) 100 B Dollars 36mm; 31.95 grams (Singles not available)

SComplete 4 coin (BU) (A,B,C, & D) (2,250 sets available) (Limit 2) @ $414 $_
Complete 4 coin (PROOF)* (A,B,C, & D) (1,250 sets available) (Limit 1) @ $565 $_

(Each set is individually numbered)
I Mini Sets (BU) (A & B only) (12,000 sets available) (Limit 5) @ $69 $
I $__nT
I TOTAL: $I

S-I- m - mmm mm mm mm mm mm


-- ----- -----------------


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Il \ i ,11itro il d 111 ll1 ll the tablc ,,
pi!.i ers. ,iind ,\\ith rilnh blenI d ,'

i cI I 2
1 Nt l I t n1i t t 1 tj
I l "Ili islt is i ii 111 .l e '
l. d I1 t \,1 stt\ \V',, tells i i it
h' III l 1 t)id i' l ic k lught ,


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p 's e p tit lls II t I 1\ i ii

ii'.. t ,''it tl tiis t ltl' t, I ,'.
I I'.I t in c eill |I i i t it ,.
s! It olil |i l i ll it il l t'

Il I.ls liti th( t hi t. ,m,! I
.|i inl \ Heart ',topf, cl \\ ]l I,
SL i'r hiis reMtint inrg tiks sI 1i I l
tisl I' t it ill it i i l', ei isL it I tI'
0 Clu .ne 4 1 1 N N
I |J t ie su i t ill t' e 0 ,


d, Is il ii i i t t>. i, i
hin io, I lubi s.
Diatmiond,,. Now hef, should .,e.
1i l a total of 3 Sp1;t k I

tA I ll-he first trick in Ili\ :,,I
1h.in1 'AnUd |li s th10 \ :
DM i'no iu s iI III ediaIcIel i I I i
lI):inond to the Queen ..'t .
i eI tI"her opponent t I !k, t1
K : ', v. e I lii All 1 tl .i fe H 1 '
I! ', .1 I t tH l e (.) e e 'n't v, i n '
, W Opponen lt slo)\\%s )i[ ;I,
n cIe!L\ switches to Clubs, ,i:ld
711i 1 set up i t\' o) t I'I k :
:i !. ll( \ t l elt, e t .
lt h ; il hlt 'ii \, i s


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- -


Saturday


BY, August 4, 1973.


Ghr Eribitty


non A 10 9 iv *HOMEUIIr. S' VIEWv LUI
Show that hand to a *BEACH FRONT *RECREATION
\ K Q() 2 congregation of top Fnglish Wtrite Airmail. RINCON RESORTS
\ K 3 players, and they will show APTDO.5060
\ J ,0 Q Y 5 vou aces wth red 's!
S ) 5h red Jce R(C SAN JOSE, COSTA RICA, C.A.






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( BEFORE BUYING ... COMPARE OUR PRICES AND W
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PALMDALE PHONE 28421--6

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____~_____~_________~ghr Iribune _______________


.NEW 1UNKANDO

COLOURING BOO8


JUNKANOO dances right
off the pages of the new
addition to the well known
Tadpole Educational Colouring
Books.
The new publication traces
the history and excitement of
the Bahamian festival and
shows how one Bahamiian
family gets involved.
''This B a hl a i a s
Goombay/Junkanoo Colouring
Book allows the Bahamian
Child to learn more about his
heritage," says publisher
Etienne Dupuch Jr.
Young readers learn how to
make their own costumes and
musical instruments as they
colour the pictures of a family
getting ready for (and
participating in) the Boxing
Day and New Year Junkanoos.
Attention is drawn to the
special Independence
Junkanoo and to Goombay
Summer as well.
The new colouring book,
available this week, also is
expected to be an ideal
souvenir of Bahamian holidays.
The Junkanoo effort
increases to nine the number of
Tadpole colouring books
"designed to tell the storN of
the Bahamas to children
throughout the world."
Other titles are: Bahamras
Boats and Ships, Bahamas
Forts and Historical Structures:
Bahamas Birds; Bahamas Fish;
Bahamas Flowers; Bahamas Sea
Shells; Islands of the Bahamas.
Nassau Treasure lHunt.
Others are in production.
The Tadpole series
Colouring Books are available
at gift shops, news-stands, book
shops, hotels and grocery
stores throughout New
Providence.


PanAm offers summer


'Visit USA' special tours


I


NOTICE

To all our Customers



Rachel's Boutique MOE

FroLincoln Bolevard& Cordeaux Ave.
FromLincoln Boulevard & Cordeaux Ave.


STAR
Mackey


PLAZA
Street and


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Robertson Road


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Distributed in the Bahamas by Bethell-Robertson & Co. Ltd.



FEARED


NEW YORK CITY has never been a bigger bargain for overseas
visitors than it is now, following the second dollar devaluation in
two years, according to Max J. Gumey, local Pan Am director.
In a statement issued today, there are very few stands in
he says that Pan Am, which New York.
offers an extensive selection of "New York is a gourmet's
"Visit U.S.A." tours, reports paradise, with over 30,000
that New York's hotel, restaurants, cafes and snack
restaurants and attractions are bars catering to every possible
now very much within the taste," according to Mr.
range of travellers on modest Gurney. The establishments
budgets. range from elegant French
"Good value for the money restaurants to cozy Italian
helped attract over 16 million trattorias, from hearty steak
people to New York last year, houses to informal snack bars.
including one million visitors which are pleasing both to the
from abroad, making it the palate and the pocketbook.
world's number one tourist "Although it is possible to
city," Mr. Gurney said. spend as much as S50 per
"New York City has the person for dinner at one ot the
largest and most diversified ultra-chic restaurants that New
hotel inventory found York is famous for, excellent
anywhere, with over 100,000 cuisine from virtually all the
rooms (more than London and world's countries is available in
Paris combined) available to New York for S6 to $8 on
visitors every night at rates fixed price menus. A hearty
from less than $10 per night at breakfast can be purchased for
smaller hotels to $50 per night $2, and lunch is in the $3 to 54
for rooms in the most range," he adds.
luxurious hostelries. Mr. Gurney believes that
"There is a number of New York has retained its
medium and lower priced popularity because of its
hotels in the midtown area in unmatched diversity of
the $15 range (based on double entertainment and attractions.
occupancy), within walking The glowing lights of
distance of the main shopping Broadway, the legitimate
and entertainment districts," theatres, fashionable shops
he added, offering fine quality at low
LOW PRICES prices, the Empire State
Mr. Gurney said that smaller Building. Lincoln Centre, and
neighbourhood hotels, which the United Nations are among
are easily accessible to the the most popular tourist sights
midtown area by way of New and attractions.
York's excellent public lie says that special
transportation system, offer half-price tickets are available
even lower prices to to a number of Broadway
budget-minded tourists. shows under a programme just
Subways and buses cost 35 begun that makes tickets
cents per ride; exact fare is available on the day of
required for the buses, tokens performance at a central
for the subways. The subways location. Free concerts and
are a particularly fast mode of shows are provided throughout
travel with good connections the summer months in Central
to all sections of the city. Park.
Taxi cabs, which are easily Mr. ;Gurney said that Pan
identified by their bright Am ticket counters at the
yellow colour, are plentiful. Sheraton British Colonial
Fares begin at 60 cents and Hotel, Nassau and at the
increase 10 cents each 1/5 Nassau, Freeport and Rock
mile. Average fares in the Sound International Airports
midtown area are about $1.50. can provide full information
The cabs cruise the street regarding package tours, as well
looking for passengers since as individual air fares and hotel
rates.


I


rn -----**


.i....a.....




Would-be female bus


driver fears her past

By Abigail Van Buren
e 1973 OD Chicago Tribune-N. Y. News Synd, Inc
DEAR ABBY: A woman who is about to make applica-
tion for a job driving a school bus is worried about her past
catching up with her.
She got a dishonorable discharge front the service 17
years ago, and is afraid that when her application for this
job is received, they will start a thoro investigation of her
past, which will include her service record, and everything
will come out.
She has no criminal record of any kind, but she under-
stands she has to have FBI security clearance for this bus
driving job. The only flaw in her record is this dishonorable
discharge which, I may as well tell you, came about when
she and another girl were discovered having a romantic
relationship. It was only a passing fancy, or an experimen-
tal thing, you might say, and never occurred again. She is
now married, has a family, and is living a normal life.
Must she be branded all her life for this single
incident? ANXIOUS TO HEAR
DEAR ANXIOl'S: Driving a school bus does not re-
quire FBI clearance. Furthermore, the response from the
Army to an inquiry about this person would he: "Dishonor-
able discharge-unsuitable for military life." IUnless na-
tional security was involved, nothing else would be di-
vulged. I

DEAR ABBY: Last November I became engaged. I
was so excited at the time that I asked a girl I work with
[I'll call her "Mazie"] to be one of my bridesmaids. I had
seen Mazie only at work, never outside the office.
Now that I know her better, I am very sorry I asked
her to be a bridesmaid. She gets drunk and talks dirty. She
is very loud and extremely pushy where men are con-
cerned.
Worse yet, my fiance can't stand her. He's afraid she
will ruin our wedding with her drinking and dirty mouth.
To give you an idea of what kind of girl Mazie is, she
keeps telling me she hopes the bridesmaid's gown will be
plenty sexy so she can show off her "38s."
How can I get rid of her politely? Or am I stuck with
her? SECOND THOUGHTS
DEAR SECOND: There is no way you can get rid of
her "politely," which means either you are stuck with her,
or you will have to get rid of her impolitely.

DEAR ABBY: In reference to the young couple who
couldn't find a church and minister for their post-pregnant
wedding:
You should do a service to others in such straits by
informing them of Unitarian-Universalist churches and min-
isters. They value individuals for honesty and candor; one
need not "belong" to a Unitarian-Universalist church to
use the building. Witness the many Unitarian-Universalist
churches that serve as forums, or centers for unusual mu-
sic, art debate, or whatever in the search for truth and for
meaningful living.
If the couple are straightforward, and respect the prior
scheduled commitments of the organization, I am sure they
will find a sanctuary in a Unitarian-Universalist church,
and a friend in the minister there.
P. F. IN NORTH OAKS, MINN.
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L. A..
Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Wedding,"
send $I to Abby, Box 69700. Los Angeles, Cal. 90069.


Ilexin is a twenty year old
Bahamian student at the
American A\cademy of
)ramatic Arts in New York
city.
The young actor. who
departed Nassau last
September to begin a two year
course in drama and related
subjects, is back in Nassau for
the summer and will be very
nutcn a part ol tnie upcoming
performances. 11e will be
returning to New York within
the next several weeks.
An active member of the
University Pla\ers for the past
several s ears, he has performed
numlierous roles in many of the
productions put on here in
Nassau by the group. including
Five Miles from Fox Hill by P.
Anthony White, and On
Monday Next by Philip King.
Stateside since last
September. Mr. McPhee played
roles in The Odd Couple by
Neil Simon and Skin of Our
I eeth I b I r one Wilder.
This summer lexirn is no less
active in the I'nirersits Players,
and took part in the first
"Experience" series put on by
the group also at the Dundas
Civic Centre. Ihe evening
features .1 number of short
plays, inchiling l)r. Fish, and
Lovers and Other Strangers.
llexin is also featured in two
monologues, one of them an
excerpt from Marlowe's
"l)Damnation of Iaiiustus'" and
the other from All MI Sons,. by
Arthur Miller
llexin's prominence in these
productions is not explained
only by the fact that he is a
capable actor. The evening of
drama has been organized
solely for the raising of funds
to help him through the final
\ear of the two year dramatic
training programme at the
American Academy of
Dramatic Arts. One of five
hundred students who recently
completed the first year, he is
one of only 75 students who
were invited tor entry into the
second .ear. This is in itself an
achievement,since thle annual
selection of 75 is based solely
on talent and potential.
PILE-UP OF RELIEF SUPPLIES
IN AFRICA
AHIDIAN, IV()Y COAST'
(AI') D)rought-ravsagedCl nations
threatened ii famine ill West
\frica Monday opened a two-das
tonferellce aimed at coordininatig
the food of incoming foreign relief
supplies.
Tenls iof thousands of tons f
food grains from over a dozen
donor nations ;and agencies are
pouring into the six worst ,it
nations nii tile edge of the Sahara
Desert.
United Nations tfisials s.% lack
of c.ordinati(on among these
donors has resulted in serious
pile-ups of relief supplies in West
Africa's congested ports.
Now the rains season has hit,
making Africa's dirt roads
imnpa.ssable and Ihampering even
more tie transport of food from
lie southern ports to the
drought-stricken areas in the north.
ihe countries where tile drought
has been severest are Senegal,
Mauritania. Upper Volta, Mali,
Niger and Chad.
An interstate committee
grouping tile six countries
requested the current meeting with
donors atnd transporters to sort out
these and other problems
hampering the massive international
relief effort.


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AHOY THERE

OUR AUGUST SPECIAL
Magnificent Big Colour Portrait


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1 ti kJ 't i \OOGt i ii i

-HOIOGRAPHY


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~


New executive team at Sonesta Beach
THERE'VE BEEN SOME CHANGES made at The Sonesta Beach Hotel. At present,
the new executive team is getting plans underway for a "totally bright future." In the
back row of our picture: Sam Cumberbatch, Assistant Manager; John Hildebrandt; Reggie
Sands, Cleve Green, Maitre d' at the Silk Cotton Tree Club and Ivan James, Concierge.
Front row: Larry Sena, Vice President (Sales); Bernard Perron, Food and Beverage
Director; Adi Mckinley, Executive Housekeeper; Robert Souers, General Manager; Paula
McMillan, Administrative Assistant; Mike Mosko, Executive Assistant Manager; Bill Shea,,
Comptroller and Tommy Thompson, Assistant Food and Beverage Director.


Players to repeat evening


(


I


r-


to help drama student
REPEAT PERFORMANCES of Experience, which has been
billed as "a for adults only evening of drama" by the University
Players, will be held next weekend at the Dundas Civic Centre,
Mackey Street. Proceeds will assist Hexin McPhee, a member
of the group, in completing drama studies in the United States.
I -- W-NO-














SHIRLEY STREET THEATRE


NOW SHOWING. "Live and
Let I)c," matinees at 2 45 and
5 p in., et being ) 00 Stuggested
for imatuire atudi ences parental
discretion iiis adis ied
B ntiishe r Roger Moore
,as. u rt es tie giu ic ot the
indestructible Agen Utt 007 in the
Albert R Broccoli and Hiarr
Saltzman production of "Lie
and ILet Die "
Also appearing ajre co-stars
Yaphet Kotto. Jine Seimlour,


(tiloria lcndr) .and \l.t N ,iiii.
Snuthti
M Ol I i .. .
opcn battle it g.li st thlic
i1i stenotC s ', ol l l ( a 1 A I I ,A
drilg in g. w hli s lia, h',id d I
l i KanIgga. I po Ira\t d t,>

Ihc ilatil \\a. s d ItreIc s bl'h
(; u\ llHanuilton tlien d
S cr e n' p I .1 1 it
Manki\\el'/
One ot tilhe locat'.itn11 s. e','e
for the new tmoll\ wl in low
Orlcatns s\ht1 rcC (n) oL t1i 1 '
htec. tIC itllghigllts \\ .aS a
dcvastatling inoltorboa1t 1ha.c ill
\w hli. ch 13 high-it-o\\ ,redd
jquliaits aidd a tit I her 13 ,hloIs
\with 150 h p ioutbhiard cnlinle's
roared through thelt w\atIr's ot
Ne\w Orlieaitn,' siIrrouildiiieV
Ba.il o L i.oint tr
tl he rmotorboat chat.I Ne\ ,,
lh rd to stIrpdss t Or C \lItI 1g
hlj o., but driot ctier illaioi slc.n.';
dt LdkL' Front .\Irport. 'sc\\
Orlcat1's. pushed Bon' l, trantit
pace to even greater liniitsI
I lghit airplanes v crc
Jest ro\ ed lwhen Hionid.
hounded h killers, poa, Ic ,1
plane adill tutnI'i 11a irJlr elId ilnt
a hbittle-ticid
Anotticr s..sn.' is d sa.n.cimimnlig
hheortul bhit > ,ltuJll 1hillin1 1
l)it \]liild t i crl i ,al lisiC a
murder iltimin \\ at,. tiI.s ill, i \ In
.-ottiln Jild o tre gcIp[ roalch
"'l.i\ and I Ct DIe'" I
relcasCi \ L'iUiled c \rtlsts,. an
entertainment service otc
I rdnisAm inei' r corporationn .


I


111l II '1 INE It It


SAVOY

THEATRE


N 0 \s S H ) 1

( I' d \!I : \I ,,!t
-'C1it .- iI
i ( It
] its 1, 1"; -! r ti t i e : ,

addl i t: t' N tt 0 It




S ith !' t
Who wd
esd\ i C a I li



pl,
ti ''' .h I s ;,IIc


it nc t t i i




I Ie iJ

Stars \ede. ii

ie\ u e ' I


IN(
1 ) > ,


NOW SHOIiNG thru
Siund i "Slaughlitlr' Big
Ripott" plus "The Brute isnd
Iite Beast Si \\i 'nig'
oninI oitI s t it on t p oll Nt
one under 17 \will ie jmuilltted
\n passes accepted.
SCorUiption in Ing pl|iss
uid sllitai \ bi te Il thcnie for
t l newli est A Ii .'- it I an
l.; iii! i t'la l til n S i .: h ,'t'
lig Ripo, l;" \ i ith |,, I ni ,
1 miwn takin, ith l.jd *r!' .is
S .li t 'l ] l l l ) i i ,' i i l l
.1 i 5l i itl l tllll.i t
1 1 p t lt.i 1 ,ii .t\ t ,i,''l

L s','t t l N I 1 i l


A 1'd I


, i' l i 'i ; l I I I I p i I


IS .i i i. i t l 1'In l I t t i C i t l i t
St ', t, s t: iilioie d I\ liii


SA 1 ' I .l li tppNtln s .
.:. i ts'\, iislk s.'k L Is liit '
l, l i l .cI' 1 I -c illn t ) 'iNar tI
,, '. k t l l ii tile p i i.l i


S : l at ti i ke 'i \h lile
t 1' )i l 1.i i i d l
SI i \ n d o unt i t ,il it

i iLi i s n i li t i i

tin 'it lie \ .!1 -- ll i t k s It s i it
i! it -A IIcI tl- .ig ,'.t
tI d \. t,, ,r k55 ll5 .!ilo ',:'
ilh th i t \, i i i s ir ul ] !.. t iti,
i'* ,', 1 0 s.10 ,1 1,. 1 il ', \\ liei .1 .i .ik e t s




l ] i i i t llnd kl 'ia e ie rli < l



l1 a lI s1


attack on Jim Blirwt in.
\IIso co-sitn tine are (;loiia
llendr\ Brock I'cterN and Judi

"The Bruiti nd hilie Beast,"
.an Am Iei it.i Intelnational
rele se, is t lie c\plosive sltor
of a brutal mind ruthless land
baron in a VWesteri Bordertown
whose son is Ctuiallk wt kicked
I'he movie stars .ire Nino
C.istelnuovo ais ihe sadistic son
anld Franco \tro ,ind (eoige
lil1lton as t iwo ilneiiil' s oft ile
to\ in's ctitli/et\ \tiWo ditscidl' to
I lI it AigainsI ti L ioi l r11 le of

li le I ilt o s' it ll ci concerns
[lic lie oi c t it ii-L' i alld
III]lila t sil C ', 11 I thie tw\% o to
dmollsh tlhe brmLltal control
eisiliCLd h\ ie laidni baIMI a)nd
Is son
.\ n Slh,i\ liet John \1.
|l)iM ,'.li. .l id Rm ai I ranchetti
,is" ) ,o st,ii Il tli t \nu-ricall
Int l l ii ott alt rtl',.i,,e dsit'II ts.-d
l' 1 it 0o t ul l.
MONDAY ONLY. "The
S. aI1l11.il teis plus II I 11'
I)'s,:r tert ." iati'n'e i)lltlllt lS
t I 11 2.45, e\ ceninig 8 30.
Suggested for mature
audiencCes, padIcint il Idiscretion
is advised.
Rankingi Black actor-author
)ssie Davis plays the role o a
runilaway slave in '" Ihe
Scalphunters,"' a robust tale of
li!e along the tamied mountain
Imtc of the filttin w-tich stars
Jurt L[ancaster.
"The Sfcalphtnters" was
released b\ lnriited Artists, a
I ranlsAmlerlca corporation ,
and was directed by Sidney
Pollack and written by William
Norton
Shell\ lntters and 'Fell
Sav.ilals c)-stir with Dl)vis in
the lin i e S uiteen composer
and tmuiicai directoi Iliner
ernstetin addl to his long list of
scores ltIr pictures with "'I le
Scalphunters -
Prior to writing "" Ilie
Scalphunt ers," Norton was
associated \ith literary
ul.iiaterlies and worked as a
n'-,v paper reporter, truck
dlncr r hod carrier and state
p.it k ranger. lie hald 1 'e'en
writing for 25 years bhefre lie
was tcinpted to write I'he
Scalphlt nt ers".' a cotnv'incing s
and htoest stori of the lfamousi
mountain menc of the American
irontiei .

STARTS TUESDAY.
"S etili Btlacula Scrcam" plus
"I li Icnrediblse I\( o loaded
Ir1 n s p 1 a n t ' I a t I ee
'conilIrtiinuous from 2 30 evening
S .t) Suiggestied for miiature


jat dieinces, parent

S lliI tor oiars
blt.i k actor is


horsing ntrnIriiit iita's

around. : rshall, whou
"Trinity s Still My Na e 'c f
t' ArbI i * o],, . . a.c tu ali a w o rlI
1 ,Y O in & PRINCE
AN EYE FOR AN EYE R


I I I


NOW SHOWING
Matinee 2:45 & Evening 9:00 'Phone 2-1004. 2-1005



ROGER I
IMOORE


JAMES ,
BOND i I


LIVE

SAND,

I LETDIE"


SS7 (;(I:S7/D I-ORI A TI RI 1A UD)/ \(CiS
I'AIR \T7'I/% DIS(RT O.\ V11ADIS1l /).
Reservations not claimed by 8 45, will be sold
on first come, first served basis


Last Da, Sunday Sunday thru Tuesday
Matinee starts at 2 1 Sunday Continuous
Evening 9:00 trom 5.00
"SSSSSSSS" PCG Monday Continuous
Dirk Benedict Monda C ou
Strother Martin from 3 00
PLUS "VENGEANC(F" PC.
"THE BOY WHO CRIED I
WEREWOLI" PG Richard Harrison
Kerwin Matthews
Elaine Dcvr\ PLUS
Monday & Tuestla "THE BIGGEST BUNI)Lf
Matinee starts at i 4 OF THEM ALL" PG
Eve*nng 9.00
"THE WRATH O(f U;0 P [(, Edward G. Robertson
Robert Mitchuni Robert Wagneri
Rita Ha\wortli
PLUS
"COOGAN'S BL -UI- P(G
Clint Eastwood
Lee J. Cobb
'Phone 2-2534

1IJJ

LAST DAY SUNDAY
ISunday's Showings Continuous from 5 p.m. 'Phone -46(661

THE MOB PUT THE FINGER
ON SLAUGHTER ..so he gave them
the fngerht ck-curled ht around a trigqer!





1IN
A5.AhLL IEW
coLoR, NuIue ." to,-o a[AO 35 R-E
s'AWt'iA Im JIM BROWN ,r'SLAUGHTER S BIG RIP OFF". ItEourr INtRwli .
EDMcMA4ION ONSTROUD GLA HoENOY RICHAROLLIAMS BROCK PETERS

I NOTHING BETWEEN THEM but HATE!


gI T5L A"'
0 7%: 'COLORSCOPE 4
%'0 0.1 \1)D1R / 7ADMI/TTD ).
SORRY NO PASSI-S A( E'PTI 1)'

MONDAY ONLY
Matinee (ontinuous from 2 45, Evening S. 30
'Phone 3-4666


.v BUR -T -LA -ASTER



AND"



IECHNICOLOR PANMISKON'G p--

SUGG:STED FOR MA T 'RI: A DItAC :SES
PARENTAL. DISCRETION ADVISED


Kids Save 10c on
Admission Price, Bring
6 Coca-Cola or Fanta
Rottle Caps.


IWI l NluS\ k\uguiti 7
9 10 .i .o

"KING KONG ESCAPES" G.
RIll)i) S RI \SON 111 It \R



I ,I uI~,NILi. August 7
ii 1t :i lit.

"THE LOST FLIGHT" G.
LLOYD) BRIID( S ANN I RAN( IS


I ucsday A iugus 7
A9: 30 atll.

"GUNS FOR SAN SEBASTIAN" PG.
ANTHONY QUINN ANJANITTL- COMER


Tuesday. August 7
9: 30 a.m.


"CANNON FOR CORDOBA" PG.
(;GOR(, PIIPP.ARD F RANCE NUYI N


al discretion

halli, tai med
A :nitA eric ain
"l "Blaculai"
Inpire role in
Scream -
portrays the
darkness' i
d rentownted


CHARLES

DRIVE-IN


Starts Wednesday, I ie
'rain Rtbbers" starring John
Wasncl anid The\ Still Call Me
Trinit


t 4,1973.


TV STAR AND WIFE HERE
ACTOR BOB CUMMINGS arrived here Thursday with his wife to spend 10 days at the
Renaissance Clinic at the Balmoral Beach Hotel. Mr. Cummings, left, star of the Bob
Cummings Show, has just completed a new comdey "What are You Doing in my Life?"
Pictured with the couple is Dr. Elliott Goldwag of Renaissance.


Ottawa frets over future


economic stability in Bahamas


B JOHN II\ARBRON
:I'ri t tle Iii I Herald
I OR()\()l. ( Can adai
('aniadian l iiie ti Minister Pierre
'rtirudeau's t it r ittial ltmessage
of, t t....I I" 1t le I Ic ew est
i( l i1 t'eillh Carilbbean
nati()ion on its Jill\ 10
lidepcndt ncl dits n'l i'l ct the
behind-the scenes concern inl
Ottawa iab utt 1 tie ituttire
economt I s'I C t,1 1'il1t )i 1lhe
Hahamas
Ot ft icial conligrat ulations
from (atnadi. tili oldest and
largCst (toh n oni' ealiti nation
in the kcesMtlIn Ienlispherel .
sent in ec;iiher sears to Jatmaica.
Barbados. I rinilaidTolObagoi and
(iuylana were a mItatter iot
c 0i rse
IIowever, with PrItme
iniistscr I ). ien Piniulting
continuiling "Bahliarmnl i/at(tion "
prograiniit t i( pitt black
iahllil aillN is t i responsible
positions in fotreign-owned
companies, combined with a
grow ing black nationalism,
government and industry in
Canada have cast ofil the old
paternalistic view tof Caribbean
island societies
(anaidian banks. which have
a dominant role in all
(' om m onil wealth Caribbean
countries,,, still remember that
tihc 1970 Irinidad riots were
directed more specifically at
them, not American banks.
And the rise mill black power in
the Caribbean since the late
1960s spilled over into
Canada's own restive black
( iribbean population in the
]ot,+ destrimct ito)n ( the
S I-million computer centre ot
Sir (corge Williamtts university
in MSomtreal. which has a large
West Indian student enrollment.
(; rowing crime rates in
,ribbealn toti rist capitals and
what Ntit' e perceive to bei a
new sutliness toward white
visitors has accounted for a
si/eable drop in the large
Canadian tourist potential in
the Comnionweallh ICaribbean
Island nations. long popular
with ('ardt- ians.
C a n at d a 's ill aj or
contributions to the Balhaitan
econliOmy have been tourismI
iNassau and Freeport are two
of the Caribbean's largest
tourist centres for Canadians)


and t Cnadian financialI
institutions operating in the
lialaml as
I'he drop in the number of
Canadian tourists was largely
responsible for the decline in
tourism revenue, which
accotnt.s for about 70 per cent
of the new nation's $380
inulion annual gross national
product.
1lquall's important is the fear
that the government's
"Bahanmianization" policy will
go too tar and interfere with
the local operations of
Cainadiani banks.
('anadian bank giants, like
the Canadian Imperial Bank of
Comnierce or the Bank of
Nova Scotia I rust Co.
(H. hinas) Ltd.. do not oppose
i-creasing dei'andti that more
and more Bahamians manage
foreign bisineses But they are
concernCIIed that the essential
trend will move too fast with
independence, before native
personnel are fully trained.
On the positive side, Ottawa
experts the newly independent
Bahamas, like Jamaica,
I rinidad-Togabo, Barbados and
iuyvana before it. will look to
Canada for expertise in
building public administration,
the tax system and other forms
of economic and technical
assistance.
The advantages of seeking
such assistance from Canada
and not from the United States
are substantial, since all
Commonwealth nations in the
hemisphere operate under the


British rule of law and
parliamentary system.
Shortly before the July 10
Independence Day, Bahamian
officials visited Canada's
department of External Affairs
requesting all information still
available about Canada's
organization of her centenary
as a nation in 1967 to assist
them in their big day.
The celebrations in Nassau
are now over. Prince Charles,
Queen Elizabeth II's son and
her personal representative at
the Bahamas festivities, has
sailed away in the British
frigate IlMS Minerva to
complete his tour of duty as an
assistant gunnery officer in
training with the Royal Navy.
Like his father Prince Philip
and grandfather in the Royal
Navy before him. Prince
Charles was showing the British
flag in the Caribbean. Unlike
his father and royal ancestors,
the young prince also was there
to haul it down.
Still, the royal presence in
Nassau might have more
meaning soon for all
Commonwealth nations in this
hemisphere if the strong
rumour floating around Canada
during the just concluded
Canadian visit of his mother
Queen Elizabeth in true that
he will be Canada's next
governor-general.
More compelling in closer
Canadian-Bahamian relations
however will be Nassau's early
needs for technical assistance,
infrastructure loans.


-IM






ENTIRELY NEW DECOR

plu PRISCILLA ROLLINS

-, IEIE M tKEiE ll CHlTIONS
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
fromn 10 p.m. until ...
Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snacks from 7 p.m.
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM
BRITANNIA RBEAtH uriTELI ADAnIliE ISLANo


h_____ ributT








-.1.11111 WULFF ROAD THEATRE


NOW SHOWING AT 10 P.M. ONLY
n.i t ..s- .. .... "..
euk in
the saddle
again and


II


I br


--


1 w


L~- -- ~-- -'


: Maee 45 & IHwzN


I


MORNING


MOVIES
PRESENTED BY YOUR
COCA-COLA H1OITL lR
FOR CHILDREN
EVERY TUESDAY
MORNING
AT 9:30 A.M.


\%












Saturday. August 4, 1973-


Shr Lribunp


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT CARS FOR SALE CARDOF THANKS HELP WANTED HELP WANTED TRADE SERVICES SRVC


LIUO16
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park -
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 212 baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room -n
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely y
furnished, large patio and poo I.
18 x 36. Beautifully y
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
central aircondition ing. T o
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C10650
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, livir.g,
dining, kitchen, family roo r
and carport, utility rooms, cn
2 lots of land beautiful ly
furnished, wall to wall carp et
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and love ly
landscape. Airconditionfd
throughout. U nusu al
opportunity. To vie-w
telephone 2-1722-3.

C10597
FOR SALE
WOODLAND OFF
VILLAGE ROAD
A very attractive 2 bedroom 1
bath house, complete ly
furnished with garage ar-id
laundry, three way wat er
systems on lot 100' x 80'wiht
extra lot 100' x 83 '
beautifully landscaped wi th
fruit trees and vegetat le
gardens. Both lots cornplete ly
walled in. Phone 31310 tv-ill
consider offers.

C10718
MONTAGU HEIGHTS located
on Windsor Avenue 3
bedroom, 2 bath, maids roo rn
and car port. Large well fruited
lot. Owner must sell at well
below replacement cast
$40,000 or nearest offer.Ri -ng
31172 for appointment.

C10692
WOULD YOU LIKE to li-we
near the sea with access to a
private lake? Beach rights ar-id
all underground facilities. $75
down. From $80 month. N-Jo
interest. From $5800.
Call Pat Rutherford at 4-111
or Morley & O'Brien at 2-41418
or 2-3027 or come to t-e
YAMACRAW BEACH Moct el
Home.

C10726
CHARMING BAHAMIA N
HOME on Queen Street. 2
storey, wide porches, hidden'
garden, bearing fruit treeIs.
Suitable for office and/cor
residence. $75,000 but ma- offer. Telephone Chest er
Thompson 24777 eveningn gs
42035, 31425).

C10684
HARBOUR ISLAND desirabi le
elevated lot a djoini-ig
1,esidency ground 82' x 123' x
93' x 141'. Phone 31252
before 8 p.m.

.C10786
ONE lot in Stapleton Garder-is
80 x 120. call 3-6164.

C10778
EXCELLENT INVESTIENT-
PROPERTIES
1. A choice location on Shirley
Street comprising the frontage
of a complete block withroa-ad
frontage on three sides.
2. A large apartment or office
lot Collins Ave. good elevatiowi,
3. A large apartment site We st
Bay Street approximateW y
47,000 sq. ft. 95 ft. elevation n.
A. Lots and cottages Adelaic:de
"Beach.
6. 62 acres prime devel opmer-it
property Eastern Road.
6. A 3 acres estate with a l2
room palatial mansion with an
additional option of 18 acres
of good developed land.
For prices information arnrd
appointment call C. W. Sancds
Bill's Real Estate 23921.

SFOR SALE OR REN
C10771
3 BEDROOMS, one bat h,
Joans Heights, South Beac h.
See Philip R. Vargas, dest, S.
South-Street on Corner.
C10732
UNFURNISHED two story
house three bedrooms two
baths, Eastern District. Phorwe
4-1183 after 6 p.m.

FOR RENT
SC10663


4500 sq. ft. warehouse cor
office space, availab le
immediately. Montro-se
Avenue. To view, telephor-e
2-1722-3.
C10653 -
ONE EXTRA LARGE tv-vo
bedrooms two bath, and oie
extra large one bedroo-m
apartment. With large livimig
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria CoLnrt
Apartments on Elizabe-th
Avenue between Shirley ar-id
Bay Street. Facilities, Phoree,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenr-ta,
-arconditioned. Phone 546-31
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.


C 106bb
HILLCREST TOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
a irconditioning, swimming
pool, short or long term. $375
per month. Contact 2-1841
days.

C10652
2 2 BEDROOM APART-
MENTS consisting of living
dining room, kitchen and
bathroom, basically furnished
- Twynam Avenue. Phone
5-8185.

C10676
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777-8.

C10677
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

C10651
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT--
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C 10757
ONE & 2 Bedroom apartments,
Centerville, Ring 5-8679 ask
for Mr. Pritchard.

C 10772
QUEEN ST. 2 air-conditioned
master bedrooms and baths.
Air-conditioned library with
bed/sofa and full bath. Maid's
room and bath. Living room,
dining room, pantry, kitchen,
utility room, upstairs screened
sleeping porch. Full sets linen,
china, glass, flatware. All small
appliances. Both electric and
gass fridges and stoves. Washing'
machine. Large lighted
furnished patio. Separate
drying yard. Large storage
room. Automatic PDS burglar
and fire radio-alarm systems.
TV antenna. Available on lease
Sept. 1st. Call H. G. Christie
Real Estate, 2-1041.

C10671
COMMERCIAL BUILDING,
Montrose Avenue. 3200 sq. ft.,
suitable for store, offices, or
warehouse, $290.00 monthly.
Call 2-8165.

C 10783
SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM
apartment, fully furnished,
including Television, off
Village Road, Phone 3-1329.

C10790
Furnished two-bedroom
duplex apartment, enclosed
garden, air-conditioned
bedrooms, automatic washer,
$260,00. Phone 5-8512.

C 10791
FURNISHED THREE
BEDROOM two bath house in
Seabreeze Estates,
a i conditioners, telephone,
garage, laundry room,
automatic washer and dryer.
$400.00 Phone 5-8512.

CARS FOR SALE
C10731
1971 AUTOMATIC DODGE
AVENGER $1400. 36477 7
a.m. 5 p.m. 51327 6 a.m. -
8.30 a.m.

C10742
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Auto. Green $1695
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
Automatic Red $500
1967 CHRYSLER
4 D,. Auto. White $950
1 968 PONTIAC
STRATO CHIEF Yellow$1400
1970 HILLMAN HUNTERs,
4 Dr. Automatic, White $995
1 971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std. Green $1200
1 968 JAVELIN A/C $1200
1 970 PARISIENNE A/C $2400
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr.Std. Blue $695
1967 TRIUMPH 1300
Red. Std. $800
1 969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/Wgn. Yellow Std. $475
1 973 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W FE Auto. Blue
856 miles $4400
1 970 RAMBLER SST
4 Dr. Auto. Blue $2100
1 969 MORRIS OXFORD
Std. White $995
1971 MERCURY


A/C 4 Dr. Maquis $5500
1 967 GMC PICKUP $640
1 964 CHRYSLERR $800
1 968 HILLMAN
Green S/W Auto. $1100
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue 1950
1969 FORD GALAXIES
4 Dr. A/C $1850
1966 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Blue $500
1 971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
Std. Blue $1595
1970 HILLMAN MINX
4 Dr. Std. Green $850
1 969 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Auto. White $895
Tradsfns Welcome
Located Oakes Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the Ice Plant


C10739
1969 REBEL, Good
Condition. Telephone 2-3301 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. ask for Charles
Sturrup.

C10659
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
1970 V/WAGON BUG
Rolls Royce hood
simulated spare wheel
trunk in very good condition
at ONLY $1,600 00
1970 HILLMAN MINX
radio W/W tyres O.N.O.
new paint work for
ONLY $2,500.00
1970 TOYOTA CROWN
O.N.O. New paint work Radio
A/C P/S P/B ice box W/W tyres
in very good condition at
ONLY $2,500.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX Radio
W/W Tyres O.N.O. new paint
work for ONLY $1,300.00
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
SL O.N.O. in perfect condition
at ONLY $2,000.00
1970 -V/WAGON 1300 BUG
with tape at ONLY $1,300.00
1969 CHEVY MALIBU A/C
Radio W/W tyres P/S P/B at
ONLY $900.00
MECHANIC SPECIAL --1966
MUSTANG AT ONLY
$300.00
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.,
OPP. DAVIS ST.,
P. O. BOX N-3741,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE 5-6739

FOR SALE

C10696
One Steel Hull 125 ft. x 23 ft.
x 5 ft. Draft Powered by 1
New 343 Cat Diesel
1 15 Ton Unite Crane
1 Cargo Hatch 14 x 24
ICargo Hatch 14 x 36
Double Bottom. In Excellent
Shape. Duty Paid.
For further information
contact Mr. Sidney Sands,
Treasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamas.

C10777
MOVING bALE! White
wrought iron dinnette set
$200, stereo $100, lamps,
vacuum cleaner, overstuffed
chair, potted plants and
miscellaneous items. Call
7-7311.

C10776
1N.C.R. cash register 4 total
$700
1 N.C.R. cash register 9 total
$1100
1 Desk $50
1 8 ft. Drug Store check-out
counter $150
6 Wall Show Cases $150 each
1 Metal Display Shoe Rack $40
Grocery Carts (stainless steel)
$35 each
1 Filing Cabinet 4 drawers $60
1 Filing Cabinet 2 drawers $40
Can be seen at Merchandise
Suppliers Ltd., Shirlea. Phone
2-3982.

C10792
1961 MORRIS good condition
$150
1966 VAUXHALL VIVA $100
Miscellaneous household
furniture -- owner leaving.
Phone 3-4358.


CARD OF THANKS
C10785


THE FAMILY of the late,
Jeremiah Clarke of Boyd
subdivision who died on
Wednesday 25th July, wish to
thank their many friends for
their kind expressions of
sympathy, cards, and floral
tributes during the illness of
our husband and father.
Special thanks to doctors
Crawford, Bethel and
Farrington and the nurses of
the Princess Margaret Hospital
and most of all Maura Lumber
Company Limited, Bethell's
Funeral Home, members of the
Police Reserve and the Masons.
SIGNED: RUTH CLARKE
& FAMILY.

C10686 *


TRAVELLING ?


For efficient friendly
advice on Worldwide
Destinations by Airline or
Steamships. Contact
MUNDYTOUIRS at 24512.



APPROVED PASSENGER AGENTS


C10769


(
THE FAMILY of the late
Culmer Clark better known as
Roker wish to thank their
friends for tokens of sympathy
shown them in their recent
bereavement. May he rest in
peace.
THE FAMILY

ART SUPPLIES

C10683
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386,2-2898.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C10773
WORK BOATS
Tugs Dredges's Barges -
Landing Crafts Cargo Boats
Freeze Boats Steel Twin
Screw- Diesel Call Mr. Nash
305-635-8602.
OCEAN MASTERS CORP.

C10688
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C10635
FOR SALE 31 foot
BERTRAM Sports-fisherman.
$15,500. (Firm). Telephone
5-4641.

C10733
For Sale from 32 ft. sloop.
Aluminum Spar, Roller
Reefing Boom, Stainless rigging
and set of Dacron Sails. Call
2-4635 before 5 p.m.

I WNCE

C10768
This is to notify the public that
I, George Adderley, presently
living in West End, Grand
Bahama, and formerly of
Mason's Addition, Nassau, am
not now, nor have I ever been,
married to anyone.


PERSONAL

C10729
PENFRIENDS OVERSEAS!
International penfriendship the
greatest hobby of all! Tour the
world by letter! For details,
write now: Five Continents
Company Ltd., P. O. Box
1219, Henderson, New
Zealand.


HELP WANTED
C10655
JOB TITLE: CRANE
OPERATOR AND RIGGER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operates crane as required to
perform erection of structures
and equipment and loading of
materials. Makes minor repairs
and adjustments to crane such
as changing cables, booms,
buckets, etc..
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10759
"THE BANK OF MONTREAL
(Bahamas & Caribbean)
Limited require an Assistant to
their International Branch
Manager. Applicants should be
generally familiar with all
aspects of banking and have
had specific experience in at
least two of the following
areas:
The Foreign Exchanges,
Eurodollar Lending and
Funding, Corporate Credit
Analysis
Qualified applicants mav anoolv
in writing to Personnel Office,
P.O. Box N-7118, Nassau.


C10681
WOLSEY HALL
THE OXFORD CORRESPONDENCE COLLEGE
Whatever the quahliicalton ou uant
i(; E 0' and "A' levels. a ILondon
UnLimeril) Degrcc. Profesironal I\-
amrnauions or Businc s Sudics Wol-.s
Hall founded in I ~Q gives >ou
* A g iuaranir e ofr luiion unlil >ou pa'-
otrrrcxarrunaiionrar noeira ao'r
* An outranding record of asucce on
e\.ample X 7",, of H ol.se Hall sludenit
MIIIIt for B a honours degrees have
pa',cd Iln ihe last 7' cars
* Overe ecars orfc\perence resulting irn
the lmost e rinient modern methods of
polaillmiachlng h'rarmara frequrcd
* I'ersonal lulion i meci our precisl
Itqullcmenir
* L ,o fcrspaa.ihle h insialmcnis
in %ou uani ito nou ho to
prepare for a-% ccessful future
S rilc for A Free prosp.tus o
WI Y D Hep V O R .
WOLSEY HAULL OXFORD OX2 BPRl


C10723
USED CAR mechanic come in
at Central Garage and ask for
Kendal Major.

C10579
MECHANICAL ENGINEER
Applicant must either have a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Mechanical Engineering or be
in his last year of study for
same or equivalent.
Job will cor:sit of the
applicant eventually assuming
complete responsibility for the
maintenance and correct
functioning of all mechanical
and process equipment
presently in the Plant and
which may arrive in the future.
Please call 3-6211 between 9
a.m. 11 a.m. after July 23rd
and before July 27th.

C10658
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10654
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPERINTENDENT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
able to read blueprints
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and
erection modifications to
buildings and equipment in
cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10592
IBM DATA CENTRE
SERVICES
Has immediate position.
available in Nassau.
SYSTEMS ANALYST
Successful applicants will be
thoroughly familiar with
systems design and
implementation of varied
commercially oriented
applications.
EXPERIENCE
Position requires a minimum of
five years in programming and
Systems/Analyst work. Must
be able to manage people. IBM
OFFERS: Hospitalization and
insurance programmes, paid
vacation, attractive starting
salary and excellent
advancement opportunities.
Interested applicants should
call Mr. McFadden at 32351/4
for personal interview

C10672
JOB TITLE: STRUCTURAL
STEEL ERECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education Qualified
in steel construction
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Work on structural steel
erection during modifications
of buildings and equipment in
Cement plant
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnrel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10767
WANTED AT OCEAN
CAY
FOLLOWING personnel ale
needed for immediate
employment in the aragonrite
project at Ocean Cay Interview
will be held in Nassau Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday,
August 7, 8 and 9. If you
believe you are qualified for
one of these jobs, Phone
2-1324 for an appointment.
TRACTOR OPERATORS
WELDER, heavy and light
metal, electrical and acetylene
CLERK TYPIST, male, for
reports and inventory.
ELECTRICIAN, 3 phase.
MECHANICS (HEAVY
EQUIPMENT). Must have 5
years experience and be willing
to be sent abroad for
specialised training at company


expense.
MARCONA OCEAN
INDUSTRIES LTD., P. 0.
Box N4177, Nassau.

C10685

MOVING?
For Expert Packing &
Forwarding by Sea or Air,
Contact E. H. Mundy &
Co. (Nassau) Ltd., P. O.
Box N-1893. Phone:
2:4511.


APPROVED CARGO A(C ETS'


C10775
WANTED Live-In Maid
References needed also health
certificate To take care of
infant & regular housekeeping
duties. Middle age preferred.
Write Box N4269.

C10656
JOB TITLE: (FOUR)
MILLWRIGHTS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Good
Cement Plant mechanical
background
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P O Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama

C10657
JOB TITLE: MOBILE
EQUIPMENT REPAIRMAN
LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
GOOD basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILI TIES:
Directs and plans work of
workmen as required to
inspect, test, adjust, dismantle
and replace unit assemblies or
parts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Baharna Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10770
THE BRITISH HIGiH
COMMISSION has a vaclncy
for a Commercial Officer.
Candidates, who should
preferably be Bahamian, must
be over 25 years, have a good
education, preferably possess
professional qualifications and
have a background in
commerce or finance. Salary
and conditions ., service will
be dependent on qualifications
and experience. Interested
applicants should apply in
writing before 14 August 1973
to: THE SECOND
SECRETARY (COM-
MERCIAL) British High
Commission, P. 0. Box
N-7516, Nassau.
C10794
LYFORD CAY CLUB
REQUIRES a young lady to
work at our pool to be life
guard and to teach swimming
and diving.
Must be qualified swimming
instructress
Must have a certificate for life
saving
Have a full knowledge of water
safety
An attractive appearance and
pleasant personality
Must be Bahamian
Please write giving full details
of age, expe iencie, and
qualifications to. General
Manager, Lyford Cay Club, P.
O. Box N7776 Nassau,
Bahamas.

C10789
GERMAN SPEAKING lady
required for manageress
position for real estate
development company. Must
be able to compose and type
own correspondence in Englisl.
& German, deal with public.
supervise staff & accounts.
Please reply in writing stating
expect rence & salary
requirements to Love Beach
Clubs Ltd. P. O. Box 6202,
Nassau.

C10787
BARCLAYS BANK
International Limited P. O.
Box F2404 Freeport ;cquires
confidential executive
secretary able to type at 50
w.p.m. and take shorthand at
80-100 w.p.m Applicants must
have at least 3 years
commercial experience
Bahamian only please
contact Mr. H. Spiers. Phone
27466 Nassau or telephone D
R. Martin 352-5391, Freeport.

C10782
WANTED: Rooms Division
Manager for 370 Room Hotel
Resort on Cable Beach At
least three years experience in
similar position. Apply: In
person to Personnel Office
Hyatt Emerald Beach Hotel
Cable Beach.


RFAD) THE T1RIBIUNE

'C 10700
CUSTOM DESIGN'
to your specifications at
ECONOMY PRICES
AVALIER
S CONSTRUCTION
SPhone: 3-5171, 3-6011
D. A. HUDSON
VARIICO-MPtEN
iaTALtUILDIYNTSYMMS

Distributed world wide by
;PAN INThRNA TONAL -
NASSAU, BA IAIMAS.


C10661

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C10638
PATIO AWNINGS
AND CARPORTS
HURRICANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George,
& Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.



RI )ADTHL TRIBUNE


REAL ESTATE

C 10507
THREE LOTS zoned duplex
LUCAYA 4 min. to
SHANNON GOLF COURSE, 1
min. te-seashore. All facilities
in. Small cash plus payments
takeover now 12 paid. This a
bargain! Also single-family lot
on Grand Bahama Waterway,
125-ft. Bulkhead facilities in
and all-time maintenance paid,
in now sold-out PINE BAY.
Write Adv. C10507, c!o The
Tribune, P. 0. Box N-3207
Nassau.


HELP WANTED
C6141
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT for
Company in Giand Bahama.
Must be A.C.A., C.P.A. or
equal. Responsibilities will
include the production to
management of monthly
reports and quartely accounts,
etc., the supervision of a staff
and the day to day running of
the accounts department.
The successful applicant will be
required to produce and
implement ideas to increase the
efficiency of his department
and to assist and advise
management in accounting and
allied matters.
Apply in own handwriting to:
Electrical Utilities Company
Ltd., P. 0. Box F-170,
Freepot, Grand Bahama,
Baha mas.
C6140
METER MAN/TECHNICIAN
at Holmes Rock with minimum
of 4 years experience in all
aspects of meter work, reading,
investigating complaints,
installation and use of check
meters, checking service
arrangements, calibration and
cali ying out minor repairs,
etc.. All applicants should have
had appropriate training and be
in possession of references
attesting to good character as
well as their experience and
ability in the field. Only
persons NOT requiring a Work
Permit need apply
Electrical Utilities Company
Ltd. P. O. Box F-170,
Freeport.


C 10657
JOB TITLE: MOBILE
EQUIPMENT REPAIRMAN
LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
GOOD basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Directs and plans work of
workmen as required to
inspect, test, adjust, dismantle
and replace unit assemblies or
parts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C10763


CECIL'S FRIENDLY
GIFT SHOP
Meadow St. & Blue Hill Rd.
Gifts for Parties & Weddings
FIGURINES
GLASS SETS
CHINA SETS
SILVER SETS
RUGS,
PUNCH BOWL SETS
PLACE-MAT SETS
5-PIECE SCARF SETS, etc.
Open 3 p.m.- 8.30 p.m.

C10637
T.V. ANTENNAS Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.
C10632

NEED A PROFESSIONAL
HANDYMAN
Call Odd Job Enterprises. We
do anything anytime.
Telephone 42724- 55191
Quick Service


HELP WANTED
C10654
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPERINTENDENT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
able to read blueprints
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and
erection modifications to
buildings and equipment in
cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C 10658
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material usinq
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6139
(2 ) KEYPUNCH
OPERATORS: Should have
experience as a keypunch/
verify operator, including
experience as a Punch Room
Supervisor.
(1) Computer Operator: To be
responsible for running all
work on the Computer System
and applicant should have
I.B.M. "System 3" experience.
Apply Monday through Friday
from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
only, to Princess Properties
International Ltd., King's Inn,
P. O. Box F-207, Personnel
Dept., Phone 352-6721.


C10788
PROCESS DEVELOPMENT
CHEMIST Ph.D.
Applicant will be responsible
for the performing of technical
and scientific assignments in
the development of new
processes to produce
marketable chemicals and the
improvement in existing plant
processes to produce high
quality products. Develops a
wide variety of organic
synthetic reactions including
Oxidations, Reductions,
H y d r o ge n a t i o n s,
Esterifications. The successful
candidate must possess a Ph.D.
in organic Chemistry.
Experience in fine chemicals
and pharmaceutical industry
desirable.
Applicants should apply in
Persib at Syntex Corporation,
West Sunrise Highway, or write
P. O. Box F-2430, Freeport,
Telephone: 352-8171.


I1I


*aUI 1 Wa get the j d(ne

Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m


1I


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED


IN FREEPIIT TEL. 352-i661


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CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPrlT TEL. 352-1N


N1 'NTED


S-~.~'Nllf.- N E
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HELP MNTED

C6142
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT
To organize and supervise the
daily running of the accounting
office, front office cashiers,
night auditors and food and
beverage cashiers. To review
and/or prepare daily, monthly
;ind other financial and
statistical reports. Responsible
to toe controller. At least two
years experience as a chief
accountant or controller with a
hotel operation.
Cuotact Ptincess Properties
International Management
Service Division, P. 0. Box
F 684, Freeport, Grand
Bahanla Island.
C 6144
PROGRESSIVE BEAUTY and
Barber Shop Company in need
eo b females and 1 male
hairstylists
'rinimuni of 3-4 years
experienc- in styling, tinting,
biJchlinqg.
Baorinmans only need apply -
Med.i!ena Ltd., P. O. Box
F-775, Freeport, Bahamas.


S, b4b
t. MAN-AGE R for busy gourmet
IT type Dilinig Room and Bar
I !. 1. l)numiI education: Must be a
(;t, Hitlgh .hool Graduate or have
equ;:.drpit education.
'MVn. ;, !: experience: Must
h i '..id 8 years experience in
S)t "'c.'d service and gourmet
vtype dining room, including 2
y'-a' experience in broiler
ookinrg and one year as
ba tenidei. Appiicant must be
0 between 27 and 35 years of
Sjage.
Ai Must have had experience in
aJ Sl.P vising staff and must have
he ability to find replacements
So additional staff that meet
requircents of General
i' Manager, as they are needed.
r ,L;tI have had experience in
Inventury and Stock Control
a iId purchasingg.
i',i:st rave some knowledge of
coter,'Jng to maintain proper
daily records and to handle and
control cash receipts. Police
S Cert ificate required.
'lujt be prepared to work
. ,.-re than average 48 hour
-,: m.- n order to supervise
,)1 ab ishment properly.
T: jTiday ois day off. Salary
1;'00.00 monthly.
S: -ic'phlcation and resume
U'! .,-aepted by mail only,
e: '-ised to. James A. Wilson,
B r: ;a z !-., jr SI ) Lim ited,
,reerort, Grand Bahama.

i


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Saturday, August 4, 1973.




The Tribune Comlcs Page


'GEE WHIZ, WE ON'Y T KONE ICE CUB APIECE *'


"Near as I can figure it, the squirrel is saying give him a
peanut or he'll bite you on your big fat nose."

rol 3 1d ri3-.-re":


Kn e ureSynd...r., In- .1973. Worl igihto e rvd
"I'm looking for a man clever enough to get a job with


the government and find out if they have any secret
-..i-. -files on me."


c cso I r
*FAA L -ML0 -3R A&AMJ.-a ---

(:::AON M"


F-


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------










Saturday, August 4, 1973.


IFICHiUR


MMMNMM...WHAT SMLLS 'PArEL
SO 6D IN HERE ?

Brother Juniper


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS 22. Exists
1. North 23. Mcist
America's 24. Screened
discoverer 25 Taxi
6. "Ara" 26 Fast plane
11. Imitation gold 27. Iron symbol
12. Rodent 29. Refrains
13. Stick-up man 32. Cap
14 Russian name 33.Hurray
15. Desserts 34 Pull
16 Peleg's son 35 Carplike fish
18. Vampire 36 Concerning
19. Briar 38. Panacea
20. Washington 40 Prospect
S ^f-fll #-_ n


SOLUTION OF YESTER1
42. Merman
43. Shovel 2
DOWN 3
4
1. Garden plant 5
7 8 a9 to 6
7.
2 8.
9
41 10

i8 17,

20
H 21
23
27 i 25
32 26
27
28
S29
30
31
32
35.
37
,are, 8-7 39


Rupert and Miss


Making his way to the upper branches Rupert
finds another hollow, and in it lies a rather
weighty book. "There's a magnifying glass
too." thinks Rupert. He takes both articles
back to the Owl. "Ah, I see you've
remembered the reading glass," says the bird.
'You'll need it, the writing's very small." But
gn npenlng the book Rupert finds nothing but


hlir ribtut


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

CIOROSCOPE
K from the Carroll Righter Institute

/ GENERAL TENDENCIES: The daytimeis
good for working at those long-range plans that
require a considerable amount of study, thought and planning,
in which you can reduce your ideas to a working success.
Tonight finds you overly eager to produce results of a practical
nature, so be sure to refrain from being too rambunctious.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Fine morning for talking over
with partners where your operations are headed. Later get
busy on the actual work involved Do what mate expects of
you, even if you feel imposed upon Think
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Make sure you know how to
get all those duties behind you early, and then you have time
to be with important associates later. Buy clothing you need.
Improve your health by proper treatments.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You can make this a fine
morning at whatever you 'ie best to do and improve relations
with mate, but work should be relegated to evening. Creativity
is the keynote dunng the day
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Morning should be
spent taking care of needs of kin, but then be off to
entertainment later m the day Begin a new uptrend early in
the am. in all of your affairs, too Take it easy in p.m.
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Get into beauty treatments and
shopping for apparel you need in the a.m., but evening should
be spent happily at home. Keep busy writing letters. Don't
forget to do your marketing
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Get your property improved
during the a m and do errands, but later be happy with good
friends Plan how to carry on with those practical affairs you
have in mind Avoid one who gossips
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) You are able to spend the day
as you please, especially where personal matters are concerned,
but take care tonight not to spend lavishly. Ask a friend to go
with you to some social matter of importance
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) You can get the information
you require by going to right sources today Daytime intuition
works fine, but not m p m Don't argue with mate over a
matter of opinion Maintain harmony
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Joining with good
friends during day is fine and brings good results; taking in the
nightclubs tonight is okay Have a good talk with a close
friend Make excellent plans for the future
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Attending to public
affairs during day is wise and gets you excellent results. You
can then enjoy social matters in p m. that are vital Push your
finest ambitions in early p m Do not be discourteous with
others
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Open your mind to new
outlets that can give you excellent benefits, and by p.m. you
get public acclaim desired Being alert to progress is wise.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Make sure you get bills paid
and other responsibilities handled during day. Seek new
outlets in p.m that revitalize you Try to be more cooperative
with an associate during daytime
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those delightful young people with a fine, inventive
mind, who should have lessons in psychology so that dealing
with others can piove very successful, pleasing Teach to stand
up for own rights early, or others could take advantage of him
or her because of this offspring's sheer innocence, trusting too
much, or wanting to be so cooperative the self is denied
S. Halios. (3)
;3. ImItate. (3)
- I l. Elevate. (5)
SI i!. I.earned man. (6)
- Finish. (3)
21. Itranches. (i6)
- own
1 I. Bristol-fashion (9)
- Cookn item. (3)
Acquaintance of many Sears.
3. 6)
4. lath and Iroltwlch. for
i- instance. (4)
S'5. Depscrlolion or one Smnde.v


S r (ursm8)
i. They auStL (
No. ".192 by TIM McKAY I o o k
Across atf te r
1. Athlete. (9) (8) I the
_. Stops. (5) (8)
10t. Ostentation. (4) 13. A b ove.
1-. Tell-tale. (!9) 0 (Ii&
,3. Anew. (6) IlL. F Fo ollsh
14. Horizontal pleces- of frame- erson
work. (9) I (3) Velrr.l, lO't .olrton

Chess


[7e Com ic ae


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURT-IS

YES-- AND TH I FaCr TO LEAVE AT L ON'T THE TWO LOCKS AWAYT
THING TAT r MIDNIGHT BECAUSE I HAD TO LAMBERTS THAT'S WHAT KEEPS
MOU AND GORDY BOTHERS ME IS THAT WORK THE NEXT MORNING LIVE CLOSF BOTHERING ME / T COULD
WERE AT THE IF WE'D LEFT AN HOUR BUT GORPY AND THE MEN TO YOU HAVE COME HOM ALONE
LAMBERT1S PARTY EARLIER, BARBARA GOT INTO A POKER GAME APART I JUST WISH ORDY
WEREN'T You f T I THREATENED TO GO HOME THAT CARD GAME /
ALONE---AND
TWIAT BROKE UP --l










JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS|

L-- .... RIGHT, I YE5 :LST CHEC HOW ARE '-GJESS! HAVE YCU HEAR. OSPTA .ES T TLL ON THE SO WE L, TE WAN" HAT
YOU, ETSY ? ANT.NG ,MORE _- i 'TCA. .ST UT HE' RE- POLICE T WOL -DEP 'ECUR TY GUAR
A50UET RICK? 3A-NE CONSCO5NES S TO C I.C OU TO GET N
t *,. .E' S EtN6 INTERROCATED TMEY.. 5E 6' ,ER, E E .ROUBLEP FOR,
1' -W .BYi 5V THE POLICE.' ---HO.RTL' ARE O HAViNG SHOT


ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


by saunders & overgard


WH..-iS -hE l', \ YOU'RE GONNA BE GUE5TS HERE
... TH,9 IS i I:) TH "
o-,ERE i5 THE kLEFFT. : TH. 0,
_HERE I i\E ...E

i. 4 -ir



1 .^CCO'E- WERE .:7
iETT!NQ OUT OF FEW DAYS YOU )
HERE. ORA. AIN'T MAAM.i


By LEONARD BARDEN


DAY'S PUZZLE


Fossil resin !
.Bounces
.Bravo
Tower Victor Korchnoi's fine showing
Traps last month in the interzonal in
SCard game his home city o: Leningrad was
, Polluted achieved by sharp, forcing tac-
tics of which today's position is
Oriental a good example. His opponent
Musical signs Quinteros (Black) has sacrificed
Palebuck a pawn for an aggressive posi-
Boy's tion on the queen's side. How
should Korchnoi iWhite, to
nickname move) continue, and with what
Contradiction rreult?
Carson Par times : 20 seconds, grand-
mrife aste:; 40 seconds, chess master;
Stre 1 minute, chess expect; 2 min-
Red utes. county player; 5 minutes,
baneberry club standard: 10 minutes, aver-
Gems ase: 20 minutes, novice.
Easy -Solition o. !971 -
Carborundum Chess Solution
Desire 1 Kt -I:t5. It I... BxKt: 2
Wont B RI) x B. R-B2: 3 B-B3,
True Q--R6 'or 3 .- Q-Kt3; 4
Strained R> ,Ii roid White has won a
.Pra dnna piece. In t he game. Black tried.
Prima donna I.. PxB but after Korchnoi's
.Shoshonean reply. 2 Q xB! he had to re-
.Truncate sion. Whit, threatens both 3
Kt x R and 3 RxB and so gains
a decisive material advantage.
Samantha-6


blank pages. That's because it's all secret,"
the Owl tells him. It's invisible writing."
" B-but this magnifying glass cries Rupert.
"There's no glass in it I"" Tak! What a
contrary little bear you are!" says the Owl.
" Don't you know that you need invisible glass
to read invisible writing ? "
ALL RIGHTS RESe$RVEf


S words ofa
fS M ur letters
S or more can
A- you make
from the
letter, shown
S here? In
making a
w word, each
SIiI letter may
Se used once
only. Eac h
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word in the
list. No piutial; nu lcreilgn worus;
1tl0 proper iliUlltes. ToIiAl'.*
TARGET : 20 words, good
253 words, very good: 30 words,
excellent Solution tomorrow.
It ETERIA\'.S .NOI. I*ION :
Eerily eery enter entire
ENTIRELY entry erne eyre e3rle
inert inertly inter leer lierne
liner litre lyre nitre reel retn
relent reline rely rent rite tern
terne tier tiler tllerv tire tree
trey trine tyre.

Winning

Bridge
Bm VICORMOLLO
Dealer East : E W Vul
North
4 AK :3
A 6 2
A82
Q 53
410 W 6 2
South
J 7 4
K Q J 5
0 A K 74
OAK ?
475
West North East South
-- -- 16 Dble
Pass 24 Pass 27
Pass 40
Sauth has nothing to spare for
a take-out double, but the final
contract isn't unreasonable. West
leads the 68. Declawer ruffs with
the 5'5 on the third round of
clubs. What is the best line of
play ?
ANALYSIS: Exercising a
little ootimisn, decl.irer can
count 10 tricks four hearts.
four da.unonds and the 0*AK
Adinlt'edly, thtli requires a luckv
3-3 diLilOnld cbre k. but that's
all.
And yet, there's a snag. Unless
the hearts also break 3 -3. which
is too muoh to expect. the 13th
di.imond will be ruffed. no matter
how the suit breaks. To ensure
the contract agialnst t 4 2 tranip
split. decl trer catshes two top
hearts only. t.i'kes three dia-
Jnonds, ending In she closed
hand and ruffs the last 4iim -nd
with the A
West East
4 6u 2 4 6Q1098
10 9 8 4 7 3
0 3 2 J 10
8 4 3 XA K Q J
Th4 is how tile tnd w.-
pl.,itd by Nitrs P.,t P'arN WIies
enmtPr w. one r t ile Ilrt to
re.mlh us tro this yetir' eiii
te.iui.ird Cv'lityv Midli< tL)t-
grcrit.


N--SME ARED


IALY GOALA

% LO-E ERO S
L IN4 MOR E
UNIO ANU
4PIS IMUS
MERMAIDm IMAILL
jAN A A OiRIT A
MEANrT8E^ L IT
ARID POGO ME
SCAR MAEE SKY
ISCIAIRI P E 5 V-


I W/61T 'TO *M
FRENC LAMI'UAGE
CLASg


___


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APARTMENT 3- By Al. Kot-. J --

APARTMENT 3-G By Ale xKotsks


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I


I-STEVE


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Ghri riTbutr


Costly errors by Schlitz,



as Becks Beer take the



championship opener 7-6

By OSCAR MILLER
PENNANT WINNER BECK'S BEES combined the services of
three right hand hurlers along with an 11-hit attack to edge
Schlitz Beer 7-6 in the first game of the Bahamas Baseball
Association Championship Series played at the Queen Elizabeth


Sports Centre Friday night.
Extending their winning
streak to 6 straight games
Beck's Bees have now taken a
commanding 1-0 lead in the
best of three gaines for the
BBA Championship. A victory
tonight would earn them the
BBA '73 Crown.
A still confident Schlitz
played their usual game but ran
into trouble early in the
contest when their defense
faltered and yielded four
unearned runs.
Beck's short stop Roosevelt
Turner opened the top half of
the first with a ground single
through the left side and then
advanced to second on an
error. e came in to score the
Bees first tall when batting
champion Anthony Huyler got
aboard on a three base error.
Third baseman Fred Taylor
took first after he was hit by a
pitch and thus set the stage for
a run-scoring single to right
field by Willie Knowles to give
Beck's a 3-0 lead.
Winning pitcher Stephen
Hunmcs. who has seen little
mound action over the past
rugged baseball week. survived
a two-run Schlitz's first and
then settled down to elude
four Schlitz batters on strike
outs with his curve ball.
SOLE HITl
Within the next four frames
Hfumes blanked Schlitz and
gave up only one hit retiring
the side in order in the fourth,
fifth and sixth innings.
Meanwhile, the Bees
continued to lash out against
Schlitz's starter Henry Williams


picking up three more big
tallies in the third on doubles
by Huyler and Simeon lumes
and a single by third baseman
Fred Tayler.
The Bees generated for
another run in the fifth and
another in the seventh to build
up a comfortable 5-run margin
going into the last of the
seventh.
But Schlitz was not to be
defeated without their
characteristic deadly retaliation
which began in the bottom of
the seventh when catcher Adler
Minus ripped a long double in
the left corner.
Losing pitcher Ilenry
Williams, who had a fine night
at the plate picking up three
hits and a pair of rbis, tapped a
single to left to push across
Minus for Schlitz's third run.
After Vincent Strachan's
single to left manager Bernie
Turnquest treked to the
mound, had a few words with
Humes and then signalled for
relief pitcher Michael Huyler.
Huyler reluctantly gave up
one run on two hits before
finally working out of the
seventh inning jam but Schlitz
had trimmed the lead to 7-5.
UPRISING
Schlitz began their eighth
inning uprising with a one out
double to left by Minus
followed by another
run-scoring single by pitcher
Williams for his third hit of the
night.
Skipper Turnquest not
about to gamble on the
effectiveness of Huyler was up


ARDENT BECK'S FANS throng 15-game winner Don
Taylor after he hurled 1 2/3 innings in relief of Michael
Huyler in Friday night's game, which the Bees won 7-6 over
Schlitz, to take a 1-0 lead in the Bahamas Baseball
Association's Championship Series.


and out of the dugout once
again, this time followed by his
number one hurler. Don
Taylor.
Meanwhile Williams, who
represented the tying run.
worked his way to second on a
passed ball and then to third
on a wild pitch.
Working carefully to
Schlitz's first baseman Fred
Fountain, Taylor was
successful in getting him to hit
a shallow fly ball to left field.
Testing the arms of leftfiedler
Knowles, Williams tagged up at
third and raced home only to


Photo: Richard Rodgers

be badly beaten by the relay
throw from Taylor for an
inning ending double play.
Protecting a one run lead
Taylor proceeded in blanking
Schlitz in their half of the
ninth to secure victory for the
Bees in the first game of the
'73 Championship Series.
Tonight is do or die fot
Schlitz. They will have to find
the winning combination to
even the series at one game
each and then to the third and
final ganie. A failure to do this
would make Beck's the BBA
'73 Champions.


SPEEDY GONZALES (LEFT) AND
ANGEL meet in return match tonight at th


PIN!
suicide
the rin
scored
Cave M
crowd
Indepe
Freepo
The
even v
Collins
Chantm
match


Mat men in action
k 1 i 1I 11I NA ..1 .. ......


WITCHITA

PITCHERS


SELECTED
TIll NAMES OF S VI N
pitchers were released
yesterday to complete the
Bahanas Baseball Association's
selection of its 21-man
Bahamas National Congress
team scheduled to leave Nassau
on August 11 to participate in
the 1973 National Baseball
Congress Tomu iatienlit at
Lawrence Stadium, Wichita,
Kansas.
Following arc tie Imembers
of the tcant:
PIT('l RS: I)on Taylor,
Bertie Murray. (;regoryv Austin,


Larry Turniiiluies
Williams, Sherwin fI
Frankie S\veeting.
IN I-11 11)1 IRS:
Gardiner, Sidney
Anthony Iluylci.
Turner, Lorcen/o
Randy Rodgers. 1,loi


Henry
aylor and

l.cster
Outten,
Rooseveli
L (ic khlart .
d li3wleg,


,. Adlai Moss and Louts MlcQiuay.
l OUTFIT L L I)RS: Vincent
Albury. John Willitams. I ddie
SFord, Willie Knv, iic; ;tt
Sanuelc Johnlison.
S US baseball roundup

NEW YORK (AI)--The St. Iouis
Cardinals were hit )\ the flu bug ....
and then stung Ir W\illie MaIs' Iat.
The hug laid them lo i and Mays'
three-run lionrer laid thel out as
the NewV York Mcts took a, 7-3
decision IFriday night.
Before the National I.eague game
at Shea Stadium. manager Red
Schoendienst and I I members of
the East-leading cardinalss were
reported suffering from a tlu
epidemic whichh affected their
noses, throats and chests. lThe\ all
plan cd through.
Mays slugged his home run, ifth
in the seventh inning to turn a
tense,. one-rutn game into( anl eass
triumph for Jon Matlack.
The loss cut the Cardinals' lead to
2 games a, tlhe steconlid-place
(Chicago (Cubs stopped the Montreal
1 x pos 3-0. I'lsc\vlhere i tihe
National League, the Il ouston
Astros w\on the first game of a
doubleheader from the (in tinnati
Reds I-t in o10 innings before losing
D THE BLACK the nightcap 11-5 the Pittsburgh
he Birdland. Pirates stopped the i'hiladelphia
Phillies 3-1. the ,tlantta Braves
nipped the San I)iego PIadres 5-4
and the I.s Angeles IDodger,,
blanked the Sla Irantisco G(ialnts
......v...;,n ,, 3-0.


NI N, IllM wit h a Da hi. i a s tUicavy w iit
dive from the corner of champ It Penn had the crowd
g post, Speedy Gonzales on the edge of their chairs
a great victory over the showing a fine display of body
lan before a near sell-out slams.
last night at the These great wrestling stars
ndence Sports Arena in will be seen in action tonight at
trt, Grand Bahana. Bill Pinder's Birdland on the
Black Angel was superb corner of Mount Royal Avenue
while he and Lil Ahner and Carew Street. Doors open
Florida State at 8 ) 'clock and the New
pion lost a great tag Providence tans will be in for
some fine wrestling.


Draw for BGA Amateur tourney


THl1 B.t;.A. today released the
starting times tor Sunday 's lB.(.A.
Amateur Chanpionship
Tournament.
The competition is divided into
three flights. championshipp A & B,
and all golfers isill pla) in their
respective flights thrnuglUhiut the
t\o day \cint.
Starting tinmes Ithe tiniil day
will be iL Co()I dle t SI und id *s
scores
NO II II
(( It l \MI )NSM III')
12 00 I. Silllli I o 1 'tttier 7.
1 G i s(il 7, A I Ir n
12 : 10 I I iiigei ii I.
Marshall 3 \\ellts o. \\ (,,ni 6.
12:20 1). Hall t V I'Pr sa , B.
1.t nch 7. M. Ouant 9.
12:30 / Stubbs 6, \. V(uthro
9, K. trantns 6, (C. S.ilurlers
12:40 I). lluthe ,). 1' | ireli 9,
1). Brafford ), i I)unitnllt 10.
"A" I 1.1(;1 II
12:50 11. M1 111unm g. I.
Adderle\ \ I',atiit n Io, \\ .Huds(on
1:00 S. Hall 1' Pindjer. 1..
Curry 14, I D. algic, stih 1
1:10 r'. I a\ lor I P. lalla L.
Jenkinson 14. I Blum 14,
1:20 J. IDu ntoliti 4. I Hliggs
6. R. Slater 4. 1. 'la\tl 4.
Nit. 10 I1 1
("" I 1.1(GI1 I )
12:00 C.A. Smnithi r 12, J
Tlhonpson, Mike Stuhhs 12. (;
Ellis.
12:10 I. largee S. ()uant 13.
T. Rahmiig 10, W. Smith 12.
12:20 L. arker 16. T.
Humphren s 1I, I.. S\et'tting I I
C.R. Saunders 12.
12:30 B. Shea, J. Virgil.
A.N.O.. F.D. Curr) 16.
12:40 B. Benjamin 24, B.(;.
Sands, N. Coerbell, J. Knowles 17.
12:50 (;. Cash 17,. ).
Cartwright 24, B. Bonaparte 24, R.
Halliday F19.
1:00 C. Lailig, B. Mel adden


2 Basil Sands. D.J. McNeilly.
1:10 A. lufi 24, B. Evans 24,
M. Lockhart 23. C. Merceir 24.
1:2(0 S. MacKen/ie, Mt.
Synonrette, I). Lineti 24, R.
MscSweellne 19.
1:30 A. \\allis 20. HI. Stewart,
;. Armbrister. J. MitN. Brown 24.
1:40 t1. lHamilton 17, N.
Alon/o 24, P. Matsas 24, J.
Wakeman 24, L Gibson 24.


A couple of innings beitore Mays
applied the game-breaker, 1),n
Hahn had given tihe Mets a 4-3 lead
with a run-scoring single.
lialn's hit drove home .T,:d
Martinez, who had singled to ofp,'
the fifth off I olkers and v\as
sacrificed to second 1 Mtatlack.
Matlack and Millan, who collected
his 1,00 th career hit in thie majors,
ss ere on base \whein Ma)s caille
through in the seventh.
Cesar Cedeno drove in the l oll
run of the game witl a sacrifice t1\
in tlhe 1Othi inning to give Iouston
a 1-0 victory over Cincincinnati in the
first game of their doubleheader.
Don Wilson pitched a four-hitter
for the Astros.
Thle Reds won the second game
11-5 with a seven-run rail in tihe
seventh keyed by Pete Rose's
three-run double.
Willie Stargell and Manny
Sanguillen blasted ionice runs to
carry Pittshurgh past Philadelphia
3-1. Rookie Johln Morlan, recently
called up from tile minors, earned
his first major league victory \with
relief help from Ramon Hernandez.


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That s because anri-fungal Desenex
contains a 'nedscalla proven formula
that has successfully helped millions
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To help heal Athlete s Foot, use
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S assured A TH II Foo
To eight Athlete s Foot, or prevent POOT. I '
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them all-Desonex


-soavailable in Soluton form
ar A P pe,'nnwalt C, r'


Saturday, August 4. 1973.


Elisha Obed in top shape for


Monday bout with Miamian

BAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT CHAMP Elisha Obed returned
from the Miami Fifth Street Gym yesterday in great shape and all
keyed up for his ten rounder with Miamian Middleweight Doug
Rodgers on Monday at the A. F. Adderley Gym.


Seeking a decisive victory,
although he expects the fight
to be a tough one, Obed
presently eyes a match with
Jamaica's welterweight champ
Bunny Grant tentatively
scheduled for late August or
early September.
The 21-year-old boxing
favourite signed a contract
with the Dundee clan earlier
this year after being with them
since he took the crown from
Ray Minus over two years ago.
Having been with the Dundees,
Obed said he had learned a lot
which can be seen in his
performances. Nevertheless, to
reach the top, Obed realizes he
has to know all the tricks in
the hook so, "I still have a lot
to learn," he said humbly.
Trained by veteran trainer
Moe Fleischer through whose
hands have passed many big
names in boxing, including the
famous Kid (hocklate of Cuba,
Obed in his past ten bouts
with the exception of that


against Jamaica's Roy Goss
refused to allow his opponents
to go the distance.
POWERFUL
Rogers is said to be a
powerful right-hander who ever
presses forward with his best.
In his short career he has paced
himself to one of the leading
contenders for the Florida
middleweight title. His trainer
Mac Goodman has predicted
sure victory over Obed.
Sonice of Rogers' victories
include wins over Tommy
Torino. Jimmy Williams,
Buddy Taylor and Roscoe Bell.
He drew with Joe Hooks and
Nat King.
Obed on the other hand
decisively stopped Williams,
Bell and Hooks.
Also featured on Monday
night's card, which begins at 9
o'clock, are Kid Cruz against
Otis ('lay; heavyweight
contender Bob Freeze against
K. O. Grant: and Cleveland
Williams against Afro Davis.


LADIES IN ONE
DAY TOURNEY
THI: I.AI)IS D)ivisioi of the
Bahamas Golf Association,
including the six to represent the
Bahamas in the ladies ('aribbean
Invitational Golf Tourlnaent at St.
(roix next \\eek, will stage a one
day tournament beginning 12 noon1
tomorrow at Coral Ilarbour.
The team IF. i.ockhart, S.
Bennett. M. L neas, F. Ialliday U.
lliggs (capt.) and (. Smith leaves
Nassau on tMondal and \will play a
practice round on iluesdiv, in St.
Croix before the two-day
tournament on Wednesday and
Thursday. Like the Iloerman Cup
tournament, the four lowest scores
\\ill co ilt each day.
A rionl voyag.le' et-togeither tor
the team. the first ladies team t
represent the Bahamlas, will be at
the South Oceall ttomlorrovw
fiili ising the first round of the
IPrinle Minister's Amateur
Championship 1 ourinament.
VOLLEYBALL
PLAYOFFS
till I NI)I' I A1TI ) lahamas
Vollet hall I-ederation's I.adies
L league pennant \wiinners Paradise
Iees take on their third place sister
team. Paradise Birds. in tie first
game tonight 7:30 at the C.I.
(ibsmon ( n in the first of the
B.V I.'s championship playoffs.
Common i\ n ea Ith League
dominators Paradise Giants meet
Islanders League second place
Police Roal s in the second game
tonight.
HOLIDAY CRICKET
ll. I IAGUE Leading
Southerners Cricket Club, who hold
a slight five point edge over second
place Carroll's Adventurers, seek to
increase that when both teams meet
tomorrow afternoon 1:30 in the
first of a two-day match at Windsor
Park.


While the Adventurers went idle
last week, Southerners mustered
three points from their draw with
St. Bernards. The Saints, who began
the first of a two-day match against
St. Albans today) are presently in
third place one point behind the
Adventurers.
Paradise Island will be up against
the rising form of St. Agnes and the
supreme bowling of George
Shannon and Alfred Ingraham
tomorrow afternoon 1:30 in the
first of their two-day match at
Haynes Oval.
St. Agnes last week at Haynes
Oval came from near collapse and
ten pointed St. (;eorges. Both St.
Agnes and Paradise Island are tied
for fourth place.
.*, * ***
IThe prizes for the Bahamas
Cricket Association Iatflle which
was scheduled to take place in Julv
%will be drawn next week Saturday
(1 lth) during the St. Albans/St.
Bernards game.
All persons who still have raffle
books should return them to one of
the following: Ilenry Burrows,
Colin lleane, or Everette Evans Jr.
ENGLAND DROP 2
FOR SECOND TEST
.ONIDON (AP) Fast bowler
John Snow and batsman Graham
Roope were axed by the England
selectors Saturday from the team
that will contest the Second Test
against the West Indies at
I'dgbaston on Thursday.
Mike Hendrick of Derbyshire and
Brian Luckhurst of Kent replaced
them in the 12. which also included
Chris Old who was 12th man in the
first Test.
Snow, a veteran of 31 and at his
peak rated one of the world's top
fast bowlers, has been out of touch
for most of the current season.
Team: Boycott, Amiss.
Luckhurst. Hayes. IFletcher. Greig,
Illiingwsorth. Knott. Underwood.
Arnold. Old. Hendrick.


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WRESTLING
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MAIN EVENT
FOUR MAN TAG TEAM MATCH
SPEEDY GONZALEZ / WILD BILL 340 LBS.
BLACK ANGEL 4 CAVE MAN


IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 22
OF THE BAH MAS 1973
Equity side

IN THE MATTER of the Petition or JASPER
FERGULSON
AND
IN THE MATTER of all that land containing
280 Acres Situate the Hermitage Exuma
Bahamnas
AND
IN TlHE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act
1959

NOTICE

To all Adverse Claimants. Adjoining Owners and
occupiers.
The Petition of JASPER FERGUSON of the
Forest Exuma Bahamas in respect of ALL that
piece parcel or tract of land containing 280 Acres
Situate the Hermitage Exuma and bounded on the
NORTH by land said to be the property of Edward
Johnson and land the property of Bueno Vista
Estate Limited and running thereon 1900 feet and
1410 feet respectively on the EAST by a Stone
Wall separating it from land said to be the property
of Bueno Vista Estates Limited and running
thereon 3891.14 feet on the SOUTH by the Sea and
running thereon 7350 feet and on the West by land
the property of Etdward Johnson and a Stone Wall
and a Road Reservatin sparatiarang it from other
portion of' the Ilermlltita E state which said tract of
land 11as such shape size boundaries dimensions and
marks as arc shown on the plan filed herein and
Coloured Pink thereon. The said JASPER
1 -R(;L'SON claims to be the owner in fee simple
of the ,said tract of land1 and has made application
to the Sutpreme (Court of the Bahamas under
Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
his title to thle said l1and investigated and the nature
and e\tcnt hereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of title to be granted by the (Court in
Accordance with tile provisions of the Act.
(Cpies( of the filed plan may be inspected d during
Office hours at tlie following places.

A hlt Registry o I lie Supreme Court in tlhe
Cit\ of Nassau in the Island of New
Prove ide nc.
B. 1e C('lhailber of nMr. l)avid Betiell Attorney
for 'tie Pcttitiner. tlie Second Floor of
Bernard Sunley Building Situate on the North
side of Bay Street in the City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providenice.

C. Tle Commnnissioner's Office and Notice Board
(;George Town Exua Bahamas.
Notice is hereby given that any person having
doswer or a right to dower or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
18th day of September A.D. 1973 file in the
Supreme Court of the Bahamas serve on tlhe
Petitioner or his Attorney a Statement of his claim
in tile prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to
be filed therewith. Failure by any such person to
file his or her claim on or before the 18th day of
September A.D. 1973 will operate as a bar to such
claim.
DAVID C. BETHELL
Attorney for the Petitioner


SPORS RUNDPS


ED PENN CO-SEMIGENE FULLER
Bah. Heavyweight Chamnpion -VS-- Leading Fla.
Heavy Weight Con tender
PLUS OTHER MATCH CARD SUBJECT TO CHANGE
COME EARLY FOR CHOICE SEATS
GENERAL ADMISSION $4.00
RINGSIDE ........ ....... $6.00
CHILDREN UNDER 12. $2.00


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