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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03408
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: July 31, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03408

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Sribunp


tRitered with Potmanster of Bahamas for postage &casions within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX, No. 207 Tuesday, July 31, 1973. Price: 1 Centa


CONFLICT OVER UNION ROLE BRINGS

CRISIS TO A HEAD AS P.S.U. CHIEF ACTS


BaTeCo


'suspended for


/''1




11-^
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! ,"

+ .


Farewell gift to H.E.


MR. AUDLEY HUMES, secretary of the Bahamas British
Legion, presenting Governor Sir John Paul with a farewell
gift on behalf of the British Legion. The gift, which was
presented to the Governor today at Government House,
was one of the new Bahamas Independence $50 gold coins.
This presentation was one of the last of Sir John's duties at
Government House as he departed for the UK today after
serving as the last colonial Governor of the Bahamas. Mr.
Charles Austin, chairman of the British Legion was also
present for the presentation.


"OUR MAN AT THE PALACE--His Excellency the
High Commissioner, Mr. A.R. Braynen, and Mrs. Braynen,
seen outside Buckingham Palace after an audience with Her
Majesty the Queen


Charity Guide in desperate


need of funds for camps
WITH THE COST of their summelnr camps mounting the Star of
the Bahamas Charity Guide No. 15 is in desperate need of funds.


for a year following a head-on clash last week between
P.S.U. president Thaddeus Darling.
Mrs. Bridgewater, who heads letter from the Public Service
the BaTelCo branch, learned of Union's acting general
her suspension 5 p.m. secretary Brenda Rolle dated
yesterday when she received a July 27.




Wellington Bank to pay



creditors first dividend



of 40 cents on the dollar

CREDITORS OF WELLINGTON BANK are to receive a first
dividend of 40 cents in the dollar, following court approval of the


i


2


The letter said the decision
to suspend her as both member
and branch chairman of the
union was agreed by resolution
at a meeting of the union's
executive committee held July
26.
The action was being taken
under Article 10 of the
union's constitution, the letter
said. Article 10 gives the
executive power to suspend or
expel any member "for such
reasons and on such terms as
they may deem expedient,"
and the decision will be final,
providing a member has been
given four weeks within which
to appeal.
Named among the reasons
for the suspension was the
allegation that Mrs.
Bridgewater's conduct and
behaviour was "not conducive
and in keeping with the Public
Services Union."
It was also claimed that her
conduct "suggested and
confirmed" that she regarded
herself as "leader of an
independent and autonomous
organisation which contravenes
the Labour and Industrial
Relations Act and the
constitutionality of the Public
Services Union."
COPIES
Copies of the P.S.U. letter
were sent to Labour Minister
Clifford Darling; Public
Personnel director Hanford
Darville and BaTelCo general
manager A.E., Curling.
The suspension of Mrs.
Bridgewater came as an
aftermath to the stormy
general meeting of the P.S.U
held last Wednesday night.
The meeting was called
without due notice by Mr.
Darling to serve notice of
proposed amendments to the
union's constitution.
When Mrs. Bridgewater
asked what these amendments
entailed, Mr. Darling
reportedly replied that: "What
I am proposing has nothing to
do with BaTelCo which is not a
part of us. This only concerns
the civil service."
The president's comment
brought an outcry from
BaTelCo branch members who
wanted to know why, if that
was the case, the branch was
paying dues directly to the
parent body.
The meeting ended in chaos
when Mr. Darling walked out
without answering the
questions put to him.
Since receipt of the union's
letter of suspension, a letter
bearing some 20 signatures of
P.S.U. branch chairmen and
union members has been
forwarded to Mr. Darling
requesting a special general
meeting under Article 7
paragraph 4 of the constitution
to discuss the resolution taken
at Thursday's executive
meeting.
Copies of this letter have
been forwarded to the Minister
of Labour, the director of
Public Personnel and the
manager of BaTelCo.
Mrs. Bridgewater, who is
appealing the suspension, said
the executive committee's
action violated the union's
constitution and the Industrial
Relations Act.
"The office of branch
chairman is an elected one and
not by appointment, therefore
the right to remove a branch
chairman is the sole
responsibility of the people
who elected such an officer,"
she said.
Challenging union members
to shoulder their
responsibilities, Mrs.
Bridgewater said that it was the
public servants who were
responsible for making the


f-I.








9%


the Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation branch and


by


Public Services Union

By NICKI KELLY
BAHAMAS Telecommunications Union chairman Willamae Bridgewater has been suspended by the parent body


service efficient. They could
not, however, do so if they
allowed themselves to be
dictated to.
"The purpose of a public
services union is to help
promote and foster a good
relationship throughout the
service between government,
public corporations and the
employees.
"We must be prepared to
help build a solid nation. This
can only be done if the Public
Service Union take its stand as
a union functioning in the best
interest of the government and
the Commonwealth as a
whole."
The branch chairman
stressed that if the present
condition now existing in the
union was allowed to continue,
"then we will really need the
help of the gods."
She declared that her
suspension also violated the
agreement between the union
and the BaTelCo Corporation
because the agreement
recognized the union as the
sole bargaining agent of all its
employees, except those
designated as management, and
she fell within the bargaining
unit.
NOT INVITED
The decision to call a general
meeting of the P.S.U. last
Wednesday July 25 was
reached at an executive
meeting on July 17. Although
a member of the executive
body. Mrs. Bridgewater was
not invited to attend this
meeting.
When she learned of it it was
too late for her to attend, but
she sent a representative
Notice of the general meeting
was not made public however
until July 22, although the
constitution states that two
weeks notice must be given for
such a meeting.
Mrs. Bridgewater said at the
time that no one was aware
what the meeting was about
and had no inkling it involved
constitutional amendments
until they arrived and saw the
agenda.
On Thursday night another
meeting of the P.S.U. executiNe
was called in Court No. I when
Mrs. Bridgewater was again
excluded.
The Tribune reported that
Mr. Darling at this meeting
suggested that the BaTelCo
branch be suspended but ran
into objections from the other
branch presidents.
Under the union
constitution, a quorum of ten
is required for an executive
meeting as well as three clear
days' notice.
It is at this meeting of July
26 when the resolution against
Mrs. Bridgewater is alleged to
have been passed.
Although this is the last day
of July, a general election of
officers of the P,S.U. has yet to
be called as required by the
constitution and the Industrial
Relations Act.
When he was questioned
about this last Friday Mr.
Darling said he did not know if
a meeting would be called
before the end of the month.
"Our executive will have to
decide if it will have elections
before the end of the month."
he said.
The reasons behind the
efforts of the P.S.U. executive
to strike at the BaTelCo branch
remains a mystery.
The belief is, however, that
the branch has shown itself
united in its bargaining
approach to management and
that certain members might
prove a threat to the
re-election of a number of
P.S.U. executive members.


second report of the liquidator.
The report, filed with the
cou-'s in January, gives the
bank's liabilities as
$1.053.550.28 at that date and
cash funds in hand as
$413,649.72 on current
accounts ati. fi-di deposits
mostly maturing on or before
June 29, 1973. It was therefore
now possible to consider a
partial repayment to creditors,
liquidator Leslie Cropper said.
Wellington Bank Ltd. had its
licence suspended by the
Ministry of Finance in
September 1970 and revoked
in March 1971 because of its
insolvency. The bank was
subsequently put into
voluntary liquidation under
supervision of the Supreme
Court.
"It is my opinion," said Mr.
Cropper. "that after taking
into account the estimated
cash flow and budgeting for
future liquidation costs. I shall
be in a position to pay a first
dividend of 40 cents in the
dollar and accordingly ask the
Court to approve the payment
of this dividend during the
latter half of 1973."
The present report states
that during the period since the
first liquidation report was
made, several accounts had
either been fully repaid or
satisfactorily reduced under
repayment agreements,
although on the whole the

MAN FOUND

IN STREET

WITH WOUNDS
AN UNIDENTIFIED white
male, found bleeding beneath
an almond tree at the eastern
corner of the Show Magazine
Club compound on East Bay
Street was admitted to hospital
for superficial wounds after
being taken there by a doctor
in private practise.
A sizeable crowd gathered
around the property as the
man lay bleeding from his
wounds, apparently inflicted
just moments earlier.
He was taken to hospital by
Dr. Jason L. McCarroll and
admitted to the male surgical
ward. His condition was listed
as "fair" this afternoon.
Apart from a wound on the
stomach, the man was also
bleeding from a would at the
throat.
He is believed to be between
25 and 30 years old.


LIGHTED WALL
ACCESSORIES

FROM ITALY

18DLY MANIN FURNIII
NASSAU, FREEPORT


liquidator was having "extreme
difficulty" in obtaining
settlement of many of the
debts.
Most of the unpaid loans
and overdrafts together with
delinuaenrt n-cgotiated
accounts have been handed to
a firm of attorneys, acting for
the liquidator, to recover them
by legal action.
UNDETERMINED
"Although several writs have
already been issued, the result
of these actions is still
undetermined,"the report said.
"On the advice of the
attorneys I have had no
alternative but to write off
several accounts as totally
irrecoverable due to the fact
that the debtors either canno*
be traced or have no assets
whatsoever." the liquidator
stated.
"Due to the nature of the
debts and lack of security it
was neither possible to make a
reasonable estimate of the
percentage recoverability of
outstanding debts, nor yet
possible to forecast the total
number of years required to
collect all realisable debts," the
report said.
Since the last report tle
liquidator had listed all known
creditors who had not
previously filed a claim against
the bank and written to them
by registered mail, where
addresses were known, to
enquire whether or not they
considered they had a claim
against Wellington Bank.
In addition he had once
again advertised for claims in
the Nassau Guardian, The
Tribune, The Miami Herald and
the Montreal Star and over
Radio Bahamas.
The liquidator said he had
now satisfied all legal steps for
contacting creditors and had
discharged his duty to them.
He was therefore now asking
the Court to approve the
write-off of all unclaimed
balances amounting to
$45,422.18 in order to finalise
all claims against the bank and
establish the total liability for
the purpose of determining
dividends.
Since the first report drafts
totalling $5,400 had been
claimed by customers and
transferred to their appropriate
accounts, leaving an unclaimed
balance of $6,335.01.
These unpaid drafts have
been subject to the same claim
procedures as the current,
savings and deposit accounts
and the liquidator was
therefore applying to the
court to also have this
unclaimed balance of
$6,335.01 written off.
According to the second
report, Wellington Bank's total
liabilities as of January
amounted to $1,053,550.28
after taking into account the
proposed write-off of
unclaimed balances referred to.


LAST BRITISH

GOVERNOR

LEFT TODAY
SIR JOHN Warburton Paul.
(;C.M.(;.. O.B3.I. M.C.. was to
leave Nassau for the United
Kingdom at 4:55 p.m. today
after serving for one year, two
months and 25 days as the last
colonial Governor of the
Bahamas. and for 22 days as
the first Governor-General of
the independent Bahamas.
Sir John and Lady Paul were
to say farewell to a number of
invited guests in the
pre-clearance lung at Nassau
International Airport before
walking out to the BOAC jet
which was to fly them to
London
At the foot of the steps to
the aircraft Sir John and Lady
Paul were to take final leave of
Prime Minister L. O. Pindling
and Mrs Pindling. Sir Milo
Butler. Sir John's successor at
Government House, and Lady
Butler. the Chief Justice and
Mrs. Leonard J Knowles. Dr.
R I.. Cooper, president of the
Bahamas Christian Council.
and Mrs. Cooper. and Director
of Civil Aviation Donald
Ingraham.
Sir John was (Goernor of
(;armbia (1962 -6h and of
British Ilonduras (1966-721
before coming to the Bahamas
on April 14 last year
July 10 marked the second
time he had witnessed the
transition of a former colonial
territory into an independent
nation. When Gambi.i became
independent in I 5- he
remained in that country for a
year as Governor-(GnerIal. as he
did in the Bahamas or only
three weeks.
Sir John and Lady Paul have
three daughters.


FNM TRIBUNAL

STILL AWAITED
TH E F RI:F National
Movement has not 'et
appointed the tribiiu.il to hear
the case ot three dissident
pailiaml ntari.ns iihairged with
fragmentingg the part .'" party
chairman Senatiei Orville
I u request confi rmned today.
M r. Turnquest ,said the
tribunal cannot heb' orally
appointed until the e\ecuitive
committee meets at an
unknown date in the near
future
Sir Roland Sn monette
(Shirle,). Mike Light bourne
(Clarence 'Town) and C(leophas
Adderley (Nassau (Cty) were
charged alter thie supported a
resolution by c\xpelled member
I rrngton Watknms (M.:rsh
iHarbour) calling for an -
independenc referendum in
Abaco. The party's official
stand was to vote with the
Government in defeating the
resolution.
The failure of the three to
adhere to the party line
resulted in the resignation of
Kendal Isaacs (Fort Montagu)
as leader of the FNM.
They were formally charged
in a letter trom the executive
committee on July 3. They
were given ten days to reply to
the charge.
Only Sir Roland and Mr.
Lightbourn replied. The
committee was not satisfied
with the replies and decided to
send the matter to a tribunal.
the next step in the
constitutional progress towards
suspension or expulsion of a
member.


For 23 years the Guide hia
conducted sulinnier canmpi !i
boys and girls at Miss M.,.ir :
(arstaris' island of Whale ,\
in the Berr\ Islands. lir i
those 23 years d 'r
underprivileged childr!'n ,
heein taken to tIhe island if ,
charge on a bo(at prots Ii,'
Sir Roland Svt,inet>c \ .
two years ago Sit Roliand Ik
his remaining lit e sliips. nd hli
( uide hlad to
transportation or thle irst
time.
Last year tihe operatli:, i
the m.v. Air Swift chlarmii tihe
camnp organizers $1.000 ti take(
the children i to tihe caii' , l!
charge was tihe sa.IIIe lii i
"T'his transporllitlmr hit.'
cats heavily inlit our tuir o.: .:il
we are dcspecratclc i i t i
donations," Mr l'ercs s I i.'.
chairman and dciectoi -,:'
(harity (uide told t ir
Tribune.
The Charity (;Guidc ,l!i h. iI
to replace a retigeiat(,r it !he
camp. "The frigidaimes a. nmii
ten years old and thIe have to
be replaced," Mr. Christie saiid
On Saturday 200
underprivileged boys retirnesl
to Nassau after a two-week
camping trip to Whale (ay (On
the same afternoon the \ii
Swift left with 200 girls 1 hic
will also spend two-tswr1 ,t1:
the camp site.
Miss Carstairs has nmatd hliei
island available to the children
every summer.
Over the past 23 \cars thiR
camp has provided recreation
and training for over 4,000
Bahamian children who have
been desperately in need of
care.
The camp was founded b\


',1 (Christie and the Rev.
Prince A. Ilephurn.i under
iand grand deputy' iot the
t h it ( guide.
At iioine wishiine t, donate
.!- it r ai retrigeratiI t,) take
s i ti o perishable oodl or ti'he
thiiJren should coint.it;i Mr.
S ;tie t teleph 'h 305 8 2.
l>riecto s l o ithe I urde are
it llpburin, Mr. ( liistie. the
It\ l.eros Roker. Mr
I niiinanrl l [tlcke i. Mi. at and
FrIs. Fr-.dcrick Johnson, Mrs.
Iliiler. Mr Annibristei, Mrs.
airdlinei. and Mr. Saunders,


ll li)\ Street ste edore.
I I+ iS, W I\ !i ,. 41. wa.s charged
I io Cl'hic. Mti gistli.l t W oiltn

I ri t elk. lI i'' 1k s. l111 n;ie sl
Vt i nles nIilh thic l tlilder ol
\\ icd I l idd \Mlc )onk, i

\Il ) naald repiir'cdIs died
0owinLWig I I ls inr\i o l.'ment in a
S rnitec at the P'rirlce (eorge
Wharl on lFrday afternoon.
n\ man. belheed to be a
lHait.in national. is also being
sought h\ the police in
connectionn with the death of
Vincent Rolle. 23. on Fridas.
Rolle died of stab sounds after
an argument on Palmetto Avenue
withe lHaitian. it was reported.

Sacrilege & hold-up
A C(ASI of sacrilege and a
hold-up. both taking place in
the Montell Heights, have
police seeking the whereabouts
Oi persons believed to be
involved.
Police authorities reported
today that a Montell Heights
resident was attacked by two
men and a woman at about
10:45 p.m. on July 28.


SIR MILO TO

BE SWORN IN

AS GOV. GENERAL

TOMORROW
SIR MILO Boughton Butler,
G.C.M C(., will be sworn in as
the first Bahamian
Governor-General of the
Bahamas by Chief Justice
Leonard J. Knowles shortly
after 10 a.m. tomorrow in the
first swearing-in ceremony ever
held in Rawson Square.
The ceremony will begin
"promptly at 9:57 a.m." with
the arrival of Sir Milo and Lady
Carolmi- Butler, 17 hours after
the I,>' colonial Governor, Sir
John Paul. left the country.
They will be greeted by Prime
Minister and Mrs. Lynden O.
Pindling and the Provost
Marshall. Police Commissioner
Salathiel Thompson.
Sir Milo will take the royal
salute before the Royal
Bahamas Police Band plays the
national anthem.
After Sir Milo inspects the
police Guard of Honour, he


SIRMILO BUTLER
... first Bahamian Gov. General
will return to the Public Square
where he will be greeted by the
Chief Justice and Mrs.
Knowles, and Speaker of the
House Arlington Butler and
Mrs. Butler.
The Provost Marshall will
then read the Queen's
Commission and the Chief
Justice will administer the
oaths of office.
(ongrtuatulator speeches are
to be made by the Speaker. the
Chief Justice and Dr. R. E.
Cooper. president of the
Bahamas Christian councill Sir
Milo will reply
Sir Milo will then mount a
dais to take the salute from the
Ilonour Guard in a march past.
The swearing-in of a new
I;o ernor has traditionally
been held in the Senate
chamber .
Sir Milo and L.ady Butler,
immediately after tomorrow's
Rawson Square ceremony, will
go on a "State drive" ending at
the junction of last Street and
the East West highway at
1 0.4 45 Ihere t he
( o vern or-General will
officially re-name the highway
"Independence Drive "
Sir Milo. a driving force in
the Progressive Liberal Party in
its earl dayis. served in various
capa,. ties as a member of the
Cabinet since the I'LP's victory
at the polls i 1U 7
e1 w a named
C,, \ rnor-(;eneral designate on
( tohber 6 last 'ear, after the
September general elections
cleared the way to
independence
lie resigned his seat in the
House of Assembly on June 1
this year after a 35-year
parliamentary career. Two days
later it was announced that hl
had been selected for
knighthood in the Queen's
Birthday fHonours list.
lHe was knighted by Queen
Elizabeth during ceremonies at
Buckingham Palace, London.
on June 13.
SIR ROLAND FILES WRIT
SIIIRLIA M. P. Sir Roland
Symonette has filed writ with
the Supreme Court against Mr.
Collin Cooper for $2.354.18.
The writ. filed by the law
firm of Isaacs. Johnson and
Thompson, claims the amount
as money which was lent to
Mr. Cooper under an
agreement on or before July 1,
1969


.. IINKM-SMEARED. .


DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
HEAR IT ALL
ON RADIO!!
AT HOME -
OR IN YOUR CAR.


union chief


I


q

all

clU,


ch?













Ghep ribunt


Tuesday, July 31, 1973.


WATERGATE COMMITTEE FOREGOES


,^ .,HALDEMAN SAYS Outbursts of te

WASHINGTON (AP) Senate Republican Leader Hfugh Scot said sd I i
v',nmda President Nixon will make a statement on \atlergate within a a E r iJ m an
ustk sor 10 days after the Senate Committee ends the current phase o' its AT
Smot told newsmen he would not rule out the possibility that Nixon l OF WATERl
.niin) make his response at a news conference. ends h is testim
The Pennsylvania Republican said he has made some recommendations ADVANCE
It the President on a suitable forum but \sould not disclose those A I C By Harry F. Rosenthal
,i,gesteons. WASHINGTON (AP)--The Senate Water


U.S. PROTESTS HANOI'S INDIFFERENCE TO WAR DEAD
WASHINGTON (AP) The United States has delivered a note to the
iorth Vietnamese embassy in Paris protesting Hanoi's alleged failure to
.,inpefate in locating and returning the remains of Americans killed in the
ir'dwchlnese war
The State Department said Monday the note was\ delivered Sunday in
wrhat is believed to be the first formal government to government protest
itcefnting implementation of the new arrangement to support the
ciiae-fire signed June 13.
ii addition to failure to locate the graves of dead Americans and return
treir bodies the United States also charged Hanoi with failure to provide
T;e irmlation about U.S. servicemen still considered missing in action
he concern over the dead and the missing is one of hunmanitairia.i
i,,rrest, the American note said, and is "unrelated to other issues." State
i trtment spokesman Charles W\. Bray advised against drawing any
,o: tlusions that the United States might retaliate by refusing to live up to
tT ,mlericjn obligations concerning the cease fire
TO RULE ON COURT ORDER TODAY OR WED.
WANSHINGTON (AP) Observers say Supreme c court Justice Thurgood
\ai all probably will rule today or tomorrow on a request to reinstate a
,.,urt orderr that bans US bombing in Cambodia The (order was issued by a
District court, then blocked by a higher circuit court. Ihe original plaintiffs
intldding Democratic Congresswoman I i/aheth Holtzman oft New York
i;ked Marshall to review the question.
NO CASINOS, NO BEACH RIGHTS, NO TAX-FREE
FOREIGN N INVESTMENTS SAYS WILLIAMS
PORT 01O SPAIN, TRINIIAI (Ai) Irinidad and Fobago Prime
'fts.iiter Eric Williams said Sunday night that it was lor people of Tobago
elect between secession or continued association with Trinidad.
,.illiams warned agitators that in choosing theN should bear in mind
"I'l be termed the "cancer" o(f tfreiitn domination to which several
itrtbeatm countries such as Baharmas. Puerto Rico, the American and
ish Virgin islands and Cayman Islands has fallen prevy
it was answering Tobago-based opposition politicians, \who urged ali
i.' to ts 84-year-old association with 'frinidad.
iKfesing a political rally in Scarborough, Irobago's Old World capital.
,llllami s vowed that "''as long as I am I'rimec Minister, there will he rn
,'nos, no beach rights, and lno freedom tri)m taxation fr foreign
l. ..t'Tas. "If we cannot save the West Indies. let us save Trinidad anid
i riagoI'."
ROYAL FAMILY TO VISIT CANADA TWICE WITHIN MONTH
IAUNI)ON (AP) Queen Elizabeth 11 and her husband Prince l'hilip lelt
f,,r Ottawa Tuesday for the opening of the Commonw'ealth Prime Ministers
.'itereftce.
the visit is their second to Canada in less than a month. They returned ti,
Imrlan only three weeks ago after an official Canadian trip.
AMIN ASKS QUEEN TO SEND SPECIAL PLANE FOR HIM
L(NDON (AP) Buckingham Palace said '"uesday a telegram had been
',eiwed from President Amin of Uganda, asking Queein -.lizabeth 11 t
.dI!d a Iecial plane to fly him to the commonwealthh summit meeting gi
"' ;iWia.
I place spokesman said that the telegram arrived after the Queen had
I for Ottawa and she was unaware of its contents. The iee message w;
S-eted to be relayed to the Queen in the (anadian capital.
MANLEY HEADS JAMAICAN DELEGATION
KINGSTON, JAMAICA (AP) Prime Minister Michael Manley wNill
I a ,r 'uelday for Ottawa Canada, where he will head Jamaica's delegation
it, lh' Commonwealth Prime Ministers conference.
The meeting opens on Aug. 2.
Th', last Prime Ministers conference \was held in Singapore, iln 197 I
,.,ich was attended by then Prime Minister fHugh Shearer.
[lhis conference will be the first Heiads if ('ommlonwealth confterenrlc to
1', attended by Prime Minister Manley since his election in February 1972.
IEAVY FLOODS CAUSE EXTENSIVE DAMAGE IN JAPAN
IIIKUOKA, JAPAN (AP) -Fourteen persons were killed, five injured
nil 15 are missing after torrential rains and floods deluged soutlihwestern
loSa Monday and early Tuesday.
Puice said 51 homes were destroyed or washed as.was, nurnlerruis rl;id
a way sections cut or buried under water and 20,5 li,'nic',
initnduled.
tl leiest hit was the northern part of Ki ushu Island.

tHVtlL FIRE CAUSE AT LEAST SEVEN DEATHS
'-N JUAN, PUFRTO RICO (AP) The death toll ni stands iat seven
ii the fire that early Sunday destroyed the lHotel Roia iln San Juan r hie
hunt inside the fire gutted hotel building has been suispended due to Itcars
that the walls could collapse on the searchers. At least tour f thine \itinms
were I ninicans.
TNAiKA/NIXON TALKS BEGIN TODAY IN WASHINGTON
'.'-.!INGTON (AP) Japanese Prime Minister ilanaki, ht,i:eis :
t ',oday; conference with President Ni\on in '.t .Irii II -i tiidas. I Itic- agndia
i4 4'pe.cted to include a cooperative arrangement with the So\ilc I nirn for
.!*.. itlg oil and gas facilities in Siberia.
:RVING OF HOWARD HUGHES FAME REFUSE PAROLE
WASHIINGTON (AP)-Clitford Irving, the man convicted i otl .tcrpting
I ite a bogus biography of mysterious billionaire Hl,)iarJ Iluigs
rl:lil was denied parole by the U.S. Parole iBoard.
i.^vi4g,, 42, was sentenced to 2 sears and (i months after bhciri .nL lui ted
inspiringg to defraud the publishing house ol Mc(Iraw-hill \ Jidk.iring
Sl:': access to the recluse industrialist.
Slruig is currently confined to the federal correctioial ini.tutit in at
-hllton. The board said it will review his case in Jan.. 1974.
'ill EXECUTIVE MAY HEAD N.H.T.S. ADMINISTRATION
A ,'. 1NGTON (AP)-President Nixon intends t,, iiniin.iAt J.n11es I).
'c 'iry. a former California oil company\ executive, Lt h e i mlinistir.jor ii
i',.- National Highway Traffic Safet\ Administration, lhlw 5iiie tloust
uitn inced Monday.
t.egtry, 48, will succeed D)ouglas 'A. 'loins, whoi stepped d,, ',iro in tlhe
c40,'PO-a-'year post March 31. Up to last lear Gregor ~', i mdnicgr )of
.:introtmactntal sciences of the Union Oil o ,i e thad hecri witl ti lie tirnn
,i ,, qStl, first as a research chemist and ltiler as .t ia arlctinr .inud ir',dir t
icr.tnalti executive. lie retired last year alter 21 e,ars willt thie l,,nlp .
w1, iasi been doing charitable work since lthln.
S.reglary and his wife, who is a phisitian, liae un'i da.iaught ii :iIl reside
:i Milerlon, Calif
in ..ahother personal action. Nixon reapporinted Il-iclI lulue I l iinard, i
: it. 'F nator from Harpers I errsv V t.V a.. I .r nes (crin ,i i, iih ',:id it
t tvis, or f the Federal Reformatory tfor Women at Alders,,n \.
frC: 410 SHOULD BE ADMINISTERED BY EUROPE & AFRICA
ll'tiISSELS (AP)- If the third world states rcpresenltld at l.st i. k 's
r'itCe with the Common Market lbecotnie associates in a ncw\ truie and
:iid li< a with the European (Communits, the\ would pr.nbal' rctcii "l;ir
t ,' si,,'" four and a half billion n drllires ins aid.
II,), was stated in Brussels Moritdav s, (Claude (tlussi.in .1 I rntuh
Illn.'tier of the Community's 13-man cse.cutivii ctiomrnrLssion.
C;'i.'y.sonl, whose main brief is to dJcil witlh the develfpint. luntlll iri.,
rtiiurtd,l. however, to be committed ti .lini firmer figure or tolrecasi wlhat
ItFe rf trade deal may eventually e vitl,.'. But ihe did isi the irncan aind
,(We developing states should have a greater siiicc in .alrinlstering


N \S1ll\l.TON (AP)-li. R.
Haldeman, who once had the
most intimate and frequent
contact with President Nixon,
swore Monday that neither he
nor the President knew in
advance of the Watergate
break-in or its subsequent
cover-up.
As John Lhrlichmnan, who
preceded him as a witness
before the Senate Watergate
(onimittee, lialdcman insisted
that Nixon will be cleared
when the facts are out.
"1 have full confidence when
the entire truth is known it will
he clear to the American
people that President Nixon
had no knowledge of either the
Watergate affair itself or a
s Libseq uent cover-uip,
Haldeman said in a lengthy
opening statement.
"It will be equally clear I
had no such knowledge or
involvement".
The crew-cut lHaldeiman,
who as chief of staff was
Nixon's right-hand man until
his resignation April 30, read
his statement quietly and
without emotion.
It was a marked contrast to
I-hrlichnian, who wound up his
testimony with a plea for
young people to come into
government.
"I do not apologize for imy
loyalty to the President as I do
not apologize for my loyalty to
my country," said Ihrlichman,
the former presidential
domestic adviser, as he left
after five marathon days. lie
denied to the end involvement
of knowledge of a cover-up.
TR AG(ID IS
Ilaldeman began with a
recital of the matters that
occupied Nixon's time in the
last days of 1972 and early
1973.
"One on the great tragedies
of our time," he said, "is that a
cloud hangs over the first
administration.
"The sense of proportion
regardingg the time period
under study becomes greatly
distorted, it is important to tr\
to retain a sense of
proportion," lie said. "Tile
harmless eyc of a fly viewed
under a microscope can
become territing.
''1 i ke wi se so can
Watergate."
But, he said, he didn't
intend to miinimize the
importance of Watergate.
llaldeman said "the
Watergate case was not a
matter of concentration with
the President until March of
1973 so it wasn't a matter
for ins concentration either."
lie called November,
December and January "the
three most demanding months
of the period I served in the
White House." It was then, he
said, that the executive branch
was occupied with the Vietnam
negotiations, the inauguration
and the President's
reorganization of the executive
branch.
That changed in the
mid-March through April
period, Haldeman said. This
was the time the President said
he became aware of White
Louse involvement in the
affair.
Like others noI longer in the
administration, I aldeman
except for the opportunity has
no access to his personal papers
to examine them under the
eye of a secret service agent.
Hlis handwritten notes of the
periodd from June 1972 to
March 1973 are in a stack of
paper eight inches high.
Ilaldeman said, and "my
Watergate notes amount to less
than one per cent of mni total
notes."
NORMA LEVY
FINED $562
I()LONDON (At') Norma Ievy.
the call girl a;t the centre of the sex
scandal that rocked the Biritish
government, was fined tlhe
equivalent of 562 dollars Tuesdays
on three charges of influencing the
movements of prostitutes.
Mrs. tLevy, 26, pleaded guilty.
She was ordered to pas court costs
of 62 dollars.


A further charge against her
attempting to procure a girl to
become a prostitute \uas dropped
by the prosecution.
Investigations showed this
wvomnan was already a prostitute.
The magistrate. John I'ipps, said
the tluhree charges against Mrs. Iev%
arose from incidents during a brief
period this spring when she agreed
to manage a friend's "organi/atilon"
for a couple of \reeks. "the h.id noi
direct bearing on lthe so-called
Lambton affair.
Mrs. Levy g.iinel fame here and
abroad when s'ie wis identified as
the prostitute connected with I.ord
Lambton, tile Air VIorce Minister
who resigned in disipace.
Investigation of the I.ambton
affair forced the resignation oti
Lord Jellicoe, government leader in
the Ihouse of I.ords wtlo admitted
consorting with call girls.


i RECESS AUSSIE P.M.


Skvlab 2 astronauts


mper TALKS TOUGH still sick & a day


TO AMERICANS
lbaind ran work


ony

sate Committee


exhibited its weariness in a bickering fifth session with John D.
Ehrlichman Monday but decided to forego an early August recess


and to hear seven more witnesses.
As Ehrlichman wound up his
testimony and II. R. Haldeman
prepared to begin reading a
two-hour statement, there were
outbursts of temper among
witness and questioners and
between the committee's
Democratic and Republican
counsel.
"1 think what we are going
through now shows that this
committee is getting tired,"
said Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr.,
(R-Tenn.) continuing his role
as peacemaker.
And later, he sighed: "We
are going to continue past Aug.
3 it would appear. That's going
to be over my firm objection
and may even be beyond the
scope of my energy and
resources.
The committee, beginning
the ninth week of televised
hearings, has hoped to go on
vacation with the rest of
congress s after this week. But
at an executive session Monday
it decided to press ahead with
Htaldeman and six others.
Ehrlichiian was asked
whether President Nixon ever
asked before last march for
information about the June 17
break-in of Democratic Party
headquarters in the Watergate
Office building.
"In this search," said
Iihrlichman, who had been one
of Nixon's closest advisers.
"On repeated occasions the
President asked that a
complete definitive statement
of the Watergate matter, how it
was planned, how it was
executed the whole picture
be set down on paper and
released."
EIGHT REQUESTS
F hrlichman said this
involved eight such requests.
but that the President never
received a satisfactory answer.
Nixon had said that not until
March 21 did White House
involvement in the burglary
and cover-up come to his
attention.
Only ousted White Hlouse
counsel John W. Dean III had
spent five straight days before
the panel prior to Ehrlichmnan.
And ihrlichman's last day was
mostly a retracing and
elaboration of his earlier
testimony.
(ounimittee counsel Samuel
Dash was questioning
Fhrlichinan whether he was
aware Nixon had been advised
in 1971 that a plan
contemplating break-ins for
national security information
were "in fact clearly illegal and
constituted the crime of
burglars ."
Thle question became
confused as IFhrlichman wiho
had testified he considered
such entries legal attempted
to reply and was interrupted
by Dash.
"Let me give my answer,"
Ihrlichmian said at one point.
"II you don't feel it's
responsive, point out where it's
not."
John J. Wilson. 'Fhrlich liian's
lawyer, got into the discussion
and so did Chairman Sam J.
Ervin Jr (D-N.(.) Finally
minority ciounstiel I:red
Thompson began arguing with
Dash over whether Itis
questioning was proper.
It was thIe first puibhli falling
out between the two
committee counsel.
Ehrlichman continued to
deny that he asked Dean to
destroy material taken from
the safe of wiretapper E.
Howard Hunt Dl)ean had said
Ihrlichman told himun to "deep
six" a briefcase full of IHunt
material but Ilhrlichman said
he didn't and that he never
uses that nautical expression,
meaning to throw material into
deep water.
The hearing was interrupted
several times, also, by Williamrn
CI Hludley, attorney for tornier
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell,
who objected to references
being made to the 'Vesco case.
Mitchell, Maurice L_ Stans and
two other men are under
indictment for irregularities in


a secret $200,000 campaign
contribution by financier
Robert L. Vesco
Ehrlichlnan was asked
whether he considered bringing
to Nixon's attention the fact
that a White Hlouse-directed
team broke into the office of
the psychiatrist treating Daniel
Ellsberg. the Pentagon Papers
figure.
"I did not" Ehrlichman said.
"It was an event that had
occurred. There was nothing
the President could do about it
or was called to do about it. I
just made the judgment it


would necessarily tax his
attention."
Asked whether he
considered the Watergate
planning meetings of January,
February and March last year
important enough. Ehrlichman
replied:
"I certainly did. I notified
him within an hour after I
learned. In April 1973.
Q. You didn't know about
them in June 1972'?
A. No.
Q. You were kept in the
dark until April'?
A. Yes, indeed.
Q. John Dean never
discussed them with you?
A. No.
Q. Hlaldeman never discussed
it with you?
A. No.
TO BE CALLED
After Haldeman the
committee plans to hear L.
Patrick Gray III, former acting
director of the FBI; Richard G.
Kleindienst, who succeeded
Mitchell as Attorney General;
Robert F. Cushman, Former
Deputy director of the Central
Intelligence Agency; Lt. Gen.
Vernon Walters, the present
deputy director; lHenry E.
Petersen, Assistant Attorney
General in charge of the
criminal division; Richard
Ilelms, former director of the
('IA.
Not on the list was Charles
E. Colson, former White House
adviser, who had been
expected to follow laldeman.
Sen. Lowell P. Weicker Jr.,
(R-Conn.) introduced a new
document into the hearings a
letter from Ehrlichman to
Dean dated Oct. 2, 1972.
In it, Ehrlichman relayed a
suggestion by Nixon's personal
lawyer, Herbert W. Kalmbach,
that a written retainer
arrangement be signed "to be
the first hurdle." -- for
establishing a confidential
lawyer-client relationship.
Kalnbach has testified that
prior to that time he had been
involved in funneling $220,000
to the Watergate defendants.
"Didn't this arouse any
suspicion on your part'?"
Weicker asked Ehrlichman,
referring to the letter. "Why is
it we had to set up an
attorney-client relationship?"
Ilhrlichman said he was
simply transmitting a
suggestion from Kalmbach to
Dean. "I wasn't at all sure
whether it was advisable,"
Ehrlichman said.
Q. The whole thrust was to
set up this relationship so he
doesn't have to make any
disclosure, is that correct'?
Under persistent questioning
by the committee's chief
lawyer, iEhrlichnian restated
that he never authorized hush
money or offers of clemency
to the Watergate wiretappers.
DIDN'T KNOW
lie said again that he didn't
know until last April that
former Acting FBI Director L.
Patrick Gray III had destroyed
material from the safe of one
of the conspirators, E. Howard
Hunt. ie said if he had known
that in January he would have
made a "very strongly
negative" recommendation to
President Nixon about whether
to appoint Gray as permanent
director. Gray quit April 27
after news broke that he
destroyed the Hunt papers.
Ehrlichman said Nixon
asked eight times for a
complete report on the
wiretapping affair between last
September and March 22, but
never received satisfaction.
Ehrlichman sometimes
bristled at questions asked by
Dash. At one point, objecting
to some statements of fact
made by Dash, he said, "You
have a way of festooning your
questions, Mr. Dash, with facts
that are apparently only in
your knowledge."
Dash's questions also
drew a partisan show of temper
from Republican counsel Fred
Thompson. And the committee
vice chairman, Sen. Howard H.


Baker Jr.. (R-Tenn.) expressed
irritation that questioning was
taking so much time. Baker
said it is clear the committee
won't be able to start its
summer recess until after Aug.
3, when the rest of Congress
takes a summer vacation.
Ehrlichman also repeated
earlier denials of his own
involvement.
Interviewed after he
concluded his testimony,
Ehrlichman again stated that
he is innocent of any
wrongdoing.


vLJI ARJ1 1 v JU v -

By Paul Recer
SPACE CENTRE, HOUSTON (AP) Motion sickness
continued to cripple the performance of the Skylab astronauts on
Monday and officials said they were a whole day behind schedule
and had little hope of catching up before next week.


WASHINGTON (AP)-
Outspoken Prime Minister
Gough Whitlam declared
Monday Australian is "not a
satellite of any country" but a
friend and partner of the
United States with
independent interests,
particularly in the Pacific.
The leader of Australia's
first labour government in
almost a quarter century told a
National Press Club luncheon
meeting that Australia also is
determined not to be open to
charges of racism.
He spelled out the elements
of a new rationalism after
meeting at the White House
with President Nixon and
national security adviser Henry
Kissinger for a review of
relationships between the two
countries.
Whitlam called those
relationships "The American
connection" symbolized by
the Anzus Treaty. The word
stands for Australia-New
Zealand-United States, and it is
a security alliance that pleages
each country to support the
other in event of an attack in
accordance with constitutional
processes.
Whitlam said his government
"wants to move away from the
narrow view that the Anzus
Treaty is the only significant
factor in our relations with the
United States and the equally
narrow view that our relations
with the United States are the
only significant factor in
Australia's foreign relations."
lie emphasized that Anzus is
only one aspect of Australias
interests and obligations.
"Our relations with the
United States are very
important but again only one
aspect of our interests and
obligations in our region and
around the world."
Whitlam also lashed out at
U.S. policy in Southeast Asia
without mentioning the United
States by name.
"For 20 years I have been
appalled at the damage we of
the West have done to
ourselves and to other peoples
by our western ideological
preoccupations, particularly in
Southeast Asia. We are not
going to be held responsible for
throwing away the chance we
had for a settlement in
Indochina in 1954. after Korea
and after Geneva," he said.
lie said summing up the
attitude of his government in a
single sentence, "I would state
that nothing Australia does by
action or inaction will
contribute to a second, final
loss of opportunity."
Whitlam said "we have all
been given a second chance
it must not be thrown away.
This would be the
unforgivable crime against
humanity."
lie said that changes in the
Australian government are only
part of a profound change that
is taking place in the whole
pattern of international
relations, particularly in the
western Pacific.
The initiative for these
changes came from the U.S..
not Australia, and they have
created what he called "a new
reality."
lie mentioned recognition of
the People's Republic of China,
and the ending of Australia's
military commitment in
Indochina, as evidence of these
changes.


Skylab commander Alan L.
Bean said he and his
crewmates, Dr. Owen K.
Garriott and Jack Lousmia.
were moving slowly and
cautiously, to avoid further
upsetting their queasy
stomachs.
The astronauts still had
hours of hard work to
complete before the space
station would be fully
activated for their record
59-day space mission. A space
walk which had been set for
Tuesday was postponed at least
one day due to the illness.
Bean reported on Monday
that Garriott "was quite sick"
late Sunday night after a day
of apparent improvement.
Lousma, Bean said, "is not
feeling too good still. He was
feeling better yesterday. 1
think he's not going to be
working as fast as we'd like
him to."
Bean said his condition also
seemed worse than on Sunday.
"I'm not quite as frisky as I
was late yesterday, but I feel
good. 1 was able to get down
all of breakfast, so at least we
got a fighting start there," he
said.
NOT SERIOUS. BUT
Doctors believe the ailment
is motion sickness, a
debilitating but not serious
condition, similar to
seasickness. Space physicians
said they believe the ailment
will disappear slowly as the
astronauts adapt to
weightlessness.
EIpisodes of the illness
occurred only hours after the
astronauts were launched on
Saturday. Lousma has vomited
three times and seemed to be
suffering the most.
Bean said Lousma took a
scopolamim dexedrine capsule
after getting up Monday. The
astronauts took this medicine
on Sunday also and it helped
to control the illness.
Mission Control told the
astronauts to work slowly and
not feel compelled to stay on
the pre-mission schedule.
Flight controller Don Puddy
said at a news conference,
"we're essentially a day
behind.
"We're going to try to have
it completely regrouped and
have it back on schedule" by
Sunday, said Puddy.
Puddy said there was no
great concern over the delay in
the space walk. although some
solar telescope cameras are not
now operating because of lack
of film.


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I


Tuesday, July 31, 1973.


wim


I


The space-walkers are to
deolov a sun shade on top of
one installed last month by the
Skylab I astronauts. Lousma
and Garriott will also replenish
film in the Skylab solar
telescope.
Sun shade protection on the
outside of the orbiting
laboratory is needed because a
metal shield ripped off when
the space station was launched
May 14. Loss of the shield
caused the 1 18-foot-long craft
to overheat in the baking
effects of the space sunlight
The Skylab 1 astronauts
installed a parasol-like shade
device during their 28-da.
mission last month, but experts
worried that material in the
parasol may be rotting in the
sunlight.
The astronauts' rest Sundax
night was interrupted by a leak
in the space station.
Mission Control sent signals
to automatically replace the
atmosphere leaking out, but
the spacemen were awakened
by the sound of the increased
flow of oxygen and nitrogen
The crewmen located the
leak a hatch which failed to
close properly over a trash bin
and quickly fixed it.
But they said they didn't
feel like staying up.
"We're going back to bed for
a while," said Garriott. "We
got to bed late last night and
only have had about six hours
rest. So we'll probably get a
couple more." When they got
up they started working slowly.
Their first chore of the da\
was to give blood. Garriott, a
solar physicist who is acting as
the crew medical man, took
blood samples and stored them
for later study on earth b\
scientists.
Garriott said the procedure
went smoothly.






EiE











Chris ti
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Tuesday, July 31, 1973.


h ___ ribuntt


hbp SribunP
NULuuS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MA'ISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUC, Pablisher/Editor 1 03 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,O.B.E., K.C.S.G.. D.Litt.. LL.D).
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207. Nassau. Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, July 31, 1973

I EDITORIAL

Liberty or licence ?


By ETIIENNE DUPUCH
A WASHII N I ON, Post Service news dispatch on June 22nd
reported that, on the previous day, the Supreme Court gave
States and the federal government new powers in obscenity cases.
This action was seen as a move towards paving the way for
crackdowns on "the crass exploitation of sex".
According to the report, in a series of 5-4 decisions, the court
established a new definition of obscenity, rejected arguments that
a "national" rather than local standard should govern and flatly
refused to carve out exemptions for obscene filns, magazines and
books on grounds that they are aimed at "consenting adults".
Chief Justice Warren Burger, the report states, delivered the
rulings, noting that it was "the first time" in 16 years that "a
majority of the court has agreed on concrete guidelines to isolate
'hard-core' pornography from expression protected by the First
Amendment".
Dissenting were Justice William Douglas. who predicted "raids
on libraries", and Justice William Brennan Jr..Potter Stewart aind
Thurgood Marshall, who called for scrapping obscenity laws "at
least in the absence of distribution to juveniles or obtrusive
exposure to unconsenting adults".
Burger spurned what he called "the alarm of repression"
sounded by the dissenters, saying they demeaned the First
Amendment by equating "the free and robust exchange of ideas
and political debate with commercial exploitation of obscene
material".

The following day The .Miami tHerald published an editorial
under the caption "Supreme Court Did Us Dirty In Its Ruling On
Obscenity".
"It is generally agreed." the editorial declared. "that nobody
really approves of pornography, and it is understandable that tlhe
United States Supreme Court would want to get out of tihe
porn-thicket entirely by ruling that if anybody does approve, it
should be sontebody else. Like the States, individually.
"But in truth, if nobody approved of it there wouldn't be any.
The proliferation of X-rated movies, blatant sexual magazines arnd
-books, however, shows somebody out there likes it. Thoe
comforting thought any of us might have at the prospect of not
being assaulted on all sides by uninvited offers of salacious
materials should be balanced to some extent by the realization
that somebody else's rights are being abridged."
The article goes on to condemn the decision apparently on the
grounds that while, generally speaking, "-i.,h.1.,I really approves
of pornography," it is nevertheless acceptable to many people
because of the fact that it has become a highly profitable
business.
This seems a strange sort ot argument.
****** ***
Over 200 years ago Edmund Burke, the great English
parliamentarian, declared dtat "liberty, too. must be limited in
order to be possessed".
In this century Bernard Shaw declared that "liberty means
responsibility. That is why most men dread it".
Socrates, who was born 460 years before Christ, laid down tlhe
fact that "laws are not made for the good".
Poor little me .... I have laid down the doctrine that there can
be no freedom without discipline. A man either disciplines
himself or he must be disciplined by man-made laws. rules and
regulations.
Alcuin of York, the great English educator who lived over
1200 years ago, condemned any thought that "the voice of the
people is the voice of God" when he warned that "we should not
listen to those who say, 'the voice of the people is the voice of
God', for the turbulence of the mob is always close to insanity".
I don't suppose anyone can pinpoint the period when Moses
lived. All we know is that it was a long time before the birth of
Christ, probably thousands of years before God recognized the
need to send His son to earth with a new concept of human
relations for man in which was laid down the doctrine of
brotherly love as a reward for a fuller life beyond the grave.
It was during the days of Moses that God realized that the
human family could not live as an organized society without laws
to govern their conduct.
And so he called Moses up into the mountain and, with His
own hands, He engraved in tables of stone the Ten
Commandments which have become the foundation on which all
democratic laws have been based ever since.
Up in the mountain .... in those early days of an organized
society .... God established the fact that it was necessary to have
laws in order to control and regulate "the turbulence of the
mob".
And so, from that day onward, it is no longer a question of
what people want .... it is a question of what is good ... what is
healthy and wholesome .... for people living together in a social
order.
I********** i
I remember some years ago going to see a member of the
Executive Council in Nassau who was engaged in the liquor
business. If it were left to him, he would have established a bar
alongside the altar in the church and in the recreation grounds of
a school.
I was fighting for tighter controls on the sale of liquor at the
time. I did not object to the sale of liquor .... I have never been a
prohibitionist ... but I did feel that there were far too many retail
bars in the island and I strongly objected to bars that were
operating near churches and schools.
He tried to sweep my arguments aside by saying that it was
what the people wanted ... and the people were entitled to get
what they wanted.
I silenced him by pointing to a safe in his office. I told him
that I was sure the people desired to share his wealth. I said that
he should open his safe and give me my share.
Oh no ... the doctrine of giving the people what they wanted
did not apply to his possessions, but it did apply when it opened
up opportunities for him to drain men of their hard earned
wages!
ae **o f Ii*******Ii
I have told this story before but I will repeat it today for the


Police kindly take note


1-DITOR. The tribune,
The residents of the
('t)conut drove area especially
those of uLs n Blue Hill R a:id
were extremely happy when it
becamirie known that a Police
Station would be built and
policed on Blue IHill Road
south. Happy we were because
it was felt that a better control
of traffic would result from it
and speeding of motor cars and
ti otor cycles would be
stopped. To the contrary, no
regard for the presence of
police stationed on Blue lill
Road is evident, and with due
respect for the officers in
charge theyx seeirin-b! take no


notice of the excessive speed of
cars driven by this station
every day especially mornings
between the hours of eight and
nine.
Thousands of children
attending the various schools in
this area walk in fear mornings
and afternoons as certain
drivers and riders disregard
their safety and go speeding
like mad by them. Numerous
collisions and accidents
resulting in injuries and
damages occur in the vicinity
of my home and often no
policemen are around until
reports are made of the
happenings. Police patrol in
this area regularly as in other


districts are essential to the
welfare of pedestrians. The
very attractive station is useless
unless its presence is felt and
respected.
Does the speed limit apply
to motor cycles? Apparently
not since some of the riders
race at speeds ranging from
fifty to eighty miles in this area
and as a matter of fact on Bay
Street. They are not noticed
apparently by the police.
This is intended to be
constructive criticism and I am
hoping that it is accepted in
this manner.
BERT CAMBRIDGE
Nassau
April 17, 1973


Paying for PLP in Eleuthera


EDITOR, The Iribune.
Please help us. by printing
this in your paper.
hatchet Bay. who so
strongly voted P. 1.P. and
brought this government to
power are suffering for it bh
the government. All through
the years we have been getting
electrical power from the
Hatchet Bay Power and Light
Company, where we thought
we were paying too much at
month for ighIt. Now
government has signed a
contract with S.I.P. Pot'c ir is
costing Ius far more than we
had to pay Hlatchet Bay Power
and Light. With S. .P. we have
to pay so tmurch fr surplus
charge and a fuel charge, if this
is legal, it menasvs-.hcr; ,miu hire
: cab 'I'll have to pa\ thb'
fare and gas bill I think this is
ungodly. We are p'or people
and we need help, Mr". editor,


this is why 1 turn to you, we
don't know who to turn to;
maybe somebody who can help
us will read this and help might
come.
They say our settlement is
dirty, 1 agree but if government
will give us some good streets
in our settlement, I think then
we can keep it clean. All the
commissioner tells the Board
of Works is there's no money
to do anything.
Our settlement dock, where
smack boats (and our own
fishing boats?) and some yacht
boats tie up, has been washed
out since hurricane Betsy in
1965. We can't get it rebuilt,
who must we turn to? They all
know about it but won't do
anything about it. There's so
much wrong going on it makes
one worry.
For, instance if a man's wife


Independence means


friendship

tDITOR. The Tri!bune
(Co ngrat ulatioIni' and
welcome. Whether you were
'for or against'. Now it's
teamworkk title'.
Now we have indep-ndence.
Wei have it because lmort1e ot tus
wanted it than didn't v ant it.
Now it's time to make our
independence g,'od...make it
an instrIumenIt it progress for
a1...and that takes all of us
working together.
Starting right now the 'past'
is passed. Whether syou fought
for or against IImakes no
difference now n ,\..'re all in the
same family and togetherness is
the key to progress.
There should he nothing
more Bahamian than a good
battle at election time. But it
,hiuld also fe very 'HBahamian'
Io i !in all t tether for progress
aiftir the i'morint has spoken.
Y There were lots of good
pec:p!l onn hibth sides of this
campaign. We need all of them
ion; the sa ei' side >f tIhe
i


to all

campaign that now faces us.
The most critical period for
building our new nation is
now. If. we. the people make
up our minds that the new
Bahamas is going to be good,
then it will be good.
Now that we have our
independence, we must
develop it. That means that the
taxi driver, our doctors, the
many persons who are engaged
in the tourist business or who
come into contact with
tourists, must all walk proud
with our heads towards the
rising sun. We must stuff our
hearts with love for each other.
There's a spot in our new
Bahams for every one of us
who wants to be a real part of
this Bahamian nation. The
hand of the government and
everyone who fought for or
againn't independence must he
extended in warm loving
friendship to all.

LESLIE T. FOX


benefit of new readers of this column.
One Sunday morning I was driving to church when I saw a
truck turned over on its side in the bushes some distance east of
Fort Montagu.
A small ,. "p of people were oili.. i.d around the truck. A
couple of wsi'ien were crossing the street screaming hysterically.
I stopped tll- car to see what was happening.
A man swas pinned down under the truck. He wasn't moving
lie appeared to he unconscious, possibly dead.
No one was doing i,:\ tli, I saw a large piece of timber on
the side of the road. apparently thrown from the truck by the
collision.
It seemed a hopeless effort to try to lift the truck with this
piece of timber but 1 felt that ....'iCli.; should be done. At least
an ecftoit could he mnade.
I1 ..,ll, the men in the group around the truck to help me. We
put the timber under the truck and gave it a hearty heave. With
this single pulh tihe truck righted itself.
Fortunately. it had fallen on some saplings that bent under its
weight. but they acted as a spring when we levered the truck
upwards.
The man was under the truck. It seemed to be resting on him
but, as it turned out, it was barely touching him. He was unhurt.
As soon as thle pressure was removed the man staggered to ,
feet. cursing everybody in sight. le was dead drunk.
It transpired that's his lman ihad taken the truck out of a lumber
yard without the knowledge or consent of his employer and had
gone on a drunken spree wit a couple of women.
Before 1 left the scene of the accident I noticed a black bottle
lying in the grass near the truck. A red liquor was trickling out of
its mouth.
I picked it up and read the label. It was a bottle of LIBERTY
RUM, a brand of rum that was popular with "the people" in
Nassau of that da .
This was "the voice of the people" being loudly expressed.
This man wanted to do what he had done .... and he did it
because hie felt that his desires should not be disciplined.
The question is .... is pornography good or bad for society'?
It can be argued that a large number of people want it. This is
true.
And so do a large number of people want to smoke pot, or to
get drunk, or to steal, or to murder or to rape or to do all the
things now regulated and controlled by law-
It we were to tfllow the argument that a free people are
entitled to get anything they want, then no law would be
justifiable and man would quickly return to the level of the jungle
which is governed by a single law .... might is right!

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
My son Hannibal will be a great general because of all my
soldiers he best knows how to obey.
HAMILCAR


has a baby the midwife bill is
$30, he makes $60 a week, a
light bill is $40 for the month,
how can he feed his family
until the next pay day? Mr
Editor I thank you, as time
goes on and no justice is done
you will hear from me.
WILL
Hatchet Bay
Eleuthera
July 4, 1973

ASHAMED OF

HER RACE
EDITOR, The Tribune,
Please print this in your
paper. I never thought that I
would cry when the Union
Jack came down, but I did.
I knew how silly I was to
vote for the P.L.P. What are we
going to do now?
This so-called Independence
came and went. What new laws
are we making? Plus we are not
processing anything. I hope
that they will not tell any more
white people to leave the
islands in 24 hours.
I was ashamed of my race
when my employer had to
leave in 24 hours. I also regret
the telegram that Pindling
received which stated that he
was glad the Bahamas was out
of hardship of the British rule.
I never knew any hardship
to the black Bahamians... at
least not in the last 69 years. I
forgot who said this, but ask
Pindling or look back in your
old papers.
BLACK WOMAN
Nassau,
July 24, 1973


TWE


I-AD


.A** ^
1.11


BLAMES MOVIES FOR CRIMES


EDITOR. The Tnhribun
Will you he kind -n1tu,'i 'i
print the folluoing.
As a Bahamian I am greatly.
concerned over the anmunt at
crime that is taking place in
Nassau, what with the aimed
robberies, raping and cutians
attacks, and the majority .ti ii
seems to bh done by teen-ajer-s.
1 am of the opinion that
most of these crimes arc caused
by watching the bloodthirstr


::,\ t pltures that are being
-%- : at the theatres, which
i'.e these o young people
Unrhcths ideas.
.ls", these movies are being
dail\ advertised over Radio
Bahtama:s. I am not blaming the
-adIi stations ;llt are being
p i.id I. advertise, but I feel
'hat screone in authority
h',,tai STOP these kind of
:n.o''- i from being shown here.
Sir;i there must be other


firls that the theatres car
import that people will enjoy
instead of putting injury
killing ideas into the minds of
our young Bahamians.
VIRGINIA J. MALONE
Retirement Road
July 26, 1973
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FISCAL POLICY and its
implementation today
exercises a far reaching and
decisive influence, on the
whole course of' economic
events in a country.,
It is estimated that
Government today accounts
directly for about 30-40 per
cent of Gross National
Product. Hence, Government
decisions and administration of.
Law and Order, immigration
. company policies, .central
banking, public education,
public health, workman's
compensation and direct and
indirect taxation to name a few.
might be said to determine to a
great degree the extent and
direction of the development
of a country.
As economic and social
events develop in complexity,
any government, however
inspired, finds that it must rily
more and more on quantitative
information to make intelligent
decisions Furthermore, to'
carry out economic and soiat
planning for the future without.
examining the quantitative
data of the past makes it
virtually impossible to predict


the probable outcome of
decisions. As a famous
economist once said, "if a
country does not know where
it has been, where it is now,
and how fast it has been
travelling, how can it
determine what to do and
wheie to-go ..."
International organiz-ations
such as the United Nations ind
Organization for Econromic
Co operation and
Development, and World Bank
as well as individual countries.
are increasingly basing their
decisions on quantitative data
to support and justify certain
requests for financial and
technical assistance to
developing countries.
As a consequence there has
developed an almost universal
recognition of the importance,
and. indispensability of
statistics for both government
and' the private sector, and the
increased demand for statistics
accompanying this recognition.
The (;Government's
Department of Statistics has as
its primary and continuing aim
to collect, compile, analyse,
abstract and publish statistical


information relating to tne
commercial, .industrial,
agricultural, mining, financial,
social and economic activities
and conditions of the Bahamas.
Its function is to provide the
quantitative information
necessary for an intelligent
understanding of the economic
and social structure of the
country, the internal and
external factors which activate
and dominate it, and the
various inter-relations between
factors. Factors which are of
prime importance to one
country may be virtually
unimportant to another and
the country must properly
discern these factors.
In addition to the functions
already mentioned, the
Department of Statistics has
tasks which include:
* The setting of statistical
standards i.e'. standard
definitions, classifications
and methods.- .
a Research into statistical
methods 'and .operations.
* Co-ordinatioji 'between
statistical offices 'with
regard 0o policies and
portfolio .-responisibilities.
* Training of.. Statistical
personnel.
* R e gio n.al and
International, o-operation
on statistical matters.
PREREQUISTIES
An essential ingredient to
implementing the functions of
a government statistics body is
legislative power to perform its
duties. To this end the
Bahamas Statistics Act passed
in June'1973 provides that:
"it shall be lawful for the
Director to require any
person
(at to furnish, in the form
and manner and within
the time specified by any
notice in writing such
periodical or other
information estimates or
returns, concerning any of
the matters set out in the
First Schedule as may be
so specified: and
(bi to supply him with
particulars either at a
personal interview with
the Director or with a
person authorized by the
Director or by leaving at
the last known address or
by posting by registered
letter to the last known
address of such person, a
form having thereon a
notice requiring the form
to be completed and
returned in the manner
and within the time
specified in the notice.
In addition the statistics
gathering body must have as


much political independence
and objectivity as possible in
order that the quantitative data
produced would 'be beyond
political reproach. To this end
the Department of Statistics is
situated admiinistratively in the
Cabinet Office which is
regarded as neutral with regard
to statistics. Furthermore, all
employees in the department
are made to swear to an oath
of secrecy .to ensure that
information on individuals is
not published or divulged to
anyone even another
government department other
than by the supplier's consent.
The Statistics Act will also
guard this important secrecy
provision, by making
provisions for appropriate
fines.
THE DEPARTMENT
The Department of Statistics
was created in 1968 following
the acceptance .by the
Government of a report by Sir
Harry Campion (a noted
United Kingdom economist
and statistician) entitled "The
Bahama Islands" Improvement
and Development of Economic
Statistics". A U.N. advisor was
accepted by the Government
to start the statistics
programme and he assumed
duties in October of 1968
acting temporarily as Director
o' Statistics until a Director
was appointed in October of
1969.
ADMINISTRATION
The Department of Statistics
falls administratively in the
Cabinet Office, and is thus in
the portfolio of the Prime
Minister. Its establishment
consists of a Director and a
Deputy Director. Sections
headed by statisticians are as
follows:
(a) Economic Statistics &
Research (including
Sa n ple Surve
Programme. Statistical
Abstract and Quarterly
Statistical Summary and
General Statistics.
(b) External Trade &
Transport.
(c) Vital Statistics. Migration
and Tourism.
(d) Establishments and
Primary Industries,
(e) Labour and Prices.
(f) Training.
(g) Administration (including
publications and the
library, printing &
duplicating and general
administration.
(h) A regional office in
Freeport. Basically, two
types of statistics were
developed since its
establishment, economic
statistics and social
statistics.


FRENCH FRANCS
SWISS FRANCS


Also, as usual, U.S. and CANADIAN DOLLARS.


The Royal


The Helrful Bank
I s.] i tii n


C~~b t~


- '
.. . : .


(What are the functionhsi.of the Bahamas Gorernmenit Department o/ Statistics and its influence on
economic trendsin. the Commonwealth of the Bahamas'
(In an effort to answer these and other questions. The Bahamas Information Services requested the
Department of Statistics to prepare a series of articles dealing with all facets of statistical data as they affect
The Sahamas.
(7his is the first in a series of articles on the functions of the Bahamas Government Department of
Statistics).


The functions of the Dept. of Statistics


DEAR ABBY: I had a date with a very handsome and
charming fellow nearly three years ago. We seemed to hit
it off, but he never called me again and that was that.
A month ago he called me out of the blue and the first
thing he asked was, "Are you married yet?" I kiddingly
said, "No, I'm still waiting for you!" He asked me for a
date that very night. I accepted.
Well, we had a marvelous time. We danced and
laughed and talked and just hated to say goodnight. Before
we parted he asked if he could see me the next night. In
fact, he dated me up for every night that week. Abby, I
was in heaven! I never knew two people could fall in love
so fast.
We saw each other every night for nearly three weeks,
and then came the bombshell! He told me he.loved me and
would ask me to marry him, but he had leukemia and his
time was running out. At first I thought he was giving me
a line, but then he showed me all the books$ and medical
journals he had collected on the subject, and he Invited me
to talk to his doctor. I did, and the doctor said he' had
maybe another year of health. He wasn't sure. Be didn't
know.
I have fallen deeply in love with this young man, Abby
and want to make the rest of his life as happy as possible,
but am I being fair to myself? Should I break it off now?
Please help me. I am 25 and he is 29. I can't even tell my
mother. BROKENHEARTED
DEAR BROKENHEARTED: Knowing that your days
are numbered [aren't everybody's?] makes every day more
precious. You would be less than fair to yourself were you
to break it off now, if indeed you could, which I doubt. In
enriching his life, you will enrich your own. Pray for a
miracle, and God bless.

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I are both 21. We've
been married for nearly two years and we have one child.
He joined the service out of fear of being drafted and now
he's in Germany.
My question: Why do men Leven married menJ tell me
I shouldn't think my husband is sitting in the barracks
every night just thinking of me? They say he is only human
and he is out for everything he can get over there. They
say all the guys in the service cheat on their wives.
Abby, this upsets me terribly. Some of these men don't
even know my husband so how can they pass judgment on
him that way? TRUE BLUE WIFE
DEAR WIFE: They can't. They are trying to suggest
that if you want to cheat on your husband, you would be
justified. Don't believe them. There are plenty of "true
blue" men in the service, and your husband could be one of
them.

DEAR ABBY: I did something terrible and I can't
sleep nights. I wish I were a Catholic so I could go to
confession.
I work in a department store which gives a discount to
employes for items they purchase for themselves.
I have a relative who wanted a dress for her daughter's
wedding, so I told her to come to the store, pick out a
dress, and I would say I was buying it for her as a birth-
day gift, and I would get the discount. Then she could pay
me what it cost.
She came in and picked out a dress, but when my boss
rang up the sale he looked at me kind of funny, like he
knew I was lying. I am not a very good liar because I don't
lie often, and I am so embarrassed now because I am sure
he wasn't fooled.
I'm afraid he will tell the other clerks about it, and I
just hate to go to work and face them. Please tell me how
to get this off my conscience. GUILTY
DEAR GUILTY: Tell your boss you'd like to return the
amount of the discount. It won't be necessary to explain
further. Then you'll both feel better.


A 16 X 20 EMBROIDERY Bahamas Coat of Arms, created by Mrs. Isolene M. Rolle,
needlework teacher at S.C. McPherson School, was presented to the Minister of
Education and Culture, the Hon. Livingstone Coakley. Viewing the lovely crest, from left
to right, are: Mrs. Dorthea Bowen, head of the Economics Department, Ministry of
Education and Culture; Mr. Sinclair Outten, M.P., Parliamentary Secretary; Sonja Toots,
student at S.C. McPherson School, Mrs. Rolle and Mr. Coakley. Mrs. Rolled worked on the
Crest during her free time but said it consisted of a full week's work.


BAHAMAS Minister of
Tourism, the Hon. Clement T.
Maynard, right, extends a
warm welcome to a special
Canadian visitor the Hon.
Stanley Haidasz, Minister of
State, House of Commons in
Toronto, Canada. The two
Ministers met briefly Thursday
at the Ministry of Tourism
Information Centre located in
the International Bazaar. The


Canadian Minister is in
Freeport on vacation and is
; .


having "an enjoyable time".
PHOTO: Howard Glass


Tuesday, July 31, 1973.


Skernia threatens


:heir 'Love Story'


CONFIDENTIAL TO; Interested In your thoughts on
the matter: I'm glad you asked. To borrow a quote from
Frank Vanderlip in The Forbes Scrapbook of Thoughts on
the Business of Life: "Since nothing Is settled until it is
settled right, no matter how unlimited power a man may
have, unless he exercises it fairly and justly, his actions
... l tu

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As always, the safest way to carry money is in the
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', r I \dJnitted
NOW 1st RUN *
I II I I S 0& 2I : 20
,* I .25 8 ()NI


GHANAIAN DANCERS
move to the beat of their music
and show the audience how it
is done at home in Ghana. The
post-independence Arts and
Cultural show of African
fashions and Ghanaian dance
began on Friday night in the
Bahamia Hall of Government
Hight School and ends tonight
at the Nassau Beach Hotel.
PHOTO: Margaret R.
Guillaume


T TOMORROWs EVENING
will be the last- chance to see
the post-independence Arts
and Cultural show.being staged
by the Ghana Arts Council in
the 'Talk of the Town' room
formerly the ,Tiki Village) at
the Nassau Beach Hotel. Show
time is 10:30 -- 12:30.
The show includes an
exceptional arts and crafts
exhibit, a fashion show
featuring the latest fashions
( 'rom Ghana and several other
\frican nations, displayed hb
Bahamian models.
Highlight of the show is the
Ghanaian dancing performed
by a fifteen-member dance
troop. The Friday evening
show was at the Government
Iligh School's Bahamia Hall.
"V The musical accompaniment
i or the show is provided by the
Boom Talents Band, one of the
top combos in Ghana.
The band's leader Gideon,
does acrobatic feats on his
hongo drums, providing a show
within the show.
The entire show is
conducted by Rose Odamtten,
producer and director ol the
ROSE ODAMTTEN, Public Affairs Division (f
(BELOW), commentator of
the Ghanaian post-inde- (Ghana Television.
pendence Arts and Cultural Mr. K. Dor, who is acting as
show. Miss Odamtten is also the group's business manager is
producer/director of the also sponsor of the hour and a
public affairs Division of half long show. Dom is a noted
Ghana Television. Ghanaian industrialist.


inalfiL


u-bW v


11 u c t n t 7 A dmi t te
IFl--Tiim, M,thni


NOW SHOWING THRU THURSDAY
matinee 2:45 & 5 00. Evening 9:00 'Phone 2-1004. 2-10051
Burt Reynolds is
The Man
Who Loved
Cat Dancing.
I
i |g



-I

BURT REYNOLDS -SARAH MILES
LEE J.COBB JACK WARDEN GEORGE HAMILTON
PG. ,r I ..... t ;, 'ntn i..

1>-IRI \7 ; ;; 71TfJIA.\ l 41/ / /,
Reservatit.:i ii .!miiild hs X:45. will be sold
on tirsrt Liiim trst served basis.
-r7T^^^in I
Start- W'.I -.c, .t, ednesdav thru Friday
Matinee Sitr I : 1 I i
s'MnTlli ( (I l _'Continuous Shos inlgs
from 3:00
"SSSSSSSS ..I
Dirk Bc-tlit J,,IT tIl I-S RUN
Strotilr M' :rii: RED" PG,
Ihomas lHunter
licnry Silva
"TIH B(M0 \H( !i ;i PLUS
WLRIUt p AItt RIIH) Il\T' G.
Kerws n \1 lin S;can Coniierv
tI 1-a1 i). (Claudia Cardinale

g
NOW SHOWING
Matinee Coi n ,2iii.,i I oi 30. I uening S: 30
I" i 466 I
THE MOB PUT THE FINGER
ON SLAUGHTER so he gave them
the fineigt back I,rled tight around a triqqer!



L I
II.^IIII IfI i ^ *'!


Stt I WKOFf jiM BROWN i j i i. D l Ft M REMIwAU43b .1mRw
ED McAHON DONSTROUD .lf HEN ri M1.u t iaui C BROCK PETERS
Mw
NOTHING BETWEEN THEM but HATE!
AMERI, N II

I : COLORSCOPE d
A\ ON l:i 'I !'7 AIMT1)M'F1 ) f
SORRY NO PASSES ACC('EFPED!


LOCAL MODEL NORMA SHACKLEFORD with arms outstretched lets her audience
get a good look at a skirt and wide-arm blouse outfit of African print. PHOTO: Margaret
R. Guillaume.


I

ig
I
I
I

I
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

I
I
I
1I



I






U
I


I

I




I
I
1I


1
I
1



I
U-


NOTICE


THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA is pleased to announce
the re-opening of its John F. Kennedy Drive Branch on
Tuesday, August 7th.


Our Cable Beach Branch will be discontinued as of the
close of business Friday, August 3. All accounts of both
branches will be served thereafter at John F. Kennedy Drive.


We wish to take this opportunity to thank our customers
for their understanding and co-operation during the
renovation period. We hope you will come in to see for
yourself the spacious new premises on John F. Kennedy
Drive where a full range of banking services, including safe
deposit boxes and a night depository, will be available on
opening day August 7, 1973.




The Royal

The Helpful Bank
Branches throughout the Bahamas


INK- SME
INKl-SMEI


THE 60-VOICE SUMITON CHURCH OF GOD CHOIR, GEORGIA, are seen
performing at the Royal Victoria Gardens at a Sunday afternoon concert. PHOTO:
Roland Rose


,, ____ __ __._~. ___ ~,_ _._ ___~_ _.,._._. ____~ ______,____ __~ ____. __-~ ~1---_ ,_~


i((~~


I I ~-


r- --- -- -~ Ir ~'- ~---'-~ I I- -- I --- I'--~----~--- -rr~l- -I


I












Tuesday, July 31 1973.


Bali a snI


SCHULES* EFIfECI VE t. AUI6US1.g73


DEPART
NASSAU TO:
10:05a.m.
4:50p.m.


ARRIVE
ANDROS TOWN
10:20 a.m.
5:05p.m.


FLIGHT
NUMBER FREQ.
(FRESH CREEK)
201JP Daily
203JP Daily


NASSAU TO: THE BIGHT (CAT ISLAND)
10:15a.m. 11:00a.m. 901JP
10:15a.m.+ 12:00 Noon 905 P

NASSAU TO: BIMINI
12:15p.m. 1:10p.m. 601 P

NASSAU TO: CHUB CAY (BERRY ISLAND
8:10a.m.+ 8:55a.m. 851JP

NASSAU TO: CROOKED ISLAND
10:00a.m. ll:20.m. 907P

NASSAU TO: DEADMAN'S CAY
9:30a.m.+ 10:40a.m. 603JP
10: 15a.m. l:25a.m. 905JP


NASSAU TO:
7: 30a.m.
10:30 a.m.
1: 45 p.m.
3:45p.m.
6:00p.m.

NASSAU TO:
9:30 a.m.
9:30a.m.
1:40p.m.


FREEPORT
8:00a.m,
ll:00a.m.
2:15p,m.
4:1 Sp.m:
6:30 p.m.


TuThS Only NASSAU TO MIAMI
Sun. Only S:00a.m. 8:4Sam.
10: 00 a.m 10:45a.m.
S.1;30.a,m.+ 12:10p.m.
MoWeFr 3:15p.m. 4:00p.m.
3:45p.m.+ 5:20p.m.
OS) 8:00p.m., 8:45p.m.
nailv


FLIGHT
NUMBER


m0 (Iri aitip


I~~~w' YI1 y.r~c


F EQ


903iJP MoF r Only


DiW ty.
.,a& ly
Da r I
Da i ly
Daily
Dai tly


TuThSu Only NASSAU TO: NORTH ELEUTHERA (HARStBOF R ISLAND)
8:00a.m. 8:20a.m. I01 JP Dai Iy
11:30a.m. 11:55a.m. 103JP Dai ly
MoThSaOy 1:15p;.m: 1:40p.m. 105JP Dai -ly
MoThSa Only 5 s5p.m; 5:55p.m. 109 JP Dai ly
Su Ontv


(GRAND BAHAMA)
38 J Daily
44J .Daly
46J. Daily
0 J Daily
52 J Daily.


GEORGE TOWN (EXUMA)
10:10a.m. 603 JP MoThSa
16: 10a.m. 605 JP TuWeFrSu
2:20p.m. 607JP Daily


NASSAU TO: GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR (ELEUTHERA)
8:00a.m.+ 8.45a.m. 101 JP Daily
5:35p.m.+ 6:20p.m. 109JP Daily

NASSAU TO: GREAT HARBOUR CAY (BERRY IS)
8:10a.m. 8:35a.m. 851JP Daily
2:25 p.m. 2:50 p.m. 853JP Daily
5:15p.m. 5:40p.m. 855JP Daily


NASSAU TO: INAGUA
10:15a.m.+ 12:30p.m. 903JP Mi

NASSAU TO: MANGROVE CAY (ANDROS)


7:00a.m. 7:25a.m. 501JP
3:45p.m. 4:10p.m. 503JP


oFr Only


SWe
lily


NASSAU TO: MARSH HARBOUR (ABACO ISLANDS)


8:00a.m,+ 9:00a.m.
8:30a.m.+ 9:35a.m.
3:30p.m.+ 4:30p.m.


401 JP
401 JP
405 J P


FLIGHT
DEPART ARRIVE NUMBER
ANDROS TOWN TO: NASSAU
10:30a.m. 10:45a.m. 202JP
5:15p.m. 5:30p.m. 204JP


THE BIGHT TO: NASSAU
12:30 p.m. 1: 15p.m.
12:15p.m. 1:00p.m.


902 J P
906 J P


BIMINI TO: NASSAU
1:20p.m. 2:30p.m. 602 P

CHUB CAY TO: NASSAU
9:05a.m. 9:20a.m. 852JP

CROOKED ISLAND TO: NASSAU
ll:30a.m. 12:50p.m. 908P
DEADMAN'S CAY TO: NASSAU
10:55am+ 12:05p.m. 604JP
11:40a.m.+ 1:00p.m. 906JP


FREEPORT
8:30a.m.
2:10p.m.
2:45 p.m.
6:55p.m.
7:30 p.m.


TO: NASSAU
9:00a.m.
2:40p.m.
3:15p.m.
7:25p.m.
8:00p.m.


GEORGE TOWN TO: NASSAU
11:25a.m. 12:05 p.m. 604 JP
11:25a.m. 12:05p.m. 606JP
2:35p.m. 3:15p.m. 608JP


ExWe
We only
Daily





FREQ.

Daily
Daily


TuThSa Only
Su Only


MoWeFr.


Daily


TuThSu


MoThSa
Su Only


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


MoThSa
TuWeFrSu
Cally


GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR TO: NASSAU
9:00a.m. 9:20a.m. 102JP Daily
6:35p.m. 6:55 p.m. 110JP Daily


GREAT HARBOUR CAY TO: NASSAU
8:45a.m.+ 9:20a.m. 852JP
3:00p.m. 3:20p.m. 854 JP
5:50p.m. 6:15p.m. 856JP

INAGUA TO: NASSAU
12:45 p.m. 2:25 p.m. 904JP


MANGROVE CAY TO: NASSAU
7:35a.m.+ 8:20a.m. 502JP
4:20p.m.+ 5:05p.m. 504 JP

MARSH HARBOUR TO: NASSAU


Daily
Daily
Daily


MoFr Only



Ex We
Daily


9:15a.m. 9:45a.m. 402JP Ex We
9:45a.m. 10:30a.m. 402JP We Only
4:45 p.m. 5:20 p.m. 406JP Daily


NASSAU TO: SAN ANDROS (MASTIC POINT)


7:15a.m. 7:30a.m. 30.11 JP. Dasly
10:40a.m. o0r-Sa.n. 303J' j TuihSa .
10:45a;ifn. -ll:00a.mn 303JP SuAo We Fr
2:55p.m. 3'o0p.m. 305JP DaOly
5.40pm .. 5:5p.m: 307'3JP - DaDly


NASSAU T: SAN SALVADOR
10:154.m-.: l1.40a m 901JP TuThSa Only


NASSAU TO: SOUTH ANDROS CONGOO TOWN)
7.00a.m.+ 7:45a.m. 501 JP E.Ve
3:45p.m.+ 4:30p.m. 503JP Dal Jl

NASSAU TO: STELLA MARIS (LONG ISLAND)
9:30a.m.+ 10:40a.m. 605JP TuaVeFrSu


NASSAU TO: TREASURE CAY (GREEN TIIR TLE CAY)
8:00a.m. 8:35a.m. 401JP Ex We
8:30a.m. 9:15a.m. 401JP We- Only
3:30 p.m. 4:05 p.m. 405JP Da ily

MIAMI TO: FREEPORT
1:10p.m. 1:45p.m. 45J Da lily
6:20p.m. 7:00p.m. 51 J Damily

MIAMI TO: SAN ANDROS (MASTIC POINT)
1:00p.m. 1:50p.m. 304JP MoWeFrSu


FLIGHT
DEPART ARRIVE NUMBER
MAYAGUANA TO: NASSAU
12:00Noon+ 2:25p.m. 904JP

MIAMI TO: NASSAU
9:30a.m. 10:15a.m. 41 J
11:45a.m. 12:30p.m. 43 J
1:10p.m.+ 2:40p.m. 45 J
4:45p.m. 5:30p.m. 49 J
6:20p.m.+ 8:00p.m. 5" J
9:30p.m. 10:15p.m. 55 J


NORTH ELEUTHERA (HARBOUR
8:35a.m.+ 9:20a.m. 102JP
12:05p.m. 12:30p.m. 104JP
1:50p.m. 2:15p.m. 106JP
6:10p.m.+ 6:55p.m. IIOJP
SAN ANDROS TO: NASSAU
7:40a.m. 7:55a.m. 302JP
1:05a.m. 11:20a.m. 304JP
2:00p.m. 2:15p.m. 304JP
3:20 p.m. 3:35 p.m. 306JP
6:05 p.m. 6:20p.m. 308 JP
SAN SALVADOR TO: NASSAU
11:55a.m.+ 1:15p.m. 902JP

SOUTH ANDROS TO: NASSAU
7:55a.m. 8:20a.m. 502 JP
4:40p.m. 5:05p.m. 504JP

STELLA MARIS TO: NASSAU
10:55a.m.+ 12:05p.m. 606JP
TREASURE CAY TO: NASSAU
8:50a.m.+ 9:45a.m. 402JP
9:25a.m.+ 10:30a.m. 402JP
4:20p.m.+ 5:20p.m. 406JP


FREQ.

MoF=r Only


Daisy
Dai sy
Daeiy
Dal my
Dai ly
Dai y


ISLAND)
Dai
Dai
Dai
Dai


TO: NASSAU
ly
iy
ty
ly


Dai ly
TuiWhSa
Su/WtoWeF r
Dai ly
Dai ly

Tu ThSa Only


Ex We
Da ily


Tu VNeFrSu

Ex We
We Only
Da ily


44 J Daily
50 J Daily


303 JP


MoWeFrSu


. +-One stop (All others nons-tp)
J-Jet
JP-Jet Prop
P-Prop


OR COSUL TE FFC ALmILN UD


7-222S, 7-


-N.a..*s. .m .tls-Prp-t

71 13/4 352-57fl

(SAVE THIS SCHEDULE FOR FUTURE REFERENCE)


*Subject to governments Apqroval.


CLASSIFIED




C0354REAL ESTATEs F RENT FOR SA
C 10354 I 1088I ...


C10718
MONTAGU HEIGHTS located
on Windsor Avenue 3
bedroom, 2 bath, maids room
and car port. Large well fruited
lot. Owner must sell at well
below replacement cost
$40,000 or nearest offer. Ring
31172 for appointment.

C10730
OPPOSITE CABLE BEACH -
4 bedrooms 3 baths furnished.
Heated pool, patio, rights to
sandy beach, Air & Central Air.
Spacious grounds asking
$72,000.00.

2 -MILES OUT EAST 4
bedrooms 3 baths plus one
self-contained guest cottage.
Pool, patio and bar. Ideal for
large family. Furnished with
air. Asking $85,000.00.

HILLTOP RIDGEWAY. 4
bedrooms 3 baths furnished
house, pool, patio, views of sea
- rights to water. Spacious
grounds. Excellent condition.
See anytime. Only
$160,000.00.

HILLTOP CAMPERDOWN
- OUT EAST. 2 houses one
for $115,000.00 other
$150,000.00. High class area.
Pool, patio. spacious grounds
for entertaining. Well
equipped. Outdoor tropical
living. See by appointment.

OLD BAHAMIAN HOUSE -
Furnished. Hilltop Sans Souci
- gorgeous views spacious
grounds. Asking only
$65,000.00.

WATERFRONTAGE OUT
EAST has dock, swimming,
skiing. 4 Bedrooms 3 Baths -
furnished. Available
immediately. Come see we can
make a deal.

DIAL THE ACTION
NUMBERS 22033, 22305,
22307, evenings 41197.

C10726
CHARMING BAHAMIAN
HOME on Queen Street. 2
storey, wide porches, hidden
garden, bearing fruit trees.
Suitable for office and/or
residence. $75,000 but make
offer. Telephone Chester
Thompson 24777 (evenings
42035, 31425).

FOR RENT
C 10437
Two bedroom partly furnished
apartment, Fastern End ot
Lancaster Street, Shirlea,
Inquire apt. next door.
C10343
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.


FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park -
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 21/ baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
-" central airconditioning. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C10597
FOR SALE
WOODLAND OFF
VILLAGE ROAD
A very attractive 2 bedroom 1
bath house, completely
furnished with garage and
laundry, three way water
systems on lot 100' x 80' with
extra lot 100' x 82',
beautifully landscaped with
fruit trees and vegetable
gardens. Both lots completely
walled in. Phone 31310 will
consider offers.

C10344
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2. lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape.
Airconditioned throughout.
Unusual opportunity. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.

C10712
YOUR. BEST BUY
FIRST time on market out
east. Four apartments earnings
$11,280 per annum. Large
main residence with rental
value of $9,600 per annum. All
units fully furnished with large
grounds and beautifully
landscaped. Priced for quick
sale. For details call Chester
Thompson Real Estate 24777,
24778.

C10692
WOULD YOU LIKE to live
near the sea with access to a
private lake? Beach rights and
all underground facilities. $75
down. From $80 month. No
interest. From $5800.
Call Pat Rutherford at 4-1141
or Morley & O'Brien at 2-4148
or 2-3027 or come to the
YAMACRAW BEACH Model
Home.


C10349
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

FOR SALE OR RENT

C10732
UNFURNISHED two storey
house three bedrooms two
baths, Eastern District, Phone
4-1183 after 6 p.m.

FOR SALE
C10714
1971 YAMAHA TRAIL 175
cc. $500 Phone 32247 after 6
p.m.
C10696
One Steel Hull 125 ft. x 23 ft.
x 5 ft. Draft Powered by 1
New 343 Cat Diesel
1 15 Ton Unite Crane
1 Cargo Hatch 14 x 24
1Cargo Hatch 14 x 36
Double Bottom. In Excellent
Shape. Duty Paid.
For further information
contact Mr. Sidney Sands,
Treasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamas.

C10711
1 8 Ft. Drug Store Check Out
Counter $125.00
1 Double Display Shoe Rack
$40.00
1 Filing Cabinet 4 Drawers
$60.00
1 Filing Cabinet 2 Drawers
$40.00
Can be seen at Merchandise
Supplies Warehouse Shirlea
Phone 2-3982.

C10728
1 4200 N.C.R. CASH
REGISTER, 1 ice machine 500
Ibs night club size, 8 air
conditioners, 1 apt. size
refrigerator, chairs, tables,
sofas, light fixtures, amplifiers,
speakers, beers $3.00 oer case
English liquors variety. 1
office desk, plus lots of other
items. All must go this week.
Call 22619 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
daily.

C10724
FAMILY LEAVING must sell
assorted toys and household
items e.g. electric car,
tape-recorder, swing and slide
set, books, cameras, records
etc. Call Powell 41232 or
57517.

CARS FOR SALE

C10725
120 cc Suzuki Trail Bike 2
years old 5,000 miles. Very
cheap. Telephone call Powell
41232 or 57517.

C 10700
CUSTOM DESIGN
to your specifications at
ECONOMY PRICES
OIAVALIER
I CONSTRUCTION |
SPhone 3-5171, 3-6011J
D. A. HUDSON
SVARCO-PRIDEN
V r .MTAL IUILDOING SYmMI
Distributed world wide bv
PAIN NTERNA TIONAL -
S NASSAU, BAltHAMAS.


E1


=,


ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Streets. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C10346
4500 sq. ft. warehouse r
office space, available
immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.

C10607
HARBOUR MEWS 2 bed, 2
bath, pool, ocean. Rent
unfurnished $375 per
month/Partly furnished $400.
To sell $45,000.00. Firm. Call
34286.
C10524
TWO 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS consisting of
living dining room, kitchen and
bathroom, basically furnished
- Twynam Avenue. Phone
5-8185
C10442
4 BEDROOMS, 2 BATH
unfurnished house,
airconditioned, double car
garage, telephone Staoledon
Gardens. Telephone 34815.
C10345
One efficiency apartment, andc
one 2 bedroom apartment.
Ring 5-8679 Mr. Pritchard.

C10356
HILLCREST TOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
airconditioning, swimming
pool, short or long term. $375
per month. Contact 2-i841
days.
C10364
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777-8.


AT

Central Garage

TODAY'S
SPECIAL BUY
1972 VAUXHALL
VICTOR $2250.00
Also Available
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
Blue stick shift $2550.00


1969 TRIUMPH 2000
Good condition $1650.00
1971 CHEVROLET
VEGA SEDAN
Good buy $2450.00
1973 DODGE DART CUSTOM
Demonstrator $5895.00
1970 FORD CORTINA
Stick shift $850.00


1965 CADILLAC
Very good buy


$100.00


1972 DODGE AVENGER G.L.
Reconditioned $2550.00
1972 CHEV. VEGA SEDAN
Good buy $3600.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER G.L.
Good buy $1750.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX S/W
Stick Shift Gold $1000.00
1968 FORD ESCORT
Good buy $575.00


1972 VEGA VAN
Good buy


2475.00


1972 CHEV. VEGA SEDAN
Good buy $3600.00
1966 CHEV. IMPALA
Automatic $1000.00
1969 FORD FALCON
2 door Coupe $1400.00


1970 TRIUMPH
Stick shift


$700.00


1973 TRIUMPH TOLEDA
Very good condition $2400.00
1966 OLDSMOBILE DELTA 88
Black $1050.00

FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3-4711

C10570
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
automatic Green $1695
1971 VIVA 2 dr.
automatic Green $1695
19GS VICTOR 2000
S/W Automatic $600
1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Automatic, White $950
1973 MORRIS MINI
Automatic $1895
1968 PONTIAC STRATO
CHIEF Yellow $1400
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
4 dr. Automatic, white $995
1968 JAVELIN
A/C $1200
1967 TRIUMPH
1300 Red. Std. $800
1973 VICTOR S/W F.E.
Auto. Blue 856 miles $4400
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 Dr. Auto. Blue $2100
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
S.S. Auto. A/C $2700
1964 CHRYSLER $800
1968 HILLMAN S/WGN
Green Auto. $1100
1971 FORD CAPRI
AUTO Blue $1950
1966 MORRIS 1100,
4 Dr. $500
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field'-"i-
Opposite Ice Plant.
Phonn -- 34636-7-8


i07PP36 DRTAY
C-10736


DEPART ARRIVE
NASSAU TO: MAYAGUANA
o: i15am. 11 50a.m.


Rentals of.

Full-lenqth movies
Children's Cartoon Shows

16 mm Sound Projectors

Tape Recorders

Filmstrip & Slide Projectors

Screens
Phone 2-2157


HELP WANTED

C10691
RESTAURANT MANAGER
TRAINEE
MALE OR FEMALE between
the ages 25 to 40 interested in
learning the restaurant
business. Applicant must be
willing to work evenings,
holidays & Sundays. Previous
experience not required.
Interested persons send resume
to: Adlv. C10691 c/o The
Tribune P. 0. Box N3207,
Nassau. Bahamas.


EARED
E.....


ADS


C10731
1971 AUTOMATIC DODGE
AVENGER $1400. 36477 7
a.m. 5 p.m. 51327 6 a.m. -
8.30 a.m.

C10645
1969 AUTOMATIC
CHEVROLET IMPALA air
conditioned power steering,
windows. Ring 5-1928.

C10701
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
1970 V/WAGON BUG
Rolls Royce hood
simulated spare wheel
trunk in very good condition
at ONLY $1,600,00
1970 HILLMAN MINX
radio W/W tyres O.N.O.
new paint work for
ONLY $2,500.00
1970 TOYOTA CROWN
O.N.O. New paint work Radio
A/C P/S P/B ice box W/W tyres
in very good condition at
ONLY $2,500.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX Radio
W/W Tyres O.N.O. new paint
work for ONLY $1,300.00
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
SL O.N.O. in perfect condition
at ONLY $2,000.00
1970 V/WAGON 1300 BUG
with tape at ONLY $1,300.00
1969 CHEVY MALIBU A/C
Radio W/W tyres P/S P/B at
ONLY $900.00
MECHANIC SPECIAL --1966
MUSTANG AT ONLY
$300.00
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.,
OPP. DAVIS ST.,
P. O.,BOX N-3741,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE 5-6739

C10704


FREEPORT TO: MIAMI
11:30a.m. 12:10p.m.
4:45p.m, 5:20p.m.

SAN ANDROS TO: MIAMI
11:10a.m. 12:00Noon


I


r


-- -------


.s ..
"""~:Ss..~:~:~::::~::::::~::~:~:::: ...r.~.~.%.... r:.:.:S~kr~~~~~::~" i:......... '' :~-~'~:5~ "''z
.;5;5;5;~;;;;.;;....;..;;;i ;r ......, ,....,,
~"' '5


Ex
Da


HAPPY BIRTHDAY and Best
Wishes to Sonia Miller, Age 1,
from her mother and father,
Beverly & Freeman Miller, and
a. host of other relatives &
friends.


I WANTS TO SAREI
C 10694
PARADISE ISLAND Person
required to share large house.
$175.00 month, Phone 5-5906.

ARTi SUPPLIES

C10669
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.



C10644
NURSING COUNCIL
COMMONWEALTH OF
THE BAHAMAS
NOTICE
All Nurses and Midwives who
applied for registration on or
before .June 12th 1972, and
whose MAIDEN SURNAMES
begin with the letters A to S
may collect their certificates
from the Nursing Council's
Office, School Lane, between
the hours of 9 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. Monday through Friday.
Brendel Cox
Ag. Registrar

MARINE SUPPLIES
C10350
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C10635
FOR SALE 1967 31 foot
BERTRAM Sports-fisherman.
$15,500. (Firm). Telephone
5-4641.


SChOOLS
C10554
ENROLL NOW at the Nassau
Academy of Business in the
following classes.
Typing with spellings
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier
Night Auditing
Telex Operation
English
Maths
Filing
French
'German
Spanish
Common Entrance Preparation
Dictaphone Typist
Call the Nassay Academy of
Business today and join any of
the above classes. Phone 24993
(Located at Shirley Street
opposite Collins Avenue.


REWARDi

C10722
A REWARD IS Offered for
information leading to the
return of a grey tool case
containing electrical tools
missing in the vicinity of
Delaporte. Phone Philip at
3-1964.


ENTERTAINMENT

C10357
ENTERTAINMENT
PROBLEMS?
call
Film & Equipment
Service













he g rt Urtm


Tuesday, July 31. 1973,


mriuwwiII,. g g get tihe jo done

Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 n Nassau,352 6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5pm. Mon. o Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.
by Classified Counter at The.Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1


HELP WANTED


II


HELP WANTED


S TRADE SERVICES [TRADE SERVICES


III


I S- I- U


EQUIPMENT REPAIRMAN
LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Directs and plans work of
workmen as required to
Inspect, test, adjust, dismantle
ind replace unit assemblies or
parts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahalma Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
reportr, Grand Bahama.


C10642
FOUR EXPERIENCED
GARDENERS (Male)
Telephone 5-1044. Between 10
a.m. 5 p.m.

C6097
JOB TITLE: CRANE
OPERATOR AND RIGGER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operates crane as required to
perform erection of structures
and equipment and loading of
materials. Makes minor repairs
and adjustments to crane such
as changing cables, booms,
buckets, etc..
INTERESTEb APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahamas Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
.Freeport, Grand Bahama.

,10359
00O YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Have you always wanted te
work closely with them? Do
you wish to help children
deprived of their normal homes
to become useiui citizens of
our new Bahamas? Then
consider the childcare field.
The Ranfurly Home for
Children is seeking the
following staff:

a) Women, 25/35 to live in
and care for children 2 to
6 years old. Nursery or
childcare experience
helpful.
b) Mature woman, 35/50
with childcare background
and administrative
potential, to live in.
c) Couple with childcare or
social service background
and/or willing to have ir
Service Training on a
contractual basis. Must be
willing to live in.
Only Bahamians will oe
considered. Apply in writing
for an interview to Mr. & Mrs.
Leslie Davies, Ranfurly Home
for Children, Box N1413
Nassau.

C6071
FOR TITLE:
(FOUR) MILLWRIGHTS
MINIMUM EDUCATIONl
Good basic education
education. Good Cement Plant,
mechanical background.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
*5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.

INTERESTED APPLICANT
'CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
iCompany, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10717
REQUIRED: Drug Store Clerk,
previous experience preferred
but not essential. Apply in
writing to: The Manager, P. O.
Box 6229, Nassau.
C10579
MECHANICAL ENGINEER
Applicant must either have a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Mechanical Engineering or be
In his last year of study for
same or equivalent.
Job will consist of the
applicant eventually assuming
complete responsibility for the
maintenance and correct
functioning of all mechanical
and process equipment
presently in the Plant and
which may arrive in the future.
Please call 3-6211 between 9
a.m. 11 a.m. after July 23rd
and before July 27th.

C10578
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
Applicant must either have a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Electrical Engineering or be in
his last year of study for same
or equivalent. Job will consist
of the applicant eventually
assuming complete
responsibility for the
maintenance and correct
functioning of all electrical
and pneumatic equipment
presently in the Plant and
which may arrive in the future.
Please call 3-6211 between 9
a.m. 11 a.m. after July 23rd
and before July 27th.

C6096
JOB TITLE: MOBILE


C10727
Wanted urgently AQUARIST.
Apply Manager Seafloor
Aquarium. Phone 36896, for
appointment.


TRADE SERVICES

C10363

PATIO AWNINGS ANL
CARPORTS
HURRICANE
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
.Ltd.,
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.


C6098
JOB TITLE: STRUCTURAL
STEEL ERECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
Qualified in steel construction.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES.
Work on structural steel
erection during modifications
of buildings and equipment in
Cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10713
IMPORTANT NOTICE
MAJOR retail firm requires
general manager who must
have had at least 5 years
previous managerial
experience, exceptionally good
salary and fringe benefits to
suitably qualified applicant.
Only persons of Bahamian
status need apply. All
applications will be dealt with
in strictest confidence. Send
resume to: Adv. No. C10713
c/o The Tribune, P.O. Box
N3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

C6090
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPERINTENDENT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
able to read blueprints
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and,
erection of modifications to
buildings and equipment in
Cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6035
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE-
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10592
IBM DATA CENTRE
SERVICES
Has immediate position
available in Nassau.
SYSTEMS ANALYST
Successful applicants will be
thoroughly familiar with
systems design and
implementation of varied
commercially oriented
applications.
EXPERIENCE
Position requires a minimum of
five years in programming and
Systems/Analyst work. Must
be able to manage people. IBM
OFFERS: Hospitalization and
insurance programmes, paid
vacation, attractive starting
salary and excellent
advancement opportunities.
Interested applicants should
call Mr. McFadden at 32351/4
for personal interview

C10664
SUNFLIGHT LIMITED
require the services of a
Representative with fluent
French, Secretarial
qualifications, own car and
available to work odd hours.
Please reply to: Adv. C10664,
c/o The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

C10720
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK Of Commerce has
opening for Branch Operations
Officer. Bahamians only need
apply. Salary will be
determined by experience and
qualifications. General Banking
background with minimum 5
years experience essential.

C10723
USED CAR mechanic come in
at Central Garage and ask for
Kendal Major.


REAL ESTATE
C6129
10 Dukes Way, Bahamia, 3
Bedroom 2 Bath, double
garage, unfurnished, quiet
neighbourhood, clean,
desirable. Brokers welcome,
call 352-8186 for appointment
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. $49,500.00
Cash.

IIELP WANTED
C6135
Body Paint and Repair Man -
5 years experience able to
make estimates own tools.
Kent Motors Limited, P. O.
Box F-384, Freeport -
352-7231.

C6123
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
CONTROLLER: Must be fully
experienced, having worked as
Food and Beverage Controller
in Hotel before. Only
experienced applicants need
apply.
HOLIDAY INN FREEPORT,
373-1333, P. O. Box F-760,
FREEPORT. Richard Plachy.

C6126
COOK wanted for preparation
of International Cuisine for
Airline Catering. Must be
prepared to work any hours
day or night when required for
breakfast flights or delayed
flights and have at least five
years training under Certified
Chef.
ASSISTANT CHEF with
knowledge of preparation of
International Cuisine and who
is capable of supervising an
Airline Catering kitchen in the
Chef's absence. Knowledge of
preparation of Airline menus.
At least nine years training
under Certified Chef.
CONFECTIONER. Preparation
of French pastries for Airline
Catering. Preparation of all
bread and pastries in both the
Airline and restaurant kitchen.
Diploma as a Certified
Confectioner from a Catering
College. At least ten years
experience.
CHEF. Qualified Chef with
Diploma from Catering
College 10 years experience in
Airline Catering preferred.
In regard to the above
positions please apply to: G. B.
Caterers Ltd., P. O. Box
F-1943, Freeport International
Airport, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Telephone 352-7391.


C10715


C10351

Plader's Costoms

BrokeraJe Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796.
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C10643
LAWNS, HEDGES, BEACHES.
For All Your Gardening Needs,
Trimming, Hedging, Priming
Beach Cleaning, For Prompt,
Reasonable and efficient
Service Call 5-1044.
C10631
THE ELECTRONIC LAB
TAYLOR STREET
Specialist in Repairing Sewing
machines, radio, watches and
all electrical appliances

C10352
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters for
homes, apartments and hote!s..
Sales and services. Call Douqlas
Lowe, 5-9404 WORLD OF.
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.

C10632

NEED A PROFESSIONAL
HANDYMAN
Call Odd Job Enterprises. We
do anything anytime.
Telephone 42724 55191
Quick Service


IELP WANTED
C6096
JOB TITLE: MOBILE
EQUIPMENT REPAIR RMAN
LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Directs and plans work of
workmen as required to
inspect, test, adjust, dismantle
and replace unit assemblies or
parts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6035
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES3
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
;Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6071
FOR TITLE:
(FOUR) MILLWRIGHTS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:i
Good basic education
Good Cement Plant mechanical"
background.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.

INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6137
2 Experienced Labourers
required.
Apply: Hensel Moore, Moore's
Maintenance Ltd., P. 0. Box
F-843, Freeport.


U L


HELP WANTED


C6136
Intercontinental Realty Ltd.
requires a Supervisor for Sales
Management. At least 5 years
experience in the Real Estate
business with special emphasis
on land sales. To be in charge
of all administration in Miami
based office and will
co-ordinate all charter planes
from Miami to Freeport. Must
be able to travel constantly,
take care of client servicing and
sales recording. Apply to: P. O.
Box F-260, Freeport, Tel:
373-3020.
C6097
JOB TITLE: CRANE
OPERATOR AND RIGGER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operates crane as required to
perform erection of structures
and equipment and loading of
materials. Makes minor repairs
and adjustments to crane such
as changing cables, booms,
buckets, etc..
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahamas Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


I HELP WANTED


C6098
JOB TITLE: STRUCTURAL
STEEL ERECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
Qualified in steel construction.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Work on structural steel
erection during modifications
of buildings and equipment in
Cement plant.
iNTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6099
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPERINTENDENT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
able to read blueprints
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and'
erection of modifications to
buildings and equipment in
Cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


Brother Juniper


"Hey, if we really are being skyjacked we won't have to
pay duty on this stuff. Right?"


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

II FIREPEIT TEL. 352-6 ,


Hl IIN-.
CAUFORNIA1
WHITE
MOUNTAINS
THIS ANCIENT

SPROUTEP
S WHN ~'M,"
^ YLONU
WAS
S FLUOURSHImNG

Ifc-ic~I ^^jC^


---~- --


I I


I I I


* I I


CECIL'S FRIENDLY
GIFT SHOP
Meadow St. & Blue
Hill Rd.
Gifts for Parties
& Weddings
FIGURINES
GLASS SETS
CHINA SETS
SILVER SETS
RUGS, etc.
Open 3 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

C10409
ISLAND T.V. SERVICE
For service you can rely on
Dowdeswell Street
T.V. Antennas Boosters
Sales and Services
Phone 22618 P. 0. Box N327,
Nassau Monday Saturday
8:30 to 5:30.







bL rtibun
7f-4R


.I


L m I i


imamm


LL


ZIPLLy'












Tuesday, July 31, 1973.


N w mm[oii


HOW many
n words of
A B rour letters
or more can
you make
f rom the
letters shown
here? in mak-
Ing a word.
M L e a ch letter
M L nmay lie used
once only.
S a ch word
must contain the large letter,
and there must be at least one


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN
1. Worry
2. Bean
3. Star in
"Draco"
4. Cowardly
5. Spawn of fish
6. Afflicts


7. Rapid
8. What the
kittens lost
9. Expert
10. Color
16. Auto
18. Assam
silkworm
21. Massachusetts
cape
23. Keel-billed
cuckoo
24. French article
25. Rolled tea
26. Glutton
27. Trailing
arbutus
28. Greek ghost
32. Confronted
33. Flow of gossip
35. Siesta
36. Drop in
medicine
39. Goneril's
father
41. Roof edge
42. Approval
43. Socials
44. Accountant
45. Sprite
46. Gypsy
gentleman


Ij I2 '
2

N 7.1 1 Il IM M l l



II lik 1a1.i1er 1 I'
1 I'fi ill I< ll Ii ir. Al !

Chess
By LEONARD BARDUN


Mata QGbburdanidze, a 1a2-
yearold girl, beat some of
ssaa's top women in a recent
itteo ational in Tiftis, and ws
warded a brilliance pu-e for
her play from today agam.
Mada (White, to move) Is a
knight up, but her opponent
Andreeva threatens to regain it
at once. What should Mat play,
how did the game end
ar times: 20 seconds, ahess
rnister: 1 minute, chess expert:


Rupert and Miss Samantha-2


Edward carries the boxed cake into the garden
where his young brother Is waiting in his
push-chair. "This is your birthday cake,
Pompey," says Edward. "You shall have it
the day after tomorrow. I hope you're coming
to Pompey's party, Rupert," he adds.
" Rather I" replies the little bear. "I've been
trying to think of a present for him. What


I L "'~ g -a ?ty
would he like 7" Edward wrinkles his trunk.
"H'm. that's difficult-there isn't much to
choose for an elephant of his age. I'm just
hoping that all the presents won't be the
same." Edward's last remark sets Rupert
thinking hard as he says goodbye to his pal
and starts for the village.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


eight-letter word in the list. No
lurais : no foreign words; no
proper names. TODAY'S
TARGET : 21 words, good : 26
words, very good; 31 words.
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Elvish evl give given helping
hinge hive Ingle Isle levin lien
line ling live liven neigh nigh
SHELVINE shin shine shingle
sigh sign sine sing singe single
sleigh sling snivel veil vein vile
vine.
l. o Inll lll l 14)
1 %7 hlxlskv iil))lliii T I: I
I % ooden-Iit l M'.illa l l il, II. ii
thenm. (;I-..4
I Fr'ilt ( )
ft'(Ih 1;. i n
I lF ir oi;lliIrhji.. 14-54,

lil'illlll. i 1 )

I ll I' I I OI i ,
lih,, (96

S.. In ill. I IS I i I i
II I I
S I I AI II
S, 5 H C U
illAKS

: I Ii II IIIT Y

2 minutes, county Paayer; 4
minutes, club strength; 7
minutes, average; 20 ridtutes
novice.

Chess Solution
1 0-0-0! RxKt; 2 RxB ch.
K-KI (if 2 . xR; 3 QxR
wins); 3 R-K7 ch! and Black
resigned because if 3 . Rx R;
4 B-Kt5 wins the queem.



Bridge
BY VICTORIA MOLLO
What happened ,) your
tweltth trick ? asked the Senior
Kibitzer raising a sardonic eve-
Irow.
Not knowing the answer, the
Professor tried to look inmerut
able.
Dealer South: Love Al.
North
SQ 10 97
A Q 10 5 2
0365
West East
4 64 4532
S6 3 'K K J 9 8 4
Q 104 2 0 73
10 974 K 5 2
SAKJ8
i 7
0 AK98
4A883
South North
16 4I
24 44
64
West led the 4J and the
Professor quickly counted up to
twelve--the VA. lhe OAK, the
6A and eight tricks on a cross-
ruff.
Going up with the &A, he
first ciahed the OAK to guard
against diarnmnd discards by
defenders during the cross-ruff.
Then he ruffed a club in dummy,
and after taking ithe OA, a heart
in his hand. Two more club ruff.:
and two heat ruffs followed.
This left him with the 4A and
098, facing 4Q, the VQ and tthe
OJ In dumnvy. He was in Mis
own hand and there was no way
at scoring the two trumps
separately.
"Since you had to ruff four
hearts and only three clubs,"
pointed out SK you should have
ruffed a heart st. before ruff-
ing a club. A alanpe hand"
added SK f you don't start on
the wrong loot."


- Tike Comic -age

-- .


By DAL CURTI


I REX MORGAN, M.D.


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HOROSCOPE
S from the Carroll Righter tstitute
\ N GENERAL TENDENCIES: A day when a
S considerable amount of confusion exists as to
how best to let others know you hke them and want to do
some thoughtful things for them Asking with a friendly smile
what your associates expect of you gives you better answers
than you could think of
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Improve order in your
surroundings now and do kind things for others without
making them feel beggardly Add new items to your wardrobe
Have a delightful time with persons you like a great deal
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Being with persons you like
a great deal can bring fine recreation and much happiness Be
cordial with everyone Creative work is excellent if you plan
each step wisely first
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Don't get into any arguments
at home, or there could be serious trouble Using care in all
you do is excellent Don't discuss that strange situation today
with kin, since another day would be far better
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Get at that
shopping and errands without further procrastination, but use
care in motion and with finances Read some communication
over twice so you get the true meaning Avoid one who talks
nonsense.
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) You want to add much to present
holdings and can do just that by wise investments Check that
bill you do not feel sure about Make certain your home is in
excellent order and is clean
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) You find it difficult to make
those decisions of an important nature, so stick to less vital
matters. If you show others you like them, all works out to
your benefit. Think constructively
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Sit down and reflect upon the
happenings around you, but do not state your views Handle
all those duties that are yours with real dispatch Go over your
idealistic concepts in the evening Put them to good use
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Some friend may state ideas
now that are not correct about you, so be sure you correct
them immediately Plan to attend a social function that can
lead to interesting conversations, benefits Do some friend a
big favor
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Plan time to
straighten out credit or career matter early in the a.m Don't
jeopardize your position with bigwigs. Show your affection for
those you like and gain more goodwill
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) You may not fully
understand the conditions about you, but careful analysis will
make you see them clearly Show patience with one who
boasts a good deal Smile more and you tone down this
person
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Get busy taking care of
responsibilities, particularly those of an official nature Mate's
views may not be yours, so don't give in to them if they are
way out Don't get into any arguments, though
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) You could be at variance with
the views of an associate, but don't take anything for granted;
wait for better time for finer understanding Have confidence
in higher-up who is in public life Steer clear of some sneaky
newcomer
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who has to have duties to
perform early in life to keep him or her out of mischief and to
feel wanted and a worthwhile member of society


JUDGE PARKER


By PAUL NICHO .S


I APARTMENT 3-G" ByiAletKotk
APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotxkv


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


lf FRIEND AND I HIS PLACE IS OUT A a.ATI/N 6 THIN YOUL.L /AVE 70 K',FASt,
WOULD LIKE TO TALK AT THE EDGE OF TOWN C/ARLE5 POFC. NOW hERE WA4T YOU E
,INTH THE COUNTYY ILL TELL 'OU HOW /DL E> TODO ---4A0DDONTASKW/.,'f ( .
EHlFF FO -GET THERE. / TAK/N6




S IVENT i /T A JE EL TE ---







1CANTU DER~TAN TD P"'OSABL' THN, A.., N(,// /N I'LL SEE'YUH-AN
WHAT'S KEEPING THAT E IN THE CAFE vOHtR4"' ZEAVE RAISE VUH FIVE.


EV IEtOT













CLEANING PLACE EHAT iF
( RE NOW







SYEAH, THAT'S OUR -_ OUR
DEARKiNG A. AND












YOU WANT TO KNOW WHO ILL WAIT.
iT BELONGS TO~ YOU LL HAVE ANM THANK YOU.
TO WALT A MINUTE ...
0c


E(-h (ribuntt


"It may not be what your boss approves of for office
wear... but he will after he sees you in it."


'YA BETTER GET YOUR MONEY BACK FOR THAT NEW
GARDEN HOSE, DAD! IT4CD "


"These waters are infested "They'll just have to take
with sharks!" their chances like the
rest of us."


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE

ACROSS 30 West Point
dance
1. Beat 31. Avenger.
5. Canadian 34. Getting on in
fliers years
8. Distraught 37. Turmeric
11. Harass 38. Frenchman
12. Salad 40. Negotiate
ingredient 44. Book part
13. Slippery 47. Notoriety
14. Boy's name 48. American
15. Office holder author
17. Index 49. Scottish
19. Locality river
20. Italian 50. Part of the
daybreeze eye
22. Trample 51. Arab's coat
25. Towhee 52. Common verb
29. Compass point 53. Optical aid


~~~


HE HAD THREE IT UPSET HIM / HE LEFT THE OFFICE IS JOAN ON NO, SHE WENT OFF
NEW PATIENTS SAYING THAT IF HE HAD TO PROVE A LUNCH DUTY EARLY/ SHE
I DON'T SEE RICE'S SCHEDULED-- HIS INNOCENCE, HE BREAK'? WASN'T FEELING WELt
CAR / DIDN'T HE HAVE BUT ALL WAS GOING TO DO IT/
SOME OFFICE APPOINT- CANCELLED/
MENTS THIS MORNING ?









/m
J'i i "


I


r I


- **


I










Tuesday, July 31, 1973.


Th b uribunt


Obed will get crack


at Bunny Grant of


Jamaica after Rogers
By GLADSTONE ADDERLEY
THE PROGRESSIVE BAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT CHAMP
Elisha Obed will get a chance to propel himself right into the
mainstream of the World Boxing Ratings should he convincingly
dispose of Miamian middleweight Doug Rogers in their ten round
main event August Monday at the A.F. Adderley Gym.


It was announced today that
an agreement has been reached
with Jamaica's welterweight
champ Bunn. (rant to light
Obed in late August.
Grant has always expressed ai
desire to fight Obed since O)bed
unanimously decisioned his
stable mate Roy Gross in April.
When Grant challenged Obed
following the Gross victors.
Obed said that he was not
ready just then but would he
within the next six months.
Placed in the hands ot the
experienced Dundees with the
training of the veteran lMoe
Fleischer to guide him alons',
Ohed has just about passed hii
creeping stage and is read\ to
move into bigger things. Yet.
his first big step depends on
how he does with Rogers.
Rogers, a toughened armys
kid who has won 20 of his 31
appearances while losing seen
and drawing four. has foughlt
many of Obed's tornmer
opponents but unlike )Ohed
lacked the skill and tcchniqte
to put them awa aJi
convincingly. These include
Jimmy Willianis. Bliudd
Taylor. Roscoe Bell and Jioe
Hooks.
A pro boxer since 1 'o').
Rogers placed himself in good
contention for the FlF!,,!.!.


middleweight title Iunil inI
1971 whecn lie was called to thli
arms. I st \ cars of Victnami
;., i: l, lia\c changed
nothiill' ,, .1 1 as Rogers is
concerned :n1ii at tlie
resnumlption ot) Ils fistic career.
iliddlkeweiights Victor Pcre/.
llenry I homiis and Sllik
Mitchell all tell at his
co lllmmalll.
As ,a sounnist er, RKogers
bought his own gloies and
practitsed in crude backward
rings it'll never had the benretit
ot amllatCtieur e\peiience. It \aks
he reali\ got started.
\ g lad hilt ,l K illiani l light
Sclhoil in Souilih \lal. iRogei
practi ses iptIlibling \hclien not
ac i e iI1 ring attairs Hlence
le is i kno in ais "the fighting
plumibe" His fighting arsenal
1is said iio be i sairied as Ils
spcci di ,ool kil
Rogcrs ,iid h Ii trI:n r 1iac
rec gainlc h pre -ni\\ to in j n
is read o% 'e p tn 'n Il


ticklllt. I ,l s tllt |i i|1 t[ i \lR 1g
lucd tiln ,iul t" c l
5 otittlu'it Is \i .11 t'el iu ctel it
Shid' i i i li i i t
Jnn he e s i is ,i


4


BAHAMAS WELTER-
WEIGHT champ Elisha Obed
gets some pointers from trainer
Moe Fleischer (second from
right) during a medical
check-up from Dr. E.N. Achara
(left). At right is Austin
Ransey one of Obed's
handlers.

,?


2*-


A, - F^^^ >

JIM DUNCOMBE

Dumcombe defends

his amateur title

this weekend
B \ II. A I AS C G 1L I
\ s s i cl ati n 's Amateur .
Slinpitn Jim l)Duncomhe is
.'\ pelced Ito be his golfing sell
.i.ii Siilida\. and t Mondasi
hs lien hc defend hs that title ini
tlie B (;.\ 's Priine Minister
( Ai: nalCeurl ('halmpionship
l'ii llar anic l for i ient at their
Soith 1 )Ocean (I 11 C' lt lu
Spmltsmed I\ (;nld and
Sil ersmiths, this 3. Iholec
to11irnal eni is onie ol the
highlights of the bhus I.(; A.
Aiugusl calendci. Open to
ii hibers iof the B.(C.A. A ionl\
tilhe t rcirn ldinn t \\ill eL di lthed
inlo thII fIhilits. \i/.
( ainllpioiil isni litchlt (i0-
handiapt, \" I lightly ( 10 16
handicap) Ji l "i 1'" lightt
(17-24 handl ,ip )
I leri \\ ill lie awards foi
\i neil nd i !iuCnner-tp; gross
and nei for eaich T light. In
addition), thl rec \%ill be a
Miedjlisi it\\ ild ii the best
I"'ss s C .In I Iti Sunda\ TheI
I,.ss winitier rcLei\es tIlh Prime
Minister's ( up and tli nelt
\Inner iecci\,es the B.C.A.
irsclIdcnl t's" ( lip
W ith spcitil I rates bt being
otlitrcd B.Ci.A. nieinhers troin
the :,iatlill\ Islands byh
Bahaina.sailr inld .Soitih O(alean
Hotel for tuts ti urnaincnt, a
stiong ti reeport- Irand Bahanma
c ntingent led b'. their best
gollers is ce\nested


Windies win first


Test by 158 runs


LONDON (AP) The West Indies scored
20 Test Matches and nearly four years with
England before Calypso-dancing fans at


Tuesday.
thousands of West Indian
fans poured onto the pitch as
Keith Boyce took the last
wicket his sixth in the
innings just 15 minutes after
lunch on the last day
England were all out for 255
in their second innings with
Irank Ilaves, making his
international debut, not out at
the end with a fine 106
1 layes, who burst into
prominence only this year.
joined the rare breed of about
40 players who have scored a
century in their first Test
match.
But the day belonged to
bowler Ken Boyce who killed
1 ngland's hopes in a
destructive display of swing
bowling.
With sweat dripping from
hin as lie tore to the wicket in
tie hot sunshine, Boyce tore
the heart out of England in the
quarter of an hour before
lunch when he got the prime
scalp of captain Ray
Illingworth and Alan Knott.
That left tHayes, playing
comfortably and attractively
trying to find an effective
helper at the other end. And
with the tigerish Boyce eager
for action after the interval the
end was inevitable.
lie waltzed through the
dfcinse of (;eoff Arnold and
John Snow and iHayes had
run out of partners.
A GRIA V TI ST
(liainlpatine flowed on the
placrs' talconn as the I ngland
and West Indian players
toastLed each other after what
was gecneilall regarded as one
of the all lime great Test
matches
Thousands of fans stood
below the balcony, swigg-ng
beer. cheering their heroes
de lirioutsl\, dancing and
singing.
Throughout th e five da\s of
pulsating action, the big West
Indian contingent in the sell
out crowds gave the visitors
vocitcrous support: the game
was tincch balanced for three
dals, ibut then the pendulum
gradually\ stwng the West
Indies' \a\ .
('lic 1 I, d l lade a
breathltking century in the
West Indian first innings and
little \liin Kallicharran scored
80 t \\ ice.
lor I ngland. Bot cott
was the stia ot the first innings
witli 'i7 and the second innings
helongeid to, 20()-ear-old I aves
with his unbeaten and defiant
cc'nt tir .
llingkoirth iand Ilaes kept
I ngland's hopes .alive lIr llmotst
1o the nilorning sssio n.
N eight wsat chn Ii n l)erek
Ulnderwood had gone early
LBW' to Botce for seven. But
Illingisorth and HIlaes put on
93 for the sixth wickct before
Boyce struck alga.in..
The English captain moved
across the flight of a Boyce
delivery and his leg stump was
knocked back. 'lhat set the
West Indian supporters racing
onto the pitch to congratulate
their heroes. And a few
minutes later they were there
again as Knott went I.BW to
Boyce who finished the
morning session on tour
wickets for 68.
lingland's hopes appeared nil
in the warm sunshine. They
still needed 161 to save the day
with only John Snow to hat
with Arnold and Ilaves.
414 TO WIN
Aiming to score 414 in 530
minutes to win the pulsating
game played before an excited
capacity crowd of well over
rT 25,000. Ingland were in dire
straights on 126 for five
wickets, as play started on the
last day.
The West Indians made 225
in fairly cavalier fashion in
their second innings and that
set the stage for Lance Gibbs,


their first vi
a crushing
the Londo


the off-break bow
mesmerized England
batsmen with a crafty
of spin and experier
Guyanan star has pla
English county Wars
for six years and few
know the local cc
better than he does.
His victims were
Boycott and Graham
both caught and bow
Keith Fletcher.
At the other end, t
West Indian slow
Inshan Ali claim
invaluable prize w
forced big Tony Gr
snicking the ball into
and Rohan Kanhai
grabbed the chance. C
out for a duck.
For the West Indi
left-hander Kallicharr
veteran Gary Sobers
batting stars in the e
of Monday.
Kallicharran, drivi
pulling to perfection,
in just under three ho
11 fours.
Sobers showed somr
vintage form in a sto
lie cover-drove Ray 111
to the boundary to
the 200 in the first o
lunch. But when So
gone, caught by
Underwood off Johr
the West Indians fell
midafternoon, with
moderate resistance
from Keith Boyce, or
first innings stars, In
and Lance Gibbs.
"We want Boyce.
Boyce." shouted the
the adulation wa
deserved. The Barba
rounder spanked 72 ir
innings and followed
five wickets in the firs
and six in the second,
all five to fall on the
At lunch I ngland sl
for 8. still a massive
short of the target.
Hayes moved con
to his century. But
no stopping Boyce.
space of 15 minutes af
Geoff Arnold mistime
and was caught
Ileadley and John S
bowled without real
the ball.
The West Indies ha
158 runs.
S'tORI BOARI) of th
match between Inglan
West I ldies:
%VI1 SI IN ItI'S 415 (C
132. (;.(;. Arnold five ft
255.
SN(,I ANI) 257 ((;. B
K. 1). BUo ce five for 7(
(I0 C. I la es 106 not
Iloyce 6 for 77.)

FENCING Tll

AT FREEPOR
THEi 1972-3
Tournament. sponsor
Freeport Fencing ('l
with 25 exciting bou
foil on July 18 in
Kevin Basden sc
over Michael Powell
declared first in
Senior group with
number of four vict
one loss. Powell wa
runner-up with three
and two losses.
In the Boys Jun
Edmund Hunt was
five victories and no
Williams was runner u
Kirk Antoni won
in the Men's division
victories and no loss
Finnikin was first
with three victories
loss. Nicka Scavona
trophy for the t
fencer with two vie
two losses. Timoth:
received the troph;
best Novice fencer.
The Freeport Fen
will reopen on Septer
the Auditorium of
of the Sea School.


IN AN UNL'St'\I
HUSBAND AND) W11
combination Beryl Hggs
successfully dciended ier
Ladies Championship (rown i
and her husband. Hired tliggs.
captured the \1e n's
Championship during the
recent International (,o1!
Tournament at the Karen and
mimuru Golf Courses in
Nairobi, Kenya.
The tournament was started
tome eleven years ago and iha,
been contested in such places
as Hawaii, Mexico, \'en/uila.
Sweden, Dennlark. NassIau
Freeport and Puerto Rico
Last year Mrs Iliggs bctaniit
the first foreigner to win the
tournament, when it wtas
played in Caracas. Vrnei'uel.i
and this year she iscrit ion
successfully to defend that
title.
Mrs. Higgs said tt,it pl) ilig
in high altitude tends i agree
with her.
Husband Fed thlggs siht
finished in a tie ftoi ws,,id spult
last year, dominated thie i.,'ni s
division by leadi;l Bert
Robinson of Nes 'i .>ik h; ,ie
shot on the first di oI di aiint
on to win by 10 sh>i- liggs


ta i r Ierl r h11 l \i til l ;,I 'I'm .

%I, J rs C'! III-' I d I c
tri in n: the cirs
isi idni I itItd tiel lis h, ilu ,
itt\ l tt.liii i,. dc\ ',ie l.u ill it usc'
D avi) Id.iunn \li had ,
w ithdrat aie! ; th Ils It J
ciiinii et SiI d l itt itncI ss
\ e\t \ car th.' l to r L ';
Ioves c e til' s ri It '
r liggs. \h le r n ,is i '! t ,i', tlc
Ito rna ent s I t
Ic it irir S I )sI s I I h IkA,,
c.ix rse \.it. p ;'! '.',isv I! \\K is
\cr\ ApcC i aJId h.id a
cO nsidertl) 1 ]. r III >t I ,0 1 1 rt
piar 4 isl. I4 is I li tl \. on
\ t'ere hlil lnm \\trip..' 1. I, s i n.
chi pair 5t i\. int t i ithe.
high t o t I i i
reach t here \\ .i .
I hI ,c
I wnillru j, wa i i i .,l
was back t, s.,,, :,", cl
t h,'r )ore ,i h.l ,, ,' 11 1lh '
b ', all i n l. . .: 'v '' \
i lte resting a il 'i, , i.i
irans tf't Inian\ lt' '


Its only natural


It


e 11 Vo ACCO COMll *Natural


p


Ingraham took three for 34,
IT Malcolm top scored for St.
Fencing Georges with 13 and was the
red by the only batter to reach double
ub, ended figures. Twelve extras were
ts all in made up of seven byes, three
Freeport. leg byes and two no balls
;ored 5:4 added to St. Georges score.
and was
the Boys
a total In other matches finished
stories and over the weekend, Paradise
s declared Island after being forced to
e victories: follow on after they were all
out for 117 in reply to the
ior group Prison Officers' 276 for seven
first with declared were 65 for two by
loss. Clive the end of the two day's match
up.
first place The Prison Officers collected
with four six points for the first innings
. Auldwin win and the Islanders got two.
runner-up ********
Sand one The Southerners Cricket
won the Club still hold command of the
Dest guest Bahamas Cricket Association's
stories and league with a five point lead
y Harman over Carroll's Adventurers.
y for the Defending champions St.
Bernards are third with 23
icing Club while Paradise Island and St.
mber 12 at Agnes are tied for fourth with
Mary Star 22.


WENT FORD

HURLS FIRST

AAA SHUTOUT

HANDER Wenty Ford picked
up his first shutout in AAA
competition Monday night
when he blanked the Syracuse
Chiefs 7-0 enroute to his
seventh victory this season.
Despite the fact that other
starters have been working all
season long, Ford still boasts of
the most wins on the pitching
staff of Richmond Braves since
joining that club only six
weeks ago.
Ford who went the distance
for his seventh complete game
allowed only six hits. After 70
complete innings Ford has
given up only 11 earned runs
and has an ERA of 1.4.
Ford's manager Clint
Courtney is very much
concerned with his hurler
moving up to Atlanta but so
far has met with little success.
Ford said that other pitchers
with much higher ERA than
-is have been called up so "I
ctory in don't know what the people at
win over the top are thinking about."
n Oval
er. e ST. AGNES HIT
's best AG E
mixture
ce. The BACK TO BEAT
ayed for
wickshire
players ST. GEORGES
conditions
PACE BOWLERS Alfred
Geoff Ingraham and George Shannon
Roope, together bagged a total of
led, and thirteen wickets Sunday as St.
Agnes Cricket Club rose from a
he other slump, winning 10 points from
bowler St. Georges following the end
ed an of their two day match at
hen he Haynes Oval. That win has
eig into moved St. Agnes from seventh
the slips to fourth in the league tied
eagerly with Paradise Island.
;reig was
St. Agnes, who on the first
es. little day's play were three down for
an and only four runs, came back
were the strongly behind the batting of
early part Nathanial Bain and skipper
Tyrone Wilson to end their
ng and first innings at 153 all out. St.
made 80 Georges on the same day were
,urs with 67 for two when stumps were
drawn.
ie of his When play resumed on
)rmy 50. Sunday under partly cloudy
ingworth skies, Shannon took no time to
bring up pace the down fall of St.
)ver after Georges and in his second over
bers had dismissed Vernon Malcolm and
Derek George Turnquest. One nin
n Snow, later. Rankine fell caught off
apart in Ingraham's bowling, bringing
S only St. Georges to five for 77.
coming
ne of the Actually. St. Georges sent a
ishan Ali total of six batters to the
wicket who added only 45
We want runs. Delray Wittaker did the
fans and rest of the damage taking two
is well wickets for I 1 runs.
adian all Ingraham in the bottom of
the first the first innings took three for
that wit 38 in 1 overs. Shannon took
st innings three for 28 in 12 including
including two maidens.
last day.
id to 243 Opening batsman Gary
171 runs Wilson, who went for a duck in
St. Agnes' first innings,
nfortably highlighted their second
there was innings of 89 all out with a fine
In the 45 not out. With the exception
after lunch of Wilson, Bain and Turner St.
ed a hook Agnes' other players failed to
by Ron reach double figures. Bain
Snow was scored 12 and Turner 13.
lly seeing Spin bowler George
Turnquest took four wickets
Id won by for 27 runs in 7.2 overs. Ken
Cumberbatch and Godfrey
e I first Test Eneas took two for 19 and two
d and the for 18 respectively.
t. 1. Llod Twelve overs were all St.
ir I 13) and Agens needed to disposed ol
Ilocott 97 St. Georges in the bottom of
)) and 255 the second innings. These
out K. I). twelve were shared evenly
between Shannon and
'LES Ingraham. Shannon bagged
L four for 10 in his six and


figured in the two-run fourth
by slugging a run-scoring
double.
The strong arm of relief
pitcher Henry Williams, who
relieved Bertie Murray in the
fourth frame, was unable to
hold down a stubborn Jet Set
who again retaliated for
another run in the bottom half
of the fifth to deadlock tht
score at 6-6. *
FINE PITCHING
Williams and Eugene
Thompson, starter for Jet Set.
then embarked on some
splendid mound performances
as each hurler blanked their
respective opponents for the
next three frames.
Schlitz began their four-run
eight with a lead off hit by
Fountain followed by a walk
to leftfielder A. Minus.

NASTASE WINS AGAIN
IST'ANBUL (Al') Romanian top
tennis star Ilie Nastase won the
28th Istanbul International tennis
tournament Monday, defeating
Juan Gishert of Spain 6-2, 3-6, 6-3,
6-2.
In the men's doubles Nastase and
Gishert beat Bob ;iltinan and
Sydney Ball. both Australians, 6-4,
6-0, 6-3.
In the mixed doubles Giltinan
and Diane Iromholtz, Australia,
defeated Ball and Wendy l'urnball,
Australia 61, 6-3.
Miss Iiromhoilt won the
women's singles championship
Sunday in straight sets, 6-4, 6-2
against Miss Turnhball.


Texas 6, Oakland 0
Today's Games
Baltimore (Palmer 12-6) at
Cleveland (Tidrow 8-9), 6 p.m.
Detroit (Perry 9-10 and Coleman
11-8) at Milwaukee (Colhorn 13-6
and Slaton 7-8), 2, 7 p.m.
New York (Dobson 6-3) at Boston
(Lee 12-5), 7:30 p.m.
Kansas City (Splittorff 13-5) at
Chicago (Stone 4-8), 9 p.m.
Minnesota (Blyleven 13-9) at
Oakland (Holtzman 15-9), 11 p.m.
Texas (Clyde 2-3) at California
(Wright 8-14, 11 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet. GB
St. Louis 55 48 .534 -
Chicago 54 50 .519 1 Vi
Pittsburgh 50 51 .495 4
Montreal 50 52 .490 4%'
Philadelphia 48 56 .462 7/2
New York 44 56 .440 9V'
West Division
Los Angeles 65 39 .625 -
Cincinnati 61 44 .581 4/2
San Francisco 59 45 .567 6
Houston 54 53 .n50 17',
Atlanta 48 60.444 .19
San iego 35 69 .337 30
Monday's Results
Chicago 3, St. Louis 1
Montreal 1-5, New York 0-2,
Montreal 1-5, New York 0-2,
second game 10 innings
Philadelphia I, Pittsburgh 0
Atlanta 7 lHouston 3
Today's Games
Chicago (Kenkins 9-9 and Gura 2-4)
at Philadelphia (Twitchell 9-3 and
Longborg 9-7), 2, 5:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (Norman 9-9 and
Grimsley 10-6) at Atlanta (Morton
8-8 and Niekro 10-4), 2, 6:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Foster 7-6) at Montreal
(McNally 7-5), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ellis 9-9) at New York
(Koosman 8-10), 8:05 p.m.
I.os Angeles (John 10-5) at
lHouston (Roberts 10-8), 8:30 p.m.
San Francisco (Willoughby 4-5) at
San Diego (Greif 6-12), 10:30 p.m.


HUSBAND AND WIFE WIN

GOLF TITLES IN E.AFRICA


let Set lose to Schlitz


who clinch spot on


championship playoffs

By OSCAR MILLER
DESPITE A GALLANT FIGHT for some seven and a half
innings Jet Set eased into the twilight of this season's baseball
action by losing their final game 10-6 to a well-balanced Schlitz
Beer in the only game played at the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre Monday night.
Last night's finale for a Respecting the potency of
mediocre Jet Set saw them slip Lorenzo Lockhart's bat Jet Set
into the League's fifth spot and issued him a free pass to load
a half game behind Del Jane the bases with Schlitz runners.
Saints. However, the Jetters are Pitcher Thompson who
still counting on that faint began to show signs of tiring
glimmer of hope in the event just could not find the strike
Del Jane loses its game tonight zone and walked catcher Bain
with Bahamas Blenders, better with what later turned out to
known as the League's be the winning run of the
"Upsetters." game. Another walk to third
A loss for Del Jane tonight baseman Smith and a two-run
would place them in a tie for double by pinch hitter
fifth spot with Jet Set. This Vincient Strachan ended
would then lead to a sudden Schlitz scoring activities for the
death match between the two night with ten big runs.
teams for the last vacancy in Jet Set failed to score in the
the Knockout Championship bottom half of the eighth
series which is scheduled to inning and thus had to settle
begin on Wednesday night. for their 18th defeat of the
Schlitz, on the other hand year. Jet Set ended play with a
by winning their game last season record of 24-18.
night, have secured themselves Henry Williams was credited
a spot in the knockout series. with the win for Schlitz while
Schlitz will make its final Thompson who chuncked
appearance tonight against the rather strong for 7 -2/3 innings
League's leading Beck's Bees in suffered the loss.
the second end of a LEAGUE'S STANDINGS
doubleheader scheduled at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. TEAM w L GB GI
QUICK OFF MARK Beck's Bees 31 10 I
BigQ 31 11 /2 0
Determined to make their Shlit 25 16 6 1
season finale a good game Jet Del Jane 24 17 7 1
Set quickly got on the score Jet Set 24 18 7'/ 0
board when singles by Bah. Blenders 5 26 16 1
leftfielder G. Woodside and
catcher Lester Gardiner
produced a tally in the bottom
half of the first inning.
But Schlitz realizing the
importance of the contest
stormed back in the top of the
second and marched 10 batters AMERICAN LEAGUE
to the plate for five runs. East Division
W L Pet. C
Rightfielder A. Smith and first New York 59 48 .551 -
baseman Fred Fountain had Baltimore 54 45 .545 I
the big bats in that frame, each Boston 54 48 .529 2
D)etroit 54 48 .529 2
picking up a pair of rbis. Milwaukee 50 51 .495 6
Schlitz got another run in the Cleveland 38 67 .362 2C
West Division
fourth to make the score 6-1. Oakland 58 47 .552 -
Jet Set began chipping away Kansas City 59 48.551 -
at a five-run deficit by scoring Micnneta 53 49.520 3
Chicago 52 52 .500
one run in the second another Chicago 52 52 .500
in the third and two more in California 48 53 .480 1
Texas 39 63 .382 1
the fourth. Leftfielder Monday's Results
Woodside, who enjoyed a )etroit 4, Baltimore 3
four-for-four night at the plate, Chicao 9, Minnesota 1
1,trn d N.wur, V+k


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