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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: July 3, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03386

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U____ _______________ _____________________


HI DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
HEAR IT ALL
ON RADIOll
AT HOME- I
OR IN YOUR CAR.


(Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage c


rirtbutt


oncessiona within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands


VOL. LXX, No. 185 Tuesday, July 3, 1973. Price: 15 Cents


BOARD CHAIRMAN FINALLY MAKES STATEMENT, &


ST. ANDREW'S TEACHER DEFENDS HEADMASTER





Chaplin'misrepresented facts'


By MIKE LOTHIAN
HEADMASTER JOHN CHAPLIN'S "total disregard"
for the authority of the St. Andrew's School Board "has
made him impossible to deal with" and forced the board
to vote against his continuing in the post, board
chairman William Holowesko declared today.


Mr. Holowesko charged Mr.
Chaplin with "misrepresenting
the facts" in his efforts to win
support in his dispute with the
board.
The board notified Mr.
Chaplin on June 18 that he
would not be rehired when his
present term of employment
expired on August 31,. after 19
years as the St. Andrew's
headmaster.
Mr. Chaplin claimed that the
terms of his contract stipulated
that there must be one term's
notification of termination.
The alleged lack of proper
notification prompted a threat
from the Bahamas Union of
Teachers to "blacklist" St.
Andrew's, a threat to resign
from 21 St. Andrew's teachers,
and reaction of "anger and
disgust" from the National
Museum and Research Centre
fund-raising committee.
In an interview with The
Tribune this morning Mr.
Holowesko said Mr. Chaplin in
fact had no formal contract
with the board, although some
teachers at St. Andrew's did
have contracts spelling out the
one-term notice of
termination.
He said the board decided to
give Mr. Chaplin notice after
final examinations were
finished, because they
anticipated that giving the
notice during the school yetr
wild hae resulted :1i
disruption of students'
education.
However, Mr. Holowesko
said when Mr. Chaplin was
informed that he would not be
rehired, in board-member
Orville Turnquest's office, he
was told that the board was
prepared to give him and his
wife a full term's extra salary.
in addition to a bonus of over
$30,000 in appreciation for
long service.
The $30,000 was more than
equal to the combined yearly
salary of Mr. and Mrs. Chaplin,
Mr. Holowesko said.
STILL WILLING
The board is still prepared to
make those payments, Mr.
Holowesko said.
But Mr. Chaplin did not
reveal this offer to the teachers
who subsequently threatened
to resign if the headmaster was
not given a year's notice, to the
teachers' union who threatened
to blacklist the school, or to
the museum committee.
Mr. Chaplin has said he has
enjoyed "harmonious"
relationships with all prior
boards, and the current dispute
is the result of a personality
conflict with Mr. Holowesko.
Mr. Holowesko said he has
correspondence from previous
board chairmen and members
who dispute Mr. Chaplin's
claim. The headmaster has
also said that the present
problems with the board began
in June last year, when he fired
two teachers and the board.
reinstated them, "within 48
hours."
Mr. Holowesko outlined the
circumstances of that incident.
He said that in June, tew
months after moving the
new campus on Yamacraw
Road from the old site on
Shirley Street, the teachers and
board met to discuss the
effects of the transition.
Four teachers, he said, felt
they needed some guidance in
certain areas, and the
implication was that they were
receiving insufficient guidance
and help from the headmaster.
TWO FIRED
The day after the meeting,
without consulting the board
as was the practise, Mr.
Holowesko said, the
headmaster fired two of the


COCKTAIl
TABLES
anC
END TABLES

[ NASSAU FREEPORT )1


chairman Holowesko






STeacher claims board pressured them



"and irritated them by their attitude

A ST. ANDREW'S TEACHER one of the 21 who voted to design if Headmaster John Chaplin
were not reinstated and given proper notice- declared today that he would not remain on the
*j Hstaff if the present Board of Directors of St Andrew's school continued in office.


teachers and would have fired
the other two except lie was
not al'l. locate them.
Tlih ',toard set. wi'ih Dr
Andrew Fsfakis as acting
chairni.'n. Mi. % lowTcsk wa'
in New Y, ik at the tins' and
imii 'diateiy reinstated the
two. Mr. lolowesko said lie
onI!y learned of the incident
when Dr. l-sfaki- called him in
New York. after the teacher,
had been reinstated
MIr Holowesko today noted
the fact that Mr. Chaplin is
obiecting t(o, ho:-. rmination l1'
the board on short notice even
though he attempted to do
exactly the same thing to two
teachers last year.
The board chairman went on
to say that Mr. Chaplin
subsequently told the board
that either the two teachers
would have to be fired, or he
would quit.
When the board stood firm
on its decision, Mr. Chaplin
threatened to resign as
headmaster if Mr. ifoloswesko
remained as chairman.
I hen in September Mr.
Chaplin actually submitted his
resignation,
According to Mr. Chaplin.
thlie board unanimously
rejected the resignation.
AGITATION
The chairman said there was
considerable agitation on the
part of some board members to
accept the resignation
immediately, but it was
decided not to do so at that
time because there was no
deputy headmaster to take
over the school's day-to-day
operation. (Mr. Lew Morgan
was subsequently hired as
deputy head.)
Mr. Hlolowesko went on to
say there were numerous
examples of Mr. Chaplin's
disregard for the board's
instructions.
lIe said last year there were
discussions in connection with
salary increases. The board
revised the entire salary scale,
but found when they applied
the formula to the existing
staff that several teachers
would have had pay cuts.
They therefore, in Mr.
Chaplin's presence, agreed that
they would not apply any
formula which would result in
salary cuts.
But, Mr. Holowesko said.
when the headmaster reported
back to the staff he created
unrest by saying the board
intended to cut the salaries
Mr. Holowesko said there
were also several cases where
Mr. Chaplin recommended the
termination of a contract, and
then told the teacher
concerned that the board had
unilaterally decided to
terminate
The board met with
concerned parents of St.
Andrew's students on Saturday
and read a statement outlining
the board's actions and the
reasons for those actions.
Ilowever, an overwhelming
majority of the parents were
not satisfied, and asked the
board to call on extraordinary
general meeting of shareholders
in the private company which
controls St. Andrew's in a bid
to have Mr. Chaplin reinstated


The teacher, who wished to
remain anonymous, said that
contrary to the Board's
allegations, no one feared Mr.
Chaplin. The teachers found
him most approachable and
could go to him iat any time
with the mo 'st personal
matters, hie said.
The children loved him, the
parents trusted him. and the
teachers respected him.
llowever, there was an element
of tear in the school. And this
had been introduced by the
present Board of Directors, the
teacher charged.
On June 18, Mr. Chaplin.
headmaster of St. Andrew's
School for 19 of the school's
25 years, was given a letter of
dismissal by the school Board
in the chambers of Mr. Orville
lurnquest. Ir C(haplin's last
day of school was tour clays
lar. The notice took effect oni
August 31, at the end of the
summer holidays.
On June 19. 21 of the 29
members of staff announced
that the Board would either
give Mr Chaplin a year's notice
or they would resign. Their
ultilmatumn was published in
The Tribune that night. Seven
members of thlie Board later
met with the teachers and
ordered them to withdraw
their notice andi make a
correction in tlie press the
following day. Ihe teachers
have ignored the order.
Under much pressure hby
parents, the School Boaird
agreed to meet with them oni
Saturdiv afternoon. The
meeting. conducted by Mr.
Michael Stewart. heard a
statement from the Board. a
reply by Mr. Chaplin and many
questions from the parents
At this meeting the Board,
in a statement read by Mr.
I'urnquest, emphasised the fear
that now gripped the school.
The Board attributed this fear
to Mr. Chaplin.
On the contrary, said our
informant, it was the Board
that had introduced teai into
the school
INF-ORMIE
The teacher, who has been
on St. Andrew's staff for a
number of years, said that at 3
p.m. Monday. Mr. Chaplin met
with his teachers. Hle told them
briefly that he had been
dismissed and the date from
which the dismissal became
effective.
Shocked bv the an-
nouncement, teachers went
into a huddle and started a
series of meetings. At one of
the meetings on Tuesday a
memorandum was drafted
stating that 21 of the 29
teachers were prepared to
resign unless the headmaster
were given a full year's notice.
"Somewhere the Board has
misinterpreted our intention.
They think that it is only the
financial matter that concerns
us. This is not so at all. We
want Mr. Chaplin to have a
year's working notice not
money in lieu of notice they
have completely misinterpreted
our intention." declared our
informant in annoyance.
"If he were given a year's
pay in lieu of notice," the
teacher said, "he could not get
a job by September. The type
job hlie should get would have


been filled by Easter, if not by-
as far back as December On
his record would be the fact
that he had not been employed
for a year. This would have
been a black maiik on his
record after 1 vcar..
"No, we were not
interested in thce iney, we
insist on a Vcar's working
notice," the teacher declared.
The teachers were prepared
to accept a term's notice for
themselves in case of
termination
"I for one cannot and will
not work urnder this Board, and
many parents have told me
that if this Board does not go
they will take their children
from St Andrew's," the
teacher said.
Il 1 I IINGS
On Wednesday, our
informant said, the teachers
held three meetings. Mr.
Chaplin was asked to attend
one of the meetings.
Satisfied that they had heard
one side of the story, they tI:en
asked to hear the Board's sid,..
They wanted to know from the
Board two things why had
they fired their headrmaster.
and why had they done so at
that time.
In the teaching profession.
the teacher told The Tribune,
holidays aie not counted ini
giving notice. Mr. Chaplin had
been given notice at the end ol
the summer term, to become
effective at the end of the
summer holidays. In the
profession this would not have
been considered a termi's
notice.
The teachers' last meeting
broke up at 12 noon on
Wednesday, June 20. Mr. Terry
Dunn, Middle School Adviser.
was asked to contact the Board
to arrange a 3 p.m. meeting
that day. The Board agreed
and seven of them attended.
"This was the one and only
meeting that we hed with the
Board and this is where the
fear entered in," the teacher
stated.
Mr. Turnquest had told
parents on Saturday that the
Board had met with the whole
St. Andrew's staff on
Wednesday, June 20, where the
staff expressed fear for their
own jobs and security.
FEAR
"Yes there was fear," the
teacher, agreed. "Fear that if
we just opened our mouths we
were out of a job." As a result
ol their fear of the Board, the
eleven teachers who were
leaving the staff volunteered to
ask any questions that those
who were staying would have
wished asked," the teacher
said
At the meeting the Board
gave the impression that it did
not matter if all the staff
pulled out. "Our decision
would in no way affect their
decision," the teacher said.
"We never did get a proper
answer as to why Mr. Chaplin
was fired. The parents were not
given a satisfactory answer and
we still have no proper answer.
"In the U.K., Canada or the
United States a dismissal of
this sort would only be done
on a morals issue. The Board
said it was nothing like this,
but they did not want to get
into name-calling or strip Mr.
Chaplin in front of us. It was


terrible. They just never
answered us," the teacher said.
"The thing that concerned
me was that one of the Board
members started off by being
very suave. Then immediately
there was this clash between
himself and Mr. Chaplin," the
teacher continued.
(The teachers had insisted
that Mr. Chaplin attend their
meeting with the Board.)
ANNOYED
"This Board member
became very annoyed with Mr.
Chaplin, and, in my opinion,
degraded himself in front of us.
I can assure you if there were
any teachers sitting on the
fence up to this point, after
this display there were no
longer any fence-sitters."
Chairman Bill Holowesko
thought that everything had
been discussed and told the
teachers they were to issue a
statement withdrawing the
announcement in The Tribune
of their ultimatum to the
Board. They were told that
they were to have their
announcement in Wednesday
night's Tribune.
"The Board seemed
prepared to sit and let us
discuss the press statement in
front of them. When they saw
that nothing would come of
that, they offered to withdraw
while we discussed the niatter.
It seemed that they intended
to wait in the background for
our decision.
"But we were not going to
do this. So they indicated that
they intended us to continue
our meeting after they had
gone. They wanted to see our
statement in the next day's
Tribune to avoid a parents'
meeting on Thursday.
"When we got rid of them,
we decided to do nothing. We
had had three days of meetings
and of tensions and we were
just not going to make a
decision. We felt we were being
pressured."
The teacher confirmed that
there was far more hard feeling
against the Board after that
meeting than there had ever
been. They were irritated by
the Board's arrogance.
"Another thing that the
staff really resent is the feeling
the Board gives us that we are
unable to think for ourselves.
If we react in a certain way
then someone has put us up to
it," the teacher said.
The Board had accused Mr.
Chaplin of encouraging the
teachers to demand as much as
they could get in salaries. They
accused him of having misled
teachers in respect of salary
discussions. The ti .cher
emphatically denied this.
At a meeting with Mr.
Chaplin, the teacher recalled, a
question had been ask,.-i by an
old staff member whether
those teachers, who had been
hired at Easter and who had
similar qualifications to those
on the staff, would come in on
the same or a higher wage-scale
than existing teachers.
"In answering us, Mr.
Chaplin in no way betrayed the
confidence of the Board. At no
time did he urge us to go after
all we could get."
Early in Mr. Holowesko's
chairmanship, the teacher
Continued in next column


EDMUN D MOX E Y,
Parliamentary Secretary to the
Ministry of Education and
Culture, announced last night
that two life-sized bronze
statues, which "would pay
tribute to our forefathers in a
tangible way," have arrived at
Jumbey Village.
The statues, which were
done by Professor Ralph
Johnson of Abaco, are both
about eight feet tall. They will
be erected at Jumbey Village
sometime this week.
Professor Johnson said that
the statues represent three
years of work, which he
completed in three months.
One of the statues is
dedicated to the struggle of
Bahamian womanhood. It
portrays a typical Bahamian


woman in all of her "grace and
pride."
The other statue shows an
average Bahamian fisherman
blowing the rally call on a
conch shell.
This statue will be dedicated
to the struggle of fishermen,
farmers and musicians.
Mr. Moxey gave thanks to
the lion. Carlton Francis and
the lIon. Livingston Coakley,
"for their understanding
attitudes and for assisting in
the raising of funds for the
initial payment of the statues.
lie also asked that
Bahamians rededicate
themselves to the task of
nation-building and strive to
obtain those high standards
that "our forefather lived and
died for."


Leonard Knowles to be sworn


in as new CJ tomorrow

FORMER INDEPENDENT SENATOR Leoaird J. Knowles,
C.B.E., who was recently appointed Chief Justice of the Bahamas
to succeed Sir Gordon Bryce, C.B.E., will be sworn in by His
Excellency Sir John Paul when the July Criminal Sessions open


tomorrow morning.
Sir Gordon, who resigned at
the end of June, left the
Bahamas with his wife, Lady
Bryce, Monday evening aboard
the steamship Oronsay for
Somerset where lie will take up
residence,
Mr. Knowles, who this
morning admitted that he "will
be glad to get over with the
swearing-in" to be held
tomorrow, was a member of
the Senate for the past 13
years.
He and his wife, Harriet, also
will be present at ai party to be
held in his honour with
members of the Supreme Court
staff, and invited law\ crs.
Over 30 special invited
guests are expected to attend
the swearing-in ceremony
tomorrow morning. Also
present will lie the Prime
Minister and Mrs I'indling as
well as members ot Parliament.
Seating arriinemiients
apparently posed a problem
with members of the press
being viven the prisoners' dock
with its steel bar enclosure and
overly modest pine bench
INSPECTION
Prior to tomorrow's
swearing-in cere,,o:i'., the new
Chief Justice is to inspect a
specially drawn ii1p guard o01'
honour in Bank I1 anme, inst
opposite the Supre me Court


recalled, Mr. Holowesko had
asked Mr. Chaplin to provide
him with each teacher's
professional, confidential file.
Mr. Chaplin refused to give it
to him.
A questionnaire, sent to
teachers, parents and students
by the women's committee of
the school, caused even more
4'ard feeling and resentment
with the staff. The
questionnaire, which asked
about the curriculum what
was good, what bad, what
would they like see changed,
etc. gave no indication
that it had come from a
professional body. Although it
said that the teachers did not
have to sign it or identify
themselves, if they had
answered any of the personal
questions about their own
qualifications, etc., they would
have immediately given away
their identities. The Board
would have had access to their
answers as would the women's
committee.
"We were just livid about
this. Some of the teachers
filled theirs out facetiously and
handed it in. I refused to fill
out mine," he said. The teacher
felt that the Board was in this
way trying to get the


building.
He will be attended by
Supreme courtt Puisne Justices,
Messrs. James Smith, Maxwell
Thompson and Samuel
Graham, who was recently
appointed following the
resignation of Mr. Justice
tledworth Smith earlier this
year.
lie also will be seated on the
bench with the three Puisne
Judges along with recently
appointed Commissioner of
Police, Mr. Salathiel II.
Thompson.
Commissioner Thompson
will bhe present in his position
as Provost Marshal
lie took over his post on
June 1, succeeding Mr. John It.
Hlindmarsh as Police
Commissioner.
T o m orrow 's cere mon ies,
taking place at 10:30 am.. will
also include the taking of first
pleas and tentative scheduling
of dates for some 33 criminal
cases, which are expected to be
held during this month's
sessions.
Several ol the cases were
ones recently traversed from
the April Assies. One the 33
cases, some 41 accused persons
are expected to plead. The
taking of first pleas is
expected to follow the
swearing-in ceremonies


information that Mr. Chaplin
had earlier refused to give
them.
On the children's
questionnaire the pupils were
asked, for example would
you like 20 minutes for
assembly? "Of course they
would like it. They would be
missing their maths, or English
classes or some other class they
should be attending. Naturally
the children would like it!"
"The whole idea was the
American idea where the
parents have a say and the
students have a say in the
curriculum. The questionnaires
did not come from a
professional body. We are
professional people, just as the
Board members have their own
professions. We resent them
telling us how to conduct our
teaching profession just as they
would resent us interfering in
their law practices," the
teacher said heatedly.
The teacher listed many
things that had annoyed the
staff under the present Board.
He recalled an occasion when a
teacher had gone home and
left a door unlocked in her
classroom. "The next morning
she found a note on her desk
from Mr. Holowesko telling her
not to do it again!"


charges school


traffic fatalities for the year to
19.
O'Farrell, of Australia and
Miss Carston, a visiting San
Franciscan were killed when
their motor-cycle S.D. 412,
collided with a tanker-truck,
which was being driven by
lienry Butler of Balfour
Avenue.


Leading Newspaper


Noma pm FNOS

jRUSSELL'S

ORANGE JUICE
available at your
SUPERMARKET


CHASE LOST

$47,000 IN


RAID BY

2 BANDITS

THE CHASE Manhatten
Bank's Cable Beach branch lost
about $47,000 Monday
morning when two black men,
believed to be Bahamians, held
three employees and two or
three customers at gun-point.
Both men carried revolvers,
police said, but they made no
effort to disguise themselves or
to hide their features behind
masks. They made their
getaway in a white Chevrolet
Camaro.
The bandits hit the bank
"shortly before ten," police
said, despite reports that a City
Markets employee called the
bank at 9:35 in connection
with night deposit bags, only
to be told by a teller that the
bank had just been robbed.
The robbers ordered teller
Perry Stubbs, another
unidentified teller and two or
three customers behind the
counter, while manageress
Sybil Deveaux was forced to
open the bank's vault.
Taken from the vault were
$21,606 Bahamian, $15.843
U.S., $81 Canadian and 48
pounds sterling (about $125).
The tellers' drawers were
emptied of an unknown
amount of cash which is
expected to push the total
proceeds of the robbery up to
"about $47,000," a police
spokesman said.
Police said reports that the
getaway car had been found
and that two men were being
questioned in connection with
the robbery were false.
Both Mrs. Deveaux and Mit
Stubbs were at the same bank
on May 10 last year when..,
lone gunman robbed it (,!
about $6,000. The branch waa
ilso robbed on Janu.ary I
1"1, when two masked min,;.
armed with a sawed-off
shotgun made off with
$53,000 There have bc'n
arrests and convictions in hboli
the earlier robberies.

HURRICANE ALICE

NEAR BERMUDA
A NOON report from a
.Meteorological Office
spokesman today said that
Hurricane Alice, the first
tropical storm for 1973, do,,'s
not pose a threat to the.
ten-day Independe nce
celebrations scheduled t.,
begin, in Nassau, on July 4.
According to the
Spokesman, the tropical storm.
which gained intensity and has
become a "minimal" hurricane,
is 850 miles N.EF. of Nass.au. It
is moving away at 12-15 miles
per hour. It is centred at
Latitude 30.5 N and longitude
65.5 W.
Highest sustained winds are
about 75 miles per hour. Gales
extend outward 20 miles to the
east and 100 miles west of the
centre.
The National Ilurricane
Centre in Miami said todiy
that Alice was 175 miles souli
of Bermuda at mid-morning,
and was expected to pass near
that island late today.


2 VISITORS FROM
ORONSAY DIE HERE
TW NTY-t w o-year-old
Barry O'Farrell, a cyclist and
Lynn A. Carston, 19, a pillion
passenger on the vehicle were
killed in a traffic accident
yesterday morning on
Carmichael Road.
The death of the two
visitors, passengers aboard the
steamship Oronsay, which left
Nassau yesterday for Port
Everglades, brings the total


2 bronze statues given


to the Jumbey Village


i -


I A-&


Lh'7


1













hr ( ribune


Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


NIXON TO SPEAK OUT WHEN HEARINGS END
SAN CLEMI'NTi (APl) The Sail ('ilenente W\hite iiuw s ,a\,I'tresideni
Nix in will speak out on watergate after the current phase ,ot thc Senate
comib ittee's hearings winds up ... probably so:metirne in August. \Whitet
House News Secretary Ronald /iegler says ihow' and \'where til' President
will speak out has yet to be decided. (e SI I STORY 'THIS IPA( A
NEVER MADE ILLEGAL CONTRIBUTIONS
HOUSTON (AP) The heads of two Itexas based corporations sas their
firms never made illegal donations to the Nixon re-election campaign ...
and that their individual contributions were small. ( eorge Brown oit Brown
and Root and N. W. I reeman of Tenneco each responded yesterday to
published reports that their companies made illegal contributions. I freeman
says his personal donation was two-thousand dollars ... and Browns
describes his donation as "modest."
FIVE ARRESTED AFTER BRIBERY ATTEMPT
NIEW YORK (AP) ive men are under arrest in New\ York on charges
they paid a 20-thousanid dollar cash bribe to twos detectives and offered
SO-thousand more to locate a government ssitne.s against theii. A police
spokesman says the case involves whatt he calls "the underworldd"
Indictments are being sought against some of the suspects for lettingg to
murder the witness.
Thle two unidentified detectives reportedly told their superiors about the
bribe from the moment it was offered. The New York police say the bribe
is the largest ever offered to city police officers.
HEATH AND COSGRAVE MEET IN LONDON
BELl AST (Al') Insurgents launched sporadic attacks early today on
British troops occupying Northern Ireland. There were no immediate
casualties reported in scattered ambushes and sniping that followed
yesterday's meeting in London betweeen Prime Minister dward IHeath of
Britain and the Irish Republic's [rime Minister, l.iam ('osgrave. ('osgrave
expressed support ofit Britain's latest moves including the creation of a
new provincial legislature to quiet down the violence-ridden Ulster
Province,
TALKS TO EASE EUROPEAN TENSIONS
HELSINKI (Al') foreign ministers of 35 European anid North
American nations begin meeting shortly in Helsinki. Called the Conference
on Furopean Securits and ( operation, its participants include the U.S.,
Canada and all European nations except Albania. The week-long
discussions are aimed at easing tensions on the I uropean continent and swill
include talks on positions ranging from trade to east-west relations.
EASES CONTROLS ON SOYBEAN EXPORTS
WASHINGTON (Al') The Nixon administration has eased its
five-day-old embargo against soybean exports from the U S. The
Commerce DIepartment sass about half of tile soybeans committed for
export in 1973 will be allowed out of the country. Meantime, the
administration has tightened federal controls on scrap iron and steel
exports.
BANK PRIME RATE HIKED TO 8 PER CENT
NI W YORK (AI') I or the eighth tine thiis sear and the second time
in two weeks Anierican banks are raising the prime lending rate ... this time
from seven-and-three-quarters to eight per cent. The hike in the cost of
loans to big business reportedly won't atfect holmie mortgages.
The w orld's largest commercial hank tlank of Amlerica says its
prine rate hike starts toda and I first National Cit o Nues'' York the
second biggest Amnerican hiank has ilot \s t annouic.'d a hike. It usual
makes such annouli cent on I rid is.
VERMONT TO BE DECLARED DISASTER AREA?
NI W YORK ('A1') I ight persons were reported dead and three others
missing in weekend flooding that caused heavy damage to farmlands in tihe
(o(nnecticut River valley.
(,ov. T'iioitas I'. Salmon if Vernilnt. tile state hardest hiit hv tih 24
hour rainfall o si\x iniesO r more. sought to haie Vermont declared a
disaster area. thI ie rain also inundated Massachusetts. Maine and New
lamnpsthire.
Tlie flooding wiped out tilhe second plantings of some already hard-lut
Vermiont farmers and caused between eight million dollars and II)
million-dollar property damage to state ro ads and ridges alone.
I'our persons died in Vermiont, three in Nes tlanipsliire .ild onec in
Massachusetts. Two persons were reported missing in Massacihusetts and
one in Nesw Hampshire.
Ilood waters today had receded in all but the ConlectuLctt River and
Otter ( reek atter tile "ieasvs rains Saturda spilled brooks alil riscrs acr ss
lowland towns, roads and bridges
NIXON SHOULD NOT BE FORCED SAYS WEICKER
iDRIiilPO)RT, CONN (AI') Sen. L.owell I'. \%eiker Jr.. ai mnemler of
the Senate Watergate committee, said today he did not think it would lie
proper for the committee to call or subpowna President Nixon to testitf
about the Watergate affair. BIut the Connecticut Republican said lie would
welcome a voluntary appearance by Nixon.
T-. "It's up to the President to, decide \whether he should appear before the
committee," Weicker told a news conference. If any pressure is applied to
"drag the President" before the committee. "the President should refuse."
Weicker said.
Weicker said he was impressed with former kWhite House counsel John
W. Dean Ill's credibility as a witness during Dean's week-long appearance
before the committee. But he added "I don't think we have heard the
complete story."
At another point tie said: "I know\ there is information you have not
heard to date that is important." le would not elaborate.
During the forthcoming appearance of former Atts. Gen. John Mitctihll
before the committee the Senators will try to determine "what he kno s.
his role ... and the extent of the political role he played while lie .is
attorney general," Weicker said. Wieicker spoke with newsmen at his
Bridgeport office after returning to Connecticut during the conlmmlittee's
I -day fourth of July recess.
PUBLIC FINDS WATERGATE BORING
NEW YORK (AP) IB 56 to l1 per cent, a majority of Americans
believe that if it had not been for the press exposes the Watergate scandal
would never have been uncovered. the Louis Harris survey reported
Monday.
And by 59 to 12 per cent, most Americans believe that "in exposing the
facts about Watergate, the 'Washington Post and other newspapers have
been an example of press responsibility at its best" Ilarris said.
The survey of 1.509 households taken lust before John Dean's
testimony also found that by 61 to 17 per cent the people reject the
proposition that "the lres.s is just out to get president Nixon on
Watergate."
By a mucn narrower margin, 46 to 40 per cenit, they deny that "the
press and television have given more attention to Watergate than it
deserves," the survey found.
When asked whether they "finl news in general about Watergate boring
and confusing," the public agreed bl 47 to .139 per cent, the survey showed.
WAVE OF ABDUCTIONS STILL GRIPPING ARGENTINA
tBUt+NOS AIRI S (AP') The assistant manager of a l.S.-owned bank in
('ordoba was kidnapped Mondi morning, one of four new victims in the
wave of abductions gripping Argentina.
An 1 i-year-old boy and a (erman natiial wt ere released for ransoiin but
the number of persons held captive bt either leftist guerrillas or common
criminals exceeded a doien.
Raul Bernalchlini, Argentine executive at thle Cordoba branch of the
First National City tank of New York, was the latest victim. 'olice sources
said the kidnappers intercepted his car as tie left his home to drive to the
bank and forced him into a getaway vehicle. His car was found abandoned
on the street in front of a television station.
Freed over the weekend were Ilans Kurt t;ebhardt, a Gernaui engineer
with the Silvana Hosiery Manufacturer, and O(scar Lapajurfker, 1 I, son of a
businessman in suburban Avellaneda.
An Italian engineer, Victor Hofferio, also appeared at his home in Santa
I and denied reports that lie had been kidnapped.
There was no news on the fate of a lBriton, American and a second
Italian being held by kidnappers.


WHITE HOUSE REPLY LATER BETTY GRABLE ACTION BY FDA


Nixon won't comment


on Watergate until



hearings are closed


SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (AP) President Nixon will remain
silent on the Watergate affair until the current phase of Senate
hearings ends in August, then discuss it in an "appropriate
forum," the White House said Monday.


Press secretary Ronald
Ziegler ruled out, however, any
Nixon appearance before the
Watergate grand jury or any
testimony by Nixon, written or
oral, to the Senate Watergate
committee,
In a lengthy exchange with
newsmen, Ziegler said Nixon
would hold no news
conferences until August lie
said the President "will address
the Watergate matter in what
he considers an appropriate
forum" after the Senate panel
winds up its initial hearings
that month.
In explaining that this forum
would not bhe before either the
grand jury or the committee,
Ziegler said
"The President feels he has a
responsibility to the office of
the presidency and to the
separation of powers under the
Constitutionn."
"The President will nol
appear before the committee
or will not respond to ainy
specific request to discuss the
(Watergate) matter because he
feels he has a responsibility to
maintain the prerogative of the
executive branch."
The Senate committee has
indicated that its hearings will
extend into 1974 and be
divided into a Watergate phase.
an investigation into other
alleged political espionage. and
Investigation into campaign
finances.
NO COMM E'NT
Ziegler. as he has in the past,
refused to conilneiil in any
s ay on the specific charges
raised by former White IHouse
Counsel John W Dean Ill on
presidential complicity in the
Watergate coverup.
ie also declined to elaborate
onl statements made bhy other
White House aides, particularly
J Fred Buzhardt, the assistant
White House counsel in charge
of the Watergate matter.
Buzhardt referred to Dean
earlier in an inllerli w as a
"confessed felon
"There are a lot it lawyers
throwing a lot ni charges
around about a lot oI f people,"
Ziegler said. "Tuis %eas a
statement made by a counsel
to the President in an intteriew
and he was speaking as a
counsel to the White House,"
lHe declined, however, to sa\
s he t h e r B u / h t1 r J s
characterization of DIean
reflected Nixon's viess.
Ziegler reiterated that Nl\on
will not appear before the
Watergate grand jury. repeating
the White House contentim1t
that such an appearance would
be constitutional
inappropriate
FOR UM
Ziegler's annoliuncemente
that Nixon will speak oil
W a t erg at e after the
congressional c iumlllittee
recesses in August wis the first
time that the White lluse has
said that the President will
reply to Senate teLstimolny.
"The President will speak in
this matter in what he
considers to be an appropriate
forum" and "in a sway he
considers appropriate," Ziegler
said.
He added that he did not
want to liml the P'resident to
"just one particular platform m,"
say iing that Nt\on would
decide what is appropriate
when the first phase of the
Watergate hearing is over.
lie said that there were "a
number of ways he can speak
out on this subject "
When asked if it would be a
press conference, Ziegler said:
NOT FIRST
"1 just don't want to limit it
to that." Nixon will blie having
press conferences and will take
any questions," Ziegler said.
but "it would be incorrect to
sax he will first address this in
press conference format."
Nixon is not expected to
meet informally with the
committee or any oif its
members. "1 don't think he
will consider that an
appropriate way to address


this." Ziegler said.
In Washington, Attorne'.
UK. REJECTS
ICELAND'S CHARGE
ILONDON (AP) The hBritishi
government Monday rejectedil ,
Icelandic charge that the frigate
Leopard threatened to fire on the
Icelandic gunboat Aegir after ain
incident syith a West t ermnan
trawler.
Reykjavik claimed the Aegir lhad
fired blank shots at the German
trawler Teutoni for fishing within
Iceland's claimed 50mnile fishing
limit.


(tencral Elliot Richardson said
the frirumll for the President's
repli still was to be decided
BEST WAY
lie said that under
disculsslon were a news
conference where the President
would deliver a written
statement and then answer
questions: a ineeting with a
limited number of reporters,
perhaps at the White House: or
con eying his position by
meeting with the congressional
leadership or members of the
Watergate committee and let
them speak for him.
"A NEWS conference has
limitation because of the large
iniiber of questions and large
nummv ber of reporters involved,"
Richurdson said, "but there
niLust be some kind of a
vorkahble solution evolved."
hittingg with reporters after
a speech, Richardson said
Nixon's appearance before a
grand jury was impractical
because such proceedings are
closed "and wouldn't serve to
present his position."
Congress ; plans to recess for
the inonlh of August, and tleC
\Watelgate commllnittee has tried
to schedule its hearings to
complete I Ie first phase tie
WVateiegac break-in and coverCip
inl time to take a break with
their l embn Iers.
I)RTY iRICKS
The hearings are expected to
resume in September with
probes of so-called dirty tricks
in the 1972 presidential
campaign and eof the various
candidates' fund-raising
practices.
Ziegler told newsmen at a1
Western White House briefing
that Nixon has been discussing
Senate Watergate testimony
with some of Ilis aides,
including chief of staff (Gen.
Alexander Ilaig Jr., Ziegler
himself. who is now a
presidential assistant as well as
press secretary and others.
The press secretary himself
declined comment 11
Watergote because of the
ongoing hearings, but said, "I
will have something to say oni
this in the near future."
The press secretary was
asked whether the White IHouse
had been contacted hy the
Senate committee regarding
Dean's complaint that lie \ as
not permitted to Xerox Ils
papers in the White House.
Ziegler said lie didn't have
anything to sa\ on the matter
that it was something
"counsel's office would hbe
working out with the Senate
committee."
But Ziegler did sa\ that "all
former mentbers of thie Whitc
House staff have the same
access to their files and
records."
Ziegler declined to comment
when asked it it were still his
position ais White Ilouse
spokesman t h ta t ('B S
correspondent Daniel Schorr
was investigated by the FBI
because he had been
considered for a job by the
Nixon Administration. Dean
has testified that Schorr was
investigated because lie was
considered hostile to the
administration and that there
never was any job in the works


DIES FROM


BABY KRISTEN


Pertussin medicated CRIES, BUT STILL


LUNG CANCER vapour is withdrawn 'GRAVELY ILL'


SANTA MONICA. CALIF,
July 3 (AP) Actress Betty
(;rable, world war two pin-up
girl famed for her beautiful legs
died Monday of lung cancer.
She was 56.
Miss (;rable, a pert blonde
singing and dancing star whose
42 movies grossed more than
100 million dollars in the
1930s and 1940s, died at St.
John's Hospital in Santa
Monica.
She underwent treatment at
St. John's last May and was
readmitted last Friday. She
also was hospitalized in May
1972 and was forced to cancel
a M el bourne, Australia.
appearance in "No, No,
Nanette."
Fasy-going and self-effacing,
the shapely, blue-eyed beauty
still got cheers for her so-called
million-dollar legs while
performing as a grandmother in
her 50s.
Nearly three millions prints
of her famous wartime pin-up
photo were distributed, mostly
to American servicemen who
posted them in barracks or
carried them in foot lockers.
In the picture, made by 20th
Century-Fox Studio while she
was under contract there,
Betty posed in a white bathing
suit. smiling coyly over one
shoulder. At least two decades
later, her measurements were
the same: 37-24-35.
In 1967. while she was
appearing on broadway in
lello. Dolly."' World War II
admirers or their sons sent
flowers and went backstage to
ask her to autograph their
copies of the photo.
"What I'd really like to
know, is how you've managed
to stay s-o-o-o beautiful all
these years." one vintage fan
wrote her.
But Miss (;able belittled her
asset IS.
"After all. my voice is just a
voilce I don't breathe with
my diaphragm as singers are
supposed to do," she once told
ani admirer.
"When it coniles to dancing,
which I've done plenty of oni
the screen and in clubs. l'm
itst average may he a little
below I'mi anything but a
great actress."
She chuckled when she
recalled receiving the Harvard
Lampoon's 'worst actress of
the year" award. She said she
wired back. "you are so right!"
Yet she set a record of 12
straight years in the top 10 of
box office stars. In 1946-47.
the treasury department listed
her as the highest-salaried
woman in thie nation. Through
the years she earned more than
three million dollars.
Amniong hei films were
'Follow ithe Fleet." "Pigskin
Parade." 'Million dollar
legs," "Four Jills in a Jeep"
and "''low to marry a
millionaire."
iHer last movie was "Hlow to
be very. very popular," made
in 1956. Later she starred in a
Las Vegas night club
production and then toured
with three different acts.
Miss Grahble was married in
1937 to actor Jackie ('oogan.
whom she divorced two years
later. In 1943 she married
bandleader Ilarry James after
appearing with htiit in the
movie "Springtinte in the
Rockies." They were divorced
in 1965 after raising two
daughters, Vicki and Jessica.
She was born Dec. 18. 1916 I,
in St. Louis, Missouri, to
stockbroker Conn Grable and
his wife. Lillian.
Funeral arrangements were
incomplete.


after child's death

WASHINGTON (AP) The government and the maker of
Pertussin medicated vaporizer announced Monday they are
pulling the product off the market while officials study the death
of an Ohio child.


The Food and Drug
Administration said it is also
studying the formulation of 22
other aerosol products for
possible hazards.
The FDA recommended that
anyone with one of the 30
million cans of Pertussin
medicated vaporizer spray sold
since 1959 return it or destroy
it.
Pertussin medicated
vaporizer is marketed by
C('heseborough-Ponds Inc. and
labeled for temporary relief of
nasal congestion.
The label directions
recommend filling a room with
the spray and spraying it
heavily on pillows and sheets.
The FDA said 18 deaths
have been linked to the
Pertussin medicated spray.
Seventeen were due to what
the FDA called "misuse," but a
five year old Cleveland
girl also was found dead in her
bed April 18 after her room
had been sprayed.
The girl's death "occurred
under conditions of use that
FDA does not at this time
consider to be abuse or gross
n is use," the agency
announcement said
"I'ven though the company
believes the product is
completely safe when used as
directed, we will comply
immediately and fully with the
FDA request to recall the
product," said a spokesman for
C('heseborough-Ponds
The company and the FDA
emphasized that the recall in
no way affects any other
Pertussin product.
An FDA spokesman said the
ingredient under question in
Pertussin vaporizer is
trichloroethane. which is used


as a solvent for the active
ingredients and for reduction
of the pressure of the'
propellant gases in the can.
ANAF STF1 TI('
Trichloroethane is anll
anaesthetic, which has been
shown to induce heart
irregularities.
Since Pertussin vapori/er
and the other products under
review by the FI)A are
nonprescription drugs, the
agency does not know which
might contain trichloroethane
or in what quantities tlhe
ingredient might be present, a
spokesman said
In addition to cough and
cold remedies and I )A
spokesman said. breath
fresh ners and any other
products sold in aerosol formal
and designed to be sprayed
into the mTouth or lungs will he
reviewed.
Although the FDA
attributed 17 of the Pert ussinT
deaths to misuse, and the
company attributed all 18 to
misuse, a researcher who had
asked the agency to recall the
vapori/ers challenged the
figures.
"The FDA does not have
any data otn those cases one
way or the other." said l r.
Sidney Wolfe of theI Heailth
Research Grouip.
Wolfe, who said hie liad close
contact with the special iFDA).
scientific teal investigating the
vaporizer said determining
inisuse in the Pertussin cases is
extremely difficult.
Deodorants or other
products intended for cosmetic
uses clearly warn against
accidental or deliberate
inhalation.


35 NATION EUROPEAN SECURITY

CONFERENCE OPENS IN FINLAND


HELSINKI, FINLAND, July
3 (AP) Foreign ministers of
35 nations Tuesday opened the
conference on Furopean
security and cooperation, the
largest postwar effort to ease
political tensions on the
continent.
For the United States and its
allies, one of the major issues
was how far the Soviet bloc
would go in easing its
restrictions on contacts
between its people and those in
the West.
The issue caused the biggest
controversy during the six
months of preliminary
negotiation to set up the
conference, and the western
ministers were expected to
make much of it in their
opening statements this week.
The Soviet Union has long
pushed for an agreement
between its Warsaw Pact
Organization and the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization
that would in effect recognize
the postwar division of Europe
into Communist and
non-Communist groupings.
The United States and its
allies for some years opposed
such a conference but had to


join in after the Russians
agreed to their demand for
negotiations on reduction of
both Communist and NATO
forces in Central IEurope. Tnese
talks are now under way in
Vienna.


LONDON (AP) A mother
wept with relief Muondiv
because her baby cried.
it was the first outward sign
of improvement in
seven-week-old Kristen Bullen,
who was stolen from 'r
carriage a week ago
abandoned for days in a woo(.
When Kristen was found
Saturday night doctors said she
was suffering from pneumonia.
eXposure and dehydration. She
was too weak to utter more
than a whimper.
But Lewisham General
Hospital, treating Kristen in its
$500.000 special baby care
unit, said Monday the baby can
cry again.
That was a slight
improvement, the hospital said
But a spokesman stressed that
the infant remained gravely dl.
Shirley Bullen, 26. and her
husband Raymond, 29. told
newsmen they were "over the
moon because Kristen had
enough strength for that cry."
Scotland Yard said Kristen
liad lain alone in the suburban
London wood "for about three
davs or a few hours more."
-IThe kidnapper and
whoever helped her must be
very wicked people." said Mrs
Bullen
She sobbed: "Even animals
care for their young better
than Kristen was looked after "




















itlt .........
i. . . . . . . .


["] Cheque
S MoneN Order enclosed


Allende attempts 'state of wh


siege' order throughout Chile Mr


SANTIAGO, CHI(' E (AP)-
Legislation ordering a state of
siege in Chile Went before the
chamberr of D)eputies on
Monday anid warnings from
the Allende government that
the nation "is on the border of
a new civil war."
The siege bill was sent to
Congress by President Salvador
Allende after his regime
crushed a revolt Friday by
rebel army soldiers. It faced
stiff opposition in the
150-niember chamber where
Anti-Allende forces hold arn
87-63 edge
The Christian Demnocrats.,
the Largest opposition group
with 50 votes, said its
legislators will vote against the
measure,
They said Allende had amniple
powers to preserve order under
a stite of emergency declared
throughout Chile at the height
of Friday' fighting, in which
22 were killed and 34
wounded.
Under a stale of emergency,


the Chilean armed forces
assume control of public order,
and the government can
prohibit public gatherings,
censor the news and order
curfews.
A state of siege, which
requires approval by the
Chamber and then the Senate,
is a more extreme measure It
gives the President far-reaching
authority in suspending civil
rights. Under it he could order
house arrests as well as search
and seizure without warrants.
Allende's popular unity
coalition, in a response to the
Christian Democrats, warned in
a statement that "every citizen
should be aware that the
nation is on the border of a
new civil war which the
government is pledged to
avoid."
And President Allende is this
morning to reshuffle the
Cabinet of ministers which has
been part of his government
since March 27.


Sale at






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Tuesday, July 3, 1973.

She GIribun
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTIU
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No .Master
LEON E I. 11 'IPUCH. Publisher/Editor 103 1014
SIR 11 IFNN I DUPIt H. O.B.:.., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., I.L.D).
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
Ell.FEEN IMIPlC''H CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., L.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


EDITORIAL

The John Chaplin affair

By ETIENNE DI)UPUCll
I WAS shocked when my daughter phoned me at my hotel in
Coral Gables to tell me that Mr. John Chaplin had been dismissed
by the Board as headmaster of St. Andrew's School.
I was concerned because seven of my grandchildren are
enrolled at this college and I am a guardian of one of them. They
are at this college because of the changes that have come about in
most of the schools in thle island and especially because of the
confidence my family have in John Chaplin.
I could not get a clear picture of the situation by long distance
telephone, nor even by reading the reports published in The
Tribune. In stories of this kind there are important facts that
cannot be published. And so I decided to come to Nassau for two
weeks to find out the truth foi myself.
I took this action because I was confused by the statement that
this decision of the Board was unanitnous.
I know moist of the members ,f the Board and I felt that they
would not take such drastic action and do it so brutally
unless there was sot.ie good reason.
My investigation showed that 77ec Tribune staff had gone to
great lengths to collect its information and to present a fair and
balanced story to the public.
If anything was lacking in the story . it was because the
Board refused to make a statement to thile Press.
I must say. tlhe took a ino, extraordinary alti'.ide which call
best be illustrated b\ a conversation that took place between the
chairman of thle Boand, Mi. Williami lolowesko. and senior
Tribune staffer Nicki Kell.
Mrs. Kelly phoned himt t, check on a repIrt of a statement it
was alleged lie had made.
"I wishli he Tribune \would check its Iacts before it rushes into
print." he scolded her.
That's exactly what /'he Tribunhe was doing when lie made this
Cxtraordinary tema k!


After this we found The '17riboine being subjected to a
whispering campaign . tlie same kind of campaign to which Mr.
Chaplin had been subjected. It was being whispered up and down
tdelsiand that T77e Trihbune was pubi!,slhin' false reports.
'There could be no doubt about what was being said because a
member of the Board talked to lone ol mi\ sons and went so far as
to say that Th77i Tributne had re'tused to phblhsh a statement by the
Board.
At this point i\ daughter. I.tlcen ('a ron. Editor ot T/wi
Tribune decided that she had to spike ile false rumtours being
circulated about this newspaper. She wrote an article in which she
laid all the facts haei emphasizing thliat if the Boat d's side of the
story wasn't full\ presented to tie public, it was only because
members of the Board. to 'hllonn shte li:d spoken, not only
refused to give her inionation hbu stated flatly that the Board
definitely would ntot make :i st:ttmenti fot'r publication. Oh yes,
they were prepared to whiuspei conti idenial inforllmatioli but
nothing for publication.
This kind of tling is not good enough to1 l/'lie ribtune. Here
was a man' s reputation and hIs whole future career at stake. lie
had been dealt with liarshl\ at least, so it appeared by the
Board. And he had not hesitated. ilwhen approached by my
daughter, to make a statement for publication. This was his only
statement to a newspaper.
On the other hand. a mtmberi ot tlihe Board. to whom miY
daughter spoke, was not prepared to talk tor publication. Others
were full of damaging whispers about this man who, in 1 years
of devoted service, had built this college from nothing to become
a beacon light in education in the colony . a school to which
hundreds of parents in thle island felt they could send their
children because of the confidence they had in the headmaster
and his staff. It was at this point /i' /ribiitne was also subjected
to the whispering campaign that had been carried ton against Mr.
Chaplin.

The parents were also concerned. I lie wanted to find out
what was wrong because thev had confidence in tils mtan.
1 successfull efforts were made by par ents to have a
confrontation with tie Board. After edging for sone time the
Board finally agreed to meet with lie parents at the college on
Saturday afternoon.
My daughter, wiot had personally directed tlie investigation
into this tory and had used only her most experienced and


responsible staffers int the process, was unable to attend this
meeting. Because of shortage of staffll she cannot get away from
her desk during the day. And so she sent a tape recorder to the
college to make a recording of everything that was said.
At the very last minute m\ wife and I decided toi 'o to the
meeting. I had no intention of entering into ithe debate.

The programme called for a statement h b the Board, a reply by
the headmaster, followed by questions from tile floor.
There was a large turn out of parents. I would say that several
hundred were there.
Normally the chairman of the Baord would make a statement
on such an occasion. But he handed this job over to Mr. Orville
lurnquest. who read a prepared statement by the Board.
I was, of course, surprised and shocked when the Board
launched an attack on the Press. alleging the publication of false
information. Since The Tribune was the only newspaper in the
island that had taken any interest in this case ... this attack was
clearly directed at The Tribune.
Other charges by the Board:
*Arrogance of the headmaster.
*Lack of communication and cooperation on ithe part of the
headmaster
*Fear and apathy int the slicool
*C('arges that the headmaster had urged tile teachers to make
unreasonable salary demands on lthe Board.
*A complete breakdown of confidence in the headmaster.
*The Board had offered Mr. Chaplin a substantial bonus as a
part ing gift.
*The decision of l' the Board wsts uitaliltoitus i it i ii\ws


___________________ ~hr ~rihuiu~


irre'ueable
Mr. Chaplin, who had no idea of the charges th1. would be
hbiought against him by the Board. w ent to the meeting
unprepared and so he had to speak "off the cut"'.
After dealing with various aspects of the situation. lie brought
in the personal angle.
lie found it difficult to understand the charge otf lack oft
,ominuunication and cooperation because:
*A member of the Board had been a dinner guest iIn is house
only six days before he was dismissed. This man must haie
known the decision of the Board at the time. Could he possibly
be a part of this attack? (As it turned outer . lie w las.)
*A member of the Board, who had never had .i child in the
school, had come to him when he wanted to get his son in a
school in England. Mr. Chaplin went to great lengths to get this
boy into a first class school. Was this lack of coniuntication.
confidence and cooperation?
Mr. Chaplin related other cases where certain members if the
Board had needed help for their children ... and lie had done what
they requested.
What Mr. Chaplin failed to mention was that lie and Dr. Paul
bJbury, the then chairman of the Board, were insltrumintal in
getting the children of one of the Board members into St.
Andrew's at a time when coloured children were not accepted ;tl
this college .., and I happen to know that he took a personal
interestt in these children because he has often told me that they
are among the finest youngsters in the school.

Now let us examine the charges made by the Board against Mr.
Chaplin and The Tribune.
*In the absence of my daughter I felt that I should reveal the
great lengths to which 77Te Tribune had gone in an effort to
present a full, fair and clear picture of the situation to its readers.
The Board sat silent and made no effort to deny the facts as I
presented them!
*Arrogance: The parents roared in anger when the Board
stated that their decision was irrevocable. In all mi experience ofi
public meetings, I have never heard a more arrogant statement
made by anyone.
*Lack ofcommunication and cooperation:
Mr. Chaplin answered a part of this charge in his repl\ to the
Board. It should be added that, for the first time in tile ') years
Mr. Chaplin has been headmaster of this school, he was shut out
of meetings of the Board. Why?
*'Fear in the School. This could apply only to the teachers. the
parents and the children who had direct contact with Mr.
Chaplin. In this case nearly 100% of the teachers. the parents and
the children are vocifer( usly fighting to retain the services of this
man. This fact was so evident at this meeting that one of the very
few men in the audience who backed the Boaid shouted several
times that this was a one-sided meeting. Of course it was
one-sided because almost everybody there felt that a, gave
injustice had been done to a man who was important to tlie
welfare of their children.
*Apathy: John Chaplin worked hard to get tile iwv school.
One only has to visit St. Andrews and see the activities in pi tress
there to know that there are no grounds for this charge
Propaganda among teachers by the Headmaster a'aitnt l/he
iloard. A fine looking and mature lady teacher stood up aLid gavee
the lie to this charge. She said that the teachers had asked Mr.
Chaplin about salaries. He told them that the matter was before
the Board and so he could not tell them anything. (At this point
it should be mentioned that, in his rebuttal statement. Mr.
Chaplin said that a member of the Board had phoned to tell hiim
that he approved of the new salary scales that Mr. Chaplin had
submitted to the Board. Hle thought they were fine!I

Hlow far are the teachers ba. king Mr. Chaplin"
All I call say is that, after the meeting, m.ina of them crowded
around me and thanked tme for the help The Tribune was giving
them. And so it is clear that they feel pers, unally involved in the
"haplin case. They realize that what has happened to this uman
could happen to them too.
*Breakdown in confidence in the headmaster. How could this
possibly be true when a member of the Board was eating Mr.
Chaplin's bread as a friend in his house only a few days before ti'
axe fell?
You know something . this is a terrible thing for this wh ,le
community because one can see in it traces of tIe attitudes tI hit
destroyed the Old Guard in this country!
And in the same way that the Old Guard destroyed itself bh\ iu
arrogance and "irrevocable" decisions. this situation threatens 1t
destroy this fine school. Already a great deal of damage has been
done . damage that it will take a long time to repair.
*Off'er iof a generous parting gift by the ,Board: This statement'
is a downright misrepresentation of the truth.
The truth is that last year senior staff at the college were given
a substantial bonus in recognition of long service priit to 1'7(i.
This was in lieu of pension. All the staff included in the bonus
awards took their money . all except Mr. Chaplin. 1he didni
take his money at the time because hlie knew that the finances ,,t
the school were in such a condition thle school could not affoLrd
it.
And this is the man they say is arrogant, uncommunicative.
uncooperative and engaged in activities calculated to strain ith.
fintances of the school!


One of the mnen who supporicd the Board ,announced that he
had fifteen shares in the college which is a private corporation.
I reminded him that the new school had been made possible b\
people in the community who had generously g'ien money to the
fund to build the school. They were interested in helping the
school. not in acquiring the power vested in shareholders b\
virtue of the fact that they hold stock in the property.
This incident has made people who supported this fund reali/c
that thev didn't eive money to the school but to increasing the
value of stock held by the original investors in this school, mani\
of whom no longer have children at St. Andrews.

At the end of the discussion parents on the platform who had
organized the ineeting and presided over the discussion, madei C
several moves in an effort to arrive at a reasonable compitomse.
These efforts were all received with cold indifference b\ tlhe
Board.
At one point the chairman of the meeting suggested that
perhaps the Board might like to adjourn to a private room to
discuss the proposal made on behalf of parents.
Without even looking to see whether any members of the
Board might want to consider a possible compromise, the
chairman of the school board said definitely ... NO!
Although it was shown in the voting that John Chaplin had
bout 98': support among those present at the meeting ... the
chairman of the Board ... supported by the silence of his members
... made it clear that they owed nothing to parents and teachers.
Their sole responsibility was to the shareholders ... and that their
decision was definitely irrevocable.
Finally, in desperation the representatives of the parents
proposed a resolution calling for all urgent general meeting of the
shareholders to whom parents and teachers may make a final
appeall ... and also providing that this whole atTffair should be
referred to all past chairmen of the Board for their consideration
and observations.
To which the chairman Mr. William Holowesko replied
that the Board will announce the appointment of an Acting
'eadmnaster in a couple to days time!
After the meeting a friend of mine who supported the Board
Page 6, Col 7


UNION JACK

FOREVER
I If I. Ilu Irlibunc
\ Ic l 1 in it l e
l n I h : ', i f.' v '.w rds ,iar
II p i tjIsti e spi, ,lly tithe
,' ',ids 'lt l ii p tu tir liheads to
th..' tiu lun Br .i lu a 1 [:nd",
Ar i t, i nt iln l Jap i"'' As tfor
ti' sI c l it s ) the
indifi'i' iu fii ag. here l is iSn
I li x .u' ii.ii ri iLie is the oc.aiin
, !i. iit u Ii, \\ ill wani t tIo
d '>In tIle ,lc'k is the
111 '111riillf. 1 lg e I e t.ll ,vw lme1 ans
t I' ., d tlth.i is inishing from
itt1' Lfh.un,1 .is
\St n \\s.sfto .s c c\pr.-ssil
tihen li.h ticd tir the British
p i.eple lAnd e everything
pcrtiitintI g i ( i;reat Brit.aI n
et Ii' honoutred on thic Quleen's
Ii thdtay. If I ere in their
shI 's I would he too
emic inarratss(d to amicept the
h' ',o ir, hiut it goes to show
thii, As IsLimuch as they claim to
iate the lBritish, they still want
It Lling to the British tradition.
'I tese sillc' people' seem to
havse forgotten Wort1 War II
whiun Btit.ain stood alone. But
fIo l her sttuIInla tlle Bahamas
wouldn't be herers t,dav, a free
ci',untrv, a.Ilsui t1lh' Bahamian
hliys wh wte1it it help these
siic' Bahuinla i slniids, some
1i '!ltg their lives PBut one thing
tor sure you can take tie uin;
tr 1iii the c country but you
cin.'l tk hec country out of
tile' ltt.11 .
()n Jiuly the 10th.. I shall
slhed tears but swill take a drink
ot IHarvey's Bristol ('Cream
Shelli. and toast lthe Itnion
Jack, and here's what I'll

llie Iilis's of France may fade
lihe thistles & h shamrock nmiay
wilher
I'hr Maple leai o0t C(n.adia mn.ayv
dei t,
1111t I'\)ON JA.'K F)OR
1 VI:\: R
RI 11 RI I \\NNIA.


A 13
\,',Is,. .
ltinl' 1973
SUN
Ris ,s S:47 i a mu
S .P


U/


I l \ I.\\N


7


Get the

complete picture

on Philips T.V.



Rr Hul


When you're looking for a TV set, let the picture on the PHILIPS
screen decide for you It should be sharp so that you
can clearly see the smallest details. And it should be
steady so that it's restful to your eyes. The kind of
picture you get on a Philips TV set.
But Philips offer you more than just that. For all Philips
TV's are well-designed sets with beautiful cabinets. But
that's not all. Remember, too, that every dependable
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> INSIAMATIC x45 OUTFIT value $695


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PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION



ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS SEND US YOUR BEST PICTURE TAKEN DURING THE INDEPENDENCE
CELEBRATIONS. IF YOU ENTER IN THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL, THEY WILL WIN ENOUGH EQUIPMENT TO
GET THEM STARTED IN COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHY.


Entries may be submitted at any of the following locations:
Island Shop Photographic Dept. Bay Street
Island Photc Centre Palmdale
Island Camera Shop Bank Lane


Or mailed to Island Merchants Ltd., Kodak Independence Photographic Competition, P. 0. Box N 3947, Nassau.


CONTEST RULES


1. The Winning Entries would be those that in the
opinion of the Judges, best reflected the aspirations
and the realisation of an Independent Bahamas and
best captured the atmosphere and feeling of the
Independence Celebration.
2. Professional Photographers, Island Merchants Ltd.
Staff and their relatives are not eligible for the
competition.
3. Prints for the General Competition Contest must be
5" x 7" or larger.
4. Prints for the School Competition may be any size.
5. All points must be in colour.
6. All prints must be taken from Kodak Film.


7. Entries must be submitted by August 31, 1973.
8. Judges decision is final no correspondence will be
entered into.
9. Names and addresses must be clearly written on the
back of each print submitted. Schools must also list
their address on the reverse side of each print
entered.
10. The Winners will be required to submit their
negatives for verification before the prizes will be
awarded.
11. Prints are not returnable.
12. Island Merchants Ltd. reserves the right to use any
Photograph for promotional purposes.


Judges have been nominated by the Independence Committee.


LINK-SMEARED


jj


"'.1


A


11 LETTRBI







Tuesday, July 3, 1973


SPECIALS


HELEN'S EXPANSION
SALE

INTRODUCES YOU TO
THE LARGEST SELECTION OF
FOOTWEAR FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
. IN THE BAHAMAS


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JUST ARRIVED!


NEW STYLES


MEN'S POLYESTER BUSH JACKETS
MEN'S POLYESTER SHIRTS
Long and Short Sleeves
MEN'S POLYESTER TIES
MEN'S POLYESTER PANTS

EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE


off


HALTER DRESSES




SHORT HALTER DRESSES $16.95


LONG HALTER DRESSES


$22.95


TO SEE THE BEST,
TO WEAR THE BEST,
visit

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r MHE YOUNG MISS "
MARKET STREET NEAR BAY STREET


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FOR THE JUNE'S BRIDE
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a Bride'' Maid Gowns
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* Girls' Cinderella Dresses -
sizes 3-14
* Girls' Pant Sets & Polyester
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* Boys' Polyesters Pants -
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* Received new shipment of
Boys' & Girls' English Shoes a
Sandals from Europe. Assorted
colours & styles.


Phone -24264


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New Arrivals
Men's Cool Open Net Shirts and Long Sleeve
Polyester Shirts in Beautiful Prints
SPECIAL
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Latest Arrivals


U


Large assortment of SKI R IS ( Full
Pleated) LAI IS' Tops (Knited
Low cut Body blouses in Cotton
'rint IThis you must see)
HAND BAGS
Also, a Large Assortment of Ladies'
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John's Dept. Store
ELIZABETH AVENUE


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IN A IASAL SHIII I i BUY PANTS

m -- -


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I I


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Geauticians
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SLACKS from $11.95
BLOUSES from $8.95

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SEERSUCKER Checks & Stripes
CHECKS I locked & Regular.
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GOLD & SILVER BUTTONS
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Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


hfg r Unbunrtn_


Come this weekend

to see how a new

way of life begins at

Yamuacraw Beach.


All this adds up to a home in Nassau's
finest future residential area. You need
the land first (70x100') for only ($75


deposit).
Beach is


And the best of Yamacraw
still available. Only about 25


per cent has gone so far but now we are
advertising you will have to move
quickly to catch the best lot. Yamacraw
gives you larger land for less money.
Absolutely no interest rates on in-
stallments, representing a saving of
$1,200 and more and you can build
whenever you want to afford it.


Come to Yamacraw Beach this
weekend. We'll all be there to greet you
- sunrise to sunset, Saturday and
Sunday. AND ON WEEKDAYS FROM 2
p.m. to dark.


Su Yamacraw Beach
NASSAU PHONE
PHONE


MORLEY and OBRIE

m"acfw 1148/23027
YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATE o t 148/ m 3
or r model horn
41141


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N



e


I


INDPEDNC VET


Independence fashion show tomorrow


"SALUTE TO THE BAHAMAS INDEPENDENCE July 4 to July 10," is the theme of the
fashion show to be held at the Crown Ballroom, Paradise Island Hotel on Wednesday, July 4 at 9
p.m. The theme of the show transfers the U.S. spirit of 1776 to the Bahamas of 1973.


working in New York is
coming home to do the show
as a guest model. Other models
will be trom Trend Bahamas
Modelling Agency, several New
York ladies and other
Bahamian men and women,
including Miss Bahamas 1973.
Cypriana Munnings.
The idea for the show was
conceived last winter, when an
Eastern Airlines representative,
Joan Bryan, manager, Special
Marketing Affairs, indicated to
John Deleveaux, assistant
director of the Ministry of
Tourism that Eastern, as a
major carrier to Nassau and
Freeport. would like to help
celebrate the Bahamas
Independence.
Creating and activity for
women was suggested by Mr.
Deleveaux, and the wheels
started turning when Miss
B ryan contacted Harold
Munnings in Nassau,
coordinator for the
Independence Secretariat. In
New York Miss Bryan
contacted Essence, which has
outstanding fashion coverage,
and the show was born.
Meanwhile, in Nassau, Roy


EVENTS AT CROOKED ISLAND


( ROOKFDI ISLAND: A full
week of Independence
celebrations have been planned
for this settlement, which is
presently holding a national
clean-up campaign and a
competition tor creative and
attractive Independence
slogans. First, second and third
prizes have been donated by
E.A. Thompson, J.P.: A.O.
Munnings, (Commissioner and
Lula P. iFarquharson, Nursing
Officer.
During the first week of July
there will be a National Prayer
Week with dails church
services at a.mi. July 8 will be
observed is National Prayer
DI)a ith ,111n I ecumenical
service to be lield at the Public
Park bcgiininig it 1 1 a.m.
11n Jul \ at I p.m.. there
will he a musical and cultural
presentation and a short prayer
service. Ilighpoint, of the
evening will be the flag raising
cerclmonyi. This will be
followed by a fireworks display
and an all night rally at Central
School grounds. Later in the
daI., July 10, there will be a


SIR MILO GUEST

OF ROTARIANS
WITH the Governor General
Designate and LIady Butler as
guests of honour, the Rl,,tir
(Club of Nassau installed its
officers for 1973 4 at a
"ladies da\ luncheon in the
(Govcrnior's Hall ofI tlhe
Sheraton British Colonial iotel
todaN.
Presiding for the last time
sas outgoing President John R.
Morley.
Newl\ elected officers
installed were A. 1). (Bill)
Farquharson, president.
(;ordon O'Brien, Ist vice
president: FI'. L. (1eter ('ole,
2nd vice president: William
Allen, secretary: and B.
Vincent Kelly. treasurer.
In addition to the otticers,
directors for the coining year
are A A. Thonmpson Robert
Adanison, Vincent D'Aguilar.
J. [Ighert Tertullien, David
Donald. Paul Cooper and
James ('ockwell.
(Coinmmittee chairmen who
are neither officers nor
directors are Clyde Minaid,
Ways & Means: Mait land Cates,
attendance; Paul Norton,
fellowship: Mike Boihainnn,
sergeant at arms and hliuse
co lllllllttee: IHarry Scales.
in en bers hip development
John Hawthorne, class-
ification: lion. Leonard
Knowles, mem bership;
Ilopet on Wray, Rotary
information; Ralph Owers,
bulletin & magazine: and
Oakley Bidwell, public
relations.
RAFFLE TO BE
DRAWN TOMORROW
IH 1 DRAWING for the
ralfle in aid of the National
Museum and Research Centre
will take place at 7:30 p in
tomorrow at the Bahamas
Teacher's College, Oakes Field.
lhe first prize will be a 1973
Avenger car. The second prize
a motor scooter, and the third
a trio for two to Luxembourg.


"Freedom Party" at Cabbage
I lill School.
A youth rally presentation
at the Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Landrail Point on July
1 1 will begin at noon. At this
presentation, there will be
s pee c hes "What
Independence means to me," a
Bible qu it and an
Independence Junkanoo
parade with rake and scrape
band to Landrail Point Park.
On July 12, Acklins will
compete against Crooked
Island in a domino, checker
antl whist tournament. The
following day there will be
Family Island All Star Games
sponsored by Ednold
F.irquharson at Colonel Hill
Park Beach.
I'he activities will conclude
'N ith a day at the beach on July
14, At this time there will be a
marathon swim meet, dinghy
boat race. tug of war,
gunm-elemi boat race and an
adult icay.


Davis, E-astern's sales manager,
was working with Mrs. Cooper
and Mrs. Kelly and their
committee members
coordinating Nassau
arrangements: selection of the
charities, selection of hotel and
setting up the ticketing and
reservations procedures,
suggesting models and Nassau
shops to participate in the
show, coordinating with the
stateside arrangements being
made in New York by Eastern
and Essence, and doing
everything that goes into
making such a show a popular
and successful event.


The first evening function
during the Independence
celebrations, the show is under
the patronage of Prime
Minister, the Hon. Lynden 0
Pindling and Mrs. Pindling.
Proceeds will aid the Crippled
Children's Committee, the
Centre for the Deaf and Dumb
and the Stapledon School for
the Mentally Retarded.
With the exception of
several Androsia outfits and
fashion accessories from
Mademoiselle, Mic-Mac,
Clothes Closet and Boneville
Bones, all garments will be
brought from New York.
Top American designers
have offered clothes for the
show. The outstanding fashion
names tol be represented will
include Willie Ferguson, a
Bahamian working in New
York, Jon Ilaggins, Willie
Smith, Scott Barrie and
Stephen Burrows, Russell
Boulangclaire for Key
Creations. Connie Saunders,
for Mindy Malone, Earl Lovell,
Alvin Costello, for Pastime;
Jules Parker, jewellery and
Iliroko.
Princess Hlanna, a Bahamian


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Financing available


FOR
ONLY 5219


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2. No interest rates

3. You can build right away


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O IW N IA..........











6 Wfeh (rtbune


Kodak announces Independence 9 1 1 !


Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


'm


Photographic Competition & rules


mo um.


EDITOR


TRIAL

The John Chaplin affair


I From Page 3


MRS. ELSIl SMITH,
spokesman for Island
Merchants, in announcing the

Trpc


Kodak Independence
Photographic Competition.
said that the aim was to make
Bahamians aware of the visible
aspects of the Independence
celebrations and to encourage
everyone to record for
posterity this great event.
"As this is a once in a
life-time opportunity no
verbal description would ever


Reserve copies

for yourself,
relatives,

friends

of this

BIG..

BIG..

BIG..


SOUVENIR

INDEPENDENCE

ISSUE
Send or bring-in to:-
The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas
Order as many copies as you wish.
Reserved copies must be paid for in advance and
may be collected at the Tribune office Monday,
.Il Qth Thursda I Julu 1 2th r thrasftar


Note:-
Copies to be c
Copies to be n


do justice to the events that
will take place and, by far the
best way to record this historic
occasion is on film," she said.
"Over $500 worth of Kodak
equipment is being offered as
prizes. The general
classification is open to
everyone and it is hoped that
we will get many entries from
the Family Islands," she added.
The school's prize consists
of twelve cameras and enough
film to get any school
established in photography
either as part of the school
curriculum or as an extra mural
activity such as a photographic
club. The picture which must
be submitted in the name of a
school may be taken by
anyone, either pupil, parent or
teacher.
M-s. Smith emphasised that
it \,as to encourage the young
of the country to develop
aesthetically to their
surroundings and events.
There is no entry fee and
prints may be sent to P. 0. Box
N3947 or left at any of the
Island camera shops.
Island Merchants are
offering completely free of
charge a special commemora-
t ive bonus during
Independence in their
photofinishing service. This
will show a customer's regular
picture with a motif beside it
commemorating Independence.
(* SEE ADVERTISEMENT
ON PAGE 3)
MOON
Rises 5:23 a.m. Sets 7:04


lq independence and the "all
* Bahamian staff."
-__- I_ Mr. Wells said he hoped the
event would make people more
The Hon. Carlton Francis, familiar with how the coke
Minister of Development and that they/ drink is produced
Mrs Francis attended the first and canned.
day of open house and guided "After all", he said, "we're
tours of the Caribbean Bottling the only canning line in the
Co., Ltd. yesterday. Bahamas. We feel it's a
Mr. Colin S. Wells, vice fascinating procedure."
president and General Manager The tours will be conducted
of the company said today that by two school girls. Gilberth
the open house was a salute to Gaitor and Sabrina Ingraham.


PM appeals for badly ne


76 pages loaded with

Bahamian Social and

Political History, with

stories and pictures,

both old and new


A SOUVENIR EDITION!


. ..gOl$$Please print or type..e"a$s8998
Please print or type


The Tribune:
Please reserve me copies of your
Souvenir Independence Issue.
- to be collected by me at 50c,
-to be mailed away at 75c.


I enclose $ to cover order.


until Friday from 10 a.m. to
Pictured on the first day o
Caribbean Bottling company
open house are from left t
right: Robert Pinde
operations manager; Mr
Christina Francis, wife of th
Minister of Developmen
Sabrina Ingraham, tour guid
Aldora Claridge, assistai
comptroller; Gilbertha Gaito
tour guide; Michael Burges
Coca Cola representative fi
the Bahamas and Jamaic
Judy Munroe, comptroller; th
Hon. Carlton Francis, Ministe
of Development; and Mr. Col
Wells, vice president


meded funds


had a talk with me. Hie wanted to know how ten fine citizens
could be wrong in condemning John Chaplin, especially when
seven of those men were Rotarians.
ti He is a Rotarian and so, when he made this statement, he had
in mind the Four Way Test, a pledge all Rotarians take, and
which is the heart and soul of the Rotary spirit.
This pledge is supposed to make Rotarians conscious of their
4 duty to their fellowman ... to be honest, fair, decent and
of considerate in all their human relations.
's This is the hell of it. This disturbs me too because I am a
to
r, Rotarian.
rIS. And I am reminded of the fact that John Chaplin is not only a
he Rotarian but a past President of the club of which I am a
it; member.
e; I think every member of the East Nassau Rotary Club will
nt confirm the statement that John Chaplin's year as Rotary
)r, President was one of the high spots in the life of the club. He did
ss, not only put life and spirit into the Friday luncheon programmes,
or but he worked harmoniously with the officers of the club who
a; served under him.


he
er
in


on behalf of Bahamas Red Cross


Prime Minister Lynden 0.
Pindling introduced tie
bi-annual Bahamas Red Cross
appeal to the public for
financial contributions.
Mr. Pindling pledged his
support to the voluntary
organization, which is now
short of funds. He asked that
the public help the Bahamas
Red Cross continue its great
work which includes Home
Help Service and
Meals-on-Wheels, for the aged
and informed, throughout the


Bahamas.
The appeal was made by
Mrs. Rowena Eldon, president
of the Bahamas Red Cross.
Following is the full text of the
appeal:
FRIENDS OF RED CROSS:
I would like to thank the
Prime Minister for publicly
supporting our bi-annual
appeal.
I wish to acknowledge with
grateful thanks all those
donations and the help which
we received from our last
appeal to you on the Ist
January this year
However, at the Annual
General Meeting of the
Bahamas Red Cross which was
held at Governement House on
the 8th May, 1973, the
Treasurer revealed that there
was a serious deficit in funds in
the Branch of the Red Cross
with the result that we have
had to draw on reserves to the
extent of $25,000.00, a state
of affairs which no longer can
continue.
In view of the lack of funds
as revealed by the Treasurer I
feel it is necessary to make this
by-annual appeal for funds to
enable us to continue the
splendid work which this
organization is doing. As you


know the Red Cross is a
voluntary organization and we
have to depend on the
generosity of the public in
order to carry out the many
activities in which we are
involved. In Social Welfare
work alone the Red Cross is
undertaking work that costs
approximately $80.000.00 a
year and unless we are able to
obtain further funds from the
public by this appeal we shall
be compelled to reduce our
activities in the field of
welfare.
One of the primary aims of
the Bahamas Red Cross is to
endeavour to help the really
needy both here in New
Providence and the Family
Islands. Naturally we would
hate to discontinue our
Meals-on-Wheels service or the
Home Ilelp Service and we are
therefore asking you to help
your Red Cross to continue its
services to the less fortunate in
our community.
As everyone knows the Red
Cross is an extremely worthy
organization and I trust that
everyone will respond to this
Bi-Annual Appeal in as
generous a manner as possible,
especially those who have not
been able to contribute before.


SITUATION VACANT

Applications are invited for the positions of
Project Manager, Assistant Superintendent,
Welding Superintendent, X-ray Supervisor, First
Class Fitter and Area Superintendents on our
Borco Extension Tank Farm Program.
Applicants must be qualified and have field
experience in heavy steel plate construction.


Apply in writing to:
CHICAGO BRIDGE & IRON COMPANY LTD.
P. 0. BOX F 2437
Freeport, Grand Bah:ima.


INDEPENDENCE


SALE

July 3rd.-July 21st.



Bargains in

rT POLYESTERS


COTTONS


Home

Fabrics


Ltd.
Dewgard Shopping Plaza
Madeira Street
Box N3692
Tel: 5-8144


Later in the evening I met on the street a member of the
Board, whom I have always regarded as a friend. This member
came up and spoke to me ... concerned lest this affair should mar
our friendship. I assured the member that this was a public matter
on which we had taken different sides but that it would not
interfere with our friendship. Intelligent people can differ
without meaning or causing personal offence.

There is no doubt about it that the ten members of this Board
are seasoned and highly respected citizens.
It they have gone wrong ... and all the evidence so far points in
this direction ... how could this have possibly happened?
I can think of only one possibility.
This Board has been holding private meetings at which people
have been encouraged to come and bring complaints to them in
secret.
At some time, in the course of making decisions, the head of
any institution or business is bound to consciously or
unconsciously earn the ill-will of people who very often fail to
get things they want '.. and don't deserve.


It is possible
has crossed in
students placed


that John Chaplin is the victim of a few people he
protecting the interests of the school and the
in his care by trusting parents.


This is a terrible affair for many reasons. The very worst
feature of all is that it makes one feel no man can be sure who are
his friends in life.
Another sad thing is that the school will not find it easy to
collect money to help pay off its debt. And, finally, it is already
being suggested that the Government should take over the
college. This warning was shouted by a parent in the audience.
The meeting ended on an interesting note when a parent got up
and said that he had listened to the discussion for two hours and
had not yet been told why the Board had dismissed Mr. Chaplin.
Would the Board oblige by telling them?
The Board didn't reply.
And another parent pointed out that examination results
showed that St. Andrew's had the highest scholastic record in the
colony. It was evident from the demonstration at this meeting
that the parents were happy with Mr. Chaplin as headmaster. This
spelled success. Who quarrels with success?
Yes, indeed ... who quarrels with success?

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: I have been informed that two
members of the Board separately and on different occasions
tried to bully the teachers into making a statement denying a
report published in The Tribune. They wanted to make this
newspaper wrong. The teachers have silently refused to be bullied
because they know that what we printed was the truth. This
member of the Board is supposed to be a friend of The Tribune!

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
The Truth will make you free.
ST. JOHN, 8-32
Those whom the Gods would destroy they first make mad.
********* **
With stupidity the gods themselves struggle in vain.
FREDERICK VON SCHILLER.


WANTED


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF
HIGHEST ('ALIBRF WITlH
EXCEPT IONA L I X PIRI R 1ENCE
REQUIRlED FOR CHAIRMAN AND
PRESIDENT 01 LARGE BAHAMIAN
COMPANY. MUST BE THOROUGHLY
CAPABLE AND TRUSTWORTHY AND
H A V F T 11 F 1 G HE ST
QUALIFICATIONS AND
REFERENCES.
SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH
EXPERIENCE. BAlHAMIANS ONLY
NEED AI'PLY. I FLEPIIONF MRS.
POWELL 5-7516 or 5-7517.


ROYAL MAIL REGULAR FREIGHT THE PACIFIC STEAM
SERVICE FROM

LINES LIMITED U.K. TO NASSAU NAVIGATION CO.
For information contact the agents

R.H.CURRY & Co.,Ltd.
PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


S e n ribunt



Souvenir


INDEPENDENCE


Issue


Available-July 9 1973


f ,dy, -uly l lltI, ur u tlitel .
Name
Address
collected ..... 50c each
nailed ....... 75c each ,
(List MAIL AWAY names and addresses on separate sheet of paper)


I


I


I


u ly WE", II "U










Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


Inhiws anniversary


becomes hairy problem

By Abigail Van Buren
t 1973 by Chicago Tribune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: Like so many others I can't believe I
am actually writing a Dear Abby letter. My inlaws' anni-
versary is coming up so I called my mother in law and told
her that John fmy husband] and I wanted to take her and
Dad out for a small dinner celebration on their anniversa-
ry.
She said she'd ask Dad and would let me know. She
called me back the next day and said land I quote], "Dad
said he was not going anywhere with John until he gets his
hair cut."
I couldn't believe my cars! John is over 21 and nobody
has to tell him when to cut his hair. He wears it longer
than he used to, but it's clean and well-groomed and not
really long by today's standards.
When I told John about it he said, "Well, I guess we


T CRIME

s Jew%'


NOW SHOWING
Matinee 2:45 & 5, Eve.,ing 9 'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005

PS~l-ft; -/.


I--D

star GENE HACKMAN ERNEST BORGNINE RED BUTTONS
SU(;(;,ESTED FOR MA TURI A4 AUDIENCES
PAR'lNTA I. DISCRETION AD VISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:45, will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Wednesday t, ru Friday
Matinee starts at 2:1 5
Evening 9:00
"NIGHT OF THE BLOOD'
MONSTER" PG.
Christopher Lee
Maria Schell
PLUS
"VENGEANCE" PG.
Richard Harrison
Allan Collins


Wednesday thru Friday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"THE CANDY
SNATCHERS" R.
Tiffany Boiling
Ben Piazza
PLUS
"10 RILLINGTON
PLACE" R.
Richard Attenborough
Judy Geeson


NOW SHOWING


Matinee continuous from 2, Evening 8: 30 'Phone 3-4666
"M li r 1amuel AkOlf presmis an Amer,,e inlcmii aional Picture
"COFFi"In
PAM GRIER BOOKER BRADSHAW
ROBERT DOQUI WILLIAM ELLIOTT
i J, ALLAN ARBUS .on" SID HAI6 ma,
Pred ice y obertbA Papaian
~iM L~W, ;W nllei ardO .rpcedb, Jack H, COLORbyMo neab
AND




I N cOLO A UNIVERSAL PICTUR
NO ON'l: ,\ AI1.R 17 ADAMITTE7D.
SORRY NO PASSES.


i

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I

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won't be with them on their anniversary."
As things stand now, we aren't speaking to his parents
until we get an apology. Don't you think we deserve one?
DAUGHTER IN LAW
DEAR DAUGHTER IN LAW: I happen to believe that
John has the right to wear his hair the way he wishes, and
his parents also have the right to absent themselves from
his company if they so desire, but I wouldn't hold out for
an apology. Start talking. But be careful what you say.

DEAR ABBY: It's Little League baseball time again
and I need your help. The father of one of these boys piles
all these boys in the back of his pickup truck-some with
their feet hanging over the side, :?nd you know how boys
are-they don't sit still, and some of them like to show
off.
I have been driving behind them in my car and my
heart has been in my mouth many times. The driver of the
truck can't keep his eye on the boys in the back, and some-
times he's watching scenery instead of the road ahead of
him.
I have heard this man's wife say they both read your
column, Abby, so maybe if you print this it will do some
good.
I don't want him to think I don't appreciate his hauling
those Little Leaguers around, because I think he's great,
but I worry. NO NAME, PLEASE
DEAR NO NAME: Here's your letter . right over
home plate.

DEAR ABBY: I would like to inform R. L. C. and
others who have also lost items in restaurant checkrooms,
that she has a very good chance of recovering her loss
from the restaurant management under bailment laws, re-
gardless of the signs proclaiming "Not responsible for loss
of personal property."
I would like to add that a practical business law course
is a valuable investment for anyone.
DAWN IN FLORIDA
DEAR DAWN: I also took a course in "business law"
and I would like to add, "A little learning is a dangerous
thing." When one has a legal problem he is ahead to hire a
competent lawyer and pay him for what he knows.
DEAR ABBY: My heart ached for those youngsters
who wanted to be married by a minister but couldn't find
one who would marry them because they didn't belong to
his church.
With so many of our young people turning away from
religion, you would think a minister would jump at the
chance to bring them into the fold.
If they can't find a minister to marry them, they
should consider a judge. At least it would be legal. Also, a
sea captain has the authority to legalize a union. Have they
considered that? LOVES CHILDREN
DEAR LOVES: After having been told to go jump in
the lake by so many ministers, they might indeed find a
sea captain the ideal one to tie the knot.
CONFIDENTIAL TO SENIOR CITIZENS: Some of my
most fascinating and informative mail comes from Sen-
ior Citizens. Will you please send me a postcard telling me
what YOUR biggest problem is? Money? Failing health?
Loneliness? Boredom? And if you have no serious prob-
lems, send a postcard telling me how you manage to stay
happy. A million thanks!
ABBY
Problems? You'll feel better if you get It off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 970, L. A.,
Calif. l N. E1Close stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abby, Box 7W00, Los
Angele., CaL .eM, ftr Abby's beeklet. "How to Write
Letters for A Oeeasions."


ARRIVED TODAY: Tropic
Day from West Palm Beach
Emerald Seas, Bahama Star,


Flavia from Miami
SAILED TODAY: Tropic
Day for West Palm Beach


-I


NOW!


MIE McKE E & THE CITAIONS

0 SW liNT DYNAMICS


Continuous dancing every night except Thursdays
from 10 p.m. until...
CANTONESE DINING FROM 7 P.M.
NO COVER e NO MINIMUM
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


IBM DATACENTER SERVICES
Has immediate position available
in Nassau

PROGRAMMERI/SYSTEMS ANALYST

Successful applicants must be throughly familiar with
systems programming design and implementation of
varied commercially oriented applications. Position
requires a minimum of three (3) years COBAL
Programming experience.
Applicants will be required to successfully complete
an Employment Aptitude Test prior to employment
consideration.
IBM OFFERS: Hospitalization and Insurance
Programs, paid vacation, attractive starting salary and
excellent advancement opportunities
Qualified applicants should call Mr. McFadden at
32351/4 for personal interview.


CLASSIFIED Sl


REAL ESTATE


I I


C10365
CHOICE COMMERCIAL
SITE, Madeira Street. Suitable
for bank, offices, showroom
etc. 2 storey building in rear,
large spacious building in front.
$95,700. Call 5-1623.
C10362
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park, 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room
and carport. Built-in range and
baker on lot 90 x 150. Nice
home in nice area. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.
C10354
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 2/2 baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
central airconditioning. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.
C 10344
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape.
Airconditioned throughout.
Unusual opportunity. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.
C 10424
FOR SALE
LOT PYFROM'S ADDITION.
60 by 100 only $5800. Terms
arranged. DIAL 22305, 22307,
22033.


C10423
FOR SALE
ON THE WATER'S EDGE
OUT EAST TROPICAL
PARADISE Ideal for large
family has four bedrooms 3
baths, plus maids quarters,
sun-porch beach, dock.
SKI--FISH--SWIM. See anytime
- Dial 22033, 41053, evenings.
41197.
C10421
FOR SALE
ST. EAST, G,.QQ,
GOCATION. 2V1/ bedrooms 2
baths, sitting, dining den, plus
enclosed grounds, garage,
maids quarters Water rights.
Under $45,000.00
WOODLAND Corner Plot. A
family pleaser. 2-storey affair.
Has 3 bedrooms 2 baths,
sitting, dining, porch.
Furnished only $42.000.00
CORNER HOUSE EAST
BAY. 3 bedrooms 2!'2 baths,
sitting, dining, den, furnished,
large plot of land under
$50,000.00 Can offer
substantial mortgage. Has
income $600 month. Better
class homes since 1945.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
22305, 41197.

FOR SALE OR RENT
C10372
FOR SALE OR LONG TERM
LEASE
Fine, elaborately furnished
house at Skyline Heights Four
bedrooms and baths. Main
rooms designed for
entertaining. Suitable for
diplomatic or executive
residence. 1 V2-acres, beautiful
garden planted for privacy.
Phone 7-7205 or 2-8162 for
appointment to see.

I FOR RENT
C10345
One efficiency apartment, and
one 2 bedroom apartment.
Ring 5-8679 Mr. Pritchard.
C10391
2 BEDROOM (air-conditioned)
house pleasant Montagu area.
Fully furnished, walled garden,
patio, carport, laundry-store-
room. $325. Phone Moss
3-1219, 3-1295.

C10332
AIRCONDITIONED one
bedroom furnished apartment
in Dundas Court, Pyfrom's
Addition, with laundry room
facilities and master TV
antenna. Also large parking
area. For information call
5-3928 or 5-4258.


C10380
FURNISHED three bedroom
two bath house in Seebreeze
Estates, airconditioners,
telephone, garage, laundry
room, automatic washer and
dryer. $400.000 Phone 5-8512.


C10341


FOR RENT


C 10403
Furnished Rooms in
Home on Prospect
Kitchen privileges.
3-4068.


Lovely
Ridge.
Phone


C10379
3-BEDROOM, 2 Bath,
Unfurnished House, Highland
Park, Phone 7-7434 Day,
5-4947 Night after 6 p.m.
C10288
LITTLE ORCHARD
COTTAGES and apartments to
rent daily, weekly or
monthly. Air conditioned -
fully furnished maid service
available. Lovely gardens and
swimming pool. Village. Road.
Call 31297 or 31093.
C10397
LARGE 4 bedroom, 3
bathroom house with study,
family room and breakfast
room. 2 car enclosed garage.
Quiet neighbourhood.
Retirement Road off Shirley
Street. $500 per month. Phone
43742.
C10415
FURNISHED Apartments on
the ocean, airconditioned, fully
equipped. Available on
monthly basis suitable couple.
Phone Mrs. McGinty 7-8341
after 11 a.m.


C10346
4500 sq. ft. warehouse or
off ice space, available
immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.


C10356
HILLCREST TOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
airconditioning, swimming
pool, ahort or long term. $40C
per month. Contact 2-1841
days.
C10349
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE-
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C10364
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished
' $250 per month. Cal
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777-8.
C10343
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.
C 10291
BLAIR ESTATES
1, 2 bedroom 1 bath
apartment, furnished. Phoni
(day) 22580 (night) 32589).

C 10426
1 two-bedroom unfurnished
apartment overlooking Eas
Street off McCullough Corne
east. Phone 5-1569.

CARS FOR SALE
C10427
AT MOTOR CENTRE
LIMITED
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
OR YOU


L




o
n
0

71

e


d
5t
r


1973 PLYMOUTH SATELLITE
only 5,000 miles radio A-C P-S
W-W tyres like new for ONLY
$5,000.00 A steal

1970 OLD'S CUTLASS con
vertible top A-T P-S P-B A-C
big daddy tyres, if you like
nice things this is the car for
you at $2,800.00 Once in a life
time offer.
1970 FORD MAVERICK radio
S-T, W-W tyres, in very good
condition yours at ONLY
$1650.00
1969 FORD FAIRLANE radio
A-T, P-S, W-W tyres, 6 cyl. a
very good used car $1,200.00
1969 V-WAGEN BUG in good
condition radio $1,000.00
1970 V-WAGEN BUG in very
good condition radio W-W
tyres, for ONLY $1,200.00
1971 V-WAGEN BUG in Al
condition 2,400 miles for
ONLY $1,700.00.
1969 BUICK SKYLARK A-C
A-T P-B radio W-W tyres vinyl
top $2,500.00
1971 FORD PINTO A-T radio
W-W tyres $1,950.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX S-W,
radio A-T $1,350
1969 DODGE CORONET
2-Dr. COUPE A-C A-T radio
P-B W-W tyres $1,450.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER S-T
radio W-W tyres low milage
$1,650.00

MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.
P. 0. Box N3741,
NASSAU N.P.
BAHAMAS
Phone 56739


CARS FOR SALE


S I CA


i I i


C10322

-at -
CentralGarage

TODAY'S
SPECIAL BUY
1968 CADILLAC
FLEETWOOD


LIMOUSINE -
$6850.00
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
good condition $2400.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER
stick shift, blue $1150.00
1970 SINGER VOGUE SEDAN
automatic $950.00
1964 LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL
white, nice interior $400.00
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
blue, stick shift $2250.00
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
green, automatic $1000.00
1969 FORD GALAXIES
reconditioned $1000.00
1970 FIAT 124
stick shift $700.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER
bargain, automatic $1500.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER G.L.
good buy $2350.00
1970 PLYMOUTH
BARRACUDA
red, automatic $2500.00
1969 FORD FALCON
automatic $1200.00
1969 DATSUN S/W
stick shift, red $800.00
1969 FORD ESCORT
blue, 2 door $759.00
1971 PLYMOUTH CUSTOM
SUBURBAN white$3500.00
1967 FORD CORTINA
white, automatic $200.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX S/W
white, automatic $1200.00
1969 ROE(ER 2000
white, automatic $p1500
1969 CHEVELLE MALIBU
good condition $1800
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3-4711


C10374
1969 NUMBER SCEPTER,
new paint job, automatic.
$950.00 or nearest offer. Call
George, 5-2483.
C10294
1972 C.S. 124 Stationwagon,
38,000 miles. Phone 3-2149
after 6 p.m.
C 10310


C 10310
1569 PONTIAC, excellent
condition. Automatic, power
steering Phone 58765 after
3:30 p m. $2200. (O.N.O.)

C 10422
SACRIFICE OFFER. LAST
WEEK TC SELL. 1970 Morris
1000. Excei'ent condition. One
owner. $989 Phone 31605.


CUSTOM DESIGN
to your specifications at
ECONOMY PRICES
-11 "'CAVALIER" I
L CONSTRUCTION |
Phone: 3-5171, 3-6011J
D. A. HUDSON
VARCO-PISEN
METAL BUILDImS SYSTEM
Distributed world wide byv
-;PAN INTERNAL TIONAL -
NASSAU, BAHAMAS.


I


FOR SALE


ECT

IS FOR SALE


C10410
ISLAND MOTOR
COMPANY 1970 L


TD.


C10411
ABC MOTORS
Budget-priced, A-1 used cars.
Best value for your money.
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA-
automatic transmission $3,900
1972 CHEVROLET VEGA -
automatic transmission $3,300
1972 FORD ESCORT-
standard $1,800
1972 FORD CAPRI -
automatic transmission,
air conditioned $2,900
1971 FORD LTD-
automatic transmission,
air conditioned $3,600
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON,-
automatic trasnmission $1,400
1970 FORD CORTINA -
automatic transmission $1,200
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER -
4-door, automatic
transmission, radio $1,100
1970 CHEVROLET IMPALA-
4-door, automatic
transmission, radio $2,500
1970 RAMBLER SST.-
automatic transmission $1,800
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON.. -
4-door standard $800
1970 TOYOTA COROLLA-
standard $1,200
1969 TORINO -
2-door *As Is* $1,000
1969 FORD CORTINA-
4-door $1,100
1969 FORD TORINO G.T. -
2-door $1,500
1969 MORROS MINI -
standard $600
1969 VOLKSWAGEN
FASTBACK- $900
1969 LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL.
air conditioned,
automatic transmission $3,500
ABC MOTORS
Colins Avenue
Centreville
Phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m.
SATURDAY 8.00 a.m. to 5 p.m


ned
field
ant
7-8.

I1-MARE.
).


C10425
VW 1967 in good condition.
$500 or nearest offer. Owner
leaving island. Phone 4-3046.

FOR SALE
C10402
MOTOR SCOOTER
Honda 70. Like new. Ideal for
zipping around town. $225
(O.N.C.) Phone 3-1423.
C 10390
SOLID MAPLE bedroom suite,
dining room suite, end tables,
bookcases and various other
household goods. Call 5-8210.
Shirley Park Avenue.
C10394
MYERS MOVING SALE:
Furniture Early American:
Appliances colour TV,
Freezer, Sewing Machine, e_:
Clothing. Go three blOteWSst
of Soldier" =Road dWW'Wfte
Charles. Turn right pn
Yellowsilk Lane.


C 10386
1967 Chrysler
Sewing machine
Massage Vibrator
Vacuum
Bicycle
Bookshelf
Side tables
Car (battery)
Toys and Games
Telephone 77885.

C10414
YAMAHA 200cc purple -
1971 model.
Perfect condition. $450. Phone
24130 (day) 57726 (night) -
Monday thru Friday.
C10413
ELEGANT BLACK
LACQUER dining table chairs
and buffet $550 -- plus one
large "traditional" style bureau
and mirror $130. One small
"traditional" style bureau $75.
Two matching bedside tables
$50. Two single beds and
headboards $135. Phone
-'508.
C10376
LARGE STURDY wooden
chest with padded lid, Metal
trunk. Many books for children
some sets. Cheap. 2-3901.
C 10404
HEAVY DUTY Commercial
Carpeting. Rust Tweed. !2 price
$6.00 per yard. 12 x 15, 12 x
14, 15 x 6, 12 x 8. Spectrum II
Interiors, 3-4068.

LOST
C 10406
REWARD will be given to
finder of black leather wallet
lost in or in vicinity of
Maternity Ward, P. M.
Hospital, with important
documents.
Please return to Sister's Desk,
Maternity Ward or contact Dr.
Siquig telephone 51641. Thank
you.
C10417
SMALL BLACK POODLE in
vicinity of Princess Margaret
Hospital, Saturday afternoon.
Answers to the name of
"Pinto". Anyone having
information please call Dr.
Prendiville 2-4927.

Im SUPPLIES
C10350
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C10355
BROADWATER 25' Straight
Drive Cruiser. 225 h.p.
Chrysler. Contact Smith
5-8311.


N-SMEARED_____


OUTSTANDING BUY!







BAS RA chose the 31' Bertram for its rescue craft.
Here is a great opportunity to get a similar yacht ata
very attractive price.
TELEPHONE 5-4641

AIR COND ITIN
5HRE TA~ ML AKN


I



I
I


SI








I I
| !















I

I

I1


FORMER NAVY MINE SWEEPER MSC 194
145'x28' Wood Hull. Ideal for conversion to Commercial
Fishing Vessel, Shrimp Boat or Yacht.
COVE CONTRACTORS, INC
P.O. Box 4068
Panama City. Florida 32401


- I


1971 VIVA- 2 Dr.
Auto. Green $1695
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA -
2 Dr. Auto. Blue $1795
1968 PONTIAC STRATO
CHIEF Yellow $1400
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER -
4 Dr. Auto. White $995
1968 JAVELIN A/C $1200
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR-
4 Dr. 2000 Std. Green $2950
1967 TRIUMPH 1300-
Red Std. $800
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR -
4 Dr. S/W Yellow $475
1973 VICTOR S/W F.E.-
Auto. Blue 856 miles $4400
1970 FORD CAPRI -
Automatic Blue $1595
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 Dr. Auto. Blue $2100
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU S.S
Auto A/C $2700
1971 MERCURY-
A/C 4 Dr., Maquis $5500
1970 TRIUMPH 1300 $1450
1968 HILLMAN-
1971 FORD CAPRI -
Auto. Blue $1950
1968 VAUXHALL $895
VICTOR STD.-


E


!


HI


I =I N mmmmmmma I I


I


.


w


Trade-ins Welcor
Located Oakes F
Opposite Ice Pla
Phone 34636-
C10387
1970 AUSTIN MIN
$1000.00 Call 7-7885


t


I


I


She lribui






_ . .. . .H ET. . .. T T -


0ihe Zribune


Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


Classified a i oget tlhejob done


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


MNO


C10O

A
pre-i
if yo
Blt's
inciu
SOU
SEV
SUN
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BFL
TRO
SAN
MA R
SE A


WIN
COL
And
Easy
disco
23'2



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exje
hone
518


C
C60.
JOB

MIN
High
equt
MIN


II


- 10 years
DUTIES 'RESPONSBI LITI ES:
Professional high press-t:r
boil'e insulating, ste.e'P'
jack 's. sand bl a ,t ,nq -
structural steel a g ."p,
painting, etc
INTERIESTTE APPLICANT
CONTACT Pe rsc.ni.
Department B[,i am a Ce', ,:,-t
Company, P 0 Bc- F l(0P
Freeport. Grati bn. .j

CC036
JOB 1I!TLE -C.r ir CHEM..
AND INSPECTOrp
MINIMUM EDUCATION
Good basic t"d .a.,,r.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: A'
least 5 yeats cement r D!ar
-hemistry experience
DUTIES/RES. "r-i. ,-..ITIES
C ,, i and .Uoe'vise the(
quality control procedures
ranging from setecticn anc'
blending of raw mateiials
through thc m.nnuflactur'-'1
processes trn the t'f
inspection and testing o'
cement irtio'r to release for
chipmet.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CON f AIC T P-rsonnei
Department, Bahama Cerrent
Company P O0. Box F 00
Freepot, Grand Bahama.
C I U32'
AC COUNTANT 0 I T :
approximately ten -Vears
accounting 'xper ience to'
position with mut ti-national
company wi'h headquarters in
Nassau Duties and
respornsiolit" / w.lv include:
Valuation of securities,:
accounting for forward
exchange contracts promissory
notes and 'rnerc.al paper,
and a assist, w ith
consolidation of financial
statement ts Witt er n
applications should be sent to
The Personnel Department.
The De I te Bankina
Corporation. P. 0. Box N3229,
Nassau.

C 10408
EXPANDING ( BAHAMIAN
INSURANCE BROKERS
require ambitious young man
as Trainee Manager. General
insurance experience useful but
not essential. The applicant
should be prepared to study
for London Chartered
Insurance Institute diploma
and should have already
obtained '0' Level G.C.E. in at
least four subjects.
Applicants should apply in
own handwriting stating age,
experience and educational
qualifications to Adv. C10408
c/o The Tribune, P. 0. Box
N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.


312
SPECIAL NOTICE
$40.00 tree bonus
independence gift is yours
ru make a deposit now at
s Real Estate. Good buys
de:
TH BEACH EST.
EN HILLS ESTATE
SHINE PARK
-DEN GATES
AIR
)DICAL GARDENS
DS ADDITION
tATHON ESTATE
BREEZE ESTATE
',I -TON GAR :. NS
lACP'AW.' BFACH ESTATE
'TON M1.E ADOWS
ON' VILLAGE EAST
in :,. ethe;ars
te ,-is and qood .ash
iu t1 ate 'va able. Call
1

ENTERTAINMENT


ENTERTAINMENT
PROBLEMS'
call
Film & Equipment
Service
Re :. ta ,'







Sr e P cordler1

& d. S d P tto

S"



POSITION WANTED
159
JNG GIRL seeks job as
iu I in your shop. Very
,.. to work. Please write
L C101b9. c/,9 T1e Tribune
. Rox N-3207. Nassau.

419
ESMAN 10
rienc. Hard v0Oi kt l a,
:st and reliable. Phonep
28.


NiELP WNTED
34
TITLE: PAINTER
I- ,s rP
JIMUM EDUCATION:
I School graduate or
i Talent
1IMUM EXPERIENCE


I


NELP WANTED


II


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21


necessary. Write for interview OPERA
giving full details of past handleI
experience to General Manager, Male, w
P. O. Box N7776, Nassau. DI S P L
ASSIS

TRADE SERVICES require
LTis requ
work c
C 10363 appear
work w
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTIS Interest
HURRICANE Grand
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS, Country
PANELS Grand
Ltd., Office
John S. George & Co. Ltd., 9:00
For free estimates and prompt Monday
service call 28421. Martin


TRADE SERVICES


TENNAS. Boosters for
paitments and hotels.
I services. Call Douglas
5-9404 WORLD OF
Mackey Street next to
Place.


NDT.V. SERVICE
ice you can rely on
Nell Street
ntennas Boosters
nd Services
2618 P. 0. Box N327,
Monday Saturday
5:30.


SCHOOLS

TUITION

English. Spanish
Phone 5-2439.


-6035 C10352
OB TITLE: WELDER T.V. ANT
MINIMUM EDUCATION: homes, a
3ood basic education Sales and
SI1NIMUM EXPERIENCE: Lowe, 5
-10 years. MUSIC, I
DUTIES RESPONSIBILITIES: Frank's F
Must be a certified welder
apable of performing C10409
i horizontal, vertical and ISLAI
overheadd welding, brazing and Foi serve
, 1'i,,,, of any material using Dowdesw
las and electric welding T.V. A
equipment Sales a
INTERESTED APPLICANT Phone 22
CONTACT: Personnel Nassau P
Department, Bahama Cement 8:30 to 5
Company, P. 0. Boy F-100, -
Freeport, Grand Balharma.

:6037
OB TITLE: GENERAL
*OREMAN-MECHANICAL C10326
MAINTENANCE I
11NIMUM EDUCATION.
aood basic education ---.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: C10369
5-10 years cement plant KINGSW
mechanical background now te'
)UTIES. Rt SP--' tiLTIES: number
'o-ordinate and supervise One. II
na i ntenance activities, contact t
including field forces, machine
hop and garage in providing
maintenance, t i, i, i oand
nspect:on services for the
entiree plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT G
SONT AC T : Pesonnel
Department, Bahama Cement
company P. 0. Box F-100.
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C 10366
JOB TITLE UCASHOPN:
FOREMAN

G.C.E. 0" Level or City anrd F
Guilds or equi valentt "
MINIMtU M EXPFRIFNCE. 10 C6009
years in Machine shop. STEEL I
twin GI
DUTIES RESPONSIBILITIES: 25,000
Supervise machine shop and ','cride'
'iel l maintenance of the entire 352 682
cement plant.

INTERESTED APPLICANT HE
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement C6036
Companrv. P. 0. Box F-100, JOB TIT
Freeport. G and Bahama. AND IN
________________ ___ MINIM1
Good ba
-10367 T MINIMAL
JOB TITLE: (EIGHT) .la 5
GENERAL REPAIRMAN lheist r
!NIM UM EDUCATION: DUTIES
Good basic educatioon;. Good Coordin
Cement Plant mechanical quality
bact ground ranging

MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: g
5-10 years process

DUTIES '1 PONSIBILITIES: specti
t', p., repairs, replaces, chipmen
i;.:.fl ,. adjusts and maintain INTERE
all michantical equipment in a C ONT
cotmnt manufacturing plant. Departnm
1 r '- A Compan
ITF STED APPLICANT Fepor
Or' T ,C T Pe sonr cl
DrnriatT 'et Bahama Cementi
C. .,y, P 0 Box F 100. C6037
Fre.p', '', Gi and '-h.pi JOB
FORE'M
A + ';: *'IAI NT E
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN? MINIM
Have yo,. always wanted to Good ba
tc' '. h. lyil with them?" Do 'i N IMI
,r sh to help children 5-10 y
o ;. ,i .: .; theii rtorma i homes mf-hani
.m seo c'tienr, o DUTIES
o tu 10Iw Bahamas? Then Co- idin
S'nilrt the childcare field .' ni toe
The PanfurIy Homrne for incdiudni
:hiidrei I seeking th. shop an
S taT' mairteni
') ^..-on. 15/35 to live ns ectic
id c C. 'or children 2 !o ent- re pl
Syeas old Nurseryr INE, LRE
Ch;dcfae ex ppnien CONT
h ul. Departni
b) aMatu're woman. 35 'ib0. Company
.*;Ith childcare ba' kgtolind Freeport
a : n d a d rin i'r at 1t e
potent tai to live in. C6062
c) plCo ie wth chtldcare o'
social service backgiot.t'r GARP
and/or wailing to have t' APPLY
Service Tairninq on a SANIT/
contractual bas". Must be KEATS
-1 i..i to live in. F REEP(
Jrly Bahamians will be
considered. Apply in writing C6054
for an interview to Mr. & Mrs LAUND
Leslie Dates, Ranfurly Home Willing
to' Children, Box N1413. work
Nassau operate
- .... ------------- Female,
S10412 necessary
LYFORD CAY CLUB GENER
Must bi
LYFORD CAY CLUB requires cleaning
a Water Sports Director other lc
Applicant must be able to
teach water skiing, sailing and LADIES
have 10 years experience as a requedec
professional Scuba Diver Basic style of
Mechanical knowledge of to us
petrol inboard and outboard, Expene
and diesel engines also D R Y (


I I TRADE SERVICES


HELP WANTED


I


'AY ACADEMY i;
sting for a limited
of vacancies in Grade
f interested, please
he school at 42158.





RAND B









OR SALE


HULL Boat 65' x 18'.
'v1 4171, 3' drautight.
Cash. See Eddie
I isheg Hol", Phone
7


LP WANTED 1


LE: CHEF CHEMIST
SPECTOR
UM EDUCATION.
sic education.
IM EXPERIENCE: At
years cement plant
v experience.
/RESPONSIBILITIES:
nate and supervise the
control procedures
from selection and
of raw materials
the tanifactui ing
s to the final
on and testing of
prior to release for
nt.
-STED APPLICANT
ACT: Perio nelI
lent, Baharma Cement
y. P. 0. Box F-100,
q, Grand Bahi ma


TITLE: G ENER_ R
1AN-M EC H A.N t!CCAL
SNANCL
UM E DtUCA TION)
sic education
UM EXPERIENCE:
'ears cement I plant
cal background
'RESPONSIBIL! TIES:
nate and supervise
nance activities,
g field forces, machine
d garage in providing
ance, installation and
on services for the
ant.
:STED APPLICANT
ACT: Petrsonnel
tent, Bahama Cement
y, P. O. Box F-100,
t. Grand Bahama.



BAGE COLLECTORS
IN PERSON:
NATION SERVICES'
ST., P O Box F771
ORT.

RY WORKER (1):
to do genera: laundry
Must know how to
Pressing Machine.
1 year experience
y
AL LABOURERS (5):
e able to do general
for large hotel and
abouring classed work.

TAILOR (1): Will be
I to be able to alter any
clothes. Must be able
e sewing machine.
nce needed.
E LEANER- PRESS
TOR: Must be able to
large type of machine.
ith experience only.
LAY & SALES
TANT MANAGER:
school education
d. Five years experience
hired, must be able to
in own, have pleasant
nce and be able to
ith the general public

ed persons apply: The
Bahama Hotel &
y Club, West End.,
Bahama, Personnel
between the hours of
a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Through Friday. Elon
Jr., Personnel Director.


I I


C 10351 I:.6059
aHORTICU
inder's sto Horticultuist
BI 1 L-d/ oversee th
Brokerage Ltd. maintenance o
M operation. Must
Mackey Street knowledge o f
& Rosevelt Avenue 'uwvirlg insi
NASSAU, BAHAMAS herbicides. Mu
P. 0. Box N3714 (7) days per
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING I!olidcays Five
FORK LIFT RENTAL experience. B
MECHANICAL HANDLING need apply.
EQUIPMENT Contact Prionc
IATA CARGO AGENTS Inteinationai
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE Nursery rDivis
& DELIVERY F 778, Eree
MOVING, STORAGE Bahama or telel
& PACKING for ilntervtew.
STEEL BANDING N- C6060
& SHIPPING ELECTRICALI
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS Electrical Eng
EXCELLENT SERVICE Dtt:tes will inc
REASONABLE RATES atnd installation
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER phase 3p
OR JACK CASH Supetvising the
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796 all radio
2-3797, 2 3798 equipment.
Airport 77434 e c t r ica
equipment (gen
and other mo
t more years
BaharIn i 11ns o nly


IjNursy "......
AHAMA 8
.. .. .. . *Bahama or telep

oreI Iview


11F^ IDI4 ADMINISTER/
ant to the
Intercontinent
-- Should be a
adm inistrative
HELP WANTED connection
CG,--- accounting
C6044 financial and s
KITCHEN PORTERS: Must ,nid tabulation
havet previcoLs experience of also requi
Nlearing laige kitchen area. secictarial ski
CLEANERS: Must be able to u0 cy in
do general cleaning of pots and well as a substa
pans in Kitchen area. This job t ,) th p,eal estai
requires long periods of Telephone 373
standing. P O Box F 26
COOK/HELPER: Must have
some knowledge of cooking C.03.
and be able to work along with Ct(34
the other cooks. Male only. JOB TITL[
Interested persons apply: The SUPERVISOR
Grand Bahama Hotel & MINIMUMt
Country Club, West End, hgI School
Grand Bahama, Personnel equivalent
Office, between the hons of M IN IMUM
9:00 a.m. and 3: p.m., Monday 1,)yeats, .
through Friday. Elon Martin, JUTIES REH
Jr., Personnel Director. Professional
boiler insol
C6035 structurinal stec
JOB TITLE- WELDER painting, etc
MINIMUM EDUCATION: INTERESTED
Good basic education CONTACT
MINIMUM EXPERi.'i. L Department. B
5-10 years. Company P
DUTIES/RESPONSiBILITIES: Freepot tI, Gran,
Must be a cnitified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, ve tical n d C6006
overhead welding, brazing jd Tg TPAINIF.;
cutting of any material usn Rspetonir Ih-
gas and elct- : weld ng e a f ctiv,,t-r,ss o
equipment. all phises of
INTERESTED APPLICANr F p oficuieti
CONTACT: Pe rson .I I si p ter i.,,
Department Bahama Cement cl ahi nt.'r *i : '
Company, P. O. Box F-100, have sutces.f
Freeport. Grand Bahama. school a in Itai
have a minim
C6065 experience in1
TOUR ElCORT (2)- This hold ciltific
position of Tour Escort purpose of t'ai
requires extensive periods of METEO
time away from home. Must Must be college
have experience in deP.ling with BS in m
guests and also speak F ench certificates of
arid English fluently Be able tu specialized
help prepare activities for training sclhoc
guests while at hotel Must be least fifteen
neat in aopeaarinc. Female experience in
only aviation t
operation.
NIGHT AUDITOP: Assistant Please apply
to the Night Auditti. Must Bahama
have knowledge of tight audit C o many,
work, be able to prepare Department,
statements. Male, with high Building, P.
school education and Freepoit, Grar
experience need only apply.
SECRETARY TO AUDITOR C6039
Must be able to take shorthand Applications a
at a rate of 100 words per MANAGER
minute, gyping required at a Sh Ltd.
rate of 65 words per minute. Shops. Ltd.
control their
must have 1 to 2 years Freeport. Api
experience mature and of
Interested Persons Apply: with the a
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL, personally w
WEST END, GRAND work, costing
BAHAMA, PERSONNEL inventories an
OFFICE, between the hours of A thorough
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. horology, gerr
Monday through Friday. Elon buying, selling
Martin Jr., Personnel Director, essential toa
general apprec


S irj-,I P .ILITIES.
high pressure
eating, steeple
Iblasting aInd
el treating and

APPLICANT
Personnel
Bahama Cement
O. Box F 100,
d Bahama.


0' F ICER
fui the overall
vid operation in
a .udemnic and
ti f ing1g "nd
in both
-.d sttuctuital
Ouledurtes. Must
tilly completed
iinqn officer and
umt' of ten years
,.iath' rescue and
:,tes for the
,ing.
)ROLOGIST
ge graduate with
eteorology or
completion from
meteorological
)ls and have at
(15) years
n a recognized
tmeteorol logical

to: The Grand
Devel opment
Personnel
18C Kipling
0 Box F-2666,
ud Bahama.


re invited for the
of GENERAL
for the Carib
of Nassau to
retail outlets i
plicants must be
sound education
ability to deal
vith all clerical
I, stock control,
d disbursements.
knowledge of
n stone jewellery,
g and display is
gether with a
ciation of Eastern
th African
rig. Practical
e of store
at managerial
past ten years is
ether with proven
ain personally all
s in all facets of
tion in a manner
es a continuity of
ve increases and
esent harmonious
staff, customer

application with
past and present
together with
isiness references
tal testimonials
bmitted to: Staff
oi Ltd., P. 0. Box
port, prior to
for a personal


HELP WANTED


I


ILTURIST
required to
e la ndscape
f major hotel
t have extensive
verticutting,
ecticides and
st work seven
week, including
years or more
ahamians only

ess Properties
I (Bahamia
on), P. O. Box
report, Grand
phone 352-8301



L ENGINEER
ineer requclired.
lude the design
n of electrical 2
phase systems.
installation of
communication
OverseeinIi of
Smn ec hanical
ieratolts, pumps
)tors). Five ot
5 expel lnce .
need apply.
cess Pi opi tiet's
I (Baha mai
.,-, P O. Box,
'po t, Gt and
phone 352 8301



NATIVE A,.is-
Ti asure of"f
it Realty Ltd. ,
ble to hirdl(.:
duties it
with detailed
p octdu r es,
tatistical repit ts
s. Ti position
i es exceltent
Ils with ieat

initial. tnowi' tle(
te business.
3-3020 ur write
0. F reepo t.


E: PAINTER

EDUCATION.
graduate or

EXPF RI FNCE:


door, oF







(rtbunr

We make things happen. /

The Tribune opens doors to
homes, apartments, hotels,
stores and offices by providing
latest up-to-the-minute news


II


both local & foreign...


Brother Juniper


C6061
YOUNG BAHAMIANS (MALE
AND FEMALE) TO TRAIN
AS PROFESSIONAL
DANCERS FOR BAHAMAS
AMUSEMENTS LIMITED'S
S H 0 W LO U N GES .
APPLICANTS MUST BE 15
YEARS OF AGE OR OVER.
APPLY IN PERSON TO MR.
B. JOHNSON, PERSONNEL
OFFICER, BAHAMAS
AMUSEMENTS LIMITED.
C6063
BOOKKEEPER required.
Successful applicant will be
responsible for keeping City
and Travel Agents Ledgers up
to date and in balance with -
General Ledger control
accounts. Must handle own
correspondence, and must be -
proficient in the operation of
NCR 3300 accounting J
machine. Will also be .-
responsible for handling the C.
advanced deposit accounts and
credit card billings.
Relative to the foregoing,
cmilent Police Certificate and
work references required.
Only Bahamians need apply to: dt
Miss Miriam Adderley, "Didn't Mars
Personnel Manageress,
International Hotel.

C6058
COBBLERS required.
Minimum of four years
expe ience in all leather craft
and shoe repair Trainees
accepted.
'hIl. to: The Boot Shop,
Chutchilll Squate ot P.O+ Box
F-141.

C10367
JOB TITLE: (EIGHT) /
GLNFRAL REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION: ,
Good basic education. Good .
Cement Plant mechanical
bac kgr found.

MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5- 10 years.

DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintain -
all mechanical equipment in a '
cement manufacturing plant.

INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel e
Department Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100.
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
S10 L3IKD Ti

JOB TITLE: SHOP YO 1/ )I1
FOREMAN .
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
G.C.E. "0" Level or City and
Guilds or equivalent.

MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 10
vta.rs in Machine shop.

DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
St:pe'rvise machine shop and
field maintenance of the entire -
cement plant

INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport. Grand Bahami


ASSISTANT LAUNDRY
MANAGER
Assistant Laundry Ma, -.ger
required to assist Director of
large laundry operation in
directing flow of work and
,supervising laundry personnel.
Applicant must be a high
school graduate and have -'
previous experience in similar /
management capacity of
laundry operation or
experience in a related field.
Contact Princess Properties "A GUY COU
International, Management 1 i
Services Division, P. 0. Box V"M'-i LIKE
F -i84. Freeport, Grand
il.iham n .















C'


As a result, The Tribune now
reaches 33 1/3% more readers
than any other daily distributed
in the Bahamas. That's a lot of
doors. And they're opening
more every day.


II






























A
a










































S


hall M'lLuhan say this was supposed to he
COOLI. me(diunl?"


C6043 and Nor
CATALYTIC WEST INDIES merchandise
LTD, P. 0. Box f-2544, experience
Freeport has job opportunities administration
for Bahamians in the Industrial level for the
Maintenance Field, Freeport essential, toge
for the following positions: ability to tra
Catalytic West Indies, Ltd., has staff member
a Temporary opening available retail distribu
in their Industrial Maintenance that guarantee
organization in Freeport for a our progress
Relief Superintendent retains our pr
Specialist. Applicant must have management,
relationship.
approximately 20 years Written ap
experience in Maintenance Written ap
Project supervision and a resume of
thorough knowledge of employment,
Refinery processes, products, copies of bL
operations and hazards, and person
should be su
Qualified applicants should Manager, Hot
reply to: Deputy Chief F-859, Free
Industrial Officer, Ministry of arrangements
Labour, Freeport. interview.


I


AE "6C D OL DAYS .E N
Tt4IS KINDA STUFF FOR ME."


aLD SrS 7"0 47"11CHEWIN'STEAK' THA
STHIN'WFAS;.. LIKE HAMU6UPZ I
I m


C10
YOU
sales
.*. .I .
Ad.,
P. 0

I10


FE


(


I













Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


Qhr Tribunt


... BUT... BOYS WvILL BE BYS. RIGHT ...

Brother Juniper


"He's painting himself into the same old corner."


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS 32 14
34. Boring tool
36. Oriental
1. Biblical queen temple
6. Fleet temple
12. Green tea 3840 Front
13. Vandykes 40. Prohibit
14. Properly 4 Middy h
16. Insects 44 Cyprinoid fish
17. Blind impulse 46. Color blue
18. Fainthearted 50 "TheUpto date
20. Moray 5 Up-Concedateg
22. Youngster 52. Concerning
23. Published 54 Min-fle
26. Protection 54. Mingle
28. And so forth DOWN
30. Greek letter 1. Queens
31. Mixed type stadium


ALPH NOVA
U VENAL
AR6U TADE
HA AG8O OT
EUCE PAR
OST UE
A RETURN
Su E RO NjA
RFjQS[T TA S~P Y
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


2. Nerves
3. Admiration
4. Anaconda
5. Theater group
6. Blood type


7. Boat race
8. Peanut
9. Plowed land
10. Insecticide
11. Burro
15. Newt
19. Caviar
21. Liquid
oxygen
24. Timeless
25. Caucasian
goat
26. Bright
27. Diamond
necklace
29. Lionet
33. Short for
certain lace
35. Dive
37. Secretly
19. Cain's land
42. Maple genus
43. Paper measure
45 Italian city
46. Mornings
47. Destiny
49. Compass point
51. Negative


No. 7,164 by TIM McKAY
Across
I. Properly oualifled. (9)i
7. Coll ot hair. (4)
8. Residence. (4)
9. Parts of a symphony. (9)
12. Large portion. (4)
13. Acted as M.P. (3)
14. Impost. (4)
15. Restriction line. (3)


Bridge
sy ViurOR MOLLO
"As au~ u, .a.u Lc p.oiessor
bittwariy, "vry ca ua uwas vwioi6.
OtvCI.,aU wa t C VA-",, t%,..-
tea the Senior KtDitzer.
Vesier boUuin: soi Vul.
INortta
V b 4
y 1 1654
West East
W 10 5 5 b 3 2
v J o 2 yv luU 5

South
Al
V 3
v A i 3
0 J 9 6 4
South iorth
*ls I

West ied the +Q, inning
witn tne KA, one pruoessor too#t
two rounoQ ui Ltrim p ana lea a
low aiamonu lroin aununiy,
untenouig lu uisert ,ne ov, so ah
to seep A ast out ot mte leae.
kinas, however, coulan t De Kept
OUt anRim near tnrougn tie
closed nana spelt aeciarer a
Qoom.
'ine odds against this distri-
butaon" ... Deanr tne proiewur.
"A rather iavouraote aiOli,-
bution,' rejoinea b& unkinmay.
W"Win trumps ania cuamoltus
breaking nicely, the odas an your
savour were rougmy luo%.
"All you naa to ao was to
let we t nota the nrst tincK.
You win tte next one, another
spade, mayDe, and alter arawa ng
trumps, you tnrow a liamona ou
aununy s aK. Now the QA, tne
OK and a aamnond rust wal set
up two long diarnonas or neart
,.cagos la Ui a is weni. in lact,
unless West cashes his VA at
tricK two, you should come to 12
trincs-2nstead of 1U."


Rupert and the Sea-Saw-21


" The Water Mites must have made this hole
with the Sea-Saw." says the Professor. Dear,
dear, when will it end ? And how can we
get back if we can't use the boat? asks
Rupert. I'm afraid we're stranded," replies
his friend worriedly. I'm hoping a passer-by
will . ah, there's someone now I" A figure
has appeared on the far bank, moving along


slowly. It's Gaffer Jarge! cries Rupert.
" If only we can make him look this way."
Rupert and the Professor wave and shout their
hardest, but the Gaffer plods on, unaware of
their plight. "They waterbirds be making
a fair noise this morning," he mumbles.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


IT. Sn cr on ai cake. (51
19 it leisure. (7)
21. Surrey town. 3)
2-2. Ireland. (4)
23. Pine muisi. (.i
-4. I.ett ce. (:3)
Down
1. 'For I i illn I ol i roIl)lI
(4..-)
2. Stiar e odiucer. (!9)
3. 'T'rees. (4 )
4. Victor. (3. (i)
3. Aces. (4)
(6. In thile school lahoratlori,
(4. 5)
3. Humnorois. (i)
10. 1) S I U A
ag near.
(6)
I1. SuIts-l
m a k er
(6)
Ili. Cotn.iur-
Ing. (5)
18. Maiden H
(4)
20. Slottish
ri vr lor
(3) te r+ *u a solut ,


-_ 5___


Comic age


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


SHOIROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute

GENERAL TENDENCIES: Make your
\ long-range plans that are of importance to you
now, and let those who are older or more experienced than
you know the specific plan of action by which you feel you
can be a bigger success in all departments of your life.
Communicate with those with whom you have ideas you want
to put across now
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) A partner expects much of you
and you should follow through so you can get back into this
person's good graces. Once your work is done, get into the
amusements that most delight you. Avoid troublemakers.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Place your finest thought on
own home and talk over money plans with kin in a wise
fashion, and you get excellent results. Curb that tendency to
impatience.Show others you have good judgment.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You can accomplish a good
deal in any sphere of your endeavor, so come to right decisions
and keep busy at them If you are in doubt about anything,
get advice from experts. Do nothing foolish tonight.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Talk over with an
expert or an associate how to have a better financial structure
in the future. Make sure you are serious since there are
important affairs for you to handle. Have fun with mate in
p.m.
LEO (July 22 to Apr. 21) Keep busy at whatever will make
you a more charming, prosperous and happy person. Get into
those social affairs that can help you be very popular. You can
make contacts that are most valuable, too.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Study your newspaper, other
periodicals for the data you need where new outlets are
concerned that you are interested in. Make sure you help a
friend in trouble or later you suffer pangs of remorse. Wisen
up.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) A good friend willingly does
what you wish so your personal life improves. Out to some
social event that can bring fine results Make the new contacts
that are most worthwhile. Do nothing to hurt another.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Get into the career or civic
matters with enthusiasm and make real progress via the good
auspices of higher-ups. A higher-up recognizes your finest
talents and grants your wishes Avoid one who is troublesome.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Out to the activities
that you like and in which you are proficient; get an early
start. Find more intelligent allies to assist you to get ahead
very much faster. Don't follow what you don't really like,
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You have responsibilities
to handle before you go out to recreations you like. so do so.
If you follow your intuition, you can expand very easily. Do
nothing of a destructive nature.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Sit down with sensible
partners and talk over how to advance mutually in the future.
Certain changes are necessary and should be made. State your
views clearly and cleverly.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Make your surroundings more
attractive and then get to work with enthusiasm with
co-workers. Step out and buy new clothes you need to round
out your wardrobe. Think along very constructive lines.


Chess


Queen and knight against
queen is an unusual and always
tricky ending. Can you work out
the finish of this position from
Yanofsky v. Golombek, Hastings.,
1951-52? White is to move. and
the master spectators were
wrong in assessing the result.
Par times: 10 seconds, grand-
master: 15 seconds, chess mas-
ter; 20 seconds, chess expert; two
minutes, county player; five
minutes, club strength; 10 mm-
utes, average: 20 minutes novice.


OLUTION1 NO. 9703 -

Chess Solution
White won by 1 Q-Kt 3 ch.
Since I . K-B8; 2 Kt-Q2 ch
now wins the black queen. Black
tried 1 . K-R8 and the spec-
tators expected White to fall for
the trap 2 Kt-B2 ch? Q Kt; 3
Q with a draw be stalemate,
Yanofsky saw the trap id
played (I1 Q-Kt3 ch, K-R8) 2
O-R3 ch! Q-R7 ch: 3 Kt-Kt3
ch, K-AKt: 4 Q-BI mate.







IOW many
Swords of
(our letters
or more can
you mn ake
from the
letters shown
Smack I ng a
word each
E letter nmav
he used once
only. Iach
ortd must contain the large
letter, and there must Iw at
least one eight-letter word In the
list. No plurals: no foreign %words;
no proper names. TODAY'S
TARGET : II words, good ; 13
%words, very good : 19 words.
excellent Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Adhere dank dare dark darken
darn dean dear deer dene drake
drank earned eked endear hade
hand HANKERED hard harden
harked HARKENED head
header heard heed herd knead
kneader kneed naked nard
neared need raked rand ranked
read redan reed rend.


"'3v-- SS a, \ OT
30 GET

a tI-
7H -?-


1 4HOW DiD
-; YOU INOW
SWAS
S HOME?






LV2U \


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

SHE WAS HYSTERICAL, NATURALLY, THE FIRST THING I THAT LIEUTENANT GISS5ON, FROM
iT '5 -T WDRICE. THEY WENT PDID WAS PHONE THE POLICE/ BY HOMICIDE, QUESTIONED JOAN
IT MUST HAVE THROUGH NURSES'TRAINING THEN/UST ABOUT EVERYONE IN AND ME FOR OVER AN HOUR/
PEENN HOC'IBILE TOGETHER WERE LIKE THE BUILDING WAS AWAKE/ I HAD WE DIDPNT TELL HIM THAT MOU
FOR JOAN--- -SISTERS I roAN LIE DOWN IN ONE OF HAP TAKEN BARBARA THENEARLV
THE NEIGHBOR'S TO THE CONCERT' 'TuIS MORNING,
APARTMENTS HE CAME TO

AGAIN.














\\' U BE SAM WANT YOU TO KNOW! SOUND 0SO FINAL! LASSITER MADE AN APPOINTMENT
AC & ETSY? YOU RE THE ONLY ONE WHAT'S HAPPENED ? TO SEE YOU! RICK CAN BE VERY
I'VE EVER LOVED- CONVINCING! I DON'T THINK
OR EVER WILL YOU'D WANT ANYTHING














APARTMENT 3-G By Alex KotxkyI

SAN THIS WARPROSE THE A, MARGO-CAN YO JOIN MEANWHILE, DOWNSTAIRS
IS LOVELYSHEL ME FOR PINNER TONIGHT? LU ANN WILL TS
SPENP HOURS PRESSING ANP BE JOINING US ANP, HOPEFULLY, CAN I GO UP TO SEE THE
SUNPRESSING THE POLL! MINPY ANP HER MOTHER! PROFESOR, MOTHER?
Y A R U E
ES BUT I HAVE BOTHER OUR
ST, .... R & M N


APARMEN E By AL NEIKHBO S,














STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


m











Tuesday, July 3, 1973.


h (ribttune


3 Olympic boxers show


their strength, are picked


for world amateur tourney
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
MIDDLEWEIGHT CHAMP NATHANIAL KNOWLES,
lightweight champ Nathanial Whymns and lightwelterweight
champ Gary Davis, all victors during last night's Independence
Amateur Boxing Tournament, have been chosen to represent the
Bahamas in the World Amateur Boxing Tournament in New York


and a rematch with Canada.
scheduled for later this month
August.
Knowles. who has greatly
improved since his ch'eIination
during the Munich Ol. itpics, is
about the best middleweight inl
the Bahanmas Last night's bout
proved it when with two left
jabs hie ko'd his opponent Billy
Fvans in 13 seconds of the first
round "'Disappointing" was
the way Knowles described the
bout "I expected a good
fight." he said "I've heard a
lot about this guti\ 1 ivans)
Evans trains out of Bahamias
heavyweight champ BBoston


FRAZIER

WINS OVER

JOE BUGNER
1 0 R M I R w o i 1 d
heavyweight champions Joe
Fraiier, in his ctuiracteristic
aggressive style, Ilab'd tind
punched his wa\ to a tdeL siLon
victory Monda. night o\ci Joe
Bugner in London
Frazier. who took an earl
command of the fight knocked
Bugner down for a nine-counti
late in the 10th round enrlute
to his 30th icltors. Referee
Htarry Gihhs had Ira/ier
winning six rounds, Bugnecr
four and two rouLnds drawn
he iAssociated Prtess, scored
the match t-1-2 tol ia/ier
while the l'nitid1 Press
International scored it 9-'-].
Frazier said tIhe has iome
down to the best weight ,it his
fighting career Couipled withlh
his M o nda \ ln iht'
performance and t hei shape he
is in, he said he feels as, though
he would soon become worlrh
champion again
His victory' was ta must is hic
is still awaiting a rcmaltch ith
George Foreman, the workl's
heavyweight boxing champion
JUNIOR ALL STAR
PLAYERS NAMED
The Junior Le.aguic SAll-Stair
players who take on stcoilv d p'lt.i.
senior league Hitcks lices ,,on Jiil\ S
at 1 1:00 a.n. is p.irt it h.s l ll',
contribution i ti' l it h ilcp.C nTdC'liL
Sports Celchratiotin haii\ bten ,
named. Thev are -
('ecil tIorthes i Bienders). Jot-'l3
White (I.cc'), Vain ikllc ( \ s.)
Stanley ratt (A'is), ('mide' 1 n li
( Lce's). I tyronu Nccl\ (A.\.li.1,
Walter I ergusonri (t eiind rs). Jciiso,
11arquesoln ( t. Mii.tli.ic l's i'cir
Isaacs (Blenders), K t'eiiiithti I ) ,i i
(A's), Joihn C(ulnir (...1.1) ,
Kerrington \Hilkecrsin ( \s),
Kenneth I o\ ( ,'si., \ (tLee's), IDavid ',ita t,i ( \.11) ).
Donnie ttBarr (r\.1.1).. .Cardiii il kini
(lee's), Dencil clajrke (Il c.'S,
Terranuie \\.allacC (Pr,',). tUiC.l Kilt
(A.1.t).). tDexter Roltic ( 11llidu'rsl.L
The iim nagers t>r th ic' .tn irtc
(C'hris I ergusion l It'.iii!ii('i A','s
Peter Currm iI t I ec'.s Cardiinils ,i!
Otfinl Morris of A.I ). ,\ai.


The World Championships are
and the Canada tournament for

Blackie's camp lie seemed
unsure of himself trom the
tune lie stepped into the ring
and was only too happy to lie
on the canvas following
K nowl's't encoiintcer "'That was
not ,i knock out,h iat was a
'scar cd out." coinilcniled
Boston atter the tight.
Knowle is I, aiboli the hardest
training boe\r \in town aind
since lis O.inmpls inp has not
stopped training HIc seeks to
het ter liimselt each step of the
way "'You can always call on
mne," he said. "I am .ilwa\ s in
shape 'rl'esellnl\ Ih works
olit on a !it r Jdil week
schedule with ito resl dia\i
Knowics still hlis h i, cecs on
that CelisI.t ()I\ niia t ( C lid
tedal and intrenl s to irr\s tile
Bahaniias; ar into inteirnat iontl
'coll p.'illti ll I illteiJ to s",.\
on the amatl'etul i sceli' it tl.'
longer to gc lt mllI.
intt tI nat itonai or'; Ip it ]in
belorie cin ring ; l t pi .
scene." said th,' chainp In
preparation fotr lasi tnll
bout. Knowi s Vle .nt il i'h
sparring s's.slnn wi lih t13!!;.'.,
w elt e irA cti'lIh t k I. li. i' p I I slhi
()bed anid ~u,,ind htl i .1 Ppt' !
Cood itlhtliet tif (Oh .'
dese'.'ses ill the pri,,s' pCi' i'
gli c h I im ." ;;lnlt'!n 'd
Knowlcs "lie s ab ,,i r llh onl i
iniddlews'cight in tih' Baha;.ias
that can gL\" :n1L. a ttc'.ihl
chance ai tls stage 'I aIls
viewing tlie sparringg sessiOn
thought Obed had trouble ont
Ills hands
I le load otl tratiing lt'l
amn;lActirs is giaduaill\ heaitng
JO n on na,!onal c)Iach B uirt
tPerr\ I \\as lhoping that ior.'
pcopl I '.. c<'ld I out aild
ti.i n thel hlir.rs '" e >a nid
N\c irth lt.'ss. tion lht' action i
last ni litl it I a Is .' ulI' t t l.hI
Pl'r \ is ',J 1in a tine intt.
l athi n iallt \ Vh l :1 ns, al\\.i ,s a
link' tl o ng b ,ikIt \\lIosc is I IC
talent is oli nd I c 'ari \ lini
pla'c.s took itlsI is s'c. itd's lto
elinr tatt' his opponent R.'t\
Malor Mhich h Jldid with a o'nM.
St 0o i 'sI b tl 11 '.i t i I oni. \'lti\int! s
won the tiolden ( Ilov
miiddleweilght c hait plionsllp
last year
(i D.r'a S)a i' win .alie bI\
die !. u ln ;a r\ s b ro thl r J.e l- t
also loundl hil i.lt vmithlout Ain
Oppoipnlnt w hli lls opponent
JOIhI I a l,0 or tailed to sIo Iw upI
In itlher ai.toion list night
()t 1, [orres 135 decisioned.
llerhert Rolle 135. Samtints
Role 14r- dect sionim'd ( "'.il
New bhuld .145. anti \ll.in
Bullard tko'd D)ad ld \MoItlliL'
in n t11111111t. l th' e l n
1i,!i Ti


INDEPENDENCE



SPECTACULAR


ALL-STAR BOXING

Tuesday July 3Rd.


A.F. ADDERLEY AUDITORIUM
Blue Hill & Harold Road

DOORS OPEN 7:30 P.M.


MAIN EVENT

10 RID() I)S
EOSTON BLACKIE I'S VINCENTE RONDON
West Indies Heavyweight Forimer Light Heavyweight
Champion Champiorn of the Wuiord.

8 RO()NI)S


RENNIE PINDER
Middleweight Champion
of Bahamas


FS SLICK MITCHELL
Ja( ksol ville F lorida.


( R()UNI)S


BOB FREEZE
Popular Bahamian
Light Heavyweight.


IS EDDIE TALHAMI
Miami Foi ida


I I = ww liuy --liI uX
THE ALL-STAR i
COLLEGIANS comprising
Bahamian students from in top shape to take
colleges in the United States
take on the Cougars in the
championship game tonight.
The Collegians are undefeated on R this eve ig
in two games of the B.A.B.A.
Independence Tournament. BAHAMAS HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP Boston Blackie, who


BASKETBALL

CHAMPIONSHIP

TONIGHT
B1.(CK'S COlU(A RS, the
ideend '1 .' N.u',assau Leaguei
'hI1inipi'ui, v. ill t m eet itheI
Co'lle.irans in lthe .ihartnpionslhip
L'.aiIeI' olI the B A B.A.
In (Ldependen loitLInainent tonight at the C,
I I(ibsonia Primari School CG mn
Px limi Rioad.
I he (Couguars were defeated
yti lth Kentucky Coloncels or
t tic Bahatmas Ailateur
lBaske 11 all A ssocia t ion's
,hainpionship in a two-ganme
sweep last March Hlowever, the
('ou'ars reLenged this loss by
ciishing tile Colonels 86-40 in
the semi-finals of the B A.B.A.
!Indepen dance Baskethall
Tournament.
Both teams played Sunday's
contest without key pla ers.
Missing from the Colonels'
linc-up were cWenty Ford and
Dewvitt I anna: I red "Ppa"r
Snitil and Jason Moxey wereL
the absCentees fioin the
(.uigars' rooster.
I lihe Collegians climiated the
Classic Pros in theii first game
and proceeded to dispose of
the G(rand hali.imia ill-Stlas in
their second gameni.
In tonight's contest the
Collegians will ha\ec to their
asset the rebounding power o t
I litsha McPhee and the sharp
shooting of Carl Minns.
However, this will bce matched
against the brilliant playing ,of
Peter (ilcud, Sarlmmy Johlson,
Ptlci Brown and Fred I i.lng of
lie ( cougars.
In clouded in tloniglt's
pi r i g r a in c aI rt I
Mint-ulasketball game ait :30
p.ml '. G irls B iLt i, I ..all gaic at
30 p.m. and the presentation
oi awards following the
c championship uatcli.

BASKETBALL

AWARDS TONIGHT
)llOI HS SPO' I'S "SII() main
J issi'. 'ru,s' rookie I'a Ingtraham
ci>h retcivcei two( trp i honumirs in
thie li:haim i nas Ama l tim lBIasketiL'all
A ssciaitiorl's 972-'73 serie'.,. 'ttes
till rC ci\c' their award,' tiiigit.
Sel'e'r. \\ itL iime out t si\ % ears

"' l Mullinticd th \1, 1-t VAuihblec
I'Li er and Sportsmi an i t thit 'IYvar
ill Oh NassL. t I ('rtie
ingrah.miin whio pil.n ,l lih i first
i..iill,( titiir'c %car w it]i tli (ltissi.
I'r,,is mnid ri I 'ilio .i m iiaJ .l uri i a riu ,i tinv
\,A' nllillalldtd r |o( lk h 1 Ci Yaw ar



J ,ilin \r li'r lr ('artir',s Io' llugiaits
ILiii m i oali oft tihe acar. i liite'r
iiiid r t Iukilers St rlut', Siop
Snt ir iiu i '. li 01C t s.ir. l''ter
liri,,\i n in ks Couigalrt s 'st
tutuisi' c pl.i er, itnd initt e
11,l burn r 1( k tW 0! thtw scarr.
',rih cI t'.ic'it' tMturiCVi' i i'\
o l, ii I os Hill Saliits best luniiior
Lo. li, ( '-%v Rlu tlcrs oI tuuiu 'I.SI L
I'r I, e b -,t sv, or t(( dtl, liom el
I .s th il Ith 1 i H ill Saiinlts' usil
il u si \c pli\t r. Strlimir' ()tiua t uti
then K titlt.\ ( "lonrll IS, II ost
V .hlihlt' i|,,\ er .iJ lld Ru, 'hlli
Isitvc, i tol lihc I, l Hill Saints
J i or osi t alha l' pl.i cr.

TOMORROW'S POOL

CHAMPIONSHIPS
Th l N .1iionlal PoI ol1
Chanpio shi, ps finals will I hldrl at
tic \.I \dd<'rlcrky (;vn1 tomorrow
us pir 'it host uti other
lidltrp lndicncc sports .itil\ities
whlinih Imt,.girt on Mond.'t it Jul\ 2.
hn thu e hanpi>oi p (lass.
ID'ulumuri' I r t will tlikC oi n I lih
N.iiindt'rs whilt' ('l'tiime (' irlowr
w ill s'i ai timt .it ainst I itvier
IiSlor i n th s l..idi s Division
Sh'\' ,,,ill will Intwt'l \ n iyi
'itiinius iII mitt' Jiinii or ('lass. .imd
I rl'us ii in lhr A linu iur ('aIs..

oi tlr Cliiinpiot islh Cll( lass lo i thi'
N til iot .i! C'hi.iin ioiislihip. All
l tih t '' m'\ I Adri'rlh't (tt III
I t' l .iliiti uin 7:30 p in.


0


recently decisioned Trinidad heavyweight champ Carl Baker for
the West Indies heavyweight title, is in top shape and all keyed up
for tonight's match with Vincente Rondon the former world light
heavyweight champ. The match begins 8:30 at the A.F. Adderley


Gym.
Lintering the ring at 190
pounds ten pounds heavier
than Rondon Boston
admitted that hie is in the best
shape of his career and has
enough stamina to go the full
ten rounds. Boston at the end
of his hout with Baker was as
full of vigour or the first
round. lHe observed Rondon in
matches against Gomeo
Brennen and Bob Foster and
does not think Rondon has
amn thing new-
M making his fourth
pu o I essional appearance
tonight is heavyweight
contender Bob Freeze who on
his last outing dropped an easy
win to Miami's Lee Royster.
Freeze tonight takes on Eddie
I alahami.
A favourite in the fans' eyes,
Freeze had everything going
for him until the sixth and
final round when he began to
let up on his opponent. When
Freez7' dropped his guard, he
was caught with aright to the
chin sending him down for the

TENNIS TOURNEY

STARTS TOMORROW
N-_NNIS will come into action
tomorrow at 2 p.mn. when Anthony
Roberts, Minister of HIome Affairs.
opens the Anthony Roberts
Independence Open Tennis Classic
at the Montagu Hotel tennis court.
The tennis tournament also
comes as part of the man ) sporting
events scheduled to be held
throughout July 4 11i as part of the
Independence Celebrations. The
finals are set for July 8.
The following is the paring of
matches to be plated'
2 p.m t'erc. \Munnings ss. Perry
McNeely Joseph lord vs. B. Barret
4 p.m. AI Sinith Vs. Peter Isaacs
Charles Carter vs. F. Barret
5 p.m. 1. tiepburn vs. Sam Small
Hall
6 p.m ;G. McNeely vs. Chuck
I)onald'on I Miller vs. I sadehy
IBahamrian actor Sidiney t'iitier
will present awards at the eind of
pla' .



CLOSING OF FACILITIES
AT SPORTS CENTRE
IN Oi t)1R to complete
preparations for the independence
sports activities crimrmencing
I ridas, Ju l\ the facilities of the
Queen I' i/abeth Spurts Centre have
been closed frotm Jul 1-5 Spurts
organizations and the general public
are advised that events previously
scheduled for that period will hare
to be rearranged tr to c place after
the Independen e C ele rationrs
REGATTA SKIPPERS
MEET TOMORROW
A SKIPi' t '-, meeting tfor the
\\orkboats, Clat'.ses A,.C' and
in the Independence Regatta will he
held at 4 p.m -ii \5ednes.dt at the
\warehouse at i'otters Ca\ this will
be the last opportunity to put in
entries for the Independence
Regatta to be held Jull 5 7 All
\wrkboat skippers should attend.
TRACK MEETINGS
JtI1)(', S and officials for the
dai events ilf the National t)a of
Independence I rack Mleet are asked
to be present at a meeting
tomorrow aftternorinit 3 o'clock at
thle administration building of the
ueen t li/abeth Sports Centre A
representative from each Island a id
ione' from each New Providence
School \which has athletes
participating in the meet should
attend. Passes and track numbers
lfor ompetitorst will he issued.
1 I' I It IM .ind judges tor the
night events ,iN ational tl.,i iof
Independence I rack Meet are asked
to be it a briefing meeting tonight
S oiclock at thIe X. I Adderle.

LITTLE LEAGUE GAMES
I)1 II NIDING I itile League
Baseball Chanimps champion Sports
I a.nd take on St. Mi.chaels IDodgers
in tre first little t.leaue Baseball
game oil Ju 1 3.1 Al clubs iwho do
inot hla\e their rosters in are asked
io h.ne thiem in tb\ 5ednesdas.
ROGER TAYLOR WINS
\i I M hI I tINt, I N(51l.A )
('1') Rogter as tor of lrituii
ousted Swedish teenage tennis
sensation i Bjorn liorg 6 I. 6 8. 3-6.
6 3. 7 5 in the men's singles
qua r ter-fialls at 55 imbledon
T'uesda\J
"lih, veertn lar h t r was seeded
thiird whilt the 17 \car- ld, Borg
wat seeded sit ill.
The rwin toik I',alor into the
semi finals of the AII Fnigland
ilampioiitshiiis. But Horg \va. a
hero. fighting back from I 5 to S-5
ill the hinal set and sainig four
miitch poiilts beotire hbssing out.


knockout count. "I feel great
for tonight," said the
22-year-old Androsian. "I am a
sportsman, win or lose, but I
am going out there to win."
Also appearing on tonight's
card will be middleweight
champ Rennie Pinder,
lightweight Sugar Ray Sears
and lightweight Freddie Major.


Leslie Fox wants an end 'to


totally foreign wrestling shows'
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
"THE PROMOTION OF TOTALLY FOREIGN WRESTLING shows in the Bahamas is not only
entirely unjustifiable to the local wrestlers but also profits the Bahamians nothing as most of the
proceeds leave the country as payment for the show," charged local wrestling promoter Leslie T.
Fox today. This, Mr. Fox said, has reached the point whereby the local wrestlers are totally
deprived of the public's support and are unable to make a profitable living in the game.
In his quest to protect it is economically disastrous", balanced and should not be
Bahamian wrestlers, "we are he said. "It has become one hundred percent foreign,"
going to register a formal senseless to promote matches." he said. "If the foreigners don't
complaint to the Immigration The promotion of local want to compete with the
Department and such copy will wrestling, Mr. Fox said, was Bahamian wrestlers then the
go to the Press, the Ministry of done through the co-operation Government should not grant
Education and the Ministry of of the wrestlers who at times them their work permit."
Finance," Mr. Fox said. "What did not receive anything due to Bahamian wrestlers, like the
I'm calling for is an end to the poor turnout. "I hope that bo xe rs, are seeking
completely foreign wrestling the Government is going to do international recognition and
shows." something to protect the sport constant competition with the
Mr. Fox' interest in the of wrestling in the country," public's support can be a great
protection of local sportsmen he appealed, asset to them. "If there was no
has led him to relinquish his These wrestlers in the competition from foreign
managementship in boxing and Bahamas, who number over wrestlers then the Bahamians
spearhead the Bahamas Boxing twelve, are athletes who "have will support the local talent,"
Commission. "I am going to been training for several years Mr. Fox said. "I hope that the
ask the Government to and members of the public last wrestling show that was
recognize the boxing who saw them in action were put on will be the last total
commission," he said."I am standing on the edge of their foreign show."
not going to have anything to seats at the end of the match," "We hope some day that the
do with boxing from a said Mr. Fox. "We will be championships that were held
promoter's point of view willing to put on a show to by foreign wrestlers will be
because I don't believe that satisfy the government that held by Bahamians. I have gone
anyone who has financial these guys (the local wrestlers) as far as I could but I must
benefit in the game should be are professionals. These fellows now turn to the Bahamas
on the board. As it stands now. are ready, equipped and fit." Government," Mr. Fox said.
"there are no rules governing Mr. Fox, however, pointed
boxing," Mr. Fox observed. out that he is not against Observing the chaotic
Having put on twelve foreign wrestlers performing in situation in pro boxing in the
wrestling shows within the past the Bahamas "hut Bahamas, Mr. Fox said that the
two months, Mr. Fox said that Bahanmians should perform on Boxing Commission will stop
what he discovered was that the card also." lie noted that nany of the advantages that
the Bahamian fans would not on the last wrestling show are being taken of the boxing
support local wrestling as long performed in Nassau not one public. All boxers, trainers and
as foreign wrestling was in the Bahamian performed on that promoters will be licenced by
country. "The problem is that show. "The card should be the commission


INA




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General Admission .......$8.00


Children UNDER 12............$500


Reserved $.................$10.00
......


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