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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: July 2, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03385

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C DUDLEY'S *r t
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.

PREMIER
PERCUSSION h r t
INSTRUMENTS B a I Nws

(Registeredi with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
tHIDDYLGTROBRI.14 ER


THIRD DAYLIGHT ROBBERY IN 2% YEARS

AT THE SAME CABLE BEACH BANK





2 armed men rob






Chase bank of 'large






amount and escape


By MIKE LOTHIAN
TWO ARMED MEN HELD UP the Chase Manhatten Bank's Cable Beach branch
shortly before 9:30 this morning and made their getaway with what is thought to
have been a large amount of cash.


Prime Minister calls for



'the help of all' on


eve of our Independence

PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING on Saturday invited
all Bahamians, "regardless of the colour of your skin or the
complexion of your politics, in helping to make our Bahamas a
happier place."


The Prime Minister's speech,
"Invitation to thebaiiatin," was
taped on Friday morning and
broadcast ov* r Radio Bahamas
on Saturday.
The full text of his address
follows.
MY FELLOW BAHlAMIANS-
On the first of January of
this year I told you that the
a:ihanmas "overnient had
successfully concluded with
lier Majesty's Government in
London the terms of a new
Constitution appropriate to an
Independent Bahamas and that
the desired date of that
Independence was the tenth
day of July, 1973. 1 also
informed you that Her
Majesty's Government had
indicated to me that it was
fully prepared to recommennd
to both Houses of the British
Parliament the adoption of the
agreed Constitution to be
effective on the desired date.
Those pledges have now
been fully honoured. Hler
Majesty The Queen has already
given her Royal Assent to The
Bahamas Independence Act,
and the Order-in-Council
emboyding the new
Constitution was presented to
the British Parliament earlier
this week. This step finally
secured for us the smooth and
peaceful transformation of our
islands from a colony to a full
and equal partner within the
Commonwealth Family of
Nations: And when it is all
over it will probably have been
the smoothest and most
peaceful transfer of power in
the history of the
Commonwealth landmarked by
the events of 1964, 1967, and
1973. July 10th is the time
when, God's willing, we will all
witness the coming into being
of our new Nation....and the
re-birth of a free people.
July 10th will sink deep into
the roo's of our human
fulfilment, deep into the roots
of our forum for unity and
understanding and even deeper
into our pledge for Peace, Love
and Progress.
All of us are aware of the
numerous obstacles we have
had to overcome in our long


They left this morning for the
Virgin Islands.
Mr. Ehrlichman, whose
resignation came as the result
of the Watergate bugging
scandal in the United States,
was one of those to whom
fired presidential counsel John
Dean III said he reported on
the subsequent cover-up of the
scandal.
Mr. Fhrlichman is yet to
appear before the Senate
Water gate Commnittee
investigating the bugging of the
Democratic headquarters and
the subsequent cover-up of the
facts of the case after the
burglary was discovered.
Dean was the first of the
former staff of the White
House to testify,


struggle for a rightful place
under God's sun; and we dare
not forget the contribution of
the many who are no longer
with us but have left their
indelible imprints in our bid to
be constitutionally and
internationally recognized.
If our Independence Day is
to be truly meaningful and our
goals for a happier Bahamas are
to be swiftly and securely built
upon, then I invite you to join
me at midnight on Monday,
July 9, in asking God's
guidance in the successful
discharge of our responsibility
to each and everyone of you
throughout these islands of
ours, I invite you to join with
me, regardless of the colour of
your skin or the complexion of
your politics, in helping to
make our Bahamas a happier
place for, as I have said many
times before, is is the only land
we have. So come, let's join
hands, let's lift up our heads to
the rising sun .... and march on
to glory with all our banners
waving high.'

FIREMEN KEPT

BUSY ON CALLS
THE INTERIOR of a
two-storey building on East
Street, housing a drygoods
store, restaurant and bar on the
lower floor and rooms to let
upstairs, was damaged by fire
at 12:10 a.m. today.
Firemen called to extinguish
the blaze had to break down an
entrance leading to the kitchen
of the restaurant and bar,
operated by Mrs. Mabel
Gibson.
The fire is believed to have
started from a deep fat fryer in
the kitchen of the restaurant,
firemen said. The building,
opposite Father Allen's
Chicken Shack, is not known
to be insured they reported.
The entire stock in the
drygoods store had been
damaged by the smoke as well
as the furnished
apartments upstairs. The stock
in the drygoods store was also
uninsured, it was reported.
The fire, which started in
the deep-fryer went to the
ceiling which had been covered
with tarpaper, a tire officer
said. The fire is under police
investigation. The building,
said to be owned by Mr. S.
Cooper was the second to be
damaged by fire since
Saturday.
A 12:33 a.m. fire destroyed
the Boyd Road gas station
owned by Mr. 1. G. Stubbs and
operated by Mr. Moseley
Canute. The fire was confined
to the roof of the building. Not
insured, the gas station
suffered an estimated $8,000
damage.
Three car fires were also
reported by the fire brigade. At
9:10 a.m. Friday, fire caused
an estimated $150 damage to
the light brown 1970 Ford
Capri owned by Mr. Alphonso
Noville as he drove it along
Minnie Street, off Wulff Road.


It was the third time in two
and a half years the same bank
has been hit in daylight by
armed robbers.
At 3:30 this afternoon
Superintendent CID Fletcher
Johnson said he had still not
heard from investigators
despatched to the scene, and
he had no details of the raid.
It is understood both men
were armed with revolvers and
both wore green coats.
They reportedly left the
Cable Beach shopping centre,
where the bank is located, in a
white Chevrolet Camaro.
The robbers held up the
bank's manageress, Sybil
Deveaux, teller Perry Stubbs
and two other unidentified
employees.
It is thought the robbers
might have taken night deposit
bags left at the bank over the
weekend by several major
hotels in the area as well as the
Cable Beach City Markets
branch.
Mrs. Deveaux and Mr.
Stubbs were both at the bank
on May 10 last year when a
man armed with a revolver held
it up and made off with
$53,000 in cash. An American
was subsequently charged in
the robbery.
The bank was robbed for the
first time on January 4, 1971,
when two masked men armed
with a sawed-off shotgun
emptied tellers' drawers and
made their getaway with under
$6,000, leaving over $22,000
locked, in the vault.


-r.1

Commodore Cameron Rusby


SNOWI HERE

FOR PRINCE


CHARLES' VISIT

COMMODORE ('ameron
Rusby, MVO. Senior Naval
Officer W'st InUes, ..ill hl
aboard IIMS Minerva when the
frigate docks at Nassau on
Friday to bring His Royal
Highness the Prince'of Wales to
participate in the independence
celebrations.
Normally based in Bermuda,
Commodore Rusby will fly his
broad pennant on Minerva
during the 2200-ton ship's
five-day visi'.
lie is the commander of all
British forces in the area
between Bermuda and Guyana.
and is NATO Island
commanderer for Bermuda.
Commodore Rusby has been
SNO West Indies since March
last year, and among his many
assignments during a 34-year
career he was -xecutive officer
aboard the Royal yacht
Brittania. 1% 2-65.
Minerva. captained by
commander John Garnier,
MVO, is on its second tour of
duty on the West Indies
Station since its second tour of
duty on the West Indies
Station since its 1966
commissioning.
The Prince of Wales is
serving as an acting lieutenant
aboard the craft as a member
of the ship's crew of 20
officers and 250 ratings.
Prince C('harles is to be the
official representative of Queen
Elizabeth during the
independence celebrations.
Minerva will, according to a
Government Information
Services press release,
participate in "many aspects"
of the celebrations, including
providing the Guard of Hlonour
for the ceremony in ch the
Union Jack will be I1 ed and
replaced by the Bahl.,nas' new
flag.


JOHH D. Ehrlichman, who
resigned as domestic policy
assistant to President Richard
Nixon on April 30, spent the
weekend as the guest of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel T. Castleman
of "Point House," Lyford Cay.
Mr. Ehrlichman, who was
accompanied by his wife,
arrived in Nassau on Saturday.




CHANDLIERS


ILUY MAISON FURIiTRi
> NASSAU- FREEPORT


p


Monday. July Z. 1~73.


r"----------,-----.

SSA LE i



I Were $30 $35 NOW $14.95 j
EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE I
L.i BAY STREET I


Price: 15 Cents


' '85 PER CENT

OF OUR DEBTS


PAID OFF' SAY


AT THE CONTROLS OF BAHAMASAIR
CAPTAIN MAYNARD AT THE CONTROLS? No, not captain, but Bahamas' chief
aviation executive Minister of Tourism and Aviation, the Hon. Clement T.Maynard.
Mr. Maynard. riqht, is shown sharing a lighthearted moment with BAHAMASAIR chief
pilot Henry Pyfrom, prior to the BAC-III aircraft take-off on an inspection flight to the
vicinity of Long Island last week. Mr. Maynard and other government officials were at the
Nassau International Airport to inspect the facilities before going on the brief flight.



St. Andrew's parents seek extraordinary



general meeting of voting shareholders



to try & get headmaster reinstated


AN OVERWHELMING majority of parents, attending the meeting with St. Andrew's School
Board on Saturday afternoon, voted to call an extraordinary general meeting of St. Andrew's
shareholders to have headmaster John Chaplin reinstated.


Although the Board refused
to call a meeting of
shareholders, stating that their
decision to dismiss Mr. Chaplin
was irrevocable, parents are
now trying to get the necessary
"10% of shares having the right
to vote" so that they can
themselves call the meeting. On
Saturday several shareholders
signed the necessary resolution
calling for an extraordinary
general meeting. If parents are
successful in securing the
necessary 1 0 an
extraordinary general meeting
must be called to decide the
issue.
Mr. Chaplin was dismissed
on June 18 by the St.
Andrew's School Board after
19 years as headmaster of the


School principal tells of


the cost of vandalism

MR. JOHN CAREY, principal of Bahamas Academy of
Seventh Day Adventists, Wulff Road, told members of that
school's graduating class yesterday that vandalism was posing a
serious threat to the maintenance of the school's buildings.
Mr. Carey told The Tribune most of the incidents take
today that there had been place after everyone has kft
numerous costly cases of the buildings. He said that on
vandalism and break-ins over several occasions he has caught
the past five years that he was children having "rock festivals"
principal of the Academy. on the porch.
Recently each class at the
Academy attempted three
times to beautify their school FNM LEADER
yard with flowers and plants CAMPAIGNS TONIGHT
for Independence. Each time
the decorations were pulled up MR. KENDAL Isaacs,
and destroyed. Leader c. the Free National
"This really makes me feel Maovement, council members
bad," said Mr. Carey, and former candidates of the
"especially when I passed by party, will conduct a
other schools that are "door-to-door" campaign
decorated so nicely." tonight in the Bain's Town area
There is a sapodilla tree in in support of their candidate,
the school year. "Vandals Mr. Clifford Cooper.
shake the tree so that the "We plan to knock on every
leaves make a mess of the door in Bain's Town tonight in
yard," he said. spite of the independence
They also pull the sapodillas activities," Senator Arthur
down and smash them all over Foulkes said today. "We intend
the walls, Mr. Carey said. to do our duty and take the
There have also been cases issues to everybody," he said.
of theivery at the school. The group will start from
About two years ago thrives Hutchinson Street at about
took away a safe containing 6:30 p.m.
$1,200 and important papers.
Mr. Carey said he reported the
matter to the Police but Sk ar
nothing has been done yet. aO iIrdIhads wate
Mr. Carey said the problems
could be solved if the school MIAMI, FLORIDA (AP)-
employed a watchman. "But if Health officials blame
the thieves and vandals are contaminated water for an
vicious," he said, "I fear that outbreak of dysentery among
the life of the guard would be the one-thousand passengers
in danger and crew on a luxury cruise
Although Mr. CArcy has no ship now betthed in Miami.
idea who the vandals, are, he The Norwegian-Caribbean
thinks they must be children, Lines ship "Skyward" had cut
"I could hardly see grown-ups short a Caribbean cmise.
doing this," he said, "and '" Health officials say the
doubt that anyone has ailment has been identified as a
anything personal against me form of dysentery which also
or the school." causes fever, stomach cramps
According to Mr. Carey. and dizziness. Two passengers


school.
Mr. Orville Turnquest, a
member of the Board. read the
Board's statement giving their
reasons for Mr. Chaplin's
dismissal.
Mr. Turnquest emphasized
that the statement was agreed
to by all the members of the
Board. The members of the
Board were introduced to the
parents aid apologies extended
for the absence of i)r. Andrew
Esfakis, who is holidaying inr
Greece, and Mr. Orfilio Pelaez
who had left the previous day
to go on holiday IHowever, the
Board had in their possession a
letter and a telegram from Dr.
Esfakis supporting their act ,n
L(Iil S OItFtFR
He said the Board had
unanimously decided to
terminate Mr. ('Chaplin's
employment from August 31
and all pecuniary obligations
would be met. in addition the
Board agreed to gve hnim a
"substantial bonus."
At the time of MIr Chaplin's
dismissal, the statement
continued, it was suggested
that a joint press release he
issued by the chairman and the
headmaster on Tuesday. June
19. The headmaster refused to
cooperate in this fhe Board
regarded this as significant, Mr
Turnquest said. Much of what
had appeared in the Press, hc
said, was at the bidding of the
headmaster, and it was based
upon misrepresentation.
He said the Boaid had imet
with the whole St Andrew's
School staff on Wednesda ,
June 20, when ihey had
expressed teat lior their own
jobs and security.
The Board deplored tire fact
that on othe, occasions Mr.
Chaplin had declared he womd
enlist the public's support in
the event of a confrontation
between the Board and
parents.
The Board was convitcedl
!th't the proper time to give
Mr. Chaplin notice wias at the
end of his period of
employment so that there
would be as little disruption as
possible. Notice was given on
the last day tof eaininaltions.
This showed said Mr.
Turnquest, how the Board


r contaminated

have been admitted to a Miamim

hospital suffering from
dehydration The vessel had
been greeted a! dockside by a
special medical team which
examined the sufferers.
The health officials say the
ship's water supply was taken
on before leaving Miami last
Saturday. And they say the
outbreak began before the
vessel reached Puerto Rico,
where the tanks sere filled
again,


cared for the children and
indeed for the staff and Mr.
Chaplin too Mr Turnquest
again commented that much of
what had been published in the
Press was untrue.
IMr. William I lolowesko.
chairman to the Board, had
been attacked by Mr. Chaplin
who had repeatedly suggested
that if only hls chairman were
removed all would be well. Mr.
'I urLnltquest charged This was
not true hie said, Ten people,
said Mr. l urinqutest, had made
the decision to dismiss Mr.
Chaplin two of them having
liheicn will the Boild for many
V J IS.
Mri. I uirniquest said that
idlnii 'Itr ()lipltni s sabbatical
s car ,is tlhC schiIol was not.
being ri on tear. it had never
I it fl i re sminoothly .
Sti tennis it were available "from1
at least two other chairmen
that Mr Chaplin had not
alwaVs got on with past
Board,. Mr ITurnquest said.
The teachers. the teachers'
union and the imniset ll
commitnnte who publicly
supported Mr Chaplin have all
obviously been misled about
Mr Chaplin's notice and
financial arrangements.
I I I \1 \1 O FI R
Mr. Turnquest said Mr
Chaplin misled the teachers in
respect of salary discussions.
lie had itviseled a salary sale
which would cause. a utser in
tuition fees
Other charges made in the
Board statement wi.ere
9 Mr ('haplin had not
carried ou t I the specific
instructions of the Board
o MIr Ch-mtin had instilled
an clement of fear in the
teachers
\e Mr Chaplin had
improperly mterlcrecd in the
business ot a company by
actively soliciting votes to set
down certain members of the
Board.
e Mr. Chaplin ihas declared
the purpose of the Board is to
laise tioliley and leave the
operation ol the s c thool to hI
'IRRI VOt( 'ABLI
"Wl are not here today to
ask tor ronr supportt" Mr.
Turnquest di, ared on behalf
of the oiter nine members.
"the Board has made its
decision and its decision is
irrevocable."
The Board, he said, had had
many dealings with the
headmaster. Most of the
parents had not. The Board, he
charged, had lost confidence in
the headmaster because of his
disregard for the ultimate and
exclusive responsibility of the
Board lHe had engaged in
activities which instilled fear.
Some of the parents fear, he
said. The teachers fear and
"sone of you are here because
of fear."
Fear has no place at St.
Andrew's, he declared.


CATHOLICS

ONLY SEVEN MONTHS
after launching a special
fund-raising programme, the
Catholic Diocese has reported
the elimination of 85 percent
of the diocesan debt which last
year threatened the continued
operation of the Catholic
parochial school system here.
"Project: Bahamas." a
programme aimed at obtaining
pledges from local ('atholics
for donations over the n,\t
three years, began in Novenbi, r
last year with a target figure ,f
S650,000.
The project was the res it-
a diocesan self-study in JUii.,
last year. when Bishop Paul
Leonard Hagarty revealed t*e
diocese was in debt more tha,
S150.000.
The bishop at the time
warned that "if we cannot oi
will not support our Catholic
schools we will be forced to
close or curtail them."
In a letter to Catholics dated
yesterday Bishop Leonard
reported that cash payments
already received under the
installment plan set up by
Project: Bahamas totalled
$169,496.15, and pledges had
alhnmost reached the $800.000
mark
"I am happy tlo report." the
bishop wrote, "that bec.uomj
your generosity we bl % e
reduced our debt to S2, ''
and we have paid all ouri 1 ig
outstanding bills.
"In addition, we have 'ie-n
able to pay more than '8 f'0
in teacher salaries o ,1
above what our parish .,.
been able to do- This w-. i
all accomplished with' P. 1.
Bahamas contributions, ii,
your payments made most a:
this progress possible."
MUST CONTINIT
Bishop Leonard cAnUitli i(
that "while our proF '- 'i;.
been good. our etforts i
of no pu pose tilunkli \
continue.
"I extend a special
thanks to those who h. :'..
paying faithltill\ n ll
pledges. You can lser e* ,
much this means and I be
to continue in the san e it
ot sacrificial generosity
those who have made pl-de-
and have not been able t,, !e-
the payNment as pro,.cisecd. (1
please make a very spec,'i:r;
effort to begin this montlih
l'er\ pledge is vita! to o.u
ultimate success."
lie noted that "'ms ;
people who made pletd-.! lh:i\
been faithful and gcnc;:>.is i,.
Inectin na"\ rnients "
l)onations to Prowe.l:
Bahamas were sitited (in ;:
down payment-m n nthl
instalment b.isis.
Besides echliinating the
diocese's su bstn trial debt. the
project w, is designed to
reduced lihe di)cese,',-
dependence on donations 1 rimi
overseas sources.
Foreign donIiations dIrinoi
the 1070-71 1i t5ri ear totalled
almost 23 percent of the
diocese's lotal income of $1.04
million.
I wo weeks alter the project
was launched pledges worth
over $100.O00 ( cire iiade
Two weeks later pledges
reached the $250,000 mark.
By the beginning of 1973
pledges received totalled well
over half the target figure, and
by the end of February the
project had drawn pledges
worth $670.325.

FUNERAL SERVICES
FOR COLIN KELLY

FUNERAL services for the
late Colin Kelly, 43, are to be
held 6 p.m. Tuesday at St.
Andrew's Presbyterian Church
Pnoncess Street. Interment will
follow in the Western
Cemetery. Mr. Kelly died
Friday at the Princess Margaret
Hospital.


INK- SMEARED,


VOLI I Y iti -o' A s- .L.X--- n. ..


EX-NIXON AIDE VISITING HERE


'A


F I i IORlI lROB | i


s "Il l~
,,-- F F-


S1-' -- -^A-, IMO, IU. 18


Monday, July 2, 1973.












Monday, July 2, 1973.


0hp Tribunt


WATERGATE REBUTTAL


IRAQ DEFENSE MINISTER ASSASSINATED
BEIRUT (AP)- Baghdad radio reported the Defense Minister of Iraq
was assassinated by unidentified gunmen Sunday. The report said General
Hamad Shihab was killed in the attack and Interior Minister Saddam
Ghaydan was wounded.
The radio broadcast said the Iraqi security director had issued a call up
of police officers and indicated emergency security measures were being
enforced in Bachdad.
The Iraqi government of President Ahmed Hassan El Bakr has been
charged with repressive police measures, particularly against News in the
capital of Baghdad.
The Israeli cabinet met today to discuss the murder of the Israeli air
attache to Washington outside his Maryland home Sunday morning, but
the officials refused to say whether they believed Colonel Yosef Alon was
killed by Arab terrorists.
Colonel Alon was shot the day before he was to end his tour in the
United States and return to Israel.
MITCHELL WENT ALONG WITH PAYING HUSH MONEY
WASHINGTON (AP) Some staff members of the Senate Watergate
committee are preparing for the questioning of former attorney-general
John Mitchell. One Senate investigator says Mitchell's appearance may
prove crucial for the hearings, but for the present, the hearings are in a
ten-day independence day recess.
In public statements, Mitchell has denied involvement in the Watergate
affair, but he reportedly told Senate investigators in a closed-door hearing
May tenth that he went along with paying hush-money to defendants in
the Watergate break-in case to avoid further embarrassment to the Nixon
reelection campaign.
SOVIET PLANE CRASHES IN AMMAN n EIGHT DIE
AMMAN, JORDAN tAP) The Jordanian Transport Ministry says a
Soviet airliner carrying 84 persons crashed into a house just after taking off
from Amman Airport. Preliminary official reports indicate eight persons
were killed about 79 were injured.
Hospitals in Amman reported admitting 20 persons. They said some 59
others were treated and released.
No identification of victims is given in the official statement, but
hospital sources say two Americans were among the survivors who escaped
unhurt. They're identified as Thomas Olson of the Ford foundation in
Beirut, and his mother.
SLAIN DEFENSE MINISTER GIVEN STATE FUNERAL
BEIRUT (AP)- Scores of arrests are reported today from Iraq where the
Defense Minister was assassinated yesterday in an apparent coup attempt.
Reports reaching Beirut from Bagdad say the Iraqi Radio reports the slain
Defense Minister Major General Hammad Shihab was given a state
funeral today.
MURDERED ISRAELI DIPLOMAT'S BODY SENT HOME
WASHINGTON (AP) The flag-draped coffin bearing the body of Israeli
diplomat Yosef Alon has left Andrews Air Force Base near Washington for
Israel aboard a jet provided by President Nixon. And Nixon has ordered
tightened security around Washington's diplomatic community following
the shooting early yesterday of Alon. Local police in Chev Rhase,
Maryland and the F.B.I. are continuing their investigation but so far no
clues as to who shot Alon or why.
NIXON HOPES TO LIFT EXPORT CONTROLS SOON
SAN C'LEMIENTE-, CALIFORNIA (AP)- President Nixon told the
nation a radio speech today that he is optimistic about the food price
situation, and he said that when crops come in this fall, he may be able to
lift export controls on agricultural products. Nixon's remarks on the
economy came in a 13-minute speech taped yesterday at the Western White
House.
The President reported that government officials are consulting with
industry and consumer representatives to work out a phase-four
programme leading to a return to free markets, and he urged Congress to
take rapid action on his request for flexible authority to impose export
,,nitrols on goods currently in short supply in the United States.
NIXON AND CONGRESS REACH COMPROMISE
WASHINGTON (AP)- Congress swiftly approved legislation Saturday to
increase benefits for 30 million Social Security recipients bs 5,6 per cent
beginning a year from now.
A payroll tax increase for persons earning more than 12.000 dollars
accompanies the benefit raise. The maximum additional sum any employ ee
would pay next year is 35,10 dollars.
The provisions were grouped with a number of others in two composite
bills, which also extended the national debt ceiling beyond Saturday
midnight.
By late afternoon the bills were passed by both chambers and sent to the
White House.
A series of compromises averted the threat that President Nixon \would
veto&l bill containing the Social Security changes.
QUEEN HELPS CANADIANS CELEBRATE
CHARLOTTETOWN, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND (AP) Britain's
Queen Elizabeth yesterday helped Canadians celebrate the second
centennial of Prince Edward Island's entry as a Canadian Province. The
Queen and Prince Phillip are on a ten-day tour of Canada.
TRUDEAU'S WIFE FAINT LED FROM CEREMONY
CHARLOTTETOWN, PRINCE IEDWARD ISLAND (AP') Margaret
Trudeau, wife of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, appeared faint Sunday
during centennial celebrations with the Queen outside the Prince E-dward
island legislative building.
Mrs. Trudeau, about three months pregnant, was sitting beside her
husband in front of the building when she put her hand to her face and
then bent over and rested htier forehead on her knees.
She seemed to recover briefly, then just as the children beg-an to sing the
provinces centennial song she again bent down and put her head on her
knees.
She was led from the ceremony by the Queen's surgeon-commiander.
Philip iulford, to the back of the legislative buildings and then inside.
The Queen, sitting on a raised platform beside the Trudeaus. looked
down with concern a number of times while the Prime Minister rubbed his
wife's neck and held here hand.
MEXICO'S RULING PARTY APPARENTLY RETURNED
MEXICO CITY (AP) Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party
(PRI) appeared early Monday to have sweep Sunday's Congressional and
guberasatorial elections.
The PRI, which has controlled Mexico politically in the last 40 years, is
expected to win seven governorships in as many states and a majority in
the 194-seat Chamber of Deputies.
Early figures showed that at least 20 million out of 25 million registered
voters cast their ballots at the 42,126 polling booths throughout the
nation.
No major incidents were reported, despite main opposition National
Action Party (PAN) claims that its representatives in the states of Yucatan.
Jalisco and Chiapas were thrown out of polling stations, on orders from
PRI officials.
BOMBING OF CAMBODIA MAY STOP BY AUG. 15
SAIGON (AP) The Saigon government reported today that South
Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops violated the Vietnam cease-fire 94 times
In the latest 24-hour reporting period. The biggest action reportedly took
place in the Central Highlands provincial capital of Kontum.
Meantime, American bombing missions continue over Cambodia ..
yesterday going into their 117th straight day. As usual, the Pacific
Command provided no details ... but said no American planes were lost.
President Nixon has signed legislation to halt all U.S military action in
Indochina by August 15th, but the President has served notice he will ask
Congress for new war-making powers if he thinks they are needed. Signing
the bill yesterday in San Clemente. the President said the last remaining
element of peace in Southeast Asia is a stable Cambodia settlement.


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Former White House FOR BELFAST


aide disputes Dean's


Senate testimony

BY Donald M. Rothbeerg
WASHINGTON (AP) Former White House aide Charles W.
Colson Sunday disputed John W. Dean III's testimony before the
Senate Watergate committee that Dean gave President Nixon "a
full report of all the facts" in the Watergate case last March 21.


"I don't believe Mr. Dean
laid out all the facts as he said
he did on March 21," Colson
said on the CBS television
programme "Face The
Nation."
Colson, who had left the
White House staff to enter law
practice in Washington, said
the President called him the
evening of March 21 and said
"that he had to get to the
bottom of the Watergate
himself, that he had to find out
the truth. lie had to find out
what was going on.
"He knew at that point that
he was not being told the
truth, that he was being given
confusing information."
Dean. fired as White Hiouse
counsel on April 30. testified
for five days before the Senate
committee last week.
Hie said that on March 21, he
told the President "that there
was a cancer growing on the
Presidency and that if the
cancer was not removed that
the President himself would be
killed by it."
Dean said he then proceeded
to tell all he knew about the
June 17, 1972 break-in at
Democratic National
Committee headquarters and
about his own involvement as
well as that of other
administration and campaign
officials.
Dean said that when he
finished "I realized I had not
really made the President
understand."
UNCERTAIN
In an interview published
Sunday in the Washington
Post, presidential counsel J.
Fred Buzhardt said Nixon is


uncertain whether he will
answer Dean's allegations that
the President knew of the
attempted cover-up of the
Watergate scandal.
"I'm not sure we want to
put the President in a position
to answer a confessed felon,"
Bu/hardt told the post.
"I'm sure the President
doesn't know a lot about this,"
Buzhardt said. "Most people
are confused to the deuce.
What makes anyone think he's
in a different position?"
Buzhardt said he doesn't
doubt Dean "believes in what
he said sincerely," but, he
added, he thinks the former
counsel's "imagination got
away from him."
Colson also said a story
published Sunday in the New
York Times saying he sought
to influence the Labour
Department in an effort to
aid. Nixon's re-election
campaign "is not true."
The Times story said Colson
sought intervention before the
national labour relations board
to settle a Teamsters Union
matter; tried to influence a
Pennsylvania State supreme
court decision on a
construction union case, and
opposed the appointment of a
black labour expert as labour
department regional director
for New York.
Colson said he never had any
contact with the union and had
never heard of the
Pennsylvania case. Hie said he
did oppose the New York
appointment because he felt
there was a better candidate
for the job.


NEW YORK (AP) Special
Watergate prosecutor
Archibald Cox is reported
investigating stories that
Teamster Union officials
collected contributions for the
Nixon re-election campaign.
"Time" Magazine says the
money was collected from
persons who'd received loans
from the union's welfare plan.
According to "Time" some
officials say former Nixon
las\ecr Charles Colson hinted
that in return for the support,
bars on former Teamster
president Jimmy Hoffa's union
activity might be lifted.
The bars never were lifted,
The magazine says the
contributions are believed to
have totalled as much as
0-thousand dollars ... But
only half that reportedly ever
reached the campaign,
tloffa received presidential
clemiency in 1971 when Nixon
commuted his 1967 jury
tampering sentence. After his



BORDABERRY OUTLAWS
POWERFUL LABOUR UNION
MONTEVIDEO, URUGUAY
(AP) P'-esident J uan M.
Bordaberry ouu. .ved a powerful
labour union organization Saturda)
and ordered -soldiers to eject
striking workers from a major fuel
distribution centre.
They were the first acts by the
strong arm government to break a
four-day general strike that
threatened to leave the country
without heat and low on food.
Bordaberry declared illegal the
Com munist-controlled National
Labour convention (CNT) that
called the strike to protest the
disolution of parliament b) the
President Wednesday. Bordaberry
reduced to a figurehead by the
dominating military commands,
assumed dictatorial powers and
declared he would rule by decree
until the constitution is reformed.
He suspended a Communist
newspaper for three days and a
weekly publication for two editions
under new censorship rules !hat
prohibit any comment or criticism
about the abolishment of Congress.
T'rhousands of workers.
responding to the general strike
order, occupi J government
buildings, factories, meat packing
plants, hospitals, the state
telephone and public utilities.

COMPROMISE SOLUTION
TO COLD WAR
HAMBURG,. (;I:RMANY (AP)
West German and Iceland may
achieve an interim solution before
the end of the year on their cod
war dispute. Bonn's chief
negotiator said Sunday after the
first round of Reykjavik talks.
Under Secretary Hans Apel of
the foreign Ministry told newsmen
after returning from the two-day
talks, that progress was made
towards achieving a compromise
solution.
Apel and under-secretary Fritz
Loogeniann of the Nutrition


release from prison ... lloffa
was forbidden to re-assume
union control.
Attorney-General Elliot
Richardson is reported as
suggesting President Nixon
could submit to Senate
Watergate questioning by
answering the questions of
individual senators
The Boston "Globe" says
Richardson made the
suggestion off-handedl> during
an interview last week, It's said
to be one means of avoiding a
constitutional clash if President
Nixon were asked to testify
before a formal session of the
full committee
The executive director of
the N.A.A.C.P1 says any move
to impeach President Nixon
because of the Watergate
scandal now would be
premature. Roy Wilkins spoke
at a news conference yesterday
in preparation for this week's
Indianapolis meeting of the
N.A.A.C.P.



Ministry conferred with Iceland's
Foreign Affairs and Fisheries
Ministers on the dispute over the
unilateral Icelandic extension of
coastal fishing limits from 12 to 50
sea miles.
Apel said Reykjavik reacted
'with interest' to a German
compromise proposal that would
replace the rigid 5- mile limit with a
fexible limit ranging in breadth
from 12 to 130 miles.
The proposal aims to protect fish
spawn and young fish while
granting some access to reach
fishing grounds close to the
Icelandic coast for German
trawlers, Apel said.


U.K. BLUEPRINT IRANIANS BLAMED FOR IT


Iraqi defense chief


is assassinated by


'clique of traitors'

BEIRUT, LEBANON (AP)- The Iraqi defense minister was
assassinated by anti-regime plotters led by the Iraqi security chief,
Baghdad announced Sunday.
An Iraqi radio broadcast countries and has received
said Gen. Hamad Shibab, a strong arms aid from the
member of the ruling Soviets.
revolutionary command Scores of arrests were
council and defense minister, reported in Iraq today after the
was gunned down by "a clique assassination and the
of traitors." 95,000-man Iraqi army was put
There were unconfirmed on alert as tanks and armoured
reports that the assassination cars took up positions around
might have been part of an the capital of Baghdad,
attempt to overthrow the according to reports reaching
ruling Baathist Party and the Beirut.
regime of. President Ahmed
Hassan el Bakr. NEAR BORDER
The broadcast announcing The defense minister was
the "martyrdom" of Shibab slain near the Iranian border
reported that interior minister early Sunday in a shootout
Saadun Ghaydan also was between the leaders of an
wounded in the shooting, abortive coup and loy 1 troops.
There was no mention of fie was given a state funeral
Bakr. t,.a ,, ;n a.hriad- those Ira


TAKES SETBACK
BELFAST (AP) Britain's
blueprint for peace in
bomb-battled Northern Ireland
took a heavy but not
necessarily fatal hammering in
elections for a new provincial
Assembly Saturday.
The one million electorate
spurned the moderate centre
and divided behind the older
sectarian barricades between
Protestant and Roman
Catholic.
At the same time it handed a
rebuff to former Prime
Minister Brian Faulkner, who
was ready to go along with
Britain's insistence that
Protestants share power with
the Catholic third of the
population.
Faulkner's Unionists, so
named because of their support
for union with Britain,
emerged the largest single
group with 22 of the
Assembly's 78 seats.
Seventeen seats went to a
'loyalist coalition' of
Protestant militants opposed to
Faulkner personally and to the
British peace programme.
Another loyalist group
claiming to be truer than the
British themselves to British
parliamentary concepts -
could count on support of
most of the 11 elected
dissident Unionists, members
of Faulkner's party who reject
his policies.
The third power centre was
the Catholic-based Social
1) Democratic and Labour
(SDLP) led by Gerry Fitt. This
was the party's first election of
this kind and it captured 19
seats and a solid mandate as
the voice of nationalist
aspirations for an eventual
United Ireland.
lopes for forming a genuine
power-sharing executive
depended on compromise
between Faulkner's Unionists
and the Social Democrats. But
the two groups have nothing in
conilion.
The middle-road Alliance
Party, hoping to bridge the
sectarian divide, trailed home
with eight seats and no real
power base.
Northern Ireland labour,
springing from the
non-sectarian trades unions,
produced one solitary victor,
The cumbersome
proportional representation
system kept the count dragging
on into late Saturday, two days
after the polling booths closed.
The British, who dissolved
the old Protestant-dominated
Parliament and assumed direct
power in March last year,
hoped the new assembly could
produce an executive
acceptable to both
communities.

FLOODS KILL 4

IN PENNSYLVANIA
FOUR 'PERSONS were known
dead and damage was mounting
Saturday as weekend rains which
belted the northeast sent creeks and
rivers cascading into communities
in southeastern Pennsylvania and
central Vermont.
Some inor flooding, or the

Htampshire, Connecticut and Maine.
Twenty-lour hours of heavy rain
on Vermont's Green Mountains
washed into rivers and streams
Saturday. One boy was reported
dead and the village of Ludlow was
reported to have suffered heavy
damage.
In southeastern Pennsylvania,
three children were killed and one
youth was in critical condition in
the wake of spotty flooding.
The greater Philadelphia area,
which had a record rainfall Friday,
was hardest hit, but some areas
which had borne the brunt of
tropical storm Agnes last June
received some minor flooding.
In Ludlow. Vt., a village of 2,500
in the central part of the state,
town manager Dean Brown said
"everything seemed to be washing
down" the Black River. The rear
end of a general electric plant
collapsed into the river, officials
said. The plant is the largest
employer in the area.


Egypt's Middle East news
agency quoted an official
statement issued in Baghdad
accusing security director
Nazim Kazzar of
masterminding the plot. The
statement said Kazzar invited
Shibab and Ghaydan to a
banquet Saturday night and
sprang a trap on them and
other officials at the dinner.
PLOT UNCOVERED
"When his plot was
uncovered, he attempted to
escape in the direction of
Zerbatia near the Iranian
border, holding the two
ministers and other officials as
prisoners," said the statement
carried by the agency.
"At Zerbatia, Kazzar and his
accomplices were overpowered
and arrested. Before Kazzar
and his accomplices were
arrested, they shot and killed
Gen. Shibab in the shootout."
It was not immediately clear
how the Kazzar forces and
their hostages travelled to
Zerbatia or exactly when the
killing took place.
The President had just
returned from state visits to
Bulgaria and Poland.
His government, cooperating
on the principle of Arab
socialism, has tightened Iraqui
relations with the Soviet Union
and other Communist


DAYAN VOWS

VENGEANCE


FOR KILLING

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL (AP) -
Defense Minister Moshe Dayan
today accused Palestinian
terrorists of slaying Israeli air
attache Yosef Alon in
Suburban Washington. He
pledged that Israel will try to
liquidate the terrorist groups.
Alon's body arrived home
aboard a U.S. air force jet
escorted by Israeli fighters, one
day after he was shot outside
his Chevy Chase, M.d., home.
"It must be one of them, I
don't see a possibility of
anyone else," Dyan said.
"We will find the terrorists
wherever they are . and do
what we can to liquidate the
terrorist movement," Dayan
added.


t oay inI agua tne iiq,
radio reported in a terse
broadcast.
Reports in the Beirut press
said Saddam Hussein Takriti,
who is vice chairman of the
ruling Revolutionary
Command Council, personally
led the troops and security
forces that crushed the
attempted coup against the
Baathist Socialist regime.
Iraqi sources in Beirut
described the assassination as a
pro-Iranian coup attempt. Iran
and Iraq, two oil-rich
neighbours, have been funding
for years over influence in the
Persian Gulf.
Violence has been an
integral part of Iraqui politics
for years. King Feisal and the
royal family were massacred in
1958. Gen. Abdul Kandm
Kassim, who followed the king
to power, was killed in a 1963
coup. A few months after
Bakr's 1968 coup, the body of
foreign minister Nasser el Hani
was found in a ditch beside a
Baghdad street. Former vice
president and defense minister
Hardan Takriti was assassinated
during a visit to Kuwait in
1971.


has a vacancy for a


MISSING BABY


FOUND IN WOOD

NEAR DEATH

LONDON (AP)
Kidnapped baby Kristen Bullen
was slightly improved but still
seriously ill in hospital Monday
as police calculated she
probably lay for five days in
the suburban London wood
where she was found near to
death.
Seven-week-old Kristen is
being treated in an intensive
care incubator for severe
exposure and pneumonia.
She was taken from her
baby carriage in Bromley High
Street last Monday and found
in the wood only
3/2-miles away by two young
anglers on Saturday night.
Her tiny body was covered
in dirt, snails and flies and she
was probably within hours of
dying.
Kristen's mother,
26-year-old Shirley Bullen said
after seeing her daughter again.
"it was terrible. If it had not
been for her little flat ears and
turned up nose 'I would never
had recognized her."
Tearfully, she added: "It
was wicked beyond description
what they did to her. She has
never been changed once
during the whole time she was
missing."
Kristen, who was born two
weeks prematurely, also
requires regular doses of
anti-convy ,ant drugs because
of a nervous condition.
But Lewisham Hospital in
South London said: "There is
no evidence that the lack of
drugs has had any effect on the
baby's condition."
Too weak even to take a
bottle, Kristen is being drip fed
intravenously. Her body was
said to be still dark and
wrinkled from dehydration and
she has lost a lot of weight.
Mrs. Bullen said: "I hope
and pray all the time that she
will pull through. They can't
let her die."
Police are hunting two
women, possibly a mother and
daughter, who were seen
carrying a baby minutes after
Kristen disappeared from her
baby carriage outside a public
toilet.


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NASSAU FESTIVAL OF ARTS

AND CRAFTS (BAHAMAS)
presents:-

ART EXPOSITION
Combined Programme of


DRAMA! University Players
SONG & DANCE! Festival Folklore Group
AT
AUDITORIUM, BAHAMAS TEACHERS COLLEGE
(Oak 1)
Friday 6th July to Sunday 8rr.-.,, at 9:00 p.m. Curtain rises
9:30 p.m. prompt. General Admission $2.00 $3.00 Reserved
Available at Carter's Record Shop Bay St. & Boyle Building ,
For reservations call: 52259


U ________________________


Bahamian


BUILDING

SUPERINTENDENT


The Coropration needs an Officer to supervise building construction
projects and maintenance of equipment and office buildings.
The applicant should have had three years formal training in building
technology at some recognized school and at least two years practical
experience.
The Officer will be required to travel in the Family Islands and remain
with projects for indefinite periods of time.
Salary will be dependent upon qualifications and experience and will be
within the Corporation's established pay scales for Engineering personnel.
Applications should be submitted to the Assistant General Manager,
personnel and Industrail Relations to reach him not later than July 6,
1973.


Teamsters Union link probed


BAHAMAS


TELECOMMUNICATIONS


CORPORATION


IBM DATA CENTER SERVICES

Has immediate position available
in Nassau


PROGRAMMER/SYSTEMS ANALYST

Successful applicants must be throughly familiar with
systems programming design and implementation of
varied commercially oriented applications. Position
requires a minimum of three (3) years COBAL
Programming experience.
Applicants will be required to successfully complete
an Employment Aptitude Test prior to employment
consideration.
IBM OFFERS: Hospitalization and Insurance
Programs, paid vacation, attractive starting salary and
excellent advancement opportunities
Qualified applicants shot-'d call Mr. McFadden at
32351/4 for personal interview.












Monday, July 2, 1973.


ihp r ribut n
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas OfNV Master
LEON H. DUPUI(', Puhlisher'Editor 1903. 1 14
SIR ETIENNE DUPUC'H, O .E KC.S (S., 1) Litt t, LI P
Publisher/Editor 1/1 7-1972
Contributing Editor 1972
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRONM.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-'1)86
Advertising 2-1986. 2-2768

Monday, July 2, 1973.


By ETIENN lDUPUCII
LONDON, June 4 The service for Commonwealth Day at
Westiminster Abbey in the presence of tier Majesty the Queen,
head of the Commonwealth, and Ilis Royal I lightness the Prince
Philip Duke of Edinburgh, was both colouriful and impressive.
The last time I was in this magnificent cathiledral was twenty
years ago for the coronation of Her Majesty. On that occasion I
represented the press of the Baihamas aid, 1 .o.,ll l my newspaper
connections here, I had a seat was up ili the ceiling witii a lady
journalist on each side of' me, one from New Zealand and the
other from Australia.
From this elevated position I could look down on the altar and
see the whole service. I could also see the wing of the building
where the peers were seated and the choir stalls where some of
the most important men and women in the world, including Sir
Winston Churchill. were placed.
In an earlier article I told you that Lads Ranfurly had obtained
good seats for us. I knew this by tile fact that we had tickets lor
the front row in the choir stalls.
But it was only after arriving at the ..i11.1ii.l for the service
that I realized what choice seats wct had.
The Lord Mayor of London and his wife castle in, preceded b '
two mace bearers. The hearets of thile aces halted in fronilt of us.
They placed the maces on a rack in front of our seats and the
Lord Mayor sat in a seat behind us.
The Queen and the I[ike ofl .dinbturdi entc'ied in a pirot, cs'i9i
attended by outstanding ineii and .A01on"lll in thle naItion. A;id hle2
Dean of Westminster and ottlle i i i ....l members oi tihe
clergy, and took seats across thie aisle alinost opposite to 11s. I hcir
arrival was preceded by a lanfaic of trumpets.
The flags of the Conmmionwealth were lboiicr in pr)occ.si'mn o
positions on the steps of thle Sacarililn. frunmplis vcic oti-id,'d 1s9
the flags were placed in their positions.
The ceremony was interspersed will music by tile )iL,'ail.
singing by the congregation, tiid :i tfanlia' b\h Itulinplptcit i n11 till
Royal Military School of Music.
The service was introduced hy the Very Rev. ODr. Inc Abbol,
t K.C.V.O., after which the .,L''.'.I| ..... stood ;ind said togei llLe :
"We affirm our common faith inll tile Fteinil Ik'ing. the (catol olf
all things, beyond and within all things".
In his introduction the Dean iemiphlli/ed that there 'as only
one race the human race.
This was followed by a reading ftroli tie i.:- ,. .1 (,ita by the
Acting High Commissionei for India,
After which the ..... ,.tii' .i stood iltiili a;itd said "We at firm
our common faith that the lives 4t all men ale in the hand ofl
God, and that lie is where men are".
Then came a reading fiom thie Ql'ati by the Ilighl
Commissioner for \ig. :i i,
And thle affirmation by tie cont),reitlo "We affirm our
common faith in the suprOemacy of iovL- in all Lhumanll
relationships".
Followed by a reading by the High Coininissionei of Sri L.anka
(Ceylon).
And the affirmation b, the congrt'gtiion,: ",'We alirnmi 0)l1
common faith in the brotherhood of man revealed above all in
service and sacrifice for the common weal".
A reading from the New Testament by the I ligh Commissioner
for Canada.
Dame Anna Neagle recited a stan/a from Pr1onm'thl'iis
Unboutd.
Then came prayers by thic representatives of different
religions who spoke in their own language. lhe Buddhist
representative spoke in Pali, the R.omait ( :itholic Iepresentative in
English, the Islamic representative li Arabic. thle Jewish
Community spoke in Hlebrew,, le Ihindu representative in
Sanskrit, and a prayer for peace by the lDe:in.
The congregation could follow lhat Sals being said in the
different languages because it \as all printed il tile pr1ogtailinie
in English.
More fanfare of trumpets :i tile :1,, of lile C('lnii IIweaI lt
were borne out by way of Ilhc ('elite Aisles of lhe Qtirc and
Nave while the congregation sang: "Immlsllortal, 1I lhk- god".
And finally, a flourish of drunks and tiilllpels fol Her Majesty
and the Commonwealth ais the QueeCr1 aind hler party left the
cathedral in solemn procession.
I have tried to give you in as brief a space as possible mI oulline
of a beautiful and most impressive service.

Thousands of people lined the streets outside to see the L Queen
and other dignitaries who attended the service dep.t t.
But I am left to wonder how deeply this Conmunonwealth spirit
sinks into the consciousness of peoples who formn this hopeful
union of races, religions and peoples around the world.
A significant fact is that the Ahmdon newspapers gave this
occasion very little space.
The Daily Express carried a five line item ont the front page
about it. The Daily Telegraph published a picture of Mrs.
Trudeau, wife of the Prime Minister ot C('anada, being received at
the cathedral with a brief caption under it. One is left to wonder
whether it would have been given any space in 'that newspaper
had not the picture been taken. Other newspapers either ignored
it or iave it only brief reference.
And already the Bahamas has abolished thle Commnonwealth
Day and Queen's Birthday holidays and will replace
Commonwealth Day with an Independence Day holiday.

We are all conscious of what is happening at the political level
throughout the Commonwealth today where England and
Englishmen are often the target of abuse and persecution
All of which is now being reflected hy a positive reaction
among a small group of leaders in England where the idea seems
to be catching on.
Earlier in this century Oswald Moseley had his Blackshirt
Fascist brigade but he got nowhere with his racist propaganda. In
the last few years Conservative M.P. Enoch Powell has raised his
voice against coloured people in the nation ... and many people
are beginning to listen because, for the first time. England is


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Britain hais i < :
they (lsl ,\pc :
wav v. lich t c.x
Africa.
Withll the t -
COU ld lffoird i
oa tsu :ii In M r i ,, -

A\ter :!tt'le iint .
rtlbble-ro'1)w ln :ir 1 1t I
news aboutl the ll4 2:
admilied into tl i ,
t i ih er \n ,'ie l< t *
I asked t .


I in lteL i


You klit' : -
when what I
it comes olt i
Years a . -.
i t ll ii ti .' .
America vw o'i

experiienLce t
were still e- . .
by the KKk in itlC
But [ 'mnow i 1 t '
evcints I h:ix -' ' :
were glu |. ;go ,
'I llelt ,'c ( . '; :
1ie coloutL' s -s',i .:- ,*:'

tdet eic !Lic -


b il.h 1 snia * i
the white .-
M e .ica(i -A inI'r \- S ,
res lt o ;



ki Ic i1 S..' s :' ,.,

(lilt. 'ii i i l
activit Ie :
ne iiie cIl : .

S itl ide i if) 4 'w i .
]Tline l:,. {, e .


sidS l in l. :i i .. .



bdisapptea. I .c, i\ : '
bc n Iti1( .A :hii J ;k il. .;.: ,
... seliot l' i :
erintt'd.


\\ha; a :: 5 4 i : ,:
hlid 1 cial pri ; I ; ,
ine\s to lB iaii ,
Ilhe fl li L il !- -
this ,i tit e. I 'll d ', '
coloured peoi p I'i [I ..'
thal 's Ille l t I t -
In Amieri' v n i ,
speak tihe .sanm i- ' .. .
have the salin .-,i :
overlolnes otf sl ;',c .' .
gradually erase tliih ia i I .
the barrier is falhitiii i .pii51 .
Tils is ni t i so ; 1 .
Pakistani and it' w uc ,
enemies. The 'l:i. k V !,' ,'


S t I

' v-: ; ;it + I, i t. i ,l a y
' h i ; )l l l
It Ill It 1



,th.



t.inl tlhe nerve

', I I IILI lIt


,,- il slm all
tIlor the 25
1 1 tl I C I '
pc, p ticlk


i phra e tlIalt


I th iile r t b!|ila-k c ia o r o f
i 'I'" the'11 nation's third

S '>:i! 'i. h uii ani Sanl
,! ,'t t. hadi r, 'i 'n d over
i' '.+ i n tivla V :*L'. tyle for

Si 111pc i ii. vii'lo ies
:.i ^ uti l\ ,';i ur. : !r, l heutlines,
tI It 11 'I i l. I r ii l. lIrprise
a 1.i' *11d' l":i 11 d tht l re are
t .)' I 'lack in l orI, in office
Sthe co4n41
'\ ,,-I I hltii idai" won
S !i,' ii' i,t i s V inl
m, i.il. I pl.c', but m in many
-t. h ilhlvl'ad had the odds
*t:Ci c'l .'Lil'. l ih lem in m uch
S mh .,i c Oi t %.i l lhai Mr Bradley
S ei h fir; challenged
rL "l. ltour vcar ago and
tlt1 c tiLI ,J c'i li i';,11 dCl' at.


On! li.it iL cc-xitln. MIt. Yorty
S: '' i -, ullv t,.id ,l >,tn racial
ii; ,"! pcihihc 1 ,ind drew
S il \ cr, in record
i. ;. 1 rie;ct \1r. Bradley's
I.t. In. I ; slightly
:. ,!. :, 1 ; i ti ni e tried usit ng
1:, i ,t'\ p iiiLS ol m alice

'w- ;:,, *L- .i;ppr.; Il is t have
' '" r ,1 ic l.ic i and M r.
1i ll tI' I. caiptlured roughly 50
S', 1 .' tlheC white vote.
B'lradley rightly observed
Si t: .iv ir iad becolIei


.1


rmu


mm a ~ '~ N.


s ,t]l i, .0Cl d and looked
" id the c olour It his skin
t Illi,i nlrnts of the man and
thi I.i!ld i sues. His triumph
w-.,i Ail the nole significant
114., .itU, los Angeles has only
iti, 16 per cent. black
population. Blacks who had
pre iously been elected as
nma\ or in large cities had thc
I'''netfit lit heavy black
poputlatlons.
1 here are now 16 blacks in
(ongiess. In State politics
there are 42 blacK Senators and
19'6 State Representatives. In
tonn hlalls around the land
ilhTer are the 83 majors. 43
vice mayors and 928 aldermen,
councillors and other elected
'tLici.ils who are black. There
;' 15- black judges and
1iag ist Ite C .
In other directions, too.
black men and women are
tultilling dreams they once
,' nisldered impossible. On the
oiher hand. it is estimated that
tihie are 4ti about 2.5 million
blacks in the South not
reiusteILred as voters.
I lit' Voter I education Project
in \tlanla points oat that there
arC sevI'en Southern States
wlich do not publish electoral
figures by race and that it is
difficult to know how many
blacks are still without a vote.
None the less, a total of
I,1 4 -black officials have been
elected in 11 Southern States
almost half the total for the
country so in a real sense
much of the impetus of black
political power is coming from
the most unlikely region of the
country Before 1965 fewer
than 100 blacks held public
office in those States.
The steady gains made by
the black population in various
fields have helped to diminish
the motives and effectiveness
of the black militants who
were so turbulently evident in
the 1l60s. Bobby Seale, the
Black Panther leader, recently
ran for Mayor of Oakland.
California, and, although he
lost. it was an encouraging sign
that suhi men and their
followers now have more faith
in the ballot box and less in
street riots.
But there are other testing
grounds, ahead in the
Page 4, Col. 4


*o $500 Wi1II IF fIHIPENT


KODAK x9O CAMERA value 144"



> INSTAMATIC x45 OUTFIT value 69"


INSITAMAIC x30 OUTFIil

Vl1 $44" -4


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4 ii-


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41 .4~



- I '

54


Kodak INDEPENDENCE




PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION




ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS SEND US YOUR BEST PICTURE TAKEN DURING THE INDEPENDENCE
CELEBRATIONS. IF YOU ENTER IN THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL, THEY WILL WIN ENOUGH EQUIPMENT TO
GET THEM STARTED IN COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHY. __


- i


Or mailed to Island Merchants Ltd., Kodak Independence Photographic Competition, P. 0. Box N 3947, Nassau.


, -


Africa who al-, lit ih ,c- 1iit . 'i, -. ink t!iti) h l ,,i'.t .. i he
Chinese from I oi KFWi ,. i n ,- i m. : Ml.:, t -, :I r i
We are even f rced t1 , ali/ Q t, W\ -, lii lt ,, i .h!_ii
islands in this he iU sphUii p criit i., i ii. A P 'l P ; ... \i' .'i
these groups aro dift-c re t t I n ,i htht- l ,T
M1iercin lies the pt li i .- ;
My EnglMish i t i ... .,
benmoan the t itlrou i i .
facts to their at tent 1i i. -
It's all very sad . t.,o i n'iafl) ; ii -"'caui I i 4 ilU
difficuniy in adjustii-ng 1i Int 1i.ace or p ic>tpl tht ,w \ ,i i tI o !; i.'
into contact. Long ;'agt1 I ro ibL- ':i ,-wLn- ,,i,.u! elii.," im al..)'.
rejected though ts of :i '. 1 !v ..i s i. '.. c-h,' ,! I,\ A -
,'. 4. ru i


!. The Winning Entties would be those that in the
opinion of thie Judges, best reflected the aspirations
and the iealisation of an Independent Bahamas and
best captured the atmosphere and feeling of the
Independence Celebration.

2. Professional Photographers, Island Merchants Ltd.
Staff and their relatives are not eligible for the
( i p til, I .,.

3. Prints for the Genetal Competition Contest must be
b" x 7" or larger.

4. Prints for the School Competition may be any size.

5. Allt points must be in colour.

6. All prints must be taken from Kodak Film.


7. Entries must be submitted by August 31, 1973.

8. Judges decision is final no correspondence will be
entered into.

'9. Names and addresses must be clearly written on the
back of each print submitted. Schools must also list
their address on the reverse side of each print
entered.
10. The Winners will be required to submit their
negatives for verification before the prizes will be
awarded.

11. Prints are not returnable.

12. Island Merchants Ltd. reserves the right to use any
Photograph for promotional purposes.


I. rit-mur


/


Entries may be submitted at any of the following locations:

Island Shop Photographic Dept. Bay Street
Island Photo Centre Palmdale
Island Camera Shop Bank Lane


CONTEST RULES


Judges have been nominated by the Independence Committee.


-%- -.W


K


, . I .


,i


-.0










Monday, July 2, 1973.


UPhe ribtm,


FroCi., age 3
member of the human race and a crusader for justice and fair
dealing for every human being,regardless of race.

This gives me an opportunity to make my position clear on this
question.
The People is the official organ of the PIP party in the
Bahamas. It is very racist in its outlook.
Earlier this year a group of fine Americans came to Nassau
with the intention of making substantial investments in the
islands. They had gone far in their negotiations when one of them
read a copy of The People. lie took it to The Tribune office and
asked for an explanation.
"This Government seem to want only black people in this
country," the man commented. "They apparently want outsiders
to sink capital in the country for the benefit of the black man
only."
These potential investors left the island the next day and took
their money back to America with them.
They were fine people with a lot of money behind them. I say
they were fine people because they were members of a very old
American family which means they were not common
adventurers and fly-by-nights.

You know ... I have never read a copy of The People but from
time to time members of my staff tell me things they say thai I
should know.
Recently I was told that the paper carried at attack on me,
stating that I had left the coloured people.
This is all wrong. I want it clearly understood that I have never
been wedded to any race . and I never will be.
As I said earlier in this article, I am a member of the human
race and, as such, I am concerned only with fair, honest and
decent treatment for all races and people everywhere ... for I see
my brother in every human being.
When the coloured people were being misused by whites in the
Bahamas I fought their battles for them, often at great personal
sacrifice. I achieved my highest objective in life when I succeeded
in breaking down racial barriers in the Bahamas in 1956.
Now that the position has been reversed and coloured men are
viciously abusing their new-found power. I have been fighting for
justice and fairplay for the victims of black persecution.
And so it is wrong to suggest that I have ever' in the past
and will every be in the future a creature of any race or
associated with any prejudicial school of thought in any section
of society.
I am a member of the human race, a servant of people
everywhere and, most of all, a champion of honest\, decency anod
airplay in human relations.
I hope I have made my position clear. The People is wasting its
time with its propaganda because I am not asking or expecting



BAHAMAS

JTELECOMMUNICA


CORPORATE(

Applications are invite

for the Position

of

ASSISTANT ENGINE

Out Island Maintenance De

EDUCATION High School Education plus a
Engineering or a City and (uilds of London Instil,
.Certificate in Telecommunications Engineering. Can
,neceCCssary qualifications will also he considered.
The successful candidate will be required to t
-Bahamas to install and repair electronic and radio e
stations and will be based at the Family Island M
Perpall Tract, Nassau..
The salary paid w1,ill he within BaTel('o's salary
Engineers S742 S892 per month plus 5"' Housing Al
Applications should he addressed to M.S.A. Tur
Manager, Personnel and Industrial Relations. Bahama
('Corporation. P. (). Box N3048 to reach him not later t


anything from the coloured people of the Bahamas. For over a
half century in the Bahamas my late father and I were their only
unwavering champions. We opened the doors to first class
citizenship for them.
We were standing out in the open taking blows for them when
most of the people who are very brave today were hiding in the
background.
I found an interesting letter in my files when I was packing
away documents just before I left Nassau.
It was written by a law student in England about 23 years ago.
In this letter he wrote in glowing terms about me and the work I
was doing in The Tribune to help coloured people.
He informed me that he wanted to write articles for "our"
newspaper. lie underscored the word "our". But he emphasized
the fact that his contributions would have to be anonymous He
was apparently afraid of being hurt. This letter was signed L 0.
Pindling!
You know something . it is easy to be brave after someone
else has cleared the path of obstacles for you.
The fact that Mr. Pindling and his crowd have so easily
forgotten the past and would now like to see The Tribune
suppressed, does not concern me because, as William Ellery
('hanning so eloquently points out in an essay on Man, "Life is a
fragment, a moment between two eternities, influenced by all
that has preceded, and to influence all that follows. The only way
to illumine it is by extent of view".
As my moment in eternity draws to an end, I can look back on
time without any pangs of regret. And I pray for the day when
the brotherhood of man will be established in the earth.
FOOTNOTE TO HIISTORY: You will see by the date of the
above article that it was written before the Abaco debate in the
Lords.
A day before the debate on the Second Reading of the
Bahamas Independence Bill was moved in the House of Lords,
Lady Mactaggart phoned and asked me whether Lord Belhaven,
who was sponsoring the Abaco cause in the Lords, could see me.
I invited them to come to the Savoy and have a drink with me.
lie was perfectly honest with me- He told me that he did not
expect to win the issue but that his conscience told him that he
must make the effort.
I commended him for having a conscience . a rare quality
even in a Lord . and agreed with him that there was little if
any hope of his winning the fight for a free Abaco, separate
from arn independent Bahamas.
I told him that I was fully in sympathy with his effort but that.
since I was already securely out of the Bahamas, I would not do
anything that might spark trouble for anyone who is obliged to
stay in the islands.
My wife and I accepted his invitation to go to the Lords for the
debate on the following day but we left while Lord Thurlow, a
former Governor of the Bahamas, was speaking and before Lord
Belhaven came on.
I read Lord Belhaven's speech in The Daily Telegraph the next
morning and I must say that he was the only one who talked
sense in the debate. I am sure that one of the Lords who
supported the Bill acted against the wieght of his own knowledge
of the Bahamas and buried the voice of his conscience.

Lord Belhaven and Lady Mactaggart have since been married.

RACE
From Page 3
powerful unions, for example,
T IO N S The labour movement in
IO JAmerica can now expect a
strong challenge from blacks
for fairer representation at all
Union levels.
[ N The successes of blacks in
politics and other fields do not
I mean that racial prejudice is on
e the way out. In the nation's
fire department, for example,
there is a pattern of
discrimination in employment
practices that a Presidential
Commission has called
S"outrageous." And there is still
LIER a virtual shut-out of blacks
from some of the construction
p artment trades and industries.
The Daily Telegraph. June 12.
Degree in Electrical JAPAN FEELS FRANCE &
ite Full Technological CHINA SHOULD JOIN GDC


didates not having all

ravel throughout the
quiipmnent at BaTel('o
maintenance Workshop.

v range for Assistant
lowance.
ner, Assistant General
s Telecommunications
han July 6, 1973.


GENEVA (AP) Japan Tuesday
called for renewed international
efforts to have France and China,
the two nuclear outsiders, join the
25-nation Geneva Disarmament
Conference.
Ambassador Masahiro Nisibori
said continued absence of the two
powers threatens the effectiveness
of international accords and may
make non-nuclear countries 'lose
their enthusiasm for participating in
disarmament negotiations as well as
for concrete disarmament
measures."
He restated his government's
concern over the planned French
tests in the Pacific and satisfaction
at the International Court


Lady Mactaggart was divorced from Sir lan Mactaggart whose
parents lived on the Eastern Road in Nassau and whose younger
brother now owns the house. Sir lan inherited the title from his
father.

I see by reports in The Tribune that some of the original
leaders of the Abaco movement went over to the Government's
side after the London Independence Conference. I understand
that some of these people were disillusioned by the performance
of the Opposition delegation in London and that some of them
have already taken steps to obtain visas for entry into the U.S.


DEAR ABBY: A high school girl wrote that she was
pregnant and she and her boy friend wanted to be married
by a clergyman in a church, but neither one of them
belonged to a church and they were having difficulty find-
ing a clergyman to marry them.
You replied, "I am sure I can find clergyman who
will perform the ceremony."
Abby, the old "accommodating" view is diminishing. If
a church wedding is desired, one or both parties must be
active members in the church. People who refuse to sup-
port or help maintain a church should not expect to use it
for a "show." A Christian wedding ceremony is an act of
worship which is based on faith.
The attitude of more and more people is to call on the
clergy and use the church facilities for "hatch, match, and
dispatch" [baptism, marriage, and funerals]-but the cler-
gy and lay leaderships of our churches are not going to
play games with nonmembers, nonbelievers and inactive
members. After all, there are other places where people
can marry, and other persons who are qualified under the
law to perform marriage ceremonies.
WILLIAM W. J. ENNIS, Pastor
St. Mark's Lutheran Church
Bethlehem, Penn.
DEAR ABBY: A high school senior is pregnant, and
can't find a minister to marry her, tho she is very much in
love with the baby's father and would like a church wed-
ding.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints [Mor-
mons] takes a very strong stand against premarital sex,
but we try to remember the words of the Saviour, "He that
is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone" and,
"Neither do I condemn thee: go, and sin no more."
We believe that the proper thing to do under the above
circumstances is to get married so that child can have a
name, and I am sure any L.D.S. Bishop would be very
happy to perform the ceremony and give them a lovely
wedding and his blessings. LEONARD R. TOLMAN,
Barstow, Cal.
DEAR ABBY: I feel that I must write to defend those
three ministers who refused to marry that pregnant high
school girl.
After nearly 40 years as a minister's wife I know some-
thing about people who don't want to contribute anything to


Sad ... isn't it?
THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Far away there in the sunshine are my highest aspirations. I
may not reach them, but I can look up and see their beauty.
believe in them, and try to follow where they lead.
L. M. AI. COrI

Success lies not in achieving what you aim at, but in aiming at
what you ought to achieve, and pressing forward, sure of
achievement here, or if not here, hereafter.
R. F. HORTON


Unwilling to tie knot


for couple 'in trouble'

a church, but they expect the minister and church to help
them out when they need something.
Of course, the church does not belong to the minister;
neither does it belong to these two immature individuals
to use for their own selfish reasons.
WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off yoer chest.
For a permoal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 0I9, L. A..
Calif. oew. BEncloe stamped, self-addressed envelope,
-a0M.
For Abby's sew booklet. "What Teen-Agers Want to
Know," seod 1 to Abby, Box WM1. Los Angeles. Cal. Mr.


WANTED


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF
HIGHEST CALIBRE WITH
EXCEPTIONAL EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED FOR CHAIRMAN AND
PRESIDENT OF LARGE BAHAMIAN
COMPANY. MUST BE THOROUGHLY
CAPABLE AND TRUSTWORTHY AND
HAVE THE HIG CHEST
QUALIFICATIONS AND
REFERENCES.
SALARY COMMENSURATE WITI
EXPERIENCE. BAHAMIANS ONLY
NEED APPLY. TELELPHONI MRS.
POWELL 5-7516 or 5-7517.


heb iritbune




Souvenir



INDEPENDENCE



Issue


Available-J




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for yourself,
relatives,

friends

of this

BIG..

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INDEPENDENCE

ISSUE
Send or bring-in to:-
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fuw~w norur ua me


urder as Imany
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may be collect
July 9th, Thur


Note:-
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Copies to be n


9 1973


76 pages loaded with

Bahamian Social and

Political History, with

stories and pictures,

both old and new




A SOUVENIR EDITION!


lh- ----*"***.se leea.--se .n..te .o r ...t..p.e...........o..............l.
Please print or type


The Tribune:
Please reserve me copies of
Souvenir Independence Issue.
- to be collected by me at 50c,


your


( copius as you wisM. _to be mailed away at 75c.
es must be paid for in advance and
ted at the Tribune office Monday, I enclose $- to cover order.
rsday, July 12th, or thereafter.
Name

Address
collected ..... 50c each
nailed ....... 75c each ___
(List MAIL AWAY names and addresses on separate sheet of paper)


mJ




Monday, July 2, 1973.


She Tribunr


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The origins of the

'jump-in' dance


By Daphne Wallace Whitfield
FOR THE LAST FEW WEEKS I have been trying to find out
the origins of the jump-in dance and to trace it back to its birth
on perhaps the African continent.


I am not much wiser now in
respect of the origins ,)of the
jump-in dance but I learnt a lot
about West African ( i
particular Yoruha) culture
the birthplace of the first slaves
who were transported to our
shores. There is a lnt of ii
tooay about looking bacK to


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ELIZABETH AVENUE


Atrica tor our ethnic cultural
origins and identity, hut I have
not heard of anybody doing
nuch more than talking My
cursory study was fascinating
adld I hope that government or
any other interested group will
,1st iute a serious study of the
B li i m i a n s A tfrican
inhent! n ce.
t)r Cleveland 1Fneas
r I. il!' that the itun p-in dance
ia,- cien round at least as long
as lie has. ie says that it used
to he called "ring play".
blasic .Isy lie sdi\s the format is
the s.ire as a song with verse
anid h rits. Thlie ones that torin
thc rrig are the chorus and the
one 1 the middle is the verse.
The ione in the middle then
selects another person to join
or replace him in the ring
this !'ting called. l)r. Ineas said
whCen ie was a child. "Comee
tfos \to". Drums provided the
ina ir source of rhythnm and as
the heat and the dancers
bcj -le lttorle exciting and
U iniit bited the distinction
1 -'en the ring and those in
he ig became less distinct.
I then occurred to mre that
thI ',iic i frorniat for Ithe
Itl p i dance L might he
In k, ial Scholt children in
th' B t.ihmias play "Browni ( rl
i R !r Ring".s while school
childJni. in 1 ngland play "Ilic
I.iT!- .'i in the De l'" I th
I -i tl ii variety lacks the
"g-oombay" rhythm, but again


^^^ ^ I ^",.:




June 3rd to Set~t. 9,:


it mightt be an interesting
investigation to, lind out it tihe
basic forn al is unitcersal. l'iaget
tani o u s I d u c atio I n al
Psychologist traced the moral
developriment of thie child
through the game rof ntarbles,
which is universal
In the Bahamian jump-in
dance the essential ingredient
of rhythm and the drum is
present. Tits is distinctly
African in origin, D r Ineas
says, who belief es tile tluip-int
dance,. as lIIk anlto), to be
African in origin bhut that int
the Bahamas it has been
-refined and polished to a
point where it is distinctly
Bahaniian".
The first act ofi the I ,!i i.
Show. which is playing at
governmentt High School every
Thursday evening thr oughoiut
goombay summrcer called
"Plantation," presents tile
artist's view of the undiluted
"African" culture of tile first
slaves with the .1 I... g
imposition of l Iuropean
culture.
A !PROBI 1M
H ow ever a serious
investigation of this African
culture poses a problem. Africa
is a large continent and the
area from which tihe slaves
were taken stretches from
Senegal in the North to Angola
in the South almost the
whole length of the western
coast of Africa. Dr. Eneas
believes that most black
Bahamians are ot Western
Nigerian descent mostly
Yorubas or Ihos yet in
Nigeria alone there are more
than two hundred and fifty
distinct languages. I hlie area
where most of the slaves came
from West Africa. north of
the (C'ongo is vaster than the
whole of Furope. I he dense
forest in which most of the
hundreds of differing tribes
lived was an effective barrier of

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Danish and
further im tagi i '. ...
no bo ,ks il
and gcts oa!lc:,' "
InaltrEiritilert arid stat ii ;
arrive ilt Austraita to (!!,l ]
the rest of lthleir lives' .
Japanese niasters. Ihe tlk it .
comrnirnt language, the lack Ia
a written i .. nd the ic.
of a cot oni on culture ss tiiii
result itn the Japanese laniu
anid culture iving ri the l!' :
o n ly untitI t t) ,is c I u [o t i i [' c
language ssnoult result i t i
torgel ting it as I ha l :
it)ost itl i J scl iret '! :


Latin
bcee i rare


Monday, July 2, 1973.






1OMBAY
x Zash'~'

'AmV1LAv I


communication so it is hig ilt\
probable that there swa, les
cultural exchange anmeg the
African tribal grt ouips tha i
amongst the I urpcan
countries. Yet in Itirope today
each luropean countrirv hais its
own language and culture
We have certain .icwts on
which we can make s li.i
assumptions. Only the iunt:
strong mien atid ..
taken as slaves. Some ttditiu
survive the journey\ an1!
nialtreatnlent from their o ho;in
to the West African coast
Some didn't survive the \aii
for the slave ship anrid mnii
died in the Middle l'assare i.
America.
When they arrived at tirci
various destination, ,n 'ith'
Aimerican coast teire I- ;i
distinct probability lh.it
amongst one group ofl
sold there ssvere none ti Ill.t
shared a common latniittc.
There can be lit.' du
that the indigent s ,,i iti itt r
thei nevw Atric,.i,.i .,-
virtuallk cornplci . s ,,
Image a bar 1 i.i,
consisting ot oi t li' ...I i
girls iieo i(Me".
Italian. i 1. t l i, ,


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Monday, July 2, 1973. 7


Former


MR. V. A. Knowles, former
Chief Out Island
Commissioner, has joined the
Freeport branch of McPherson

m -


Chief 01 Commissioner joins real estate firm at Freeport


& Brown Real Estate (Comipion
as assistant properly director.
The announcement was
made by Mr. I). Lester Brown.


president of the company.
Mr David Hunter,
vice-president of McPherson
and Brown Freeport noted that


Mr. Know !es is affiliated
and to .in harmonious
understanding s(t the problems
and ambitions o( the firm's
Bahamian employees," Mr.
Hunt declared.
Mr. Knowles served for four
ears in the Bahalmas Battalion,
reaching the rank of Warrant
Officer. No. 2 In the 1944


with the Royal Eagles No. I
Order of Masons and is tht
Long Island Sailing Club's race
coordinator.
He has been joined in
Freeport by his wife the
former Dolores Elizabeth
Carroll and their three
children, a daughter, Michele
Nicole, born in Freeport while


her father was Commissioner
there; a son, Dwight Recford
Henry and a second daughter
Melonic.
There are four other
children, David Alfred, Steven
Cardinal, Andrew Alexander
and Diane Elizabeth from Mr.
Knowles' marriage to his late
first wife.


president.



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INDEPENDENCE

CELEBRATIONS

AT INAGUA

I \ \(; I'A O ftficial
Indlepe)Clndcnce celebrations nll
Itiis' sI the rnmilost Bahaia
l-aid d I begin o'. .Jul 13
'sinh the visit of lMr Joseph
Ford. representative. and other
government officials.
tHowever the flag Iaising
Sk' m'I1litny will be held at
midnight July i i ,1 by a
fireworks display and ringing
,i church hells. At the
tconchlsion there swill be a
th Ain 1 k gI vi n g s erv ice .
I cniieniecal services are now
being held weekly and will
cintmtime ever\ Sunday tol July
'S when services will be held etn
masse at tile p.irade ground at
I t .1 il .
(On the t morning of July 10,
i rasitg ceremonies will be
held in all the schools, after
ss h ichli t here will be
refreshments tosr the school
children and.i bieakfait for the
oilsi re' silentt.
\1. I. ord. accompanied by
\1rs 1ord 01 nd (ove rnilent
i i.ils- I i \e at noon11 111 on
J I i' 3 I hc\ ', l he taken on
a solt'ic.ide lim tlhe .airport
't o \ ti Ior t a welcoming
ce ltremony a the parade
grouI lnd. 1I s sw ill be : Ill .... .d
Ihy a sports meet and
' tr e IIshments. lhi.it evenllilg.
cocktails and a1 btffet dinner
will be held at the
( I ill issl1 s01 i s residence,
followed bI dancingi at the
Parade tennis court.
(On JIl\ 14. Mr. ord and
parllt wStill sit 1 I0 i
licktore their Lt letrn home, they
will be i\Ce I a P Cise l Itour of
Ina.t'ui .nd \l.iton ahiliamas
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Mr. Knowles be... nes the first
Bahamian to hold a top
nii.injg l. in, it position in the
branch since it was formed in
1967 although the company
has always been 100 per cent
Bahamian owned.
"Since the Freeport branch
opened executive control has
been in non-Bahamian hands.
However we have always hoped
to find a qualified Bahamian
with executive ability to fill a
top management position and
this week we were successful,"
Mr. Hunter said.
Mr. Knowles, who began his
career in the Out Island
service, served as an Out Island
Commissioner throughout the
Bahamas for 26 years. During
the last five-and-a-half he was
Chief Out Island Commissioner
before his retirement in
January when the post was
abolished.
FAMILIAR
Mr. Hunter pointed out that
Mr. Knowles served for
three-and-a-half years in
Freeport from late 1963 to
July 1967 and was therefore
familiar with the foundations
and early growth of Freeport,
its people and its problems.
lie also served as Freeport
Magistrate for two years.
At the start Mr. Knowles
will spend three months
learning the basis of the
property management business
with Mr. Sam Ilankin. At all
times he will have direct and
special responsibilities for
recruiting, training, motivating
and helping Bahamian
employees.
Mr. Hunt said the new
assistant property. director will
not be confined to property
'" .. i, ". lil. i [ hut will be
encouraged to take ain active
part in the sales fielIl.
"We are confident that this
appointment must lead to an
expansion of the collplilIn 's
business, to assured
employment with gs!Od salaries
New Year's Honours List lie
was awarded the British
Empire Medal for Meritorious
Service, Military Division
In 1946 he tc as awarded a
citation by the Bahamas
branch of the British Legion as
the outstanding ex-serviceman
of the year.
INDEPENDENCE
AT ACKLINS
CKI.INS Dluring the first week
ot July, prayer services will bhe held
throughout this settlement with ai
N.,tional )it y otf rayer on Sunday.
July 8 to be observed with a
combined church service at their
\ C.tL. Association Hall. Snug
(',rner.
(On J uly I the ot'ficit l
Independence celebrations \\ill
begin at 1 ) p.m. with a variety
concert, tollowed ;it 1 1:30 p i.
with a short prayer service and the
flag raising ceremony. iFhe Ceennil:
\ill conclude with a tirewo(rk,
display. dancing nid rally.
()n Jult i., the Independ'nce
part wIth rtel refreshments Ind
dancing to the rake aind scrape hand
will begin Ait 1 p.m. Atnd on July 12
there will be a domino, checker iand
whist touriillent Ait Snug Cornei
school. T'he competing teams \\ill
be Acklins and C rooked Island.


WEATHER

Wind: North-easterly 5 to 15
m.pAh.
Weather: Fair tonight,
showers and thundershowers
likely tomorrow afternoon
Sea: Smooth tonight, slight
tomorrow
Temp: Min tonight 74
Max tomorrow 87


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MR. VIRGINIUS A. KNOWLES, second from left, is shown being welcomed to the
firm of McPherson and Brown by its president, Mr. D. Lester Brown. Mr. Knowles has
been named assistant property director of the Freeport branch. From left are: Samuel J.
Hankin, property director; Mr. Knowles; Mr. Brown and Mr. David P. L. Hunter, vice


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Monday, July 2, 1973.


b^ 20="
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-..MOW




____ _______ II


Ght ribitnt


Monday, July 2, 1973.

armB--


i Students can contribute


more by wasting less time,


Says Paul Adderley


t PAUL L. ADDERLEY, Minister of External Affairs, in his
address to the students of Government High School at their
S annual Speech Day, told them that he always had a certain
amount of regret when it was time to leave the institution of
learning, which he attended.


-Ir^ t


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from 10 p.m. until . .
CANTO',,cSE DINING FROM 7 P.M.
NO COVER NO MINIMUM
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


MRS. C. A. RODGERS,
headmistress of Government
High School, is seen giving
her report at the school's
annual Speech Day
ceremonies. Seated on the
platform from left to right
are: Hon. Gerald Cash,
chairman of the school's
board of governors; Deouty
Prime Minister, A. D. Hanna;
Lady Butler; Mrs. Paul
Adderley; Minister of
Tourism, Clement T.
Maynard; Minister of
Education Mr. Coakley;
External Affairs Minister Paul
Adderley; Mrs. Coakley;
Governor General-Designate,
Sir Milo Butler; Mrs. A. D.
Hanna and Mrs. Clement
Maynard.


"So far as the Government
High School was concerned,
that leaving took place exactly
28 years," he said.
Mr. Adderley told the
students that the worst crime
he ever committed in high
school was that he chose to
learn what he wanted to; and
just enough of what he did not
want to learn to be able to pass
the relevant examinations.
This, he said, he would not
recommendd as a course of
;tudy for anybody and
mentioned it as a warning to be
avoided by those who still have
to learn a great deal more.
"In a few years time, this
school will be 50 years old."
the minister added, "for the
Bahamas that's old, in the
world, very young. But its


Chides women for failing


in their role as citizens
JEANNE THOMPSON, barrister at law, columnist and
playwright, told a group of West Nassau Rotarians along with
their wives and friends, that the role of a woman in a dependent
country was not different from that of a woman in an


independent country.
Miss Thompson, who was
the guest speaker at the club's
special Ladies Luncheon, held
Thursday at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel, spoke on "Women In
An Independent Bahamas."
"Women are citizens of the
Bahamas just as much as men
and there are responsibilities
that all people have as
citizens regardless to sex." Miss
Thompson said.
A citizen must become
involved in the affairs of his
country. she said. "Women in
the Bahamas have been
reluctant to express themselves
in these aspects and have not
fulfilled their role as a sitizen,"
she said.
Commenting on the subject
of marriage, Miss Thompson
said, "There has developed a
tremendous hang-up in the
Bahamas over marriage. You
are not considered a
responsible person in some
cases if you're not married.
Certain promotions, she added,
"are withheld from unmarried
people, because persons in the
position to give the promotion,
say that you must not be
responsible if you're not
married."
Stressing the importance of
w o in en not allowing
themselves to fall in the "wife
syndrome" or to follow the
traditional role of a wife. Miss
Thompson said, "Those roles
being the one who takes care
of the children, washes the
dishes, scrubs the floor, have
caused the Bahamian woman
to take a subordinate role in
the Bahamas."
"The Bahamian woman,"
she added, "should engage
herself more actively in the
community and show her man
that she's willing to stand
beside him instead of behind
him. She must push herself
forward and stop pushing the


JEANNE THOMPSON
man forward."
Although in no way a
woman's liberationist or a
spokesman for married women
inn the Bahamas, Miss
Thompson said, "I am only
stating the problems that the
traditional institution of
marriage has created in the
Bahamas where both sides
suffer."
At next Thursday's meeting
members of the club will elect
new officers.
VALUABLE PAINTING
RECOVERED BUT
CORSS MISSING
VERONA, ITALY (Alt') A
painting by the Renaissance master
Andrea Mantegna was recovered
early Tuesday, 10 days after it had
been stolen from San Zeno church
in this north Italian city.
Police declined to say how they
recovered the precious painting, but
ransom was not ruled out. The
canvas was returned to the Church.
Meanwhile in Bergamo, also in
north Italy, thieves made their way
into San Maria Maggiore church
Monday and stole a 14th century
silver and gold cross valued at 500
million lire (850,000 dollars).
The cross was the work of
sculptor Andreolo de Bianchi and
had been on display in the church.


continuation today marks an
academic continuity which we
recognize." He said he believed
it was important to understand
this as each succeeding
generation of students ought to
be able to better its
predecessors.
Past history was important,
Mr. Adderley said, but "in the
Bahamas, we seem to have an
unusual cpaacity to ignore our
past and history, all of which is
relevant to what we are
today."
lie also told the students
that the educational process,
which they had been exposed
to, in the end, had given them
that degree of intelligence and
reason to enable them to
function in and contribute
towards the development of
the whole community in a
fashion that will not suppress
the innovative original
thoughts of the young or
frustrate the experience and
wisdom which ought to have
been gained by age.
SKILLS
Mr. Adderley said he felt
every student should be
equipped with some skills to
enable him to function in the
community. "E'quality of
opportunity," continued Mr.
Adderley, "provides the baisis
for the concept, but one of the
obvious problems here is that
the child in ('at Island has a
longer way to go than the child
on Last Street." Nevertheless.
he said, the concept is not
thereby invalidated because
some inequalities of
opportunity may make it more
difficult for one child to.
become a doctor rather than
another. He said another
problem in this area was the
mental attitude towards certain
kinds of jobs. which have
caused Bahamians to develop
preferences which were not
based on community need. but
upon individual prejudice.
In the pursuit of
specialisation which, a
competitive society demands,
Mr. Adderley said the aimn
should be to produce not more
specialists, but rather
cultivated tmen and women
"If the students who
graduate from this school," he
continued, "wIl cut in half the
time they waste in absolutely
useless and pleasureless
pursuits, their contribution to
the Bahamas could be
limitless".
Mr. Adderley said the
students ought to be taught to
acquire a habit and attitude to
existence from a common
point of reference to achieve a
common culture and common
standards of civilization.
"There is lastly an aspect of
education which I would
commend." Mr. Adderley
concluded, "and it is what I
choose to call the spirit of
education, an indefinable
quality, without physical form,
and difficult to define. For the
want of more precise
description, it may be ann
ideology of education, it really
consists of all those many
facets of school life which
create a good or bad
character "
Mr. Adderley said he would
not presume to tell the
professional educators how to
arrive at these things, "'hut I
believe 1 know when they have
succeeded; for my part," he
added. "success means the
creation of a character of mind
in the students which prizes
Christian virtues, loyalty,
honesty, a sense of duty and
responsibility, resourcefulness,
initiative, leadership and



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Making his second appearance
The EXCITING SOUNDS OF

WENDELL STUART
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I I 'Il
(a i


STUDENTS OF THE
GOVERNMENT HIGH
SCHOOL are seen listening
attentively to their
headmistress, Mrs. C. A.
Rodgers, as she gives the
school report at the Speech
Day ceremonies held last
Wednesday in the school's
auditorium.

Mrs. Livingston Coakley,
wife of the Minister of
Education, is seen presenting
Ruth Bowe, head girl of
Government High School,
with the Dux Adderley prize
for leadership at the Speech
Day ceremonies held at the
school last Wednesday.




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Last Day Tuesday
Matinee starts at 2:15
Evening 9:00
"BAD MAN'S RIVER" PG.
Lee Van Cleef
Gina Lollobrigida
PLUS
"FIVE MAN ARMY" PG;.
Peter Graves
James Daly
PLUS Late Feature
Tuesday night.
'Phone 2-2534


Last Day Tuesday
Continuous from 3:00

"THE MECHANIC" PG.
Charles Bronson
Keenan Wynn


PLUS
"OPERATION KID
BROTHER" PG.
Neil Connery
Daniela Bianchi


self-reliance in such abundance
and proportions that a child
could not help but live ;i
rewarding ,and satislying life
which after all are the elusive
rewards of a gIood edLucation."
\Mr. C. A. Rod'gers.
headmistress of the school,
gave a comprehensive
report on the school year. In
her report Mrs. Rodgers said.
"I am not very happy about
the general attitude of the
students of our 'V l.cvel sixth
form. nor about the kind ,of
education we're giving them.
IFor too) manyI studentss" she
added, "'still do not easily
appreciate the meaning of the
responsibility of nimore personal
study which 'sixth fornm'
entails."
Shie said that the kind of
education they are giving tIhe
students was not mier-.'l to
prepare students, no.i enti\ i .,
universities, but to prepare
them for right-thinking and
right-living.
Msirs. Rodgers also' thanked
her staff and tile students or
their cooperation during tnlte
school year.
The MinisteC of I education.
Mr. Livingston Coakley.
presided over the ceremonies.
which were turned over to him
by Mr Gerald Cash.
A speech on behalf of the
students was given by Ruth
Bowe, head girl of the school.
In her address. Miss Bowe
said the success and
achievement ot the school year
can be attributed to the hard
work of the teachers and
students of the school.
Mrs. Coakley and MIrs.
Adderley presented the prizes
to the students and tlie vote of
thanks was given by the
school's head boy, Charles
Bain.

JUMP-IN DANCE
From Page 6
according to the tone. There
are words in English that are
the same. but have different
meanings. You can only tell
their intended meaning by the
context, but in the Yoruba
language the intended meaning
is conveyed by the tone.
Another form of "talking
drum" was shaped like an hour
glass and carried slung from the
player's shoulder arid is so
versatile that it is used for
telling stories and sending
messages. So in Africa the
drum was both book,
telephone, telegraph and radio.
Children of the tribe were
taught their history and
religion by the drum.
Michael Craton in his
"Hlistory of the Bahamas" says
"Today in the Bahamas there
are no names and few cu l:stoms
that can be traced back to
Africa with any certainty". Ite
mentions Junknmoo as an
exception whis.Ih i, hld ,. Ole
playing of goombay drums liHe
says further that "similar
drums of wood and goatskin.
are called gumhies in Jamaica
and gombies in Bermuda".


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Matinee continuous from 2, Evening 8:30 'Phone 3-4666
S Samuel 7Arkolfpresentsa, Ame-s, an i;,,t,,onaPclufe

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*z IN cOl0 R A UNIVERSAL PiCTURE
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SORRY N Y l>A'(P,I I


isimm


J


0












Monday, July 2, 1973.


hp iribunt


EASTERN'S

RECOGNITION .

OF SERVICE Vih.


IN APPRECIATION of five r.
years of service with Eastern .
Airlines in Nassau, Mr. Charles
Scully, manager-passenger and
cargo services congratulates 5
members of his staff and
presents them with pins that
attest to their years of service,
Shown left to right: Mr. Scully,
Mr. J. V. Bastian, Miss J. V.
Knowles and Mr. L. C.
Knowles and Mr. W. H.
Bierman, regional director
Bahamas.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells
UI


Under the distinguished patronage of


Prime Minister and Mrs. L.O. Pindling


Eastern Airlines & Essence Magazine


present an


Independence ari&l4on S ow


4th July, 1973 9:00p.m.


in THE CROWN BALLROOM

Paradise Island Hotel


proceeds in aid of
Stapleton School for the Mentally Retarded
The Centre for the Deaf and Dumb
Crippled Children's Committee


Tickets $10, now on sale at
Eastern Airlines Ticket Office
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel
Telephone 2-1570/71


Original designs by
prominent U.S. Fashion
Designers. Models by
Trend Bahamas Limited.


LaT CHance











L T VICC K


rRI




















N,011ONO I INI O! 1 ', .l. ON" ,Nl F QIOl AND +O1,i f F A UTFULO LTC)


KING & MARKET STREETS
P. 0 BOX 4631 NASSAU BAHAMAS
TELEPHONE 21631-2-3


CUSHIONS..... FURNITURE .....
......TOYS ........


BATHROOM ACCESSORIES.......
..........PAINTINGS..........


AND MANY MORE ITEMS.


cOME


SEE Us


OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY.


CLASSIFIED SECT

REAL ESTATE _FOR RENT CARS FOR SALE FOR SALE
C10306 C 104031( ,, ,


ONE OM ME RACIAL
CORNER L01 in Highland
Park. 16,b00 nights 34527 days, 29293.
C10344
FORH SALE
IlY OWN[ R,
House ill highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living
dining, kiti hmr, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
a nd di ape, i, t.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape.
Airconditioned th roughout.
Unusual opportunLIty. To view
telephone 2- 1722-3
C10362
I OR SAt.L
BY OVWNE R
House in lighlatrd Park, 3
bedoo ms, ? hbath, living,
dining, kitlhuii, utility room
anld car)po)'r uIit- iN range and
baker on lot 90 150. Nice
horme inm ni area. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.

C10365
CHOICE 0L COMMERCIAL
SITE, Madena Stir t. Suitable
foi bank., office, showioorn
et(. 2 sotey building in reari.
large spa iOLIs building itn tont.
$95.700. Call 5 1023.
C1035/1
I OP SALI
{bY OWNIE R
House in lgllacnd Parik
executive tyie' home. 4
bedrooms, 2 b.iths. living,
diu inn faiii ly. kitclin- rldo hle
car gaage and ttin lit'. ,uon 0on
2 lots of I and, .-.%il to wall
carpet and dapes, (ompletely
furnished. lige i)r'tio 'i1d pool.
18 x 3G. Bei ltifullv
landscaped, hbening ulrit tree-
cenrtrial ... i. igj To
view telephone 2 1722-3.

FOR SALE OR RENT
C10372
FOR SALE OR LONG TERM
LEASE
Fine, 'uial)- .-i i Inslie l
house I Sl -Ik', t,,)ht,. f-ooui
bedrotiii .,id hI'thI',. M 1n!
r o rn s d ' i (j lied f oo
enter a. l nit '-'lita ble foi
diplomatic' or executive
resid,-tice. IS ,, ai(r(s. beautiful
garden planted for privacy.
Phon-- 7-7205 or 2-8162 for
)ppoointment to rf ee.

FOR RENT
C10332
AR CONDITIONED 0.
beod om furnished apartmetit
i Dundas Court, Pyfiom's
Addition. with laundry mioo
fl lifie't arid rnastler 'f V
iirter'r), Also large p m kirq
JerIa. I o irformrnatio r i ( i
5 3928 or b 4:158.

C10288
I I TTLE O 0 R C AR
COTTAGES and apai tinent,
rent daily, weekly u,
monthly. Air conditioned
fiilly furnished maid s'r n -
available. Lovely gardens rii
swimrrming pool. Village. Ru.id
Call 31297 or 31093.

1 10345
One efficicer y apartm dri L .i ,
one 2 rbedioo rr aiparttne:t
Ring 5 8679') Mi. Prtihard


C10379
3-BEDROOM, 2 Bnt1,.
Unfurnished House, I hhla'
Park. Phone 7- 7434 t )a,r,
5-4947 Night after o p..-

C10380
FURNIStlEf) thie bedroomr
two bath lotse in Sebree -
Estates, a irco nd lito e!s
telephone, garage, laurdrlI y
rooIn, automatic washei and
dryer. $400.000 Phone 5-85 1 2.

C10397
LARGE 4 becdioom. 3
bathroom house with study
family room and bhrakfast
room. 2 car enclosed g aqge
Qu i et ne i g h bo lihiiod.
Retirement Road off Shiilov
Street. $500 per month Phtef
43742.
C10391
2 BEDROOM (air
2 BEDROOM (air c-orditionied)
house pleasant Monitagiu area.
Fully furnished, walled itdeii.
patio, carport, laiundrv sltoue
room. $325. Plionri MoI,
3-1219, 3-1295.

C10415
FURNISHED Apar time'- on
the ocean, arconditioiru tulil,
equipped. Available onr
monthly basis suitable COLuIle.
Phone Mrs. McGit .7-83,11
after 11 a.m.
C10343
2 BEDROOM APARTMEN-T
Montrose Avenue. Ba,>
furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.


_______________________________________________________________________ i


C10341


Furnished Room)r i ,
Home or.n P'- 'rpo1
Kit(i rnlet 1 : I' ll,.
3 4068,

C1 0349
O F f I i i1' ; l I(, '
Charl tte t i o :
M(3C In f ,I .. 11]1, I.
in q u ire 2il- r

S1035i,
1111 f I H'i ', I )'V
Spa( c'''1. .
apat trt ier !,- .

poo! oi -i *i !

days.

apL/ t r" ; 1 1
$25U 1 ( i(
CtL STA O R i.'A
/1.1 t .1 ,



45Ua p 1. *'t *.. I

(I IF '1 ia .-
S19 /I -P I




C2-I 22 3.


CARSFOR SO
( ] Ii "
1 S I r f r' i
SCOMPftv 1 QJ1
1971 V IV *

i ( . -
1971 VAim' i'l 1. rI

4' 1 : !
1968 P3 j ,A' S R

1970 ? i- A Ii
4 I >, L ' .


1968 J1INIF ''i' 1
1973 'VA i'i' -'" i :

1 967 ( Ii l.',i!H i 3q(

1969 VA 1 'IV i !






7 v 5 i v I
1971' '.IE I .1 3 ?./


+ fi : :



li
i
























+ I


1
'' i


/ ( I


1 A7 i lp!Vi '

19 0 Fo i ; .l'ip' I r'In L
1968 HILL IAN -
1971 FORD CAPP

1968 V.AUXHA"i I -
VICTOR) SF


APP' Nit ,

S-- Sr- !

9 7 PO iint i'
i 0.va Ir ... .- -.


tC 1 3 10

fcu'c(itr g I ' .'

10411




1972 CHEVF8 u ; ; .-

1972 FORD C V .

1972 FORD F ;':
-itn r !utu

1971 FORD L I I

Ott ");' t W
1971 VAIlIXIA/'. '
STATIONl '/A' ,I

1970 FORD C :

1970 ILLMA :/l
4 d'o,- i..uut.i 'i-r

1970 CHFV RO -
tn dui ,',, l'. i 1 '
1970 RAMBLE '

1970 VAUXHAi i r
STATION VWAC- (N,

1970TOYOTA r'l I
1969 TORINO

1969FORD CL(: ui i/',
4- door .
1969 FORD l!'1'. ; 1
2 doo (- I
1969 MORRO'. ;,;N.;
stand l (h i -in
1969 VOLKSr. FN
FASTBACK
1969 LINCOLN
CONTINENTAl
an ( Onditiu i''l
autom atic ti r' ',




OPF N M!ONf)/Y Ii I ,/5
8.00 a.TRD t ..u'r. n.in.
SATURDAY U.O .1.. ', '


r'/ C 5S. 124 Stationwagon,
w" 000 miles. Phone 3-2149


HAVE TO SELL!!
.10 6) MK2 red with neat
-w, t woIk Condition like
Going at $1,800.00 or
S..r-.t offer Contact Peter
S'., t 5 7430/1, ext. 170 or
: / Owner leaving Island.

'..i P iS MINOR 1970.
Ii t condition $950.
l'.rphonre 52471.

1.\032?


Sewing machine
Message Vibiator
Vacuum
Bicycle
Bookshelf
Side tables
Car (battery)
Toys and Games
Telephone 77885.


__________________________ _____________ I!


CIU413
ELEGANT BLACK
LACQUER dining table chairs
and buffet $550 plus one
large "traditional" style bureau
and mirror $130. One small
"t,-aditional" style bureau $75.
Twc matching bedside tables
$50. Two single beds and
headboards $135. Phone
77508.


C10414
YAMAHA 200cc purple -
1971 model.
Perfect condition. $450. Phone
24130 (day) 57726 (night) -
Monday thru Friday.

LOST
C10406
REWARD will be given to
finder of black leather wallet
lost in or in vicinity of
Maternity Ward, P. M.
Hospital, with important
documents.
Please return to Sister's Desk,
Maternity Ward or contact Dr.
Siquig telephone 51641. Thank
you.

I CARD OF THANKS
C10392


S-
THE FAMILY of the late Mary
Louise Morley wish to thank
their many friends for cards
and tokens of sympathy during
their recent bereavement.
Special thanks to Dr. & Mrs.
Meyer Rassin and nurses of
Rassin Clinic, Canon William
Thompson and Bethel Brothers
Morticians.
James E. Morley

APPRECIATION
C10405


at -
CentraloGarage

TODAY'S
SPECIAL J3UY
1968 CADILLAC
FLFFTWOOD
LIMOUSINE -
Se850.00
1i72 VAUXHALL VICTOR
I r conditionn $2400.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER
; shil, bilu $1150.00
i'l/0 SINGER VOGUE SEDAN
d ...). $950.00
164 LINCOLN
f r'JNT!AEINFTAL
-.i{- 'ln U intelnor $400.00
19/2 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
i hift $2250.00
lr(,N MERCURY COUGAR
S, 'rrrrr, fAnai $1000.00
1969 FORD GALAXIE
S '!.. iltl-io(-d $1000.00
i i70 F I AT 124
:;i! .I't $700.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER
'- .r .,' m rrtomatic $1500.00
/: Oc()OGE AVENGER G.L.
-' ,' ,,$2350.00
11(70 'L YrMOUTtH
FArP vRACUDA
* i '.i n'! t $2500.00
i69 FiEORD FALCON
,l ....' 1,"$1200.00
")96( DfATSUN S/W
i fIlt, tod $800.00
'7), FORD ESCORT
-1' ,'. : ,-,- $759.00
1971 PLYMOUTH CUSTOM
LEUFURBAN white$3500.00
1967 FORD CORTINA
aliie, automatic $200.00
i 970 HILLMAN MINX S/W
white, automatic $1200.00
1969 ROVER 2000
-.. :; artoumatic $1500
199 CIE VELLE MALIBU
. .... i .iti,,,i $1800
i ':4lNCIN-G AVAILABLE
( le ir and see us
(a< es Field near
'ioflice pI'arracks
Phone 3-4711


S' .' AUS II' 'lJi l.iMAPE.
'!, i ,1 ti a! 7.7885.


FOR SALE

S 12 rubber boat with
f ud io $300.00
)14; Austin Morris Mini --
$1000 n0
1 il7f Iacy Davidson 150 cc.
0, 00 i nr. 8
S --. 7.7B85

S" -PL hedioom suite,
s 1uite, end tables,
L ' i T var ioLus other
.... qriods. Call 5-8210.


r0'i (R SCOOTER
i.i ,' Like new. Ideal for
'iD i ii 'nd town. $225
,k. il lN ) !cr)ie 3-1423.

S ING SALE:
i -... ,' n- I arlly American:
.' n cs colour TV,
i 'er -o Sewing Machine, etc:
S. Go three blocks east
1 '. ci Road on Prince
!mii Turn l eight on
"r i ., ,ilk Lane.

SIf [ 1 P1 MARIS MARINA at
ong Isliand, has for sale the
'filoviriti One GMC 671
ila' ilil d iesel engine,
MLd l:,0 72A, 32 volt
fri i ,ir'i, -i aloi with GMC
fiyd. r iili' geali box. Ratio:
3.00/t in excellent
ondi ni., 1 bKW KOEHLER
"- nne 'qenei ator, powered by
WV ikshra diesel, Model: 180
I).C in excellent condition;
/.' KW ONAN marine
foure.ito, iresh water cooled,
orhdel. M().I almost new,
ie, leut condition; 2 GMC
diesel iuarine engines, V8, 4
,yiIe type "Toroflow", fresh
water cooled, complete with
ir hu x, heat exchanger,
tiarust manifolds, turbo
Sfi gin s anid mounts, in
10iellent condition. Call or
Wiu re StI-lha Maris Inn, Long


1 967 Chrysler


THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE
World-famous postal
tuition for the GCE,
School Cert. and
Accountancy, Banking,
Law, Marketing, Company.
Secretaryship Examinat-
ions. For details of our
specialised courses write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Results College Dept. TIN
Tuition House Londqn
London SE19 40S.


9


FOR SALE
FORMER NAVY MINI' S\l II'l I ,- li i


145'x28' Wood Hull. Ide.l for conversion S o r .. o !i t. 1
Fishing Vessel, Shrimp Boat ot Yacht.
COVE CONTRACTORS. INC
P.O. Box 4068
Panama City, Florida 32401


M R. & MRS. CECIL
MAURICE JONES who were
married on 3rd June 1973 wish
to thank the many friends and
relatives for the very lovely
gifts and messages of
congratulations extended to us
during our joLQur occasion


MARINE SUPPLIES

C10305
19 FOOT THUNDERBIRD*
with 2 Evinrude 55, and
ship-to-shore radio. Phone
nights 34527 days 28293
C10350
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


SCHOOLS -

TUITION
C10326
English, Spanish
Phone 5-2439.

C10369
KINGSWAY ACADEMY is
now testing for a limited
number of vacancies in Grade
One. If interested, please
contact the school at 42158.s


CUSTOM DESIGN
to your specifications at
ECONOMY PRICES

-CAVALIER
S CONSTRUCTION
L Phone: 3-5171, 3-6011
D. A. HUDSON
% VAICO-PRimI

Distributed world wide by
1;PAN INTERNAL TIONAL -
NASSAU, BAHMAMAS

C10353


I













10 (the ribuntt












Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freer


EImm


I I


C10312
SPECIAL NOTICE
A $40.00 free bonus
pre-Independence gift is yours
:f you make a deposit now at
Bill's Real Estate. Good buys
include : -
SOUTH BEACH EST.
SEVEN HILLS ESTATE
'ONSHINE PARK
GOLDEN GATES
BEL-AIR
TROPICAL GARDENS
SANDS ADDITION
MARATHON ESTATE
SEABREEZE ESTATE
GLENISTON GARDENS
YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATE
WINTON MEADOWS
COLONY VILLAGE EAST
And many others.
Easy terms and good cash
,I,,-._ are available. Call
23921.

POSITION WANTED.
159
JUNG GIRL seeks job as
salesgirl in your shop. Very
willing to work. Please write
Adv. C10159. c/o The Tribune,
P. 0. Box N-3207, Nassau.


HELP WANTED
C6036
JOB TITLE: CHIEF CHEMIST
AND INSPECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good bas,, education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At
least 5 years cement plant
chenist'rv experience.
DUTIESr RESPONSIBILITIES.
Co ordinate and supervise the
quaNity co' roln procedures.
rja' jinJ ir rr selection and
-ilending of aaw materials
rough the mianufactum ing
o ocesses to the final
sectionn and testing of
cement prior to release for
.'-ipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
iDepartment, Bahama Cement
Company P. 0. Bc F-100.
F-reF-port, Grand Bahama.

C6034
JOB TITLE: PAINTER
SUPERVISOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Hig h School graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Professional high pressure
boiler insulating, steeple
jacking, sand blasting and
structural steel treating and
painting, etc.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Dt-nartment, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100.
Freepoit, Grand Bahama

C10329
A C. 0 U N T A N T W 'l":
ipproximat-'iv ten -
accountir'g '. xerience -,
position .i ih milti :-nat, n.
company with ':, quait's. .
Nassau ., t e, a
responsibilities will inc-jde
Val iatio0i of securities.
.. countinci fcr fow 1d
cxchani e contract.; uO iamnisscry
"rojtes and cor"mercial paper
and assi tin with
consolidatior- of financial
t a L m ents. W itten
apoli, nations should he i-ent to:
The Personnel Departmer'rel,

rr-ton, P. 0 Box N322'j.



0.;1 TITLE GENERAL.
FOREMAN-MECHANICAL
. r I i .' 1 k -
MINIMUM EDUCATION
Good basic education
MIN IMUM EXPERIENCE:
0-10 years cement plant
-n.cth.inrcal background
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise
mar i ntenance activities,
including field forces, machine
sh--p and garage in providing
maintenance, installation and
inspection services for the
entire plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10378
RELIABLE MAID to care for
infant and two school children
Call 56118.

C 10384
APPLICATIONS are invited
for the position of Assistant to
Manager (International and


Branch Banking).
The successful candidate will
be based in the Bank's
International Headquarters in
Nassau.

Candidates should have had
previous Banking experience'
combined with practical
experience in international
banking and credit appraisal,
fluency in Spanish necessary in
view of the need to
communicate with the Bank's
Spanish speaking clients.
Write giving a synopsis of
qualifications to the Personnel
Manager, Bolam, P. 0. Box
N1262, Nassau.


P LEH WANTED


I I


C10381
THE BANK OF NOVA
SCOTIA requires a Consumer
Credit Officer for its Bay and
Deveaux Street Branch,
Nassau. Applicant should have
at least 8 years lending or
related experience. Must be
male and at least 30 years of
age. Only Bahamians need
apply.
Please apply in person to Mrs.
H. Barrett. Bank of Nova
Scotia, Rawson Square.

C 10308
WANTED: young man with
Bachelor of Science Degree in
Agriculture or Animal Science
to Manage out island cattle
ranch. Applicant must be an
experienced cattleman
knowledgeable in artificial
breeding, calving techniques
and practical Veterinary
medicine. Salary according to
experience. Furnished
accommodation provided.
Apply to U.S.Y. & T.
INDUSTRIES INC., Box 41,
Rock Sound. Eleuthera.
C10318
GARDENER HANDYMAN
willing to sleep in when family
travels, otherwise to work once
or twice a week. $8 00 per day.
Write or call Pelaez, leox
N4686. Phones 31286 or
31998
C 10408
EXPANDING BAHAMIAN
INSURANCE BROKERS
require ambititots iouing man
as Trainrc. "' .i, General
mcirsiiai (n( u\pcneni)t ic useful but
nut essential. The applicant
should h- pirpared to study
for London Charte ed
I nsuLr a1'e stitute diploma
amid should have already
obtained 0' Level G.C.E. in at
least four subjects.
Applicants should apply in
own handwriting stating age,
experience and educational
I *'. to Adv. C10408
-,o The Tribune, P. 0. Box
N 3207, Nassau. Bahamas.
C 10366
JOB TITLE: SHOP
FOREMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
G.C.E. "O" Level or City and
Guilds or equivalent.

".,'ir. ,ri EXPERIENCE: 10
years in Machine shop.

DUTIES,/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise machine ,shop and
field maintenance of the entire
cement plant.

r 1EPEC:.TED) APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
De-partment, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport. GOand Bahama.
(C104'2
L* FORD CAY CLUB

L YORD CAY CLUB requires
a Water Sports Director.
Aop'h ant must be able to
teach vinatr skiing, sailing and
hnve 10 years experience as a
professional Scuba Diver. Basic
Mechanical knowledge of
petrol inboard and outboard,
anid diesel engines also
necessary. Write for interview
g-ving full details of past.
experience to General Manager,
P 0. Box N7776. Nassau.
C 10367
JO3 TITLE: (EIGHT)
GENERAL. REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Good
Cement Plant mechanical
background

MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.

DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjLsts and maintain
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.

INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100.
Freeport, Grand Raham,
CL10359
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN';
Have you always wanted to
work closely with them? Do
you wish to help children
deprived of their normal homes
to become useful citizens of
our new Bahamas? Then
consider the childcare field.
The Ranfurly Home for


Children is seeking the
following staff:
a) Women, 25/35 to live in
and care for children 2 to
6 years old. Nursery or
childcare experience
helpful.
b) Mature woman, 35/50,
with childcare background
and administrative
potential, to live in.
c) Couple with childcare or
social service background
and/or willing to have in
Service Training on a
contractual basis Must be
willing to live in.
Only Bahamians will be
considered. Apply in writing
for an interview to Mr. & Mrs.
Leslie Davies, Ranfurly Home
for Children, Box N1413,
Nassau.


P LEH WANTED


C6058
COBBLERS required.
Minimum of four years
experience in all leather craft
and shoe repair. Trainees
accepted
Apply to: The Boot Shop,
Churchill Square or P.O. Box
F-141.
C6035
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10331
YOUNG LADY wanted for
general office work. Typing
essential with a view to joining
sales staff in an expanding
wholesale agency. Must have
pleasant personality. Write for
interview to: Manager P.O. Box
N8717, Nassau,

TRADE SERVICES

C10352
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters for
horne-, ap t.-jm1rents and hotels.
Sdiies and services. Call Douglas
Lowe, 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
F iank's Pla(e.








|GRAND B


FOR SALE

C6009
STEEL HULL Boat 65' x 18',
twin GM 471, 3' draught
$25,000 Cash. See Eddie
McBride, Fishing Hole, Phone
352-6827.


HELP WANTED

C10367
JOB TITLE: (EIGHT)
GENERAL REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education Good
Cement Plant mechanical
background.

MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.

DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintain
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.

INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0 Box F-100.
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6060
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
Electrical Engineer required.
Duties will include the design
and installation of electrical 2
phase 3 phase systems.
Supervising the installation of
all radio communication
equipment. Overseeing of
electric l -mechanical
equipment (generators, pumps
and other motors). Five or
more years experience.
Bahamians only need apply.
Contact: Princess Properties
International (Bahamia
Nursery Division), P. 0. Box
F-778, Freeport, Grand
Bahama or telephone 352-8301
for interview.

C6066
TRAINING OFFICER
Responsible for the overall
effectiveness and operation in
all phases of academic and
proficient training and
supervision in both
crash/rescue and structural
firefighting procedures. Must
have successfully completed
school for training officer and
have a minimum of ten years
experience in crash/rescue and
hold certificates for the
purpose of training.
METEOROLOGIST
Must be college graduate with
BS in meteorology or
certificates of completion from
specialized meteorological
training schools and have at
least fifteen (15) years
experience in a recognized
aviation meteorological
operation.
Please apply to: The Grand
Bahama Development
Company, Personnel
Department, 18C Kipling
Building, P. 0. Box F-2666,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


TRADE SERVICES


C10351 C6044
Am e OKITC-
Pinder's Ciestomn i
cleanir
Brokerage Ltd. CLEA
Mackey street do gen
& Rosevelt Avenue pars i
NASSAU, BAHAMAS requdir
P O. Box N3714 stand
COOK
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING some
FORK LIFT RENTAL and be
MECHANICAL HANDLING the ott
EQUIPMENT Interest
IATA CARGO AGENTS Grand
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE Country
& DELIVERY Grand
MOVING, STORAGE Office,
& PACKING 9:00 a
STEEL BANDING through
Jr., Per
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS C6065
EXCELLENT SERVICE TOUR
REASONABLE RATES position
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER require
OR JACK CASH time a,
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796, have ex
2-3797, 2-3798 guests
Airport 77434 and En
help
C 10363 guests
neat i
PATIO AWNINGS AND i;nly.
CARPORTS
HURRICANE riIGI IT
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS, to the
PANELS have k
Ltd., work,
John S. George & Co. Ltd., statemi
For free estimates and prompt s.choo
sei vice call 28421. expecie
C 10409 SECRET
ISLANDT.V. SERVICE .1 a b
I or service you can rely on i
Dowdeswell Street minute
T.V. Antennas Boosters ati of
Sales and Services mut
Phone 22618 P. 0. Box N327, expert"
Nassau Monday Saturday
8:30 to 5:30. Inteles
CGRAN
WEST


AHAMA AHA
9:006
Monday



BOOK
I Succes
respond,
and Tr
to dat
Gene
HELP WANTED aCCOUn
6c corresp
Ct6055 profici
ASSISTANT LAUNDRY NCR
MANAGER machir
Assistant Laundry Manager respond'
required to assist Director of advance
large laundry operation in credit (
directing flow of work and Relativ
supervising laundry personnel. current
Applicant must be a high woik k
school graduate and have Only B
previous experience in similar Miss
management capacity of Pers-(
laundry operation o 01 Intern.
experience in a related field.
Contact Princess Properties, C10361
International, Management JOB
Services Division, P 0. Bo- FOREF
F-684, Fireport, Grancd M[INII
Bahama. G.C.[
C6034 Guilds
JOB TITLE: PAINTER R I
SUPERVISOR MINIM
MINIMUM EDUCATION. years 1
High School graduate or DUT
equivalent SuTerv
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: SfupirV
5-10 years field no
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES: cem
Professional high pressure
boiler insulating, steeple INT ER
jacking, sand blasting aid CON1
structural steel treating and Departi
painting, etc. Compa
INTERESTED APPLICANT Freepo
CONTACT: Personnel C6035
Department, Bahama Cement JOB TIC
Company, P. 0. Box F-100, MINI
Freeport, Grand Baha"ma. Good b
C6037 MINIIM
JOB TITLE: GENERAL 5-10 ye
FOREMAN-MECHANICAL DUTIE
MAINTENANCE Must
MINIMUM EDUCATION: capab
Good basic education horizc
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: overhe
5-10 years cement plant cutting
mechanical background gas
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES- equiprr
Co-ordinate and supervise INTER
ma intenance activities, CONi
including field forces, machine Depart
shop and garage in providing Compa
maintenance, installation and Freepo
inspection services for the----
entire plant. C6059i
INTERESTED APPLICANT H
CONTACT: Pe rsonnel Horticu
Department, Bahama Cement oversee
Company, P. 0. Box F-100, mainten
Freeport, Grand Bahama. operati


C6036 knowle
JOB TITLE: CHIEF CHEMIST ,,uwrbc
AND INSPECTOR hr dc
MINIMUM EDUCATION: (7) da
Good basic education. Holiday
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At expense
least 5 years cement plant Contac
chemistry experience. Contec
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES: Liter,
Co-ordinate and supervise the FNurser-778
quality control procedures Baham.
ranging from selection and Baham
blending of raw materials for int(
through the manufacturing C6062
processes to the final
inspection and testing of 6 GAI
cement prior to release for APPL'
chipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT SANIl
CONTACT: Personnel KEATt
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


HELP WANTED I


-iEN PORTERS: Musti
previous experience of
ig large kitchen aiea.
NERS: Must be abc- to
eral cleaning of pots arid
n Kitchen area. This job
5 long periods of
ng.
/HELPER: Must have
knowledge of cooking
able to work along with
ier cooks. Male only.
ted persons apply: The
Bahama Hotel &
ry Club, West End,
Bahama, Pers onrell
between the hours of
.m. and 3: p.m., Monday
h Friday Elon Martini,
sonnel Director.


ESCORT (2) Thi'
n of Tour Escort
s extensive period' of
way from home Must
:perience in dealing with
and also speak Fieric -
glish fluently Be ahbl to
prepare aciivitris for
while at hotel. Must be
n appear anc. Female


AUDITOR: AJ,cistant
Night Audlio:. Mr'.t
knowledge of ghiqhl 1inuit
be able to pic'lpa) e
cents. Male, with hnigh
) e (I L C !t:, ) 1 )11
rnce oeed Ionly inppI .
ETARY TO AU l)Irfl')
e able to it.ike -:hi t;i.inlI
ate of 100 vo 1ts i ,-
gyping rieq tired .it a
f 65 woids per rI m l '
have I n t o .,,'
-nce.

ted Per ,n' /\ppi ,"
D BAHAMA iHOFT L.
END, C.1 \rND
\MA, PE RhSONiIF L
E, between tihe ir -- 1 s
a.m and I 3:00 ().; I
y through I ida I I l(I n
, Jr., Personnel i r- ori


.KEEPER n-qmluted.
iful applicant wVill tI).
sible for keeping i City
ravel Agents Led-iger 1i)
e arid in balance withl
al L dectgei control
ts. Must handle m)wn
onrldencr and mul-,! lie
Ge t in the opoe ati.in, of
3300 1accounItl m
1e Will also hp
sible for im handling Ith'
ed deposit arcf.owitts ai(l
(ard hill i (Is.
e to thel fol cgoir;nq,
t Polir Coi ficate and
eifeien t:', I equIi i ed
ahamia.nnr 'med apply to-
M Ill Ad(ini Irv.
m ln +' in.1 a i Q n ', ,
tit- i 1.l 1. t


T I 1 1 s C I'
MAN
M. U !) IUCATIOUl
"0 l. ^,l ,1 ( I -', .1 |
or equivalent. n

UM EXPi RIENCF: Ii
1 Machnt, ,i' hop.

S/.RESPFONSIBI It -S:
isle m shiop al
ainteriai( of thc C tin tn -
plant.

ESTIf APPLICAN
TAC T P rson no I
nment, Bahama Ceniint
ny, P 0 Box F 100
it, Graindt Baharm.i

TLE: WELDER
M1UM EDUCATION
asic education
1UM :XPE RIENCL:
-ars
S/RESPONSIBILI TIeLS.
be a cter tified weldr i-
le of performnigj
intal, vertical and
ad weldingr bhazinc; and
of amiy material usi ..j
nd lec ti welding
ment.
ESTED APPLICANT
T AC T: Perisonnel
ment, Bahamrna Cement
ny, P. O Box F-100.
rt, Grani Bahamna.

ONTICUJLTURIST
ilturist requirned to
e the landscape
nance of malor hotel
on. Must have extensive
dge if verticutting,
., Insecticides and
des. Must work seven
ys per week, including


ys. Five years or more
-nce. Bahamians only
)ply.
t Princess Properties
iat iona (Baham i a
y Division), P. 0. Box
, Freeport, Grand
a or telephone 352-8301
erview


RBAGE
Y IN
NATION
S ST., P
PORT.


COLLECTORS
PERSON:
SERVICES'
. O. Box F771


I I I f---- . t... . . I I .. .. .. .. .


SE WAY LITTLE KID SOSHECAN PRACTICE AN'A OAT/h
BE : JN4MG ArlOLJWO 1W A
P M UT

S.. / Brother Juniper
ti.' .













/ K

CLASSIFIED' ADVS. -

BRING RESULTS-FAST

TO PLACE YOUR ADV.


TELEPHONE


2-1986 in Nassau,

in Freeport .


352 6608 "On a clear day you can watch the prices rise."


i ... i


m


Monday, July 2, 1973.








Sget the job done




port from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


HELP WANTED
C6064 -'
A DM iN !STRATIVE Assis-
tant to the Treasurer of /
Intelr L tinental Realty Ltd... A
Should he able to handle
administrative duties in
connection with detailed
accounting procedures,
fina"i, ial and statistical reports
anid tabtrilations. This position
also r requires excellent
s eretarial skills with great
1 cura cy iin mathematics as 4
well as a substan ial knowledge
of the real estate business.
Telephone 373 3020 or write
P. O Ix F 260, Freeport.


LAUNDRY WORKER (1):
WilIng to do general laundry
wor k. Must know how to
operIte Pressing Machine.
rimal, I yeai e-xperience A

G NI R.PAL LABOURERS (5):
IVOl be ahle to do general
leaniz;q fnor large hotel aid -
rIth, Ihbouri i eg classed work.

ADI. F AIe LOR (1): Will be "You're my designated pinch-hitter. Go pinch hit for
ri qIIfd to beh atle t alter a lly
style of clothes. Must be able Pacificus in the pea patch."
to ris,! sewing machine.
Expert tenc e ieeoded.
D R Y CLEAN ELR iPPR ESS
OPI R/\ TOP: Must be able to Brother Juniper
lanrdl i lai te Ipc' of rnachine.
%vli th eriprience only.
,D IOSPL A Y & SALES
ASSISTANT MANAGER:
lobh school education C)URIN&
WlquIred. Five years experience ON
r- mquiriid, nimst be able to
-r'k in ,.w have pleasant
appe,acr e iand be able to
wor k wi t he general public

nt-ire e persons apply: The .i
(o dI B01hama 3 Hotel &
Io:, I\ CluIb, W\ st End,
Grand Bahama, Personnel
0ff-oe between the hours of
)On a.in and 3 00 p.m.
Mondla- through Friday. Elon -.)
OaIn Jr Peosolrnel Director.















f -. --., 1, ."Who says we can't adjust to change? Change is all
-" : / / we ever get!"

.....,___- ...._..._..._ ,. -;---------.-----------

i aSO A "ONJ -T GO ..
SiESEC-AZY '-/
PSSliONS I .


T. .










LKE N CE'

COSERVATAL E
,













Monday, July 2, 1973.


Qhe r'.1ut


"it's impossible to punch your timecard in late without
the boss knowing about it."

~ I ~T~- ---cEZZ


'THIS USED TO BE A NICE, ... INMY KITCHEN, EATINGG
FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD. RIGHT OUT OFMYREFRIGEATOR '


'Like you always tell the congregation, Chief, be thankful


for small

CROSSWORD

PUZZLE

ACROSS 28 Japanese song
1. Varnish 30. Wither
ingredient 31. Hawk parrot
4. Trading 32. Past
exchange 33. Bastile
7. Preoccupied 34. Elicit
11. Yellow bugle 36. Normal
12. In what way? 38. Outlay
13. Silkworm 40. Reason SO
14. Cocktail 44. Particle
16. Associate 46. Profit
17. The beginning 48. Libertine
18. Temporary 49. Gold in Spain
star 50. Fodiy winks
20. German city 51. Formerly
22. Mercenary 52. Gob
25. Puppeteer 53. Informer


favors."
S ASP ABEL
CHIANTI RULE
REMEDY IQED
USES PELE
I NODET A.L.


rmo I I lU


No. 7,163 by TIM McKAY
Across
i. Prove victorious. (3, 3, 3)
7. Contented. (6)
8. Victimised. (2. 3. 4)
11. Beer. (3)
12. Spirit. (3)


OS REATA USO 14Chil doo:
SET STILL .r 16 Prosperity.
EARTUTT
SES5ISM V OLA
MOA POETIC
ANTE TELSTAR Chess


AISSE A-M E E MI^H-I
LUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN


1. Bean
2. Grandparents
3. Cavil
4. Small bottle


5 Charged
particle
6. Sibling
al 7. Permission
8. City in Florida
9. Yellow ocher
- 10. River in
Scotland
15. Assassin
19. Eggs
21. Police picture
23. Tune
24. Lease
25. Haggard novel
4 26. Succor
27. Noisy
29. Pinnacle
32. Roman bronze
33. Herr's wife
35. One of Santa's
reindeer
3 37. Thespian
- 39. Run
41. Coffee makers
42. Break
43. Discover
44. Land measure
45. Craggy hill
7-4 47. Period of time


(5, 4)
(4)


By LEONARD BARDEN













t9702)
White mates in two moves.
against any defence (by G.
Svatov).
Par times: 30 seconds, problem
grand master two minutes,
problem master; four minutes,
problem expert; 10 minutes,
good; 15 inmates, average; 4U
minutes, novice.

SOLUTION NO. 970T --

Chess Solution
I Kt-B4. I1 1 . RxKt; 2
Q-Q6, or i/ B x Kt; 2 Q-Q4, or
t1 K-Kt3; 2 B-Q4, or if Kx R;
2 B-B8. A trap for solvers is I
R-KB4? Q-KR1! and there is
no mate.


Rupert and the Sea-Saw-20


Yet another shock is In store for the Professor.
He Is still gazing unhappily at his flooded box
when there is a gasp from Rupert. Oh, your
boat!" exclaims the little bear. "It's
sinking I" In great concern the Professor
follows Rupert along the bank and they reach
the landing-stage to find the little rowboat


awash, :ts prow under water. This has
happened since I came back," declares the
old gentleman. After a struggle the friends
succeed in dragging the craft partly ashore,
then to discover a gash in the metal hull.
SI suppose this is more of the Water Mites'
work." says Rupert. ALL RIGHTS RES!EvroD


,e Comi.ac ae


K REX MORGAN, M.D.


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

,'HOROSCOPE
i from the Carroll Righter Institute
S / GENERAL TENDENCIES: A beautiful day
'NI and evening to get out in the world of social
and romantic activity and to be with those who bring you the
greatest amount of joy. You are able to gain the goodwill of
those who have resourceful and ingenious ways and to build
up your vitality so you can work and play harder, better
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You can do the things that you
most enjoy today and can make this a memorable day, p in
Being more complimentary with mate can bring much more
happiness with him or her Do something constructive about
that home problem
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Spend some time improving
your home and making life there with kin more pleasurable.
Put those new ideas to work that can start a fine uptrend in
your life. Take it easy tonight.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Get into the amusing hobbies
that appeal and plan travel matters wisely. Shop, do errands,
keep appointments on time that are important Doing
something kind for those who are deserving is wise.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Sit down with
persons who have fine financial structure and ask them for
ideas and advice to improve your own. Improve your budget
so it is more workable. Get into the activities that add to your
happiness.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You are very charming now and
can make a fine impression on others and gain the special
favors you want from them. Out to the group meetings that
help you add to present roster of friends Think
constructively.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Instead of fussing and fuming
over little things, get out and look into important outlets that
bring real success in the future. Confer with a specialist in your
field. Know how to advance more quickly in that, too.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Contact that good friend w ho
understands you, state your m.irs of a social nature, and
improve your position in that important realm Know what
you most desire in the future. Takfe steps along such lines
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov 21) Any public work you do
now can be very profitable in one way or another Look
around for the gadgets that can assist you in making your
work easier and more profitable. Do nothing foolish.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You want to get into
new interests, which is fine provided you are careful. But think
big for big results. You have a clever new associate who should
be cultivated now. Do something nice for mate.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Tackle those
responsibilities with greater enthusiasm and they are soon
behind you, and you gain benefits. Once your work is done, he
happy with attachment. Avoid one who does not really like
you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) A more cooperative
attitude toward others is wise as well as less demarminv.
especially with partners who are important to you Get into
that civic work that pleases you. Avoid one who argues
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Get busy and make your
surroundings more delightful and use more modern system of
operating in your business. Be sure to talk over plans with an
understanding co-worker. Make the future much brighter
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. he or she will he
one of those delightful young people with so much charm that
everyone will want to spoil this child, so teach your fine
offspring early to stand on own two feet. Then the life
becomes a most productive and intelligent one instead of one
that is hardly inspiring. Be sure also to encourage your child a
good deal, give a pat on the back when deserved
r 1 17 Filter may describe It.. (:)
19. Out of sorts. (3i. (
/ - 21. Nothing. (3)
III I' 2z4. Parasite. (5)
LI i I 23 Pedallers. (8)


PLEASE--TELL WELL, I DROPPED
ME WHAT OAN OFF AT THE
HAPPENE P APARTMENT A LITTLE
GORPY! DID AFTER TWO IN THE
YOU AND M4ORNING---ANDI
JOAN FIND STARTED DOWN THE
BC-BARAA STAIRS Lo T MY CAR /


L '-


By DAL CURTIS


L'JUST AS I WAS ABOUT TO LEAVE
THE BUILDING, I HEARD JO'AN'S
SCREAMS/ SHE HAD WALKED
I NTO THE BEDROOM AND
FOUND BARBARA
S---STRANGLED/


JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS

VAS WOMAN NO... THERE ANY PROAB MEANWHILE, SANE HAS I CAN'T
4 0O PHONED AND IT WAS P WAY I CAN NOT UNTIL B r10 EXPLAIN,
CANCELLED MY A MAN! I REACH MR. MORNING! I DON'T UNDERSTAND SAM...IT'S
S APPOINTMENT? ANSWERED DRIVER ? HE'S GONE WHY MUST YOU LEAVE .A PERSONAL
-C FOR THE TOWN TONIGHTa--MATTER!
DAY!













APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzkyv r

II 9 I 1JUS1T PICKED UP A MOTHER i THE MOTHER'S TOO OLD FOR COME ON IN AND SHOW
FEWTHINGS FOR THE OR ME, MARGO---BUT THE US WHAT YOU BOUGHT
W 1 NEW NEIGHBORIN DAUGHTER? DAUGHTER ISTHE PER- FOR MINPY!

STEVE,- OP FOUR YEARS
OLD!


Down
t. Barsac or .ieihfrantii lcIh.
k5, 4)
'4. Tavern. (3)
3. Of course. (9)
4. Part of the foot. (4)
5. Expensive. (4)
6. Still. (3)
7. Word of the future. (5)
9 <( I r I's n a in e. (5)
10. Scottish language (6)
13. Engages. (6)
15. a r d s
a n d ARC l T CT
SI Ree late.. 5 U K
(4)
18. tAdtidition T T2
A. (.4) A( T E M 005
20. T h e1 2 "
sort of
word aI I A
m I g h t
use. (3) Yesterday's solution


How many
words of
SE N I r letter,
EE or more 'aII
*** ilou In ia k
1i rom the
lItters shown
E h e r e II
III a k I n g I
R ord. eat c i
A R K 'etterIn i1t
be used o11','
o n -iy. El 'iE
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least two eight-letter words In the
list. No plurals; no foreign words:
no proper iiines. TOI)AY's
FARGET : 31 words, good ;
36 words. very good ; 41 words,
excellent Solution tomorrow.
Yesterday's solution Leer Utre
ioir loiter LOITERER lore oiler
oriel reel retire riot rioter rite
role rote tier tiler tire tiro toiler
tore tree trier trio triole trior.

Bridge
*y VICTOR MOLLO
Which side shall we back on
this hand featured in Bridge
d'ltalia ?
Dealer South: E/W VuL
North
SK 42
0 A 6 5 2
West East
A Q 10 7 5 3
0 2 6
SK QJ7 0 10 943
SK 2 A Q 10 9854
South
SJ 9 6
( A K Q 108 4
SJ 6 3
South West North East
30 3# 40 56
Pass Pass 5 Pass
Pass Dble
West opens the OK and South
sees three losers-two spades and
a club. Can one of them be made
to disappear ?
When this deal came up,
declarer went in with the CuA.
ruffed a diamond, and alter
cashing the VA, lost a club to
West. Ruffing the diamond
return South ruffed a club on
the table and dummy's last dia-
mond in his hand.
Next he played the c 6. Had
West gone up with the 4A he
would have had to lead another
spade, so he played low.
Is South now going to lose two
spade tricks ?
No? Quite right. After taking
the trick with the 4K, South
crossed to eb hand with a trump
and led a club. When West
showed out, he threw a spade
from dummy. With only clubs
left East had to concede a ruff
and discard. Ruffing in hand,
South discarded dummy's last
spade. A spade ruff in dummy
now yielded the 11th trick.


'OLu SEE, MRS.
CANTRELL, MOST
OF Uj'- ASUME
PUS C RELATIONS
EP P: 'ET THEIR
NT': NAMES
iN Th! .MEDIA.
,i i u THAT'S
S*CT AL AYS





. . .


SOMETIMES WE PERFORM BUT IF MY HUSBAND
A FAR MORE VALUABLE IS FPCKEP FOR
SERVICE BY KEEPING OUR. THE SUPREME COURT
CLIENTS'NAMES OUT OF .1 PON'T SEE HOW
THE NEWS! ONE COULP CONCEAl
"-*,1 ,Tl THAT INFORMATION!


WELL, WOULD YOU
U KE T PA ME
BACK .. ..' -.


Par time 20 min. AP Newsfeatures


I


fi


S ,1 LI(E I SAID, THE
f.. .^-' ~POLICE SUGGESTED
AFTER rFt R II tIN C THAT I NOT TALK TO
'C. j" l.&NiE- ANYONE, BRICE- BUT
CALL Pk i-. f DONT THINK THAT'S
*APAM FAT O TO OU /




if


Monday, July 2, 1973.


_____he___________ gribunt


INDEPENDENCE BASKETBALL TOURNEY



Becks Cougars trounce



Colonels in semi-finals

iys GLADSTONE THURSTON
Peter Gilcud trounced Bahamas Amateur Basketball Association's
Champions Kentucky Colonels 86-40 last night during the semi
finals of the B.A.B.A. Independence Basketball Tournament.


The All Star Collegian
have proved a domiatlin
since the tournament be
Naturda,. take iln the (
in the championship
toniorrow i 30 p n .iat
1. (;ibson (ivm
I m iori row's acititon
w illt :t halt mI ii has
,tame i t.' Io he followed
halt girls haskethall gaim
I o\ Htill Saints Junior w
plans (Calers ('ollCeI ans
the hie championship
The awards presentall
the past 1 ,.I r ill s rine
place itollo,,ing the gaimei
Ihe Collegians behir
sharp shhooting ot (Carl
and the rebounding o
Ta',lor and I lilsha M\cS\
powered them to a
victory soer the Classi
and a I101-'s2 thrashing
Grand Bahama All-Stars.
scored 31 and 30 respe
in each game Iai lor wl
IF rebounds in the firs
and 1 S in the second
another 30 points
secon d game
Binini ,wai s ij, ninMIaleTi
hy the (irand hamrna .*\
on Satrirda\ In their
iamei with the !'i"s wli
also, elnllti natd in tih
'round the y lell 0S 71
I \RI 11 R ( J \1I
Pete! (;iil ud chipped
points and TII r 'I I
reb ,ounds to lcjd the (
it (i5 over tbud\\cisci
Jero eIl, BarI'I y scor
points .nd t.)II k 11 reboi
that goan. lionel
i-Imerli\ .! lie 1 io\ 11ll
had 11 reht ,nd,,
(;oin ntf the bigp
S aterdj c a Itiernton
meant the linnett meet

chmpn',iship the Ci
w'il pli ed \ igiholl
ser\ e- ,,l 1 \\ e!i \ I", c I
-s)~ t \\eHInt'i a
1)w\ I anna s
themselves tismatched
tilhe ( iiials Cil tlcid
S.tinnlm Johns In s(qLtec/
Colonels htl 0 1 ns
Sterlig Q IuanIt to a 1111
giv nig him onl\ I 0 poll
I reCbLinitds
Peter Brown did h1,
thing with his speed

AMATEUR BOXEI

IN ACTION TON

prepi r.Sitni r ti.t n \
ilterrAl. l b 1,.t s '11
i- t, rilni t ilih l t hr i
iln ;wA trl tire in. -itihs \%I
c iin r t 111s the I
I .ldep;) en1-1 [.e,\int' lI ,u
It ,ia htIhc N Stadlunr
-\%Im ilurs lor (lie re nmi
the --.ir cain lhi k l',r\iarJd
1, .1ct ,m iincludin t(he
h('a i pi ]in ship hut ill Se
til ( ,,Id etl (;Ilo( vt'r I ti rrii
'i-.-emi er .iid tue
S [ r i l .1 ITi .i d i
i( caII ii \ .ill i ne ( mt is nie
S he pairiig titr)r t niglhlt
NV ithiiilit l iino.iles v
Bullard. i,.r\ % I)t s I
Neshibdd !erbert Strachal n
I n \\ llingtoin M miller
5.)\.I% cr. J l ]et )It s s J)ohll
lth 1:idS i m.l ll\ r is Ir(s)
W!I.. -1f f, ....nsp \ ll c,, h





AMERICAN LEAG
Ueast Division

l.< l 1, ,r 7 33
1'"11i i iS tK 17
6' i' Il.i 27 M(,
West Division

i i I i s 42 3i%

is i ,26 46,
Sunday 's Resul
\ 1 0 "i .r, 5-1 I. ( I+l, ln
I iclr. il 5- 1 ll illim ori 3-

l ii s I.i l >-3. 1iiai i 4- i
NATIONAL LI'AGt
Fast Division
\\ I
1 l lit it,** ,14 7 .i.i
I ,* il-. .17 .S
t'i t .' r hii r 'i i, .
'llh iilr hi .td 40
M nlrtu.l 34 .t)
N s -\, ** irk \ 40.
West l)ts isiioi
i is lits")c 51 21
,.ii I r~i i i sti 44i 35.
I!..usthn 44 3h


is in iecth Si2
Sani I r.in;in -4(i .15
Ii must in 44 316
Cintisiiniti 41 37
A .iit.i 34 46
S.in tliLeii 25 53
Sunday's Resiults
I'itt ,hurih R(-8, MontrcAl 2-
New Yrk- (5, C.lic.i1,' 5-(
Chininnati 4-3, I ,s \ngvlr,
scKImid gamc 10 ivinthw
San I raMnksci 14-7, Atltil
l'hilatdclphi I
P'liladelphiia 1, St. Ioids i)
lhuston 6, Sain lDiep, 4
Saturday's Results
'ittsbirgh 5,, M mtriil I
New York 2, (i'ii c.ip I
Ios Angeles 8. (iniin.iiti
I 3 innings
Los Alii'eles 8H, 'inciiiii.ii
Atlanta 5, San I ra.mistn 2
St. Louis 9, 'hilldelphii.i 8


is. who
ig force
*gan on
cougarss
match
the C.

begins
,k ei ball
with a
te The
ill then
be ore
game.
on for
s takes

nd the
Minns
f Noel
weeney
75 72
c Pros
ot the
Minns
activelyy
ho had
t game
added
n the

JI uS-73
I -St;r.,
second
o were
e tirst

S


handling and sharp shooting.
Brown an under six footer even
played over his head at times
rebounLding in the midst of the
big men Brown scored 22
points.
Within twelve minutes of the
game, tie cougarss who were
humiliated by the Colonels
during the B A.B.A.
championship playoffs. held a
steady 37-22 lcadt
The second half showed
total disintegration of the
Colonels With Brown and Fred
Laing taking full control of the
shooting, the Cougars within
the first seven minutes of the
second half pushed their 39-24
first half lead to 65-30.
I he Colonels offence was in
vain and in the final of their
humiliation, the defending
champs were subjected to a 40
point deficit which they never
recovered from as they lost by
46.


Wardy Ford, Louis McQuay



in top form for Paradise
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THIRD BASEMAN WARDY FORD knocked in three runs
including a two run homer and short stop Louis McQuay added
another two on a triple Sunday as defending softball champions
Paradise, behind the pitching of Charlie Mortimer, stopped B.E.C.
11-5 to win their second in three played this season.
17-A wn tace I- epctierstartd+wit-seemd.to o.di


Frord, who faced
four times, collect
and scored one ru
also with four at bN
two safeties and
runs.
Herbert Sears
loser's offence witl
during three at ba
collected two hi
Taylor also knocked
scored one during
three at bat.
The Islanders
tir e and, on the 1


PETER GILCUD (25), the
board strength of the Becks
Cougars, controls another of
his 18 rebounds while the
Colonels' Sterling Quant
looks on helplessly. Also
watching the play is Sammy
Johnson (44) and Stancel
Ferguson (22). The Cougars
won 86-40 and will play the
Collegians in the championship
match tomorrow.
PHOTO: Richard Rodgers.


Evonne Goolagong puts out


Virginia Wade at Wimbledon

WIMBLEDON, ENGLAND (AP) Australia's Evonne
Goolagong, 1971 Wimbledon winner, moved easily into the
semi-finals of the ladies singles Monday with a 6-3, 6-3 win over


I 2/ Britain's Virginia Wade.
I 15 Miss (Goolagong, seeded
cougarss third, led sixth-seeded Miss
l'agles Wadie throughout the
S23 6(O-1mniute match, volleying
funds in easily and hitting innumerable
I ians forehand winners,
1Saints Margaret Court of Australia,
chasing the tennis grand slam
tgame hammered 1S-year-old Glynis
whClh holes s of Britain. 6-1, 6-4.
111n the Saturday and reached the
lie u arter-finils of the
n els tWinmhbledon championships
I the Australia's other big hope
rd il for the wlomens title, l-vonne
found ( iolagtong, had an even easier
against win over Patti lHogan of the
and IU.S.. 6-0, 6-1.
'cedi lehe Huge rowds again thronged
centre the All-i-ngland Club in the
nin l sunshine.
nts and Kerry Melville of Australia,
No. 7 seed in the women's
i usual singles, reached the last eight
S uball with a 6-2, 3-6, 6-4. win over
P M'largaret Michael ot the t' S.
Ri but only after a spirited tigliht
IGHT "' tfi American girl
'I CIIAMPION WI\NS
I Billie Jean King of the ['.S._
rir de rending her wotmlenI's crown
t" ick f had plenty of trouble before
isl ilhlli
n the o ,erconling Lesley Hunt of
iitimn Au lstralia 6-4. 5-7, (i-0 and
irn.mitii lolling into the qularter-tinals.
S I he Australian blonde.
t, I, t pila. ing one of the best
r world m1.itches of her life. held her
ptembel., service easily throughout the
imenit s secondd set while Billie Jean was
('entlr.i
Itriti 1h i under constant pressure
x\t ser \Miss Hunt twice caught Mrs
card i K ring sth lobs in the ninth
SAllan I taine, and the champion made
ivs thl tOt forehand volleying errors
i~, Jihn to drop her service. That put
i \hir. \Miss ItHunt level at one set all.
I)rci'l But that was virtually the

,u,. n rii end of the struggle. The
Australian failed to keep up
S the pressure in the final set and
lMrs King cruised home
I he big upset on Saturday
w as Alex 'Sandy' playerr. a
UE >ear-old Americani college
IIc. s i > ti's upset of Romania's llie
.577 Nstase6 -4. 8-6. o-S ,-4
,521' 4 It ass the kind ott trimi ph
.507 5"
5to0 5s enr, tennis player dreams
.51o1 i(, about. After the boycott of
the All-nI gland championships
557 b'y more than 70 stars of the
548 i Association ot Tennis
.520 1 Protessionals ( ATP), Nastase
.51' i became top seed and I to 2
.3(61 11i. odds-on favourite. Many
ts considered him unbeatable.
Id 2-3
1) Nastase's volleying was off
-4 tiunTic but Mayer played
cmisistently well and beat hin
fairly and square [To
uE complete the tairy-story,
', s Ia er wov n the I'.S.
i mter-collegiate championships
.4,'3 7 on clay last week and didn't hit
.4, S m d a hall on grass until he arrived
.174 1)
'(,., 6 v iin I ngland at the weekend
.452 Ii )AVDll)SON IOSI S
(One other big upset brought
.5; "7, the weekend men's singles
o55 event to life Saturday. Vijar
.M -- Amritraj, a lithe 19-year-old
.o55 7 Indian from Madras, toppled
.52<, 9 Australia's owen Davidson. the
.425 17
.32t .. No 7 seed, 7-5, 8-9. 6-3, 6-4.
Mayer and Amritraj marched
into the quarter-finals, the
'4
6 heroes of a hot and sunny day
s 3-2. which saw nearly 29.000
,i (-S people packed shoulder-to-
shoulder around the courts of
the All-England Club.
Chris Ivert, the 18-year-old
%,imericican, narrowly escaped
being the victim of another
"7 upset. She trailed 0-4 in the
final set against Janet Young of
7 hin,,.,tralia but came back to
win, 6-4. 3-6, 8-6.


Two Americans Mayer
and Jimmy Connors, are in the
last eight. ('onnors. 20, took
Bernie Mitton of South Atrica
apart. 6-3. 6-3, 6-2.
The third American ini
contention. Bob McKinley, was
eliminated Roger Raylor.
British left-Hander, mastered
him. 6-1. 7-5, 6-8. 7-5.
Bjorn Borg. 17-year-old
Swedish boy and the
personality of the tournament
thus far. had hordes of teenage
girls screaming again b)
winning another long, hard
match. In another strong finish
he conquered. Szabolcs Branyi
of Hungary 6-3, 6-2, 6-8, 5-7.
6-L.
Jan Kodes of Czechoslo-
vakia, seeded No. 2 behind
Nastase, downed Jaidip
Mukerjea of India, 6-4. 3-6,
6-4, 6-3.
Alex Metreveli of Russia
ended the hopes of 21-year-old
English prospect John Feaver
and the hopes of a packed
and partisan centre court
crowd, 8-6. 6-4. -1 -I
J ue r g n a s s ben der
hammered Ilans Juergen
Pohmann. t-2. 7-5, .-3. in an
all-German duel.
In the quarter-finals it's
Mayer vss Fassbender.
Metreveli vs Connors, Borg vs.
Taylor and Amritraj vs Kodes.
Fans lined up on the
sidewalks all night to see the
Mayer-Nastase clash. Two
hours before it started the
2,000 seats on their court were
full and the standing room
jammed.

WENTY FORD PICKS

UP HIS FIRST

AAA VICTORY
Bahamian rightli inderr Vcnt,
I ord picked up his lirst *'AA
victory after working a total of
t) 1/3 innings in close con test
against the I'Peniinsiiula Whips l.ist
Fhrusday night.
I ord can e onitl il mound duties
for the Richmondt lraves in the top
of the first two outs and down by
three runs. After retiring the first
hatter to face him e he hen went on
to shut out the Whips the rest of
the distance.
Slord's victory was highlighted by
his three perfect innings and the 10
batters he retired in order starting
with the batter he got out in the
first.
The Iraves picked up .a single run
ill the sixth on .1 solo homer and
%en t on tot lie the score in the
eighth on a two run homer by
Lavelle Blake
In the first half of the I 1|th, Ford
gave up a single and the batter
reached second on an error. The
runner posed little threat as he
pitched his wvay out of the inning
without further pro tlenis.
The titr bre.ikine run for the
Braves .illi in the bottom of the
loth thus giving I ord his firs t
victory in Al \ ihall.
Present ,. I o l holds I I
record witih lI- Braves. tie h.as
hurled t al.il of I, tfr nics all in
relief g- giving up two rni miand six
hits. IJ.nfortunatel, th IBraives are
iot dllng well is they are 20 gaies
out of first place.
BRAZIL I, SCOTLAND 0
(GLAS(;O\. ( SC)ILANI) (Al')
World Cup sOtCer tihampions Bracil
beat Scitl.and I 0 ait Hampden Park
Saturday with the line goal scored
by Scottish defender DIerek
Johnstone who sliced the hall into
his own net.
In a mainly defensive game the!
Bra/ilians put on one of the best
displays so far of their iline match
tour (t North Africa and Furope.
The Scots, who played hard but
unimaginativelv never recovered
fron the shock of Johnstone's 33rd
minute goiial It came when he
miscued an altte'pted clearance of
a shot from Valdomiro on the
Bratilian right wing and the ball
spun into the net


9
*



^ '+


a


I i
T .


COKE'S SECOND BASEMAN MIKE WHYMNS is far too late in his attempt
third as Bahamas Blenders' third baseman Robert Sawyer applies the tag on the
Th RBlenduers won 15-3.


Big Q lead by only 2 after



error gives Schlitz game

ONE TEAM'S ERROR is another team's gain and league
leading Big Q Marketeers learned it the hard way Sunday when
hurler Godfrey "Gops" Johnson issued Schlitz' Lloyd Bowleg a
base on balls and proceeded to wild pitch him home. The result?
Bil 0 ended up having one game clipped from their three game
lead following the Schlitz Beer 1-0 triumph.


Second place Becks Bees
chipped the other half game
from the Marketeers' command
when they took a defaulted
game from Paradise Island.
This gave Becks a 24 and 10
win-loss record with Big Q
resting at 26 and eight.
Del Jane Saints who also
took a defaulted game front
Ileastie Lumber rests
precariously in fourth place a
half game away from Schlitz
Beer. The Lumbermen have
defaulted their third game this
season.
Schlitz' winning pitcher
Bertie Murray gave up five
scattered hits enroute to his
victory. HIe struck out two and
gave no walks. Left fielder
Vince Albury collected two of
the Marketeers hits which were
all singles. Ben Rolle and
Randy Rodgers got the others.
Johnson, who pitched two
perfect innings, gave up the
first of his four hits to centre
fielder Anthony Roberts in the
bottom of the third inning.
Johnson then fell short of his
target and gave Bowleg the
lead off batter in the fourth
four consecutive balls putting
him on first. Bowleg was
sacrificed to second by
Lorenzo Lockhart's bunt and
took third when Godfrey
Eneas' ground out to
short-stop before reaching
home on the wild pitch.
Schlitz again threatened in
the fifth inning when Murray
and Gary Johnson singled to
put runners on second and
third Godfrey Eneas collected
Schlitz final hit in the sixth.
Jet Set meet Paradise Island
in the first game tonight at 7


o'clock at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre. Becks Bees take
on Bahamas Blenders in the
second game at 9:30.

6 Bahamas golfers

play themselves

into Hoerman Cup
SIX BAHAMIAN golfers
earned themselves positions on
the Ba'ia-ias 1973 Hloermnian
Cup team when trials ended
Sunday at South Ocean Golf
Course.
At the end of play Robert
Slatter, Jim Duncombe, lan
Masson and Mike Taylor had
secured the top four positions
on the Hoerman points list.
The other two players, Reggie
Dumont and Duke Brafford,
earned their places by
qualifying as the top two
senior players in the trials.
Slatter completed the day's
action with 461/2 points,
Duncombe 43V2, Masson 41
and Taylor 36. Selections of
the other two players and the
captain will be made later this
week by a Bahamas Golf
A ss ociat ion Selection
Committee.
The squad, which leaves
Nassau un Sept. 2, will see
action at the Camanas Golf
Course in Kingston, Jamaica on
Sept. 5-8.
HOERMAN POINTS LIST
R. Slatter 465
J. Duncombe 43''
I. Masson 41
M Taylor 36
J. Moree 34'/"
V. Prosa 33'Va
I. tHiggs 32
B. Smith 3 1 '2


PHOTO: Rick


mhe pitcher started with seemed to go dim
ed two hits in the second inning when,
in. McQuay with the exception of Bowe's
ats knocked single, brought no batters home.
scored two It was then B.F.C.'s turn to
take advantage of inaccurate
paced the pitching and Charlie Mortimer
h two rbi's issued three consecutive wair.s
ts when he to cram the comers. To make
ts. Robert things worse, Mortimer ripped
d in one and through two wild pitches
his one hit scoring Michael and Hlerman
Thompson. Robert Taylor
wasted no brought them one behind on
ball, took a an rhi single.
-A4 It took the Islanders the
third inning to recover before
increasing 6-3 on Bowe's nln
and rhi. Shad Mortimer
/- collected his first hit of the
game on a hunt and scored on
Bowe's double. Bowe scored
J on a throwing error.
I Sears' first rhi a sac fly
was the answer to Joe
L McPhee's sac fly in the fifth, as
the Islanders moved 7-4.
---- Ford and Richard Brooks'
homers complemented the
Islanders' three-run sixth
inning. Both sides scored one
each in the seventh for the
Paradise Island victory.
Defensively for the
Islanders, Michael Major at first
collected eight put outs.
McPhee behind the plate had
five. Charlie Mortimer give four
assists.
The Islanders now go into
extensive training beginning
to steal this evening at the government
button. 1ligh School grounds tor their
button. big match wiltt the All-Stars of
tey Wells the Ministr ()t Works.
Key Wells**


4-0 first innings lead. Losing
pitcher Joseph Pratt paved the
way by hitting lead off batter
Shad Mortimer with a pitch
and walked the second batter
Anthony Bowe. "Shad was
going so good, it was decided
to move him in the number one
spot," commented coach
Bobby "Baylor" Fernander.
Mortimer at lead off scored
two runs.
Moving to second on a wild
pitch prior to Bowe's walk,
Mortimer scored his first on
Kendal Munroe's rbi single.
McQuay followed and
connected Pratt's one ball one
strike pitch sending it deep
into left centre driving in Bowe
and Munroe. Reading the signs
well, Ford laid down a pretty
bunt along third base line
which saw McQuay scoring as
third baseman Rudy Levaritt
attempted Ford's put out for
the fourth run.
Shad took the first out in
thle bottom of the first as
B.l.C. who took one walk
went blank as Rudy Levarit\
and Everette Neely grounded
out harmlesly to first and
third.
The spark the Islanders


In other softball action,
Daisy Walker knocked in twos
runs and Celestine Wilson
scored three pacing the Blazers
to a 15-2 victory over Jet Set
behind the one-hit pitching of
Patty Symonette.

Lionel Neily cracked a two
rhi homer and Gregory Fisher
scored three runs pacing
Bahamas Blenders to a 15-3
victors over Coco Cola. The
Blenders collected 12 hits
enroute to their third victory
in as many played.

Ace pitcher Mavis Iowlcu g
silenced thi LPolice batters for three
hits s while defending I adies
('Chatmpion 'abslt leea.rls brbtomibed
losing pitcher Jud\'Ilae Miller for
20 lhitns on their iwas to a 20-2
vlctonr. I inda.i I ord :ind leaner
MtMiinls etiad scored foutir runs for
th -\\i Tinn rs. N iaoiii llo\\ie s'(iri'I
Ih1rmc and tlmletted iti i triples.
Ksiren I'urliiu st in ai three tor
l' plate .1)app ara.inte scored three
.ind knci ck'd inl three as Ialu.mti.i
irlr In ga.lh ring further i ilTinsnui
I iower tIroimi ilenice Reu.klic ,
Jennifer Kiln\t I s i, and t wrinlnini g
pitcher 1. nllt 5Willilnis defeated
Sihlit/ Bier 27-1 I. \Villi.ims u ind
reckle\, CiLhi kini ktid tin three
rillns. Kllo\I les had .had I'oir r i's


INDEPENDENCE



SPECTACULAR


ALL-STAR BOXING

Tuesday July 3Rd.


A.F. ADDERLEY AUDITORIUM
Blue Hill & Harold Road

DOORS OPEN 7:30 P.M.



MAIN EVENT

10 ROUNDS
BOSTON BLACKIE VS VINCENTE RONDON
West Indies Heavyweight Former Light Heavyweight
Champion. Champion of the World.

8 ROUNDS

RENNIE PONDER VS SLICK MITCHELL
Middleweight Champion Jacksonville Florida.
of Bahamas.

6 ROUNDS


BOB FREEZE
Popular Bahamian
Light Heavyweight.


VS EDDIE TALHAMI
Miami Florida


SUGAR RAY SEARS VS FREDDIE MAJOR




General Admission.......$8.00


Children UNDER 12............$5.00


Reserved .............. 10.00


SITUATION VACANT


Applications are invited for the positions of
Project Manager, Assistant Superintendent,
Welding Superintendent, X-ray Supervisor, First
Class Fitter and Area Superintendents on our
Borco Extension Tank Farm Program.

Applicants must be qualified and have field
experience in heavy steel plate construction.


Apply in writing to:

CHICAGO BRIDGE & IRON COMPANY LTD.
P. 0. .BOX F 2437
Freeport. Grand Bahama.


-Iusp p







-^AO: ^^

ft*IA SAPAN JEWWWOtt^*u