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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: June 26, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03380

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!.. I... ..at ihm po tee


"..,,....., ...... Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL LXX, No. 179


Tuesday, June 26, 1973.


MONETARY AUTHORITY DISMISS CLAIMS

OF IMPORTERS AS 'PURE HOGWASH'


New


customs control is


being enforced


to


halt


persons loading invoices


By MIKE LOTHIAN
CLAIMS BY LOCAL IMPORTERS that Customs and the Bahamas Monetary Authority last week instituted an
entirely new control procedure were dismissed as "pure hogwash" by Anthony Thompson, BMA acting manager.
Last Thursday Customs, shipments. thus increasing the a time at least, and customs foreign currency to pay for the
according to reports, began danger of pilferage. brokerage firms particularly are goods.
requiring that import licenses Mr. Thompson told The aware of that fact, he said. Now, however, importers
- clearance from the BMA for Tribune that the requirement Neither Mr. Thompson nor must get BMA clearance before
importers to purchase foreign for presentation of an import spokesmen for the Customs going to Customs, adding at
currency for the payment of license for Customs clearance Department could explain the least one day to the process of
overseas suppliers be was begun during the long period over which strictly importing goods, according to
submitted along with invoices September, 1971 world enforce the requirement. importing sources,
and Customs entry forms when monetary crisis, when the BMA Prior to Thursday, importers As a result, the goods re left
importers seek Customs instituted a number of controls were able to present the that much longer in
clearance for shipments to pr rte ( the Bahamas' necessary documents and clear Government warehouses,
Importers art claiming the foreign currency reserves and their shipments as soon as the where they are subject to theft,
requirement is entirely new, balance of payments position. goods were landed. They particularly on the docks, the
and complain that it slows Mr. Thompson made it clear would-iubsequently seek BMA sources said.
down the process of clearing that the licenses were used for approval for the purchase of COUNTRY BENEFITS
Mr. Thompson said that in
instituting the control in 1971,

Headmaster ad seven teachersarewas toensurethat for every
dollar spent on foreign
St s h o currency the country
beaefitted by the importation
i Ps All other purposes of the


SEVEN STAFF MEMBERS OF PRINCE WILLIAMS HIGH SCHOOL,
t h madatser elyWlith, will be lea s wf school at thie end of this term.


The announcement was
made by Mr. Smith at the
annual Jordan Memorial/Prince
Williams graduation exercises
held at the Governor's Hall of
the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel. __
The teachers are: Mr. Rupert
Burey, Mr. Melvin Douglas,
Mrs. Minette Douglas, Miss
Hortense Douglas, Miss Troy
Nelson, Mrs. Olive Smith and
Mrs. Sharon Wilson.
The Tribune understands
that Mr. Burey and Mrs. Wilson
indicated that they would not
be remaining at the school at
the end of this month, and the
contracts of the'other five were
not renewed 6y the school's
Board of Governors.
Mr. Smith was reportedly
prepared to stay on as
headmaster, but the Board
declined to renew his contract.
DISPUTE
The departure of the Prince
Williams staff members is the
culmination of a Board-teacher
d te which began on
uary 10 when the Board
/dismissed the entire staff with
three months notice.


SELWYN SMITH
... leaving P.W.H.
Board chairman Artemus
Cox explained at the time that
the Bahamas Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention, which owns and
operates Prince Williams, had
decided to exercise its
contractual option to serve the
staff with three months notice.
He said the period was to be
regarded as a moratorium
during which time teachers
could advise the Board whether
they were willing to enter into


in addition to.


a new contractual agreement.
When the school re-opened
after the mid-term break on
February 28, only 11 of the 24
teachers on the staff showed
up for classes.
A letter signed "Concerned
Teachers" was transmitted to
the headmaster who in turn
submitted it to Mr. Cox and
Convention president Dr. R. E.
Cooper. The letter demanded
that all contracts in existence
on January 10 be allowed to
run their natural course. All
the striking teachers, except
Mrs. Wilson, were expatriates.
On March I the Baptist
Convention agreed not to
terminate the contracts on
April 10 as originally stated
and the teachers returned to
class.
In its statement, however,
the Board said that any teacher
who did not wish to continue
working at the school after his
contract expired should inform
the administration of his
intentions no later than April
10 so that arrangements for a
replacement could be made in
advance.


St.Andrew's parents to meet with


Board of Directors on Friday?

A MEETING BETWEEN PARENTS AND THE BOARD of St. Andrew's School is expected to
take place Friday evening to resolve the issue of dismimed headmaster John Chaplin.


Details of the meeting have Board which has however
not yet been finalized however, refused to go beyond the terms
Board chairman William of its letter to the headmaster.
Holowesko said today the Asked today for comment
Board was hoping to m, ;t with on the Teachers' Union
the parents and thought this proposal to blacklist the
might be arranged for Friday school, Mr. Holowesko said he
evening. An announcement had been preparing for bar
would be made in due course, examinations an-d had to read
he added. the papers.
Mr. Chaplin was advised by "The Board will make a
the St. Andrew's Board on statement in due course, but
June 18 that his appointment not as the result of statements
would not be renewed after made by some other body."
August 31. Meantime he was ASKED FOR TIME
told that he was to begin Mr. Michael Stewart,
pre-retirement leave from June chairman of the parents
X.' committee, said that as the
Since the announcement result of a parents' meeting last
about Mr. Chaplin parents have week, the Board had been
sought an explanation from the approached for a meeting. Mr.
Holowesko had asked for time,
he said, to contact Dr. Andrew
Esfakis, one of the Board, who
is presently away on holiday.
SWAG LA "Mr. Holowesko said he
hoped to speak to Dr. Esfakis
yesterday, but I have not yet
had an answer from him," Mr.
Stewart said.
ENASSAU FREEPORT The intention was, he
continued, to have all the


parents attend a meeting at
which the Board would be
requested to give its
explanation for dismissing Mr.
Chaplin.
Mr. Chaplin was also to be
present so as to be able to
reply, and the parents could
ask any questions they wanted.
The members of the St.
Andrew's School Board are all
shareholders in St. Andrew's,
only shareholders are entitled
to vote on matters of school
policy.


controls are secondary, he said.
One significant effect of
strictly enforcing the
requirement for presentation
of import licenses to Customs
by importers is to prevent
some importers from cheating
on payment of Customs duties.
Sources said it was a fairly
common practice for certain
importers to present a false,
under-valued invoice to
Customs for the purpose of
calculating the duty to be paid.
The importer would
subsequently present the true
invoice to the BMA to obtain
sufficient foreign currency to
pay the supplier.
However, that abuse of the
system is now effectively
halted. Customs officers have
merely to ascertain that the
value of the goods on the
invoice is the same as the
amount of currency the
importer was authorised by the
BMA to buy.
One complication resulting
from strict enforcement of the
requirement is causing concern
among importers whose
suppliers allow them 60 days
to pay for goods.
Sources said an importer
may not be in a position to pay
for a large shipment within the
30 days for which the import
license is valid.
Before, importers obtained
the licence when they were
able to pay the supplier. Now,
the licence must be obtained in
order to clear the shipment
through Customs, and it might
expire before the importer is in
a position to pay the supplier.


COLUMBUS GETS A BATH
IT ISN'T VERY OFTEN that one takes a bath In full
view of the public. But when Christopher Columbus gets a
wash,everybody looks on. The statue of the discoverer of
the New World that guards the entrance to Government
House got a bath this week. It's all a part of the massive
beautification campaign readiness for the Independence
celebrations which start in the Bahamas on July 4 and will
continue until July 11. Government House, public buildings
and private business places are being given that sparkling
look. The Bahamas becomes Independent on July 10 and
the occasion will be heralded by a week-long national
celebration.
PHOTO: Fred Maura.


Total confusion reported at


huge youth rally rehearsal
, THE ORGANIZERS OF THE JULY 10 INDEPENDENCE
YOUTH RALLY called an emergency meeting at the Uriah
McPhee Primary School this afternoon following what was
described as a "chaotic" rehearsal on Clifford Park this morning.


At that meeting the
organizers decided that instead
of the entire student body 50
children would be selected to
represent each participating
school at the rally.
"I don't think they
visualized what 30,000
students involved'" someone
commented after the meeting.
An estimated 30,000 high
school and primary school
students converged on Clifford
Park at 9:30 this morning for
the rehearsal. The result, sources
said, was total confusion.
One source summed up his
own opinion of the cause: "the
organizers had no programme."
Contributing to the
problems this morning was the
fact that a number of drivers
ignored appeals from the
organising committee, and
instead of parking their
vehicles on Arawak Cay as
instructed, left them all around


Clifford Park and even in the
assembly immediately west of
the park.
Also causing trouble was the
fact that workmen were active
in a large part of one of the
areas in which students were to
have been seated, and one of
four mammoth bleachers was
incomplete. Railings along the
sides and top were not yet
installed, and the bleachers
were considered dangerous, so
students assigned to the
bleachers were told not to sit
there.
Edmund Moxey, Coconut
Grove M.P. and a
parliamentary secretary to the
Education Minister, told The
Tribune only that "we have to
iron things out."
The press was excluded from
the 1:30 p.m. emergency
meeting. The meeting was
attended by representatives of
all the schools on the island.


Dean testifies about White


House 'enemies list'


WASHINGTON (AP) -
John W. Dean III testified
today that the White House
maintained "an enemies list"
of its political foes, and said
that as counsel to President
Nixon he prepared a memo on
methods of dealing with them.
The ousted White House
counsel told the Senate
Watergate committee on
receiving information from a
secret service official about


HP questions standstill


on hospital extensions


THE POSITION of the
hospital extension programme
has been questioned in the
House of Assembly by the
FNM's Clarence Town
representative Michael
Lightboum.


Mr. Lightbourn yesterday
asked Health Minister Loftus
Roker if the work on the
extension had come to an
almost complete stand-still due
to a lack of funds
If the hold-up was lot due
to a lack of funds, the member
wanted an explanation.
"How much money has been
paid to date to the contractor
and what is the total cost of
the present phase of the
hospital extension," Mr.
Lightbhurn asked.
He has asked Mr. Roker to
table a copy of the contract
and advise the House of the
contracted completion date for
the present extension work.
If the work was not on time
Mr. Lightbourn wanted to
know how far in arrears it was.


Sen. George McGovern, the
1972 Democratic presidential
nominee, and of trying to
make income tax trouble for a
newsman who wrote an article
about Charles G. (Bebe)
Rebozo, a friend of Nixon's
Under committee
questioning, Dean stuck by his
charges that Nixon was
involved in the Watergate
affair, and said he had
expected the president would
come forward and admit it
earlier this year.
Dean did not say when the
secret service man, whom he
described as a top official but
did not identify, came to him
with information about
McGovern.
Dean testified that there was
in the White House "an
enemies list which was rather
extensive and continually being
updated."
Swetill denies

sale te Francis
MR. GARTH Sweeting,
proprietor of G. R. Sweeting
and Son Limited, this
afternoon denied that his store
has been sold to Development
Minister Carlton Francis as
stated in several reports.
Contacted, he confirmed
that the Rosetta Street
department store, which has
been in the Sweeting family for
almost 49 years, is up for sale.
Neither Mr. Francis, nor
anybody known to be related
to him, has attempted to
negotiate the purchase of his
store, Mr. Sweeting said in
denying the reports.


THE BAHAMAS cannot be
nominated for membership in
the United Nations until after
July 10, External Affairs
Minister Paul L. Adderley said
today.
As no application can be
made until the Bahamas
becomes an independent
country, no dates have been set
for Security Council and
General Assembly hearings on
the application, Mr. Adderley
said.


East Germany and West
Germany won unanimous
Security Council approval on
Friday, and will be seated
when approved by the General
Assembly on September 18.
Their entry will bring the U.N.
membership to 134 countries,
compared to 51 when the
world organisation was
founded in 1945.
The Bahamas, to be
nominated by the United
Kingdom, is expected to be the
135th member of the U.N.


H DUDLY'S
SAI IT. ROYAL AVE.
m MYIER

lUMENTS 4J


Paradise Island casino.
Junket or promoted business
was carried out extensively in
1969 and again in 1972.
According to the report the
Gaming Board received and
processed 123 new applications
for Certificates of Approval
and 65 new applications for
permits under Section 46 of
the Gaming Act.
Out of this number 108
certificates were issued and 15
rejected, while 58 permits were
issued and seven rejected.
The Board said there were
no applications received to
operate new casinos during the
year.
With the co-operation of
the Nevada Gaming Control
Board, two assistant inspectors
completed a training course
during an attachment to the
Nevada Control Board in
October 1972. "This afforded
them training and experience
in specific areas of


enforcement duties,"
Report said.

NP CLAIMS ACTI

REVEN E FOR '7

$92m., NOT $114i5
THE ACTUAL revenue for
1972 was $92 million, not
$104.5 million as stated in the
1973 Budget figures tabled in
the House in April.
The allegation was made in
the House of Assembly
yesterday by the FNM's
Clarence Town representative
Michael Lightbourn during
debate on a government Bill to
provide for the administration,
control and audit of the public
finances.
Mr. Lightbourn took
exception to Section 27 which
says that the treasurer is
required, within a period of six
months after the close of the
financial year, to prepare, sign
and transmit the statements of
account to the financial
secretary.
He felt the auditing process
should be speeded up and that
the Bill should specify when
the accounts had to be laid
before the House.
"I can see from the way
thing# .,e .,ow WhA
over rfnt d veeii t tw 5
give us any audited accounts,"
Mr. Lightbourn declared.
He pointed to the fact
that the estimated revenue for
1972 was $110 million, but
was subsequently revised to
$104.5 million. Mr. Lightbourn
claimed, however, that the
figure was $92.2 million.
He said that the expenditure
for 1972 and $112 million and
on the basis of the $15.4
million deficit experienced in
1971, the general revenue
deficit at the end of 1972 was
$35 million.
Mr. Lightbourn predicted
that this was going to continue.

SHOOTING

AT BIMINI
POLICE are investigating an
early Sunday morning shooting
incident, which took place at
Bimini, and a reported armed
robbery at Paradise Island at
10:45 last night.
It is understood that a
25-year-old Bimini resident is
assisting police in their
investigations of the reportedly
"accidental" shooting at that
island which caused Larry
Bain, 21, to be flown to
Miami's Mercy Hospital for
treatment.


The Report, tabled in the
House this month, shows that
annual income from gambling
rose from $470,857 in 1965 to
$6,693,135.93 in 1972.
Bahamas Amusements Ltd.,
which operates two casinos at
Freeport, showed a gross win
from 1965 through 1972 of
$111.936,659, while the gross
win of Paradise Enterprises
Ltd. totalled $69,689,428
between 1969 and 1972.
The Report also provides a
breakdown of wages paid
Bahamian and expatriate
employees by both casino
companies.
In 1964 there were 116
expatriates employed by
Bahamas Amusements who
received a total of $1,097,794
for the year. In 1972 there
were 232 expatriates on the
payroll and 19 Bahamians who
together received a total of
$5,045,420.
The overall amount paid
in wages by Bahamas
Amusements during the last
nine years was $31,636,080.
Paradise Enterprises Ltd.
paid out $2,493,000 in wages
during 1968. There are no
figures however on the ratio of
Bahamians to expatriates. In
1972 there were 135 expatriate
casino employees of Paradise
Enterprises and 58 Sanlamians.
who rc3i3 e,06.k- a -4totalt,
$3,239,000. *
The overall amount paid by
Paradise Enterprises in the past
five years was $15,010,000.
JUNKETS
According to reports made
by management to the Gaming
Board, the junket or promoted
business in the Freeport
casinos has contributed
significantly to the
profitability of the operation.
During the years 1966 to
1972, 202 junkets were hosted
by Bahamas Amusements at
Freeport.
The report also provides
figures for the number of
people who visited gaming
establishments on Paradise
Island and in Nassau.
Of the 109,000 visitors to
Freeport in 1964, 70,850 went
to the casino. In 1972 there
were 483,872 visitors
to Freeport and 314,516
visited the casino there.
These figures represent an
average of 65 percent of the
annual visitors to Freeport.
The Report says that 41 per
cent of the total visitors
patronized the show lounges
and casinos and another 24 per
cent patronized the casinos but
not the show lounges.
In 1968, when the Bahamas
received 740,187 visitors,
415,475 went to the Paradise
Island casino. In 1968 visitor
totals were up to 1,027,986
and casino visitors rose to
600,000.
AT CASINO
The statistics show that 90
per cent of the guests staying
on Paradise Island, 70 per cent
of other tourists arriving by air
and 40 per cent of visitors
arriving by sea between 1968
and 1972 patronized the


II


FIEEPORT CASINOSS 11SS $1$0

PAIAIISE CASINO NEALTY $71


Casinos made B



nearly $29 million



richer in past 8 yoam

REVENUE DERIVED by the Bahamas from casino ga
has amounted to $28,970,235.43 during the past eight yea
1972 annual report of the Gaming Board discloses.


Bahamas to ke 135th. member of thie .N.


," "


Bain, also a resident at
Bimini, was flown to Miami
after having been accidentally
shot in the head by a
.25-revolver, a police
spokesman said.
It is understood that the
shooting incident took place
near a Bimini night-spot.
A C.I.D. investigating
officer, making enquiries into 4.
the incident, returned to |;
Nassau from that island on
Monday evening. Bain is
expected to be discharged from
Mercy Hospital sometime
during the week, reports state.
The armed robbery of two
American visitors, which took
place as they walked towards
the paradise Island Casino, also
has police searching for two
"young men."
The two men reportedly
held up Mr. and Mrs. Donald
Nulan, guests of the Montagu
Beach Hotel lost night and
robbed them of $35.












gIht rnnt


Tuily, June 26, 1973.


U--ws higtilt gi


NIXON KNEW OF COVER-UP TESTIFIES DEAN
WASHINGTON (AP) Ousted White House lawyer John lean returns
to the Senate Watergte heartier today -ostart what's expected to be a
long salon of questlnnl. The select committee held its longest single
public meeting yesterday dix hours to hear Dean's 245-page opening
statement. (a See Story This Page).
Yesterday, Dean testified that Praident Nixon knew about a Watergate
cover-up, but ignored Of1 11d to undertaid repeated warning about its
inherent danger.
Dean's testimony apparently eonradlets four key atetesents made by
Nixon ... that Nixon knew of the cove-up ... that he knew of payments
to Wstergate cae defendants . that he discussed executive clemency
offers ... and that Nixon pestad In the cover-up even after stating
publicly that he was trying to gt al1 the facts.
COLSON A SPECIALIST INTRIGUE, SAYS DEAN
WASHINGTON (AP) Charsw W. Coleon, a former White House side
who remains cldoe to Prhldent Nixon, was singled out by John W. Dean
Monday as a apeealt in latrigue deeply Involved in various aspects of the
Watergate scandal.
The Senae Senate testimony of Dean, fired as presidential counsel April 30.
dramatized the wide galf between him and Colson, a Washington lawyer
who in recent week has taken the lead In defending the President and
seeking to discredit Dean.
Dean mentioned Coson's name dozen s of times as he read through a
245-page statement prepared for his first day's appearance before the
Senate Watergte committee.
WILL KELLY BE NEXT HEAD OF F.BJ.?
WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate judiciary committee is to vote today
behind closed doors on President Nixon's nomination of Kansas City police
chief Clarence Keloy to be Director of the F.B.I. Committee chairman
James Eatland a MbMidppI Democrat says he hopes for full Senate
confirmation before he July fourth recess.
HOUSE APPRVES MILITARY FUNDING CUT OFF
WASHINGTON (AP) The House shouted Its approval today of a
Senate-sed measure to cut off all funds for U.S. bombing raids over
Cambodia. The aUtoff was approved after the House rejected an effort to
postpone the cutoff until September first.
President NIxtna supporters had appealed to the House to give the
President at leat 60 more days to try to force negotiations of a cease-fire
in Cambodta.
House Democratc Leade Thomas O'Neill said the total cutoff in funds
is the only way fort the House to get across emphatically that it wants the
The sint have ten days after receiving the bill to either stop the
bombing orveto the measure.
Mitary sources in Cambodia say rebel forces fired Russian built missiles
todayy against American jets flying in support of government troops south
of Phaom Penh. They say none of the American planes was hit. It was the
frt reported instance of Russia heat-seeking missiles being used against
U.S planes in Cambodia.


S AITIAN REFUGEES ORDERED JAILED
MIAMI. June 26 (AP) Forty-two Haitian refugees who fled to Florida
last Dfecmber have been jailed afier they failed to raise $42,000 in bonds.
-Immnlatetion Judge Harry A. Mattingly ruled earlier the Haitians had
until Modey to post $1,000 bonds each pending their appeals against a
A Immigration Department order they be deported.
laNeal Sonnett, attorney for the Haitians, said his clients would remain in
the Dade County jail while the appeals were processed.
Exempted from the jail order were two pregnant women, a third who
recently had a miscarriage and all children among the 65 Haitians who
landed in a small boat at Pompano Beach last December.
Neale Foster, immigration Department district director, said the Haitians
tad bypassed the State Department step of getting visas to the United
Sates.
The Haitians charged they couldn't obtain visas while in Halti because
they were in political disfavour there.
Two refugees said they feared deportation because the Haitian
govemment&Aad executed their parents.
ife Rev. W. E. Sims, president of the sptist Ministers Council which
has been raising defense funds for the Haitians, accused local politicians of
deowing little concern for the Haitian refugees. ,
Robert L Woytich, immigration Department district director, said the
S 1,000 bonds set for the Haitians were reasonable.
"People who comply with t Immigraton laws are rewarded by being
allowed to remain& the United States,"*Woytlh said.
LEADING CATHOLIC POLITICIAN ASSASSINATED
ELFAST, June 26 W lso, ale.dsas, olc politician,
Sassassinated egly TU0e snlis dy lrinJa .0e t is
h eTi"1 ster- reedom Fighters, a newly extremist Protmtant
i'W SS oap zstion, claimed resposailby tor the double slaying
I rbq'howe doe s." ,.4 .'N
e as Northern Ireland approached general elections for a
s w assembly to replace the Parliament dominated by
Protestants for half a century. The new legislature was proposed by the
British to give minority Catholics a pgoeater share of power. The election is
only two days away.
Wilson, in his late thirties, was a member of the Upper House of the
Provincial Parliament suspended-by London. He also was the political agent
of Gerry Fitt, perhaps Northern Ireland's top Catholic politician, for the
present election campaign.,
Fitt, a leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party, said of
Wilson's death: "nowthat he has been murdered, I don't give a damn
whether I'm elected or not. He was the most honest and sincere friend a
man could have, and he fought desperately to bring back sanity to this
community. I am crushed."
NORTHERN IRELAND'S FATALITY TOLL NOW 833
BEJAST, NORTHERN IRELAND (AP) Three guerrillas on a
bolats raid were lied Monday when their car blew up on the outskirts
of Oma h In t he center of Northern Ireland, police reported.
A spokesman said the sedan was travelling into town when it suddenly
exploded. No other vehicle was involved.
Bomb experts estimated the blast was set off by about SO pounds of
*explosives.
The bMast, near where guerrillas launched a mortar attack on British
army barracks a week ago, raised Northern Ireland's fatality toll to 833.
HEAVY FIGHTING IN SOUTH VIETNAM
SAIGON (AP) Heavy fighting is reported in South Vietnam. The
Salson Commend claims 86 violations of the Vietnam ceas-fi were
cotemitted by Hanoi and Viet Coal troops in the latest 24-hour reporting
period, and Viet Cong forces have gained a stronghold near a provincial
Maeong Delta capital VI Thanh where the heavy, combat is reported.
LUUMMOURG HEADQUARTERS OF B.M.C.F.
LUXEMBOURG (AP) This capital of the Common Market's smallest
country was selected Monday as the headquarters of the European
Monetary Cooperaton Fund, hoped to be the basis for a West European
c.emtrel bank like the U.S. federal reserve system,
The ftnd is beginning by lending money to member countries when they
S need to shore up the value of their currencies on International markets. Its
finances are now limited, but there is pressure to increase them.
On Thunday, finance ministers from the nine Common Market
countries will meet to consider a proposal that $12 billon or more be
made available for short term support projects. The money would be
pooped from the reserves of the individual member countries.
Monday's decision on the headquarters was made by the foreign
minister of the Common Market, also known as the European Economic
Conumuuity.
The ministers decided to review their choice of the fund's headquarters
in 1975. France and West Germany insisted that Luxembourg and some of
t ihe that have made IIt a center for legal tax avoidance through
PRIME MINISTER FROM DOWN UNDER TO VISIT NIXON
-, BAN CLEMENTE, CALIF. (AP) President Nixon id Australian
S Pme' Minster Gough Whitlam will meet on July 30, the White House
S announced Monday.
The brief announcement said the two leaders "wil review matters of
S comma concern to the United States and Australia as partners In the
S Annu Alliance."
The announcement did not specify where the meetiap will be held.
They could be conducted at the White House or at the Camp Davd
paldentIal retreat or at Nixon's residences is Caifoiab and Florida.
A Whi House spokesman mid Whitlam' vilt to the United States will



I1 #--11 Hu*ia i t
C; with a diffanw a


TION7S "BY "TMi /DAY I

84 o,, s. I fully
e44ppid 14 4rmw
onpop mens facin our






a t -, ge
ir m
all3


MA ManPOP


GIVES 6 HOURS OF WATERGATE TEST DV


Dean says Nixon


aided in coverup of


Watergate scandal

By BROOKS JACKSON
WASIGNGTON (AP) John W. Dean I0 quoted Pesident
Nixon Monday ayiM be hed peonally discussed clemency offer
for the Water te defendants and said Nixon told him it would be
no problem to raise up to S$ million in hush money.


The ousted White House
counsel swore Nixon was
personally involved in the
wiretaping affair,but said he
didn't think Nixon knew the
imnlications of his own actions
an hopes the President will be
forgiven.
Dean said he told Nixon as
early as last Sept. 15, less than
three months after the
Watergate raid, that the
cover-up of the wiretaping
might eventually unravel and
reach into the White House.
He said Nixon told him Feb.
27 of this year that two of his
top aides, H. R. Haldeman and
John D. Ehrlichman, were
"principals" in the case.
Dean said those two directed
the extensive cover-up
activities, including efforts to
derail a Congressional
investigation, destroy evidence,
tailor the testimony of
principals and blame the
Central Intelligence Axencv for
the fiasco.
Dean said the President told
him at a meeting March 14 that
former presidential counselor
Charles W. Colson had
discussed an offer of clemency
to E. Howard Hunt, one of the
men convicted in the case. At a
subsequent meeting, April 16,
Nixon told Dean "he was
probably foolish to have
discussed Hunt's clemency
with Colson," Dean said.
At the March 14 meeting
Dean said he told the
President, in Haldeman's
presence, that the amount of
money being asked by
Watergate defendants could
reach S.I million. "He told me
that was no problem, Dean
said. "He also looked over at
Haldeman and repeated the
same statement." A
Not until April 30 did Nixon
announce the resignations of
Haldeman and Bhrlichman and
the firing of Dean.
THOSE INVOLVED
The former White House
lawyer said vigorous efforts
were undertaken to hide White
House ties to the break-in and
named the chief participants
as:


Haldeman, Ehrlichman,
former Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell; former Asst. Atty.
Gen. Robert Mardian;
campaign deputy director Job
Stuart Magruder; and former
White House aide Charles W.
Coison.
He said he also briefed then
Atty. Gen. Richaid Gp.
Kleindienst and Asst. Atty.
Gen Henry E. Peterson about
G. Gordon Liddy's role in the
wiretapping, almost three
month# before Uddy was
indicted. ULddy eventually was
one of the men convicted of
conspiracy, burglary and
wiretapping in the June 17,
1972, entry at the Watergate
office building.
"It's a very difficult thing
for me to testify about other
people," Dean told the
Senators in his awaited
testimony of the hearings,
entering the fifth week.
"It's far more easy for me to
explain my own involvement
of this matter, the fact that I
was involved in the obstruction
of justice, I assisted another in
pedured testimony, the fact
that I made personal use of
funds that were in my
custody."
With that preface, Dean
begn reading a 243S'pe
statmWent weighing more than
thrme p0mds a recitation
arranged In advance and free of
inteumption by committee
questioning.
His beautiful bride,
Maureen, sat behind Dean as he
read in an eva voice his
testimony catned Ive by the
three gomme ..miesml
netO worbs -Itt m Nao

Dea sai lntd ow
from *1 5



kaow apecllcaliy 'tle


intelligence. He said the covert
intelligence operations in the
Nixon re-election campaign last
year evolved "not by conscious
designs, rather an accident of
fate," he said.
Dean said Haldeman and
Ehrlichman directed the
extensive cover-up activities,
including efforts to sidetrack a
Congressional investigation.
destroy evidence, tailor the
testimony of principals and
blame the Central Intelligence
Agency for all that had
happened.
At a meeting March 13,
Dean said, Nixon told him that
Colson had discussed an offer
of executive clemency for E.
Howard Hunt, another of the
Watergate defendants.
Dean said he told Nixon
about money demands being
made by the Watergate
defendants and said there was
no money to pay.
"He asked me how much it
would cost," Dean said. "I told
him that I could only make an
estimate, that it might be as
high as a million dollars or
more.
'NO PROBLEM'
"He told me that that was
no problem and he also looked
over at Haldeman and repeated
the same statement."
But on April 15, at another
meeting with the President,
Dean said: "The President
recalled the fact at one point
he had discussed the difficulty
in raising money and that he
had said that one million
dollars was nothing to raise to
pay to maintain the silence of
the defendants.
"He said that he had, of
course, only been joking when
-he made that comment ... the
'ost interesting ithg
.4hat happened during 'the
conversation was, very near the
end, he got up out of his chair,
went behind his chair to the
corner of the executive office
building office and in a barely
audible tone said to me, he was
probably foolish to have
discussed Hunt's clemency
with Colson."
Dean said he decided that he
was "being set up" to take the
heat for the cover-up and that
he went to federal prosecutors
to tell them his story.
He said his talk with Nixon
on Feb. 27 was the first he had
with the President about
Watergate since Sept. 15 the
previous year.
"It was at this meeting that
the President directed that I
report directly to him
regarding all Watergate
matters," Dean testified. "He
told me that this matter was
-taking too much time- from
Haldeman's and he also told
me that they were principals in
the matter and I, therefore,
could be more objective than
they."
They had talked about the
Senate investigation shaping up
and the necessity of contacting
two Republican, Senators on,
the Committee, Howard H.
Baker Jr. of Tennessee and
Edward J. Gurney of Florida.
PRAISED BY NIXON
"On the way out of his
office he told me I had done an
excellent job of dealing with
this matter during the
campaign." Dean said.
"I told him ... I had only
managed to contain the matter
during the campaign, but that I
was not sure it could be
contained indefinitely."
On April 16, Dean said he
was summoned into the
President's office and while he
was waiting to be admitted
"Haldeman and Ehrlichman
emerged laughing."
He sMid when they saw him,
their faces dropped.
Inside the office, Nixon told
In it might be a good idea If
he submitted either a letter of
reignation or a request for
ladeflate leave of absence.
e Dee said the President gave
him two letters for signature,
sying "he would not do
" sylng with them at this
6ase but thought it would be


od if he had them."
S id Dean: "After reading
b letters, I looked the
squarely in the eyes
iim that I could not
letters. He w
with me And
at a lon for wds."
In rempa g 1 to his
Dean said, -he
told him he had a
agn areementd h fro
an and Ehrtthfan


Uv nVFERS


'I WE NIUN sohated protests SNlIT CIAIR


ISFInMN


SAYS DEAN


WASMINGTON (AP)- He
is the statment with which
ousted Whte Hose cosel
John W. Dean I prefaced his
Watergate tesNmony Monday:
"Beft*e I obm Um reading
the rather lengthy statement, I
would just e to maki a
couple comunst. Fist of ll,
Mr. Chairman, Mr. Vice
Chairman, members of the
committee, I dacerely wish I
could say that it's my pleasure
to be here today.
"You can understand why
it's not. It's a very difficult
thing for me to testify about
other people. It's far more easy
for me to explain my own
involvement in this matter, the
fact that I was involved in
obstruction of justice, I
assisted another in perjured
testimony, the fact that I made
personal use of funds that were
in my custody. Its far easier to
talk about these things myself
than to talk about what others
did.
"Some of these people I'll
be referring to are friends and
are men I greatly admire and
respect.
"And particularly with
reference to the President of
the United States I'd like to
say this.
"It's my honest belief that
while the President was
involved that he did not realize
or appreciate at any time the
implications of his-
involvement, and I think that
when the facts come out, I
hope the President is forgiven."

'NO COMMENT'

FROM WRITE

HOUSE ON DEAN
SAN CLEMENTE, CALIF.
(AP) The Western White
House said Monday President
Nixon "is fully aware of what
is taking place" at the senate
Watergate hearings but will
have no c6mmetit On the
Asbject this week.
Press secretary Ronald L
Ziegler said Nixon "Is being
informed of pertinent parts" of
testimony by his ousted
counsel John W. Dean III.
Ziegler said the task of keeping
the President informed was
being performed by staff
assistants, including Gen.
Alexander M. Haig Jr., who is
chief of staff.
He said Haig was providing
"recaps as the day goes along"
in both written and oral form.
Ziegler said the President
has been discussing testimony
with various other members of
his entourge since the outset of
the Senate hearing,
Urged by newsmen to
provide White House reaction
as Dean's testimony continues,
Ziegler said, "as the week
proceeds, we do not intend to
have comment."
In response to a question.
Ziegler said there were no
plans at present for Nixon to
hold a news conference while
he is in California. The
President plans to remain at
San Clemente until after July
4.
Responding to other
questions, Ziegler said some
members of the White House
staff in Washington are
assigned to watch the televised
hearings and to monitor news
service accounts of the
testimony.
In addition, he said the
White House is making
videotapes of the hearings.

WATEHATE

AT-Ae.LAUCE
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Here, in brief, are
developments in the Watergate
case:
DEAN Fired White House
counsel John W. Dean III faces


& tried to link


them to Democrats

WASHINGTON (AP) Fired White Home Counai John W.
Den Ill said Monday that owe of the major preparations 1or a
psldedtal trip was to lasure that demonstrators were not soen
or herT by Presdent Nixon. Ad be said both legal and illegal
mas were athweraed to deal with demostratoMr.


Dean told the Senate
Watergate committee that
demonstrators angered Nixon,
and that Nixon and his aides
were determined to prove that
the demonstrations were
funded by the Democrats and
had a direct connection with
Sen. George McGovern's
presidential campaign.
"I was made aware of the
President's strong feelings
about even the smallest of
demonstrations during the late
winter of 1971 when the
President happened to look out
of the windows of the White
House andsaw a lone man with
a 104oot sign stretched ouit in
front of Lafayette Park," Dean
said.
DISPLEASURE
H. R. Haldeman's chief
assistant, Larry Higby, "called
me to his office to tell me of
the President's displeasure
with the sign and told me Mr.
Haldeman said the sign had to
come down. When I came out
of Mr. Higby's office, I ran into
Mr. Dwight Chapin who said he
was going to get some 'thugs'
to remove that man from
Lafayette Park.
"He said it would take him a
few hours to get them, but
they could do the job."
Eventually, Dean said, the
U.S. Park Police convinced the
man to move behind the White
House, out of Nixon's sight,
and the move was
accomplished before any White
House "thugs" arrived.
On another occasion in
Akron, Ohio, Nixon was
greeted at his motel by an
anti-Vietnam demonstration,
Dean said.
"The President, after seeing
the demonstrators, told the
Secret Service agents beside
him, in some rather blunt
synonyms,- to .. get the
demonstrators out of there,"
he said. "The word was passed
but the demonstrators couldn't
be moved much to the
distress of the advance men ...
"In early February of 1972,
I learned that any means -
legal or illegal were
authorized by Mr. Haldeman to
deal with demonstrators when
thq President was travelling or
appearing some place."
Dean .said he advised that
illegal means should not be
used, but did not expand on
the kind of tactics involved.
Haldeman was Nixon's chief of
staff until he resigned April 30,
the same day Nixon fired
Dean.
Dean aid there was a feeling
In the White House that
intelligence being received
about demo tratos was
inadequate Haldeman was the
most frequent critic "but the
Pmidment hbuelf discussed
this with me in early March of
this year as part of the
planned counter-offensive for
dealing with the Senate
Watergate investigation," Dean

"The president wanted to
show that his opponents had
employed demonstrators
asinast him during his


reelection campaign. However,
with each demonstration that
the President was confronted
with, and each incident that
occurred during the campaign,
my office had sought to
determine if it had in fact been
instigated by political
opponents of the President -
Sen. McGovern, the
Democratic Party or
whomever.
"We never found a scintilla
of viable evidence indicating
that these demonstrations were
part of a master plan; nor that
they were funded by
Democratic political funds; nor
that they had any direct
connection with the McGovern
campaign.
"This was explained to Mr.
Haldeman, but the President
beleived that the opposite was,
in fact, true," Dean said.

It1 TAMER

DAMAGE OFF

COAST OF IULL
HULL, ENGLAND (AP) -A
60,000-ton tanker that was
spilling oil was yanked off a
Humber estuary sandbank by
tugs Monday. after she ran
aground in thick -fog and
touched off a pollution scare.
Oil slicks that had seeped
from the vessel while it
perched on the bank since
Sunday threatened bird
sanctuaries and beaches, the
coastguard reported.
"The sea looks black," one
officer reported before five
powerful tugs hauled the
Liberian-registered Conoco
Britannia free. Waves of thick
crude oil were reported
washing ashore along d the
estoary. ;- *
But while fears- of a
pollution disaster mounted, the
trade and Industry ministry
claimed there were only
isolated slicks offshore and the
situation was "reasonably
rosy."
Conservationist officials on
the scene said at least eight
miles of beaches had already
been blackened. Earlier reports
said the oil has also smeared
two major bird sanctuaries to
menac6 a cliff colony of rare
auks and a nesting area for
galls, terns and sea ducks all
sea birds vulnerable to the
clogging oil that could kIl
'them.
A ministry spokesman
insisted the sanctuaries were
not affected by the oil spills
from the tanker that ran
agmroand Sunday after engine
trouble left her drifting
helplessly in thick fog and high
The vessel was carrying
100,000 tons of crude oil for a
nearby refinery when it ran
aMrod. A sea anchor thrown
overboard to halt its drifting
gasled -the hull and one of its
main tanks when it hit the
sandba*k, leaking oil at a rate
of between five to 20 tons an


TS PSMPiWI
By John Vinocur
PARIS, JUNE 26 (AP)
Leonid I. Brezhnev started two
days of follow-up talks on his
trip to the United States with
President Georges Pompidou
Tuesday with the Soviet leader
reported ready to offer
Pompidou chairmanship of a
'Super East-West Summit'
conference here in December.
Brezhnev was readying the
offer with the approval of
President Nixon, French
reports said.
Anticipating the proposal,
which the French mistrust as a
scheme for trying to draw
them away from their
independent stance on nuclear
and arms reductions, a
government spokesman
indicated that France would
not be able to consider it until
after the end of the second
phase of the European Security
Conference beginning next
month in Helsinki.
The super-summit was
described here as an East-West
meeting meant to put a
definitive end to the cold war
period. In an historical
perspective, it was equated to
the Congress of Vienna, which
closed out the Napoleonic Era.
The date mentioned for the
talks was December and the
carrot held out to Pompidou
the immense prestige of being
its chairman.
Brezhnev and the French
President are meeting at the
Chateau de Rambouillet, about
30 miles southwest of Paris
Even before Brezhnev flew
in from Washington at
Midnight Monday, official
French sources stated that,
whatever the Soviet leader had
decided with President Nixon
on atomic and weapons
controls, "France intends to
maintain her sovereignty in
matters of national defense."
A French official sajd
privately that the
Brezhnev-Pompidou talks at
the Rambouillet Chateau could
be the most difficult between
Russia and France since
Charles de Gaulle began
friendship overtures toward the
Soviets in 1964.. . 1
It was widely expected, tWt
the Soviet Communist Party
chief would attempt to assure
Pompidou, and through him
Western Europe's other leaders,
that the new Soviet-American
cooperation does not mean
exclusion of other countries
from the decision-making
process in Europe.
Brezhnev and Pompidou
were expected to be in conflict
on the French refusal to
participate in force reduction
talks and Paris' opposition to
any discussions of nuclear
limitation.
While the Soviets regard
France as a western ally, the
French see their attitude as a
guarantee of independence
outside the two big power
blocs.
The French have some
leverage in their dealings with
the Soviets at the moment


Select the FAN



of yourchoice



FROMi 2 OOUP


questions Tuesday from the
Senate Watergate committee.
In a statement to the
committee Monday, Dn
implcated P iddent Nxon and
many of his sides In the
WateraSt covermop.
NIXON Nixon knew of
the covera-p, of payments to
keep Wattto s mmmlrtos
tient tamds a ft to'n
Pas -aid T. e WTim Rom



HRLI~UM -.m D.


1~ U*~


S2-.41/A


Box N4806









Tuesday, June 26, 1973.


ght Urtbunt
Numus AmrC-mrs JsuA IN VmBA MAGUsm
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH.Publhifre/Edtor 1903. -1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E.. K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Pablier/Editor 191 7.1972
Coatrlbuftq Editor 1972.
'ILEEN DUPUCH CARRON.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PueAsItr/Erdlor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2.2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986,2-2768
Tuesday, June 26,1973.



ITheChaplin affair


By EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON
THE TRIBUNE has been accused this week of closing its news
columns to the Board of Directors of St. Andrew's School and of
presenting only one side of the John Chaplin story.
We do not mind criticism, but we do admit to having a few
sacred cows, which we jealously guard. One of them and to us
the most sacred o of all is the reputation of this newspaper
for fair dealing. It has taken three generations of hard work and
sacrifice to keep our columns open to all people who wished to
use them regardless of race, colour, creed or political
persuasion. There have been many times over the years when it
would have been easier and certainly financially more profitable
to have moved with the crowd. But The Tribune has not chosen
to do so. Therefore to accuse us of being deliberately biased in
our news columns is an unforgiveable sin.
A few days ago a member of St. Andrew's School Board told a
friend of ours that the reason the Board's side of the story had
not been published in the dismissal of headmaster John Chaplin
was because The Tribune, when approached by the Board, had
refused to take a statement from them.
This is not true. At no time did The Tribune refuse any
statement by any member of St. Andrew's School Board. And if
our reports have seemingly told only the Chaplin side of the story
the answer is simple. We only know the Chaplin side of the story.
The other side has refused to make a statement. Therefore,
without fabricating the news, The Tribune is in no position to
give any reason for the action of the Board of St. Andrew's in
firing its headmaster other than the reasons given by the Board
itself in its letter of dismissal. This letter was published in full on
June 18.
It is true that we have met with a member of St. Andrew's
School Board. This meeting, which was meant to have been
confidential, seems to have lost all confidentiality as various
people have been spreading a whispered rumour of what is alleged
to have taken place. Because so many people now seem to know
of this meeting which as far as we were concerned was meant
to have been strictly private we now feel free to report what
took place to clear the name of The Tribune.
However, I want to make it perfectly clear that we do not
believe for one moment that the person who came to see us
misrepresented the facts. He came as a friend and it would be
completely out of character for him to have distorted the truth.
And so our quarrel is not with him. However, we do believe that
as the story passed from one mouth to another it was twisted -
accidentally or otherwise to make the Board appear to be the
aggrieved party ... the side that had been placed in an unfair
position. If the Board now finds itself in this position it has only
itself to blame.
The following are the facts behind the publication of the John
Chaplin story.
About mid-morning on June 18 a telephone call came through
to the news desk. It was Mr. John Chaplin, headmaster of St.
Andrew's School, who informed us that he had just been fired.
He asked if he could come in immediately to make a statement.
Much later in the morning a member of St. Andrew's School
Board also telephoned. He asked for an afternoon appointment.
He did not give the purpose of his visit, but after hearing Mr.
Chaplin's news it was not difficult to guess.
The meeting between ourselves and the Board member took
place shortly after 3:30 that afternoon. During the course of the
conversation we were told that several teachers had gone to the
Board (it was never made clear whether the teachers went to the
Board chairman or to the Board as a whole). They are alleged to
have informed the Board that Mr. Chaplin intended at the end of
his headmaster's report at Speech Day four days later to
announce that if the parents did not call for the resignation of the
Board, with whom he could not work, he would be forced to
resign. We were told that the Board had been given a draft of Mr.
Chaplin's intended headmaster's report. We understood by
inference only that Mr. Chaplin's announcement was
incorporated in this report. Later we discovered that this
assumption on our part was incorrect,
The dismissal of Mr. Chaplin in the middle of school exams
and only four days before school closed was intended to take
the wind out of his sails and to prevent his shock announcement
on Speech Day.
We outlined to the Board member what Mr. Chaplin had said in
his story for publication that night. We told him that Mr. Chaplin
had provided us with letter of resignation, which he had written
to the Board on September 29, 1972. We said that Mr. Chaplin
had told us that this resignation was unanimously rejected by the
Board at its next meeting on October 3.
Our friend denied this statement by Mr. Chaplin. He said the
Board's rejection of Mr. Chaplin's resignation was not unanimous
as he, for one, had objected. We told him that at that hour it was
too late to make any additions to the story, but we would like
him and other members of the Board to read Mr. Chaplin's
statement that nitht and five us their story the next day. He
protested. The oard, he said, would never make a statement.
They considered the matter a prtvte /fair. He then qualified this


by saying that he did not know what Board members would say
after seeing that ndht's TMWre, but he would strongly advise
them against making any statement
They did not want this episode to become a second Neville
Stewart affair, and so they had no intention of washing their
dirty linen in public. We amsud him that the columns of The
Tribune were wide open and that we would welcome a statement
from the Board Again he protested. He remarked that no matter
how inaccurate Mr. Chaplin's statement might be, the Board
would say nothing.
Two days later another person met us not a Board member,
but obviously someone who had the ear of a Board member -
and repeated the accusation allegedly made by the teachers.
Apin we were led to believe that Mr. Chaplin's ultimatum to
parents was contained in I headmaster's report. That night we
called on Mr. Chaplin and asked him if he had intended to make
Ouch a statement at Speech Day. He denied the allegation. We


Ibt W rUtut


More questions to St. Andrew's board after four daS'


EDITOR The Tribune.
I would appreciate it if you
would publish the following
letter.
An open letter to the
Directors of St. Andrews'
School.
M r. W.P. Holowesko,
Chairman
Mrs. Leonard Chappell,
Secretary
Mr. D. Barry Nottage,
Treasurer
Mr. McGregor N. Robertson
Mr. Ritchie W. Sawyer
Mr. Orville Turnquest


Mr. Raleigh I. Butler
Dr. Andrew G. Esfakis
Mrs. Ronald Lightbourn
Mr. 0. Pelaez
Dear Sirs and Mesdames:
Four days have passed since
I wrote an open letter to Mr.
Holowesko and the sound of
silence has been deafening.
Perhaps one of the above will
provide an answer to the
followinlquestions:
(1) How many of the


above directors were present in
body (and mind) when the
vote to dismiss Mr. Chaplin was
taken?
Proxy votes excepted.
(2) For what reasons did
Mr. Chaplin threaten to resign?
(3) How many times did
he tender his resignation?
(4) What are the "other
factors" mentioned in your
dismissal letter to Mr. Chaplin?
(5) Should you


condescend to meet with us
peasants can we expect to
receive honest and direct
answers? (6) Will the
chairman explain the 'School
Journeys' of his children in
New Providence and how come
they were placed at St.
Andrews under such a
monsterous headmaster as Mr.
Chaplin?
If any of theb above
questions can be answered and
should your answers justify
your actions, I am certain that
the parents will support the
Board in its action or doe.


Says John Chaplin IS St. Andrew's


EDITOR The Tribune,
Please publish the following
letter to parents of St.
Andrew's School.
Dear Parents,
We now have the BEST
headmaster, teachers and the
best school and facilities. But
the most important is the
headmaster. Actually he is St.
Andrews, and St. Andrews
him. They are like one. If you
get rid of Mr. Chaplin you are
actually getting rid of St.
Andrews. He is what made St.
Andrews for the last nineteen
years.
Before Mr. Chaplin arrived
nineteen years ago we have
experienced peace, harmony
and progress. We have had


advances on all sides -
education relations, school
facilities, etc. He has worked
hard, spending long hours to
bring St. Andrews to the high
standards it has achieved. Now
all of a sudden he is fired.
What a shame,
I can just imagine how he
and his wife must feel.
I will repeat again, PLEASE
LISTEN.


Even if Mr. Chaplin
did make a mistake after
nineteen years of HARD work
HE should be entitled to not
only one mistake but eighteen
more. Remember only the
good Lord does not make
mistakes, unless Mr. William
Holowesko has just joined
Him.


VENICE FILM FESTIVAL IN DANGER OF SINKING


VENICE, ITALY (AP) -
Venice's once-acclaimed Film
Festival is sinking for lack of an
organizer.
Recently the oldest International
Film Festival In the world has
lacked just about everything,
including top films and Its coveted
Hon awards. The main show had


were satisfied that his shock was genuine. We asked him if he had
written his headmaster's report as yet and if so'would he mind us
reading it. Without hesitation he handed us the report. We read
and re-read it. Nowhere could we find such an announcement.
What surprised us even more was that nowhere was there a hint
that there was friction between Board and headmaster. (See the
headmaster's speech in full on page 4. Except for minor
adjustments it is virtually the same as the draft we read on June
20).
If anyone went into shock it was us. At that point we felt that
we had been completely misled. Therefore, the next morning, we
spoke with the Board member who had met with us.
We asked for a clarification of the story. He said that we had
misunderstood the position. He told us that we would not find
the ultimatum to parents in Mr. Chaplin's report as Mr. Chaplin
had intended to make his announcement "off the cuff." He was
alleged to have made the remark of his intention to someone,
who in turn had reported it to the Board. The Board member did
not know how serious the "remark" was. Mr. Chaplin might well
have "been fishing" he suggested. We were frankly flabbergasted.
We thought the Board had written proof and their action was
based on real and incontrovertible evidence. But when we found
out that the B6ard's action was founded on a chance,
unsupported remark which Mr. Chaplin denies ever having made
even in jest we were dumbfounded.
Again my friend assured me that the Board would not make a
statement. He was adamant that the Board would not "wash its
dirty linen" in public.
And now we are accused of refusing to give the Board space for
a statement it never made and which, we have been told on
more than one occasion, it never intends to make.
The whole situation is absolutely incredible.
As a result of this we are now satisfied that the John Chaplin
affair has its base in half-truths, whispered exaggerations,
personality conflicts and personal dislikes, which, when all mixed
together, amount to downright lies in many instances.
The whispering campaign now going on against this man is
insidious, vicious, unchristian and must be having a
soul-destroying effect on the participants.
On more than one occasion we have been told by persons close
to the Board that the Board did not want to enter into a
character assassination of Mr. Chaplin. Others have suggested that
the Board's silence was to spare Mr. Chaplin from embarrassment.
And still others have been "sworn to secrecy". Jumping
Jehoshaphats! Aren't these people intelligent enough to realize
that such innuendoes are about the worst form of character
assassination possible. Statements such as these invite a person to
think the worst possible thoughts about this man, who, with his
wife, has given 19 years to the education of Bahamian children.
Where will it all end?
The Chaplin affair has now got out of hand and the Board's
prolonged silence has placed it in an indefensible position. What
can they now say to justify their actions?
How can Mr. Chaplin, at this late date, possibly secure a post
elsewhere for September?
What can they say to justify the timing, and the manner of Mr.
Chaplin's dismissal?
Remember, children were in the last week of school. Many of
them were writing examinations. Teachers were busy marking
term papers, preparing reports and getting ready for Friday's
Speech Day. What a time to choose to upset everyone! What type
report cards will children get from upset teachers? What kind of
examinations will children have written who were distracted by
the confusion over the dismissal of their headmaster? Really the
tragedy does not bear thinking about.
And what is so incredibly astounding is that the Board made
their decision apparently on such flimsy evidence. Why didn't
they wait until Speech Day to find out for certain whether Mr.
Chaplin intended to make his announcement. If he made the
announcement would not their position have been stronger if
they then decided to take action against him?
The bungling by the Board in this case is unbelievable. If for no
other reason than their clumsiness in the handling of the John
Chaplin affair, they should have the good grace and humility to
step down.
Think of the children who are being set such a terrible example
by what appears to be unfair dealing by their elders. Think of the
parents who are paying high school fees and are being denied an
explanation for the Board's action. Think of the school with its
fine academic reputation. Think of the friendships that are being
broken. And last, but not least, think of the injury that all the
whispered scheming in the past few weeks is doing to your own
characters.
All we are asking you to do is to cool down, examine your own
consciences, get back your reason and for God's sake think ...
think intelligently.
We are certain that you will agree with us that the only
solution now is for you to resign.
Yes, resign ... if only for the sake of the children.
** **0*55* 5*
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
The truth shall make you free.
St. John 8-32.


been political arguments, student i
demonstrations and a
counter-festival by leftists.
Now the exposition finds Itself
without a director and a staff. The
term of Glan Lulgi Rondi, director
for the lst two years, has not been
renewed. Parliament failed to pane a
special law that would enable the
government to appoint organizers.
'Only a miracle can save the
Festival this year,' a knowledgeable
film source said. But that seems
unlikely although the special bill Is
expected to get priority from
parliament as soon as a new
government If formed.
RAFFLE WINNERS
The following are a list of
winners of a Raffle held by Mt.
Royal Lodge No. 20 of Exuma
and drawn at the Pieces of
Eight Club on June 11.
Ist Prize Yamaha Scooter
won by Wilton Farquharson
with ticket No. 3057; 2nd
Prize Two Round Trip
tickets to Haiti won by Edna
Bain Ticket No. 2863; 3rd
Prize Sewing Machine won
by Esther Rolle Ticket No.
2854; 4th Prize Transistor
Radio won by James Rolle
with Ticket No. 3294; 5th
Pvize Polaroid Land Camera
won by Freddy Wilkinson
Ticket No. 4770


TI4E


PAD


Hi


A


I wonder why Mr.
Holowesko put his children in
St. Andrews. I wonder, and I
wonder.
MICHAEL N. ROBERTS.


the Board consider the metare
parental body a bunch of
ignorant and irresponsible
persons?
A point for consideration.
During the course of the recent
"Parents Meeting" it was
pointed out that St. Andrews
is a privately owned Company
and the shareholders alone,
through the Board of Directors
will run the school. To this we
spee. But I wonder what court
with a moral conscience would
take lightly the fact that the
new premises were built from
publicly solicited donations,
pledges etc., while we
acknowledge there is still a
sizable debt to be retired, we
are also aware this will be
repaid by increased school
fees (to be paid by present and
future parents of St. Andrews
students) and the honouring of
pledges, etc., plus the hard
work and concern of those


rippowd I s W
of the prMttS
far I i1ca me
Board is far fti
School be i
c o ntinue
present sharebhldi
substatal ca"iM
our expense? We M|
date it is quite bol
How long muat weI
some light to be died
matter?
MICHAEL RO
MELVINA RO


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We 9thwm


St. Andrew'sceapltesfirst



fll year in new school

WITH SPEECH DAY EXERCISES on Friday night, St.
Andrew's staff and students completed their first full year in their
new school building at Yamaraw....


During 19 of its 24
Headmaster John Chap
seen the school grow fi
premises now occupied
Ministry of Educatic
Shirley Street to its
30-acre site at Yamacra
swimming pool, tennis
and playing fields.
Mr. Hugh Sands,
resigned last wee
permanent secretary
Ministry of Educatio
Culture, gave the main i
Prizes were present
Phyllis Price, who is lea
Andrew's after 13 yean
staff. Mrs. Price came
Bahamas from Egypt wt
late husband had
headmaster of Victoria
Cairo.
Following is


headmaster's
school.
"I now
Headmaster's
progress of
School in


report
present
report
St. A
its 24td


Everything for the past
three years has been tie
new school, so I b
remarking that this is
full year in our new 1
- and a most successful
hasbeen.
'l e have probably
levelling off in the
population, which is
thibs, for, you will reci
nrei-been our policy
Andrew's grow to fill
with buildings.
,ns a that we may just
pufis some time du
coahing year. We b
Septasber with 760-c
strange aspect c
enrollment is the shif
bulge from the lowest
to the first form of th
School. We must for
few years at least, prep
Full one third of our sa
pupils starting St. Ani
.the age of 12 yes
accommodation is flui
. at present to cope
change, but it would h
f idier if all of our s
ra6puis could have be
]the bridge". The Scie
just about fully oc
Sthe moment, so e
"there might prove som
a problem. This is not
however, to start thi
Phase II of our
programme.
$700,000 LOA
"Nor Is this the
mention finance, othe
state that the comp
holds its own again
costs, but we do not re
capital sum of our lo
stands at about $700,(
"A full year has s
the snaps in the new
and I am happy to say
few. The running cos
huge plant are vast
than they were at Cc
but good mainten
essential in order thi
the full benefit of
facilities. The value
property must contain
and in a few years
Think how wise it w
'have put off build
longer than we did.


4 years now be so dogmatic as I may
Uin has have been. In the main we feel
rom its that 'sampling' of other schools
by the is to be frowned upon. There is
on on a universality about education
present a child who is not doing too
1w with well in one good school is not
courts likely to shine in another good
school but there are
who exceptions.
k as "I have earlier noted the
to the change in the distribution of
)n and the school's population. More
address. and more Nassau parents are
ted by anxious to have their children
wing St. attend our Upper School. We
I on the must decide soon if we should
to the make special provision in the
here her way of classroom space and
been teachers. Many of the children
College, come as a result of the
Government's Common
the Entrance Scholarship Exam. kt
to the is said this may discontinue
soon. Do our own pupils
it the coming up from Grade 6
on the automatically have preference?
nidrew's Should there be a qualifying
1 year. examination? All of these
t two or questions and a host of others
ed to the must be faced and soon. This
gn by takes me on quite naturally to
the first my next point.
buildings "-Recently the school
ul year it committee took upon itself the
task of reviewing our
seen a curriculum. This was
school broadened to a study of the
no bad aims of St. Andrew's and how
all, it has well we fulfill them. There are
to let St. times when I feel I could save
I our 30 the committee a great deal of
It rather time and energy by staying
t see 800 what I know to be the desires
ring the of the vast majority of our
begin in parents when it comes to
odd. The schooling.
if our "Parents, I believe, realise
t in the only too well that academic
ft classes qualifications and good habits
he Upper of work and study are and still
the next remain the basis of much
pare for a success in life.
secondary "Parents simply want the
drew's at best for their children. They
ars. Our want a school which teaches
d enough academic subjects in a fairly
with this formal atmosphere in a school
tave been which is not too large. Such a
econvary school placy emphuis on hard
en "over work. Pride and good manners
nce Labs are considered important as
cupied at developing self discipline.
expansion Obligations precede the
thing of demand for rights.
the time, "Well-qualified teachers in
nking of the Lower and Middle Schools
building prepare pupils for a secondary
grammar school type of


place to
r than to
pany just
1st rising
reduce the
an which
000.
thown up
property,
V they are
its of this
ly higher
entreville,
lance is
at we get
our fine
of the
ue to rise
we shall
as not to
ding any


education so that they pass
with the minimum of fuss on
to a school or section of the
school staffed by university
graduates who have degrees in
the subject they teach along
with professional training in
how to teach. Such teachers
teach a limited number of
subjects to an extremely high
standard. Such schools have
clear aims and they achieve
them unlike the
comprehensive schools which
are all things to all men. I
would hope that St. Andrew's
is such a school.
CHANGE
"This does not for a
moment mean that St.
Andrew's intends to stand still.
Our curriculum is constantly
changing, our methods vary
with varying classes. The ideal,
I suppose, would be to fit the
teaching method to every
individual child's need. In a
school this is impossible but
any of our teachers will tell
you that they adopt different
teaching tactics from one class
to another. Nor do we rush
into experimentation. So far, I
think we have saved parents
money and children frustration
by waiting until each new craze
in education has been proved
before adoption. Such terms as
reading lab are bandied around.
It is interesting that we have
been using S.R.A. reading labs
for years in our remedial
classes withoutt undue
publicity.
"In he matter of
Bahamianisation, much has
been said especially with the
coming of independence. Let
me assure you this is a
Bahamian school with a
Page 7, Col. 3


MR. HUGH SANDS, permanent secretary, Ministry of Education, *lv the main
address at St. Andrew's Speech Day on Friday. Seated on the platform from left to right
are: Mrs. Barbara Strange, chairman of the school committee Mr. Terry Duhn,
headmaster of the Lower School; Mrs. Jean Chaplin, English teacher end wife of the
headmaster; Mrs. Lynn Holowesko; Headmaster John Chaplin; Mrs. Phyllis Price, who
presented the prizes and who is leaving the school after 13 years; Mr. William Holowesko,
chairman of the school's Board of Directors; Mrs. Hugh Sands, and Mr. Lou Morgan,


42 graduate from Xavier's


College Lower Scheui

THE MOST REV. PAUL LEONARD HAGARTY, O.S.B.,
D.D., L.L.B., addressing the graduating class of Xavier's CoDege
on June 13, rged the 42 graduates to remember to base their
lives on Christian principles and ideals and to always remember to


pray.
Father John Finger, Chaplain
of the school was the master of
ceremonies, and Mr. Edmund
Moxey, M.P. addressed the
parents of the graduates. Mr.
Moxey congratulated the
parents and said that it was
because of them that their
children were graduating.
Carmen Malone,
valedictorian, said "We the
graduating class of '73' will be
among the leaders of
tomorrow.
"The preparation we've had
at Xavier's has been difficult
for some of us to live up to
expectations, but those that
persevere, however, will be first
rate citizens". I .t 't
..She. thanked .tbh
headmistress and teachers of
the school who she said llha
been selfless in theidlevotion4
Clifford Galanis, the
graduate with highest average,
was awarded a floating trophy,
which was donated by Dr. and


Mrs. Doherty. Dr. Doherty
made the presentation.
Myra Mitchell, another
graduate, was given an award
for contributing the most to
the school's "Bahamian week
Exhibition."
Scholasrica House won the
trophy for the year for both
academic performance and
swimming, and Selton House
won the award for track and
field.
The graduates were: Trevor
Burgzorg Sythela Cambridge,
Sharon Cargill, Joanna
Cartwright, Alfie Castroagudin,
Elena Coe, Kevin Culmer,
Phillip Davis, Judith Dean,
Kevin Dean, Francisco de
Cardenas, Clifford Galanis,
Trudi Glynatsis, Wendy Hanna,
Theresa Hepburn, Bryan
Knowles, Paul Lamb, Kamre
Limer and Billie Lunn. Carmeo
Malone, Rosita Martinez,
Page 8 Col. 7


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SEA: Smooth, locally
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TEMP: Min. tonight 76 Whx.
tomorrow 89
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XAVIER'S LOWER SCHOOL GRADUATION


GIRLS OF THE GRADUATING CLASS of St. Francis Xavier's College lower school
are from left to right (front row) Myra Mitchell, Sharon Cargill; Cheryl Pinder, Darlene
Sands, Carmen Malone, Sythela Cambridge. (2nd row) Trudy Glynatsis, Billie Lunn,
Joanna Cartwrlght, Eleta Coo, Denise Mores, Rosita Martinez, Karen Lomer; (3rd row)
Michelle Strachan, Judith Dean, Theresa Hepburn, Portia Smith, Donna Wallace, Sharon
Moss, Wendy Hanna. Photo. Philip Symonette.


Distrbuted by BAHAMAS RENDERS LIMITED


*OaMOTORS


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Tutday, Je 26, 97I


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Yeaeday June 26 19


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18 MORE STATES

Ti ATTEND OUR

IISEFENIENCE
SIXTEEN MORE countries
have indicated they will be
Sending representatives to the
Bahamas' Independence
Celebrations, bringing the
current total to 44. The
JwoUiatles that have accepted
*0vttations since the first
Sirtial list was released are:
Barbados (Ministry of
External Affairs); Chile
(Ministry of Foreign Affairs);
:"!anada (Ministry of External
Affairs); Ecuador (Ministry of
Foreign Affairs); France
(Ministry of Foreign Affairs);
Guyana (Ministry of External
Affair); Jamaica (Ministry of
External Affairs); Mexico
(Ministry of Foreign Affairs);
Nigeria (Ministry of External
Affairs); Panama (Ministry of
Foreign Affairs); St. Lucia
(Ministry of External Affairs;
Sweden (Ministry of Foreign
Affairs); Switzerland (Ministry
of Foreign Affairs); Trinidad
and Tobago (Ministry of
External Affairs) and Turks
and Caicos (Office of the
Governor).

FAIMER CAUilT

STEALING WININILL
CARMICHAEL ROAD
farmer Edgar C. Johnson, 39,
who was caught red-handed as
he attempted to steal a
Ministry of Works windmill at
Perpall Tract was fined $600
by Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay Monday morning.
Johnson, the court was
informed by police witnesses
p.c. 463 F.E. Stubbs and p.c.
117 Dean, was caught after
they noticed a car which was
parked, unattended by anyone,
at the side of the street.
They said later on, they
observed a man who was
holding some tools in his hand.
He had a windmill on the
ground and was attempting to
dismantle it.
Johnson said that he did not
know who the windmill
belonged to and thought it was
not wanted so he was taking it
as the one he had on his farm
was in need of parts.
After taking him to the
Ministry of Works, they took
him to the police station and
charged him, the officers said.
Johnson, had pleaded not
guilty to the offence and
maintained that he did not
know the windmill had an
owner.
Valued at $600 by the
-,Ministry of Works, the
magistrate fined Johnson the
cost of the windmill which he
had taken down.


Name.....................
Addr d w...................
City i......................
State..........a.......
C- Cheque
f"- oiev a, dor oneln~


MISS BAHAMAS VISITS FREEPORT
CYNTHIA MUNNINGS, Miss Bahamas, accompanied by her chaperon Miss Joan
Neilly, spent a recent weekend In Freeport, as special guests of the King's Inn & Golf
Club. Above she is dining in the elegant Rib Room. Left to right are, Edwin
Johnson, Night Manager, Miss Munnings, Darren Scavella, Maitre d' and Miss Neilly. Miss
Bahamas was later entertained in the popular Bahamia Club where a special selection of
songs were dedicated to her by Bahamian song stylist Sonny Johnson.


A LESSON IN THE IMPORTANCE OF TOURISM: The primary division of Queen's
College received a lesson recently on the importance of tourism to the Bahamas. Giving
the pep talk was the Hon. Clement T. Maynard, Minister of Tourism. The pupils also saw
the Ministry's latest film "Play It Cool". In the background, Mr. Maynard (standing) is
flanked by Q.C. primary teachers. PHOTO: Lorenzo Lockhart.



National Youth CongrsSs officers elected


RECENTLY The National
Youth Congress held its first
general election of officers.
The elections were presided
over by Miss Gladys Brown,
who has been active on the
Steering Committee of the
Congress.
The following were elected:
Carlton A. Martin,
Chairman; Gregory
Armbrister, Vice Chairman;
Angela Bowleg, Secretary;
Beatrice Moxey, Asst.
Secretary; Kermit Ford,
Treasurer; Mervin Watkins,
Asst. Treasurer and Kirkwood
Seymour, Public Relation
Officer.
In his nomination speech
Mr. Martin said he would try
to work with the Congress
"toward setting a new
direction and the creation of a
new era for the young people
of this country". He made it
clear that there were "many
problems confronting young
people today and that this


SFOR 3m in 1
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women four evenings per week, four houri per
evening, four dollars per hour. Assisting local
businessman good reference, good credit and
car egential. See Mr. John, I.O.D.E. Hall on
Shirley Street, Wednesday night 8:00 p.m. NO
PHONE CALLS.


present generation must work
hard in order to establish
better living conditions for
posterity," a press release from
the National Youth Congress
said.
Mr. Armbrister, vice
chairman, stressed the
importance of hard work and
dedication on the part of the
members. "By all means", he
said, "it is time for the youth
of the Bahamas to start
thinking seriously and getting
involved in every aspect of
Bahamian life".
The National Youth
Congress is an amalgamation of
more than fifteen youth
organizations. The Central
Committee of the National
Youth Congress is composed of
three representatives from each
member group. There are also
few high schools with
representation at council level.
It is the policy of the Congress
to organize youth groups in
most of the family islands and
to extend invitations to tl
DONATIONS TO
HUMANE SOCIETY
THE BAHAMAS Humane
Society has received the following.
donations:
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Holmes, $100;
Mr. Keith David, $200; Miss
Rounna Todd $10; The American
Women's Club, in memory of Mrs.
May Albury $150; Mrs. David
Kelly, $20; Mr. and Mrs. Ernest
Calhoun, $50; Mrs. Donald
Lawrence, $25; Arlon Bahamas
Ltd.. $100; Mrs. Mary Johnson -In
memory of "Dolly" $s0; Mrs. B.
Collura, $10; Nssau Operatic
Society, $1,069; Mrs. Geoffrey
Willis, $50; Mlu Jane Whreham, $9;
Miss Kirstie McNabb (sale of sift
ta). $13.75; Mrs. Phillips Drefus,
S25; and Mr. Undone $50.
HUMANE SOCIETY
MEETING WEDNESDAY
THE ANNUAL general
meeting of the Bahamas
Humane Society will be held
Wednesday at 5:15 p.m. in the
New Providence Room of the
Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel.
A short film will be shown.


new existing ones to become
affiliated;
The congress will also
appoint an Advisory Council,
which will consist of "people
from all walks of life and serve
as a source for consultation."
The first general meeting of
the Central Committee will be
announced later.
"Only the three
representatives from each
member organisation are
allowed to sit at Council
meetings, except in the case
where there is provision made
for observers," the release said.
PROJECT: BAHAMAS
MEETING TONIGHT
A MEETING for all pastors,
chairman, secretaries and
workers of Project: Bahamas,
Diocese of Nassau on Tuesday,


will be held at 8 o'clock
tonight in St. Benedict's Hall at
Saint Francis School, West
Street.
Mr. William Hanrahan,
executive vice president, of
Community Counselling
Service, Inc. will be the guest
speaker for the evening.
STONES BROKE
WINDOWS, COST $70
PATRICIA Bell, 28, of
Soldier Road was bound over
for one year in the amount of
$100 by Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay Monday morning.
Charged with causing
damages to the home of
Winnifred Taylor, Eight
Terrace, on May 26 when she
found her husband there, she
pleaded guilty.
Insp. Okell Cartwright told
the court that the Soldier Road
house-wife had thrown stones
at Taylor's home and caused
$70 worth of damage to the
windows.
She threw the stones at the
house after she failed to catch
her husband who had been
visiting Taylor. She was also
ordered to pay $70
compensation to Taylor for the
damages caused.


bunt


Taxi-dri


Crippled Clildren's

Committee disations

The Crippled Children's
Committee have received the
following donations:
Anonymous, $1,000; W. A.
Russell, $15; John Templeton, $25;
Brass & Leather Shop Ltd, $50;
Credit Suisse (Bah.) Ltd., $100; Mr.
& Mrs. Hugh Wright $100; In
Memory of the late Rita Toote;
Diana McKlnney, $25; Mr. & Mrs.
C. W. Pemberton, $10; Mr. Everette
Bannister, $100; Mr. Leonard
Dalsemer, $100; Mrs. Olga Esfakia,
$20; Mr. T. V. Anett, $25; Eunice,
Lady Oakes, $1,000; Hemo Co.
Ltd.; $145; Anonymous, $5S; The
City Meat Market Ltd., $25; Mrs.
W. A. Curtis, $25; Bacardi A Co.
Ltd. $500; Manofacturers Hanover
Trust Co., Nassau, $200; Barclays
Bank International Ltd., $S0; Mr. &
Mrs. E. LM. MullMhu, $100; Mr. and
Mrs. Donald d'Albenas, $20; Ethel
M. Coleman, $10; The d'Albenas
Agency Ltd., $25; Estate of the late
Sidney Crapper, $1,000; Island
Builders Ltd., $200; Mr. & Mrs. Lex
Orr, $10; Mr. & Mrs. T. B.
Donaldson, $50; ESo Standard Oil
S. A. Ltd., $200; Dr. Patrick Baslfe
$20; Mr. B. C. Malone, $25; Miss
Vermelitta Mott, $25; Irene M.
Bantouvanis, $6; Mrs. iabel H.
Ault (Second donation) $50; Mr. &
Mrs. John G. Rhodes, $10; The
Fidelity Bank, $50; IBM (Bahamas)
Ltd., $100; Peter L. Schellenk, $20;
Arimas, $20; Nestles Products Ltd.,
$25; Mr. Martin Pounder, $25;
Maura Lumber Co. Ltd., $30; J. S.
Johnson, $35; Staff J.S. Johnson
& Co. Ltd, $42; Nassau
Underwriters Agency Ltd., $50;
First National City Bank, $100;
Anonymous, $100; Republic
National Bank of N.Y.
(International) Ltd. $100; Span
International Ltd., $200; Super
Value Food Stores Ltd., $100; Mr.
& Mrs. Harry Oakes, $250; Mr. &
Mrs. H. Dean, $10; Mrs. E. D.
Beans, $25; Dow Corning
International Ltd.. $25; Mr. & Mrs.
E. A. Boyce, $20; World Banking
Corporation Ltd., $100; Swiss Bank
Corp. (Overseas) Ltd., $25; Clark,
Hulland & Co. $20; Mr. A. J. T.
Gooding, $25; Mr. Baerg S.
BU saen. $100; Staff The Royal
Bank of Canada Day & Victoria
Branch. $41.


ver accused of indeed


assaulting Jamaican


else and then began to drive engaged in a conversation, she for a mdi l eW d
off. said. Miss m Ham id.
"I opened the door on the After she had informed Dr. She sai told O
other side of the car and Gay of the incident, she said he Mrs. Mi W i had
S--- -. fn %nmead n. taen. number of as


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'ROLEX' For Men:
D. 'Oyster Perpetual Submariner Date'
chronometer. It's pressure-proof to a
depth of 660-feet. Stainless steel case and
bracelet. $340.25


WATCH AND JEWELLERY HOUSE OF THE BAHAMAS

SAY XTNRIT LAST Of AWUON KJARI
PIONE 2-6U7. 2411. II-ON


By SIDNEY DORSETT
AN ADJOURNMENT was
made in the lower court trial of
Ridgeland Park taxi-cab driver
James Storr, 47, accused of
indecently assaulting a young
Jamaican visitor on the night
of June 3 after she had hired
his car to take her to an
apartment at the West Bay
Street Medical Clinic.
The trial before Chief
Magistrate Wilton Hercules,
was adjourned until tomorrow
when additional prosecution
witnesses including Dr.
Norman Gay, a campaigning
PLP candidate for the Bain's
Town Constituency, is
expected to give evidence.
Petite, and of East Indian
descent, Miss Rose Maragh
testified that Stubbs had
picked her up from the home
of her friends, Mr. and Mrs.
Ray Minus at about 10 p.m.
She instructed him to drive
her to her West Bay Street
apartment. She said she told
him to speed as she wanted to
make a long-distance call to
New York.
When they had passed the
West Bay Street stop-light, he
drove off the main road and
preceded to an area behind the
fort, she said.
He parked the car in a clump
of bushes after she had
enquired why he had left the
main road. She said he had told
her that he was stopping for his
friend and would not take very
long. As she noticed a red and
a white car parked nearby, she
assumed he was being truthful.
He began to question her
concerning oral intercourse,
she said. Aware that he was not
stopping for friends, she
attempted to open the door
but found that it was locked.
H9 held the door and bit her
on her arm, she testified.
She said Stubbs had asked
her; "Young lady, did a man
ever eat you before?" She said,
he then told her that he was
going to 'eat' her and jumped
into the rear seat where she sat
and began to molest her.
"I did not scream out
because I believed he would
strangle me," Miss Maragh
said. She said she did not
believe there was anybody in
either of the other cars.
She said after he had started
to molest her, he said he was
going to take her somewhere
CHARGED WITH
FIREARM ASSAULT
WILLIAM Benjamin Curry,
27, of Ridgeland Park west,
was formally charged before
Chief Magistrate Wilton
Hercules with unlawfully
assaulting Kenneth Carey of
Dannottage Estates with a
firearm Monday.
Curry pleaded not guilty to
the offence which allegedly
took place on June 21
following an argument with
Carey. He was released on bail
until August 8.
The magistrate also allowed
bail in the case of Garnet
Newbold, 32, and Cynthia
Deveaux, 26, who were jointly
charged with possession of an
unlicensed .20-gauge shotgun
on June 21.


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SERVICE FROM

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For information contact the agents

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PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


I


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Elm. & ~t [Tu.s~v, June 21.1 .73'
w


- -,- 7


-1


SPECIALS


HELEN'S EXPANSION
SALE

INTRODUCES YOU TO
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MadWtra Shopping/Bay St. next to John Bull,


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MEN'S POLYESTER SHIRTS
Long and Short Sleeves
MENS POLYESTER TIES
MEN'S POLYESTER PANTS
EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP BAY STREET -PHONE 22246

"THE YOUNG MISS"
MARKET STREET NEAR BAY STREET
"A NAME NEWLYWEDS TRUST"
I -, I ^ i i liii iiiORTvHEiB DE i
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Best Man and
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BAY STREET Next to Lurms
TELEPHONE 2-3281


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Polyester Suits sizes 3.18 in
assorted styles and colours
Girls' Cinderella Dresses -
Wases 3-14
Girls' Pant Sets & Polyester
Pants size 3.14
Boys' Polyesters Pants- -
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Received new shipment of
Soys' Girls' Engslh xfsoes and
Sandals from Europe. Assorted
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DACRON or POLYESTER.
LONG PANTS:
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Black, Gray, Khaki,
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Priced From $6.50 to $12.
Permanent Press
SHORT PANTS
sizes 6 to 12
Navy, Brown,
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II


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973.
1973.


+


Tuesday, June 28, 1


*^*h-


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510"a hk ,


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'June 26, 1973.


* Sget grtbonw


4


''.4


LOCAL BOTANIST PLANTS TREE OF REMEMBRANCE


WELL-KNOWN BAHAMIAN BOTANIST Mrs. Leslile
Higgs planted a Tabebula plant Sunday afternoon to mark
the official opening of the Botanical Qardens in
Chippingham. Immediately to the left of Mrs. Higgs is
Development Minister Carlton Francis and Mrs. Francis,
while Director of Agriculture Claude Smith (dark suit,






eo& Ab6mmm


Centerfolds are


unstapling marriage

By Abigail Van Buren
0 17M If CMCe Tri@N. Y. Nws SPm., INc.
DEAR ABBY: Since the beginning of our marriage four
years ago, I told my husband I wouldn't tolerate "Playboy"
or any other such magazine in our home, and if he wanted
to read that kind of stuff he would have to leave it at his

S We moved recently and I found a stack of these girlie
.magazines in the attic. My husband laughed about it and
said he read them when I was asleep or out.
Now he continues buying these magazines which he
keeps In his drawer. I told him to remove them or I would
throw them out. Well, he didn't, and I did. Now he tells me
,1 owe him $8 for his destroyed magazines, and he refuses
to giveme his paycheck until I pay him the $8.
Am I wrong, or is he? He knew my feelings, and he
rwas warned. He says those magazines belonged to him and
Shad no right to destroy them.
S It youwant topublish this, go ahead. There must be
ethers with this problem. HATES FILTH
SDEAR HATES: Yea are wrong. Your husband has a
right to read what he wishes, and to keep whatever he
wants n Mhis drawer. And if you don't quit invading his
,privacy and destroying his property, It could cost you more
thamS.
SDEAR ABBY: Both my husband and I are nearly 30
years old. We've been married for six beautiful years, and
we have not had any children because we just plain do not
want any. We have given the matter a great deal of serious
p:osderation and have concluded that having children Is
,pt a tW's crced up to be. Maybe we're wrong, but that
the way we feel about it.
The problem: Both his mother and mine have been
:,houndig us hr rome time now with: "When are you going
4to make me a grandmother?" The answer, of course, is:
"Never!" But how do you tell two women who have done
A littl se in their lives but produce children without invit-
a fight?
We have been told that we are "selfish," that it's
"U'anatural" to want no children, and maybe we should see
psychiatrist. I'm sure you get the picture.
So how do you tell two would-be grandmothers that
..he t we want children or not is strictly our own basi-
MsU and even tho it's a disappointment to them, we would
amher not discuss it? CHILDLESS AND SATISFIED
DEAR CHILDLEMS: You seem. suffielently articulate to
get the message across. When the subject comes up, simply
.ay that you peer not to discuss It. And don't try to
Ieefend your peesMm or you will be in for an endless debate.

DEAR ABBY: I know I shouldn't think about myself so
much, but I feel so big and ugly and dumb. In other words,
I Nst don't have any confidence in myself.
Fm 5 foot 8 and weigh 140. I have mousy brown hair
nat In a shag, wh I hate on me. But I also hated my
'dair when it was long. rm 24 and married. Everything I
buy I want to return as soon as I get it home. Everything I
cook I feel like throwing out, and I never feel like I look
right in anything I ut nm.
All this lack of odlonee In myself is driving me nuts.
.hate for people to look me in the face because I think
Jhey'e looking at my me. I know I have shoulders like a
*otball player, but I'm not any bigger than my sister, and
A always looks niet
Please help me, Abby. rm so miserable.
J u ,ONE BIG MES
S DAR ONE: Ye eas't be nearly as big a "me Gs" as
y thk yea are. At leart oe man must have thought ye"
*ere pretty speeial or he weadM&t have married yoe.
What you need Is a bel er a elomage. Start with getting
w payehbeloglCal heW li order. Your doctor can e Om-
,m ad eonssie, I- ad a et If yeou feel "fat"1, lA
remember, the loaget maareh in the world started with a
S*p-e. get going.
PrvemsTaOl SiNd elr It yn g et I ef yf w iew t.
er a pEa m to 43eAp Bes. es M. L A..
e-l g .ma se amrod. MedNm l* d


right) also looks on.
Described by Mr. Francis as "a symbol of art and an
emblem of beauty," the gardens are open to the public
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. MOnday to Friday. They are
closed on Saturdays and Sundays.
PHOTO: Phillip Symonette.

Chamber of Commerce


Independence Banquet July 11

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE will celebrate
the coming of nationhood at a black-tie banquet to be held in the
Polaris Hall of the Holiday Inn, Paradise Island on Wednesday
evening, July 11. Announcement was made today by Holland G.
Smith, chamber president, and Stephen Strachan, banquet
chairman.


Speaker for the occasion will
be Dr. James E. Cheek, PhD.,
President of Howard
University, Washington, D.C.
which earlier this year
conferred an honorary
doctorate on the Prime
Minister, the Hon. Lynden 0.
Pindling.
Cocktails will be served from
7:30 p.m. and dinner, with
music, will commence at 8:30
p.m.
Dr. Cheek was born in 1932
in Roanoke Rapids, North
Carolina. He received his early
education in Greensboro,
North Carolina schools,
attaining his B.A. degree in'
1955 from Shaw University,
Raleigh North Carolina. In
1958 he received a Bachelor of
Divinity degree from
Colgate-Rochester Divinity
School, Rochester, N.Y. His
degree of Doctor of Philosophy
from Drew University,
Madison, New Jersey was
attained in 1962.
He became President of


Shaw University in 1963 and
President of Howard
University in 1969.
Dr. Cheek has received
honorary doctorates from
Trinity College, A.&T. State
University, Drew University,
State University of Haiti,
Providence College and
Delaware State College.
He is a trustee of the
University of Miami,
Colgate-Rochester Divinity
School, Drew University and
the American Association of
Colleges for Teacher
Education, among others.
His directorships include
Wgas ton, Washingt6n Urban
League, International African
Chamber of Commerce and the
Greater Washington
Educational Television
Association.
He is married to the former
Celestine Williams of Newton
Grove, North Carolina. They
have two children, a son and a
daughter.


ST. ANDREW'S REPORT


From Page 4
majority of Bahamian pupils
teaching Bahamian History and
so on. Parents will know
however of my reluctance to
make St. Andrew's narrowly
national. I believe that there is.
room in Nassau for a school
with an international flavour, if
not an international
curriculum, and staff. Broadly
educated students of a school
like this will make future
Bahamian citizens with a
breadth of outlook which can
only be to the benefit of the
country.
In September you will see an
increase in the number of U.S.
teachers. I can attribute this to
an excess in the teacher market
there plus, of course, a desire
on the part of these young
people to visit our lovely
island.
"To my devoted and loyal
staff I cannot say thanks
enough. So far as I am
concerned St. Andrews is the
pupils and their teachers.
"We come now to this year's
closing ceremony and the
reason for the change of
format. When I came to St.
Andrew's, I resolved that there
must be a good reason for
everything that had been
established. I was therefore
quite slow about changing
things and hoped never to do
so purely for the sake of
change. I do believe the small
intimate school of 140 pupils
then did have a place for the
award of prizes. It has taken
19 years to usher out the
presentation of books as prizes
and I do this, this year
expecting to hear some
protests. Let me start by giving
a theoretical reason for ceasing
to award book prizes to the
top pupils in each class or
form. That's not what
education is about. Education
is pursued not for immediate
rewards such as books and
cups, and the more educated
one becomes, the more one
realizes that the rewards of
education are mental
satisfaction and improved and
widened prospects. I have
always been at pains, as has


every speaker on prize days, to
point out that not everyone
can be a prizewinner, and so
often the leaders of industry
and politics never took a prize
in their lives.
"Mainly, I think I have
always felt that the very pupils
who required encouragement,
who most need fine book
thrust into their hands are
those who go away from
prizegiving empty-handed or
even did not come at all. But
let not the hard workers, the
conscientious student feel he
or she is thought any the less
of. Your names are inscribed
on our memories, and on
today's programme, and they
will be read out as the Merit
List at the time usually set
aside for prizegiving. This
allows us to be more generous
in our mention words cost
nothing I know, but
considerable honour is
attached to your having your
name on the Honour Roll of
St. Andrew's for 1973.
"I close with a word to this
year's students who are leaving
us. Being at St. Andrew's has
been a phase in your life which
is passed. I rather think you'll
find in looking back that it has
been one of the happiest
periods in your life. Here you
mixed with children of many
races and nationalities. Here
you were taught by teachers
most of whom you liked, and
even from the occasional one
you may have disliked you
learned something. School is a
preparation for life, but don't
think that life is like this. We
have tried to teach you
resourcefulness, we have tried
to show you the value of
applying yourself to a problem.
In striving to master subjects
you don't naturally like, you
may have found an unknown
stream of interest.
"So graduating students, go6
forth, your education is just
beginning. Think kind thoughts
of your old school, do well for
us and return to the Bahamas
to take your place as leaders of
the nation which is emerging
into statehood in two weeks
time.


i 1


11


r..
0, *'
it; -
" -S ^


.-ill underground utilities ready telephone,

electricity, water.


-landscaped park areas

-church and school sites

-sparkling salt water lake

-ocean front for Beach parties, picnics and

sunshine fun.

-privacy 365 days a year.
-ideal atmosphere for bringing up the family.

-constant sea breezes.

Come to Yamacraw Beach this weekend. We'll
all be there to greet you sunrise to sunset, Saturday
and Sunday. AND ON WEEKDAYS FROM 2 p.m. to dark.


EAST END


Y ia i-ft AFiI sr


NMacraw Beach PHONE LEY and NE M 48/2327
or our mdel hoh 41141


wREwWrjjt


I














Air Jamaica wil fly



direct to Loend i 'm74

AIR JAMAICA tis week reported eord pi for 1972 and
at the same thme mevea d th it wM m update the fkit
reguhr no-top akr Mrvice between Kkeon and Londo. ,
Enland, nextyear.


Tuesday, June 26,1973.



IA


LIUNS INIIALLi

NEW OFFICERS *iS


THE 1973-74 OFFICERS
of the Lions Club of Nassau
were officially installed
Friday night in ceremonies at
the Lions Clubhouse on John
F. Kennedy Drive.
Installed were, from left,
treasurer John Thorn, third
vice president Buck Johnson,
second vice president Sidney
Brown, first vice president
Gary Albury, lion tamer
Clyde Sawyer, president Alec
Thrower, immediate past
president Arthur Kemp,
secretary Wfliam Kemp,
assistant secretary Arnold
Shepard, tall twister
Edmund Knowles and
assistant treasurer Tyrone
Knowles.
A group of about 20
Nassau Lons left the Island at
3:30 p.m. today bound for
the four-day Lions
International convention at
the Miami Beach Convention
Hall beginning Wednesday
evening.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette.


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CANTONESE DINING FROM 7 P.M.
NO COVER a NO MINIMUM
IRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND




Exciting things are

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Paradise island


Making their second appearance
The Golden Boys Of The Bahamas



SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY: 10-40 & 12:40

July let. to 22nd


Make the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.


L .


TRIBESMEN IN KENYA FEAR

SCIENTISTS PLAN TO STEAL SUN


By ANDREW TORCHIA
NAIROBI, Kenya, (AP)-
American scientists preparing
for the solar eclipse battled
gale-force winds Mondays and
hostile witchcraft among
spear-carrying tribesmen
suspicious that the Americans
would steal the sun.
Thousands of amateur
eclipse-watchers began moving
north in a massive invasion of
Kenya's frontier desert.
Nairobi rent-a tent operators
said they were fully booked
and authorities trucked
emergency water and gasoline
supplies to remote camp sites.
The longest total eclipse of
the sun for the next 177 years
will sweep across Africa
Saturday in a 9,100-mile path
from Brazil to the Indian
Ocean. Hundreds of
astronomers from a dozen
nations will observe the eclipse
in northern Kenya and
Mauritania, on ships in the
Atlantic Ocean and in airplanes
flying along the eclipse path.
Scientists hope the length of
the eclipse more than seven
minutes at maximum will
enable telescopes, cameras and
radiation sensors to crack some
of the mysteries of solar
behaviour.
Scientists and Roman
Catholic mission priests
attempted to calm tribesmen at
Loyengalani, a lonely oasis
beside Lake Rudolf where
some 80 American astronomers
have set up equipment on a
point of land nicknamed Cape
Kennedy. A spokesman said a
witchdoctor among the warlike
Samburu and Turkana had
spread the word that the
foreigners were going to cause
the eclipse, instead of merely
studying it.
The unexplained burning of
a few Samburu huts added to
the tension of the tribe, a
spokesman said. One,


camel-mounted warrior
scientist took refuge in a small
tourist lodge.
Primitive Kenyan tribes
regard eclipses as omens of
drought and disease. The
terrifying darkness when the
moon passed between the
earth and sun nearly 100 years
ago is still told in legends as
'the day the s' n stopped
shining.'
Armed men are guarding
scientific devices at
Loyengalani against theft and
vandalism. Roadblocks will be
manned around the oasis
Saturday to keep out
wpaynted visitors. -
Scientists wqre reported
concerned .that the
40-mile-per-hour -
64-kilometer winds
prevailing around Lake Rudolf
would upset sensitive
instruments. But eclipse
preparations were said to be on
schedule.
Carpenters were still putting
the roof on the lodge where
many of the Americans were
staying. Astronomers were
spending hours in the scorching
sun testing and aligning
equipment.
MURIEL MADER DIES
MRS. Muriel S. Mader, 79, a
Miami resident since 1917,
died of a cerebral haemorrhage
on June 20.
The former Muriel Saunders,
Mrs. Mader was the widow of
the late Frederick C. Mader,
co-founder of Saundlers and
Mader Steamship Agency,
which later became Mader and
Company.
She is survived by a
daughter, Mrs. Robert P.
Hilton of Naples, Italy; a sister,
Mrs. Ethel Mather; a brother,
Rowland D. Saunders and two
grandchildren, Robert and
Wendy Hilton, also of Naples,
-Italy.


... IT ALL ADDS UP 1


your reusahiA hut unwanted


items of


clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc. .. clear out


your closets, garage, storeroom...

all can be of help


to someone else.

Donate them to


ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOWRS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


The airline, which is in its
fourth year of operation, had
profits of $394,000 last year,
according to the Hon. G.
Arthur Brown, chairman of Air
Jamaica, in presenting the
company's annual report. The
carrier sustained losses in its
first two years of operation,
but in 1971 achieved a
"modest" profit of $200,000.
The earnings, Mr. Brown said,
"though relatively small,
represent a significant point in
Air Jamaica's history and are
gratifying in view of the state
of the airline industry in
general. The increase in profits
for 1972 over 1971 is
remarkable in the face of world
monetary pressures, keener
competition and rising costs."
Announcement of Air
Jamaica's London service was
made by F. Charles Eyre,
president of the airline, who
said that beginning April 1,
1974, two flights weekly
would be operated between
Kingston and Heathrow
Airport. He noted that flying
time between the two cities
would be just over eight hours,
making it the fastest service
between Jamaica and England,
and added, "we believe the
new service will be an
important factor in the growth
of tourism and commerce
between the two countries."
The inaugural date, April 1,
also will mark the beginning of
Air Jamaica's fifth year of


operations. Mr. Eyre revealed
that Air Jamaica is expanding
Its jet fleet with the purchase
of three additional aircraft a
DC-8-62 for the use on the
London service, a iDC-8-61 and
a DC-9 for use on the airline's
route to Detroit beginning
December 1.
In the airline's 1972 report,
the chairman noted that during
the year, Air Jamaica carried
more passengers to Jamaica
than any other carrier. "It is
significant that on the New
York and Miami routes, the
two major tourist oriented
routes, Air Jamaica
consistently had the major
share of new market growth,"
Mr. Brown said.
Total operating revenues for
1972 were more than
$24-million, the annual report
indicated, with $19-million
earned in foreign currencies.
The 1972 annual report
pointed out that Air Jamaica
"continued to achieve its goals
of growth and staff
development." Passenger miles
operated exceeded 1971 by 47
percent, and revenue
passengers carried increased by
43 percent. Operating expenses
for the year, however, also
accelerated, and at
S22.6-million represented a 47
percent rise over the previous
year, "reflecting the increased
unit costs of items throughout
the airline's operations."


COURTESY EMPLOYEE
OF THE MONTH. Itha
Mosgrove, (ABOVE) an
employee of the Hyatt
Emerald Beach Hotel for the
past eight years. is fully aware
of the importance of a simple
smile. Itha was awarded the
"Courtesy Employee Of The
Month" for her courteous and
friendly attitude to the staff
and hotel guests.

42 GRADUATE
From Page 4
Philmore Matthew, Myra
Mitchell, Denise Moree, Shona
Moss, Michael Neita, Michael
Pecoff, Walter Palmer, Ian
Phillips, Cheryl Pinder,
'Lendrex Ross, Darlene Sands,
Mervyn Sasso, Franz Smith,
Portia Smith, Asim Soofi,
Michelle Strachan, Earl
Thompson, Paul Thompson,
Donna Wallace, Stephen
Weech, Andrew Tynes.
SUN
Rises 5:22 a.m.
Sets 7:03 p.m.
MOON
Rises: 1:26a.m.
Sets 3:10 p.m.


MAID OF THE MONTH:
Cleotha Oliver (ABOVE) was
awarded the honour of "Maid
of the Month" at the Hyatt
Emerald Beach Hotel. Cleofta
has given five years iof service
to the hotel and has excelled In
accomolishine her lob.


NOW 8HOWINO
at l:20& 11:5

THE

DESPERADOS
AND

Fred Willlamson 10:15

THE SOUL OF

NIGGER '

CHARLY
FIRST NASSAU SHOWING


Price controls policy to



be well enforced in US


By BILL NEIKIRK
WASHINGTON (AP)-
Beginning Monday, stores
throughout the nation will
have to provide legal ceiling
prices to customers who
request them.
The customers, however,
will have to fill out a form and
wait for up to two days for the
answer.
For food stores,
requirements under President
Nixon's 60-day price freeze
will be tougher. Each food
retail store must keep on hand
a list of legal freeze prices for
immediate inspection by
consumers. And the posting
requirements of the president's
ceilings on meat prices remain
in effect.
The cost of living councils
said 2,000 Internal' Revenue
Service agents will conduct
spot checks nationally
beginning Monday to make
sure stores are complying with
the requirements. If any stores
are caught in violation, they
will be asked immediately to
roll back their prices to the
legal ceiling.
The requirements went into
effect at 11:59 p.m. Sunday.
As the government geared
up for the new requirements,
the Cost of living Council
began investigating whether the
60-day freeze is causing any
food shortages, particularly in
poultry, eggs and tomatoes. A
council official said there have
been allegations that shortages
have been developing but it
will be another week before
the government can document
the claims of farmers and other
representatives.
The IRS will watch closely
whether stores are selling
poultry, eggs and tomatoes at
their ceiling prices during the
next several days, the council
said.
There have been reports that
some farmers may withhold
some agricultural products
from the market because it
costs more to produce them
than they can get on the
marketplace. Although the first
sales of raw agricultural
products is exempt from the
freeze, subsequent sales, that is
at wholesale and retail, are not.
CARD
Consumers will have to take
the trouble to fill out a card or
information slip if they want
to demand from most stores
the legal ceiling price for an
item they are buying.
According to the rules,
sellers must make available at
each place of business request
forms that consumers can fill
out and give to the store.
Within 48 hours, the seller
must supply the consumer the
legal ceiling price requested.
As for food stores with total
sales of more than $25 million,
consumers should expect to
find inspection lists of ceiling
prices available.


This list will contain the
freeze prices of at least the 40
best-selling items in each
department. Or, the store has
the option of listing prices for
items which accounted for at
least 50 Rer cept of its total
dollar sale 'n each department
Ever since March 29,
supermarkets have had to post
in their stores the legal ceiling
prices for beef, lamb and pork.
These remain in effect. For all
other stores, the only poster
required is a 22x28-inch sign
telling consumers that they can
obtain legal prices by filling
out a request with the store..
Meanwhile, the council said
that IRS agents will begin this
week to conduct the "price
and profit sweep" promised by
the president when he
announced the freeze on June
13. The council will use
financial forms submitted by
companies, some of which are
due June 30 and some of
which are already in hand.
William Walker, the council's
general counsel, said IRS
agents will telephone 2,300
companies this week to remind
them of new reporting
requirements. The council
expanded its requirement that
finance data be reported to the
government by 2,300 more
companies.
Between July I and July 15,
IRS agents will visit each of
these companies to review
copies of the reporting
documentation, Walker said.
Between July 15 and Aug.
15, agents will carry on
detailed investigations of
companies where possible
violations appear from the old
phase 3 programme.
Walker said it would take
time to complete the sweep of
more than 3,000 companies.
But he declined to say
how many price rollbacks may
be ordered as a result of the
government survey.
PEARL BAILEY
SUFFERS CHEST PAINS
LONDON (AP) Pearl Balley.
the 55-year-old American
entertainer. has been discharged
from London's Brompton Hospital
after treatment for exhaustion and
chest pains, a medical spokesman
mid Sunday.
Mils Baley, who has had heart
trouble previously, was admitted to
the hospital Friday night after the
pains developed while she was
waiting to sing at a London nisht
club.
The spokesman strewed that Miss
BaBey had not suffered a heart
attack. Her plans were not
disclosed.
TWO SKY DIVERS
PLUNGE TO DEATH
SALEM, MICHIGAN (AP) -
Two sky divers plunged to their
death Sunday when the lines of
their parachutes apparently became
eWtangled, Waghtenaw County
sheriffs deputies solaid.
The two were Jumping from a
plase out of Salem Airport.
The aydlvedr were not
Immediately Identified.


FOUR 1973-74 DIRECTORS of the Nassau Lions Club were Instialled In office Friday
in ceremonies at the Lions Clubhouse on John F. Kennedy Drive. They were, from left,
Raymond Claridge (one year), Paul Cleare (one year), 0. Knowles (two years) and George
Friesen (two years.)
PHOTO: Phillip Symonette.


SAVOY IP N


['WU~LFRD


24*


A


[CAPI TOL' ',,I


I











TuMday, Jun 26,1973.


. Whr rthbmnt


R ESTATEE


I I


SPACIOUS EXECUTIVE
HOME
For gracious living and
entertaining on 150 foot
waterfront Lot, this the buy
of the year for the person who
wants something just a little

OTHER HOMESAVAILABLE
from $23,850 up. Call us If
bu want to buy or sell Real

GROSHAM PROPERTY
i LIMITED
'rvtg the Bahamas in Real
teSales
since 1947
107 Shirley Street
Next to Sassoon House
Phone 27662 or 28966.
C10039
FOR SALE
By OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dlIng; kitchen, family room
i.hd carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape. AiroorTditioned
throughout. Unusual
opportunity. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.
C10042
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park -j
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 2% baths, living,
Sdhiing, family, kitchen, double
*car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
.carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18x36. Beautifully landscaped,
,bearing fruit trees central
irconditioned. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.


-C10113
MUST SELL one lot
;approximately 87' 1 110' --
Blair Estates. zoned private
dwelling or duplex. Phone
4-3026.
C10002
CCHOICE COMMERCIAL
SIT5, Madeira Street. Suitable
for bank, offices, showroom
htc. 2 storey building in rear,
targe spacious building In front.
$9700. Call 5-1623.

10297
S,. 1 FOR SALE
S" Bedroom .house
FURNItSIED plus family
room, enclosed garage-
led-in grounds 90 by 120-
)NLY $30,000.00 finance

DLAND Spacious 3
m 2 baths, furnished,
od grounds fruited.
5,000.00 come see and
offer.
OODLAND large house,
lngslze swimming pool -
clous grounds fruited,
eluded. Has bedrooms two
I*ths, prus family room extra.
Ideal for 4th bedftom. Asking
5,000.00
I NTON semi-hilltop,'WPws,
each rights, split level hOse
bedrooms, 2 baths
ishly furnished, plus 1
room and 1 bath furnished.
yve-In one rent the other.
I for Inlaws or guest.
uced for immediate sale.
ATERFRONT-
7 feet on WATERFRONT-
S OUT EAST. Dock,
ch, house with 3 bedrooms,
baths plus income producing
bedrooms 1 bath apartment.
I furnished-gorgeous views,
Ieal tropical living.
11GHLAND PARK houses
th tree bedrooms, 2 baths,
Slow as $44,000.00,
,000.00, $56,000.00 and

ROVE lovely houses, from
||5,000.00 and up.
TOWARD VILLAS -
ses from $40,000.00 and
up. Have beach rights.

BLE BEACH 127 ft. on
er, has beach. Approx 2
es. No restrictive covenants.
isonable in price.


ATERFRONTAGE approx
m 9 ft. on water, with old
hamian house, in disrepair,
5 3 lots opposite approx.
res total. Was $150,000.00
er will sell for $75,000.00.
l)UR BEDROOM HOUSE -
)h the water, east of
dgeway. Has dock, little
h, ideal secluded area.
rage. Nicely furnished and in
od condition. Asking
5,000.00. See anytime.
ESTATE Eastern Area -
luded Kingsize pool for
Its and area for children.
changing rooms, patio,
cited spacious grounds. Even
Tennis Court has four
Wdrooms 3 baths. Furnished.
Separate dining, sitting, plus
-n. Ideal for large family. Can
finance. Be Independent on
the way to INDEPENDENCE
Ny being your own
LANDLORD.
'. DAMIANOS
DAMIANOS REALTY
MIANOS REALTY CO. LTD
r IAL 22033, 22307, 22305
enlngs: 41197 and 41280.


RE ESWlTE


C10034
FOR SALE
By OWNER House In
Highland Park, 3 bedrooms, 2
bath, living, dining, kitchen,
utility room and carport. Built
in range and baker on lot 90 c
150. Nice home in nice area.
To view telephone 2-1722-3.
C10306
ONE COMMERCIAL
CORNER LOT in Highland
Park. 16,500 sq. ft. Phone
nights 34527 days 29293.


:10090
PRESTIGE HOMES
Phone 28851
P.O. Box N-1469, Nassau

HIGHLAND PARK 3
bedroom 2 bath, living room,
dining room airconditioned.
Furnished, patio with BBQ pit.
SEABREEZE 4 bedrooms, 2
bath, living and dining room.
Furnished, carport, laundry
room.
PARK GATE 2 bath 3
bedroom, Uving and dining
room, breakfast room, den,
patio enclosed, laundry room,
maid's quarters.
NASSAU EAST 3 bedrooms,
2 bath, living and dining room,
patio, laundry room, furnished,
airconditioned.
LITTLE BLAIR Duplex. 2 2
bedroom, kitchen, living and
dining room. All rented
BLAIR 3 bedrooms, 2 bath,
living room, dining room,
office, double carport. Wall to
wall carpet, laundry room,
airconditioned. Patio, den.,*
HIGH VISTA 2 bedrooms 2
bath, living and dining room.
Family room, den, large patio.
Wall to wall carpeting.
Furnished.
EAST SHIRLEf STREET -2
2 bedroom apartments. Living
and dining room, kitchen, near
Montagu Beach.


DREAM HOUSE -
waterfront Call
information..


4 UNIT APARTMENT 2
bedrooms, living and dining
room, bath. Completely
furnished.
2 COINErItCIAL bUItING
- Centreville 30x100 has 3
year lease. $850 per month.

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
75x100 warehouse 2000
sq.ft., 3 bedroom apartment
and 1 bedroom apartment.
2 LOTS Coral Harbour.
LOT HIGH VISTA Best buy
of the year ONLY $4500.00
FOR QUICK ACTION LIST
[ITH US

WANTS TO RENT
C10272
CANADIAN COUPLE require
nice 3 bedroom furnished
house for long term. Preferably
In west end. Phone 7-8203.



C10040
2 BEDROOM apartment -
M ontrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.
C10032
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C 10033
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE :,2-4777-8.
C10041
4500 square feet, warehouse or.
office space, available
immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.
C10116
3 Bedroom, 2 bath, completely.
furnished home, Nassau East,
near school. Available July 1st.
Call 3-6151 nights, 5-8141
'ys.
C 10244
INTERESTED in leasing home
on waterfront Eastern Road.
Possible purchase. Call Mrs.
Saunders between 8 a.m. 4
p.m. at 24001.
C10248
STORE SPACE, East Street
South, next door to Mae's
Beauty Salon Phone 3-5350.


C 10083
HILLCREST rOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
airconditioning, swimming
pool short or long term. $400
per month. Contact 2-1841
days.


CLi
3
air
hot
chi
C1-
2
fui
Sta
3-5
c1I
LI
CC
re
mc
ful
ava
sw
CA
C1
4
ho
34


FI RENT I


0190
BEDROOM 2 bathroom
conditioned, fully furnished
use In Sans Souci. Large
:losed garden. Safe for
Idren. Telephone 41562.
0249
BEDROOM completely
rnished apartment --
pledon Gardens. Phone
3590.
0288
TTLE ORCHARD
)TTAGES and apartments to
it daily, weekly or
nthly. Air conditioned -
ly furnished maid service
liable. Lovely gardens and
imming pool. Village. Road.
Il 31297 or 31093.
0276
BEDROOM 2 bathroom
use, Bamboo Town. Phone
6694.


C10022
AIR CONDITIONED
Efficiency apartment. Ring
i4679 Mr. Pritchard.
C10314
HARBOUR MEWS CLUB.
Swimming pool, small marina
and beach, central TV
Antenna.
2 bedroom, 2 bath delightful
town house, fully furnished,
central airconditioned.
2 bedroom, 2 bath part
furnished in front courtyard.
Phone 7-7466.

I CARS FOR SALE I
C10279
RELIABLE 1967 Fiat 850 -
new tyres. $500. Tel. 55260.
after 4 p.m.


C
1
A
$
c
V
r
3
c
1
3,


1

u

1


3
3f
if


10281
970 MORRIS 1300
automatic Mint condition.
500. Call 74031.
10250
164 BUICK SPECIAL. Very
liable $350. O.N.O. Phone
1355.
10294
972 C.S. 124 Stationwagon,
8,000 miles. Phone 3-2149
ter 6 p.m.


C10235


PROVIKNCE



umm
Collins Avenue





l I BIIIES





IIUIlEU IFFE







SUH

ON

MYMUIIS START

AT *46


AMERICAN CARS

EUROPEAN CARS

JAPANESE CARS


AUTOMATIC
TRANSMISSIONS

STANDARD SHIFTS

SOME
AIR-CONDITIONED

SOME SUITABLE
FOR TAXIS



oil -ISCOUNT



AAKE -mAU I

NOBETTER
BARGINS AROUND
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL
BARGAIN -- 1972
CHEVY 6-ton FLAT
DUMP VEHICLES
LOCATED OPPOSITE
LAUNDERETTE ON
GIBBS CORNER DON'T
BE DISAPPOINTED ..
COME EARLY.


SECTION


CARS FOR SALE


I ~


"WILLYS JEEPSTER" with
307 Chev engine, cam and
headers, Corvette 4 speed, 4:11
rear. Mag wheels, big skins.
Interior: rolled, white,
Naugahyde, stereo tape.
$2,000.00 Freeport, 352-5730.
C10303
1970 PLYMOUTH Sport
Satelite. Air conditioned and
radio. In excellent condition.
Phone nights 34527 days
28293.
C10302
1969 MORRIS MINI
TRAVELLER $450.00 for
quick sale. Call 4-2023 day,
31765 after 4 o'clock.
C10247


at -


TODAY'S
SPECIAL .BUY
1968 CADILLAC


C 10255
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
SUBSTANTIAL END OF
SEASON REDUCTION
1970 MGB GT
Hard top, std. $1450
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 dr., auto, blue $2400
1970 FORD CAPRI
automatic, blue $1595
1971 VIVA
2 Dr., Auto., Green $1695
1969 VICTOR
;2000 s/w Automatic $600
1969 VIVA
2 dr., auto. blue $875
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA


4 Dr. auto radio,
orange
1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Auto white
1970 FIAT
850 white
.1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. blue


$3500
$950
$495
$1850


1968 FORD FAIRLANE
4 dr. auto, brown$450
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRU
blue A/C $2800
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 dr. auto, blue $1695
1968 PONTIAC
STRATO-CHIEF
Yellow $1400
1968 JAVELIN A/C $1200
1969 FORD MUSTANG
A/C $1950
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
4 dr, 2000 std.. green $2950
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
4 dr., std., yellow $475
1973 VICTOR S/W
F.E. auto, blue,
856 miles $4400
1969 HILLMAN HUNTER
auto, green $750
1971 VICTOR S/W
2000 auto S1400
1968 PONTIAC TEMPEST
green $1200
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
S.S., auto, A/C $2700
Trade-iris Welcomed,
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8


CARS FORiS]E ISAE M


C10284
1967 CHRYSLE1R 4 doors,
auto. factory air and heater,
radio $1,200.00.
Comet, 20 inch 3-speed fan -
$20.00
Brother Console Cabinet,
Zigzag sewing machine $300.
Water Skis, new $30.
Massage Vibrator $80.
Hoover Vacuum Cleaner -
$15.00
2 coffee tables $15.00
2 drawers metal file cabinet -
$25.00
Phone 7-7885.
C10269
14 FLATS used previously
used by Kingsway Players In
their drama productions.
Phone 42158 for further
details.
C10261
6-5-Piece place setting of
Rosenthal China with extra
serving pieces. Call 41062
between 4-7 p.m. -
C10275
OWNER LEAVING 2 Girl's
bicycles, AM-FM Shortwave
Radio, Household Articles
priced for quick sale. Call
74031.
C10277
ELECTRIC CLOTHES Dryer
$85.00. Easy parts recently
replaced. Phone 31318.


C10285
C-CRAFT 12' rubber boat with
3 HP Evinrude $300.00
1970 Austin Morris Mini -
$1000.00
1970 Harley Davidson 150 c.c.
-$100.00
Phone 7-7885.
C10225
LEAVING ISLAND'
16' Boston Whaler 100 h.p.
Johnson-trailer, Skis, tanks,
anchors, etc. $2900.
RCA colour T.V. $250.
Stereo -$200.
Phone 7-7155.
C10295
WEDGEWOOD China set
Stratford 'EDME'. Call Higgs
32391 weekdays
C10278
24" Phillips T.V. -. $180
O.N.O.
Antenna and Booster $120
Hoover Constellation Vacuum
30
Bookshelf -$12
Stereo radio/player $30
Chaise Lounge, high chair,
hassock, fan, standing lamp -
Each $10 or less.
Call Mr./Mrs. Smith 31685.




C10035
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yach.
Phone 3-2371.

C 10026
BROADWATER 25' Straight
Drive Cruiser, 225 h.p.
Chrysler. Contact Smith,
58311.
C10305
19 FOOT THUNDERBIRD
with 2 Evinrude 55, and
ship-to-shore radio. Phone
nights 34527 days 28293


C 10283
42' MATTHEWS 325 H.P.
Chryslers RFlybridge, full
electronics double cab.
Shower in beautiful
condition 1963 registered
Bahamas. 665-5403, Miami -
6822 Mindello Coral Gables,
Fla.
C 10301
1969 35ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander Sports Cruiser
with 2 state rooms and shower
- in excellent condition. Fully
equipped including 110 volt
generator, 3 burner stove with
oven. 85 watt ship to shore
telephone, fishing chairs and
many other extras. Price:
$37,500 Call 22680 or 32020
ask for Geoffrey Brown.


C10264
Found Drifting 12 ft. plywood
punt, flbreglassed, painted
aquamarine, bottom damaged.
Owner contact R. G
Lightbourn 2-8293.

I SCHOOLS
C10298
ST. MATTHEW'S PARISH
SCHOOL. We have a few
places, in the Infant
Department, for September.
Details from Headmaster
22198.

POSITION. WaTED
C10159
YOUNG GIRL seeks job a
salesgirl in your shop. Ver
willing to work. Please writ
Adv. C10159 c/o The Tribune
P. O. Box N*3207, NaaU.


1 I 1


C10300 6


-1


I -


C10268 -,
QUAL S
KingswY 1
September, 1wr
call 42158.
C10293 ..o.
Old establMih
requires m
shorthand t
bookkeepingql
day week, r
excellent salary. i
handwriting toc
Manager. P. 0. BMoIxi
Nassau. Bahamam.
C6034
JOB TITLE: PiH
SUPERVISOR D
MINIMUM EDUCA
High School gradual
equivalent .i
MINIMUM EXPERI 1
5-10 years:
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILI
Professional high
boiler insulating,
jacking, sand blasting
structural steel treating
painting, etc.
INTERESTED APPLICA
CONTACT: Personnl
Department, Bahama Cer4
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport. Grand Bahama.


te zrtbtm

CLASSIFIED AiB mlM


BRING

RESULTS-FAST

TO PLACE YOUR ADV.

TELEPHONE

21988-EXT. 5


CLASSIFIED


CLASSED ADVS. BRING MSU7S-FW
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 2W0 -1


C10267
TWO BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment Cooper's Terrace -
fenced in yard. Monthly or
weekly payment. Phone
32688.


ii


C 10299
1969 Volkswagen Bitis.
$1000 O.N.O. Phone 41411
or 21404.
C10310
1969 PONTIAC, excellent
condition. Automatic, power
steering. Phone 58765 after
3:30 p.m. $2200. (O.N.O.)
C10304
1973 MORRIS MARINA: In
excellent condition. Only
6,000 miles. Phone nights
34527 days 28293
C10397
TRIUMPH Spitfire MK IV -
overdrine radial tyres -
condition as new $2500 -
Phone 34541.
C10292
HAVE TO SELLII1
1970 GT6 MK2 red with neat
paint work. Condition like
new. Going at $1,800.00 or
nearest offer. Contact Peter
Major at 5-7430/1, ext. 170 or
177. Owner leaving Island.



C10251
DOUBLE BED, two chests of
drawers, bedside table. $100
the lot. Phone 31355.


I I


I


15 FOOT BOAT and trailer, 40
i.p. Evinrude. Priced to sell.
honoe 32744.


:10239
HARRY D. MALONE
i111 sell at his premises on
AIbury Lane situated five (5)
floors from Shirley Street on
he right hand side on Friday,
luly 6th 1973 at 12 o'clock
noon the following property:-
ALL that piece parcel or lot
of land being Lot Number
One (1) on a plan of the
Subdivision called and
known as "Peardale" situate
on the South side of Wulff
Road in the Eastern District
of the Island of New
Providence which said piece
parcel or lot of land is
bounded on the North by
Wulff Road and running
thereon Sixty (60) feet on
the East by Lot
Number Two (2) on the said
plan and running thereon
One hundred (100) feet on
the South by a portion of
Lot Number Three (3) on
the said plan and running
thereon Fifty-eight and
Seventy hundredths (58.70)
feet and on the West by land
formerly the property of the
New Road Volunteer Union
but now the property of
various owners and running
thereon One hundred and
Twenty hundredths
(100.20) feet which said
piece parcel or lot of land
has such position shape
marks boundaries and
dimensions as are shown on
a copy of the said plan
attached to an Indenture of
Conveyance dated the
Sixteenth day of January,
A.D. 1954 made between
Peardale Limited of the first
part Camion Limited of the
second part and George
Meshach Blatch of the third
part and now of record in
the Registry of Records In
the City of Nassau in the
said Island of New
Providence in Book 0. 20 at
pages 407 tO 410.
Mortgage dated the Thirteenth
day of September, A.D. 1971
and made between Bahamas
Plumbing and Steam
Contractors Limited of the one
part and The Royal Bank of
Canada of itheother part and
now of record in the said
Registry of Records In Volume
1819 at pages 123 to 133.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at theat the time of the sale
and the balance on completion.
Dated this 19th day of June
A.D. 1973.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer



C 10271
INDEPENDENCE CLEAN-UP
OFFER: Roberts used Car Lot,
phone 42981, will remove
abandoned vehicles from
private properties at a greatly
reduced rate. Offer good until
July 10. Contact Percival
Roberts, phone 42981 7 a.m.
to 7 p.m. dally for prompt
courteous service.


C10312
SPECIAL NOTICE
A $40.00 free bonus
pre-Independence gift is yours
if you make a deposit now at
Bill's Real Estate. Good buys
include:-
SOUTH BEACH EST.
SEVEN HILLS ESTATE
SUNSHINE PARK
GOLDEN GATES
BEL-AIR
TROPICAL GARDENS
SANDS ADDITION
MARATHON ESTATE
SEABREEZE ESTATE
GLENISTON GARDENS
YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATE
WINTON MEADOWS
COLONY VILLAGE EAST
And many others.
Easy terms and good cash
discounts are available. Call
23921.

C 10


IN SAD and loving memory of
our dear beloved wife, mother,
daughter and grandmother Mrs.
Merlene Terecita King, who
departed this life 25th June
1972.
For all the Saints who from
their labours rest
Who Thee by faith before the
world confessed
Thy name, 0 Jesu., be forever
blest. Alleluial
Greatly missed by her husband
Arthur C. King Sr., father
Ernest Sears, mother Olive
Cooper, children Neville,
Rudolph, Vanria Davis, Israel,
Pa u lette Nairn, Brenda,
Dorothy, Arthur Jr., Dwight,
Ernestine and Sandra. Two
brothers Dr. Bertram Sears and
Wilbur Sears, two sisters Muriel
Bowe and Irene White, thirteen
grandchildren and a host of
relatives and friends.

HELP INTED
C10257
DIRTY DICK'S requires :-
2 steel drummers.
1 Limbo dancer
1 Bottle dancer
1 Belly Dancer
3 dancing girls
For personal interview call Mr.
E. Burrows 5-8650 between 11
a.m. and 3 p.m.
C10258
LAND SURVEYOR required
by the Nassau Engineering Co.
Ltd., Suitable qualification
desirable but person with good
experience and recommenda-
tion only considered. The work
entails spending about half
time in the family islands
where all living expenses are
paid. Generous salary, free
medical scheme, and
jermpaent stff position to
conscientious person.
Telephone 22-9 67 for
appointment.


C6035
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6036
JOB TITLE: CHIEF CHEMIST
AND INSPECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At
least 5 years cement plant
chemistry experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise the
quality control procedures
ranging from selection and
blending of raw materials
through t,* menufactnung
processees- to the final
inspection ar t e .mitn of
cement prior to release for
shipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6037
JOB TITLE: GENERAL
FOREMAN-MECHANICAL
MAINTENANCE
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years cement plant
mechanical background
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise
maintenance activities,
including field forces, machine
shop and garage in providing
maintenance, installation and
Inspection services for the
entire plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10311
2 FARM LABOURERS TO
WORK ON FARM' Contact
Enid Grant, Nicolt's Town,
Andros.
C10308
WANTED: young man with
Bachelor of Science Degree In
Agriculture or Animal Science
to Manage out island cattle
ranch. Applicant must be an
experienced cattleman
knowledgeable in artificial
breeding, calving techniques
and practical Veterinary,
medicine. Salary according to
experience. Furnished
accommodation provided.
Apply to U.S.Y. & T.
INDUSTRIES INC., Box 41,
Rock Sound, Eleuthera.

C10287
MANAGING EDITOR
Looking for first-class,
polished, editor who can run
department with supervislan.
ETIENNE DUPUCH JR.
PUBLICATIONS. Telephone
3-5666.


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C10122
DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN?
Have you always wanted to
work closely with them? Do
you wish to help children
deprived of their normal homes
to become useful citizens of
our new Bahamas?
Then consider the childcare
field. The Ranfurly Home for
Children is seeking the
following staff:
a) Women, 25/35 to live in &
care for children 2 to 6 years
old. Nursery or childcare
experience helpful.
b) Mature woman, 35/50, with
childcare background &
administrative potential, to live
In.
c) Couple with childcare or
social service background
and/or willing to have in
Service training on a conractual
basis. Must be willing to live in.
Only Bahamians will be
considered. Apply in writing
for an Interview to Mr. & Mrs.
Leslie Davies, Ranfurly Home
for Children, Box N-1413,
Nassau.
C10262
MAID WANTED from
September at Coral Harbour to
look after baby and do
housework. Mon-Fri., 8.15
a.m. 3.30 p.m. Own transport
an advantage. Phone 36808
(12-1 p.m. Mon.-Fri.)
C74U5
JOB TITLE: (EIGHT)
GENERAL REPAIR RMEN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Good
Cement Plant mechanical
background.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,.
installsr adjust and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


I


m


I


FLEETWOOD LIMOUSINE
$6850.00

Also available

1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
good condition $2400.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER
stick shift, blue $1150.00
1970 SINGER VOGUE
SEDAN automatic $950.00
1964 LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL
white, nice interior $400.00
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
blue, stick shift $2250.00
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
green, automatic $1000.00
1969 FORD GALAXIE
reconditioned $1000.00
1970 FIAT 124
stJcishlft $700.00
-971 DODGE AVENGER
bargain, automatic $1500.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER G.L.
qood buy $2350.00
1970 PLYMOUTH
BARRACUDA
red, automatic $1500.00
1969 FORD FALCON
automatic $1200.00
1969 DATSUN S/W
stick shift, red $800.00
1972 FORD THUNDERBIRD
very low mileage,
2 door $8500.00
1970 DODGE CHALLENGER
very clean $3200.00
1969 FORD ESCORT
blue, 2 door $750.00
1971 PLYMOUTH CUSTOM
SUBURBAN white $3500.00
1967 FORD CORTINA
white, automatic $700.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX S/W
white, automatic $1200.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3-4711.


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10


C10318"
GARDENER HANDYMAN
willing to sleep in when family
travels, otherwise to work once
or twice a week. $8.00 per day.
Write or call Pelaez, Box
N4686. Phones 31286 or
31998.
C10289
COMPETENT BOOKKEEPER
AND TYPIST Abiity to
keep accounts through Balance
Sheet for a large organization.
At least 5 years experience
required. Skill In typing. Must
be Bahamlrt. Salary
commensurate with
experience. Please apply in
writing with two references to:
Personnel Department,
Catholic Chancery, DO1cese of
Nassau, P. 0. Box N8187,
Nassau, Bahamas.

TRA
C10037
PATIO AWNINGS ANC
CARPORTS
*, IRfRICANE
SI"FRS, PANE
John ti. 4.ewrge & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.
C10046
T.V. ANTENNAS; Bsotters for
homes, apartmate s and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, .Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.


REAL ESTATE
C6018ools
ONE BEDROOM, furnished
apartment, 6th floor
overlooking ocean and canal,
docking facillbes, has tenant.
352-5730.
C6029
Large furnished 4 bedroom, 2%
bathroom house with Bahama
room and study on oversized
corner lot WaO landscaped
with fruit bearing trees. Sale
price $3,000.00. Low down
payment.
Phone 352-5596 weekends or
weekdays after 5:00 p.m.
C6027
FREEPORT
Beautiful family home, 4
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2
Bahama Rooms, sauna bath,
fully furnished. Full Price
$39,000, minimum down
$12,000. Available
Immediatly. 373-1977.


C7467-------
JQB TITLE: SHOP
FOREMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:.
G.C.E. "O" Level or City and
Guids or equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 10
years in Machine shop
DUTIES/RESPONSIBiLITIES;
Supervise machine shop and
field maintenance services for
maintenance of the entire
cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Fraort Qrand Bahama.
C6084 **'* '** *- '*
CABI0tT MAke/VTRIM,
CARPENTER .- basic
education, 5.6-4 years
experience, stable person with
r ntesm and past history in
field. tools of Trade essential
and own transportation.
Appy In writing to: G & Q
Cs 477o o. Lt., P, 0.
Box F-*-. Freeport.


ASSISTANT SALES &
CONVENTION. MANAGER:
Appilcant must be presentable,
pauaemWa and wtln to k
W4n hom pteferty with
and Convention
pNrtne or oMn year', Sales
OART-TtWM SECRETARY-
Mg NOr feateot typing and
sit *t IHotel-
bienefIlal.
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSWANT TO OeNT


m~w tiarM Hptelh tpneaduws
WAN have eaellent typing and
~~nW liiiW *5tt#V


!ELP WANTED
C10290
JOB TITLE Senior Branch
Operation Officer. Applicant
must have full High School
Education G.C.E. '0'
level in 5 subjects with 5 to
7 years experience in
International Banking.
Bahamians only need to apply,
interestedpersons should apply
in writing, to Canadian Imperial
Bank of Commerce, P. 0. Bow
F2556, Freeport.
C6002
ASSISTANT COMPTROLL-
ER: Must have five years of.
hotel accounting. Capable of
training staff for accounting
department.
CHEFS: To take complete
charge of station: Supervise
and direct assistants. Must be
able to prepare French and
International cuisine.
Apply: Oceanus Hotels, Ltd.,
Personnel Dept. P. 0. Box
F 531, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C6037
JOB TITLE: GENERAL
FOREMAN-MECHANICAL
MAINTENANCE
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Qood basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years cement plant
mechanical background
ODUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise
ma maintenance activities,
including field forces, machine
shop and garage In providing
maintenance, Installation and
inspection services for the
entire plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C602S
PEST CONTROL
SERVICEMAN required, fully
experienced in rodent, insect
and termite control, Apply in
writing to: Rentokll
International Ltd. P. 0. Box
P-g5, Freeport, Grand Bahama
C60~32
FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
Will be expected to be able to
prepare and develop
counting systems Involved in
the mnufacturlng operations
of the company. Will be
responsible far completing
monthly financial statements,
slmIM-anual budgets, and cash
flow1 reports for
multitcompany, International
operations In addition to
normal optional accounting
and bookkeeping functions.
Must hate a god background
-iI maniofcturlng cost
icowrtliq, and should be
familiar with profit center
accounting. Must be willing to
assume complete
admiiltatlve responsibilities
.of petkimns for short periods.
whenm riMary.
The1o with experience in a
prWfeslonal accounting office
il lis ven preference.
.. eaoure to medical or
StaI f.fad desirable.
colemanseurate with
oimaln. one enquiries
4I t Aot be accepted.
inm-ieans only ned apply.
drsums toe Personnel
Cooper Laboratories
SLt., P. O. ox
Pre-, rt._ -sham._-


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TiM TOMIESlE
C10045
-b 's sst..s
awgwle Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P.O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2.3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
C9838
FENCES
For your fence needs
Call 35491
DOSCAR FENCES
Free estimates.
Terms -arranged.
C10044
TROUBLES.... small or large
call The Plumber on Wheels:-
ROBERT M. BAILEY
P. O. Box N56, Nassau
Telephone:3-5870.


hr rritbunt
Published daily
Monday to Saturday.

S FUSALE
C6009
STEEL HULL Boat 65' x 18',
twin GM 471, 3' draught.
$25,000 Cash. See Eddie
McBride, Fishing Hole, Phone
352.6827.


C6028
CHEF At least three years
experience. Bahamian only
need apply.
Contact Mr. Pietrak, Andy's
Pancake House, Ltd., P. O. Box
F-835, E. Sunrise Highway,
Freeport.
C6030
Three BARBERS required
Immediately. Apply to the
Arcade Barber Shop, P. 0. Box
F-758, Freeport.
C6035
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6031
Three TAILORS, three
DRESSMAKERS required.
Apply to Elegante (Putney
Holding Ltd). P. 0. Box
F-2223, Freeport.


RAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFED

IN FiEEPORT

TR a29mgMM


Tumday, June 26, 1973.


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C7405
JOB TITLE: (EIGHT)
GENERAL REPAIR RMEN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Good
Cement Plant mechanical
background.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6036
JOB TITLE: CHIEF CHEMIST
AND INSPECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At
least 5 years cement plant
chemistry experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise the
quality control procedures
ranging from selection and
blending of raw materials
through the manufacturing
processes to the final
Inspection and testing of
cement prior to release for
shipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6038
PLANT OPERATIONS
MANAGER-ENGINEER IN
CHARGE Grand Bahama
Telephone Company has a job
opening for a qualified Plant
Manager with management and
supervisory skills. Knowledge
of Station/Key/PBX
Installation Repair, C.O.E.,
Engineering, Traffic and
Service Centre Operations.
Must have at least 7 years
practical experience in United
States or Canadian telephone
methods.
Apply: Personnel Department,
Grand Bahama Telephone Co.,
Ltd., 2C Kipling Building, P. O.
Box F-2478, Freeport.
Telephone: 352-9352
C10126
OUTREACH DIRECTOR to
develop programmes and
activities In the communities
outside Freeport Grand
Bahama that help men,
women, boys and girls to build
their spirit, mind and body.
Applicant with university
degree preferred, sh6uld have
training and/or experience In
community, organization,
administration, delivery of
social services, leadership
recruitment and development.
Salary commensurate with
qualifications and experience.
Apply In writing to Executive
Director, Grand Bahama,
YMCA, P. 0. Box F-253,
Freeport, G.B.I.
C8034
JOB TITLE: PAINTER
SUPERVISOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCES
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES.
Preeeof lonal high pressure
boiler lelatin, steeple
jacking, send Masting an
structural Ie treating and
painting, etc.
INTE STED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
, P.o. 0. O F-oO.
Gramnd Bahasma.


i Souvenir



INDEPENDENCE



Issue


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GARAGE COLLECTOR
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY.
PLEAS& SEE OR WR4ft.TO:
ERNT PINOER, WEST
END, GRAND BAHAMA.


I












, June 26, 1973.


a 'Congratulat
promotion' card


MO MtDARSFOANENCOP
wft sf EVE/tp PEANUT MU

Brother Juni


i REX MORGAN, M.D.


sm the o m G lghter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: A day to make sua
you have everything pertaining to money and
property in correct pespeth a since the aspects are not
important for new ide or visiceary matters. Financial and
business situations should be careftaf handled.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Study debits and credits and
ae how to make wiser investmeats. Make sure you do routine
taMks with efficiency. The evening is excellent for attending a
.social event you 0oy.
-I-- -I d A d TAURUS (Apr. 20 to MW 20) Study your appearance well
ions-even if you aOd ms where you can make improvements. If you need health
onse tatments, take them. Attend the social tonight and make big
headway in right circles.
S GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Find out what it is that is
keeping you from getting ahead and do something about it. A
friend in trouble needs your assistance so be sure to give it.
Control your temper at a11 times.
S ( MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You are now able
to receive aid you need from a good friend for a project you
have in mind. Showing affection for friends brings the right
results now. Avoid a troublemaker.
LBO (July 22 to AV&. 21) If you show higher-ups that you
are an excellent citizen, you can get the cooperation you will
need for a civic affair. Make certain to increase credit rating by
paying bills on time.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) You are able to obtain the
data you need now so you can start expanding and gain the
support of associates. Plan time to make new contacts for the
help you need in the days ahead.
Z. a LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Study what your pressing
obligations are and then discharge them in a positive and
efficient manner. Precision where detail is concerned is wise. A
kind attitude with mate brings right results.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Study the methods of an
t associate and then you will know how to make the alliance
more successful. A puzzling public affair can be clarified easily
now. Avoid one who belittles you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Attend to important
work that means so much to your advancement now. Show
how efficient you are. Find the right way to improve your
health and appearance. Use your own good judgment.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Plan now for the
recreation you need soon and do something constructive about
your appearance. More devotion for mate is a must now, if
EDIA SET AND IT you wish to have harmony. Be more cheerful.
TTE !I AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) You may find it a bit
difficult to get home conditions as they should be, but using
per willpower works wonders now. Not a good time for
entertaining. Don't forget to pay an important bill.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Keep busy at communication
matters and then do errands that are expected of you. Handle
routine affairs so they go more smoothly for you. Think along
constructive lines. Be wise.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who never makes a move
until something has been thought over at great length. Teach
to come to prompt decisions, otherwise your progeny could
miss out. Business is the finest media here and education
should be directed along such lines, particularly concerning
property management. Give ethical traininearly in life.
"TMh Stars impel, they do not compel. What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


MEANWHILE -.
WHAT'S HAPPENED
BETWEEN YOU AN:
ABEY, SAM?




PARKED


I 0N 'NOW 4
Ic 4111--.% R Tti


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex trky


I GOODi I
A |j MINPY'
AfbTT


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


ACROSS

1. Audition
5. Dull finish
8. Poke
1l. Principal
2. Yale
3. Vanity
*14. Italian money
:5. Japanese
Sstrinliged
* Instrment
'17. Units of length
18. Pmantlets
l9.Parson bird
A wChmflet


34. Hatchet
35. Something
valued
37. Tricl's name
39. Type of lens
41. Cheese
45. Obliteration
47. Italian capital
48. Johnson or
Cliburn
49. Romaine
50. Wicked
51. Fiale
52. Abstract being


DOWN


1. Fifty-fifty
2. Toledo's lake
3. Field
4. Scarlett's


S klet step hA artist husband



MC III









---
5 4






.,


fer time aS Ml.


AP Nswsfeafures


6-26


5. Handel oratorio
6. Wings
7. Occasions
8. Shylock's
daughter
9. Season
10. Kidney bean
16. March date
20. High
22. Roofer's tool
23. Before
24. Constrictor
25. Classified
section
26. Cyrano's.
creator
28. Early UN
headquarters
31. Old autos
33. Function
36. Armistice
38. Sherry
40. Firmness
42. Bird of peace
43. Arbian prince
44. Disseol
45. Dusk
46. Hank of twinm


-EW




No. 7.158 by TIM MeKAYV
t. Itemainet In plsce. (6. 3)
t i 42r 74 )
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BSr LEONARD BARDN














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*oene below tha i et the great LL ies Rasua


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ton. the
ette hown
here? In matk-

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must contain tie letter,
and there must Se Mleast one
elht4-letter word In the Ot. No
murals; no worem wI s: no
prop r names. TODAYD'
TARGT: 18 wqrda, good;
23 words, vera ood; ,8 words,
excellent. So uon tomorrow.
YESTIROAY8 SOLUTION.-
Arty aster avert east rate ratty
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stare start stve state stave
st stay er ye tare tart
tetaster turw tear teat test
testy TRAVtiH trae treat
treaty treat res tryst tyre vast
vert vest vest vestry yeast.


Bridge

ub defense in rooms
was a tfeture at this trad in the
flneals af the Vandertut Cup., one
ato A two moat Important
Dealer North: Beth Vul:
north
987 6
A 5
86

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J 10 8 4 2 K 9 3
K Q J 10 7 5 4
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both 2roomaS oi to the
sae cours. Wted the
Atfe A takig the A.
later laid down the #A
&ad took the MeigW flnema In
hSart Defenders cMashd their
two lUbS MiAd pat Sotuth back
to dummy with a tOert. Now the
p verged. YBobb Wolff, for
tse AcM ocn9nued with

declare every ae to t-
guMed l ad oot and

bel WiEig Aces.
plfu bl eti teedm-
Ae4a iw dItmmd the OQ,
WeMtLwd t 0. Ooldman.
ru edMdu Lawrence.
4v w-r u. t


YOU'LL MAKE THE `I TOLP HM I'P 7tcNK IT
BEST JUSTICE THEY'VE )OVER, JUL'E THAT MEANS
EVER HAP! YOU NP 1 P A lOTOF
TALKING 1,(-1 RL WE
MAKEOU R' ',ON-IF
THE OFFER F AA' 'L


TEN YEARS AGO, BECAUSE OF SOME
TRUE OR FANCIEP INDISCRETION ON4
JOR 'S PART, SHE WENT INTO A
SHELL! WELL, IT WS ONE WY OF
PUlSHING HIM! BUT, DOING
SO, SHE PRACTICALLY
i i DESTROYED HERSELF! A


mmmwlwmmmwNmm


,y <


MARTHA N ASH I 1
^ UNHAPPY/ BECAUSE
HER HUSBAND SAIP HE'S LEAVING
ER! SHE DOESN'T SEEM TO REALIZE
TAT SHE LEFT HIM A LONG TIME AGO S

UNERSTAINE


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DROP ME OFF AT THE AIRPORT
HOTEL! THEN DRI'E THIS
YOUNG LADY TO HER
DESTINATION!













12


NATIONAL POOL

SEMI-FINALS


START TONIGHT

AT BLUEHILL
v \YSIX semi-finalists
Bahamas National
o.. nship Pool
::. vie to be among
.; finalists who will
for the
p\, s in the Ladies,
Amateurs and
..ip Classes on July
the Bahamas
: nce Sports

e mi-finals begin
X0 at the Blue Hill
se and will continue
1 hitrsday at the same
i1 place The National
will be the person
ii, the match between
Stcur champ and the
nhip class winner.
tonight's eliminations,
','h Albury v Beverly
Ihomas Sands v Steve
Charles Gibson v Mervin
intm, C(arl Malone v Samuel
111npuon, Jeffrey Major v
.1 Thompson, P/C 734
d li v Nello 0. Coerbell,
.lwnes lockhart v Benjamin
irc inoni, Martin Farrington v
.iTrov "Flo" Saunders,
I dward Glinton v Albert Rox
r.. Donnie Lee v Basil
:icholls.
Flor tomorrow's matches,
'leome Charlow v Theresa
Moss, Wayne Minns v Arthur
Bailey. Leo Dwight Ferguson v
S Basil Smith and Carvel Moxey
v Don Knowles.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W t. Pet (GB
Ne\\ York 40 31 .563
Milwiaukre 37 32 .536 2
iBaillimor 33 30 .524 3
ilslon 34 33 .507 4
ectfoit 32 37 .464 7
(levclan.d 36 44 .371 13'A
West Division
KalS.is Citi 40 33 .548 -
111Cicago 36 30 .545 V
( alitornii 36 32 .529 1I'
()ikland 38 34 .528 %
"innesois; 35 32 .522 2
IU.Ias 23 42 .354 13
Monday's Results
C'hcagu 3, Minnesota 2
IBlltimore 3, Milwaukee 3(12innings)
I exas 4, Oakland 2
lHoston 2, Detroit I
lh' Ivrlnid 4. New York 2
(:itfornia S. Kansas City 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L I'ct GB
f hitago 42 30 .583 -
Iontreal 32 33 .492 6'A
St. Loui, 33 35 .485 7
I'iladclrphia 32 36 .471 8
1 i( I'l ir,'l 31 36 .463 8'/2
N-1: ,l 30 35 .462 8'
West Division
l.Is AneleIs 47 26 .644 -
ih,,st,,n 42 32 .568 5'A
SF,- Irancisco 42 32 .568 S5"
'incinnati 37 34 .521 9
Atlanta 30 42 .417 16%
a3n ID)icgo 25 50 .315 24
Monday's Results
I.s Angeles 3, San Diego 2
Pittsburgh 8-3, Montreal 6-1
P'hiladelphia 7. St. Louis 6
Chicago 3, New York 2
I Houston I 3. Cincinnati 2


wit Tuesday, June 26, 1973.


BECKS BEES


lE8CTELFH TIEK


stag 24 glTs witlet Sat, who slip to3rd. (178) SAVES

AGAllST BEASTIE SECill TEST
TTLE btwen Jet Set's lmes Fox sad SchHtz


THIRTEEN TROPHIES to
be awarded among many
other prizes to winners In the
Bahamas National
Championship Pool
Tournament, the final of
which will be played on July
4. Top players will also
receive bonus prizes of trips
to Luxembourg donated by
International Air Bahama.

INDEPENDENCE


'ENNIS TOURNEY

AT MONTAGU
BAHAMAS Tennis stars Leo
Rolle and Bertram Knowles,
fresh out of pacing the
Bahamas to the semi-finals of
the Brandon Cup in the
Com mon wealth Caribbean
Tennis Tournament recently,
will seek top honours among
others during the Anthony
Roberts Independence Open
Tennis Classic which begins
July 4 at the Montagu Beach
Tennis Courts. The tournament
run through July 8, and play
begins at 2 p.m. each day.
Entries for this tournament
-which will see the best of the
amateurs and professionals in
the Bahamas playing for $500
in prize money and trophies,
close on July 1. All interested
persons may contact the
Montagu Beach's resident
tennis pro and director of the
tournament Bradley Demeritte.
The prize money was donated
by Paradise Island Limited.
Mr. Roberts starts the first
day of play by hitting the first
ball over the net. World famous
Bahamian actor Sidney Poitier
and Mr. Roberts will present
the awards on the final day
Among the pros competing
are Bob Isaacs, Felix Rolle,
Larry Rolle, and Al Smith.
Among the amateurs are Steve
Norton, Barry Farrington,
Peter Isaacs, Charles Carter and
Donald Archer.


" MG






BERTRAM "COWBOY" MUSGROVE


SECOND BASEMAN Sonny
Haven knocked in five runs and
Lenny Taylor added another
four as Becks Bees in an
offensive performance
commanded a total of 24 hits
enroute to a 29-1 massacre of
Heastie Lumber in the second
game last night at the Q.E.S.C.
It seemed like a complete
mis-match for Heastie who
gathered four scattered hits off
winning pitcher Paul Johnson.
Becks started with a 4-0 first
inning lead which they
commanded to 24 by the end
of the second inning. Three
more in the third and two in
the fourth topped the game
which was welcomed by the
Bees batters.
Haven went three for four
and scored three. Fred
"Chicken" Taylor got four hits
from five times at bat, scored
two and knocked in two. Sim
Humes also had a good night
with the stick when he went
three for five, scored three and
knocked in three.
Noticeably absent from
Becks' lineup last night was
league leading hitter Anthony
"Perez" Huyler. Such a game
might have pushed him far
ahead of his contenders.
BWr'KS BEES
ab r h rbi
R. Turner 3 4 2 3
S. Haven 4 3 3 5
W.Knowles 5 3 3 3
F. Taylor 5 2 4 2
S. Humes 5 4 3 3
G. Moncur 3 4 3 1
L. Taylor 4 2 2 4
B. Burrows 3 3 0 1
V. Jacques 1 0 0 0
P. Johnson 4 4 4 1
G. Austin 0 0 0 0
HEASTIE LUMBER
S. Burrows 3 0 1 0
A. Minus 2 0 1 0
A. Phillips I 0 0 0
R.Thompson 2 1 1 0
W.Ferguson 1 0 0 0
R. McPhee 1 0 0 0
C.Carey 2 0 0 0
N. Mlaoulis 2 0 I 0
R. Carey 0 0 0 0
C. Knowles 2 0 0 0


A rl-FUjIrMUt iPAL Za 9 Wl w-*cm a*t f 0 r wu =a -ax
Dewr's Bewtic Mrray ended in defeat for FrO I. the bottom of
the sixth inning he was ripped for three aomacuthm e ui
inchding two doubles pacing the Brewers to a 3-1 victory and a
half pme behind fourth place Del Jane Sainta.


Jet Set suffered a costly lose
and are now one and a half
games behind second place
Becks Bees with whom they
were tied for second on
Saturday. Becks are still three
games behind league leading
Big Q. Market
Sidney McKinney's rbi in
the top of the sixth drove in
Eddie McQuay for Jet Set's 1-0
lead. McQuay took one of
Murray's three walks, stole
second and went to third on
another of Murray's two wild
pitches. McKinney who took
four pitches for a two balls two
strikes count connected the
fifth pitch for a grounder to
Lloyd Bowleg charged with a
fumbling error.
'That guy (Fox) was
pitching us tight man, but once
I get the hang of it, I just lace
out," said Lorenzo "Doni"
Lockhart. After grounding out
to third during his two
previous times at bat, Lockhart
jumped on Fox's first pitch in
the bottom of the sixth with
two out for a double into left
field. Godfrey Eneas continued
the rally and laced a single into
left centre driving in Lockhart.
Catcher Mackey Bain took a
one ball count and shot the
second double into the same
position in left as Eneas scored
the lead off run.
After giving up those two
costly runs, Fox was relieved
by David Johnson who pitched
to and walked Murray, the
sixth batter of the inning.
Adler Minus followed and
touched a soft grounder to
Johnson on the mound. On a
wild throw to first baseman
Eugene Thompson he
committed a two tase error
and Bain scored the unearned
run.
Doni figures that Schlitz


Bertram 'Cowboy' Musgrove readies for his return to cycling


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
IT IS AMAZING the Interest
fans take it an athlete or player ...
the many who come to see him
perform. Perez Huyler, for
example, out of Becks Bees lineup
for only one game will give rise to
queries as to his well being. Some
fans might refuse to see the
Colonels perform without Sterling
Quant. All sports have named
figures In whom the fans take
interest. Professional cycling is no
exception.
Names like Boston Blackle,
Deuce, Donna, the Bratt. the Whip,
Lloyd Blake, the Farrington
Brothers and Cowboy have become
just about synomymous with pro
cycling in the Bahamas. Of these,
the Whip, Blake and the Farrington
Brothers have retired from
competitive racing, and Boston
Blackle is a potent force who leads
the 1973 season with three wins


out of four races. The Bratt won
the other. None of these wins
however were subjected to the
competition of Cowboy who is yet
to make a forceful debut in 1973.
Being a regular man on wheels,
he was constantly showered with
queries when his name was not
among he competitors. "The fans
told me they just like to see me
ride," he said.
Eager fans need wait no longer
because Bertram "Cowboy"
Musgrove with the help of a
special fan-makes his grand
return to the cycling world on July
S when he heads pro cyclists in the
Bahamas Independence Cycling
Championship. "I expect to be in a
condition that once I get within 25
feet of a cyclist he can't close that
any more," said the veteran cyclist.
"In order that he does that he has
to be pacing at 45 miles per hour
for two miles straight "


What makes Musgrove so elated
is that for the first time in his life
he has owned and will be riding an
International Fixed Wheel. This
came through the compliments of
that special fan, Mr. Franklyn
Wilson M.P. "He felt like he wanted
me to perform at my best in the
Independence Race and he felt that
I can't perform at my best on an
unrecognized bike," said Musgrove.
"I went over the route today and I
felt beautiful. I felt like I was in a
Cadillac." Actually, Musgrove won
the Grants Town Constituency
Race last year when he nosed out
amateur champ Nathanial Munroe.
"I can't pay him (Wilson) back," he
sighed humbly.
Born In Nassau 37 years ago,
Muagrove, described as the
"mischievous type" In his youth
was sent to. live with his grand
father Nathanial Munroe in Moss
Town, Exuma. Grandfather


July 4, 1973















Tickets are now on sale for this first evening event of
Independence Week, to be held in the Crown Ballroom of the
Paradise Island Hotel and Villas at 9 pm on July 4th

The show presented by Eastern Airlines and Essence
Magazine in honor of Bahamas Independence will benefit the
Stapleton School for the Mentally Retarded, the Center for the Deaf
and Dumb and the Crippled Children's Committee.

Prime Minister and Mrs. Pindling are patrons of the
event which will feature fashions by Mr. Willie and American
designers, presented by Bahamian models from Trend, Ltd.


II


Admission is $10 (including bridge toll). Tickets now on sale
at Eastern Airlines ticket office in the Sheraton-British Colonial
Hotel on Bay Street.


El


Muagrove.
All along, Muagrove played the
role of a horse trainer and cyclIst.
With his knowledge of
conditioning, "it made me wiser in
my training," he said.
What Musgrove liked about
cycling in those days is thatoIt was
undivided by the controversies of
amateurism and professionalism.
"It was a combined thing," he said.
In 1970 when the amateurs got
their thing going, the amateurs used
to run their races differently.
Instead of one championship, there
were several championships
explained Muagrove. There was the
ten mile championship, the track and
sprinting championships. However,
during championships both
amateurs and pros used to compete
together. Musgrove said that he
used to dominate the 10 mile
championship. From then on,
Muagrove established himself as a
favourite among cycling fans.
2 TO BEAT
Looking into the Independence
Championship which he would like
to see compete for by all Bahamian
cyclLi: regardless of their status,
Muagrove cited a lot of upsets, the
results of which will go down in
history. "Definitely I have two
cyclists to beat Jeffrey Burnside
and Nathanlal Mimroe," he said.
However, over that route and that
type of race is just the kind for
Musgrove's style.
As a man trains, he conditions
himself and a man must condition
himself to train," said Muagrove as
to the key of being successful. "I
have quite a lot of knowledge of
the cyclists and their condition and
if they don't live up to their
principles they would not be able
to finish with me."
Following In his father's
footsteps is 16-year-old Holland
Musgrove who captured a spectator
race last year. "He hopes to go into
a series of training after the
independence race," said Musgrove.


FOR ENGLANI


will be in the playoffs. "The
way Jet Set is going now we
might just end up third," he
said.
Murray, who pitched an
excellent one hitter, was
picked off by Lionel Neily for
a dinge in the top of the fifth.
Nelly went on to steal secc-.d
and die on third where he
reached on Bain's throwing
error. Murray who faced 23
batters struck out two.
Defensively for Schlitz
Lockhart had ten put outs.
Bain and Gary Johnson had
three each. Murray and Bowleg
collected three assists.
For Jet Set, Thompson also
had ten put outs at first. Neily
at third collected five assists.
LEAGUE STANDINGS
Big Q Market 26 7
Becks Bees 23 10
Jet Set 22 12
Del Jane 19 15
Schlitz Beer 18 15
Paradise 14 17
Blenders 11 24
Heastie Lumber 1 33
GAMES TONIGHT
SECOND place Becks Be.a who
have already clipped a half game off
Big Q's lead battle plan to dig into
it some more tonight when they
take on Bahamas Blendera In the
first pme 7:00 o'clock at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.
A win for Schlitz Beer tonight
will give them sole possession of
fourth place. They meet fourth
place Del Jane Saints In the second
game at 9:30.
VOLI EYBALL STANDINGS
ISLANDERS LEAGUE
Wardrobe Stars S 0
Police S I
Gladiators 2 S
S.A.C.A 1 3
Cold Front 0 3
COMMONWEALTH LEAGUE
Paradise Giants 5 0
B.E.C. 4 2
Pizza Solos 4 2
Prince Williams High 1 4
Ed's Dugout n 6


BAGC NET WINNER Mike Stubbs, who shot a sizzling
47 to top the field In the Central Garage's Bahamas
Amateur Golf Club tourney, is shown accepting his trophy
from Mr. Aaron H. (Kikl) Knowles Sr., managing director
of Central Garage. Leroy Jenklnms was second with a 69
after topping Craig Flowers In a playoff. Flowers also had a
a- total.


Musgrove was a horse breeder and
Bertram filled in around the stables.
"I mostly was like an acrobat on
horses," he recalled. "My feeling
was always to be a jockey hero in a
western manner hence the
nickname "Cowboy." From Mr.
Musgrove's farm came notables like
Honny Boy, Little Harry and
Daisymae. Muagrove had the chores
of breaking these in.
With weight catching up on him,
he never made a name in Jockeying
but from the knowledge he gained
from working with his grandfather,
Musgrove advanced from a stables
boy to a groom, to assistant trainer
and today he is a full-fledged horse
trainer. As a matter of fact, It was
the horse racing season that kept
him from cycling during the earlier
part of this year.
During the late 1950's, Musgrove
watched a lot of cycling and was
inspired by such notables as
Alexander, "the Whip" Harris,
Leonard "Boston Blackie" Miller,
Christopher "Deuce" Thompson,"
the Farrington Brothers and even
Kingsley "the Bratt" Rahming.
FIRST BIKE
His first bike-an ordinary three
speeder Humber came his way in
1961 when he became a horse
trainer. With the understanding of
what the condition was, Muagrove
worked out on his cycle the rest of
1961 and was awarded with third
place in his first race the following
year. He nosed out Alfred "the
Ghost" Taylor in a race which saw
Blake taking first. Impressed with
his performance, "after I ran third I
took cycling serious," smiled
Musgrove. For two years he
gathered his cycling know how
through competitive performances
with Harris, Miller, Thompson,
Blake, the Bratt and Rocket 88, the
last of the Farrington Brothers.
The first of his big times came in
1964 when he in all splendour
upset Blake and Harris to win the
Governor's Trophy. "That was
great because at that time Blake
was champ and everybody was
wondering if Blake would win the
race," recalled Muagrove. "But I
had to enter the race because I
didn't want Blake to win them all.
That was the glory of the year."
The Whip ran third in that race and
hasn't ridden since.
Later that year, Miller won the
championship, Muagrove was
second and Blake ran third. From
then on, fiats and seconds were
shared between Miller and
Musgrove. Musgrove won the
championship in 1965, Miller took
It in 1966 and from 1967 to
1969 It all belonged to cowboy
FOREMAN TO FIGHT
ROMAN IN JAPAN
SAN FRANCISCO (AP)- World
heavyweight champion George
Foreman will return to the gym this
week to begin "shakng loose" far
his flint title defense, his manager
said Monday.
The fight epre. y will be Sept.
I in Tokyo against Puerto Alco's
Joe "King" Roman, ranked by the
World Boxing Council a the No. I
heavyweight contender.
"We were hoping for a fight in
July, but if nothlag msaerialsze
soon, the Tokye4lsght wil be the
first defense," said Dick Sadler,
Foreman's manager and trainer.

ROW OVR MONI L'S
OLYMPIC VILLAGE SITE
MONTREAL (AP)- The
Montreal City Council voted early
Thursday to build the Olympic
Village for the 1976 Summer
Olympic Games in Visu Park, five
miles from the city's downtown
area.


I


pom


LONDON (AP) Keith
Fletcher eased the Second Teds
for England Tuesday with 0a
heuoic 178 and the match with
New Zealand ended in a draw.
England battled into a
narrow lead by lunchtime and
the match was on knife edge.
The New Zealanders needed
another quick breakthrough to
swing the pendulum their way.
At the interval England had
scored 307 for four wickets in
the second innings and with
Geoff Boycott, Dennis Amiss,
Graham Roope and Tony Greig
all back in the pavilion, the
home team's lead was a spindly
nine.
With a bare three hours at
most left to play, time was
running out for the New
Zealanders in their bid to win
their first Test Match against
England.
During the morning session,
England had two casualties.
Roope fell to a catch in the
slips off Bruce Taylor for 51
after the third wicket
partnership with Keith
Fletcher had put on 65 in 80
minutes and England were 250
for three, still 48 behind.
Then South African-born
Greig fell to an uncharacteristic
flashing stroke to a ball from
Dayle Hadlee that was missing
the off stump after a mawkish
innings during which he scored
12.
Greig was caught behind the
stumps by Ken Wadsworth and
England were on 274 for four.
At the interval the two not
out batsmen were Fletcher and
Ray Illingworth.
STANDING OVATION
Fletcher's innings ended just
four minutes from the close
when he was caught off Taylor.
But long before that moment
he had treated the crowd to a
cavalier display as he drove and
cut England to safety and the
fans rose to give him a standing
ovation as he walked back to
the pavilion.
Until just before the tea
interval the match appeared to
be swinging New Zealand's
way.
Wickets fell at regular
intervals and when Alan Knott
went for his second duck of
the game England still had only
a slim lead and New Zealand
looked poised for their first
win against their oldest rivals.
New Zealand wicket keeper
Ken Wadsworth dropped
England tailender Geoff
Arnold three times in quick
succession and those lapses
gave the home team the let-off
they needed.
Arnold stayed stubbornly in
defense .at one end while
Fletcher blasted away at the
other, at the close Arnold was
still undefeated on 23, with
Norman Gifford, the other not
out batsman, on two and
England had scored 463 for
nine.
They started the last day on
224 for two and needed
another 73 to avoid defeat.
Earlier Fletcher had
scored 12 fours in his century
in 4% hours and then he really
opened out, including two
sixes and a four in one over off
Bruce Taylor.
It was a welcome return to
form for Fletcher who was one
of England's most successful
batsmen on the tour of India
and Pakistan last winter. He
had never scored a century in a
Test match in this country
before. His previous best had
been 113 in India.


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