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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03359
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 29, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03359

Full Text







H DUDLE S
CON. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.



*P, M ago0- PHONE 12.1306/2-3237


Wurtlrur


o.-e .n., e.... .-.... ...,e .or .i emsemi .. mv ei.... Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL LXX, No. 168 Tueaday, May 29,1973. Price: I Cent


BUCKINGHAM PALACE STALLS, THEN MAKES

THE ANNOUNCEMENT ALL WERE EXPECTING




Princess Anne, daughter


the


marry

LONDON (AP)--Buckingham
commoner.


,to


Lt. lark Phillips


Palace announced Tuesday the engagement of Princess Anne to Lt. Mark Phillips, a


Bahamas growing as world


financial centre: 42 new bank


licences issued in past 12 months

By NICK KELLY
IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS SOME 42 NEW BANK LICENCES were issued by the Monetary
Authority, "indicating a continued trend" in development of the Bahamas as a flanncial centre, a
RoyWest banking official told representatives of the American Management Association in
Freeport last week.
Mr. G.H. Roy Hall, general of management might .be for small U.S. bank. "The branch
manager of RoyWest Banking the establishment of its overheads are low and can be
Corporation, said that even Bahamas branch; the cost of constantly controlled with
after allowing for 25-licences overheads for this type of ease," Mr. Hall said.
revoked during the ;period facility is generally reasonably On occasions, when lending
ending April 30-mainly low when compared to costs at margins were more attractive
affecting "restricted" other major financial centres." than at present, "shell"
licencees-there was a net Nevertheless it should not be branches could advantageously
increase of 14 in the number of assumed that because of the engage in off-shore lending
,.anks and/or trust complies, aq etwt sinplicilty of the which would probably not be
Sk"censd uinder the pankd atd procedure for making aqc6saible otherwise to the
Trust Companies Act. application for a bank licence, bank concerned at a
In discussing the growth of a licence would be comparable cost.
the Bahamas as a financial automatically granted upon Establishment of a branch ir
centre, Mr. Hall pointed out its submission of the data called the Bahamas has frequently)
relative youth and the rapidity for, Mr. Hall said. solved the problem for a smal
of its expansion since the end CHECK U.S. bank otherwise unable to
of World War II. Experience had shown that serve the needs of large
Apart from the Post Office the officials of the Bahamas domestic clients who might
Savings Bank and "another Monetary Authority ckecked have substantial oversea:
small ill-fated bank which was each application thoroughly business interests.
established in the latter part of and extensively, and often
the 19th century, the first bank conferred with the Federal Whereas he was previously.
of pny consequence was Reserve Bank officials or other shackled by his guide-lines, h
established in the Bahamas as appropriate authorities in the can quite legally, through hi
recently as 1908. U.S. Bahamas branch, service hi
"It was not until after the Even so, the cost of setting customers' requirements unde
cessation of hostilities at the up a "shell" bank was "not an the Foreign Credit Restrain
end of the Second World War expensive exercise in terms of Programme.
that another bank established dollars and cents," Mr. Hall "He may also prevent th
its first office in the Bahamas," said. loss of his clients' foreign
Mr. Hall said. "As a rough guide" he business to a larger competitor
However slow the start may quoted $10,000 to $20,000 as and the fear of many small
have been, he added, by April the annual costs associated banks is that having lost th
30 there were approximately with "shell" branches operated foreign business, the sam
333 institutions holding on behalf of an American bank competitor might successful
licences under The Banks Act by a Bahamas trust company woo away his clients' domestic
1965. or bank. business," Mr. Hall explained
CLASSIFICATIONS This included government
These were classified as 200 licence fee, management fee, STIMULUS
public licences; 108 restricted legal fees and other minum "It remains to be seen whi
licences and 25 non-active expenses, the ultimate effect of th
licences. The operational cost for recent change in Regulatio
Mr. H all's address "shell" banks with their own will have on Bahamas 'shel
concentrated particularly on premises and personnel was banks, but if the writer of
the rise in the number of however so easy to assess, as recent article which appeared
"shell" banks amongst the this was determined by the size in Euromoney on this subje<
licencees and the financial and quality of the offices and is correct, there may be
advantages of establishing such the seniority and number of further stimulus given to th
branches here. staff employed, activity of Nassau 'shel
At the end of April there "A completely conjectural banks," he added.
were 133 in this category opinion on my part is that the There were also ta
whose Bahamas branches were cost would be anything advantages to be gained fror
managed for them by local upwards of $45,000 per annum the operation of "shell" bank
banks or trust companies, and for a most modest operation," here, Mr. Hall emphasized.
did not include "shell" banks Mr. Hall said. The Bahamas, he said, ha
occupying their own premises He based this estimate, he no income taxes, profit taxes
and utilising their own explained, on annual capital gains taxes fc
personnel exclusively to government licence fee, corporations or individuals i
operate the Bahamas branch. $6,000; rent of 600 square feet the Bahamas. Neither wen
tft was worth noting, that the at $6 per square feet; salaries there any inheritance or estate
total number of foreign banks (one manager and secretary) taxes.
with branches in London in $30,000, other expenses, th
November 1972 amounted to $5,400. "Therefore other than th
135 against 133 in the IN EXCESS payment of its licence fee,
Bahamas, Mr. Hall said. "In some cases we would 'shell' bank is not responsib
He pointed out however that expect the overheads for this for any further payments I
the total assets of U.S. banks in latter type of 'shell' bank to be government of anythir
their Nassau branches as greatly in excess of my resembling taxation," Mr. Ha
reported in May 1972 suggested basic minimum said.
amounted to approximately 25 annual cost, but it should be He noted that with tt
per cent of the aggregate recognized that the banks who Bahamas' forthcomir
asaount reflected on the books have opted for this method are independence questions ha
it London branches of U.S. generally the larger U.S. banks been raised as to the likelihoc
bahks. who feel the necessity for of a change in the tax have
"It does not really matter acquiring prestigious premises status of the Bahamas.
what the particular objectives in order to reflect their This point had been dea


.NEWSHIPMENT
OIL
PAINTINGS

, '.NAAU ONLY


standing in the industry."
The establishment of "shell"
banks in the Bahamas offered
particular advantages for the
small U.S. banks, Mr. Hall
pointed out.
First it could be said
categorically that this device
was comparatively inexpensive
doorway in to the
Eurocurrency market for a


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with in the Independence
White Paper which cited the
government's intention to
maintain the tax haven status
of the Bahamas.
He also referred to the
government's "clear
statement" in the White Paper
that nationalisation would not
be an instrument of its
economic policy.


The announcement came
after months of denials from
both the 22-year-old Princess
and the dashing 24-year-old
cavalry officer. They have been
constant companions since last
December.
Palace spokesman insisted
right up until a few hours
before the announcement that
reports of an impending
engagement were "pure
speculation."
The official announcement
said: "It is with greatest
pleasure that the Queen and
the Duke of Edinburgh
.announce the betrothal of their
beloved daughter, the Princess
Anne, to Lieutenant Mark
Phillips, the Queen's Dragoon
Guards, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Peter Phillips."
FIRST TO MARRY
Anne, who will be the first
of the Queen's children to
marry, is fourth in line of
succession to the throne. Her
brother, Prince Charles, 24, is
first inline.
Palace sources said the
couple may marry in
November either in
Westminster Abbey or at St.
George's Chapel at Windsor
Castle outside London.
Phillips spent the past bank
holiday weekend with Anne
and the British Royal Family
at Balmoral Castle.
He was the only guest
visiting the royal family and
this touched off intense
speculation that an engagement
might be announced soon.
Buckingham Palace
spokesmen, however, have
dismissed all such suggestions
as "pure speculation."
The Queen's press secretary
said, "The Queen and Prince
Philip, who have both known
Lt. Phillips for some time, are
delighted with the
engagement."
Phillips is the son of a
wealthy country squire. He
met the blonde Princess at the
1968 Olympics in Mexico at a
party given by the British
equestrian team. He was a
reserve rider.
KISS ON DOCK
When Phillips was sent to
join the Dragoons in Germany,
early this year Anne was on the
dock to kiss him goodbye.
That separation was viewed
as part of a tradition of
keeping royal sweethearts apart
for some time. However,
Phillips seemed to get frequent
dunnes to spend in England
and he and Anne both
competed in the Badminton
horse trials last month.
They did not talk in public
at the event, but they were
rarely seen less than 100 yards
apart. Phillips was relaxed and
signed autographs, but the
Princess seemed strained and
spoke angrily to photographers
who got too close.
The marriage of Anne to a
commoner will raise no
eyebrows in Britain.
In 1936 the late Duke of
Windsor was forced to abdicate
as King Edward VIII to marry
American socialite Mrs. Wallis
Warfield Simpson, a divorcee.
Three members of the royal
family have since received full
consent to wed commoners -
Princess Margaret, Princess
Alexandra and Prince Richard
of Gloucester.
Anne and Mark were due to
take a royal train with the
Queen and Prince Philip from
Aberdeen, Scotland, Tuesday
night and arrive back in
London Wednesday morning.
The report that Phillips
would be joining the royal
family on the train fueled
speculation that an engagement
announcement from London
was possible Wednesday.


PRINCESS ANNE, whose engagement to Lt. Mark
Phillipswas announced today, seen when she won an award
as Britain's Sportswoman of the Year trophy in 1971 by
winning the European Three Day event equestrian title. She
hopes to compete at the European Horse Championships in
Kiev in September. Her fiance won a gold medal for Britain
in the Olympic horse events.



Bahamas Attorney General



to become AG in Bermuda


BAHAMAS Attorney
General Gerald Collett has
accepted an appointment from
the government of Bermuda to
become Attorney General of
that country after the Bahamas
becomes Independent.
The announcement was
made by the Ministry of
External Affairs Monday
evening.
Mr. Collett will be replaced
as Attorney General by
Senator Paul L. Adderley,
Minister of External Affairs,
who is to assume the office
after independence.
The appointment will then


be a political one.
Mr. Collett came to the
Bahamas in 1963 after serving
in Nyassaland (now Malawi) as
Crown Counsel
He entered the Legal
Department and served as
Solicitor General until hli ne
1970, when he was named
Attorney General upon the
elevation of Sir Gordon Bryce
from that office to Chief
Justice of the Bahamas.
Mr. Collett was appointed a
Q.C. in July 1971. He hopes to
take up his appointment in
Bermuda towards the end of
July.


Mr. Gerald Collett at his desk today


UNKNOWN TI PARAISE

SECURITY OFFICERS, lUT--


50 cars have their tyres



slashed while owners



attend P1 fashion show

AN ESTIMATED FIFTY CARS had their tyres slashed id
punctured on Paradise Island last night while their owners were
Le Cabaret Theatre enjoying a talent and fashion show sponsored
by the Immigration Department.


The show started at 9 p.m.
When the patrons left at about
1: 15 a.m. 50 cars, all parked in
the same area, were found to
have each had from one to four
of their tyres flattened.
An unknown number of
vandals used knives and
ice-picks.
The owners of cars, with
only one tyre ruined put their
spare wheels on and left the
scene, offering rides to the
less-fortunate owners of cars
which suffered more than one
flat.
Service stations were busy
this morning sending repair
crews across the bridge to fix
flats on 18 cars left there
overnight.
All of the vandalised cars
were parked on either side of
the main road leading to the
northeastern rear entrance to
Lowe's Paradise Island Hotel.
Patrons who had left their
vehicles in the main parking lot
east of the Paradise Island
Casino found them
undamaged, and some,
including Immigration director
Mrs. Barbara Pierre, were this
morning unaware that there
had been any vandaliaislast,
night.
Neither the Criminal
Investigation Department of
the police nor the private
Paradise Island Security were
aware of the vandalism.
One of the fashion show's
patrons, who had her tyres
slashed, blamed the lack of
security in the parking areas
last night on the fact that the
security guards were inside Le
Cabret enjoying the show.


Last night's show was held
to raise funds for the
Immigration Department's
float, which is to participate in
the Independence float parade.
NIXON BLAMES'FREAK
ACCIDENT' FOR CRASH
WASHINGTON
(AP)-President Nixon today
described the crash of one of
the presidential fleet
helicopters that killed a secret
service agent as "one of those
freak accidents." "
The president said he was
"up all night" Saturday as the
result of the crash, which
occurred in the Atlantic Ocean
off the private island of Grand
Cay off the Bahamas where
Nixon was a guest of
millionaire industrialist Robert
Abplanalp.


INSTRMCTOt IIES

AFTER IS CAI

PLINGES INTO SEA
A 63-year-old Nassau driving
instructor, who died late
Sunday when his car plunged
into the sea off the Potters Cay
Dock, is listed by police as the
island's seventeenth traffic
fatality of the year.
Dead is Captain Cyril Jones
of Second Street, the Grove,
the driver of car NPB 902.
Capt. Jone's body was still
behind the wheel of the car
when police recovered it from
the water.
A police spokesman said this
morning that efforts to contact
relatives of the dead man had
so far been fruitless.
Capt. Jones spent 30 years
sailing around the Caribbean
before turning his attention to
the operation of a machine
shop and heavy equipment.
In the mid-1960's he
switched to teaching others to
drive, and in the interim
became a recording artist,
producing two records, "A
Golden Dream" and "Creator
of Creation."


Tk11f denies stery
BAHAMAS Business League
president Dan Scott today
denied reports that the League
was seeking legal advice on
behalf of member shop-keepers
who have been threatened with
prosecution under the Price
Control Act.
Mr. Scott said there were
"talks" taking place concerning
price control in relation to
small food operators, but he
said the League has no need of
and no intention of seeking
legal advice in the matter.
He confirmed that a number
of shop-keepers have received
letters from the Prices
Commission. The letters
pointed out that some of the
shops' prices were over the
controlled limit, and ordered
them dropped. The letter went
on to point out that violations
of Price Control Regulations
make offenders liable to a
$5,000 fine or a year in prison
or both.
Mr. Scott said it was the
view of the league that the
letters were not of a
threatening nature.
Mr. Scott said the League
would be issuing a "full
statement of the true facts"
shortly.

Telths give 500


feed parcels to needf
-j OVER 500 PARCELS of
food and clothing were
distributed among the
underprivileged, the aged and
the sick in the Bain's Town
area on Sunday by volunteers
working under the Bahamas
Federation of Youth's
"Operation Breadbasket," it
e was announced today.
--, Mr. Ortland H. Bodle,
chairman of Operation
Breadbasket, also announced
the appointment of Mr. Greg
Armbrister, son of Killarney
M.P., Cadwell Armbrister, as
national vice chairman of the
relief programme.
The new vice chakia is afn
articled student in the law
Chambers of Paul L. Addertey
and Company, and is ao viwe
president of thet Sy,


CAR LEAVES ROAD. CLIMBS WALL
SURPRISINGLY, there were no serious injuries at about 5:30 p.m. Monday when this
Pontlac,8N8019, climbed over a low wall on Hawkins HHI and slammed Into a tree and a
light pole. The driver of the vehicle, Hawkins Hill resident Falcon Watson, escaped with
only minor Injuries. Several neighbourhood boys who had been sitting on theim wall
reportedly suffered minor abrasions in their dash for safety.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


U.. RUSSELL'S
ORANGE --CE
swallow atla
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SPACE STATION COOLS DOWN IIEEK UITIMEE


TuiOy, May 29, 1973.


DESPITE STATEMENTS


Astronauts begin to RPElEtL IALT Govt. spent over
VA A&MAWAM40aia --- --


WILL NIXON APPEAR BEFORE GRAND JURY?
WASHINGTON (AP) Watergate prosecutors reportedly say they have
evidence to justify calling P dent Nixon before a grand jury, but the
"Washington Poet" quotes government ourceas saying they awe not sure a
subpoena would be constitutional. The newspaper says in Tuesday's
editions that the prosecutors reportedly have told their superiors that
Nixon should be questioned about bow high-level White House staffers
could hoe been Involved in a Watergate coverup without his knowledge.
White Houm News Secretary Ronald Ziegler id the White HouM is
asking Attorney General Eliot Richardson and Watergate pMrometor
Archibald Cox to Investigate the charges.
Ziegler said the Post story, if true, reflects a shocking and Irresponsible
abuse of authority on he part of the federal prosecutors."
In other Watergate developments, C.B.S. news reports former White
Houe counsel John Dean has been asked to reveal all his information on
the cae in return for facing only one count of obstructing justice. The
network aid It learned the offer was made by Watergate prosecutor Earl
SSilbert.
SMeanwhile, Republican Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee ays the
Senate Watergate committee will call former Attorney General John
Mitchell and three former White House aides by the end of June. Baker
identified the aides Monday as H. R. Haldeman, John Ehrlmchman and John
Dean.
ASTRONAUTS HOPE TO REMAIN ALOFT 28 DAYS
HOUSTON SPACE CENTRE Skylab commander Charles Conrad has
assured newsmen on earth he and his crew are confident of completing
their funl 28-day mission in orbit. Conrad and his fellow astronauts, Dr.
Joseph Kerwin and Paul Weltz, held a news conference today In which the
questions and answer were relayed through Mission Control.
The news conference lasted seven minutes and came during the
astronauts' lunch break In their fourth day in space. During the news
conference, the astronauts pointed cameras out of Skylab's windows and
showed a view of the US. west coast. One of the questions from the
newsmen related to completing the full mission and Conrad answered,
"we're in good shape to complete a full 28 days up here."
The astronauts cooked their first meals today in the Skylab kitchen.
Astronaut Welts admitted he was having a little difficulty with food. He
said the menus warremore than he's used to eating. They cook on a heating
tray, and one problem is got drifting away from the food In their condition
of weightlessness. (a SEE STORY THIS PAGE)
'COD WAR' CLOUDS AIR FOR U.S.-FRENCH TALKS
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon meets with Congressiuonal
leaders of both parties Tuesday morning on foreign policy matters, and
Nixon's Wednesday trip to Iceland for talks with French President
Pompidou Is reported high on the agenda. Nixon returned Monday night
from a four-day holiday stay in Florida and the Bahamas.
Also returning to Washington Monday night was Secretary of State
Rogers, just back from his 18 day tour of Latin America. Rogers win
accompany the President on his trip to Iceland.
Meanwhile, representatives of IS NATO nations continue their meetings
I Brussels Tuesday on the dispute over fishing rights between Iceland and
Britain. The escalating dispute has clouded the atmosphere for the
NIxon-Pompidou summit.
DENIES OTHER MINISTERS INVOLVED IN SEX SCANDAL
LONDON (AP) Prime Minister Edward Heath's office strongly denied
Monday reports that a third minister is involved in the sex scandal that has
led two ministers to resign in disgrace.
A detailed statement also stressed that there is no evidence to support
published hints that a fourth minister is implicated.
Heath's denial came only hours after sources reported that the unnamed
third minister personally assured Heath that a call girl's reported claim he
was one of her $125 customers was untrue.
The sources said Heath accepted the assurances and left for West
Germany for a brief vacation. The statement issued soon afterward said
Scotland Yard Investigations had produced "no evidence of any kind" to
Support the allegations that a third Heath government officer was involved.
BUT RUMOUR OF A THIRD INVOLVEMENT PERSISTS
LONDON (AP) The third government minister In the sex scandal
shaking Prime Minister Edward Heath's administration categorically denied
Monday that 'he was a client of a call girl. But the sources smid police
invetisations were continuing.
The minister, whose name has not yet been disclosed, was reported
Sunday to be a client of the call girl at the centre of the scandal.
Mrs. Norms Levy, 26, left the country last week after she was identified
as the call girl who entertained and had photographed the former Air Force
Minister Lord Lambton. He resigned Tuesday. Investigations Into the
Lambton affair led to the resalgnation Wednesday of a second minister,
Lord Jellicoe, who admitted "some casual affairs" with prostitutes.
SThe Sunday People newspaper said earliIeriql Levy had been contacted
In Morocco and had named a third government minister among her clients.
The information was passed to Scotland Yard, to Home Secretary Robert
Carr, and eventually to Heath.
IMMEDIATE WITHDRAWAL OF U.K. WARSHIPS REQUESTED
REYKJAVIK (AP) Iceland's Leftist coalition government Monday
formally called on the North Atlantic NATO Council to arrange for
the Immediate withdrawal of British warships from Iceland's disputed 50
mile fishing zone.
The move at once thrust the escalating dispute between the two allied
states on to an international level two days in advance of an
Amerlcan-French summit conference here.
I It also insured Presidents Nixon and Georpges Pompidou, who ae due to
fly in late Wednesday, wil however reluctantly be sucked into the quarrel.
TORNADOES CAUSE LOSS OF LIFE & PROPERTY DAMAGE.
NEW YORK (AP) Tornadoes, heavy rains and strong winds marred
Memorial Day weekend observances from Oklahoma to Florida, claiming at
least 48 lives and causing millions of dollars in property damage.
S Deaths were reported in nine states as the storms moved across the
SMidwest and South.
... Authoritle said hundreds ot persons were injured and thousands of
hones were either damaged or destroyed.
Elven persons were killed by storms In Alabama. Six died In two
i accidents In Missouri; five died In a tornado that struck Keefeton,
Oklahoma; three were killed in tornadoes in Jonesboro, Arkansas; three
drowned in Kansas when a tornado struck their fishing boat; five were
Reported drowned in Tennessee; four drowned In flash floods in North
Carolina; a Florida man was killed in a tornado and one person drowned in
MississippL
MYSTERIOUS SUBSTANCE OOZING FROM GROUND
DALLAS, TEXAS (AP) At three Dallas are homes, residents are
a watching a pulsating blob of matter which has mysteriously oozed from
te rMound, thus far defying definition.
Some 75 miles to the northwest, an armed sentry guards a graveyard
Where villagers my a spaceman was buried in 1897. lsvestiptors are
holding what they say may be metal fragments from hiS spaceship.
The whole affair has become a siense fiction buff's idea of heaven.
London newspapers have been asking for more intormataon along with
porter from Canada and Australia, and scientists and universities ar
The mysterious substance began ooalsg from the backyard of a Garland,
Texas, woman two weeks ago. Marle Harris described the strange material
Sas reddish with thick bubbles on top ... blackish macous Inside. It has
multiplIed itself by 16 times in two weeks.
ROGERS WINDS UP HIS LATIN AMERICAN TOUR
: WASHINGTOtN, MAY 29 (AP) Secetary of State WItlam P. Rogers
seturaned late Monday night from a 1'day tour of Latin America.
in his last stop, Jamaica, Rogers conferred with Prime Minister Michael
iM- p y about the SIegal entry of Jamaeians lato the United
alates. Ofnan would not reveal dataila of ter conversation.
epr and Manley also discussed several others subjects, Including
Jamalca's diplomatic relations with Cube. Washington and Havana broke
e mir the a decade ago.
Thi touring Setary visited Mexico City, Mana, NiMagua; Caracas,
Veassualsa; L PerIu; Buogots, Colombia; Rioe ds Janeiro and Bradila,
S ,lmall; enos Ahe s Caca, the Nethetands Wet adies, and then
Ria s ar tis wek, Nixon nd Roigs ar aslhdled to fly to leeland for

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News highlight


space.
With soft music playing in
the background and their next
meal simmering in the kitchen,
Skylab I astronauts Charles
Conrad Jr., Dr. Joseph P.
Kerwin and Paul J. Weitz
settled down to scientific and
medical studies aboard the
world's largest spaceship.
"You Betcha", said Conrad,
when asked during a news
conference if they were ready
to spend four weeks in the

COMPLEX STIlY

WILL PROBE

SUN'S SECRETS

SPACE CENTRE,
HOUSTON, May 29 (AP)-
The Skylab astronauts today
point a battery of telescopes at
the Sun and hope to give
scientists their best look yet at
how this sphere of gases
controls our solar system.
Physicists also hope the
experiment will help unlock
the secret of controlled
thermonuclear fusion, the
source of the Sun's energy.
This might aid in the search for
an unlimited, pollution-free
power source on Earth.
Ground controllers
completed an automatic
checkout of the $107-million
array of six telescopes Monday,
and Charles Conrad Jr., Dr.
Joseph P. Kerwin and Paul J.
Weitz plan to put it in
operation today, the fifth day
of the scheduled 28-day orbital
flight.
Once the system is activated,
Kerwin will be the first to sit at
the console, which Conrad calls
so complex that "it's like
playing three 88-key piano
ta04s at one time."
e astronauts on Monday
completed setting up
housekeeping in the
laboratory, which is the size of
a three-bedroom home, and
began their first medical
experiments.
A makeshift sunshade
erected Saturday reduced
temperatures to near 80
degrees, far below and 125
degrees recorded inside the
cabin after a heat shield was
ripped away during the launch
of Skylab on May 14.
Flight controller Neil
Hutchinson predicted the
temperature would level out
near 70 degrees within a day or
two and make the workshop
fully livable.
Kerwin, the first physician
to fly in space, conducted
three major medical
experiments Monday. He drew
blood from all three crewmen
and then monitored Weltz on
two devices.
One was a cylinder which fit
over the lower half of Weitz'
body and, with air evacuated,
simulated gravity pressure like
that experienced by a man
standing on Earth. Several
measurements will be taken of
each man during the mission to
gain a running measurement of
the deconditioning rate of the
cardiovascular system (heart
and blood vessels) in weightless

Waltz also rode a bicycle
exerciser at various workload
speeds while Kerwin took
heart, blood pressure and
respiration readings. The
physician, however, reported
both tests ware affected
somewhat by the high
temperature and that readings
wouldn't really be meaningful
until the workshop cooled
further.
More medical checks were
scheduled today in an
extensive programme that aims
at learning how well man can
live and work in space for a
longtime.


orbiting laboratory. "I think
we're in good shape for 28
days."
Kerwin, the first physician
in space, said they had adapted
to zero gravity with
"remarkable" ease.
"You do have a sense of up
and down and you can change
it," said Kerwin. "It's just a
matter of orienting your
eyeballs and brain."
He said the mind was
"remarkably efficient" at
accepting the idea that the
floor can suddenly become the
ceiling or that the walls can be
used for the floor.
Temperatures in the
spaceship, which had soared to
more than 125 degrees before
the astronauts deployed a sun
shade on the craft, dropped to
88 degrees. The readings were
expected to level out in the
70s.
NOT BAD NOW
"If the temperatures keep
going down," said Conrad, "it's
gonna get real pleasant in here.
It's not bad now."
He added later: "We got the
most important thing working
now the music. And it's
speeding everything up."
An onboard stereo set plays
music from a small library of
tapes.
Kerwin drew blood from
himself and his crewmates
Monday morning for the first
of a weekly series of tests. The
blod tests start an intensive
programme of medical
experiments, which will
include use of instruments to
check the heart, lungs and
ability to work. Using the tests,
doctors on the ground will
closely monitor how well the
men are adapting $o living for
weeks in weightlessness.
"Be advised, Joe just drew
a41 three of us," said Conrad,
after the Tilst blood letting,
"and that it went very
smoothly."
In answering one of several
questions submitted by
newsmen and relayed by
mission control, Weitz
admitted he was having a little
problem with the Skylab food
"This menu is just more
food than I'm used to eating,"
he said. The astronaut was
unable to finish his portions
earlier of asparagus, bread and
apricots.
SWIM IN AIR
Part of the news conference
was beamed to earth by an
onboard television camera. The
scenes showed Kerwin and
Weitz floating around in the
wardroom of the Skylab,
preparing to eat their lunch.
They seemed to be swimming
through the air as they moved
from place to place.
The astronauts used the
heating tray and water
dispensing system in the
wardroom to fix their meals
Monday. They ate while
grouped around a table which
has foot rests to keep thdm
from floating away from their
food, which is held in place by
the heating tray.
Conrad said there were still a
few "hot spots" scattered
around the spaceship,
particularly around areas of the
hull which are not covered by
an improvised sun shade.
Skylab began heating up
after launch on May 14 when a
solar, shield was ripped away.
Launch of the astronauts was
Delayed 10 days while
sunshades were fabricated. The
astronauts installed a parasol
device on Saturday, their
second day in space. The
shade, which Conrad calls a
"sail", did not fully deploy,
but still quickly brought
temperatures down.
'"That sail does have a
wrinkle in it," said Conrad,
"the walls have cooled off and
I can almost plot the shape of
that sail by feeling along the


ARIGEINNA & CUBA ESTABLISH walls.
DIPLMATIC RELATIONS The astronauts paused
occasionally in their work to
tBUNOS AIRnS, MAY 28 (AF) look out a large picture
.- _.entinta's new.. Prae window and watch the Earth
-t day wit apawin below them.
IPreMeet Hector I. Camars, iThre's Puget Sound down
wse took offlee Feiday, madth there," said Weitz as the space
aneemeAit at gtamam station pawed over the west
weh tuba n aiont meealdo coast of the United States. "I .
Dortleea who came her for the can see Vancouver Island and
Iammupsatin ememaly. Mt. Rainier."
A became the 10th Latin He also said that the white
A r eaountry eeosPlains
Cbss Communist onmnment vapour tails of high-flying jets
he b b y b Il Csco.w Until stood out plainly and at one
CameW took Argentina% point be should se all of Italy
sSens mW y i n r~Mats a booblike peninsula Jabbing
e p of t dowa into the blue of the
CuAn fmod Bie sea of the Mediterranean.
hmitso ,


feel at home in


Skylab, cook meals

SPACE CENTRE, HOUSTON (AP) TIree astronauts,
beginning to feel at home in their cooling space station, Monday
cooked the first meals in the Skylab kitchen and started a aeries
of medical experiments by conducting the first blood test in


government."
The paper predicted that
a decision would be made by
the end of the year.
The government neither
confirmed or denied the press
claims.


Fill AKES

PAYT FF IN


& am dAhiMWM a


$100,000 on Nixon's MIENTIMA


San Clemente home

By Gaylord Shaw
SAN CLEMENTE, CALIF. (AP) The federal goImment has
spent more than $100,00 for inprevements at President Niona's
San Clement estate sine he bought it four years ao, mreod


II 9IHIAITINI
ROME (AP)--Greek
mutineer Captain Nicholas
Papps sa Mid Tuesday he was
ready to obey any order from
self-exiled King Constantine
"unconditionally."
He hailed the King as the
"symbol of national unity."
But he restated that he did not
contact Constantine before
hand to inform him about his
mutiny against the Athens
regime.
Pappas led six officers and
24 sailors aboard the d ut;oyer
Velos into a mutiny Friday.
They landed and were granted
political asylum in Italy the
next day. He said:
"If the King summons me
this would be for me an order
and I would readily obey. This,
however, has not occurred yet.
"On my behalf and on that
of those who followed me
here, with the firm belief that I
am expressing the feeling of all
the officers, my colleagues in
the Greek navy, I solemnly
state:
"Faithful to our oath whose
ingredients are love for our
fatherland and obedience to
King Constantine, we restate
our unconditioned loyalty to
our King, symbol of national
unity and guarantee of a
constitutional, free and
democratic Greece."
Pappas made the statement
through a Rome-based Greek
lawyer who is one of mnay
self-exiled Greeks who have
called on the captain and the
other mutineers.
King Constantine, who has
been living in Rome with
Danish-born Queen Anne Marie
and his children since 1967,
was not immediately available
for comment.
A refugee commission
including a United Nations
representative and Italian.
officials formally
acknowledged the 31
mutineers as political refugees
under a 1951 international
Geneva convention.
As a result, the Greeks will
be provided with identification
papers enabling them.to freely
stay in Italy or travel to other
countries which have backed
the convention.
The captain has said he plans
to remain in Italy. Others
planned to join relatives
currently living in Germany,
Holland or other West
European nations as immigrant
workers, many have said they
would like to go to a
Scandinavian country and seek
a job in the merchant marine
there.

GREEKS MAY

REPLACE KING

WITH REPUBLIC

ATHENS (AP) The
pro-government press
headlined Tuesday that the
Greek monarchy "might" be
abolished directly by the
government rather than
through a plebiscite.
Quoting informed sources,
"Acropolis,' often used to leak
government intentions, said
that the government is
considering whether to act in
its capacity as a revolutionary
regime to abolish the
monarchy and declare a
Presidential Republic.
This was listed as the second
of two possibilities. The first
was a popular vote.
"The second possibility is
more likely due to the several
advantages it offers," Acropolis
said. The paper did not
elaborate.
'Apogevmatini', another
pro-government afternoon
daily, said that following the
recent anti-government events
in the navy, "the fate of the
throne and not only of
Constantine has become the
foremost concern of the


show.
Most of the work was
done in the name of
presidential security. Muck of
it, however, has enhanced the
value of the oceanside property
owned by Nixon and one of his
wealthy friends, New York
industrialist Robert Abplanalp.
The federal investment of
more than $100,000 was
disclosed in city building
permit records and in
subsequent interviews with
government officials. The
figure is nearly three times the
$39,525 which the White
House said during the weekend
the government had spent for
improvements at the estate.
The federally financed
improvements included the
beach cabana, a redwood
fence, a storage shed, and an
electric heating system for the
President's home.
These improvements are in
addition to the $123,514
which the White House said
last week the Nixons have
spent for improvements on
their house and homesite.
NO BREAKDOWN
The White House would not
provide a breakdown on the
$123,514 figure it gave on
Friday in a statement
disclosing that Nixon had sold.
all but 5.9 acres of the 29-acre
tract to Abplanalp in
December, 1970.
The complex transaction
took place 18 months after
Abplanalp had loaned Nixon
$625,000 to help him with the
initial purchase of the property
adjacent to a coast guard
station where the Western
White House now is located.
The 1969 loan was cancelled
in a subsequent transaction
which left Nixon with a net
investment of $374,514 for the
house and 5.9 acres and
Abplanalp with an investment
of $1.2 million for the rest of
the property.
The entire tract, including

NEW SOCIALIST

PREMIER TAKES

OVE IN KILLANI
THE HAGUE (AP) Joop Den
Uyl, the first Socialist Prime
Minister of the Netherlands since
1958, Introduced his coalition
government's programme Monday
before the second chamber of
Parliament.
He said the new government
would strive to diminish the
existing differences between higher
and lower Incomes and ways of life.
As a mark of the government's
attitude cabinet ministers will take
a cut in pay of ten per cent.
The new left-centre government
- a coalition of labour, radicals,
left-wing liberals and two Christian
Democrat parties has 97 of the
ISO votes In the second chamber. It
emerged earlier this month after
169 days of political wrangling, the
longest political crisis in Dutch
history.
Den Uyl said in his policy speech
that fighting inflation will be one of
his main sims.
Future bargaining between
unions and employers may be done
in terms of Income rises In flat
amount instead of In percentages
of Income, as the latter tend to
benefit the higher earners he said.
Taxes in general will be cut or
kept at the present level, Den Uyl
said.
In the area of the national
defense he announced that the
defense budget will be reduced in
the coming years.
The budgets for culture, social
work, development aid and housing
will be increased.
The Premier admitted the
coming years would not be amy.
especially in those areas in the far
north and south of the country
where unemployment is high, utt
said his government would do its
bet to carry out a progressive
programme.
As to the Independence for
Surinam and the Netherlands
Antilles, with the Netherlands now
united in the kingdom of the
Netherlands, Den Uyl said his
government's policy would aim at
independence for these countries at
an early date.
The debate In the second
chamber on the new government's
policy would run for three days.


the portion owned by
Abplanalp, remains under
secret service guard. And while
the White House won't say
specifically which portion of
the overall tract is now ned
by Abplanalp, it is apparent
that some of the federally
financed improvements are on
land he currently owns.
An examination of records
in the city of San Clemente's
building department and
subsequent interviews with
White House and other federal-
officials disclosed that the
improvements included:
A $42,500 eight-foot-tall
brick and concrete block wall
stretching for about 1,400 feet
around three sides of the
property. The White House did
not include the wall in its
accounting of federally
financed improvements, saying
most of it was on coast guard
property. But city officials say
building permits are not
required for work on federal
property, and one was
obtained for the wall.
An $11,561 six-foot
redwood fence that extends for
about 800 feet between the
Nixon-Abplanalp property and
the beach.
A $13,500 electric heating
system in the Nixon home, a
replacement for the previous
heating system which officials
deemed a "security risk."
A $12,964 dlass wind
screen installed alongside the
President's swimming pool.
The glass is one and one-fourth
inches thick and is bullet
proof.
A $3,360 storage shed
with stucco walls to blend into
the architecture of the
President's estate.
A $2,000 cabana on the
beach beneath Nixon's house
near a redwood crossover on
the railroad tracks separating
the beach from the estate. The
crossover is complete with
small red warning lights to
signal if a train is approaching.
Asphalt paving costing
$1,500 to link the President's
home with the adjacent
Western White House.
Three gazebos and a
gatehouse costing an estimated
$22,000 and used by security
personnel who guard the
presidential property.
Most of the government-"
financed projects were
undertaken as part of what
officials dubbed "Operation
Sunrise" soon after Nixon
bought the property in
mid-1969.
In addition, city records
included building permits for
several projects apparently paid
for by the Nixons.
These included a swimming
pool costing more than $5,000,
a fireplace in the President's
study costing an estimated
$2,000, and recent renovation
of the kitchen costing an
estimated $7,000.
The kitchen project,
undertaken, last November,
included the purchase of two
new sinks, two food warmers, a
dishwasher, a clothes washer
and dryer, a garbage disposal
and another appliance with
records described as a "trash
masher."


with diffrnc-
APARTMENTS BY THE DAY I
34 charming, fully
equipped 12-34 room
apeort mu s ech g our
w excellent beAc or
Owebeautiful prdena"
poolarem. Al wih hotel
type maid service.
kiduhn, u -ircood soning.
Supwrmar et, to res,
resmwrnt a 3 minute
a" mall smit.
TI% -M -m fo vow Ohm, Ebaw semI,.
tl ,D*lOy led w may m ratos now.
HMOm LstAL Sg t P. O. Il Na1a. New.u.
Mrs. Joan Maryon, manager, Mrs. Sandra Enes, as't. manager,
Mrs. Cleoml SNlth, receptonist.
CH 7-.778r64 new


SUit Srlbl


sUN


;. C f


Porcelain white, Royal blue upholstery, 11.000 miles, air
conditioned electric adjustable seats and windows,
power brakes and steering, multi-band radio, recently
surveyed by Rolls Royce engineers. Telephone 31257.
Box 22910,00


Tu I 29, 1973.


^ ^ J _ ^ ^ ^ ^. ___IA- ^


BUENOS AIRES, MAY 29 (AP)
Residents of a Buenos Aires
shMatytown a up today to receive
3,000 food peCages from the Ford
Motor Co.'s Argentine subsidiary.
The devred Monday
to the oa ch were part of
the first instalment of Ford's
minon.do ar protection payoff to
the People's Revolutionary Army,
whose guoerriNa wounded two
employees of the company during a
kidnap attempt last week.
The company also delivered
$400,000 to two children's
hoptals. It also has promised to
hand over 22 ambulances, a total of
$180,000 worth of food for slum
dweers and $300,000 in school
supplIes for shantytowns.
Some Pronift youths opposed
accepting the frat fqbd packages as
they came from terrorist activities.
But the leader of a liberal religious
movement, the Rev. Carlos Mujioa,
told them:
"Now Is not the time to quarrel
about ideology. Let's get this food
to the people. At least the children
will hav tested, ilk and cocoa
once in their lives."
Meanwhle, Argentina's new
Peronlst President, Hector
Campora, restored diplomatic
relations with Cuba after an 11-year
break and announced he would
establish relations with the
Communist governments of East
Germany and North Korea.
"A new e has begun," Campora
declared; after emerging arm-in-arm
from an hour's talk with Cuban
President Osvaldo Dorticos, who
came to Buenos Aires for
Campora's inauguration last Friday.
SArgentina is the seventh of the
25 members of the Organization of
American States to establish
relations with the Castro
government in defiance of the OAS
ban voted in 1964. Mexico never
broke off relations.
Since taking office, Campors also
has freed 600 guerrillas and
political prisoners, legalized the
Communist Party and abolished a
special anti-subversive court that
the previous military government
had set up.
However, Campora appointed a
largely moderate Cabinet, and some
observers thought this might delay
the socialist domestic programme
he has promised. The only leftist in
the Cabinet is interior minister
Esteban RIghl, 3S.
PRINCE CHARLES TO
VISIT ST. KITTS
ST. KITTS (AP)-Prince Charles,
the Prince of Wales, will pay his
first official visit to the Associated
State of St. Kitts, Nevis and
Anguilla this week where he will
officiate at the opening of a
restored 18th century fort.
The British Prince, an officer
aboard the frigate HMS Minerva,
will arrive In St. Kitts May J1 and
will officiate at the opening Of the
"Prince of Wales Bastion'" the
following day, which has been set
aside as a holiday in honour of his
visit. He will then visit Nevis from
June 4 to 6.
Meanwhile, neighboring
Anguola will celebrate a separate
holiday Wednesday, the day prior
to Prince Charles' arrival, in
observance of the sixth anniversary




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Tuesday, May ....9.3..


34ht rtbunr
NUiTUS Ammn r JUmAl IN VUA MAcSmM
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, PubliWaer/BEdtor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publitser/Editor 1917.-1972
ContvurOiN Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,MJte., B.A.. LL.B.,
PubUler/Edlor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532,2.2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986,2-2768
Tuesday, May 29,1973.

I EDIORAL

Change and decay


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
ANOTHER terrible murder has been committed in the
Caribbean. This time in Kingstown, the supposedly quiet capital
of the island of St. Vincent, where the Acting Attorney General
of this British colony was assassinated.
It is believed that the crime was committed by five members of
a Black Power group in the island.
Eric Rawle, aged 50, was shot twice when he was called out of
his home during the early evening. He lived three miles from the
city. He died in a local hospital two days after the attack.
An order for arrest has been issued for Junior Cottle, leader of
a group called B.L.A.C. Cottle was arrested some time agp on a
narcotics charge. A reward of $1500 has been offered by the
Government for information leading to the capture and
conviction of the assassins.
The murder weapon was found in an abandoned car which
contained a shotgun, several rounds of ammunition, food, green
fatigues, first aid equipment, a map of Africa and of St. Vincent,
red and green flags, a radio, a notebook and a collection of
literature.
********4*
Black Power originated in the U.S. For many years the black
revolution manifested itself in various forms in the U.S. but it was
brought into focus by the British racist Stokeley Carmichael, a
Trinidadian who has become an American citizen, when he stood
in the middle of the street in a southern town in the U.S. a few
years ago and, with clenched fist held heavenward, shouted the
two powerful words "Black Power".
Immediately this slogan became the battle cry for black people
across the U.S. and it quickly spread its infectious poison to black
communities beyond the borders of the U.S.
**e*******
About two years ago an Englishman called on me at my office.
He brought for my examination a sheaf of propaganda leaflets
about the New Hebrides which he was promoting as a tax haven
that could offer security for investment capital for another 100
' -years.
This man had pictures to show that the natives in this distant
country were so backward that it would probably be another
century before they became aware of the black revolution in
America.
A few nights ago I saw a TV programme on the New Hebrides.
It revealed that Black Power has already reached this outpost of
humanity. The movement is being led by a burly, bearded native
who is urging his followers to push the white man off his lands.
And so those two words "Black Power" have galvanized blacks
wisely or unwisely into action around the world.
It is interesting to realize that, while this revolutionary black
consciousness has arisen in the U.S. some of its outstanding
leaders have been of West Indian origin.
The first man to stir the consciousness of power among the
black people of the U.S. was Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican.
He raised his battle cry some time after the first world war.
Recognizing the need for economic strength for his people he
organized a shipping company and named it the Black Star Line.
This was by contrast with the British White Star Line.
The company bought an old ship and Joshua Cockbum sailed
as its master. Captain Cockburn was a black Bahamian who grew
up in Grants Town but settled in the U.S. after eating a Master
Mariner's certificate from the Board of Trade in London.
The ship entered into service in the seven seas, particularly in
the African area, but, because of lack of business experiern., the
venture failed.
Inspired by the Garvey spirit, a Black Star Line was formed in
Nassau. This company also bought an inferior ship which was
entered into the Nassau-Miami service and sailed with Captain
Stephen Dillet, a noted public figure, as its master.
Captain Dillet, who also held a Master's Certificate, had served
for years as the 2nd Officer on the Imperial Lighthouse Service
tender Canarvon. It is interesting to recall that, after retiring
from the sea, Captain Dillet joined the staff of The Tribune and
worked actively with my father in efforts to bring about social
reforms in the colony.
Again, because of lack of business experience, this venture
failed and carried down with it a number of budding black


merchants in Nassau. They had put all their savings in this
enterprise.
The time came when Marcus Garvey was under such heavy
pressure in the U.S. that he left New York and returned to his
home in Jamaica where he entered into politics and enjoyed a
measure of success for a time but he was finally pressured out by
*the power groups that exercised control of the island during that
period.
Today Marcus Garvey is one of Jamaica's heroes. A bust has
been erected in a public place in his memory.
An interesting bit of news reflecting the widespread influence
Aof the Black Power movement comes out of Africa. Not
surprisingly its location is Uganda where the dictator, General
Amin, is pursuing a ruthless policy of purging Indians, Orientals,
f Englishmen and other European elements from the territory over
which he rules.
A news despatch from London reports that Uganda's
Ambassador to West Germany and the Vatican, Prince John
1Patrick Barigye, has announced that he will to into voluntary
,dI&e "somewhere in Africa" rather than accept the Upndan's
military leader's recall of all his ambassadors for his
anneuacement about a new government.
The report states that "Uganda has been without a Cabinet
~udsne Auin sent all his ministers on two months 'recuperation'
leave after the defection of two of them, including his own
'brothei4"saw, Wanume Kibedi, the former foreign minister, who
:is now ia voluntary exile in Somalia".
BDe lye., the 33-year-old son of the King of Angola and a
'professaonal diplomat, wrote a letter of resignation to Amin in
which h said that "the reign of terror that has been established
in our belowd country has shocked the conscience of all men of


BaTelCo board say they cannot afford union wage demands


FOLLOWING three weeks and/or promotions were
of silence after a staff awarded to approximately 309
demonstration on Monday. workers as of April 1, 1973.
May 7, the Bahamas Tel- This is in keeping with the
mmunications Corporation philosophy stated above. To
yestaday issued a press grant the Union's request for
statement in reply to changes increases of approximately 30
concerain. wage notiatk per cent would increase staff
mde by the BaTdeCo branch cost to approximately 63 per
by cent of revenue an
of the Bhama Public Services impossible situation. The
Unl"a. Corporation's survival, with or
The full text, read at a press without a salary increase is
conference by BaTelCo public highly dependent on improved
relations director Errol Leach, productivity and efficiency.
follows. Despite the adjustments
The Bahamas mentioned above, Management
Telecommunications continued to meet with the
C o rp orat ion Union and did not at any time,
(BaTelCo) wishes to apologise break off negotiations. A
to the public for any Recognition Agreement was
inconvenience resulting from signed by both parties in
the recent demonstrations December, 1967. Article 1 of
staged by its staff on May 7 that agreement states:-
and 22 which resulted in delays "The spirit and
in operator handled overseas intention of this
calls and repair service. agreement is to maintain
BaTelCo wishes further to and further good
correct certain misleading relationship between the
allegations appearing recently Corporation and the
in the Press. employees represented by
Negotiations have been in the Union."
progress between Batelco and This agreement also provides
the Bahamas Public Services procedures for the proper
Union over an extended period settlement of disputes and the
concerning salary increases, orderly disposition of
During the course of these grievances. The Industrial
negotiations, it was made clear Relations Act, 1970 also
to the Union that their demand provides procedures for the
for a general increase which settlement of grievances. Either
amounted to approximately 30 set of procedures could have
per cent of salaries could not been effectively used by the
be met. Union to avoid the
Batelco's present payroll is embarrassing situation brought
$5,923,425. Additional staff about by the demonstrations.
costs in the form of pensions RUMOURS
and other fringe benefits On May 4, 1973 Batelco
amount to $270,549 which heard rumours to the effect
amount to approximately 51 that a demonstration was
per cent of gross revenues, imminent and in accordance
Batelco takes the view that with the spirit and intent of
any further overall increases in the Recognition Agreement
salary notwithstanding drew the attention of the
increases in the cost of living, Union to the fact that such
must be met by increases in action would be in violation of
productivity and efficiency. the agreed procedures. On the
The Union has a joint same day all employees were
respond sib ility with similarly advised in writing that
Management, whether they such a demonstration would be
accept it or not, to help bring in violation of the Recognition
about this improved efficiency Agreement as Management had
and productivity if Batelco is not broken off negotiations
to remain solvent and and there was no dispute in
improved benefits are to accrue
to its workers. It is progress.
Management's hope that they These ettorts to avoid
will assume this responsibility, disruption of an essential
Batelco also maintains the service to the Bahamian public
position that increases and proved fruitless. Management
promotions should be awarded received no response from the
on a merit basis to those Union and a large number of
employees who have workers left their work stations
demonstrated efficiency and without permission on the
potential. morning of May 7 and staged a
INCREASES demonstration in front of the
Batelco presently employsCorporation's headquarters on
1084 workers. Of these, Thompson Boulevard.
approximately 249 received It is interesting to note that
salary increases in October, a Union/Management meeting
1972 and merit increases was scheduled to take place at


goodwill throughout the world. While innocent people continue
to be brutally and savagely eliminated, your regime has failed to
bring to justice the perpetrators of these crimes.
"Indeed, eyewitness reports and circumstantial evidence tend
to implicate you and your benchmen in these barbarous acts,
which show complete disregard and contempt for human life."
One of the prince's two brothers, Patrick Ruhinda, a lawyer,
was murdered in Uganda last December. His other brother has
since succeeded in getting out of the country.
According to this report, written by Colin Legum of the
London Observer staff, Barigye is one of Uganda's best known
diplomats. A graduate of Cambridge University with a B.A.
degree, the Prince has a distinguished background in various
countries as a diplomat.
Barigye was knighted by Pope Paul VI in 1969. His father Sir
Charles Gasyongo, was knighted by Britain. As a member of the
Angola royal family, he has considerable standing among his
people in the former kingdom of Angola.
"The resignation," writes Legum, "comes at a time when Amin
is known to be in serious difficulties about finding sufficient
people of real influence to join his new government."
**********
Black Power, which breeds irrational hatreds, has taken its full
toll of life in the Bahamas and may eventually be responsible for
the destruction of the colony's delicate economy.
The place where it has probably done the most damage is in
the Catholic church in the Bahamas where a great effort has been
made to build a native clergy that would eventually take over
from the American Benedictines who founded the Catholic
Mission in the Bahamas and built it into an independent diocese.
What appeared to be a fine body of men had been prepared for
the job of leadership in the church in the Bahamas. At least two
of these men gave promise of becoming a Bishop. One of them
reached the position of Prior of the dependent St. Augustine
Monastery and headmaster of St. Augustine's College.
After the election of the Pindling Government most of these
men became so infected with the Black Power spirit that they
seemed to go to pieces quickly.
All but one has since left the clergy. The one who has remained
was recently appointed Chancellor of the Diocese by the Rt. Rev.
Bishop Leonard.
This has been a great tragedy for the whole Christian church in
the Bahamas. And a sad reflection on the stability of the class
from which they were drawn.
In microscopic form, this is the fate that now threatens to
overtake the entire Bahamas where, one after another, former
sound business enterprises are now experiencing serious economic
problems as a result of political harassment by elements in the
Government.
.********IH
There is really nothing wrong with the idea behind Black
Power. It could be a constructive influence in inspiring formerly
backward people to aspire to a better place in life.
But it was bred in hatred .... and so, as hatred never fails to do.
it is gradually consuming everyone who gets too near to its hc(
flame.
**********
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Change and decay in all around I see;
0 Thou, who changes not, abide with me.
HENRY FRANCIS LYTE


10 a.m. on May 7 the ver, day
the demonstration took place
resulting in considerable
inconvenience to the public.
UNION & LAW
In order to ensure that
Management was at all times
acting in the spirit of the
agreement and the law, it
requested the Ministry of
Labour to rule on the legality
of the demonstration. The
Ministry subsequently ruled
that the Union failed to
comply with the provisions of
the law during both
demonstrations. Batelco
cannot and will not be a party
to the violation of an


agreement drawn up in good
faith, nor can it be party to a
violation of the law.
It must be appreciated that
Batelco like any other
Corporation would have
policies and procedures to
govern the conduct of its
workers and the conduct of its
legitimate business.
On noon, May 21 Mr. V.
Major was suspended for the
remainder of the week, not for
participation in the
demonstration as purported by
the Union but rather for
impeding Management
personnel in performing their
normal functions in more than
one section of the Corporation


and for threatening to do
"Hurt" to a member of
Management. This uncalled-for
threat was made in the
presence of the Acting General
Manager, the Assistant General
Manager/Engineering Services,
the Acting Assistant General
Manager/Personnel & Industrial
Relations and the Assistant
Controller. These actions on
the part of Mr. Major
constitute serious breaches of


Corporation discipline.
Mr. Major was given owa
week within which to expala
his conduct. During this
period, there was opportunity
for dialogue with Mr. Meaor
who was most uncooperative in
discussions with his Division
Head and senior members of
Management.
Many other supervisors ad
Pra S. L@tS


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Tueiday, May 29, 1973.


She gr@ggy


TREE













MENTAL ASSN.
SPONSOR PUBLIC

LECTURE AT Gass
IN THURSDAY
OVER a year ago members
of the Bahama Islands Dental
Association examined the teeth
of from 5 to 6,000 elementary
school children and were
"appalled by what they
discovered."
"Concerned over what
appears to be a seeming lack of
,preventive measures to ensure
dental health," the association
has arranged to present at
Government High School on
Thursday at 8 p.m., a special
lecture, "Better Health
Through Sensible Nutrition",
an Association release said.
The lecture will be delivered
by Dr. William L. Hembree of
Jacksonville, Florida.
Dr. Hembree is a past
president of the Southern
Academy of Clinical Nutrition
and has appeared before many
dental and lay groups
throughout the United States.
He spends a great deal pf his
-time in his private practice
counselling teachers, parents
and children on the prevention
of the processes that produce
dental disease.
Invitations have been sent to
selected elementary teachers,
secondary guidance counsellors
and various other associated
health and educational units.
Members of the medical and
dental profession have been
invited to attend with their
wives and office personnel.
Dr. Harry C. Cook, president
of the sponsoring dental
association said that "with all
the scientific and practical
knowledge so easily at hand, it
is frightening to comprehend
why there is so much
destruction of the oral tissues
accompanied by equal
indifference."
"Sadly," he continued, "the
future outlook for controlling
dental decay and pyorrhea is
bleak indeed. The real answer
lies in preventing it in the first
instance through education and
the adoption of optimum
nutritional standards. This is
where Dr. Hembree comes in
so well for our purposes."
Treatment. of" defective
teeth would be ideal if
4----4u efficient facilities were
available and if recurrence was
unlikely. General statistics
show 'that tooth decay is
occurring at least five times
faster than it is being treated in
other more sophisticated
countries and that refined
white flour products
containing enormous quantities
of sugar are involved as the
culprits. Much has been written
and published about the
advantages of water
fluoridation and the
association is currently
investigating.its practicality in
Nassau.
All three Kiwanis Clubs in
New Providence have either
built and/or manned treatment
and education centres at Long
Island, Exuma, Andros and Her
S Majesty's Prison.
S "The overall report from
studies is discouraging," the
S release said.
"In a nine-year observance
at one of the clinics most
i patients apparently have failed
to-understand the concept of
prevention as taught although
they all sheepishly admit to
S what "too many sweets' will
S do. It is difficult to convey the
S iea that when a tooth hurts,
S particularly at night, it is
uwally too late to be able to
S do much for it in an
unsophisticated clinic. Too
i often the dentist is regarded
only a 'tooth puller." Very
', I vfew report for annual or
: mi-annual inspections in spite
S of reminders or encourage-
S ment," the release said.


"In the public eye dentistry
in any form is unpopular. So is
regimentation of food
practices. Many people never
consider, the conditions that
lead up to losing one's teeth as
a personal disaster, shortening
life and frequently other vital
-i body structures.
"As yet, no miracle drug or
vaccine has been found to
combat dental disease
specifically. Funds for such
sar-ch are difficult to come
by because of the more heroic
aeds In heart and cancer
to Hembree's address
wU at pipt to offer a digest of
Wi atWeWadSf presently
*n generally




Syi r u id from
by.r bth dental and
,r said Dr.
"in hope our
wig hglu tde
J 0th saMadeon 'saim
R ron. o'wa
a se JO md from


YOU CAN


PAY LESS


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If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Valuel


OUR STORES WILL BE OPEN
UNTIL 9:00 RM.ON THURSDAY MAY 31.


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BATELCO


"PUBLIC HOLIDAYS:- FRIDAY, JUNE 1/73 AND MONDAY,


MAPLE L EAF

WIEN IS
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CLUB BOLOGNA
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SPRAT""TS
DOG BISCUITS

YORK PEANUTS
SWIFT
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VENC&TS
CUItRY POWDER


4 Ears


$1.39
(VALUE
754 I DAY


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13-oz.


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FAMILY FARE
OBAIBE JUICE


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PILLSIBURY
CINNAMON ROLLS



Bt DEN'S MILK


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91oz.


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1.49


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From Pqge 3
all Union branch officers took
part in the demonstration on
May 7 but in that they
committed no other known
breaches of Corporation
discipline, disciplinary action
was not taken against them. All
staff who were known to have
left their work stations were
told that they would not be i
paid for the period that they
were away. This is not a
penalty but merely
non-payment for time not
worked.
As a pre-condition to further
negotiations, the Union
insisted that Batelco lift the
suspension and revoke the
decision to deduct two hours
pay for time not worked. This
was unacceptable to
Management but in an attempt 2
to break the deadlock, an offer
was made to cancel the
suspension in return for an
apology from Mr. Major or the
Union. This offer was refused.
Owing to the Union's refusal to
negotiate further, a dispute was
filed with the Ministry jf
Labour and National Insu'ance
by Batelco and the Union was
so advised.
Workers ignoring
information sent out to all
staff soon after the
demonstration on May 7 which
detailed the proper procedures
for resolving disputes as laid
down in the agreed grievance
procedure and the Industrial
Relations Act, 1970,
again demonstrated on May 22.
During the demonstration
on May 22 the Ministry of
Labour and National Insurance
advised the Union that they
could not convene or
participate in a meeting
(Union/Management) while an
illegal demonstration was in
progress.
DISCUSSIONS
Upon receiving this advice
the Union officers called off
the demonstration and
discussions were held under the
supervision of an officer of the
Ministry of Labour and
National Insurance. The
Ministry handed down a
decision that the suspension
should be lifted. Batelco
immediately complied withsthe
decision and allowed Mr. Major
' to return to his duties. In that
the wording of the decision did
not clarify whether it was
based on Mr. Major's action
being in the capacity of a
member of Batelco Staff or an
officer of the Union the
Corporation appealed against
the decision.
The Union had maintained
in all the news releases
attributed to them and in
meetings with Management
that the May 7th
demonstration was not Union
orientated, hence Mr. Major's
actions had to be treated as
breaches of discipline.
A ruling on the appeal today
under the Signature of the
Hon. Minister for Labour and
National Insurance states that
on the basis of the arguments
and documents presented to
him by both parties to the
dispute he is convinced that
Mr. Vance Major was acting in
his capacity as Deputy Branch
Chairman of the Bahamas
Public Services Union
immediately prior to, during
and following the May 7th
demonstration. As
Management's action arose out
of Mr. Major's behaviour
during the period he should
not have been suspended. The
Corporation accepts this ruling.
It is clear therefore that the
Corporation appealed not in
the spirit of "Fight to the end"
but rather to establish clearly
on what grounds the Ministry's
ruling was based.
MINISTER'S RULING
With regards to the Union's
demand that staff be paid for
the two hours during which the
demonstration May 7th took


place, the. Minister's ruling was
as follows:-
There can be no doubt
that the demonstrators
withdrew their labour from
the Corporation for the
period of the
demonstrations and that
this was time for which,
u under normal
circumstances, they would
have been paid for work
done. It is necessary to keep
in mind that wags are
payment for work
performed. From this point
of view, therefore, no
worker can honestly expect
to be paid for work that he
has not performed. As a
result, the Babtmas
Telecommunications
Corporation cannot
reasonably be expected to
pay those member of staff
who demonstrated for the
time they spent away from
agreement of the


e S. CoL 2
t


Si

i:* ;
*' A.


-SA WCH.EAS


DAWY L.-RIS




A s. ".- lav"m ou" -
7 /*


ORltf lUANGE D~RIN




2/99CB ite


Ip







29. 1973.


iRE Sk


-0'


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UNTIL 9:00P.M.
THURS.


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S. MiTON CNICKEN AM TKEY .
POT PIES..... 3 F.99
12 UU.MA LEE ALL FLAVORS
OAKES .......... 1.05.
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UK inventor has the answer to fuel shortage,he puts a i
By Hfugh A Mulligan weighs a little over a pound of manure to the equivalent of size of a beer keg. sourcesof Supplies. Traedas p ali O
Al special Correspondent and costs $33 including air a lank of gasoline. Bate says he now gtsto be the steam enlae et got 0s
TOITNIS I N;LANI) (AP) freight from the factory, which "Thirty cubic feet of miles to the gallon from his Ku wsit of manure first job lai hn s t
EInthroned behind ti -wheel happens to he Bale's garage. methane equals a gallon of Hillman, compared with a little supplies," he intoned diesel trca cs Md.n .Ag, a .t
of his manure mobile, British addingg iraw, to form petrol, but it's more efficient over 20 when using gasoline, tpturously "There must be He lust his lleg I a
inventor Harold Bate can sniff carbon. and water, for and powerful," said Bate. and "can get her up to 78 miles millions of tons of It going to motobH yc bit40 y arsit
haughtily at fuel shortages and hydrogen, it takes two weeks Bate keeps the equivalent an hour if the coppers aren't waste out there. They're ago, but tYo 1
the energy crisis, to Look up a hatch of methane of 10 gallons of pig power in about." He figures his costs at famous for it, aren't they?" family sad aI g l r
Wa ? cd along at from the manure pile, with the the trunk of his car bottled about 2 cents a gallon and reaumably, he meant the as a stock car racer. His g
78-miles-an-hour on wings of ratio being roughly 100 pounds under pressure in a canister the always has an eye open for new cattle industry. for chemistry, which hl ff ngt
n n...... a tinyh -n emu..ndutry.Ifo.ch.misry,,w...be.. "


ILI


IPlSe4 to a hoth o,
dnk and Inventing. 'fh
locals hnk ilh half nrod, h,
eid.
"ate aleo has patented
bicycle "propelled only by th,
boumciaz of yoar bamIs ec
u.a;hi at work, between
towing up batches of pig
A16 gom electric racing car.
I- '


Buy your
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IR Because we treasure your business, Maura's makes this fabulous offer to our valued
Free with the purchase of each Lawn Boy Power Mower one Jerry jug and one gaic
Value $4.95 Free.
Hedge
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Reg $9.75 Special Price $8A I
Hand
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0 Special 0 A .m Asitl- r


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Sunday. May 3~ 173. Elm Eulbunt


INiai woman caught

with forced travelers

chmps, ets finid $4U


A 27-YBAR-OD WOMAN a
VUITOL digped with 16 in
aueO afutad after her arrival W
m on FrMday aftenmoon from M
* M W ftahed $400 or w
* *maglk Msentenced to six h
Mm* 2*- m-agistrate George ci
D oawnoman Donnie to
Namtt Ioo.; described a a
CoUlas Avenue Street ho
amdaiMt, pleaded guilty to the co
16. eait oan Monday. She S4
wu m by attorney fc
Niedzln who told the court fa
Seat b being un d by Ii
NAMMbody W cad a number of
dMqM, found in her 1
-enmaM. '.
Moon woo accused of in
ftgia" the danaturea of p
vadme pople oan 14 American Ii
Exps tellers' cheques and
* O toe~ptins to defraud the B
RoyaW uk of Canada's airport b
Sbi krc of $250 by false d
plmteneM, when ihe arrived s
here rom Miami on May 25. -
Poeie who arrested her, also i
found ber possesion $1,320 s
In uncahed traveller's cheques
lumed by an American agency, q
as well a 11,400 worth of al
trmvelDs' cheques in Swim si
frams iad 150,000 yen. o
Blooa pleaded guilty to the n
charge oft lawfully posessing s
the cquh e a well as having B
pnumel documents belonging a
to Linda Levine, Alice
Azaddul Justine Kibowitz, a
Dime Nddum, Does Archave, 1I
Yvette L Dekeyr, Iris Gjula, i
Marie M. Yamanka, Larles I
KUir sad Madine Alinll. a
PROM MIAMI I
The 27-year-old brunette
THE GIFT FOR
I"NEPENOENCE
Up-$to daaNMory of the ittful rise to
piN e by the PLP through the
oce omws-without volnce.
'ith Pi, ber e ce,. ..w ho
ulm the Mw .7.. NW>h thefate
tien twsahe m... A far more a
t Mtw." troma-C dcmnen-
,ft air". w


no~l meh empI to provide som
Bfuiumwer tor a number of eiQ-
....t..... aboutthlpwnomenonof
abluiloai4##uleNin effecling a change
f govinmt In the Commonwealth of
the iands In 1387 to Independ-
v In if*'
AVAILABLE AT MOST
. OKSTQRO S


nived here aboard a Pan Am
%ht from Miami, Inpector
lifted Jack told Ge wt
onday. He sid that paea
re contacted and 4aseld
W after she presented asred al
heques totaling $250 to -
irport lRoyal Bank of Canada
ller to be cashed.
She was not found out
however, until the bank had
contacted Thomas Cooke and
ona, the agency seponstle
r iuinas the cheques, and
bund out that they had been
sted as stolen.
When questioned by police,
loon told them she had been
*en the cheques by someone
SMiami, but was "not
repaed to msay who it was,"
spector Jack said.
Attorney Bowe said that
loon was evidently being used
y some other peremon. He
described her as being very
arry and upset by the incident
nd requested that a fine be
imposed instead of a prison
sentence.
He said she had made it
quite clear that she was sorry
bout the matter in her
statement. She was a ftst
offender in the Bahamas end
o "pecuniary lose" had been
offered by anybody in the
Bahamas as a resmit of her.
attempt to defraud.
If she was msat to prison he
mid, she would .auffer a peat
Ms as she opera a business
n Florida. Mr. Bowe aid that
Bloon would also hare to fae
more serious penalty is the
United States upon he return.
His request for the retun of
plane ticket, which dal had
sed to arrive here, was to sd
by the magistrate after he Wa
formed that even that bore a
icttious name.
Magistrate Hannays granted
Br. Bowe's request not to
prison his client and fined
hr $300 or three months for
attempted fraud and $100 or
hnee months for unlawful
U7 what sentence would
be imposed on the additional
charges the magistrate said that
he was imposing a "blanket
fine" for the additional
offences.
He remanded the woman in
custody until payment of her
fine.


MORALITY & THE
NEW BAHAMIAN
THE INTER-denominational
Christian Youth Association
will sponsor a talk on
"Morality and the new
Bahamian" by Jeanne
Thompson 8:30 Wednesday at
Stephen Dillet Primary School,
Wulff Road. The public is
invited.


Conuow dani evawy nw t exct Thun days
frqm 10 p.m. until...
CANTONESE DINING FROM 7 P.M.
NO COVER NO MINIMUM



NOTICE
ESTATE OF THE LATE
EMILEJEAN PAUL VAN DER LINDEN
Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demands against the above-named
Estate are requested to send the same duly
certifted to the undersigned on or before the 30th
day of June 1973.
And Noticeis hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time above-mentioned the assets
of the deceased will be distributed among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the
claims of which the Administrators shall then have
had notice

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administrators
Sandrinham House
83 Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

SMEARED


2 men on trial for piot to rob Royal Ban


TVO MN, -ns d and
qmloui ed by mabas of th
Criminal lnvestiatioo
Deptumant on tdri peat in
dlabd plot to rob the L4fe
Ow bwanh of the Royal eank
t Coida lSt myr wew t oNa
tdw Mondqa in the htpmm
10 two en-. Tlhm
fatnAm, whob m epemtd
by mtormy ray Clit, m
WdUtom ambM, who hM
t HOey otwlok, -pl
Po ra r C. l.'D.
rin imIsat A. MeOaid
FPis M Mid thWt agdmm
admitted dar the int Tmtw
that they "planed to 'do' the
Lyford O bank together."
Hel id hemade noteeoft I
Iteview with the two man
mhen he sw them on May 1.


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Iona A.


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At that time, he said hq told
tam they were iaspected of
pleaadng an armed robbery
without listing any specific
bank.
It was his understanding that
thdey ware supposed to be
making preparatios to pull
eeal robberies lup. Fields
Id.
16 aid that Gilbert reiasd
to make a written statement
but told him that lhe wa
ppiAd to talk what he knaw
about the alleged ompiy.
INTERVIEW
The interview with GOlbrt
dad Iraham was conducted
I -the C.I.D. office of
supalntendant Gittens in the
pesence of Det. Corp. Dean,
Mr. Fields said.
He told the court, that
GiWt told him the robbery
plah began about three months


Lyford


prior to the interview.
"He said that about three
months ago, Thomas told him
about the Lyford Cay ank.
He said that he believed it had
plenty of money. They went
around the bank in a car, but
he could not remember whose
car it was, but they had
planned the robbery together,"
Insp. Fields said he was told.
He said Gilbert also
admitted complicity. Gilbert
had told him that they
"planned to do the Lyford Cay
bank together," Mr. Fields
mid.
An additional remark
included in his evidence
brought strong protest from


superintendent, who had access
a to his notes of the interview
during the preliminary inquiry
could not recall whether he
defence counsel Perry Chritie hadtold old the lower court
who termed it irrlev and magistrate that Iraham said
prejudicial, having "no value they had planned to 'do' the
whatsoever as related to the Lyford Cay bank together.
charge before the court." He said it was also
Solicitor General T. Langton "unusual" that Mr. Fields did
Hilton, leading the witnse, not mention what he alleged
told the court that he agreed nrtham aMid at the
with Mr. Christie the remark preliminary inquiry "if that
was prejudicial, statement was true."
NO CAUTION Mr. Botwick also made
Insp. Fields told the awrt application that the notes
when cross-examined by Mr. which Mr. Fields made during
Bostwick that he did not his interview be put in as
administer the required ctatim exhibits for the sake of the
to the accused Ingraham and jury.
Gilbert during the interview he Outlining his case, the
had with them. solicitor general said that the
Mr. Bostwick also termed it two men had admitted to Mr.
"unusual" that the police Fields "what the Crown claims


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k at

amounts to the offence of
conspiracy."
He said although Inpgraham'
statement was objected to
defence counsel, Gilbert h
made a statement to Mr. Fie'ds
admitting that he had agreed t
rob the bank along with
Ingraham .
A search conducted by -
C.I.D officers at Gilbert's
Highbury Park home and at
several other places at which he
lived revealed that he had two'
gas masks and a number of .22
bullets as well a handcuffs.
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SCENERY EXCELLENT, & SOME FINE SINGING, BUT-

Nassau Operatic Society's Merr

a Widow, more mellow than merr.


THE NASSAU OPERATIC SOCIETY'S
disappointingly more mellow than merry.


By Colin Kelly
night production Saturday


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Technically, the production
had everything in its favour;
nothing was spared in wrapping
the package.
The Civic Centre's curtains
opened to reveal a scintillating
and strikingly beautiful
achievement in scenery,
costumes, make-up and
lighting. This breathtaking
moment should have come
alive, but it didn't.
Not until the middle of the
last act did the musical catch
the boisterously comic flavour
of what it was all about: a rich
and merry widow, courted
and pursued for her money in a
gay Parisian setting at the turn
of the century.
Vocally, the production was
a success, but even the singing
would have benefited
immensely from a more joyous
show of gesture.
INERTIA
The chorus, except for the
high-stepping can-can girls,
seemed stricken with inertia,
and what could have been a
totally exuberant evening
simply was not.
The orchestra's tendency to


THE PONTEVEDRIAN EMBASSY provides the setting for Franz Lehar's "Merry
Widow" being presented by the Nassau Operatic Society throughout the week at the
Dundas Civic Centre. Clive Webster, centre, plays the dashing Count Danilovitich, in love
with the widow but reluctant to marry because of her money. Beth Hutchings, seated,
performed the role of the widow, Anna Glavari.
PHOTO: Andrew Toogood


lag behind the tempo of of fervour.
musical conductor George The blame for this surprising
Annan contributed to the lack lack of overall spontaneity and


fun can only fall on producer
Charles Sindall and choral
director Bruce Curtis. .


All but two of the lead
singers showed a remarkable "
flair for restraint, totally
uncalled for in such a -
lighthearted and frivolou
piece.
Beth Hutchings, beautiful
and radiant as the widow Anna
Glavari. sang with precision 4
and range. She lacked j ,
however, the power one would,,:
expect of a leading lady.
Miss Hutchings, too. would-
do well to broaden
interpretation of Annas
Madame Glavari, well-atttuae
to the risque" tempo of her.-
time, was not the sweet
ingenue portrayed by Miss
Hutchings.
Bill Pinder as Rosilon,
seemed overly tense in the role
of Madame Zeta's
admirer. This placed an u
strain on his voice, produce .
at times an undesirable h
tremulo.
Ted Kallergis, amusing as
Baron Zeta, head of the
Pontevedrian embassy in Paris,
Page 12, Col. 3


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"THE MERRY WIDOW," played by Beth Hutchings, centre, and Baron Zeta, left,
played by Ted Kallergis, are among the principals in the Nassau Operatic Society
production at the Dundas Civic Centre. The show has been playing to capacity audiences.
PHOTO: Andrew Toogood


I


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m


^\


mUm.....











Tko flri n Teda_ Mm__ 29-,* 973-&"MTN


Ghr Grthant


Operatic Society


EDUCATION DISCUSSION Leroy Bailey and Bahamas
SLATED FOR TOMORROW Federation of 'oath chairman
A PANEL discussion on Ortland B8die.
education tomorrow night will Cabinet secretary Rodney
be the last in a series of six Bain will act as nmod-rator.
lectures and discussions on the PRE-INDEPENDENCE
implications of independence, MASS
sponsored at the Bahamas
Teachers' College, Oakes Field, ON WE DNESDAY, June 6,
by the extra mural department the Catholic community of the
of the University of the West Bahamas will celebrate a Mass
Indies. of the Holy Spirit at Our
The discussion tomorrow is Lady's Churchkl on Deveaux
scheduled to begin at 8 p.m. Street at 8 p.m. -
Participating will be Chamber "This will be a
of Commerce president concelebrated lass to seek
Holland G. Smith, Bahamas God's guidance on our country
Employers' Confederation and our people as we become
executive vice president T.V. an independeatt country," a
Arnett, manager of the Labour release from the Chancery
Ministry's youth employment. Office said todaLy,
service Mrs. Gertrude Civic leaders and church
Colly mor e, Sonesta dignitaries have been invited to
International Hotels director attend this MLas, when the


8:10 & 11:30
cbheLcgend

of Boggy

A TRUE STORY
A byTteIOmKe FftidmTE[MNSOP
AND AT 9;55


Most Rev. L,-igi Barbarito,
Apostolic Delegate, will bring
greetings from Pope Paul VI.
The Most Rev. Samuel E.
Carter, S. J,, president of the
Antilles Episcoal Conference,
of which the l)iocese of Nassau
is a member, also will be
present for this celebration.
GAINS DIPLOMA
MR. GLEINROY "Flo"
Saunders, well-known among
baseball and softball fans, was
recently awarded a diploma in
professional locksmithing by
the Locksmithing Institute of
New Jersey.
The diplomat follows a year
of study anac certifies Mr.
Saunders, 29, as an expert in
the latest technical skills of
locksmithing and key-making.


a 0


a SAVO


WU~LFFlRD.


From Page I1
sang and acted well. But even
Mr. Kallergis seemed to have
fallen prey to understatement.
His voice is a rich one and
could have been used more
fully.
Baron Zetq is the character
around which all the others
revolve, and as such, Mr.
Kaliergis should have set a
stronger pace.
Helen Smith as Valencienne,
the Baron's wife, not only sang
well but gave feeling to her
portrayal.
Clive Webster as the dashing
Count Danilovitsch,
playboy-diplomat who finally
wins the hand and fortune of
Anna Glavari, created a
delightfully full-size character
to go with his ample and very
pleasing voice.
What Count Danilovitsch
lacked in polish, refinement
and "elegance, Mr. Webster
made up for in effervescence,
impetuosity and passion.
"The Merry Widow" will be
performed at the Dundas Civic
Centre nightly through
Saturday.


'a d


l.U. 15111 I ATrrA RAI

HOLIDAY INN, FREEPOT


SEEN WITH HORACE
BULLARD, (at left) Resident
Inkeeper of Holiday Inn,
Freeport, is entertainer 0. C.
Smith.
While visiting Nasmu Mr.
Ballard saw O.C.'s show at the
Emerald Room in the Hyatt
Emerald Beach Hotel and was
so impressed by what he saw
that he immediately signed the
entertainer up for appearances
at the Holiday Inn for
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday.
0. C. Smith will appear on
PHLULIPS SPENDS WEEKEND
WITH ROYAL FAMILY
LONDON, MAY 29 (AP) Lt.
Mark Phillips, a close friend of
Princess Anne, spent the spring
holiday weekend with the Royal
Family at their Scottish estate of
Balmoral. However, Buckingham
Palace dismissed as "speculation"
suggestions an engagement was
imminent between the Dragoon
Guards' officer and the Queen's
only daughter.
Phillips, on leave from his
regiment in West Germany, stayed
at Balmoral with Queen Elizabeth,
Prince Philip, Prince Charles, Prince
Andrew, Prince Edward and
Princess Anne. ___


these days at 9:30 p.m. and
11:30 p.m. "If the crowds that
0. C. has been drawing at the
Emerald Room in Nassau can
be used a an example his
performances in Freeport
should be an immediate
sellout," said Mr. 9Bullad
today.
PHOTO: Andy Toogood.
SIi


SPECIAL

NOTICE


See the film "No Need
To Hide" the exciting
true story of Nicky Cruz
presented by Bahamas
Youth Evangelism
Fellowship at the
Epworth Hall Shirley
Street Saturday June
2nd. at 8 p.m.
_ ii i l -- i1


What s your




hearts desire?


A Royal Bank



Savings Account



can help you



izetit. fl


The most important thing
about savings is to do it
regularly. When you do,
your money builds up.
Another important thing is
to put your savings to work
for you. Earning interest. In
The Helpful bank. Savings
offer security for rainy
days, future investments,
flexibility.
Savings also offer you something else.
Your chance to buy your heart's desire.
Helpful Bankers in Nassau and the Family
Islands can tell you about savings. Just ask one.


The Romal The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas


9..- M^


IAmIT ,


Tuda. MWy 29, 1973.


. 1








trtbmte 13
$70m. HQ for Christian Science

opens in Boston tomorrow


BOSTON (AP)- A
modernist,. 70 million-dollar
headquarters for the
world-wide activities of
Cliristian Science opens here
Wednesday.
The sprawling concrete
centre spread around a
700-foot long reflecting pool,
dwarfs the tiny romanesque
stone church that was the
original home of the First
Church of Christ, Scientist, in
1894.


impact studies can be
550-car parking garage. to their wishes. performed.
The church has also tried to Other church-related Construction is scheduled
upgrade the neighbourhood construction in the urban for completion in 1975 when
around it, to the dismay of renewal area on the perimeter the existing administration
some neighbourhood residents, of the centre has been ordered building will be razed and a
who protest loss of existing stopped by the U.S. Appeals new entrance to the mother
housing and allege insensitivity Court until new environmental church comnleted


-altunderground utilitleb ready telephone,
electricity, water.


-landscaped park


areas


-church and school sites
-sparkling salt water lake
-ocean front for Beach parties, picnics and


sunshine fun.
-privacy 365


days a


year.


-ideal atmosphere for bringing up the family.
-constant sea breezes.


Come to Yamacraw


all be there to greet you sunrise
and Sunday. AND ON WEEKDAYS F


Beach this weekend. We'll


to sunset,


Saturday


ROM 2 p.m. to dark.


EAST END


Yamacraw Beach PHONE MORLEY and OBREN 24148/23027
or our model home 41141

'YamcrawBeah PHNE ORLE and N 2148/302




II. _____ ___ _________ _________________


14


WANDERERS


REGAIN

SOLOMON


TROPHY


By COVER POINT
THE COMMONWEALTH
Wanderers cricket team added
another trophy to their rapidly
growing collection when they
won back the Roy Solomon
Trophy from Carib' Cricket
Club of New York in a cricket
match at Windsor Park on
Saturday.
The trophy was won from
the Wanderers in New York in
'0i'1 and Carib Cricket Club
.*I' in Nassau on Friday as
guests of the Wanderers to play
for the trophy, which was
donated by Mr. Roy Solomon
of Solomon's Mines.
Popular Wanderers captain,
Horace Stewart, won the toss
and very wisely elected to bat
in the 90 degree heat. Opening
batsmen Vernon Addison and
Pat Louison were in fine form
and posted 33 runs before
Louison was unfortunately run
out. Their partnership,
however, laid the foundation
for the Wanderers grand total
of 205 runs all out. Addison
went on to top score with a
S well made 53 before he was
stumped off Ainsley Edmunds.
The Carib bowling was not
really penetrating, and with the
exception of Selwyn Cesar,
former Trinidad speed
merchant who was really
hostile with his vicious
bouncers, the batsmen had no
real problem. Cesar, in spite of
his hostility, did not get among
the early wickets. He picked
his up at the end.
Carib's reply to the
Wanderers total was 134 runs
all out.
Their strength was in the
early batsmen. The opening
pair of Weeks and Roberts
caused some concern in the
Wanderers camp as they went
on their merry way in scoring
79 runs.
The second wicket
partnership got the total on to
93 as the Wanderers quickies
failed to penetrate.
When Spinners Kellman and
Ingpston were introduced the
batting side was
S unceremoniously bundled out
j for 135 runs.
WANDERERS
V. Addison Stumped Edmund 53
P. Louson Run Out 16
H. Kingston Stumped Roberts 15
A. Alleyne Run Out 24
T. Davies Bowled Charles I
G. Brathwaite Caught Cesar 13
H. Stewart Caught Charles 22
W. Ford Bowled Cesar 0
E o. Hayns Lbw Coesr 14
F. IKtamen Ct. Cesr 7
* J. Lunn Not Out 0
Extras 38
TOTAL 203
CARIB BOWLING
0. M. R. W.
Ceser 12 3 42 4
Laaord 3 -- 8 -
SM. Charle 10.4 1 47 2
A. Roberts 9 34 I
J.wwkes 2 I 4 -
A.Bdmaund 2 18 I I
1 CARIB
1. Weekes Cauht Kelman 39
A. Roberts CaughtKlnaton 37
A. EdmundCaught Kmaun 4
Strtkman Caught Kellmn 14
.- M. Caught Kingston 17
C e'sar Kun uu I
T Laeford Lbw Kinton 0
O. Ediand Lbw Kdlman 3
rj ThonUi Bowted Kin lan 6
R. Dalrymple Not Out
Extr 13
TOTAL 135
WANDERERS BOWLING:
O. M. R. W.
LM 6 1 22 -
W. Fd 4 I 19 -
R. Vrdhwaite 3t 1
iNon sa 2 4 4
It R.flman 9.4 I 5 4
he Trophy was presented
at a party held after match at
the home of Mr. & Ms.
Rudolph Chalmners in
tpletdon Gardens.


hr rtbunt___


Tumay, May 29, 1973.


Governor's Harbour Hustlers undefeated in 14 fames


IMPERIAL CHAMPIONS
GLENROY SAUNDERS of Imperial Lek0ue champlons
Paradise Island receives the Championship Trety from
Anita Doherty, secretary of the Grand Bahama Ladies
Softball Association, during Saturday's award
presentations. PHOTO: Rickey Wells


Del Jane, on a win


streak, defeat 2nd.


place Becks Bees 4-2
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
TWO UNEARNED RUNS nla the top of the eighth driven in by
left fielder John Williams and catcher Sidney Outten pushed the
now regenerated Del Jane Saints 4.2 over second place Becka Bees
to win their sixth in a row during the second game last night at


the Q.E.S.C.
Moving into the final inning
tied at two all, Eddie Ford,
facing the pitching of Don
Taylor was safe at first when
Becks' first baseman Anthony
Huyler dropped an assist from
Sonny Haven who fielded
Ford's hit. With Williams
batting, Ford stole second and
rode home on Williams' rbi
single into left centre.
Moving around to third on
steals, Williams with one down
after Wardy Ford lined out,
scored the second run on
Oatten's rbi single into centre.
Outten also collected them hitd
during his four times at bat.
Defensively, he had five put
outs and one assist.
Pacing the Bees offence was
Huyler who collected three hits
during his three times at bat
including a triple. At first he
had eight put outs.
Both sides took a scoreless
first inning in which Huyler
picked up his triple off starting
pitcher Roscoe Hall. Hall was
substituted by Frankie
Sweating in the bottom of the
seventh.
Outten's first rbi in the top
of the second started things off
for the Saints when he drove in
Wardy Ford. A fielding error
on Haven at second saw Ford
safe at first. A steal sent him to
second from where he was
driven in by Outten's rbi single.
Becks threatened in the
third when Huyler picking up
his second hit reached third
and Fred Taylor on his first hit
reached second. Willie Knowles
followed with a walk to cram
the corners with two down.,
Sim Humies, however, was
unable to send Hal's delivery
anywhere but flying to the first
baseman for the third out.
Eddie Ford on a sac fly
packed up an rbi in the top of
the fifth moving Del Jane
ahead 2-0. He drove in Benny
BUts who got on with an


NOTICE
ESTATE OF EDNA MAE ROBERTS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all creditors and
r persons having any claims or demands against the
to of Edna Mae Roberts late of the Eastern Districl
the Island of New Providence, deceased, who died on
Twenty-sixth day of January A.D. 1973, are hereby
red to send particulars in writing of their claims oe
hands to me, the Attorney for John Roberts and
rules William Pemberton the Executors of the Will ol
said late Edna Mae Roberts on or before the
nty-seventh day of June, A.D. 1973 at the
; er-mentioned address, after which date the said
cutors will proceed to distribute the assets of the
late Edna Mae Roberts, deceased, among the parties
ed there-to having regard only to the claims and
d of which they will have had notice, and the
John Roberts and Charles William Pemberton wit
1 be for the assets of the said late Edna Ma
deceased or any part thereof so distributed tc
pusan or persons of whose claim they have no
, : .. tc '"


Dated this Twenty-fifth day of May, A.D. 1973'

WILLIAM McP. CHRISTIE.
HIGS & JOHNSON,
Chambers,
Sandringham House
Shitey Street.
P. O. Box NI6?8,

NASSAI-L


infield hit.
Catcher Vianny Jacques and
Haven on rbi's again placed the
Bees in the game when they
tied up at two all in the
bottom of the sixth. Humes
and Gilbert Moncur were the
run-scorers for Becks. They
both singled on.
Frankie Sweeating came in in
the seventh to stage a duel with
Taylor. Del Jane's offence
came through in the eighth as
Becks' defence fell to errors.
Sweeting in picking up the
win pitched two innings and
stuek out two of the fte
batts he faced. He gave up
one walk anidone hit.
DEL JANE SAINTS
ab r h tt
A y 4 0 I 0
E. Ford 3 1 1 1
Rf! 4 4I I I
4 o 1 o0

H 2 0 0 0
Woods I 0 0 0
Swetins 0 0 0 0
BECKS BEES
Turner 5 0 0 0
Haven 4 0 1
Huyler 3 0 3 0
IF. Tylor 3 0 2 0
Knowles 3 0 0 0
Humes 3 1 1 0
SMoncur 4 1 1 0
1i 0 1I 0
D. Taylor 2 O 0 0
urrows 0 0 0
JETSETWIN
Losing pitcher Barry Carroll.
found himself peppered for
seven runs in the bottom of the
third as Jet Set peied by the
two for four two rbi hitting of
left fielder Eugene Thompson
defeated Bahamas Blender 9-6
in the first game last night.
With Isaac Fox doing the
mound duties for Jet Set, the
Blenders took an eaty 30 lead
which was complemented by
Ronald Smith's two Al single
in the top of the third. Paul
Johnson drove in the first run
in the first inning.
Two unearned runs coming
from Richard Brooks and
Bernard Burrows added to
Thompson's two rbi stgle in
Jet Set's commanding third
inning. Eddie McQuay also
picked up an rbi.
The Blenders made a last
effort in the sixth when they
came up with three runs
moving one behind. However,
two more unearned runs
coming from Liont Ntely and
ldde moQuay topped Jet Set's
ie.n- *- they rnmun strong
contenders for this year's
championship.
In picking up the win, Pox
struck out three md walked
two of the 26 he faced. Barry
Carroll struck out four and
walked four.



,, ,
iB~i3E ^^~ra W^BT


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR HUSTLERS,. sfta
cmapiom for 10 yea before losing to the Roeek Soeed Hese
hst yer, -m wel oa their way to mother h Ipodl as- they
lead the Eleethem Seftd Seris madfeated l featsm pgea.
The Teraen, who were Kermit Uraham. In his
defeated three times by the comment he was including
Hustlers and once by Palmetto third baseman Vanny Patty,
Point, are second with a ten second baseman Chares Sands
and four record, and catcher Mark Thompson.
Paclng the Hustlers offence "Theas .uys aM planning to
is captain and first beesan make a lean weep throughout
David Micklewhite with 22 its athe Behamas". Both Patty and
during his 44 times at bat Thompson hare 17 hits each
which include seven homes. and Sand has IS.
icklewhite is present Pacin the Hustlers from the
leading the league's hitting. mound is star pitcher Glen
Also getting a good piece of Griffin, who Is known for his
the stick is rookie Rudolph contribution duridn the
Sands who besides his good Bahamas' trip to El Salvador
defence has compiled last year. He has an impressive
seventeen hits during his 45 record of seven win and ano
times at bat and hit two lose, with at least teo strike
homers. outs during each gme. Besides
Relying more on their his mound duty, Griffin for the
offence during past years, "the season so far has recorded 13
Hustlers have improved a great hits from 3S times at bat.
deal in their defence," Helping out with the mound
commented centre fielder duty is the 17-yeareld rookie
commented ctre Tony Petty. Under the
WI EI PS gSL uidanceof Griffe, ettyalso
W R ?OI-rU L has a 7-0 record. He joined the
------E Hustlers O -1W after


CHAMP TO

PLAY HERE
ORGANIZERS of the
Bahamas National Pool
Championship ae arranging to
have Willie Mosconi, seven
times World Champion of Pool,
to give a one and a half hour
exhibition during the July 4
pool championships at the A.F.
Adderley Gym.
Organizers have termed
"disappointing" the fact
that a number of entrants in
the 1973 B.N.P.C. have failed
to turn up and play according
to schedule. In most cases,
persons turning up for their
match have won by default.
Twenty eight competitors
are scheduled to play on
Saturday at the Blue Hill Golf
Club and entrants are asked to
call the Club at 34-6333 to
confirm their play.
Thirteen trophies are at
stake in the Championships on
July 4.
The following Is the
schedule of players for the
Third round of eliminations in
the 1973 Bahamas National
Championship Pool
Tournament to be played at
the Blue Hill Golf Club on
Saturday, at 6 p.m.
LADIES CLASS
loke Lockhart v Ceosae
Cho-ow.
JUNIOR CLASS
Wayde MIans vs Mine Role Jr.
Stem funds v Weyde Bethel
AMATEUR CLAMS
Kmdl Sands vs Mervin Herdin
Carl T. Mslo vs Jazm Melone
Wlase Burnett Jr. Roland
Burrow
Er naton Wattles M.P. vs
Samuel Thompson
Den Stuart Hanm Thompson
BasSol Ch arles Sflders
Richard (Par) Tu4aquet vs
Albert Rox Jr.
CHAMPIONSHIP
Joe Knowle vs Ralph Munnlm
Robert Btbel vs Bead Nichols
Cvel Mosey v WAted
Deanie Lee wv Ken Capron


VOLLEYBALL
RESCHEDULED
THE BAHAMAS Volleyball
Federation's temporarily
suspended series due to the
gymnasium being used for
examination purposes -
Recommences on Friday and
Saturday at Garfunkel
Auditorium with two games
each night.
To review the series and
aeoftruit their schedule, the
B.V.P. holds a management
to tigt 6:30 at the






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S Nw York. ppd.. rain
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A


TEN YEAR VETERAN CHAMPIONS, the Governor's Harbour Hustlers, are from left
(standing) David Micklewhite, Kingsley Bethel, Edmond Johnson. Glen Griffen, Charles
hands, Franky Petty, (kneeling) Tony Petty, Livingstone Parks, Vanny Petty, John Sends,
James Sands and Rudolph Sands. The other boys in front are the bat boys.


completing his preliminaries in
the junior league.
Making up the outfield is
James Sands at centre, John
Sands at left and LUvinastone


Sands at right.
Last year, the Hustlers ran
into injuries and with broken
spirits were unable to make the
grade. With the New


Providence Softball Series but
one tame old, the
championship competition so
far seems to be coming from
Eleuthera.


IN A



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