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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03353
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 22, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03353

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ST. A MT. ROYAL AVE.



Is-PPHONE 2-13O/2-3237


VOL LXX, No. 152


Urrtbtune


S ... m,. e w........... .., Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


wATELCO WAGE NEGOTIATIONS BREAK DOWN

& BOTH SIDES FILE STRIKE NOTICE




BaTelCo staff want


unionist


reinstated


or will stage a strike


By MIKE LOTHIAN
BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION EMPLOYEES voted unanimously last night to stage a


sit-down strike beginning at noon today if management
Further complicating the BaTelCo branch of the
BaTelCo's industrial relations Bahamas Public Services
problems are: Union;
The reported breakdown e The registration by the
of wage negotiations between union on Friday of an
the BaTelCo management and industrial dispute; and


failed to reinstate suspended
The' registration by
management yesterday of an
industrial dispute.
About 200 of BaTelCo's
approximately 1,000
employees attended an


Another slump shown in 1973


first quarter's building figures

THE ESTIMATED VALUE OF BUILDINGS begun in the I rst quarter of 1973 showed a
dedlee of BS1189,257 over the same period last year, indicating a continued dump in the
csiMruct ind..stry
Building statistics released This compares with buildings were started in the
today by the Ministry of Works B$ 563,740 for housing, private sector of which 114
gave the estimated value of BS739,780 for commercial and were for housing, !6 for
starts for the first quarter of industrial and B$19,800 in the commercial and industrial and
1973 as $5,550,884 public sector for the a further 3 in the public sector.
compared with $6,740,141 for corresponding period in 1972. In Freeport, the Ipumber of
the corresponding period in In New Providence, the total applications approved for the
1972. number of applications first quarter of 1973 was 21
The private sector approved during the first compared with 17 for the
accounted for B$3,830,377 of quarter of 1973 was 279 corresponding period oft1972.
--.,is year's flrt quarter ttaJcompared with 315 for the The number. f staw* during.
Of th" 3 1 l.71,9Vwas forF rpo dijperiod Cl?1972. to. first quarter of 197a was
Jousting; B$717,450 for- Tw h nhied and seventy '21 compared with 17 for the
commercial and industrial buildings were approved in the- corresponding period of 1972.
buildings and a, further private sector, of which 225 The estimated value of
B$1,720,507 was in the public were for housinLg 45 for buildings started for the first
sector. commercial and industrial and quarter of 1973 was
In the corresponding period a further 9 for public sector. B$221,462 compared with
of 1972 housing accounted for The estimated value of B$304,5 00 for the
B$ 3,998,719 of the building permits approved for corresponding period of 1972.
B$6,740,141 construction the first quarter of 1973 was The number of buildings for
total; B$2,713,442 for B$7,145,337, compared with the first quarter of 1973 was
commercial and industrial and B $8,645,962 for the four compared with six for the
B$28,000 in the public sector, corresponding period of 1972. corresponding period of 1972.
In the first quarter of 1973 The estimated value of Estimated value of buildings
construction was completed on buildings approved in the for the first quarter of 1973
78 buildings compared with private sector was B$6,801,352 was B$71,454 compared with
199 'for the corresponding of which B$S5,642,752 was for B$2,466,600 for the
period of 1972. There were 66 housing, B$I,158,600 for corresponding period of 1972.
in housing, 12 in commercial commercial and industrial and In the Family Islands,
and industrial and public sector a further )$343,985 was in the excluding Freeport, the total
ail. public sector., number of applications
COMPLETIONS This compares with approved for all islands were
Estimated value for .B$4,918,172 r for housing, 47 with an estimated value of
completions for the first B$3,402,790; for commercial B$29,110,240 for the first
quarter of 1973 was and industr;l and B"325,000 quarter of 1973.
B$5,219,212 compared with in the public sector for the Total number of buildings
B $1,323,320 for the corresponding period of 1972. started were 18 with an
corresponding period of 1972. For the first quarter of 1973 estimated value of B$489,678
Of this B$2,840,352 was for construction was started on 133 for the first quarter of 1973.
housing, BS2,378,860 for buildings compared with 190 Total number of buildings
commercial and industrial and for the corresponding period in completed were nil for the first
public sector nil. 1972. One hundred and thirty quarter of 1973.


West German pgided missile


GUIDED missile destroyer'
Rommel (D 187). com-
missioned for the West
German Navy on May 2, 1970
in Boston, Mass., arrived in
Nassau 10 a.m. Sunday from
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where
tsa men have "been in training
for 3% weeks.
The guided missile destroyer
be under the command of
Prepgttenkepiteh Klaus Rehder








NASSAU FREEPORT


and will leave Nassau for
Mayport, Florida today.
Named after Field Marshall
Erwin Rommel ("Desert Fox")
the vessel has a complement
of 338 men, including 18
officers, 25 chief petty
officers, 107 petty officers and
188 enlisted men.
Stationed at Kell, on the
Baltic Coast, the Rommel has
displacement of 4,500 tons and
is powered by dual steam
turbines, 70,000 horse-power,
with a length of 440-feet
eight-inches and makes in
excess of 30 knots in speed.
As part of its armament, the
ship has a Tartar guided missile
system with two fire control
systems, two five-foot gun
mounts for 'AA' surface
action, an ASROC laurcher,
bow mounted sonar and two


destroyer visits
triple torpedo launchers as well
as a Satir I naval tactical data
system.
Launched in February 1,
1969, the Rommel was
sponsored by Frau Lucie M.
Rommel, widow of the Field
Marshall, and will visit San
Juan, Puerto Rico, and
Trinidad after leaving Mayport
where she will be engaged in
exercises with American,
British and French units.
She returns to Kiel on June
27 after being in the Caribbean
and Norfolk, Virginia for
3r-months. She has also
stopped at Pointe Pitre,
Guadeloupe.
"The men are really
impressed about the climate,
water, the friendly people we
find everywhere,"
Kapitaenleutnant Michael
Souchon told The Tribune.


union official Vance Major.


emergency union meeting in
the St. Agnes schoolroom at 8
o'clock last night.
Sources said the workers
unanimously agreed to halt
work at noon today if Mr.
Major, branch vice chairman,
was not reinstated.
Mr. Major was suspended for
a week beginning yesterday,
reportedly because of his
involvement in the two-hour
staff demonstration on
Monday, May 7.
It is understood that over
200 sympathetic co-workers
held a spontaneous slow-down
at several BaTelCo job sites
yesterday.
Radio Bahamas last night
reported incorrectly, The
Tribune has confirmed that
union branch chairman Mrs.
Wimae Dridgewater had also
been suspended.
Reliable sources reported
that wage negotiations broke
down at about 4 p.m.
yesterday after only five hours
of discussion.
WIW .Noe contract expired at
1he end of June last year, and
at about that time the union
submitted a new wage
proposal, which management
rejected.
Workers have charged that
management then consistently
refused to come up with a
counter-proposal.
About 350 BaTelCo staffers
marched around the parking
lot in front of the
administrative offices on
Thompson Boulevard on the
morning of May 7 in a bid to
force management to negotiate
a new wage scale.
TALKS
The demonstration ended
when management requested
immediate talks with workers'
representatives.
It is understood that the
first thing the unionists
demanded and received was an
assurance from management
that there would .be no
victimisation or intimidation as
a result of the demonstration.
Management was then given
time to prepare a wage
proposal.
On May 15, however,
management issued a staff
memo serving notice that all
persons known to have
participated in the
demonstration would have two
hours' pay deducted from their
pay envelopes on May 31.
On the following day
management came up with
their wage proposal, but the
union rejected the proposal in
a general meeting the same
night.
However, it was thought the
proposal could form the basis
of negotiations, and a
union-management meeting
was scheduled for 11 a.m.
yesterday.
Before the meeting began it
was learned that management
had suspended Mr. Major.
Sources said the suspension
was the centre of a heated
debate as the meeting got
underway.
The meeting, follow ag a
break for lunch, end(. at 4
p.m. when it was reported the
talks had broken down.
The Tribune lU0 confirmed
that on Friday thO union filed
notice of an industrial dispute.
Filing the notice with the
Labour Ministry is the first
step unions must take under
the Industrial Relations Act
before being able to legally call
for a strike.
Yesterday, it was reported,
management filed a similar
notice. Such notice by an
employer is the .first step
towards legally barring
employees from a company's
premises.


Tuesday, May 22, 1973.


Price: IS Cents


S. .
BATELCO EMPLOYEES apparently expected they
would have to march longer this morning than they did -
90 minutes. At least, that Is the Impression given by the
woman at right, who snapped off a bit of portable shade
from an almond tree. The 300 employees were
demonstrating at Oakes Field In support of demands for the
reInstatement of a union official suspended yesterday by
BaTelCo management. PHOTO: Philip Symonette


Over 300 in surprise


walkout at BaTelCo


receive an ultimatum
By MIKE LOTHIAN
IN A SURPRISE MOVE, over 300 Bahamas
Telecommunication Corporation workers left their jobs this
morning to demonstrate outride the BaTelCo administrative
office on Thompson Boulevard for the second time in 15I days.


This morning' s
demonstration, beginning at 10
a.m., was staged to back
demands for the reinstatement
of a suspended union official
and for management's
withdrawal of a stated
intention to cut employees'
salaries for the May 7
demonstration, which was held
to support demands for wage
negotiations.
The demonstration ended at
about 11:30, when the Labwra
Ministry refused to0hear union
arguments on the dispute until
the workers returned to their
posts.
Members of the BaTelCo
branch of the Bahamas Public
Services Union voted last night
to strike at noon today if
management failed to re-instate
Mr. Vance Major, branch vice
chairman.
Instead, workers from the
administrative offices, the
Poinciana Drive Technical
Centre and the Perpall Tract
exchange left their jobs two
hours earlier than expected.
NO ORDER
Whereas on May 7 certain
union members were instructed
to remain on the job to
maintain essential
communication services, no
such order was given prior to
today's action, it is
understood.
However, some
non-unionists remained on the
job and the demonstration had
no immediate effect on


services.
At r,'rout 9:45 this morning
about 100 ZaTelCo employees
streamed out of the Technical
Centre and walked to the
Nassau Street round-about.
Five minutes later well over
a hundred workers from
Perpall Tract marched south on
Nassau St. and joined up with
the group from the Technical
Centre.
The united groups than
marched the 50 yards to the
administration building, whem
close to another hundred office
personnel joined the
demonstration.
The demonstration
continued even when union
leaders and management
spokesmen were called to the
Labour Ministry on John F.
Kennedy Drive.
It is understood the Ministry
was called in for a ruling on
Mr. Major's suspension and the
threatened pay cuts.
Union officials returned to
the BaTelCo administrative
offices at about 11:30 to tell
workers the Ministry had
refused to hear the dispute
until everyone was back on the
job. The demonstration ended
immediately and the unionists
returned to the Ministry for
further discussions.
BaTelCo employs over
1,000 persons throughout the
Bahamas, about 900 of them in
New Providence about 600 are
union members.


MIAMI HERALD DEPLORES

MEDDLING IN OUR AFFAIRS


THE MIAMI Herald, in an
editorial today, "deplored" the
meddling in Bahamian affairs
of individuals outside the
country.
Dealing with the Abaco
separatist movement, the
editorial said the idea was
destined from the start to be
"stillborn."
It pointed out that 40 per
cent of the population was
white; that one of its two
representatives favour
Independence, the other does
not.
"Unfortunately," said The
Herald, "what Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling calls 'a
criminal conspiracy" has
developed. He told the House
of Assembly in Nassau last
week that the impetus for it
came from outside the
Bahamas. In this connection,
he named two U.S. citizens.
"If that is the case," the
Herald said, "we find it
deplorable. At this sensitive
stage, weeks away from the
formality of full independence,
the Bahamas have problems
enough of their own without
outside meddling."
The Herald said "it would
seem proper to us that the
United States, because of the
close ties that exist and the
mutuality of interests, express
itself clearly on the subject -
Just in case any might
misunderstand.," '
The Herald pointed out that


at the time of the Prime
Minister's si.'ech last week,
there had been no reply from
the United States to a
Bahamian protest on the
subject.
"Mr. Pindling, we think, has
effectively focused world
attention on this incipient
farce. The affair should be kept
in perspective," The Hearld
added.
Ll IiHNFALL

LAST MliTI
THE DROUGHT which
resulted in hundreds of bush
fires during late March and
most of April is reflected in the
Meteorological Office's April
weather statement, which gives
the rainfall for the whole
month as slightly over one
tenth of an inch, compared
with the nearly two-inch
average.
The Meteorological Office
recorded measurable rainfall on
only six of the 30 days in April
for a total of 0.13 inches. The
average for the month has been
1.89 inches, the statement said.
The low rainfall last month,
however, set no record. The
Met. Office has recorded
rainfall In March as low as 0.04
inches and as high as 5.63
inches.
Temperatures during the
first nine days of the month
were higher than usual, hitting
90.3 degrees on April 9.


POLICE PIOSECITII

lIES SIIIElLT

SF BEART ATTACK
INSPECTOR Silas Nixon,
44, of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force died suddenly last
night after what is believed to
have been a massive heart
attack.
Mr. Nixon, who has served
as a court prosecutor for the
past four years, was in court as
usual yesterday.
According to mebaeakinds,
family he retired at 9 p.m. at
his South -Beach home and,,
suffered the attack sometime
later.
Rushed to hospital, he was
reported dead on arrival
Mr. Nixon joined the police
force in August 1949 and
worked in the uniform branch
in Nassau and Freeport until
1969 when he was transferred
to the court prosecutor's
department.
He was promoted to
corporal in June 1966, later to
sergeant and in mid-1970 was
made an inspector.
LAST CASE
Mr. Nixon's last appearance
in court yesterday involved the
unusual case of a Jamaican
woman who was found to have
been carrying approximately
seven pounds of marijuana
hidden in false panty hose,
girdle, brassiere and hips which
she had attached under her
clothing.
Highly respected for his
court conduct, Mr. Nixon was
warmly praised by Magistrate
Wilton Hercules on his
promotion to inspector. "I
think the promotion was
well-merited and
well-deserved," Mr. Hercules
said.
He said he had sat as a
magistrate in Trinidad, St.
Lucia and the Bahamas and he
regarded the inspector as a
prosecutor "second to none in
integrity, honesty and
knowledge of court
procedure."
Mr. Nixon is survived by his
wife Dorlyn; three sons, Craig,
Brent and Tyrone; three
daughters, Sharon, Chantelle
and Dion; five brothers,
Samuel, James and Robert of
Inagua and Joseph and Henry
of Nassau and one sister, Mrs.
Eurenia Reckley.
Arrangements are now being
made for a military funeral.


PAN AN SIES

FLAUIm


PAN AMERICAN Airways
has filed suit against Flamingo
Airlines Ltd. for $29,951.17
"representing the balance due
aend owing" to PanAm on
account of services rendered
and goods supplied to
Flamingo by PanAm.
The writ wu filed Friday by
the law firm of Dupach and
Turnquest on behalf of
PanAm, which claims
additionally "Interest and such
further relief sad costs that the
court may feel justified."


ABAC I FEARS

VICTIMISATION,

BRITISH N.P.

TELLS CMINS1
THE BAHAMAS
Independence Bill was
scheduled to go aintoe
committee in the House of
Commons today whea Mr.
Ronald B el warned that he
would move an mu endmet at
that time to have Abane
excluded from independeae.
He said he would move for
Abaco to remain a Crows
colony.
If the Independence Bll
goes through the committee
stage it is expected that it will
be read a third time and
passed. In London for the
debate is Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling and Mr. 1
Errington Watkins, M.P. for
Marsh Harbour and leader of
the Council for a Free Abaco.
On May 15 on an order for a
second reading Mr. Bell
(Buckinghamshire, South) said
that on independence the first
thing that the people of Abaco
have to fear is "political
victimization." He said "they .
have already experienced the
appropriate threats and, more
than that, examples of it." '
Mr. Bell told members of the
House of Commons that "the
election was hardly over before
individual cases of
victimization of the most
alarming kind began to be
manifested." He said that he
would not "weary" members
with a full discussion at that
stage, but promised that whea
the bill went to commitfts b
would give "specific examphs.
There are all too many of
them" he added. "There is no
lack of evidence. When I say in
general terms that political
victimization is feared I can
prove it with ample cases after
the General Election in -
setember. W)mn f speak oa(
bleak hatioetftIm f (can agela
justify It by sp -ric quotations
from Ministers of the Crown,,"
as they are at present in the
Bahamas. When I speak of
corruption I can illustrate it
with precision."
As an example he told
members about a road contract
at Abaco. "Contracts," he said,
"have been given to the highest
tenderer instead of the lowest,
because that tenderer is a PLP
supporter. Abaco is a good
case.
ROAD
"A very big road," he said,
"had to built there, 120 miles
long. The contract was given to
a company formed by a PLP
supporter which owned no
equipment at all and which put
in the highest tender by a big
margin. The company did not
even own a wheel-barrow and
had never built anything. It
was given the contract and
immediately sub-contracted
the work to another company
in the construction business.
"The first company put in a
bid of $30,000 a mile and
sub-contracted for $20,000 a
mile. The two companies
pocketed the difference. That
kind of case can be multiplied
in the island. This has
produced a sense of profound
depression among the people
of Abaco. What are they to do?
They do not want to become
part of a black nationalist State
of sharp antagonisms between
black and white."
He said that the property
which was mentioned by
another member was "not
there now, because there a r '
few developments In the, '
Bahamas without imported
skills. That may change ome
day, but not for a lon time.
For lack of them, buinesae
are collapsing. Half-built
buildings are being put for sale


by mortgagees. Unemployment
is rising because of the upsurge
of extreme black nationalism
being operated by extreme and
inexperienced politicians.
"What were the people of
Abaco to do? tn 1971 they W.".,
petitioned Her Majesty to j
remain a colony of the Crown
and that petition was lgned by .


On Beka


U


"RUSSELL'S
ORANGE JUICE
a labi| at your
SUPERMARKET


%Aftlh adJ I -


LwT
















I N^ highlghts


CAULFIELD FOLLOWS McCORD IN SENATE PROBE
WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate Watergate probe resumes today with
Watergate conspirator James McCord maklng dhs second appearance.
Former Nixon liwenforom-en advim John Caulfield Is expected to
follow McCord today. McCord ha mattfled that CauMleld met with him
and offered executive clemency In the Waterte came ina exchange for
McCord' dsece.
When FrMday seseaon ended, th committee's Republican Leader -
Howard Baker of Tennessee asked McCord to volunteer all relevant
Informato he may pmea. Baker told McCord he was the sort of witness
who aswen only tne exact quetlions put to him. Bker aaled for all
relevant Information hin Baker's words "whether we have got ense
enough to ask for it or not."
RICHARDSON MAY BE CONFIRMED AS A.G. SOON
WASHINGTON (AP) The Senate Judiciary Committee start action
today on Piesident Nixon'a nomhiation of EUiot Richardeon to be
Attorney-General. Committee Chairman lman Eatland, a MIsssppI
Democrat, says he hope Richardson will be confirmed by Thursday, when
the Senate recesses for Memorial Day.
Confirmation hearings ended yesterday, and committee members
appeared satilfled that special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox would
be given adequate Independence under Richardson If Richardson is
confirmed.


SPECIAL UNIT NOT FOR F OUTICAL PURPOSES
WASHINGTON (AP) ThU White House has acknowledged that it had a
special Justice Department unit created in 1970. A White HouM
spokesman says the unit st ll exites and is assigned to evaluate information
about what the White Hous call radical organizations.
The presidential spokesman emphasizes, however, that the unit was not
created for political puapoes
Richard Helms says he would like to have remained as head of the
C.I.A. to keep It from Involvement In the Watergate affair. Helms left his
post at the spy agency last December and was appointed ambassador to
Iran. He told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee yesterday that he
felt a newcomer could not have handled the Watergate problem as he could
have.
UNIT SET UP TO EYE RADICAL & ANTI-WAR GROUPS
WASHINGTON (AP) Deputy Press Secretary Gerald Warren has
denied that a special intelligence unit set up to evaluate Information about
radical and anti-war groups was created for political purposes.
Warren says the unit wa set up In the Justice Department after
President Nixon expressed concern, about the valuation of domestic
Intelligence.
The New York Times had quoted source close to the Watergate
investation a saying the unit was ordered by former preaddentil assistant
John Ehrllchman In alleged efforts to justify espionage against the
Democrats.
HELMS LINKS NIXON TO WATERGATE COVERUP
WASHINGTON (AP) Former CJ.A. director Richard Helms has
linked President Nixon to the Watergate coverup. Helms told a Senate
committee today that former White House Chief of Staff Haldeman told
C..A. official it wan the President's wish that the organization approach
the F.B.L to discourage an investigation linked to the ease. (0 SEE STORY
THIS PAGE)

WASH ON(AP) The Justice Department has announced an
nvestgatiAe Into alleged corruption n lbthe southwest region of the
Immlgnation and Naturalization Service. The New York Times disclosed
the nvest on in today's donTheTimes said mm atonoffce
reportedly smuggled narcotics and aliens into the U.S., physically abused
immigrants and permitted aliens to temporarily enter he States for Illegal
purpose.
Other alleged wrongdoing included the sal of counterfeit, altered and
stolen American documents an d th exchange of sexual favors with
Mexican women for entry documents. The Department has not said
whether a grand jury is probing aalleged corruption.
DEAN TO TESTIFY ON S.EC.'s HANDLING OF IT & T CASE
WASHINGTON (AP) Congressional sources my President Nixon's
former counsel, Jon Dean, has been called to testify secretly In a house
subcommittee's probe of the Securities and Exchange Commission's
handling of an l-T.nd-T.cae. Dean is being subpoenaed for questioning
Wednesday.
The sources my Dean will be asked about contacts with then S.E-C
chairman Wllam Casey shortly before the Commission decided to send 34
boxes a smeet I-T.nd.T papers to the Justice Department before making
them vitilable to Conpeas. Eventually, the ubeommittee was given a
digeA l1thSe S.C mmsu aririg the contents of th material. '
SNEW WORLD MONETARY SYSTEM UNDER STUDY
WASHINGTON (AP) With the dollar under pressure In Europe, a
panel of international finance officials began today debate aon the first
draft outline of a new world monetary system.
International monetary fund sources my the draftoutline moves away
from a plan submitted by the U.S. last fdsn which nations with a surplus
balance of payments would be required to change the values of their
currencies.
Instead, the eansal officials w more concerned with the flow of
dollars across international boundaries by speculators. The outline favours
controls on dollars leaving the U.S.
AIM IS TO LEAD U.S.S.R. OUT OF ISOLATION
BONN (AP) Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev said today his aim is to
lead his couey out of Isolation into ew nIncreasing cooperation with the
western wold. He made the statement in the nationwide television address
to West Germans as he wound up a visit to Bonn.

SOME PROGRESS IN KISSINGER-THO TALKS.
PARIS (AP) Presidential aide Henry Klssinger ad Hanoi's L Duc
Thb today at expected to conduct their fifth talk session n the Iatet
round of Paris conferences. After a fiveohour meeting yesterday, Kisnger
reported ase progress In his talks over the shaky cease-fire, but he did not
specify what he meant by "psopes."
ROGRS CONTINUES LATIN AMERICAN TOUR
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) Secretary of State Rogers leaves Rio de
Janeiro today for the Brasillan capital of Brasilia. He'l meet with the
BOullan Vism President and other dignitaries, nd president Emito
Medicik tomorrow. Next stop an Rogers' 17I-day Latind-Amerieca tour is
Argentina.
12 H AITIANS FROM BAHAMAS SEEK U.S. ASYLUM
WEST PALM BEACH, FLA., MAY 22 (AP) Twelve Haitia efusgee
who left ls Bbans rae tha dn return to their native country s a seeking
asylum di b taed Statet.
"They would kill us If we return to Haiti," said Samuel Davi, after
the poop arrived hate by boat Monday night.
e would rather spend the rest of our lives I jail hea than go back,"
LFiWme aid the group had paid $300 a piece to ie captain of the boat
to be bought to the United States from Freeport. the Bhmas.
He said m iey emed the money while working at odd jobs in Freeport.
The jobs had run out mad ts men feared they would be forced back to
Hal, Flhalm mid.
The 12, ranging e ages from 21 to 35, were taken into custody by
federal 1ed 11d
HaHit gee spokesman in Miaml aid about 1,000 refugees from
the island nalton a now In the South Florid8 aa.-


MIOONNASAI*GRA

ViOh 1to be t

,.sj. WLLAM14' MOIrIAQF.
% u I nd,1973
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EX-CIA CHIEF SAYSW-

Haldeman told me:


'It's the president's


wish' to cover up

WASHINGTON (AP) A Senate comiB was toM Mosday
that fomtr Wie. HMoue chief f daft JLR HAdmlM toM CIA
offide "It b the President's w th" that the CIA Ie the
FM to discouae an investigation lted to'the Waterpl e me.


Richard Helms, former CIA
Director, confirmed to the
Senate foreign relations
committee that the statement
was made in a memo by his
Deputy Director Lt. Gen.
Vernon Walters following a
meeting between Walters and
acting FBI Director L Patrick
Gray.


TIME POLL SHOWS U.S.
THINKS NIXON KNEW
NEW YORK (AP)-A majority of
Americans questioned by Time
Magazine think President Nixon
knew about efforts to cover up the
Watergate scandal, and 41 per cent
figure Nixon approved the break4n
plot.
The telephone poll of 1,037
voters last week by Crossley
Surveys, Inc., for Time was almost
finished before Nixon's latest denial
on Friday of such participation in
the political espionage case.
Asked whether the President was
aware long ago of attempts to
suppress Watergate Information, 58
per cent replied yes, 25 per cent
said no and 17 per cent had no
opinion.
Asked whether Nixon knew and
approved of the bugging ahead on
time, 41 per cent replied yes, 41
per cent said no and 18 per cent
had no opinion.
"WhIle only one in four would
approve of impeaching Nixon If he
was merely aware of the cover-up,"
Time said, "nearly half believed
that he should be removed from
office if it is shown that he knew
about the plot in advance."
Time added that 62 per cent of
those questioned said they voted
for Nixon's re-election last
November..
NIXON LAWYER PAID
WATERGATE ACCUSED
WASHINGTON (AP)-
Government auditors said Saturday
that President Nixon's personal
lawyer, Herbert W. Kalmbach, told
them he paid at least $210,000
through Intermediaries to the
Watergate defendants or their
attorneys. One of the defendants
has 4aId money was sed in
'attempt to buy hisltlence.
Most of the money came from
two officials of the Nixon
n-election campaign, Maurice Stans
Nd Frederick C. Lame, the General
counting Office said. At least
$50,000 came from a third source,
Thomas V. Jones, chairman of
Northrop Corp.
The GAO said Stans admitted
giving $75,100 to Kalmbach but
contended that It wasn't campaign
money and that he was unaware the
money was intended for the
Watergate defendants.
Jonesa mid he ave $50,000 to
Kalmbach but thought It was a
regular campaign contribution and
that it would be reported. Laume
declined to talk to GAO
Investigators
Watergate conspirator James W.
McCord has testified that he and
other defendants received cash
payments after th bugging crew
was arrested last June 17, and that
they, we re msured to keep silent
about others Involved in the
political espionage scheme.
Specifically, M-Cord swore that
he received $21,000 In "salary" and
$25,000 for "legal fees" last year
from thenow-decesed Mrs. L
Howard Hunt, wife of another of
the seven men convicted in lb
conspiracy. McCord said Mrs. Hunt
told him he money came from the
Nixon campaign through certain
lewynm
The GAO statement was the first
official report that Kalmbach, Stans
or Jones were implicated in such
payment. Larue has been
Ideatied In news reports as a
soue of tde money. -
ANOTHER CAMPAIGN
CONTRIBUTION QUERY
HOUSTON, TEXAS (AP)-A
federal grand jury has completed Its
lIvestigetion Into a 100,000-dollar
campaign contribution which
wound up In the bank account of a
convicted Watergate conspirator.
A Justice Department lawyer
said any decision about indictments
wi come after the case Is studied
is Washington.
Thoe contribution was made In
the name of Robeft H. Allen,
President of Gulf Resources &
Chemical Corp. of Houston, and
bank drafts for 9,000 dollars of It
were cashed h the account of
Bernard Barker, convicted in the
burglary and bugging of Democratic
national headquarters.
The rmad jury here reportedly
was checking to ee If the
contribution setually came from
Abn or from Gulf Resources.
Federal law forbId campaign
oatbutlions by corporations.
Ailan% lawyer, Richard Haynes,
aM 0lOOOO w- telegraphed to a
Meileo CIty subsidlury of Gulf
ar M compania da
e uasuo paid the money
to a Maiao Cty lawyer, Manuel
esw. e.Myonesa*.
Alb thle borrowed the
lMO0110 boea Ogarslo, who aent It
beH * lostoa $59,00 In
sf a1d 511,0OO is eash, lb
Opgio, contacted in Mexico
Clty, MfiMsd to talk about the
trnaasetn. "I have no declaration
to make," be aid. "Let them may
what. dg want up there. It is your
A5 ah waso w chairman of
lfa nvnbee Commsnee to
he dM dst, atear
ef n NIp e leo. He he denied
Sr Enwder of lb


The memo was first
disclosed at an open hearing by
Sen. Stuart Symington,
(D-Mo.) concerning a meeting
on June 23, 1972 at the White
House involving Walters,
Helms, Haldeman and John D.
Ehrlichman.
Symington said that in the
memo which was given to
the Senate armed services
committee last Saturday -
Walters reported that
Haldeman turned to Walters
and said, "it is the President's
wish that you go to see Mr.
Gray."
Helms said he was in the
room but does not recall on his
own whether Haldeman used
the President's authority
specifically.
Helms did say, however, that
when instructions are from the
White House chief of staff, it is
assumed that it had adequate
authority behind it.
DIDN'T KNOW
Helms testified that he did
not at the time know about
any money that might have
been "laundered" through
Mexico.
He said he did not
understand "to this day whyv
Haldeman selected Walters,
rather than Helms himself, to
make the approach to Graz to
inform the FBI that pursuit of
its investigation of the Mexican
angle of the Watergate affair
might jeopardize CIA covert
operations in Mexico.
Helms said he himself felt no
concern about such a point and
tried to modify the approach
to Gray in a subsequent
conversation with Walters.
Helms said he told Walters it
would be proper to inform the
new FBI director of an
operating arrangement between
the CIA and the FBI that when
any investigations overlapped,
the other agency should be
notified.'
Helms said that his sole
concern at the time was that
the CIA should be kept out of
the Watergate affair entirely.
Helms said he does not know if
his reluctance to have the CIA
involved in Watergate played a
role in his abrupt departure as
CIA chief.
TALK WITH NIXON
He said the reasons for his
departure were contained in a
conversation he had with
President Nixon. 'He said
Watergate was not brought up
in that conversation but that
the restraints of executive
privilege bar him from saying
what he discussed with the
President.
"Frankly, I wanted to stay
as head of the agency to
continue to keep it out,"
Helms said. "I thought I would
be more successful than a
newcomer."
Helms told the committee,
"I did not know" whether his
refusal to cooperate with the
White House In domestic
affairs was responsible for his
new assignment as ambassador
to Iran.
He said Watergate was not
mentioned in his conversation
with Nixon, which he declined
to describe fully.
The committee session was
abruptly opened to the press
and public after Sen. Stuart
Symington said news articles
pointing out apparent conflicts
in what Helms told the
committee in February and
what he now says are
tantamount to "perjury."


WATEIlATE

PIISECITIO

WON'T IE

INTIMIDATED
W AS HI NG TON
(AP)-A ald Co0 Harvard
University law professor,
assured Senators Monday that
he would not be intimidated as
special prosecutor In ls
Watergate affair and would
follow leads to President
Nixon, if necessary.
Co* a Democrat who served
five years as Solicitor General
under Presidents Kennedy and
Johnson, said he was, in his
words, overawed by the
guidelines for the job as special
prosecutor as revised over the
weekend by Atty. Gen. -
Designate Elliot L Richardson.
"I'm more overwhelmed by
Its (the guidelines) scope than
by its limitations," Cox told
the Senate judiciary
committee. "I can't see
anything in it that would
prevent me from doing the
job."
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, (D-W.
VA.) asked Cox if there were
anything in the guidelines that
would restrict his investigation
of the Watergate affair and
other alleged illicit political
activities of last year's
presidential campaign.
Before he could answer,
Byrd said: "Would you be
inhibited from going beyond
the ion (wiretap) statute and
follow any trail?"
"I can promise the
committee that," replied Cox.
Byrd: "Even if that trail
leads to the oval office of the
White House itself?::
"Wherever that trail may
lead," said Cox, -
Afterward, Byrd said he
would like to see the Senate
confirm Richardson's
nomination before it starts its
Memorial Day recess late
Thursday.
The morning session of
Richardson's fifth day before
the committee was spent
primarily on explaining the
agreement between the Atty.
Gen.-Designate and Cox, whose
appointment Richardson
announced last Friday.
SATISFIED
Cox said he was satisfied
with his agreement with
Richardson and did not believe
the guidelines needed to be
broadened.
"I'm going to have the whip
hand," he said.
"And you won't hesitate to
use it?" asked Byrd.
"No, sir," came the reply
quickly.
Cox said it also was clear to
him that he did not have any
obligation to advise Richardson
on matters of the investigation
if he did not want to.
He said, too, that he would
not supply information of the
investigation to President
Nixon and did not believe the
chief executive wou4 ask for
the data.
One of the changes in the
, guidelines made by Richardson
was the area of supplying
information.
Under the original
docume nt, Richardson felt that
the special prosecutor should
keep the Attorney General
advised on the status of the
Investigation from time to
time.
In the revised version, a
provision says the special
prosecutor will determine
whether and to what extent he
will inform or consult with the
Attorney General about the
conduct of his duties ad
esponsibllitles.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2167 .


BATTLING AGAINST TIME


.. .. ......1.73
Slt W i u ili iIii .- l


Mission controllers NIM KItVI


walk 'thermal


tightrope' on


Skylab


CAP UENNM TY, FLA. (AJP)- tinw ha. the Skyla I
arenttd Mouny prastetd S tedMus meanouesaes aIeys M
p-wfo perfectly to se Asseris'i space station. Mldmc
Coastrol waed "a tiherma tltope" keeplb the ovearisod
uOtfd lab In M fae Sdev .
Astronauts Charles Conrad They will wear masks to
Jr., Dr. Joseph P. Kerwin and guard against possible poison
Paul J. Weits worked in gas inside the space station.
simulators at the Johnson Like submariners moving frmw
Space Caenter near Houston, compartment to compartment,
rehearsing the techniques for the astronauts will use
fixing a broken solar panel on gas-testing equipment to
Skylab and for installing an "sniff" through each
umbrella-like sun bonnet to compartment's hatch before it
cool off the lab. is opened. This will assure that
The spacemen then fly to the unopened area is free of
Marshall Space Flight Centre toxic gases.
near Huntsville, Ala., and plan By Saturday afternoon, the
to practise the repair job spacemen will be in the large
procedures in a water tank orbital workshop area which
there on Tuesday. By contains the crew quarters and
rehearsing underwater, the experiment stations.
astronauts achieve sensations SOLAR SHIELD
similar to weightlessness. From this area, the
Engineers in Mission Control astronauts will deploy a solar
are "walking a thermal heat shield on the outside hull
tightrope," said an official of the spaceship.-
trying to keep one part of The shield considered the
Skylab from overheating and prime "fix" is a rectangular-
another part from freezing, shaped device resembling a
The baking effect of the Sun beach umbrella. It will be stuck
is causing temperatures to through an airlock in a folded
hover at Sauna-like 115 degrees condition. Once it is projecting
in the crew and workshop areas outside, springs will force it
of skylab. Another section of open to a 22-by-24-foot shield
the 118-foot-long craft is with a shiny aluminum coating
facing away from the Sun and on one side and an orange
temperatures there are color on the other. The shield
approaching 34 degrees will be placed flush against the
Engineers worried that water in side of the spacecraft.
a plumbing system may freeze, After completing the repair
causing pipes to burst. job, the astronauts will return
BALANCE to the command module for
Mission Control is delicately their second night in space.
maneuvering the craft as If the sun umbrella cools off
required to achieve a workable Skylab a 'planned, the
balance. astronauts will move into the
"We are able to maintain a space station on Sunday and
successful balance of set up housekeeping, ready to
temperatures in each of the live there for the balance of
areas," said Don Puddy, a their 28-day mission.
flight controller. "We think we Should the umbrella fail, the
have it under control." astronauts will try to install a
Engineers, faced with a second type of sun screen. This
tightening, schedule, are is a shield rolled up on a
completing fabrication of sun T-shaped frame.
shields designed to control the
high heat being soaked up by
the Skylab.
These will be flown to Cape
Kennedy on Wednesday and
officials will make a final
decision on Thursday on
wether to attempt'a launching WILLBE
Friday.
A tentative mission flight FOR STOC]
plan calls for Conrad, Kerwin
and Weitz, to board an Apollo
Command ship crowded with 25th &2tl
new tools and materials for
their repair mission, to be
launched at 9 a.m. EDT '
Friday. K
RENDEZVOUS
They will rendezvous with sUn
the troubled Skylab at about
4:32 '.m. and perform a F
fly-around inspection which
will be televised to Earth. S UN4-0I
The astronauts will dock agk icvi
with the space station, eat Ifor I
dinner and then start their
repair work. The first job is to
undock and fly the Apollo
craft in close formation with
Skylab. This will enable Weitz:P^
to lean out of a hatch and try tS iM aH
to free a jammed solar panel
using a 10-foot shepherd's
crook tool. SUNDAY r
Afterward, they will dock
once more and then sleep TOOGODS...
aboard the command ship.
On Saturday, the astronauts OPEN SUNDAY
will enter Skylab for the first
time. FROM 2 5


************** ********tt tWt.t. tkwtrt****t** wm
: 41









: will Interview Intlwacted parents & students for admission to FIorida Air
4 AcUdemy.

4 wil be at thi Nassau Beach Hotal for Interiews.

R fH I Jum 2Sth to Auut 10t, 1973, ae- 6-19 :

fGraie 9-12 Melbourn,Pa. .


Junior School -- Grades 1-8 Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
* Senior School Grades 9-12 Melbourne, Fla.


4 Interlme alif be hAdd Theriay, Friday and haturdey, May N4th, M8thr &6 lth. :
********************************w** **** ********* *
41 4R
49 4
49KI
49 4
4* mo4

RU K~D
49AClee'Krtr ot lfrby nonesta t ometl~
49wl neve neete aet tdosfr diso oKo~ i
'K' Zcaehy A











IN. ue2t t uie 0h 17.as -0 '


s 1. VIiTNAM


SAIGON (AP)- T-e
Coemm lad Me bdMding a lS.mie
red Mtwoak from te northnet

aid M eold sa M the
The ma M."h a b
a 0a dn l A Sh Val, a
|qiMANl CoEmmunit baWe are
t Le s L9, saotheaMtwuid to
ft Dh Po vko e -O the central
MI t somethldni new," said
t maM. la*"This one .new
a tiy 1M other 1 de nMi pbplied
at I Offsent htan before the
He amd he istent of the
Communists was not clear. But he
added there were no algpe of an
aimablnt ehadve in the northern
and cmtrl sectorsn.
He peeumted that the
Conmma l might be "pulling
,to tin ir Sa eaweod liberated
areas.".-
There is nothing in the ceme-fire
aMoematt p11Ohblt1S road building
by the Comnuists i thier own
sas le offlo lasid.
The rleed 1 work winds ward
rm M dlhs to the west bordering
Laoa het tnrm reward toward
111 6oat. Most or thi aid is
mconroBad by the Communist. But
d Blson government holdt the
stitch of Hishway I Unking the
ma r eoMtl citi es suh as Hud, Da
Na and QUou lNip.
The soum aain denied Ha oi
4casss that Amercan bombers had
attached a major Communist
headquarters the Loc Ninh zsne
75 ara torth of Saigon and five
n. &tom t Cambedan border.
The afour-ountry International
Commilmion of Control aWd
Supervklon plans to begin another
effort Wedhesday to investigate the
allied air attack. A previous
effort faied Saturday because the
Saison government refused to
provide Commuenit Ilason officers
with transportation, the Viet Cong
caimed.
Haoi charged on Monday in a
broadcast by the official Vietnam
news pancy that the United States
had renewed air econnaance
over North Vietnam for "spy
activities." The statement,
monitored in Tokyo,. said the
activitia would have "a negative
effect" on the U.8-North Vietnam
talka In Pubs between Henry A.
Ihain er and La Duec Tho of the
North Vietnamese Communist
Party Politburo.
A U.S. official In Bangkok said
there is no evidence that 2,400
American s still listed as masinK in
action in Indochina e sti alive.
Bri. Gen. Robert C. Kingston,
head of tbe joint caasualty
resolution centre, made the
anounemenut after inspecting
three cash dtes ia South Vietnam.






CLOSED

TAKING

h MySn7


SALELkN5
who must be a Iamlan oklmn
Essential Quallfltiom
1. General Certificate in Education to
Advanced Level but a University degree
would be preferable.
2. At least S sears sales experience in the oil
industry.
3. Thorough knowledge of oil marketing
methods, sales techniques, petroleum
products and dealer and general business
management.
4. Proven ability to manage a department
including the supervision of sales
representatives, staff training and
motivation.

Con naping s lary will be according to
qualifications and experience.
AppicatiowBn writing to P. 0.
Box N3717 ttr, Bham .


"a


Tutyn My 22, 1973.


e llE $7$1881@


MI 1NMIII










Tuesday, May 22. 1973.


hbr ortibtt


Being Bound To Sww To The DoVgnas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH.Publlwr/lditor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH. O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Lltt., LL.D.
PabtleWr/Editor 1917-1972
Contriburt q Editor 1972-
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PubM&Ir/Editor 1972.

End of a dream?

End of a dream?


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the 6th and final article in a series arising out of a
discussion at a conference held in Miami on U.S. Caribbean
relations in the changing pattern of power in this area.)
WHENbTMIarted this series I aid that I would not discuss the
American-Caribbean conference in detail because it might be
considered a breach of courtesy if I said too much.
But I now think I can discuss some features of the talks
without being critical because I am able to endorse most of the
report of the meeting.
. There were some very sound men in the group but a few
advanced revolutionary views ... and, of course, they were the
most vocal. They reflected some of the impractical ideas held by
the Government of the Bahamas.

One of the subjects examined was dependent territories and
how they might be made more independent of foreign investment
by becoming inter-dependent within the Caribbean area.
This is the idea behind the Free Trade movement in the area,
so that the products and manufactured articles of.our territory
can be sold within the area.
I made it clear that I could not speak for the Government of
the Bahamas but I would feel that the Bahamas ... which had
nothing to export ... would not gain anything by such a union.
Indeed the colony would lose in Customs duty on which the
Government largely depends for its income.
The Government is now talking a lot about industrial
developments but it remains to be seen how far they will get
without plentiful and cheap labour, the prime ingredients in this
kind of enterprise.
If their development plans succeed, then there might be some
advantage in joining a free trade union.
******
There is a good deal of feeling in the Caribbean about the
tourist business making servants of the people. This kind of
propaganda is responsible for the arrogant attitude our people
have developed in their contacts with visitors to the islands.
As I have told you on more than one occasion, I was obliged to
do all kinds of menial work in the British army in the first world
war, even the job of cleaning toilets and sweeping public streets. I
am not ashamed of the fact. Nor do I feel humiliated by the
memory. On the contrary, I am glad I had the experience.
What is a servant?
The President of the U.S. is a servant of the people ... so are all
the high and mighty men in the Government of the Bahamas.
Public servants, from the Governor down to the lowest messenger
boy, are constantly reminded that they are servants of the people.
Whatever any of us do in life, it is a form of service. We are all
servants of each other. Do your job well and you bring dignity
into the most menial types of labour.

It is recognized that, for strategic reasons, the U.S. government
will take a deep; AntpaW.-in C" affairs, especially since
more and more of these territorlesf'e gainirig independent status.
It is clear that the $10 million Uncle Sam gave the Bahamas for
agricultural developments at Andros had this selfish motive
behind it.
America has been handing out billions of dollars all over the
world in the hope of buying friendships. So far, this has been a
wasted effort, largely because most of this money didn't achieve
any tangible results that might endear Uncle Sam to the people of
the territory.
If nothing comes of the Andros venture ... it will be just
another fruitless effort from which no permanent benefit will be
derived.


Light industry and agriculture for the Caribbean were
discussed.
It was agreed that sugar and bananas were the imLortant
agricultural activities in the Caribbean but it was also agreed that
they had no future.
Late in the 1600's sugar was such a profitable enterprise in the
Caribbean that Britain was seriously considering exchanging her
colony of Canada for the French sugar producing islands of
Martinique and Guadeloupe.
Beet sugar was later developed and became a strong competitor
for cane sugar. Incidentally, my doctor in Miami has taken me off
beets and carrots because of their heavy sugar content. I knew
that beets were "loaded" but didn't know this about carrots.
-Today cane sugar production in the Caribbean survives only
because it is subsidized by the U.S. and Britain.
********
Banana production has been placed in the same position. The
banana producing islands of the Caribbean cannot compete with
banana production in Central and South America where the land
is;more fertile, there is better irrigation and labour is almost down
St the slave level.
:The banana industry in the Caribbean has survived only
because Britain sends a ship through the islands once a week to
collect the cargo and the product is given preferential treatment
intthe British market.
'Will this form of British paternalism for her colonial children
* cease with Britain's entry in the Common Market?
If it does ... that will be the end of the banana industry for the
West Indies.
a *********
If long established industries like sugar and bananas cannot be
saved ... what then?
There is only one answer to this question ... and that is
markets. Without a guaranteed market, there isn't anything to
discuss, especially in a place like the Bahamas with a population
of only 180,000. Jamaica, with Its large population, has a built-in
market for some of its products.
I asked this question at the meeting ... where are the markets?
No one had an answer.
a*****
One of the men at the conference advanced the philosophy
That is the basis of the PLP Government in the Bahamas.
He felt-that investors should be brought into the area only to
benefit the black people. They should baild businesses and then
hand them over to the poor black people.
This is an utopian idea that will never work out in practice.
Because of this approach to investment capital in the Bahamas
has dried up ... and money is flowing out of the islands.
A4 sound investment must have the profit motive if it is to
succeed, And It can be made to benefit the entire community.
When money flows into an area the native people rise with it.
For example, back in my father's day when the Bahamas had a
Fishing Village economy my father had a small treadle press.
That was all the economy could afford. But when money came in
The Tribune grew with the country and today It is a big business.
Many other Bahamian enterprises have grown In the same way.
And those that have not grown were managed by men who ...
within themselves ... lacked the capacity for growth.
If a dependent country like the Bahamas wants to grow it must


New harsh punishment,-- Africa-style


By LARRY HEINZERLING
LAGOS, Nigeria (AP)-A
cattle rustler in Guinea
reportedly had both his arms
amputated at the shoulder for
his crime.
In Gabon, President
Alexander Bernard Bongo
recently ordered three
murderers thrown into the sea
.MdA ..u.


i t Uwnii.
And Across Africa in
Liberia, the whipping of
suspected thieves has been
introduced to reduce stealing,
according to reports from the
capital of Monrovia.
While capital punishment is
fading in much of the world,
more and more African nations
are facing the rising tide of
crime by striking back with
harsh and unusual punishments
many times in public.
The official Liberian
newspaper quoted a high
ranking police official as saying
authorities have been too
lenient with people involved in
stealing and explained that
after their arrest the "rogues'
are whipped, then charged and
prosecuted in court.
When President Bongo
ordered two men and a
woman, who had been
convicted of slaying eight
.ronna in a week thrown into


the sea, he was quoted on radio
Liberville as saying:
"The assassins will not be
shot ... we must throw them
out at sea and let these
cut-throats rejoin Point
Saint-Denis," a small island off
Gabo's palm-fringed coast.
The cattle thief in
Marxist-flavoured Guinea not
only had his arms cut off
before crowds of spectators,
according to the self-styled
"Voice of the Revolution," but
was also sentenced to 15 years
in prison for stealing more than
200 cattle.
But perhaps the most
notorious recent crime-busting
operation was last year's
beating to death of thieves in
the landlocked central African
republic.
The country's ruler, Gen.
J ean-Bedel Bokassa,
personally led a group of
soldiers armed with wooden
clubs to the central prison in
Bangui, the capital, and
ordered troops to begin a one
minute beating of 46 prisoners.
"All thieves must die," he
declared. "There will be no
more theft in the Central
African Republic."
The next day Bokassa joined
several thousand persons who
m.th.Arl in the centre nf


LET ABACO BE FREE


EDITOR The Tribune,
It is time someone spoke out
against the LOP-sided news
reports on ZNS. Especially you
Abaco people.
A few weeks ago a story
broke in London about two
Bahamians and two Americans
in London representing the
Abaco people. ZNS couldn't
wait to report this (the way
they liked to hear it, but not
truthfully), in fact it was on
for two days straight but yet
when Mr. Watkins denied most
of what they had said, there
was complete SILENCE isn't
this very strange?
They made mention of the
fact that these men were not
from Abaco or Bahamians. Mr.
Watkins is the representative
(or one of them) of the people
of Abaco and Mr. Hall is a
direct descendant. Perhaps
they meant the Americans
were interfering yet Martin
Luther King was not a
Bahamian, Adam Clayton
Powell was not a Bahamian,
the Senator from Texas,
Robert (Shaft) Roundtree.
Were these people not
inteferring in Bahamian politics
and not Bahamians?
But this is different. They
were with the PLP and
Government. This is only to
name a few. There were others
from Africa and Jamaica, etc.,
etc., etc. Like ZNS, it is right
when they do it but not
someone who is not under PLP
or Government influence. Is
this right? Freedom?
Democracy?
In the past few days the
P.M. has gotten wind of a
petition for Abaco being
passed around. Now he is
trying to scare the people,
saying they are traitors,
committing treason and the
likes. Why is this so for the
Abaco people and not he
himself. Did he not ask Britain
for the same thing
Independence?
The difference, of course, is
that Abaco wants to be free
from the Bahamas and Pindling
from Great Britain The true
Loyalists want to stay loyal to
Great Britain (Abaco). Mr.
Pindling said Independence was
not the issue how come then
we did not have a referendum?
If Independence was not the


issue, why weren't the people
given the right to vote for it.
They believed him but perhaps
he is scared now they don't
really want Independence so
we won't have a referendum.
This is the "Square Deal". If
it had been fairly done by
referendum, and Mr. P. won
the right to Independence
those of us against it would be
more content to sit back and
accept it. Without that vote we
are not. But rather must have it
crammed down our throats,
like it or not.
Mr. Pindling is trying to
frighten the people of Abaco
and its descendants, and has
done this in some, very few,
cases. He knows he needs
Abaco because they can and
will sustain themselves without
Pindling. The tourist figures
alone can show this up in
Aoaco and down in N.P. and
other islands. If they don't
need Abaco why not let them
go free to do their own thing.
Don't be a "Dog in the
Manger." Let Abaco be free.
I say to you who voted,
signed the first petition and the
one in the past few days -
BRAVO, Don't be scared as
some of your friends are -
you at least are standing up to
what you want and believe.
Those who refused to sign the
Petition are at this moment
making plans to live in Abaco.
I hope you Abaconians don't
let them set foot on your soil. I
hope the names were noted.
They do not deserve a place
there. If they are scared now, I
pity them after July 10th. Yet
you 'scared' 'Conians' expect
others to fight your battle and
you to reap the benefits. Some
of these men could be in
danger, yet you say "No I
don't want to or won't sign,
but I'll go live there anyway
because that's where I was
born" I hope they don't let
you back ever.
Come on ZNS, put both
sides on the air or not at all.
The people in the Family
Islands don't all get the
newspapers and can't hear both
sides. If you can't be honest
and Tell it All Like it Is be
SILENT!
AN ABACO DESCENDANT
Nassau,
May 17, 1973


allow money to come in ... let it operate without unreasonable
restrictions ... and then allow the native people to grow according
to their individual capacity.

After this discussion one of the men at the meeting told me a
story to illustrate how impractical is any plan that eliminates the
profit motive.
He told me that he put a few millions in Haiti during the Papa
Doc regime ... and got squeezed.
He put several millions in Cuba ... and his investments were
seized by Castro.
He thought Jamaica was safe. He put a million there, now he is
being squeezed.
He was sure that the Bahamas was the right place and so he put
a hunk of money in the islands. Now ... how secure is his money?
He shrugged his shoulders. He is no longer sure of the Bahamas.
He must have a pile of money because he was able to laugh at his
misfortune.

As the Bahamas and the Caribbean tighten up ... more and
more people both investors and tourists are avoiding the
area.
But I don't suppose any of this will matter if President Nixon's
Bill, now before Congress, to stop the outflow of money from the
U.S. becomes law and is strictly administered.
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
You cannot force the growth of human life and civilization,
any more than you can force these slow-growing trees. This is the
economy of Almighty God, that all good growth is slow growth.
GAYNOR


Bangui where the bodies of
three beaten prisoners and 42
injured convicts were put on
display.
Many African officials point
out that theft has traditionally
been considered far more
serious an offence in Africa,
where poverty is widespread,
than in richer, more developed
nations.
And in many nations the
penalty is harsh.


More than 200 convicted
armed robbers have been
publicly put to death by firing
squad since the end of that
country's 30-month civil war
with Biafra.
In neighboring Cameroon,
21 men await execution
following their conviction late
last year for allegedly having
stolen 60 million dollars in a
safe-cracking spree.
Clove smugglers in


NOW YOU


BARCA
Inentoa


BREAK


TUE


Zanzibar 15 persons,
including I I Kenyans have
been senter.ced to death and
refused clemency despite
appeals from Kenya.
Libya recently declared
that the penalty for theft be
the amputation of the right
hand and left foot in certain
cases. The amputations must
be performed by a surgeon in a
hospital.
And Kenya has introduced


StE


IT


the death Penalty for armed
robbery, reflecting, observers
say, a growing concern in the
East African nation about the
rising crime rate.
Summing up many
arguments for harsh penalties,
a Nigerian newspaper
columnist said recently, "a
deterrent won't work unless we
punish wrongdoers in public
where people can see what will
happen to them."


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EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP
BAY STREET PHONE 22246


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"A NAME NEWLYWEDSTRYST"
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^ FOR THE AUNE'S BRIDE
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DR. ESFAKIS BUILDING MARKET STREET


SANDALS ASSORTED STYLES & SIZES
$2.00,$2:50,$3:50

Boys' Pants PERMA PRESS ASSORTED
SIZE & COLOURS
1/2 Price


Boys' Infant Suits


III I 1II IIII


SHOE SALE

EVENING SHOES and SANDALS
GOLD, SILVER and BLACK PEAU
$0O. a pair

Chris' Boutique
BAY ST.. NEXT TO LUMS PH: 2-3281


JON'S DEP STORE
ELIZABETH AVENUE


THE LEADER IN FASHION FROM
THE LATEST FASHION SHOWS
FOR ELEGANCEW
& QUALITY,
VISIT JOHN'S
DEPARTMENT
STORE.
LADIrS SHOES hINg malum plItforms In two-tones.
So~ tet CLOGS In tmg. Wowvset It alL
Knitted Tope Dires, Cool Polyest Suit beutifully
toned by "That oWrl


- $2:00


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TO M &O...S
WEM IS ATm..


The


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TEL: 5-66


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Smock blouses


7,


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hy belt's


FOR THE YOUNG MISS


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BROWN
$3.99


BLACK ONLY



BAY ST. 24727

CHAMPION SPORTS LAND
Specializing in competitive and recrattonal sports.
"SPORTS IS OUR GAME"


FOR MEN & WOMEN
SRA- also


STAR PLAZA, MACKEY STREET PHONE 2-.1862


hEAlT FER MEH ENCE
DRESS UP YOUR.
HMIE WITN
DRAPERIES


ITIME
Madeira Shopping Centre
Palmdale
PHONE 5-9934


wet h the
Quality wiS


tyb wJ h


by Vence7 of Italy
Cosmetics, Drugs ,
& Perffme


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STAR PLAZA MACKEY STREET PHONE S9928


THINK AHEAD

For FORMAL, CASUAL & SPORTING OCCASIONS
FABRICS WILL BE THE KEY.
--9 The most fabulous Swiss Embroideries
O *Sheer Patterned & Crushed Velvets
FOR Beautiful Laces & Re-embroideries
BRIDES Brocades of every description
Patterned & Plain Jerseys
TOOl Knit & Woven Polyesters
e Dashiki & African Prints
Printed & Plain Sailcloth
For THE FINISHING TOUCH LACE EDGINGS,
BRAIDS & FANCY TRIMS.
A IK IMIMII IIII-I


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Tel. 28908


=A -I:
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FLTER,HOOD
AND 1.8 LENS


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AU


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&AV anurs ..m ak n )


-1


TuedeMs 22,i1973.


ghi arlhmu


01










Tuedy. May 22 1973.. Xhr Urtbmt
MEMBERS of the public INDEPENDENCE CLEAN-UP DONATIONS Ltd., $300; Super Value Food
--- _, / have donated $17,457.22 to L A Stores Ltd., $200, Lyford Cay
"" the Independence (lean-Up goal was $20,000, to defray "It is now up to the public where it beloitn. Company Ltd. $100;
Committee, the Independence the cost of approximately as a whole. The Litter bins are "It every car driver and Tanganvika Concessions Ltd..
Secretariat announced. 1,000 steel litter bins, concrete being placed along our majo, passenger will do that, we $60; Cisalpine Overseas Bank O
b "We are most gratified by bases and wire catchment tops. highways as fast as the Prisoi should be able to welcome our Ltd.. $50; Crown Life Y
the public response to our The fact that since our original can construct them. There Independence celebration Insurance Company, $40; E
SMf. appeal for help in making our announcement on March 19, should no longer be any excuse visitors to a clean New Vickers Da Costa & Co.
roadsides presentable. before 124 local businessmen and for tossing papers, bottles and Providence Island," Mr. Smith (Bahamas) Ltd., $40; R. H. F
Independence," said George A. women have contributed over tins out of vehicles. We ask said. Curry & Co. Ltd., $40; Thorne
Smith M.P., Parliamentary $17,000 for this purpose can everybody men, women and At the same time, the Gunn & Co., $20; Columbus f
Secretary to the Prime Minister be considered indication of children to please hold your Independence Clean-Up Pharmacy, $20.
and Chairman of the wholehearted support for our litter in your car until you pass Committee announced receipt SUN
T rust your rIndependence Secretariat, objective of cleaning up the one of the new black, yellow of th following donations, not SUN
and red bins, then toss it in previously acknowledged SUN: Rises 5:23 a.m.
: A F~ t yO~r ears, not "Our originally announced Roywest Banking Corporation Sets 6:50 p.m.


second-hand feedback
DEAR ABBY: I am a W-year-old wife and mother of a
S -Wld M. Due to flnaneal c rcumstance, I am a
wrkig mother-but because my huIband works mgh ts
he's a blr] he stay wfit he baby all day. I ased my
alter if the baby would be afected if I worked days, and
e said as lang as he Is with one loving parent there would
bane hbanr.
My problem Is that I Just foand out that my bet
Me md's husband has told others that I am an unfit mother
because all children need their mothers with item and that
I am seIAsh to be workig.
Altho my girl friend didn't say anything, rm quwe hurt
that she didn't stick up for me, and frankly don't think our MAURA'
friendship can now last because I'm so angry. What would .* OFFERS
"Y FITstFI MOTHER
S DAR FIT: Yu seem to be getg a t e aseead- MOTORS
d freedback. Why d't yee ust tel wbomnever it was SUPPLI


am ears-w* ih a't a bad Mdea. .
DEAR ABY: My daughter, 2, and my asm, 18, recent500
l:y got lht a violent argument. Here's the story: my s-
was recently fitted with contact lensIa and the other ngt 35 L
be removed them at the dinner table. My daughter was
ved al saM id U h lda have left the diner table. Ift *d
n saMid that slane contact lenses er the sam purp % FF 130
as eyeglasss, it was no more "revoling" to remove them
at te dimmer table thn it would be to remove one's eye TRUE TEMPER
glasses. What do you say? BROOKLYN FATHER
DEAR FATHER: I say all the cemiderMU en year sm-
a=s for Ms feew diners, he can stick i his eye. ---
DEAR ABBY: Your column in the Nevada State Jour-
11l and the sulbect of putting a bottle of wiky in the WE'VE GOT
cukat rembidmd me of when my Undo Pat, an old cooftry FULLY EQUIPPED
Irihmunan, was dying. Hi best Mind, Jerry, asked Pat WITH 50 HP.t ELECTRIC
there was anything he could do for him. Pat replied that he
had a bottle of fine Irish whisky in the closet, and would FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY MOTOR
Jerry sprinkle It on his grave after he was buried.
Jerry replied, "I'd be glad to, Pat, but you don't mind THIS 16'
SI train it men kdneys fArst, dol ye ?'
DENNIS IN RENO LAN
DEAR DENNIS: Yoer Uncle Pat must have had bhu- FROM
dreds of nphews-al = e the ORKOvaudeville CLIPPER

DEAR ABBY: Your letter about whether it's against CA M
the law or not to bury a person with a fifth of bourbon in
his casket brings to miad my German grandmother. REG. $3420.00
She was fod of playing cards and having a "schapps" SPECIAL
with friends, so she left money for her wake and also for
bradLw pl ing cards, A"Ap M n&sameo sc e pds,
;and a ste ) bor. We atrled Grandmother wth a deck of
rd, pen and pad, four gla, and a pit. ____
WhO te Day ofr Iecoi 0g come0 she wAs bae ready to
start in n over gain. Why not prepare for the atrife I I ES
=ewT Wouldn't it be awful if we had to start from scratch 1 5 0 lUn
as the world onee did? AND
A.CARD-PLAYIGELIENVIG FA
pom.'V AitNDISCOUNT BFEATHERS O


AILE E wACH, MA READIS ATOL
with a difference -i
APARTMENTS BY, THE DAY H E FU
34 charming, fully 10r
equipped 1-2-3 room
apartments, facing our
own excellent beach or CATCH A
the beautiful garden and



HOTE CABLE BEACH MANOR. P.O. Box N263. NaAll with ho WITH 20 HP. JOHNSON MOTOR
trs. Joan Mayypon, manager Mrs. Sandr Eneas, ass't mangervi ceNEW E A T GO 5
Mrs. Cleomk Smith, receptionist. onng REG. $2161.00 .





Cal 7.7785 Or-84 nowl SPECIAL $1 Q (O 0 A


ARRIVED TODAY:
teanic, Rotterdam from New
'ork; Olympia from Freeport;
Emerald Seas, Bahama Star,
lavia from Miami; Tropic
lyer from West Palm Beach.
SAILED TODAY: Rommel
or Mayport, Florida
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
3rand Turks from Miami
MOON
Rises 11:14 p.m.
Sets 9:41 a.m.


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Tuesday, May 22, 1973.


hIt Sribmu


SPECIAL I


WEEK


CHEVY


MALIBU


1973


THIS IS


CHEVY WEEK


O COME ON IN


AND BUY


OR TRADE


0 see...... 000000 0@000 S 00 SS0 S 0 0 00


1973 Monte Carlo


Demonstrator in like New
k-?"*.A


Condition only

SAVE A-Lot of


1,500 miles

- MONEY!


* ..O@S@S 0 0 *...... 0* 0 0 O 0 o*o 9 S0 *0 0 0 0


[ ia
T-i


FIBRE AVAILANI


semt ,m .


FINANCE AVAILABLE


J.F. KENNEDW DRIVE NEAR COCA-COLA
iA-As, IANAMA*


sex N741


I'


0
O.


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- y wl -w-


'W 'V- 'W 'W 'V' "%r 'W 'W -W 'W IV r 'g- '4r -V- -W- -'W -Ir w IV- -w--


4


&- -AL- -& A. -









TudWv. Mw 22.1973.


Come this weekend

to see how a new

way of life begins at

Yamacraw Beach.


Anwwelyfaue rnig o h


I


new weekly feature bringing you the
test in Bahamian shows & entertainment

how Club has many rooms

or many moods & good life
S YOUR APPETITE JADED with night spots and shows that all seem the same?


4



I


I





p


A
la

S
si

f<


sor
rea
pre
De
fat
clu
dif
the
oui
Ro
Sh
of
dif
ro
flo
sys
wa
sh(
(M
nol
Ma
and
Sc
mo


1. Large lots

2. No interest rates


You can build right


away


All this adds up to a home in Nassau's
finest future residential area. You need
the land first (70x100') for only ($75
deposit). And the best of Yamacraw
Beach is still available. Only about 25
per cent has gone so far but now we are


advertising you will


have to


move


quickly to catch the best lot. Yamacraw


gives you larger land for
Absolutely no interest r


stallments,


representing


$1,200 and more and


less money.


rates


on in-


a saving of


you can build


whenever you want to afford it.


Come to Yamacraw


Beach this


weekend. We'll all be there to greet you
- sunrise to sunset, Saturday and
Sunday. AND ON WEEKDAYS FROM 2
p.m. to dark.


Hunting for fun? It's here.
Andre'Cold Duck. A happy
blend of fine champagne
and sparkling burgundy.
With deep pink bubbles
to tickle your tongue
with a surprisingly
refreshing taste.
Serve Cold Duck
when the flock gets
together. But make
It the best Cold
Duck. Make It
Andre'Cold Duck!I


Now available
in the
Bahamas
BUY IT
chilled from
your favourite
liquor store.


AT ONLY



2A

A BOTTLE


I. -- Yemcw Bead
NIONE
"MORLEY nd OIRIE
SK S 24148/23027
YAMAOW B or w model ho

41141


]




I




I.


AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE & AMERICAN SPARKLING BURGUNDY SPARKLING WINE ARMAT SULK pOCSS NATURALLY#ER*ENTED PIOd D & BOTTLED BY THE ANDR9 CHAMPAGNE CELLARS MODESTO. CALiF
imported & Distributed by BAHAMAS BLENDERS LTD.
the Commonweamh's leading Wine & Sprit Merchant.


Do you want to go
newhere different that's
lly special?
Then go to the not terribly
possessing address of Bay at
veaux Street and enter the
bulous world of the Sun
Ab.
You will enter a completely
ferent world once you pass
e gates. You are then in the
ter patio called the Bahama
om each room in the
ow Club is a miniature world
its own and named after a
fferent Bahamian island.
The Nassau room is the main
om. In here is the dance
or, the band, the stereo
item and the bar. On the
ills are posters of
ows from which the Show
magazine) Club takes its
me. There are posters of
irilyn Monroe, Moulin Rouge
d one advertising Brando and
hneider in "the hottest
>vie of the year Show."


3.


Are you in the Nassau room
of the Show Club or are you
on Broadway?
At this stage an explanation
is in order. The Show
(Magazine) Club is owned by
Huntington Hartford (who
needs no introduction) and
operated by equally as
well-known a personality (in
Nassau at least) Peanuts
Taylor. Huntington Hartford,
Bill Roker, assistant manager,
told me, he owns a show
magazine from which the club
gets its name. He (H. H. that is)
already has one other Show
Club in New York and is
planning on opening another in
London and Canada.
Back to the Nassau room.
Here there is a beautiful bar
made out of driftwood and
polished with silicone.
It is these sort of
non-commercial touches that
Page 8, Col. 1I


THE SHOW CLUB got off to a rousing re-opening recently as George Smith M.P.,
second from right, wishes his fellow Exumian Terry Bain, right, good luck on his
managerial assignment Peanuts Taylor, left, joins In the re-opening celebration along with
Huntington Hartford, landlord of the Mermaid premises.


I


5h Mriham











a ~Jht U~rtbunt


From Pge 7
make the Show Cub so special.
There is an old World ,,* ,*
atmosphere here that results
from beauty for its own sake. r, .
From a strictly commercial *
viewpoint I should imagine
that it would have been bad
economics to dismantle,
transport and re-construct a
fifteenth century cloister from
Europe to the Ocean Club
grounds on Paradise Island.
The Show Club has on a
smaller scale the same grace.
There is an interior patio appropriate way to describe
not as conventionally gracious the Eleuthera room. The deep,
as the Bahama room but soft, comfortable couches and
delightfully secluded. Here a chairs are covered in
game called "double up", expensive-looking maroon
similar to table tennis and leather. There are elegant
invented by Huntington antique occasional chairs and
Hartford, can be played the walls are covered in neutral
throughout the long balmy coloured velvet. There is a
Bahamian summer nights. And fixture on the wall over the
the Show Club doesn't close mantlepiece which I took to be
until 4 a.m.! Neptune with mermaids, fishes
The Bimini room is small and sea horses. The San
and cosy this is the room to Salvador room is the ultimate
go to if you want the in privacy and intimacy with
imp ossible-made-possible its deeply upholstered couches
combination of being close to and dim lighting. Columbus
the action and yet away from would have missed it
it all. altogether!
The Exuma room is Now to the music which is
intimate. Lighting is by means an indispensable feature of the
of a chandelier and the table good life.
tops are the signs of the zodiac.... The Paul Hanna Trio play
A room for the children of from ten o'clock at night until
Aquarius perhaps? four in the morning and it's a
"Distinguished" is the most toss up between which is more


delightful to dance to the
very danceable music or to
listen to it and the exquisite
voice of Paul Hanna.
Paul is an artist in more than
the performing sense of the
word. He has the ability
through his voice to transport
you from the common place-
even when the words are
commonplace. He adds a
quality to "Sweet Caroline"
that transcends the trite
phrases. Simeon Rolle on the
drums keeps the beat going in
the mambo and the merengue.
Fitz Gerald is on the bass
guitar and Paul Hanna on the
piano.
The sound system at the
Show Club is superb. It is


When you re





out of cash...


you r not




out of money


Security. Reliability. Dependability. They're
what a Royal Bank chequing account offer you.
And safety. Because the safe way to pay is by
cheque ... with no risk of losing cash.
A Royal Bank chequing account means instant
money .... anywhere in the Bahamas. Cheques
are businesslike, more convenient, and make it
easier to keep track of payments.
We're the first bank in the Bahamas to have a
fully computerized system too. So.. .fewer
mistakes .... greater efficiency. Better for
you. And each cheque is personalized with
your name and account number on it.
Helpful Bankers in Nassau and the Family
Islands can tell you about a chequing account.
Just ask one.


The RMal


IN THE SUPREME COURT 1973
OF THE BAHAMA ISLANDS No. 7
EQUITY SIDE

IN THE MATTER of All those Parcels of land
comprising portions of Blocks Number 23, 26, and.
27, of a Subdivision of Lots known as Nassau
Village and situate South of Soldier Road in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of KENNETH
RITCHIE,
NOTICE
a) To All Adverse Claimants
b) Adjoining Owners and occupiers
The Petition of Kenneth Ritchie, of Palm Beach
Street in Englerston or Bamboo Town in the Island
of New Providence, in respect of All those three
parcels or tracts of land situate South of Soldier
Road and comprising portions of Blocks Number
23, 26, and 27, except for lots Number 6, 17, 18,
43 and 44, of Block No. 23, except lots Number
27, to 30, inclusive of Block No. 26 and also all
those lots in Block Number 27, except lots
Number 1 to 10, inclusive and also 22, and 23,
which said tracts of land hath such shape size
position and dimensions and boundaries as are
shown on the Plan filed herein and coloured Pink
thereon. The said Kenneth Ritchie claims to be the
owner in fee simple of the said tracts of land and
have made application to the Supreme Court of the
Bahama Islands under the provision of Section, 3
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
'be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provision of the Act. -
Coeofthe filed Plan may be inspected during
Office hours at the following places.
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court Bank
Lane in the City of Nassau.
tb) The Crown Lands Office Bay Street.
(c) The Ministry of Work John F. Kennedy Drive.
(d) The place of business of the Petitioner in Palm
Beach Street, Engleston. .
Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or a drilt to dower or an adverse claim or a
cdm not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the 4th day of June A.D. 1973, filed in the
Supreme Court and served on the Petitioner a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure by any such person to file his or her claim
on or before the 4th day of June, A.D. 1973 will
oprate as a bar to s.cl clanm.
KENNETH RITCHIE
Palm Beach Street.


The o efut t Bank
9SBMANK t
Bnchms throughout the Bahamas od


q.


piped into every room but not
so loud as to interrupt
conversation.
On June 3rd Goombay
summer enters its third season.
Goombay summer has
proved to be a success. Mr.
Basil Al bury, Assistant
Director of Tourism hopes that
this year the programme will
go "from success to greater
success'*.
To achieve this some
additions have been made this
year promotionally, visually
and in the Goombay
programme itself.
The airport at Nassau and
Freeport, and other places of
entry, will be decorated with
overhead lanterns and banners.
The girls at the airport
will wear uniforms yellow
and green pants and a blouse
made out of a goombay print.
The Ministry is
encouraging taxi-cab drivers to
wear a Goombay shirt. These
are of two types. There is a
very sharp belted safari jacket
- white with the goombay face
on the pocket. The second
jacket, very similar to the first,
but more appropriate for the
maturer figure, is also white
with the goombay badge on


the pocket. The belt on this
jacket is just a small one at the
back.
To encourage the wearing of
these jackets the Ministry
proposes to suggest a
maximum retailing price -
about $11 or $11.50 for tee
safari Jacket and about $10 or
S 10.50 for the bush jacket.
Vendors of food on
Goombay nights will also be
encouraged to wear goombay
prints and the Ministry is
making every effort here to
ensure high standards.
Another new feature this
year will be an information
booth on Prince George Dock
in conjunction with a loud
speaker system. This is mainly
to cater to the cruise ships -
incidentally cruise ship visitors
are on the increase. This booth
will be located in such a place
that it will be visible from all
the piers and the loud speaker
system will insure that no
cruise ship visitor will remain
ignorant of Goombay summer
activities. Girls also will be on
hand to greet these visitors
who, in the past, have not
always been acquainted with
on-shore activities.
On June 2nd at Nassau
International Airport and in


report three projector units
wi be insad. Thee will
show m from goombay
parade aides of daily
activities.
The Minltry is aso
hopin that Im ration
and Cutm officials will wear
goombay t ao .
Phycal improvements of
the anda for Independence
iould also help tour Mr.
Albury said. Juabey Vlap,
which is 1prgee1n1 and the
Royal Victoria gardens wll
feature in this year's Goombay
summer.
At Jumbey Village
(commencing July 1 there will
be all-day art exhibits artisans
at work, musical presentations
and a restaurant featuring
Bahamian dishes. Admision
will be free.
The Royal Victoria GardesL.
should be ready in time. Here
there will be a sophisticated
musical programme. The Royal
Bahamas Police Band will play
on the last Sunday of June,
July and AugMt from 3 to 4
p.m. and there also will be
ballet, chorale singing and
gospel singing. Refreshments
will be on sale at the Cafe
Royale restaurant, which is
being renovated.


Another addition to the
programme will be a beach
party every Tuesday at Cable
Beach and Paradise Island from
noon to 3 p.m.
A m4aor new feature this
yew will be the Sunday
programme. Father William
Thompson will be the
coordinator. Five hundred
Bahamian families of different
tlilass denominations have
volunteered to help him. Their
names are being compiled in a
directory that will be made
available to the hostesses in the
different hotels. Visitors will
then be invited to attend the
church of their choice with a
Bahamian family.
Mr. Albury recognizes that
this programme will have a
limited appeal not every
vacationer is particularly
anxious to go to church.
However the proposal was
welcomed when introduced on
the promotional tour.
The main purpose of this
feature is directly related to
the objective of Goombay
Summer itself and that is to
bring visitors into direct
contact with Bahamians. It is
part of the people-to-people
programme. Bahamians have


Tusedav, May 22, 197
the reputation of beln the
frlendieat people on earth and
this will be a further
opportunity for visitors to see
more of the Bahamian way of
life and culture.

Other nightspots and their
happenings:
Sheraton-British Colonial
Hotel features Tony,+
Seymour and the Nightbeate; s:
Loew's Paradise dWa
Hotel, Trade Winds, stars
Prentice Minner.
iritanais Beach has the
Mighty Makers in their Coyaba:
Room.
Hyatt Emerald Beach have
the Islanders in their Fore and:
Aft Lounge.
King & Knights Club, West
Bay Street, now boast King-
Eric A His Knights.
Watch this column weekly:
for what's on in at the local;
nightapots.
WEATHER
WIND: Variable, 4 to 12,
m.p.h. Weather: Mostly cloudy
with showers or*
thundershowers, Sea: Smooth,'.
maybe moderate in showers,
Temp- Min. tonight 70 Max.
tomorrow 84
i


-I












ghygrtumnt


CN1 3getthe &aob de

by lasstfed Counter at The Trbune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 In Freeport from ean to 5pmn. Mon. to FrI. -Sat. a.m. to .m.
-- I II m- 'r 'r


EL ESTATE


& fi ES15TE


MSmtr


E LASR OFS RAC


W IRAM SWFLES


ILP UMEfS


IT M WIVICES


RT W SElgWS


___-____--___.......__v_--we.......... ........ .. .. I.. U --


C9682
FOR SALE
By OWNER
House In Highland park, 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room
and carport. Built In range and
baker on lot 90 x 101 Nice
home In nice area. To view,
telephone 2-1722-3.
C9915


FOR SALE
ST. AUGUSTINE RD- Near
Monastery 3 Bed 1% Bath
house with study or 4th
Bedroom. Asking $30,000 or
nearest offer.Mtg. Available.
BLAIR ESTATES Lovely 3
Bed 2 Bath house with family
room & study (4th Bedroom)
on large enclosed grounds.
Only $45,000.
FIVE UNIT APT. BLDG In
quiet residential Area.
Furnished. A/C. 100%
Occupancy. Income $1,130 per
mrth. Coin operated
washing machine Price
$88.000.
MARATHON ESTATES Lot
60 x 100 $6,000
MILLARS HEIGHTS- 2
commercial lots fronting
Carmichael Rd. 212 x 167 .....
$15,000.
SOUTH BEACH- Beach Front
lot 75 x 165 .-$10,000
GARDEN HILL ESTATES-
Lots 60 x 100. All utilities
completed $6,000 ... $100
Down ... $120 per mth.
WEST GROVE West Bay St.
& Coral Dr. large lot $40,000
IMPERIAL PARK Lots 95 x
100 ... all utilities .., Price
$8,300. 10% Down ... Balance
on Terms.
PINEWOOD GARDENS -
Lots $75 Down & $18.40 per
week*
CANTERBURY PARK -
Adjacent to Prince Charles
Drive In Theatre Lots 75 x 110
- $150 Down.
SEAF.. aWEIE- One of
Nasd 'fWnest *'ridenip
areas Lots 100 x 100 From
$6,300 ... 20% Down.
SAN SOUCI Attractive 3
Bed- 2 Bath house with
screen d in back porch ...
Price. $42,000.

CALL BERKLEY FERGUSON
REAL ESTATE
Ph. 1238- 24913
IERWIN HOUSE,
FREDERICK ST.
NASSAU


Coo
PtESTIGE HOMES
P. O.Box, N 1469 Nassau
Phone 14259 Day 58979
4-1584-Night
SPECIAL BUY
OF THE YEAR
Duplex 2 2-bedrooms, kitchen,
living and dining, furnished.
Annual incom#15700.00
Large Commercill property -
Palmdale
Warehouse 2000 sq. ft.
Lot 75 x 100
1 bedroom apartment
3 bedroom house Good
Investment.
Commercial Bldg. -
Centrevllle. Sound Investment.
Has 3 year lease. Annual
Income $10,200.00*****
HIGHLAND PARK
3 bedroom 2 bath living room,
dining room, airconditioned,
furnished. Wall to wall carpet,
patio with BBQ Pit.
*****
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living
room, den, family room,
kitchen, dining room, office,
laundry, double carport, wall
to wall carpet, airconditioned.
Yard likely landscaped. See by
appointment only. Blair
Estates.

3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living
dining, and breakfast rooms,
kitchen, den, wall to wall
carpet, laundry, alrconditioned
off Vfllage Road.
2 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living
dining and family rooms, den,
Large patio, wall to wall
carpet: High Vista.
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living
and dining rooms, kitchen
aircondftloned. Nassau East.
4 UNIT APARTMENTS
$
4 UNIT APARTMENTS each
has two bedrooms, living and
dining rooms, kitchen, one
bath. Nicely furnished. Annual
Income $12,000.00. Selling for
low, low price.*****
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
for sale. Yearly income
$10.000. Has three years' lease.
Palmdale.*****
LOT In High Vista. Nice quiet
Larea.
LOTS In Coral Harbour.
*c***
For qIck action list with us.


C9847
3 bedroom 1 bath house with
adjoining income producing
efficiency apartment. Good
location. Price: $35,000.
Contact: DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY Phone:
2-1178 or 5-5408 P. 0. Box
N-4648, Nassau.


C9681
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park -
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 2% baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing, fruit trees
- central air-conditioned. To
.view, telephone 2-1722-3.
C9907
B ILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY offers good
Investment opportunity
attractively priced apartments
lots with good rental potential
near St. Andrew's School.
Reasonable terms or good cash
discount if required.
Large Bay Street property with
170 ft. frontage and
approximately 480 ft. deep.
For information and.
appointment call 23921.
C9680
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedroonwt, 2 baths, living,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape. Airconditioned
throughout Unusual
opportunity. To view.
Telephone 2-1722-3.

iF. SALE anUT
C9912
HARBOUR MEWS CLUB:
Rent or sale Cable Beach. 4
bedroom 3% baths. Call77470
or 77466



C9633
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C96 83
2 bedroom apartment -
M ontrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. 1 bedroom
alrconditloned, washer. To
view, telephone 2-1722-3.


C9648
IN TOWN furnished rooms.
Efficiency Apartment, and also
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.
C9899
PRESTIGIOUS downtown
office spaee 3 rooms, 700 sq.
ft. Call 2-3041 or write c/o
Box N3709, Nassau.
C9684
4500 square feet, warehouse or
office space, avallabl
I m m ediately. Montrote
Avenue. To view, telephone
2.1722-3.
C9640
ONE EXTRA LARGE TWO
BEDROOMS TWO BATH
AND ONE EXTRA LARGE
ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT. With larqe
living and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C9839
ATTRACTIVELY furnished
house Sapphire Ridge Road,
Sans Souci, 3 bedrooms (2
aircondltioned) 2 baths, study,
maid's room, wall to wall
carpet throughout, all
cedar-lined closets. Available
immediately. Phone David
Hudson 3-6262/3. After 5 p.m.
7-7085.
C9911
2 ROOMS for rent 1 furnished
- 1 unfurnished at Roland and
Carteret Streets, Ridgeland
Park. Inquiries at pink stone
house on corner, ask for Lewis.
C9910
3 BEDROOM 2 bath
completely furnished home,
Nassau East, near school.
Available July 1. Call 36151
nights 58141 days.

C9638
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C9624
FULLY AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedroom apartment Centreville
near Z.N.S. Ring 5-8679 ask
for Mr. Pritchard.


ONE USED deep
Telephone 54834.


freeze.


9836
350 HONDA 3500 miles. 15
mqnth' old include 1 year's
Insurance $650. Cash only.
Schiller Willi, Blmoral Hotel -
Kitchen 77481.
C9868
10 piece bedroom set Was
$310 Now $272 Hollywood
beds Single and double -
Was $85 Now $75. D & R
FURNITURE OUTLET Wulff
Road,:next to Wong's Grocery
Store Phone 59600
9771 ROBERTS reel to reel
tape deck 650xD, Scott 386
AM/FM Receiver.
1971 Pinto airconditioned/
heater, radio, seatbelts,_ low
mileage. Gdod condition.
$2,500.00 O.N.O.
1 lot 100'X150' Blair Estates.
Phone B. Harris 27680, 9:00 -
5:00 Mon. to Fri.
C9886
BIKE FOR SALE
200 cc Triumph Scrambler.
Phone Charles 32510.
C9869
APARTMENT size fridge -
Was $265. Now $225.
Apartment size stove Was
$225 Now $187. D & R
FURNITURE OUTLET Wulff
Road, next to Wong's Grocery
Store Phone 59600.

C9891
STEINWAY GRAND PIANO
and modem furniture, rugs,
lamps etc. Phone 7-7704.
C9885
SUZUKI 50 mini-trail good
condition. $275.00. Phone
5-4207

ENTERTAINMENT
C9917
THE NASSAU AMATEUR
OPERATIC SOCIETY
wiI parent


"Thr Meny Widow"
at the Dundas
Civic Centre,
Saturday May 26th
Saturday, June 2nd.
Excluding Sunday,
May 27th.
Excluding Sunday,
May 27th.
Box Office
open at the
Perfume Bar
Beaumont Arcade.
Bay St.
Telephone: 2-8913
for reservations.

CARS FOR SALE
C9790
ISLAND MOTOR
COMPANY 1970 LTD.
USED CAR LIST
1968 FIAT 124,
Green $900
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W
Auto. $850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio, Orange. $3500
1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL
A/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI,
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD
Blue A/C $2800
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Auto $1695
1971 RAMBLER
Auto., Blue $2100
1971 FORD GALAXIE
A/C, Green 4 Dr. $3500
1970 VICTOR STD.,
Red $875
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA,
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4600
1968 JAVELIN.
1968 JAVELIN, $1400
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
4 Dr., Std. Green $2950
1964 DODGE S/W
Auto. Green $400
1972 FIRENZA
Auto., White $2750
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR,
4, Dr. Std.
S/WIYellow $650
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite Inc Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8


C9879
One 1969 HILLMAN MINX -
automatic $1400 O.N.O.
Telephone 58171.


__ _ _ _ _ _ia


C9900
BLUE 1971 PONTIAC
FIREBIRD 350 H.P.
airconditioned and tape deck.
BARGAIN $3,000. Ralph
2-1530 Shell Palm Tree Service
Station.
C9880
LATE (November) 1968 Ford
Custom 4 door V8 engine
- automatic transmission air
conditioned radio, power
steering licensed and insured
for 1973 one owner. Phone
22216 or 42718 (After 6:00
p.m.)

C9918
ECONOCARS
Best-used-car values, including
clean, low-mileage, late-model
vehicles.
1969 HILLMAN MINX,
4-door seda... automatic $900
1967 ROVER, new paint
job, engine recently
completely overhauled $1,200
1969 FORD, automatic $800
1971 FORD CAPRI,
radio, air conditioned,
automatic $1,900
1969 TOYOTA
CORONA MARK II,
4-door, automatic,
radio $1,200
1969 TOVOTA CORONA,
automatic, radio,
air conditioned $1.100
1971 FORD CORTINA
STATION WAGON
airconditloned $2,400
1968 TOYOTA CORONA,
air conditioned, radio,
standard transmission,
right hand drive,
excellent condition $1,000
1967 FIAT 600D,
good condition $500
1966 FORD FLAT BED
TRUCK engine recently
overhauled $1,200
1971 TRIUMPH TOLEDO,
like new $1,600
1969 LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL, air
conditioned, fully
powered, radio tape .$3,500
1969 TOYOTA CROWN,
air conditioned, automatic,
radio, one owner $1,600
1969 FORD CORTINA.
station wagon.
automatic $1,000
1971 TOYOTA COROLLA
automatic, rafio $1,800
1969 TRIUMPH 2000
4-door sedan, automatic
A-1 condition, low
mileage $1,500
ECONOMY CARS LTD.
Flat & Toyote Sales
and Service
DowdeIwel Street
P. 0. Box N1382, Tel. 2-1322

C9808

at-^


'at s d Bei oe'

TODAY'S PIlCM 6-
1972 CHEVY NOVA
$4400.00
Also available
1973 VAUXHALL FERENZA
very clean $2750.00
1971 FORD MUSTANG
big engine $3100.00
1968 DODGE DART,
very clean $1800.00
1972 CHEVY NOVA,
2 door coupe $4400.00
1969 FORD FALCON'
red automatic $1200.00
1969 CHEVY CAMARO,
red reconditioned $1850.00
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA,
blue, stick shift $2250.00
1970 PLYMOUTH
BARRACUDA
orange automatic $2250.00
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA S/W,
good buy $2200.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER G.L.,
good buy $2350.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER,
Bargain $1500.00
1969 FORD GALAXIE,
reconditioned $1000.00
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
green $1000,00


1972 VAUXHALL FERENZA,
blue, stick shift $2250.00
1967 CADILLAC,
Sedan $350.00
1964 LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL $400.00
1967 PONTIAC
LAURENTIAN $400.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 34711



C9905
HOPEDALE CENTRE
A private remedial school for
children with special needs.
(Retarded, spastic, behaviour
and speech problems, slow
learners.)
Now accepting limited
enrollment for September
term.
Qualified teachers.


Inquiries invited.
Phone 35492 or write P. 0.
Box N8883, Nassau.


C9903
23 Foot Formula with twin
120 Mercruiser 1/0 in excellent
condition. Phone 5-8512.
C9645
PACEMAKER 44 f
Luxurious Cruising Yachi.
Phone 3-2371.
C9884
24 FOOT FIBRA two-berth
cruiser. 150 H.P. sterndrive,
just completed $3000 refit.
Depth ometer, transmitter,
fishing chairs, pumps etc.
Lying BROWNS. $3750 for
quick sale. 9 foot fibreglass
dinghy and 5 H.P. outboard
available $200. Telephone
58647 evenings.

I LOST
C9756 BROWN MINIATURE
DOG with brown collar, area
of Williams and Shirley
Streets. $100 REWARD.
Phone 7-8139.


C9914
FEMALE WEIMARANER in
Airport area. Please telephone
7-7737 If seen. REWARD
OFFERED



C9906
SHOPKEEPERS and bargain
hunters please note the
following may be viewed by
calling 23921.
1 A selection of clothing
items of well known name
brand.
2. 362 assorted flower pots
and additional garden
ornaments.
3. A selection of PUTA
Vases, candle holders etc.
4. A quantity of assorted
styles of sunglasses.
5. Double sided mirrors.
6. A large quantity of
factory made doors and
parts for cabinets and
other trimming material.
7. Other miscellaneous
items.

IELP UNTEI
C9894
Experienced couple as Club
Manager and Manageress. Full
knowledge of all phases of club
operation. Windermere Island
Club, P. 0. Box 25, Rock
Sound, Eleuthera.
C7377
JOB TITLE: INSTRUMENT
REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years industrial instrumenta-
tion experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Install, repair, calibrate test
and adjust any type of
integrating, Indicating or
graphic electrical or mechanical
instrument.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama:..


C9909
EXPERIENCED SENIOR
OPERATING OFFICER
required by local commercial
bank. Salary commensurate
with experience. Forward
resume to P. 0. Box N-466,
Nassau
C9882
CARFER OPPORTUNITY for
senior clerk with good
command of English and
ability to communicate. Under
supervision, successful
applicant will be required to
prepare reports, compile
statistics etc. Age requirement
20 26. General office
experience required. At least
one reference to accompany
application which should be
directed to: Adv. C9182, c/o
The Tribune, P. 0. Box
N-3207. Nassau. Bahamas.
C9862
GENERAL TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY CO
IMMEDIATE OPENING
FOR
OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR
SALES REPRESENTATIVE.


General Telephone Directory
Co. needs permanent Office
Administrator Sales
Representative. Male or
Female, College education
required. Age 25/35. Office
and sales experience preferred.
Starting salary $150 per week
commission later If sales
qualify. Will receive training in
St. Petersburg, Florida. Must
be able to travel to U.S.
occasionally and to Family
Islands. Expenses paid, Starting
date June 4. 1973. Reply in
writingstating qualification by
May 22 to Personnel Office
Manager Gerry Sorg., P. 0. Box
N3048. Personal interviews to
be conducted starting, May 23
at bahamas Telecom-
munications Corporation
Personnel Office, Chase
Manhattan Building, Oakes
Field, Nassau, Bahamas.


We require for 1st September
1973 a TEACHER with at least
one year's experience In a
Montessori School. Minimum
requirements are four G.C.E.
"O" levels and a Diploma in
the Montassori Method of
Education for 2% S5 year
olds. Please apply in writing to
Infant Education Centre, Box
6196, Nassau.


0.7397
JOB TITLE: ELECTRICIAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years. DUTIES/RESPONSI-
BILITIES:Inspect, repair,
Install and wire all electrical
apparatus, devices and circuits
of any voltage In cement plant
or assigned area.


INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P.O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.
C7384
JOB TITLE: STEEL
FABRICATORS (fou-r)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years experience in steel lay
out and welding.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Read and, follow structural
steel detail drawings, cut and
weld In accordance with
drawing specifications.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C7378
JOB TITLE: MACHINIST
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good Basic Education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES.
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
COINTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C9916
SOCIAL HOSTESS/HOTEL
INTERPRETER. Must have
two languages preferably
French and German. Apply to
Jeff Roberts, Holiday Inn.
C9919
QUALIFIED BOOKKEEPER
with knowledge of higher
Accountancy needed. Apply
with complete resume and
photograph to H. 0. Merren
and Company Ltd., P. Box
63, Grand Cayman, B.W.I.
TELEPHONE: 92961 or
9-2934.

TRADE SERiCES
C9636



Brekenmp Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795,2-3796.
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77414


C9805
NEED FAST SERVICE?
Do you have goods in Miami
you need In a hurry? Wells
Fargo Express will dellveri For
service call: NASSAU 51901
MIAMI 758-5597.
C9632
,PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HURRICANE
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
JOHN S. GEORGE & CO.
LTD.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.
C9801
USED FURNITURE WANTED
Contact D&R FURNITURE
OUTLET, Wulff Road East
next to Wong's Grocery.
Telephone 65-900.
WE BUY AND TRADE USED
FURNITURE


C9889
NIXONS UPHOLSTERY
SERVICE Bernard Road Phone
41298 Quick reliable service


C9635
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5.9404 WORLD'


C9638 OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
FENCES next to Frank's Place.
For your fence needs
Call 35491 C8106
OSCAR FENCES WORRY NO MOREl CALL
Terms arranged. CLEANING PROBLEMS.
TEL: 51071-2-3-4.



GRAND BAHAMAi


_CLASSIFIE..D


I lELP f lUTED I LP ML TE
4.1377 C7397
JOB TITLE: INSTRUMENT JOB TITLE: ELECTRICIAN
REPAIRMAN MINIMUM EDUCATION:
MINIMUM EDUCATION: Good basic education
High school graduate or MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
equivalent years. DUTIES/RESPONSI-
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5 BILITIES:Inspect, repair,
years industrial instrumenta- install and wire all electrical
tion experience, apparatus, devices and circuits
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES: of any voltage in cement plant
Install, repair, calibrate test or assigned area.
and adjust any type of
Integrating, Indicating or INTERESTED APPLICANT
graphic electrical or mechanical CONTACT: Personnel
instrument. Department, Bahama Cement
INTERESTED APPLICANT Company, P.O. Box F-100,
CONTACT: Personnel Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Department, Bahama Cement Bahamas.
Company, P. 0. Box F-100, m
Freeport, Grand Bahama'.. C7395


C7378
JOB TITLE: MACHINIST
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good Basic Education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILI'rlES
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
C OUTA C 'V Pervon nel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C7384
,OB TITLE: STEEL
FABRICATORS (four)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years experience in steel lay
out and welding.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Read and follow structural
steel detail drawings, cut and
weld in accordance with
drawing specifications.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C7396
Appointment vacant next
month CHIEF ACCOUNTANT
for Company in Grand
Bahama. Must be A.C.A., or
C.P.A., or equal.
Responsibities will include
the production to management
of monthly reports and
quarterly accounts etc., the
supervision of a staff and the
day to day running of the
accounts department. The
successful applicant will be
required to produce and
Implement Ideas to increase the
efficiency of his department
and to assist and advise
management in accounting and
*allied matters.
Apply In own handwriting to
Electrical Utilities Co. Ltd., P.
0. Box F-170, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas.
C7393
ADVERTISING & PUBLIC
RELATIONS GIRL: Must have
extensive knowledge in local
and foreign advertising and
promotion to assist in
promotion of all Hotel
functions. Must have excellent
.typing skills.
AIR CONDITIONING MAN:
Must be completely familiar
with the repair and
maintenance of A/C units, air
handlers and all A/C
equipment. References
necessary.
A ADMINISTRATIVE
BOOKKEEPER. Must have
experience in Food and
Beverage Control; must be able
to control all the books for the
Food and Beverage
Department, must be a high
school graduate; must have
Hotel experience.
FOR ALL OF THE ABOVE
PLEASE APPLY TO MISS
STAFFORD, HOLIDAY.
FREEPORT 373-1333,
IPERSQNNEL DEPARTMENT



Interested In buying for cash,
Bahamian stamp Collection or
a part of. Phone Freeport
373-5452.


RESIDENT GOLF
PROFESSIONAL: Must have
high school education, to be
Assistant to the Golf Director.
Must be able to run the Golf
Shop in the absence of the
Director. Must also be able to
give lessons on the Golf Court
and be familiar with Golf
Producers.
Interested persons apply: The
Grand Bahama Hotel &
Country Club, West End,
Grand Bahama, Personnel
Office between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Eonw
Martin, Jr., Personnel Dilagcgr.


C736-
ONE KITCHEN ST
With 5 years experenM -
Buffet set ups, must be able to
supervise kitchen staff In their
duties, also be able to work
long hours. Must have High
School education or
equivalent. Must be between
the ages of 25 and 40 years of
ONE CHIEF ENGINEER:
With 10 years experience In
Hotel Maintenance and
supervisory capacity of large
staff. Must be able to reed
blueprints and work by them,
also be able to work long
hours. Must be College or
University Graduate. Must be
between the ages of 35 and 50
years of age.
Interested persons apply: The
Grand Bahama Hotel &
Country Club, West End,
Grand Bahama, Personnel
Office, between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.


C7394
FREEPORT FLIGHT
SERVICES require One
qualified Mechanic for Fuel
and Ground Equipment. In
possession of his own tools and
able to maintain AC and DC
aircraft generators, Arreach
and Premac starting units,
Mobile Air-conditioners,
Primemovers and Tractors, Gas
and Diesel Fueltenders and
Tankfarm equipment. Be able
to read technical manuals and
electrical schematics.
10 years experience required of
which 5 years with the above.
equipment. Salary
negotiable. Willing to work odd
hours.
For qppolntment call:
352-8881 or write to: P. O.
Box F359


C7392


C7392
GENERAL PLUMBER (1):
Must have high school
education, read all phase of
plans, install e phai
correctly for health and
sanitation reasons, know cost
both labour and material from
price list, know gas and water,
electrical panel control,
sleeping for the insM.
Knowledge of swimming pool
work, boiler work, heat
exchange, hot water systems
including balancing. Must
know house pumps and hot
water circulation pum9
material take off. Must be abL
to get along with people.
Certified licence and reference
required.
GENERAL LABORERS (6)
Must be able to do general
cleaning for large htel and
other labour'ng class work.
Interested persons apply: Th
Grand Bahama Hotel 4
Country Clu.
Wet End, Grand Bahama,
Personnel Office between ON
hours of 9M0I am. and SMG
p.i.; Monday through Friday.
Eton Martin, Jr., Pmonnel
Director.


Tuseady, May 22,1973.


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1973.


"It's such a pretty carpet that I let him go ahead an
Install it-even if he is in the wrong office."

Rupert and the Memory Birds-19
S -'rr (w r- .:,


Blowing trd-I'ke notes on birds to perch on hie tMft.
tho whistles Rupert and his There is only one mimang--
ied nme from place to perhaps It fl ew fetha lin
p4moo. Pntly two of the the otrs. But I have been
parr ota pear, seating on the away from the house too lon1
WSS Old Goat's arm, while a the K ng will be displeased
third Suttenr to join them. he is left alone." I l look out
"W hwe done well," says the for the other parrot on my
Wie Old Goat, coming the way home," promises Rupert.
u. ,mars .estrnwe.


imTGnwosSNO Bm BTrER Iw A M ...lI WINK
TOB TRofi &AW GOTAH BUlMt"

Brother Junipe


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
#Am


I. Wld animal
5. ScwutiMg
orgmlfleon
&. Llwhrted
11. Ws oem
12. Ship's diry
.l& HaM debts
14. Nlat' wife
15. FIm
l$.Fb



amalopes


29. Roman
emperor
31. Tit for---
33. Map
desigtion
34. Fashion
36. River bank
38. Aftsr-dinner
42. Substitute for
45. Atted a
46. Fodder
47. - de
France


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^ift-./-": -- *
W^ *.+ % ,


48. Farw

60. And not
1.tL.esweut


I, soloreed
2. Sea Mle
3. Ambassador
4. Transistor
5. cow
6. Soft drink


M0 01M-HOMUR


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White mstes In two moves,
=n0t 0a detene (by J.
Ae -Tdafy'w pus won
a tourney'Shrt pre but received
a mixed restltop r ad solvers cn
an "lMTer.Dubttatlon. Not at
all dt0ul~tl" wrote (, but
another Sdmitted hat he only
found t'm kay "on my fourth
Seoet oi notq-ppw".
Par Uses: 1 I nxte.
muateri; minutes, problem
mltS minutes god; S
smiute, avrwge; M minutes,
na .- -
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S. Comoome teM. 44)
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RBX MORGAN, MD. 9 DAL CURTIS


(4 -CARROLL RIGHTER'S


*Io. cam" SItIw .bate,
GENERAL TENDENCIES: A very good day
and evening to get your affairs in excellent
shape. There is just enough opposition to make you want to
triumph over circumstances and really accomplish a great deal
that advances your ambitions and progress considerably. Your
day also to organize what requires careful and practical
attention.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Keep busy in the active world
outside furthering your career aim and be alert to new
opportunities. A superior makes good suggestions that should
_ be taken into consideration and used. Avoid one who bickers.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Get the data you need from
d those whose experience has been different from your own.
Listen attentively to others and pick up good ideas that can be
used in the future. Avoid that tendency to splurge.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You can handle any
responsibilities you have intelligently now and quickly, so get
at them early and plow right through. Come to a greater
accord with mate who is in a most favorable mood. Cultivate a
larger sense of humor.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Know what is
most expected by associates and try to please them so there is
greater understanding and profit. You can reconcile with one
who meant much to you before this. Contact some good
relative you have not seen in a long time.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Put your shoulder to the wheel
and get all that work behind you with speed and precision.
Add new pieces to your wardrobe that are attractive, make
you look your best. Iron out personal problems easily.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Put those creative ideas to
work and get excellent results with them, and secure the aid of
a higher-up who can be most helpful. Have a frank talk with
mate and reach a far better understanding. Think calmly,
intelligently.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You want to make changes at
home, but it would be best first to talk this over with family.
Have a more secure foundation for your daily living. Your
activity now can make it so. Don't reach an impasse by losing
your temper.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You are able to
communicate with regular associates about your Joint outlets
and have greater success in the future. Handle your
correspondence well. Get into statements and reports that are
important.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You can get a clever
business person to understand your views now and give you
the cooperation you need. Be sure to study new outlets that
can increase your income in the days ahead. Think
constructively.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) G C after those personal
goals that mean so much to you with an excellent chance of
gaining them. Make sure you accept invitations or that you
yourself do some entertaining of right people. Get quick
results.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) You are in a most
practical mood and should contact experts so you know how
to advance more quickly in the future. Forget about going out
to visit and stick to the productive. Tomorrow is a better day
for such.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Plan to accept invitations
extended you today, when you are in the right mood for
sociability. Know just what your desires really are and then
you can go after them with vim and vigor. Think kindly of
others.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. .. he or she will be
one of those young people who is quite cold and calculating,
so bd"ture to teach early in life to be more thoughtful of
others and to help those who are not as lucky. Ideal chart for
any of the practical professions where good judgment is
required. There can be much personal happiness in this chart.
Many fine talents here, also, particularly in the arts. Mate
should be picked through astrology.




fou ra reta eurnte care U crt cute ecru
or more an grae e reck racket reset reck
e am axe rack tck" tack er trace traec
1row te tr truck TRUCKAUN tuea
lete shown tucker.
In" Bridge
on"e o l. tt r o
ass contain the IsoIn Ie i fce
an there must be at r-t one .7 afamer
eiht4etter word In the lit. No e Sd ft 544 h
plunse; no rorelin f so. me fWlu. rID a s flO SIk
q a times. TO DfAY' soroee ttt* L ?ah.-41M.
NT: 21 words. rood; os 4d d,,so ,,--T1fy
gooa d o.S, probt!) iaOllY ow
xetmu ution esnow. reader.
YESTERDAY SOLUTION: Acre North
tl Q J 10 32
10 56 4
Chs KS


APARTMENT 3-G By Al Kotxsk i
-r r ar -


I STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


by saunders & overgardI


I JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS|

NO....I FEEL MEANWHILE THE TRUTH IS TMAT LOOK, I'M THE ONE I THOUGHT
IS THERE RESTLESS! I'LL FEEL I DIDN'T JUST HAPPEN INTO YOUR WHO SHOULD BE YOU'D NEVER
ANYTHING I BETTER IF I DRIVE NEIGHBORHOOD, SAM! I CAME APOLOGIZING, ABBEY! ASK! /
CAN DO, BETSY?? AROUND FOR A DOWN HOPING YOU'D E HERE! LET'S GO OUT
LITTLE WHILE! I'VE BEEN ACTING A TO DINNER! -:mOd ,
l/ 3 LITTLE CHILDISH! 7, /\~ < )


t.










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TusdaOy, May 22, 1973.


MEDAL WINNER
efeS amamel asham Nesonal miSmibm -g li him


DAVID BRAZIER, tleft, president of the Bahaumms Foedeaon of
Amateur Aquatics. is pictured presenting the bronse medal to Dima Miler,
who placed third in the 100 metres breaststroke for girls 1-17 years
Spring Carts Glamfortons, centre, smashed the Bahamas National
Swimming Championship's record for the event to take first place at the
St. Andrew's wimming pool over the weekend. At right i second pltea
flniher Diane Holowesko. PHOTO Rickey Wells.
PHOTO: Rickey Wedl.















IA




PETER DRUDGE, left, vice president of the Bahamas Federation of
amateur Aquatics, congratulates Hugo Ribot on winning the gold medal
* and breaking the record in the 100-metre breaststroke for boys II and 12
years. He also broke records In the i00-metre freestyle, the 50-metre
butterfly and the 200-metre medley. John Vandershoot, second from left,
and Marc Popov, right, finished third and second respectively in the
100-metre breaststroke. PHOTO: Rickey WelU


HOERMAN CUP PLAYOFFS
DATES CHANGE
The R.G.A. announced today


that the 72-hole playoff to decide
the team to represent the Bahamas
at Hoerman Cup 1973, which will
be contested In Kingston, Jamaica
in September, has now been
changed to June 28 to July 1 and
will be played at the South Ocean
Golf Club.
The annual Prime Ministers
Cup/Amnateur Championship wil be
reduced to 36 holes Instead of 72
and will be played on August 5-6 as
originally scheduled.
"These changes -e made in
order that B.G.A. golf tournaments
do not clash or interfere with the
Independence Celebrations and
special tournaments slated for this
period," a spokesman said.
GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
BOTH SA.C GIris mad the
Ministry of Education vie for their
first win of the young Bahamas
& Volleyball Federation' 1973 series
when they clash In the firalt game
tonight at the Donald DjraGlysm.
LLE.C. will see action for the flat
time when they takes on Ed's Dug
Out In the second game. B.E.C. a
week ago took a defaulted gamS
from the Prison Overseers who have
since withdrawn from the series.
The Ministry will have to put out
extra force tonight if they want to
stop S.A.C.A. who showed their
strength against Paradise Birds.
Although they lost S.A.C.A.
showed their strength by taking
two sets from the Birds.


EW SHO SHOWING THRU THURSDAY u
1% -A AA


ee 2:45 & 4:55, Evening y-Phone ,.It 1 2.1uJ -










UGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES.
PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:45, will be sold
on first come, first served bads.

-U
neasdy thru Friday Wednesday thru Friday
inee starts at 1:45 Continuous Showings
Evening 9:00 from 3
MEN IN LIMBO" PG. ..WHAT THE PEEPER
Kate Jackson SAW" R.
Lathleen Nolan Brit Ekland
PLUS Mark Lester
N 8 BELLS TOLL" PG. PLUS
nthony Hopkins "SOLDIER BLUE" R.
Robert Morley Peter Strauss

'Phone 2-2534 Candice Bergen
No one under 17 will be admitted. f




STARTS WEDNESDAY
Continuous from 1:45, Evening 8:30--'Phone 3-466

harks Bronson Telly Saims












me
pAl







NO ONE CNDER I 7ADMfTJD.


GIRLS
AGE STROKE METRES NAME
1A Under I esety e 1e D1 Tasmy
u5e*neJ1 o0 V.Jpr

9410 SO T.tCbp
neatvie SO R. Added ley
Freestyle F. Holdomm
11 12 Freetyle 100 T.Jar
Fematyle 100 1. MeoCuouodae
Fresstyle 100 P. .m
IS 14 Fnestyle 100 D.h yen
teetye 100 C. Adderery
FMetyle 100 C. Knowles
IS 17 Freeste a 100 J. McCoreodade
neetyle 100 D. Holoweako
fiestyle 100 C. Albury
1 &Oewr Festyle 100 V.Hwady
(Ou staimmeronly)
a8 Under Baekstroke SO D. Tanney
Backstroke 50 V. J
Backtrok SO V. Jip
Backstroke so J. Lewb
9410 Backtroke SO T. (Oob
Backstroke SO V. Amell
Bakstroke SO It. Adderky
i11 &13 Backsroke 100 T.lIr
Back*toke 100 W. Lewis
Backsroke 100 V. RIbot
13 & 14 Backsroke 100 D. ayers
Backsuttboke o100 C. Knowles
Backstroke 100 J. Adderiy
1 s 17 Bac io 100 J. McCorquodale
Baektroke 100 C. Albur
S& Under eastroke SO D. Tarmey
keetroke SO J1. lwis
Breastroke SO L.. Pap
9 & 10 Beseatrok SO Addertey
Bseatroke SO T. Cob
BeseMtoke SO D. Dickde
11 & 12 beestroke 100 I. Goodall
Brestrokl 100 K Addley
Breastroke 100 V. Ribo
13& 14 Bafssroke 100 D. Mayrs
keastroke 100 C. Adderley
Beastroke 100 J. Addersey
15 17 Breastroke 100 C. Olamfortone
Bmrestroke 100 D. Holowuko
Breatroke 100 D. Miler
I & Under Butterfly 25 D. Tamey
Butterly 25 V. Je
Butterfly 25 .. PaeL
Butterfly 50 V. Amil
9 & 10 Butterfly 50 R.A4derley
S& 122 Butterfly 50 T. Ja
Butterfly 50 K.Woemner
13 4 14 Butterfly 50 C.Addeley
Butterfly so50 C. Knowies
Butterfly so J. Addiely
1 & 17 Butterfly 100 J. McCorquodale
Butterfly 100 D. Holowusko
Butterfly 100 C. Albury
9 & 10 Medley (Ind.) 100 T. Cole
Medley (Ind.) 100 D. Dbike
Medley (ind.) 100 R. Adderoy
11 & 12 Medleyy Ind.) 200 T. Jar
Medley (Ind.) 200 K. Woesgur
13 & 14 Medy (Inad.) 200 D. Symers
Medley (lad.) 200 C. KaowaI
Medley (ind.) 200 C. Adderey


15 & 17


13& 14

IS& 17


Medley (Ind.) 200
Medley (ind.) 200
Medley (Ind.) 200
Feestye 200
Freestyle 200
Freestyle 200
Freestyle 20oo0
Freestyle 200
BOYS


8 & Under Freestyle
- freestyle -
Freetyle
9 A 10 Fseestyle
Freestyle
Frestyle
1f & 12 Fueestyle
Freestyle
Freestyle
13 & 14 Freetyle
Freestyle
Freestyle
15 & 17 Freestyle
Freestyle
Freestyle
IB & Over Freestyle
Fleestyle
Freestyle
8 & Under Backstroke
Backstroke
Backstroke
9 10 Backstroke
Backstroke
Backstroke
11 t 12 Backstroke
Backstroke
Backstroke
13 14 Backstroke
Backstroke
Backstroke
15 & 17 Backstroke
Backstroke
Backstroke
18 & Oer Backstroke
Backstroke
Backstroke
8 Under Breastroke
Breastroke
Breastroke
9 A 10 Breastroke
Beastroke
Bmastroke
1i 4 12 Breastroke
Beastroke
Breastroke
13& 14 Breastroke
Breastroke
Brea.troke
15 4 17 Brematroke
Breastroke
I8 a 4Over Breastroke
Breastroke
Basatroke
8 & Under Butterfly
Butterfly
Butterfly
9 4 10 Butterfly
Butterfly
Butterfly
11 12 Butterfly
Butterfly
Butterfly
13& 14 Butterfly
Butterfly
Butterfly
15 & 17 Butterly
18 Over Butterfly
Butterfly
9 10 Medley (Init.)
Medley (bh)
Medley Ind.
11 & 13 Medley (ld.
Medley (Ind.
Medley (ld.)
134 14 Medley (I nd.)
Medley (Ind.)
Meay (hid.
15 & 17 Medley d.
Medley (lad.)
14 & Over Medley (Ia.d)
Medley (Ind.1
Medley (tIad.)
13 14 Freestyle
Freestyle
IS & 17 Fretyle
S over eetyle
18 & Over Freestywle.
Freestyle
Frneestyle


C. Glamfortone
. McCorquodale
D. Holoweako
D. Sayers
I. Woemsr
C. Knowles
J. McCorquodsle
D. Holowaske


50 0. Gehelman
-SO eL LoDdeBas- -
So M.Lamberte
SO B.W Weaer
SO C. Thompson
50 R. Longhurst
100 H. Ribot
100 I. Glebling
100 C. Sayers
100 R. Butler
100 M. Carey
100 A. Mleming
100 B. Knowles
100 J. Martinborough
100 B. McQuesney
1500 A. Knowles
1500 J. Undley
1500 W. Bastan
S0 G. GdleNamn
so50 M. Lambert
50 1. DeCardenaas
SO D. Beatty
so C. Thompmon
SO A. Klbble
100 M. Dvias
100 M. Card
100 J. Gdiebing
100o R.Buuer
100 M.Caorey
100 M. Strange
100 B Knowles
100 J. Mrtinborough
100 B. McQueenay
100 J.Lindity
100 A. Knowles
100 J. Colbom
SO G. Geoeilmm
so M. Lambert
50 D. Griffiths
50 McCartney
50 C. Thompson
O5 S. McCartney
100 H. Ribot
100 M. Popov
100 J. Vanderachoot
100 M. Carey
100 B. Waugh
100 M.Stanum
100 B. Knowles
100 B. MeWeeney
100 A. Knowles
100 0. Bdtshford
100 J.1Jadley
25 G. Goselimnn
25 L DeCardeaes
28 P. Thomas
SO B. Woarer
50 C. Thompson
10so McCartney
50so Rbet
50 S. Hut
SO J. Odeblea
50 M.4Cmy
So A. romla
SO R. Butler
100 B. Knowles
(One Swimmer only)
100 LUndley
100 A. Knowles
100 C. Thompson
100 A. KlRbble'
100 D. Beatty
200 H. Rlbot
200 J. Gdeming
200 M. Dawles
200 M. Caney
200 I. rea-o
200 R. Butler
200 A. tieming
200 B. Knowles
200 J. Mrtlnborough
200 A. Knowles
200 J. Undicy
200 S. Wrinkle
300 R. Buder
200 M. Caney
200 A. Fleming
2100 B. Knows
300 5. Martmnbatoigo
100- A.Kn*wtM
200 J.tiy
100 J. Lhidley
Mo A. Knowist
100 B Wrinkle


PLACE

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THE SPECTATOR Suds -"
at the St. Andrw swmrnming
pool were packed over the
weekend deqe hItenmttet
rain, nd the M anem t may
have compenei-ld Tbr getting
wet: U new records wen st.

EIl I M TIP
LIMA, MAY 2 (ACf)-The Soett
Union A mesy double
victory Monday niaht a l-a me I
team defeated PeN S48 end tI
womei suad downed Cube 9046
hi third n = t ia round flb


women' dhitvdontle la the onuad
robin tou nmet, poMnud by
the Pwian BvkD fide der5Ctlon.
The Soviet men, 197 Oympic
Gemes chunl0m, ed m say ttme
with Peru, enterd the flsl
by virtue of the hoamse team.
The RuMlaled 3-127 at tu bdfe
in the same at Lina 1.00seest
The Ru len wooan had an AfN
equady dmple teak n t re i he ped
Cubena for their second vtoy i iham
Mua play. They downed e Ands y
M l men-esi Zndley,
aVted a 77-3W vito o ve B0
a women't coMohioo round reordh
which opened Monday niht., eenta.
Panama downed Cl-e-76-7 r m aondi


-;elan*
"a."


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nOwwmLIS. boka fou" r ecord h
ig Chsmph ioswh*stattfl the weekend. males
otil to realvte g oedal for the lnoo-metram
A Federation af ASaSteur Aqtlics preusdet Oat
so cared away-lheg4ol md attired thetornrdi
-the 200-oom tsa ttyb Md the Is6Mate*
c, entire, who plfiBidtaes4hiie 100-meaew ha
and won top hoaum In the O.Sb-inse thfetya
Grantley Brtlchford ftom Freeport, second tom
il the 100-metre brwaterok. PHOTO:


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five-wicket .wtIn. '-o ":w '
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Sapiece from Weat Indan
"Z Gordo Gienid" e d Dsrid

SUMMARIeD SCDZBS:
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anminse tosm 231.,.NottlahmUte 183 for
d baer, Iaft. four.
ths.2SeS -BtSON. A IDGES
hsS;l J CUP: At 40 We* Sumy
hd bactMoke 234 for eiaghtS E'. 218.
liht, ame in Suney wos' _16 tas=
Rlikey Wells.


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Elisha Oked fights Florida


junior welterweight Friday

BAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT KING Elisha Obed encounters
yet another rough fistic challenge on his way to world
championship honours when on May 25 he takes on Floridian
junior middleweight Cliff Johnson in a 10 rounder at the Name
Stadium.


One of the top in his class
around Miami Beach, Johnson,
who is being managed by Pat
Curry, will be coming in with
a slight advantage over most of
Obed's former opponents. This
should make the bout quite
interesting.
This 24-year-old opponent
with fifteen wins, five losses
and ten draws on his record has
had the opportunity of not
o' observing Obed in action
'.'' sparring a few rounds
irit. During the sparring
session, "I told him (Johnson)
to study Obed's style which
he did and when he was
through he told me he could
beat the guy," Currey said.
Currey who has also seen many
of Obed's fights pointed out
that many of John's draws
were similar to Lloyd sf on
Saturday.
Besides that. Johnson has a
few inches reach advantage
which he intends to use
effectively. Being good with
both hands having a good jab
and a powerful right hand -
Johnson a boxer/puncher "is
the type of boxer you need to
beat Obed," said Curry. "I
think he has an excellent shot
at beating Obed."
STILL UNBEATEN
Obed on the other hand has
secured an impressive record of
29 consecutive wins. Late last
year, he made his debut in the
middleweight division and
since then he is looking
stronger than ever. Winning


nevertheless was not all that
easy for the 2 i1-year-old champ
and matches with Puerto
Rico's Sandy Torres and
Jamaican Roy Goss really
brought out the best in him.
Lately, Obed has signed a
four-year contract with Mike
Dundee as manager. Mike is the
son of promoter Chris Dundee.
This contract, according to
Obed, envisions a bright future
if all the regulations are lived
up.
Presently rated number nine
in the British Empire
Welterweight Division, Obed it
is understood will seek to fight
the B.E. welterweight champ
before going fullfledged into
the middleweight division.
Cliff with only four years'
experience to his credit
recently dropped a split
decisions to Florida's
middleweight champ Dennis
Riggs.

Royals lose to
ONCE UNDEFEATED and
leading the junior league, A.I.D.
Royals continue to fall and
Saturday dropped their third In a
row following a 12-8 lost at the
hands of fast Improving Bahamas
Blenders Junior, who won their
fourth in a row.
A.I.D. now rest in third place
with a six and four record while the
Blenders, once last are now In
fourth place with a five and five
record.
Topping the Blenders' offence
was catcher Walter Ferguson who
collected two hits during his two
times at bat an't scored one run.
Seconding him was Peter laeaacs
who scored three times during his


O.C.


FLORIDA JUNIOR
middleweight Cliff Johnson
having experienced Obed's
style seeks to end his
undefeated reign.

Blonders limior
two official times at bat and
collected one hit.
A crumbling defence gave A.I.D.
a terrible second inni and the
Blenders pounced on losing pitcher
Alfred Brown for ix runs. Facing
ten batters n that inning, A.I.D.
made seven errors and gave up three
hits.
The Royals however returned
with a five run third Inning but this
was not enough to top the Blenders
who returned In the bottom of the
third for three runs on one hit off
four more A.I.D. errors.
Third baseman John Culmer,
presently leading the Junior league
with a .480 batting average, paced
the Royals with two hits from three
times at bat and scored one.
Backing him up was second
baseman Etienne Farquharson who
went one for one, scored twice,
received base on balls and got hit
by a pitch.,
Lees Cardinals kept their second
pace hopes alive when behind the
hitting of centre aider Joseph
Clark sad second baseman Claude
Lynden, they clobbered St. Michael
Dodgers 12- 2 Saturdy.
Lees *e now six and three, two
games away from defending
champions ad league leaders
Flamingo A's with whom they have
an incomplete game to Anlsh.
Clark went three for four scored
one aso knocked In two. Lyndn
went two for our and knocked In
two.
PLmowi td semd aInnsing
Lee' heh lead 3-1 and staye
he-ad uorlag three In the fourth,
three in the axlh and three in the
sovent. St. Michaela scored their
other a in the fifth on an error by
the second baseman Lee's only
error of the game.
Winning pitcher Joe White
inereed his wining to tor and
oan. Leneia pitcher Brad Imith
ple' deph third lo n four

t aDefed in Juow ta
ChimplonsiaxhIn A's aturd
up their sixth In a row Saturday


AT THE

AEME.ALRALD EOOAMS



HYI ATT EMERALD BElACH


&~;











d


for reservation
PL B -


Schlitz pitcher Henry


Williams humbles Big


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
KG Q MARKETEIRS found the rising form of Schlitz Beer
hard to contend with and, with the superb pitching of Henry
Willi amglast them, the league leading Marketeenr dropped
thek fourth Ina 23 played following a 9-1 low in the first game last
night at the Qoesia Elkabeth Sports Centre.
WilUlims, in picking up the last night struck out twelve of
win, struck out ten of the 28 the twentyfour batters he
batters be faced, walked three faced pacing the Bahamas
and gave up eight htLoing Blenders to an 8-0 shut out
pitcher Dencil Major was able victory over Heastie Lumber.
to get only three of his 25 Johnson walked one and gave
opponents via the strikeout up five hits.
route. He walked five and gave Leading the hitting attack
up seven hits. for the Blenders was short stop
Big Q however, is still Ronald Smith who collected
leading by a four game margin two hits during his three times
over second place Decks Bees at bat, scored two runs and
while Schlitz moved to fourth knocked in one.
place tied with Del Jane Saints The- Blenders took the lead
with a 13 and II record, from the second inning 3-0 and
The Brewers started from went on to score one in the
the first inning when they took third, two in the fourth and
a 2-0 lead on an rbi by third two in the fifth.
baseman Godfrey Eneas and an
error by right fielder Marhall v Rs
Cooper. Short stop Lloyd
Bowleg following Anthony


Smith's strike out reached first
on a walk. Third batter
Lorenzo Lockhart was also
walked. He got stuffed at
second on a fielder's choice by
which Eneas reached first and
Bowleg scored.
Catcher Mackey Bain
followed with what looked like
a routine fly to Cooper in right
but he misjudged it and Eneas
scored the unearned run.
The big batters of Big Q
failed to click and their only
big inning was the third when
they scored their sole run. That
unearned run was scored by
Vince Albury who went four
for four last night.
Schlitz after slowing down
the pace in the third and
fourth innings jumped on the
Marketeers floundering defence
for seven commanding runs in
the fifth inning which was
sparked by Anthony Smith's
two rbi single. Lockhart started
the rally with a double his
only hit during his two official
times at bat. Eneas followed
with a single to advance him
while Bain the third batter
connected for an rbi single
down centre scoring Lockhart.
Gordon Farrington'i single
crammed the corners and
centre fielder Anthony Roberts
drawing a walk collected an
rbi.
A fielding error at short stop
put Eugene Simon at first to
bring up Smith who sent
Major's one strike pitch deep
into right centre. Smith scored
on a three base fielding error.
Big Q in the final inning was
good for only one hit as Schlitz
Beer continued to make their
presence felt.
SCHLITZ BEER
Smith 4 1 1 2
Bowleg 2 1 0 0
Lockhart 2 1 1 0
Bneas 4 2 I I
oin 3 I I t
Wlliams 2 0 0 0
Farrington 3 1 I 0
Roberts 2 I I 1
Simon 3 I I 0
BIG Q MARKET'
Cooper 4 0 1 0
Ran. Rodgers3 0 0 0
Albury 4 I 4 0
Moxey 3 0 0 0
Mom 3 0 0 .0
Hila 3 0 0 0
Roy Rodgers 2 0 I 0
Role 3 0 1 0
Major 3 0 1 0

BENDERS SHUTOUT
UMBERMEN
WINNING PITCHER Paul
Johnson in a fine performance


-1

'a


FRANK SATHERWAITE


TONY LANCAS1


Lancaster gives top US pl


tough fight in squash tol


FRANK SATHERWAITE,
the number one United States
player from New York, won
the individual squash title at
the Nassau Squash Club over
the weekend with a hard


on 1st. innings


By COVER POINT
BY BATTING TOO LONG in their second innings and not
introducing his spinners early enough in the Adventurers' second
innings, Grazette and his Overseers team had to settle for six
points on first innings, when they might have bowled out
Adventurers and got ten points.
Adventurers started with ADVENTURERS Bowling:
their score of 74 runs for 9 F. Phillips M R w
wickets from last week when Demeritte 2 ll9ps 9 4
play resumed on Saturday w. Deane 2 20
afternoon and their first G. Deane 3 17 s
innings ended for that same Adventurers (Second Innings)
score. W. Deane b. Brarette 5
The Overseers started their C. Demeritte b. Ramsawak 24
second innings better than they Delancey b. Grazette 7
did their first. The opening F. Phillipsb. Kellman 13
partnership of Miller and ff. Deane Not Out .7
Louison put on 40 runs, but A. Marsh ct. Ransawak 3
E. Collins Lbw Ramsawak 4.
the middle order batting could G. Deane Not Out w
not maintain the run-rate and Extras 23
Gully Deane in the space of TOTAL (for 7 wkts 83
two overs captured 5 wickets Overseers bowling:
twice approaching the hat-trick 0 M R w
- to turn the Overseers batting Puckering 2
A. Grazette 8 3 14 3
inside out. The Overseers slid GQBrathwaite l s -
from 79 runs for 2 wickets to H. Hamilton 3 10 -
89 runs for 6 wickets. T. Ramsawak 7 1 24 3
Grazette was not content R. Kellman 4 2 6 1
with the lead of 156 runs at The Bahamas Cricket Board
this stage when he might have of Control is left to rule on the
declared. He batted on and results of the match which
made 118 runs for 9 wickets started between St. Bernards
before he declared asking the and Paradise Island team
Adventurers to get 186 runs if Saturday before last. It is
they wanted to wid the match. alleged that there was no
By stumps they had collected resumption in this match when
93 runs and lost 8 wickets. the St. Bernard's captain did
Overseers might have forced a not play because one of the
ten point win had they umpires who called play in the
declared earlier and put on the opening day was not present.
spin bowling sooner. PREAKNESS WINNER
OVERSEERS (firstinnings) BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
S141 runs (AP)- Secretariat, the Kentucky
141 runs nr.-.....ne .... tre.... a ;i a. si,


ADVENTURERS (first
innings) 74 runs
OVERSEERS (second
innings)
E. Miller b. Phillips 25
P. Loulson b. G. Deane 40
N. Taylor b. G. Deane I1I
G. Brathwalte ct. G. Deane 0
H. Hamilton b. G. Deane 1
A. Grasette b. PhillIps 10
R. Kellman ct. G. Deane 0
T. Watkins Not Out 1 6
T. Ramsawak b. Phillips 11
C. Browne b. Philips 0
C. Puckering did not bat
Extra 4
TOTAL (for 9 wkts declared) 118


U y WIwinner, tulo in al z llig,l
front-running performance
Saturday and won the $182,400.
Preakness Stakes at Pimlico.
Secretariat crossed the finish a
daylight victor over Sham, who had
also been the runnerup In the
Derby Our Native, third in the
Derby, was third again.
BRITAIN LOSES
MUNICH, GtRKMANY (AP)-
Britain went down 4-1 to West
Germany Sunday after winning the
final singles match of the third
round for the European Zone Davis
Cup tennis group II.
Mark Cox beat Karl Meiler 4-6,
F-0. 6-4. 6-2 to save Britain its only
point. Previously, Juergen
Fassbender played 6-4, 8-6, 6-3
against Roger Taylor.


fought four game mat
Nassau's Tony Lancaste
The scores were 9
9-6,9-0.
Nassau's Keith Parl
won the plate compete
first round losers. He 1
Qentin Huyler of New
three sets, 9-2, 9-7, 9-6.
After the first day
when Nassau were hi
7-I drubbing, Nassau
improved and some
performances were tu
by Ivern Davis, Eric Wi
Tony Lancaster and
Parker.


ABACO FEA
From Page 1
a considerable majority)
electors of Abaco. Of c
counter-petition was
whipped up there a
of whipping things up
PLP government.
"I could quote letter
an ex-Governor," Mr. E
"telling him in so man
that if he thinks the sa
in the Constitution foi
rights with the sanction
courts behind them w
any value in the Baham
deceiving himself. Thi
and I am afraid that
had experience of
certain other
independent countries
the spirit of national
become established.
"The petition," chat
Bell, "went through td
channels by the Gover
to the Queen but
Department of State co
and sank into the sand
all that has been heat
That is one sadness
present state. People a
the world think that 1
petition the Queen an'
means something, but v
that it does not and th
merely presenting one'
the Government for t
being."


they can
d that it
we know
at one is
s case to
the time


HILL WINS MEMPiNS
MEMPHIS. TENNESSEE (AP)-
Wiry, Intense veteran Dave Hill
turned back a flock of challenger
with a t ar-72 and won the
$170,000 anny Thomas-Memphis
Golf Clanic Sunday, while e
Trevino moved past he one-million
mark in career eiarnnip.


5ORIT1


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SLADIE SIFTIALL

TEAM TO PLAT

IN BEIRMA
A TWENTY-TWO member
Ladies National Softball squad
to compete nla the 1973
Hermon Spoerri Toutrament
will be chosen be Sunday
following two exhibition games
between the New Providence
Softball Association Alstars
0 and the Grand Bahma
Alstar. The Harmon Spoerri
TER Tournament will be held in
Bermuda during the second
ay r w.eek in Aust.
ayer The Grand Bahama Allatan
are expected to arrive in
Nassau Friday evening at 7
I P.V p.m. On the same evening, six
E y3 of its members will be
honoured at the Paradise Island
tch over Beach Pavilion where the
0-. N.P.S.A. will be presenting its
-1, 6-9, 1973 awards. The six were a
part of the Ladies National
ker also team which played in the 1972
ition for Hamon Spoerri Tournament.
beat Dr. The first exhibition pgame
York, in will be played Saturday night 8
o'clock at the John F.
Y's play Kennedy Park and the second
handed a on Sunday morning 11 o'clock
players at the Southern Recreation
I good Grounds.
rned in In preparation for the
ilkinson, coming contest, practice for
SKeith the 30-member N.P.S.A. was
today and again on Thursday
afternoon at the Government
High School grounds. The team
isW selected to meet the G. B.
Allstars will be' named on
Friday at the presentation
y of the dance.
course, a Coaches named to train the
quickly team are John Adderley, Leon
ire ways Knowles, James Wood, Frankie
under a Sweeting and Sidney Bain.
The following is a list of
ers from those selected to the trial
Bell said, squad:
y words 1973 Ladies All-Str
feguards PABST PEARLS Na6mi
r human Bowleg; Pat Saunders; adse
Thompson; Mavis Bowleg;
n of the Evangeline Bowleg; Linda Lod.
ill be of BLAZERS Hattie Moxey;
las, he is Patty Symonette; Barbara Knowles;
at is so Margaret Albury; Florence Rolle.
HEINEKEN STARS Erca
we have Llghtbourse; Bernadette Clarke;
that in Maine Duncanson. Mastlyn Fox.
newly- CENTREVILLE SISTERS -
where Barbara Arnette; Fanny Rolle;
SAntoinette Glover.
ism has WORLD BANKING Val
Thompson; Marilyn Toote; Miriam
rged Mr. Ctlmar.
ie usual SCHLITZ Adline Hisp; Eva
h "W* Thompson 1",
npr, not ST BERNARDS Cheryl
to the Armbrlster; Ann Johnson
)ncerned DEL JANE Judy Pinder;
Cheryl Turnquest
. That is BECKS RAIDERS Glenice
rd of it. Thompson
of our BATELCO Hazel Seymour
11 ..... POLICE Aladlei Smith.


I