<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03352
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 21, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03352

Full Text








HOUWLEY'S
COR. ROETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.



P.O. BOX 81150 PHONE 2-130/2-3237


Uih1


Sriturn'


'Aso'm Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


SALE


I Were $30- $35 NOW $14.9
t EDDE'S DEPT. STORE
--- BAY STREET


BAYSTRETm


VOL.LXX, 15m 1,1VS


Monday, May 21, 1973,

LABOUR MEMBERS NOT HAPPY AT BEING

LEFT OUT OF INDEPENDENCE PREPARATIONS


Many trade unions feel


& will


boycott


Independence celebration

By MIKE LOTHIAN
A NUMBER OF MAJOR TRADE UNIONS are likely to boycott official independence celebrations in July
because the labour movement has been "ignored" by Government in planning the moves towards nationhood, The
Triumna lmanmd tnblau


I-7y.


PM flies to London to


'correct


misleading opinion' on Abaco


PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING flew to London yesterday on "official business" and
"to correct misleading opinion carried in the British press recently about Abaco," the Cabinet


Office announced today.


'No conflict' os&lSmbay


Sum*- says Ministry man


ASSISTANT TOURISM
Director Basil Albury denied
today that his Ministry's
promotiA of Goombay
Summer was in conflict with
Minister Clement Maynard's
announced policy of restoring
the/Bahamas as a quality
Answering a question raised
at this morning's press
conference on the plans for
Goombay, Mr. Albury claimed
that the Minister had either
been quoted out of context or
that he had used an
"unfortunate" way of phrasing
his meaning.
The Tourism Director
readily admitted that there had


been a decline i tourism in the
Bahamas for the first three or
four months of this year.
"There has beet a decline ...
it's well known," Mr. Albury
said, but it was difficult, he
explained, to isotte causes.
He attrtMted' the decline in
the Behamas to. the unusually
warm northern winter and the
trend to multiple vacations.
There was no way of proving
how many tourists Goombay
had brought in, Mr. Albury
admitted, because to do this
the programme would have to
be dispensed with for one
summer and the Ministry was
not prepared to do this.


Capt.Leonard Thompson sues


Treasure Cay for $132,622
CAPTAIN LEONARD THOMPSON, former Opposition party
member and candidate for the Cooper's Town constituency, has
filed suit through his attorney Foster Clarke against Treasure Cay
Ltd. for $132,622,50.


STRIKE BREWS

AT BATELCO
MR. VANCE Major, vice
chairman of the Bahamas
Telecommunications Corpora-
tion branch of the Bahamas
Public Service Union, was
suspended by BaTelCo
management today, The
Tribune learned.
The reason for the
suspension was not
immediately known, but
sources said it was probably in
connection with the May 7
demonstration by 350 BaTelCo
staff members.
Mr. Major was not a part of
the union delegation, which at
II o'clock this morning began
wage negotiations with
management.
The Tribune was unable to
reach either a union or
management spokesman for
comment on the suspension,
It is understood there were
slow-downs by workers at
several BaTelCo job sites this
morning over the suspension.
There were unconfirmed
reports that strike action was
being contemplated
BATELCO UNION CALLS
EMERGENCY MEETING
THE BAHAMAS
Telecommuancations branch of
the Public Services Union will
hold an emergency meeting at
St. Agnes auditorium at 8
o'dock tonlp .



POLE LAMPS

S IAI I MoL illl
FIrEPORT ONLY


Treasure Cay, one of the
Abaco Cays, is being developed
by Treasure Cay Ltd.
Captain Thompson is
claiming that on or about May
15, 1968, the company, by
resolution, confirmed in
writing, that in consideration
of and as compensation for
services provided by him,
Treasure Cay would pay him
U.S. $300,000 repayable at par
on May 15, 1973.
According to the statement
of claim the debt of $300,000
was reduced when Mr.
Thompson took conveyances
of land from Treasure Cay in
lieu of cash under the
arrangement set out in the
conditions attached to the
stock on July 31, 1968.
The initial stock certificate
was surrendered to Treasure
Cay Ltd., who delivered and
issued Mr. Thompson Stock
Certificate number 12 in the
amount of U.S. $143,512.50,
repayable at par on May 15,
1973.
That sum was reduced
further when Captain
Thompson took conveyances
on other properties from
Treasury Cay in lieu of cash.
This transaction took place
under the same arrangement as
the initial agreement, but on
January 12, 1972, a balance of
$132,622.50 was left under the
Original Stock Certificate
number 12.
Captain Thompson filed suit
when he was informed by
Treasure Cay Ltd. on
December 21, 1972 that it
would be unable to settle the
balance of the loan by May 15.
TOM MILLER WHALE
CAY MEMORIAL FUND
CHILDREN and parents of
Lyford Cay School held a
family barbecue on Sunday,
Mother's Day, and raised $500
for the Tom Miller Whale Cay
Memorial Fund.


The Prime Minister will be
seeing to matters connected
with independence and the
transfer of power and plans to
take the opportunity to correct
press opinion on Abaco.
The Cabinet statement said
that a delegation of five Abaco
citizens is also in London to
refute the claims of the
secessionist group that it
represents a majority of
Abaconians.
The delegation consists of
Messrs. Gordon Hudson,
Percival Archer, Edison Key,
Cecil Mijs and Everette
Archer.
"'They have asked the
Bahamas government for
assistance in putting over their
case that most Abaconians,
despite misleading press
reports, are prepared to go
forward with the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas when it achieves full
sovereignty on July 10," the
Cabinet Office said.
WATKINS TOO
Marsh Harbour
representative Errington
Watkins, leader of the
secessionist movement, is also
in London prepatory to the
heavy debate expected
tomorrow when the Bahamas
Independence Bill goes into
the committee stage in the.
House of Commons.
Thy Tribune understand
that the Bill was not slated to
come before Parliament until
the .end of the month but was
moved forward mi an effort to
get the matter settled in time
for the announced date of
independence.
Second reading of the Bill a
week ago prompted strong
criticism from certain
Conservative members who feel
that Abaco should not be
pushed into independence with
the Bahamas if it does not wish
it.
Tomorrow attorney Ronald
Bell, who is supporting the
secessionists, will move an
amendment that would permit
Abaco to remain a British
Crown Colony when the
Bahamas becomes inde-
pendent.
FLAG
Mr. Pindling was
accompanied to London by
Home Affairs Minister Anthony
Roberts. Some matters
pertaining to the flag remain to
be completed and Mr. Roberts
will be looking into these in
the next few days.
Governor-Designate Milo B.
Butler Sr. will be visiting the
United Kingdom soon in
connection with the
assumption of his new post,
the Cabinet Office said.
By agreement between the
Bahamas and British
governments, governor Sir
John Paul will be sworn in as
Governor-General on July 10
and Mr. Butler will succeed
him on August 1.
"This is in accordance with
che usual practice except that
the British governor will
remain for about three weeks
following independence instead
of the usual six months to a
year." the official statement
said.
The Prime Minister and Mr.
Roberts are expected to return
to Nassau at the end of this
week.


The Bahamas Hotel and
Catering Workers Union, the
biggest union in the country,
have flatly refused an
Independence Secretariat
invitation to participate in the
independence march and float
parade on July 10.
The Airport, Airline and
Allied Workers' Union has
reportedly done the same
thing.
The Bahamas Engineering,
Fuel, Service and Allied
Workers Union has received no
invitation. However, a
spokesman indicated that any
such invitation would be
turned down.
A spokesman for the
Bahamas Taxicab Co-operative
Union was non-committal
when asked whether the taxi
drivers would be marching or
sponsoring a float 'on
Independence Day. The East
Side Stevedoring Union has not
yet been invited, and attempts
to find out whether the union
is to play a part in the
celebrations have been futile, a
spokesman saidL
MUSICIANS IN
The Bahamas Musicians and
Entertainers Union was the
only one known to be
participating in the
celebrations. The United
Brotherhood of Longshoremen
were also reported to have
accepted the Secretariat's
invitation, but this could not
be confirmed.
David Knowles, president of
the hotel union, told The
Tribune this morning:
"We got a call from a lady
about marching, and because
we have been left out of
everything else we refused. We
get the impression they figure
the only thing we're good for is
marching," he said.
"I was trying to find out
whether the union would even
be prepared to put up a float,
but this was totally vetoed by
the executive board," he
added.
He pointed out that the
unions have been asked to
march on Independence Day,
but there have been no
invitations to speak publicly or
to participate in any
discussions about
independence or the
independence celebrations.
"We have been ignored," he
said.
He said the airport union
had also refused to take part in
the official celebrations.
AAAWU president Reg Grant
could not be contacted for
confirmation.
Dudley Williams, president
of the engineering union, said
he had received no invitation
so far.
In any event, he said, "it's
kind of late to ask us to
celebrate.
The unions should have been
involved right from the start.
The unions should have had
someone at the constitutional
talks. Marching is just
symbolism. The constitution is
agreed on and signed and the
unions haven't been asked
about it yet. It's a bit late to be
getting the unions involved,"
he said.
Taxi union secretary Harold
Major said the taximen have
been invited to participate in
the celebrations, and a union
committee is "looking into"
the invitation. "I cannot say
whether the union will
participate," he said.
Salathiel Mackey. president
of the East Side Stevedores
Union, said he called Labour
Minister Clifford Darling "a
few weeks ago" to find out
whether the ESSU was to take
part, and he was referred to
George Smith, M.P.


BANDSTAND

FOR POLICE


fo


THE FIRST STAGE in the redesigning of the
Royal Victoria Hotel grounds Is nearing
completion with the construction of a
bandstand where the Royal Bahamas Police
Force band is expected to give regular band
concerts during Goombay Summer and the
Independence celebrations. Landscaping for the
project is being carried out by Mr. E. J. Rolle.
Photo: Andrew Toogood.


Wholesalers complain of delay



as 111 of 152 price control food



items await to be increased
By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE PRICE COMMISSION agreed three weeks ago that two-thirds of the wholesale and retail
od prices fixed by the March 28 Price Control Regulations had to be revised because of rising


costs, The Tribune has learned.


EX-COSTA RICAN

PRESIDENT

SLAMS VESCO
SAN JOSE, COSTA RICA
(AP)-President Jose Figueres
scheduled a broadcast Tuesday
to explain his links to indicted
financier Robert L. Vesco.
Meanwhile, a former President
charged that Vesco has gained
control of Costa Rica.
Figures admitted last week
that Costa Rican companies
owned by the American
promoter have transferred
$335,000 "in small amounts"
to his personal bank account in
the United States.
The U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission has
brought suit against Vesco in
the United States charging
him with defrauding
stockholders of Investors
Overseas Services of $224
million during a period when
he was investing heavily in
Costa Rica. Swiss authorities
also have warrants 'out for the
arrest of him and five other
IOS officials.
Vesco is also under criminal
indictment in New York -
along with former U.S. Atty.
Gen. John N. Mitchell and
former Commerce Secretary
Maurice Stans on charges of
attempting to buy off the SEC
investigation with a $200,000
contribution to President
Nixon's 1973 campaign.
Vesco left his home in New
Jersey and has been living in
the Bahamas. He also has a
home in Costa Rica.
Former President Otilio
Ulatel said Sunday that Vesco
through his close connection
with Figueres has taken control
of the executive and legislative
branches of the small Central
American country's
government.
"It is urgent that the world
finds out that Vesco and
Figures and their associates
have tried to smear the always
clean name of Costa Rica and
that the whole cour.,ry faces
them," Ulatel declared. He was
President from 1949 to 1953.
Vesco headed an electronics
firm in Fairfield, N.J., which
he used as his base of
operations to gain control in
January 1971 of Investors
Overseas Services, the huge but
foundering mutual fund
complex created by Bernard
Cornfeld in Switzerland.
Vesco, who bought in for
$5.5 million, became the chief
executive officer of lOS and
the architect of a series of
complicated financial
manoeuvres which the SEC
says defrauded thousands of
investors.


But it is likely to be at least
two weeks more before food
dealers will be able to legally
change their selling prices
assuming the revisions win final
Government approval.
Wholesale sources said only
two weeks after the Price
Control Regulations came into
force that the fixed prices were
based on already out-dated
cost figures.
The sources said then that
wholesalers were already
paying more to import certain
items than they were allowed
by the Regulations to sell them
for.
The Bahamas Wholesalers'
Association, who applied for
revision of the Regulati, is
almost immediately they were
published, today broke six
weeks of silence to complain
bitterly about the long and
continuing delay.
Association president
Emmette Pritchard told The
Tribune that despite early
approaches, wholesalers were
invited to meet with the Prices
Commission only three weeks
ago.
"We gave them as .much
information about our costs as
we could."
PRICES AGREED
He said the Commission
agreed a large number of prices
needed revision, even though
there was subsequent enquiry
on white grits specifically. The
Prices Commission were finally
satisfied on that item as well,
Mr. Pritchard said.
The Commission then
au thorised Commission
secretary Ken Symonette to
draw up the details of the price
changes for subsequent
Commission approval.
The Commission was,
according to Mr. Pritchard,
scheduled to meet last
Tuesday, May 15 to discuss Mr.
Symonette's revisions but there
was no quorum.
NO QUORUM
Sources attributed the lack
of a quorum to some members'
absense from the island and to
the suggestion that some
members of the seven-man
Commission are refusing to
attend a meeting until a
permanent chairman is
appointed.
It is understood that Cabinet
has already turned down one
unidentified nominee.
As there was no quorum on
Tuesday, no date was set for
any subsequent meeting.


Mr. Pritchard said Mr.
Symonette had told him he
was trying to arrange a meeting
for Tuesday, May 29.
FINAL RIGHT
It is also understood that
last week Mr. Symonette told
the wholesalers he might take
the proposed revisions direct to
the Finance Minister, Arthur
D. Hanna, who in any event
has the final right to approve
or veto decisions of the
Commission.
This has not been done, it
was said.
Although Mr. Symonette
confirmed most of Mr.
Pirtchard's statements, he
could not be contacted later to
comment on the report that he
had considered by-passing the
Commission.
Mr. Symonette told The
Tribune he "hoped" to arrange
a Commission meeting in the
"near future."
There were 152 maximum
prices cited in the original Price
Control Regulations.
Mr. Symonette told Thje
Tribune this morning his list of
revisions deal with 111 prices.
He pointed out that the
Regulations refer basically to
17 "bread-basket" items, with
breakdowns as to brand and
package size.
He said "a few" of the IllI
revisions dealt with a further
breakdown of package sizes.
Mr. Pritchard said "this is an
issue that effects all of us. We
cannot operate this way. If we
don't hear something definite
in the next few days two or
three of us will request a
meeting with the Minister. At
least then he won't be able to
say he didn't know about all
this."
He commented that "by the
time they come out with the
revised list the costs will all
have changed again. Two or
three items know of are
changing on our next orders."


Price: IS Cents


SWISS ISSUE

AH ARREST


WARRANT

FOR VESCO
A SWISS MAGISTRATE
Friday issued a warrant for the
arrest of financier Robert
Vesco, who is alo wanted for
appearance before a New York
grand jury investigating his
business relationship with IOS
as well as his $250,000
donation to President Nixon's
re-election campaign In 1972.
The warrant followed the
arrest last Monday in Geneva
of Bernard Cornfeld, former
lOS chairman, on fraud charges
in connection with IOS.
Among those against whom
the magistrate also issued
warrants were Dr. Milton
Meissner, present IOS
president, and a Swiss director,
Ulrich Strickler.
Mr. Vesco, who took over
from Mr. Cornfeld in 1971,
was indicted by a federal grand
jury last week on charges of
making the secret contribution
to President Nixon's re-election
campaign in an effort to
obstruct an investigation by
the Securities Exchange
Commission into his financial
empire.
The activities of Mr. Vesco
in Switzerland, the Bahamas
and Costa Rica prompted an
editorial in The Miami Herald
Saturday.
CLOSE LINK
Mr. Vesco has been closely
linked with the activities of
Bahamas Commonwealth
Bank, which has done the
financing for the purchase of a
number of well-known
businesses in Nassau.
The Herald said that the
Securities Exchange
Commission $224 million
fraud suit brought against Mr.
Vesco revealed he had
high-powered friends in the
Nixon administration who
were willing to accept political
contributions.
"In the Bahamas" where Mr.
Vesco is alleged to have
substantial business interests,
"that set off negative reactions.
His obvious political muscle
became less impressive. Mr.
Vesco reportedly was about to
buy two hotels, a casino and
some acreage on Paradise
Island near Nassau. This
transaction would have
required government approval.
"After the SEC charges,"
The Herald claimed, "that deal
stalled and there are reports
now that the Bahamas
government would just as soon
Mr. Vesco took his business
interests elsewhere."
One place he already had
gone was Costa Rica. "The
Wall Street Journal revealed
earlier this week that the New
York bank account of Costa
Rican Pre Jose Figueres
grew by $32,,ui00 after that
nation gave haven to Mr. Vesco
last fall.
According to The Herald
President Figueres said the
money in the account was not
his personally, but was
transferred from Vesco-linked
companies through that
account by other Costa Rican
organizations.
The Herald said it is
reported Mr. Vesco has put
$25 million into Costa Rica
since 1969, but a special
congressional committee in
Costa Rica cleared him of any
wrongdoing. "There was no
doubt cast on the legality of
Vesco's operations," said the
committee


MAGISTRATE'S CLERK FILES

SUIT AGAINST MAGISTRATE


SENIOR COURT clerk Mrs.
Patricia Jones has filed suit
against Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay claiming damages for
"wrongful arrest and false
imprisonment" as the result of
an incident on March 23 when
Mrs. Jones was detained in a
cell at Central Police Station
on orders of the magistrate.
The writ also names police


INDEPENIENCE PAAIE NEETINI
THF il1PFNPDFNWiM.-


Secretariat Committee set up
to organise a civic, cultural,
fraternal and labour parade on
July 10 is to meet 8 p.m.
Tuesday at the Anchorage
Hotel on West Bay Street.
A press release said a
number of organizations which


officer Constable 508 Sidney
McPhee "as serv nt or agent of
the magistrate" in carrying out
the instructions made.
The incident involving Mrs.
Jones took place in open court
after the magistrate had called
her before the .bench and
reprimanded her in connection
with a case set down before
him.


had been contacted had failed
to attend an earlier meeting of
the committee "mainly due to
the inclement weather. In
addition, the committee had
been unable to contact all the
organizations it was hoped
would attend.


II I I I ll ,,


I


IWO I V


AA- L1___ i-. 024 4 ^1% -













e siW 5ttliness


MITCHELL & STANS ENTER FLEAS TODAY
NEW YORK (AP)-Fomer Nixon cabinet member John Mitchell and
Maurice Stas enter their piew today in New York to charges involving a
serent Nixon campaign contribution. Both men mare charged with
obstruction of justice, perjury and conspiracy in connection with a
200-thousand dollar campaign donation from financier Robert Vesco.
Vefco and New Jersey Republican leader Harry Sears also have been
Indited In the case. VeMCo out of the country (e SEE STORY PAGE
ONU) but aen Is expected to appear today with Mitchll and Stan. before
JudQo John Cannella in U.S. district court.
TO DECIDE ON COX SCOPE OF FREEDOM
WASHINGTON (AP)-- The Senate Judiciary committee considers
today how much freedom of action special prosecutor Archibald Cox will
have in probing the Waterate scandal. Attorney General-designate Elliot
RJehudson mid last week his appointee would have full authority in the
ca. But some Democrats have called for more information to ensure the
prosecutor's independence.
The Senate Watergate committee remains in recess until tomorrow, But
the Investigation continues in other areas today as the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee questions former C.I.A. director Richard Hedms on
possible agency involvement in the bugging operation.
As the Watergate cloud continues to grow, pollsters report the American
public Is becoming rapidly more disturbed about the affair. The Gallup poll
anys the Issue of corruption in government has increased as a matter of
concern from one to sixteen per cent of the persons polled, and a "Time"
ma ne survy ldicate that three out of five persons questioned on the
Waterate affair refused to believe President Nixon was ignorant of the
ovp operations. (# SEE STORIES THIS PAGE).
KSSINGER AND THO MEET IN PARIS AGAIN TODAY
PARIS (AP) Henry Kissinger faces Hanoi' Le Duc Tho across the
bargaining table at Paris again today a the two top negotiators continue
their efforts to strengthen the Vietnam cease-fire. The meeting follows a
record 12-hour session yesterday between Kissinger aide William Sullivan
and North Vietnam's Deputy Foreign Minister Nguyen Co Thach.
Although yesterday's meeting was the longest In four years of
negotiations, no progress was reported toward ending violations of truce
agreement. Kissinger is expected to return to Washington later this week to
report on the latest round of talks.
IRISH DEATH TOLL REACHES OVER-800 MARK
BELFAST (AP) Guerrilla bomb pecking an estimated 20 pounds of
explosives wrecked a police station In Northern Ireland early today. No
Injuries were reported, but the bombing follows a weekend that put the
four-year death toll over the 800-mark.
A Catholic painter was shot in the back yesterday, becoming the tenth
fatality in four days. The latest toll of 80 1 marked an upsurge in violence
by the Irish Republican Army evidently aimed at disrupting elections
scheduled during the next six weeks throughout Northern Ireland.
CHAIRMAN POLICE COMMISSION KILLED IN CRASH
HONOLULU (AP)- Six person, including the chairman of the Honolulu
Police Commission, were killed last night when their twin-engine
Baeechcraft plane crashed near Honolulu airport. The Federal Aviation
Administration says the Commissioner, Dr. Robert Chung, owned the
aircraft and was at the controls when it crashed.
The five other victims, were identified only as three adults and two
children pending investigation of the accident and notification of kin.
WATERGATE SCANDAL WON'T AFFECT VISIT
BONN (AP) Soviet Communist Party leader Leonid Brehnev says
the Watergate scandal won't Interfere with his plans to visit the U.S.
mat month. Breshnev told newsmen in Bonn, West Germany yesterday
thathe expects to go ahead with the visit, scheduled for June 18th to 26th.
The Soviet leader arrived in Bonn Friday for a five-day visit with West
German leaders. He and West German Chancellor Willy Brandt signed an
agreement on economic and industrial cooperation Saturday.
REPAIR MISSION PREPARATIONS CONTINUE
CAPE KENNEDY (AP)- Skylab-One astronauts and space engineers
&eatinue their preparations today for a repair mission to the disabled space
station. Crew members Conrad, Kerwin and Weltz are scheduled to arrive
at Cape Kennedy tomorrow, and repair parts are due to be delivered to the
Cape Wednesday.
A decion will be made the following day whether to go ahead with the
#* scheduled launch of the mission Friday. The flight plan calls for the
astronauts to install a giant shade to protect a damaged portion of the
ship's heat shield.
S LLS OF FARM FAMILY CAPTURED
~"PONALDSONVILLE GEORGIA (AP) Four men charged In the
Sof members of a farm family face preliminary hearing today in
hUkkeonvhle, Georgia. The four were captured last week after what
pdlee described as the execution-etyle murders of six members of the Ned
Alay famldy.
SAYS ACUPUNCTURE CAN CURE NERVE DEAFNESS
SEATTLE (AP) A Chines acupuncturist, Jok-Yuen Leung in Seattle,
Wadsngton says the ancient treatment can be used to correct nerve
deatnas. He citsthe case of a boy who had suffered almost total deafness
ce birth due to defective auditory nerves. Treated with acupuncture at
Seattle's Pain Research Centre, the boy acknowledged a human voice for
the first time.
N.VIET REFUSE TO WITHDRAW THOUSANDS OF TROOPS
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA (AP)- President Nixon told an armed forces
day audience Saturday that it would be a crime against Americans who
died In Indochina to lot the Pats peace agreement be destroyed by
ceae-flre violations.
"That is why we are continuing to take the necessary measures to Insist
that all parties to the agreements keep their word and live up to their
_p9lteailons," he declared.
Nion repeated allegations that the North Vietnamese have refused to
withdraw thousands of troops in Laos and Cambodia. "A peace
apseement that Is only a piece of paper is no good," he said In a ceremony
at the Norfolk Naval Complex.
Later he travelled to his Camp David, Maryland, retreat for the weekend.
Nixon Indicated that failure to force adherence to the Paris agreement.
eould lead to a asoondary role for the United States.
SIX HAITIANS LAND IN FLORIDA IN 8-FOOT BOAT
WEST PALM BEACH FLORIDA (AP)- Six more Hitisns who msaid
they fld their la bee bemuse they couldn't find work beached their
eMigt-toot open boat off the South Florida coast Sunday after spending
aeavs days adrift in the Alantie.
One of th four men and two women picked up by U.S. border patrol
oflnes sald, "there wan no work. We couldn't find jobs. The government
doeint care. If you die, you die."
They appeared in gooed health and in good spirits, officials said. The
woman wore dresses and the man wore suits and sport shirts. They were
* I being held by the U.S. Immigration Service for entering the country
f group Is one of aeveral boattoad. of Haitians who hav landed in
l'torisd i r cent months, all seeking asylum and employment because of
what sthey term difficult political and economic e sndtlaons in their
'h mho-land.


VISIT OUR STORE AND
CHOOSE FROM OWU
WONDERFUL SELECTION
OF GIFTS FROM
S THE ORIENT
4^ ^emrnap'u

*Sr I 'V eii s


r, IXJ-MSeaS iRseeJ

P-'jpJ ^


A %


^igj~j^;.4tb^.l msur^ ^bg^.Rkiutihsas


SENATE CHIEF SAYS: ATilAIfi l nIat l eLhargTes US I*iIEs iTsI

McCord's statements' it o r1LE
FIn R0S1 111m with volating Paris alinTP


not evidence against


President Nixon

By Harry F. Rosenthal
WASHINGTON (AP) Sean. Sam J. Etin idd Sundy t It
hily huprobable h Senate Waterpe im ettng committee
Squestio or seek a written statement from Peddest Nixon
about any ivovement hi the scandal.


CAPE KENNEDY, FLA. (AP) -
Fced with tight shedule to meet
a FrideaLy|a ye uab tean
date, today weme oa procedure*
for erectiag a gold ad while
shad t might slm ss the damaged
space station.
A tetat flight plan ca for
s actroaut on the first day in
space to inas out the hatch of tde
Apollo frry ship and attempt to
didodg at lea t on of two
powea proeduer solar u that
might beJsamed.
Oa theM scemd d, after docking
with the eitintg laboratory, the
three atroMuta would try to
deploy a giut shade to cool down
the sun-bakied craft sad protect it.
from solar heat.
The favoured method is to push
an umbrslaype devise through an
opening from isede the workshop.
If thiss not possible, a space wlk
deployment of a separate ld will
be attempted.
If the shads can be erected, the
pace agency believes there is a
good cha s setromuts Ches
Conrad Ir,, Dr. Jospir P. Kerwin
and rau J. Weits an earry out a
ull 28-day mission. But medical,
sclntilfc and earth resources
experiments will have to be
curtailed.
Activity today, now that most
work on the su shades is
completed, triggers four days of
fast-moving events aimed at
launching the astronauts at 9 am.
EDT Fridy on man's first space
amige operation.
"The schedule Is awfully tight,"
one official said. "Ther's a lot to
do and there's a possibility we
might have to postpone another
five days. But we're hoping for
Friday."
Conrad, Kerwin and Welts are to
fly to Cape Kennedy Tuesday night
and two sun shields ad associated
hardware are to be delivered here
Wednesday. After evalsution, a
decision will be made Thursday on
whether to proceed with the
launching or to nnag delay It.
Over the weekend, mission
control purged the 85-ton
laboratory of Its nitrogen-oxygen
itmospher, beloved to have been
polluted with potentially deadly
pass discharged by hot foam
plastic Insulation In the cabin.
Flight controllers sent radio
signals to vent the gas overboard,
dropping the pressure from 4.2 to
.6 pounds per square Inch.
At least four repressurisations and
purges an planned before the
astronauts board the craft.
In cae some pockets of toxic gas
remain, the astronauts willUcary gas
nmaskse and "sniffing" devices like
those used by miner. If gas is
detected, additional purges will be
necessary.
Average temperatures Inside the
overheatsd workshop, the main
section of the station, climbed from
10S to I5s degree Sunday.
On Sunday, astronauts in
simulators and engilnesers
determined that the slot way to
deploy a un shield would be to
extend it, folded like an umbrella,
through a snall airtock in the side
of the workshop.


The testimony by convicted
Watergate burglar James
McCord that offers of
executive clemency were made
to buy his silence "is not
evidence against the
President," Ervin said.
The North Carolina
Democrat spoke on the ABC
television programme "Issues
and Answers", amid
indications that the committee
hearings were put on a faster
track by McCord's statements
and new disclosures by
government auditors of money
funneled to the Watergate
conspirators.
The committee's televised
hearings resume at 10 a.m.
Tuesday with McCord still the
witness. He is expected to be
questioned closely about his
statement Friday that as
security chief of the
Committee for the Re-election
of the President he received
daily intelligence reports from
the internal security division of
the Justice Department.
Committee investigators said
they will want to know
whether government wiretap
information was included.
"We already know of FBI
wiretaps on reporters and
White House aides," one
investigator said. "We know
about the Watergate taps. But
there may have been 25 or 100
Watergates we don't know
about yet that were carried out
by the government and turned
over to the Nixon Re"lection
Committee."
McCord's testimony is likely
to lead the committee to call
Robert C. Mardian, former
head of the internal security
division and later a re-election
campaign official.
The Senate committee had
planned to lay the groundwork
at its hearings by proceeding
first with the break-ins of the
Democratic Party Headquarters
last Memorial Day and June
17, when McCord and four
others were arrested.
TIMETABLE SHIFT
But McCord's allegations
disrupted that timetable. One
immediate result was
scheduling former White House
side John Caulfield next to be
questioned about McCord's
statements Caulfield offered
executive clemency and that
the President was aware of the
offer and wanted to know
about the results.
Ervin repeated his
cautionary statements that
McCord's testimony was
hearsay. But he said he was
impressed with the former
re-election committee security
coordinator as a witness and
called what he said "competent
evidence."
Caulfield, Ervin said, "may
corroborate McCord to a very
substantial degree," and may
testify he met McCord three
times In January as McCord
said.
Sen. Lowell Weicker,
(R-Con.) said McCord's report
of Justice Department
involvement in the campaign
was first-hand knowledge and
s such "probably surpasses in
importance and significance
much of what else was said."
Weicker added he plans to
question other witnesses on the
subject.
PAID CONSPIRATORS
Auditors for the
Government Accounting Office
said Saturday that President
Nixon's former personal
' lawyer, Herbert W. Kalmbach,
told them he collected and
paid at least $210,000 "for
distribution through
intermediaries to the Watergate
defendants or their attorneys."
Moat of the money,
according to the GAO report,
came from Maurice Stans and
Frederick C. Larue two
officials of the re-election
campaign last summer after
the arrest of the bugging crew.
The GAO said Stans, the
former Commerce Secretary
indicted by a New York grand
jury, admitted giving 75,100
to Kalmbach but said he


contended it wasn't campaign
. money and that he was
unaware the money was
intended for the Watergate
defendants.
Lame declined to talk to
investigators, the GAO said. It
reported that Thomas V.
Jone, chairman of Northrop
Corp., gave at loast 50,000 to
the fund, bat thought it was a
campela contrbtion that


would be reported.
McCord testified Friday he
received cash payments of
$21,000 in salary and $25,000
"legal fees" from the late Mrs.
E. Howard Hunt, wife of one
of the seven men convicted in
the conspiracy. McCord said he
was told by Mrs. Hunt the
money came from the Nixon
campaign through certain
lawyers.'
The re-election committee
denied it had done anything
illegal, but didn't contest
Kalmbach's statement about
payments to the Watergate
wiretappers. It described
GAO's conclusions as
incomplete, inaccurate,
unbalanced, sensational,
premature, unsupported,
hastily drafted and arbitrary.
In forwarding the report to
the Justice Department for
consideration, the GAO said
Kalmbach's transactions
appeared to violate the federal
campaign spending law that
took effect April 7 last year.
Another apparent notation,
the GAO said, was that
briefcase containing $350,000
in campaign cash was secretly
given to an aide to then White
House chief of staff H. R.
Haldeman just before the new
law went into effect. Gordon
Strachan, the aide who got the
cash, told a grand jury the
money was kept in Haldeman's
White House safe during the
campaign and that he later
turned the cash over to Lame.
during the campaign and that
he later turned the cash over to
Lame.
News reports have said this
money eventually was used to
pay off Watergate defendants,
five of whom pleaded guilty..
John Gardner, head of
common cause, said on CBS'
Face the Nation Sunday that
the Watergate affair has shown
"the deep, corrupting power of
money in politics," saying the
love of power "is as strong as
the love of money."
Common cause, the citizen's
lobby, has pursued a lawsuit to
force disclosure of pre-April 7
campaign fund sources and
spending.
Gardner and Ervin both
declined to be drawn into a
discussion of possible
impeachment of the President,
should the multiple ongoing
investigations point to his
involvement in the coverup.
Gardner called it "far too
serious a problem to speculate
on"'
Ervin said it is up to the
House to decide on such
action. The constitution gives
the House the power to vote
impeachment charge
malfeasance in office and
gives the Senate the power to
try the chame.


peace agreement

SAIGON (AP) -- nma Ipd Suay t dhe Uaitwd Sa.t
bir miPm eam -A- A t weK Neiorth Vietnamt. It Mid
thi *gS "ab e -hae S s" el te euan eat eas hiParki
between L Due IT% md lem A. K hqew.


SUNDAY PC

TOOGOOCS....

OPEN SUNDAY
CB% I at K I


TI 4 MUillitS
MEXICO CITY (A?) None the
woaes for war, te 37 hostages
aboard ta VeaeM Man Avensa
O*- W d Friday, left Havanas'
JoaM a Alport Sunday at 1621
t, the Oban newa agency Prens
Labaa par*d.
Mea hW it was stated the
Mackeus received asylum in Cuba.
LOr, it was reported the
owfVteed plane arrives safely in
Curacao with pesiels and crew
on its eturna.trip to Venesuela.
According to the report, Swiu
and Cuban functionaries were at
te dsrport to 8ee off the 32
passsanpr and crew of five, exactly
1 hours after their arrivaL
Venezuela does not have diplomatic
relations with Cuba and was
presented by the Swass diplomatic
mislo ion the cm.
Mioel Naor, an official of the
federal security department of tie
Mexican ministry of interior, was
flown in a Mexican government
plane back to Mexico separate from
the other pamengam. He had
offered dimaaSf as hotage to the
armed hijacker as a guarantee for
the safety of the passengers and
crew Saturday when the plane left
Mexico for Havana.
The two.engned Covair plane,
was hijacked on a domestic flight
over Venezuela by three men and
one woman. They received asylum
In Cubae after a flight of five stops
involving four countries: Curacao,
Panama, Mexico and Cuba.
Prense Latin. reported that the
passengers rested overnight in
Havana, before their return flight to
Venezuela Sunday.
The report stated that the
passengers took a vote when the
hijackers apparently were given the
choice to remain in Mexico or to go
on to Cuba with them. The vote
was almost unanimous to go to
Cuba, the agency said.
One of the passenger, Elena de
la Peruta. a student said, "they have
a very different setup here than we
have in Venesuela, but I wanted to
see what it was like." She went on
to say, "It was all such a surprise,
and we were a bit scared at first,
but the hijackers treated us il,
and we knew everything would turn
out all eight "


El


Especially for i e


fa loi. ON TH AT
Eas t of ths Di -Ph 5a4>4


end aB reconaignce activities
over Democratic Republic of
Vietnam territory.
Rscallg the KIlsager-Tho
talks, the statement said: "*he
aforementioned acts of
violation by the United States
obviously have a negative
effect on the atmosphere of
that meeting."
The charges followed
accusations by the Communist
aide that the United States has
resumed bombing in South
Vietnam in Communist-con-
trolled area near the
Cambodian border.
The U.S. embassy in
Saigon denied the charges, but
refused to disclose its bombing
targets in Cambodia or how
close they are to the Vietnam
border.
Hon Me Island is about 115
miles south of Hanoi. Article 3
of the Paris Peace agreement
cited in the North Vietnamese
statement says, in part:
"A cease-tire shall be
observed throughout South
Vietnam as of 2400 hours gmt,
on Jan. 27, 1973. At the same
hour, the United States will
stop all its military activities
against the territory of the
Democratic Republic of
Vietnam by gound, air and
naval forces, wherever they
may be based, and end the
mining of the territorial waters,
ports, harbours, and waterways
of the Democratic Republic of
Vietnam."


450 Beer Is Back!


in 7-ounce bottle




Bey It by Ithe eo t* 454


or by w an t SM


.Idt.~b.vwyIu.indw~ I
~ ~ I


LAST CHANCE

To own charming Bahamian TOWN HOUSE, 2
storey, wide porches, secluded gardens, and fruit
trees on quiet end of Queen Street. A bargain at
$75,000.00
CHESTER THOMPSON
Phone
24777 daytime
42035 evenings

1 71(


. . . II II Illlll I IIII I II ngll 11 o qII --


I r tonh VOW 21s.1973.


? I MR 1%


wu


There was Ma dIs ate
comment from U.S. eofcils in

acknowloeeda thlat umaumnd
reconnaissance ghts have
been carried oat in the past
over North Visetam, using
pilotess aircraft Mnied Drones.
An official statement from
the North Vietnamnese forein
ministry baIroadcat over Radio
Hanoi implied that Tho miht
decide to break off hisa talks
with Kiainger.
"The U.S. egaont must
be held totally mRepoNabIe for
all the coneqana nces arising
from its violations," the
statement said.
Tho and Kassinger took a
day off Sunday in their secret
talks, but their two deputies
met to discus details f the
negotiations.
There was no word when
Kissinger and Tho would
confer again. The U.S.
presidential adviser is expected
to return to Wahngton later
this week after several more
meetings to explore ways of
stopping violations of the
peace agreement asaed in Paris
Jan. 27 and mans of putting
into effect several key
provisions that have never been
carried out.
The statement from the
foreign ministry in Hanoi said
that shortly before noon last
Friday, the second day of the
Kissinger-Tho talks, "two U.S.
aircraft encroached on
Democratic Republic of
Vietnam air space and
conducted reconnaissance
activities over the Hon Me
Island area in Thanh Hoe
Province."
"... on the same day,Uv the
statement continued, "the
United States aimin sent two
aircraft to conduct
reconnaissance activities over
coastal areas in Nghe An and
Thanh Hoa Provinces
'These are additional ants
Violating Article 2 of the Paris
Agreement on Vietnam and the
U.S. government's
commitment to completely


I













Monday, May 21,1973. Mi,. fltrlhtm,
0~


UShr rtibunt
Nuunus Amwocrus JutA=n IN VERBA MACWTr
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publjsher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Lit., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Monday, May 21, 1973.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the fifth in a series of articles arising out of a
discussion at a conference held in Miami on U.S. Caribbean
'relations in the changing pattern of power in this area.
In this series I am reviewing experiences of the Bahamas in its
efforts to develop enterprises for the benefit of the people.)
******
SIR STAFFORD Sands will go into the records as the cleverest
-Bahamian of the century perhaps of all time but perhaps the
unwisest public figure the colony has ever had. It was he who
promoted escapist capital to the Bahamas until it became almost
a science.
But his greed for material possessions led him to excesses that
were finally responsible for the scandal in 1966 that was largely
responsible for toppling his Government in January 1967 and
placing the colony in the hands of a group of young and
inexperienced theoreticians who have no understanding and are
apparently incapable of learning even from experience of the
real fundamental facts about life in the Bahamas. They don't
understand that what they inherited from the experienced and
resourceful men of the U.B.P. was a balloon that could be
deflated by the kind of mistakes they have persisted in making
for six painful years.

But now, let us get back to the land.
By the early thirties the tomato industry had reached its peak.
-Thousands of acres were under cultivation in New Providence and
- Eleuthera. In spite of transportation problems, Cat Island also
-entered this field of effort.
The Hon. Charles Dundas, Colonial Secretary, was chairman of
the Agricultural and Marine Products Board. Some years later Mr.
Dundas was made Governor of the colony and was knighted. I
was a member of the Board.
Because of a certain quality in the soil Bahamian, tomatoes
-matured several weeks earlier than the American product. During
-this short period the Bahamian farmer made his profit.
The U.S. was the major market for this product. Canada
provided a very much smaller market.
Suddenly and without warning.- the U. S. slapped a
crippling tax on imported tomatoes. This action completely shut
the Bahamas product out.
At the time the fields were already cultivated and only the tiny
'Canadian market was left. That year the farmers took a heavy
loss. By the next season the industry had been scaled down to
serve the small Canadian market.
This went on for years until farmers in Florida scarified and
cultivated land similar to that used in the Bahamas. This land
produced an early crop which captured the Canadian market,
thus completely killing the Bahamas enterprise.
Only one farmer has survived this blow.
Alexander Knowles was one of the big exporters of tomatoes
to the U.S. and Canada. When the colony lost the export market
jhe packaged tomatoes for the tiny Nassau market. He has a farm
-on which he also produces bananas, corn, beans, peasokras and
-other vegetables. He has been able to survive with the small
Nassau market. But the big industry, employing thousands of
people, is gone forever.

After the second world war Britain established 'an organization
to help and promote industries in her far flung colonial empire.
She put millions of pounds into this effort.
A large sum of money was spent on agricultural developments
.pt Andros and Eleuthera. Large crops of the finest fruits and
:vegetables were produced. But the venture failed because of the
lack of a market.
Since then several British, Canadian and American financiers
Aiave gone into Andros to develop agriculture. Many years earlier
the Standard Oil heiress, Marion Carstaris, also poured money
-into agriculture at Andros.
All these ventures failed. No market.
Now the U.S. government has given the Bahamas Government
$10 million for agricultural ventures at Andros but nothing has
been said about a market for the products of this venture.
$*4****
An American company has the timber concessions in the
,Bahamas. With modern equipment the timber lands in the
*Bahamas can be cut out in a short time. The company then has to
Wait years for its reforestation programme to produce a new
forest to be reaped.
When the company last denuded the forests at Abaco they
:decided to set up a cane factory to give employment to the
.people who had worked for them over the years.
Cane requires moisture and so it had always been thought that
"this industry could not be developed in the Bahamas.
But, using modem methods of cultivation and fertilization, the
cane fields flourished at Abaco. Sugar was produced.
J But the effort failed. The factory closed down and the cane
fields have been deserted.
SAlthough the company had been given a guaranteed quota at a
profitable price by the U.S., the market was inadequate. I also
imaginee they must have run into labour problems with
Immigration.

All these enterprises require plentiful and cheap labour.
Cheap labour is undesirable but the cold blooded fact is that,
wthout cheap labour, enterprises that were possible before the
ahaman people reached their present high standard of living,
cannot be successfully undertaken.
Costs in the Bahamas are so high that it is now often said that
the colony is pricing itselfout of the tourist market.
It has certainly priced itself out of the food market.
For example, fish caught in Bahamian waters is dearer than
meat imported from Australia.
Meat produced in he Bahamas has a strong competitor in the
,Australian product that comes from exactly the opposite side of
'the world, known as the Antipodes.
SGrouper imported from Africa and South America is cheaper
*n Nassau shops than grouper caught in the Bahamas.


ESS MAN TELLS rITARIAHS

SAYS RADIO BAHAMAS Spills from oil


IS FOR DIM-WITS


EDITOR, The Tribune,
It seems quite obvious that
when Jack Dodge left Z.N.S.
he took along with him all
vestiges of culture and the
dissemination of culture to the
people of the Bahamas through
programming at an intelligent
level. For past years, under
Jack Dodge's direction, ZNS-2
had built up a weekly schedule
of programmes worthy of a
high category station. Since his
departure only a few weeks
ago the programming seems
to have collapsed into what
now seems a meaningless rout.
Unfortunately I can think of
no announcer with
sufficient interest in any
but the most banal material -
mostly screamers and
tin-horn-playing exhibitionists
masquerading as musicians a
horde of 'beats' strictly for the
institution.
I tuned in the other evening
to what was a "quiz
programme" of selected
members of the staffs of two
"leading" banks in Nassau. The
atrocious results of the quiz
turned the programmes even
for the participants into one
grand laughing matter. They
apparently thought their
stupidity a wondrous big joke!
Oh yes, they knew the name of
this year's and last year's "Miss
High School Bahamas", but
anything with a grain of
intelligence they miserably
fumbled.
But that is only one
programme. How readily they


kick aside a truly entertaining
or cultural programme to
broadcast some asinine
basketball, baseball or other
game. These games should not
all be broadcast they NEED
the stimulation of live
attendance of as many
devotees as they can get.
People will not attend in
person while they can have the
convenience of stretching out
on their verandahs, living
rooms or wherever and
listening to a Government-
sponsored facsimile. The
objective of Government radio
stations should be the
attainment of an improved
culture among the people. Or is
it to their perpetual advantage
to have the masses as
dim-witted as possible to
ensure their continued support
on election day?
DISAPPOINTED LISTENER
Nassau, May 18, 1973.

JAMAICA'S PLANS FOR
LABOUR DAY
KINGSTON, JAMAICA (AP)- A
number of projects are being
planned on an island wide basis for
Wednesday May 23, to be
celebrated In Jamaica as Labour
Day.
Up to 1970 May 23 was observed
with allies and marches by political
parties, but starting last year, Prime
Minister Mitchael Manley has
instituted the custom of work
projects by citizens on that day.
Among those slated to take part
in Labour Day projects Wednesday
are Acting Government-General Sir
Herbert Duffus, Prime Minister
Manley, and parlimentarian and
cities from all classes of society.


Pigeon peas will grow wild in the Bahamas but it has been
found that it is cheaper to import 50-pound sacks of peas from
Africa and pay a heavy Customs duty on it, than to handle the
local product, even though it grows so easily in the Bahamas.
4eec
Now then ... I started this series to tell you about a new law
that is now before the U.S. Congress that may stop the outward
flow of American investment.
The tourist business in the Bahamas is facing a crisis. Even
Minister of Tourism Clement Maynard and Director of Publicity
S.N. Chib have made statements to this effect.
The question now arises... have the Bahamian people reached
another fork in the road in following their destiny?
If so ... will their leaders turn them to the RIGHT or to the
LEFT?

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: This has been a discussion of events
that led to the rise ... and now the possible downfall of the
Bahamas.
I don't feel that I should close this series without paying a
tribute to Sir Roland Symonette, the colony's first Premier.
Bahamians are a people who "go down to the sea in ships".
One of the greatest attractions to the Bahamas is its maritime
tradition.
"Quality" tourists who can afford to maintain yachts love to
cruise among our islands. These are the monied people and they
spend liberally.
Sir Roland helped to focus the attention of yachtsmen on the
Bahamas when he built a shipyard capable of hauling out most of
the boats that came to these waters.
Then he pioneered in international yacht racing by taking the
first Nassau sailing team to Jacksonville to compete in a regatta
there. At the time Sir Roland was operating a steamship service
between Nassau and Jacksonville.
Later he financed the building of the Nassau Yacht Club.
Along with the Conmmodore of a yacht club in Miami, Sir
Roland organized the Miami-Nassau ocean race which has become
a leg in the Southern Conference, an important international
series of races in this area.
These activities focused attention on Nassau as an
international yachting centre and also resulted in producing at
least one world champion among a large group of outstanding
Bahamian yachtsmen, including Sir Roland's son Bobby, who has
become a social and racing figure in the international yachting
set.
The Bahamas is known today wherever yachtsmen unfurl a sail.
Sir Roland and I have had some serious differences but, on
balance, no one can deny that he is recognized as a pioneer
developer, a political warrior and a great patriot, with a bit of a
hellish streak coursing through his veins.
****e.
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
I have watched this famous island descending incontinently,
fecklessly, the stairway which leads to a dark gulf. It is a fine
broad stairway at the beginning, but after a bit the carpet ends. A
little further on there are only flagstones, and a little further on
still these break beneath your feet.
-CHURCHILL


By The Associated Pressom
TODAY 1IS MONDAY, May 21st,
the 141st day of 1973. Therea are
224 days left in the year.
dIGHLIGHTSein history on this
A972 A fanatic smashes the;
Mchelangelio treasure "Pleta" with
a ledghammer at the Vatican.
1971 International mountain
climbing expedition gives up
attempt to scale unconquered
southwestern face of Mount
Everest.
1967 It is disclosed that
warfare In Vietnam has taken more
than 10,000 American lives; more
than 300 persons perish In
department store fire in'Brussels,
Belgium.
1957 Socialist Guy Molet
resigns as Premier of France.
1956 First hydrogen bomb is
exploded by the United States over
Bikini Atoll In the Pacifie.
1953 Yoshida forms Ministry
In Japan.
1944 Allied forces break
through the Hitler line n Italy In
World War Two.
1927 Charles A. Lindbergh
reaches Paris, completing the first
solo airplane flight across the
Atlantic.
1533 Dutch conclude armlstic
with Belgium.
1813 Indecisive battle of
Bautzen, Germany, between
Napoleon and armies of Pruasa nd
Russia ends with heavy losses on
both sides.


tankers not major



cause of pollution


SPILLS FROM TANKERS have not been the major source of
oil pollution of the seas, but the industry is taking steps to cut
down the "substantial potential for serious spills" and develop
means of dealing with serious spills when they do occur, the East
Nassau Rotary Club was told on Friday.


H.G. Prall, environmental
protection co-ordinator with
Esso Inter-America, Inc. of
Florida, was speaking to the
Rotarians at the Flagler Inn,
Paradise Island, on
"objective cleaner seas."
Mr. Prall revealed that of the
estimated five million tons of
oil dumped into the sea each
year through man's activities,
only one million tons come
from tankers, and only about
200,000 tons of oil pollution
are the result of explosions,
groundings, collisions and
strandings.
Four-fifths of tanker
pollution comes from pumping
out bilges and engine spaces
and the discharge of sea water
which tankers use as ballast
when they carry no oil.
Recognising that
"preservation of the marine
environment is crucial here in
the Bahamas," Mr. Prall
outlined the work being done
to reduce the number of major
spills and to clean up the mess
when prevention does not
work.
He said there is a tanker
captain training centre at
Grenoble, France, where
captains learn the techniques
of operating the large vessels
using small-scale models on a
lake. To supplement the
training received at Grenoble,
there is a computerised tanker
simulator at a school on Delft,
Holland.
The school provides
"realistic simulation of tanker
operations in all the major
passages and harbours of the
world," Mr. Prall told the
Rotarians.
QUICK REACTION
"With the simulator, officers
can be confronted with
potentially hazardous
situations and can be trained to
react quickly and properly to
avoid accidents.
"In addition, the industry is
involved in a substantial
research and development
effort involving radar control of
harbour traffic, and shipboard
anti-collision radars. If such
devices can be developed with
proven performance that meets
the exacting standards of
reliability and durability laid
down by the industry, still
another tool will be available
to help safeguard the quality of
the sea."
He went on to deal with the
industry's efforts to devise
means of dealing with spills.
"Work on improving
containment booms is a
continuing process. Several
booms have been developed
that show promise in handling
spilled oil on the high seas
under rather extreme weather
conditions a problem that
has until now defied a. really
acceptable solution."
Work is also being done on
the development of a "total
open sea recovery facility"
centreing around a 7,000 ton
ship which is hoped to be able
to contain spills, and recover
and store the spilled oil, and a
European oil company has a
prototype of an open sea
recovery system which can be
delivered to the site of an oil
spill by air.
Another hindrance to


cleaning up after a spill has
been settling the question of
who will pay for the expensive
operation.
Mr. Prall recalled the March
7, 1968 incident in which the
Greek tanker General
Colocotronis, carrying 110,000
barrels of oil, ran aground off
Eleuthera. The vessel was
damaged below the waterline
and "the threat of extensive
pollution from escaping oil was
very real."
"It became apparent," Mr.
Pr"l. said, "that neither the
owners of the ship nor the
insurers were prepared to
undertake on their own the
costly job of removing the oil
from the wreck.
Although Esso did not own
the vessel and had no legal
liability for the accident, "our
company agreed to participate
heavily in the salvage work.
"Esso technicians and
equipment, including a
10,000-ton tanker from
Venezuela, succeeded in
recovering about three-fourths
of the oil from the stricken
vessel," and little damage was
done.
Mr. Prall said that since that
incident, the oil industry has
brought into being two
agreements to guarantee that
anyone participating in a
clean-up following a major spill
can recover their costs, and
persons who suffer from oil
pollution from such ,a spill can
be "fully and promptly"
compensated.
The agreements, "Tovalop"
and "Cristal," enable oil
companies and governments to
begin cleaning up immediately
without worrying about
recovering expenses.
RESEARCH
Mr. Prall went on to say the
industry is also researching
methods of reducing the
pollution through ordinary
discharges from tankers.
Some ten years ago the oil
companies and tanker
operators recognized that
"something more could and
should be done to minimize
the amount of oil discharged
into the ocean" by tankers.

"Today, about 80 percent of
the world's tanker fleet utilizes
what is known as the 'load on
top' system of operation.
When .a tanker's storage
spaces are being cleaned out
with sea water, or when any
water is being pumped out of
the ship, the oil is separated
from the water and stored in a
special tank, and part of the
ship's next oil cargo is loaded
into the tank on top ofC the
retained oil.
"As an aid in efficiently
performing this operation,
many vessels are presently
equipped with onboard
oil/water separation equipment
and instrumentation for
metering the oil content of
shipboard water. However,
more work is needed to perfect
this equipment and shipboard
research projects are
continuing."
Mr. Prall said another factor
that will decrease oil pollution
from tankers is the fact that
tankers are being built bigger
than ever, and therefore fewer
will be needed to do the job.


it ** ** **** *** ********************** * * * ** *t










49 A Coll@c preparatory school for boys announces that Its representative
4 will Interview interested parents & students for admission to Florida Air
Academy.

will be at the Nassau Beach Hotel for interviews.
S| June 25th to August 10th, 1973, ages 6 19
4 I Grades 1-8 Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
S ll CW I Grades 9-12 Melbourne, Fla.


Junior School -- Grades 1-8 Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
SSenior School Grades 9-12 Melbourne, Fla.
4 ,
4( For appointment call the Nassau Beach Hotel this week and leave message. 4i
4 Interviews will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday, May 24th, 25th & 26th.
'th
-(i** **********t*************


For

Sun and S&

by

G-OTT'"33C
of br.L

Exotic beach and swim
coordinates by Gottex of Israel


(N


44

S*


V.-'


ABOVE Pretty two-piece bikini with brief
halter top and not so brief bottom. In'plat k
white or yellow & white. $12.95.
Matching blouse (not shown) M14..
Eye catching check-mates. One plee Swia
suit with draw-string neck. Black gr'autllMh.
bold multi coloured check design UL,..
Matching skirt. M35.95.

THE HOUSE THAT FASHION SUILT
% NASSAU and FREEPOQRT


.


Monday, May 21.1973.


Rhe Mfllrhitn











Grandpa wants tattler

to rat on best friend


By Abigail Van Buren
e i"aw amf Vt M m V. m. we. M fe.i
DZAR.ABBY: I am is and a Junor in high school, and
I Uwe wth my grandpa My beet friend [I'll call er
Dom ] in my ae and we've been ike sister all our lves
atoesd io lve. sasm the Mtest.
iy gandpar ts think D a an s ange, so yester-
d* a w e they wwre tgog and on about how perfect
Dma wae, I got mad ad an rted out that Donna went all
the way with Kenny, the bay the's bma going steady with.
I was orry right sitar I said It, but it was too late.
Well. lt igtGran ma d befelt it was duty to
Il Doma's fatl what I told him, bet be needed my



SEAT, GLARE, FADE!


-ol b sam tidy. laar or
aLame -G d ow m Sa. Psow.4
at w&D fat few he du ensees*

^________ PLNAL- maEK a *'


cooperation. Now he wants me to repeat to Dona's fther
what I told him. Abby, what I said was true, but I don't
want to repeat it to Donna's father.
My grandpa is giving me a week to decide o what I
want to say. I need your help, Abby. Shod I cooperate or
not? I really don't want to. I feel like a rat. BIG MO(11
DEAR BIG MOUTH: You've a ye h de toe m
talking. Tell grand you doi't wat to repeat what y
said about Donam. If be wants to te Doaaa's father, ye
can't step him. If he does, I hope you have a saltlMme
best friend warming up In the bullpes.
DEAR ABBY: My divorce will be final In three weeks,
but my ex is still following me around begging me to gie
him another chance.
Abby, I still love him, but I don't want to live with him.
He's insanely jealous for no reason at all. I am a good
Christian woman and never gave him came to doubt me,
but he has beat me up several times trying to get me to
"confess."
Once he broke my nose, knocked out four teeth, and I
had 22 stitches on my lip. Then he pinned me up agat
the wall and broke my collarbone. That's when I filed for
divorce.
My friends say I'd have to be crazy to take him back. I
still love him. What would you do? IN DOUBT


Out IskRdAfrways


Serves the Bahamas Best


UA 1RT -DOOR STrATS. AN* Iesart 2S4er ad 4-deer
sale. All three mustels vllle wth ether 110 cc engi e
mi standard trammeolen or IM cc englue and automatic
trammlasls.


CAPRI 1600L 2-DOOR SALOON. 1600 cc overhead em engin
automatic transmission, vinyl roof.


Fords come
replacements.


F The English Ford line has stood the test of time In
p has to be a reason why Babamians who own English
back to ABC Motors again and again for their new-car


A few such reasons ore on this page. For the others, you'll have to see
the cars for yourself. Come in soon, and fall in love with the best buys
in Nassau the English Fordsl


AJM9 OL 4mk SALOM. Mcc e ngine,,
Str -s. Ai
,4.,er e ate


I-.PASUENGIN TWa U SW. T -.mMC
standard treamlsmilon, d al tear whlee, ie ta
Well ventilated, comferteble aMd rigged.


SHOW ROOM OPEN MONDAY, FRIDAY, 8 AXM. 6 P.M., SATURDAY, 8 AM. -. 5 P.M.


TEL. 2-1031
Illilllll IIIIIIIII II II I I u eine -i i -- .


4 fasons Why


lOut IindAirwr


is the Best Choice


It o I ii ,I Leweet fares. For just $38, OIA will fly you
round-trip between Nassau and Miami on our one-day fare. And our
21-day roundtrip excursion fares are just as attractive: $42 Nassau-Miami
and $32 Freeport-Miami. These three fares are the lowest of any airline.
2. Better equipment. We fly the 8AC-11, the world's most reliable
short-haul, pure-jet aircraft. With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can
stretch out.
3. Setter serve. Beautiful Bahamian stewardesses to see to your every
need. And a complimentary rum punch to refresh you.
4. More convenient schedules. Three non-stop flights daily from Nassau.
8:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M. And one at 10:30 A.M. which makes a stop
in Freeport. Plus one direct flight daily from Freeport to Miami at 11:30 A.M.
Returning flights are just as convenient.
Remember, lowest fares. Better equipment. Better service. More convenient
schedules. That's Out Island Airways. So call your travel agent or Out
Island Airways now for reservations. 7-8222.


*


A


I
5
U..
U.
4!
C
a


*


IB MOTORS

"Where the Customer is King"


V 7i~.


AVENUE


-&=. L=


ii-
.l .-.


o hW Brtina a


.9
4'
I


L










Bn- ^ - ---_________WSW Mw -- 37 m-


" WO~ VqpU


T.K K.

wllt be holding a Welding Test for all
Bahamian welders on Wednesday, 23rd
May, from 8:30 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., at

NthtI ltltltkCl.
On West Settlers Way, Freeport.


AH Interested
registered with
Department are


Bahamians who have
T.K.K. or the Labour
requested to be there.


Intmest persons not living in Freeport,
should contact Mr. Rich Penn at T.K.K.
Office In Coral Gardens, Freeport,
telephone 373-3065.


Non-Bahamians need not apply.

" l llllIIII I I ll-l I


has a vacancy for a

SALES MANAGER
who must be a Bahamian citizen
Essential QualificatioWn
1. General Certificate in Education t


Advanced Level but a University degree
would be preferable.
2. At least 5 years sales experience in the oil


industry.
3. Thorough knowledge of oil marketing
methods, sales techniques, petroleum


products and dealer and general business


management.
4. Proven ability to manage a department
including the supervision of sales
representatives, staff training and
motivation.


Commencing salary will be according to
qualifications and experience.
Applications must be made in writing to P. 0.
BoX N3717, Nassau, Bahamas.


2 National Youth Exhibition at


A.F. Adderley from June 24-

THE NATIONAL YOUTH EXHIBITION will be held at the A. F. Adderley Ju
from June 24 to June 30, Mr. Exmund Moxey, Parliamentary Secretary to
Education and Cultwure announced Friday.


HEADTEACHERS FROM StVERAL SCHOOLS of Ministry of Education and Culture
in Nassau, who we resposlbe for the planning of student projects that will be on display
at the National Youth Exhibition ere seen here discussing the subject with Mr. Edmund
Moxey M.P., Parlianentary Secretary of the Ministry of Education and Culture's
Community D evlopmant divison. The exhibits will be shown at the A. F. Adderley
Junior High School f om June 24 to 30.


1,000 6. Bahama families

in 4 week price survey


OVER a thousand families
on Grand Bahama are to keep



ABBEY



FUND






(I


11.05
Offered Price
As Of
May lIth, 1973


track of all their spending for a
weak to help the Department
of Statistics set up a retail price
Index to measure changes in
the cost of living on the island.
The Department's survey,
scheduled to last four weeks,
began today, a Bahamas
Information Services press
release said.
Each of the families
participating is to keep
accurate records of
expenditure on food, clothing,
accommodation, recreation
and other items of
consumption in daily record
books provided for the
purpose.
Trained Department
personnel will visit the families
regularly to assist them in
completing various
questionnaires.
"The Department
emphasizes that all information
given will be held in strictest
confidence and will be used
exclusively for the purpose of
constructing a retail price
index


IMPORTED & DITRBUTED BY


BAHAMAS BLENDERS, LMTED

Don't miss the Heinleken Behiamas Blenders Golf
Tournament, Paradise Island, tomorrow & Mondayl
qI


CABLES FROM

GRENADA DON'T

ARRIVE IN U.K.
ST. GEORGES, GRENADA,
British West Indies (AP)-
Grenada chamber of commerce
president Leslie Pierre
expressed shock Friday that
protest cables sent to the
London conference on
Independence for Grenada had
not reached their destination.
Independence was opposed
by the chamber, the seamen
and waterfront workers' union3
the commercial and industrial
workers union and the
association of secondary school
masters and mistresses,
according to Pierre.
Since talks started on
Monday, "numerous cables"
were sent to the chairman of
the conference, Lord Balniel,
opposing the timing and
manner in which Independence
was being sought by Premier
Bric Gairy's government.
He also pointed out that a
virtual island-wide general
sd e for an indefinite period
1 been called in protest of
Premier's move. *,
opposition leader Herbert
Blize, in a telephone call to
the chamber, indicated that
neither he nor Lord Balniel had
received the cables.
The chamber president then
complained to the British
government representative to
the Associated States, George
Baker, of alleged "sabotage
somewhere in London."
Baker is on his way here "to
observe any change of opinion
on the question of
Independence," Pierre said.
Baker was expected to arrive
Saturday.
SHIPPING


Arriving tomorrow: Bahama
Star, Emerald Seas, Flavia from
Miami; Oceanic, Rotterdam
from New York, Canberra
from Norfolk; Olympia from
Freeport; Tropic Flyer from
West Palm Beach
Sailing tomorrow: Tropic
Flyer for West Palm Beach.
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157

INTERNATIONAL
COFFEE SERVICE
LTD.
PHONE 24173 P. O0' BOX 5245
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


FRESH

BREWED

COFFEE

ANYWHERE
CONTACT
J. KIITH SMITH
Phone 2-4173


The exhibition will be open
between the hours of 10 a.m.
and 8 p.m.
On display during this
period will be projects created
by students from various
Ministry of Education and
Culture and independent
schools throughout the
Bahamas. Students from the
Teacher's Colleges and the
Technical College will also
exhibit works. From this
presentation various exhibits
will be chosen to be displayed
at the Bahamas National Arts
and Crafts Exhibition to be
held at Jumbey Village from
July 4 to 14.
Mr. Moxey said that the
planning of "this unique
event" began in the Ministry of
Education and Culture in
November, 1972.
He said committees were
then formed to develop
projects in various subject
areas, based on the learning
experiences that had been
suggested by headteachers at a
series of meetings.
These committees, organized
by Curriculum Division
Officers from the Ministry of
Education and Culture, were
chaired by the following
teachers and heads of schools:
Language Arts, Mrs. S.
Strachan and Mr. Hugh
Jenkings; Social Studies, Mr. C.
Moxey and Mrs. L. Moss;
Science-Mathematics, Mr. E.
Moncur and Mrs. M. Collie;
Home Economi.-s, Miss Julia
Burnside; and Arts and Crafts,
Miss Veronica Ingraham,
Lecturer, Bahamas Teachers
College. The chairmen of these
committees will form, in part,
the School Exhibition
Committee.
Other committees that were
organized were the research of
literature, performing arts,
sports, radio programmes,
song-writing, youth rally and
fund raising. These
committees, which are
concerned with community
and schools' cooperation, were
organized also by Ministry of
Education and -Culture
Headquarters staff and chaired
by teachers and heads of
schools. The Beautification of
School Grounds Committee,
however, was organized and
directed by Mrs. A. Rodgers,
Headmistress of Government
High School. The work of
these committees is still
underway.
Mr. Moxey said that "the
total involvement and
cooperation of all school staffs,


both independent and
Government, portrays the true
spirit of this Independence
year. This cooperation has set
an excellent example for
school children and even adults
to emulate."
Continuing. Mr. Moxey said
that "the curriculum activities


nior Schodol
dthe Mmier of


that have been carried on in
schools throughout the
Bahamas have engendered great
enthusiasm and have lent
themselves to providing the
necessary basic knowledge to
school children about the true
rneining of our forthcoming
Independence Day."


a
NOW SHOWING THRU THURSDAY
Matinee 2:45 & 4:5S, Evening 9-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10

fi E % I.411


I


Reservations not claimed
on first come, first

Last Day Tuesday
Matinee starts at 1:45
Evening 9:00
"THE YOUNG
GRADUATES" PG.
Patricia Wymer
Marly Holliday
PLUS
"THE SICILIAN CLAN" PG
Alain Delon
Jean Gabin
PLUS Late Feature
Tuesday night.
'Phone 2-2534


LAST DAY T


I ITTAIC TII IFANY BOLLIO BN Pt2AJ


I mR 40 b
RobertPaOd"-SthEnWyA Dm*-Ritag
I NO ONE UNDER 1


by 8:45, will be sold
served basis.

Last Day Tuesday
Continuous Showings
from 3
"THE REVENGERS" PG.
William Holden
Ernest Borgnine
PLUS
"HOUSE OF CARDS" PG
George Peppard
Inger Stevens



UESDAY -
Evening 8: 30-'Phone 3-46









as*SIm sarad*nGum r dw
I7ADMI77ED


Mi


OeC. SMITH


AT THE

EMERA.L.D ROOM



HYATT EMERALD BEACH

MAY 22nd thru MAY 271h,


10:00 P.M. SUN THURS
10:00 & 12:00 P.M. FRI & SAT
CLOSM MONMAT

for reservations


CALL 78 1
- :.: ." .


to


.aW. Ney 21. 1r73a.


SW 8t*Usaur


w3l




























it.UTAT F| lKENT CARS FOIR SALE I I ll EIS I J ELPWANTE I I L P UITEI I TIM N -yt S [
C60C63qit2I .I c A rT77X


1971 VAUXHALL
STATIONWAGON 2300 S.L.
Ideal for large family good
condition. Telephone 5-1440 -
9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and
4-2595 after 6 p.m.
C9880
LATE (November) 1968 Ford
Custom 4 door V8 engine
- automatic transmission air
conditioned radio, power
steering licensed and insured
for 1973 one owner. Phone
22216 or 42718 (After 6:00
p.m.)

C9900
BLUE 1971 PONTIAC
FIREBIRD 350 H.P.
airconditioned and tape deck.
BARGAIN $3,000. Ralph
2-1530 Shell Palm Tree Service
Station.
C9879
One 1969 HILLMAN MINX -
automatic $1400 O.N.O.
Telephone 58171.

C9904
A NEW GALAXIE 500
FORD costs over $8,000. Buy
mine with 39,000 miles for
$1,200 CASH. Power brakes.
power steering and new tires.
Call 42679 between 6 p.m. and
8 p.m.



C9832
ONE USED deep freeze.
Telephone 5-4834.
9836
350 HONDA 3500 miles. 15
months old include 1 year's
Insurance $650. Cash only.
Schiller Willi, Balmoral Hotel --
Kitchen 77481.
C9861
HALF BOXER PUPPIES. HAD
WORM SHOTS $30.00,
Telephone 5-4209.

C9779
HONDA 50. Perfect condition.
Hardly ridden less than 150
miles $425. or nearest offer.
Phone 5-7102 Glenn Hepburn
C986- .
10 pl0ce bedroom set Was
$310' NOw $272 Hollywood
beds Single and double -
Was $85 Now $75. D & R
FURNITURE OUTLET Wulff
Road,'next to Wong's Grocery
Store Phone 59600
9771 ROBERTS reel to reel
tape deck 650xD, Scott 386
AM/FM Receiver.
1971 Pinto airconditioned/
heater, radio, seatbelts, low
mileage. Good condition.
$2,500.00 O.N.O.
I lot 100'X150' Blair Estates.
Phone B. Harris 27680, 9:00 -
5:00 Mon. to Fri.
C98S,

APARTMENT size fridge -
Was $265. Now $225.
Apartment size stove Was
$225 Now $187. D & R
FURNITURE OUTLET Wulff
Road, next to. Wong's Grocery
Store Phone 59600.
C9885
SUZUKI 50 mini-trail good
condition. $275.00. Phone
5-4207
C9886
BIKE FOR SALE
200 cc Triumph Scrambler.
Phone Charles 32510.
C9891
STEINWAY GRAND PIANO
and modern furniture, rugs,
lamps etc. Phone 7-7704.

C9913
Quick sale by owner ... House
on double lot Johnson Road
Estate. Furnished or
unfurnished. Garage sale on
household Items dally. Phone
Mrs. Albury 41629.



C9901
BEAUTIFUL Beagle Puppies
$50.00 each. Alveron Dorsett.
Phone 22743 Night 58366
C9883
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS
6-weeks old -- shots fblmele.
Asking $120 white. $100
Black. Mr. Thompson 35402 or
42862.

LOST I


C9756 BROWN MINIATURE
DOG with own collar area
of WtImie-" and Shirley
Streets. $100 REWARD.
Phone 7-813,.




CARGO OR MAIL BOAT
FOR SALE
100' x 22' x 6' steel, twin
screw, 100 tons plus cargo, two
holds, clear deck 32'K20' aft,
electric 11ley, rebuilt 1973, 2
GMO-* ..
Call beffe 9 A.m. Mr. Nash
6613777 or write Box 424,
Miami 13148.


PACEMAKER 44 ft
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.
C9903
23 Foot Formula with twin
120 Mercruiser 1/0 in excellent
condition. Phone 5-8512.

C9884
24 FOOT FIBRA two-berth
cruiser. 150 H.P. sterndrive,
just completed $3000 refit.
Depth ometer, transmitter,
fishing chairs, pumps etc.
Lying BROWNS. $3750 for
quick sale. 9 foot fibreglass
dinghy and 5 H.P. outboard
available $200. Telephone
58647 evenings.



C9906
SHOPKEEPERS and bargain
hunters please note the
following may be viewed by
calling 23921.
1 A selection of clothing
items of well known name
brand.
2. 362 assorted flower pots
and additional garden
ornaments.
3. A selection of PUTA
Vases, candle holders etc.
4. A quantity of assorted
styles of sunglasses.
5. Double sided mirrors.
6. A large quantity of
factory made doors and
parts for cabinets and
other trimming material.
7. Other miscellaneous
items.


L SC.LS
C9905
HOPEDALE CENTRE
A private remedial school for
children with special needs.
(Retarded, spastic, behaviour
and speech problems, slow
learners.)
Now accepting limited
enrollment for September
term.

Qualified teachers.
Inquirits invited.
Phone 35492 or write P. 0.
Box N8883, Nassau.

NELP NMTED
C9870
THE AMERICAN
CONSULATE GENERAL
requires 2 office clerks male
or female, typing essential.
Bahamians preferred. Contact:
Mrs. Maria Symonette 2-1181.

C9867
COOK FOR PRIVATE
residence -- excellent
references required. For
interview phone 7-7673.

C9855
WANTED experienced man to
look after large property and
pool. Good wages and
two-bedroom house provided.
Telephone 78187 after 4 p.m.

C9866
BUTLER required for private
residence, excellent references
required. For interview phone
7-7673.
C7384
JOB TITLE: STEEL
FABRICATORS (four)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years experience In steel lay
out and welding.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITI ES:
Read and. follow structural
steel detail drawings, cut and
weld in accordance with
drawing specifications.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company. P. 0. Box F-100,
*Freeport. Grand Bahama.

C9862
GENERAL TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY CO
IMMEDIATE OPENING
FOR
OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR
SALES REPRESENTATIVE.

General Telephone Directory
Co. needs permanent Office
Administrator Sales
Representative. Male or
Female, College education
required. Age 25/35. Office
and sales experience preferred.


Starting salary $150 per week
commission later if sales
qualify. Will receive training in
St. Petersburg, Florida. Must
be able to travel to U.S.
occasionally and to Family
Islands. Expenses paid, Starting
date June 4, 1973. Reply in
writing stating qualification by
May 22 to Personnel Office
Manager Gerry Sorg., P. 0. Box
N13048. Personal interviews to
be conducted starting. May 23
at Bahamas Telecom
munications Corporation
Personnel Office, Chase
Manhattan Building, Oakes
Field. Nassau, Bahamas.


JOB TITLE; INSTRUMENT
REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years industrial Instrumenta-
tion experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Install, repair, calibrate test
and adjust any type of
integrating, indicating or
graphic electrical or mechanical
instrument.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama .
C73781
JOB TITLE: MACHINIST
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good Basic Education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C9890
We require for 1st September
1973 a TEACHER with at least
one year's experience in a
Montessori School. Minimum
requirements are four G.C.E.
"0" levels and a Diploma in
the Montessori Method of
Education for 2% 5 year
olds. Please apply in writing to
Infant Education Centre, Box
6196, Nassau.
C9908
APPLICATIONS are invited
for the position of Manager,
Bahamas Industrial Gases Ltd.,
Nassau, Bahamas, a member of
the Island Gases group of
companies. Applicants must
have either
(1) A degree in the
engineering sciences,
preferably chemical
engineering, as well as
managerial and industrial
gas plant experience, or
(2) Several years experience
in the gas industry in a
similar position. .
The Company supplies local
markets with industrial and
medical gases, welding supplies,
safety equipment, sport diving
equipment, and fire fighting
equipment.
The successful applicant will be
responsible for: the safe and
efficient operation of the gas
producing plants, distribution
and sales of the gases and
merchandise, administration of
the business.
Salary commensurate with
qualifications and experience.
An Incentive bonus scheme
related to the profits of the
Company and the group as a
whole is in force.

Applications in writing only
together with supporting
details should be marked
"Private and Confidential" and
mailed to: The Manager,
Bahamas Industrial Gases Ltd.,
P. 0. Box N-4688, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ONLY WRITTEN applications
with full details attached will
be accepted.


Experienced couple as Club
Manager and Manageress. Full
knowledge of all phases of club
operation. Windermere -sland
Club, P. 0. Box 25, Rock
Sound, Eleuthera.
C9882
CARFER OPPORTUNITY for
senior clerk with good
command of English and
ability to communicate. Under
supervision, successful
applicant will be required to
prepare reports, compile
statistics etc. Age requirement
20 26. General office
experience required. At least
one reference to accompany
application which should be
directed to: Adv. C9882, c/o
The Tribune, P. 0. Box
N-3207, Nassau. Bahamas.
C9909
EXPERIENCED SENIOR
OPERATING OFFICER
required by local commercial
bank. Salary commensurate
with experience. Forward
resume to P. 0. Box N-466,
Nassau
C7397
JOB TITLE: ELECTRICIAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years. DUTIES/RESPONSI-
BILITIES:Inspect, repair,
install and wire all electrical
apparatus, devices and circuits
of any voltage In cement plant
or assigned area.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P.O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.

TRVIE SCICESL
C9636

Pl.der'i Citers

BroSkere Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
I ATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
-C9805
NEED FAST SERVICE?
Do you have goods in Miami
you need In a hurry? Wells
Fargo Express will deliver! For
service calh NASSAU 51901
MIAMI 758-5597.
C9632
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CAHPORTh
HURRICANE
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
JOHN S. uEORGE a CO.
LTD.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.


FOR YOUR building needs
RI dential Remodelling -
Mantenancew. Call G. Patton.
Budget Builders 32656.

USED FURNITURE WANTED
Contact D&R FURNITURE
OUTLET, Wulff Road East
next to Wong's Grocery.
Telephone 5-9600.
WE BUY AND TRADE USED
FURNITURE
C8106
WORRY NO MORE CAL


ABCO TO SOLVE YOUR
CLEANING PROBLEMS.
TEL: 51071-2-3-4.



GRAND I


PCLAS



C7378
JOB TITLE: MACHINIST
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good Basic Education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILI'IES:
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring Instruments and
performs any" dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C7377
JOB TITLE: INSTRUMENT
REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years Industrial instrumenta-
tion experience.
DUTIES/R SPONStBILITIES:
Install, repair, calibrate test
and adjust any type of
integrating, Indicating or
graphic electrical or mechanical
Instrument.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama-..
C7388
ONE KITCHEN STEWARD:
With 5 years experience in
Buffet set ups, must be able to
supervise kitchen staff In their
duties, also be able to work
long hours. Must have High
School education or
equivalent. Must be between
the ages of 25 and 40 years of
ago.
ONE CHIEF ENGINEER:
With 10 years experience in
Hotel Maintenance and
supervisory capacity of large
staff. Must be able to read
blueprints and work by them,
also be able to work long
hours. Must be College oi
University Graduate. Must be
between the ages of 35 and 50
years of age.
Interested persons apply: The
Grand Bahama Hotel &
Country Club, West End,
Grand Bahama, Personnel
Office, between the hours ol
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.


C9635 -I
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boostersl
for homes, apartments and#
hotels. Sales and services. Call,
Douglas Lowe 5.9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street;
next to Frank's Place.
C9838
FENCES
For your fence needs
Call 35491
OSCAR FENCES
Frea estimates.
Terms arranged.

C9889
NIXONS UPHOLSTERY
SERVICE Bernard Road Phone,
41298 Quick reliable service



IAHAMATE






C7384
JOB TITLE: STEEL.
FABRICATORS (four)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education'
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years experience in steel lay
out and welding.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Read and follow structural
steel detail drawings, cut and
weld In accordance with
drawing specifications.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C7391
MALE NIGHT ROOM CLERK
required. Applicant should
have completed High School
and must be experienced-in
position. Accuracy in figures
important. Must be of pleasant
and outgoing personality and
willing to work odd hours
Relative to the foregoing,
references and impeccable
Police record essential. Starting
salary $100.00 pep week, plus
1 duty meal.
Please contact Miss Miriam
Adderley, Personnel
Manageress, International
Hotel.
C7392
GENERAL PLUMBER (1):
Must have high school
education, read all phases of
plans, install. all phases
correctly for health and
sanitation reasons, know cost
both labour and material from'
price list, know gas and water,
electrical panel control,
sleeping for the lines.
Knowledge of swimming pool
work, boiler work, heat
exchange, hot water systems
Including balancing. Must
know house pumps and hot
water circulation pumps,
material take off. Must be able
to get along with people.
Certified licence and references
required.
GENERAL LABOURERS (6)
Must be able to do general
cleaning for large hotel and
other labouring class work.
Interested persons apply: The
Grand Bahama Hotel &
Country Club.
West End, Grand Bahama,
Personnel Office between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00
p.m.; Mond.,y through Friday.
Elon Martin, Jr., Personnel
Director.


I I.


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 In Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from a.m. to 5pn. Mon. to Fri -Sat. Oa n. to p.m,


j


I


I


h Wrtibmir


Momiai. Mav21. 1973.















GRAND BAHIA MA


CLASSIFIED
mmnmmi m mm-m mm" m


I LP WTEI
-7393
ADVERTISING & PUBLIC
RELATIONS GIRL: Must have
extensive knowledge in local
WWd foreign advertising and
promotion to assist in
omoton of all Hotel
Must have excellent
typing skils.
AIR CONDITIONING MAN:
Must be completely familiar
with the repair and
maintenance of A/C units, air
handlers and all A/C
equipment. References
necessary.
ADMINISTRATION VE
BOOKKEEPER: Must have
experience in Food and
0-roage Control; must be able
to control all the books for the
Food and Beverage
Department, must be a high
school graduate; must have
Hotel experience.
FOR ALL OF THE ABOVE
PLEASE APPLY TO MISS
STAFFORD, HOLIDAY.
FREEPORT 373-1333,
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT'
C7396
Appointment vacant next
month CHIEF ACCOUNTANT
for Company in Grand
Bahama. Must be A.C.A., or
C.P.A., or equal.
Responsibilities will include
th production to management
of monthly reports and
quarterly accounts etc., the
supervision of a staff and the
day to day running of the
.accounts department. The
successful applicant will be
required to produce and
Implement ideas to increase the
efficiency of his department
and to assist and advise
management in accounting and
*allied matters.
Apply in own handwriting to
Electrical Utilities Co. Ltd., P.
0. Box F-170, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas.


To bl upset's rdief tme Wisw
' OMd Ge shown no anoer, and
m Ihw make for the surround-
g Me the t e beer asks:
" were the parrots in that
seags?" have taught them
to frso mber many master in
S wrk,-" mepMee his friend.
*" he, good memorle
ALL RfIGHTS
r i""


C7394
FR EEP SE RVICE-S require One
qualified Mechanic for Fuel
and Grom.nd Equipment. In
possesslom of his own tools and
able to nrmalntain AC and DC
aircraft generators, Alreach
and Previac starting units,
Mobile Air-condit loners,
Primemowers and Tractors, Gas
and Dles-l Fueltenders and
Tankfarns equipment. Be able
to read technical manuals and
electrical schematics.
10 years experience required of
which 5 -years with the above
eq ulpruent Salary
negotlableq. Willing to work odd
hours,
For appointment call:
352-8881 or write to: P. 0.
Box F35SD
C7397
JOB TITLE: ELECTRICIAN
MI NIML.JM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MIINIMUvMA EXPERIENCE: 5
years. DUTI ES/RESPON4SI
BI LITIES:lnspect, repair,
Install arnd wire all electrical
apparatus, devices and circuits
of any vc:ltaje In cement plant
or assigned area.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Departnsment, Bahama Cement
Comnpan, P.O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas..-
C7395
R ESI I)EN T GOLF
PROFESSIONAL: Must have
high school education, to be
Assistant to the Golf Director.
Must be able to run the Golf
Shop In the absence of the
Director. Must also be able to
give lessons on the Golf Course
and be familiar with Golf
Producer s.
Interested persons apply: The
Grand Bahama Hotel &
Country Club, West End,
Grand Bahama, Personnel
Office between the hours of
9:00 a- and 3:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Elon
Martin, J.r, Personnel Director.


and emn mtore up much of my
knowlods. Should I forget
any impnMtwt ots, I hawe
only to a~ que rione and
wiln vw me the answers '
Then, talcng up poatimon on
hg ground, Rupert and he
Vte Okld Goat begin to blow
the blrd-mong whistles,
RESERVE. ______


I I Ft**|> Sy,,d.... -H.7. m t 1973. ldW riMh ..
-"If Mr. Blane is still in your loan office trying to get a
Sl"oan, will you tell him it's too Iate?"

CROSSWORD


S27. Low bench
S1. Surmount 29. Upturned nose R
7. Expert 30. About
12. Electrify 31. Samovar
13. Kitchen gadget 32. Dr. Brown's
14. Sierra dog story
33.Leaf cutter
15. Secrets 34. Palm leaf
16. Fruit stone 35. Burdensome
18. Pigery 37, Yellow bird 50LUT101 OF YISTIIDAYSi PU
19. Imitate 39. Scottish title OM 5. 6 Concerninual
21. Cain's land 42. Aspect
22. Trmric 43. Name for a 1- Honey 7. Field
23. Compass point girl or boy 2. omahiawk Physician's
24. Ashen 44. T.bone 3. Area nickname
25. Adjudicate 45. Shooting star 4. Small 9. Obliterated
....... .. ,_.t 0


AP Nowsfeatwure


( CARROLL RIGHTER'S
loGHoRsCopE

S from the COarr e R tW Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Stick to proven
\1 methods today and tonight and avoid the
temptation to be dramatic and make sudden changes, for if
you do you low out on the first day of this new week where it
counts the most. Contact those of prominence who have had a
different background from yours and get their support for
your projects.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Contact a bigwig now and get
the data you need to further your career in a most ethical and
wise way. Your partner has rather strange ideas now that
should be discarded. Make this a fine social evening.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Use the methods that have
been found ideal in the past where your job is concerned and
do something to placate an irate fellow worker. Take the right
treatments to build up your health. Improve diet.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Handling promises to others
in a most exact fashion is wise at this time. Your inventive
Ideas are not suitable to today's needs. Await a better time to
put these in motion. Evening fine for the emotional.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) If you show you
are indeed dependable, you will get the backing you need from
a bigwig. Using good judgment is important now. Don't permit
another to take you off on a silly tangent.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Plan your time wisely if you want
to accomplish the most when you have so much to do. Don't
depend on a co-worker who is not acting just right today.
Show mate the depth of your affection tonight.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Enjoy amusements that are
inexpensive but pleasurable, and get fine results. Forget that
monetary worry for the time being. You can sleep on it
tonight and the right solution will come to you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Plan how to please those who
dwell with you more and do some entertaining of good pals
tonight, also. Get the foundation of your life on a more secure
basis. Stop being so self-centered.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Instead of wasting time
worrying about what you can do little about, get busy and
handle those matters that are vital and which you can do well.
Later, attend to investigative work. Run errands.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Study facts and
figures that will help put your practical affairs in better shape.
Do your work before you get together with bosom pals. Avoid
one who borrows too often from you.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) A fine day to further
personal goals, but make sure you do not relax and jeopardize
your reputation. Avoid that higher-up who likes to have a
whipping boy for you could become that. Think more
intelligently.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Don't run away to some
far-off place, but handle those private and personal matters
that are important. You have new ideas, but they need further
study. Put all drudgeries behind you.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You can get needed support
and information from one who is conventional and serious.
Then handle personal affairs. Study further before putting
plans to work.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those clever young people who will understand how
important it is to follow the ideas of those in high places, and
should be taught to act in a conventional way so as not to lose
the respect of such. Teach early to complete whatever has
been started. A fine practical mind here that knows how best
to function. Give the benefit of cultural training that can be
very helpful in the future. Teach to play golf, tennis, etc.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!

Bridge Chess
ft V01hu.6LO 1b LIONAND BARDSN


msae
A AJ987e
7 5
zi 10
QJ 3
ki&tthe to.
I ( Play i ^a
AM there's no
problem. Declared drthere'suno
and takesthe itclub fl
oo he rid his los.
lng heart anhpooi e top
pnto for a
slam. f the~A~he
twoloos

apes odepen
an tan exta



east now ad club or con-.
CedeaE a6nd ms Oth te



~g. teickone,,heols ar
11"t'-not havea
ers~fflerr.
womitno lnod cuo



*AS!= AS
!"*~~ nl~ o ~ ortnut
Wet t hafeTh not baveu
;pea*= KWNfettt
M red^^^0


Can you spot what a Ieading
ovet gran ster overlooked
In this position from Velinmlrovic
v. Stein, OObr W12, former
USSR c n Stein continued
I . q allowing White to
sacrifice rook for knight by 2

In the diagram. Stein could
have forced mate, ordained a
Row f
Par itsnes: 30s eoonds, end-
master: 40 seconds, chess master;
2 minutes, che expert: 4
minutes, county player; I
minutes, cdlub strength; 12
minutes, average; 30 minutes,
novice.


Chess Solution
JI .-M h: 2a x R it2


APARTMENT 3-(; By A~le x Ktgl

W- M.mNASOMl ABS ,JfU MARTHA'S GETTO H(Al TH S
Doi" #f," EAlY ME Ow THItG---
""UT 3 WOUL T LiKa- HIM 10 SH'LS UPST ASOUTSMETHING!
JON US IN A N#TfCAP!
V"si






Lo

lm ll I II limaI Il Trl 132 11


*


A-
L. Hena tr at l(Aag.) (5)
10. Venellan rules. (4)
1l Tp tee'e meeting
3.5 .
wI;-smlll 4


IL. African tate. (6)
19. Unusual nook. (8. 6)
XI. DelleaY. (3)
St. Declare. (4) 3. Oeean. (3)
S4. Weekend h ghlIght. (6)
Down
eood restaurants make
them kbrftt wlg sed linen
Isfow nd here. (S)


aI. fn le n. (4)
9. Pull u.1
13. is) o-

()
14.

T17. O I1 r lsa
(a. sMaae.


Wbi 3rUtmn


[ REX MORGAN, M.D.


7


By DAL CURTIS |


ISTEVE


ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


by saunders


& overgard !


1


I fr'tim 8 aila.















Movlv Ma 21 0


DOMINIQUE TARMEY, DEBBIE SAYERS, Greg Geilman and Brce Knowlm domuina
their divisions during the three-day Second Annual Bahamas National Swlunding Chmnpionhi
when 58 of the 60 Bahamas national records were shattered.


The successful event was
held at St. Andrew's School
pool -"d was attended by
many swim clubs, including the
Freeport Aquatics Club.
Tarmey, a member of the
Dolphins Club and known for
her performance during the
Dolphins/Jamaica Y.M.C.A.
swim meet earlier this year,
outswam the competitiveness
of Vanda Jagr and won all four
of the races in the girls under
eight division. Jagr however
tied with Tarmey in the 25
metres butterfly. Tarmey won
the freestyle, the back stroke
and the breast stroke.
Sayers, another member of
the Dolphins, collected five of
the six wins in the girls 13 and
14 division having given away
to Camille Adderley in the 50
metres butterfly. Sayers, who
also paced the Dolphins in
their meet against Jamaica,
won the freestyle, the
backstroke, the breaststroke,
the individual medley and the
200 metres freestyle.
It was not all easy going for
the Dolphins though and the
newly formed Freeport
Aquatic Club showed letter
form with the efforts of Tracy
J agr, who won four of the
events in the 11 and 12 division
She was beaten in the 100
metres by Judy GoodalL Jagr,
the second runnerup in the
Sportswoman of the Year
award won the freestyle, the
backstroke, the butterfly and
the individual medely.
ALL BOUT TWO
The only two records that
were not broken were in the
girls 15-17 division when Janle
McCorquodale and Carla
Giamfortone won the 100
metres butterfly and the 200
metres freestyle respectively.
Geiselman, althcagh he got
stiff competition ir m Ignatio
De Cardinas in the free style
and the butterfly, went on to
win the breaststroke and
backstroke easily. De Cardinas
came second in the freestyle
and butterfly.
Bruce, following in the
successful footsteps of his
brother Andy, swam ids way to
six gold medals and six new
records in the 15-17 division.
He won the freestyle, the.
backstroke, the breaststroke,
the butterfly, the individual
medley and the freestyle.
Andy Knowles found tough
competition in John Lindley in
the sprints and took four of
the seven events in the 18 and
over division. Lindley won
three sprint races.
The following is a list of the
first place results:


2nd Annual Bahamas National Swimming Chanpionships
May 18, 19, 20 1973
GIRLS


AGE STROKE
8 & under Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
9 & 10 Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
Medley
11 & 12 Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
ind. Medley
13& 14 Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
Ind. Medley
Freestyle
IS- 17 Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
Ind. Medley
Freestyle
18 & Over Freestyle

AGE STIROKE
8 & Under Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
9 & 10 Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
Ind. Medley
t &12 Freestyle
Backstroke
Breastroke
Butterfly.
Ind. Medley

AGE STROKE.
13& 14 Freestyle
Backstroke
Bremstroke
Butterfly
Ind. Medley
Freestyle
IS -17 Freetyle
Backtroke
Breastroke
Butterfly
Ind. Medley
18 & Over Freestyle
Freestyle
Freestyle
Backstroke
Breatroke
Butdefly
lad. Medley


FUTURE SWIMMING REPRESENTATIVES of the
Bahamas Debbie Sayers (left) and Dominique Tarmey
(right) smile happily after winning the 13-14 and eight and
under divisions respectively. Sayers took five of the six
events and Tarmey won all four of her events.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


GOLD MEDALISTS -Bruce Knowles (left) and Greg
Gelselman (right) congratulate each other after taking top
honours In their respective divisions. Knowles won all six of
the events In the 15-17 division and Gelselman captured all
four events In the eight and under division. Photo: Rickey
Wells.

Big Q win their nineteenth
CATCHER ED MOh"Y and four and three sessts respectively
centre fielder Eugene Higg teamed Johnson took the win end Ber
up for four rfb's & fist baseman Murray got the loss.
Roy Rodgers scored two runs Paul Johnson' two rbi triple w
during his three times at bat as Big complemented with there constste
kete secued their itching of Barry Carroll e
teant win in 22 played Be Wasm Blenders defeated thi
following their 6-2 victory over pie Jet Set 6-2 in the second
Scheltz beernSaturday.eRodgersalso S au .
collected two hits. During the me in which t]
Dit Q took the lead 2-0 from the. lender led a! the way, Cor
bottom of the second and scored struckout nine of the 26 batters]
one more in the top of the fourth faced, walked two ndgaveupfl
when Schlitz replied for their two. hits. Catcher Pansy Johne
The Marketeers went on to score collected te ut outs and Willis
two more in the fifth on Moxey's Thompson had six.
homer and one in the sixth. Helping the Blenders to their w
First baseman Lorenzo Lckhart wasthird-baseman John Rolls wh
was the only spark for Schlitz. He scored two runs and collected o
collected one hit during his three hit during his three times at bi
times at bat and scored one run. Also batting three times, short sto
Lockhart had a total of 13 put Ronald Smith and Carroll e*
outs. Both third baseman Godfrey collected two hits and scored o
Eneas and second baseman Gary run. Smith had an rbl.
Johnson bad four mists each. Losing a pitcher David Johnso
Defensimdvely for the Marketeers, struck out six of his 25 opponer
Roy Rodgers at first got seven put walked one and gave up six hits.
outs. Moxey had six and HIggs Jet Set took their revenge
three. Short stop Randy Rodgera Heastle Lumber yesterday a
and third baseman Ben Rolle had came up with 14 runs in the fli


METRES NAME
50 D. Tarmey
50 D. Tarmey
50 D. Tarmey
25 D. Tarmey
V. Jagr
SO T. Cole
SO T. Cole
50 R. Adderley
50 V. Ansell
100 T. Cole
100 T. Jagr
100 T. Jagr
100 J. Goodall
SO T. Jagr
200 T.Jagr
100 D. Sayers
100 D. Sayers
100 D. Sayers
SO C. Addedey
200 Sayers
200 B. Sayers
100 J. McCorquodalie
100 J. McCorquodale
100 C. Glamfortone
100 J. McCorquodele
200 C. Glamfortune
200 J. McCorquodule
100 V. Hardy


BOYS


METRES NAME
50 G. (ileselman
SO G. Gelselman
SO G. (iselman
25 G. Gleselman
SO B Woemer
50 D. Beatty
50 &, McCatney
SO B. Woemer
100 C. Thompson
100 H. Rltot
100 M. Davies
100 H. Ribot
SO0 H. Rlbot
200 H. Ribot
BOYS ,"
METRES NAME
100 R. Butler
M. Carey
100 It. Butler
100 M. Caey
so M. Caey
200 M. Casey
200 R. Butler
100 B. Knowles
100 Knowmes
100 I. Knowles
100 B. Knowles
200 B Knowles
200 L. Knowles
1500 A. Knowles
200 A. Knowles
100 J.Llndisy
100 J.Unwley
100 'A, Knowea
100 J. Undtey
200 A.Knaowles


TIME
44.1"
S2.2*
53.0*
23.7*
23.7*
35.5*
44.3
46.8*
42.1*
1:31.2*
l:16.9*
1:29.S*
1:35.80
39.8*
3:16.4*
1:15.S
1:25.70
1:31.7*
35.1*
3:1t.l*
2:4.8J*
It 12.6*
1:24.3*
1:34.50
1:33.8
3:09.7
2,42,4*
1:37.6*


NEW RECORD
TIME
36.0*
43.3*
49.7*
18.$*
3,.O*
43.4*
49.3.
40.4*
1:34.S*
I:11.8*
1:25.0*
1:31.S*
35.8*
3:01.3*
NEW RECORD
TIME
1:03.6*
1:03.6*
1:16.4*
1:ZL4*
34.4*
2:11063
2:24.*
1:02.8*
1:ISA*
1t21.3*
2:46.*
2322.0*
18:42.3*
2:05.5*
S7.30
l:09.7*
1:17.1*
1:03.2 *
2:26.8*


ed
ps


Baby Boy giv i draw with Miamiai, has




fans mad


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
BAHAMAS LIGHTHEAVYWEIGHT
CHAMP Baby Boy Rellb was to cattle any
doubts against Miami stylist Bobby Lloyd on
Saturday in their 10-round return bout. But the
outcome a controversial draw settled
nothing, and did much to tarnush the name of
boxing in the Bahamas and the reputation of
Baby Boy.
*e, Fans booed hysterically following the
announcement of the decision. And, no wonder,
because not only was Lloyd in a fairly commanding
position throughout most of the bout but the total
amount of rounds given to him exceeded Rolle's by
five. Referee George Wilmore gave It 4-3-3 for Rolle,
i judge Lea Davis scored 3-3-4 even and Judge Wilfred
Coakley saw It 7-1-2 for Lloyd This final decision
I was favouribly accepted by the spectators.
m "I had him winning easyy" commented Pat Currey,
Lloyd's manager/trainer who also gave Lloyd seven
rounds. "He (Lloyd) was never in trouble at any time
and in the fifth, sixth and seventh, he was just
coasting. We wanted to finish strong which we did.
"I can't understand it," continued Currey. "Ive seen
bad decisions before but this one is the worst. If I was
Baby Boy Rolle's manager, I would keep away from
Lloyd."
Fans who voiced their sentiments
agreed with one accord that Lloyd
"gave him a complete lesson In the sixth, a rig
boxing. Lloyd's head
Showers of praise and Uoyd's head
sentimental consolation covered Lloyd's counter
Lloyd's section of the dressing jabs failed to ft
room while bleak would describe in his agressive
Baby's. "I think it was a tough fight uppercut.
and I don't think Baby gave it his Many times I
real boxing form," commented but found Lloyd
Rolle's manager -Marty Goldstein. way. Many cif
"He couldn't get started in order to Wilmore busy ai
generate the speed to use against Baby threw Lio
Bobby." Following an
NO COMMENT to the head a
Although he had no present Lloyd wasd
comment on the decision, "it seems powerful right
like another controversial who saw the fi
decision," said Goldstein. "I think about convince
every fighter runs into a spoiler good for only
sometimes who puts some blemish But how they nm
on his record," said Goldstein. Lloyd came o
However, this does not hinder a new surge
Rolle's climb towards World evidently spelled
championship, he maintained, champ. Calling
"I'm very surprised at the withd volley of
decision," voiced Rolle finally with a volley of
pulling himself away from the not only surprise
maddening crowd. "I thought but aso stagter.
won six rounds. Rolle explained Both fighters
that the fans failed to see his the tenth but th
body-ehot technique punches which bore down on
were hardly missing. Rolle admitted Lloyd however
that Lloyd was a little different stamina and witt
from their first bout ten days ago, good right to
I but he was aware that Lloyd was showed form in
Just trying to set him up. Because BADLY
of the body shots, "I figured that If The Nassau Sl
It goes the distance I would displeasure am
Soutpoint him." vowed not t4
Both fighters breezed through unatisfactry
the first round as Lloyd although faRens failed to
ly. he was not as he was during ans hfa tllo
tie their tinrst bout paved the way with punch". "Roll
left Jabs. Many however fell short with an *xtrenn
as of the target and were blocked by punches," he s
nt Rolle. This continued through the aggremor through
?d second roun as Baby sought the Referee Wilnu
rd opening. punch th t e*lin
54 STEPS UP PACE first match witl
. Stepping up the pace in the third clean shot to tl
S round, Lloyd sparked things off said. WlImore sal
he with a combination to the head. he was aght a
ve Although Lloyd was more he pulled an ar
an aggressive, Baby held fast and was mentioned
an powered a right uppercut to was mentioned
Lloyd's midsection. Yet, Baby so not see any or
S far was unable to get started against fight I would I
&. _... V-.. .


ne

ne
on
its
on
nd
fth


Inning and clobbered the
Lumbermaan 19-3


Lloyd whose threatening counter
punches kept him off.
It was not until midway in the
fifth round that, Role retaliated
with a stunning one two
combination the effect of which
seemed to say somethingfor the
first time in the bout. As Lloyd
showed weakening signs Baby
began to open up.
Carrying the pressure over Ino


corner for *
recover," said W
Wilmore said
he knew that ti
was when he a
media.
***e
Former Iig
Freddie Major in
streak to three
when he unani
Otis Clay in a si


BAHAMAS LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP Baby Boy Rolle
winces from a vicious straight left from Floridian Bobby Lloyd. Both
Rolle and Lloyd battled to a highly disputed 10-round draw following
Saturday's return bout.


hgt overarm shot to
told its tale and
r punching and left
nd the mark. Baby
ness received a right
Rolle tried to get in
l's left always in the
nches kept referee
nd a now aggressive
*yd on the coverup.
exchange of rights
nd more clinches,
staggered with a
to the head. Fans
rat bout were Just
d that Lloyd was
a half of the bout.
Isjudged.
ut in the ninth with
of energy that
d trouble for the
the fight to him,
the ninth exploded
lefts and rights that
ed the local champ
dhim.
went for the kill in
e test of the battle
the competitors.
had the edge on
h the exception of a
his midsection
keeping off Rolle.
RECEIVED
tedium roared with
id many fans
o return should
decisions continue.
more claimed that
see Rolle's body
9 was continuous
a amount of body
aid. "He was the
hout the fight."
are said he saw the
inated Lloyd in his
h Rolled. "It was a
the aidsection," he
d he asked Lloyd If
ad Lloyd said that
um. "No low blow 1
and if a low blow
- although I did
n the night of the
have sent him to his
Eight minutes to
rlmore.
that the only time
oer was a low blow
aw it in the news

htweight champ
creased his winning
in a row Saturday
mously decisioned
x round event. Clay


PHOTO: Rickey Wells
in a six round semi final. Williams
had good a Jab but many times
faied to follow through.


Eastern's



Bahama Express.



15 flights daily to Florida.

We have 9 flights a day to Miami from Nassau (4 more than any other
airline). 9:30 and 10:30 am; every hour on the half-hour from 12:30 to 5:30 pm;
and an extra flight at 8:00 pm.
Plus one flight to Ft Lauderdale at 6:30 pm.
And five flights daily to Miami from Freeport.
For information and reservations call your travel agent or Eastern
at 2-1461 in Nassau, or 2-2311 in Freeport.
Or stop by one of our ticket offices at the Sheraton British
Colonial in Nassau, or the International
Shopping Bazaar in Freeport.














SEAST=IARN TheWingsof Man.
"The Wis ot Mda" sb a malmid snrwe msrti of asterm Air Limes Inc.


Records topple as Bahamas


swimmers set 58 new marks


h


1
I

i
i


*


W" r me


Monday. May 21. 197