<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03349
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 17, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03349

Full Text








WREY'S
YA U#T.T. ROYAL AVE.

"t "a m CompatiownP
t^L,. a $ .eg
...... .... ._ m ,, m^


,ritbuur


--mitOW. Nassau and Bahamna Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No, 148


Thuradmy, May 17. 1973.


Price: IS Cetft


'Mad Mitch' may

By Ed Blanche
LONDON (AP) Lieutenant-Ceonel Colia 'Mad Mitch'
Mtchell, a daredevil British Army hero tared polittian, usad
Wednesday he may go to the Bahamas on a hush-hush mission to
sort out a 'security problem.'
And his target on the secrecy-shrouded trip may be the Mafia
a Black Power militants trying to muscle into the Caribbean
islands.
Mitchell, a 47-year-old Commando who has fought all over the
world, said he had been asked by the people of Abaco, one of the
Bahamas chain where most of the 6,500 islanders are white
settlers, to 'advise' them on security problems.
The majority of the Abaconins apparently want the island to
remain part of Britain when the Bahamas gains Independence
fran Britain July 10. Their big fear apparently was that Mafia
mobsters or Black Power extremists will try to take over control
of the idsle's sun-and-sand paradise.


visit Bahamas on 'ush-hush

Two months ago they were reported to have hired an Ame British government."
armas dealer to recruit mecenaries to defend them a=1i e Mitchell, 47, said darkly, appear
troublemakers. Mitchell acknowledged that his first contact to go the Abaco islanders: "Very oftel
to Abeco came from New York. But he declined to name thit people think they're going to happen
person whocalled him. He said the Abaconians were "'
S Mitchell, Consecutive party Member of Parliament for? world for people interested in se
Aberdeen West since 1970 after he quit the Army in a huff conceded included mercenaries and
because of a quarrel with his commanders over his unorthodox, He added: "I know a lot of peop
tactics, was cagey about his mission to the tiny island of Abeco. But he declined comment aboi
"Vive put to them a number of considerations," he said; "'m mercenaries or planned to do so.
now waiting for a reply. It's pomible Ill visit the island either Mitchell won fame with the Arg
before Independence' or just after. regiment. He was in action with the
"I don't want to say whether it's internal or external secity." later in Palestine, Korea, Cyprus,
However, he told The Associated Press: "I'm definitely the time battling guerrillas.
interested in this. It's a very delicate position in Abaco. He was wounded twice and beca
"It is what the position is then after July 10 that interests me. warfare.
What happens before that . wel, I don't want to embarrass the The silver-haired pint-sized office


security mission in Abaco


ently referring to the fears of
n things do happen the way
en."
probably shopping around the
curity matters" a term he
soldiers of fortune.
le in that business."
ut whether he was recruiting
yll and Sutherland Highlanders
em in Italy in World War II and
Borneo and Aden much of
ame an expert on anti-terrorist
cer became a household name


and national hero in Britain with his exploits fighting nationalist
rebels in Aden in 1967. Aden was then a British Protectorate but
later achieved Independence as the Republic of South Yemen.
LEGEND IN ARMY
Mitchell led the legendary Scottish troops under fire and his
bravery in securing and holding the crater district of Aden, a
guerrilla stronghold, without losing a man earned him the
nickname 'Mad Mitch.'
He quit the army soon after when his tactics brought him into
conflict with his superiors.
'Mad Mitch' later talked of recruiting a private army of
mercenaries to hire out to quell rebellions anywhere in the world
and said he actually put friends onto jobs as mercenaries.
He proposed the best way of settling the Northern Ireland
conflict was to round up 100 suspected Irish Republican Army
guerrillas "and start shooting". He believed that by the time ten
had been shot the guerrillas would have fled.


to rebut UK contention


Watkins lashes the 'arrogant and


stpuid attfitik*I FM Vlractors
;y -A. *-' r. 'y. '*
SU #SACO LEAE t T MA INS'tody1 lashed bas atu certal members of I
wioofE* ae Noat ao at ae ssekaing to censure him er allegedly acting i
i manner cowrx" to t Intmets et hiskaity.
S : O of the points at
eient uith forwprodncthe MahH
representative and the FN
his contention that they"
haa i. y 1vt out" to the government on
eyc lf.t question of independence.
O hba'hy p lV.a Mr. Watld. co f med
,.-' .. J ".' .. ., '. ... 0P. atpta- foria trib
Bp. BKE L iltfAJ of the PNtt execu
GOVERNMENT yesterday turned down an Opposition bid for committee, but said he
a aselet committee to investigate the operation of the Produce asked not only for
Exchange on Potter's Cay, on grounds that "no ease" had been adjournment but also a ch
made out to justify the appointment of such a committee. of locale for the hearing.
Moving for the appointment for a comtnittee. What he has Mr. Watkins wants
of the committee was Michael done is prove the ignorance of matter dealt with at Al
Lightbourn (FNM-Clarence the consumer of the existence "where my constituents ca
Town). of the Produce Exchange and my witnesses."
"In my island farmers have the ignorance of the farmers in As chairman of the Cou
actually slowed down on packaging their produce and for a Free Abaco Mr. Wat
production because they have sending it up. said he wanted to remind
to wait so long to get paid and "The Government recognizes detractors in the party tha
because they are paid so little, the potential of the Produce nine seats in the House
So they're farming only to feed Exchange and over the last Assembly were won on
their families." several months has been anti-independence platfonr
He said he knew of one molding it into the kind of NO REASON
farmer who had to wait seven organisation it should be to "There is no re;
months for .payment for provide the service, therefore why they sh
produce he had sent to the WON*' LOSE have given up the fight.
Produce Exchange. "It should do more than wishes of my constituents
Mr. Lightbourn said there subsidize farmers. It is being always come before
was considerable wastage at the molded into an operation that policies of the party,"
Exchange "because produce is will not continue to lose declared.
not, in many cases, in a $125,000 a year, but will break "It is their wish that
saleable condition, when it even and maybe make a explore every avenue on
arrives at the Produce profit." question of Abaco. If the I
Exchange. He said wastage at the feel I should be victimize
"Farmers on the out islands Produce Exchange was due to ostracized, that is the pa
have been given very little help poor packaging and shipping business, but they can
and the only way they will get methods, nothing to change my court
the proper amount of money is "Last year," the Minister He was prepared to coant
that certain things must be said, "I was able to make the fight for a free Abac
done." arrangements with the hotels, whatever legal
GRADING SYSTEM the supermarkets and the constitutional means t
He said depots must be set cruise ships to use Bahamian were available he said, "b
up in the islands to receive produce. But when their we fail we fall, and we
farmers' produce, and a grading buyers went to the Produce have no choice but to sl
system has to be established. Exchange it just didn't make hands and congratulate
"Another very important sense for them to buy stuff winners.
problem," he continued, "is they would have to throw "However no one wil
getting the produce to Nassau away." able to say we haven't t
quickly and effiloilnty. Mr. Roberts 'said the and no one will be able
Transportation is essential, and Produce Exchangel's slow accuse us of being cowards
the produce must be properly payment of farmers was due to bootlickers. The wbrd at I
marketed. several factors. will respect us as fighters."
"The Government must He said the Exphange Mr. Watkins si he
find out what the farmers can formerly ophed with a tried to keep dte FN toga
produce each year, and tell $30,00 "e'ess" which was by not making any state
them we can consume so much used to pay the farmers. The which could damage the p
and if you produce more you "excess" was not kept at the at this time. "However if
do so at your own risk," he $30,000 level, but was allowed continue in this arrogant
added. to be depleted, when it would stupid attitude I will have
The motion was seconded be replenished by the Treasury, other choice but to ex
by Cyril Tynes (FNM'Crooked replenishment took "several them for what they are.
Island and Acklins). days," he said. little while," he asserted, "
Government's reply to the Another problem, he said will be in the poli
motion was made by Home was the arrival of produce with boneyard."
Affairs Minister Anthony no indication of who had sent If the Free Abaco Coi
Roberts, the former Minister of it and who was to be paid. falls in its bid to have Al
Agriculture and Fisheries, who NOT KNOWN remain a Crown colony
was acting Minister f, "At the Produce hap h OWNto .arry I to
Development and AgluttlttV,' o _.have cheuthoUl 0" 1
in the absence of Ctitot bacs far as April last year tq i support t' iar
Francis. because the Produce Exchange saeln pendent coBtry.
He declared that Mr. doesn't know who shipped ffie "We are also kin* for
Lightbourn "has made no case produce." moral support of
Finally, he said, ships' Organization of Amer
COCKTAIL captains, who normally take States (OAS) In our effo
TcOCA AIL the farners cheques back to Mr. Watkins said.
TABLES the islands with them, often 1200 Onion Bagp For I
and fal to collect the cheques. BETWEEN 1200 and I
TA I e said the Exchange has bags of Bahamian onions
Snow begun making payments ready for shipment to
-- aon Tuesdays and Thursdays United States market, It
each week, following the manunced today by he I
U-FR working out of a "better Carlton E. Francis, Mhnst
system" with the Treasury. Development.


MORE THAN HALF THE REGISTERED VOTERS
of Abaco have reportedly signed a petition to the Queen
akq that Abeo remain a British Crown colony when
the BShames becomes bIdapendent on July 10.
Marsh Harbour the combined vote of the two
Spresentative Errlngton constituencies of Marsh
" Watkins, leader of the Free Harbour and Cooper's Town
Abaco Council, said the "overwhelmingly showed that
petilion is to be presented both they were against any request
i&the Commons and in the for independence."
die ase of Lords to dispute the "The majority of the people
Sa gatilon by Lord Babmid hat of Great Abaco have never
the Abaco separatist xaNet supported the present
-wa not supported -by te government party and do not
N majority of Abaconlams. feel that they can be associated
bost Debate on the Bahismas with a government, one of
is independence Bill opened in whose chief Ministers has
sold the House of Commons publicly stated that it matters
Tuesday amid a stormy not what the United Kingdom
I ha exchange between members of writes into our new
:un the .C.on0etaaith s" meet, --4eastitution because we canm
ttve some of w tr stmaty h hdajep it imnmlitely."'J'
had sympthi with the Abaco The petitioners say they are
cause. I seeking the continued
an The petition to remain protection of the Crown and
ange British is the third In five years trust the Queen will see fit to
to be forwarded to London by exclude Great Abaco from any
the residents of Abaeco. grant of Independence "and
mhco Noting that the people of thereby provide a safe haven
n be Abaco have been ioyal Crown for ourselves and the numerous
subjects for 300 years. the other residents of the Bahama
ncil petition ails that they Islands who wish to remain
Skins continue to retain that status, loyal to the Crown."
I his even though the Bahamas has They claim they are satisfied
t its requested Independence .from that from an economic point
0 of the United Kingdom. of view Abaco will not become
an WONT ASSOCIATE a financial liability of the U.K.
"We cannot and will not "as for the past few years
associate overselves with this Great Abaco has seen increased
ason request,"says the petition, prosperity when the general
would It points out that in economy of the colony has
The September's general election declined."
will
he LiLh ses to cost $ m.

we

o a year to staff & upkeep
rtdo TE MAINTENANC AND OPERATION of the nine
rs." lighthouse to be taken over by the government on independence
inue b estimated at 00,SO000 annually, which may necessitate the
o by introduction of Ligt Dues to cover costs, Transport Minister
and Darrell Roe advised the House of Assembly yesterday.
here Mr. Rolle made the dollars per annum and
ut if announcement in a prepared therefore the government is
will Communication outlining the considering legislation
hake agreement reached with the prescribing Light Dues, which
the United Kingdom Department it is hoped will earn sufficient
of Trade and Industry for the revenue to pay for the
I be transfer of lighthouse maintenance and operation of
tried responsibility to this these lights," Mr. Rolle said.
e to government on July 10.
and The U.K, government, he Mlans eIRIs
lare said, will turn over the FlI iC 11 1
arge lighthouses at Bird Rock, Cay
had Lobos, Great Isaacse, Cay Sal,
ther two li'h ause at Inapua, and N SWer o
tets others at Abhco, Castle Island,
rty Great Stirrup Cay, Watling A FIVE-page memorandum
they Island, Little Guana Cay and embodying Chamber of
and Potters Cay, as well as the Commerce recommendations
e no Imperial Lighthouse Service following the tariff increases
pose Depot and Morro Castle has not yet been answered by
In a Westward Villas stations in Finance Minister Arthur Hanna
they Nassau free of charge, although a month has elapsed.
tical In addition the British This was among points
government will continue to raised by Chamber of
uncil pay the pensions of all Commerce president Holland
baco employees of the Bahamas G. Smith in his report
, it Lighthouse Service who retired presented at the Chamber's
Sthe before the ae dat, and anu general meeting held at
opeso would i"i te IonsIbl for 9e Sheraton British Colonial
itself any sup uaoa payment f6tel last night.
due or becoming due to an Mr. Smith said that shortly
the employee of the Service with after the new tariff increases
the regard to his employment on March 28, the Chamber
rican before the transfer date. Council held three emergency
rts." The Minister said the U.K. aessons to study the effect of
government had agreed to the Increases on the economy.
automate Great Isaac, Cay "The results of our
J.S. Lobos. Bird Rock. Castle deliberations was a five-page
1500 Island and Stirrup Cay memorandum embodying a
* are lighthouses at its expense. number of specific
the "The acost of maintenance recommendations which wec
was and opeThitlon of the nine felt would relieve in some
Hon. lighthoueds .in the measure the financial problems
er of Commonwealth is estimated at the country was undergoing."
approximately half a million This memorandum, he said,


BaTelCo staff reject


wage proposals, may



. *move for strike action
"1 "By MIKE LOTHIAN
j| THE BATELCO BRANCH OF the PuMbl Services Union hope
,i to meet with management tomorrow to discuss management
Snew wa proposal rejected last night by the branch


SAM PINDER
... dies with his hat on


es
's
h


membership and management's avowed intention to cut
employees' salaries became of the two4mm-hour staff demoaotratio
on May 7.


Sam Pinder leaves The

Tribune after 36 years

SAM PINDER, 52, died early yesterday afternoon at the place
that he knew best, loved most and which he called home The


Tribune.
Sam Pinder, adopted son of
the late Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Cooper who lived next door to
The Tribune, drifted across the
street one day as a little boy
and soomad.e himself a part-
of The .Tribune plant He
officially joined the staff 36
years ago as a general
handynean and made himself so
handy that no one could think
of The Tribune without Sam.
At a party given in January
last year for The Tribune staff
at the East Hill Club, Sir
Etienne Dupuch said: "Sam
has done everything that
nobody else wanted to do, and
he did it without grumbling."
On that occasion he was one of
seven senior staff members
who was presented with a
cheque for his long and faithful
service.
Sam's tall, lean figure, clad
always in navy blue denim with
sandled feet, could be seen at
any hour of the day or night
around The Tribune. He
opened the doors in the
morning and he closed them at
night.
Sam's peaked navy blue cap
became to Sam -what
Churchill's cigar became to
Churchill. Sam lived in that hat
and yesterday he died with it
fixed securely on his head.
Sam spent so much time at
The Tribune, even after the
doors had closed, that a small
apartment was eventually
provided for him in the
building. Except for short
walks around the block to chat
with neighbours and friends,
Sam never left The Tribune for
any length of time, even on


ter still has to

proposals
was forwarded to Finance
Minister Hanna on April 12.
"Appended was a request for
an early audience for frank
discussion on the subject." Mr.
Smith said.
To date, he added, "we have
not ha.d a formal
acknowledgement of the
memorandum. Nor have we
been able to get an
appointment with the Minister
to discuss it."
The Chamber president mid
it would be improper for hint
to give members the details of
the recommendations to the
Minister prior to talking with
him. but the position would be
made clear "in due course."


d


ka







at

ba
IQ


t
I





tr
I

ti


tl
V
I


tl

le


pi
t



it
Q





)r
u

I
s


Sunday.
In December Sam lost his
voice. Everyone thought it a
common cold and as usual he
refused to see a doctor. When
Stconditi,/did not improve
he was taken against his will to
a private doctor, who sent him
to a Princess Margaret Hospital
specialist. His case was
diagnosed as cancer of the
throat and he was hospitallsed.
He was then sent to Miami
for cobalt treatment. He was
not happy in Miami -
"although everyone is so good
to me" all he wanted was to
get back to The Tribune. The
Miami specialist sent him home
with the verdict: "He might
live six months, or he might
make two years."
NEVER COMPLAINED
Sam never complained of
any pain. A few hours before
his death he declared: "Every
day I am getting stronger."
He became a familiar sight
during his illness, sitting in his
rocking chair at the back of
The Tribune building, with his
little transistor radio at his side
and sipping his mid-morning
drink of milk.
After lunch he would go for
a short walk around the block
and then return to his rocking
chair at The Tribune.
About the same time
yesterday he went for his usual
walk. But he did not make it
back. Neighbours saw him fall
just outside The Tribune's
Deveaux Street parking lot.
They carried him back home to
the rocking chair. An
ambulance came immediately,
but it was too late. Sam was
already dead.
Funeral services, conducted
by Canon Addington Johnson,
will be held at 5 p.m. on
Saturday at St. Matthew's
Church. Interment will be in
Old Trail cemetery.

HISE AIJ1tSNS
HOUSE members face a
heavy agenda when they next
meet on May 23, with four
bills scheduled for second
reading, committal, third
reading and passing.
Amendments were read for
the first time in the Housc
yesterday to the Public Service
Act, the Road Traffic Act and
the Derelict Motor Vehicles
Disposal Act.
In addition, the House will
deal with a bill "to provide for
the taking a censuses and the
collection, compilation,
analysis and publication of
statistical information."


Branch chairman Mrs.
Willimse Bridgewater told The
Tribune this morning there will
be no "immediate" de-
monstrations or strikes as a
result of the rejected pay
proposal or the wage cuts, but
"it may become necessary" to
register a dispute with the
Ministry of Labour.
Registration of an industrial
dispute is the first step In the
legal progress towards strike
action by workers.
Mrs. Bridgewater uid ;f
management's proposal for a
new, two-year contraetJo
replace one which e
the end of June last ,'-
received by thiaeci M war oe0'
Wednesday afte**ke Minorca in
Officers had v i n ent es .
study it before i John Georsaee '
the Taxico U n
Wulff Road last night
originally in connection -
the pay cuts.
However, the members -
rejected the proposal when -i
was read to them without
officers' comment.
NOMINAL INCREA
It is understood the proper i
called for only a nomin-al ..
salary increase effective '
October 1, with a large
increase a year later.
Mrs. Bridgewater said no -
action would be taken on the
pay cut, scheduled to come ,.
May 31, until branch offlomrs
have discussed the matter with -
management in the light of
management's earlier promise "
there would be no
"intimidation or victimisation"
as a result of the May 1
demonstration.
He said the union would
study the pay proposal today
and try to arrange a meeting
with management for
tomorrow.
On May 7 about 350
BaTelCo employees staged a
demonstration outside the
administrative offices a&
Thompson Boulevard ia
support of union demands for
wage negotiations.
The workers charged
management had reftsed
to negotiate claiming "their
hands were tied."
The demonstration ended
after two hours wjen
management requested an
immediate meeting wit.
workers' representatives.
Mrs. Bridgewater told 11 I
Tribune the first thing the
union negotiators asked for
and obtained was "
management's psae t
there would be no
the demonstration. -
management sent a am
all staff giving notice e
May 31 all known
in the demonastratio
cut two hours pay.


EXAMS NOTE
THE MINISTRY of
Education and Culture
announced today that all
examinations will be held
during the month of June as
scheduled, regardless of public
holidays.


New Abaco petition to


seeks


$3.5m TREASURY BILLS
The S3.5 million Treasury
Bill tender held at the
Monetary Authority May 15
was oversubscribed.
The average rate at which
successful tenders obtained
Bills was approximately 98.42
per cent


r
|


!


I











. .w -. w. &. .


WATRGATE PROBE OPENS TODAY TO PUBUC
WASHINGTON (AP)- The Senate Watergate investigating committee
opens jreb to the public today with millions of Americans expected to
wak 1weleavalon coverage or the i:st season. The first phase of the
bear Will be limited to the Watergate bugging Itself, but developing
.fatllibsy may take the four Democratic and three Republican Senators
o.oAdissamian of. political sabotage and Illegal campaign contributions.
(MB STORY THIS PAGE)
Athe public aasslons were about to begin, the "Washington Post"
reported tn today edition that the Watergate Incident was only one In a
ams of Whi Howe undercover operation involved stl-unreported cases
of burglary, wiretapping, spying and sabotage.
In mother Watergate development, the "New York Times" reports that
preadential adviser Henry Kissinger has been described by Justice
Department sources as personally in the wiretapping of his aides in 1969.
The Times quotes the sources as saying Kissinger gave the F.B.I. names of
the aides he wanted tapped after President Nixon authorized him to do so.
NIXON PERSONALLY APPROVED WIRETAPPING
WASHINGTON (AP)- The White House acknowledged Wednesday that
President Nixon personally approved wiretapping of more than a dozen
National Security Council and Pentagon aide starting in 1969.
"It was a national security matter," a spokesman said. "The procedure
was approved by the President and authorized In individual cases by the
Attorney General In coordination with the Director of the Federal Bureau
of investigation."
The spokesman did not identify those whose phones were tapped.
Earlier, the New York Times said they included three former aides of
Presidential Adviser Henry A. Kissinger Daniel I. Davidson, Anthony
Lakaand Winston Lord.
DEAN RESPONSIBLE FOR POST-WATERGATE PROBE
WASHINGTON (AP)- The White House today placed the responsibility
for a post-Watergate investigation on former counsel John Dean. News
Secretary Donald Ziegler said Dean was in charge of an inquiry ordered by
President Nixon, and, he said, all subsequent statements by Nixon and
others that so one In the White House was involved in the affair came
directly from Dean's work.
Ziegler said Nixon did not receive a personal report from Dean on his
findings, nor did he personally instruct Dean to make the investigation.
Ziegler contends that all directives and information were conveyed orally
by former presidential aide John Ehrlichman and other unnamed members
of the senior White House staff.
CHAIRMAN COOK OF S.E.C. RESIGNS
WASHINGTON (AP)- The chairman of Securities and Exchange
Commission, Bradford Cook, resigned Wednesday a move he says was
necessitated by recent disclosures. Cook has been criticized for his handling
of a report of a cash contribution to the Nixon 1972 campaign by Robert
Vesco, who has been under investigation by the S.E.C.
Cook's resignation is certain to affect Wall Street as he has been at the
forefront of movements to reform the country's securities markets and
create a single central market system. A federal grand jury in New York has
alleged that Cook yielded to pressure from the Nixon campaign fund
raiser, Maurice Stans, by deleting mention of the 200-thousand dollar
contribution from Vesco from an S.E.C. suit.
VOTING ON MILITARY FUNDING DELAYED
PARIS (AP)- Top U.S. and North Vietnamese negotiators meet In Paris
today for the first time in three months In efforts to plug the holes in the
Vietnam cease-fire agreement. Presidential Adviser Henry Kissinger and
Hanoi's Le Due Tho are expected to continue their latest round of talks for
three or four days.
Some observers believe Hanoi may feel its position has been
strengthened by the Watergate scandal and by Congressional moves to
block spending for U.S. action in Indochina, and for the first time in four
years-of talks with Kissinger. Tho threatened on Monday to walk out on
his American counterpart if alleged U.S. cease-ire violations continue.
In a related development. Senate Democratic leaders have given up hope
for an eary vate to cut off funds for continued bombing in Cambodia.
Senate Republican Leader Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania said yesterday the
Paris talks should be allowed to continue without such an action by the
Senate. And as a result, voting on the military funding is likely to be
delayed until the lawmaker return May 29 from the Memorial Day recess.
'DAYS OF U.S. PATERNALISM TOWARD LA. GONE'
LIMA (AP) -- U.S. Secretary of State William P. Rogers conferred
Wednesday with leaders of Peru's Leftist military government and
American businessmen whose property may face the threat of
S natlonsalzation.
SIn We fourth stop on an elght-nation tour. Rogers continued to reiterate
that thOw days of American poternallsm toward Latin America are
Your nationalism, we respect your. sovereignty and
"he aid is a statement on arrival Tueadav.
with Latin American leaden, Rogers is taking the position
is consistent with international law, but that proper
Must be paid.


MBY RAFT RUNNING INTO TROUBLE
,CANARY ISLANDS (AP) The raft Aealth, which is
i p anti n an experiment to test human behaviour under

a sasaid the steel able on the raft's rudder snapped Tuesday
S l s l I being steered temporarily with a rope line. Its
end mqmu.ps to 1.5 knots.
T astb ad h mleao-month voyage to Mexico was organited by Mexican
satHnia Dr. Santiago Genoves. The six women aboard do the
TfMam s of inb Mhe navigating while the five men do the cooking and
a i Prtt Ies add amateur radio operator Manuel Cabrera Rivero of Las
Palm'spelMa with Genoeves by radio Wednesday. Geoobves msaid the
* eapoeted wmld t continue, the newspaper smid.
Th wrl's location, according to the radio report at 1200GMT
S Wednay, wAm at .2 J North and 17.10 degrees Weat. or about 90 miles
S uth of da Canary l41anda. Earlier reports had placed It 250 miles south.
Gemqvr sid b radio the newspaper mid, that a Braidlan ship passed
ar ae raft bht would not be contacted in time to give aid.
KENYA ORDuMS KIBEDI OUT OF COUNTRY
KAMPALA. UGANDA (AP) The Kenya government ho ordered
former Uamigi FForeign Minister Joshua Wanuma Kibedi to leave Kenya
S Mndlaaely, Upindan radio reported Wednesday.
It quead ovemea t source as saying Kenya would not allow itself to
be dua l plsform for propaganda against Uganda.
inawho arrived in Nairobi, from Tasia'ia .fi"&-;' ;"hi
wa to Adis Ababa, the radio laid. ow oIs
Klbpl qeit as Foreign Minister a few weeks ap c tn poor health,
thought eel asvon was suspected to be dlee ntk with President

WGYPt SATISFIED WITH FRENCH TALKS
PARIS (AP) Egyptian Deputy Premier Hafes Ismal conferred for one
bow s Wedma gy with Preldeant Georges Poarntdoe and later paid warm
tONN to hPlanose's "very ibm position" in the Middle e.
A As e targhed from the meeting ia the psmaldetal Elysee Palace, Ismal
a d 11o a-sen Pompidou n f the forthlMonag Egyptian moves in the
U-nUla NatinU Selurity Council. smaUl hiond tt 1Ponmpldou gave him an
-uMpa Frlunh msppart in the Saeusit Ceouncil debate.
S" isped to ae French support for these mova, and IIt seems that
m noda 4eub that I wi be forthcoming," he told newsmen
Acempaoneld by Egyptian Ambassador U Bries Abdahah, Ismall
aded Pbomplou a pe aal manage fom PriddemAnwar Sadet. The
a. aeae of i magsge wa not disclosed.
. sioal he was "wmry mledled" with his talk with Pomlpidou.
S & OD ARTICLES ON JAPANM TRAINS
S TOKYO. MAY 1? (A") Amunt-mlnded Japanese left a record 1,300
.o-M yeV (4* miller dollar) in ao aboard tsi sad at railway
S-ash a contry leat yeer, tw stateownmed Japan National
itwa(JR oou uee jrd Thunday.
IN I wm "o pair i aiiet lost end found Ia IsYZ7 JNR said he sum
S m e dienAm datW ldb 1971 fimre. It ad tcat about O00 million
lno (M OM *lba m wew redreled.




Klima,




or


~betissgt ohm Nag, tasit.,
f^^^Q'Sf^ete * tia
aPon, eatm
^**E~i-B AA-a- -HI -| am>e*s.w 1


Igsas' a I'fs if,
-&swu"
^^|f,~~ canfM asft. mana-r.


Nixon while still AG

ty Lawrence L. Knutson
WASHINGTON (AP) The leadoff witness in Senate
Watergate hearings aid Thursday that Attorney General John N.
Mitchell was making major decisions about the Nixon election
campaign for up to 10 months before he resigned as head of the
Justice Department.


Robert C. Odle, former
director of administration for
the Committee for the
Re-election of the President,
also said there was no doubt
that ultimate political
authority for the campaign
rested in the White House.
Odle was questioned at
length by the tribunal of seven
Senators as it opened historic
hearings into the wiretapping
scandal.
Senator Joseph Montoya,
Democrat of New Mexico,
inquired about "decision
memoranda" that Odle said
were sent regularly to Mitthell
in the Justice Department.
Q. Well, how far back was
the committee or its
administrator sending
memoranda to Mr. Mitchell at
the Department of Justice?
A. I would say, after it was
there and had been staffed up
for a while, May of 1971.
MADE DECISIONS
Q. And you still presume
that he was making some major
decisions in the Department of
Justice prior to the time he
resigned as Attorney General.
A. Of course, Yes.
Mitchell resigned as
Attorney General in March
1972, took a lengthy vacation
and began functioning as
campaign director in April,
Odle testified.
Odle said he would
routinely get Mitchell's
approval, while he was at the
Justice Department, for such
matters as renting more office
space or leasing cars. He said he
didn't know what other
decisions Mitchell approved by


ELLSBERG


ON EFFECTS


OF SECRECY
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Daniel Eltsberg told a Senate
hearing headed by Sen.
Edmund S. Muskie, (D-Maine)
Wednesday that he believes the
Nixon administration hoped to
use the Pentagon Papers case to
tarnish Muskie's presidential
candidacy.
Ellsberg said the charges
brought against him in June
1971, soon after he leaked
portions of the massive
Vietnam War study to the
press, were "part of a scheme
to re-elect the President."
Noting that at the time
Muskie was leading President
Nixon in some opinion polls,
Ellsberg said the administration
hoped "to establish a link
between me .and the
Democratic candidates,
specifically you, Mr. Muskie."
He said the role of E.
Howard Hunt Jr., later
convicted in the Watergate
case, was to determine "could I
be made into a mud ball that
would stick to a presidential
candidate."
With Muskie leaning forward
in his chair, listening intently,
Ellsberg noted that several
individuals who worked on the
Pentagon Papers study had
worked as advisers, on foreign
and defense policy, to the
Muskie campaign.
Ellsbetr said he had never
met Muskie and didn't work
for any candidate.
Government charges against
Ellsberg ranging from
espionage to misuse of
government property were
dismissed last Friday in Los
Angeles after a series of
disclosures of government
conduct U.S. district court
Judge Matt Byrne called
offensive to a sense of justice.
One of the most sensational
of the disclosures was that
Hunt, while a member of the
White House. staff, had
engineered the burglary Of the
Beverly Hills office of
Ellberg's psychiatrist In
September 1971.
Muskle was chairing an


examination by three
subcommittees of the
g ov oeranu t security
classification system.
Bilaberg described the
system as far vaster than most
people, including members of
Congress realize.
He described secret rooms in
the Pentagon to which access is
limited to people with special
super-secret clearances, the
nam es of which are classified.


other campaign staffers.
Odle said he had not known
of political sabotage or spying
by the campaign committee.
Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr.,
democratt of North Carolina,
opened the hearings, nd said
his panel "must probe into
assertions that the very system
itself has been subverted and
its foundations shaken."
Ervin said Watergate
disclosures have "cast a black
cloud of district over our
entire society. Our citizens do
not know whom to believe ..."
To dispel that, he said, the
Senate committee must find
the truth.
HISTORY WATCHING
"The nation and history
itself are watching us," he said.
"We cannot fail our mission."
Then, in turn, other
committee members promised
thorough, impartial
investigation.
Odle testified that former
presidential staff chief H. R.
Haldeman played a key role,
along with former Atty. Gen.
Mitchell, in selecting staff
members for the Nixon
campaign committee.


He said seven White House
staff members formed the
nucleus of the Nixon campaign
organization in May 1971, and
that by July of the next year
another seven from the White
House occupied high positions
in the campaign.
In response to questioning
by the committee's chief
counsel, Sam Dash, Odle said
the campaign finance
chairman, Maurice Stans, had
ultimate authority for all
campaign spending, that Stans
participated actively in
campaign budgeting and
approved all major
expethditures.
FINANCED BUGGING
The Watergate bugging, and
reportedly other more
widespread espionage activities,
were financed from Nixon
campaign funds.
Odle said Ni.%on's personal
lawyer, Herbert W. Kalmbach,
once was "associate chairman"
of the campaign finance
committee. It is known that
Kalmbach was the chief
fund-raiser for the campaign
before Stans took over the job.
Newspaper reports say
Kalmbach controlled a
500,000-dollar bank account in
California, from which
payments for political sabotage
were made.
The hearings began II
months to the day after five
men were arrested inside
Democratic headquarters on a
wiretapping mission.
In his opening statement
Ervin recited the record of
Watergate, and the published
charges of broader political
surveillance and sabotage.
CLOUD OF MISTRUST
He said the scandal has "cast
a black cloud of mistrust" over
American government, and
promised candid and intensive
investigation to uncover all the
facts.
Ervin said the committee
inquiry was born of crisis, the.
crisis of a mounting loss of
confidence in politics and
government.
Even as the long-awaited
Senate investigation took
centre stage, Watergate
inquiries proceeded on other
fronts.
Gen. Robert E. Cushman
said Watergate conspirator E.
Howard Hunt Jr. lied to him
about why Hunt wanted help
from the Central Intelligence
Agency two years ago.
Cushman, then CIA Deputy
Director, talked to newsmen
before entering a closed
hearing of congressional
committee.
He said before Hunt
appeared, John D. Ehrlichman,
then a top Nixon aide, called
to ask Cushman to "give him
(Hunt) a hatd." But Cushman
said he does not believe
Ehrlichman lied to him.
At U.S. district court,
former FBI Acting Director L.
Patrick Gray III visited
Watergate prosecutor Earl
Silbert. Gray quit his job April
27 amidst the Watergate
scandal. The Watergate grand
jury was to hear from Roy
Shepherd, who was granted
immunity Wednesday and is
said to have removed eight
cartons of records from the
White House complex the day
after the Watergate break-in.


IESIENS


DECISION BY SATURDAY

Sun-shade may be


set up for crippled


Skylab space static

By PadRnow
CAPE KENNEDY, PLA. (AP) aEses., ill hop
Shndy pt mu-i nD deto thwe Sstyb aqPI
desl hadte d amad aM dade Wdaii w med
aSomut my hmt" to od eoff the stii labmtormy.


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Chairman G. Bradford Cook of
the Securitiet and Exchange
Commission Wednesday
announced his resignation.
In a letter to President
Nixon, Cook said: "I deeply
regret having to tender my
resignation a Chairman of the
Securities and Exchange
Commission, but in light of
unfortunate circumstances now
prevailing, I believe it is beat to
do so."
Cook, named SEC chairman
by Nixon only a few months
ago, has been criticized for his
handling of a report of a cash
contribution to the Nixon
1972 campaign by Robert L.
Vesco, who has been under
investigation by the SEC.
At a news conference later,
Cook denied any wrongdoing
in handling of the Vesco
matter.
"The web of circumstances
that I find myself confronted
with has made me feel that the
effectiveness of the agency
might be impaired."
The resignation
announcement came 15
minutes before Cook was due
to testify at a closed session of
the House commerce
committee's investigating
subcommittee amid
speculation the members
wanted to question him about
the Vesco case.
After a huddle,
subcommittee members
rescheduled the session for
next week, tentatively
Monday. Rep. Harley 0.
Staggers, (D-W.Va.) chairman
of both the full committee and
the subcommittee, had no
comment on whether Cook's;
planned appearance was tied to
the Vesco case.
YOUNGEST
Cook turned 36 last
Thursday and was one of the
youngest chairmen in history
of the SEC.
He testified earlier this week
at a closed-door hearing before
a Senate committee on the
Vesco matter. The nature of
the testimony was not
disclosed.
Cook's resignation is certain
to affect Wall Street in view of
the fact he has been at the
forefront of moves to reform
the country's security markets
to create a single central
market system.
A federal grand jury in
New York alleged that Cook
yielded to pressure from Nixon
campaign fund raiser Maurice
Stans by deleting mention of a
large cash donation from Vesco
from an SEC suit against
Vesco, a New York financier,
with Bahamas and Costa Rican
connections,
It has been alleged that a
200,000-dollar contribution
from Vesco was made in secret
to the Nixon campaign.

Canadians shot


Victoria Fals, Zambiansblamud


SALISBURY, RHODESIA
(AP) A white Rhodesan was
killed when his jeep ran over a
land mine in a iame reserve
Wednesday, a day after
gunmen with automatic rifles
fired on a party of four North
American tourists at the famed
Victoria Falls.
A Canadian gir was killed in
the Falls attack and a second,
who fell into a deep gorge, was
presumed dead. An American
identified as John W. Crothers,
33, of Troy, Ohio, was injured
in the stomach. His wife Carol,
25, escaped injury.
Officials of the .white-
minority Rhodesian regime
claimed Zambian troops from
across the troubled border
were responsible for the Palls
shooting. The government sent
a stern protest to the Zambian
foreign minister.
A government spokesman
said, "there is no question of
terrorists being involved in this
incident."
The government made no
immediate comment 'on the
death of the he White civilian at
the isna Pools game reserve
near the eastern end of
Rhodesia's border with
Zambia.
Blpok terrorists have been
operating In Northern and
Central Rhodesia in a campaign
to stir black revolt against
Prime Minister Ian Smith's
white rule. In recent months,
they have killed six white
civilians, I I soldiers and 2
policemen.
Black guerrilla infiltrations
across the Zambian border
have strained relations between
the Smith regime and
black-ruled Zambia. The
Rhodesials ocoan Zambia of
harbour and encouraging
Ola territtedts.
Smith 0d hi military


leaders met in emergency
session to discuss security
aspects of the shootings.
There was no immediate
reaction from Zambia to the
Rhodeslan protest.
The Rhodesian note to
Zambia called the Victoria
Falls shooting a "murderous
attack." It expressed "deepest
concern at this deliberate and
flagrant violation of human
rights and protests in the
strongest terms at this
indiscriminate killing and
maiming of innocent people."
"The government of
Rhodesia holds the government
of Zambia responsible for tihis
crime and calls on the
government of Zambia to take
immediate steps to bring the
perpetrators of this murderous
attack to justice."
The Canadians shot were
identified on Ottawa, Canada,
as Chklstinse Sinclair, 19,
of Guelph, Ont., and Marijan
lbuna Drober, 19, of
Rockwood, Ont.
Despite its protest, the
Rhodeslan government was
uncertain about further border
trouble. A statement xI 'the
government had asked the
Canadian ambassador( in
Lusaka, capital of Zambia, to
seek assurance from the
Zambian government that its
troops would not interfere
with rescue- parties trying to
recover the bodies of the two
girls.
The statement said the gorge
was steep and recovery would
be extremely hazardous under
any circumstances. Inter-
ference from Zambian troops
would make it impossible. r
Crothers, who was on a
world tour with his wife, was
flown to a hospital at-Wankle,
about -300 miQes wedt of
Salisbury and n-e r t ls i.


I


I{ MHEN ARE

SimI FAR

FER IAlAES


WAMSIN ON (AP)- For the
OU S-- "& a. -in fty, the rate at
S WCh .AW:. wja woman have
S i era-iidecdibnedt In 972 to a rate
..--.- -wlorThp al sleI1mrY to sustain
-, aeoS P. N*h. the Census
Bureau aepomwesnesay.
It ouhd lead eventually to a
*fr dwme as ifn country's
Si0 populmtion. However the 1972 rate
rwouid bhas to be sustained well
lo theo nasMt century before this
wOUId nerB.


Officials add tentative plans
are being studied for Skylab I
astronauts Charles Conrad Jr.,
Dr. Joseph P. Kerwin and Paul
J. Weitz to rocket up to the
space station and attach an
aluminum-treated sheet of
plastic to the side of the
laboratory facing the Sun.
A final decision on how to
salvage something from Skylab
may not come until Saturday.
Engineers believe the
shading device will provide
enough protection to allow
Skylab to cool off enough for a
28-day manned mission.
Temperatures in the cabin have
been recorded as high as 150
degrees.
Conrad, Kerwin and Weitz
are at the Johnson Space
Centre near Houston, ready to
undergo some hurry-up
training in techniques of the
space repair work.
Training for the task, which
will require a space walk by at
least one of the astronauts,
may cause the Skyalb I launch
to be delayed from Sunday
until Friday, May 25.
MUST BE FIXED
Officials said that unless
Skylab could be cooled, no
long-term mission aboard the
S294 million craft would be,
possible.
This, in effect, would mean
a total failure for the new $2.6
billion American space project.
Conrad, Kerwin and Weitz
were scheduled to spend 28
days aboard the craft and the
Skylab 2 and Skylab 3 crews
were to fly 56-day missions.
Heat began building up
inside the space station within
hours after its launch Monday
to a 271-mile orbit.
Officials said that an
aluminum sheet coated with a
thermal-protection paint was
ripped away from the side of
the craft during launch. This
disrupted the thermal control
system on Skylab and caused
the space cabin to soak up heat
from the Sun.
The ripped-away aluminum
also apparently jammed
deployment of two or six solar
power supply panels, This cut
the Skylab electrical power
supply by about half.
WHAT'S INVOLVED
Installation of the sun shade
would involve a tedious and
complex space walk using
jury-rigged equipment never
before tested in space.
The shade would consist of
two rolls of mylar coated with

& killed at


1/l I

if
(Excapt-JANTZEN SWI



On Chriatle St n
TM. 2-33


s DOWNTOWN MIAMI





Double $11
Tripe $13
M RAwn Quadruple $16


-aB
irBay


S,. .> ....-


w of the
AMERICAN.BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


uJie


.ti


ThatAJ~S 2L^


WATERGATE INQUIRY OPENS SE[,C CifF


Mitchell made top


election decisions forOVER VIS A


*amin This The es1mned se number of births
reactive aubainum. T ln 192 was thea lowest total since
mantel is a tough but flexible 14g.
plastic ued in layers qof the -i addition a. te 1972 rate of
astroauts' spacst. popuka growth droppsd to its
Other "shade tree" lowest evel in 3s years at 7.
engineering ideas were being p pe.
generated by the hour as space Thie tsigurse*a r what most
workers at Cape Kennedy, the Amftele kioeW, ihat ter are
having few r cldres.
Johnson Space Centre and the The total fertility rate-the
Marshall Space Flight Centre in number of births per 1,000 women
Alabama huddled to discuss as 1544 years during Jheir
the troubled Skylab. siffethae dropp to about 2,02s
the "fixesbled Skylab. in 1972,below the leel required for
Among the fixes the population evnt~ualy to reach
suggested was a large balloon a zero growth status if there is no
which could be inflated against muirpation.
the side of the spacecraft to The declining rate is significant
provide shade. There was al for the country because it means
abe s a te Slab 1 the population is getting older, with
talk of an abbreviated Skylab 1 lons range cosequences on such
missons consisting of a aspects of life as education, labour
fly-around of the station to force, and spending habits.
photograph problem areas and A spokesman for the Census
then a brief onboard in- Bureau aid there is no single
spection. NdAfir of tie explanation for the declining
favoe fertility rate. Among explanations
options is heavily favoured by that have been offered, she said, are
officials. economic factors, availability of
Conrad, Weltz and Kerwin abortion and contraception, the
remained in quarantine at the movement of: the population from
Johnson Space Centre. rural to urban areas and the new
Officials said they were being independence of women.
included, however, in "There is no way to simplify it;
included, however, in there is no one explanation," she
discussions about the troubled aid.
space station. The total estimated U.S.
The astronauts were at Cape population on Jan. l, 1973 was
Kennedy Monday for the 209,717,000, Including armed
Kennedy Monday forces overseas. The total
Skylab space station launch, population in the 1970 general
but returned to Houston after censuswas 204,33s,000.
their planned Tuesday launch The 1972 figures include an
was cancelled, estimated 3,256,000 births;
Evewasnf a solution to eat 1,964,000 deaths, and net civilian
Even f a solution to heat Immigration of 33,000, the lowest
buildup in Skylab is found, the dnce 1964.
astronauts' missions will not be The nation's death rate has
up to the pro-launch hopes. remained relatively constant in
The two solar panels, which aent years at about 9.4 per 1,000
population.
extend from the space station Current census bureau
like wings, are still undeployed. proleetions estimate that the
These Were to provide more median age of the American
than half of tAe lerical population will rise to 30 by 198S
than h f Oif present trends are maintained.
power required by experiments The median age is now about 28.
and equipment on the space The Census Bureau spokesman
station. od It's Po*5 that many adults
As a result, officials said postponing having children until
a late age, anod that the fertility rate
activities would, have to be could Inearo e In the future. But
severely clrtafe d during ay deaddead that other Census Bureau
long-term mim"on aboard i V n, women
skylab.aThey sid nudy of the lifetimes than their mothers had.
complex experiments aboard The average annual rate of
the craft would be able to population grmeth dropped from
gather only a part of the 1.7parcent in the 1950s to 1.26
hoped-for lta. per cent In the 1960's.
SUPER-ORGANIZATION SET UP IN ROMANIA
VIENNA (AP) Romanian President sad Communist Party chief
Nicolae Ceausescu Wednesday assumed leadership of a newly created
sauper.organisatlon controlling Romania's economic, social and cultural life.
Te Romanian New Ae.cy reprsd the costiuent meeting of the
supremee council of economic and cetal deveIopment of Romania was
held ia Bucharest, comprising ha s9 mesbs, ramging from party veterans to
ministers and experienced technocrats.
The vast setup appointed Ceauseacu as chairman, giving him ultimate
decision affecting nearly all of Romania's economic and public activities.


L-


** ,. ,*.


.&,17,1973.


e hS Wrtbala











Thursday, May 17, 1973.


(Ubr tUribunt
: NmULu A mI JUuAR VEBA MArrM
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH,PubUlsfr/Editcr 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPULH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G.. D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contribution Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PubUsher/Editor 1972.
Published Dafly Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, May 17,1973.


EDITORIAL


End of a dream?


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the second in a series of articles arising out of a
discussion at a conference held in Miami on U.S. Caribbean
relations in the changing pattern of power in this area.)
YESTERDAY I told you about a tax Bill Mr. Nixon has sent to
Congress that is designed to stop the outflow of escapist capital
and to tax money that is already out of the country.
Should this Bill pass safely through the legislative machine it
might have a crippling effect on the Bahamas economy and
especially on the wage scale in the island.
It was development of off-shore companies in the Bahamas
that started the phenomenal rise of wages in the colony by
comparison with wage scales in other islands in the West Indies.
It was this money that financed the building boom. It was
this activity that started paying competent female secretaries 50
pounds sterling ($150) a week and that made it more profitable
for the Bahamian working man to stay at home instead of going
"on the contract" to pick beans in Florida or to work in factories
in the eastern, middle western and western States.

Because the Bahamas has no natural wealth the islands have
had an up and down career ... long periods in the valley followed
by shorter periods on the mountain top.
Its present period of prosperity is one of the longest in its
phenomenal history.
It started in 1919 with the bootlegging "industry" and, except
for a comparatively short depression when bootlegging ceased on
a return to the legitimate bottle by the U.S., it has floated from
one boom period to another until today it finds itself threatened
on one side by the policies of an immature Government and on
the other side by a possible tax law that might form a destructive
pincer's movement. The term "pincer's movement" became
familiar in the language by its use in both world wars to describe
movements of armies in combination to surround and destroy an
opposing force. It is now used in application to any activity that
hems in any situation to prevent escape from its consequences.

It has been wellsaid that the further back you can look into
history, the better are you able to understand the present. This
makes it possible for you to develop a reasonably clear view of
the future.
At this time it might be interesting to cast our eyes back over
the years in an effort to understand our story.
Money was common in the Bahamas during the rip roaring
days of Blackbeard and the Pirates. England ended this period
when she sent Woodes Rogers to the colony as its first Royal
Governor. Prior to this the colony was ruled by Proprietary
Governors who were employed by landed gentry in England to
whom the islands had been ceded.

Blockade running during the American Civil War was another
period of great prosperity. During this period a fleet of fast
vessels based in Nassau and manned by adventurous crews, were
engaged in smuggling cotton the South's major crop out of
the country for transhipment to England and taking in arms and
ammunition which was needed by the South in its life-and-death
struggle with President Lincoln's northern army. This activity
ceased with the victory of the North over the South and the unity
of the States into a solid nation under a Federal government.

Still another period was "wrecking". In this activity the
captains of many ships ran their vessels on a reef in the islands on
a pre-arrangement with a professional "wrecker" in the island to
share the profits from a salvage operation.
Apart from the value of merchandise saved from a wreck, in
those days business negotiations were conducted largely with gold
coins. In some cases these vessels carried large sums of money in
gold which conveniently "disappeared" when the vessel came to
grief on the sharp edges of a bristling Bahamas reef.
This period of prosperity ended when Britain built a chain of
lighthouses along the entire length of the archipelago. These lights
removed any legitimate excuse a captain might hope to have for
losing his ship in these waters. These navigation lights provided
maximum security for vessels sailing in these waters.

And now, let us get to a period in my own memory.
At the turn of the century the total annual revenue of the
colony ranged between 75,000 and 100,000 pounds sterling. The
pound was then worth $5. Converted into dollars the colony's
revenue was $375,000 to $500,000 as compared with last year's
revenue of $104.5 million.
The Public Treasury was so lean that often it was unable to pay
its public servants. They were given IOU's which were discounted
by a few of the merchants on Bay Street who could afford to
wait for their money until some sort of windfall rescued the
Treasury from complete collapse.
SAs small as it was, the colony couldn't even afford to pay the
full salary of the Governor. England paid half of the salary of the
Governor until, blown up in importance with bootleg- prosperity,
the House of Assembly declared that it wouidd pay the full salary


because members wanted to have some say in selecting future
Governors of the colony.
They paid the full salary but they had no say in choosing men
for the office of Governor until now when the colony is on the
edge of independence and the Government wants to have its own
Bahamian Governor. Because Governors were selected by England
from the broad Colonial Service these men even though they
were not all likeable persons were men of broad experience and
brought respect and dignity to the office.
In spite of the poverty of the Treasury the people were
reasonably secure more secure in some respects than they are
today.
Pineapples were a major industry. About 130 years ago The
Illustrated London News published a picture of the first shipment
of pineapples from the Bahamas to reach the London market.
This industry was lost when Hawaii obtained pineapple "slips"
from the Bahamas and introduced them to more fertile and
rrigated land. This misfortune threw hundreds of people out of


She Griuntm


Grenadians petition UK against Independence &



closedown capital of St.George's


ST. GEORGE'S, GRENADA (AP) Most businesses remained closed and the docks were idle in Grenada Tuesday as the chamber
of commerce and two of the islands's main labour unions protested the island government's attempt to gain full Independence from


Britain at a current conference in London.
The chamber of commerce leaving
took the decision late Monday leaving
to instruct members to close them,
shop Tuesday and Wednesday. Tide,
It followed a request from the George'
commercial and industrial day,
workers union that the estimate
chamber come out against the
Premier Eric Gairy's move for croP-
Independence. Businesses in The
Grenville, the island's second powerfi
town, had already taken a workers
similar step Monday and later to
almost all commercial activity they c
in Grenada has now come to a technical
halt. union
The seamen and waterfront service
workers union also voted to c om m
add their protest to the telephone
growing movement against In an
Independence. protest,
About 300 dockers stopped comme
work Monday afternoon, sent a r

General strike hit:


two ships idle. One of
the banana boat Geest
steamed out of St.
s harbour later in the
leaving behind an
ed 280 tons of bananas
island's main export

teachers union and the
ul technical and allied
s union were to meet
decide on what action
could take since the
al and allied workers
controls the essential
es of electricity,
unications and
ne.
inouncing its decision to
, the chamber of
rce revealed that it had
memorandum earlier this


s Grenada


month to the British Foreign
and Commonwealth Office
protesting against
Independence for Grenada at
this time.
The memorandum set out
the adverse economic situation
in the island which "provided
an unfavourable background
for the attainment of full
Independence." The chamber
said it did not object to
Independence "under the right
circumstances".
The conference which
opened in London Monday
between British government
and Grenada government and
opposition officials, is a
follow-up to one held last year
at which the Independence
issue was discussed.
Premier Gairy contends that
his victory by 13 seats to two
in last February's general
elections is clear proof that
Grenadians have given him a
mandate to seek full
Independence. Opposition
leader Herbert Blaize reflects
the widespread opposite view
that Grenada is not
economically ready for it.
At present Grenada is an
Associated State of Britain,
like five other territories in the
Windward and Leeward
Islands. This means that it is
fully autonomous except in
matters of foreign affairs and
defense, which remain the
responsibility of the British
government.
The protest groups have
cabled the British government
their "complete opposition to
the Independence talks now in
progress."
Grenada, a former British
colony, has complete self-rule;
only defense and foreign affairs
are delegated to the British
government.
The streets of St. George's,
the picturesque capital city of
Grenada, are being patrolled by
armed policemen, although
there have been no reports of
disturbances. The normally
busy city is unusually quiet, as
buses, trucks and most taxis
have curtailed their operations
due to an island-wide strike by
fuel suppliers.
Opposition leader Herbert
Blaize in London said he
carried a petition signed by
19,000 of the 90.000 islanders


opposing Gairy-style
Independence.
The Prime Minister then
summoned reporters and stated
some of the names on the
petition belonged to dead men.
At the entrance to
Marlborough House one group
of people carried placards
alleging corruption in Grenada
"Similar to the Watergate
affair ' Another r
placard-waving group
demanded Independence now.
British Foreign Office
Minister of State Lord Balniel.
who opened the talks, carefully
avoided committing the
British. lie merely repeated the
London formula that Britain
does not stand in the way of
those countries which want
Independence or impose it
on those who don't.
In accordance with a Treaty
of Association concluded in
1967 between the East
Caribbean islands and Britain
any one of "The Little Six" is
free to seek Independence
whenever it wishes.
The islands are Antigua,
Grenada, Dominica, St.
Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla, St. Lucia
and St. Vincent. Grenada is the
biggest.
Talks are due to last a week.
Then Britain will assess the
situation in the light of
arguments from both the
Labour and Opposition
Popular Parties.


By The Associated Press
TODAY is Thursday, May 17th,
the 137th day of 1973. There are
228 days left in the year.
HIGHLIGHTS in history on this
date:
1972 West German Parliament
approves treaties that West
Germany has made with the Soviet
Union and Poland.
1970 Norwegian explorer Thor
lHeyerdahl sets sail from Safi,
Morocco, in Papyrus boat, the KA
II, in second attempt to prove that
Egyptians could have reached New
World about 4,000 to 5,000 years
ago.
1968 Soviet Premier Alexei
Kosygin flies to Prague,
Czechoslovakia in midst of
mounting dispute with
Czechslovakia.
1963 It is announced that U.S.
President John F. Kennedy will
have an audience with Pope John
XXIII when Kennedy visits Italy
late in June.
1962 U.S. officials say


THE FINANCIAL TIMES today commented in a leader on the
Bahamas and Grenada with the second reading of the Bahamas
Independence Bill in the Commons and the Grenada
constitutional talks taking place in London.
The paper said: "Both territories are poor and, apart from their
beaches, have none of the natural resources which give the mini
states of the gulf, for instance, wealth and viability".
It said both countries must avoid domestic pitfalls if they aie
to get their Independence peacefully and instances the opposition
in Grenada to independence and the "would-be secessionists" on
Abaco.
The paper continued: "In the light of all their problems the
two territories might, once the first flush of enthusiasm for
Independence is over, seriously consider how they could help
themselves and the rest of the Commonwealth Caribbean by
supporting the regional integration movement."
In the last few years there had been a growing realization
among the small and scattered units which once made up the
former British West Indies that their future was dim indeed if
they did not pool their meagre resources.

The hard economic facts of life had been constantly repeated
by the Commonwealth Caribbean regional secretariat in
Georgetown resulting in the "promising growth" of the Caribbean
Free Trade Association and the recent decision to set up a
Common Market.
The leader continues: "Up to now, however, the smaller
territorities of the region have been wary of committing
themselves fully to the integration process for fear that they
would become the mere economic appendages of the "big four".
If Grenada and the Bahamas, now on the threshold of
Independence, publicly recognized their need for the close
support of their neighbours and committed themselves to regional
integration this could have a persuasive effect on the rest of the
smaller units in the region.
"The need for Caribbean unity is today stronger than it ever
was. The territories must simultaneously defend their interests
vis-a-vis an enlarged European community, safeguard their sugar
interests, prevent poaching by twhse who would like to take over
their markets for bananas and citrus, make sure their voices are
heard at the forthcoming GATT multilateral trade talks, and win
their fair share of the world tourist market. No individual
Caribbean territory, independent or not, can do all this for
itself."


American troops which landed In
Thailand will play defensive role
and not invade Communist-
threatened Laos.
1961 Premier Fidel Castro of
Cuba offers to exchange prisoners
captured in the Bay of Pigs invasion
for U.S. heavy tractors.
1960 Kariba Dam in Rhodesia
is opened.
1957 Egypt bars Israeli
merchant ships from Suez Canal.
1949 Britain recognizes
Independence of Eire but reaffirms
position of Northern Ireland within
the United Kingdom.
1946 Mitri Antonescu,
wartime Premier of Romania, is
sentenced to death.
1940 Nazis occupy Brussels,
Belgium in World War Two.
1939 Sweden, Norway and
Finland reject Nazi Germany's offer
of nonagresslon pacts, but
Denmark, Estonia and Latvia
accept.
1933 National coalition wi.-;.
138 seats, opposition 12 in South


African elections; associations law
In Spain nationalizes church
property and closes church schools.
1926 Wilhelm Marx succeeds
Hans Luther as German Chancellor.
1900 British force relieves
Mafeking in South Africa.
1885 Germany annexes
northern New Guinea and the
Bismarck archipelago.
1848 Ferdinand I of Austria
flees Vienna for Innsbruck.
1809 Napoleon Bonaparte
issues Imperial decree annexing
Papal States.
1803 British Orders in Council
places first embargo on all French
and Dutch ships in British ports.
1792 New York Stock
Exchange is founded.
1782 Treaty of
war between British and
in India.
1756 Britain declares war
France; French take Minorc in
Spain.
1632 Gustavus 11 enters
Munich and Elector John George l-


economy.
Businesses, banks and
schools remained closed. The
docks were idle, so was the
airport. Essential services such
as water, electricity and
telecommunications were cut
off as thousand of workers
answered calls from a number
of major labour unions for a
general strike to demonstrate
opposition to the government's
intention to seek full
Independence for the island
and its small dependency,
Carriacou, from the British
government.
Talks on the Independence
issue opened in London
Monday between British and
Grenada government and
opposition party officials.
Premier Eric Gairy is pressing
for full autonomy for the
island government by next
year. The opposition Grenada
National Party and several
ipfluentiaj groups in Grenada
are against Independence at
this time because of the shaky
economic situation of the 133
square-mile island.
At present, Grenada like
five other territories in the
Windward and Leeward Islands
- is an Associated State with
Britain. This means that it has
full internal self-rule accept in
matters of defense an foreign
affairs which remain Britain's
responsibility.
The protest against Gairy's
claims began Monday when
businessmen is Grenville, the


island's second town, closed
their doors.
It gathered momentum
Tuesday when the Chamber of
Commerce agreed to a
suggestion from the
Commercial and Industrial
Workers Union (CIWU) that
business be closed for two days
- Tuesday and Wednesday.
NO SERVICES
The Seamen and Waterfront
Workers Union (SWWU) and
the teachers union followed
suit. The former ordered all
work on the docks to cease at
2 p.m. Monday and the
teachers at 10 of the 11 leading
high schools did not turn out
for duty either Tuesday or
Wednesday.
A total of 280 tons of
bananas scheduled to be loaded
on a boat destined for London
Monday have been left behind
as a result of the dockers
action.
The most telling decision has
been that of the technical and
allied workers union which
controls work in the essential
services. Their stoppage
became effective early
Wednesday morning cutting off
Grenada from the outside
world and halting supplies of
water and power.
It is expected that the
chamber of commerce protest
will end Wednesday and that
life will be back to normal by
Thursday. However, the
position is not entirely clear.


PREMIER GAIRY STILL HOPEFUL

FOR INDEPENDENCE NEXT YEAR


LONDON, MAY 16 (AP) -
Prime Minister Eric Gairy of
Grenada said Wednesday he
hopes his Caribbean island
state will become Independent
next year and claimed he has
great popular support for this
aim.
"I have had messages of
solidarity from many quarters
in Grenada," Gairy told the
Associated Press. He produced
a wad of cables from such
Grenadan organizations as the
Women's League, the
Importers Combine, the
Friends of Islam and the City
taxi drivers' association.
"They all wish me success in
my talks here in London,"
Gairy said. 'One cable
informs me that a solidarity
demonstration is planned for
Thursday.


Gairy scoffed at reports that
business interests in Grenada
opposing Independence had
disrupted life in the East
Caribbean island.
"My information is that
everything is normal except
that a few small shops
sympathizing with the
opposition have closed down,"
he said.
Gairy was interviewed amid
the regal splendour of
Marlborough House near
Buckingham Palace, home of
Queen Elizabeth II. The stately
mansion has been the venue for
talks between Grenadan and
British officials since Monday
on Grenada's constitutional
future.
At present Grenada is
self-governing in home affairs
Page 6, Col. 6


work and left the planters mostly at Eleuthera land poor.
Thousands of men were engaged in the sponging business.
Thousands of sloops and dinghies were used in fishing sponges in
these waters and this also gave employment to a large number of
boat builders.
There were two active shipyards on Hog Island since
renamed Paradise Island one at the site of the landing at
Paradise Beach, the other about a quarter mile west of it. There
were also shipyards in some of the Out Islands.
The entire population of Andros was engaged in sponge fishing,
while large numbers of men were drawn from Exuma, the
Crooked Island-Acklins Island group, Abaco and the Biminis
where smaller fishing grounds existed. The largest sponge area was
located on "The Mud" at Andros. This industry was killed in
1938 by a mysterious disease that came out of waters east of the
islands.
The people of Andros were then forced to turn to agricultural
activities in order to feed themselves.
By the time nature healed the wound about 30 years later
industry had produced an artificial sponge and there was little -
if any need for the natural product. Wages were also then so
high in a new form of prosperity that had overtaken the colony in
the interim that it cost too much to finance a sponging voyage.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
No great improvements in the lot of mankind are possible,
until a great change takes place in the fundamental constitution
of their modes of thought.
JOHN STUART MILL


protesting Independence

ST. GEORGE'S, GRENADA MAY 16 (AP) Almost all
commercial activity on the Windward Island of Grenada ground
to a halt Wednesday, as a massive protest against Independence
talks now in progress in London affected every sector of the


ml.'


i
^^^-^^--ff _

.,^ *l


ANEW


0 D'Al










Thurwda, May 17, 1973.


6hit rihbu


1973 Chryslers have fine engineering, style and performance


CHRYSLER CORPORATION cars fof 1973 are the finest ever produced by the
firm with regard to eninering, styling and performance. The 1973 Plymouth line,
aMvbtla through Bahamas Bus and Truck, offers the sporty Duster, Valient, Scamp,
Barrauda. Satalite, Fury and the Plymouth station wagons, each one incorporating
all the features for which Chrysler is famous.


Take the Satellite, for instance.
Chrysler's Torsion-Quiet
Ride used to be available
only on the Fury. Now it
has been installed in every
Satellite. The
sound-reducing features
make these cars the quietest
ever offered by Plymouth.
The "Ride' combines a
unique front torsion-bar
suspension with unibody
construction and sound
isolators for quiet,
. controlled driving.
For 1973. both the front
" and the rear suspensions on
all Satellites are isolated.
The front suspension, a new
design, utilizes an isolated


cross member separated
from the body by six rubber
isolators. In the front,
torsion bars twist to stoften
road shock and smooth out
bumps.
The rubber surrounding the
rear leaf spring clamps
reduce vibration, road
harshness and noise.
The Satellite Sebring-Plus has
even more sound-deadening
features, including sound
deadeners and silencers in
the floor, luggage
compartment, door trim
panels, steering column, rear
wheel housing and rear shelf
panel plus a new resonator


in the exhaust system.
QUIET CAR
These additions make this
year's Satellite Sebring-Plus
the quietest mid-size car ever
offered by Plymouth.
Unitized construction is
another important feature of
Plymouth for 1973. It is
impossible to unbolt the
product from the frame.
Plymouth's engineers felt
that the thousands of welds
make the car body tough
and strong and help
eliminate rattles.
Rust in the Bahamas is one of
the worst problems for car
owners. To help stop rust


before it starts, all Plymouth
models go through a
seven-step dip and spray
process. After that, the car is
painteJ with a new acrylic
dispersion enamel which also
helps the car to stay bright
and shiny for a much longer


time.
The new electronic ignition
system is more reliable and
consistent. There are no
points or condenser to wear
out or replace therefore
there are no periodic


Bahamas tourism being

sold to German tourists


AN In-depth promotional scheme
organized by the Ministry of
Tourism, the Bahamas Hotel
Association and Lufthanes German
Airlines started In Munich and
Hamburg, Germany yesterday.
Taking the form of a two.day
workshop, the promotion will
acquaint West German tour
operators and travel agent with the


attractions of the Bahamas as a
year-ound resort,
Designed to gve travel
oranlestions in this e a a closer
look at the profitabliUty of the
Bahamas product, the workshop li
coordinated- by Mr. E. John
Deleveaux, Assistant Director of
Tourism. The workshop will involve
about 30 hotel representatives, the
largest contingent ever to viet
Europe.
European tour operator and
agents wiU be able to meet
individually with hoteliers In a
special cubicle complete with a
picture poster and information
about the individual hotel Many
Bahamlans will be representing
their hotel on his promotion.
This orientation wil last about
four hours and was held May 16 In
Munich and May 17 in Hamburg.
The operators, aents and travel
representatives outside Munich and
Hamburg, were flown to the
workshop sites by Lufthansh.
Mr. Deleveaux will be assisted by
Mr. Robert Duffett, General Sales
Manager for. the Bahama Idsland
Tourist Offices nla London and
Europe and Mr. Walter Friedrich,
Manager of the Bahama lands
Tourist Office in Frankfurt.
At the end ofthe daily workshop
sessions, Mr. Deleveaux will give a
comprehensive talk on the
attractions of the Bahamas as a
holiday resort for Germans. Further
opportunities for discussions will
follow the cocktail hour.


iguntimo tune-upL. The
original engine t should
be good for 50,000 miles or
more. These is 35 per cent
higher voltagep to give
dependable cold starts and
starts in damp weather. This
type of ignition also helps
eliminate many of the major
causes of engine misfiring
and thereby reduces engine
emissions caused by a weak


Mini 1000 Saloon Std.
Mini 1000 Saloon Auto
Mini Clubman Saloon Std.
Mini Clubman Saloon Auto
Mini Clubman Estate Std.
Mini Clubman Estate Auto
1300 4 Dr. Saloon Std.
1300 4 Dr. Saloon Auto


spark. Excluding the routine
spark plug service, the
electronic igtion system is
virtually maintenance free.
For better starts, all the 1973
Plymouths have an electric
asst choke which helps
shorten the period of choke
operation when outside
temperatures are above 63
degrees Fahrenheit.
Although Satellite is a family
car in every respect, the
contemporary styling makes
It anything but dull. All


$2234.60
$2593.78
$2371.27
$2603.31
$2531.75
$2737.53
$2729.53
$3058.70


Satellite two-door models
have been restyled in a fresh,
tasteful look that is very
handsome when compared
to other intermediate cars.
The sedans and hardtops are
different too. These models
keep their best proportions
intact and the sedan buyer
or the hardtop buyer can
have the car which is just
right for his particular needs.
See the Satellites and the other
Plymouth models at
Bamus hie and Truck.


$2892.20
$3174.31
$3192.23
$3508.50
$2665.38


FOR A HANDSOME FAMILY CAR that Is anything but dull, see the 1973 Plymouth Satellites at Bahamas Bus and
Truck.


f9lzaau flot0or Co. etod.
QUALITY & SERVICE
TELEPHONE 2-4626/SHIRLEY STREET/
P.O. BOX N-8165


WITH THE PURCHASE OF ANY NEW CAR,


WE WILL GIVE YOU FREETHIS BEAUTIFUL


EAY TERMS AFANED YON ANY CAR!
MR 8RANT1S ARE THE BEST IN TOWN NoU9CAR8 I MONTHS OR 6,000 MILES; AMERICAN CARS -12 MONTHS OR 12,000 MILES


IM & TI
PHONE 2-.1M2-344 ( MONTROgE AVENUE) P. 0. BOX N-1662
Ageoft For MORRIS.M.Q.-WOLSELEY


lii


TISE NOW PeM


1300 Estate Std.
1300 Estate Auto
1300 G.T.
MAXI 1750 Std.
MOKE


F.


CO.
LTD.


II tll I I .. .. .. I I


I I I l l











Og'1rrw3lM S r
< -


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF
THE BAHAMA ISLANDS
Equity Side


1973
No. 12


NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1969


The Petition of Cazna Mitchell of the Settlement
of Governor's Harbour in the Island of Eleuthera in
respect of:


FIRSTLY ALL THAT parcel or tract of land
comprising One acre situate at Balara Bay
approximately One and a quarter (1%) miles
Northwestwardly of the Settlement of
Governor's Harbour in the Island of Eleuthera
one of the Bahama Islands and bounded
Northeastwardly by the Government Main Road
and running thereon One hundred and
Ninety-eight and Sixty hundredths (198.60) feet
Southeastwardly by the parcel of land
hereinafter described and running thereon Two
hundred and Eleven and Ten hundredths
(211.10) feet more or less Southwestwardly by
the Sea at High Water Mark and running thereon
One hundred and Ninety-eight and Thirty
hundredths (198.30) feet and Northwestwardly
by land said to be the property of Richard
Oakley and running thereon Two hundred and
Twenty-nine and Seventy hundredths (229.70)
feet more or less.

SECONDLY ALL THAT parcel or tract
of land comprising One and Thirteen hundredths
(1.13) acres and 'situate as aforesaid and
bounded Northeastwardly by the Government
Main R6ad and running there=i Two hundred
(200) feet Southeastwardr t rt.


Two hundred and Eighty and Forty-three
huno.edths (280.43) feet more or less
Southwestwardly by the Sea at High Water Mark
and running thereon Two hundred and Thirteen
and Thirty-three hundredths (213.33) feet and
Northwestwardly by the parcel of land
immediately hereinbefore described and running
thereon Two hundred and Eleven and Ten
hundredths (211.10) feet more or less which
said Two parcels or tracts of land have such
positions boundaries shapes marks and
dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan
filed in this matter and are delineated on those
parts which are coloured Pink of the said
diagram or plan.


Cazna Mitchell claims to be the owner of the
unincumbered fee simple estate in possession of
the said pieces parcels or tracts of land (subject as
regards the land firstly herein described to an
Agreement for Sale dated the Fifteenth day of
January, 1973 and made between the said Cazna
Mitchell of the first part and Robert Stephens of
the second part) and ha3 made application to the
Supreme Court of the Bahama Islands under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
her title to the said pieces parcels or tracts of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes 50 Shirley Street in the City of
Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioner.

(c) The ottice of the Commissioner at Governor's
Harbour in the Island of Eleuthera.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or right of dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the Twenty-econd day of June, A. D. 1973
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his
claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on
or before the Twenty-second day of June, 1973
will operate as a bar to such claim.



McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Petitioner,
50 Shirley Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.


UNDER ThE PATRONAGE OF

nnMUM Il SITIE
THE LADIES OF SHIRLEA
WILL SPONSOR A


SATURDAY, MAY 19th
From 3 p.m. until 12 midnight
.If

MONTROSE AVENUE
In Aid of The Old Folks At The Geriatrics Hospital
SUPPER $2.00 DANCE $1.00


kids light up the


grass


By Abigail Van Buren
swa a ceMssC w nO.. V. m Swe., Mes.
DEAR ABBY: How right you are! No one should
drop in on their marrft children unannounced. They
might be smoking grass there!
I learned the hard way. If someone stole my purse, I'd
report it to the police. But when I'm present when they're
smoking marijuana in their own homes, I just eep my
mouth shut, come home, and air out my clothes and hope I
never have to smell it again.
I know what I am going to put in their Chriatmas
stockings next year. A hacksaw for her, and a file for him.
I've invited my daughter, her husband, and several of
their friends over for dinner next week, and if tose kids
light up In my home I'll call the sheriff. [I wonder if I
should warn them in advance? Or do you suppose after
four years of college they are sufficiently educated to know
that one doesn't break the law in the home of a host?]
I never thought I'd send a letter I couldn't sign, but
here's one. Aren't we a bunch of lovely law abiding Chris-
tian parents? Thanks for being a good ear. I had to tell
someone or explode. FRUSTRATED MOTHER
DEAR FRUSTRATED: Why the frustration? Just tell
your kids you don't want them lighting up in your home,
and if you are present when they Ight up elsewhere, abset
yourself.

DEAR ABBY: Since you frequently give waitresses
space in your column to air their pet peeves I hope you'".
give equal time to a cui,,omer who has one:
Where do people get the nerve to go into a busy restau-
rant and READ at the table? I can understand someone
giving the newspaper a quick going over to get the neww,
but Ive seen people leisurely reading books and magazines
at the table while others are waiting to sit down and eat.
I hope you'll print this for some of those selfish people
who need to be jarred into more considerate baavior.
CHICAGOAN
DEAR CHICAGOAN: Ill prnt It. But these who b have
in the aovemeatlesed manner eed more than a "Jar."
They need an earthquake.


DEAR ABBY: My problem has no solution, unless this
is printed and the "culprit" just happens to see it and
recognize herself as the singer.
My sister, whom I love dearly, has been a widow for
several years, and since she is a very congenial person my
husband and I have invited her a lo on our motor trip
vaeatlo. We love music and our automobile is equipped
problem: My sister, who has no singing
voice at all, must accompany every song she hears. She
does this in a shrill, off-key voice, four to six beats ahead
[or behind] and sometimes she "harmonizes."
My husband and I intend to spend three months touring
Mxteo and my husband has given me an ultimatum: Tell
Sis to keep her mouth shut, or the trip is off.
Any ideas? LOVING SISTER
DEAR SISTER: Tel lis that your hMsband, the music-
lover, 1 1ek10g forward to enjoyig the muie o the trip,
and you'd appreciate her quiet cooperation.

DEAR ABBY: After 25 years of gambLng, losing a
small fIrtune, tie1 losing my wifH and family because of it,
I was ready to commit suicide. Then I Joined GAMBLERS
ANONYMOUS. It gave me a new lease en IMe.
My wife gav a another chance and I am happy to
say that I wil never bet another dollar on anything as long
as I live. That's a big statement for a man to make who
has bet horses, dogs, dice, cards, sports you nnae it, I
had money on it Ive begged, borrowed and mortgaged my
soul to get money to gamble with. I've known people who
have forged checks and embezzled hundreds of thousands
of dollars to pay their los and when thU re even, they
I wish every compulsivegambler in the world would
attend Jut one GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meeting. It
could save s Usife. It saved mine.
POURED IN SAN FRANfCIO0
DEAR CURED: I heard aboet GAMBLERS ANONY-
MOUS 10 years ag, ad althe I'm nm gambler. I took a
shmese end ataded saaoe meootgs assymely in New
Yrk and Loe Aageles tocbeek them out. Iwaa sn tspire-
otie to see eab drivers, stoek brokers, hool teachers,
amerlaners. b, sassme. maslelaus, bartendr aM sd o-
elates a Jenld together to overcome a smama enemy
the arge p gamble.. For l ormaea aboet te G. A.
meings nearet yes, write to P. O. Box 71s, IAs A1eles,
Calfoeria n~. Y ea't lose. It's free.

CONFIDENTIAL TO "IN THE STOCK MARKET IN
ALBANY": It' not the bills and ta bear you have to
watch out far. It's the bum steers. Be ure you're getting
yeaw tipfrom aa expert.

Praolea? TeYIW fee better If yea gNt oaff year eet.
fW a perimal reply, writs o ANDY: Ran 0M., L. A..
Cagr. UO. Uaelsse stamped mifsiasIed xee aleope,

For Abby's new booklt, "What TfeAges s waet to
Koew." send MsI n Abby. Oens im Le AAngels. CaL. sn.


"Just when the public was beginning to forget, the
government issued a SECOND recall on our product."
0


Mother smokes when


q



,t
'*
,q


>






<







*t


lfthly, May I17, t1973.


I -- 'E;' In -7-9- Cr, "*:, 7' -"' 7X-M 2


-411


im


Is


Lmla Hmiij












l la 47


A hard-working farmer


who gets pleasure-and



profit--out of the land
Mr. Palestine Michael is a businessman. A successful 44\
businesnan and a farmer. ,


It's really not that simple.
There's much more behind
becoming a successful farmer
than just the sun, soil and
water.
And strolling through one of
Mr. Michael's farms along
Carmichael Road, it's evident
that his type of farming is
conducted on a business-like
basis. He presently has 22 adrcs
under cultivation.
"I count my seed and crops
as an accountant would count
his figures," quips the slight
and wiry Mr. Michael. He has a
parable for every situation.
He was asked: "How often
do you plant?" iHe answers
sharply: "I eat every day I-
plant every day."
It's not because of luck that
Mr. Michael is a successful
farming businessman. lie
knows what to do and he is
doing it. His explanation is
"working and knowing or
working and not knowing."
GREEN FII-LI)S
So there is a reason why his
fields are always green And
why his neat rows of cabbage
are large and healthy and
tomato plants laden with rosy
solid fruit.
It all started out in 1937
when he started work as an
apprentice with the
Department of Agriculture. He
served at Andros, Long Island,
Exuma and many of the other
Family Islands.
Mr. Michael was finally
promoted to agriculture
superintendent in charge of the
old experimental station at
Chippingham where he started
with a 12-acre holding and
developed it into a 41-acre
station.
But he is the first to admit
that there is always need to
learn. His face it a familiar one
around the Department of
Agriculture seeking out the
latest methods of farming.
Mr. Claiudh Smithk director
of Agriculture and Fcisherie
said that Mr. Michael still
participates In many
experiments for the
department and that he uses
the successful methods on his
own farm.
FINE CROPS
He grows cabbage, a big
Japanese variety, year round
-by using proper fertilizer and
irrigation. The same with
cucumbers. He grows an


unbelievable Japanese hybrid
that reaches two leet in length.


Mr. Michael's fame has
spread far and wide. Hie has a
steady flow o customers at the
farms buying a wide variety of
vegetables from tomatoes,
peppers, broccolli to onions,
cabbage. okra, melon and
whatever else might be in
session.
It is almost true- that he
plants every day. For instance,
when his cabbage begins
heading, he plants okra or
something else between the
rows that grow as the cabbage
is harvested. By doing this,
there is always something
growing and something being
harvested all year.
A lot of his beautiful
vegetables end up in hotels and
supennarkets. Most of his
customers, however, come to
the farm by word of mouth -
"fresh vegetables at a
reasonable price."
MEClHANIZED
Another major reason for
the success of Mr. Michael is
the proper use of machinery.
"A carpenter needs tools to
build a house, I need tools to
farm." he reasons.
First the land is ripped,
pulverized, fertilized, then
neatly furrowed into rows for
planting. Sometimes he lays
thin plastic over the prepared
field to halt the growth of
weeds and hold moisture in the
ground. This, however, is
expensive.
He is always looking for
improvements. Recently Mr.
Michael dreamed about his
weed problem and awoke with
a solution, He set out his
cabbage plants a certain
distance apart so that he could
drive a tractor through the
field and straddle the plants in
all directions. He attached a set
of car springs beneath the
tractor which digs up the
weeds from between the
cabbage. .-
He claims that he can now in
one hour weed a field which
would normally take a full
week.
When the rain refuses to fall,
his farm doesn't even seem to
notice as the lush green fields
will indicate. He has installed a
complete irrigation system
with sprinklers to keep the
ground moist 24 hours a day.
He obtains his water from wells


ii"~ ~
~, =
'4'


-TI




MR. Palestine Michael, left, and Mr. Claude Smith, Lbaector of Agriculture
Fisheries, inspect a cabbage plant in the top photograph. In the bottom picture,
Michael displays a handful of ripe. firm tomatoes.


and irrigation ditches.
Mr. Michael says: "There
need not be unemployment. If
a man goes into farming, he
can make money at it . but
he must work."
Another Michael saying:
"How many hours a day do I
work? All that God gives me."
Still another Mr. Michael
saying: "If I'm gonna sit down
and rest, I'm gonna make
myself comfortable. If I'm
gonna work, I'm gonna work
like hell."
NIXON ACCUSES CONGRESS
WASHINGTON (AP)-. President
Nixon has accused Congress of
action that he says "could severely
undermine" prospects for an end to
the fighting in Cambodia. A
statement issued Wednesday by the
White House referred to recent
moves in the House and Senate
against war activities in Indochina
without the approval of Congress.
The statement, read by News
Secretary Ronald Ziegler, portrayed
Nixon as very concerned at the
action by Congress before new Paris
talks between Presidential Adviser
Henry Kissinger and North
Vietnam's Le Duc Tho.


SHIRLEY BURROWS

GRADUATES

WITH HONOURS
SHIRLEY BURROWS,
business, administration major
at Bryan College, Dayton,
Tennessee, was graduated with
honours in a class of 105
members, during the college's
40th annual commencement
exercises on May 7. She is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Edwin Burrows of Governor's
Harbour.
Miss Burrows was the
recipient of the Wallstreet
Senior Award.
She is a graduate of
Governor's Harbour Public
School and attended the
Princess Margaret Hospital
School of Professional Nursing.
She was on the Dean's List
while at Bryan.


Jungles, animals & waters imperilled



as backlash of 'progress' hits Africa

By LARRY HEINZERLING
LAGOS, Nieria (AP)- Africa's drive for development is polluting its waters, eroding its jungles
and killing its wild animals.


A little zoo in Gha.na

from England.
Monkeys have become
victims of insecticides.
Environmentalists estimate
that the population of lions,
zebras, gazelles, leopards and
other animal in East Africa
'4 ,*' has been reduced to one-tenth
> of what it was 50 years ago
because of poachers seeking
hides and the loss of thousands
of acres of wild grazing lands
to farmers and land developers.
Few statistics on pollution
in Africa are available. The
majority of Africans, illiterate
farmers who live off the land,
have never heard of ecology.
A recent study in Kenya
shows that humans in that East
African country are retaining
residues of three different
types of agricultural poison,
including DDD.
POLLUTED
Water-borne diseases such as
cholera, typhoid and hepatitis
have plagued many Africans
because rivers and ponds are
and polluted.
SThe possibility of a major oil
Ng spill in Nigeria's booming
, offshore petroleum fields
threatens the coastal
"l- swamplands of Africa's most
and populous nation.
Mr. In a recent court case, a
chieftain and five others in
Nigeria's Mid-West state sought
I* compensation from an oil
company for destroying their
magic shrine and eroding
creeks in the area during

AGRICULTURE


TALKS IN FLORIDA
MINISTER of Development,
the Hon. Carlton E. Francis,
left Nassau for Tallahassee,
Florida, Tuesday 16 discuss
agriculture procedures and
policies with the Florida
Commissioner of Agriculture.
From Tallahassee, the
Minister will travel to
Gainesville, Florida where he
will have meetings covering
agriculture research and
policies, relating to the work
being conducted at Homestead
where conditions are
comparable to those found
in the Bahamas.
Mr. Francis will then go to
Tuskegee, Alabama, where he
will review agriculture
education and training
especially in the area of
underprivileged groups.
Travelling with the Minister
is Mr. Lionel Davis,
Parliamentary Secretary to the
Ministry of Development and
Mr. Godfrey Eneas, Deputy
Director of Agriculture.

PREMIER

HOPEFUL
From Page 3
but Gairy is anxious for
complete independence. British
officials say they will not
withhold independence so long
as two-thirds of the population
agree to it in a referendum.
"The talks in London are
going very well," Gairy
reported. He said delegates had
diaused a eriesd of provisions
that would be adopted into a
constitution if Grenada became
Independent
"The constitutional
conference is the prerequisite
of Independence which we
hope to met next year," he said.
Gairy said the atmosphere
at the London talks was
workmanlike and without

Herbert Blaize, leader of
Grenada's opposition, did not
attend Wednesday's talks.
Aides said he was slightly
indisposed.
"We are making excellent
progress and we hope to
conclude the talks by Friday,"
Gairy said.
British officials declined
comment on the progress of
the talks, which opened
Monday in an acrimonious
atmosphere with allegation and
counter-allegation flying amid
the guided halls of
Marlborough House.
Blaze said he had a petition
signed by 19,000 of the 90,000
islanders opposing Gairy-style
Independence. Gairy then told
newsmen noi.C of the names
on the petition belonged cu
dead men.
As the conference began,
one group of demonstrators
outside Marlborough House's
main entrance carried placards
alleging corruption in Grenada
"Similar to the Watergate
Affair ,' another
placard-waving group
demanded "Independence
Now."


BERKLEY WILLIAMSON

WINS AWARD

IN ENGLAND

BE RK LEY H.
WILLIAMSON holds the
Caldecott Memorial Award a
silver "taste vin" for being
the student showing the most
meritorious progress in his
year. Mr. Williamson has
completed his first year at
Highbury Technical College,
Portsmouth, England, where he
is taking a hotel management
course.
He was presented the trophy
at the annual prize-giving
exercises by the college's
principal.
The Caldecott Memorial
Award was presented in
memory of Mr. William
Caldecott, lecturer in wine at
the college. Mr. Caldecott died
suddenly during the Christmas
vacation. Mr. Williamson is the
first to receive the award.


Mr. Williamson is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Holsten
Williamson of Pine Field,
Acklins. His wife is Mrs. Sarah
Rolle Williamson of Soldier
Road.

CONFERENCE OF

OBSTETRICIANS I

GYNAECOLOLISTS

THE DEPARTMENT of
Obstetrics and Gynaecology at
the University of the West
Indies will host a conference of
Fellows and Members of the
American College of
Obstetricians and
Gynaecologists on Friday, May
25.
This will be the first
scientific meeting of the
college to be held outside the
United States since the college
was inaugurated in 1951.
The conference will be held
in the Medical Lecture Theatre
on the Mona Campus in
Jamaica and will be officially
opened by the Vice Chancellor
Dr. 0. R. Marshall.
Papers will be presented by
members of the Department of
Obstetrics and Gynaecology of
the University of the West
Indies, the Department of
Pathology, the Department of
Pathology, the Department of
Nuclear Medicine at the
University Hospital and the
Victoria Jubilee Hospital.


dredging operations. They
asked $180.000 in damages.
As far as is known. Nigeria
requires only that petroleum
companies "adopt all practical
precautions to prevent
pollution." No penalties are
mentioned.
West Africa's beaches
already are being spoiled by
giant tankers carrying crude oil
from, Saudi Arabia to the
United States and Europe via
the Cape of Good Hope.
The ships' oil tanks are
cleaned off the West African
coast, discharging an oil film
that hardens into a tarlike
substance when it reaches the
palm-fringed beaches.
Shippers in Lagos say that
the West African countries
have no laws against this
practice and even put up with
vessels' dumping large
quantities of garbage at sea
that eventually litters the
shore.
In Sierre Leone, the
country's major industry of
diamond mining is leaving ugly
scars as prospectors move from
one site to another.
UGLY SCARS
Peasant farmers, who make
up 80 per cent of black
Africa's population, are
eroding soil with bush fires,
improper rotation of crops and
indiscriminate leveling of trees.
Officials in Ivory Coast and
Gabon, two former French
colonies, express concern
about unrestrained
exploitation of their vast
timber.
Growing populations across


Fishing experts in West
Africa are alarmed at the pace
of exploitation of fish beds
along the coast.
"Eco-catastrophes are much
more likely to occur in
developing countries than in
the industrialized countries
that have far more fruources to
deal with them," says Maurice
F. Strong, the Canadian
secretary general of the U.N.
Conference on the Human
Environment.
iut even if countries to
Africa had the resources to
deal with environmental
pollution, they would be
useless without awareness of
the problem.
"The particular terms,
concepts and issues involved in
the current, emerging
international awareness of
pollution are still almost
entirely foreign to all levels of
government," complains
Udochuku Uwakaneme, a
student of the environment in
Lagos.


SHR E B//(-dt


STARTS FRIDAY
Matinee 2:45 & 4:55, Evening 9-Thom








Reservations not claimed by 8:4
on first come, first served


Last Day Friday
Matinee starts at 2:00
Evening 9:00
"GRAVE OF THE
VAMPIRE" R.
William Smith
Mike Pataki
PLUS
"GARDEN OF THE
DEAD" R.
Phil Kennealy
Duncan McLeod
PLUS Late Feature
Friday night.
No one under 17 will be admitted.


La
Conti


"T

Jc
Fre


"SH


R


NOW SHOWING
Matinee continuous from 1:45, E
'Phone 3-466S


iaR M TIWP'aY 5OLLINO M mW A
_ L _


ne 2-1004, 2-4005









5, will besold
beds.


at Day Friday
nuous Showings
from 3



ohn Forsythe
derrick Stafford
PLUS
OOT OUT" PG.
Gregory Peck
obert F. Lyons



evening 8:30-







RI


SPai a. -t SlMw aM it- nam ,sr asW d. e bnm OeMda
NO ONF UNDER 17 ADMITTED.


NK-


SM


LAST CHANCE

To own ciarmning Bahamian TOWN HOUSE, 2
storey, wide porches, secluded gardens, and fruit
trees on quiet end of Queen Street. A bargain at
$75,000.0w
S CHESTER THOMPSON
S- Phone
S ... 24777 -daytime
42035 -evenings


Jug 20 minutes and a



complimentary rum punch


separate Nassau and


fW P** rti.t Out Island Airways now offers 20-minute super-jet service
between Nossau and Freeport. On a schedule designed just for


Bahamians.

That s Out Island Airways' way of expressing its confidence in the future
growth of the Bahamas. Providing the truly Bahamian service expected
of on independent nation. Beautiful Bahamian stewardesses to serve you
... complimentary rum punches to entice you.. and million mile
captains to fly you.

You'll be flying the BAC-111, theworld's most reliable short haul aircraft.
With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can stretch out in comfort.
Aboard the Bahamas' own airline.

And to introduce you to Out Island Airways' super-let Nassau/Freeport
,- viOce, OIA offers a special low-cost, round-trip one-day fore just $33.

Oith 20-minute jet service and $33 rates, can there be any other choice
: t I' Outf Island Airways? Call your travel agency or OIA now for
reservations. 7-8222.


the Bahamas Best


!


Turday, May 17, 19M.


She Wrthame









ThMs y, May 17, 1973.

CAil-EI-PE TOURISM CONFERENCE,


taribbean as holiday


cmitre for Europeans


should be promoted


7 ~*~i


Goombay Summer film shown


Ulr "GOOMBAY Holiday" a
13-minute colour film
highlihtins Goombey Summer
in the Bahames, has beAn made
available to local theatres for
showing.
The initial showing took
place at the Shirley Street
Theatre on May 12. On
Tuesday the film started at the


LONDON: The promotion of the Caribbean as a holiday centre
for EWSapean was a task which was "absolutely vital to the
economy of the Caribbean" said Mr. R. M. Hilary, chairman of
the Weel India Committee, when opening the two-day
Caribben-Emrope tourism conference in London Monday.


Mr. Hilary, who is
commercial director of BOAC,
said he believed the conference
would prove exciting and
purposeful covering in one way
or another every feature of the
tourist scene in the Caribbean,
Bermuda and the Bahamas.
There are over 400 delegates
attending the conference
including some 50 leading tour
operators from Germany,
Switzerland, France, Italy,
Scandinavia, Belgium, Holland,
Austria, Norway, Sweden and
Denmark.
Since last year's meeting,
said Mr. Hilary, the European
Economic Community has
been enlarged by the accession
of Britain, Eire and Denmark.
"The growing prosperity of the
community was bringing in its
train the expansion of long
haul travel. This process would
gather momentum quite
rapidly and thus provide an
ever larger target for the
Caribbean tourist industry.
"And in the Caribbean there
was a great quickening of
interest in, and a much surer
knowledge of, the needs of the
European market. All
territories were, in varying
degree, recording an increase in
the number of visitors from
Britain and other parts of
Europe.
DISAPPOINTING
"On the other hand, very
significantly, the growth in
tourism from North America
had been generally
disappointing and the urge to
seek business elsewhere
correspondingly greater."
Mr. Hilary went on to list
what he thought should be the
objectives of the conference.
Thdee included: to inject fresh
thinking into the minds of the
Caribbean tourist industry; to


t FOR 3 in1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


M M:I'hlb


No ndimy thi



The autioMW and practical married
wmwm of today, place her con-
de in the effectiveness of
SI Sal ine ssuppositories
beoms they cra
PO ed me Pteaee against embar-
odrie with their highly
eie P is In avidir of-
bteatodosn with their rapM deodo-
NuImo disolve at normal body
Oteperatue, forming a protective
a cu than

of6,12 wan 24.


Usass a


i frn stiw booklet. white to:


4 E kARe w Y IN.
FEARED


turn the Caribbean's eyes more
towards Europe as opposed to
North America; to bring out
into the open what the
European market needs; to
make Europeans more directly
conscious of the attractions of
the Caribbean as a year-round
holiday area.
It was of the very greatest
significance that in the
Caribbean there was an
increa sing tendency to
concentrate resources for joint
research, marketing and selling,
he said.
Mr. Hilary's opening address
was followed by a panel
discussion in which the
Caribbean "sellers" gave a
general picture of the tourism
situation in their part of the
world for the benefit of the
European "buyers".
This was chaired by Mr.
Peter Morgan, Minister of
Tourism, Information and
Public Relations, Barbados,
and the other speakers were
Mr. Som N. Chib, Director of
Tourism, Bahamas; Miss
Yvonne Maginldy, Chairman,
Eastern Caribbean Tourist
Association (Antigua)., Mr.
Jack de Lima, Chairman,
Trinidad and Tobago Tourist
Board, Mr. D. Burke, General
Manager, North Coast, Jamaica
Tourist Board; Mr. E. B,
Morton, Chairman, St.
Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla Tourist
Board and Mrs. S. Bergstrom,
Cayman Islands.
SPECIFICS
Among points they covered
were the choices available in
accommodation; entertain-
ments and sporting facilities;
hotel service and staff training;
local food and drinks.
In addition to the
discussions the conference
programme is also providing
time for workshop sessions
when the Caribbean Tourist
Board's representatives can talk
business with the European
tour operators.
Caribbean countries
represented at the talks include
Antigua, the Bahamas,
Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman
Islands, Dominica, Grenada,
Jamaica, Montserrat, St.
Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla, St. Lucia,
St. Vincent, Trinidad and
Tobago, Turks and Caicos and
British Virgin Islands.
Companies taking part
include British West India
Airways, Cayman Airways,
International Caribbean
Airways, International Air
Bahama, Air Jamaica, BOAC,
P and 0 and Cunard.
The current issue of the
Travel Trade Gazette carries a
eight-page supplement on the
Caribbean as a holiday area. It
says in a front page article:
"Last year's conference gave
the European travel industry
an opportunity to tell the
Caribbean about the problems
it faces in packaging and
marketing the area. This year's.
conference should indicate-
whether or not the Caribbearsi
participants in 1972 listened..
learned and, most important of
all, went home and devised
formulas to overcome them
hurdles".
FINAL MEETING FOM

GOOMBAY ARTISTS
ALL ARTISTS interested sim
participating in the Clotheslilse
Art Exhibition to be staged
during this year's Goombay
Summer festival, should attend
a special meeting on Friday at
the Ministry of Tourism.'s
office at 3 p.m.
At the meeting final plams
for the Exhibition will be mace
and the film "Goomaby
Holiday" will be shown, T11Ue
Exhibition will take place at
Rawson Square on Wednesd y
evenings during the weel.ly
Goombay Summer Shoppex'
Mall from 6:30 p.m. to 10p.au,
EASTERN-CARIBAIR
FINALLY MERGE
WASHINGTON, MAY IS(Atl) -
The Civil Aeronautics oacrd
formally transferred the certificate
of Caribair to Eastern Airtlaem


today.
Eastern won CAB pernnsmion
April 19 to acquire Caribair after
President Nixon twice returned to
the board, for reconsideatios, a
3-2 vote against the merger.
The CAB declared that the
merger was consummated &a of
today with proof that Eaitenm hid
satisfied all conditions attachehl to
the certificate of transfer.
Eastern has said Carlbtlir'
equipment and stations will buwsin
operations in Eastern's nme on
June 1. There will be few cha isps
until Dec. 2


traw Vendors supportGoombaySummer '7
NASSAU STRAW VENDORS have pledged their support to Bahamas Goombay
Summer '73 which starts June 3 and ends September 9. At a meeting held last Friday at
the Ministry of Tourism, members of the Straw Vendors Association heard a presentation
of Goombay Summer '73 by Assistant Director of Tourism Basil Albury. They were also
shown the film "Goombay Holiday" and were handed out stencils of the Goombay
symbol which will decorate straw bags, baskets and other handicraft during the Goombay
Summer weeks. Mr. Albury, co-ordinator of this year's Goombay Summer, is pictured at
the head of the table surrounded by the straw ladles.


Prince Charles Drive-ln
Theatre.
After two weeks showings at
these theatres the film will
rotate between the Wulff Road
Theatre and the Carmichael
Drive-In Theatres.
The movie, which was made


'73 opens in the Bahamas as
June 3 and ends September 9.
And like its predeceosm ,
Goombay Summer 71 and '72,
will be an actionalled
programme, arranged for
visitors coming to the Bhaeas
during that period.


GOOMBAY FOOD VENDORS here last summer and which
has already been released
SHOULD GET PERMITS overseas in theatres and on
SFOOL vendors on Bay television, shows such
Strut for the Wed ay colorful activities as the
Street for the Wednesday weekly Goombay Parade down
Shoppers' Mall and the Friday Bay Street and the
Goombay Parade night are International Bazaar in
reminded that they are Freeport; the performances of
required to apply to the Police the Royal Bahamas Police
Department for the necessary Band in the two cities and
3 vendor's permit, other sidelines of summertime
Vendors are advised that vacations in the Bahamas.
before applying they should Bahamas Goombay Summer
ensure that their vending


facilities are of an acceptable
standard, interested persons
should contact the coordinator
of Goombay Summer, at the
Ministry of Tourism's office,
Nassau Court, for further
information.


When you re





out of cash...


Youre not




out of money


Security. Reliability. Dependability. They're
what a Royal Bank chequing account offer you.
And safety. Because the safe way to pay is by
cheque ... with no risk of losing cash.
A Royal Bank chequing account means instant
money .... anywhere in the Bahamas. Cheques
are businesslike, more convenient, and make it
easier to keep track of payments.
We're the first bank in the Bahamas to have a
fully computerized system too. So .. .fewer
mistakes ... greater efficiency. Better for
you. And each cheque is personalized with
your name and account number on it.
Helpful Bankers in Nassau and the Family
Islands can tell you about a chequing account.
Just ask one.


The Royal N The Helpful Bank
ROYALMBANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas


at local theatres











ir Srthuat


Thuasmy,W ait17, 173


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 In Nasau,352 -6008 In Freeport from aam to 5pmn. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to p.n.


I EAL ESTATE


C9798
FOR SALE
SHIRLEY STREET
PROPERTY approx. 22,500
sq. ft. Setting at reduced price.
Also 8,500 sq. ft. adjoining,
Price below market value.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033.
22305, 22307 Evenings 41197.
C9826
LAST CHANCE
To own charming Bahamian
town house, 2 storey, wide
porches, secluded gardens, and
fruit trees, on quiet end of
Queen Street. A bargain at
$75,000.
Phone: CHESTER
THOMPSON 2-4777 (daytime)
4-2035 (evenings).
C9680
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, living,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape. Airconditioned
throughout Unusual
opportunity. To view.
Telephone 2-1722-3.
C9702
3 BEDROOM. 2 bath, living
room, den, Tamily roon,
kitchen, dining room, office,
laundry, double carport, wall
to wall carpet, airconditioned.
Yard nicely landscaped. See by
appointment only. Blair
Estates.
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living,
dining, and breakfast rooms,
kitchen, den, wall to wall
carpet, laundry, airconditioned
off Village Road.
2 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living,
dining and family rooms, den,
Large patio, wall to wall
carpet. High Vista.
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living
and dining rooms, kitchen,
airconditioned. Nassau East.

4 UNIT APARTMENTS each
has two bedrooms, living and
dining rooms, kitchen, one
bath. Nicely furnished. Annual
Income $12,000.00. Selling for
low, low price.
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
for sale. Yearly Income
$10,000. Has three years' lease.
Palmdale.
LOT in High Vista. Nice quiet
area.
LOTS in Coral Harbour.
For information on above
listing call 24259 day 41584
and58979 nhts.
C9806
LOT OUT WEST GROVE
80 by 140 only $8,000.00

LOT OUT WEST GROVE
130 on Street by 90 depth.
Asking $9,500.00

HAWKINS "ILL 2-storey
corner property with three
bedrooms, 2 baths baskic
furniture. Asking $25,000.00.
Come see anytime.
VILLAGE ROAD AREA 3
bedrooms 2 baths, spacious
sitting, dining area. Painted
throughout even outside.
Grounds 70 by 140 enclosed,
carport. Come make offer
$36,000.00, we can finance up
to $26,000.00. Low interest
rates.
NASSAU EAST 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, furnished for only
$35,000.00
BLAIR ESTATES 2
bedrooms 1 bath, furnished
only $35,000.00 Others up to
$64,000.00.
EAST BAY 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, spacious grounds, only
$47,500,J0 Income $7,200.
OUT EAST.WATER-
FRONTAGE From
$70,000.00 and up.

CABLE BEACH on the
waterfront with beach,
contains 6 bedrooms plus one
bedroom apartment. Asking
$85,0o@.0 Furnished. High
class area.

WEST BAY STREET not far
from PolIe Station.


bedroo hem, fu




Out East slOWI%7,a.00
ad up
AN ES"It Opt E*t A
sandy has Or
bedom Pu coftaep -or
mavds. (h cStakeer cottage.
44 4- two swipnfll
Ies. ito appreciMe*
Via
newh d ttout E
0 iTy,<- .
GET di wlls
2207 IO


I I KLESITE


I C9682 I


FOR SALE
By OWNER
House in Highland park, 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room
and carport. Built in range and
baker on lot 90 x 100 Nice
home in nice area. To view,
telephone 2-1722-3.
C9755
4-BEDROOM, 1 bathroom,
house Podoleo Street off
Robinson Road. Contact Mr.
Hanfield after 5 p.m. Phone
55178.
C9847
3 bedroom 1 bath house with
adjoining income producing
efficiency apartment. Good
location. Price: $35,000.
Contact: DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY Phone:
2-1178 or 5-5408 P. 0. Box
N-4648, Nassau.
C9857
CHOICE BEACH PROPERTY
ADELAIDE. CALL 42458
evenings.


C9799


FOR SALE


2- ACRE PLOT SKYLINE.
Was asking $70,000.00 owner a
willing Seller for $45,000.
HOUSE, POOL AND PATIO
facing Lake. Has 3 to 4
bedrooms. Only $150,000.00
HILLTOP GROVE Gorgeous
views. See by appointment.
DAMIANOS WE SELL
REAL ESTATE. Dial 22033,
22305, 22307 Nite 41197.
C9681
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park
executive type home. 4,
bedrooms, 24 baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
- central air-conditioned. To
view, telephone 2-1.742-3.
C9800
PRESTIGE HOMES
P. O. Box, N1469 Nassau
Phone 242'59 Day 58979
*4-1584-11ilght .
SPECIALtBUY
OF THE YEAR
Duplex 2 2-bedrooms, kitchen,
living and dining, furnished.
Annual income $5700.00

Large Commercial property -
Palmdale.
Warehouse 2000 sq. ft.
Lot 75 x 100
I bedroom apartment
3 bedroom house Good
investment.
Commercial Bldg. -
Centreville. Sound investment.
Has 3 year lease. Annual
income $10.200. 00
HIGHLAND PARK
3 bedroom 2 bath living room,
dining room, airconditioned,
furnished. Wail to wall carpet,
patio with BBQ Pit.
For quick action
list with us.



C9713
FURNISHED 1 or 2 bedroom,
1 bath apartment good
location must have good
washing area. Monthly rental:
$150 to $170. Phone 2-1986
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mrs.
Roberts.


C9633
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Imaediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C9828
1. TWO AND THREE
BEDROOM apart-ment
for rent yearly from 300
par month to $550. No
children or pets.
2 Two bedroom apartment
in Montagu Heights. Air
conditioned, wall-t4o-wall
carpeting, T.V., deep
freeze, telephone. $300
per month
H. G. CHRISTIE
REAL STATE
309 Bay Street,


PFO RENT


0 I1 1I -


C9624
FULLY AI RCONDITIONED 2
bedroom apartment
Centreville near Z.N.S. Ring
5-8679 ask for Mr. Pritrhard.
C9780
FURNISHED 2 BED ROOM, 1
BATH HOUSE AIRCON.
DITIONED AND CARPETED
5 Minute walk to Montagu
Beach Phone 28504 Day
51647 Night.


C9829
HILLTOP APARTMENT -
One bedroom, fully furnished,
airconditioned, $200 per
month. All utilities included.
Phone 5-8327
C9648
IN TOWN furnished rooms,
Efficiency Apartment, and also
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.
C9781
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath furnished
house for rent Claire Avenue
off Mackey Street, telephone
34528 6 p.m. 9 p.m.
C9638
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C9642
PROSPECT RIDGE
Fully furnished garage
apartments in large private
grounds witn use of swimming
pool comprising large
bed/sitting room, separate
kitchen ano bathroom, private
patio. Rent. B$250 per month
Including utilities. Available
Mav 1st. Call 77737 to view.
C9845
1 BEDROOM 1 bath garden
apartment, fully furnished and
equipped, airconditioned,
swimming pool, beach
privileges $245 per month.
Contact 2-1841 (days) and
2-8248 (evenings).
C9683
2 bedroom apartment -
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view, telephone 2-1722-3.
C9840
BEAUTIFULLY furnished 2
bedroom apartment, Carefree
Limited with beach and pool,
T.V. antenna. Phone 7-8141,
7-7655.
C9843
3 BEDROOM 2 bath
apartment, large balcony, view
of harbour, airconditioned,
wall to wall carpet, fully
furnished and equipped,
swimming pool, beach
privileges. $435 per month.
Contact 2-1841 (days) 2-8248
(evenings).
C9833
.FROM JUNE 1st.
2 bedroom apartment,
completely furnished, master
T. V. antenna, washing
machine and 'dryer on
premises. Blue Hill Road south
on block south of Soldier
Road. Telephone 23287.
C9839
ATTRACTIVELY furnished
house Sapphire Ridge Road.
Sans Soucl, 3 bedrooms (2
alrconditloned) 2 baths, study,
maid's room, wall to wall
carpet throughout, all
cedar-lined closets. Available
immediately. Phone David
Hudson 3-6262/3. After 5 p.m.
7-7085.
C9736
UNIQUE RENTAL penthouse
apartment, overlooking Nassau
Harbour and Paradise Island. 3
bedrooms, study, large lounge.
breakfast room, dining room,
bar and kitchen, working
*kitchen with dishwasher, fully
airconditioned, island ceiling,
fans in lounge, shag carpeting
throughout, 4 bathrooms, plus
maid's bathroom. Available
June list. Long term or short
term. FuTr nshed ..e:
unfurnlshtk Plea. 1tect
2-1841 days aen& 4624'
evenings.
C9640
ONE EXTRA LARGE TWC
BEDROOMS TWO ATi,
AND ONE EXTRA lRGE
ONE BED RN E 'OM
APARTMENT. With t
Living and dining all Ial
furnished Victoria Couel,
Apartments on EIIzabeth
Awvenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
I laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
-AtmInditloned. Phone 64631


, O pWY STREET.
,NAMWMAIAOCADE.


-M1 14357 or 4.


I fcii


FORSALE


Wy pWnr, WMtSItU AiMS pt Building 11
I MS W- I t in-o. mPh ld Hoffer 2837 or
AMm __-.


C9825
1971 VAUXHALL
STATIONWAGON 2300 S.L.
Ideal for large family good
condition. Telephone 5-1440 -
9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and
4-2595 after 6 p.m.

C9801a


-at -


C9844
2 BEDROOM 2 bath
apartment, shag carpet
throughout, airconditioned,
swimming pool, beach
privileges, fully furnished and
equipped. $350 per month.
Contact 2-1841 (days) and
2-R748 (evenings).

I SALUE
9836
350 HONDA 3500 miles. 15
months old include 1 year's
insurance $650. Cash only.
Schiller Willi, Balmoral Hotel -
Kitchen 77481.
9771 ROBERTS reel to reel
tape deck 650xD, Scott 386
AM/FM Receiver.
1971 Pinto airconditioned/
heater, radio, seatbelts, low
mileage. Good condition.
$2,500.00 O.N.O.
I lot 100'X150' Blair Estates.
Phone B. Harris 27680, 9:00-
5:00 Mon. to Fri.
C9813
OFFICE FURNITURE,
secretarial and steno desks and
chairs, executive desk ard
conference table, filing
cabinets, electrical typewriters
and calculating machines,
S.C.M. Photstating machine,
Zenith portable 19" T.V.,
exercycle, aluminum
household ladder etc. Call
22338 during office hours.
C9795
SACRIFICE
38ft. boat 671 GM.

Commercial Lot 50 x 103
Tel: 77078
C9809
COMPLETE COMPONENT
STEREO System -first owner
SANSUI 3000A 120 Watt 4
speaker amplifier with
headphones TEAC 4010S
Reel-to-reel stereo tape deck
with pre-amp/DUAL 1019
turntable/Wharfdale W30D
multiple segment speakers
complete cross-over
connections w;th
matrix/discreet capability -
$1000 or best offer Write
to: Graham Jones,' P. 0. Box
6118, Nassau.
C9823
FOR SALE
at
ROYAL ELIZABETH HOTEL
Elizabeth AVenue north -
Starting May 11th. Beds -
Dressers Tubs Chairs -
Couches Face Basins -
TeoIlets 1 Gas Electric
Generator- 1 Commercial
Deep Freeze Unit and
Miscellaneous Items. TERMS:
CASH.:
C9850
GARAGE SALE
May 19th Saturday
From 10:30 a.m. till 5 p.m.
Entire household effects:
Linens, glassware, electric
utensils, trolley-tables, desk,
T.V., trays and miscellaneous
Items. Phone 4-1629 Mrs. D.
Albury, Johnson Road Estate.
C9606
BUMPER-STICKERS
POSTERS; DECALS,
QUAL.fTY SIGNS in dozens, in
hundreds, in thousands. Truck
signs a specialty.
ARAWAK ART- Phone 23709
Montrose Avenue at Arundel
Street.
C9864
PATIO SALE. Winton.
Saturday 19th all day.
Expatriate leaving Island. Toys,
clothing, beds, chairs, and
bargains galore. Turn right at
Solomon's Lighthouse, then
second turning on left.

LOST
C9766 BROWN MINIATURE
DOSi with brown collar, area
of Williarn and Shirley
Streets., $100 REWARD.
Phone 746139.
C9653
GREY white and black fluffy 2
months old Saint Bernard's
Puppy from Hutchinson Street,
Phyfrom's Adition. Anyone
sitng this dg please call Mrs.

TelH 57687.


air conditioned $1,600
1969 MORRIS MINI,
standard $600
ABC MOTORS
Collins Avenue
Centrwevllle
Phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8i00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
SATURDAY 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m


CMFs wi SaI


C9834
MORRIS 1300 11 months
old. Perfect condition. One
owner. Phone 24573 -
morntn.. ..


C9841
Young lady seeking days work.
Call Roney 35868.

.....TED__
C9675
WANTED LISTINGS
WHY FRET? WE WELL
List with us for ACTION.
WANT HOUSES WI'lH
ESTABLISHED MORTGAGES
ALSO.
DAMIANOS REALTY Dial
2033. 22305

SELFMMITEI
.7378
JOB TITLE: MACHINIST
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good Basic Education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and .specified
finished. Use precision
measuring instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


TODAY'S I L i(
1972 CHEVY NOVA
$4400.00
Also available
1973 VAUXHALL FERENZA
very clean $2750.00
1971 FORD MUSTANG
big engine $3100.00
1968 DODGE DART,
very clean $1800.00
1972 CHEVY NOVA,
2 door coupe $4400.00
1969 FORD FALCON'
red automatic $1200.00
1969 CHEVY CAMARO,
red reconditioned $1850.00
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA,
blue, stick shift $2250.00
1970 PLYMOUTH
BARRACUDA
orange automatic $225U0.Uu
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA S/W,
good buy $2200.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER G.L.,
good buy $2350.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER,
Bargain $1500.00
1969 FORD GALAXIES,
reconditioned $1000.00
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
green $1000,00
1972 VAUXHALL FERENZA,
blue. stick shift $2250.00
1967 CADILLAC,
Sedan $350.00
1964 ULINCOLN
CONTINENTAL $400.00
1967 PONTIAC
LAURENTIAN $400.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come In and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 34711
C9790
ISLAND MOTOR
COMPANY 1970 LTD.
USED CAR LIST
1968 FIAT 124,
Green $900
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W
Auto. $850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio, Orange. $3500
1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL
A/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI,
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD
Blue A/C $2800
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Auto $1695
1971 RAMBLER
Auto., Blue $2100
1971 FORD GALAXIE
A/C, Green 4 Dr. $3500
1970 VICTOR STD.,
Red $875
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA,
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4600
1968 JAVELIN,
1968 JAVELIN, S1400
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
4 Dr., Std. Green $2950
1964 DODGE S/W
Auto. Green $400
1972 FIRENZA
Apto., White $2750
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR,
4, Dr. Std.
S/WYellow $650
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite Inc Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8

C9858
ABC MOTORS
Budget-priced, A-i used cars.
Best value for your money.
1973 FORD CORTINA SEDAN,
automatic transmission $3,400
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA,
automatic transmission $3,900
1972 TOYOTA CROWN,


standard $1,800
1971 FORD LTD,
automatic transmission,
air conditioned $3,800
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON.
automatic transmission $1,400
10#1 MORRIS PICKUP $1,200
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
4-door, automatic
transmission, radio $1,100
1970 RAMBLER Sst.,
a mtic tranmmiion $1,800

1970 TOYOTA COROLLA,
standard $1,200
109 VOLKSWAGEN
FASTBACK $900
1969 FORD CORTINA
4-door $1,100
169 MERCURY COUGAR.
automatic transmission,


C9851
WANTED to work in wholesale
warehouse, young man
between the ages of 18 to 25.
Drivers licence an asset but
not necessarily essential.
Bahamians only need apply.
Salary will be decided upon
Interview. For appointment to
Interview phone 22351
between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Monday thru Friday.


WL RITES


C9642
REQUIRED: 2 farm workers
to lv on premises. $45 per
week. Call C. W. F. Bethel
2-4891, P. Box N-3006,
Nassau.


C9835
BRITISH-AMERICAN
INSURANCE COMPANY,
LIMITED wishes to employ a
Corporate Secretary,
preferably Chartered, to assist
In and eventually take charge
of the Secretarial Department.
Applicants should have at least
three years' experience in this
type of work, and be prepared
to undertake further study If
necessary. Salary will be
commensurate with age and
experience; only Bahamians
need apply. Please reply In
writing only, enclosing a brief
resume to the Assistant
Secretary, British-American
Insurance Company, Limited,
P. 0. Box N-3005, Nassau
C9854
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
SECRETARY with at least 3
years experience, good
shorthand and typing skills and
iniative to work on own at
times. Interviews will be
conducted on Saturday May
19th. ONLY. Qualified persons
please call 23320 for
appointment.

C9855
WANTED experienced man to
look after large property and
pool. Good wages and
two-bedroom house provided.
Telephone 781P7 after 4 p.m.
C9862
GENERAL TELEPHONE
DI RECTORY CO
IMMEDIATE OPENING
FOR
OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR
SALES REPRESENTATIVE.

General Telephone Directory
Co. needs permanent Office
Administrator Sales
Representative. Male or
Female, College education
required. Age 25/35. Office
and sales experience preferred.
Starting salary $150 per weekI
commission later 4ff sale
qualify. Will receive training in
St. Petersburg, Florida. Must
be able to travel to U.S.
occasionally and to Family
Islands. Expenses paid, Starting
date June 4, 1973. Reply in
writing stating qualification by
May 22 to Personnel Office
Manager Gerry Sorg., P. 0O. Box
N3048. Personal interviews to
be conducted starting, May 23
at Bahamas Telecom-
munications Corporation
Personnel Office, Chase
Manhattan Building, Oakes
Field, Nassau, Bahamas.
C9846
APPLICATIONS are invited
for the following positions at
St. John's College, Nassau,
commencing employment in
September 1973. Teachers of:
1. Mathematics
2. Spanish
3. Geography
4. Chemistry
5.History
6. Latin
7. Music
8. Physical Education male.
9. Physical Education female.
Particular consideration will be
given to applicants who are
able to offer a combination of
two of the above subjects.
Applicants should contact the
Headmaster at Saint John's
College, P. 0. Box N3597,
Nassau or telephone 2-3783.

I TRADE SE VICES
C9805
NEED FAST SERVICE?
Do you have goods in Miami
you need in a hurry? Wells
Fargo Express will deliver! For
service call: NASSAU 51901
MIAMI 758-5597.

C9363
FOR YOUR building needs
Residential Remodelling -
Maintenance. Call G. Patton,
Budget Builders 32656.

C9632
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HURRICANE
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
JOHN S. GEORGE & CO.
LTD.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.


C7384
JOB TITLE: STEEL
FABRICATORS (four)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years experience in steel lay
out and welding.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBI CITIES:
Read and. -follow structural
steel detail drawings, cut and
weld in accordance with
drawing specifications.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Graqd Bahama,- J
C9796
BODY MEN WANTED
ABC MOTORS requires two
body men experienced in all
phases of automobile body
work. Must have own small
hand tools. Must be sober,
reliable and willing to work.
Good pay to right men. Many
fringe benefits. Call Mr. Stunce
Williams at 2-1031.

C9818
MANAGER required
Immediately for the Hawks
Nest Club, Cat Island
Single person or couple, duties
include supervising ten modem
bedroom units, dining room,
kitchen and bar. Elementary
bookkeeping experience
helpful. Food, accommodation
and Transportation provided.
Salary $500.00 per month.
Phone Wanklyn a.t
22000/22001 weekdays or
write c/o P. 0. Box N.3919,
lassau.
C9827
ACCOUNTANT
The Royal Bank of Canada,
Freeport, Grand Bahama
requires the services of a
branch Accountant. Bahamians
only. Applicants should have
the following qualifications: At
least 5 years previous banking
experience in all aspects of
commercial banking. Must have
the ability to supervise and
train subordinate staff, plan
and supervise the day to day
routine of an office with
approximately 20 staff
members.
approximately 20 staff
members.
Applicants should apply in
writing to the Assistand
Manager Administration P.
0. Box F61 Freeport, Grand
Bahama or call for an
appointment at 352-6631.
C7377
JOB TITLE: INSTRUMENT
REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years industrial instrumenta-
tion experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Install, repair, calibrate test
and adjust any type of
Mgrati6, IndLcatlg or
ralphic eltrical or mechanIcK
instrument.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport. Grand Bahama .


Ii P11W ANTE.] V U-


4500 square feet, warehouse or
office space, available
Immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.


OSCAR FENCES
Free estimates.
Terms arrangeL. ,
C8106
WORRY NO MORE CALL
ABCO TO SOLVE YOUr
CLEANING PROBLEMS.
TEL: 51071-2-3-4.


The Tribune

CLASSFED

ADVS.

BRING RESULTS


II CI I


C9720
HARRY D. MALONE will ell
at his premises on Albury Lne
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side In the
Eastern District of the Isl4nd
of New Providence on Friday
the 18th day of May, A.D.,
1973 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL that Condominium
Unit namely Unit Numner
Nine (9) Building "B" being
a part of Waterfront
Tow n-houses 1
Condominium situate 'at
Great Harbour Cay in he
Berry Islands which slid
Condominium Unit is that
described In an Indenture-of
Conveyance dated 6th day
of September, A.D., 1971
and made between
Residential Resort
Developments Limited of
the one part and William
Victor Gubbins of the other
part and now of record in
the Registry of Records in
the City of Nassau in
Volume 1835 at pages 20 to
35 and entitles the
Borrowers to an undivided
share in the Common
property appurtenant to
Condominium Unit Number
Nine (9) subject to certain
terms conditions restrictive
referred to in the said
Indenture of Conveyance
dated the 6th day of
September, 1971 and the
declaration of Condominium
dated the 16th day of
February, A.D.. 1971 and
recorded in the said Registry
of Records in Volume 1714
at pages 1 to 30 inclusive.
The property Is being sold
under te power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the 6th day of
September, 1971 between
William Victor Gubbins and
Residential Resort
Developments, Limited and
recorded in the Registry of
Records in Volume 1850 at
pages 99 to 116 which said
Mortgage was assigned to Harry
Shier.
The sale Is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his halff to bid up to #t1Wd
prict Terms 10% of tt*
purchase price at the time of
sale and balancee on
completion.
Dated this 27th day of April
A.D., 1973.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.

TRAmE SERVICES

C9636



Brkersge Ltd.
Mackay Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P.O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
C9635
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
next to Frank's RPlace.
C9801
USED FURNITURE WANTED
Contact D&R FURNITURE
OUTLET. Wulff Road East
next to Wong's Grocery.
Telephone 5-9600.
WE BUY AND TRADE USED
FURNITURE

C9838
FENCES
For your fence needs
Call 35491


C9859

JOBS WANTED


Summer liven jobs in
Bahamas wanted by
Britdh Exchange Students
in U.S.A., will baby sit or
mild work. Call
217-332-3530 8 pJn.


C9645
PACEMAKER 44 ft
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

C962U
BAHAMAS YACHT SALES
1973 F-25 Trojan Cruiser,
completely equipped. Call
2-8079 for appointment to see.
C9849
26ft. CABIN CRUISER ... tip
top condition. Must seal
$6,000.00. Call 4-1298 day or
night.


8


M NT I I CAISFOISALE


I -'- ~- C .~ -, a I


m


I I


I


I I I


I I I m


nr


"I


I


JL


. :.__ -


.db.-


I III


I-


7


JLI


__


I


r


I










1-, Impd1y, Mey 17,1973.


"AND BAHAM

LCLA IFED
mmm wnE n mmimlm EUl



C731 (C7383
S. TITLE: MACHINIST CHIEF ENGINEER: -
& I M EDUCATION: be qualified in all phas
G Iood gsic Education Refrigeration, Air
pllt I UM EXPERIENCE. ditioning, Plumbing, Elec
S NSIIITIES:Carpentry, Stone Work
S.LU't/RESPONSICILITIES: Building Mainten.
lay out work, set up and Applicant must
operate machine tools, experience in Super
Milachine parts to pre..sion capacity and must have a
tolrances and specified three years experience.
finished. Use precision Certificate and
measuring Instruments and References required.
performs any dismantling, Applicant must apply in I
Sfittin or assembly work to: Personnel Departm*
required for plant maintenance Casino, P. 0. Box I
or construction. Freeport, Grand Bahama.
INTERESTED APPLICANT Freeport Grand Bahama
CONTACT: Personnel C9634
Department, Bahama Cement INTERNATIONAL FIR
Company, P. Box F-100, Chartered Accountants
Freeport, Grand Bahama. several vacancies for Chai
: 7377 or Certified Accountan
their Freeport a
JOB TITLE: INSTRUMENT Successful candidates w
M NI MUM EDUCATION paid excellent salaries
i' MINIMUM EDUCATION: bonuses. Applicant I
High school graduate or apply in writing to the
equivalent Partner, Price Waterhou
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5 Co.; P. 0. Box F.
years Industrial instrumenta- Freeport, Bahamas.
tion experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES: C7388
Install, repair, calibrate test ONE KITCHEN STEW
and adjust any type of With 5 years experien
Inteating, indicating or Buffet set ups, must be S
graphic electrical or mechanical supervise kitchen staff Ir
instrument. duties, also be able to
INTERESTED APPLICANT long hours. Must have
CONTACT: Personnel School education
Department, Bahama Cement equivalent. Must be be
Company, P. 0. Box F.100, the ages of 25 and 40 ye
Freeport, Grand Bahama.. ago.
ONE CHIEF ENGIrN
C7384 With 10 years experler
JOB TITLE: STEEL Hotel Maintenance
FABRICATORS (four) supervisory capacity of
MINIMUM EDUCATION- staff. Must be able to
Good basic education blueprints and work by
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5 also be able to work
years experience in steel lay hours. Must be Collet
but and welding. University Graduate. Mi
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES: between the ages of 35 a
Read and follow structural years of age.
steli detail drawings, cut and Interested persons apply
weld In accordance with Grand Bahama Hote
drawing specifications. Country Club, West
INTERESTED APPLICANT Grand Bahama, Pers
CONTACT: Personnel Office, between the hot
Department, Bahama Cement 9:00 a.m. and 3:00
Company, P. 0. Box F-100, Monday through Friday.
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
--C9647
C7390 INTERNATIONAL FPR
Parts Manager required for Chartered Accountants
General Motors Dealership, vacancies for
'minimum 5 years experience Accountant/Auditor for
required, must be fully Freeport office. Cad
onversant with General must have hld eagedlam
otors parts manuals, maintain professional account
-Inventory control ordering and office and mutt bi
processing Warranty claims, possession of at
knowledge of General Motors University entr
products. qualifications anil airas
Five Wheels of Grand Bahama studying to be a Chartl
.Ltd. Phone 352-7001. Cr tif led Accoun
Applicants should app
C9.856 writing to the Staff Pa
PpTWASHER, DISH. Price WaterhouMe Co.
WASISHER, KITCHEN Box F 241& Fr
CLEANERS, HOUSEMEN Bahamas.
AND KITCHEN PORTERS
quired. WANTED
Relative to the foregoing, valid
Health Certificate and Police C7389
record required; Interested in buying for
Please apply in person to Bahamian stamp Collecti
International Hotel, Personnel a part of. Phone Fro
i Office for interview., 373-5452.


*MtyAupert quavers
he King's stern gaze.
I 'I don't know why the Wise
Old Goet keeps the parrots
StVeW. But he Is vewy. very
kind. He wouldn't do any-
ilng to make them unhappy."
SThe King peoe up andown.

CROSSWORD
PUZZLE

S1. Crone 23. Flat
4. Flourish 25. River barrier
8. Oriental ship 26. Coin of Macao
captain 29. Re|lgder
11. Muhammad 31. Scorn
-.t 33. Scoundrel
12. WTinted 37. By mouth
j 13. Some 38. Sidewise
1 J4.Soy's 39. Trimming
nickname 42. Form of I
-15. Transactions Esperanto
S 17. Strength 43. Annex
S19. Tax 44. Against
K 20. FrHfor.all 45. Religious
1 21. Respect 46. Stain


Vcannot allow .
- As monarch of all the Mrds
I demand that tm ee
rrot be et free.
Iri he crie. wavItg hi
mace towards te A0.M
" Open th door and let eamm
out this very moment. It Is
my command I"


SOLUTION OF YIITEIDAY'S PUXZU

47. Trumpet call 1. Zenana
48. French pronoun 2. beolaed


p *- *-.-,.. ,
,.- -.----" 'ilif A


- 9'. ~.----
Pb?


..NEA......L T ..NC. steer r of [ REX I
a. samumate w rm eqM.tmI ntots ma us
batl.. werloek soa aamedat loti Ia -
,inm a & eotail a we to .
AIl9 Mar. 21 to AgB. 1A Ciiangigati ighf
OpIag I th b dalh M ', anir youmhfin ayhVy. I AS
Gp to riht oM for t-e data you need. ved hg bI
p him Ias for the medal sdeoft Hi.
A (Apr. 20 to May 20) Do soamthin to alprowe
yi he106sd you an eaody beaidle tho o|Mf issig
the ftlap. StUve far a mm harmomaous relmtioap hwit
male. ShiN kImdamto one whole I.
aMDIW(Mr 21 to Stm 21) Dos't aver coasection wa .
a ansodte because you a n a a trean mood or yrou ww
fgt it later am. Show that you m teadfasat with othem,
eves nader diffmult eamilltons.
IOON CHILDRBN (Jme 22 to July 21) Put all that eo-in
lato doag your wek in a mot pucks way and you add to
matte at thi time. Take health teatnat. U GE
LEO (hdly 22 to Aug. 21) You want romance, but makW
asm you doa't fom yormmosf onmyose. Start perfect yaw
flset taits ad Imaprove your portion tl life. Avoid oam who I DIDNT KNOW
am be lnmful to your pngrem WERE BACK, 1E
VIRGO(Apg. 22 to Sipt. 22) Try to understand the views WILL YOU BE HM
of kbo better and be hqipstilsothee's more harmony athIm". DINNER WITH U
den't be so citial of others. Pind a better way to add to
pmegant income. US ca~e in travel
SLIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Much cae in motion I
importtt *now or you could pet nlato a costly accident. Tal |
are of your purt or wallet when out hopping. Avoid those
who as in a saary mood at this time.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Don't think you have to
*apad a good deal of money. to galma another's favor. PorWt
vidtin an adviser who has own problems and could do itte
for you now. Do your own thinking.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Make your plans
carefully if you want to add to psent abundance, otherwise
lhaty sltn now could result in loss. Don't be forceful with
anyces. A diplomatic approach is best.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) If someoan has slighiad APART
you, Jut know that person wasn't worth worrying about Cay I
through with whatever you have promised to others. Assit
ame who seeds youwr help.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Avoid friends today diee
you as not in the right mood for them and there could be = AKYOU
rguaset. Keep buy at the woek you have to do. Try not to eOP
both otlmu with your personal wae, -iw jb R
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Make msu you take an ABIML
unecemy risks in any buaiam dealigs today. Observe evesy
tien ad reulation that apples to you. Pay bills when due.
Show that you ar onAsolntiousom
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY... he or she will to
one of those oarmin young people who will act on Imputl
and aj in trouble if you don't teach to be more disiplned.
There is honesty here. Woek nforelp countries could be mat
proitable, Teach to do nothing that could bring criticism frou
othae. Musical talent here
"The Stare impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life Ianerelvup to YOUI I .,-


Cdhegm s-




Black (ta move) la0ed in a
bad way In tt podit from
Quinone v. In tba world
tamu chic > i. gg b a



m-ater; I xsm A r
.1.._J--I --

What didi, i oim; w
0Deaws, ds trength; I
M- avra; "o moutes
novice.

*5 I, r *IA h


4 K-Kti, X-a Mt.. Wme
Mh msolyvaitsol.Mgi5b5

C winA..^4-


How 5 letter Mdll a0 -t *
QrnI L esl' No pluam me mNoPN IM
imo-n n o * wae a .Mi
lat0a mee nust :aw
R A L "IJWr R Wo j .
^ -*~ me a st" VM "'^ L.0-1

weI E I m ls lb rUe n P lI ola s li
-erd must l>ullo t'bt B o;: ieIM^


MORGAN M.L
-ur i n


Ii-~I


JL1I1


ByAle tota s |v

.... ,., Nmi JM ....Nm I M..
"W raw vo BMWa ME



.


W'PMAWM WOMAN
VER KPPy---1 OW
TIW, MRS. LUPINMO!


do/


19 Ir ALL HAPPIY.
ARSm r.nrP TO= "K swL L
To THOM"U5I PL


uI. uT TAK A
COUPL OF5 DAYI AND
TfL. HAVE IT tWOtKIN6
L AW OOP AG NASE /


*m m m^^^^^^^^ -m^^ -L0

AM lE-- 'J!KM,. el


-
-B m" mu -" a& Cfea5L .



s. -Bm "

*MB -i-B Iewb). t) 6kS, '-H


WULII


ma'?



~
I-


'.1

ip


iar


..-.' j~ -
'1


- 0


* 1~
I-,
Iz~


M


- : -. -


. a


i 6m-m-.


M.


a


V iL


mm
i












Cl hr h ribun


St. Andrew's win inter.


schools swimming meet,


beat out QC by 7 points

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
UNDER THE DEDICATED COACHING of Antis Murry and
Martin Finning, St. Andrew's College for the second consecutive
yew took top honoess in the Inter-School Swimming
Championship held yesterday at St. Andrew's pool. With an
overall total of 201 points, St. Andrew's topped Queen's College
by seven points with St. Augustine's College coming in third with
153 and St. Anne's College fourth with 96%'


NATIONAL SWIM

CHAMPIONSHIPS

LIART FRIDAY
OVER 200 ENTRIES have
been received and processed
for the Second Annual
Bahamas National Swimming
Championships,
The three-day weekend
meet, to be held a St. Andrew's
School pool begins at 4 p.m.
tomorrow with 16 events
scheduled for the opening
session.
The action ,-ts underway on
Saturday at 30 a.m. with
heats during the morning and
finals in the afternoon.
Sunday's activities begin at
2:30 p.m. with finals slated for
the afternoon wrapup of the
meet.
Fifty-five entries have been
received from the Freeport
Aquatics Club, who hope to
splash by the Nassau Dolphin
Swimming Club during the
Nationals. Keen competition
exists between these two Clubs
since both beat the visiting
Jamaican Y.M.C.A. team
recently.
All entrants have been issued
schedules of events and gate
passes.
Food and beverages will be
sold on the premises during the
meet.





AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet. GB
Detroit 16 17 .485 -
Milwauke 15 16 .484 -
New Y I t17 .469 Y
Bomatn 14 16 .467 V
Baitimose 14 17 .452 1
Cleveland 15 19 .441 1%
West Division
I Ch 19 10 .655 -
Caornia 18 13 .581 2
S KansaClty 20 15 .571 2
Oaldad 18 17 .514 4
S Minamsaot 15 S .500 4
Texna 12 19 .387 8
*Wednesda's 1.Results
New York 11, Mwaukee 4
Deolt6 Betoens (I(0 Innings)
S Txaas2,kaasCity I
S Minneaota 8, Chicalo 6
Californis 7, Oakland 2
Today's Games
S Baltimore (Palmer 3-2) at Cleveland
(Perry S-4), 6 p.m.
vukee (Colborn 3.1) at New
N'urk (Stoatlemyre S-4), 7:30 p.m.
B aibt (Curtb 1-3) at Detroit
S (Fryman 2-3), a p.m.
i Kas City (Simpaon 2-2) at Texas
S (Sebert 1.1), 8:30 p.m.
(Woodson 2-1).9 p.m.
0:a; ind (Hunter X2) at California
(May 4-2), 11 tip.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
SBast Division
a W L Pet. GB
Shicago 21 14 .600 -
New York 18 15 .545 2
Montreal 14 17 .452 5
l P13 16 .441 5
S3ia 230 .394 7
S. Lo1023 .303 10
West Division
Ian Francl io 26 14 .650 -
S Houaton 22 15 .595 2V
n Cliatl o20 14 .568 3
LO Anl so 2016 .556 4
A i At 15 19 .441 8
S San o 14233 .378 10 o
S- Wedsddnay's ReudRN
S{I St. L 3 O.C gcego A
S lNew York 1, Montreal 3
| PUwd S, Pittibur" 2
1 AdmsiaHouston 2 (f1 Innln )
Lo Aa 8 Cincinnati 6 (I n
n 8 Dieo 4. an Francisco I
Today's Games
Lo Angaelesa (Sutton 3-3) at
S Clolanati (Grilaley 4-2), 12:30
p.m.
I. Leule (Ibby 0-3) at Chicago
New Yoea (eawver 4-3) at Montreal
oerb p4). pjm.
a rhl (Casties 4.5) at
I lKembub (Moos 2.3), 85 pJH.
S Al (Doaon s2.5) at Houston
(oests 3-1), 8:30 p.m.

Iulto s mhsiatn lh
I Iratitkll


St. Andrew's though faced
with fierce competition from
Queen's College, won the girls
under 12, the girls under 14,
the girls under 16 and the girls
under 19 divisions. Queen's
College took the boys under
12, the boys under 14 and the
boys under 16 divisions. S.A.C.
controlled the boys under 19
divi.ion.
Young up and coming Penny
Joss paced St. Andrew's in the
girls under 12 by winning the
25 metres butterfly and breast
stroke in 20.7 and 21.1
respectively. Lynn Kelly won
the freestyle in 15.8 and
Wendy Dimbero took the back
stroke in 19.8. Teaming up
together, they took the relay in
67.2 Coach Murray said of
Joss, "She is going to be very
good." Queen's in that division
took second and S.A.C. third.
STILL BEHIND
Queen's, after winning the
back stroke, the butterfly and
the free style in the boys under
12 led 18-15 when Billy
Braithwaite came through in
the beast stroke beating Q.C.'s
K. Jupp. Still behind, St.
Andrew's went on to win the
relay which tied that division.
C. Eldon saw Queen's through
with wins in the back stroke
and free style.
St. Andrew's then jumped
back and took five events in
the girls under 14. Debbie
Sawyers, known for 1-er
performance in the
Dolphins/Jamaica Y.M.C.A.
swim meet, started St.
Andrews off by winning the
back stroke in 37.2. Charlotte
Knowles took the 25 metres
butterfly in 17.1 while Calille
Adderley and Susan
Holowesko, Dolphin
swimmers, won the free style
and breast stroke in 32.7 and
42.8 respectively. They
also teamed up to win the,
relay. L. Lauderdale paced
Queen's with seconds in the
butterfly and free style.
Mario Carey and the
Martinborough brothers
together with C. Lloyd saw
Queen's ahead in the boys
under 14 division. St. Andrews,
who maintained a consistent
second, took the 50 metres
back stroke and the breast
stroke.
TOUGH BATTLE
It was a tough battle but St.
Andrews managed to hold a
one point edge over S.A.C. in
the under 16 girls division. St.
Andrews had 32 points. S.A.C.
took the lead on wins by
Jeanie McCorquodale. who
won the back stroke and the
butterfly. St. Andrews, who
came second in the back stroke
and free style, captured the
breast stroke and the relay to
edge out S.A.C. Queen's took
first in the free style.
Queen's who took third in
the girls under 16 returned in
the boys under 16 and took
three of the five events. C.
Martinborough won the back
stroke and the free style. Again
after settling for seconds, St.
Andrews won the relay which
carries double points.
St. Andrews winnings
ended with the girls under 19
division in which they
dominated all the five events
including the relay. Diane
Holowesko won the butterfly
and the free style while Dianna
Miller won the back and breast
strokes.
S.A.C. finaBly came into the
lead and paced by D.
McCorquodale won the breast
stroke and the free style and
the relay. Queen's Tony Carey
won the back stroke and the
butterfly.
Competition this year was
keener, said St. Andrew's
coach Murray. Most of it came
from Queen's and S.A.C.
However, she said that she
would like to se more schools
participating.

55-5. Pns. and uldarias meets
Thunrday luht Jwere to deciM the
first place In the Frop.
At the Ameston eity of Iqulto,.
about 900 miles noriheuast of Lima.


the United Statem and Yugoslavia
men' tesaml won the qualification
for the final round. The U.S. team
conquered Chie 92-62 while
Yusodavls defeated Urugusy
96.91. Both teams meet tonight for
the flit plce.
At Truills. 00 miles north of
Lima, the Olympic hatmplan, the
lBolet Uilo, Waon its third straight
pwme o l Cups T's Im a wvry
MaeitMWo. WIth tO minutes to
go, tm 0 mp bit t Ceban Tomas
Heera e d by five
Culban Syae it- nag settled
Immedisely.


FLASHBACK -
Action-packed start in one of
last year's events at the first
Bahamas National Swimming
Championship held at St.
Andrew's School pool.

INTIKHAB ALAM

SLAMS CENTURY

IN 84 MINUTES
LONDON (AP) Intikhab Alam,
the Pakistani star, hit a century in
84 minutes at Kennington Oval
Wednesday one of the fastest
hundreds in English cricket in
recent years.
He went on to make 139 in 125
minutes, his highest score since
joining Surrey in the English county
championship four years ago. His
whirlwind hitting enabled Surrey to
declare at 360 for 8 against
Gloucestershire.
Intikhab, whose greatest
successes in England have been as a
leg-spin bowler, did not make a 50
in the county championship last
season.
Fe slammed a weakened
Gloucestershire attack for three
sixes and 19 fours, hitting with
tremendous power on the offside.
One of the sixes was a stunning
blow over extra cover. He reached
his century off 84 balls.
Surrey began uncertainly and
lost two wickets for 31. Their
recovery was started by another
Pakistani, Younis Ahmed, who hit a
brisk 76 and was joined by Graham
Roope in a third wicket stand of
109.
Roope was then concerned In a
sixth wicket stand of 135 In 77
minutes with Intlthab.
Roope left the big hitting to the
two Pakistanlnans but batted
soundly for 91 In 3 hours 40
minutes.
Mike Procter, the South African
fast bowler, left the field with a
muscle strain early In the
afternoon, and this weakened the
Gloucestershire attack.
Clive Radley hit 133 for
Middlesex against Lancashire at Old
Trafford, Manchester.
Geoff Boycott. the England
opening batsman, maintained his
fine form and propped up a sagging
Yorkshire aside with 73 against
Hampshire at Leeds. With the
wicket helping the bowlers,
Yorkshire were all out for 168 and
would have been in a sorry state
without Boycott.
Oxford University, who seldom
was a game against the county
sides, kept up their Improved form
and dismissed Worcestershire for
191 at Oxford. The University's
opening bowlers, Tim Lamb and
the Pakistani student Imran Khan,
shocked Worcestershire by taking
the first five wickets for 28.
SUMMARIZED SCORES: At
Cambridge. Cambridge University
223 for 3 (R.P. Hodson li1) vs.
Kent.
At Chelmsford. Essex 337 for 7
declared (Stuart Turner 80 not out,
Keith Boyce 66). Derbyshire 33 for
no wicket.)
At Oxford. Worcestershire 191
(George Cass 89). Oxford
University 143 for 2 (R.J. Lee 89
not out)..
At Leeds Yorkshire 168 (Geoff
Boycott 73). Hampshire 105 for S.
At The Oval. Surrey 360 for 8
declared (lntlkhab Alam 139,
Graham Roope 91. Younis Ahmed
76). Gloucestershire 22 for no
wicket.
At Manchester. Middlesex 297
for 7 declared (Clive Radpay 133).
Lancashire 12 for 2.
At Edgbaston. Somerset 281
(Peter Dennin 75,. Norman
McVlcker 4 for 52). Warwickshire
32 for no wicket.
At Leicester. Sussex 223, vs.
Leicestershire.


JERRY QUARRY

TO FIGHT SARCIA
NEW YORK (AP) Jerry
Quarry, hoping to solidify his
position as a heavyweight
contender, and Jose Luis
Garcia, making his New York
debut, will meet in a 12-round
heavyweight bout June 18 at
Madison Square Garden, it was
announced Wednesday.
Quarry, who re-entered the
title picture following a brief
retirement with an upset
triumph over Ron Lyle In
February, is ranked fifth by
the World Boxing Association.
Garcia, ranked eighth,
scored the biggest victory of
his career in July, 1970 when
he stopped Ken Norton in
eight rounds. Norton stunned
the boxing world the past
March when he broke
Muhammad Ali's jaw and
decisioned the former
champion in 12 roun4t'
Quif n, a 28nyear-old
Catronvan now figf.til out of
New York under manager Gil
Clancy, has a 46-6-4 record


Another boxer out of Bimini,


Eddie Hash, to debut soon

FROM THE FAMILY ISLAND OF BIMINI came boxing greats
like Yama Bahama, Gomeo Brennen, Cordell Rolle and others
whose fistic ability has gained respect in the ring throughout the
world.
These men in their
endeavour to reach the top
have not only
paved the way for those
coming behind but have also
shown the world the boxing
potential that can be found in
the Bahamas. And now out of
Bimini comes a new boxing
sensation Eddie Flash.
Having been around the
boxing squares nearly half his
life where he picked up the p's
and q's of the game, this
20-year-old prospect has seen
fit to emerge from the fog that
has been covering his talent so
long. Quite a guy from his
baby-hood, "in Bimini when -4
Yama Bahama and Gomeo had
finished training, they used to
put me in the ring," reflected
Eddie. "They (his opponents)
used to be bigger than me but I
always used to knock them
down."
Perhaps just a flyweight in
those days, Eddie recalled
times when in the school yard
he and other boxing
enthusiasts used to construct a
ring and perform in it. Boxing
from then on took root in him
although "I never used to like
it before," he said. "It just
developed inside of me."


LOVE SPORT
His flaming love of the game
has led him across the seas
where he displayed his talent
against "the big guys" by
employing himself as a sparring
partner. Among other places,
experience carried him to New
York and finally Florida. His
work was to practice those
preparing for a match.
This has taken him into a,
greater fistic challenge as his
work Included boxers in all
divisions. This has given him
more ring experience and
sharpened skills. Actually, he
even worked with Al Cook. "I
used to beat him all the time,"
clai-ned Eddie. Cook on March
29 was handed a sixth round
technical knockout by
Bahamas Welterweight King
Elisha Obed.
Determination then took
hold and although he has never
been on a card before, because
of the experience he got
through sparring, "I believe I'm
ready." said Eddie.


-Th --, 17. .



" Plans complete fr ,ladopeMnce


Regatta; over 151 beats te copti
THE COMM1ITEE IrIrbrism 7 eui miM fpm HuW b lm i 4
has completed all of the prethatory pm i1 hkt ,t 8gmemm | iuy.
The Committee announced in the Bahama, m e to A MesMly for Mangrov COa
that in addition to the five be named ian ett of A "'
classes of workboats from the prominent metd isn this T.
Family islands, there will be field. While M stl jet yet *rpby sigalfloii
seven other classes competing, complete, tIe pelmliauy Hi cUntacatiomlo to yacat iagtn
The Bahamas Yacht includes the follja:- fM11;
Squadron expects to have Famally Idi lltHta H y M. EKswtles Mm r
approximately 20 yachts Trophy preste by the tphf a prosmistat loogt
competing in the handicap Prime Minitwer yaihtnan who kept y&ati
division. The International Star L. E. W. PFopta e iM loril ive In the Bihamas for m
and Snipe classes expect about trophy a desilem and boat yc s;
10 yachts each. The smaller builder of great importance in Ll-o 3. trophy -
Sunfish and Sailfish classes are Andros; Poader of the Out a
looking forward to Clarenee F-l-IMn trophy Regatt in Geore TowA
approximately 25 boats each an Exuma _boat boulder; Exuna.


and the newly established but
very popular Laser class hopes
to have about the same number
of contestants.
As all competitors in these
classes are amateur yachtsmen
no cash prizes will be given,
however, the traditional
trophies will still be awarded.
PROMINENT BAHAMIANS
TO BE HONOURED
In recognition of the part
that has been played in boating


Rupert Moewl-M trophy -
An outstanding workboat
builder from Long habnd;
Captain Heoge WaMa
trophy Raged bland boat
builder;
Wilam Amry Memorial
trophy Abaco boat builder
who made Man O'War Cay
famous for boat building;
Clarence A. nle Memorial
trophy Lbng standing
member of the House of


Captain Durward Knowl.
chairman of the Reptt
Committee, has recently
tvited Interested international
yachtamen to bring their boatg
to Nassau to take past in te
Regatta. He found that
yachtmnen of the Snipe and
Star classes were very
enthusiastic at the prospect of
competing in the Independence
Regatta.


Two Paradise girds teams


clash tonight i# volleyball


*' -

EDDIE FLASH young but
experienced and ready to make
his debut.
On his return to Nassau,
Eddie, who tips the scale at
about 150 pounds, seeks the
opponents who block the way
on his climb to the top of the
ladder.
Though shorter in stature
than the average in his class,
Eddie makes up for this with
his broad built, swift feet,
flashy hands and the ability to
take and dish it out.
Eddie denounced any
possible threat that might
stand in his way even welter
champ Obed. "I watched Obed
fight a lot of times and the way
he fights, I believe I can take
him," commented Eddie. "I
believe I could take Obed or
anyone else."
Presently Eddie Flash has
been taken over by Leslie Fox.


450 Beer Is Back!













in 7-ounce bottle




Bvy It by the beMt at 4 5


or by tlM em at* o'


ld tohe very last dr