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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 10, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03343

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M-. RutW l Mt. Royl Ave.

P 6 MUSICAL
P .O. S E 2-13062.3237


Uritluzur


.S imatNassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX. No. 142


Thursday, May 10, 1973.


ONE DISPUTE SETTLED AT DOCKS, BUT B.E.C.

-MAY STRIKE, & UNREST AT BATELCO I


Wildcat dock


ends


Price: I Cents

'- METHNODISTS


l "LIKELY TO

4S3 il ORDAIN WOMEN

"'-- ".... THIS YEAR
: l.ll411 ."A 'U R- M I fril AM


strike


after union boss


reinstated


by Ministry


By MIKE LOTHIAN
A WILD-CAT STRIKE by members of the United Brotherhood of Longshoremen ended shortly before noon
today when the Ministry of Labour ordered the re-instatement of stevedore Joseph McKinney, UBL president, who
was fired yesterday for using abusive language.


BaTelCo memo warning staff on



pay deduction has union upset

By MIKE LOTHIAN
IN AN APPARENT BID TO WARN EMPLOYEES against a repetition of Monday morning's
two-hour demonstration, BaTelCo management yesterday issued a staff memorandum pointing out
that "unauthorised absence" from the job site makes employees liable to "deduction of pay for


time lost."
The memo was sent by
Bahamas Telecommunication
Corporation Issistant manager
for personnel and industrial
relations Max Turner to the
estimated 350 persons who
demonstrated Monday in
support of their union's
demands for salary
negotiations.
The memo. said: *
"It has been reported that
on the morning of May 7, 1913
you. 1ft your job site without
perm*On. As a member of
sipff must be.aware that
usait Ihorised absence
constitutes a breach of
Corporation discipline.
"The Corporation's
personnel policies and
procedure number 422 on


unauthorised absence states in
part: 'failure to obtain from
the supervisor concerned
advance permission to be
absent, or failure to provide
the supervisor with a justifiable
reason for absence constitutes
an unauthorised absence and
shall' be the grounds for
discipline, including deduction
of pay for time lost.'
CONCERNED
"As stated in recent
memoranda, to all staff, the
Corporation operates and
0',vid..-as essential service to
the public on a 24-hour basis.
In view of this, the
Corporation must take a
serious view of this absence
from your job."
Mrs. Willimae Bridgewater,


BEC strike unless settlement


made 'in reasonable time'
EMPLOYEES OF THE BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY
CORPORATION last night agreed to strike unless management
was prepared to reach a "reasonable settlement in a reasonable
time," Fuel and Engineering Workers union president Dudley
Williams said today.
Mr. Williams said a meeting December and the union claims
of the union was held at the management is stalling on a
Texaco Hall last night to bring new contract.
members up-to-date on the The workers maintain that
progress being made in a new they must have a cost of living
wage agreement with the clause written into the new
Corporation. two-year agreement.
"The union voted to accept The union yesterday signed
nearly all the clauses in the old a recognition and grievance
contract, but on the question procedure agreement with the
of money and cost of living Freeport Oil Company. "The
they voted to strike if next step is a contract of
necessary unless a reasonable service," Mr. Williams said.
settlement is reached within a The union has also applied
reasonable time." for a recognition agreement
The previous union-manage- with Freeport Power
ment contract expired in Company.


CHOOSEY THIEVES BURGLE

AQUARIUS BOUTIQUE


FASHION conscious thieves,
who burglarised the Charlotte
Street Aquarius Boutique
clothing store of Mr. Brent
Malone, escaped with over
$1,000 worth of men's wear
and jewellery after they
entered by smashing a pane of
glass in the door.
The break-in, discovered
early this morning by police,
took place sometime. after the
closing of the store at 6 p.m.
yesterday and early this
morning.
No arrests have been made,
the goods, according to police,
are valued at $1,187.
Contacted this afternoon,
Mrs. Patsy Malone, mother of





SWAG LAMPS



SNASSAU FREEPO 'r


the store's owner, said that
upon arrival at the store this
morning, the broken glass was
found scattered all over the
floor.
She said the thief, or thieves,
"were very selective in their
choice of clothing" and
apparently took time to pick
out pieces that were their size
and "nothing else", she said.
Missing was a jacket from the
store's display case along with
other pieces including pullover
shirts, antique jewellery rings
and bracelets and several
pairs of sun-glasses.
In choosing a man's jacket,
which had a matching scarf,
she said the thieves apparently
did not like the scarf and so
they left it behind on the floor.
No cash was taken as cash is
never left in the store, store
manager Thomas Love said.
The amount of goods taken
included "about 20 pairs of
men's denim trousers in the
range of 26 to 28," he
added.


chairman of the BaTelCo
branch of the Bahamas Public
Services Union, told The
Tribune this morning that
although some staff members
were concerned that the memo
might mean management
intends to cut their pay two
hours for Monday's
demonstration, she does not
think that is the case.
"When we first got to the
table on Monday the first thing
we asked was that there be no
victimization or intimidation as
a result of the demonstration,
and management agreed there
would be none.
She could not explain
management's reason for
issuing the memo.
However, she said it was
"plain bad timing. We
shouldn't call it intimidation as
such that is too strong a
word but it has caused
unrest."
Mr. Turner told The Tribune
that in the memo "no
inference is made as to whether
they will be docked." He
added, "I am not in a position
to say" whether the
demonstrators will in fact have
their pay cut for two hours.
On Monday workers'
spokesmen said the
demonstration was staged
because management had
allegedly refused to negotiate
the up-dating of a wage
agreement that expired at the
end of June last year.
The demonstration, held
outside BaTelCo's
administrative offices on
Thompson Boulevard, ended
when Mr. Turner delivered a
letter to Mrs. Bridgewater from
general manager Aubrey E.
Curling, requesting workers'
representatives to meet
"immediately" to discuss the
problem.
HOLDING OFF
M rs. Bridgewater said
subsequently that the workers
had decided not to hold
further demonstrations for "a
while," in order to give
management time to prepare a
wages proposal.
This morning she declined to
say how long management had
been given to come up with
their proposal.
BaTelCo is not the only
focal point of labour problems
at present. The Grand Bahama
branch of the Bahamas Hotel
and Catering Workers' Union
has charged the Labour
Ministry with "incompetency"
over its failure to enforce a
ruling in connection with the
dismissal of a union member
from the Lafayette Store in
Freeport.
Management of the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation and the
Bahamas Engineering, Fuel,
Service and Allied Workers'
Union are locked in a dispute
over contract negotiations, and
members of the United
Brotherhood of Longshoremen
were in the second day of a
wild-cat strike sparked by the
dismissal of stevedore Joseph
McKinney. union president, by
Bahamas Stevedoring
Company. This last dispute was
settled at noon today.


It is understood that the
ruling was based on the fact
that at the time of the incident
Mr. McKinney was acting not
as an employee, but in his
official capacity as a union
officer trying to settle a minor
dispute involving other
longshoremen.
The worn contract between
the UBL. and Bahamas
Stevedoring Services Compay
provides for a month's
suspension from work for any
stevedore using obscene
language on the job. However,
it also provides that an officer
of the union may interrupt his
work to deal with union
business.
At the time of his
"offence," The Tribune
learned, Mr. McKinney was in
fact acting in his official
capacity, and on that basis
industrial relations officer Bert
E. Edgecombe and permanent
secretary C.A.P. Smith ordered
that the suspension of Mr.
McKinney be lifted.
The incident which sparked
the strike occurred on Tuesday
afternoon. When the
stevedoring company asked Mr.
McKinney to come to its Bay
Street offices to give his side of
the story, Mr, McKinney
refused.
SUSPENDED
On Wednesday morning
Bahamas Stevedoring delivered
the suspension letter. At that
point, shortly after 8 a.m. Mr.
McKinney is reported to have
claimed the stevedoring agents
were trying to depose him as
president of the union, and the
wild-cat strike ensued.
Police intervention was
necessary both late Wednesday
afternoon and again this
morning to enable permanent
dock staff to handle two ships'
cargos in the face of the
continuing work-stoppage by
the longshoremen.
Reports indicate that the
dispute was in fact near to
resolution yesterday afternoon,
and the longshoremen agreed
to unload the Japanese
freighter "Dalmatia" tied up at
Prince George Wharf.
However, the unionists
became disgruntled when some
non-union labour was hired to
augment the few union
members who were
immediately available.
When they learned that Mr.
McKinney personally would
not be hired to work aboard
the Dalmatia, the unionists
refused to work.
When the stevedores tried to
interfere with the casual labour
and permanent dock staff, who
were attempting to unload the
vessel themselves, police were
reportedly called in, and the
unionists were barred from the
dock until unloading was
completed.
The same situation arose at
Kelly Dock this morning when
unionists refused to handle the
cargo of the m/v Betty K and
the m/v Betty K IV: police
were called in to enable casual
labour and dock staff to work
the ships without interference.
NATIONAL FLAG ON
DISPLAY MONDAY
THE DESIGNATED
on display in the entrance
lobby of the Post Office
Building, East Hill Street,
commencing Monday, May 14,
it was announced today by Mr.
R. F. Anthony Roberts,
Minister of Home Affairs.
To ensure that ample flags
will be available prior to
Independence Day, the
Ministry has ordered an initial
supply in various standard sizes
for distribution to stores


60 HAITIANS FOUND ON BOAT
MORE THAN 60 HAITIAN NATIONALS were packed into and onto this 35-foot
smack which was intercepted 15 miles southeast of Nassau at about 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday by the police patrol boat "San Salvador" under the command of DSP Howard
Sweating. The vessel was towed by the police boat to Prince George Wharf, where it
arrived at about 2:30. Two large trucks, a Land Rover and two cars were needed to take
the immigrants to Central Police Station, Bank Lane, for immigration processing.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette


HBahamians must wait


BAHAMIAN GETS

HIS AWARD AT

BUCKINGHAM PALACE
LONDON Five Bermudians
and a Bahamian met the Duke
of Edinburgh at Buckingham
.Palace, London, Tuesday and
were presented with their gold
awards gained in the Duke of
Edinburgh award scheme.
They were among 790
young people who attended
the presentation ceremony.
West Indians won a total of
292 awards last year, including
the bronze and silver medals.
All the awards holders have
completed their work over a
minimum of eighteen months
in four out of five sections of
the scheme service,
expenditions, interests, design
for living and physical activity.
Thomas Bums, John Jensen
and Peter Marsh, from
Bermuda, have all done
psychiatric hospital work as
part of the award scheme.
They also made photographic
studies of Europe and did a
course on the Bermudian
youth parliament. Burns and
Jensen intend to help with the
award scheme in Bermuda.
Peter Marsh and Jensen have
also done some archery.
Norman Pogson helped to
build classrooms at Kirimon
and he has done some hospital
work. He took part in a
commonwealth gold award
expedition to Mount Kenya.
His interests include cricket,
photography and the long
jump.
Janel Minors is another
Bermudian who received the
award. She is at present in
England at Epsom School of
Art. For her award she did
Brownie Leadership in
Bermuda and painting and
studied "democracy in action".
She attended a young adult
conference in Switzerland and
took part in an expedition to
the Katskill Mountains in New
York State.
Bahamian Lester Albury,
who gained the award in the
Bahamas, is now in Wales at
the United College of the
Atlantic, Glamorgan.
The fifteenth annual report
of the scheme, just published,
says that once again, the record
figures of the previous year
have been "substantially"
exceed. There were more
than 90, 000 new entrants
from all parts of the world and
more than 35,000 awards
gained. The cumulative total of
entrants since the scheme
started is now 875,000 and
the three million mark is
expected to be reached by
1974.
Bermuda had three operating
units involved in the scheme
and two new entrants. The
Bahamas had six operating
units. 67 new entrants and
gained 47 bronze, 49 silver and
seven gold awards.


for 'luxury' of TV



here, warns Pindling

UNTIL 100 PER CENT OF THE POPULATION can be
reached through radio, the Bahamian public will have to wait for
the "luxury" of television, Prime Minister Lynden Pindling
indicated yesterday at the opening of Radio Bahamas' South
Beach transmitting station.


The transmission centre, he
said, marked the completion of
the first phase of Radio
Bahamas. The second was the
inauguration within the next
ten days of Radio Bahamas'
Northern Service through its
new Freeport station.
Third would be the
construction of another
transmitter located in
Georgetown, Exuma which
would beam an even stronger
signal to the Central and
Southern Bahamas.
The fourth phase would be
television.
"We have given priority I
think, where the priority ought
to have been given sound
broadcasting first which could
reach and will reach, and which
does reach 100 per cent of the
population. Then will come the
somewhat more luxury item,
television," Mr. Pindling said.
The Prime Minister pointed
out that although Radio
Bahamas had been assigned the
1540 kilocycle spot, it was
found nevertheless that at
10,000 watts the station could
not reach all the Family Islands
with as strong a signal as was
wished.
It was when present Tourism
Minister Clement Maynard was
associated with the then
Bahamas Broadcasting and
Television Commission, that
the plan was instituted
whereby a major effort was
made to reach every single
island in the Commonwealth,
Mr. Pindling said.
DOUBLE POWER
The South Beach
transmitting station, which
operated on 20,000 watts,
would double the original
power of Radio Bahamas, he
continued.
In congratulating all those
involved with the radio station.
the Prime Minister said he
would ask them not to rest on
their laurels "because the high
standards that have already
been set will have to be
maintained, and indeed
improved, so that our Radio
Bahamas would continue to
have a good name in the
broadcasting field and be able
to hold its head with any
broadcasting system anywhere
in this hemisphere."
In his remarks Mr. Maynard
said he felt the decision taken
during his tenure to upgrade
broadcasting had made a
"tremendous impact on
communication in the Family
Islands," and indeed would be
a tremendous benefit to the
Bahamian people.
"I'm sure that fairly soon we
will be expanding to the extent
where a larger transformer will
be placed in Grand Bahama for
the islands in the north, and
one, I understand, for the
islands at the south," Mr.


Maynard said.
"But even so, he
continued, the signal at present
which was being tested all
along is so clear that I believe
that all of us who travel to the
Family Islands can safely say
that ZNS is still coming
through loud and clear."
Mr. Maynard said that one
of the things which motivated
the Corporation was the fact
that although it would be
difficult to buy a very big radio
these days for people in the
Family Islands, everyone could
afford a transistor set.
Those attending yesterday's
ceremonies included
Broadcasting Corporation
chairman Milo B. Butler Jr.,
vice-chairman George W.
Smith, Reno J. Brown, Aaron
Knowles, and Perry Christie, all
members of the Corporation.

MITCHELL, STAINS &

VESCO INDICTED
NEW YORK (AP) Former
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell,
former Commerce Secretary
Maurice H. Stans and two
corporate officials were
indicted today on charges of
conspiring to arrange a secret
$200,000 contribution to the
Nixon re-election campaign last
year.
The others named as
defendants in the 16-count
indictment returned by a
federal grand jury were a New
Jersey Republican leader,
Harry L. Sears, and Robert L.
Vesco, 37, former board
chairman of International
Controls Corp. Vesco made the
donation, which was later
returned by the Nixon
campaign.
Mitchell was the director of
Nixon's Re-election Campaign
until last July. Stans was chief
fund raiser. The 200-thousand
dollar contribution was
returned later to Vesco after it
was revealed that Vesco was
under investigation by the
Securities and Exchange
Commission. The conspiracy
charge could bring five years in
prison and a ten-thousand
dollar fine to each defendant
upon conviction.
In Washington, the
Committee to Re-elect the
President has issued statements
by John Mitchell and Maurice
Stans proclaiming their
innocence. The Mitchell
statement read: "There has
been no wrongdoing on my
part, and insofar as I know, on
the part of any other person in
the matter."
The Stans statement
expressed his dismay at the
action of the grand jury. And
Stans said, "when all the facts
are heard, I will be vindicated."
Vesco's whereabouts are
unknown.


THE 1973 CONFERENCE
of the Methodist Church in the
Caribbean and the Americas
(MCCA), to be held in NasMu
May IS to 24, is certain to
approve the ordination of
women to the Methodist
ministry in the area, and the
first woman will probably be
ordained to the ministry within
a year, MCCA president the
Rev. Claude L. Cadogan
announced this morning.
Rev. Mr. Cadogan told the
press that a motion before the
conference is carried by a 75
percent vote, and all eight of
the MCCA districts have, in
their district synods,
recommended the ordination
of women.
"We have been studying this
question for at least three
years." Mr. Cadogan said, "and
this will be the climax, when
the conference reviews it all.
and all indications are that we
are going to pass it."
lie said he knows of one
among the 16 deaconesses
serving within the MCCA who
is interested in proceeding to
ordination, and since she is
already highly-trained,
ordination is likely within a


year.
Ordinarily a candidate to the
ministry must go through three
or four years of preparation.
MEN'S DEACONATE
Also up for a final decision
during the 1973 MCCA
conference is the question of
establishing a deaconate for
men with the region.
Mr. Cadogan said there were
deacons in the early years of
the Church's history in the
area, but the deaconate was
dropped and now an attempt is
being made to revive It.
He described the proposed
deacons as "part-tine
ministers."
He said "there is a great
need in the Caribbean area for
this kind of ministry. If we are
to fulfill our function we have
got to augment our ministry."
Six of the MCCA districts
are "positively in favour" of
the deaconate, and the
remaining two are "uncertain,"
Mr. Cadogan said.
Fifty-three persons are
attending the nine-day
conference in Nassau from the
eight districts: the Bahamas,
Guyana, Haiti, Honduras,
Jamaica, Leeward Islands,
Panama-Costa Rica, and South
Caribbean.
REPRESENTATIVES
Representing the Bahamas
will be district chairman the
Rev. Edwin Taylor, the Rev.
Colin B. Archer of the Abaco
circuit, Mr. Mark F. Murray
and Mr. A. B. Archer of
Nassau.
This is the first time the
MCCA conference has been
held in the Bahamas District.
Another first for the
conference will be the
installation on May 24 of Miss
Carmen Lusan as the first
woman vice president of the
MCCA.
Mr. Cadogan will be the
preacher at the official
conference service, conducted
by conference secretary Rev. P.
A. Dean, at Ebenezer Church,
Shirley Street, 7:30 p.m. May
20.
The official opening is slated
for 8 p.m. May 16 at Ebenezer,
when addresses of welcome
will be given by Prime Minister
L. 0. Pindling, Rev. Mr.
Taylor, Anglican Bishop
Michael Eldon, Catholic Bishop
Paul Leonard Hagarty and the
Rev. Dr. R. E. Cooper,
president of the Bahamas
Christian Council.
The conference will be
highlighted on the social side
by a dinner in the Polaris Hall
of the Holiday Inn on Paradise
Island at 8 p.m. May 18, when
Mr. Pindling will be the guest
of honour and the speaker.
Visiting ministers are to be
the preachers in all of the
New Providence Methodist
churches and in the out island
circuits on Sunday. May 20.


SIh p











EL... U8laam. ThIIUVrMSY '10. 1972
war wd*WU* maw a m


RMOGS RORITDLY ISSUED THREAT
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon told a gathering of party
flthtld and financial backer tut aniht that he would have the guilty
ptlles in the Watergate scandal brought to justice. The President spoke at
a ose thoumesd.doll*r-.plate Republican fund-raining dinner in
Washinnton, but planners noted the turn-out was about two-thirds the
number expected.
In a separate development, a prominent doctor has confirmed that a
Nixon official who topped down as a result of the Watergate affair once
threatened to destroy anyone who opposed the Preident's policies. Doctor
Daniel Freadman who l chairman of the Pxychiatry Dcpartment at the
University of Chicago said yesterday that Egil Krogh, made the threat to
him in 1970. Krogh resigned his position as Undersecretary of the
Tranportaton Department yesterday, after taking responsibility for the
burglary of the office of Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist.
DIRECTOR CALLS CIA HELP 'ILL-ADVISED'
WASHINGTON (AP) Director fames Schlesinger or the Central
Inteolllgence Agency said Wednesday the CIA was insufficiently cautious in
providing paraphernalia for "an ll-advised act" the Ellsberg psychiatric
burglary.
"Regulations will be changed to preclude such happenings" in
clandestine operations inside the United States, he said.
Schlesinger, appearing before senior members of the Senate
Appropriations Committee in closed session, said the CIA's extension of
technical help to White Hous aides planning to burglarize the office of
Daniel Ellsbergs psychiatrist was "an Ill-advised act."
Schlesinger told newsmen after the session that he is not prepared to say
the CIA decision to give White House aide E. Howard Hunt false identity
papers, disguises and other technical aids was illegal because "I ant not a
lawyer."
ENGLISHMAN WINS 'PROHIBITED IMMIGRANT' APPEAL
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS, MAY 9 (AP) A ritish hotel manager,
a resident in Barbados for over eight years, has won an appeal against the
decision of a court last year that he was a prohibited immigrant.
Roger Seymour, a 32 year old native of Southampton, England. was
granted a work permit that expired In February 1972. He was given until
July IS to leave the island by the Immigration )Department with no
explanation offered.
When he failed to leave, he was arrested, jailed for a night and charged as
being a prohibited immigrant. A lower court magistrate upheld the decision
of the chief Immigration officer. The magistrate had refused to grant bail
to Seymour, but was later given on appeal to the Supremne Court.
Seymour's appeal against the decision finding him a prohibited
immigrant was upheld by the full Court of Appeal headed by Chief Justice
Sir William Dougias. In the time Seymour has lived in Barbados, he has
bought land and shares In a hotel company and, at one time, was president
of the local Hotel Association. One of his two children was born in
Barbados.
ARGUES IN FAVOUR OF MFN TREATMENT FOR U.S.S.R.
WASHINGTON (AP) US. Secretary of State William P. Rogers told
Congress Wednesday that its failure to grant trade concessions to the Soviet
Union "would seriously jeopardize" the United States' relations with
Moscow.
In a statement prepared for the House of Representatives' Ways and
Means Committee, Rogers said the so-called most-favoured-, nation (MVN)
treatment is essential to increasing trade with the Soviets, as well as leading
to more satisfactory political relations between the two superpowers.
"Extension of MFN status to the Communist nations ... would be a
major step toward political and economic normalization," Rogers said.
"It would not grant them exceptionally favourable treatment, for we
extend MFN status to all the countries with whom we have substantial
trade," he said.
MONETARY REFORM NOT IMMINENT
WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. Under Secretary of the Treasury Paul A.
Volcker said Wednesday he is convinced it will be possible to agree on
general principles of monetary reform at meetings of the International
Monetary Fund in Nalrobi, Kenya, next September.
However, Volcker said on his return Wednesday from visiting a dozen
Asian countries and Australia that the "technical details will require at
least another year or two to work out after Nairobi."
But Volcker said the present Informal dual system of fixed and floating
exchange rates for currencies "Is working in ag effective and stable manner
that can continue until final details are worked out."
Voicker, who Is Under Secretary for Monetary Affairs, talked with
officials in India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia end Australia following the annual
meeting of the Asian Development Bank at Manila.
STRIKE ENDS, COUNTDOWN CONTINUES
CAPE KENNEDY. FLA. (AP) Countdowns moved smoothly and in
l, diadem e)sll 1al the rockets which next week will launch skylab, the
lstin'ml e station, and the three-man crew which will live aboard
aorbitU i for 28 days. A strike which posed launch problems was
" i t t he d -
t?.'- Skylab, pethed atop a 33- storey Saturn et, ,stood on a pad
elgtbenths of a mle away from the 22-4tory Saturn 1 which will be used
to launchl astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., Dr. Joseph P. Kerwin and Paul J.
Welts.
The unmanned skylab will be launched .at 1:30 p.m. Monday and the
astronauts will be drilled Into orbit at 1 p.m. the next day.
Separate 500-man teams worked In adjoining firing rooms at the Launch
Control Centre three miles from the launch pads. As electrical power
surged through the two rockets, the launch teams monitored thousands of
system In the complex space hardware.
A mt of tracking station technicians, which at one time threatened to
delay the start of skylab, was settled Wednesday with a tentative agreement
between the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, local 2088,
and the Bendix field engineering division.
federal mediator William A. Rose said the agreement ending the
13-day-old strike came after a marathon session between union and
company representatives.
MEXICO WILL NOT REPAY RANSOM LOAN
GUADALAJARA, MEXICO, MAY 10 (AP) The governor of Jalisco
Stae said Wednesday that U.S. Consul General Terrance G. Leonhardy is
responsible for paying back the $80,000 bank loanmm that boutghtt his
freedom from guerrilla kidnappers.
Fede ral police and secret agents led the search for the abductors, making
a number of detentions, but Ruben Alvarex, chief of the State Police, said:
*msy arrets that are being made are completely legal."
AMvrea, whose state forces have apparently taken a secondary role in
the investigation, said an affidavit signed by Leonhardy describing the
abduction was ended for arrests to be legal. The U.S. Embassy in Mexico
City md it was awaiting word from Washinglton on what to do about the
A Mexican government spokesman, asked if Mexico might help repay
the $80,000 ransom money, said: "The government is not thinking of
dol anything al ong that line."
The Jalsco Governor, Alberto Oroaco Romnro, suggested that
Guadajara's lr American community should try to raise that amount
totbelp the sa-year-old diplomat pay it back.
GEUMVA FORMULA IS STUMBLING BLOCK IN OIL TALKS
TRIPOLI, LIBYA (AP) OPEC negotiations with western oil
iompales failed Wednesday and an extraordinary sesklon for the II OPEC
member countries was called in Vienna May 21. an official announcement
"The negotiating teans, having exhausted to no avail all possible means
to each an equitable agreement, decided to call for this extraordinary
eoaftence," a sew release by OPEC said.'
"The meetingp In Tripoli were unfortunately unsuccessful since the oil
copanels' repfeeatatlvm continued to adopt the same negative attitude
visvb thUe ma I lue," the release said.
Explaining he failure of the conference which began here Monday.
OPEC Seeaetary.lenel Abdul Rahman Khan of Algeria told newsmen the
Geneva aggement called for compensation only fur 6.6 percent while the


devalsution of the dollar caused a loes of I 1. I percent.
"The represetativs of the oil companies continued to stick firmly to
he Goneaes amemnt," Khan said.
"We nouilder th e aol companies ar.not trying to mow any step
forward to assure the full compensation demanded by the oil producing
eatiKs," Khas add, adding "it is evident that the Geneva formula in
werkidg ag t Ithe a ll producing countries while the companies alone are
tmoefttflg front It."

GAS fliOrTAG I LJAD TO CLOURE OF 562 STATIONS
WAf O (AAP) The ULS govenu announced WeWdnesday its
assgei sMw Ms geli statsien scres the United States have closed
eeNese of shedr aMI nd other 1.376 we threatened.
Dev ll M. e su Mtlas director of mthe Office of Emerpgncy
geWedhle ()), repeated his earlier assertion that any shortages will he
."ITIu i no acres of the country where the driver is unable to obtain
g. -' ugils.o" add 'Te Ina statement. The shortages "are not expected to he
a ity to waMes rationing by the federal ovwrnmn.nt."
*M eom t hed se intest count of stations closed or threatened with
dJh ds leSs than one per cent of the 22000 gaoilne ataltimms
Iba nHamll.. V sMd lb survey was based o-report from Its regional
lwas en lauease over the 342 s1atkons closed nd 930
... e g s Apr 23.


MI


St., il ,-t2h from 11 al m. to 6 p.m.
d wIN mu you might find
M" w"et of Show


WATERGATE SCANDAL LEAKS EflNATION


Mitchell, Stans &


Vesco to be indicteil


reports N.Y. Times

NEW YORK (AP) A report that two former mnlamn t tihe
Nixon Cabinet wil be indicted Th euaps fey ud
developments in the musooming scandals invol M White


House.
Although several U.S.
Cabinet members have been
indicted in past administra-
tions, only one was ever
convicted of wrongdoing.
The New York Times
reported Thursday it has
learned that former Attorney
General John Mitchell and
former commerce secretary
Maurice 14. Stans are to be
indicted in connection with a
secret contribution to the
re-election campaign of
President Nixon.
The federal indictment is
understood to charge that
? 'itchell and Stans accepted a
200,000-dollar secret cash
contribution from financier
Robert Vesco in return for an
effort to influence an
investigation of him by the
Securities and Exchange
Commission The Times said.
Mitchell was the director of
the Committee to Re-elect the
President until last July. Stans
was President Nixon's chief

Richardson will not

surrender final

authority in Watergate
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Elliot L. Richardson said
Wednesday he would delegate
full responsibility for the
Watergate case to a special
prosecutor, if he is confirmed
as Attorney General, but
refused to surrender final
authority.
Richardson, now Defense
Secretary, said he would seek
the advice of former Chief
Justice Earl Warren and leading
attorneys in making selection
of the person to direct the
government's investigation of
the Watergate case.
He also said he believes the
prosecutor should be part of
the Justice Department with
the title of special assistant
Attorney General and should
answer to no one but himself.
The special prosecutor, he
said, should not be established
in an independent agency
created by Congress because he
would lack the resources of the
Justice Department.
Richardson made his
comments in his first
appearance before the Senate
Judiciary Committee reviewing
his credentials to succeed
Richard G. Kleindienst as
Attorney General.
Kleindienst resigned last
week because his close personal
and professional friends had
been implicated in the
Watergate scandal.
Richardson is not expected
to run into trouble before the
committee but there was
speculation that the panel
might delay final consideration
of his nomination until he
names the special prosecutor.
Sen. Philip A. Hart,
(D-Mich.) said the committee
"ought not move toward
confirmation until there is an
agreement on the ground rules
governing the special
prosecutor.
"We're concerned with more
than giving the President his
man," said Hart. "We're
concerned with getting all the
facts in the Watergate ability of
government to work."
The Michipgan Democrat's
statements were prompted by
Richardson's refusal to excuse
himself from the Watergate
case as did Kleindienst.
"If I were to undertake the
Attorney Generalship on the
basis that I could not accept
ultimate responsibility on
matters and their necessary
action, then it would not be
appropriate for me to
undertaken the Attorney
Generalship at all," said
Richardson.
"It's not a matter of needing
someone to mind the store on
all other matters," he said "I
would not wish to go over


there without accepting the
responsibility of the office."
Richardson said he would
delegate all responsibility for
the Watergate to the special
prosecutor but 'I must he
answerable for what the
Attorney General does and
what the special prosecutor
does."
Richardson mid "I would
not expect in matters of
Judgment, to interpose my own
jogtment. The special
prosecutor would, for all
pamtical purpose, he in a
Oaation to do what needs to
1e done.


fund raiser. The Time said
Vesco, who is out of the
country, would be Indicted as
well.
Meanwhile, President Nixon,
in a speech to Republican
Party faithful and financial
backers, promised that "the
guilty will be brought to
justice" in the Watergate
scandal.
But Senate testimony about
high-level involvement in
clandestine operations has
raised new questions about the
strange goings-on.
DEPLORABLE
Nixon told a 1,000-dollars-
a-plate Republican campaign
dinner Wednesday night, "I can
assure you that we will get to
the bottom of this deplorable
incident."
The President said he was
elected to build "a more
peaceful world" and is
determined to go forward
toward that goal.
"We're going to make the
next four years better than the
last four years," Nixon told the
kickoff fund-raising event from
the 1974 Congressional
campaign.
But planners said the
turnout was far below the
number of contributors
expected and that the dinner
might raise little more than
half the 1.4 million dollars
usually raised in the off-year.
GOP gala.
In a Watergate development
earlier Wednesday, the director
of the Central Intelligence
Agency told Senators that a
trusted Nixon adviser, John D.
Ehrlichman, smoothed the way
for E. Howard Hunt to obtain
CIA materials later used in an
office burglary.
CIA chief James L.
Schlesinger said the agency
didn't. -know what Hunt's
mission was but that giving him
the aid was all-advised, Even
though Ehrlichman, who gave
up his White House post last
weak, was said to havou asked
that Hunt receive, agency
assistance.
Hunt, a one-time CIA
employee, hastestified he took
part in the September 1971
burglary of a Los Angeles
psychiatrist's office in an
attempt to photograph the
doctor's files on Daniel
Ellsberg, a defendant in the
Pentagod Pnpers trial.
At the time, Huilt as
working for the White House as
a "security-affairs consultant."
Nine months later, he was
arrested in the break-in at
Democratic headquarters in the
Watergate here.
NOT CLEAR
Shortly after the Watergate
arrests, Schlesinger said, the
CIA gave an account of its
dealings with Hunt to top
Justice Department officials
and Earl J. Silbert, chief
prosecutor in the Watergate
case.
It is not clear what was done
with the information before
the CIA's involvement was
disclosed by the New York
Times this week.
Meanwhile, the' Senate
judiciary committee continues
hearings Thursday on Nixon's
nomination of Defense
Secretary Elliot L. Richardson
to be Attorney General and in
over-all charge of the
government's Watergate
investigation.
Ktchardson told the
committee Wednesday he
would "be answerable for what
the Attorney General does and
what the special prosecutor
does." But he said he would
choose that special prodcutor
with great care and give him
the job of carrying out the
prosecution. The Senate's
special Watergate investigating
committee, which opens public
hearings a week from
Thursday, announced it plans
to cal 20 witnesses during the
first round of hearings.
The questioning will begin


with relatively low-ranking
figures in the Nixon re-election
campaign and the Watergate
begging incident, committee
leaders said, and will culminate
with testimony from ranking
figures, including fired White
House counsel John W. Dean
IH, former Atty. Gen. Mitchell,
Ehrllchman and former White
House chief of staff H. R.
Haldeman.
OBruchman made a second
lengity appearance before the
Watergate grand jury
WeadMday, and Haldeman said
he wl return next week,.


LIST SigVS
WASHIGTON (AP)- The
re9sla laf TTaIs.. of BgW
Krtud* Uadesnestary of
Trmnpotatmn bip to at
least 10 the number of reat
redaiom iand flAp related
to the Watrgate and Eoihbesg
scadaln.
HERE is a list:
Preeidantial chief of staff
H. R. Haldmax, quit April 30.
Chief White Houm
domestic adviser John D.
Ehrlichman, quit April 30.
Presidential counsel John
W. Dean Ill, fired April 30.
Acting FBI Director L.
Patrick Gray HI, quit April 27.
Atty. Gen. Richard G.
Kleindiaenst, resigned April 30.
but remains in igs post pending
Senate confirmation of his
designated replacement, Elliot
Richardson.
-Job. S. Magruder, former
Nixon campaign deputy who
quit a $36,000-a-year policy
job at the Commerce
Department April 26.
David Young, a former
National Security Council staff
member who allegedly
participated in planning the
Daniel Ellsberg burglary while
working under Krogh. Quit
without explanation or formal
announcement sometime last
month.
Gordon S. Strachan,
former aide to Haldeman who
quit as general counsel to the
U.S. Information Agency April
30.
Robert C. Odle, former
White House aide and
campaign official. Quit a
$26,898-a-year "management
counselor" job at the
Agriculture Department May 6,
after five days on the job.
In addition, a number of
former White House and
campaign officials who are now
linked to the Watergate scandal
returned to private life before
the recent wave of exits.
These include former
presidential counselor Charles
Colson, former presidential
appointments secretary Dwight
Chapin, former Nixon
campaign chairman John N.
Mitchell, former re-election
officials Robert C. Mardian and
Frederick C. Larue, and former
Nixon campaign treasurer
Hugh Sloan Jr.
Also, two of the seven
men convicted in the Watergate
wiretapping had worked for
the Nixon campaign. G.
Gordon Liddy was fired as
counsel to the Nixon finance
committee after he refused to
answer FBI questions about
the wiretapping. James W.
McCord Jr., has been employed
as security director for the
campaign before he was
arrested during the Watergate
raid last June 17.

2 top govt. o11

authorized lout

to read doceonts
WASHINGTON (AP) Two of
the highest State Dpartment
officials authorilsd convicted
Watergate bursltr E. Howard Hunt
to read and copy 240 highly
classified doeumess eaonemln the
Vietnam War, a department
spokesman aid Wednesday.
Department spokesman Chrils
W, Bsay said then deputy
undeMseretary. Willam Maember
and deputy undersecretary U.
Alexis Johnaon spcifcaly
authorlsed Hunt to eveoaw the
classifled material nla Sieptember
Bray Mid the authorization was
ives t the uest la both writing
end by phoneqa from El Kreogh and
David Young, then White House
sides.
The original request was
contained In a memo written Aug.
II, 197I to Maconmber. Inay said
the memorandum was "'spellitealy
addressed to iavestlgations rto
to Pentaon Papers aka ges
requested ... copies of all able
which had passed between the State
Department or the White Houe on
on hand sad our embassy in
Baleon for the prteod Apr 1 -


Nov. 30, 1963."
The d.pertment had
acknowledged that Hunt had mes
to the documents but had Indleated
it did not know who had issued the
authorization.
On Aug. 16, bray related.
Young, who is a prinacll flure In
the current Watlerswte viestloatn,
apparently talked to Mueomber by
phone. The State Deprtent
offiWal Is desred as havit told
Young that It would be a bevy
workhleed on the State Department
to provide the amount of cabes
requested.
Young responded that he would
have someone some to the
deputenmt to look at the material.
The matter lay dr emat until
Sept. 20. 1971, Dray s1id. "On that
day ... Young ain caed
Macomber nd Id th poIIty
tat someone would eao ever tad
rviaw the telegraphicd traf, aad
he sid Mr. Hunt weoM do se."
Then. Bray sld. "Mr. Macmbt
authorized Mr. Hunt's sees to the
Macumber is now U.S.
ambuassdor to Turkey. TOMday.
Meaomber was said by the State
Do rtmet to hbw nrmemberd
only the phoMne by Yeaoung sad
that he conversaleo dealt with Ma
esmdtetoen of permmntwids
clesftl or sy em t In
Asurdin to m a, W mesber
ems wstlseerd alus to qV e Md
asks ple r its A .u ..


White House tried to


IOBIM ItARS
IT ifItill I1


blame CIA for burglary LwAU' asfig


says former CIA agent

By LawremeL. Kautams
M. sAmi t-h Whime Bw M ad t bhasame he CIA forpolMelcal
asiplmp esmtaeBd by PPeWiat Nitnme r10 CetloM OamWpeiL
The statement by the former Boston but said he couldn't
seurty chief for the Nixon comment publicly because he
casmpaip, who faces up to 45 feels still bound to silence by
years ln jail on his conviction the attorney-client
in the Watergate can, was relationship.
disclosed on the heels of thee "By now, I was completely
developments. convinced that the White
Former CIA Deputy House was behind the idea and
Director Robert Cushman out ploy which had been
short a European tour by presented, and that the White
several days to return to House was turning ruthless,
Washington for talks with the and would do whatever was
Justice Department and politically expedient at any
Congressional committees. one particular point in time to
Cusamnan auethoided CIA help accomplish its own ends," the
to White House aides who memo said.
planned the 1971 burglary of McCord said he also had
the office of Daniel Ellsberg's become convinced that the
psychiatrist, but the CIA says White House had fired CIA
Cushman cut off the aid six Director Richard Helms and
days before the breaking after replaced him with Schlesinger
a subordinate became "to lay the foundation for
convinced the operation was a claiming that the Watergate
"domestic clandestine operation was a CIA operation
operation" forbidden to the and ... to be able to claim that
CIA by law. Gen. Cushman is 'Helms had been fired for it."'
now Marine Corps McCord said there were
commandant. indications as early as last July,
The Justice Department the month after the Watergate
refused to make any comment arrests, that the Nixon election
on why it had withheld campaign "was claiming that
information about the CIA's the Watergate operation was a
assistance to E. Howard Hunt, CIA operation."
who received false IMPEACHMENT
identification papers, a camera McCord said he was told by
disguised as a tobacco pouch, a fellow Watergate conspirator E.
recorder, a wig, glasses and a Howard Hunt that Hunt told
speech-altering device before him more than once in the fall
the Ellsberg Burglary. CIA and winter of 1972, "that he,
officials told the Justice Hunt, had information in his
Department about this aid at possession which 'would be
least as early as last December, sufficient to impeach the
and reportedly as early as President."'
October, when Hunt was under Hunt's name arose in
indictment for the Watergate another set of memos, said to
raid. have been prepared by the
Two Senate committees CIA, which has been given to
ordered CIA Director James the judge presiding over the
Schlesinger and other past and Ellsberg Pentagon Papers trial
present CIA officials to Capitol in Los Angeles.
Hill to give formal One memo said that on July
explanations. 22, 1971, Hunt, then working
McCord, a CIA agent of at the White House, visited
more than 19 years' Gen. Cushman, then the CIA's
experience, had retired well Deputy Director.
before he was arrested inside Hunt, the memo said,
the headquarters of the "stressed that he had been
Democratic Party in the authorized to .conduct a very
Watergate last June 17. sensitive operation by the
INTENSE PRESSURE' White House and that it should
In his memo to Senate and be held as a very secret
government investigators, matter." ": <
McCord said "intense pressure" Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy,
was put on some of the another convicted Watergate
defendants in the Watergate conspirator, have been
trial last January in order to identified by their former
help clear officials of the White House superior, Egil
Committee for the Re-election "Bud" Krogh, as the men he
of the President and the White authorized to steal the Ellsberg
House of any responsibility for Psychiatric records from the
the Watergate bugging. Los Angeles office of Dr. Louis
McCord said his stand Fielding.
against that "ploy" may have Krogh resigned Wednesday
been the reason it was not used as Undersecretary of
in the trial. Transportation.
hus ssh seasseesgueisaum.s wi s


nut 1e saw suggesuons were
made to him through his
lawyer that he agree to state he
had been recalled from
retirement by the CIA to take
part in the Watergate
operations.
McCord quoted one lawyer,
Gerald Alch, as saying that his
CIA personnel records could be
doctored to indicate he had
been recalled and that
Schlesinger, whose
appointment to head the CIA
had just been announced,
"would go along with it."
McCord said he rejected the
idea both out of loyalty, to the
CIA, and because it isn't true
that the CIA was involved.
Alch was contacted in


REIRUT, May i0
tAP)-Lebues troops battled
P g .tlni rO from Syria
into the em"ly hours today along a
55-mbe iront In the eastern Bekaa
Valy near the border, a senior
ary officer said.
e said the lihting stretched
fro the army' ma garrison town
of Maeriyou in the south to the
viciWety of Raalbeck, in the
northeast.
In many aras, including the
towns of Hasbaya and Rachays,
villagers took to the hit armed
with Worlad War II rifles to support
army ets and atilery attempting
to repulse "a. massive influx" of
guerril a reinforcements from across
the Syrian border, the officer id.
Whe the Lebanew jets attacked
the Palestinian guerrillas from Syria
along the border late Wednpagty
afternoon, Beirut was quiet ihe
second outbreak of fightl-
between the Lebanese army d
guerrillas based Inside the coun y
subsided. *
The air force struck at guerriis
battling army forces in the Beta
Valley and. moving up for an attak
on army commandos in the toawrf
Rachaya, In southeast Lebanon,
9fficlal sources said.
Palestinians who crossed the
Syrian border during fighting in
Beirut Tuesday has clashed with the
army near Rachaya Tuesday night,
but the army said then that the
fight was "quickly contained." '
The number of invaders from
Syria was not known, but 5,000 of
them came over during the fighting
last week between the Lebanese
army and guerrillas based in
Lebanon. That force clashed with
the army near Alha then returned
to Syria after a cease-fire was
reached in Beirut.
Persons living near the border
said the Lebanese air force flew, 20
sorties against the intruders, hitting
positions near the villages of Yanta,
Deir el Ashayer and Bayader al
Adamss for more than two hours,
The attacks followed a prolonged
artillery attack on the guerrillas.
In Beirut, a commission of army
and guerrilla representatives
announced it had reached a series
of agreements to make the most
recent cease-fire "final and prevent
incidents that might strain .,he
situation again."
Details were not immediately
~S|

BOYS' SCHOOL PANTS..... .. ... 00
MEN'S PERMANENT PRESS PANTS... '. . 5,
LADIES' DRESSES .. . . .00


TABLE SPECIAL BARGAIN


rea- a m anI


SHIRTS, DRESSES, BLOUSES,
SWEATERS, SKIRTS I.UU
MANY OTHER ITEMS MUST GOI
SALE STARTS- FRIDAY, MAY 4th

TONY'S DEPT. STORE
MARKET ST. NEXT DOOR TO HARDING'S FOOD STORE
.V)sW i11a


FF AU Ml APIIAKES


5- 9
I RUST RTTgLgkO 2-371


I. - I -


TnMWAy, May 10, 1973


la. *


...


RL.. fRlahsem


I I










Thurmsdey, May 10, 1973.


Se Uribunt
NuTu s Amancrs JUA IN VZRSA MAGCSm
Beint Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
S LEON E. H. DUPUCH, PubilAmr/Edltor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.D.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Pubisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributritn Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Pubisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
* Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, May 10, 1973.


I D"OlUAL


Some startling figures

By ETIENNE DUPUCH
HEALTH Minister Loftus Roker is to be commended for
instituting controls at the Princess Margaret Hospital to stop
'leaks" in the hospital's supplies.
This move will not make him popular with some members of
the staff but it is a necessary piece of discipline to protect public
property and to assure that adequate supplies will always be
available to the patients.
I have it on good authority that over a quarter million dollars
worth of medicines and supplies has been disappearing from the
hospital every year.
Other public departments also need to establish controls.
It is going to be interesting to see from what source Mr. Roker
draws his security officers. If he is not careful he might find it
necessary to establish a second unit to watch his "security."
******** **
In the recent Budget debate Prime Minister Pindling had
something to say about the Public Service.
He said Ministers had been asked to keep their staff
complements this year at the 1972 level because it was felt that
"the service had an abundance of staff".
This is an interesting admission by the Government. An
investigation would probably reveal that the overall staff
complement in public departments has doubled since the PLP
took over ... and it is certainly no more efficient.

Money is so tight in the Treasury today members of
Government are beginning to look around to see what has
happened d to the flow of money into the Treasury.
Expenses are piling up and will skyrocket further under
independence while the sources of revenue are steadily drying
up.
But if the public service staff is frozen at its present level and
business operations continue to stagnate under governmental
-restrictions what is going to happen to all the young people the
Government is pushing through schools?
The Prime Minister said he would have to build up the police
force in order to preserve order after independence.
This is once he was right but when it is realized that the
situation is being created by Government nonsense, he doesn't
deserve any marks for taking this precaution.
Indeed, he is to be condemned for allowing his Government to
make this measure necessary.

Norman Solomon (FNM) came under criticism by Government
members in the House when he charged that "certain Ministers
were in somebody's back pocket".
Whether this charge is true or false ... questions must be raised
in the public's mind when they recall the names of some of the
men who were associated with Dr. Cruz in his extraordinary
,operations in the Bahamas ... and his final departure with $1
million of the British-American Bank's money!
Apparently no effort has been made by local authorities to
*deal with this case, and no effort has been made to publicly
'investigate the people who were connected with the Dr. Cruz
Operations.
In any civilized country in the world I feel certain there would
:have been a public investigation of this affair.

SAnd when you read of the major businesses in Nassau which
are alleged to be controlled by Vesco interests today, it would
*seem he has been allowed to build up a commercial power that is
"capable of throttling any government.
SThe money this man and his group brought into the colony is
2now under investigation by the S.E.C. in the U.S.
: Check the names of people who owe substantial sums of
:money to Butler's Bank, one of the Vesco interests, and you may
'begin to realize that, while some Bahamian businesses are
"cramped for staff by the Government, the Vesco organization
seems to be crawling with foreign staff.
SI am not saying that Vesco should not have all the trained staff
that is needed for the efficient operation of his many enterprises
in Nassau, but how does the Government justify the
discrimination it practises against reputable fully-owned
Bahamian institutions of long standing?

SGovernment seemed painfully quiet when Opposition member
of the House Norman Solomon challenged them to deny that


ihey had borrowed $8 million either from the Port Authority, the
,asino operation at Freeport or a large private firm there and
discounted it at $1.5 million because they needed money "so
desperately".
According to a report of the debate in The Tribune ... time and
gain Government members tried to get Mr. Solomon to deal with
he Appropriations Act which was then before the House, but the
fNM representative said that the miscalculations made by the
Government in the past all "intended to deceive" were the
key to what could be expected in the future.
In the course of the debate Mr. Solomon surveyed the various
Budgets dating back to 1970 to prove his contention that this
year's Budget was designed to "positively and malevolently
mislead the Bahamian public into a haze".

2 Referring to building statistics Mr. Solomon brought out some
Phteresting facts.
" He revealed that a local cement factory produced 70,000 cubic
7ards of cement in 1970 and only 26.000 cubic yards in 1972 a
drop of 44,000 cubic yards in two years!
These startling figures are reflected in building statistics
produced by Mr. Solomon which showed that in 1967 the value
of building permits was over $83 million. In 1972 it had dropped
tp $8.415 million, a difference of $75 million.
It must not be forgotten that 1967 was the year the PLP took
over control of the Government.
Instead of new buildings being erected in the Bahamas the
building and banking industries have boomed in the Cayman
iWlands where I am told that the standing joke taxi drivers tell to
visitors to the Caymans is that they are going to erect a statue in


Sht Xrthimv


I TOWNand AROUNDS I


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


3 nuns who celebrate their 35th. anniversary tomorrow


started their religious


life in a dance hall!


THERE aren't many nuns who can honestly say they received
their early training in a former dancer hall. If they admitted it,
they would probably be honoured by a belly laugh of disbelief or
be quietly drummed out of the corps. Sisters Maria Rahming,
Elizabeth Claridge and Teresa Symonette all Bahamians -
readily admit their dance hall background yet, strangely enough,
nobody bats an eyeball.
The dance hall was located active in education.
on Nassau Street and in 1937, Their primary education was
18 young girls who thought received in Nassau and all
they were interested in the attended private high school
religious life attended St. classes at Aquinas College.
Francis School, West Hill Sisters Maria, Elizabeth and
Street, for a year to take Teresa had two years of junior
instructions while the dance collage at the Franciscan
hall was being converted into a college of Mount St. Clair,
convent. Clinton, Iowa.
The girls took instructions In 1963 Sisters Elizabeth
for 18 months from Sr. and Teresa went to New York
Josephine Rosaire and later to enter the Sisters of Charity
from Sister Agatha. However, Convent on the Hudson and
by the time the convent was completed their college
ready only three of those 18 education there. They have
decided to enter. Soon the remained Sisters of Charity.
dance hall became a serious All the sisters have bachelor
shelter for knowledge and the of arts degrees.
worship of God. Sister Maria attended St.
Tomorrow marks the 35th. Benedicts College in.
anniversary of the convent of Collegeville, Minnesota, and
St. Martins de Porres and the majored in social studies with
35th anniversary of three her minor in education.
young girls who decided to After a varied experience in
take the veil. teaching at primary schools she
Chatting with the sisters on is now a mathematics teacher
Tuesday brought out many at St. Augustine's. College, Fox
interesting facts about their Hill.
lives as nuns and their feelings Sister Elizabeth majored in
about the tremendous changes English with education as her
that have taken place in the minor.
Church in recent years. She has taught at St.
SISTER MARIA RAHMING Joseph's, St. Francis, Sacred
is the daughter of the late Heart, and St. Bede's.She also
Josiah and Alice Rahming of spent two years teaching in
Sandilands Village. She knew New York, but is now back
early in life that she wanted to home as headmistress of Our
be a nun. Lady's School.
To Sister Maria the religious Sister Teresa obtained her
life offers two advantages over B.A. at Mount St. Vincent on
the secular life. the Hudson, New York. She
There is more of an majored in English and
opportunity to serve one's received her minor in
fellowman, she says. education. She taught for two
Freed of the duties of wife years at Sacred Heart before
and mother one's energies and entering the convent. After
time can be completely teaching for two years at St.
channelled into service. She Augustife's, Bronx, New York,
told me how her father would she returned to Nassau and is
always come to her to discuss now back at Our Lady's School
his problems. His other where she had taught 20 years
children would be concerned ago. Her teaching career
with their own pressing included St. Francis School,
personal problems whereas she Sacred Heart, St.. Bede's and
was able to give him her Hunter's, Grand Bahama.
undivided attention. Life at St. Martins, all three
This same absence of assured me, has not changed
domestic and personal fundamentally in 35 years.
obligations also frees one for Basically the nuns still fulfill
religious devotions, the same purpose to worship
For as long as she can God and serve their fellowman.
remember Sister Elizabeth However, externally, things
Claridge wanted to be a nun. have changed.
She was encouraged in her Gone are the habits of old.
ambitions by her adopted By dress alone it's almost
mother, Mabel Thompson impossible today to tell who is
Davis, and by her early and who isn't a nun.
teachers, the Sisters of Charity. Nuns now have the option
Sister Elizabeth, in a smart of being called by their
blue dress, is a slim handsome baptismal names.
woman without a trace of grey Gone also is the regi-
'in her smooth dark hair. Gone. also the reI-


Sister Teresa Symonette was
born at Dunmore Lane,
Nassau, she attended Western
Central, Eastern Central and
Sacred Heart schools.
She is the quiet one of the
three very slim with
gold-rimmed spectacles and a
tranquil countenance. Unlike
the other two she wore a black
veil and a short white habit.
The three sisters are all


mentation of01 convent living.
Lights no longer go out at 10
p.m. the sisters go and come
as they like. No longer do they
live by the bell now they set
their own time-tables.
Although these changes. I
was assured, were not basic
changes they were beneficial.
They enable the sisters to
come into contact with more
social problems. Sister
Elizabeth thinks the changes


the Public Square of the island to the stupidity of the
immigration policy of the Hon. Arthur Hanna!
S * * * *
And then Mr. Alfo'd Maycock (PLP), chairman of the
Bahamas Development Corporation came to the House with the
story that investors ... with $1 .000 million to spend ... are panting
on the sidelines, just waiting to rush in and start a gold bonanza
in the islands as soon as honest Britain is completely removed
from the scene!
We will wait and see when this great tide of money starts to
flow and from what source it comes.
Readers of The Tribune will recall that it was this newspaper
that pricked the Dr. Cruz balloon.
The first time we raised a question about this man we received
an urgent telegram from the bank a short time after the paper
was published threatening us with a suit for damages if we were
not careful.
But we refused to be silenced. Every time we brought out
something new on this man an associate of his in New York
phoned our news desk to say that they were planning to spend
hundreds of millions of dollars on low cost housing in Nassau.
When the situation got too hot Dr. Cru/ cleared out with drafts
totalling $1 million of the depositors' money He has not been
able to cash these drafts because The Tribune alerted the foreign,
press in time to warn the world of this affair.

Ordinarily an investor would feel more secure in a country
where Britain still exercised some control but now we are told
that $1,000 million are ju nting to come into the colony and
that this will happen after independence!

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
What's a' your jargon o' your schools.
Your Latin nameF for horns and stools:
If honest nal'ire made you fools,
What stairs your grammars?- BOBBY BURNS


NUNS CELEBRATE Sister Maria Rahming, Elizabeth Claridge and Teresa
Symonette will celebrate their 35th anniversary as nuns at special ceremonies at St.
Martin's Convent, Nassau Street, tomorrow afternoon. It is also the 35th anniversary of
the convent, which was converted from a dance hall after it was taken over by the
C tholic Church. PHOTO: Philip Symonette.


have caused a more natural
relationship between the nuns
and their secular brothers and
sisters. Now a sister can show a
natural emotion. Before the
ecumenical changes nuns were
expected to maintain an
unnatural aloofness. We
laughed as I recalled my
convent school days when I
believed nuns never ate!
In our conversation we
touched on other changes
going on in the Church.
The three seemed to
thoroughly endorse the trend
towards individual choice.
They emphasised that as
nuns they were in a different
position to priests. A priest,
appointed to a very primitive
post, might spend a very
isolated and lonely life. They,
on the other hand, had the
companionship and intellectual
stimulation of their sisters in
the religious community.
Under certain circumstances,
they thought, marriage of
priests might be a good thing.


The founding fathers were
the old Benedictine priests,
Bishop Bernard Kevenhoester,
O.S.B. and Father Bonaventure
Hansen O.S.B. St. Martin's was,
until 10 years ago, the home
for an independent order of
Bahamian nuns. In 1963, after
a year of being neither one
thing nor t'other, the nuns
were allowed to choose which
they preferred. Most of them
chose the Benedictines. So in
1963 there was an
amalgamation with the
Benedictines, whose Mother
house is in Minnesota, and
whose mother superior is Rev.
Mother Henrita. sister of Fr.
Cornelius Osendorf, O.B.E.
The old Bahamian group of
nuns of the convent of Blessed
Martin de Porres became St.
Martins under the Benedictine
sisters.
It was very difficult for me
to realize that the laughing
slim Sister Mary was the
Superior. I recall the rather
Page 8, Col. I


Art show is interesting, amusing,


By ARTGOER
NOT SINCE the days of the
old clothesline art sale which
collapsed several years ago has
Nassau had such an interesting,
different, inspired, amusing
and amazing art show as that
presently going on in the old
Bethell Robertson building on
Bay Street. The show really
began over dinner at Tommy
Goodwin's home a few months
ago. Tommy and Mrs.
Stephanie Bethell Cousins
talked about it and Stephanie
took on the job of collecting
the artists and their works and
putting on the show. Naturally,
Fommy is one of the
participants and his painting in
acrylic of Bahamian work
boats is one of the stars of the
show.
The grand opening took
place on Friday evening and by
Wednesday, about a quarter of
the 210 works had been sold to
the tune of over $3,000. The
show continues through
Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9
p.m.
The variety of the exhibits
caters to all tastes from the
over of delicate flowers, the
Bahamian seascape fanatic, the
photographic buff or the
collector of what would have
been classed as hard core porn
a decade ago but which is
today just another subject for
the eye of the beholder.
It would be impossible to
















r M
b"'r ^J


inspired--& different!


mention every piece of art in
the show but highlights do
come to mind. Denis and June
Knight are well known potters
who have turned out some
imaginative work in the past.
Their contributions brought an
immediate tug at the old purse
strings. June has done
earthenware figures in two
forms. Some are simply
ornaments while others are
made as wind bells for hanging
on patio or verandah. Denis's
multi-holed vases have sides
which have been pressed with
newspaper stories. On display
is part of the 10-foot high
mural which June is doing for
the Royal Bank in the
Beaumont Arcade.
Amos Ferguson, who
delighted art enthusiasts at
Stanley Toogood's studio, has
several of his very pleasing
primitive paintings on display.
Eddie Minnis didn't choose Pot
Luck or dripping Poinciana
trees for the show. He offers
instead several excellent line
drawings of truly Over-The-Hill
scenes. His astute eye for detail
has caught even the STOP sign
which frequently finds itself
slithered to the bottom of the
pole instead of the top. Molie
Maura shows some very
delicate floral water colours, a

,(>1


line drawing of frangipani
flowers and several of her
intricate collage efforts.
Brent Malone who has been
devoting most of his time to
leading his shop Aquarius to
the top of the fashion world,
has done some very fine
batiking. The knight and of
course, Brent's favourite bird,
the owl, head the list of
interesting offerings at the
show.
Marion Laney and Alston
Pilgrim both like bold, bright
colours applied in bold strokes.
Their works are strong and
striking.
To the artists must go the
praise for making this show the
most notable to have come
along in quite a while. But to
Stephanie Cousins must go the
highest award. Mrs. Leslie
Higgs, who displayed some of
her Bahamian water colours in
the show, said in the
programme that Stephanie
"deserves credit and a genuine
vote of thanks for this, her
effort in fostering art in the
Bahamas". Mrs. Higgs saw the
demise of the old Bahamas Art
Society thanks to lethergy. As
an art lover, it must please her
very much to see that art is still
alive and well in Nassau.


ART EXHIBITION Georgia Cook of Kent, England, has several exhibits In an art show that is
now open In the old Bethell Robertson building on Bay Street. She studied painting and sculpture
at Bromley Art College, Ravensbourne College of Art and Design and Southamption University.
During this time her work was chosen in two successive years by the Arts Council of Great Britain
and a place offered at the Royal Academy of Art in London. PHOTO: Philp Symonette.


CYRIL JOHNSON
... leaving after 4a years
SISTER MARY PATRICIA
RUSSELL the Regional
Superior of all the sisters in
New Providence, Bimini and
Grand Bahama was present
during our chat. With the aid
of Sister Maria's memory -
Sister Maria has almost total
recall she told us about the
history of the convent.









Thurdft, IMy 10.1973.


Many new features give American Motors Javelin style & grace


NASSAU MOTORS on Shirley Street number among their products the American Motors range
of cars with the Javein tarring in the highest tradition of motor sports and touring.


Javelin's long, low lines give
it the look of an aristocrat at
first glance. There is motion in
the sloping hood, the
sculptured fenders and the
recessed screened grille. Like
the other American Motors
vehicles, Javelin is protected by
the new front and rear
bumpers that withstand carrier
impacts of five m.p.h. in the


front and 2% m.p.h. in the
rear, making those
embarrassing parking and
garage door dents things of the
past.
Javelin has an all-welded
single unit body construction
with a guard-rail door
structure. It is rust proof and
carries a double coat of
lustre-gard acrylic paint. The


side windows are ventlaes and
curved giving additional grace
to the styling.
The Interior features a
nononsense instrument panel
that wraps around the cockpit
for easy inspection of any dial
or gauge at a moment's notice.
Road sound is kept to a
minimum by the floor
insulation and the ceiling is


AMERICAN MOTORS JAVELIN with Its long, low profile and wrap-around
instrument panel Is available at NASSAU .Motors on Shirley Street.
11 ,dk A -n -"11


done in fibrCglass. Javelin has
built-in comfort for both driver
and passengers in the foam
rubber front seat pads with all
viny! upholstery. The bucket
seats are high-backed and
contoured to the body.
In the area of safety, Javelin
is really spectacular. Standard
on the model are back-up lights
and four-way hazard warning
signals. There is a rear view
mirror on the outside left and
the interior rear view mirror is
a full 12 inches wide and
equipped for day-night vision.
The side-of-car safety
markers are illuminated with
the headlights. All the outside
door handles are flush
contoured and there is a brake
warning system. Seat belts of
course, are fitted for all
positions, and the front seats
have shoulder belts and head
restraints. The instrument
panel is padded. So are the
visors, pillars and the roof


Rolls oyceeaders. The steering wheel is
ollsce m ay develop energy absorbing. It's difficult
Pto go wrong with a car so filled


manual on floor transmission.
Automatic transmission is
optional and there are five
option engines right up to the


high-powered 401 cu. in. V4.
There ae loads of options
available on the Javelin to
make it practically made to


measure. All the "powers" ma
available power steering,
power brake. Mukc cal be
supplied by an AM radio, an
AM/FM radio with two rear
speakers, or an 8-track
stereo-tape player with manual


AM radio, two rear speakers
asd two door mounted
speakers.
S the Javelin at Natsau
Mets on Sbrley Street. It's
another winner from American
Motors.


--lagfnmfw


LONDON (AP) Rolls
Royce and General Electric are
discussing a partnership to
produce a revolutionary new
engine for a new generation of
airbuses, it was reported
recently.
The Times of London
newspaper said talks between
top executives of the two
companies were going on
following an apparent
breakdown in General
Electric's efforts to link up
with European firms.
They envisage a 10-ton
engine to power the next crop
of airliners that will be smaller
and more economical than
those beiqg built now.
The engine, British
newspapers reported, would
generate about half the power
of Rolls Royce's RB-211
engine that was developed for
the Lockheed Tristar airbus.
"The most likely customer,"
The Times said, was Boeing,
which is looking for an engine
of this size for its proposed
707 airliner.
General Electric, one of the
major American aircraft engine
manu tmr, needs a project
tq keep going during the
current "adup, and so does
Rolls Royce.
Rolls needs a project and
money to follow the RB-211
to keep its design teams and


new airbi
highly expensive technology
functioning.
General Electric, faced with
increasing domination of the
U.S. market by its major rival
Pratt and Whitney, has its eyes
on Europe. And to finance and
develop a project like the one
the two firms are discussing,
they need each other, the
papers said.
The Times commented:
"From this point of view, the
participation of Rolls would,
they hope, open sales doors for
the engine among the airlines
of Europe."
Rolls has been involved with
a consortium of six European
nations for the last year on
discussions to develop a new
engine. Any linkup with Rolls
would give the American
corporation a big boost in the
new expanded European
Common Market.
Rolls and General Electric


is engine
signed an agreement two weeks
ago to develop a new version of
the British Pegasus engine that
powers the Harrier vertical
takeoff fighter now in service
in Britain.
The Daily Telegraph
reported Rolls' new power
plant was known as the
"three-spool engine."
In it, fans, compressors and
turbines have separate shafts
rotating within each other at
their own speeds that made it
quiet to run and economical to
operate.
The engine, the paper added,
would be the first of its kind in
the world.
The Times, however, noted
that "immense problems ... in
the political and technical
fields" would have to be
overcome before any
Rolls-General Electric project
got off the ground.


within safrey features.
Standard with the Javelin is
a 232 cu. in. engine with six


cylinders and a three-speed


1. Javelin Instrument panel wraps around cockpit. Note the big, easy-to-read dials and
convenient controls.


3. Optional Stereo tape plyer with manual AM radio.


"Polaroid" is a registered trademark of Polaroid Corp.. Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A. Film comparison: T108/88.


lap rotary engine has problem


LOS ANGELES (AP) -, An
independent research firm here
reports that 20 per cent of the
Japanee-made rotary engine
Mazda automobiles with more
than 30,000 miles of wear


AN INTERNATIONAL BANK

REQUIRES APPLICANTS FOR

THE POSImION OF MANAGER

OF ITS NASSAU R 1ANCH.

PREVIOUS MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE IN LOCAL
AND INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND A
SUCCESSFUL BACKGROUND AS MANAGER IN A
SIMILAR POSTING IS ESSENTIAL.
Please apply In writing to Ernst & Ernst, Chartered
Accountants, P. O. Box N-3239, Nassau.


develop a "major engine
problem of one kind or
another."
This compares with between
five and 10 per cent of cars
with conventional power
plants, the report by J. D.
Power & Associates says. It is
based on a survey of 660 U.S.
Mazda owners who bought
their cars prior to October
1971.
The study says the most
frequent problem is failure of
"0" rings (a type of seal) in
the rotary engine. Failure can
cause engine overheating,
warping and burn-outs, the
firm said. Replacing the "0"
rings costs about 250 dollars.
A spokesman for Mazda
motors of America Inc.
conceded that some owners
have had problems but said the
20 percent figure was too high.
They also found, however,
that Mazda owners continue to
be enthusiastic about the
rotary engine.


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Y Thursday, May V10. 1973.R%
'YOU AND YOUR ENVIRONMENT'


WIst Ur2lknmt
S


Walt Disney & the Red Cross
hiWALT DISNEYwaschooinhca 191 Walt and a friend tried to saying that her son was born driving ambulances
high brhool in Chicago in1918. enlist in the Navy, but as they on December S, 1901, and as Evacuation Hospital No. S
,tes brother, Roy, had joined were only sixteen years old, soon as she turned her back, he Paris, and later to a me
the Navt Lakes Navasttionedat they were turned down. Then took the pen and made a zero pool. Int his spare time,
ls Great Lakes Naval Training the friend rushed up to Walt out of the one. would do a little drawing
Station.- Wen he would come one day and said, "There's Walt was accepted by the local canteen had him make
bowe on leave, his younger something just forming here Red Cross late in October, some posters. An enterpri
would by h e terribly that you and I can get in; they 1918, but during training a rid suggested search


WORLD RED CROSS DAY This year the League of
Red Cross Societies has selected the theme: "You and your
Enviornment." And stepping out to help you protect your
environment are the Walt Disney characters of Mickey
Mouse, Dopey, Snow White, Goofey and Donald Duck.
Cleanliness, they say, is next to Godliness and what better
way to stay healthy than to protect and keep your
enviornment clean. So read The Tribune this week and see
how you can help your Red Cross be a good neighbour by
protecting your enviornment as suggested by Mickey
Mouse and his friends.


of the. Red Cross.
The universal appeal of the
Disney characters is matched,
today, by only a few of man's
creations, including the
international Red Cross.
Perhaps it is appropriate on
this 50th anniversary of the
Disney "world" that Disney
resources are given free to the
international Red Cross, to


help stimulate world opinion
to make our one world a better
place in which to live.
DISNEY cartoon designs.
made especially for the Red
Cross, will appear in The
Tribune this week with slogans
to help make the Bahamas a
cleaner and healthier place in
which to live.


.
* I.


They say "opportunity knocks only once". Opportunity knocks in vain -
once or many times if you don't have the money needed to take ad-
vantage of it.

The years to come will open an increasing number of business op-
portunities to enterprising Bahamians. Retail stores. Sales agencies.
Specialty shops. These have one thing in common: owner or partner,
you'll need money to invest. So now is the time to start saving for your
golden opportunity.

There is no better, safer, more convenient way to save for your big chance


X..FIRNANCE CORPORATION
aOF BAHAMAS
. -----LIMITED


i Um I
BAHAMIAN WANTED


ADVERTISING SALES
PERSON


Male or Female,
experience preferred.

Interested persons please
contact :

MR. H.R.BETHEL

* Phone 2-2768 The Tribune,
between 9a.m. & 12neon I
Monday through Saturday.

Salary open.
LIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW=t=J


5


gIbp drirmr












e hS Wrthant


Thurbny,11 W 1973.


Canadian posits anti-


NUGE RESEARCH


PRIZE To CONTOI


Einstein theory on matter MULTIPLE STCLEOSIS3


By FRANK CAREY
WASHINGTON (AP) A
Canadian physicist theorized
Wednesday that somewhere in
the universe there's a great
"anti-galaxy" made up of
particles that travel faster than
the speed of light, seemingly in
violation of Einstein's special
theory of relativity.
But Dr. B. B. Sinha, in
announcing his new concept,
said that, instead of challenging
Einstein's views, his own
theory extends them so as to
include something vastly
different from "the ordinary
matter of our world."
Einstein's theory, proposed
in 1905, holds that "velocities
greater than that of light


(186,000 miles a second) ...
have no possibility of
existence."
But Sinha, addressing the
American Physical Society,
suggested that Einstein, in so
saying, had in mind only the
ordinary matter of the earth's
Milky Way and other known
galaxies.
Dr. Sinha of the University
of Guelph, Ontario, said that,
years before Einstein proposed
his theory, some scientists had
voiced belief in the existence
of particles moving faster than
light, "and a logical faith in
such particles was revived in
1962 by others."
Since 1962, he said, search
for such particles called
tachyonss" has been going
on in various parts of the
world, but with negative and
inconclusive results as yet.
Sinha suggested that the
tachyon-scientists may be
looking for the wrong kind of
particle, and in the wrong
place.
He said he had worked out
theoretical mathematics and
physics suggesting there well


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HML G SABLE 88ACH MANOR, P. O. Box N263,1
Mrs. Joan Mayson, manager, Mrs. Sandra Eneas,
/ -... -. Cleoml Smith, receptionist.,
"Call 7-) S 8 r-84 nowl


WASHINGTON (AP)-
Establishment of a $100,000
scientific research prize, the
largest medical award ever
offered in American history,
was announced Tuesday by the
National Multiple Sclerosis
Society.
The prize would be given the
society said, "to the research
scientist or scientific team
anywhere in the world that
develops a control for multiple
sclerosis, the crippling
neurological disease that
affects hundreds of thousands
of Americans and millions of
others throughout the world."
The monetary value of the
prize exceeds that of the Nobel
Prize. The announcement was
made, the society said, in
connection with the official
launching Wednesday, at a
ceremony here, of the National
Advisory Commission on
Multiple Sclerosis.
The nine-member
commission, established under
legislation signed by President
Nixon last October, was
created "to determine the most
effective means of finding the
cause and cures and
treatments" for the


disease.
Page 7, Col. 7 The name of the donor of
the big prize will be announced
at a news conference
lIBEt I Wednesday at the National
S "R Press Club where the new
commission will be meeting.
Invited to attend the formal
DAY announcement of the award
are the ambassadors of 18
countries whose national
ing. fully multiple sclerosis societies are
facing1-2-3 our members of an international
ft beaching or federation of which the
l garden and American Society is a founding
Ml with hotel member.
id service, Among other invitees are
conditioning. Rep. Margaret Heckler,
at, stores, R-Mass., and Sen. Harrison A.
a 3 minute Williams Jr. D-NJ, who
Free parking, co-sponsored the legislation
mail service, establishing the commission;
Rep. Paul G. Rogers, D-Fla.,
Was. aM61, chairman of the House
subcommittee on health and
Nassau. environment; Sen. Edward M.
Kennedy, D-Mass., chairman of
ass't. manager, the senate subcommittee on
health; Asst. Health and
Welfare Secretary Dr. Charles
Edwards; Lord James
Creighton Stuart Great Britain,


Carib Indians dying out in Dominica


DOMINICA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES (AP) This
island is the last outpost for
the Carib Indians, former fierce
cannibals 'who ruled the
Caribbean Sea.
Now they struggle for their
existence on a 3,700-acre
reservation in the mountains.
There are 2,000 inhabitants
living in wooden houses
perched on stilts against
flooding rains. Only about 100
are pure Carib. The rest are of
mixed Carib and Negro blood.
"If we do not do something
soon, in another ten years
everything will be gone," said
Frederick Masclem, the
bespectacled Carib chief.
The Caribbean got its name
from the Carib. Two words
used in English cannibal and
canoe are said to have come
from the nearly extinct Carib
language.
Before Christopher.
Columbus and other European
explorers appeared on the
scene, the Caribs ranged the
Caribbean with impunity.
The other large Indian tribe,,
the peace-loving Arawaks,
usually ended up as lunch and
dinner for the Caribs after a
sneak raid from the sea in their
dugout canoes.
The Arawak women became
slave-wives. The Caribs
saved the fat from their roasted
male victims to coat the bodies
of Carib boys to make them
brave.
BRUTAL
The initiation rites of the
Caribs, transforming boys in to
warriors, were brutal.
A bird was beaten to death
against the chest of a young
candidate. He was expected,
not to flinch or cry out as it
pecked and clawed at his skin.
Deep cuts were then made in
his flesh with the teeth of
jungle animals. The carcass of
the bird, dipped in pepper
sauce, was rubbed in the
wounds.
The Caribs wiped out early
colonies of English, French and
Spanish settlers in raids. But
their spears and arrows were no
match for the cannons and
muskets of the Europeans.
The Indians were finally
pushed back to Dominica, a
290-square-mile island
sandwiched between
Guadeloupe and Martilnqupe.
the Eastern Caribbean. The


rugged mountain terrain
sheltered them from British
and French soldiers who also
fought each other for control
of Dominica.
RESERVATION
Finally, after the British
established themselves here,
Queen Victoria granted the
Caribs a reservation in
perpetuity and the Indians
retired to farm and fiah.
The Caribs have since
become a mild tourist
attraction. There are several
handicraft shops displaying
their fine woven baskets and
hats.
The Indians also produce
traditional "wife leaders."
These are woven tubes with a
handle at one end. A Carib
would insert one of his wife's
fingers In the other end and
pull her around. The
contraction of the tube
imprisoned her finger. "We
don't use them anymore," said
the chief.
The Caribs possess the
copper skin, high cheekbones
and almond eyes of their
ancestors. They usually charge
tourists a fee to take their
picture.
A visitor snapped a
photograph of an elderly Carib
lady standing by the dirt road
into the reservation in a faded
cotton dress with a banda.na
wrapped around her head.
Afterwards, she nudged him
and said: "Gimme a quarter for
a Coke."
"Gee, you were lucky," said
Jimmy the driver. "She usually
asks for five dollars."




ARRIVED TODAY: Sarah
Elizabeth from Trinidad
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Mardi Gras, Skyward from St.
Thomas.
SAILING TOMORROW:
Mardi Gras, Skyward for Miami

WEATHER
WEATHER: Cloudy with
chance of showers
SEA: Smooth to slight
TEMP: Min. tonight 74
Max. tomorrow 86
WIND: South-westerly 10 to
16 m.p.h.


The Cadbs stopped eating
human flesh a long dte ago.
Now they dine on more
mundane foedatuffs.
A score of guests at a recent
Sunday afternoon luncheon for
the elderly and disabled
residents of the reservation ate
dolphin and flying fish. The
fish was accompanied by salad,


plantan and various roots and
Subers.
Some of the male diners
downed ppioafrult punach
spiked with white rum.
Most o~ the old talk were
pure Caris. The old ones are
dying without teaching us their
language," said Noel Francis,
$4, a member of the four-man


tribal council. He himself onlf
knows a few words of t$
Carb tongue. 4
Chief Mascleam is just
years old. He was recent
elected to a three year to
His office gives him the right
wear a red sash and carry
wooden staff topped w
silver.






LY1


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S^Ei^BS^SSSy Scuilm.
vS '--^y^l^--^^Hr 'BK^^&

VlHnLllM


ScotrAWtest









tfw. Mw'10.1973.


B~n~iI~gu ENNEER U I


ARE NEEDED BY
BAHAMAS OIL REFINING COMPANY
To be trained for career positions at its rapidly
expanding refinery in Freeport.
Parents of Bahamian Engineers expecting to
graduate in 1973 with Engineering degrees are
asked to contact BORCO concerning the
dallenging opportunities available now and in
the future.
Contact: Ed Ambrister
Personnel Officer, Bahnmas Oil Refining Company


P. 0. Box F-2435
Telephone 352-9811 Ext. 235
Freeport, Grano Bahama


Olr Iteilitttw 7


OWL A^bm


I-


By Abigail Van Buren

DBAR ABBY: My motbr ha boen a very slek woanm
for a year ad a half. Bar doteer says she could lw
another year, or die tomorrow. eM time she doeM't
evn kw me.
My hund and I ave put ff taking any kdof
vacation ever since mother's Iumm, and we really must


4 Reasons Why


Out Island Airways


is the Best Choicke


to IM iai 1. Lowest fares. For just $38, OIA will fly you
round-trip between Nassau and Miami on our one-day fare. And our
21-day round-trip excursion fares are just as attractive: $42 Nassau-Miami
and $32 Freeport-Miami. These three fares are the lowest of any airline.
2. Better equipment. We fly the BAC-111, the world's most reliable
short-haul, pure-jet aircraft. With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can
stretch out.


3. Better service. Beautiful Bahamian stewardesses to see to your every


Don't take


a vote to


igt away. My question: Should we go? I'm afraid i we go,
mother might die, and we'll have to turn around and rush
home.
I've asked our minister and be said we should go-but
not too far. I've asked my mother in law, and she said we
shouldn't go at all. My best friend, who's a registered
nurse, said we should go and take our chances. The doctor
refuses to give me a yes or no. My husband says it's up to
me.


What do you say, Abby?


HAVE A PROBLEM


DEAR HAVE: You have another problem: You want
suseose else to make the deesisea and accept the respoasd-
IbUty for it. So far you've polled the doctor, your minister,
year mother In law, yeur best friend, your husband-and
now me. Make your owa decision, and accept full respeasl-
Maty for It.
DEAR ABBY: I have been going around with this man
for 6% years. At one time we talked of marriage, but he
asked that we postpone it because his mother was going
thru a divorce and he was quite upset about it.
Now, -he tells me be thinks he is also in love with
someone he met at work. He says he has never gone out
with her, but they've had coffee a few times.
I love this man and want to marry him, but I can't
think clearly now. How do you figure this? CONFUSED
DEAR CONFUSED: I'figure that 6% years Is lnag
enough lfor him to make up his mind about marrylag you.
And If he could fall in love with a girl he's only had effee
with a few times. I'd like to know what kind of coffee it
was. Tell him to get lost before he tells you to, wMekh is
probably what he has in mind.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 24-year-old college student. I'm
also an alcoholic.
I just want to let kids know that they don't have to be
over 30 and on skid row to qualify as an alcoholic. Alcohol-
Ism is a disease that makes no distinctions in a person's
age.
If teen-agers or young adults think they have a drinking
problem and want to help themselves, please tell them to
contact Alcoholics Anonymous. It is a wonderful organiza-
tion of marvelous, understanding people who try to help
each other.
Since I became a member two years ago it has helped
me tremendoaly. Not only am I sober, I have been able
to help others. It has been a lifesaving experience for me.
Thank you for letting me share this. YOUNG ALCOHOLIC


evade responsibility
costs. Whether you kept your hair because of your wl.
er kept that wife because of year hair Is anybody's goess
but the salt water riae is news to me. I have heard wive
telling their husbands to go soak their heads. But iM SALT
water?

CANAIAN POSITS ANTI- EMSTEIN


From Page 6
might be an anti-galaxy made
up of strange particles he calls
"Jugomons."
These mass particles would
behave just the opposite of the
ordinary mass particles of a
galaxy, in that they would
constantly be annihilating one
another and then be restored
by others.
To annihilate one another,
Sinha suggested, it would have
to travel at speeds greater than
that of light.
The Canadian researcher


offered no tips on where and


how scientists might look for
the world of the "Jumoas."


S. IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusable hut unwanted


items of


clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks.
fans, etc. . clear out


your closets, garage, storeroom .


all can be of help


THOMPSON BLVD. eppodt DAVIS STREET ju t WEST of COCA-COLA PHONE 5-6739 P.O. BOX N3741


I.


i





7 ja
A4 w"
"; o -


m











8 ~Iit Ulrthunt


Thursday, May 10, 1973.
-r w. ---r.


P.M. POSES WITH COMMISSIONERS
PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING and Home Affairs Minister Anthony
Roberts, (third and fourth from left sitting) posed for this photograph with Out Island
Commissioners attending a conference at Arawak Cay May 8 10. The Prime Minister
officially opened the conference, and Mr. Roberts was to give the closing address today.


From Page 3
forbidding figure of our
reverend mother. But then the
sisters had emphasised that the
changes were external ones.
I'm sure that behind the lovely
laughing exterior there is a
mind and soul as mature and
pure as any of her
predecessors.
Congratulations to you
Sister Mary, and all at the
Benedictine Community in
Nassau particularly to Sisters
Maria, Elizabeth and Teresa.

This week we wish "Bon
Voyage" to ,
KAY and CYRIL JOHNSON
ones of a vanishing breed.
Cyril leaves Nassau next
week after 45 years in the
banking business- the last
four and a half have been spent
in Nassau where Cyril was
manager and senior president
of the swiss Bank Corporation
Overseas) Ltd.
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE- FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157]


Cyril has also just stepped
down from the presidency of
the Bankers' Club.
He was also an active
member of the Rotary Club
(West Nassau) and on the
economic committee of the
Chamber of Commerce.
Kay that indefatigable
bundle of energy has already
left. She flew out on Monday
and she and Cyril are to
rendezvous later in London.
On the tennis court Kay was
a human dynamo a quality
she brought to her myriad
other activities.
She worked as a Yellow Bird
at the Princess Margaret
Hospital in charge of the
canteen.
She helped in the public
library.
Once a week she took care
of a little girl from Sandilands.
This responsibility she has now
turned over to the Rotary
Club.
She sold tickets on Bay
Street for practically every
charity in particular the Red
Cross and Humane Society.
Kay and Cyril still managed
to find time to relax.
They were members of the


exclusive Lyford Cay Club
where they both played tennis
and Cyril played golf.
But they are not, Cyril took
pains to explain, exclusive
people. They are "very much
much run of the mill people."
There were many farewell
parties all over Nassau for Kay
and Cyril last week.
Their retirement plans are to
winter at their condominium
home in Fort Lauderdale and
spend their summers at their
home in Chichester, Sussex
England.
Cyril, when I spoke to him
on Monday evening, left with
me a message for the people of
the Bahamas, for whom he say
he's always had "a soft spot"
as he was previously with the
R.A.F. in Nassau from '43 -
'44.
"We've had four and a half
very fine years in the Bahamas.
"Kay and I will be close by
in Fort Lauderdale and will
observe the Bahamas in the
immediate future with interest.
"My only hope is that the
Bahamas will unite under
Independence and go ahead as
it ought to do".
Good-bye Kay and Cyril
-- and ("nnd Lrck


45C Beer Is Back!














in 7-ounce bottle




Buy it by the bottle at 4 5


or by the case at *8"


Cold to the very last drop


1-Y


THE CHAMBER of
Commerce and Nassau service
clubs came together to provide
5.000 bumper stickers for
graduates of the Road Traffic
Department's defensive driving
course. The course, which
consists of four two-hour
sessions, is held every Monday
from 7 to 9 p.m. at the
Government High School.
Seen (at right) with Mr. R.
V. E. Wood, Controller of
Road Traffic, are from left to
right: Bill Farquharson. Ist
vice president of the Chamber
and a member of the Rotary
Club of Nassau; Kenneth
Sawyer, of the Chamber's
Road Traffic Committee; Mr.
Wood, John Rhodes and David
Thurlow both of the
Chamber's Road Traffic
Committee; Shervin
Thompson, chairman of the
Road Traffic Committee, Errol
Leach, Kiwanis Club of Nassau
and Rudy Moultrie, Kiwanis
Club of Fort Montagu.


M*aill










SThursday, May 10, 1973.


Bade County now


officially declared


bilingual, bicultural

By IKE FLORES
MIAMI (AP) Dade County has been officially declared
bilingual and bicultural, but no one is really quite sure what it
muens.


"I really don't know,"
confessed Dade County Mayor
Jack Orf, who should have
because it was his resolution
which the County Commission
adopted recently.
"But we'll almost certainly
% have all street and office signs
printed in both English and
SSpanish and have bilingual
People in all the government
s offices," Ofr said.
"And we should have
county tests, such as
contractors' qualifying exams,
in both Spanish and English,"
he added.
The resolution called for
creation of a division of
bilingual and bicultural affairs
in the county manager's office
to implement the proposal.
County Manager Ray Goode
said that he wasn't sure who he
would appoint to the agency or
just what its duties would be.
Despite the uncertainty, the
Miami area's huge Latin colony
of 300,000 90 per cent of
whom are expatriate Cubans
was delighted by the decision.
They considered it a victory in
a campaign seeking better local
government services for the


Spanish-speaking.
The prime mover behind the
resolution, Cuban-born banker
Bernardo Benes, told the
commission, "today is a
beautiful day for Dade County
and its Spanish-speaking
people. You are making official
what is already a fact of life,
that Dade County is already a
bicultural county."
SHUT OFF
Dr. Carmen Marina, director
of Biscayne college's bilingual
institute, says many Cubans
"are realizing that this is their
home, and they want to
participate in the community.
But when you don't speak the
language you are shut off
completely."
The few criticisms expressed
have come primarily from
private citizens, some of them
anonymous letter writers to
Orr and the commission. Some
people sympathetic to the
Latin community believe the
resolution will further
discourage some
Spanish-speaking residents
from learning English.


S IRL Y5T. 7 Pah


PC I


SI .1. j


RENTS FROZEN

IN JAMAICA
KINGSTON, JAMAICA
(AP) Under rent restriction
law all rentals in Jamaica will
be frozen for the time being at
the amount which prevailed on
April 1, 1973.
This is contained in a
statement made in the House
of Representatives by Minister
of Commerce and Consumer
Protection, Will Isaacs
Tuesday.
Among other things the
statement says that rentals of
dwelling houses have in many
cases escalated out of all
proportion to reality. It has
created unbearable burdens on
tenants bearing in mind that
rent accounts for a significant
proportion of disposable
income. The government has
come to the conclusion that
this state of affairs cannot be
allowed to continue.
Already there has been
reports that because of certain
increases in the amount of
property tax to be paid, certain
landlords have served notices
on their tenants of rental
increases


Fathers & children are coping in


the UK village that lost its mothers


By DONALD FORBFES
AXBRII)GE. England (AP)
Rachel is S. Sometimes, she asks
her father: "Is mummy coming
home?" "I have to tell her 'No, love
- Mummy's gone,' says John
Chard, a 32-year-old farm worker
suddenly confronted with the
problem of raising three young
children without their mother.
Chard's dilemma is echoed in a
scon of other cottage homes in
Azbridge and surrounding hamlets
dotted within a few miles of each
other in the Mendip Hills of
Somerset County near Bristol.
On April 10, a month ago, a
charter airliner with passengers
from this verdant corner of
southwest England ploughed Into a
Swiss mountainside near Basel.
killing 107 persons.
Among the victims were 63
persons from Axbridge and
neighbouring villages, Cheddar,
Yatton, Wrington and Congresbury.
Nearly all were women who had
left their homes on a one-day trip
that was an annual treat. Many
wer mothers of young children.
The Relief Coordinations Centre
set up after the crash in Axbrldg's
centuries-old High Street knows of
48 children of school age or
younger who have been left
motherless in the villages.
No one tries to minimize the
impact on the villages of the death


of so many womenfolk in a single
catastrophe. What happened was, in
the words of the Rev. Anthony
Martin, Rector of Axbridge,
"unique we have no precedent to
fall back on which might help us
cope."
But the reaction of the surviving
adults, whose livelihood depends on
the strawberries, cream and cheeses
for which the area is famous, has
been to draw a protective veil
round the children.
NORMALITY
Michael Dexter, headmaster of
the little gray-stone village school.
comments: "We have tried to
restore a sense of normality to the
bereaved children. No teone wants
them to feel they are somehow
apart from the rest of the
community."
The problems are those of
Axbridge and its neiahbours and
the villages want to solve them on
their own. Disaster funds have
raised around$200,OO0 and money
still is coming in. The money will
be used to alleviate distress and
help with education of the children.
But despite the flood of
compassion and offers of help from
all over Britain and beyond, says
Rector Martin: "We really want to
be left alone to lick our own
wounds."
The scope of the disaster Is clear
from the size of the villages.


bridgee has a population of only
1,200. Cheddar 4.000, Congresbury
1,300 and Wringlon, 1,400.
Most families can trace their
village pedigree back through
generations and in that., at least,
the villages are fortunate.
A spokesman at the coordination
centre notes: "All the families have
relations in the village where they
live. or nearby. Thank God there
are so many aunts, grandmothers
and sisters-in-law who have been
able to step in and help these
motherless children."
John Chard is one father able to
call on relatives. He has two
children in addition to Rachel -
Isabel. 3. and John. IS months.
VERY SAD
"When my wife Diane was
killed." says Chard. "Rachel was
very sensible and she seemed to
accept it. Isabel. on the other hand,
was terribly sad for days afterward.
She wouldn't even menion her
mother.
"It's got better as time goes by. I
have my sister-in-law, who gets the
children out of bed and dresses
them and she takes Rachel to
school.
"Ib ,ome home from tlhi farm for
breakfast at 9 a.m. and stay for an
hour with the other two. Then I
take them to my mother-in-law on
the other side of the square when I
go back to work.


ALL THE FACTS ON THECARIIIEAN


LONDON: Pages and pagis
of useful information for the
exporter, the business traveller,
the tourist and the student,
This is the well-eamed
reputation of the West ladies
and Caribbean Year Book
which is maintained in the
latest edition.
The 44th Year Book, just
published, covers the islands of
the West Indies, the countries
of Central and South America
with a Caribbean seaboard and
the Bahamas and Bermuda.
It contains a section for each
cowitry, giving details of
government, public and social
services, public utilities,
communications, natural
resources, industries, finance,
trade and commerce, and travel
and tourism.
This information is
supplemented by sections
covering ports, shipping and air


svick and by classified
diectories of firms exporting
to the Caribbean fro Britain
a= other countries. ere are
nearly 1,000 pages of text,
phkcographs and advertising -
plh a large coloured map of
the area.
"The Year Book keeps its
popularity and we have slightly
increased the print number this
year," said a spokesman for the
publishers, Thomas Skinner
Directories of Croydon, near
London. "It is sold in many
parts of the world including
Britain and other parts of
Europe, the United States,
Canada, Japan, Australia and
Africa and of course the
Caribbean."
Other reference books
produced by Thomas Skinner
inc- *de "Stock Exchange
Yearbook", "Bankers'
Almanac" and the "Directory
of Directors".


FORYOUCARIC OfDiEctorT"C
IGARDENS


"Happy to meet you...






I'm the Helpful Banker


"u'll find me at any branch




of the Royal Bank"


The Royal U The Helpful Bank

ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas.


She grmtar












hte gr51mw t


Thursday, May 10, 1973,


Come by Classified Counter at The Trbune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 In Nasau,352 -8608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5pn. Mon. to Fri.- Sat. to p.m.

SE T I I MESUTE | O RENT I | FO ..SU I MRINE SMPMES FKLPNTESI I ] WANTED S I TRi h


C9776 LEGAL SECRETARY;
minimum qualifications: 4
G.C.E. 0 levels including
English Language, at least three
years experience, references
required. Applications in own
handwriting to: Adv. C9776, P.
0. Box N-3207, c/o The
Tribune, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES
C9632
PATIO AWNINGS AND


C9682
BY OWNER
House 4n Highland park, 3
bedrooms., 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room
and carport. Built in range and
baker on lot 90(S 150 Nice
home in nice area. To view,
telephone 2-1722-3.
C7381
OWNER LEAVING island,
must sell 3 bedroom/2 bath
home, furnished, landscaped,
fenced in. $24,500 or best
offer, financing available- call
Freeport 373-4790 after 7:00
p.m. or write Box F-1727.
C9681
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park --
executive type home. ,
bedrooms, 2% baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
- central air-conditioned. To
view, telephone 2-1722-3.
C9744
NEW SUSSEX COTTAGE
STYLE TOWN HOUSE in
pretty Downland Village near
Pulborough (Victoria 70 mins).
Lounge/dining room,
beautifully fitted kitchen,
downstairs cloackroom, 2 large
bedrooms, bathroom and
toilet. Full oil fired Central
Heating, delightful small
landscaped garden. Fitted wall
to wall best quality Wilton
carpet throughout, French
nylon curtains to all windows.
Immaculate, and ready to walk
into. Freehold (Sixteen
thousand five hundred
pounds). P. 0. Box 7517,
Nassau.
C9791
LOT FOR SALE
Stevenson's Subdivision off
Twynam Avenue. No
reasonable offer refused. Call
5-3801 (night) 5-9542 (day).
C9755
4-BEDROOM, 1 bathroom,
house Podoleo Street off
Robinson Road. Contact Mr.
Infield gfti 5 p.m. -Phone
5617. ,
C9717
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES
All lot owners have beach
rights. Only $75 down. From
$80 month. Priced from
$5,800. 70 x 100. All utilities
soon completed. Lakefront lots
from $7,500. $100 deposit.
Tel: 2-3027 or 2-4148
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE.
C9782
Choice lots In a nwr
Subdivision underground
utilities beech rights $75.00
down and as low as $80.00 a
month with-n6 Interest
Choice resdentil lot 60 x 110
ft. Bargain pre $3200.00
Aprtlments and Duplex lots in
Colony Village east, Golden
Gat,. Beql-Air, Tropical
GarMns Soldier t Rd. and
other good areas with easy
finance available.


A large church lot at a good
cash price or terms If required.

Residential lots at low prices In
Seabreea Estate, Emerald
Ridge. Dnno~ta South
ach Estate, Bamboo Tom,
Golden Gate., Bel-Air,
Sunshine Park, Seven Hills,
Tropical Gardens and others.
For Infbrmation on any of the
above or to list your property
tor quick sale call Bill's Real
Estateat 23921


C9788
FOR SALE
1. Outstanding opportunity
to buy at below market
price attractive one-storey
residence with two large
bedrooms, each with
private bath and walk-in
cedar lined closet, powder
room, living room,
separate diing room, sun
room, laundry area,
kitchen, garage. Lot 97' a
130'. Prce: $50,000
furnished.
2. Excellent buy in three
bedroom, two bath house
SVillage Road. Living
omn with dining ll. en,
kitueu1 laundry. carp.rt,.
etc. Lot 100' x inn'
$49,500 -fur jaad

sln i Vists Marine-
wt -abo amd' b.oat
right arby. Three
EdrOems, living room,
S8t dining roO.
I-Ro,. .rpd, Al.-
ALL Ofrdult or"..
$75 uiflshed. Ofers
.(tniiraned.
[.;+' ,


C9785
FOR SALE
44 acres of choice land at Joe
Bookies' Bay just south of
Little Harbour, Abaco, with
1200 feet beach waterfront.
Phone 4-1240 6:00 p.m. to
9:00 p.m.
C9680
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, living,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape. Airconditioned
throughout. Unusual
opportunity. To view.
Telephone 2-1722-3.

A TS TO RENT
C9775 BANK EXECUTIVE
seeking 3 bedroom house
preferably unfurnished but
furnished considered must
have swimming pool one to
two year lease. Please
telephone Personnel Manager,
BOLAM 28711 ext. 38.



C9708
STORE SIZE 24' x 24'. East
Shirley Street. Phone 5-8196.
C9648
IN TOWN furnished rooms,
Efficiency Apartment, and alsc
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.
C9640
ONE EXTRA LARGE TWO
BEDROOMS TWO BATI.
AND ONE EXTRA LARGE
ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT. With large
living and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
aircogditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C9624
FULLY AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedroom apartment -
Centreville near Z.N.S. Ring
5-8679 ask for Mr. Pritchard.


C9633
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C9683
2 bedroom apartment -
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. I 1 bedroom
airconditloned, washer. To
view, telephone 2-1722-3.
C9638
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2.4777-8.
C9758
UNFURNISHED house off
Shirley Street 2 bedrooms, 1
bath, kitchen, living and dining
room $30.00 a week. Tenant
would pay for electricity and
water. Phone 54811.
C9684
4500 square feet, warehouse or
office space, available
immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.
C9727
LARGE STORE off East
Street with Jovely display
windows. Suitable for any type
business. Call 3-4128.
C9773 1 LARGE SHOP on
Soldier Road.
2 2-bedroom unfurnished
apartments on Soldier Road.
I 2-bedroom unfurnished
apartment on Wulff Road.
Phone 42981.


C9784
UNLIMITED private fresh
water supply. Available
immediately secluded
picturesque splitlevel rustic
stone two bedroom cottage,
acre of grounds, furnished,
$160 per month. Country
estate western edge Nassau
overlooking Stapledon
Gardens. Phone owner 5-7224
evealngs.-


C9642
PROSPECT. RI DGE
Fully furnished garage
apartments in large private
grounds with use of swimming
"pooa comprising large
bed/sitting room, separate
tdchlan and bathroom, private
pat*o, Rst; B$260 per -month
W'dint utlilties.: Avalbie
May Isti,Cal 77737 to view.
IL
C742 .
1, 2, and 3 bedroom
apartments, fully furnished and
equipped:, lhg .. Wpat

a400and $500 M sdthtvy per
.Moh.2' t 141 or 2
lisys) I4S jjlsnngs).


C9780
FURNISHED 2 BED ROOM, 1
BATH HOUSE AIRCON-
DITIONED AND CARPETED
5 Minute walk to Montagu
Beach Phone 28504 Day
51647 Night.

C9736
UNIQUE RENTAL penthouse
apartment, overlooking Nassau
Harbour and Paradise Island. 3
bedroom, study, large lounge,
breakfast room, dining room,
bar and kitchen, working
'kitchen with dishwasher, fully
airconditioned, Island ce5;ng,
fans in lounge, shag carpeting
throughout, 4 bathrooms, plus
maid's bathroom. Available
June 1st. Long term or short
term. Furnished or
unfurnished. Please contact
2-.1841 days and 2-8248
evenings.
C9781
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath furnished
house for rent Claire Avenue
off Mackey Street, telephone
34528 6 p.m. 9 p.m.

FOR SALE 1 R9T
C9777
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
Johnson Road Estates. Phone
42193 58803 ask for Mrs.
Bethell.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C9720
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side In the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 18th day of May, A.D.,
1973 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL that Condominium
Unit namely Unit Number
Nine (9) Building "B" being
a part of Waterfront
Town -houses 1
Condominium situate at
Great Harbour Cay in the
Berry Islands which said
Condominium Unit is that
described in an Indenture of
Conveyance dated 6th day
of September, A.D., 1971
and made between
Resident Lal Resort
Developments Limited of
the one part and William
Victor Gubbins of the other
part and now of record in
the Registry of Records in
the City of Nassau in
Volume 1835 at pages 20 to
35 and entitles the
Borrowers to an undivided
share in the Common
property appurtenant to
Condominium Unit Number
Nine (9) subject to certain
terms conditions restrictive
referred to in the said
Indenture of Conveyance
dated the 6th day of
September, 1971 and the
declaration of Condominium
dated the 16th day of
February, A.D., 1971 and
recorded In the said Registry
of Records in Volume 1714
at pages I to 30 inclusive.
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the 6th day of
September, 1971 between
William Victor Gubbins and
Residential Resort
Developments, Limited and
recorded in the Registry of
Records in Volume 1850 at
pages 99 to 116 which said
Mortgage was assigned to Harry
Shier.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price. Terms 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated this 27th day of April
A.D., 1973.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.


FOR SALE i
C9769 BUSH RECORD Player
plus 10 records. Tel 2-2861
Ext. 335.

C9774 1 HEAVY DUTY
FORK LIFT. Phone 42981.


C9706
FURNITURE, Television.
appliances, tape-recorder, new
wall to wall carpeting, rugs,
paintings, reducing machine
etr. Phone 42043..,

9771 ROBERTS reel to reel
tape deck 650xD, Scott 386
AM/FM Receiver.
1971 Pinto airconditioned/
heater, radio, seatbelts, low
mileage. Good condition.
$2,500.00 O.N.O.
I lot 100'X150' Blair Estates.
Phone B. Harris 27680, 9:00 -
5&00 Mon. to Fri.


C9606
BUMPER-STIC KERS;
POSTERS; DECALS;
QUALITY SIGNS in dozens, in
hundreds, In thousands. Truck
i4M a specialty.
ARAWAK ART- Phone 23709
ontiw Avenue at Arunde


C9764 TWO METAL store
display gondolas 3ft. x 16ft., In
excellent condition. Telephone
2-3214 Daytime.
C9789
GARAGE SALE

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Adults clothing, baby's
clothing and equipment, books
and tools, Also, various other
items. Saturday 12th only
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Smith
First Terrace Centreville.
C9607
DISCOUNT PRICES
Shop today your dollar buys
more.
Our best sale values.

MOTHERS DAY GIFTS
GRADUATIO.N' DAY GIFTS
FATHERS DAY GIFTS
All these and more Sales
Promotion Signs in stock at
Arawak Art, Montrose Avenue
at Arundel Street. Phone.
23709

CARS FOR SALE
C9765 OWNER LEAVING
ISLAND 1967 Austin 1100
38,000 miles, excellent
condition, $550.00 or nearest
offer, CASH ONLY. Telephone
7-8325.
C9754
1969 Triumph 1300, good
condition, new tyres, new
battery $900. Call 42624 or
53752.
C9790
ISLAND MOTOR
COMPANY 1970 LTD.
USED CAR LIST
1968 FIAT 124,
Green $900
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W
Auto. $850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio, Orange. $3500
1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL
A/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI,
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD..
Blue A/C $2800
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Auto $1695
1971 RAMBLER
Auto., Blue $2100
1971 FORD GALAXIES
A/C, Green 4 Dr. $3500
1970 VICTOR STD.,
Red $875
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA,
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4600
1968 JAVELIN,
1968 JAVELIPJ, $1400
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR'
4 Dr., Std. Green $2950
1964 DODGE S/W
Auto. Green $400
1972 FIRENZA
Auto., White $2750
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR,
4, Dr. Std.
S/W Yellow $650
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite Inc Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8


C9631


-.--. at- -.



TODAY'S C31L 1-6
1971 DODGE AVENGER
DELUXE $1500
1968 FORD STATION-
WAGON -
white automatic$600
1973 BUICK REGAL
demonstrator $7000
1970 TOYOTA -
green, good mileage $850
1969 FIAT COUPE 124-
white, low mileage $1200
1970 TRIUMPH
blue, stick shift $850
1971 PONTIAC
VENTURA II -yellow,
good condition $3000
1972 CHEVELLE MALIBU -
very clean $4850
1969 FORD GALAXIES
blue, reconditioned $1000
1971 CHEVY VEGA COUPE
green, automatic $2995
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN -
air conditioned $4200
1968 PONTIAC FIREBIRD -
good condition $1500
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
-- like new $2250
1969 CHEVROLET CAMARO
red, automatic $1850
1972 DODGE AVENGER -
like new $2350
1971 SINGER VOGUE -
white, radio, automatic $1500
1973 DODGE POLARA
light blue automatic $5500
1971 FORD CORTINA -
green $2500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come In and me us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3411


C9753
16ft Boat fibreglass. $600.
O,N.O. 31642 after 6 p.m.


C9645
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Y&cht.
Phone 342371.


C9725
26Ft. Cabin Cruiser .... tip top
condition. Must seel
$6,000.00. Call 4-1298 Day or
night.

I STM
C9756 BROWN MINIATURE
DOG with brown collar, area
of Williams and Shirley
Streets. $100 REWARD.
Phone 7-8139.

S SCHOOLS
C9658
CLASSES for Guitar Students
held by Calvert and Sydney.
Located temporarily at
Howard Street East.
Chippingham.
Studies In: Classic, Jazz,
Theory improvisation, Chord
Building, Ear-training, etc. For
information call 3-4853.
36412.

ENTERTAINMENT
C9748
THE BAHAMA
DRAMA CI RCLE
PRESENTS
John Hester &
Winston Saunders
in the
BLOOD KNOT
mm_ I


Full Text by Athol Fugard
Continuing May 11th and 12th
8:30 p.m.
DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE
Tickets 2.50, Box office: THE
ISLAND CAMERA SHOP,
Bank Lane. Phone 22126.


DIDYOUGUESST?T
Allright!!
Whoisshe?? f
Dolly Levi??
Mary
Poppins??


Widhe
You'll findher
at the Dundas
Civic Centre
on May 26th.
Presented in
allherglory s'
by the Nassau

Operatic ,
Society /2 1



DON'T MISs HER!!!!

WANTED
C9675
WANTED LISTINGS
WHY FRET? WE WELL
List with us for ACTION.
WANT HOUSES WITH
ESTABLISHED MORTGAGES
ALSO.
DAMIANOS REALTY Dial
O33, 2230fs


C7377
JOB TITLE: INSTRUMENT
REPAIRMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3.5
years industrial instrumenta-
tion experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Install, repair, calibrate test
and adjust any type of
Integrating, indicating or
graphic electrical or mechanical
Instrument.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C7378
JOB TITLE: MACHINIST
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good Basic Education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring Instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


____________________________ p ____________________________


C9746
GENERAL MANAGER FOR
SHIPYARD
Minimum experience 10 years.
Complete knowledge of
estimating all phases of marine
type construction including
wood, steel, aluminum & fibre
glass. Administrative ability
required.
MACHINE SHOP OPERATOR
Minimum experience 5 years.
Must be responsible for entire
operation with absolute
knowledge of tool & die
making.
SHIPYARD EMPLOYEES
With general knowledge of
repairs on all types of boats.
Only applicants with these
qualifications need apply.
POSITIONS FOR
BAHAMIANS ONLY. Apply
to Mr. B. Ware at Hurricane
Hole Marina, Paradise Island.


C9761
JOB DESCRIPTION
SENIOR BOOK-KEEPER TO
TAKE CHARGE OF
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
QUALIFICATIONS: Complete
knowledge of book-keeping.
Experienced in the hotel
business with Travel Agents
and Wholesalers Accounts.
Knowledge of Machine
Accounting is desirable. Salary
by negotiation based on
experience and qualification.
Applicants for the above
position should reply in their
own handwriting, stating
experience, qualifications
together with references and
details of salary presently paid
and salary expected. Apply to:
Mr. William Hawkins P. 0. Box
N7756, Nassau Beach Hotel.

C9778
JOB DESCRIPTION SHORT
ORDER & BREAKFAST
COOK
Must have at least three (3)
years experience in a major
hotel to prepare and serve a
high quality of Breakfast. Also,
be able to prepare all kinds of
sandwiches and salad usually
served in a First Class Hotel.
Must be able to relieve the
Staff Cook during his absence.
Apply: William M. Hawkins P.
0. Box N7756. Tel. 77711
Nassau Beach Hotel.


C9762
CHIEF NIGHT AUDITOR
QUALIFICATIONS: At least
three years experience in large
hotel in similar position. Age
30 or over. Accounting
background desirable. Ability
to lead and take charge of
training of subordinate staff
essential. Salary by negotiation
based )n experience and
qualificizon Applicants for
the above position should reply
in their own hand-writing,
stating experience,
qualifications together with
references and details of salary
presently paid and salary
expected Apply to: Mr.
William Hawkins, P. 0. 'Box
N7756, Nassau Beach Hotel.
C7384 .
JOB TITLE: STEEL
FABRICATORS (four)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years experience in steel lay
out and welding.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Read and follow structural
steel detail drawings, cut and
weld in accordance with
drawing specifications.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C9792
GENERAL TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY CO
IMMEDIATE OPENING
FOR
OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR/
SALES REPRtESEN-
TATIVE
General Telephone Directory
Co. needs permanent Office
Administrator/Sales
Representative. College
education required. Age 25/30
Office and sales experience
preferred. Starting salary $150
per week commission later if
sales qualify. Will receive
training in St. Petersburg,
Florida. Must be able to travel
to U.S. occasionally and to
Family Islands. Expenses paid,
Starting date June 4, 1973.
Reply in writing stating
qualification by May 14 to
Personnel Office Manager
Gerry Sorg, P. 0. Box N3048.
Personal interviews to be
conducted starting May 15 at
Bahamas Telecommunications
Corporation Personnel Office,
Chase Manhattan Building,
Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas.


C9786
AUTO MECHANICS WANTED
ABC MOTORS requires two
auto mechanics experienced In
all phases of automobile work.
Must have own hand tools.
Must be sober, reliable and
willing to work. Good pay to
right man. Many fringe
benefits. Call Mr. Stunce
Williams at 2-1031.


CARPORTS
HURRICANE
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
JOHN S. GEORGE & CO.
LTD.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call.2-8421.
C9506

ISLAND TV SERVICE
"For service you can rely on"
Dowdesweil Street.
TV -- antenna booster
Sales & Service
Phone 22618 P. 0. Box N327
Monday Saturday 8.30 to
5.30.
C8106
WORRY NO MORE! CALL
ABCO TO SOLVE YOUR
CLEANING PROBLEMS.
TEL: 51071-2-3-4.


C9636




Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2.3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C9635
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments anc
hotels. Sales and services. Cal
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLC
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.


mm-m-a-- mm m mm m --a


'GRAND BAHAMAtI


CLASSIFIED.


IIELP WANTED HELP TED
C7377 C7384
JOB TITLE: INSTRUMENT JOB TITLE: STEEL
REPAIRMAN FABRICATORS (four)
MINIMUM EDUCATION: MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school graduate or Good basic education
equivalent MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5 years experience in steel lay
years industrial instrumenta- out and we I ding.
tion experience. DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITI E:
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES: Read and follow structural
Install, repair, calibrate test steel detail drawings, cut and
and adjust any type of weld In accordance with
integrating, indicating or drawing specifications.
graphic electrical or mhrdWIcal' tINTERESTED APPLICANT
Instrument. CONTACT: Personnel
INTERESTED APPLICANT Department, Bahama Cement
CONTACT: Personnel Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Department, Bahama Cement Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.. C7383


C7378
JOB TITLE: MACHINIST
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good Basic Education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
iC737 llI0 rrU


C7370
Need one MECHANIC/
TIREMAN with a minimum of
3 ,ears experience in repairing
and changing truck tires, loader
tires, grader tires and other
heavy duty equipment tires.
The applicant must also possess
the ability to work as a
mechanic on trucks.
Interested persons should
contact Mr. Alvin Swan,
Freeport Construction Co.,
Ltd., P.O. Box F-2410.

C9647
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
vacancies for Staff
Accountant/Auditor for their
Freeport office. Candidates
must have had experience in a
professional accountant's
office and must be in
possession of at least
University entrance
qualifications and already be
studying to be a Chartered or
Certified Accountant.
Applicants should apply in
writing to the Staff Partner,
Price Waterhouse & Co. P.O.
Box F-2415, Freeport,
Bahamas.


CHIEF ENGINEER: Must
be qualified In all phases of
Refrigeration, Air-Con-
ditioning, Plumbing, Electrical,
Carpentry, Stone Work and
Building Maintenance.
Applicant must have
experience in Supervisory
capacity and must have at least
three years experience. Police
Certificate and Good
References required.
Applicant must apply in person,
to: Personnel Department, El
Casino, P. 0. Box F-787,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C9634


C9634
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicant should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. 0. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.

I WANTED

C7371
STAMPS WANTED
FOR OXFAMI l
Any amount, large or small,
new or old, on or off paper, in
collections, etc.. Please sent to
A. James, Oxfam Stamps, St.
Paul's School, P. 0. Box F-897,
Freeport, G. B.. All donations
of stamps acknowledged.
Credentials forwarded if
required.

S CARS FOR SALE


C7382


C7382
1969 Cadillac limousine.'
excellent condition, chauffeur
driven, low mileage, full
equipment, ideal for Taxi
Service.
Five Wheels of Grand Bahama
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.


U' idAMT



a ^"^r^


Tow FnmWe P.1..l...in. ..e tms.. ..tWA


"Tell me, did your doctor prescribe anything to relieve
you of your office tenasioWalf


mI OFFIIE


m


-L.


i-


A


OI -
I BM i.*


-4


-- ___1


F


ii


I


ri









1 9


"I checked the spelling on every word in this letter -
, md then misspelled his name."

RApert and the Memory Birds-9


NO hurrie Rupert Into the
how0e. "You say the King is
weting to come here? he
m ets. "Time Is short, and I
ehal Med your help in prepar-
ing for him." So Rupert is told
fe wrte a note to his Mummy
explning, that he is staying
awhie wh the Weeo Old Goat.
She won't worry if she knows
ALL RIGHTS


where I am," says Rupert.
When the message is ready he
asks the secort bird to deliver
it. "You can't miss our
cottage," he smiles. "It's a
thatched one w.th a blue gate
and front door." "It shall be
done," says Sir Percival. "I
w.II go there before returning
to my King."
RESERVED.


Brother Juaipm


I "If you wanted sleeves, wh)
SPete's s


CRtOSSWORD
PUZZLE
j ''0 32. Retaliation
1. Sleeping 34. Masculine
5. Took cover 36. Announced
I Siklsy 37. Dons by it
r1. M luOte 39. Insignificant
12. Amwrlcn 43. Club moss
hu morllist 47. Italian river
'13. Winter peril 48. Great amount
14. Secular 49. Attention
1 Criminal 50. Pungent
7. Muse of poetry 51. Husband
9. Cm 52. Distorted
S Lyric 53. Observes

0 Understand 1. Versatile
1. Spawn of fish 2. Wild hog


y didn't you SAY sa, for
ike."


SOLUTION OF YISTDSOAY'S PUZZUL


7. Liability
8. Spectator
9. Particle
10. Saul's
grandfather
16. Kinsman
18. Perfume
21. Patron saint
of lawyers
22. Onion
24. Turmeric
25. Solidify
26. Fortify
27. Blue grass
28. Web-oted
bird
29. Leak
33. Imagine
35. Ike's war
command
38. Extrude
40. Server
41. Concerning
42. Youngsters
43. Navy landing
ship
44. Verily
45. Propeller
46. Uninteresting


\W GEBGNERAL TENDENCIES. A day and evening
when you need to avoid at almost any cost any
mpaumnt or discussion with anyone else and to make sure you
do not get so involved n the small things of everyday life that
you anglect a pleasant and kind word for those with whom
you are allied Hasty words or acts could lead to

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) Handle all those replies to
letters and other respoalbilltis you have very intelhgently
today and gt good results Don't waste time criticizing a
co-wa er. Just make sure your own work is right
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Put yourself in professional
Hands and improve your appearance considerably Get into
thoa hobbles tonight that give you much pleasure Try to be a
more active person and you become happier.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You want to make good
changes at home so there is more charm, beauty there, but
first get approval and cooperation of km Throw out whatever
is old and ugly. Replace with the new and charming
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You are in a
fightIng mood so be mre you do not get into arguments with
associates. Curb your temper. Don't let some disappointing
letter floor you. This can be turned to your benefit later
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Cultivate the habit of economy
now and you soon have a tidy sum for more constructive
investment. That business expert is not in a good mood Await
a better day to consult with him Take it easy tonight
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Don't waste time bickering
witu another over some small matter Keep busy at %whatever is
important. Take the tune to improve your particular
surroundings and get rid of the jitters Out to dinner tonight
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) You're now able to get at all
those duties awaiting your attention, but do them in a
methodical fashion for best results Cheer mate who may be in
a sad mood. Smile more.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) You may not see things as
your friends do, but if you give in a little, you gain much
instead of losing a good deal Don't be argumentative or
forceful with anyone. Diplomacy is your best bet.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Show a bigwig you
imitate him and make a real place for yourself. improve your
reputation considerably. Make sure you pay that bill, or you
get into trouble later. Save time for one who needs help
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You have new plans that
require more study before you can put them in operation
successfully. Some new acquaintance has good advice, so listen
carefully. Study it further before you show anyone, or use it
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Use wise system for
handling your responsibilities and don't fall down on any of
them, You had better not say much to mate, who is in the
mood to criticize now. Get some reading done that you like
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Postpone those talks with a
partner until a better time and do that work that is necessary
first. Get advice from bigwigs how best to handle that civic
duty. Then follow it to the letter.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those fascinating young people who will be good at any
work that requires the handling of much detail efficiently, but
it is important you teach also to keep the big goals always in
mind as well. The chart is fine for research work, exploring,
handling whatever has to do with diet, working in laboratories,


ate.

Bridoe
IPAOINATNa hands and
amitg iltmuaitneae o ight
In on
last year's
by the

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te whole iAdd. This one was
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The handbook ecsmu up to the
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Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


White to move; can he save
the game? When today's position
occurred In a Oennan tourna-
ment, majority opinion amon
the spedtatcr was that Black
must win because of his advanced
pawns, oe about to queen and
the & other *ttckib Wh.te's
bishop. 1 B xP? Is no good
because t 1 .. Rx Kt.
Par times: 10 seconds, grand-
master; 20 aonds oheas master:
1 minute, s expert; 2 min-
utes. county player; 5 minutes.
club strength 0I minutes, aver-
age; 40 mInutes, novice.
SOLUTION NO. 9656 -

Chess Solution
White e sJust hold on to a
draw b y 1 --i1 If then (a)
I ... R.-tR A; -2 K-KJ,3 Px B;
3 Kt x P ed White wins the QP
to reach the book draw of king
and knight v. kng and rook; (b)
... R--t; .2 Xtx P. Ax Kt: 3
B x P aan with a book draw:
(e) f . RxB: 2 KtxP. R-
QB6: 3 K-QE wins the last pawn;
or (d) 1 . Px B; 2 Ktx P,P-
Q?; 3 Kt-B4 ch and 4 Ktx P
draws.


S list. No plrals;nofoterelgnwords:
no roper names. TODAYN'
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Clue Aero"r
Tranl e Ibaad. (5-4)
AuMerloa eels, (4)
show sger. (4)


ounxster. : :.
ransirec,:r (o)
in debt. (5)
Kind or sort. (3)
Close-flsted. (4)
WInning card. (.3)
Simple. (4)
Clues Down
Sudden submersion' ol
marine. (.-4)
Martful fact. (4. S)
contest. (4)


.Makes up on. (9)
Poa plant. (35
Everyone. (A)
Consumed. (3)
Foray. (4)
Posa esor
man. (6orse
man. (6)
Tree. (3) c
pieces.
C h alenge ng -
(4)
te* Toi"y


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REX MORGAN, M.D. y DAL CUcTIs

THAT'S wOPWME OF MV THINK KEN ANDI A ay PEPLE W A& W N
SInT, ZI OsTTINf TOO PERSONAL, oCUSE O Oi TO Ue IIM. I '
I'M AFRAID l U'RE JWST AN DOC E :' JUNE- BUT KEN OARON THAr, OCE PROPUCT& u
0P-FASHIONEI KIMO OFA64, IL HAS P. /H OULP D ^ AY YKAVWt A) .A LA
NE / U INSIST THAT A AMARY MIbi"P11 HISM A
MAN PROPOSE TO )W I FUTURE IS UNCERTAIN WsHEN O











JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS1

-- .BUT YOU WILL YES!. I DO HAVE TO DISCUSS WILL I SEE THINK I SHOU
BETSY ')OEN KNOW I'mSEE HER BEFORE ANP GET HER SIGNATURE ON YOU TH IS SPEND TH9 EVININO
IN CWN, LET ALONE THAT YOU LEAVE ? A COUPLE OF CONTRACTS! I'M EVENING, / WITH THE PARKNR,
I vE CONE TO SEE YOU! I'D USING THAT A5 AN EXCUSE FOR ETSY? SAM! WHY DON'T YOU
APrREC'ATE iT IF YOU MY UNANNOUNCED APPEARANCE' CALL ME IN THE
WOj-N EL HER I'LL TRY TO REACH HER AT MORNN ?
we've JUDGE! YOUR HOME LATER
THIS AFTERNOON!









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By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE ROOKIE TEAM of 'C. C. Sweeting High, entering the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation's 1973 series as the New
Heineken Gladiators, will have the blocking and spiking of 6ft.
4ins. Garnette Lockhart and 6 ft. I in. Brenville Thompson to
contend with tonight when they take on the Police Royals in the
second game of a triple header at the Donald Davis Gym.
Paradise Island Birds, tipped Sweeting Senior Girls Squad.
by many as having the Her school coach Grant
potential to top their sister described her as "a very good
team the Bees and the highly hustler and is fast improving."
favoured Coco Cola Jets play Smith and Bowe, both
S.A.C.A. Ladies in the first members of the National
game beginning at 7 o'clock. Squad are very good all
The newly formed Pizza rounders. Smith is one of the
Solos the brother team to key players on A. F. Adderley
Coco Cola Jets coached by High's senior team. Bowe with
Dr. Norman Gay, meet the good spiking ability only needs
Gladiators twin brother Ed's some more consistency,
Dugout in the night-cap. All M. Smith needs is a good
Coached by Tom Grant, the setter and if one can be found,
Gladiators are presently second her left hand hitting can be a
in the inter-school volleyball terror to her opponents. She
series having been defeated by was picked for the National
defending champions Prince Squad but due to personal
Williams High. Prince Will have reasons turned it down.
also entered the night league. Carroll, Russell and
Although thi whole team is McKentle are all good all
fairly new to modern around players, but as they
volleyball, through hard work have not seen much action
and many hours of training lately might be a bit off cue.
"we feel that we can really GOOD AS BEST
make our presence felt in the S.A.C.A.'s Ladies, coached
night league," commented by Paul Clark formerly of
coach Grant. "We are going to the Old Gladiators, now with
make a run for the playoffs Pizza Solos can go far once
this year" there is co-operation between
With an average age of 15 players and management. They
years, this team is paced on the have the ability to top either
forward line by Kevin Rolle, the Bees, the Birds or the Jets.
Max Smith and Mathew Last season, they carried the
Leckey, Captain Dennis Forbes Bees to four sets and the Jets
and Wilfred Culmer control the to five.
back court. Among many of St.
SECOND BEST Augustine's College Senior
Rolle at 6ft. I in. is Girls, S.A.C.A. is paced by
considered the second best Patty Symonette and Linda
spiker in the school league Davies, both of whom are
being topped by Prince Will's members of the National
David Bullard. Besides spiking Squad. Symonette is
and blocking Rolle is capable principally a server and a setter
of giving assistance in the back while Davies commands the
court. forward line. Davies with her
Smith, another good spiker, height and potential can
has strong setting fingers. Being become one of the top
able to climb higher than any spiker/blockers in the
other member of the team, he Bahamas. Among other players
can block well. are Denise Moss, Denise
Co-captain Mathew Leckey Whylly, Cora Hepburn and
is known for his versatility in Tangy Armbrister.
all positions in both front and Pizza Solos on the offence
back court. He is an asset to C. will be depending on the hard
C's team and is one of the chief hitting of Brock Barrett. Roy
players behind their success. Yaralli, long considered one of
GOOD SET MAN the best set men in the league
C. C's back court is nothing will feed Barrett and Ferreston
without little Dennis Forbes. Lockhart while player/coach
Only five-feet tall, "he is a very Dr. Norman Gay handles the
good set man and server," said back court. Paul Clark, beside
Grant. He will team up with having a good left hand serve i
Culmer who can also bump and also good at the back court.
serve well. S.A.C.A's Men, revolving
Most of the Police Royals around Leonard Archer and
rely on Lockhart and John Ferguson might be out
Thompson. However, the for some rough competition
remainder of the team, tonight. However, they are not
although they have not had the team to be taken lightly.
much exposure have good The Bahamas Ladies
potential. Lockhart, a member National Volleyball Squad
of the National Squad is deadly went through final rounds o
at the net especially on an over training last night as they leave"
pass. However, he falls short on for Florida on Saturday when
serving and setting. Thompson they will compete in thi
only needs to pick up his rang Region Six Champlonahip.
and both he and Lockhart can
be unstoppable. EL|is cricket
The Birds are remnants of LONDON (AF- KeiW Boyea
the Bees who last year found rua bowster i~sda, -s
tes e i etoo may hdoh sts Is mfser day e
players. The Birds this year tueMign wickets hI the Knile
have lost the assistance of county lcket ehlamploest
spiker and server Winsome wednesday.
Dviwason. Davidson plays with eg3eu a.lms for 5a
the0101. helpd ito sh o ov urry for IW
thevertheloss, they are still At Nortampton. LeancMn r 20
left with wining players (Fareu EnVg*ir T. esen Bedr
cludind g Bries JIman (the to o70) Norts, elteele s for i
ister of the nees Laurn N LOu! Seea 291 ror
(mele c! IS)S (ul Hiddlelesx. A
Jeckmaian. vone Smith. oaebd. Ostbed UInfeswy i3i
Janet Bwe, Uadlyn Smith, wuMMMd W. foe I (J1

M .c commi .. Aof t
aa s er. player c A
,p the uIdftd C.C. ijS.ws ieru Sf


CAPTAIN VS CAPTAIN: Barbara Knowles, captain of
Paradise Bees, Jumps high and strong to spike a point
through Florence Rolle, the captain of Coco Cola Jets.
Backing up.Rolle Is Yvonne Brown. Action was the opening
game of the Bahamas Volleyball Federation's 1973 season.
Paradise Bees defeated defending league champions Cola
Jets in three sets. PHOTO: Rickey Wells.

Becks Bees come from behind

to win, now level with Jet Set


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
BECKS BEES after trailing 4-1 came up with four runs in the
bottom of the fifth inning and edged out Heastie Lumber 5-4 to
move into second place tied with Jet Set.
Although Stephen Humes second when Earl Carey who
was awarded the win, Van followed was also walked.
Rolle did most of the damage Burrows stole third and home
to the Lumbermen. Facing for Heastie's third run.
fifteen batters, Rolle struckout With two down, Levarity
ten and gave up two hits, and picked up his first hit on an rbi
two earned runs. Humes came single into right. Carey scored
on in the fifth, faced two on the single.
batters and gave 'up one run. Becks in the bottom of the
He was relieved in the sixth by fifth took advantage of a wild
Don Taylor. pitch, a pass ball and an error
Offensively for Heastie Allen bringing them tied with the
Minus collected one hit during Lumbermen at four all. Fred
his two times at bat and Taylor's rbi-single topped it all
knocked in two runs. Newly and the Bees were ahead 5-4.
acquired catcher Rudy Basil Burrows, who led off
Levarity scored one, knocked that inning, connected for a
in one and got one hit during double. He was wild pitched
his two plate appearances. home. Anthony Huyler
Facing the pitching of Larry followed with a walk and
Turnquest who went the whole scored on a pass ball. Lenny
distance, Becks took a I-0 lead Taylor who came in for
in the bottom of the second. Roosevelt Turner in the fourth
First baseman Willie Knowles took a walk stole second and
scored the unearned run off scored on Taylor's rbi. Taylor
Levarity's throwing error. made use of a throwing error
Minus in the top of the to move the Bees to victory.
fourth inning changed things ROOKIE BOXER WINS
when he cracked a two-rbi STOCKTON CALI F
single deep into centre moving (AP)-Rudy Beae, making his firsl
the Lumbermen ahead 2-1. stin s s wel right afte
winning six straight lgishtweIhi
First baseman Wenzel Ferguson bouts since coming to the United
led off that inning with an states from the Phippems i%
infield hit and Levarity yors eo, won a decision Thursday
followed on a fielder's choice. night ove Agi toI Vna10 o
They both scored on Minus' Each weighed 142%.
single.
The Lumbermen continued
in the fifth on two more runs
as the Bees tagged 4-1. Left
fielder Stephen Burrows, who
suffered strikeouts in the first
and third innings, took a base
on balls and advanced to i


Baby Boy seeks amether wim

Oet US boxer tomorrow


BAHAMAS LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP Baby Boy Ro1ll
aweirgto the rinf Fridy when hee la on Flreidlm
heavymweight lobby Lloyd in a 10-rounder at the Nam Stadifm.


Prince Will & C.C. Sweeting

clash in ball game tomorrow
DEFENDING SENIOR BOYS VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONS
Prince Williams High and the second place rookies of C. C.
Sweeting High clash in a decisive match tomorrow in the City a
the Inter-School Volleyball series nears its close.
Leading the Western all-round playing of Leslie
Division undefeated in nine Cartwright and Alpheus
games Prince Will yesterday Forbes. Arlington Wright and
defeated McPherson High 15-7, Terrance King can contribute
15-5 and 15-2 at McPherson. tantalizing services.
Sweeting High having "They play very well as a
suffered their sole loss to team," said coach Thompson
Prince Will moved their second about C.C. "That's their real
place record yesterday to eight asset."
and one following a 15-10, NO PUSHOVER
15-8, 9-15 and 15-4 victory C.C. playing on their home
over Government High School. ground should not be
Meeting for the first time considered another pushover.
last month, C.C. found the With the vigilant coaching of
experienced veterans too much Tom Grant they could very
to contend with and fell 15-17, well turn the tables and force a
15-13, 15-10 and 15-2. W.D. championship playoff.
We have been working a bit The rookies have to their
on our defence and if it holds advantage the all-round playing
out, our attack should come of Mathew Leckey, Kevin
through," said Prince Will's Rolle and Max Smith. Dennis
coach Caswell Thompson. Forbes and Wilfred Calmer, the
Pacing Prince Will on the back courters, can give the
forward line will be David winning sets.
Bullard and Leslie Cartwright. Sweeting High in the last
Together on spiking and game took the first set.
blocking they can be Whether they can hold out will
dangerous. Prince Will also be seen tomorrow 4 o'clock at
have to their advantage the Volleyball City.

Reviewing some of this

season's volleyball teams


." ..

ARLINGTON WRIGHT
(17) of Prince Will goes up for
a point scoring spike following
the bump from Alpheus Forbes
(45), during yesterday's game
against McPherson High. Prince
Will won 15-7, 15-5 and 15-2.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


.BENCH TIES RECORD
NEW YORK (AP) Johnny
Bench clouted three home runs,
driving in seven runs, and tied a
Major League record for
consecutive homers, but the
Cincinnati Reds needed a
tie-breaking two-run shot in the
ninth inning by Dave Concepcion
to beat the Philadelphia Phillies 9-7
Wednesday night.
Bench, who homered in his last
time at bat Tuesday night, smashed
all three homers off Phil!!-s' Steve
Carlton, equalling the major league
record of four homers in
consecutive times at bat held by 17
other players. It was the second
time in Bench's career that he hit
three homers and drove in seven
runs in one game. Carlton, then
with St. Louis, was the victim that
time, too.
In other National League games
it was the St. Louis Cardinals 3. San
Francisco Giants 1, and the New
York Mets 8, Atlanta Braves 1.
Houston at Montreal was rained
out.
In the American League games it
was Cleveland Indians 10,
California Angels 3; Oakland A's 4,
Baltimore Orioles 3 in 10 innings;
Milwaukee Brewers 5, Texas
Rangers I; New York Yankees 2,
Minnesota Twins 0; and Detroit
Tigers 4, Kansas City Royals 1.


BABY BOY ROLE
Light-Heavyweight Champion


Guevera his second Nassau
defeat when they clash in the
final of the six rounders.
Guevera, who has been
training on the beach with Nat
King and Marced Clay, was
scheduled to meet Sugar Ray
Sears who stopped him on his
last outing. Unfortunately,
Sears cut both his thumbs in a
glass accident and will be out
of action for three weeks. A
lightweight championship fight
is presently being negotiated
with Gypsy Mike Whymns.
Bahamas heavyweight
champ Boston Blackie takes on
Carl Baker West Indies
heavyweight champ in a title
fight on June 8.

GAME NOT COMPLETED
SECOND baseman Charlie
Mortimer and left fielder
Sammy Johnson each knocked
in one run in the bottom of the
fifth inning to send their game
against Schlitz Beer into
overtime. Both sides at the end
of regulation time were tied at
two runs each. The game will
be completed when they meet
again.


LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP Baby Boy Rolle seeks
Vincente Rondon and Mike Querry but takes on Bobby
Lloyd In ten rounder at the Nassau Stadium tomorrow.


-10 ROUNDS-


-vs-


BOBBY LLOYD
Jacksonville Contender


CLAUDIUS WOODSIDE
BOB FREEZE -
FRED MAJOR VS-


GENERAL ADMISSION $5.00
RESERVED $7.00


DOOR OPEN 1SRN.M.


-vs- JOHN WILLIAMS
TIGER BROWN (Fla.)
ANDRE GUERVERRA (Fla.)


CHILDREN $3.00
LADIES' $4.00


FIRST BOUT:30 SHARP


FOR INFORMATION TEL. 21495


Role, now rated number
two in the British Empire
Comaoawalth ratings, is
coeditiolonS himself for a bout
with Vincente Rondon and
Mike Quarry.
According to his manager
Marty Goldstein, the Quarry
terms have been agreed on and
just the date remains to be set.
However, if Rondon is
available first, they will take
him on. "I feel Roll is a true
champion and ready
to beat both of them," said
Goldstein.
Little is known of Lloyd
except that he scored
knockouts in his last two
outings. His most recent was in
March when he ko'ed his
opponent in the second round.
Middleweight Cladius
Woodside after a brief layoff
takes on the popular John
Williams in the first of three six
round preliminaries.
The sensational heavyweight
Bob Freeze will be on hand for
the second of the six rounders
to display his boxing and
slugging ability against Miami
Tiger Brown.
Freddie Major, fresh from
victory vies to give Andre


DIHrbumtedby


-TlREE -6 ROUND CO -FEATURES-


-TWO- 4ROUND- PRELIMINARIES *


C. W. Sands will sell at
public auction for G. R.
Sweetings at 10 A.M. on
Saturday May 12th; at the
parking lot Immediately
west of Dupuch &
Turnquest Building Shirley
Street a quantity of clothing
Items Including:-
SWEATERS BLOUSES
SLACKS SLIPS SHORTS
AND OTHERS
TERMS CASH
.- ^^ ^ ^_ ^


ite you to a



Beefeater Gin



HAPPY ESOR

5p.m. 6:30p.m.


PRniM MY II .11


Complimentary Beefeater drinks will be served by Amos Gaitor
(All other highball drinks $1.00)


-.
--" f" . .


Thur I 10, 1073,


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VS-