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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03337
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 3, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03337

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f


North Vietnam risks renewed war with US,President Nixon warns


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By KENNETH J. FREED
WASHINGTON (AP)-
North Vietnam risks renewed
war with the United States
unless it lives up to the
Vietnam cease-fire and
withdraws its forces from
Cambodia and Laos, President
Nixon ai~d tods;
He also indicated the
chances of improved U.S.
relations with the Soviet Union
and China are threatened by
~what he said was continued
North Vietnamese aggressions.
The claim of Communist
violations of the Jan. 27
settlement came in Nixon's
annual State of the World
Message to Congress.


He indicated American
tolerance has been tested to
the breaking point and Hanoi
now has two choices.
"The first is to exploit the
Vietnam agreement and press
its objectives in Indochina. In
this case it would continue to
infiltrate men and material into
South Vietnam, keep its forces
in Laos and Cambodia and
through pressure or outrightt
attack renew its aggression
against our friends."
By packmng this path, Nixon
stated, Hanos "would endanger
the hard won gains for peace in
Indochina. It would risk
revived confrontation with
U.S.


This was the plainest
language Nixon has used in
dealing with North Vietnam
since the war was supposed to
have ended more than three
months ago.
In his three previous
warnings the president was
more veiled, talking in terms of
Hanoi learning from history
that his statements should ntot
be disregarded lightly.
Although the United States
feels the grace period has about
ended in which violations
could be excused as the
expected aftermath to a dirty
war, Nixon said Hanoi still can
retrieve the situation,
"The second course is for


North Vietnam to pursue its
objectives peacefully," he said.
This would mean total
observance of the Vietnam
settlement, including full
accounting of missing
American servicemen and a
removal of all North
Vietnamese troops from Laos
and Cambodia-
"If North Vietnam chooses
the peaceful option, the United
States remains committed to
better relations," Nixon said.
This includes the U.S.
economic aid he said is
essential to a lasting peace.
Vietnam was only one of the
sections covered specifically in
Nixon's 232-page report.


Henry A. Kissinger in briefing
newsmen pleaded that they
give the other portions of the
document some attention.
POINTS
In the rest of the report,
Nixon made these points:
The dramat ic
improvement in relations with
mainland China should
continue, even though he
realizes there will be
continuing frictions over
ideology and views of history.
Nonetheless the measure of
the improvement was
illustrated by the fact that of
the 11pae devoe toCi
only onpe p ragrp hddateo w sh


the government the United
States officially recognized as
China, the Nationalist regime
on Taiwan.
And in those 59 words,
Nixon did not even use the
official title of that
government, the Republic of
China, referring only to
Taiwan.
The United States and the
Soviet Union have taken the
"essential first step in freeing"
themselves from cold war
confrontation .
This means, Nixon
explained, that the obstacles
are cleared for long-term,
substantive agreements on
limitation of offensive nuclear


weapons, trade, troop cuts in
Europe and in efforts to solve
the Middle East conflict.
This "will take patience,
hard work and perseverance to
cast our broad undenrstndings
into concrete results." Nixon
said.
"If we can do this, the
United States and the Soviet
Union can move from
coexistence to broad
cooperation and make an
unparalled contribution to
world peace."
Western Europe has to
realize its otherwise welcome
drive for economic regionalism
cannot be at the expense of the
American trade Oosition,


While Nixon pledged the
United States would "never
compromise the security of
Europe or the interests of our
allies," it is time for the
Atlantic Alliance members to
stop debate and get on with
new programmes.
*The inevitable recovery of
Japan and its immense new
economic strength means a
ne w Washington-Tokyo
relationship.
*It will require a conscious
effort of political will not to
make the key decisions
according to short-term
econmic r plitical
odvnomeTic His moreothan a
problem of bureaucratic
"anagament," Nixon said,''

The president personally
will "underscore our deep




"America's objective in
the Middle East is still to help
move the Arab-Israeli dispute
from confrontation to
negotiation and then toward
conditions of peace .. "
To achieve this state, Nixon
said, the United States will
work realistically for a
negotiated Arab-israeli
settlement and for a
recognition by Moscow of the
need for restraint and the
"uouat un lies A erc n-aS et
relations.
REFORMS
In other areas, Nixon said
his administration would work
fordaef an of Mthintemastiona
aid in the economic and
political development of
Africa, help decrease tensions
in Sputth Asia and the rest of
the Orient and pursue a
rational military policy that
will bring about a peaceful
world without sacrificing U.S.
national security or its defense
commitments.
The mark of national
security adviser Kissinger wastt
evident all through the report,
particularly in its theme of the
interdependence of the various
world problems and solutions.


Mr. Adderley shared the
pl':":" at h ner Teachers'
Lewis, deputy director of the
Institute of Social and

Ba:b:dos camp ol' t:
University of the West Indies.
The Minister, appearing
unusually subdued and lacking
his Icustonfarily 18r~ceful tone,
contended that -this was
probably the reason why the
average Bahamian had never
had the same attitude to
independence as other
territories,
"It is because he never felt
the presence or authority of an
external presence, and this was
also true of the practical
application of the colonial
administration in Nassau and
the Out Islands. tigwste
Governor, Mr. Adderley
pointed out.
He noted that as far back as
1799 the Bahamas had 29
elected members in the House
of Assembly, and although the
question of independence was
not raised at the 1962 and
I 96 8 constitutional
conferences, what was initiated
ten years ago had that as its
ultimate objective.
"Independence therefore is a
very logical progression of
constitutional events here,"
Mr. Adderley said.
NO ASSAULT
"While there may have been
some radical changes in
personnel and political
philosophy, no politician has
dra d asrsaulththehdeme rse c

This, he maintained,
distinguished the Bahamas
from many other similar
former dependent territories.
Discussing more specifically
the role of the Bahamas in
world politics, the Minister said
this would be largely defined
by this country's own political
evolution, history, and
geography .
Unique though Bahamian
hs iory ws cn rnany wy, its
plantation slavery had
Iomint ed all th Cai t on

blchabee hprooe frao
th itohwn e 1 eoms Iture in


tengl areakigCaibe the Bis lgc



distinct identity that history
ha cetd for u,,
a ea Minister sob evd th t
like all the e slansds eof t =
Caribbean, the Bahamas itself
was an archipelago extending
over 100,000 sqisare miles of
sea Ther total Oland are wam

which made it half the size of
Jamaica and the size of
Trinidad.
Under these conditions the
administration and security


pleblems for the 22 inhabited
i eJds were enormous, he
Qver the past three centuries
the Bahamas' proximity to the
UnitedmSit as had dformedh a

presented the situation of a
British colonial dependency
bound economically to the
United States. *
This bond also extended to
transfer nee of the
rudimentary plantation system
from the U.S. As a result there
was hardly a Bahamian family
that did not have a relative
who was a citizen of the U.S. 1
Mr. Adderley noted that in
addition to more Americans
than any other nationality
visiting the Bah~amas, the
Bahamas ranked sixth in the
niu be6 he% foreigners who
Furthermore 60 per cent of
the goods imported here were
from the U.S. and 70 per cent
of the Bahamas's exports went
to the U.S
Mr. Adderley pointed out
that certain of the former
colonial territories were not
naturally designed for
nationhood, and therefore
certain ingrdients had to be
combined to create successful
states of these countries.
These states had tremendous
physical limitations on their
ability to survive. Their
yardsticks for success therefore
were not necessarily the same
as those the larger more heavily
populated countries could use.
One of the specific

ea t rseat th bemplc unt i:
ohlrtun toay ad thalladult
tomorrow, who for normal
reasons, will get the best
education of any previous
generation.
An example of the extent
to which the Bahamas would
be subjected to this pressure
could be seen from the 1970
census, Mr. Adderley said.
The census showed that at
that time there were 53,000
children undebettne ena jusd

14. This meant therefore that

children b tw enwe7 and a d
lnscool receiving th bevo

genemlyo a certain level of




as r. A derley obsere th t
Bahamas had no natural
resources, therefore the
resources of the sea were of
great importance-
At the forthcoming Law of
the Sea conference the
Bahamas would seek to
rsai at thew extent nao its
jurisdiction over the sea bed
and application of the
archiprelago principle for
fishing and mineral
exploitation.


Ends 25-year association with Guides
MRS. NANCY COLE, left, who retired on April 30 as district commissrionert~f Girl
Guides in the Eastern Drstriort, wasr on Wednesday theI guest of honour at a reception hld
at guide herdquarter on West Bay Stnret. Lady Paul, wife of the Governer, presented the
d sivr tray in front-of her to tr. Cole on liabal of the guldes as a tgkeSut efsppREciation
for 25 yeass' service At right is Miss Gnwel Frenc, deputy commissioner of gluides in the
Bahamas. PHOTO: Philip Symonette


ItI pitfstSrg WarBS IS


8808t 800mapl (08tl0RS

UNLIKE OTHER COUNTRIES which have come
independent in recent years, the IBahama Is being thrust into its
new IMatus +t a ~ime whien issues directly affecting its economy
fataleri'i to condilrartionsr fbr the large powers.l
In this context, Dr. Vaughn country.
Lewis aird last night,tnormous O^*The Bahamas must develop
impostance sust' be attached a sophisticated approach with
to the ektternal relations regard to both its monetary
bureancracy established by this system imnd the question of
CltT II 1~~Ito Uvrsty oaof the WetIn is
professor said in a talk at the
I.S. EISgLI EI Tachers' sole on the ro e
FIII r~lt LI I1 politics
Dr. Lewis observed that the
CUBAN PRIM Minster Bahamas was entering the
Castro has called for the international system while it
-creation of a Latin American wam saeoflx nd
regional organisation which change, some of these
would exclude time United dlirte ad sm tht
States, The Miami Herald seemed incapable of being
reported.controlled.
Castro said Cuba would not Hedtid oeoth
seek a nlormalization of changes as: the breakdown of
;relations with the United political rigidity that
Stats utilit rmovd a characterized the cold war
political and economic period after 1945, the
blockade of the island and disintegration of the
chaned is police of international monetary and
"exploitation and domination ec nomic s itu nation ad he
of the peoples of this change m teitrainl
continnt ,,legal system.
Addressing hue Ma Day The Bahamas, he said, was a
rally in Havana's Revolutionary very small statewihnt
Plaza, Castro attacked the wsen hmshr, a
United States for imposing "its adto owihi a n
sovereisaty, hegemony and archipelago state very close to
com oete domination over thi0 hUS SMALL
It was also a relatively small
in oh nexpatn eenri so th country in terms of population
Castro urged I in American hcueurtcifa ha
governments to rally "against exc hans tosreahg
USc domination. He called ex e


TWO WELL-KNOWN BAY STREET restauurats, The Riviera
between Frederick and Charlotte Streets, and Blackberd's
Tavern between Market and George, have changed hands in the
past week, The Tribune hras lerned.


THIE BANK of Nova Scotia
yesterday won its suit for
$57,707.50 brought against the
now defunct Bahanuan Times
f or overdraft facilities
advanced the paper.
The judgment in favour of
the bank was handed down by
Mr. Justice James Smith when
the Bahamian Times formerly
the official organ of the PLP,
failed to put in an appearance,
He also awarded costs of $254.
The writ against the
Bahamian Times was filed
April 12 by the firm of
Graham Thompson and
Company, representing the
Bankl of Nova Scotial. At that
time it claimed the amount of
$51,584.89 together with
interest up to February 28.
baThe overdraht involved the
Street.
An earlier writ was taken

Times b he AthoremBGneami
in June 1972, claiming
$7,777.28 under the tenrm of
an agreement dated February
4, 1970.
The Times was named the
official gazette in 1970
without the printing contract
having been put out to tender.
It was agreed at the time that
the paper would pay the
government $35,000 for the
privilege, which mn effect would
be stie u rt deisn


y oThetimsm an 5 mo t
later the co aract was giventhto


dtwice-we kzlyc Times hadt failed


publ cation imesApdsusp 2 17
when it become apparent its
financial condition was such
that it could no longer carry
on.


This was most apparent in
the relationship of a Vietnam
settlement to a meaningful and
lasting improvement of
dealings between the Urnited
States and the Communist
powers.
"If the flames of conflict
flare up again," Nixon wrote in
his message, "there will be ...
the danger of another war and
a threat to the improvement of
relations among the major
world powers."
Administration sources said
this was a direct reference to
China and more particularly
the Soviet Union. In this
regard, the president said
theree can be no reasonable
justification for sending Hanoi
large arms shipments ...
"A mil trys buildup would

(Hanoi's) intentions, but also
about the motivations of the

suK i sner said in his initial
briefing on the report that
some arms have been shipped
from Russia and China to
North Vietnam, but the
meaning is under study.
He also said "the situation in
Indochina and all its aspects
will be raised in Moscow"
when he visits the Soviet
capital later this month.
la other words, "there
cannot be a glot structure of
ne c wh i c et persist ath e

sofchn, Ie st. g in


Nix, n ai went on, "the mo I

omeou neta e rh statt o


N hlaionW nfhe askeemant '
Hanol "has also continued its
military activities in Laos and
Cambodia." he asiai


the Organization of American
States the "ministry of U.S.
colonies.
"The OAS is incompatiblef
with Marxism-Leninism,
Castro said. "It is incompatible
with the dignity and interests
of our people and the future of

Te mCeb dictator praised
Chile, Peru and Panama which

hroom td e poici'br gf th a
mnopposin plha io clleoid

coutre pomised that Cuba




with these countries, the ai


because "we know socialism
will come sooner or later "




BED PDWS




NASSAU -FREPORT


J im Diamantis ,
Greek-Bahamian owner of
Delphi's in the Madeira
Shopping Centre, confirmed
this morning that he sold The
Riviera to building contractor
Arnold Cargill for $75,000 Mr.
Cargill took over the premises
today, Mr. Diamantis said.
Mr. Cargill purchased the El
Toro restaurant, which is
opposite The Riviera on Bay
Street, from Nick Pikamenos
mn December last year for an
undisclosed sum. .
G r ee k B ah am ian r


busine as man Geor ge
Skandalaris confirmed that he
has sold the controlling interest
in Blackbeard's, but he
declined to say who had
bought itor for how anch. Mr.
Skandalaris retains an interest
in the restaurant.
One source said the
purchaser was Andrew "Dud"
Maynard, brother of Tourism
Minister Clement T. Maynard.
Other sources named a William
Curtis as the buyer. Neither
Mr. Maynarld nor Mr. Curtis
could be contacted today for
comment.


KIRBY Brooks, operations
manager for ZNS and popular
"morning man" on the station
from 1965 to 1968, will bring
a group to Nassau on Friday,
May 18, for a weekend holiday









n~IE~ to do


mOS n ai the tlosta ei
nhumber mofo vehicles on New

25,000" have been 7 liened o
droate, atouh the 1973diabe
licensfing dacdlinews, March
"Ifroe you thin Rofd thenmber
of accidentc dhael every da
unl ticesd vehnicl re't


2,0 hv e licensedbeusthyrof the
road as a esult o traffic

accidents" Mr. Thopso er dy


said.


on a chartered Eastern Airlines
aircraft.
Mr. Brooks, who joined
WVCG; radio station in Coral
Gables after the Bahamas and
Tel vision Commission
declined to renew his three
year contract with ZNS, has
arranged for the group to stay
at the Britanna Beach Hotel,
Paradise Island.
The $107 round trip fare

h~omdt on cokailh an

n lber is as ye unknown n-

BAonk intoerve withN r.

sl au e 9 5 bro u h th

firstnvisite lure 18 years agoin

June, 1968 his only comment
on the non-renewal of his
contract was: "'I think the
reasons are pretty obvious."


Third, it was a state that had
an economic system dominated
by external countries and
systems. It was a country with
an extreme dependence and a
system that was difficult to
insulate from the vagaries of
the international system and
particularly the U.S. system.
In addition the Bahamas
sys em woas n openoof oin


Clearly, as it entered the
dnentoa tsy stem, althe

oaaa ra t se ip a a
ntai er rf inks sih Le
Heid pint sed outibl that beaue
sofl itsk proximiy the Bahmas


must of necessity deal with
Cuba on the question of
territorial limits.

lseals if tis, al d its need
like the U.S. on the samne
q uestio n, "enor mous
importance" had to be
attached to the external
relations bureaucracy.


IN THE list of students who
passed the entrance
examinations to St. John's
College the name of Jesse Dean
of Claridge Road Primary was


lett out.
Jesse is among the students
who must contact the school
by May 15 to scure place at
St. John's for next term.


BHBL~
Car. e~ort~ 8~. a MI. F~o;yd AM.
--
AN1YTHI~JQ I#USICAL
4.6. Bw kAeur, p~ 1it~08)2~3237


~bp


~ribunP


... *na .......... .s m .... ... ....... ......... ... Nassanlland Bahama Isla ad a Leading ~~~ee


VOL. ILXX, No. 138


Pri~c: I $ Cents


Thursday, May 3, 1973.


EXTERNAL AFFAIRS .MINISTER BOASTS --


' Fewer countries better


for


By NICKI KELLY

WITHI 245 YEARS OF UNINTERRUPTED LEGISLATIVE AUTHlORITY behind it, there will have been fewer
territories better prepared for independnene than the Bahamast, External A~ffars Minister Paul Adderley told a
capacity audience attending las night's discussion on the role of the B~ahamas in world politiCS.


St8TIA ~AANK


iI 8I10K blW~il Irer

4~1~ IERE 01 MAY 18


STUDENT LEFT. OUT





WlASHJINGTON (AP)


United States Wedn aday
requiring the nation's largest
companies to notify the
soverrnment in advance when
they intend to raise average
prices by more thn 1.5 per
cent over Jan. 10 levels.
Nixon also announced that
the lagest companies, those
with annual saaof more than
250 m81i~lon dollars, would ,be
requie to make a full and
dataie report on pnice
increases that have ffn
mnto Pfeffec sine pha~~
cont ls% bea snJen. Is.
Sst ack toward
phase 2 controls mn whichI
companies harda set adM
claranc fo a re blsts
but he stopped far short of
goingmbac aoth sm ndat

prior to Jan. 1.
In a statement, Nixon said


woul lie r some month,"
but he said that inflation
would not be as had in th
Feruary and Mc.
Before Nixon's statement,
stock market prices rose
sharply Wednesday in
anticipation of measures by
the President to stem inflation.
The President said he had
rejected a now freeze on wage
and prices, adding, "we should
be mature enough to recognize
that there is no instant remedy
for this problem."
He also urged American
farmers to produce more to
attack skyrocketing food
prices, saying that "the county

Amecanmf rers hae never
failed to deliver when the
country eheeded them b fim
Bsd requ rig aig im
to notify the cost of living
council 30 days in advance of
price increases in excess of 1.5
per cent, Nixon also said that
companies not exceeding this
hii wudpris required to





IowNTowN MIAul





Single 9
Double SII
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home bf the
AMERICAN.BAHAMIAN
PEDARATION


M~ arr.
SMMf WI R~'
rea. rour


AIDES HALDEMAN B ERLICHMAN MEET PROSECUTE*
WASHINGTONY (AF) Outgolog White Hous sides H. R. Haldeman
and John Erliclunan reportedly will meet with the Watergate prosecutor
today, and the two may speak later In the day with investigators of the
****;: .,***:"h mn:*,: inditme-g,*\." .,ei a n fit alee Wit:
House cover-up of the Watergate wiretapping.
la another development, the Justice Department yesterday cited the
Nixon campaign organization for failing to report a secrt 200l-thousand
dollar contribution. The Nixon re section committee could face a
Lthre-th und-dollar fine on the alleged violation, but the group denies it

NO AC IlON BY PRESIDENT NO RE-ELECTION
C:HICAGO (AP) The Chicago "Sun Times" says President Nixon
berran his own investigation of use! Watergate scandal after six Republican
',nr sr imlicated the p sane So aut bcu or It Lhewn ohi te
;n ed Nixon in March that six of the 15 GO-P Senators up for
rl estion had indicated they had no hope of re-election unless the
PI si lent took some action on Wa t s as ereAle fVemn,
Hernry Belimon of Oklahoma, Marlowe Cook of Kentucky, Norris Cotton
of New Hampshire, Peter Dominick of Colorado and Will Saxbe of Ohio.
The Senate has left standing its call for an independent prosecutor for the
mesee ooa. Onyte Seaboswr nt h nlo ya eday hern th
resolution was voted on.
The wife of former Attorney General John Mitchel, Martha Mitchell, I
scheduled to testify behind closed doors Thursday in New York In the
Wa ergate lawsuit. Today a friend quoted her as saying she plans to tell the

COMMITTEE ACCUSED OF NOT REPORTING DONATION
ree ASlHINcG Ni edP e Jstitcep~epartmentoaccuned th a xo
cash contribution from financier Robert L. Vesco.
The three count criminal information carries a maximum penalty of a
93,000 fine against the finance committee to re elect the President. No

conribtio pi n I2 ntd ftailthd to eorm ether doe at it2 ,nr
This is the date a representative of Vesco delivered a briefcase full of $100
bills, totalling $200,000, to Maurice Stans, the campaign finance chairman,

efde hernha dimsct re dst pu sap 91 dors t Nxn comth e
to be reported.
The Justice D~epartment information didn t name Vesco, but the date
and amount of the contribution coincide with the Vesco gift which
stvel m~en auditors had previously listed as an apparent legal violation to
The money is believed to figure also in a New York grand jury's
investigation of Vesco, who is being sued by the Securities and Exchange
Commission for allegedly looting $224 million from four mutual funds.
file at xon campaign returned the money two months after the SEC
The first count of Wednesday 's charges said Stans failed to report receipt
of the money to committee tresuurer Hugh P. Sloan Jr., as required by the
federal election campaign act which took effect April 7, 1972.
dA ston d utn acued to c amm tet ofiing tot kepctorldsd ohe
accused the committee, acting through Sloan, of failing to report the
contribution to the Office of I edtral Elections of the General Accountins
Niher Stans nor Sloan was charged. The maximum penalty upon
conviction on each count is $1,000.
ROLLS-ROYCE FOR SALE TO PUBLIC IN STOCK ISSUE
LONDON (AP) Rolls Royce motors, makers of perhaps the most
prsiius car n thM word chl ne cdt thhe public in a stock issue'
The banker said details of the sale would be announced later; but
financial sources said shares worth a total of 38.5 million pounds 96.25
minlion dollars would be offered
Rothschild is acting for the I~quidators of the old Rotll-Royce company
which! colapsed in April 197 I when its aero division failed to meet
contract commitment on the Ra2t I engine.
The Britih government took over the serypace division, Iinjected new
monelemdanalt HtoeoR 2Id fo AnswineswLkhred rksturairliner,nbuth I
Profitable motor car builders.
JUDGE MAY HAVE BEEN COMPROMISED
LOS ANGELES (AP) The judge in the Pentason Papers trial ha
ordered attorneys in the case to report to him today on motions for
dismissal and mirstri. The move follows claims that Judge Matt Bymrn may
have been compromised by meetings with former White House aide John
Erltcluna a a~t B rne' posible apdpointmeqtha Dr Uetor of ch s raors
Howard Hunt and Gordy Liddy reportedly supervised the wiretapping of
phones of at least two journalists as prt orf a White House probe of the
Patgn paesla. Thamm s"p~ a ute rs a w a un naming two

JUDGE DEFENDS SELF AGAINST ACCUSATIONS
LOS ANGELES (AP) Pentagon Papesn trial judge Matt Byrne
reene U.rcl A dnia so ina rilehattorneys' ace stion mha
offering himl the post of DirLtor' of the F'edetrs Bureau of Investigation.
He insitetd that he never discussed the case in two meetings with
Ehrichmnt~ or in a brief chat with Pedsidnt Nixon
asw xU sare oir ug n asaw n ceowdt xat urinba the tnimhe
Advisr, Henry Klossier at a party.
Despite Byrate's statement, defense attorney Leonard Weinglass later said
euatide court that the defense probably will move for mistrial.
NATION-WIDE STRIKE LASTS THREE HOURS
.. OA0 (AP) -he gB Wth r d of Ralay aE oiln ksal ha
endlag a astloa-wide strike after three hours. About 15 thousand R.E.A.
earpfresre won affectd by the sttrik.
A pklessase for the Brotherrhood of Railway and Airline Clerks asld the
themn' prlst A a te arm to tal pneral and local informing
CASUALTIElS 80s NG IN BEIRUT FIGHTING
SEIRULT (AP) casualties are reported soaring in the srend day of

Lebauonla President to stop the fighting. But it appeared neither side we
able to aforce a cas**firedeclared eaHer.
P enhia L pt Mrts Dmace my sewn-thousand trooped of t e
possibe latessnction i Lebanon
Beirst tRadle had annrounced that Lebanese and guearril lenadrs mwoud
meet today, but there i no Irord on how the resumed fighting wlit affect
the planned confwnce.
BREAK IN HEAVY RAINS PREDICTED
ST. LOUIS (AP) The National Weather Service predicts a break today
inr hsWeav wls that have added to flood problems in the mrid-wet, but the
forecasters wata that new c~rets on the ulppe Mississipp would result in
coInthmd flooding farther south.
The Weather Service prediction fromr St. Lants catts for calaa weather ~
through the wekend, allowing the swollen Mississppi and its tributaries to
neede slightly. No new crises have been reported in the seven-state area
rwavad by the floods.


--........... . -.-




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WASHINGTON (AP)- 11.8
duci~ t Nixon ad W**
Om ClseltWC8 10f Ely
Brandt jointly 6delred
Wednesday that "an adequate
presence of U.S. forces in
Europe" la ladiseal in
marintaining t East Wst
b al ance of' atflitary
power. The two leaders also
agreed in a jolat stateent
issued after two -days of
meetings that each member of
'the Atlantic Alliance usest
contribute "spbprpritely
toward the burddst of the
common defense."
"... while seeking ~to reduce
the mgilitary confrontation in
Europe, the capacity ~of the
alliance to assure the security
of all of its partners at ny
'time must be preserved
without qualification," the
communique declared.
The 1,000-word statement
ranged from military islueL to
trade, monetary, diplomatic
and international questions.
T AID STRICT'UR ders
"emphasized that it is now
imperative" that the Paris
agree et f afu letnanm

scrupulously implementedd"
Until this happens, they
said, neither the United States
nor West G~ermany will fully
implement their "humanitarian
relief and reconstruction" aid
for "all the states of
Indochina...."
This clearly 'meant that
Nixon and Brandt would
withhold any~ aid to Vietnam
until satisfied with Hanoi's
compliance with the cease-fire.
Concerning the Mid-East,
the two leaders have said that
steps to initiate these
negotlastiomnm staendr the

concerned ... are essentia to
help bring about pro.
'gross toward a stible peace ,
Th*y hie he 1971 Berlin
agreement for bringlag
"Lprctical improvements" to
the live of Berlinesn said
respect for its terms by all
parties is essential fo.a
continuing relaxation of
tension -and added that
"expanded international air
traffic to the western sectors of
Beriin would constitute further
progress."
Nixon's summit sessions
with Brandt were a part of a
aderls of meetings the

hodn withM Erop cn le dr
prior to his planned visit to
Western Europe later this year
The communique disclosed
that Nixon planned to meet
"with NATO and the European
community" on the trip and
said Brandt welcomed the
President's intention "to
Intensify" his European ties.


OR 6NIxoR aldes

YORKr (AF)- Gemamnen immeprtern sy tiny line evidence
that higheasida 1911e BEurse aides and ofiledal of Posidnt
Nfixoir'sa elcte connelatesa sepipe to device as elaborate
cove r tory following dre Wat~ergete rea-in, Tim Ne s York
li~nerrs pacrt*A Werstigdy
T newspaper quoted the far
aaynamethe bcm inlade Ivsiaoshv n thed
payments to the arsresd that everyone involved L he
duriC the iniet orfi cover-op acheam repeatedly
of e~cutive llmny n ied to federal investigators,
series of public dealais pro~seutors, other White House
the evidence shows the officials ad finally to Nixon
covra~p offot wcootrdinated himsef, The Time seary said.
by presidenitrl H.isn R. At least four other perrsons
Hlalde m.an rad John were also involved in the
Ehrlichm~sa who reigfned coverap and are now under
Monda ~n~d former Atta investigation bythe grandjury ,
General J ha Mitchell, ~ho The Times quoted sources as
headed the Committee for the @ng;
Reelection of the President at Those named were Dwight
the time, The Times said. Chapin, the President's former
DENIALS appointments secretary.
Also ~iqvolved, the G~ordon Strachan, Haldeman
newspaper said it had learned assistant; Herbert Porter, who
rom k a invrtgonwe dkt ke at Her erto Kle n'
counsel who was fired this Washihgton-based attorney
week, and former White House Kenneth Parktinson, who was
speca orisa d i Sur iede b u mi tesho reelect o
Mitchell ad Wednesda inl Juner 17 break-in.
sae et ysue a The additional funds needed
Ws hnmet isue for the alleged payoffs, the
"A s ory appearing in newspapersaid, were collected
today's New, York Times by Herbert Kalmbach, Nixon's
alOging that I conspired wi~th pe~rsonapl lawyer, who also
H R. Hldem, lo rv;ed as a chief campaign
Ehrlichman rad Joh nba and money raiser.
others to obstruct justice in theBA EDOT
Watergate case is absolutely The newspaper said Hugh
false ad without .frtac Sloan Jr., treasurer of the
foundat ons." tareelection committee who gave
The Times said that the cash to G. Gordon Liddy,
according to sources close to one of those convicted in the
the case all six men are bugging, was the only key
expected to ~be indicted by the official who apparently chose
federal grand jur noW hah ng O to rcip ie sn tert
tetmn lt dh taegt c eN au ilg fi thero


IIn mE ~i IESIGHTISAS


Nixon gives Agnew


Re W IOle and ma 4


stop gap stall joDs

WASHINGTON (AP)--Presidet Nixonr has adde Vice
Presdent Spiro T. Agnew to hirs donwtic-olicy appahriatsmd
aggilrggg ggag ygtegges to 181 tempomrary vacancies catetd by


Watergate-related m~fresigntios.
Press secretary Ronald L.
Ziegler said Wednesday that
Agnew, whose role within the
administration had seemingly
been reduced as part of
Ni xon 's second -term
reorganization, has been
designated vice chairman of the
Domestic Council.
Ziegler said that this would
give Agnew "a broadened role
.. in domestic policy
formulation." This came at a
time when a potential rival for
the Republican presidential
nomination in 1976, Texan
John B. Connally, was
switching from the Democratic
to the Republican Party.
Agnew is in no way to be
regarded as assuming the

Eri tmn, Nixon'Johansista t
for domestic policy, Ziegler
said. Ehrlichman and White

HBoob) H lman re iged, a
presidential counsel John Dean
III was fired Monday.
Ziegler said that "the
President has made no
decisions as of now regarding
the way the staff will operate"
in the absence of Ehrlichman,
Haldeman and Dean.
STOP G;AP
However, it was learned that
the President outlined at a
Cabinet meeting Tuesday a
stop-gap plan for permitting a
continuation of normal
administration business
pending a rebuilding of his top

staomestic-policy matters
once handled by Ehrlichman
are being coordinated by
Kenneth R. Cole Jr., the
35-year-old executive director
of the Domestic Council that
Nixon heads. Cole, who joined
the administration in 1969, has
held his current post since last
December,
Stephen B. Bull, 31, another
initial member of Nixon's
White House staff, was said by
an associate to be functioning
as a 'sort of traffic cop
regulating the flow of papers
and people to and from the
presidential office. Haldeman
had performed those and other
funl nit was learned, is in
charge of the President's
day-to-day schedule.
Handling longer-'range
scheduling for Nixon is David
N. Parker, 33, a special
assistant who joined the White
House staff in January 1971.
2 TESTIFY *
Two key figures in the
Watergate case appeared before
the grand jury Wednesday.
Former campaign deputy
Job S. Magruder was before the
panel about three hours and
later said he answered all
questions. He ~reportedly has
told prosecutors that Dean and
former Attorney General John
N. Mitchell approved and
helped plan the wiretapping.
E. Howard Hunt, currently
serving a jail term for his prt
in the wiretapping conspiracy,
was led into the grand jury
room In handcuffs for a nrpeat
appearance. Hunt earlier had
been granted immalaity from
prosecution for anything he
might Mybefore th day e grand jury
and had answered questions.
At the Cabinet meeting,
Nixon said that, at least for the
ptreent, laterdepartmental and
personnel matters should be
taken up with the Offloo of
Management and Budget, an
arm of the executive office of
the President.
DISPLEASED
At his Wednesday news
briefing, Ziegler acknowledged
that Nrixon had expressed
d"ispl **ur at theabnjMM
resolution urging him to sek
Senate confirmation of a
nominee from outside the
executive branch to serve as a


special prosecutor to take
charge of the Watersate
investigation.
The White House spokesman
said Nixon felt that the action,
taken by voice vote with only
five senators present, might be
regarded as reflecting ill on
"the responsibility and
integrity" olf Blliot L.
Richardson, the President's
nominee to be attorney general
who already has taken over
direction of federal inquiries
into the Watergate burglary
and subsequent coverup.
The Senate wrangled
inconclusively for 20 minutes
over the matter Wednesday and
let stand tbs resolution
sponsored principally by Son,

-Pry offMe to rescind the
action provided that a fied
time was set for a second vote

Ctton (R. N.) ob etedo ta
this would not allow sufficient
debate.
Sen. Carl T. Curtis (R ,
Neb.) wanted to amend the
Percy resolution. Curtis
favoured naming the outside
prosecutor, he favours former
Sen. John J. Wiliamns (R.,
Del.), who is not a lawyer.
In addressing the nation
Monday night, Nixon said he
had authorized Riichardson,
now Secretary of Defense, to
"name a special supervising
prosecutor for matters arising
out of the case" should
a o dri tn consider that
Ziegler said Wednesday that
Nixon told Richadrdon, in
effect, "You have no
limitations placed on you by
me "
However, the press secretary
also spoke of Richardson's
being "free to proceed under
the President's direction" and
voiced the opinion that any
decision regarding appointment
of a special prosecutor "would
be thoroughly discussed wtith
the President."
Responding to questions,
Ziegler said that all files from
the White Hoouse offices of
Haldeman, Ehrlishman and

a ntnal In aton mntoe dW i
House where they are beint
guarded by PBI agents.
Nixon had complained at
the Cabinet meeting that FB
men had been standing outside
the office doors of the thred
former aides and directed that
they station themselves inside
the offices.


algreed-upon story.
"Sloan made incredible
efforts to get word to the
President or somebody about
what he kne w rog"
a source was quoted as saying.
"They all told him to go back
to the committee."
The Timest' story also said
.tat 'a. number. 'beidsulrt~j
ca 9tioned th at the
investigations have yet to turn
up as one put it "a nice,
tidy little meeting where they
all sat down and planned how
to' do it."


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Martha Mitchell was quoted by
a friend Wednsay prasyts,
U!FLi iujPBI t a ~ r 41the
truth,". win ~Fr pleiretrial
testiimony ii't t Waitergate

Mrs. Mitchell, wRife of former
Attorney General John N.
Mitchell, is scheduled to testify
behind closed doors today in
New York., Printed transcripts

tobe toilbl few da ltr
Mrs. Mitchell was called
earlier this month by lawyers
for James McCord, the
convicted Watergate burglar
who is entangled in the
complicated la~wsuit.
Although she formally we r
issued a subpens about a weekr
ago, one of McCord's lawyers
called this "Just a formality."
A frie~nb of Mrs Mitchell
askred whether she carefully
was goin over what she would
say in response to tquestions.
"No, I'mi just going to tell
the truth," the friend quoted
Mrs. Mitchellu rasplyitng
Mrs Mitchell has been
outapoken in the prat in
declaring that she has no
intention of letting her
husband, forseer head of
Nixon's reelection campoain
committee, become a
scapegoat in the Watergate
imropin,


Almost two mnonths of hligl
water he shot down the appe
Missiasppi to comtmerlla traffic
flooded an estimated 11 mlliotr
acms i 3**4 a tnt and caurse4
countin futurer losse to fnnam
unable to plant their crops.
Elewnflnood-related dett hshve
been reported, and a #n timed
35,000 perons are homeless in
wisconsin, Missourl, Iinfools oble
Akrknse, Loalslana and Mississippl.
Illinois and Missourl were both
drenched with thuridertsltom, and
the national weather service
_Wdnesday sed prellatinary reports
Indicate new cmret can be expected
along the Missouri and M~slesppi
rive wl hidn coall da brouh
gustinS wndsB and wave, and a
corps olwfeneers spoksman said
it was "pnnalaey conewned" sout
windmrloele dmrp to the
already4)aterd levees
The Mit**dppi has ben above
Anod rf krh a3drrt 8 Lo
to keep the dwvr abow flood sages
beyond the 58-day record set in
e~ Ilatu of three cests this
spring passed St. Loulson Saturday


at an historic record of 43.3 feet
The river hd brn telips rbr t
then as thr cret trwled
downstrem, but1 offilais sad
Wednarday the m nh had t
northwar neru Rockt blnd. Il.
Theo ne eatst, howrrwr, were
not expueted to approach the
reord lowls oftest week.
The weather services sai~d
tnthes of trla which fell ha lowa
and~ two lahes# in noarthatnra
Missourt "wlR dbdtently afrut the
drin stuation." Mon thanB twoD
Inches ofb ra n wre lso rerpotrte l
southern tilnels.
A co~rpssokam~lan se the
Sktak Riart la lowsut hdn s~e orer
than eIgh t fet in 241 hous.
Jack Mul~a, rnglanl elvR
defeau dirator for 5 sourthern
glinois oosatis, sad9 It would taker
weeks to elean up after the Isat of
the flodiapng as.
"Easept fo n ea#rtinquakel of all
Mar~nath gt hn8 cmi h phto
litllne said. "It takes a leap time
to coat*. Yor figt It and light it
aru Whend uo~ b lor otnP u ha
mes. It smum Ilke 18 neve ends.'


;i.'.' -nrrl-~--: -~- -- ---
L;Y.. :-~T.*


Thursdy, My1S 3, 1973.

li~ lll 818ES


EIt $1'Hittr


.I.. pggggggg N.Y. TIMES ON COVER-UP


I~II EllP Indictments expec


~tedart tSITILS


DERETISIT


''lHINDISPliALE' to b~e~.ainded down


By 11s A larted PRes
HEAVY NEPW RAINFALLS ase sxpectd to bring yet another sales of
errsts to aborthen actions of the god-sweiie Missisappller.So ~uthern
gau are braced for the onstlauht Qhigh warters alredy headed down tre


INTkE BERRY IKA SO


ROOM & BOARq e VACATit'N
sixten minuftes5 from Nalssau on O.I.A.
Writes CHUB CA'Y CLUB
P. O. Box 223 I.A.B. Miaml SM AR












hatr, y ,


NOTICE is hereby given that Peter W. Brine of
P. O. Box 2, Spanish Wells. Bahamas is applying
to the Permanent Secretary to the Premier for
Naturalization and that any person who knows
any reason why Naturalization should not be
granted should send a written and signed
statement of the facts to the Permanent
Secretary, Office of the Premier, Grenada, W.I.


pUanau Amo~ncr JOnams In Vlrxas Ma
SbB9 any son o swealr To 78e Deprcr ofllo Akteter
LBONIE. H.DUPU~CN,Pul~faf~akerBdaer90191
SIR ETtIENN DUPrUCH,.O..e., KEJ.o.S..DLat., LL.D.


BILEEN DUPU1CH CARR~ONQ,MYc., B.A, LL1.B.9,
)CEWIAor/Batter1972"
Publirshd Daly Monday7 to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau9, Bahamas* ,
:TELEBPHONJES.
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By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(MThi is the thint article in a series I am writing~ on the
destmctire results of violence and the lust for financral and
,pottricalpower.)
LATE in tim last century the distinguished British jurst, Sir J.
.E. E. dalberg, fr Bon Acton, made a statement that is often
Hef said that "power tends to corrupt and absolute power
corrupts arbsolutelyhalUay *( lt i~ds thtlsrf

power tends to destroy rand absolute power destrgys absolutely 't
+*****
For the purpose of this discussion let us cast our minds back
to the Napoleonic period in Europe.
Napoleon had won power on the field of battle. He made

B hm warte dFre. Eg d stoo fas one lid bastion of
freedom against his desire to rule the world. He felt that Eligland
had to be destroyed.
After conquering most of Europe he cast his eyes across the
English Channel, that tiny strip of water that acted as a
"defensive most" against foreign intruders since the successful
Invasion of William the Conqueror in 1066.
He was so sure of success that he struck a Victory Medal to
commemorate his great achievement.
But Imrd Nelson, Britain's greatest Admiral of all time, stood
in his way. And so he struck a blow at Russia. He felt that if
Russia were out of the way his chances of a victory over Britain
would be increased.
This venture was a fatal mistake. t destroyed him.

Now .. let us skip a century and examine the period of
Kataer Wilhelin of Germany, architect of the First World War.
P A andson otQuen Victoria, he envied the throne of Britain.


nation. German products were pushing British manufacture out
of the markets of the world. Actually, Britain was already
suffering an unfavourable balance of trade ... her imports
exceeded her exports.
frBut hr fiacilpo itio un da tllsrn deaun 8of i
centuries when she ruled the sea.
It would have been only a matter of time when Germany
;would have become a supreme power in the world. With the
strong arm of commerce she might have pushed Britain into
second place as the financial centre of the world.
But the Kaiser could not wait. Nor was he satisfied to win
Ipower by peacful pursuits. In the past all lory hadbeen wonon
;the battlefield. And so he started a great war.
SAnd he was destroyed.


I wonder what the Kairsr and Hitler would say if they were
able to return to Germany today and see the results of their folly
. .. for it was these two world wars that knocked the props from
under the old order in Europe and set loose new power forces all
over the world.
......
During the period of which I now write, Britain was the great
power with a vast Empire at her back.
Germany was the agge~ressv challenger.
Today all this has changed.
Now there are three great powers making themselves felt in the

kpn;a ul byth U S fe the won wrldo w, has
the Oriental orbit.
Now East is beginning to square off against West, with the U.
S. the main target.
If there is a third world war .. and certainly the world is
moving n this direction .sito now seems certain that it will be
Britain has faded into the background, conquered by economic
pressures which could have been achieved by the Kaiser and
Hitler were it not for their lust for personal power and glory.

You will recall that I have ofte s pressed surrprise that the U.
S. did not see the wrisdom of helping Britain to recover from the
economic drain of two world wars of which she bore the brunt.
I have always said that had America poured money into
Britain and her Empire instead of rebuilding her enemies,
Germany and Japan, these two igeat English-speaking nations,
who were in many ways blood brothers, could have preserved
peace and stability in the world.
Today the U. S. dollar is not only dominated by German and
Jaipanese currencies .. there is also a movement in Germany to
throw' U. S. . not Russian! .. troops out of Germany. The
feeling is so intense that an American soldier was recently
pounced on and beaten to death when he went into a German
restaurant and asked for service.
Now this Master Race is turning its eyes in the direction of
Japanese tourists!
Isee*1
It is only now that I am beginning to understand why America
not only failed to strengthop Britain but alsro brought financial
pressure on British interests in the Iranian oil dispute when Prime
Minister Mossades tried to oust the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company
from control of the Iranian oil fields; and, worse still, when U. S.
Foreign Secretary Poster D~ulles halted Britain and France in
their legitimate bid to enforce the terms of the Suez Canal treaty
with Egypt and stood up in the U. N. alongside the Russann
representative in a bitter condemnation of British imperialism!
But the U. S. was painfully silent when Russia later physically
raped Hungary and put manacles on the wrists of Poland and
Czedhoslovaklalf~
e++++
The picture is made clearer today by a recent UPI despatch
out of landon which reports that "documents on British policy
in ther 1920' revealed that by 1928~ Anglo-American relations
had reached a danpsrous low that did not preclude war between
the two nations".
And so nrow the picture is clear.
Lake Napoleon, the Kaiser and Hitler . .the U. S. too saw
Britain as the one obstacle to to removed from her desire to be
recognized as the top world power. But, in the process, she too
created new forces that now not only threaten the position of
the U. S. In the world picture but forces that may eventually
destroy our Chritrian society.
Is Armapeddon just around the corner?

I wUil continue this discussion tomorrow.
******
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
If drunk with sight of power, we loose
Wild toge thart havre not Thee in awe,
Such b aatin th(ibe stles use
Or lesser breed without the law.
KIPLING


four meetings with SEC
sfcil upon edy held to
investigation by the Agency
STILL IN CABINET *
Two of the thme
interventions occurred while
Mitchell was still a member of
T eson dNixon's Cabinet, the
The State Department was
unaware of the communication
to the embassy in Beirut until a
letter was received from
ambassador William B. Buffum,
the newspaper said. Buffum
was reported to have written
his superiors to ask the
meaning of Mitchell's message
and was told that Vesco was
not to receive special treatment
while in Blerut.
The Times said details of the
intercession are sketchy, but
sources said the contents of
Mitchell's message were put
into memo form.
A source close to Vesco's
~over attemeptanos inr
involved, confirmed Mitchell
attempted ttolintetr do, the

communication between the
Justice department and the
embassy indicating that there
was top-level interest in Mr.
Vesco," said the source, who
askred not to be identified.
The State Department had
no comment on The Times
report. Attempts to reach
unrcastrfl Temm es sad
The newspaper reported last
weeki that newly resigned
MOON
dMOON: Rises 5:53 a.m. Sets


Ehrlichman said later he had
met with the men but denied
offering to aid the Vesco
interests.


3



Id


T e M ama


LOS ANGELES (AP)--John
'~tht wonl A tre
communications channesls to
intercede directly on behalf of
Robert L. Vesco in the
flasncier's attempt to take over
a Lebanese bank, the Los

A utr lag 1 ifid son a t
in Washington, the newspaper
said Mithe~ll did not use
aromal State Department
communications, but either
wavisis us teephauneu the l *.2
section at the U.S. embassy in
Behrut, which can be reached
o Justice Department
communications facilities.
An account of .the action
was said to be contained in
.acret State Department files
turned over last Friday to a
gem rand jury in Nlew
York. The panel is investigating
a $200,000 cash campaign
contribution from Vesco to the
committee for the reelection
ofthe President on April 10,
The Timnes sid Mitchell


committee. The a~ rtribution
was returned when the foedrl
government b*San investigating
Veaco.
Vearco is one of the
defendants in a Securities and
Exchangie Commission civil sit
alleging the looting of 224
million dollars from the mutual
Mfrvids tf investors Overseas
The Times also referred to
previous reports that Mitchell
intervened to help Vesco and
two associates set out of a
Sws jei n pm ount tr


presidential aide John
Ehrlichman had met with three
Vesco associates in his office
a p ombMe r .S. embassy
hep inip going Vesc '
tarnished re utetion with th
Lbanese baonk hereby
enhancing Vesco's chances for
a takeover,

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2167


t Incidentally, Britain is now feeding on the fat of the past. With
?verry death in a wealthy old family she is made permanently
rer~c by the heavy tax toll levied on inherited wealth which
ha~d formerly created revenue from foreign sources. When it goes
:Into general revenue it is swallowed up by the welfare state and
=herefore ceases to produce new wealth.
'= +**2
i A quarter of a century later Hitler emerged from the
ackground in Germany. He was only a Corporal in the Austrian
jrmy in the first world war when the Monarchy was overthrown.

p highly cultured German people. But he did because at that
itme they were smarting under the humiliaton of defeat and
they wanted a ruthless ruler to restore their image.
SHitler also wanted to rule the world. By this time Germany
was once again in a powerthrl position as an industrial nation.
;:He wanted more than the power of a ruler. His desire was to
psjtabllah the German people as the Master Race, with the Jewish
people completely destroyed, the African people thrown back
into slavesry, and all other peoples and races sulbject to his will.
SHad he waited, he too could have dominated the markets of
thre world and made Germany the great financial centre for the
flow of world currencies.
'iHitler's tasks would have been easier than the Kaiser's because
Br~itain had been badly drained by the first world war and the
heed to continue to bear the burden of policing the high seas in
6rider to preserve pacethlr trade.
Hitler started a war. Like Napoleon and the Kaiser he was
c~rushd* ,4,,

O nce spain Gemrmany has made a remarkable recovery. Nor
benefactor after her crushing defeat in the second world war was
Ame~ric. America also rebuilt Japan after this war.
These two defeated nations are so strong economically today
that the Almighty American Dollar has been pushed into the
backtgound.
I As a result the flow of American tourists into Germany has
marot dried up. American are going to places where their
i olars stretch the farthest.

rSince the second world war the Japanese have become great
w~ord travellers. They are to be seen everywhere today. They
sp~end all tmhe time taking pictures. They seem to take pictures
:of everything and anything and one wonders whether there is a
:real purpose to this activity.
It has now been revealed that the German people ... Hitler's
aslter Race .. are now gearing their tourist activities to attract
Ja soui outs sapnuew are travelling, a great many of them do
no~t speak any foreign lanuapr. And so business people in
Germanry ar now learningt enough Japanese to be able to trade
acros ther cotunter wtit their new patrons.


If England was what Englarnd seems,
Aa'n a the Enur f u ad eams,

'Ow quick we'd drroo 'er! But she aint!


- KIPLINGC


Mlr WF~rtimag


F~rorrll ~istterney Geaeral intercedled directly


gA htallf Of VlSCO IR Lebanese bank deal


The past anrd thes present













) WIse aritiss


inppy Entertairement







COnt HUOUS D80Cing nightli
(Except tugtheaday)


7r C ;;b with


BT nv ant cp te toout n

Txe ati a Toas master
successful in bringing the
international convention to the
Bahamas in the near future,"
The Tribune was told today.
The disclosure came from
Mr. Patrick Bosfield, president
of the Nassau branch of the
Toastmasters.

Ric ard see tte,a pesidnt
of the Fre a tt ra~nch a

delegation to a district
convention in Fort Lauderdale
this weekend. The district
convention is regarded by the
Bahamians as a "warming up"
for the international
convention in Houston in
AsI~ st


I


Will any other person (depositor, shareholder or other creditor) who considers
that he has a valid claists against the company which has not been formally
admitted by me as liquidator also contact me at the above address.

SYNDEY MORRIS'

Liquidator.


CeM theW vr~y lat drop


*


G


TRADERS BANK & TRUST LIMITED

(IN COMIPULSOR Y LIQUID TION)

Will the following persons kindly contact the liquidator, First Floor, Kings
Court Building, P.O. Box 1491 in connection with claims which they may have
against the company.


A.M.E. Church Badingl Fund
Adderky, Charles
Adderhy, Christophar J.
Adderky, Daid
Adderly, M~ichuad
Adderley, Zaclkls
Allmry, Beatrice
Allan, Jack
Arbruister, Patrick V.
Arnett, George
Adderley, Audley
Akxander, Robert
Altman, Sam
Amrnke Construction Co.
Atlantic Family Fashions


Bain, Curtney

Belod Ehrthm A
Berros De, Majorie*
Brice, Betty
Brice, Wellington
Bron Richard
Budasde We~ington
Bastian, rrol
Bastian,Willim
Bethd, Frnk
Bereen, Octavius
Bailey, Nathanidl A.
Barld~win, Joseph
Banrnet, Robert
Beneby,Bealamin
Blostwick, Micael
Briggsd N. A or Ann

Burrows, llwokrth

Bain, Carolyn
Baker, ble
beaks, Josephine
Bell, Jamues
bonamy, Shlrly
Braenne, beei
~renaen, Thelm r

Brown, James


Bain, Alexander
Bein, Cedrk

Bain, Gertroade
Bain, Willia
baker, Michael
Baptiate, Jelm
Bastin., Erret
Bastian, Hlton
Beckford, Rev. A.
Baer, Donique
a wl, Da y
krb, Rath Mae
Blaine, Vgte lo

bc@, Theophilu

Bowh, Clhritopher
reamao, BEbroP

Senaswn, hanes
Brenes, Daley
Bridgoewter, Leonrd
Bridpwtter, Nathranil
Browm, Daiy
Brown, Vldirgi
Ballad, Em~y
BEgard,'laez
Ihnd, David
Batllr, Alexnder
*dr CM
ashr#, sh l
*tr lep
b~tr k


Cookley, Eugene
Cox, Cyr8
Cox, Felicita
Cox, Sidney
Culmer, Lortta
Carry, Roseya

Deveaux, iArlnton
Davis, Godfrey
Davis, Hearea
Davis, Leroy
Davis, Olive
Davis, Zerine
Delancey, Thomas
Dixon, Frrak A.
Donaldrso, W.
Dais~, All~a F.
Dawkins, Harold
eaxor rlll m
Duncomk, H. C.


Edwadrd, Lon
Eungenwll Enterpris@


A 15-yearrdd Utak
Harbour, M~nagrve CVi yesth
who wiitnragd tin Novembeo
13 murder of his step-fathr,t
Prince Mdoxey, whoe died of
multiple iqjuries' received la a
fight with a cousin at Andros
ended h is test iso ny
Wednesday in the trial of
seaman Miltoon Moxey, 67.
Moxey, accused of beating
his cousin in the head and
about the body with a length
of wood during an argusenet at
Andros, went on trial Monday.
He pleaded not guilty.
Beginning his evidence in the
box early Tuesday afternoon,
Michael Moxey told the court
sa ce rr wet n Adthe acu
the head with a piece of wood.
SMichael said the deceased
"was like a father to me, he
grew me up," He was attracted
tothe fight when he herd
"Louisar hollering." His
reference Mwas Ltoo an Merlier

sister-in-law to the accused. '
He said he had bee vsti
a friend but when he heard t
screaming and saw Louise
Moxey running, he went to
find out what was happening.


standing apart fo anh ohr

M xeydhad a piece of board in

Dem nstrating thte m ne

being swung, he said that the
accused struck the deceased in
the back and head. The second
blow caused his father to fall
to the ground. He did not see
the accused hit his father any
more after he had fallen to the

x o id the court, dig
General T. Langton Hilton
that he had removed the
cutlass from the ground.
He said that at the time,
only a friend. David, was with
him.
The boy s~ aid, under
cross-examinadion by defence
counsel Mrs. Ruby Nottage,
that pieces of the board issed
by the accused had broken off
and fallen .to the ground after
his stepfather had been hit.


MYUler, Arnold
M~iler, Cliff
MY~ler, LAwan
MIefr, Nev~ila
Mtlecr, Prince
Mddier, Susan
Minabnls, Wuam
Mitchell, Offrne
Moncer, With
Mdonroe, MY. 8.
MYos, Rossile
Moss, Veronics
Moxey, Carvel
Munsings, haenntte
Mackey, Gary
Malckry, Joasth~an
Mack~ey, Karrol
Mackey, Shelly
Martinr, Doreen


Miiler, Cynthia
Miller, Hielen
Mliller,Accine
Miller, Naomi
Minus, Arthur
M~issick, Florene
Misseick, Franklin
MotmeG71Foie
Mullings, Joseph

Odorite of Bahamu

Phlllips, Prince

Fte, eon d/or Gloria

Pratit, Menvella E.
Phlulip, Paul
Pierre, Phillip
Pinder, Hubert
Pinder, Ival Loulse
Plader, Roscoe
Pratt, B. L.
Pratt, David

Rahming, James
Rah In~ V cent


Roetwr, Ol ;
Rolle, Rob to
Roman, Fortune
Rose, Matth~w
Rahming, Hamfreth
Rahmingl, John H.
Rahalag, Wilfred ).
Ramseey, Debdrah
Roberts, Bernard D
Roerts, Ivy
Rolle,Doris
Roll, H~ensel J. W.

Rolle, Patience
Rolle, Olga
Rolle, Samuel
:::*;, ete ,** T
Richardson, Maria
Riketts, Kenneth
Roetmrts CecH
Roktmrt, Gladys
Robertson William
Rodgers, Jacqueline
Rokert, udolph
Role, Alfred
Roll*, H~enrietts
Rolled, Isne
Rolle, Rodney
Rolle, Sles
Ro11e, Thomas
Roll, Victoria
Rnsseii wali~nrm
Rahming, Anita
Richardson, Sylvl.
Rosch, Samud
Roktert, lorothy
Roke, John
Rolle, John
Roll*, Pete
Rose, Walter
Roxborough, Beakte

Shdil Corner Sevie Station
Sands, Kenneth
Soevdes, John
Smnith, Sherwin
Stubbs, Maxwdi
Sinbtv~le, Gerald
mithIU, Jamnes
Smith, Fracis
Sttrahan, Eara
Stubbs, Rosie
Stamrrp, Viacent
Swrrting, Charles
Swureting, Joseph
Sweelttag, Sklaey A.
Saundrsbt Joselph
Sawywr, Erie Jr.
%Symour, Mlonica
Sherwood, Hernd
Smith, Gertrade
Smith, Preston
Smith, Rosmary
SZt. Psal Saptist Chrurch
Sudaby School


Sltrasesru, Rose

SIItaba, Eserkid
Sitabb, Joy L.

Srargs, Wilhainta

SeydmeHar, als

Salth, Fred
mirth, Gladys

mItL, Joseph

Sealth, Sam
'=ait W


Budding harmonica




DEAR ABY: We ae stby. Asbl a cMM sy usba8
was kMeed uarod, dkla't have mteac dcati~on, Int Berate
schooled blanal and beine a vry big bruglage secoa
We haer no mony preoeas, Imt I hav a big pom
with Bnral.
He has dcibded that e is a "performr."' He has ad
no musleal tralaing, iMt snw be tre to ply te anath
organ by just blowlag la ad dralag out. He does't wat
to be rked, In carries the mouth org~an erywhere, sag
offers to play. He is simply terrible, It n at peo le ot haew
how to disarag him.
We recetly went o apart Iand Berale hek theflor
for ab minutes atempting onesrongl after another. It was


I hav a feelagppler are looklag at us skieways. I
asked Berale not to ply ina puble untBl he learrs ia fw
numbusr, Int in blew Ms top and saifd, "Eerayst's ese
Odiaks Pa great. You're just jealous.,
He remind sw me f man we rboth kne who had a good
volo when to was young, but in Ms loate year Ms efforts
to eertdati wer pidfful. Whefbn be died I heard sa y,
"Well, now we owo't have to listen to 'Shasty 'Irowa
anymaor.
Row can I handle this? I love him, but he won't listn
to me1. BETTER HlALP INI ARISONA
DEAR BETT~CER: If yes east ealbt Bne'ral best
irkd fcn the trut 'ba L "R," ran be




IMIAR ABBY: My h usboad isn't a n alchoc, but after
he's had a few he gets vey gnraous rad stars giving
awayr things. [Is~ cffltabs, espeasive pesand pencils,
even the qdkhe i fs werlag.3 He pratctlelly forces
thingsr on1 ple, somer of whom he hardly knowsr.
Some folks realls it was the boose talkng, and the
nex day they will retur whbatever he's given them. But
most people just keep it.
Is there a sluio to this ~blem? HIS WIFE
DEAR WrIE: Yes. BLJq:.

DEAR ABBY: My husbsad and I live on the same
street with my nlawns, and sinc we hav the sam last
name, the Post Office is coastantly getting our mail mixed
up. When my mother in law gets our mail by mistake, rshe
open it and reads it. Then bse brings it over. Swhe ko~s
all our taline before we do.
I told my husband to tell hisr mother to quit opening our
mail, but he doesn't want to start a figh. Don't teB us to
uk the Post CgIce o ( Brrr pbaadj~ll utl vy~ap~ )vert
acus in the h~ee from man rorter who cran' lbd, to
addresse the~y asre't able to makerh out. Sometime I think
they do it on putrgene. ~What shookI wie do? NO PRIVACY
DEAR NO: 81see year habad duss't wrat to Irritate
Ms mther, a Post Omee boxr oagte be a good hvetmeat,


Insta~lla by the Independnce Clsan*Up Committw with
funds raised by public subscription, has barn fillerd to
overflowing with household garbage. No room has been left
for passing motorists to toss in the papers, tins or bottles
that habitually Imttred the highway verges before these bins
wer provided. The Committee asks the public to use the
bin ,.ut Tnl ar ath ce Io foIro ohihd ath w
trash.


Toastmasters International.
CALL OUT FOR
R AF FLE WINNERS
THE PRINCESS Maargaret
Yellowbirds a re seeking two of
the winners of their raffle held
April 27.
Still unclaimed is the fifth'
prize, a large stuffed pink
elephant won by Wilmet

Alo ncamed is the7

mboe around trip ticket to
Jana of Ch rch rHiln ith t cke
780.
The winners can claim their
prizes by calling Mrs.
Bardekeeler at 41233


I


Ferguson, Elia
Fe~rguon, Sidney
Farringston, Rudolph
Forbes, Kennecth H.
Forbes, Lincola
Fowler,Charlotte

Fnnran, Cafrvdi

eysr oa5llu A Ethel


Ferguson, MkI be
Forbcr, George Mi.
Fortes, namesA.
Forbes, Kenneth &/or Neville
Miller
Forbes, Rosells
Forbes, Rowena

Fyc EtheomAs
Fe arn, Edmand

elrguson, Iken

Ferguson, Simon


PcGiben, Jamfes
Geniuse, Culadi

Gre~enlyadErE.




Hepburn, Mrtha
Hepbur~n, Mrtha n
Hepburne, Tyrone

Hdnse, ALarece

Hamrtn, Jennie
Hamilton, Nellie
Hanasn, Baseean

Hepburn, Beratrce
Higginsto Ja cob e
Higgsy, Souph
Hieru, assah N
Houston, Joanne
Humetts, Alb~ert
Hutcnso, L. r

ohunso, Ivan l
Jack, OdeH t
Jpohn, Robrtre
HfrJone, lla a
Jouone, Ph68p
ohnmae, Anthony
ohnson~t, DaidW.
Joghaen, Donad .
Johnson, EraMae

Jolmsn, Vincent

Morley, Edds Mrae

utier, Paslette oas
Mobftro, Flrank W
MJehell,( RaILdle Lee
Mhaon, Hadle w
Me~ltosh, Kden J.

Mcbeast, idr y B.
MeMrma, Betty V.
M~ewh, Edwaorrd
Major, Haeert
Maior, Joseph Lor~

MPer, Dills

Mutesala, Joyeey Ls
MeIesis CHelli
Meletast, 8sekie J
Mc~dasle, George
McKenat, Ro~y Y
ICMeee OBvia

Mechee, Ihery

Mebho, Luthe

YblEL Jlp a lu


Scott, Horace
Simmons, Randord

Sinflair, Janet
Smith, Agnes
Smith, Aarells
Smith, Christine
Smith, Georrge
Smith, Howatd
Smith, Thomas
Storr, Baphem
Storr, Rose Ma~rl
Strachan, Edwla
Strachan, rnest
Strachan, inda
SPtrachn, Meael


Storr Hertrt

Stubbs, Clovim
Stubbs, Naoml
Stabbs, Walter
Stubbs, Welington
Swarby, Joseph
Symonette, Iva
Sands, John
Scott, Lisa
Strachan, Rosetta
Strachan, Vida
Staurrp, Berths Mae
Swain, Marie
Sweetlag, Anthony


Taylor, Leon


Thompson, Dorothy
Thompson, Herbert Leon
Thompson, Jacquelyn
Thompson, Lloyd
Thomrpson, Milto.
Throwecr, Arthur H.
Turelli, Raffael


Whymms, Joseph


A~ftinees on Fri~days & SatutstaBys,

witty Ametsrgy Wour gon agcagys

fnrom 3.00-5.00pm

LOTS OF FREE PRIlZES !
Evening shows start from 9.00pm
?10 00987 ChBtgE~C


Cartwrbigt, Florase
Camblrig, HRlfosert

Cartwrigh, Anthear
Clubs, kpu A.
Clarke, Nichlas
Caler, Jams~ Addis
Cwryr, Suthe L**

Curwy, Ims
CaggM, Tysom Y
.Cartw~l~rigtJmeN.
C'ertwrigt, Neville

Clash, ko*rp W.
Clask, Merid Ddres
Clarke, $MMF
CeMM~, Anthear
ComR, Phaip A.

campbe, Mynra
Carey, Althemes
Caey, Demnwrus
cautrtwrit, Pier~'eac



Cleas, Austin

CeIh, Lathr
kll, Lotrey
CarY,Chtepher
** ,Cb MI u
tapm, Bert


~ =--U



UYL -A6b~-


'"**tla8S~s Col8 1087uefo
Tosnatr co g 4 .n


I' g)*~ O


'5'Be i ak


in ~oune basl


r~ri ti Lltkat IO












THE TRIBUINE Central Gerage Suppleme


11973-- the year of





change--the year



Cen tr a wen t Doge

By MICHAEL A. SYMONETTE
FROM ONE PUMP under. a huge almond tree has grown one of the most progressive
companies in the Bahamas offering a vast ran of motor vehicles from some of the best known
malnufactuersm in the world.


rerusaert rea ure


_Yn_~_C


rrm ~ rr ~rrrrr


""~"-'D- -
I


~1


THE 1973 DODGE LINE In front of the Oair kesFi Showroom of Central Galrag
presents an imposing view. The showroom is one of the finest In the Caribtma.





Centrl Gaage hs C7


Central Garage has existed
for half a century in the
Bahamas and was started in a
modest way by L. C. Brice in
1920. The first home of
Central Garage, originally

- ::-'d hepa tentfac tis
of the Kentucky Fried Chicken
on the corner of Bay and
Charlotte Streets.
Carl Brice and his partner
had originally operated the
Brice & Ranger Sisal and
Storage Warehouse and
enjoyed a booming business
during the period when the
sponge and sisal trade was the
nation's most important
industry.
However, when tragedy
struck the ill-fated sponge
industry, Carl Brice started the
Bahamas second filling station
behind the Warehouse.
100 VEHICLES
In 1920 there were
approximately a mere hundred
vehicles on New Providence
and Bay Street was a two way
path. Mr. Elmer Russell who
started with Central in 1926 as
a Book-keeper recalls that
"there weren't many buildings
on Bay Street during that time.
The main activity was the
women sitting in the long Brice
& Reager shed slieing sisal".
Central Filling Station, later
known as Central Gas Station
and Garage Limited, was run
by the late Arthur Fountain
and then by his brother*
Ambert.
After 10 years of operation
Carl Brice and his associates
including Harold Cancino,
Vincent Perpall, Arthur
Russell, Leonard Kemp, and
Eddie Bodie introduced the


to meet the demand fort
vehicles and service as the
economy of the Bahamas
began to boom andr tourists
arrived in ever increasing
numbers.

In 19El CANtraO embarked
on an ambitious programme of
expansion, the Rootes family
having bought the remainder of
the shares in the Company.
A new facility was erected
on Thompson Boulevard
incorporating a large Service
and Parts Department and a
showroom; the property on
Bay Street was then sold.
The boom continued and
Central Garage was granted the
General Motors Buick
franchise, increasing its range
of automobiles even further.
In 1968 the Company
acquired 1-%/ acres of
Thompson Boulevard to the
west of the Oakes Memorial
and a new showroom was
erected, the older premises
being used exclusively for
service and parts operations.
RATIONALIZATION
In June 1972 Central Garage
Limited was purchased by
Grand Bahama Leasing
Company and Mr. Aaron (Kiki)
Hi. Knowles was appointed
Managing Director. A review of
the Company's entire
operations was immediately
undertaken and it was decided
that in order to improve the
Company's image and provide
a better after sales service to
the Bahamian public, a
complete rationalization was
necessary. .
By December 1972 the
facilities on the showroom
property were extended and
modernised and the whole
service and parts operation was
transferred to the one location.
On March Ist, 1973, Central
went Dodge; the Company
ceased its sales of Chevrolet
and Buickr vehicles and
commenced sales of Dodge
automobiles and trucks built
by the Chrysler Corporation,
Detroit. The new franchise
complemented the franchises
of Chrysler's British subsidiary
Chrysler United Kingdom
Limited, formerly Rootes
Motors Limited.
Central continues to
represent Rolls Royce and
Rover, but this significant
rationalization of its franchises
and operations is regarded as
fundamental to the prolgamme
of expansion and improvement
established by the new Board
of Directors and the
management team under the
direction of Mr. Knowles to
meet the challenge of 1973 and
the future in an independent


Chevrolet franchise to the
Bahamas.
In 1929 centrall Lecame
agents for Dunlop tyres and in
1935 it began selling the
Seagull marine engine which to
tI dayfis epopularowith the
Providence and in the family
islands.
NO VEHICLES
When the Second World War
began in 1939 Central could
not obtain any vehicles and
Frank Christie, brother of Sir
Harold Christie who at one
time served as a Director of the
Company, remembers "buying
the last four Chevrolets Mr.
Brice had in stock".
Following the war Central
resumed the sale of motor
vehicles and improved their
premises. The Company took
on the British Hillman
franchise from Rootes Motors
Lumited and their sales rapidly
ex panded with the
development of the Bahamas.
In 1952 Lord Rootes, the
Chairman of Rootes Motors
Limited of Coventry, England,
purchased shares in the firm
and strengthened Central's
connection with the Rootes
Group products. It was also at
this time that Central G~yge
became the local dealer for the
prestigious Rolls Royce and
the Landrover and Rover
vehicles from the Rover Motor
Company Limited of
Biringham, England.
Business continued to
expand and property was
rented in 1955 on Frederick
Street to sell used cars. But by
the late fifties it became
apparent that Central's
premises were anite inadcauate


and the after service


FROM THE END of the Second World War the number of automobiles registered in Nassau has
Increased from a few hundred to 37,000 by the end of 1972.


interest in Rootes Motors
Limited. Dodge, one of the
Chrysler Divisions, had
previously been represented
in Nassau by Tropical
Motors Limited. So when
that company ceased its
operation the franchise was
not assumed by any other
local dealer.
The Chrysler Pentastar, the
corporate identity of the
Corporation, is now evident
at Central Garage and is in
fact depicted on a flag flying
high and proud in front of
the spacious showroom on
Thompson Boulevard.
An enthusiastic sales team is
headed by Kendal Major, the
General Sales Manager. The
sales team is comprised of
two sales-men and two
sales-ladies: Euriel Gibson
David Miaer, Judy Alleyne'
and Carolyn Morrison,
res etivel .
Since there are just as many
women buying cars as there
are men CG's management
saw no reason why selling
cars should be restricted to
males. Hence the new idea
of sales ladies,
SHOWROOM
Central Garage takes great
pride in their Thompson
Boulevard Showroom and


facilities which are almost
unequalled in the Caribbean.
.2t any one time one may
view as many as ten
different models on the
floor with as many again out
front of the imposing
ultra-modem structure.
Over 100 new cars are kept in
stock, through the careful'
planning of GSM, Kenahl
Major.
Advertisn and demonstration
are perhaps the most
significant aspects of
Central's success in
marketing their particular
automobiles. However, Mr.
Major agrees that selling a
car doesn't just involve the
finalization of a transactionr.
Rather it is the start of a
perennial relationship with a
customer.
Central is also aware that an
image is built not just on the
type of vehicle you are
selling ilr on the service
that is offered after the car
or truck is delivered.
Chrysler's theme "Extra Car
in Engineering" is a tradition
that Central G~arage knows
they will have to maintran.
"Our Service will make the
difference in the years
ahead," asserted Mr. Major.


Today, the big four automotive
manufacturers in the United
States namely General
Motors, Ford, Chrysler and
American Motors are
represented in the Bahamas
as are British Ieyland, which
now embraces Austin.
Miorris, Rover, Jag~ur and the
General Motors subsidiary,
Vauxhall. In addition to
these extensive franchises,
Fiat of Italy, Volkswagon of
CGermany and Toyota and
flatsunr of Japan have
distributors on New
Providence.
Central Garage has represented
a number of manufacturers
during its 50 year history.
However, recognizing that in
a competitive market such as
ours in the Bahamas it is not
necessarily advantageous to
carry a vast range of models
of different manufacturers;
the Board of Directors of
Central last year embarked
on an ambitious programme
of rationalization aimed at
consolidating Central's
market share and improving
the after sales performance
of the company.
PENTASTAR
Chrysler Corpo ration
established its connection
with Central Garage when it
purchased a majority


"GENTLEMEN, THIS 15 MY FAVOURITE DODGE" -
says Mrs. Zoe Maynard, wife of the
Tourism & Aviaton Minister to Mr. Anthony Esp.
psdwn Sof Centra lng Grand MM AronrdKiki)
raong the thin hundred guests who recently got at frsd
hand viewing of the new I~ni of Dodge car now available
at Central Grrage. Mrs. Maynarrds fancy is the Dodge
Dart Sports CoUpe 340.


'Extra~ caei






DODGE AUTOMOTIVE PROGRESS is a by-product of an
early comanitmelnt to utilize engineering excellence as the
foundation for customer satisfaction.


"Were they so disposed,
Dodge Brothers could not
lower the quality of their
products .. because public
opinion has established a
standard for everything bearing
their name. And . .the public
expects constant improvement
of any product in which they
repose supreme confidence."
This excerpt taken from a
Dodge car catalogue written in
1919 represented the Dodge
Brothers' early attitude about
building automobiles. And it
still represents Dodge
Division's attitude today.
John and Horace Dodge
produced 'the first Dodge
Tourer in 1914. In the nearly
60 years since their first
automobile, design innovation
and extra care in engineerinS
have been synonymous with
Dodge. These values make a
product different and are in
the forefront of all other
contributions a manufacturer
can make.
The early Dodge years saw
at least three important
historic examples of Dodge
engineering leadership.
For instance: although an
enclosed four-door Dodge
Sedan was produced in 1919*
Dodge's greatest post-World
War I contribution was the


inrdcd in 9 2.b t 2
in 1932, Dodge developed


drcton and war trotnsndun! g



D o years hat ,oinel 94

e gi swing ds gemeh
provided better visibility and
added passenger safety. Dde
engineering innovations are still
providing important
differences.

different 973 Dod ipoirstana
wy. Dodge has ngine rin
expensive cars don't provide -
lked ite8 stuady-r ingbdide and
suspension and unitized body
and frame construction.
A NEW TECHNOLOGY

Wihi he nodkrn, fr in'

commitment to concerned`


engineering .. that better
serves you and the world in
which you live.
A good example is electronic
ignition, standard on all
models, a system that not only
reduces the expense of regular
tune-ups, but cuts down
pollutants in the environment
by keeping the engine iiI tune.
Like all Dodge electronic
components, this system is
electronically tested on 100
percent of production.
The cars themselves are
development tested and
production tested by some of
the most sophisticated
equipment yet used in the auto
industry.
A new Engine Function
Tester is just one instance of
advanced testing methods:
EFT is more sophisticated than
previous equipment for testing
engines at high speeds (called
"hot testing" by engineers),
EFT can identify such things as
improper oil flow, engine
misfires and unacceptable
vibration levels. Only those
engines that pass all EFT tests
are shipped to car assembly
plants. Engines that do not
pass the first time around are
adjusted and retested before
they are installed on the car,
another assurance of excellence


oEta pa nEgneerre
ing": it makes a difference.


t THE MEN SKHIND CENTRAL GARAGE Aaron
(Kikl) Knowles, ma~nagn director and Gordon Bussell,


~NylatutlaticL~cle~'~2~~


Succet~


THE NEW VEHICLE COMPOUND where a larger stock of Chryster vehicle ar
available for inspction at Centra Ol G ge.


~ousc


e RESIDENTIAL
* COMMERCIAL
* INDUSTRIAL
* SUBDIVISION


jm


Ilul~v Ir UUY~I


ENTRAL GARAGE


car, the fac1ities


la CENTRAL GARAGE


We AT9 PTOud To Harve Been Chosen As

General Sub-Contractors For ..

CENTRAL GARAGE COMPOUND & SHOW WINDOW

BOSt WisheS






P HON E 36 131 57822

POST OFFICE BOX 2291

(It's Experience That Counts)


CON TR ACTOR Sand

BUILDERS E "


BAHAMAS PAVERS LTD.
ROAD0S- PARKING AREA DRIVEHA~YS


HOT ASPHALT -CONCRETE -
Al type ofaurfaces
a WATER SYSTEM FOR SUB-DIVISION


- Pearrdale R&Box ES. 54133


eaehpeleT 2-8089
















L ecJntraf saPs ater


Service--a sawr tiraition at PE ~


LIOU~ su, ~t.J~- c ~ si~bwhn he sP
Sit;C mrrym Mictr liauo wh

'dutetfentn Baa useads the Cuenraf Lehiled a des

rlarget franchise vehicle In 1967 Castor tLmited was


with the Central organization along with the accounts section
under the management of lC. for a yesi. However, I was
Bkic, la the TyreDivision. Mr. asspciated ,swith. New
B~rcse started Central with a Providence Letzasing until
dy Pump in 1920 on Bay 19N2," he~r dene eai
Parwrvded to Service purchased Central Garage in
Department in 1948, Mr. 1972 ftsm the Rootes Group
Knowles was promoted to aond app~ointed Mr. Knowles
Plart Department as assitant managing director.
stanpger in 1953, dingg the A native of Governors
acqiu~isiion of Central'sintelest Harbour, Eleuthera, he is the
by the Rootes Group of son of the lte Rev. Robert Hi.
London. This appointment was Knowles an~d Alice Knowles.
the first of a series of executive Married to the former Althea
mmanagerial positions that was Bullard the couple have five
inevitably to lead to the top of children. Aaron H. Jr., Sandra

eP ooton to Parts Manager ernda and he steB hidren
came in 1963. Ho held this Orry,Billy and Anterenette.


p dO M TH TRN ofe

konpr a luxur alA bheric t
ra afford,n it h become
worksn cluas as well.
oh automobile



trucks tomean ah wnell as
demands of the consumer
Not until the late flftie ad
early sixties did the he an t
realise the importance of a itao
service to car owners. The
rea Cation at Camte sale,
necessity. Many distributors
and daers fund the exercise

aot eupp d nith th f 8ltis
and expertise to theet the
technology ad en iern
innovate sof a sooph st c te
industry
The public demanded

ter auto bile ateol lneo
and was worth more when
eventually traded-in. The
manufacturers, cognizant of
the need for sound dealer
network to sustain their sale,
embarkedthupsn icen r id


are able to take adv~ of

railties, Wtthntbl *' ~l
months a few of our~pe~posel
will be sent on fa liber tralatla



valuable to wa in apiil ply
new tchalqesr and aspanm
maintenance control ., Mr.
Stnbracwnsd*
ocAw ee th chp do aot AAI
facilities do not necessary
mean an im mediate I
improvemerntin service for
their manry ctutomers, the t
samagement team of Central
Guara promises that 1973 will O
be the year that changes will diffic
become more and more of ti
evidentth uu uh
t ftre we shall be M
sending our managers E~ntal
rndm anic ts oat ~sit o
torse and buatsto ah the d
the
inMaito broaden their pr
eru
experience rad knrowlded of ensua
ou roduor Ws alweou
o rtomers o~)uw aitoind a
time the Bahaianu people will Mg
be bletorely on Central Centr
Garage for thy type of arvice doze
they deev, maOOnag o wa
'iet97 Mr. A. Hi. Knowles GroU]
mi. .93i also our year for started
change" attend
a up to
9 pn r
t:,LL\r iBw
dyna
G~ibso
Morri
expre
futua
the B
Th
ofCe
the
They
Chipl
child
Walk!
stude
old f
14,
Augur

r Na
K1OLILL Wi. MAJOR Ns
...dlearseat sale Mansearr 9 yeal


to so that ardafil and puart re
adqaa td rra fr As n

the Custotaer to sit in comfort,
with a cap of coffee durQin


for its actiffetion.
A new workshop with
improved tooling and
equipment sad an enthuias~ic
tM m Sf era rc e n d bd a
Fergusonr, their new foreman.
GREAT ASSET
A great uaset of Central
Garag is the wide range of
experience it has in three
Bahamians namely IRik
Knowles, C~harie~ Delancy and
Godfrey ltrachan. The trio
have collectively more than 50
years of experience in the
automobile business. Messrs.
Knowles and Deluc hav

automotive parts, while Mr.
Strachan has "had his head
tucked under the hoods of crs
for many years.
CMtral Delancy depicts
ordering, wmontM gplo sak
"usuage formula" hand-in-hand
with the extperience as the key
to providing a steady flow of
parts both for the workshop
area and customer sales.
Nevertheless, "it is not
possible to carry every part
there is for every model the
company has sold and this is
where it is particularly
important for us to be able to
obtain parts as qickIy U
possible. We have co acts wii
dealers O Miami and
emergency supplies from the
factory endos that if the pu
is available we shall gt it, quite
often within~ 48 hours," Mr ~
Delancy proshrises.
SATISFIED
Godfrey Strachan ud
Service Dep~rtment person mS
are quite satisfied that he r'
his mechanics can offer tkc-
service that is demanded qi ~
them and they are anxious ( t


association with a la
corporation like Chrysler. 91


GORDON R. BUSSELL
... Tnreaurr/Diretor


C~~rlrr ( btrl
AT THE AGE of 18 Gordon R.
Burel 's ses dmply b or *s of
Glasgow and London. Ten years
later he is servins as
Treasurer/Director of one of the
Igth hutomrotive distributors in
In 1967 he joined Rootes Motors
which is now known ra Chrysler
Uniteks eidom tiu suent y h
Chrysler International S. A.,
Marketing investment Department

Slrir Yt $@
SERVICE MANAGER ft
wth rentstracGanage rinhas on 7
starting as a mechanic apprentice at
the Bay Street division under the
mrme nt C tor hree, he has,

f mb chief mecel tio f )amn od
eventually into complete charge of
the Service Department an
appointment he received three
monlths go of Rolletown, Exuma,
he is married to Shella Albury of
Nassau. The couple has four
children including Terrance, a vsen
verrs od tueen' colleges tuent
Denise. Kevin, 2-years old and
Wayne, two months old.
The recipient of General Motors
Certificate in Managemesnt,Godfrey
rloholdsc the GM Clerdicatec i
products. In addition to the
specialized certificate for the Rolls
Royce line of the Shadow*
Phanthom and Cloud models


the department that Is directly
reh nsble for ah development of
Bussell was primarily responsible
for the instatlrlaon of chrysler's
Delale Uniform Accounting
S. mBussell started with Central
Garag Limited as Treasurer and
later was named to the Board of
Direct ve of Scotland, he is a
member of the South Ocean Golf
Club.


... MetagCIs Director




YE F' e Md h
~ult Jobs la car sale is that
he genetarsles ma aa
r the job of K na
r, at Cuntral Garae
ling the administration of
of wad ure ve c ,
the supervision of
laing new vehicles to
e that an adequate stockt
vays available to Contral's
customers, is no ea
.Major' has been with
alGuara more than a
n year. Under the
ership of the Rootes
p and Carl Brie, he,
d out as a gas station
dant, and worked himself
the executive position of
al sale manager.
th the assstance of a
mic satle force of Euriel
,n, Judy Alleyne, Carolyn
son and David Miller, he
sses confidence in the
Sof Dodge products in
ahamas.
e General Sales Manapr
,ntral Garge is married to
former Hyvah Newmnan.
reside on Tyler Street in
gingham with their seven
ren: Karen, 17, a C. R.
erTechnical Collqee
nt; Kendal Jr. a 15-year
lffth former and Pamea,
porm III both of St.
stine's College; Voy Lee,


lu Street students Trevor,
rs; Darryl, 7, and Marcel 5


' ... .~.~ .~~:r.;_ r_.i~~CI~~r;jll ~ :Ir:;;fL~. . I ;. ''!- ' .:: : : - i.


1,


Clltral Gavts


CcaTatulatilOTS





























THE AC N SSTAFFERS Providing MalYnagee with accounting informereA so the ~C~cenatbing
sttaffer, frbnm lf: Astrid Johnson, supervisr; Pemels Cox, Parkic Pellte, Done Sutherlan, Gerden
Busset, (Conrtroffer), Rose Miller, Jackle Campbel ad Edith Hall.

PARTS DEPT:





~I u r THE: PARTS SCTAFF An effident
hrts Deparm ent i the aim of Charles

Toote (assitrat parts manager,
Richard Smilth, Myrtle Byfiel, Mr.
Defency, Benni Anderson, Stenwrt
I~~~~~~~~ II anohrC~.W~cWnto yor d


c;'

rr;
r
J.


s
r(


THE SALES STAFF A dynamic team with an evablSe reord for ca dsae
ar from left: Brndas Sands, David Miller, LeAers McCartay, Kendal Mteor
(generl sales manager), Carolyn Mortrisn, Eartel Gibson and Judy Aleyne.



Staff members at


Centra


Garage


VEHICLE PREPARATION TEAM Thirh business is beutiful cars. They prepare
the new vehicles aftert arrivl in the Behamas from the, United Kingdom andl ther
United States From left: Arthiur Cartwrig t, Herbrt Reile, Edgar Cary and Getrad
"Pa" Rolle.







~THE TRIBUNlE Cenral Garage Supplement 4


'73o~ QDECOcRONEt
The Dodge mid~sized quieterr car designedl as a four-door sedan froni the ground up. Roomy yet easy
to ptak and all of Chrys~tr's automotive innovations makes driving a Coronet a pleasure.


teimmebe asksaSH~Ibrniala .~n..dad


AUHORD EAA


~se


I
t
.. -r t5


'73 DODGE DART SPORT COUPE
The newest addition to the great Dart family. The, Dart Sport. Three cars in onea a six passe~nger
coupe ... wvith stldng sun roof, a convertible ... with fold-down rear seat, a station wagon, a family car
for fun or cargo.


'73 DODGE POLARA
The big Dodge that makes sense. Polara, Dodge's full-sized car with family room and luxcury, and
engineering features that make it a really outstanding buy.


'73 DODGE DART 5EDAN
The comnpact Dodge. Roomry, rkorngand eonomical. A practical family car with electronic ignition,
front dis: brakes, a host of meaningful features and enginaaring innovations to assure mnile-after-mile
of mnaintenane-free driving, Great valuel


'75 IMNMEWWVWWWPLW
The popular, *Conomical Avengers with styling all their own Inside and outside value for money
and built to last, with an extensive range of 4-door Saloons and Station Wagons and the 2-door Coupe
coming soon the choice is yoursI


OAKES FIELD


PHONE 3-4711


~


THE

YEAR



CHANGE ...


CE\RA~L


GOS M


WVITH THE BEST OF EVERYTHING FOR '73


L
t
IC
' 1 ~- -".


(E~~'IRAEN AA










I __ I L


LYFORD CAH C B




APPtLCANIT MUST HAVE THE FOLLOWING
QUALI FICATI ONS:
-Fast and acrcurat typist with Shorthand
- Able to compose own correspondence and
work with a minimum of supervision.
- Willing to work ra 6 dun week during the busy
Attractive appearance
Pleasant personality -- able to meet and
converse with V.I.P.'s
-- Previous experience in Hotel Reservations
helpful. but we are willing to train right
person.
S-- Year round position
Applicants should apply in own handwriting, giving
education, previous experience, age, etc.

THE GENERAL MANAGER,
Lyford Cay Club,
P. o. sex N7ms.
NASSAU


TABLE SPECIAL BARGAIN


SHIRTS, DRESSES, BLOUSES, ~U ~)d
SWEATERS. SKIRTS
MANY OTHER ITEMS MUST GOI
SALESTARTS -FRIDAY, MAYRth
TONY'S DEPT. STEOtE
MARKET ST. NEXT DOOR O HADING'S FOOD STORE


__


a


ARRIVED TODAY:
Southtward from St. Thomas;


RoHALED TODAY: Oceanic,
Grasse fom Charles Yor, S.C
bahama Star, Flavia for Miami
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Sk~yward, Mardi Gras from St.


Thoasn.
SAILING TOMIORRBOW:


TIDES: Hish 7:47 a~m. and
I~ap.m. Lowv 1:41 aLm. and


Cabaret Theatre, Paradise
Ishand beinn t 83 p m
event will be the finals of the
Miss Nassau High School
Beauty contest and the
c ownin oftthe neew queen by

The show will include choral
renditions by the Aquinas
College choir, accompanied by
th Pu anna Tnoda Cr
selections by Kayla Lockhart
Edwards. and vocals by




IINDEEERIENE
ANYONE who has had
dae sa perienceo id is1
the Stephen Dillett Primary
School, Wolff Road for an
audition on Monday.
Women will be auditioned
at 6 p.m. and men at 7 p.m.
The audition will be
held to choose performers for
the cultural dply to
be performed at Clifford Park
as part of the independence
celebtrtions on July 9.


Kenineth Symaonette, described
as Nassau's answer to American
scordl: star Johnny Mathis-
Also included in the show is
an exhibition of strength and
precisi b the Oymdpi ds, a
Thousand and One Bahamian
Nights' revue.
it is also expected that the
m le an aeara e durn t
festival. Emces for the evening
is well known Le Cabaret
comedian Freddie Sayles.
thThe fi aists can beS de b
between the hours of I and 3
p.m. when a motorcade begins
at Aquinas College and
proceeds to Mackey Street,
then to Bay, continuing down
Bad, up Cun eria II Stee ,
Te pratdo then tavels east on


Wulff, north on Mackey and
back to Aquinas College by
way of Madiera Street
nJutd nsg e the s ven fi ait
will take place during the
festival activities on M day at
said that names and
wil epali she sh rtl nlits


SUN
SUN: Rises
6:40 p.m.


5:35 aIm. Sets


csotious ranpraci mrid



~cfwi re r

gaolrmicidl prmuicla mrr
e lodors wih t hei r ra oodo-
cion .eclcieero
deissole at normal ody
,nmm formnst a protect
e rrctiv thanr hintrl
at all in pvackage of
od 12t ahirnpd 24. o


BOYS' SCHOOL PANTS .. . ...
MEN'S PERMANENT PRESS PANTS...
tAIS D "" *


.A ~calak



Saving s c ~~t



can hep yo



& st it. Al


The most imprortant thing
about savings is to do it
reglularly. When you do,
your money builds up.
Another important thing is
to put your savings to work
for you. Earning interest. In
The Helpful bank. Savings
offer security for rainy
daysb future investmenrts,

Savings also offer you somnething else.
Your chman to buy your heart's desia.
Helpful Bankers in Nassau and the Famrily
Islands can tell you about having. Just as one.


Theag~leY, Mayt 3, 1973.


e hS Wrthittit


Cable Beachi Kiwanis 'Internrational


f8stivl8' 88It $08887


* LE


... 2.800
. . 500
. *


rnr n 6(m


heart~s de~sin


The Real Bg The I bful Bank
It0IYAL bANK
Branches throughout the Bahamasr stgo Bay













8
---


M FA ESTATE REAL E$18TE PUBLIC ACTION PUBLIC ASITAN CARS FOR SALE CARS FOR SALE FOR MLE SMSSI.S


Ci


LI


CS$80 C9613 Ter e


_ __ I~


CL 8SES for Guitar Students:
held by Calvrt and Sydney.
Located temporarily atr
Howard Street East.
Ch pngham. Gsi aa

Theory improvisation, Chord
Building, Ear-training, etc. For
information call 3-4853.
36412.
C9710
MRS. LORENE GREENE and
J.P.M. winl h* o**nln a night
French School on May 14th.:
Anyoos wishing to learn
French please call William
Gordon Primary School,
Collins Avenue and Wulff
Road. Phone 34728.


C9676
BROWN MINIATURE DOG
with brown collar, area of
William's and Shirley Struets.
$100 REWARD. Phone
7-8139.
C9700
WELSH CORGI -tan
coloured with white chest.
Answers to the name
"leffrey". Reward offered.
. *(aphon 5-6844.


C9609
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LTD, is anxious to
receive listings in, FOXDALE
SUBDIVISION, IMPERIAL
PARK, ROBINSON ROAD,
ENGLERSTON, COCONUT
GROVE and MILLER'S
HEIGHTS. Call 23921.
C9675
WANTED LISTINGS
WHY FRET? WE WELL
List with us for ACT)ON.
WANT HOUSES WITH
ESTABLISHED MORTGAGES
ALSO.
DAMIANOS REALTY Dial
22033, 22305

C9715
ONE USED trailer suitable for
18 to 20ft. outboard. Call
2-2738 ~or 3*1664 after (p~lrg
Bill Clridge.

POSITION WINTED
C9611
Cashier with 8%1 years
experience require night work.
Phone 5-4278.



C9668
WANTED: Certified (NAUI &
PADI) Scuba instructor to take
ovrer position of Director of
Watersports and entertainment,
must have some degrees in
Oceanography (underwate.
biology, research, underwater
medical first aid, photography,
and technical courses, for
instance underwater
demolition). Duties will
comnpris~e of administration of
all watersports programmes,
holding beginners' and
advanced Scuba coutrse,
directing and actively
supervising all maintenance,
holding courses is specific
underwater subjects as tafore
listed. Applicants should also,
possibly, take charge ofa
watersports equipment stor,
with own financing for stock
desirable. Write St*Its Maris
Marina and Yacht Club, Sktek
Maris, Long island, Bahamas.


I AII I


1


C9669
loMitTRIUMPH 1300, good
battery $900. Call 4224n o
53752 *

C 20 VOLKSWAGEN carry
van good condition, 5 new
tyres, recent safety check and
registration. Custom made cab
partition. $1175. Telephone*
53232, preferably between 6-7
..m.


C9711
PATIO SALE Saturday May
5th. Seabreeze. Telephone
42284.
C9593
MOTOR CYCLES, Hondas 70
c.c. and Harley Davidson 150
c.c. Call 7-7885.
C9706
FppRa MURE -rcTelevis on
wall to wall carpeting, rugs *
paintings, reducing machine
etc. Phone 42043.
C9712
ONE TWIN bed and frame*
excellent condition.
One mahogany china cabinet
62" Lx 78"H.
One Walnut end table with
drawer. To view phone 32732.
C9707
ONE 18ft Capri Boat with 40
H.P. Evinrude and trailer.
$1,000.00 Cash.
One 16 M.M. Sound Projector.
$300 Cash
One 14 cu. used 2 door frost
free refrigerator. $250.00 Cash.
Telephone 59540.
C9672
All Electrical items, table linen.
rugs, towels, toys, garden tools,
golf clubs, Solex bicycle*
Christmas decorations books.
baby equipment, etc.
3rd house west of Shell West
Bay Garage, West Bay Street,
south side. By appointment or
all day Saturday. Telephone
34317 POTTER.

C9670
PRICED TO SELL
BEDROOM SET double bed
with bookcase headboard,
double dresser & mirror, chest
drawers, two night tables.
DANISH LIVING ROOM SET
- 2 six foot couches, 2 chairs,
2 end tables.
CEILlING FAN 36"
AUTOMATIC WASHER -
DRAPES -- POWERn MOWE R
Phone 3-1025 after 5:30 p.m.
or weekends
C9625
MISCELLANEOUS BABY
FURNITURE
Play Pen
Stroller
High Chair
Rocking Chair etc.

Telephone 2-2763 day 5-3801
night*
C9607
DISCOUNT PRICES
Shop today your dollar buys
more.
Our best sale values.

MOTHERS DAY GIFTS
GRADUATION! DAY GIFTS
FATHERS DAY GIFTS
All these and more Sales
Promotion Signs in stock at
Arawak Art, Montrose Avenue
at Arundel Street. Phone.
23709


UnfurnishMOR L eo~om 1 bath
house. Located Nassau Village.
Contact Edward Taylor
3-1558.
C9708
STORE SIZE 24' x 24'. East
Shiriey Street. Phone 5-8196.
C9717
YAMAC RAW BEACH
ESTATES
All lot owners have beach
rights. Only $75 down. From
$80 month. Priced from
$5,800. 70 x 100. AHl utilities
soon completed. Lakefront lots
from$97,500. $100 deposit.
Tel: 2-3027 or 2-4148
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL,
rSATE.


C9536
HARRY D, MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
1.ane, situated five (5) doors
from Shiriey Street, South on
the right hand side on Friday
the 18th day of May 1973 at
12 o'clock noon, the following
property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot
number Forty-five (45) in
Block Number Three (3) on
the Plan on the Subdivision
called and known as
"Regency Park" which said
Plan is filed in the Crown
Lands Office of the Bahama
Islands as Number 417 N.P.
in the said office."
Mortgage dated 29th
September, 1966 George
Hubert and Arimelda Louise
W iImore to Finance
Corporation of Bahamas
Uimited
Recorded in Volume 1102 at
Papes 17 to 23.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10%k of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 17lthlay of April-
A,D.'\973. ,& '
HARRY D. MALONE i
Piblic Auctibneer.

MARRD 0. MALONE will sell
at his premise ton Albury
ILan*, situated five (5) doors
from Shirley Street. South on
the right hand side on Friday
the 18th day of May, 1973 at
12 o'clock noon, the following
L THEAT piece parcel or
lot of lad situate in the said
Western District of the said
Island of New Providence
comprising a portion of the
said Subdivision designated
as Lot number Two
Hundred Fifty-nine (259) on
the said plan which saltF
piece parcel or lot of land is
bounded Northwardly by a
portion of: land formerly
designated as Oakes Field
Sports Centre but now
known as and called Queeln
Ellrabeth Sports Centre and /
running theron Forty
(40.00) feet Eastwardly by
LCot number Two hundred
Fifty-eght (258) in the said
Subdiviion and running
thereon E~ighty (80.00) .feet
Southwardly by portion of
Carby Road in the said
Subdivision and running
thesoon Forty and one
hurthsidth (40.01) feet
':Waptwardly by Lot riumber
Two Hundrea sixty (E60) in
the said Subdivision and
rulnring thereon Eighty
(80.00) feet."
Mortgage da te d 23rd
September, 1988 Stafford
and Loulse Albertha Newbold
to Finance Corporation of

ueo d d I V ol m 1329 at

price and to the right for thee
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that


prc at the tim ati sale and
Dated this 17f day of April
A.D. 1973
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer
C9538
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
Lane, situated five (5) doors
from Shirity Street. south on
the right hand side on Friday
the 18th day of May 1973 at
12 o'clock noon, the following
property:-
"ALL THAT Piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Subdivision called and
known as "Ivanhoe" in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence and
numbered as Lot number
Eighty-two (82), the said lot
of land hereby granted and
conveyed being bounded on
the North by Lot number
Eighty-one (81) and running
thereon One hundred and
Eleve,: and Sixty-five
hundredths (111.65) feet on
the East by a road Thirty
(30) feet wide and running
thereon Fifty-two (52) feet
on the South partly byLt
number Eighty-three ( )
and running thereon ne
hundred and Three and
Seven tenths (103.7 feet
partly by Lot umber
Sixty-two (62) an running
thereon Seven ( feet on
the West part by Lot
number Sixty-two (62) and
running thereon Thirty-six
and Seven tenths (36.7) feet
and partly by lot Number
Sixty-three (63) and running
thereon Fourteen and Three
tenths (14.3) feet."
Mortgage dated 17th May,
1967 John Edgar Sands to
Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Volume 1125 at
pages 332 to 339*
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Tem: 10%r!to of the pure so
patedJ at the time ~of pae hd
.bhiance 40comf etton. n
Dated this 17th day of April
A.D. 1973
"HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.
C9720
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 18th day of May, A.D.,
1973 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL that Condominium
Unit namely Unit Number
Nine (9) Building "B" being
Sa part of Waterfront
Tow n -houses 1
Condominium situate at
Great Harbour Cay in the
Berry Islands which said
Condominium Unit is that
described in an Indenture of
Conveyance dated 6th day
of September, A.D., 1971
a nd made between
Residential Resort
Developments Limited of
the ona part and WIliam
Victor Giubbins of the other
part and now of record in
the Regiistry of Recordls in
the City of Nassau in
Volume 1835 at pages 20 to
35 and entitles the
Borrowers ,to an undivided
share in the Common
property appurtenant to
Condominium Unit Number
Nine (9) subject to certain
terms conditions restrictive
referred to in the said
indenture of Conveyance
dated the th day of



recorded in the said Registry
of Records In Volume 1714
at pages 1 to 30 inclusive.
The property is being sold


C9606
BUMPER 5TIC KER 5:
POALT SS SDE CAL S;
QUALIV SINS inctens, in
hundreds, Iri thousands. Truck
ARWA A Phone 23709
Montrose Avenue at Arundel
Street*

MA~RINE sPuS
c9645
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious croissng Vacht.
Phone 3-2371.

C MPLETE SCUBA gear -
Inytw months'old. Wili sell
on yraction f original cost. Tel
53232 netween 6-7 p.m
preferably.

ENTERTAINIME MT
C9627

Ma t,5th, 6th -- 11tth
12th
8:30 p.m.
Ttt 1JWtAMA IAMA CHLCLE
essNess


House if BYMgh ndR Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 ~baths, I~ving,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
Ilt of lnd beautifru

and drapes throughout.
Com fet*Iy walled and lovely
lan scape. Alrconditioned
thou ghout. Unusu al
opportunity. Tb view.
telephonee 2-1722-3.
BLAIR ESTATES
C9703
3 bedroom 2 bath, living-dinin9
room, family room, large
kitchen, fully furnished,
airconditioned, laundry room,
front and rear -patios, carport.
walled. Landscaped gardhns
with gates. Fresh water well
with pump A sk In9
$55,000.00. Phone 32675 after
6.00 p.m.

C81 FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House In Highland Park -
,xctv 2 be home.vi4
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
v2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool
18' x 36. eautifull
landscaped, bearing fruit tre s
- central alm onditioned. To
view, telephone 2-1722-3
C9704
LOT FOR sale near sea.
Reasonable price terms
available. Phone 41200.
C9677
2 STOREIY HOUSE OFF
VILLAGE ROAD -
Fumished, specious enclosed
grounds. 3 bedrooms 2H baths*
garage, no immediate
neighbours - asking
$45,000.000. Near shopprin9*
school, and beach.

HQUSE with large swimming
pool, Patio 3-way wratr
system. 2. lots enclosed
grounds. Spacious and ideal for
outdoor living. Tremendous
grounds -fruited, Askintg only
$90,00g0.000 Cdedl selucded
aryi,- 10ads of grivacy. Su
anlytime. ~Walking distance of
school, shopping etc. Situated
off Vllapg Ri d
Dial The4 Reator for Action.
We sell nothing but .Real
Estlat. Osir phone s 22033*
22305, evenings ~1197.
C9712
3~ BRRDOM, 2 bath. (Wving
room, done farmly room,
kitche~n,di room, office,
Iaundry,e carport, .wall
to wall carpet, arkconditioned. ~
Yvard nicely landscaped. See by
appointment only. Blair
Estates.

3 BIEDRbOOM, 2 bath, ifying,
dining, arncd bnrekfat rooms,
kitcha, den, wall to well
carpet, latedry, sirconditioned
off Villagei Road.

2 CEDR0QM, 2 bath, Ilving,
dining and famlily~rooms, den,
Large patio, will to waH
carpet. High Vsta.
3 BIEDROOM, 2 bath, living
and dining rooms, kitchen,
aircondditioned. Nassu Eatf.

4 UNIT APARTMENTS each
has two bedrkoomps, living and
dining roomsitdche, 1Ca
bath. Nicely furnishbd: Annua
Jnome~ $12,000.00. ,Sellring0 for
)ow, low prie ~
OMttCIAC BUILDING Q

10,00. Hesthtre years' ete.

mdale. u MU




por inforptatlrir on above
ystin call 242$9 day 1584
An 5407aninehts


2 bedroom apartment -
Montrose Avenue. Basic
f furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view, telephone 2-1722-3,
C9684
4500 square feet, warehouse or
off ice space, available
im mediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.
C9642
P RESPECT_ RJ DG E
Fully furn ished garage
apartments in large private
grounds with use of swimming
pool comprising large
bed/sitting room, separate
Idtchen and bathroom, private
patio. Rent: BS250 per month
including utilities. Available
May 1st. Cali 77737 to view.
C9648
IN TOWN furnished rooms,
Efficiency Apartment, and also
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.

O FFIE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Basy.. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
in uire 4-2.017
C9624
FULLY AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedroom apartment
Centrevile near Z.N.S. Ring
5-8679 ask for Mr. Pritchard.
C9638
LARGE OilE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
5250 per month. Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
0' 7
1 LARGE 2 bedroom
apartment, unfurnished, near
town off East Street. Phone
5t1569*
C9693
UNFPURNSISHED 2 bedroom 1
bath apartment Keniston
Gardens $170 per month -
water included. Phone 3-5415.
C9696
ONE SPACIOUS 3 bedroom 2
bath house. Large yard and
patio. Seabreeze East.
Furnished or unfurnished.
Phone 42981 from 8 a.m. 5
p.m.
C9688
ONE TWO BEDROOM

sea nt hathe a dng
.to appreciate. Phone 32524.
C970
TOWERS
Newly furnished and
redecorated with acarpeting
throughout airconditioned, 2
Bedroom, private beach on
ocean front, television,
telphonet, carpark, swimming
pool and garden. $300 $350
i hpendinrg on I~rleae Cl owner
at 77054. Available now.
C9640
ONE EXTRA LARGE TWOI
BEDROOMS TWO BATh
OND EONE EX TRA LARGE
APARTMENT. With large
living and dinihcg all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on ElIaabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. phone 54631
between ,am. andj p






1968 Triumph excellnt
congdion. Call 3-2636.


IN THE



or hma rum '
TICKETS .$2.50 Boxe Office:
THE ISLAND CAMERA
SHOP, BANK LANE. Phone
22126 *
C9698
ST. GEORGE'S PARISH wil
be holding their annual Bazaar
on Friday May 4th on the
church grounds, Montrose
Avenue. There will be turkey
and ham supper, conch fdt~ters,
salad, home cookery, hoopla
and other attractions including
dancing. The bazaar will be
officially opened at 5:30 p.m.
by Mrs. Rowrena Eldon. This is
in aid of Parish Funds, THE
PUBLIC IS INVITED
C9695
ATTENTION ALL
THEATREGOERS!!!
Arrangements are being made
to bring an outstanding theatre
personality to Nassau at the
end of May.
She is young, pretty, gay and
rich. Who is she 1??????
Watch this column for further
details!! !

SCIISuOLS
C9583
ENROLL NOW
Typing with Spelling
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier
Night 'Auditing
Telex Operation
English
Mathematics
Filing
Call the Nassau Academ of
Business today and Join mny of
the above clas es. Phone 24993
(Located at Shirle Street
opposite Coallins Ave ue.


Y- ---- -~ ~ -- ~


ON FPJDN MAY 4 1973
TO CELEBRATE THE OPENING OF: NASSAU'S LATEST "IN PLACE"

COMPLIMENTARY BEEFEATERt DRINKS WILL BE SERVED FROM 6- 6 :30 p.rn.
(All other Highball Drinks 51.00)


I


under the power of sale
c nand in a wntue o

September, 1971 between
William Victor Gubbins and
Residential R ot
Developments, Limit~ed sd
recorded in the Registry of
Record In o~lomehil8h50 a

Motgage was assigned to Hasa
Shier *
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price. Terms 10%r of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated this 27th day of April
A.D., 1973.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctonr.


,"9713
WANTED FOR
2nd WEEK IN JUNE
PARTLY FURNISHED 1 or 2
bedroom, 1 bath apartment -
good location must have
good washing area. Monthly
rental: $150 to $170. Phone
2-1986 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
- Mrs. Roberts.

FOR RENT
C9683


white automatic$800
1973 BUICK REGAL
demonstrator $7000
l970 TOYOTA -
green, good mileape $850
1969 FIAT COUPE 1 24 -
white, low mileage $1200
1970 TRIUMPH
blue, stick shift $850
1971 PONTIAC
VENTURA II yellow,
good condition $3000
1972 CHEVELLE MALIBU -
very clean $4850
1969 FORD GALAXIE
blue, reconditioned $1000
1971 CHEVY VEGA COUPE -
green, automatic $2995
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN -
air conditioned $4200
1968 PONTIAC FIREBIRD -
good condition $1500
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
-- like new $2250
1969 CHEVROLET CAMARO
red, automatic $1850
1972 DODGE AVENGER -
like new $2350
1971 SINGER VOGUE -
white, radio, automatic $1500
1973 DODGE POLARA
light blue automatic $5500
1971 FORD CORTINA -
green $2500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3471 1
C9630
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
USED CAR PRODUCTION
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Radio. Auto. $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000
S/W Auto $850
S1972 PONTIAC VaNTURA
4 Dr. Auto. Radio OrangeS3500
S1967 HILLMAN STD.
Green $450
S1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL
SA/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto Blue $1850
e86 FORD THUNDERBIRD
1969 PONTIAC GTO $80
A/C Vin I Green $1600
1965 BLUE DODGE $300
1970 VICTOR STD
Red $875
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std. Green $1,200
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4600
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue $695 j
1971 RAMBLER
Auto, Blue $2700
1989 TRIUMPH HERALD
Blue $700
1968 JAVELIN
A/C $1400
1970 PORI;t MUSTANG
A/~C $ 2000
Trade Ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8
C9659
LATE 1971 MlEHt-a->
8ENZ 280 S.E.L., sun roof and
all extras. One owner -
nexelent cn~dit on. P one day


inViteS yoU tO O


re SW


nuwrrsev.Maya 1i sTS.


Come by Classifed Counter at The Tribune or caH 2-1986 Ext. 5 h Nahssau,352 -6008 In Freprt i from Sa~m to Spin. Monto~p~ FH -St.G .m.t


C9631

at D





1971 DODGE AVENGER
DELUXE $16i00
1968 FORD S~TA'TONJ-
WAGON -


THE~O BARRE1~8 L UB"~

(GLENEAGLES HOTEL)


Beefeaer Gi






















SR6X MORGAN, M.D). ByDAL CUlrTIS

I PRAY. 1 0A8 OrI TWINK IT 's I ssawW# r 80 InSCr agD
13IAT ME MlIArult*---7 /rnriEnr~ T MAY It A FBWF0158
PU'RE E SE S~rT INS W1ALRAPt! MULTIPLE MS DO LRWRYTHIler w~UI-Rfx MOltena)l/ OFF,4ggUaAt

FELING Mt's earles ADSQUATE REST DeV/ ARE )0OUALL D C~L
TO MAKE IT BACK egg AND A WELL-E4L- RIONTF WWAT 1DA4V/ t'A
THE TOUR, JUNE / AIYCEP DtET/ NAPPENED 70wnr NRWW If SktitI











JUDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS~

DON'T MAKE ANY I CAN'T HELP IT, INOW that's' DARLING, PLEASE~ 1 6HOuLDM'
I DON'T EVER DRASTIC DECIStONS RIeMT ~ KATHERINE... A HEALTHY 1 ...DON'T LET IT HAVE I..tD 70
WANT TO SEE HOW, ABOEY! GIVE YOURSELF BUT I'M GETTING SIGN! /I SPOtt OUR DAY!~ ADEY~ ON1 TH5
SAM DRIVER Ao PW DYS KO OL MAD! PHONE, SEOy!


M ID WANTED to live on
premises. General household
duties Only Baunhaman ned
apply. 30 years and older.
T lpone 41346 after 6:00

C9666
OUT ISLAND RESORT
requires couple to manap
Catering, Housekeeping, and
SCUBA diving program.
Must have had training in
Catering Management and at
least two years experience in
this capacity. SCUBA
Instructors Certificate required
- either NAUI, PADI, OR
YMCA. Reply by letter to
Romora Bay Club, Box 146,
Harbour Island.

C9679
THE MEDICAL CENTRE at
LYFORD CAY, NI.P. requires
the wholea-time services of a
fully qualified and experienced
Laboratory Technician.
Applicants should ekpress their
interest in writing to the
Ca rasn ou dae Ic P, Tyo
Box N7776, Nassau.
C9614
BANK CLERK. Swiss Bank
Corporation (Overseas)
Limited. Nassau, requires the
serifices of a bank employee,
having at least 3 years
experience in the handling of
securities and general
accounting work.
Bahamians only to apply in
writing to: P. O. Box N757.
Nassau, or call for an
appointment at telephone
2-7570 (Mr. Naef).
C9577
STELLA MARIS INN on Lon9
Island, has the following open
position and ask that
applicants (Bahamian only
need apply) kindly contact
immediately in writing or by
phone:
Book-keeper, female or male,
preferably single, to start
immediately, must hold a Stage
III RSA certificate in
book-keeping, should have at
least two years experience.

C9714
NE W PRO EVIDENCE
LEASING LIMITED requires
young man to clean cars and
general help on used car lot.
Apply in person with two
references to New Providence
Leasing Limited, Collins
Avenue, P. O. Box N3920,
Na~ssu, Bahamas.

C9716
r- BACKHOE -OPERATOR
with at least 5 years
experience.
1 Mechanic with at least 5
years experience in the
handling of Gas and Diesel

Pln ne apply in person to Mr.
Charles McDonald, Cavaller
Construction Company
Limited, Oakes Field, Nassau.

C9661
ASSISTANT MANAGER
wanted for hotel at Driggs Hit.,
Andros. Must be personable,
and able to deal effectively
with guests, duties will Include
handling reservations, planning
menus, supervising dining room
and kitchen, also supervising
housekeeping of hotel.
Must have previous hotel
experience and minimum of
High Shoolajducato ana be



Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207.
Nassau.
C9595
MANAGER AL couple
required for food, bae ape a d
hu Ise ennhotel. Applicants
ntust have qualifications or
previous experience in similar
fileds. Must be willing to
relocate in Out islands. Salary
negotiable. Apply Green Turtle
Club, Green Turtle Cay.

TRADE SERVICES
C9636


wrme L '


Mckey Straat
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING

ME AICAL RNLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING

SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT 'SE RV ICE
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796*
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
C9632
PATIO AWNINGS AND

HA R TCNE
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS*
PANELS
JOHN S. GEORGE & CO.
LTD.,
For free estimates and prompt
Isrvice call 2-8421.


MSL WIITEDt

C9634
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicant should
apply In writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.
C9647
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
vacancies for Staff
Accountant/Auditor f or their
Freeport office. Candidates
must have had experience in a
professional accountant's
office and must be in
possession of at least
University entrance
qualifications and already be
studying to be a Chartered or
Certified Accountant.
Applicants should apply in
writing to the Staff Partner,
Price Waterhouse & Co. P.O.
Box F-24 15, Freeport,
Banamas.

C7370
Need one M EC HAN IC/
TIREMAN with a minimum of
3 ears experience in repairing
and changing truck tires, loader
tires, grader tires and other
heavy duty equipment tires.
The applicant must also possess
the ability to wJork as a
mechanic on trucks.
Interested persons should
contact ~Mr. Alvin Swan,
Freeport Construction Co.,
Ltd., P. O. Box F-2410.

WANITIED

C77STAMPS WANTED
FOR OXFAMIII
Any amount, large or small,
new or old, on or off paper, in
collections, etc.. Please sent to
A. James, Oxfam Stamps, St.
Paul's School, P. O. Box. F-897,
Freeport,'G. B.. AHl donations
of stamps acknowledged.
Credentials forwarded if
required.


SSTE VE R 0PER


& MI K E 80 MAD by s au nders & vrgar


IIglihyMy 3, 1973



P1 7ner meld required, Prince
Dwrrrive-in area Call

C9692
Mi Psto pn fors"M cinlrgn

Solar Sat Operation, at Long
jt~kn, Baamas. Applicant
atust be Bahamian, having the
,fell~ewing frquall fiction :
Techniale instituteoogn ze
Tachlca Imlutin. with 5-8
years experience, age 25-35

BASIC JOB DUTIES:
1. Reads complex drawings
requiring machine work of
low tolerance.

t. Las t wrk omt be*

27 milling machine
shaper, drill press and
other shop power tools.
3' D;ust be able to set up
work on the above
i machine.
3.2. Must understand and
be able to operate heavy
du3y Md aull pr e to
operate and maintain a
threading machine.
, 4. Performs hand machine
work using common and
specialized tools of trade,
such as inside, outside and
depth micrometers, inside
and outside calilpers.
5. May braze or weld,
temper or anneal metals.
" 6. Uses precision instruments
SIn work and repair same.
7. Repairs shop equipment
and tools
86. Ai~gns, fits and assembles
parts and equipment in
shop or field.
9. Dismanties, repairs and
rebuilds all mechanical
equipment as required.
;10. Observes safe ty
regulations and quality
standards.
.11, Prepares reports as
necessary.
12. May supervise labourers or
m echan ics on shop
T projects.
413. Perform other work as
assigned.
"14. MUST:
14.1 Possess excellent
knowledge of metals and
metals working.
14.2. Must be able to read
detailed blue prints
14.3 Must have high
mathematic al a nd
mechanical aptitudes.
14.4. Must be able to read
technical mand'*(s.

Salary commensurate with
rual~ificgtious: Air-mail
Ap~plbtfons, to Diamond
Crysal~ Salt Co. Clarence
Town, LQng Island, Bahamas,
We time for preliminary
iFatrview May 14, 1973.
C9665
MANAGER wanted fo hotel

supervise kitchen and dining

gr cries.o A i~c ts mst haea
had previous experience in
restaurants and hotel
management. Also must have
High School and Business
College Education, and be able
to keep' books and to type.
Should be clean ared neat in
Appearance and over 35 years
of age. References required.
$alary $125 per week plus
percentage of profits, and free
board and lodging. Apply to:
Av 96 ,d c he Tribune*



malsr for a challenging position
with well established Nassau
based firm. Position will
require initiatives juhgmnthaonod
SbcgounA goupled with some
work experience in banking or
accounting would be an
advantage. Resumes should be
dirictd to Adv. C9678,, c/o
The Tribune, P. O. Box N3207


ple folr wrk* i out islnd
1ao. Fru room and board,
B pus $800 per month salary,
alu 2 months paid vacation.
Tping necessary.


cptact: Rusty Bethel -
788tBI, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m*
Openings 7-8074.
Q96i90
BAHAMIAN shorthand typist
qilth at least five years'
eXperience for Bay Street
office. References required.
I ust be over twelnty-five. Five
iIy dweek,reredicalinbeneo n .
handwriting to Adv. C9690,
C/o- The Tribune, P. O. Box
N*3207, Nassau, stating salary
required
C9699
A IAOMNA L NRTUESRT
COMPANY LIMITED have a
vacancy for a Company
Administrator. The applicant
mulst be caphible of working on
hii own initiative, conducting
aft necessary correspondence of
companies under his control.
holding dietr' ad
shareholder' meetings and
iing of s atutory returnsom H
knowledge of banking and
.Mcohuanne Conto e~g atiand
Some progress in the
estaminations of the Chartered
la~stitute of Secretaries and
administrators would be an
adatge lase apply with
dael othe Deputy Genesral
taapP.O. Box N.7768,


,\CARIROLL RIGHITER'S



ftrou the Correl Righter lsitutt
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Avoid getting
stirred up about a property matter today,
otherwise a bitter argument as possible. Analyze where you
stand financially and think of the most practical ways to
overcome handicaps. Don't consult experts at this time
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr, 19) Although you may feel a
financial lack, takte no chances wWit unwise investments. Stick
to the accepted methods and all works out fine. Do nothing
unwise motionally. Relaxtonight
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Don't get into an argument
with one you' think is deterring you from gaining personal
aims, since you could be in error. A day to exercise much
**Ir-control. Stop being so demanding with others.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Although you feel imposed
upon, don't pt into arguments or matters could get worse.
Being alert to conditions around you could prevent an
unfortunate happening. Take it easy tonight.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Steer clear of
those friends who don't see eye, to eye with one another, or
you could pet caught in the middle of an unpleasant situation.
Don't become involved in an argument.
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Take no risks where your good
artr is concerned and take no chances with debating in
public. Political involvement is not good now, since others are
arguing too much. Engage in your hobby.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept. 22) Study new thoughts and ideas
that are progressive, but don't give up parent methods. Study
every angle for possible use in the future. Avoid one who
gossips too much. Be calm.
.LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Not a good day to talk over
monetary affairs with others, but tomorrow is fine. Aloid the
poassbility of getting into arguments. Come to a better
understanding with mate in the evening.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Although an associate is
difficult, don't lose your temper or there could be added
trouble. Get those promises of a public nature handled
properly. Do nothing that could hurt others
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You fmd that some
co-workers ae not in a good mood, but don't upbraid them.
Try not to weak so hard that your health a sendangered Be
moderate in all that you do todayi.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) You can have fun but it
is important that you stay within your budget or you could
togret it later. Your anate is in asa bad mood, so try to be more
coARU tiv. TS tonsrutFY% 19) Try not to do anything
that could upatt others at home or there could be a big
argument there. A social affair should be postlioned until a
better time. Do some studying tonight.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Much care in motion is
important or you could get into trouble. Think before you
speak. Show that you are peaceful, kind and gentle with
others. Avoid one who is a terrible gossip


TC1IIIII


C 18 Y NO MOREl CALL 1 V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
ABCO TO SOLVE YOUR ftor homes, apartments and
C LE ANING P ROBLEMS. Ihotels Sales and services. Cill
TEL: 51071-2-3-4. uuuglas Lowre 5-94us WOmRu
CM506 xet tM Fak's StrIt
ISLAND TV SERVICE C9656
"For service you can rely on" AUDITORIUM FOR RENT
Dowdessell Street. Musical Shrows Conventjons
TV antenna Booster Boxing. The New, Arawrak
Sales & Service Auditorium Oakes Field Tel.
Phone 22618 P. O. Box N327 Mr. Fox, 2-8012 3.1295.
Monday Saturday 8.30 to
5.30. C9363
FOR YOUR building needs
Residential Remnodelling -
Maintenance Call G. Patton,
Budget Builders 32656.
mm e me aa (Iamemmesmmage


GRAND BAHAM~
gICASFE,

Iu mmmaem gmam.. ... 11


C7367
The following positions are
available for our tank
construction proj ec t
for the Bahamas Crude
Oil Trans-shipment Terminal
Facilities at South Riding
Point, Grand Bahama island:
FI RST CLASS WELDER
capable of welding of 3/8" to
1.53" thick steel plate and
structure ISO-Fe 52 Gr. C
and A283C and who has
certificate of AP1650 and
ASME IX.
FIRST CLASS STEEL
FITTER who has at least 2
years experience of fitting up
of 1.53"t x 8'w x 45' steel
plate and knows tank drawing
and fitting procedure well.
TECHNICIAN FOR HEAVY
DUTY EQUIPMENT who has
at least 2 years experience and
knows operation of 40 ton
truck/crawler crane and 15 ton
truck crane well.
300 KVA X-ray TECHNICIAN
who has at least 2 years
experience of operation of 300
KVA X-ray machine and who
has certificate of AP1650.
ULTRASONIC TEST
TECHNICIAN who has at least
2 years experience of operation
of Ultrasonic Flow Detector
and who has certificate of
ASME.Section VIII.
COOK( who knows Japanese
and Korean Food well.
Please reply to: Toyo Kanetsu
K.K. c/o LBI Excavation &
Engineering Ltd. P. O. Box
F-306, Freeport, Grand
Bahama Island. Telephone
373-1046 or 373-3065.

C7366
Leading manufacturer of
alcoholic beverages requires
PLANT MANAGER/CHIEF

CHEas ed eeche in ala phas10
of distilling and blending of
alcoholic beverages.
Please apply to: P. O. Box
F-2444, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C7369
Cambridge Investment requires
a man for the purpose of
janitorial machine cleaning and
operation, should have at least
3 years experience. Bahamians
only noed apply to: Burger
King, Freeport.


ilE t 't IMSir


B AreA Ko** k Mas


APA RTMENT 3- G


c~c~-~


















Althooth Knowrles wins,


LeeIRol Ioe 10 R scl



& Bahamas~ e iiatr




B~hamas No. I player. Leo Rolle, in three straight sets and gain

from the Commonwealth Caribbean Tennis Tournament being


5 thi.place Schlitz tnrosce 3rd. plt acelrc'sl 11


LI

I. Il I

SOLUTION C YESTARDAY'S PUZZLES
DOVWi 6. Fruit of the
1. Pasture horse-tadish
2. Removed tree
3. Stoof 7. Wild plums
4. Syrup 8. Song refrain
5 Abroad 9 Grasping
10 Various
16 Llquor
18. Nothing
20. Line
21. Salutation
22. Sprout
24 Gloomy
p ~25. Drum



29. German city
F0 pr~h Moia


34, Conclusion
S 35 To temkr,

36. Must
38. Perlod
40. One
#eurer- S. 41. Com~pass point


SUSAN BiSCOE (right) of Jamaica steadies for one of
her strong forehand drives during the first round of the
Phillips Cup finals in which she and Lomrn Wood (left) feill
6-2 and 6*0 to Trialded's Ria Mark and Jean Merry. The
second game was played today. The Trinidad pair beat the
Bahamas team o Tuesday. PHOTO: Rickey Wells



A preview of this


year's cricket teams
CRICKET IN THE BAHAMAS has nearly always been at a modest level
of achievement. There is, however, no at ampt to convert our goese into
swans. From time to time we have seen locals who play their cricket well
and with spirit. Throughout the years the teams have all had men of
integrity and humour and they have been unforgettable character who
have enriched the lore of the game.
Cricketers in the Bahamas will -..
get between the wickets on Series.
Saturday May S to start the 1973 Last year's top all-rounder,
cricket season. Edmund Lewils will lead the Law
ex itemsent aou ht h aped mn o'thd as tofd g ood s um e
a particular cricket season, and this To help Lewis hi the batting will be
could lead one to misjudge the Jerry Thompson, Carrol Clarke,
season completely. This could not onor Ivan Tanvior. Prank El an
astoneinNo oel97ltal almost an albround team and
not be called one of the bestt cricket Lewis, Thompson, Taylor, Deveaux
seasns.lake and Ell income bac Pal he
The umpiring, in most cases was has not really been a threat in
below standard. Teams and players recent years but argain this is cricket
wer suspede t ro one wan o and though they start far from
before the regular srales was h ppenfaortsayhngcud
complte presntin the Teddy Grazette will be the
Association with the problem of Overseers captain again this year.

aetem 108 erhe lr, h dj mtbri~h e Heb dm aiso abomli bleears d
St. Bernards won the Prime ac p o nhn
Minster's FlottinS Trophy for the treatment two years ago. Hamilton
regular series and Paradise Island and Pukrn sntbdbtte
was second. The Knock-Out ao' Puceing masre o a but threy
Trophy went to the Southterner. cudo't It mad o numR n ke us
Only two centuries were chalked Kellman both left-arm slpiannrs,
updrn pttt rnlaun. Lne y *h and with Brathwaite, Taylor and
the other by Pat Loulson of the hm tttbelmpceln
Prisn Ovrsees. Aart rom my team In the island. There is a
making a century Lewis won the odln fbtmni rtwie
bno te salng thrb a eomn ypha Holford, Watkins, rrazette, Taylor
out tandinallall rounder oftheg yar an Kellman so Her dMje y's boys
aggregate score with 294 runs, and themselves.
g3or b~e m e~guo en hi latia g t t eoS ( G gs~nver failto come I
1972. It is now time to look lahed so again this year. Names like the
in 1973. Cumberbatches. the Turnquests and
Ten teams have registered wtla h adre nheas wBi ap lar.NSo will
registered lasrt seaon. There was much is ever known of this team



entered again aind will be making "Junior" Lunn. He had a broken
every effort to play through the hand last seasn and did not play.
season and not drop out as they did But practice sessions at home and
icas Id fooF ahn ut yis,Dte in eFlrd ral cmntly pre Mim4 f

ncleus of the A venturemrm aI the mere fun of playing cricket.
St. Bernards return again, and Thyeoyteraewehr
will, of course, be the favourites to they win it or lose it. Perhaps more
win the trophy again. With playws att ita re tkrigthe stwome toa as
of the carlbre of Francis Scott' it was nrealy meant to be. Nickle
Edde Frd nd is rotersWarle Moss, and Darnley Jones, Adrian
:",d pKei H~r o wne adldthr d'g, oande V srn addmiro
a cL] h iomake itL not n will al ong with Westerns when the fun



hrU nodms th s Uiedwnity ofte Umpises, Captains and their players
ber teamins wricth form. staile woukd settls own this yelea and
mate Gaiunes Yearwood, who wasr gaie before the resulput ng won
captain of the Unlarity team, and aertalaly sor a lot of improvement
along with Martin Dean, thethA
Estwick brothers Tony Alleyne and beee ton173
the Reece brothers, should dlw
some stable batting. Add to this Val
Lawrence, Desmond Brown and
Colin Deane. (he skipper, who has
also lured Dudley Selfert into the
team. Paradise Island should be in
there with a good chance.
Irvl evcnrms r / to um oraan NAsNTI NADL GE
St. Albans team this seaon because W L Pet. GB
of a fractured les. So Horace Chicam 12 9 .571 -
Stewart will have to make do with New ork 12 9 .571 -
what batting he can muste In irwl Pittsburgh 9 7 .563
Hunter, Honrac Kirltngston, Hugh Pildlpi 9 I .450 2H
Smith, Sltantrd Walker, Fraci Mt5 2
Bala and himself. Irvine as als o a West Division
fast bowler who helped Daddly &anFrancisco 19 7 .7.31 -.
Rrdero a g1ant donl and staCicnati 14 .3 3
Bain comes near adm. St. Albans Los Angeles 12 12 .800 6
usuarly begin their seasons well and Sea Diego 8 16 .333 10
the nse towards the middle of the Atlanta 7 IS .318 to
seaso. They seem to laoe laerest Wednesdaysr Results
and pt disorpnied. This Is a thing Pittrburgh 2. Ban Frandcho I
thgtStewart will have to watch. Houston 9, philadel hia 4
The once resst St. Asnes will be Clacinnatt 6, New York I
playing spin. How much fight this Montreal 3. Atlanta 2
team will he able to put up this ao~ b 4, ahep41
year is stll relrltvely unknown.
There aresdill rome good players in AMERICAN LEAGUE
this team and since cricket la a Bast Divildon
psam of such unemairnfies players w L. pet. GB


Southerners, wllbed anothrm edwor on1.41
ngrmt a en fomth 8arl op KaH tyrd 1 .5
co.':':::""p S.2: 'tne :r *lvsm ::: .5 1


team in the figh all the thn. Outenr exas rr~: a ~~~r.389
player wYI Incude Jimmrle en yaRm
Hterrsone la n mte ll~rundr K nr Cy 4. Nm York 3
hadll~ a fine K seselas er asII ah Calllltn~ro mis Srl, Detoit 3. 12
~pening batman. and 8sil Hall Oakland 7, Milwaukes 3, 10
alonr with Clas Laint. Southerner ~ Lkt lla
mm the Kas~ek-ut sup last yar 4 etltg
and cutsid wrry well pulrl off so d Minneota 4, to
upast thi year in the thanlrr leaks


OFFER IVOW !



ALL THIS WIEEK AT ALL CITY MARKETS


































(BALT AT RC N IAN O XR ODHAT






1P0
i ~ ~,~g, ~ 1 ie


at chemists and stores.
rrn~~on Du ldfisxl l~ltnribute Nu


By GtEMTOE URWWT
CATCHER MgACKEYt BAIN and first bamseanLoesetn Lockhart teamed up for three rmun and
four rbl's last night as fifth plracseShit lts Ber tt~~rethd their winning strea to thre in a row hi an
11-6 victory over third place Becks Bees who suffered their sixth loss in seventeen played.
Bain, facing the pitcher Burrows again camme~d the bottom of the sixth and final
three official times, scored corner after he was awarded inning when they camte up wth
two, knocked mn two and first hit by pitch. Anthony three runs. Jacques, Sonny
col"ected twrbhts. Lockhnd Rbr floeadnd cku Hated nds oHu s.t each
and collected two hits during came in with the third run.
his four times at bat. Anthony Bertie Murray connected a SCHLITZ BEER
Smith also had a neat perfect on n n ic o i o mt h rbi
night at the plate. He went two sac fly into centre and a Bowles 2 1 o I
for three and scored two runs. throwing error on the second Lockhart 4 I 2 2
Catcher Vianny Jacques was baseman gave Schlitz their five. Brrow J 1 o o
the bright spark for the Bees. Anthony Huyler and Fred Roberts 3 1 0
Besides collecting four put Taylor were the Bees only runs Murray I I o
outs, Jacques went three for mn the bottom of the first in winlisms o o o o
three from the plate, scored which Sim Hummes connected Johnson 2 o o a
two and knocked in one. for an rbi double. Huyler also onsvs 1 I I
Batting first, and facing the collected -a hit in that inning. Hepburn 0 O o o
pitching of Sherwin Taylor, Lockhart's rbi-single in the
Schlitz came up with five top of the second gave Schlitz BECKS BEES
commanding runs from which another. Bcsas ele Turner 3 o 1 I
the Bees never seemed to with one in the bottom phase N~lo 4 1 o o
recover.t Rightofielde Anthon as they cont nued thoolag 6-3.o Knowles 3 0 I 0

followed by Lloyd Bowleg relief pitcher Stephe Hue steVe HUmes I o o o
making use of one of Taylor's for five more in the fifth Bowe 2 I 0 0
three walks. Lorenzo Lockhart inning. Lockhart picked up his Jacques 3 2
singled and loaded the bases second rbi in that inning. Bain
for Bain, also scored his second run.
Bain took two balls and Pinch hitter Godfrey Eneas
cracked the third pitch deep connected for an rbi double
ino enr "''-1 n in Sm: :: sn saoyd fowle 8akmig a

twThird baseman Andrew over oem Sclt nza th mptt


Bertram Knowles, who
has been playing great tennis
throughout the tournament,
placed the Bahamas in a
possible winning position
when, following a three hour
and twentyfive minutes battle

Patt 3-6 8d6, m-, 3 andavid
This brought the Bahamas tied
with Jamaica at two matches
each. Jamaica previously took
one of two singles and the
doubles.

Kn wles/ reatt datch,ofRusthle
and Bahamas' number one Leo
RoleR sere laread in their firs

ptwann, ran ahead 5-0 in the
However, Rolle not beaten
so easily, bounced back to a
five all tie. Though each played
went one up and one down
aussell's experience came
through and he took the last
two games over the local
chd97ampion, and won -.
BAHAMAS OUT
From that point on Rolle
was not given a chance above
four games and though he
played a commanding game,
Russell eventually came
through for Jamaica's
important win, 6-4 and 6-1 -
thereby putting the Bahamas
out of the finals.
Pratt, who dropped a set of
singles to Rolle on Mlonday
found his Bahamian
counter-partner a little easier


to work with in the opening of
the match when he allowed
Knowles only three games in
the first set.
A sizzling service together
with well placed lobs sa-
Knowles pull away from a four
all, five aill six all tie to tie th
regained his confidence.
Knowles pounced on the
elusive Jamaican to take a 2-1
lead and a ten minutes break.
By this time, Rolle and Russell
whee read ing themselves for
On their return to the court
ha tfseemed liketa r 1 mi o

retreat 3- as Pratt chalked up
With the advice of coach
Bob Isaacs together with the
backing of enthusiastic fans,
Knowles re ained his
composure and romped to a
brilliant 6-4 victory.
Jamaica met Trinidad today
in the first of the best of five
Brandon Cup finals.
In the first of the Phillips
Cup finals Ria Mark and Jean
Merry of Trinidad, who beat
the Bahamas girls on Tuesdays
stopped Sue Biscoe and Lorna
Wood of Jamaica 6-2 and 6-0
in the only match played
yesterday.
In other Brandon Cup
reverse singles, Paul Lee-Llm
of Trinidad defeated Peter
Simmons of Barbados 6-4, 6-3
and 6-0.
In a Phillips consolation
match Vicki Knowles and Jane
Saertgd bbithe Bhamas
Kean Gibson of Guyana 2-6,
6-2 and 6-4.



Lotrn Wood of Jamaica defeated
6-4 Jlmaica nd T I id 3,d on6
gmam each in the finals of the
Phillips Cup. The deciding ainme
will be played later this afternoon.


VOLLEYBALL



NINE MSENS teams tobped
by the New Heineken
Gladiators and five ladies teams
headed by Paradise Bees take
to the court on Tuesday when
the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation starts its 1973
series.
The series was first
scheduled to begin on May but
was re-arranged following the
B.V.F.'s annual general
meeting.
During that meeting, Dr.
Norman Gay was re-elected
president, Oswald Moore first
vice president, Roy Yaralli
second vice president, Barbara
Knowles secretary, Ruby Ann
Darin as r uaersecreta y, Paul
Grant publicity director.
The men's teams are Pizza
Solo, Paradise Giants,
S.A.C.A., the Ward Robe, the
Police, Heineken Gladiators,
Cold Front, Prison Overseers,
and the Over-The-Hill-Gang.
The lady's teams are Coco
Cola Jets, Paradise Bees,
Paradise Birds, S.A.C.A., and
the Ministry of Education.


ale a step

BAAAI~ Alt 71
BIG Q MARKETEERS, after
their Friday loss to Becks Bees,
jumped back on the winning wagon
last night and stopped Paradise
Island 7-1 to win their fifteenth
game in 17 played. The Marketeers
now hold a two and aI half game
lead over second place Jet Set.
diActually, Blia Its anstohlBe e
**because it helped to wake up the
guys a bit," said player manager Ed
Moxey. Moxey last night behind
the plae ocolecitedt sena pub ous
got one hit and scored one. After
fourteen straight wins it created a
lot of tension in the club, explained
Moxey.
Myith centrethflelderwi Ke
runs and two rbl's during his four
times at bat, winning pitcher
Godfrey Johnson pitched five shut

"BokI en b so dho wa
threatening in the fourth when he
connected for a triple, saw the
Islanders one up in the bottom of
the sixth on a homer over left.
Making use of a two base error,
Munroe put the Marketeers one up
in th tp of the uis.Th t Iou he
which Munroe got an rtb. Randy
Rodgers, Vince Albury and
Johnson also got the rbl's.
ouRo~y Rohdgersat first pt sa pus
got four assists.


DO An'S

Give yourself happy relief fom (

urvinry disorders due to

K AB pills to kesP
yon felingl t and
agrbh,


1. Card ga~e
Fa irycqueen
11. Nevt
12. Astonish
13. Latite
14. irtern
15. Scaly sateate
17. Exclusively
19. Ofntheitating
20. Bast fiber
22. Comr gnus
23. Stadium
24. Spaded
25. Pggeda


28. Small tumor
29. Make fun of
30Sm draft

32. Aplomb
33. Range
36. Aspersion
37. Over-all
39. Caustic
42. Land held in
fee simple
43. Polish
44. Eternity
45. Girls name
46. Woodlen core
47. Sitter herb


;7 "


WtrtlMMS


Thutrsdy, Maly 3, 1973t.


.





LOREN ZO ''DONI'i
LOCKHART .... his; batting 16
taking Schlitz out of the cetllrr
Sher sylor I 0 0 O


PC Z LE