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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03335
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 1, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03335

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;"I................ u Nassaal sse ashna==n IsP~laads Lding Nowe~lpaper


ilCi -S.


Tuemisy, May 1, 1973.


BlkallS 10


ask ilncle Sam






THE BAHAMAS gov-
ornment plans to ask 525
million in lease payments for


reported yesterday.
The news analysis story by
Phil Galey quoted an
"informed Bahamian sourc"
as providing the information.
The Gailey story said
tripartite talks will begin this
month between the U.S., G~reat
Britain and the Bahamas over
the continued use of the
islands '"McU.S;. ddefenc
missile-tracking station on
Grand Bahama, a naval facility
on Eleathera and an
underwater testing area at
Andros.



la an interview with The
Herald earlier this year Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling said
he wanted to know more about
the purpose of these
installation.
"We would need to find out
from the U.S. what she sees as


he was quoted. "They cannot
Just operate in a vacuum. We
don't precisely, you see, know
what role they play. We only
suspect that their role isi part of
some larger plan.
According to Herald writer
Gailey, even though there are
no major problems in
U.S.-Bahamian relations, there
are sensitive issues to be
negotiated, among them
territorial limits, outside
control of Bahamian resources
and the continued presupce of
U.S. defence lastaltionk oli
thre islands.
"Some high level officials
here believe that the U.S.
approach to the Bahamas
question could lead to some
basic changes in U.S. policy
toward other Caribbean
neighbours," Mr. Galley writes
from Washington.
How far the U.S. is prepared
to go in maintaining its
Bahamian bases remains to be
seen,
U.S. representative Dante
Fascell (D., Fla.) chairman of
the House Inter-American
Affairs subcommittee, pointed
out Saturday that technology
increasingly made it
unnecessary for potential
enemies to have their banse
near the United States.
"What this means," he said,
"is that while military
c onsidera tions remain
important to U.S. policy, they
are not likely to become of
overriding concern."




EDNEY KNOWLES, 20, a
West End Avenue farmer, who
pleaded not guilty to "stealing
from the person," was
remanded in custody this
morning to Monday, May 8.
Knowlese, who appeared
before Chief Magistrate Wiltop
Hercules, was accused of
stealing a Royal Bank of
Canada deposit bag No. 27
from Bahamas Electricity
Corporation employee Miss
Viotot Neymour yesterday.
The bag contained chequest~~~tttt~~~ttt~~~
and cash together valued at
S 15,265.94. Among thre
witnesses to be called are Mr.
Franklryn Seymour, police
resrvist, Miss Neymoutr and
Miss Madronna Watkins
FAITH ER CORNER L IUS'S
BROTHER DIES
FATHER Co rn elius


Osendorf, O.S.B., O.B.E. left
Freep or t yesterday fo.

Mu creal f hilobrotohn, Joseh
who died on Friday in
Paynesv01e, Minnesota.
Mr. Osendorf is surivead by
his wife, Katheriner, rad two
marrried children.


B~y NICKI KELLY
,BAHAMAS ENGINEERING AND FUEL WORKERS presid~ent D~udieyt Wgiims wanted today that unlew
management o~f the Bahamesa Electicity Corporation wasr prerpared to "stop rstaling" and see through its
negotiations on a new wage contract, there might well be a strike that could threaten the toulist industry.


alredy at ther dock to daily
cloe the area to trucks at 5
p.m. when the government's
sand operation closed.
However, a second chain


up in the area," Mr. Flowers
said. The area is now clean
and the Haitians have moved
to join Bahamian stoops at
PM rO RP Ii Symonette


CLEAN-UP, MOVE OUT
-- These Haitian stoops
dkigapperd from Malcolm's
Park over the weekend and
tunrnd up anchored off the


clen up the park arr eand
have put up a second link
clalin to prevent the Haitians
using the Malcolm's Park
deck area for their freight


and refuse. "F~or over a
month we have ttred
everything to move the
boats," said Port Director
Leon Flower. The Haittens


Ministry found that to keep
the park clean it was havi g
to truck alway the rre
accumulated almost every
other day. A chain was


"Wes don't want that to
happen, but we may not have



negotiation meeting and gt
dowr~ to business," Mr.
Wrilliams said.
The union leader
complained that BEC chairman
Preston Albary had
demonstrated poor
le drhp" in the han"Mn o

were generally dissatisfied with
conditions at the Corporation.
"The chairman (s getting
junior people to do the
negotiating and every time we
reach agreement on a point it
has to be referred to him and
he knocks it down."
Mr. Wriliams maintained that
the negotiators should be given
bargaining authority
In addition management
refuerd to sit down regularly
until settlement was reached
on wlhast la lreardy a four
months overdue contract, he
said. r


Thief seizes .515,000 BEC d eposit,


bet eao ai fol bel


MyNCKI KELLY
THE DAUGH IER OF A FORMER POLICE INSPECTOR and a newly inducted pdolie rservist
combined forces yesea to foA a weal~b thief who earlier had seized s safety deposit bag
aeatrtaing some $1,000 in cheuesea and cash from a Bahamas Electricity Corporation employees.


The events leading to the
capture of tile robber were
described this morning by
19-year~sid Madroat Watkins,
daughter of Mards Harbour
representative Errington
Wa'tkins.
Miss Watkins, an employou
in the Payments Department of
Royal Bank of Canada for the









MIAMI Bleach hotelma
Morris Lansburgh, a partner in
the company that operates the
King's Inn In Freeport, was
sentenced to one year in
federal prison F~riday for
conspiring with underworld
'figure Meyer Lansky to skim
st~illion of dollars in untaxed
revenue from the Flamingo
Hotel gambling casino in Las
Vagas,
~.Lasburgh told Las Vegas
U.S. District Judpe Roger
Ppoly he was "terribly sorry
-s~oenac the judge passed

SAlso sentenced with
Lansburgh was his business
partner Sam Cohen.
The tw oen were ordered
to report toForida a minim
saeurt tat Eglin Air Force Bse
inFl~orida May 14.
5n addition to the jail
sentences Judge Foley ordered
Lausburgh and Cohen to pay
$10,000 fines each.
Lansburgh, 55, and Cohen*
66, pleaded guilty to
govenrment charges that they
conspired to hide casino
avenue and to evade paying
lacome taxes. Approximately
$16 million was illegally
removed from the casino
during the period the Miami
Beach men owned it from
1980 to 19671.
the~b maximum sentence on
~thetwo caunt was ten years in
prison-and a 520,000 fine.
Lansburgh owns the
Assoclated Resort Hotels
company which in turn is
co-owne with Mr. Charle
Schlakrman of the firm which
lemaes the King's Inn. Mr.
Schlalkman is managing
.partner.
Lansburgh and Mr:
S40a~ckatn leased the Klas's
lan for' 20 years begtinning
Daeather 23, 1968 from
~L~ magna Danel .


past Sight months, said she and
her cousin Virgill Cartwrisht,
who Wo~rks across the street at
due General Hardware China
Shop, were waiting in front of
the Bankt of London and
Montreal on George Street at
about 5 p.m. when they heard
woman's voice shouting
"Stop Thief."


"We were waiting for my
sister Vivapa to pick us up
when we heard the screams and
saw a man holding a packet
wrapped in newspapers under
his right arm, come running
from the direction of Debbid's,
straight down. the middle of
King Sa set towards George
Street.
"There was a woman chasinS
him and crying." At that
moment, Miss Watkins said, a
small redcr 4ar tavellin south
"on George Street, stopped at
th~e'etrance to King Street and
blocked the road.
As the driver started to get
out the thief swerved north on
George Street and headed
towards Miss Watkins and her
cousin.


BIShop Eon tk sof prie p






THE ANGLICAN CHURCH "cannot support any efforts to create division at this crucial stage"
in Bahamian history, the Rt. Rev. Michael Eldon, Bishop of Nassau and the Barhama, declared
Monday in his opening of the 74th. annual Diocsan Synod.


of Synod to find ways and
means of improving the
efficiency of both the diocesrn
and parochial admialstrption
and finance, as well as the
effectivapse of the evangelistic
approach.
"It is important, we afk, to
emphasize that these matter
concern the parishes a wdll as
the diocese. Very often the
efficiency of the diocesan
operation is affected by the
character of the parochial one.
"Naturally, any study of a
system with a view to
improvement will recommend'
cha nge," Bishop Eldon
commented. "None of us really
likes change, but if we can see
that those changes are for the
better then we should be
prepared to accept them.
"We must remember that
what was efficient for the
Bahamas for the first three
quarters of the 20th century
may not be so for the final
quarter of it."
During last night's Synod
service at Christ Church, also,
Bishop Eldon installed Rev.
WilanTho pson Fof Stk
Guikd of St, Lukte's, Roc

Cathedral to replace Canon E.
W. G. Holmes who is now
retired, and Canon William
Granger, new Dean of the
Cathedral.




HERE FO1 TALU S

ARRIVING in Nassau this
afternoon for a discussion with
External Affairs Minister Paul
L. Adderley on the role of the
Bahamas in world politics was
Dr. Vaughn Lewtis, deputy
dioetor of the Institute of
Social and Economic Research
at the Bar ~doshcmu tof te

to hLewi and M Added e
~m. Wedne day at a the
Bahamas Teachers' College in
Oakes Field as part of the
University extra mural
department current
proar mm oan th implication
Dr. Lewis specialises in the
politics of small state systems
with special reference to the
problems of small states in the
international community of
nations.
Following tomorrow night's
discussion, four more
Wedaeaday night discussion
sessions are s~chduled.
Last Wednesday Mr. Rex
Nettleford, head of the UWI
citra mural department, drew
capacity crowd to the
Teachers' College auditorium
when he talked about the
challenges of independence.


Delivering his "charge" to I
Synod delegates in Christ
Church Cathedral, Bishop
Oldon said:
"$it~y 10 will see the
energence of the new
Bahamian nation. The dawn of
nationhood will bring to all of
us a pride in being Bahamians,
as well as opportunities and
privileges which hitherto were
not ours.
"'Simultaneously, important
responsibilities will be placed
upon us," he said. "The
greatest of these being that we
all commit ourselves to the
building of a prosperous and
happy Bahamas; a Bahamas
upholding Christian principles.
"A successful Bahamas must
be a united Bahamas. We must
strive to break down all
barriers that cause separation
to dispel all ignorance that
create prejudices, and to
encourage a mature outlook on
life, which allows for differing
opinions, but maintains
fellowship.
"As followers of Christ, the
great reconciler, we must
co ~otlyt ded atmeeng t

of our society. We cannot

dvsio at this cruc al sta
our history '
RESPONSIBILITIES
The Bishop continued:
"Nationrhood demands thet
we all determine to be
responsible working citizens'
putting forward our best effort
at all times and be willing to
serve the Commonwealth in
any location where our services
may be best used and where
they are needed.
"Now is not the time," he
said, "for idlenesrs, slackness or
for unwoillingnessr to make
sacrifices for the good of the
country and our fellowmen."
In a 45-minute address
Bishop Eldon touched on
independence, censorship,
education and women in the
ministry. He mentioned also
administration, finances and
evangehism within the diocese,
points which were likely to
spark considerable debate
doT and We Snd meetings

Bishop Ai~don expressed
plesasue at growing concern
over the quality of films being
shown in the country.
'"We support any move to
improve the quality and to
saf~egard our young people
belag exposed to violent and
other unwholesome types of
films.
."However, we would like to
stress that the cinema or
movie-theatre is not the only
avenue through which these c
and s~able influences come to
lus, hut also through the
television and certain types of


RtISK PAY
There are a number of
grieva~nces agitatmng the saln. m
First it is seeking "risk" pay
for BEC employees who must
work on the lines. Mr. Wiliams
recalled the electrocution of
three men over the last four
years, and said that linesmen
were in many cases receivinS
less pay than employees on
desk jobs.
Secondly the Corporation
was trying to bring in a new
oslary scale which would
reduce the annual increment
for monthly paid workerstfrom
$18 to $33 to $13 to $16, Mr.
Williams said.
In addition BEC wats trying
to get the union to agree that
before a shop steward could
take up a cars he had to get the
approval of the Board. 'They
will never give this, so the
efect is` to enstrave the sho

declared,
He also complained of the
shabby treatment being meted
out to female staff at the
Corporation's Bay Street
office.
There was not where for
them to eat their funch, added
to which they were being
discourteously addressed by
their superiors.
INSURANCE
A mqjor union grievance
concerns insurance coverage
for injury.
It is understood that the
BEC chairman is planning to
shift group employee coverage
from Travellers Insurance to a
firm known as Transoceanic
Insurn~lce.
Mr. Williams said the salon
wras dissatifed with the injury
coverage provided by
Travellers, and was "Justifibly
fearful" that the same situation
might continue with the new
company.
Under the existing insurance

wol ha,@ to espe ki h
hand to get SS,000
compensation. "We want every
form of the body to be worth
something," the union leader
said, and poliaed out that a
person could well lose all his
fingers and not be
compensated.
The Tribune undwatands
that employees do not wish to
make the switch from
Travellers, with whom they
have baen insured for the pst
three yeess to a company
about which they stegdly
know nothing.


CHARGED
'For a brief second I
wondered what I would do and
then jisst as he ran past me I
charged into him without
thinking," Miss Watkins said.
The sudden attack threw the
mobber off guard and he
dropped the package he was
carrying and kept running with
the driver of the red car in
pursuit. *
Mhaiss Watkins said the
package fell just behind a
parked Volkswvagen. When she
bent over to pick it up she saw
that it wais a safety deposit bag.
She turned and gave it to the
crying woman who then ran
s ri tt downECGeorge 8Street

pu ,t rat the tie ignd hi
police reservit Frnklyn
Seymour, had circled the block
and wess back in George Street
heading towards Marlborough
when Mr. Seymour managed to
mseie him In the vicinity of the
Lofthouse Club.
HOLD MAN
A bystander came to his
assistance and between them
they kept the man's hands
pinned behind his back until
the police came on the scene.
Just at that moment Miss
Watkins' sister drove up and
thought there had been some
sort of accident when she saw
the large crowd gathered.
"Until then I had felt quite
calm about what had
happened, exbcept that I
thought I had knocked out all
my teeth when I hit him."
When however her sister
pointed out that the man may
have been carrying a knife "I
just went cold all over and
started to cry," Miss Watkins

laA si oo 8 inches, the
young bank employee was
modest about her part in the
recapture of the BEC receipts.
She said the only people who
knew what had happenedb were
her cousin and her family.
She had not mentioned
anything to her fellow
employees at Royal Bank, and
the only evidence of her
encounter was a dslihtly
swollen lip, cut when she threw
herself on the robber*
ironically the BEC employee
wag said to be on hwr-~ tP
.dsoJ~p the money in t n~~i~c
I'deposit box of the oyl J
Bank of Canada.


-W .
BISHOP MICHAEL ELDON
..no time for idleness or
slackness


literature that is being sold
here.
"We do appeal to parents to
censor severely what
programmes their children
watch, and to the authorities
concerned to be Vigiant about
the type of literature that is
being sold in the country."

Bishop ElonD told the
delegate ao he Synod that

ac usition of a parcel of land
on which to re-locate St.
John's Collose are still
proceeding and plans for the
building are being prepared.
"It is the intention of the
Church to play its full part in
the Government's educational
plan for the country. The part
that we shall play is not yet
certain as exact details of the
poition of voluntary schools
sae not yet been fully worked
ot by Government "
oBisho Eldon is to appoint a
commiotte to study and report
on the advisability of ordarining
women into the priesthood and
the episcopate
"Our Provincial Synod
referred this matter to the
Doctrinal and Educational
Committees and we shall be
meeting in Antigua during the
first week in May to discuss it.
"Meanwhile, the House of
Bishops has requested that the
q 8es tion be thoroughly

Wo ar tqunestn athheard sdyof
the question be made at the
parochial level and reports be
sent to the diocesan
committee. We sincerely hope
that this matter will receive the
serious attention it deserves,"
he added.
REPORT
Bishop Eldon pointed out
that during this Synod
committees appointed at the
1972 Synod to **** ty diocesan
administration, finance and
evangelism will report on their
findings-
"The committees were
requested because of the desire


MORRIS LANYSBURG
... King's Inn partner









IF THE tides are right in the

Ando Malia, whic shada i

y ar,N Hi be r otold8 an
towed away.
Mr. Leon Flowers, Port
Director, rald today that some
time ago thi Port had the barge
moved about 100 feet from
where it sankr to a position
where it is "no longer a real
danger" to navigation. The
barge is now out of the
channel. However the
authorities are just waiting for
the right tide to move the
barge completely from the

The barge was bringing 15 ~
cubic yards of sand to Nassau
at about 8 p.m. June; 18 when,
without warning, the engines
cut off.
It was reported at the time
that the crane operator
dropped the erane's bucket
into the water in an ef~fort to
control the barge's drift In the
channel's swift current.
However, the barge drifted
over the bucket's cable and
capsized. The four crewmen
wers rmac ed by passing
insured.
The boat remained a
navigational hazard until it was
recently moved out of. the
channel. As a resurlt of
persistent complaints of
mariners using the channel, a
warning .light was put on the
hull sometime in August. .
At that time Mr. Flowers
had said that charge owner Rick
Penn was responsible for
moving the wreck. If the owner
failed to remove it willinn a
"nreaonabic" time Grovrnlment
rrouSQ have to deep 9~and. bill
MrlnrPmr; Mt.' Flowers tofd The
Tribune la January.


5b he Wehuno


SUPERMARKET


P%-C IS CarSs


'':.C. CON rrtRACT '1OW FOUR MONTHS

O VERDUE, SO UNION CHIEF WARNS


BEC


workers may


Haitian SlOops banned at Malcolm's Park




I I i nnn .I


L _.~---------


___Y


W TRGATE PEIDEN S KS TOdNATo .ErN h.
resigned their top White Hous staff posts and Atty. Gen. Richard G.
Kletedienst quit the Cablaet Monday in an administration shakeup
pr ienbt Nton anucd th resignations and said he had fired White
Hous Counsel John W. Dean III.
Nixon said he is rlaminating Secretary of Defense Elliot L. Richardson

mh Peint mae I nain e rd ad tlvso d reas at pm
EDT to discuss the snak Otat began with the breek-ia at Democratic
national headquarters June IT. (* See Story This Pose>
RADICAL CHANGE IN SOVIET FOREIGN POLICY
MOSCOW (AP) Soviet Communist Party chief Leonid Brezhnev today
kicked off the annual May Day parade through Red Square in Moscow
with a speech emphasizing detente with the U. S., Western Europe and
Japan. The party leader specifically mentioned improving relations with
Gc mSOw ftH YTENE DIPLOMATS DIE IN CRASH F~nO~f~O~~
ADEN, SOUTH YEMEN (AP)- The government of South Yemen
reports a military plane carrying the country's Foreign Minister and seven
other South Yemen diplomats has crashed, killing all 25 persons aboard.
The government cancelled May Day celebrations and ordered one week of
offielal mourning. Further details were not available.
ASSASSINATION LEADS TO STATE OF EMERGENCY
BUENOS AIRES (AP)-A state of emergency has been declared In parts
of Argenthsa following the assassination of a retired military Isader, and
ptredsdnt elct Hector Canapora Is expected to return today from a
political vlisP to Spain to deal with the latensified guerrilla campaign.
Admiral hermes Quljuda was the third high-ranking Agentine military
officer murdered since D~ecember. The military Junta's emergency decree
puts the capital and four provinces under martial law and could imperil a
r ad odeRBOTn FAsOURABLE FOR TALKS
PARIS, MAY I (AP) North Vietnam's Deputy Foreign Minister today
ruled out a meeting soon between Henry A. Kissinger and Le Duc The
saying: "The atmosphere is not favourable at present."
Namen after thre rmeeig wto r S.itDluoy InA. tSecretary of State Wimlim
Sources at the White Hous said lrast week that the meetings between
Sullivarn and Thach would be the prelude to another meeting between
President Nixon's National Security Adviser and the North Vietnamese
Politburo member with whom he negotiated the cease-fire agreement.
But North Vietnamese sources in Paris said The would not return to
Paris unless Nixon did three things: resumed the clearing of U. S. mines
from North Vietnalmese waters, resumed economic aid talks with the North
Vietnamese in Paris and stopped U.S. reconnaissance flights over North
Vietnam.
PRESIDENT'S CONTROL POWERS EXTENDED
WASHING;TON (AP) The Senate Monday passed and sent to the
House of Representatives a compromise bill to extend President Nixon's
authority to impose wage-price controls for one yer.
The Senate action was by a non-record, voice-vote.
Ths presidential authority to impose controls was scheduled to expire at
LENIN PEAC uPRmZ WA ANNOUNCED
MOSCOW (AP) TASS announced Monday night that Lenin Peace
Prizes have been awarded to four persons including Soviet Communist
Party leader Leonid Brezhnev and President Salvador Allende, Marxist
President of Chile*
The other two winners of Lenin International Prizes 'for strengthening
idae cmong te pe teles ui 907n2o %a e Unru nPastorino tUrhuguahrn
James Alrddse.
TWO ROYAL VISITS DOWN UNDER ANNOUNCED
L.ONDON (AP) Queen Eliizabeth II with her husband Prince Philip and
dauahter Plcrh Anne will attend the C'ommonwealth Gaimes early next
Tuesdy I hitchurch, New Zealand, Buckingham Palace announced
Two, royal visits to Australia within the space of a few months were also

I'ii n ne twill arrive co time to pen theaC'ristct rch Games Ja .
the Games and to perform the closing ceremony f~e. 2.
Later they will visit other parts of New Zealand aboard the Royal Yacht
Brta ni and call dtPpu Newr G;lna Pn sonAnne usen wl


chtala fmser Austa In tnean and rnhdrn errioseaiv huleint

AfhSoviet Amassadr Jacob d M'elai beom Ies rsdnti ue udrt

system of at habetical rotation.
FISHING PROTECTION COSTLY TO BRITISH TAXPAYER
LONDON (AP') The British government admitted Monday it has spent
almos I le Icmillion dollar chartering tops to protect British trarwler
Anthony Studort, Minister of State at the Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries told the Ho~use of Commons the cost to date was 196,874 pounds
oreacd d472,4ndd Itas.0ishing limits Sept. I but British trawlers still
aI DAp OtD HU BNITS AT AIRPORT
NEW YORK, MAY I (AP') Three gunmen made off with a
500,000-dollar shipment of diamonds Monday night after holding ~up the
Air India cargo warehouse at Kennedy Airport, police reported.
the .e' w d oun n t y cmte Iim nds o ehsm afeno an he want
envelopes from the safe. The three left after binding the supervisor and six
other employees with handcuffs and rope and taking their wallets, police

It watshnot known immediately where the diamonds came from or who
Police said the bandits were armed with pistols when they entered the
warehouse about 9:45 p.m.
Police gave this account: Luis Rodrigues, 39, the supervisor, handed the
envelopes to the gunmen, who stuffed them in their pockets. The bandits
then handcuffed six employees to each other in a chain and tied up the
seventh with rope. All were sagged, herded into a washroom and robbed of
their wallets, which contained about $2so-
The trio left, apparently on foot, about an hour after their arrival. At
11:20 p.m., one of the employees worked free and telephoned police, who
m FNEIA SU RTS REOPENING OF BORDER
JAKARTA (AP') Indonesia expressed its support Monday for Zaembia's
struggle to reopen its border, closed by the neighboring white government
of Rho~desia.
A Foreign Office spokesman said the support was expressed by Voreign
hbinister Adam Malik in a one-hour meeting with Mark Chona, a special
envoy from Zamble*
Chone brieted Malik on the latest developments in Zambia, the
spokesman said.
"The landlocked south central African country has suffered economic
losss following the closure of its border by Rhodesia because the border
was the only outlet for Zambla's copper," he added.
The envoy also met with Vice President Sultan Hamongku Buwono to
convey a message from President Keaneth Karunda of Zambia to President
Suhuarto who Is visiting South Kalmmatn.


APPLICANT MUST HAVE THE fOLLOWING
QUALI FICATIONS.
- Fast and accurate typist with Shorthand
Able to compose own correspondence and
work with a minimum of supervision.
.- Willing to work a 6 day week during the busy
season November - June.
Attractive appearance
Plesrant personrality -- able to meet and
converse with Vi.I.P.'s
-- Previous experience in Hotel Reservations
helpful. but we are willing to train right
Vr~i person.
-- Year round position
Applicants should apply in own handwriting, giving
a dptcation, previous experiece age, etc.


L


I I


twJy Mn i, 1973.


Iru Irr~~~


3


By Llatda Deutsch
LOS ANGCELES (AP) -
Daniel Ellaberg's chief attorney
today asked that former ActinS
FBl Dir tr I. Ptacl C~a
John Dean and convicted
Watergate conspirators E.
Howard Hunt and G. Gordon
Liddy be brought hoem Tuesday
to testify about an alleged
burglary of Ellsbergl's
pschiatrist's office
The judye denied the request
to bring them here Tuesday to
testify in the Pentagon papers
trial, saying affidavits would
have to be taken from them
first.
U.S. district court judge
Matt Byrne said he would
consider the defense request
for a hearing with the four men
but said he would not hold it
Tuesday. He indicated he
would prefer to take sworn
affidavits, rather than bring
them here to testify.
Attorney Leonard Doudin
told te jutdg he wnts thte
indictments (against Ellsberg
and co-defendant Antho ny
Russo) were brought and
whether they were brought as
part of a general political
espionage effort by the U.S.
government.
Ellsberg and Russo are
charged with espionage, theft
and conspiracy in copying the
secret Pentagon study of the
Indochina War.

cons drd "a lrge n mberh o
other potential witnesses" but
said he settled on these four
because "they seem to be those
with the most intimate
knowledge" of documents
which he said were found in
Hunt's White House safe.
REMOVED
Boudin said he had
established through various
sources including news media
tat Pseveral folders relatinga t
one folder simply marked
"Ellsberg" were removed from

HDea ord s. pe ni d e

ao no nhat hasin t

Gray resigned as Acting FBI
Director Friday after reports
that he destroyed politically
sagensitiVe files belonging to
Hunt. Dean was fired today by
President Nixon.
Boudin confirmed that the
psychiatrist whose office was
burglarized in September 1971
BuerlDr.ill if.Fielding of
In a long presentation as the
court session began today,
Boudin asked for a stay in the
trial. He said the situation calls
for "special kinds of relief, and
we will ask for a suspension,
very brief, of further

anivsiain op t algd
break-in is under way.
Bryne said Friday he had
received a Justice Department
memorandum which alleged
that Liddy and Hunt
burglarized the psychiatrist's
office.


The Missiasippi stood at 42.8
feet in St. Ltouis, down from
43 feet on Sunday and from a
record crest of 43.3 feet -
13.3 feet above flood stage -
on Saturday.
But the yesther forecast
called for mr ain, ith
thunderstorms Monday night
and the army corps of
engineers said it was rebuilding
its stocks of sandbags and
eme gny pum a
A spokesman noted that the
river already had created three
times in a short period and
warned people to remain
vigilant. "Any relarxtion now
would be courting disaster," he
said.
The corp of engineers has
estimated 35,000 persons have
been evacuated from the area
between Hannibal, Mo. and the
Gulf of Mexico.Eleven persons
have died because of the flood
and more than 10 million
acres, including prime
farmland, is under water alonS
the 1,500-mile route of the
Mississippi. Agricultural
experts say cotton crops may
be cut back sharply
Damage already is in the
millions in the seven states
affected by the flood and
officials say they will be unable
to provide a total estimate
until the waters recede.
South of St. Louis, in
Crystal City, police capt.
Robert Nahlik said his first
helicopter flight over the area
was a startling experience. "I
damn near cried," he said. "I
finally realized how many
people we've got down here
affe t b thi e e g.

of the flooded areas on

To e Mississippi was cresting
M onday at Ce st r gee, a



of ceest of 45.6 feet 13.6
feet over the 32-foot flood
stage was predicted for the
Cape Girardeau area in
Southern Missouri late Monday

niThe rie Pf r cat g service
said the Mississippi would crest

astuthern ost pa of th stat ,
n WelWnesday but said th
below levees and no flooding
was expected.
"Of course this crest wI
move on down stream, a
sokesmanl said "so it looks
Naec ez wilri se osl am
the next several days. Below
Natchez, that is, below the
Morgnza and old river control


structures, which ae of rin
part a~ the river water out O
the main stream the river
should stay fairly flat since
these structures will fla can ot
that crest and will tk f
lot of the flow and divert it.
Nevi Orleans will change very
little "
There was no rain in
Louisiana and Missiasippi over
the weekend, allowing drainage
in some areas. The forecast
caled for a 20 per cent chance
of sowenof sh Thday and
Wednesday .
leEfforts to sava1b ackwater
lve in Lusa wr
abandoned on Monday when
flood waters reached 58 feet -
six inches above the levels -
and authorities said another
50,000 acres of farm and
woodland in Catahoula and
Lasalle parishes would be
flooded in the next few days.
Officials had anticipated
that the levee would not hold
and built a back-up structure
65 feet high to protect ~a
hospital, 8 a tor an a
residential section near
Jonesville. Wedson Smith
President of the Tensas basin
levee district said the town of
Jonesville "is in no danger of
flooding. "
The Illinois river crested
overnight at Beardstown, Ill.,
in the west-central part of the
state, reaching a height of
27.02 feet, more than 13 feet
above the flood stage. Levee
and seawalls held.
Most of the town was dry,
but police spokesmen said
"quite a few farm families have
hadM to move onet. to m'
town.'
Calvin Davis, director of the

dfensed uit si hi o. es



two persons were bitten by the
poisonous reptiles. But were
treated promptly, Davis said,
and seemed to have suffered no
ill effects.
In New Zealand, flood
waters from the St. John River
forced the evacuation of 75
families in Fort Kent, Maine, a
ad stonsh wre l se .cho
The bureau said that early
Monday morning the St. John
rose to 25.77 feet, topping the
previous record of 15.30 feet
set on May 9, 1961.


Kleindi t
In a solemn address to the
na io, hur afe atrn r
.hku in hi diitai
the President said the blame
belongs at the top.
"I accept it," he said in a
nationally broadcast and
televised address.
In the shakeup, Nixon fired
presidential counsel John W
Dean III and nominated
Secretary of Defense Elliot L.
Richardson to be Attorney
General
The President gave
Richardson the job on


SENATE PROBE
WILL CONTINUE
WASHINGTON (AP)
President Nixon's nominee for
the office of' Attorney General
SElliot Richardson has
been given authority to name a
special prosecutor if needed
in the Watergate scandal.
The president announced
the present Defense Secretary
as his choice to head all federal
inquiries concerning Watergate
dr hs Inatsoin ade broadcast
Nixon's announcement
followed the resignations of
three top administration
figures. Attorney General
Kleindienst, White House chief
of staff H. R. Haldeman and
presidential assistant John
Erlichman all stepped down.
White House counsel John
Dean was fired.
In spite of the President's
announcement, pr n Senata

Watergate affair intends to
continue its work. Committee

wtdra am of ten fosuar Nixt



administration ought to
investigate itself "
MANY CONGRESS
MEMBERS CRITICAL
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Many members of Congress say
the President's promise to mop
up the Watergate mess didn't
oDae oatic Senator
Edmund Muskie of Maine
criticized Nixon's selection of
Elliot Richardson to lead the
clean up, noting that the
nominee for Attorney General
is, as Muskie put it, "a member
of the official family."
Pelepublican i ntor Charles
introduce a resolution calling
on the President to pick a
prosecutor with full subpoena
po wers outs id e the
administration,
And Democratic Senator
Henry Bellmon of Oklahoma
says neither the Congress nor
the people will be satisfied
with an investigation carried on
by the administration.
SOME TALK< OF .
IMPEACHMENT
WASHINGTON (AP) U.
S. Senators and Congr~essmen
uniformly approved the
departures Monday of three
top White House aides linked
to thei Watergate scandal, but
many said the truth still must
be told
Representative John E.
Moss, a California Democrat,
said the House of
Representatives should set up a
special panel to look into any
"possible involvement of the
President in conduct which
might lead to initiation of
impeachment action.
But Hours Speaker Carl
Albert told a reporter that this
is no time to be talking about
impeachment. "I haven't given
that a thought," Albert said in
response to Moss' suggestion.
Reacting to the resignations
ofNixoon iE H.r h. Indean
the firing of John Dean III,
Moss said it is "most difficult


to conceive" that Nixon was
not aware of Waterlate.
M~os did not yet call for
horpeachment but said it is
Important that the House
consider creating a selct
committees aend "develop, facts
pn ia ow"Mio d bei
dependent infonrmtion.
Senator Lowell P. We~lckr, a
Conciut R publican, a i

Senate atergarte committee
now scheduled for May 15
would be premature.


overseeing the administration's
investigation of the Watergate
affair and of naming a special
prosecutor to probe the
bu gng incident if Richardson
deems one necessary.
Until late March, Nixon said*
he had been assured by thorn
around him that no one in the
administration was involved in
the wiretapping.
CONCEALING FACTS
"However, new information
then came to me which
persuaded me that there was a
real possbility some of these
charges were true, and
suggested further that there
had been an effort to conceal
these facts both from the
public, from you, and from
me," Nixon said.
Thus did Nixon disclaim any
advance knowledge of the June
17 break-in at Democratic
Party national headquarters.
The President said he
ordered an intensive new
inquiry with the results to be
reported "directly to me, right
here in this office.,,
He said he was determined
that the truth be brought out,
no matter who was involved.
Even as he recounted the
resignations of Haldeman and
Ehrlichman as top White House
aides, Nixon said it ddidd n
imply teir guilt, and c le
them two of the finest public
servants he ever known.
Nixon said in a nationally
broadcast and televised address
that those who committed
crunanal act br full


But he said that as the man
ve the to ,a e must a et


i ipnte i White cH gon
torgaiain the easiest coure e

would be for me to blame
those to whom I delegated the
responsibility to run my
campaign,"s dixo ai ud b
the cowardly course.
mlnanya organization te
n pniblt," he said.b"That
.epniblt tefo blngs
here, in this office.
"I accept it "
But he pictured himself as
the victim, for nine months, of
lies by trusted assrociates who,
he sad conyncebd him no o

involved in lat June's
campaign burglary of
-Democrat ic si atonal
committee headquarters in the
Watergate here
..JUSTICE PLEDGE
"I pledge to you tonight ...
that I will do everything in my
bwrotuo tnsur that the dguil y
such abuses are purged from
our political processes ...
Nixon had earlier announced
he was nominating Secretary of
Defense Elliot L. Richardson
to become Attorney General,
and assigning him immediately
to oversee administration
investigations into the
w ir etapping raid on
Democratic headquarters and
I lred cas
Hae cases he had given
Richardson authority to name
a special prosecutor to pursue
the case if the Attorney
General-designate considers
that appropriate.
ABUSES PURGED
Nixon said it now is essential
to restore faith -in the
American system and to make
certain that "such abuses~" are
purged from politics.
And he said he must turn
full efforts toward "the larger
duties of this office,"
especially the seach for peace.
sIgnnatonn ancing t e
the lategrity of the White
House had to "take priority
o v r all personal
considerations"
A number of Congregg
members of both parties have


demanded that Nixon himrself
appoint a special prosecutors
from outside admidstration

a *e criticism wasr noet stlled
by Nixon's addre, although
he won gesneral praise for 145
atCmte teo cleant up the Whl(*l

[* NIXON'S PUL liTET
PAQBr SEVBN)


WASHINGTON
(AP}-residet Nixon and
U...o.... Cace..... Willy
Brandt began two days of
latensive talks Tuesday
morning to demos aela ne

partnership in the light of the
Preident's call for a New
Atlantic Charter.
The Chancellor,
rcopnied by foreg
minister Walter Scheel and
Egon Bahr, admiB t'ewithu
negotiator with East G;ermany,
arrived at the White House five
minutes late from across tie
street where the Chancell~r
resdes at Blair House,
Nixon and Secretar fc
State Wiu P. Rogeys
received the visitors under bl~e
skie with the sun shining after
a week of rain on the south
lawn of the ex cutilve mansion.

f ono could trust the
President's face the Wate gte
affair was forgotten for the

da was an "unofficial"
orrval: the Chancellor is on an
official but not on a state visit.
There were no speeches, n~o
gun salutes and no honour
gards to insect.
Nixon shook hands with the
sizable German delegation
arriving at the White House in
three limousines flying the
flags of both nations.
The two leaders, surrounded
by the German aides and
Rogers, posed for many
minutes for photographers.
Nixon and Brandt joked
about Brandt's fishing trip
Monday which, t Cancellor
admiTtd nl ued o fia uh.
was provided dby the U.S.
army's hrald trumpeters
greeting the limousines which
proceeded slowly through the
ruh antraa e ofth ex uttie

mxon escorted his guest
through the gden ao his Oval

Oficeestill follow d balaarg

NEE AND WIN n PsI

(A )-Fr lnon in wmah oper
against conviction and a year's hard
labour for violating the Officilr
secrets Act.
The agpellate division of the high
court, the highest court in the land,
rNuee d sIh dd onb ine or
passed on information prejudicial
to the security of the srtat.

FOR 3in 1
LAWN SERVICE


~ACHILL~ES SILVER/SHIELD
REDISCOVERED
LOS ANGELES, MAY I (AP) -
The recently rediscovered
three-foot-dlameter Achilles Sliver
shield made for the Duke of York
in 18211 sold at auction for 40,000
dollars Monday night but its
whereaboats may soon become a
mystery again.
The purchaser's Identity was
withtwid at Ms, rquest by the
Sotheby Parke Bernet auction
house. Not even his nationality was
revealed although itm wa tated the
purchaser was a man.
spirtboduh b ddlalrt bmon
latrnational buyers including some
believd frosn Englad and France.
Manan representatives als were
The rediscovered art object came
to Ilght la southern Caliornlo
dwarla a routine appnraisl of ob ac
ia m l hw y the ruto im ,
At bfirt the firrm skwr urpert,
arlan Ivond)oner, thought he was
lookila at a handsome mahogany
tabek with a rather tanrnihed bura
pkgrutgrta d .R. .d DuMetab
had originally bn a case that had
ner conwatd with the ad~dition of
Sepr to ph ore t ad the

*l lbM ii thU t to' hav
bee lost around 1904, haviny
bef~o the twea i n the oudo
by tow% Du ofCubn d. t
Atlantic to the United States in the
1920's Sotheby userchers bello.
It was on of asty four of Its
a now~b rtw dt 4b
the cllession o dr theQu of
Englad. It was made for King


sale or xceSslaserted, Lor4
Leasdale and de Duke of York


was asr 4.e and as names of
Plraxman hd ae shmramles.


m~ ar~u


FOLLOWINGC SHAKEUP jgggg tgggg 4gg FLOODS RECEDE, BUT-


Nixon accepts final sucasss' reasest Danger far from


is Postages case over in worst


re ponsibility for





By Harry F. Ro~snthal
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Nixon tod8 the nation
Monday night he accepts final treponsibility for tin Watergate
scadnde that led him to accept the treignations of H. R.
Haldeman, John D. Ehrilchman and Atty. Gena. Richard G;.


Amerscan flooding


THE FLtOOD WATR t~dd tl bs rtimra par of
the M-ississpi Rivrf alley onI Monday, but the dhangr was far
from oer rand the damage r wast mstllwontin@*


QBICERAL M)ANAGER
~ip~w Clubt *

















of domes
By George Gedda
WASHINGTON, APRIL 28
(AP) The chairman of the
nobuce mi e er ensnt afa
Dante Fascell, urged tonight
that the United States stay out
of the domestic affairs of the
Caribbean.
At the same time, Pascell
said the U. S. should not
foreclose all possibilities of
r ebea interventacoinesm tathe
warrant.
"Intervention can only be
legitimate when there is a clear
and present danger to our
survival,"F~ascell said.
Coincidentally, his remarks
came on the eighth anniversary
of former President Lyndon B.
Johnson's decision to send
Doiican tR public o he d
off what he feared would be a
Communist takeover of that
country.
Fascell made noo direct
reference to the Dominican
invasion but he said that the
United States mujt make every
effort to refrain from
in rsemen iri cae internal
"Anything else would
constitute un justified meddling
by us and probably be counter
productive ;n the long run," he
said.
His reritarks were prepared
for delivery to a conference on
the Ur ited States and the
Caibn t sponsored by mh
American Assembly.
Fascell, who represents the
Miami area in the Congress,
called on the Nixon
administration to face up to
"the emerging new realities of
the Caribbean and develop a
clear, coherent policy toward
the area."
"The only prudent and
realisticiscoursee no the tUhnitted
the area is to be viable and to
provide a better life for its
people, the active, generous
and sensitive concern of our
own people will be needed."
As a measure of U. S.
cnoemrn fredthtehaear acl
hfa deputy assistant sec ear


;maH W8RIS US 10 Stay 881


;tic affairs of the CaniBbeen


Qbr Br tb n

Babyr Boast To Swagr To Th~e Depea~r Of N~o Master


46Itster/Bditor 1917*1972
Contreattrtsg6w ro 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.a.'
46Maker/Badiol9172-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirle~y Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
GellneraOffces(15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday7 Ittay 1, 1973 *


It's onh/ natural


__


; _11_______ II~__


I) ~~~y rr
I)


tUeadaY Mov 1 1973.


to save the scraps of his broken country.
sfctd h sent nc na tlaa rf tomue a la's

island where he died at a great old age. It was said at the time that


hand.
Petain was buried at his prison fortress. The body was stolen
recently by some of his admirers who felt it should rest in a grave
hnte ridg wit h cmae Vm t fr wl a
U.Jftertunat ly te csk t wa e v emybin the gr~v m nt a
the body has been returned to a vault in the fortress prison
compound.
Pierre Laval was also tried and sentenced to death as a traitor
by a French court. The sentence was carried out by a firing squad
amid the scorn and ridicule of the newspapers of the world.
******
After the repudiation by Britain and France of the floare-Laval
plan, Laval became a bitter enemy of Britain. I don't have to
convince anyone that I love Britain. I think my devotion to
Britain can be covered by the oft-quoted line "with all her faults
I love her still".But I have always felt sorry for Laval. I feel that
his bittemess was understandable and justifiable,
Another victim of diplomacy in this was Major Vidkun
Quisling, who collaborated with the Nazis, and was executed by
the Norwegians in October 1945.
Quisling headed a wartime government in Norway while King
Haakon spent the war years in England with his cabinet. He saw
country after country invaded by Hitler with no help cominS
from the Allies. He witnessed the unhappy . the terrible .
partitioning of Czechoslovakia. And so, when H~itler's legions
approached his country, he invited them to come in and take
over.
In view of all that had happened all across Europe, this seemed
a natural thing for this man to do but he was condemned by tle
Allied world as a traitor and his name has earned a place in the
dictionary for shame. The word quisling now means traitor.
King Leopold of the Belgians was another tragic figure. In the
first world war his father King Albert became one of` Ji, world's
great heroes by fighting for every inch of ground in his country
when K~aiser Wilhelm ignored a friendship treaty between the two
countries and used Belgium as a corridor in his attack on France.
in the second world war King Leopold surrendered when his
army was surrounded by the Germans. This too, in mly opinion,
was an understandable decision.
The whole strategy of war had changed since his father
courageously defended his country. The first world walr wals a war
of fixed positions (trenches). The second world war was a war of
fast movement (planes and tanks). The dive bomber was the main
instrument in attack. The Belgian army was hemmed into a small
area and could have been completely destroyed froml the air.
There was no corridor of escape for them comparable to the
famous British escape from the beaches of Dunkirk when they
"rere driven to the sea after the collapse of France in the early
stages of the second world war.
Not to have surrendered under these circumstances would have
been foolhardy and could have only ended in wholesale slaughter.
This humane action cost Leopold his throne. Hie abdicated in
favour of his son Baudoin.
You know .. there is no r f tlmanity in war. This situation
is now reflected in the attitude of some of the men in the PLP
Government in Nassau today who have openly said: "Winlners
take all".
But all history shows that this approach to life bly any
government eventually exacts a heavy price from a country and
its people.
The worst reaction to the Ethiopian situation was that Stalin
turned against Britain and France.
When Churchill took over the reins of government in Britain
from Neville Chamberlain he sent a mission to Moscow. They
were shocked to find a German mission already well established
there.
Albert Speer was Hitler's Development Minister. He was onl` of
the few war criminals at the Nuremberg trials to escape the
gallows. He got a long prison sentence. After he came out of
prison he wrote The Third Reich,an authoritative book on the
Hitler regime. In it he revealed that Hitler was the only head of
government in the world that Stalin trusted!
And so it was a shock to Stalin when his trusted "friend"
stabbed him in the back.
Unfortunately for Hitler, he didn't trust Stalin.
+*****
When (litter reached the coast of France he had to mlake a
decision. He knew that if he attempted an invasion of England
and Russia chose that time to strike, his position might be
critical. He didn't realize that Stalin was a true ally that could be
trusted.
The British army had already been crippled at Dunkirk and so
Hitler had nothing to fear from Britain. If Russia could be
crippled then Germany would be master of Europe. He could
then easily deal with Britain. With Britain out of the way, all he
would then have to do would be to blockade the coast of
America with his U-boat fleet' to become master of the world.
This seemed a sure bet. It could hardly be regarded as "a
calculated risk". But Hitler had forgotten the experience of
Napoleon in Russia in the last century. And so his armies suffered
the same crippling fate as Napoleon's in the last century that
resulted in sending Napoleon into permanent exile. Hitler finally
paid for his mistake with his life.
+*L***
It is extraordinary the mistakes governments make because
they become the slaves of the people.
Stanley paldwin was Prime Minister of Britain in the years
before Hitler threw down the gauntlet to the world.


Winston Churchill kept on sounding the warning but any
thought of war was so much anathema to the British people that
he became an outcast in all political parties.
When the war came the people called Churchill out of limbo to
save the nation.
After Churchill had saved the nation and the world, .the
British people dumped him for the Labour Party under Clement
Attlee, who proceeded to turn Britain into a welfare state.
Later Stanley Baldwin, who accepted an earldom and
became Lord Baldwin, admitted that he realized that Germany
was arming but he could not go to the nation with a war policy
because the Conservative party would have lost the election!
******
Lordy me! I started out to write a short article about the
assassination of the two American and one Belgian Ambassadors
in the Sudan by eight Black Septemberists and here I've dug up
from my memory a lot of not commonly known background
material about two world wars.
In fact, I haven't written what I intended to write about the
Black Septemberists. I will do that tomorrow.
Indeed, this discussion has opened up a whole line of thought
on which I will now do a series of articles.
******
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
It is commonly said that "the voice of the people is the voice
of God".
This is an incomplete version of a letter written to
Charlemagne in the year 800 by the great scholar Alcuin.
"Nor should we listen to those who say, 'the voice of the
people is the voice of God'," wrote Alcuin, "for the turbulence of
the mob is always close to insanity."
Alcuin wrote this letter I173 years ago, four years before his
death.


shoring up the Cuban
economy.
Related to Soviet-Cabn
te hn FIg cnawrn
makes it unnecessry for
potential enemies to have a
base near the United States.
"What this means," he said,
'is that while military
considerat ions re main
important to U.S. policy, they
are na Lkeyto bcme of


immediately approve the
furnishing of a second $10
unilion to the Caribbean
Developm to Bank eidiet
reference to Cuba, saying that
"our primary potential enemy
already has a major Caribbean
ally and is unlikely to want
another expensive client state."
This was an allusion to the
estimated 1.5 billion dollars a
day the Soviet Union spends in


would bl: Caribbean af fairs. He
noted that the stars
department structure at
prseiblrequireds tdhe oicial
among Mexico, Central
America and the Caribbean.
Fascell recommended
intensification of the level of
Uj. S. support for nregonal
Institutions and ad, "
particular, we should


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
An Associated Press news despatch from Cairo reports that the
Palesttne G3uerrilla command has washed its hands of the Black
'September guerrillas who murdered three diplomats in Khartoum,
'thus clearuig the way for the Sudanese government to try them,
sources in Khartoum reported on Tuesday, March 20.
All the evidence gathered in the area at the time indicated
clearly that at least one revolutionary organization Al Fatah -
planned this outrage.
The AP report states that after the guerrillas killed the two.
American diplomats and a Belgian, Sudanese President Gaafar
Al-Nimeiry in a television speech accused Al Fatah of organizing
the attack on the Saudi Arabian Embassy. He said plans for the
attack were found in the Al Fatah office in Khartoum; an Al
Fatah car was used by the terrorists; and the local Al Fatah
representative fled to Libya shortly before the attack.
+******
This is a manoeuvre that is often used by governments and
revolutionary organizations when it is found that an action by
any of its members places it in a bad light in world public
opinion.
This affair recalls an incident in European capitals-sthat
ultimately led to the second world war.
When Italian dictator Mussolini moved his legions against
defenceless Ethiopia, Sir Samuel Hoare was Minister of War in
Britain and Pierre Laval was War Minister of France.
They came out with a plan to stop Mussolini by force. Britain
and France were under treaty with Emperor Haile Selassie to
protect the sovereignty of Ethiopian territory from foreign
attack. Russia, under a similar pledge, was prepared to act.
But the unfavourable reaction of peoples in Britain and Frances
who had suffered greatly in the first world war, was so
widespread that the governments repudiated any responsibility
for the Hoare-laval plan*
A news despa~tch from London during this period stated that
Sthe Foreign Minister of Russia had sat on the doorstep of No. 10
Downing Street, official residence of Britain's Prime Minister, for
days without gaining entry while the G~erman Ambassador came
aned went freely.
Germany was backing Mussolini because the success of this
outrage wkould give Hitler an excuse to start a rampage across the
face of Europe that would finally lead to the most destructive
war in the history of nations .. a war that would introduce the
atomic age.
The only action taken by European nations against Italy at the
time was the introduction of Economic Sanctions that had no
effect on the situation because, as an ally of Germany, lIaly was
able to obtain all the supplies she needed to ravage this small
African state.
I was considered crazy by the English official group in Nassau
at the time because I declared in this column:"ntis means war"
******
-~ Sir Samuel Hoare resigned as War Minister and was later given a
:peerage and went to the House of Lords.
France has no system by which a man can be kicked upstairs
;and so Pierre Laval had no place to go when he was forced out of
ithe governm~ent.
Anthony Eden was then Foreign Minister in the government of
:Britain. He courageously resigned from the Ministry in protest
against this betrayal.
SWhen Britain was later forced into war by Hitler's ravishing of
:Europe, Eden retumeod to his post as Foreign Minister in the
Churchill Cabinet. He became recognized as heir apparent to Sir
Winston Churchill, whose niece he married, and stepped into his
s hoes as Prime Minister when he retired years later because of a
stroke that finally reduced the greatest man of the century and
one of the greats of all time almost to a vegetable. Sir Winston's
S~laesr is fully described in a book written after his death by his
privatee physician, Lord Moran.
Anthony Eden's career was destroyed by pressure brought on
Britain and France in 1956 by Ui. S. Foreign Secretary John
Foster Dulles to cease an attempt to recover control of the Suez
Canal which had been illegally seize 4 by the country's dictator,
Ma)or Nasser.
This honest and courageous public man resigned as Prime
Minister after Suez. He became very ill, withdrew from politics
and took a peerage that landed him in the House of Lords as the
Earl of Avon.
******
The betrayal of Ethiopia had wide repercussions.
When Ethiopia was forced to submit by Italy, Emperor Haile
Salassle and his family fled to a distant point of the country.
They were rescued by a British naval vessel and taken to Britain
where they were given asylum until the Emperor was restored to
kid country after Mussolin and Hitler had been crushed in the
second world war.
Emperor Solassle had been a devoted friend of Britain and
France prior to the betrayal of his country. They lost the loyalty
Of this spectacular world figure. This change in loyalties knocked
the first prop from under British control of a large area of Africa.
Africa had lost faith in Britain.
SThe second world war was a natural sequence to the rape of
Bthiopia but now the stage for violence was in Europe and not in
Africa.
Wlhen France fell under the Nazi heel Field Marshal Petain,
Sof Vimy Ridge in his finnous war cry in the first world war
)"they shall not pas" ... formed the Vichy government in
rance with ierre lava as Foreign Minister.
Th 'ist was a move to cushion the blow to France. I feel that by
i#1 a puppet goverment Petin was able to help the Westem
~lles ia many ways.
At his trial for treason after the war Petain expected Churchill
to give evidence on his behalf. Apparently he felt that Churchill
dould reveal the things he had done secretly to help the Allies but
Sir Wfnstondid not raise a finger on his behalf. .
SUnless all the facts were known, no one is In a position to
j dgeth rights or wrongs of this situation but I have always felt
er for this great soldier and French patriot who endeavoured


caa _n


A


Shet TWrtistit


oun11 Iawarn OmroLCCOue. COI nessm..<1111 **~tu a


TUf


f31GGf~ST


TR~f


UAD


SMALL


BfGINNINC


i


CULTIVATf


TUF ~ARCLA~S


SAVINGS


CIABIT



MO)leY


A~D WATCU YOUR


GROW .




I I I


Ilr~------------------------------- I - -


SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
CAPITAL STOCK
Authorized 1,000,000 shares of B$1 each
Issued and fully paid 600,000O shares
Reserves
Retained earnings


IA Y(al e


*i~sdr *rctor


NOTES


ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER of Police Mr. Courtney V.
Strachan addressing Friday's passing out squad of 19 new police
officers said that mn doing their duty they must inct "without fear
or faour ad notwrkhsa 1 grace, colour or wreed."
recruits in the presence of and functions of the police, in
other senior police officers so far as law and order are
Commissioner Job n concerned, my advice is to do
Hindmarsh, Senior Assistant itas oe utrnso ent becans n
Commissioner Stanley Moir' iStedt fec n
Commissioner Designate everyone of you, and the force
Salathiel Thompson, Asst. as a whole, to enforce the rule
Commissioner Paul Thompson, of law that is to say detect
Superinte ndant Avery crime, protect life and
Ferguson and Police College property all of which must
Commandant O. L. Burrows, be done without fear or favour
GagnaldBenb and Supt. Our "twithstanding race,
The passing out parade, the "I find that in this day and
second for the year, was the age when ... nationhood will be
first to have been held at the on out doorsteps," said Mr-
new Bahamas Police College, Strachan, "it means added
Oakes Field. responsibilities for the force;
Assistant Police the task will not be an eas
Commissioner Strachan also one, but wiith the concrete
presented the baton of honour leadership of the force today
to 18-year-old St. Augustine and in the future, with the full
College graduate p.c. 925 co-operation of the rank rand
Ty ce inAugs of ish toie thea relationship between the police
Morris, a resident of Prince and the community at large
Charles Avenue, is the son of which is of paramount
Mrs. Patricia Thompson. importance; the exercise of
He congratulated the 19 common sense and sound
ofim r Ifoe their "spanadnid tn udgmenpu wen dealn nu it
"for the decision which you behaviour and good manners, I
have made to become members see the force building from
of a reputable organization." strength to strength."
The passing-out of the The 19 new policemen, all
members of squad "C" of between the ages of 18 and 20
st~r gth of th oyal ah a einld: 2a.Pt5
Police Force to 916. Levarity, 923 John Rolle, 933
"I wish to place it on record EdadWso,94Dvd
that you are just beginning Knowles, 935 Burnile
your police career and there is Charlton, 937 Lernel Forbes,
a long, long rugged road a head o38dnAuMi KoMury 1 3a91
ce to @in, good daesigt, th McPfsps, 942 Pat~tickr Browg,
an open mind, determination' 944' Welbourne Bootle, 4
and challenge," Mr. Strachan Brenell Cartwright, 946 n
said. Dean, 947 James Major,; 948
"If you have not quite made Harrison Sands, 950 Wellington
up your minds on your Wright and 952 Carrington
..responsibilities, nd the role Mclntosh. _


NOTICE is hereby given that Peter W. Brine of
P. O. Box 2, Spamish Wells, Bahamas is applying
to the Permanent Secretary to the Premier for
Naturalization and that any person who knows
any reason why Naturalization should not be
granted should send a written and signed
srtatrent` "of the 'facts to the Permanent
Secreit~ary, Office :of the Premier, Grenada, W.I.


Casle has further agraeed to provide additional work og pital in the amoulnt of approxlmately
$130,000 to Barysore, to be used primary for the payment of the trade editors aF Bayshore.
Accordingly, tim debt of $418,000 ras been Ineluded in real estate and other investments, for sale.
5. Baenk Loan is scured by Ilsted seteak at a rest of $508l,702 (makrkt value $888,170).


AUDITOR S' EPORT

The Shareholdrrs,
Castle Bank & Tnrut Limited.

We, have examined the consolidated statement of condition of Castle Bank &r Trust
Limited (fortherly Castle Trust Company Limited) and wholly-owned subsidiaries as at
December 31, 1972 rad the consolidated statement of income and retained learning for the
period then ended. Our examination included a general review of the accounting procedures
and such tests of counting records and other supporting evidence as we considered
necessary in the circumstances.

In our opinion these consolidated financial statements present fairly the financial position
of the company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries as at December 31,. 1972 and the results
of their operations for the period then ended, in accordance with generally accepted
Kaccunting principles appild on a basis consistent with that of the proceeding year.


-


d ~- I"~ ----


Chet Baly -The Bahamin~n Wa~'Y


~YIPISI


fr~rd~ tbr!, rPn_.


DRILL DEMONSTRATION -- Ninetuin members of
"C" Squad 1972-73 under command of their training
instructor, Mr. George Lowell, put on a demonstration of
"sgient drill" during graduation ceremonies held at the new
Bahamas Police College, Oakes Field. The nineteeln recruits
were honoured at a special luncheon held earlier in the day
and were addressed at the passing-out-parade by Asst.
Commissioner Courtney V. Strachan.

1IIEFMBENCE INKANI ~

IEAILINE SET FOR MA T 15


$1.975,817
222,920
10,493,818


,534,6;86


792,440

725,979

1* *,49

29,297
78,693
$16,922,148




$6,443,241
.9,057,520
400,000






600.000
150 000


$16,922,1;48
summmmemp


THE INDEPENDENCE
Junkanoo Committee has
announced that plans are
underway for the publication
of a programme for the
Independence Junkanoo
celebration scheduled for
Wednesday, July I1, between
the hours of 4 a.m. and 9
I:pa.m. The competing groups


are asked to submit the
following:
Thle name and size of the
group; the name of the sponsor
(if any); and the theme or
design that the group will be
depicting.
This information should be
forwarded to the Independence
Junkanoo Committee chairman
by May 15.


today.
The topic of his address was
"Insurance Problems in the
Bahamas." Mr. Donaldson was
extended an invitation to
address this group by
Commissioner & State
Treasurer Thomas O'Malley of
the Sate of Florida.


MR. Charles Donaldson,
Registrar of Insurance
Companies, was guest speaker
at the Zone III, National
Association of Insurance
Commissioners Convention on
at the Doral Hotel & Country
Club, Miami Beach, Florida,


DEPOSITS
Demand
Term including accrued interest
Bank loan secured (Note 5)
Other liabilities


SM. Wol cbtqncro ft, rectoy~


t


1. These finabcisi statements include the accounts of Castle Bank & Trust Limited and its wholly-owned
subsridiaries.
During the year the company changd its name to Castle Bank & Trust Limited (Castle) from Castle
Tnrut Company Limited.
2. The statement of condition does not include asets under administration on behalf of clieats.
3. The fiscl year ad of the comprhy was changd to Docember 31 from March 31. The comparaotive
figures shown in these finncial sftatmants therefore reprset the statement of condition at March 31,
1972 and the sbtatemnt of income and retained earnngs for the 12 month period ended March 31,
1972 and the current figunrs show the statement of condition at December 31, 1972 and rstaennt of
inome and nretined eanin fr the~ 9 month period to Denmber 31 1972.
4. ubsequent to the year ed, Castle, bingl the grntor of various loans to and gualrantor of certain other
loans and obi tions of M~odeo (Bahamas)1 Limited, (Modco) and its wholly-owned absidiary
company, Baydm Maorina Lmie, (Bayshore) recmio an agnrement idthP Modco whereyb Mdco .
world transfer 980% of teirk s~haroldig in Bayshore to Castle in return for the followlag
conridenraton:


(a) The payment and/or continuing guarantee by Castle of obligations of Bayshore
amounting to approximatly
(b) 'The payment by Crhaste of srtain other indebtedness of Bayshore to third partles of
approximarttif


$484,o000

160,000


(c) The convasion of debt owlag by Medco~ to Castle as of Decemkr 31, 1972.


418,000e

S1,040,00


~Za.


J
I'''


~hu Qlrrtbrxrtt


I i~JL-~cl--, -

?Y"rrrrrrr
'' ~t~c~l~ s
?~


aggggpg we L pmu
(ksleaggersed les du Asrgesi Idami)
AND) WH-LOLL.WNEID SUlfSSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CiONDITION AT DECEMBER 31, 1972
(ExIprese in United SDbt~at umrrey)


aerut tod'oyo

WWWr wtou fea Mgfvor


ASSETS


Cash and deposits with banks at
Call and short notice
Accrued interest and fees receivable
Loans and overdrafts receivable, secured
INVESTMENTS
Commercial and Government paper at cost'
plus accrued interest
BONDS AND STOCKS
Listed, at cost (market value $1,083,734)
(Note 5)
Unlisted, at lower of cost and estimated
net realizable value
Real estate and other investments, for sale
(Note 4)
Fixed ass sio at cost less accumulated
Other assets


lllistrar tallks as insurance pn~rehs


LIABILITIES


NCTOI E


CMA W


OFIR#W


BL 555@ WEE# AT LL T MRIS


SrE1cm~nE EUL


seru a l


rMLITrY -l~rST PACE ANW VITAMIW D. FOR EXTRA GOOD HEALTH
-I A COMBMM'l0NO MIAM)TO IRAT~ -


ehr~i~dnb~aniieuy~rb


Nw#u, c~c~
Ill~ra~ 30, 1~










Ct'
C~


I


yCdt, Mayv 1, t193.


.C).'
2'
'
L:.p


SPECIAL
SPECIAL


GALVANIZED
MDCING
6 REG. $1.06
8 REG. $2.50


DANTZLER

1, 0 O OR E EET


JAX(
m.....NCOM


BARGAIN PLACED


SCMNTRAC TO R





BTrS
SIZES 7, 8, 9, 10, 12


PER BOARD
FOOT


ONLY


RW D



REG. $34- 0
SPECIAL

1299*
200' ROLLS
R EG. $68.00
SPECIAL

'57.so


I 1


M E WLE**S A HR
COMPLETE WITH SCREENS ETC., CLEAR GLASS.


PER SHEET


1.1


isill


WEYERHAEUSER
DOUGLAS


2 x 8 No. 2 S4S
PER BOARD FOOT


2 x 10 No. 2 S4S
PER BOARD FOOT


I~
5
.'
5 .r

I
.
.5 .(1
''
~Z ~a
.
.. t
Z



,

.. j
.. ~

...
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''
''
'
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5
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.. n
2 C'
r.
T
'5 ~
.5
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~
~
i
i'. 1
~5
,5'
C


6' REG. $4.99 SPECIAL S3.

8' REG. $6.65 SPECI AL f5.

10' REG. $8.29 SPECIAL U.Q
PER SHEET


Stainles Steel
800*
$6e.65 SC35
SPECIAL jl.


WITH PURCHASE OF 16 OR
MORE WINDOWS RECEIVE ONE


PER BOARD FOOT




BLANCHAR CD II


GALVALNIZED

DM BUTT HINGES
3" x3" perpair ~D
3% x 3 perpair )?
4 x4 per pair (i.

DOUBLE ACTION

3" SPRING IIINGE


8'-16' 310
8'-18' 324
8'-18' 320
8'-16' 320
8'-16' 350
8'-16* 320
8'-16' 350
8'-16' 33*

8'-16' 332 / e

d"'~; ~g;'5'~ i i:i~::


1x3 and 1x4 84S
2 xr 4, 2x~ 6, 2 x 8, 2 x 10
3 x 4, 3 x 6, 3 x 8
4 x 4, 4 x 6, 4 x 8
%A x 4, % x 6 848
1 x 4 VJoinrt T & G
1 x 6 V Joint T & G Siding
1 x 8, 1 x 10 848

1 x 6, 84 6 oh


No. 1 -- 18" 60 OR MORE
BUNDLES
PER
BUNDLE


No. 2 -16" 50 OR

BUDEPER BUNDLE Bi


PRICES BASED
ON 1,800
OR MORE
BOARD FEET.


I
r
I
I
r
r'
I`
r;
rj
r-
) i
r
I
r
I
C
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r -
I-
Ii
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r*
11~1
cJ;!
r


No. 36-3


No. BP235
60 BUNDLES
OR MORE
PER BUNDLE


'55


MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
P. O. BOX 8t11 .- NASSAU, B3AHAMAS


Wht fa~btnrW


GALVANIZED SHEETING

R=Ed1d.'t )2! A


BARREL


B~ 65C


6" 750


4' x 8' 5/8" THICK




60 SHEETS AND UP


ASBESTOS

RO W IN G


E A


FREE


BATHROOM WIN~M


JUST ARRIVED

o .1 HOIYRAN PINE No.1


WHEEL BARROW


:i. SHINGLES
50 BUNDLES & UP
iii~iNo. 235 2
iiiiiiii BUNDLE '61


,RU








_


_ __


I-


IRrg Al~rmn If RERO ET A

Chrisue and Dowdeswell Sts
Phone 2-ll97 2.31S2 P.O. Box 4818



AFMER WlIl SALE

"-OLS MDES )IE 'r
ALL SIZES & COLOURS AVAILABLE

EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
EAST OF STOP Ni-SHOP
BAY STREET -PHONE 22245


WERY! $28.00


Hklen's hoe Stores
Bay stMt ark Sh0pping Centre


L.A D1E S!!

THE LATEST
CASUAL CO FORT

19?*TAVinSud

THE PARISIAN
BAY STREET


I I -


UNM E.I A B1.E



SALE OR MN




ER ES W100 L d


PHONE 2-3811


OCO

SIEER TERYLENE: & COSTTON
SUIIMER DRESSES
....i. -s 10
Parking at rear of store on Quan8 Stnret. PHONE 2-8800


* AtFRICAN PRINtS*

SIt PANT ~StL WITHCU S




MAIDeIRA SHOPPING CENTRE (next to Cole's Pharmacy,


I


ForwSarka,Shqo at (
Clonarl' KUTE 10DDY
Dr. Esfakis Building Market Street


Received newr shipmrents of
llOIt6 &I agnd1 Igan Italy
lgrte~d algag & tyls


L~~rrI~ I


1
Oll. ..l...
rrrr wrn e rrmr r


Thompson's Dept. 5tore


ARRIVAL OF SHEDS
AIO PILLOW CASES

RG 2.0 $.0 & S.s0D
A complete line of Infants Wear
CURITY DIAPERS $5.25


n .*-rr----.--


I _i


YE'S SIMSE STORE
BAY O'R;IEET


Tuesday blal 1, 19gy


Pe~~


New Stock from London


FOR SAVIViS jSHOP AT

CloirarisknMT KD
DR. ESFAKIS B iN MARKET STEET

/1 AwShi mntsAnived/nc/ludhg


a LO--------LSO:
POLYESTER SUITS sizes 3-18 in assortal style
and colours

ALSO new shipmernt frorn Italy BOYS' & GIRLS'.
SANDALS & shoes in assorted styles and slass

Girls' Pant Sets & P6yeter Pants sle 3-~14
Boys' Polyester Pants assorted colours slaas 4-18 4

NE VV SHIPMENT

SANDALS ~AND SI-OES


r"""""""""'


1
C
'


COTTON PRINTS AFRICAN &
)I)AWAIIAN PRINTS PIQUE -
$AILCLOTH POL YESTE R
LENDS PERMANENT PRESS
BUTTERSCK & VOGUE
PATTERNS SET THE
PACE IN TRIMMINGS -
ZIPPERS 'BUTTONS &
OTHER sEWING AIDS


IBMil11Wll n l IIE~IIIllIIIII rrlellllll

-""AS"pppease ------
I Lkl~r kr
I 8tege Air Codlleagr I
Resear te*Mdrs
II~ r tarlls I
#IL1I.i .
S~L..3 Sa SERVICE ~
FAlCTORY WTAIWLD MECHIIWCS


-~; 7-~
Wurw r~s
from ~2i~i ~ ..
rY C

gAa(8
IL'
M ~inL ~

ulrkh
tCw rumnirr t(lltR 'I
rrA~V ft. mrt tr ar ~m
.._.. .,.


L e- F


~h, ~Ertln~


$PiECIALS


SHOE STORE
BAY STREET PHONE 2-4535


.


aiinn~a~ ~ones'
IVEN'S CLOTHERS
EST. 1970
BAYV & GEORGE STREETS


THE WARM WEATHER
.WITH


SPECIAl
80OYS
'SlOES


DRESSYEAIR
















President Hixon's speech on Waterlate


Page 9, Col.l I 91 )~ -


~r_71___


r

rA
c: I
~a
,...

.
1


WASHINGTclON (AP)
Here i the text of President
.Nixon's natioarlly broadcast
address Monday night:
Sant taW t o t ngh

deep concern to every Amerl*
Inrecent months, members
of my administration and offi-
cials of the Committee for the
Re-election of the Peresdent -
including some of my cloest
friends and most trusted aides
have been charged with in-
volvement in what has come to
e ktnown as the Watergate af-
fair. These include charges of
illegal activity/during the pre.
ceding 1972 Presidentia: elec.
tion and charges that nrspo's.
sible officials participated in ef.
forts to cover up that illegal ac.
tle inevitable result of the s
charges has been to rain
serious questions about the in-
tegrity of the White House it-
self. Tonight I wish to address
iIthose questions.
'lrda trying tompetv it f
Moscow I ftrt Ae targad f

bra -i I was apple at thi
was shocked to learn that em,
ployes of the re-election com-
mittee were apparently among
those guilty. I immediately or-
-- dered an investigation by ap
propriate government author-
lites. Ori Sept. 15, as you will




NixoR BelieV d

T A BE 8 ce

As the investigations went
forward, I repeatedly asked
those conducting the invetiga.
tion whether there was any res"
son to believe that members of
my administration were in any
waj' involved. I received re-
peated assurances that there
ts inot Lecana at ten eo-

Se lieve th seo rlta f ar

thetlpersonsmfront woun I a
ghe ng ris in th ps that ap
nore to impledressmembe
ofm dinstrationc ot er
ofcal ofte campaign cor.

SUntil March 6f thit yest 1
remained convinced d rt t e
denials were true and *tu t
crar of inovmn a
members o Wi Iua
rstff were false. The comments

Ihmshe durn ti ra

the com eto mae whc per
suaed me that the ifre as a
proiea po ssiilty tha t sme of
maethese chargeenttre and

nhe c ef to m hconceal
thaed fct bth fro there pubic a


from you, and from me.
As a result, on March 21, I
personally assumed the respon-
albility for coordinating In-
tensiv new inquire ion oh

dered those conducting the in-
vestigations to get all the facts
and to report them directly to
me, right here in this office.

Staff Is Told

TO Coperat8
I again ordered that all paer-
sons in the government or at
the re-election committee
** should cooperate fully with the
,* FBI, the prosecutors and the
grand jury. I also ordered that
anyone who refused to cooper-
ate in telling the truth would be
asked to resign from govern.
ment service. And, with ground
rules adopted that would pre*
serve the basic constitutional
separation of powers between
the Congress and the presiden-
cy, I directed that members of
the White H~ouse staff should


Appear and testify voluntarily
under oath before the Senate
committee investigating Water-
gate.
SI wras determined that a
should get to the bottom of the
S~ matter, and that the truth
Should be fully brought out -
Sno matter who was involved.
r'' te n e nameodime I as d
tous action, and to avoid, if at
Small possible, any action that
would appear to reflect on n-
Icent people. I wanted to be
tair. Bnut I knew tha ingrle fi

i tgon y of thisu ofieb o l
have to take priority over all
personal considerations.
Today, in one of the most dif*
ficult decisions of my presiden*
cy, I accepted the resignations
of two of my closest associates
in the White House Bob Hal
deman, John Ehrlichman-
'.." ithha be hmtmpu i vile e
to know.
I want to express that in ac-


Whot, then, is to -9lame for
what happened in this cse?
WFor rpfjnR cruialsradi n
who committed those actions
mus~t, of course, bear the liabil-
ity and pay the penalty.
For the fact that aleged Im.
proper actions took place with-
ia the White House or within
mqy campaign organisation, the
easlet course would be for me
to blame those to whom I dele.
gated the responsibility to run
the campaign. But that would
be~ a coarrrdly thing to do.
'I wil not plcer the blame on
sobordinates- on people
whose zeal exceeded their judg-
meat, and who may have done
wrong in a cause they deeply

In Py organz tion, the man
at the top must bear the re.
sponsibility. That respcnsibility>
therefore, belongs here, in this
office. I accept it. And I pledge
to you tontght, from this office*
that I will do everything in my
power to nsure that thledgul y

ou uoistia poc sre~s in the
years to come, long after I
have left this office.
Some people, quite properly
appalled at the abuses that oc.
curred, will say that the Wtatr.
gate demonstrate the bank-
ruptcy of the American politi-
cal system. I believe precisely
the opposite is true. Watergate

number of individuals. It was
the system that has brought the
facts to light and that will
bring those guilty to justice -
a eytm that in this cas has
included a determined Grand
JXury, honest prosecutors, a cour
rageous judge, John Sirica, and
eigeppasur free press.

800fac 8 1t


et in America; to set in motion
new and better ways of ensr*-
ing progress toward a better
lifem thin ofthis offlee -
of what it means I think of
all the things that I want to ac-
complish for this nation of
all the things I want to accom-
plish for you.
On Christmas Eve, during
my terrible personal ordeal of
the renewed bomblag of North
Vietnam, which after 12 years
of war finally helped to bring
America peace with honor, I
sat down just before midnight
I vr e out me assy rl
dent.
Let me read them to you.
"To make it possible for our
children, and for our children's
c ildren, to live in a world of

"To make this country be
more than ever a land of oppor-
tunity of equal opportunity,
full opportunity for every
American.
"To provide jobs for all who
ca zw ok andn generous help


each person respects the feel-
ings and the diginity and the


PRESIDENT NIXON
SIp mek nfor you prayers to

cepting these resignations, I
mean to leave no implication
what ver of personal
wrongdoing on their part, and I
leave no~ implication tonight of
Implication on the part of oth-
ers who have been charged in
this matter. But in matters as
sensitive as guarding the integ.


orous legal and ethical stand.
yards be observed, but also that
the public, you, have total con.
fidence that they are both being
observed and enforced by those
in authority ald' particularly by
the President of the United
States. They agreed with me
that this move was necessary
In order to restore that con-
fidence'


It is esaetlai ,"it'.atwe"
- and especially in the judicial
system. It is esslentiarl that we
let that process go forward, re-
specting those safeguards that
are established to protect the
.innocent as well as to convict
the gulkyf. aH sene
ers f into

It fe alrso essential that we
not be so distracted by events
such as this that we neglect the
vital "work before us, befote
this nation, before America, at

Aeia fn F amir wrd



believe, it has claimed far too
much of my owth time and at-
tention.

in th a e r- whaer te
tions of the gIrad jury, what-
ever the outcome of any even*
tual trials I must now turn
my full attention once again to
the larger duties of this office.
I owe it to this great office that
I hold, and I owe it to you to
our country.
I know that as attorney gen-
eral, Elliot Richardson will be
both fair and fearless in pur-
suing this case wherever it
leads. I am confident that with
him in charge, justice will be
done.
Thee is vital work to be
done toward our goal of lanlas
world -awork thatdcannot wait.
Wokta Imust o.
.Tomorrow, for example,
Chancellor Brandt of West Ger-
many will visit the White House
for talks that are a vital ele-
ment ofi "The Year Of Eu.
rope," as 1973 has been called.
We a re already preparing for
the next Soviet-American sum-
mit meeting later this year.
This la lsom a year in which
we are seking to negotiate a
mutual and. balpnced reduction
of armed forces in Emuop,
which will reduce our defense
budget and allow us to have
funds for other purposes at
home so desperately needed. It
is the yar when the United
States and Soviet negotiators
wuill seek to work out the sec-
and and even more important
round of our talks on limiting
nuclear arms,' and of reducing

as we know it. It is a year in
which we confront the difficult
tasks of maintainag peace in
Southeast Asia, and in the po-
tentially explosive Middle East.

Y lere'8 Ork

TO Be Done
There is also vital work to be
done right here in America -
to insure prosperity, and that
means ai good job for everyone
inhat on nah I k ow anrrit""
every housew~ife, everyone fho
tries to balance a family budg-


By Agreement
Because Atty Gen.
Kleindlenst-though a dis.
tinguished publlic servant, my
personal friend for 20 ~years,
with no personal involvement
whatever in this matter-hras
be los personal apd prot
those grlare involved adds
wr rd ndceyar toame a
new attorney general.
The counsel to the President,
John Dean, has also resigned.
As the new attorney g~enes af,
s'ae tdy unnme or ;




apartment of Justice has the
confidence and trust of every
law-abiding person in this coun-
to have given him absolute au-
thority to make~ al) decisions
bearing upon the prosecution of
the Watergate case and related
matters. I have Instructed him
that if he should consider it ap-
propriate, he has the authority
to name a special supervisinS
prosecutor for matters arisinS
out of the cae.
Whatever may appear to
have been the case before -
whatever improper activities
may yet be discovered in con"
nection with this whole sordid
affair I wanlt the American
people, I want you to know be-
t tddthe shadow of do it

fary fu I ean iIprily u
matter who is involved. This of.
flee is a sacred trust and I am
determined to be worthy of that
trust
Imoking back at the history
of this case, two questions.ar,
1se: H~ow could it have hap-
pened? Who is to blame?
Political commentators hae
correctly observed that during
my 27 years in politics I have
always previously insisted on
running my own campaigns for
office
But 1972 presented a very dif-
ferent situation. In both domes.
tic and foreign policy, 1972 was
a year of crucially important
decisions, of intene negotia.
tions, of vital. new directions,
particularly in working toward
the goal which has oen my
overriding concern throughout
my political career the goal
mb pmdto the w ld.mria

NIXOn Delegated

'72 Operations
That is why I decided, as the
1972 campaign approached, that
the presidency should come
first and politics second. To the
maximnut extent possible,
therefore, I sought to d:e'eate
campaign opratbfdds, and to re.
move the day-to-day campaign
decisions from the President's
ofic aod foun oh daahite
verelty limited the number of
my own campaign appear.


The ZIP Polaroid's new instant picture
Camera, uses onu olur inexpnsive black-and-whie
8411870 f im. Jutst 8 00t, pull out the
film packtet, and wait 80 seconds. Big (8%6" x 86"1
pictures develop right in your hand.


"Polaroid" is a registered trademark of Polaroid Corp., Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A.


Tue~day, May 1, 1973.


Wht GrBIRW


K~leindienst Out lateSytm
rri theS~st.m


( The new camera from Polaroid.


You see the picture in just 30 seconds.)


Remember Modher with a Polaroid on Mother's Day Mar, '3th




I I I I I I I I I I I I' I I I 1 '113


,


I~rr~rmA UQI rrm~L-~UDU ILIIID


-- -r


_ __ __


nro (rr; iil~CI 1 7 ~cm;:rrra


NOW SHOWICNG THAU T~HURSD)AY
Matiate 3:00 A 5:00O, Evening 9-'Phone 2-1004, 2-100$
Chades Bronson Tely Savalos
MI Ireland







c.rwwfe w ... ....... .....um.,, y
NOi t:"..' f': 7 ys:R 17ADMI'ITEDI
2** vaions nota whaed by 81: AS wll be sold
on fird earse, fIrst srrvd beds.

Weonesday theu Frkisy Wedsraday thru Frkly
Mad~e Startsr at t:45 Contttttttttt HtianusSowfg.
Eesd~al 9:39, froa 3
THE HIRED NfAND" FG. "HAIVNrIA CM~IL.DER" R.
Peter Fonda RaquelWIk flr
Wlnarrea 0* Robert C~alp
PLUS PLUM9


TuesdY anYI 1, stIa


WEDNESDAY THRU fFRIDAY
Matine sedaortus freeo 2: Evsalag 8:30-'Phne 34666
MMruwE J& th WRRIIE" R.e
WHILLIAMr~ SMITH MI1KE PATAKI
P L Uld -rrtr
'QUAANN~f thrEMA1D" R.
Starri as
PfHIL KENSNEALLY DUNCAN McLJOD~
NO aNE~ c/lAta'R 17AnaermL~ZZ1


SONY


REGULAR FREIGHY
SERVICEFeROMI
U.K. TO NASSAU


ARRIVED TODAY:
Emerald Sea:, Flavid, B~ahama
9tar frotc t'iami; Oceanic,
Rottterdarm frosel bit" Yr ;~
T'ro~ic t';yer from rde' 6'1-
Beach
SA!',ED TODAY: Grand
Turks for M ami; Tropic ."lyer
for West -Oalm Beiach.
ARRIVING TCOMOROV':
Jama f:om Jacksonville,;
Rortterdam from New York~;
Romar.za from London
SAILING; TOMORROW:
Romanza for cssaolanca
SUN
SUN: Rires ',:35 a.m. Sets


CHIL! REN UNDIFR 12 FREE
S'ee 2 feartures late as 8:55
EXCLUSIVE
FINAL NITE
"W'LLARD" AT 7 & 10:40
"isEN" AT 8:SS ONLY


Savings c







aet it.


II | But Seeg suby bl Jakse


grcU~


AIB


The most important thing
about savings is to do it
regularly. When you do,
your money builds up.
Another important thing is
to put your savings to work
for you. Earning interest. In
The Helpfid bank. Savings
offer security for rainy
daysb future investments,
Savings also offer you something else.
Your chance to buy your heart's desire.
Helpful Baenkers in Nassau and the Family
Islands can tell you about savinpr. Just ask one.


"BARBARELLA" R.
hasw Fonda
John Phll~p ILaw
N oones.rder 1'7 -fuakremrrd c


T"

A


'TOPAZ" G.
Jobrl Forsytae
2r~c 34 lr


TheRovlC The Helpful Bank

Krnhstrughout the Bahamas ntego Bay


I- ----~-----~.~g~k~~u.rrrtuvl.;u;r*~~~i.r ~v ~:rrr~-~r;lrl~U~-~~- ~ *.-4~j


Whr Erthunt


GRADUATES WITH PIlI~llS
MR. ALBERT Sidney
Ferguson, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Hayward A. Ferguson of
Tenwich' Street West, was
graduated with honours from
the University of Detroit,
Detroit, Mich. at the 90th
annual commencement held
April 28.
Mr. Ferguson received a
Bachelors Degree in Economics
with a minor in Finance. He
began his studies in September,
1970, and was the first
Bahamian to graduate from *
this university. He was awarded
various honours from the
Ulniver idy dh ing this tioe ea ABR S E
I)ean s List.


coURSES IN
PAINTING &
MASONRY

TH1E C. R. Walker Technical
College will offer short
full-time courses in general
painting and masonry starting
today and enoiing June 29.
The course in masonry will
encompass all aspects of local
masonry practice and will
equip students with a sound
basic knowledge for entry to
the trate

paiTheng ou nrtsended forge r g
men aged 16-19 years and will
cover many aspects of painting
and dercorating. It will include
the apphecation of paint by
br'sh,"vi roller an p yd
nlotor Jeh~i le refinishiilpg


NAVIGATION CO.


ROYAL MAIL

13NWES LIMITED


WINNERS OF INCENTIVE PROGRAMME
!'iNINERS OF TH'E INVCENTIVE PROGRAMlrlE at the Grnard Bahama hotel and
Country Club at West End were from the 400 buildlng.1 he plras money of 5150 wuill be
equally divided among the staff of the winning build:ng. Photogranhee from left to right
are Han, Barnett assistator manager of housekeepingJ, Abe Rolle, Lulamme~ Strachan,
Alberthe Gl**son, Mlo.aise F~ith, Evr Gireene, C~hades Roker and Loretta Laing,
inpecratres In change or that building. Presenting the cheqiues is Lowerll Grant, treident
manager of trhe hotel.


FOr inforfmatiow cn 008%tiet e agq~nt


PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N81168 BAY SfTEET


What's your

~art'sI~ desire?


~out


SuW1




I I I'' II I


~crrL~I rm~y 1109s~.
IIIC --



6


- ------ ---


C


c4n~~%-


board and cal to Pdance who
was still wallkins awy. Pdsoe
stopped and Milton
approached him and hit him
fatehies Prime felmmo th
ground rad while on the
ground, rim saw Mdilton give
him a second and a third
knock **
This was th evidence, in
part, that witnesses aB
mrembers of Moxey'sl family -
would gve, the Sohcitor
Gwnerl adb. He sad the only
other witnesses who were ot
related to the accused were the
police constables, and Dr. Joan
Read.
The case is expected to
continue through Friday when
jurors, not empanelled in th
case are requested to return to
rt
TIDES
TIDES: Hight 6:02 a.m. and
6:34 p.m. Low 12:07 a.m. and
I2:0s nam.


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14 Shrink 53 Cutlropidt
IS Cbleak JA Grade
17t Ankl 37. Outt
20Booted a Eve
avodact 44, Eropan

2Q.101 I Qrr II,
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4. Compreshesive
5 Voyage



11 omerly
18. Nomad
21 ete o
interest
23. Study
25. Confirm
26. Mutt
27. Tavern

Coventry
31. Toga
32. Sullion


3 3 Bitter
34. Exqli!

40. Notab
41. Worm
43. Comp


The tda opened after
Sodicitor Genral T. Lanston
manslaughter brought agalad t
the accused .te the
manarteagter charg although
he diffserd with defence
counse~t Mrs. Ruby Nottas
that it was an mbamrrsment
to the accud.
In his openlag remarks, the
Solicitor General told the jury
headed by Mr. Geoffrey
Brown, that the majority of
witnesses in the case: for the
Crown were members of the
Moxey family*
He said the Crown's case was
that "Lth accused on Monday,
November 13 at Little
Harrbour, Mangrove Cay,
Munlwu cae thedeathand
Prince Moxey by hitting him
about the body and the head
with a piece of board."
David Moxey, Mr. Hilton
said, is recorded as sying that
*he saw the two men (Prince
and Mlilton Moery) together
between 4 and 5 p.m. on
November 13 going down the
road sining and holding hand.
The deceased Prince Moxey
had a bottle in his hand the
accused had two bottles in lds.
They went to Milton's house
Hei~ alsoaid that Milton's
wife, Louise Moxey, would
Mal be called to testify as a
prosecution witnesses His
reference to Mrs. Moxey,
however, drew objections from
defence counsel Mrs. Nottap
who troe to inform the court
that she would be making
further objections to the
evidence of the witness.
"So, if the solicitor General
intends making any comments
on the evidence of this witness,
it would be better that none
were made," Mrs. Nottapl
advised,
Mr. Hilton told the court

of~ the acceued wh~o has sid
that "on November 13 she
heard Prince and Milton
arguing At the time, both were
AdT git' yard and neither
"1Prnins left the: yard and


said she screamed and ran off
hp tned," t Hilton dshut
Joyu Moxy the niece of
the oac e "x l Malso me
and teBl you," Mr. Hilton
continued, "that she saw the
rwomenge c ose ato ria b
raised the cutlass and chopped
M~ton on the left side of bl.
shoulder. Prince made a secnd
attempt to chop Milton but
Milton stopped it with his hand
and Prince walked away."
He said that further in her
evidence, she also remembered
seeing "Mi~lton go to his
kitchen and get a piece 'of


11081gd SItil

OA BnoOK ILLayI -
the one ~millionth member of
the International Association
of Lions Clubs, it was
announced by Lions President
Gaeor Friedrichs of Annecy,
France. Lions international is
the world's largest service club
organisation with more than
26,000 clubs in 148 countries
around the world and the first
to meve rach one million
members.
Gill, a 45S-year-old retired
VA y Nauenn m oloE lu =
Director of the United Drug
Abuse .Council, Inc., the
planning and coordinating
agency for all drug related
programmes in the Tidewater
region of Virginia. During his
20 years in the Army he was
named to the Service
All-American Football Team
and the All-Army Basketball


Team. He also coached for
several years, including five
years at West Polat.
Gill lives in Virginia Beach,
Virginia with his wife and five
children, and is a member of
the Virginia Beach Oceans
Lions Club.
Lions International is a
non-political, non-sectarian
service clutb orpanisation. Lions
work together to anet the
needs of ther tekllow men.
They help the blind, the
:handicapped, the sick, the
needy and the lonely. Their
motto Is "Wle Sesw".


Ig
L, Nbus


JUDIIE ELIS ( DENNIS ATTFIELD

2 former presidents engaged


THEB ENGAGEMENT of
two former rsridents of Nassau
has been announced.
Miss Judle Mist, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Btts,
formerly of Nassu and now
reedent in the FUii Islads, is to
be married to Mr. Doenals


Attfield in Melbourne,
Australa on June 15.
Mr. Attfield's parents, Mr.
atd Mrs. J. Attfield, formerly
of Toronto, are now ~lvn in
Nassau.
The couple will honeymoon
in Nassau.


TALK ON LIVESTOCK


MR. J. Halpin, projct
coordinator of the Agricultprl l
Development Programme on
Andros, will address the
Bahamas Organisation for
Scientific Studies at the
Bahamas Teachers' Collop on
Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Mr. Halpin who is from the
United States Apncy for
Iternationsl Development will


speak on, "Livestock
Development in Tropical and
Sub-tropical Areas."

BASRA MEETING
THE GENERAL monthly
meeting of BASRA will be held
8 p.m. Wednesday at BASRA
headquarters.


Hunting for funt 19 here.
Andre'Cold bok. A hrpy
Mkda tucrg ar

With deep pink bubbles
to tickle your tongue
with a surprisingly
nrefehing taste
Serve Cold Durck
when the laock gets

it the best Cold

Agg_ ColdDuckI

Now availabbo
to the


your iovurt

Squer sters.










AMIWTL


From3 Pag 7

*aghan rights of his migh*
To make this a land in
wrhtich~ eah person can dare to
See p I or ut blaM -
bated at his community, prud
of his countrY, proud of rhat
Americo has meanot to himself
a~t tloth rldw."
Thew ae great goals. I he-
licve we *Air, w muslt, work
fior than. We cia achieve
thm. But we Lcannot achieve
tbo r unler we cdedicte
ourrrhnrto ura Ba ol*
We must riggitrai tim latr-
flty of th@ White House, and
that hnlatgrt must in real, not
~tr~urrmt "fbr "o k
whosewash at the white House.


im am a petttd ir, jr
I urg the leaders of both po
Il ai yoer ghee,ct fia
in wiorkhla towardu a new set of

elections wll b asu neu tarl e
of such abuses as they posiebig
can be made. This is my goal. I
sk' you to joirin lamakila it
America's goal.
WVho I wasu inaugurtatd for a
srend term this past Jan. 20, I
gave ech,aember of my Cabi.
not ad ach menter of my
reder White Houe sttaf a spe-
de~l few~year calendar, with
each day marked to show ie
number et days tmremling to
* ** mnrni.


,C,

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P

g
f~i


Andros


seaman,67,


goes on trial for


ais cousin a murder

MILTONI MOKEY, a 47f-yearold Mexey Town, Asmes
seeaun, arssmd of the Novmb 13 marder of Mis eeals ~
Prineh Mlosey weat on ardl la the Slrpsrem Court Monday) bfore
Yr. Jas~tee 6smuel Gaham.


PSyC O Ogist


or psychiatrist

by Abgai l aurt ea
two a casese n iem. v. ma seass u
DBAR ABBY: A wif* eplts thetr hvad


m drat calmnemad a sycidogis? Sosoe py-


I[BIARI WANTS: A preatatristr isfis a phystate,
abM~l reaspenalb lar the emedesl problem. Parter.
1agae aty a apityleln i able to IMp r
rgwrg gt bo --
A papabEgis who behaves in a ametleal ruahemr
[*@ aagla la~~r L hmasss with padeatr is MM- pl~
al] shuIM, la y eplate, see a psychiatrist Aad I'd
mehe the ame rsomandslar fr a Ilawyr, C. P. A., or
myP elbe pefemti ml p reswh pts earrie away la tite
&s rl appa m uuM ePk osrob his famMF
se Blibad. IC lfm de payetrist dleetesr tht ly Pt?"
MM~mpL Wtird* a alerral to a ettaleal psyche
glit wel tha be mdad*

DBAR ABBY: You advised someone to "go th 70sy
site" al no on in our offle can figure out wrht you
meoot. Pleas clariy. STUMdPED AT KRUPP'S
DBAR IrUMlP~ED: I aesat that howeverr emany time~-
7, a Watemeoe tasrpasu agalat you, ife abs w
Aergivnes, frgive him. [Newr Testamet: Ma~tthew, XVI-

DSBA ABBY: I ma a 14-year-old boy w~ith an unusual
problem. Fer the lat tw~o yeurs I have had a paper route
sal dom add jobs. I hawe savd $80 to do with what I

My rS isterlve in Belglum lad has askltd me to visit
her dur~ing vacation time. San i 28 and tachsl school

My men said I may go, but my father hit the callng.
He said I was too young to lears anythingr, that it rwol be
a wraste o time and money for me to make that trip at age
MA. Abby, I do crPell in school and I think I aould learn a ot
if I made this trip. I earned all the mnoey myself cand
saved it, rad I think I should be~ allowed to go. What do you
th~ak? YOUNG READER: YELM, WASB.
DEBA BBADER: Prom yea letrm I rwEa say yesare
a sqwEepeas le yeea ads set wll lear a gret eag a

I t wB rhC Mem. [P. 8. If yes go, sed me ua posard]

CONFI2DENTIAL TO JOHNNY: The best tbaslap Me p
amo fa AMm "Aree"-(L~~~141e dteteso eagme ws erl.
emes. Ana aprsease was b speswi.


hxal's spleec on Water ~tat


Political Reforan. Daysin Office


Can Bring Good
In te Inscipption on each ca-
leader, I wr~ote these words:
"Time pmreshlntial term whbich
begies today consisbts of: 1,141
dasr -- aore nm( o less. Each
can la a day ofst rerngtheins
and lnewalt for A~awicar; ec~h
can add depth and dilmension to
Ser Amertalnt expedurce. It we
adven bltogedr, it rpe make the
seest of the challenges rad the
ig UI ,-,t~ *: mdd ost r
gret days for America, rad
gret magnnts in the history of
I lookedw at my owfn calendar
this morning up at Camp Darvid
as~ Iy wasorking on this
speech It howed eauctly ~1,31
days amelat ing lasy tm. I
wast agap to be the best days
In AMr's hisaory, laner I
loven Agrfea I deeply Islieve
tMt Awr#i t hops of th
work, and I knowf that In the
afitj rd wrisdom of the lead-
aanlysg for alllla of people
all eve the arrl that they
mdtheaden. WeY mut be we -
My~O el tbt hope la every lense
of the wrord.
T "ouight, I ask for your pray.
me aW bl in everything
that I do throughout the days at
my pnreldemy to 1 ibtsthy at
askr hopes and or youM.
God bless Amrica and God
Mess eas Ikaar evrgene dof e


Needed in U.S.
WeI mut reform our political
progges z deding it not only at
fhe violations o the law, bt
ga4 otie launumble case.
jrpag ttigs that have Imen tQoo
ofte n pmiad ap to mtdly .
L~aN tiggs tht may W ia

Imatao kasp n prlon de i

solean~tr a qrt ofr a nts.
ry. ILik say ot~calling, polt.
lo And let I tolyu, th
rlot n POsfE in On




-- to rationalise thi tin 1

slaht imprtl m i to asd na. e
a tha timlru atid the

eseeam tlt isu f t inn L
on r alalba sid te haw r
~ rrr tso demosatinao t
anna as. Tim is=** Bf a n
Ish br: Amrlan iutsp etral
a hggg o ge al


tin rs~nwurlW', rdlr~l m~n~ ~~r wdwd. .) 2, .

















CLASSIFIED SECTION TO ======AV ftP~~Pl8 UC.


REU ESTTElt RER STT SMSlt Felu SME FOR~ SAL1E PERSGML I agMMSr WELP MlTE) WELP WWl~l


C9663
1 CHILD'S riding hat. As new
condition. Call 36729.

C9664
R.S.W. MKII Bicycle. 3 sped
with dynamo, fights and
basket. As new condition. Can
36729.
C9670
PRICED TO SELL
BEDROOM SET double bed
with bookcase headboard.
double dresser & mirror, chest
drawers, two night tabler.
DANISH LIVING ROOM SET
-- 2 six foot couches, 2 chaise,
CEILING FAN 36"*
AUTOMATIC WASHER -
DRAPES -POWE RMOWE R
Phone 3-1025 after 5:30 p.m.
or weekends
C9649
HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS
1 Living Room Suite
1 T. V. Set
Miscellaneous Items.
Telephone 5-2272
C9672

HOUSEHOLD SALE
Ali Electrical items, table linen,
rugs, towels, toys, garden tools,
golf clubs, Solex bicycle,
Christmas decorations tennis
racquet, books, baby
equipment, etc.
3rd house west of Shell West
Bay Garage, West Bay Street,
south side. By appointment or
all day Saturday. Telephone
34317 POTTER.
C9637
1 CNERTIBLE COUGH
1 250 Ibr amplifier ad speaker
Ca1177947.


C9627

M 4th, 5th, 8th --' 1 th ,

8:30 p.m.
THE 94tMMr IElMM aCRLE


r=9659
LATE 1971 MERCEDES
BENZ 280 S.E.L., sun roof and
all extras. One owner -
rexcllent condition. Phone day
or nite 5-5441 extt. 7015.

C9630
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
USED CAR PRODUCTION
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Radio. Auto. $1600
1969 VICTOR 20600
S/W Auto $850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA.
4 Dr. Auto. Radio Orang$3'500
1967 HILLMAN STD. 50
Green ER L
1969 CHRYSLER IMP 2600
1A7 Au .D CAPRI
Auto Blue $1850
19681 FORD THUNDERBIRD
Blue A/C $2800
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Green $1600
1965 BLUE DODGE $300
1970 VICTOR STD
Red $875
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std. Green $1,200
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4~600
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue $695
1971 RAMBLER
Auto, Blue $2700
1969 TRIUMPH HERALD
Blue $7o00
1968 JAVELIN
A/C $51400
1970 FORE) MUSTANG
A/C $2000
Trade Ins Welcomed

Telephone 34636 7*8
C9631


b b



TODAY' ijS~:W ~ :
1971 DDODE AVENGER
DELUXE $11600
1968 FORD STATION-
WAGON -
white automatic800
19713 BUICK REGAL
demnonstrator $7000
1970 TOYOTA -
grn, cood mileq $850
1989 ~IAT COUtP 124-
white, low mileage $1200
1970 TRIUMPH
blue, stick shift $850
1971 PONTIAC
VENTURA II -yellow,
good condition $3000
19'7$ CHEVELLE MALIBU -
mry clean $4850
1989 FORD GALAXrE
blue, recond~itiond $1000
1971 CHeVY'EGOA COUPE. -
grrn, automatic $29915
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEQANt-
air conditioned $4200
1968 PONTIAC FIREBIIRD -
good condition $1 500 :
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
-- I~ke new $2250
1989 CHIEVR~OLET CAMARO
red, automatic $1850
1972 DODGE AVENGER *
1971 tNBERI VOGUR -
white, radio, automatic $15~00
S1973 DODOS POLARA
Ilght blue utomatic $5500
197 F~lORD CORITINYA -
green $8500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Fiel nerr

Piai 4711


(=9593



C9608
BUMPER -STIC KER 5
GOSLTWRS DE AS I
hundreds, In thousands. Truck


Stret.


Ceed by, and man an effr.


CSho o yu doCIr buys


C9557
WILLIAM'S COURT
2 bedroom 1H bath houe,
built in gara, furnished, T.V.,
new front room set and stereo,
washing machine, carpeted,
one arkconditioner. $20,000.
Phone 5-8595
C9682
BY OWNER
House in Highland park, 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room
and carport. Built in range and
baker on lot 90)< 150 Nice
home in nice area. To view,
telephone 2-1722-3.
C9582
COMPLETELY FURNISHED
and air-conditioned three,
bedroom, two bath home.
Spacious living and dining
rooms, large kitchen, complete
laundry room and facilities.
Highland Park uaea, off West
Bay Street. Phone 5-7089 after
5:3 p.m.
C9681
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House In Highland Park -
executive type home. 4
bedIrooms, 2H baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
'2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
- central air-conditioned. To
view, telephone 2 1722-3.
C9613 ,

UnfurnishMOR bdom 1 bath
huse. ocate Nrassau V~illa e


FMl RENT

CARGE STORE off East
5taa tiith towly display

SItalblefo any type business.

C9642
PROSPECT RIDGE
Fully furnished garage
apartments in large private
grounds with use of swimming
pool comprising large
bed/sitting room, separate
idtdan and bathroom, private
patio. Rent: 85250 per month
Including satilit~ies. Available
May 1st. Call 777137 to view.
.18
AVAILABLE Immediately
unursually secluded specious
furnshed hilltop nrsidnce
overlookfug western Nassau.
Two indrrooms and sleeping
porch, two baths, maid's room,
children's swimming pool
.private, fresh water well, acre
.grounds, television, bnreey
stone architecture, both gas
and automatic electric cooking,
Iaundry machine.
Convenient airport, teaches,
shopping, $300 month untiI
November or yearly, includes
I~nens and dishes. Phone owner
5*7224.
C9648
IN TOWN furnished rooms
Efficiency Apartment, and alt
tow pr rty for sale. Phone

CS688
2 -bedroom apartment -
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. I bedroom
aircnditioned, wasrher. To
vielw, telephone 2-1722-3.

4500 square faet, warhouw or
office space, evailble
Immediat*Iy. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2.1722-3.

CRS WATER un~llImted.
Available Immediately secluded
stone two indroovi cottage,
furnishd. $160 per month
Naa. p on onrm5-7 2


E'F1 XTRA LRGE TWO
DEROOMS~ T QI BATH
AND ONEI EX TA LARGE

r~~SA(IT~ENT. Wt e

kaln e dnn krl


L~ltGE A IONElt SE O

Thdrompo Steel Esltte

Chariette ner ImmedRlete



bb6 ~ M 48@ orr M;rtbd


C9680
.9Y OWNER
House In Highand Park. 3
bedroomsl, 2 baths, I~ving,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 ints of lnd beautifully
furnished,' wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Com Iktely waited and lovely
landscape. Airconditioned
thr ong hout Unusu at
opportunity. To view.
Telephone 2-1722-3.
C9677 '
2 STOREY HOUSE OFF

murisd Espaciou Aucto e
grounds. 3 bedrooms 2H baths,
garage, no immediate
neighbours asking
$45,000.000. Near shopping,
school, and beach.
HOUSE with large swimming
pool, Patio 3-way water
system. 2 tots enclosed
grounds. Spacious and idali for
outdoor Ikving. Tremendous
grounds -fruited, Asking only
$90,000.000 Idrel seluaded
area loads of privacy. See
anytime. Walking distance of
school, shopping etc. Situated
off Vifiage Road.
Dial The Realtors for Action.
We sell nothing but Real
Estate. Our phones 22033.
22305, evanines 41197
C9576
FOR SALC
OUT EAST on the
waterfront. Hae house.
furnished ,3 bedrooms 2%
baths only $10;0,00.00
CORAL DRIVE GROVE -

Fr iished evew bI Sna ah
See by appointment

V S' MARINA &i BEACH

fnram d2 bacMM, tetsu

omman late com iton qu- art
$65,000.00 owner willing seller
for $5,000.00 -
Substantial mortgage available.
FOUR B %atjROOMS 3Y
BATHS Pool, Patia and
Iandscaped grtounds
2ar-gaorage~ on two fots of
land, landscaped, ftruited
newly belt. Ideral. ftor ar
family. Owner wRilsat or
$150,00(30.
: HIGHLANIB pARK( han 3 J
indrooms ba~th; furnisad,
fe $5$,000.00 -with
substntia moatgaeg.'Come see
and in suripriied,
HOUSE VILLAGP ~RO`AD. -
newly painted only $36,000.00
Wuith $10,000.0 downt balance
$26,00 00. mortgar at 10%
Monthly $353.81. Best deal of
thmyear.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033
22306 22307 NITE 41197 *
C9628
FOCR SLE
OUT EAST -soml-hilitop with
four bedrooms 3 thaths, plus
one ladoom on+ bath
apartmemt kingsize swimming
pool, patle some views and
only $90,000.900
QUT WEST -- 3 bdrooms 2
bath, plusr compete suite used
as den or office, Compidely
furntishe. Opposite ;Gold Coast
witW' beac righits See anytime
Sisy. today, occupancy
immediately. $48~,b00,00 Has
approx. $15,000.00 Inventory.
Gfccrest buy of theYs~ r.
bed~ioroom 2 batits, plus ore self
contained apartment gorpoaus
views. Frnishedir PO'OL -
PAtIO - high class area for
.high' dassr etetminihg Only


two bath, funished houe.
From $40,000.00 and up. i

baths and 3 tegrooms 1
tastefully fumrihed. 70 by 140


financing.


DI~om, b4nr. ',





n- we ms HQnlSEr -a wel


Cwpt ~rd~. Enctsrrd, wl~h
sut. :40~r prtls 'md dinly.
rrradim ki~Ck~.
:luin~hid, 'JC(J'tor
~reuU~y. crTd~--;Ir ~SO~t~
~e~ tr Iklsk


O9666
OUTf ISLAND RESORT
reqhuies oupts t maragl
Catering, HouakuPing, adr
SCUBA diving program
Must have had tranin i
Caterin Managemert afl dt'
leat two years experiener to
this capacity. S'UBA
instructors Certificate faquired
-- father NAUI, PADI, OR:
Y6CA. BRplYB by lttr to
Romora Bay Clutb, Box 146,:
Harbour island.

C9643MI ANTED to fle a
Gemis.Onera househodd
duties. Only Bahamians nwad
apply. 30 years and odbr.
fTlephone 41346 after 6:00,
evenings.
C9665
MANAGER wanted for hotel
at Dr0ggs Hill, Addres to
supervise kitchen and dining
room, order supplies and
groceries. Applicants must have
had pmireiu experience in
restaurants .and hotel
management. Also must have
High School and Busines
College Education, and beableo
to keep books and to type.
Should be clen and neat in
appearance and over 35 years
of age. Refwences equired.
Salary $125 per wak plus
percentage of profits, and fre
board and lodging. Apply to:
Adv. C9665, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.


A 56(STAN T MANAGER
wanted for hotel at Driggs Hill,
aAnndro Must de I m vrt
and gbl to nu fetvi
menus, s prisin diningro

houukeeping opr s hot
exg r hoolanddu aion and
5vr a35 kars sof ua. Salas
profits ad dryo Cm oad
Apply No d. 96,/o 20
Tribune, P. O. Box N-3 7,
Nassau.

C9577
STELLA MARS INN on long
Island, has the following open~
position and ask that
applicants (Bahamian only
need apply) kindly contact
phone:
Book-keeper, female or male,
preferably single, to start
immediately, must hold a Stage
Ill RSA certificate in
book-keeping, should has at
leat two years experienu.


Candidate wrantd for
immediate employment, as
detailed below.
CONSTRUCTION DIVISION
MUANAG~ER
Construction Engineer requied
with extensivte experience in
buldidlg contract supervision
and execution. Should be
familler with aft phases` of
building trades and materials.
Apply to: New Providence
Development Company Ltd.
P. O. Box N-4820
Nassau, Bahamas
or telephone Nos. 7-4177 or
7-4178dbetween the hours of 9
Sand .mp.m.
C9629 ~
SECRETARY -- wanted for
Out island luxury resort in the
Bahamas. Must have excellent
shorthand, typing, be able to
compose business letters and
work on own initiative without
supervision. Experience in
hotel reservations an asset.
Must have pleasant appearance
and pleasant manner with
guests. Minimum 3
years secretarial experience
required.
Send applications to: Eleuthera
South island Resorts, P. O.
Box 28, Rock Sound,
Eleuthera.
i'C9668
WANTED: Certified (NAUI &
PADI) Scuba Instructor to take
over position of Director of
Watersports and entertainment,
must have some degrees In
Oceanography (underwater
bile l rme er h,phun rw te
and technical cun es at
dmoait en). Duties wil


sump sin ou ar smianitrton o
underwater subjets pgas before
listned. Appiant should aso,


possibly, take charge of a
watersports equipment store,
with own financing for stock
desirable. Write Stella Maris
Marina and Yacht Club, Stella
Maris, Long island, Bahamas.

C9595
MANAGER AL couple
required for food, beverage and
huepilOut island hoatb. A hants
must have qudalfcatios or
previous experience In similar
fields. Must be willing to
relocate in Out Islands. Salary
negotiable. Apply Green Turtle
Club, Green Turtle Cay.


C9671
MR. ERNEST ARCHER
PLEASE MEET ME AT THE
TENT iN ENGLER5TON 8
P.M. ON SUNDAY
OSCAR E. JOHNSON



C9673
GOOD WATCH Madeira -
April 27th Telephone 5-3992.



C9575
HOUSES from $25,000.00 to
$60,000.00 We have clients
waiting. Phone or came in to
I~st them with us. Damianos
Realty. DIAL 22033, 22035
anytime*
C9609
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LTD, is anxious to
receive Irstings in, FOXDALE
SUBDIVISION, IMPERIAL
PARK, ROBINSON ROAD,
ENGLERSTON, COCONUT
GROVE and MILLER'S
HEIGHTS. Call 23921.
C9675
WANTED LISTINGS
WHY FRET? WE WELL
List with us for ACTION.
WANT HOUSES WITH
ESTABLISHED MORTGAGES
ASO.
DAMIANOS REALTY Dial
22033, 22305


C9686


in loving memory of our dear
mother Rachael Huyler, who
dep~rtd this Ilfe May 1st.

Oealdion,m2 rsonsl Bduaug rnd
Joseph and a host of other
relatives.



C9641
This is to give notice that the
Registered Office of Rings and
Things Limited has been
changed to Rings and Things
Limited, Britannia Beach Hotel
Arcade, as provided under
Section 7 of the Companies
Act.

POSITION WANTED
C9611
Cashier with 8% years
experience requires night work.
Phone 5-4278
C9655
SITCI-1OARD OEAT R

Bank Messenger with re erece
Rnederenoes. Tel. 28np8 8 to
5 days 52075 nights.



C9667
ROCK SOUND AUTO PARTS
require experienced manager
immediately. Applicant should
have at least 5 years experience
in automotive parts and trade
and be prepared to live at Rock
Sound, Eleuthera. Salary
commensur at a with
experience. interested person
should call or write to: The
Manager, Mercantile Division,
South Eleuthera Properties
Ltd., Rock Sound Eleuthera
for an interview *
C9561
ALBURY'S RADIO and, T.V
Company requires young lady
to take care of shop. Must be
able to type. Phone after five
3-5291.


summiulummumm


adebintersri t rm nam 5mpin
IN mTH


W onIP name
TICKETS .$2.50 Box Office:
THE ISLAND CAMERA
SHOP, BANK LANE. Phone
22126.
C9698
SF. GEORGE'S PAR1SH will
bi* holding their annual Bazaar
on 'Friday May 4th~ on the
church grounds, Montrose
Avnue. There will be turkey
a nd ham supper, conch fritters,
salad, homer cookery, hoopla
and other attractions including
dancing. The bazaar will be
offically opened at 5:30 p.m.
by Mrs. Rowena Eldon. This is
In aid of Parish Funds, THE
PUBLIC IS INVITED

W IPLES

IRWIN 24' flbreglass sal~boat,
glals four, 5 sails, outboard
skwyr dinghy. 54,750 o.n.o.
Call 7-4168 or 7-4063.


13e.callO nHALoER l
33 fr~p.. or 1973 50 h.p. Phone
64761.

S REMAKE R 44 ft.
Luxurious C'ruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.


C95813





FIIol~png

Svir5 *.boa


10:00 P.M. SUIN THURS
10*00 & 12:00 P.M. PRI 8 SAT






fOr rear 8 Mton


Hr~ltBr DAY efF~TS
tn'hewm ad more Sles
Prromotio Signs In stock at
Arrwk~ Aert. Montrose Avenue .
art Arundel S~trd Phone.






Racn kC ahair ec.

Telephor 2-2783 dy 5-3801


_ I I __


I - -- --' I


I"'IT'r


C9691


THE FAMILY of the late Miss
Pr~escola Conchita Bridgewater
would I~ke to thank thei
mnr foralnd and relatives for
thi lrlcan ribons and
mpathy shown them during
ftr recent benrevement.
etthanks to -fev. E. A.
kfrStaff and Students
oft C. i. 41bson Junior High and
Butler's Funeral Homes'


CORMILIUS BROS. & SISIER 102P




EMEAID 00M of Hyatt Ellarald learL


DAWYN


Whe Wrthms


Tues~y. age t, Ireta


Y


MAY 1


- 6th.


Cerr ES or Guitar Students
C gt by Cts rdr ydnry
Howard Street east,
Chippingham.
Studle, 105: Classic, Jaz,
Appro vl~ isation, Chord
1 gRln~l~ training, et. For
Il~~r s cll 35670 or





01W REWIAtRD. Phon


BitoOK BeNrTON


PATTI JO


O.C. SMITH


BILLY ECKSTINSI











91~ 1973.


t9614
BANK CLERK. Swiss Bank
Corporation (Ovrrsasi)
L.If-id,~ Nassau, requires the
servie of a bank employee,
cawnc ain Mth handling so
securities and general
accounting work.
Aghamians only to apply in
wInriting to: P. O. Box N757,
tNassau, or call for an
appfointment at telephone
Il2-7570 (Mr. Neef).


I


She Wrtham1 .


I I I -e


- I I - -------


RE~X M O G AN, M.D. By DAL CUR~TIS

YLsa, I~ ALL I tW46 CONICERNCED***TH16OUS PER- NOW DD IYof 4ffW luM*
Raeur as ce / NAPS Mou wElrE IL/ 1LL vOU SE W IIE VUDY' BELLF Massedr
RLX, 18 TNAY )OtUt ?s- SA~ CK AT THE OFFICE tDiMORRtOW---
vu/Aa vO W0PIA BO'LL SE TNERE/
ALL mourT r a TWIE AtORefWO t z*L MaiYT )roU ag#i3

( .









JUD GEPARK ER Byr PAUL NICHOLS


betr Sasexr as iunclr abac an
miladur thatm tale kiungo


dotat~e tooke on tale seventh

move-an how1 dkit~l tate
Pare tes: 1.EJR ageods sh
1...CQ1 8h~rvu h

as~b lackd' uh a daw.~

mia- cB asse
nrrrs (921-97 mate.fe


s...


VU V res **ea,
U e inss r 88 wr d
ro iiTpe
TI 0 ~r
d A R e~ ~
rW~~~a lar u1LY1j ir t


APA RTMENT 3- G av A Isr K onL k


ELP MATfE
C9678
APPLICATIONS are Invited
from qulified career minded
males for a challenging position
with welf established Nasau
requdra l tietve,P augr t an
interest. A good high school
background coupled with some
work experience in banking or
accounting would be an
advantage. Resumes should be
directed to Adv. C9678,, c/o
The Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207
Nanau .
C9679
THE MEDICAL CENTRE at
LYFORD CAY, N.P. requires
the whole-time services of a
futty qualified and experi~eed
Laboratory Technician.
An plants should a press th i
Chairman of the E. P. Taylor
Bahamas Foundation, P. O.
Box N7776. Nassau.

TfRADE SERVICE
C9635
r. VhoANTENNAS. Bom er
f h t as, o prmet R
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.
C9632
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HURRICANE
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,

JHN S. GA OERE & CO.

Frrifree estimates and prompt

C9506
ISLAND TV SERVICE
"For service you can rely on"
Dowdeswell Street.


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


CFNOMI NG RE VENUE E
ICASHIER: Must have high
flhool education. Be able to
dSa~il with the public. Have
."'"'m".ndlin s f e
teeto fieyears experience
we G erair Cao ng. Reference
PATY CHEF: Must have 10
ersexperience in European
ndAmerican Plan. Must have
gh school education or
Ivln.Must be able to
long hours. Police record
health certificate required.
rested persons apply Th&
euty Club, West End,
nd Bahama, Personnel
fiebetrween the hours of

e aym)roag F3.d y. Eo
IJr., Personnel Director.

SClassifed Advettrtisig
Bring at lrrits.


with capabilities to understand
and carry out pipefitting and
pump repair work when
required. Boilermaker
knowledge required in
lIng lyort pnrd fanr ca lube
tower and tray work, cutting
en tburningx end rigging WI
Agud Chem Desal Units and
Related Refleery Speciality
Equipment.
Qualifierd Applicants should
reply to: Deputy Chief
industrial Officer, Ministry of
Labour, Freeport, Grand
Bahame island, Bahamas.
C73i4
C LEAN E R/M MAINTENANCE
MAN Appliiant will be
required to do general
mopno and cl nin ofin 1,
storage rooms and toilets. Only
applicants who are prepared to
work hard will be considered.
Apply to: Devco Personnel,
18C Kipling Bidg., P. O. Box
F-2666, Report, GBL.


ii


iS


i


-,CARROLL RIGHTER'S




GENERAL TENDENCIES: You have .
enc et chtsnow to pi healb~th md
WMi~a taklag tastawata for this specific purporr. Yes
wiB be able to put in motion an advanced plan that brings you
iderr to year ott)*kctfus and mental expanalon.
ARIBS (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) The planets are most favranble
and yea can now accomilsh a geret deal, particularly during
the daytimer hours. Do what you can to improve your
rP~nareme E*come men style-conscious,
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) A good day to discuss with a
cever fried the tight idea to employ for future advancement.
Get the bdcking you need. Show more ingenuity where the
romrante side of We s comml~erned
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Get in touch with good
frieds wo can help you achieve a personal ambition.
Attendhts soial gatherings la fine for furthering your
advranamnt Avoid one who impedes progress.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) If you work with
more vita~ity, you make a better impresion on hier-us Join
c~ivi groups that are progresive rad have altruistic goals.. Show

'"s? coaitions around that are distasteful. Make decisions ealy
anrd then full speed ahead. A new associate has fEe

VIG (C 23 to Sept. 2) o hv nwa system for
handlfag your obligtions that should be put in openraton
without delay. Show more devotina to loved one and give a
nice gift that will be appreciated. Be happy.
. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) A change of attitude toward
an asociate can make a big dittesence now with excellent'
astalts. Taking part in a civic activity is helpful. Show more
appaciation for the favors of others.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You have to work up mose
enthualasm to handle them duties rhead of you efficiently. Go
shopping for the right clothing items that will improve your

SAIIARU tNov 2o De. 2 GCe outiof ruth yoan

outlook. Look into new outlets that are profitable. More
happiness with mate is possible with little effort.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to JanI. 20) Study problems at home
in an objective way and then you can solve them wisely. Go
along with idesu of kin where recreation is concerned. Avoid a
troublemaker. Expses happiness.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) You are thinking very
cleverly now and can easily put your ideas across to the right
people. Communicating with higher-ups now brings fine

PICES Feb. 0t Mu 2O) Y 8u can improve your
financial position at this time if you an alert to the
opportunities around. Talk matters over with a business expert
and find new avenues of expression. Be poised.


C9574
MADE MOISELLE
solicits applications
pOost of Junior
Assistant. Some
aptitude is essential.
ttran.


LT D.
for the
Display
a istic
We will


C96;87
Part-t/ime maId required, Prince
~Charles Drive-Inr area Call
32556.


SCS636




Mlacky Stret
& Rosevlt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
CASA CR AE N E

MlOV NG,CSTORAGE
STEEL B GDNG
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES


CONTACT LYMAN BINDER TV antenna Booster
OR JACK CASH Sales &~ Service
SPHONE: 2-37295,7 3796, Phonde 22618 P. O Box N3
Airport 77434 30
C9363 C9656
FO YU bidigned AUDITORIUM FOR RENT
FReieta YOU Remodeing -ed Musical Shows Conventions
M intenac 26l G. Patton, Audtru I 2e Fpied -Tl

WR Y NO MORE! CALL
ABCO TO SOLVE YOUR
CLEANING PROBLEMS.
'TEL: 51071-2-3-4



~GRAND BAHAMA


ELmP WArnTED I.I gELP MMTED
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTANT C7363
i 7_361 COMMERCIAL ARTIST with
IReuired by an Associate of five years practical experience
C ihamapm Oigh Re inon aadd the~e4 d ar oll w
.ed cation with 3-4 years all phases of advertising,
ad inced education in including full colour brochures,
:accounting or college degree. from layout to finished
:Maintains Corporate books and "rtwork. Darkroom and
:records for two companies, photographic experience

.ad rep"ri, '-'cst "afs AHdrs io e. O. ho la 2 56
stblishes and keeps records please.
f various financing activities, C32

iffwforc ro econtn Mn DEHIIN Lfo tXe -Anton
accounting matter s. trained and registered with at
ICoordinates supply sales and least two years of ClInical
fakcounting for all marketing ex pe'r l ce. Telephone
:operations concerning marine 373-3339.
cand industrial lubes and C7365
:avia iron fuels. Basic 56 n as Catalytic West nxdies, Lt

Per chu accoutn F eprt, Grn hBaham ha
csidr. Maintenance organization,
1Hlease reply stating details of Freeport, for the following
q cualifications and experience position:
and past salary to: C. E. METAL TRADESMAN Must
.A~mbrister, Personnel Officer, have a minimum of five (5)
(Blahamas 011 Refining years experience in Refinery or
Company, P. O. Box F2435, associated industrial plants as a
report. Grand Bahama. Bollermaker/Steamfitterr. Must
be fully qualified Boilermaker


TH inal o heCrcfod

Cp, chh wllB bebp aed next
year after ya, hands~o of

North, and Nico Oardener,



8 g10 a76g2106
S3EL

;K A 8 Q J 9 42
11( p a A Q 10KQ 5 4 B

8~8AJ9653

Wa N 10 3

Pass Des 1O Ps
aci each side, o tun

have surey leubd so as
waarlnin to Hisner P
oat6 4 i o bk Oasn am and
East had no quailms. He wRould
Invt settled Gyn Mr 6m0, but
iafc to na~lt~d~u1e on8v

Rol a and hs acice i

Wolach, sitting North, bid u~p to

than save for 700, he let them
acor 640.


54 9 rrn na m eless ttra.


i ,ms anrIP~t~' 'W)
a eam. (4l) t.

a: .le ts
IT~ A rtm. )

ess m in
IF ,ag~c(I
m,
(L24:t~
at ror
ICnIH
a***rson


tread on ~hem H
' crack So they must
dry I I'II fetch some for you."
Pioased to be of (elp, Rupert
scammpr away. As)He reaches
the woods h* so** many
birds filing up and down.
" Hullo. they're very busy
today," he thinks,
a)ssEIvesD.


Mr. Bear is tryln to I ht a
bonfire. This OI an rubish
is damp." he compains. I
really need a bundle of dry
sticks to get 4tgong"6O ")M I
know where to frdsm,
Daddy," Irtupert oheerl~y.
"fk The I I'w an~n lots
of sticks tther and when you
AL. m)ours


ir


~7x. ~ntic/3a.


NG DO...DO YOUHAVE
hR. j e NIL


11 toI 4 *
it
iEL


Rupert and thLe M~emory Birds-1


i/











...


She SI~rthanuto >


4lea50tIS Why



Out IslasdArys









round-trip between: Nosaurr and Miami on our one-day fare. And our
21-day round-trip excursion fares are just as attractive: $42 Nassau-Miami
and $32 Freeport-Miami. These three fares are the lowest of any airline.

2. Better equipment. We fly the BAC- ll, the world s most reliable
short-haul, pure-jet aircraft. With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can
stretch out.


OutlsstlCi~rr serves thesohamassest


wer


B.


,, werM citmrplen in the
SunfYigClem.


9ICEI I EE




TIIB HAMYAS' )lur
Siegetheler eastinset his
outsteading perfornaceo in
asilleg nd last week captnred

prance, Mart qr, AprQ 24,
to 29.
Si rethaler, votea hin
ikducedd to 9h Ba as in

inderding defendingl Unital
States champions. His teamn
mnate,, John Dankley, cuam in
third. Other member of the

flrh 'utscmd was Kris

Up to the flfth of the six
race series Curacao led with the
Bahamas hi second, Marthlquoe
third and Dunkley fourth. In
order to win the series,
SEiegenthaler had to beat
Curseto in the final round.
Getting off to a good start
Siegenthale was the first to
turn the windward mark with
Curacao in third and Dunkley
in fifth. On the second
windward leg, Siegenthaler
managed to hold Curacao
during which time Mrartinique
threatened.
With Martinique rounding
the leeward mark first and
heading for the finish,
Siegenthaler was in second,
Curacao was third and Dunkley
Fourth. Knowing that he had to
keep Curacao out in order to
win ~"9Segenthaler began to
cover fis opponent as long as
he coatd tiykas to steer him
into anoterr direction,
This proved Waltful as
France crossed first,
Martiique second Dunkley
third and Curacao fourth dth
Sliegantheler flfth
This proved traitful as
France crossed first,
Mdartinique second Dunkley
third and Curalcao fourth with
Slegenthalw fifth. This did not
afford Curacao enough points
to top the Bahamas'


Opeanla the competition
with a second in the firt race,
Sfpnuatar crame Mrt in dt
rsconad race, 35 la the third
racea, fourth in tim fourth raee
and 18th in the fifth.

DA~VISCUP WIN
GneNBVA (A ) West Genrany
Lksh du Matet Moady to r
lbrlal la the qiurtrr floal roand


Howevru, i was not all that
assy for the Sa~haga wrho also

teewint want down to the
Carabean's number one,

6a, 6-2, and 60tom whMc~
pttr JIeCI a one easei
nations today vied for valuable
double victory.
This bo~oweve did not deter
fetar Janica or t he Bahuama
''We ass confdsnt of thee

man srecoas Rine r
thompson. Of Rolle he said "I
think he played quite well, ktmt
weplaysd a plywo was o
dfiut to beat a player like

"I think that the two key
matches will be Pratt agast t
Knowlar ad the doubler. We
think that the doubles will in


Jamalca, having lost the fist
set, were behind 3-1 in the
second set when Pratt tallied
back to tle and takes a 43 lead.
Rolle then played beautiful
tennis after that and won nine
guame in ar row.
A GOOD CHANCE
Rolle, a hard workeer on the
:ourt, found that match very
lateresting especially in the
second set whon he
temporarily lost himrslf.
"After the second at I gpaind
my confidence," he sid. Rolle
too fe~es that the doubles will
be the hey factor of the match.
However, "I stBIl feel very
confident that we stand a ey
good chance."
Rumssel, in a very rdaxed
glame had Knowlesr ddiveria
shorrt lobs which he smashsd
backt effectively famcinS
Knowles~ to hit tmhe bal ot of
bounds. 'aolesli, shower,
ansitto life la the sixthi agala
and bhtaid 5.0 threatened
Jamainar's sr by winning thra
consecutive games. Russetll
howeverm caine thirough on his
senrs to win the set.
Agan an agilk Russel dise~d
out to fnowles tact and
techniques s sexperience saw
hi on to victory.
In other matches played
yesterday, Michael Valdes of
Trinidad defeated 1Richrd
ofd d- intsfito
Brandon's asmi finas.
in a Sandon consolation
ma'tch, Rojy Ashton nd
Btradley Dealeritte of tl
BarhamCs deesrted ional
Berridge and Auckland Hootor
of St. Kittts 6-0 and 62.
Mdichael Nanton and poun
Punntt of the Wrindwsal fisands
defsated Raymond Mnaroe
antd Even Haniff of Guyans 6-3
and~ 62 In another Brandon
CongolatiB IR~tch.


3. Better service. Beautiful Bohamion stewardesses to see to your every
need. And a complimentary rum punch to refresh you.

4. More convenient schedules. Three non-stop flights daily from Nassau.
8:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M. And one at 10:30 A.M. which makes a stop
in Freeport. Plus one direct flight daily from Freeport to Miami at 11:30 A.M.
Returning flights are just as convenient.

Remember, lowest fores. Better equipment. Better service. More convenient
schedules. That's Out island Airways. So call your travel agent or Out
island Airways now for reservations. 7-8222.


LEO ROLLED


EISHA OIBED



QSTS w wl#Enwm

A M#II


LOODGNG INTO s propushe
1973, Bahaeasr wodterweigt kins
n~lh O ~, tm oecn arl o
Eumpire wdteweit rainp last W
Wk< signed a brad new contret
with manuag Mike Dundeer of the

taholbhmunt prepre t
Obed said that good thlp were in
stor for him IIrt asontreet was
roaY n't r er *yl, h ri.Wb
so oneR to giver himn a mrI
.comtpetitive rateh, "Il Just et
Okdmiwa rult the Dundees
about t~q ibars ago ma he took

sad that ws asiast supr also
"d r wtllt r ow d rism,*'
age wth the Dundesh "
lmaprod a attl tit, but I stUl have
a' lot to lean,"' he sid. His new
coantract does not change his trainr

Having chalked up I9 wins
without debat, the 25-yer-ld~
shoutp's name hpt bcosts
househoM wed and' a pleat he Is
abant on de, threshold of mose
Sm u~d henr Ib n l
assph .o" seld Obd.~ "Hrdwrk

BETTERRATING
Theeks to ble vitory owr
I~lamaes number on wel~te
rtngs d pl*** Obed up
anoha netch a the then #est
itle has now bone erlelad.
RElktilla his abatb wihb Gos,
Obed aglen adentled ~ 188 tht a
his topighet to dese. "He (Gos)
was smart and he had a bl eto
experisage." Ob* salA. "I wage't

the spr th way I wealed to.n
Although he eyei the Wl
Emples setter titl, Olmd seld that
monH*thsin ban senod late
the middlewsh divison. "I ~alas
pushing for it, but I can't help it,..
he said expnlanin that bdag sta
young, he isn fatrowing. Actually
his trainer Moe Fleischr nd
promtetr Chris Dundee echord
then sam nnremrk. "Hek (Obel)
has the stakbts of a atddleweile"
said Felesher.
la the Ulalii FI 8 Oph
whero b heale Obeg


CATCHER FLOYD Kh~INB damatd out r tWhred doule la due
top of agdles him4'b rlm Asarth agalag pradag sla~ to a 16-
vieter ever Me dippi Del Joes sanlat who res (third troc tin ca~ll
fo4dlk Lte ask dnth lose irn laseen played.


Pasdise Isld, wvho got off to a
slowv stalrtetler la thr sesa~, are
dowlyr but surely rmakng thir r
panm~ fdt a they let night
asogad their ainth wla la
Second baseman Dewitt
Johneea, tim powr~ hitte r for
slanders lat night, somerd two,
kbbnked laI two sad sellseged tale



fldds felub Wr11ss wul Lo hed
in eas, rw twrord ,ag sa 8*8
twro h1bsdring th ~r them gas
est.
Battin firt and feeing the
pitching of ~hank Mle eng, the
Islandes cann up wilth two runr in
thefrt an~ d second nlaning before
Del Jane evnd up with four in the
bottomr of the weond. Both sides
naresisd urped M fle at by she
Paul4=R~~~*br piekwller a y~
b~IM Set l
heS th i .l W~k see


Saint to coro la the bottom of the
fourth. Aftw collecting a double be
mnove to hird or a stal and
soeed oaAdderle rbt.


DEL JANE
ii r



3' e
3
a a
2


agle
Weds

HNowick
WmigAM
OI)No


PARADISE ISLAND


2
2
O
eI
a
2
.O


0
2


Demeriner 2
Jolao~n 3
Asm lahmea 3

agover a


kileshl'll )r able to unite` br La r s ane eme ~ was, eser' aiQY sl lt e tookf sol possesson of
middlewelpht,") rIted. pitch to lef fldebr bklth Coarla* reead plaw~ las night when they
DQnd as doubt has porowd his With ten leded Watkhs rllied behind the hitting of Les

on Ili ewoa er and to E d Wo H~reld Sweetin gs rt UQwan Purth Ip
Haywood, ntheL seobnd InatS, was the onl? His Upetters tarting off hot
BAHAMAS PRO-AMH TOURNEY MAYV 3-1 relild fo right runs on flw hits.


s.
~1 i '
~ .:*~ ;~~I
r:

.
6'L
:si;f' *~.:
r. I" ;. i
ri;
;; L~
;- a~ ;~~-*hI ~P~ i
'' h* ... r:


~1BRAR8 StP T~ilalWT



Bahamas, inal with classic, sWi Clss


'sand chann'twie


CONFIDENT PLAYING by tbsk~~k eae Irlolle agefmie th that- ~Ybless o
the Ikadon Caip Tommeant yesteday as As best IM Pl 62L, 6 and 64 L6 the Ast
singl astch of the seeem seead ofr th Ceememmdik Cri~bbe Tesa ~ls IC tee