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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 26, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03331

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(Registerd with Postaste of ashame for potg co easelone wthin the as~hun.) NassaU and Ba~hama IsB1lands Leadlling News Ppapr
VOL. LXX, No. 130 Thursday April 26, 1973. Price: i $ Cents


SURGEON DAMES
...55,000 bail bond




KIONAP ACCUSED

GR ANTED BAIL

and Ler MN Le nAM35 bot
accused of kidnapping
4V2-year-old Andrea Spencer on
February 15 and ordered
remanded in custody pending
their trial, were yesterday
released froml prison following
the granting of their
application for bail.
The two, police officer
Dames. and fotrmer -.I.D).
officer McL~ean 100t the
Supreme Court within an hour
of each other. D~ames was
released from custody at 4 30
p.m. and McLean at .5.30 p m.
yesterday after consultations
ended between their attorney,
Randol Fawkes, and Acting
Supreme Clourt Registrar,
Joseph Strachan.
The conditions for their
release were laid down on
Wednesday by Mr. Justice
Alaxwell Thompson to their
attorney in chambers Tlhe two
had all their travel documents
impounded and are to report
to the commanding officer of
the (central Police Station
twice daily, until the hearing of
their case.
They are charged with
attempted extortion, burglary
with intent to commit a felemy
and assault with a deadl
in st ru m en t along with
kidnapping.
Escorted from thle court by
Iris attorney, Dames who
appeared in good health and
spirits, exchanged greetings
with his fellow policemen who
were on guard duty at the
Supreme Court.
No date has yet been set for
the trial, which is to be heard
in the Supreme C:ourt.





T'HREE men .;nd t vo
women, all Amenicans. were
charged before Magirstrate
Imlmanuel Osadebay on
I nesday afternoon with
unlawful possession of 1,200
pou nds of ma riluana
TIhe charge is indictable.
The accused were not called on
to plead. A preliminary Inquiry
was set for May 10) No bail
was allowed.
Before the court were Daniel
Paul C`ormier. 377. his wife
Kaye,.30. Shcila W'interberg.
27. all o~f F~ort Lauderdale.. and
Richard C'onstantine, 13, and
I rnesta Villoch. 7 of
Massachusetts.
The five were arrested
aboard a boat tied up in the
harbour at Matthew Town,
Inagua on Monday morning.
The seized drug is valued at
nearly half a million dollars.


6


Abaco group deny



any associated with



militant separatists
By NICKI K3ELLY
THE GREATER ABACO COUNCIL today publicly conceded
for the first time that it has abandoned its hope of separate
Crown status for Abaco when the Bahamas becomes independent


Independent nations



must help themselves


think for themselves

THE GREATEST CHALLENGE of an independent Caribbean
nation is learning ro "think for ouralves", rather than applying
alien solutions to local problems, it wast detclaired last nightt.


Mr. Krx Nettleford, director
of' extra-mural studies at the
University of the West Indies,
was discussing the challenges of
indae endenc of gthe Bahamas
Field.
"The greatest challenge for
ex-colonial areas," he said, "is
that we tend to look at our
problems from an alien
viewpoint. Every point of view
we use is unrelated to our own
experiences. All are being
imported and adopted."
Mr. Nettleford noted that
"there is a tendency to be very
suspicious of the intellectual,
because too many of us who
have two letters after our name
use them as a badge for social
advancement.

noBut intellectual lactivity hi:
declared av\e are khepeole

ourselves. We have to look at
Our own experiences and with
a kind of recycling come up
with out own ideas, our own
solutions.
As an example of the
adoption of foreign solutions,
Mr. Nettleford referred to the
birth control programme in lus
native Jamaica.
MAJOR RESOURCES
"We cannot have an interest
in killing off people, or .-
preventing their gro~wth-
Manpower is one of our major
resources. Think in terms of
family development, rather
than of birth control."
He sad paets should b
educatsai oparento limit th
number of children in their
family to the number of people
the family can properly

sMprt. Nettleford linked
"self-help" and co-operation
with the philosophy of
Caribbean indigents thinking
for themselves,
"We have to get rid of the
lethargy and the resignation
and replace it with action and
determination. If one is serious
about inde endence the
ability f ief-hel i
important.
He pointed to the family
closeness of C'aribbern
residents of Indian and C'hmese
extraction as an example of the
kind of "co-operative system "
the Caribbean nations need.
However, he pointed out
that the majority of' the
population, the black people'
were highly individualistic
because they, through their
slave ancestors, were cut off
from their traditional cultural
and family bonds.
MOTIVATION
"How do you motivate
strong individualists to lend
themselves to a co,-o~perative
system? How do we persuade
him to make sacrifices,. perhaps
for a whole generation. for the
benefit of the people andi the
nation as a whole?"
This question must be
answered, he said
Mr. Nettleford warned
Bahatmians against considering
July 10 "the day on which you
become free. Jully 10 is only a
convenient date, he said.
He referred tol the PLP '
election victory in 196(7 as "a
symbolic leap forward Into
something new, something
right. It was a milestone in the
die-colonialization of the
Bahamas. July to is just
another milestone.
"Many of us think of
independence in terms of a
new flag, a new national
anthem, heroes and mlyths. But
we have found that there is
much more to it than that."
Mr. Nettleford' address was
the first in a series ofI six
weekly lectures and panel
discussions on indelpendencne
sponsored jointly~ by his
department of the U~niversit)
of the West Indies andl the
Guild of' Graduatecs.


on July 10.
The admission came as the
onicai sough ttho deryoand
move in London to recruit
m cnsareastat ossupport the
In its news broadcast this
morning Radio Bahamas said
that Marsh Harbour
representative Errington
Watkins, accompanied by
Charles Hall and American
lawyer Edwin Marger, had met
with Conservative M.P. Ronald
Bell to discuss the Abaco case
further, and that according to a
report in the British press they
were seeking mercenaries.
Mr. Watkins and Mr. Hall
were said to have told the
British press that there were
mor arms arnt ammunition a

the Bahamofficial statement
today the Greater Abaco
Council said it wished it known
that they had no knowledge
concerning the recruitment of
mercenaries, nor did they
support such a move.
"in response to the wishes
of a majority of Abaconians'
the Greater Abaco Council met
with British officials at the
tim~e of, the conatien~tione'
conference last December to
seek, by legal and
constitutional means, Crown
Colony status for Abaco," the
statement said.
NO REGARD
"At the time it was evident
that the British government has
no regard for old loyalties and
is prepared to abandon old
friends for diplomatic
expediency," it continued-
Having failed "in this
legitimate exploration of the
L possibility of separation," the
Greater Abaco Council was
now persuaded that "their
duty is to work for the success
of an independent and
prosperous Bahamas.
The Council therefore
"rejected" the idea of
recruiting mercenaries and was
of the opinion that "the
reported recruitment is by
persons who are not even
Abaconians."
The Tribune was informed
from another source today that
the Greater Abaco Council was
disbanded in December and its
work in the cause of Abaco
assumed by a new group
known as the Council for a
Free Abaco.
This Council is headed by
Mr. W atkins. Meantime
Abaco's fight for separatism
has continued to receive
considerable publicity in the
American press.
T LOBBYISTS ,
"Today" pblished ins etanto
Ge gia, carried a lengthy p '
art ce oho atobney ~ Marert bh fa been re ainhd
to lby in favour of te
Abaconians.
Mr. Marger's past activities
have included serving as
lobbyist for the Dominican
Regnablic.
"Today" said he was on his
second visit to London to
plead the cause of the islanders ~
with members of Parliament.
The article by Tom Dunkin
said the Abaconians are
planning two courses of action.
First they will again petition
the British Parliament to keep
them a crown colony when the
independence constitution is
debated.
If that fails they plan t
plead their case he orehe


CHROME

ACCESSORIES



NASSAU FREEPORT
Le a --


United Nations and declare
the selves an independent

Both Mr. Merger and Mr
Watkins were quoted asosa in

information as to what the U
S. attitude towards a free
Abaco would be. The U.N.
states "any colony, however
small, however unready, has
the right to instant
independence."
Queried about his last
mission to London Mr. Marger
reported "it was highly
successful. We aroused quite a
bit of interest in the objectives
of the Council for a Free
Abaco."
According to "Today" Mr
Marger, "thiedC uncle thor al g e


Faisorsand Geman for the r
separatist aims


of the Bahamian flag at Clifford Park< promptly at 12:01 a.m. July 10.
Mr. G:eorge A. Smith, organizations abroad and on the morni
c a rat yf te Idep nd nce international orgamiz ions. bl ewv
for reporters the programme of "I am confident that people arranged for
activities planned between July from a wide cross section of of the celebr;
4 and July I1. the community will join in and The N
Prince Charles. the Queen's work together in a spirit of Championshi
special representative at the national dedication to make held on Jul
ceremonies, will arrive in our independence celebrations Adderley Hit
Nassau at 4:40 p.m. Friday, a memorable event," he said. Cycling
July 6, in one of Hier Majesty's The Secretariat chairman Professional
ships which will herth at Prince also expressed his gratitude to will be held
G;eorge Dock. the Advisory Council, the On July 6
The Prmece will land in working committees, the mndependence
uniform at 5 p.m. The royal Bahamas Christian Council and held at the
salute will be fired and he will all those who have responded Sports Cenl
inspect a Guard of H-onour willingly and shown such attended by
before proceeding to a cooperation. The follo~
welcoming ceremony in Steering committees are in depend

hRaado dqa to bein n ceinp a te retOut Championshi

governments throughout the there. Flag raising ceremonies sailing regat

r presentativas of Rahamia sc oolsa tro goutathe illathe MotguB


ing of July 10.
Provide ve seve a
the opening days
nations.
Jationial Pool
ip finals will be
y 4 at the A4. F
gh School and the
Amateur and
Championships
the following day;
the finals of the
e games will be
Queen Elizabeth
tre and will be
SPrince C'harles.
wing day the
dence G;olf
p 1il tk s pla 8

ta to be held in
Son July 5. 6 and


said the regatta promised to be
a mammoth affair involving
laerse100 boats of various
"This is so because we have *
been fortunate to have very
distinguished Bahamian
yachtsmen work with us," he
added.
At 9:30 p.m., July 6, the
Folklore Show will be held at
Le Cabret Theatre, Paradise
Island, and will be attended by
Prince Charles
Another important event
will be the official opening of
the Museum and Art Show at
Jumbey Village Sunday July 8
at S p in

obSurnd as ulyNa ioa Da o
Pae. \vb n ten Pincee will

at C'lifford Park and read the
lesson.
CORNERSTONE
At 10 a.m. the following day
Prince Charles will lay the
cornerstone of the Central
Bank, and will also visit The
Royal Bahamas Police College
at Oakes Field. Later that
evening he will attend a
musical and cultural
,presentation and a short prayer
service by the Bahamas
Christian Council at Clifford
Park prior to the flag raising
ceremony and fire work s
display. .
At 10 a~m. on July 10
Prince Charles will present the
Constitutional Instruments and
will read the Queen's message.
Both the Prime Minister and
the Leader of the Opposition
will reply.
Following this Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling will
receive visiting state
representatives and diplomats
at his office in the Churchill
Building.
Later in the afternoon
Prince Charles will speak at a
Youth Rally and
demonstration at Clifford Park.
At this ceremony Mr. Timothy
Gibson, who wrote the
Bahamian National Anthem
will be presented.
The highlight of Wednesday,
July I1, will be a Junkanoo
Parade at 4 a.m. to be attended
by Prince Charles before his
departure.
A float parade comprising
civic, cultural and labour
organizations will take place on
the afternoon of July 10. The
parade will leave Arawak Cay
beginning at 3 p.m. and travel
east along West Bay Street to
Nassau Street, south along
Nassau Street to Poinciana
Drive, east along Poinciana
Dnrve to Wulff Road, east along
Wulff Road to Mackey Street,
notth along Mackey Street to
last Bay Street, west along
Bay Street and back to Arawak
Cay.
RECEPTION
Other events planned for the
July 4 through 11 week are a
reception for the press at
I1:45 a.m. July 7 to meet
Prince Charles at G~overnment
House; a marathon swim meet
the same day, and a reception
at Government House that
eve~ning.
O)n independence day three
state balls will be held at
various locations still to be
decided.
Mr. Smith said that
hencefiorth July~ 10 will be
observed as a national holiday.
While there was expected to be
anoth er holiday during
Independence week he was not
yett In a position to say when
this would he.
TI~he independence
Seiretairia chairman told
rprtl"rers that he had shown
Olppositlcon Leader Kendal
Isaac~s the proposed programmte
''because I thought it proper
and because the Leader has an
important role to play in it.


I t


i :


PRIME Minister Lynden
Pindling will officially open the
Commissioners Conference at
Arawak Cay, at 9:30 a.mn.
Tuesday, May 8.
After the Prime Minister's
address, Mr. Harold Munnings,
co-ordinator at the
Independence Secretariat, will
speak to the Commissioners on
"Independence 1973".
At 11 a.m. Mr. Ernest
Strachan, in charge of protocol
at the Independence
Secretariat, will speak on
"(Protool.
Mrs. Beverly Whitfield, who
is in charge of Public Services
at the Secretariat, will also
speak on "Indepnendece."
Se veral films on
independence celebrations in
other countries will follow. At
4:30 p.m. the Commissioners
will be taken on a tour of the
Independence Secretariat.
Following are the events f'or
Wednesday, May 9 and
Thursday, May 10, the closing
day of the sessions.
WE.DNEISDAY:
9: 14 a.m. Financial Matters
(G;eneral) Speaker M.O .
Watson, Treasurer
10:45 a.m. Break
1 i 1 :I5 a.m Ne w
Constitution. Speaker T~he
Secretary to the Cabinet.
12:45 p~m. Lunch
2:15 p.m. Duties and
responsibilities of Police
Independence 1973 Supt. A .
Ferguson
3:15 p.m. Co-ordination oIf
work with Ministry of Wo~rks
Speaker Director of Works
4:15 p.m. Break
4:30 p.m. Possibilities for
Agricultural and F~isheries
Development in the Famnily
Islands. Speaker Diretctor (f
Agriculture and Fisheries.
THURSDAY
9:15 am Judical
Procedure. Speaker Ch)ief
Magistrate W'ilton Hecrcules
10:45 a.mn. Break
I1:15 a.mi. Open Disc~ussio~ns
-Commiissioners' probhlemls In
their Districts
1:00 p.mn Lunch
2 30 p.m. open D~iscutss-ions
continued

4 45 P~nm. Closing of
Contference. Speaker Tfhe
Hon. Minister of Homne Affairs.
Mr. \Inthrn\ Roberts. M.P.


NOT MISSING: Liz
GImore of Toronto, Canada,
right, is not missing, as this
photo by Philip Symonette
outside The Tribune's Shirley
Street office today proved.
She was reported missing by a
Toronto printer who claimed
she was his common-law wife
dena clita embphatiM ll
Gilmore. She and he
travelling companion, Helen
Carpenter, left, are both
enjoying an extra week's stay
in Nassau with Bahamian
friend Philip Thompson,
centre-


Sunday, and they plan to leave
on the weekend.
Mr. Hildenbrand checked
out of his room at the Montagu
Beach shortly before 1 1 a.m.
tday, land left for Canada
beore p m.


"MISSING? Not me!" So
dcared pret y Cana ian Liz
Gilmore early this a ternoon
when she walked into The
Tribune office, living proof
that she was alive and well and
living in Nassau.
She was reported missing
yesterday by Toronto printer
Gottfried Hildenbrand, who
claimed she was his
common-law wife.
Mr. Hildenbrand said she
arrived in Nassau oln April 15
for what was to hacve been a
one-week visit to Nassau, but
failed to get on the aircraft for
the return home on April 22,
although she had checked out
of her room at the Montagu
Beach Hotel.
Mr. Hildenbrand arrived in
Narssau on f~uesday to look for

She was travelling with a
girlfriend, Helen C'arpenter.
also of' Tloront,.
INF'ORMlED TIORONTO )

TriMun .hi Gmternoldn Tha
before checking out of the
hotel she called her office in
Toronto to advise them she
had decided loexternd her slay
for another wee .
sikissw liarpentern a~lnd sser
lier sister was instruc~ted to tell
Mr. Hlildenbrand.
"'It is not true tha~t I In
G;ottfried's c~ommllonlall w wife'.
Mrs. G;ilmlore suef.. "I (,nly mlct
him in Novcnlhcr.;lt nna wave
dated, but hec's ne~ver li~tal wvith
me, though h c'd lik dto." d
Miss Carpenter hiave been living
with Bahamian friends since ~


SilAWNI I Airlines will
resumer daily schedule service
between Florida and Nassau
tomorrow after suspending its
flights four months ago.
Service tor Freeport was
restored Apnil 1.
A brief anlnouncemnent said
the once-daily flight will arrive
in pNassa at 15 pm r antd
Lauderdale. West Palmn Beach
and Orlaindo. F~lorida
I'he airline plans shortly to
increased the f'lights to~ twice
daily. a sy"'bdusnia for Majestic
oant~ aal/td operated
re!ulal~rly sche~duled services
betlwccen I loridu aind the
Balhamia\ focr threte years when
at de~incided weanse of
"subsutanti il fll~cinnlu a~SSeS in



off'ical;. thi \ear 1')73 did not


It was 1Nude' clear. however.
lliei tlic neerlins financial
losses didt notl sI.Item romn the
BAhaiarn cic.<>ficial was
quotedlc .r say ing: that "without


States, we found it difficult to
compete against major
Americ~an carriers in the
f~lorida area.
He pointed out, however
that Shawnee was not
bankrupt nor was the airline in
receivership.
MEMORIAL SERVICE
FOR BASRA MAN
A MEMORIAL service for
Mr. David Mitchell, 58, who
died in a car accident at
Governor's Harbour. Eleuthera,
on April 20, will be held at St
Patrick's Church, G;overnor's
Harbour at 4 p.m. Sunday. The
service will be conducted by
the Rev. John Larsen
F ieds a ked t ed
don tins tareBa amnas Ais a
Rescue Association instead of
flowers. For the past four years
Mr. Mitchell had served as
BASRA commander at
governor's s Hlarbour and
assistedl in many r~c~ue
operations,
Mir. Mitchell. whto waos born
in sorth wales. come~ to the

sur l dn I his w\ife I'az ia. and
hn soI-c;rod Msr s
nde is Sub st wanat St.
Andrew's~~~ Scol'l~


~1


WhrD


Bribuno


CELEBRATIONS


8-DAYS


INDEPENDENCE


WILL


SPAN


Prmece Charles to arrive


here boat on


By NICKI KELLY
INDEPENDENCE CELEBRATIONS FOR THE BAHAMAS will span an 8-day period culminating in the raising


The Out Island regatta
customarily held at Eilizabetl'
Harbour, Exuma, is being
transferred to Nassau for the
_Ioccasion.
Based on reports he had
received from Captain Durward
Knowles, chairman of the
'Ratta Committee, Mr. Smith

:M WILL OPEN






a ON MAY 8


Missing~~ Caaia g


Shawnee~~ .ilie reu

flgt her ro





I


IShe Gr~titbtft


SUNDAY PORTRAITS

TOOGOOS***

OPEN SUNDAY
FROM 2 to 5

Especially' for the



looqoa~s ON THE WATERFRONT
East of the B3ridge --- Phone 54641


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATnON



MONA CAMPUS, U.W.I.
JAMAICA

ADMISSION OF ST WENTS
October, 1973.



i. Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates for
admission in October, 1973 to the Norman Manley Law School,


2. The Legal Education Certificate will be awarded by the Clouncil to
candidates on satisfactory completion of a course of study and
professional training over a period of two years and will render the
holder eligible to be enrolled as a legal practitioner in any of the par
ticipating territories.

Details of Courses and Qualificationls

3. Persons holding the LL.B. degree of the U.W.I. or any acceptable
equivalent from an approved University or Institution shall be eligible
to apply for admission. Full particulars of the qualifications required
for entry and details of courses ;.are available on request. Enquiries
should be addressed to the Registrar, Council of Legal Education, P. O.
Box 231, Mona Kingston 7, Jamaica.

4. Application forms are available from the Registrar, or from the office of
the Dean, Faculty of Law, U.W.I., Cave Hill, Barbados. Application
forms should be completed in duplicate.

5. The closing date for the recipe of applications is 30th April, 1973.


CONFLICTlg


PROPOSALS BY


BOT 1 SDES


I g. g g II
PARIS (AP)- The Saigon
government and the Viet Cong
handed each other sharply
conflicting proposals Wednesday
fo'u a fnal political settlement in
Each side quickly rejected the
key provisionsr of the other side's
plan and acknowledged failure to
meet the Friday deadline set by the
Paris cease-fire accord for
settlement of the political
For the first time since the talks
opened on March 19, the two sides
failed to set a date for their next


Saigon' e eputdy Pre ier, Nguy n
Nguyen van Hieu of the Viet Cong.
But the United States and North
Vietnam agreed meanwhile that
Henry As Kissinger and Hanot
Politburo member Le Duc The will
meet in Paris in mid-May to discuss
violations of the cease-fire
provisions they formulated in their
secret negotiations last winter.
D~epurty Asst. Secretary of State
William L. Sullivan and Hanol's
deputy foreign minister, Nguyen Co
Thach, who also played a major
role in drafting the Kissinger Tho
agreement, were scheduled to meet
F'ridaY in suburban Choisy Le Roi,
presumably to prepare for the new
Kissinger-The talks.
Ever since the Paris agreement
was signed Jan. 17, the parties have
accused each other almost daily of
violating itstperdov s and ouh
Vietnam have accused the
Communist side of continuing
mussiveininfiltration ovi .ro ants

protest, President Nixon last week
suspended economic aid talks with
tao adtnhalted removal frorn
American mines planted there
during U.S. attacks against North
Vietnam.
Vie atheansasne tirnej CNoor h
provisional revolutionary
government charged that Saigon
a ouaement ad s prneicn
conitilnuously tatt co td Cnodmrm ie
ao release Communist political
prisoners In violation of the
ceas-fire ag Eemel OCK
Throughout the first seven
sessions of their political talks, Hieu

dhir ag d~am and dr en ganoa
discussion of substance. At
Wednesday's eighth session, they
bypassed the agenda dispute and
simultaneously presented their rival
plans for South Vietnam's political
future.
The 10-point plan presented by
Vien and the six-point plan
presented by Hieu in essence
restated each side's long-standing
position, although there were
changes of emphasis in the two
plans indicating possible minute
moves toward compromise.
The Saigon plan for the first time
dropped the insistence that future
elections must be held within the
framework of the existing
constitution. south vietnamese
spokesman Nguyen Thien Dan said
the elections would establish an
"organism" that would be free to
change the constitution as it
wished.
The Viet Cong plan for the first
time hinted that the Communist
side might be willing to discuss
withdrawal of North Vietnam
forces from South Vietnam but
only after all Communist
conditions have been met and
elections have been held under the
suspice oa fa national council of

outtheo Saon plan maintained
withdraw before amecetion rca nu b
held. ItPooe rc
himetablet for a soi ical settlpranste
including the restoration by May 27'
of democratic freedoms restricted
"because of the state of war.,,
On the same date, the Saigon
plan said, North Vietnamese forces
would have to begin their
sprdirsd aree el ttion aol Tda
held on Sunday, Aug. 26. For the
firt time, Salgon offered to
demobilize as many of its troops as
the number of North Vietnamese
troops who pull out of the south.
Vien proposed that the talks
reconvene Thursday and Friday to
meet the 90-day deadline set by the
peace agreement. The deadline
expires Fiday Heu tfure no ::
indicated the talks would resume
some time next week. That
appeared to erase any chance the
deadline could be met.
The Viet Cong plan was divided
into two stages. In the firt, Saigon


would luarantee strict observance
of th e a esaerleas alal pol Hial
including freedom of movement,
freedom of the press and freedom
oe pl at ract tall aspects of this
first rstae must be fully
implemented before the proposed
National Council can organize
elections. Talks on the military
forces of both s desp isd tolow jnt

precise timetable was mentioned.
toe so ldh S~news conference
to dnoune th Sagon proposals.





I owNTowN MIAMI




Y $1 I $$

Single $
Double SI
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Homteof the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


1. Use of our Pool and 1-3 mile of Beach tComplimentary I
2. Mats. Towels and Lounge Chairs (Coinplimentary)
3. Four Champions~hip Tennis Courtsr Night Tennis
rComnplimentary a
4. His and H~ersr Sauna Baths (Complimentary>
5. Putting G;reen cComplimentary
6. 10 p.c. off Weddings. Banquets and Meetings held at the

7. Additiionarl Cocktail partiesi held throughout the year
8. Tehnis~i andS Swimming Clinics
e-Joap.e ff-allsrpecial parties and group dinners
to. M. allnagr Coplimentar Reception. Wed. 6:415pm -

II. Jumrla Torch Light Steak Cook out cWed.)
12. Thursday.Chamnpagne LancelIlpm ore N'AffL ounge
it.1 Itmtion Bfest Hibiscus Dining Room

IS. For those of you who like to play bridge. the Nassau
Bridge Club meets every Tuesdasy and Friday at 8:00pm
in the Bird Cage.

P)LEAS CALL MAtllAER'S Off(Ct t18001

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION


t;L~.-.-I,._.~_ .~-_- -- --- ----- -- -- -- -- ----- ---- ------- -- -- ---- --- - -~--~-


g

























































































,-
'


DENIES RECRUITING YOUNG INFILTRATORS
WASHINGTON (AP) The "Walshington Post" reports Nixon
campaign official Kenneth Reitz as denying he recruited young persons to
infiltrate D~emocrat George McGovern's presidential campaign organization.
Reitz announced his resignation from the G.O.P campaign organization
yesterday. T~he Post says he was asked to resign by Republican National
Chairman George Bush after Bush learned of a link between Rietz and
alleged Republican espionage
Syndicated columnist Jack Anderson says he's agreed to a request by
federal tinvestip trs that he stop quoting from secret transcripts of the
Former Attorney-G;eneral John Mitchell has told a F'lorida federal court
that he doesn't recall any Nixon re-election committee plans to conduct
electronic spying against the Vietnam Veterans against the war. Mitchell
testified vesterday at the Pensacola pre-trial hearing of eight peace
activitists accused of conspiracy to disrupt the 1972 G;.O.P. convention
with violence. Seven of them are members of the veterans group.

AGNEW EXPRESSES CONFIDENCE IN NIXON
WASH1INGTON (AP) --Against the background of continuing reports
linking the Watergate bugging directly with the White House, Vice
Prsdn Aged hs iel r ae cofrec conference yesterday, Agnew declined to answer questions from newsmen.
FIRST DEATH IN WOUNDED KNEE AFFAIR
RAPID) C:ITY, S.). (AP) An Indian wounded last week In an exchange
of gunfire with federal officers at Wounded Knee died Wednesday. It was
the first death since militant Indians took over the reservation village 58
days ago, in a protest that has been marked by sporadic gunfire.
Ftrnk :learwater, 47, died Wednesday In a Rapid C:ity hospital o~f a head
wound suffered last Tuesday during what federal officials called the
heaviest gunfire exchange during the occupation.
A total of 11 persons, including two federal marshals, have been
reported wounded since followers of the American Indian Movement to~ok
over the town.
Clearwa ter's wido~w, Morning Star, 37, told authorities in Rapid City she
wants her husband's body buried at wounded Knee.
Mrs. (learwater, who, said she is three months pregnant, was with her
husband in the PIine Ridge reservation village when he was wounded.
Clearwater was evacuated by government helicopter to Rapid City where
he unlderwent brain surgery at few hours after the incident.
Mrs. Clearwater had earlier said her husband was lying on a cot in a small
church in the village when shots fired from a federal bunker went through
the walls and struck him in the head.
TO RENEW PEACE NEGOTIATIONS WITH N. VIET

Wa hn North Vietnam. Sullivarn goes into preparatory talks tomorrow with
~lanoi s Decputy F~oreign Minister. They will lay the groundwork for next
moth's planned meeting between Hernry Kissinger and Hanol's Le D~ue

The White House hopes tomorrow's session and the higher-level talks
next month will lead to an ironing out of disagreements that have come up
since the January Vietnam cease-fire was signed.
CANCER CAUSER D-E-S BANNED IN U.S
WASHINGTON (AP) The food, and Drug Administration says the
livestock-growth drug, D-E-S will be banned from use on American farms
and ranc es starting toM rrew t--S is considered a possible catusehof
recommended substitutes for the outlawed D-E-S. but it's been learned
that even the substitutes have been classified by government scientists n

t aINcGn TE 1..L EXPOSED
WASHING;TON (AP') A top official of President Nixon's re-election
campaign says Nixon workers mailed in more than a third of the favourable
responses to a Vietnam war-related Washington opinion poll. The poll wts
taken by a T-V station to monitor reaction to last year's mining of North
Vietnamese Waters. Campaign official Devan Shumway says he doesn't
regard the G-O-P action cas rigging the poll because the D~emocrats would
have done the same thins*
HUNT'S WIFE CARRYING $10.000 AT TIME O F DEATH
WASHINGTON (AP) The Federal Reserve System wats asked by
government investigators to trace money carried by the wife of Watergate
conspirator E. Howard Hunt at the time of her death last year.
Authorities found $10,000 in $100 bills in Mrs. Hunt's purse after she
was; killed Dec. 8 In a Chicago airline crash.
Her husband said at the time that the money was intended for
investment in a motel. Mrs. Hunt has been quoted as saying shortly
before the crash that a lawyer for the Nixon campaign was paying the
couple money to remain silent about others in the case, and had urged
them to Invest some money to create some "ostensaible source of income"
to cover~ for their continued high standard of living.
Most of the bills In Mrs. Hunt's purse were traced to New York State by
their serial numbers, but the Federal Reserve determined that it wouldn't
be able to trace those bills further.
CENSUS BUREAU REVEALS UNDERCOUNT OF S.3 MILLION
WASHINGTON (AP) The Census Bureau today reported it missed
approximately S.3 million persons In the 1970 census, an undercount of
about 2.5 per cent.
However census officials said at a news conference that the undercount
for 1970 was lower than for both the 1960 and 1950 censuses. The 1960
undercount was 2.7 per cent and in 1950 It was 3.3 per cent.
Bureau figures show the undercount for blacks in 1970 was considerably
higher percentatgewise than for whites.
They showed approximately 3.5 million whites or 1.9 per cent, were not
counted, while 1.88 million blacks, or 1.7 per cent, were not counted.
Both figures were a slight Improvement from the 1960 census, the
Census Bureau said.
The total estimated residential population as shown by the 1970 census
was 203.4 million. Thle undercount of 5.3 million is in addition to the
1970 figures reported earlier.
U.S. TRADE DEFICIT NARROWED IN MARCH
WASHINGTON (AP)- The U.S. trade deficit narrowed to 52.6
m~hon rddhars meM rce, o bed s onth since September 1971, the
The Department said seasonally adjusted imports for March totalled 5.4
billion dollars and exports totalled 5.3 billion dollars.
The March deficit of 52.6 million dollars wase a considerable
improvement over the deficit for February of 476.2 mUllon dollars when
imports totalled 5.5 bilulon dollars and exports totalled 5.06 billion dollars.
'The Department said the March rise in exports of 315 million dollars
consisted largely of an increase of about 120 million dollars in aircraft
deliveries and an expansion of 180 million dollars in shipments of
agricultural products*
TWO MACHINE GUNS AMONG; GUNS TURNED IN TO POLICE
HAMILTON, BERMUD)A (AP) More than 1,000 firearms have been
turned in to police under a law passed here after the assassination of the
British governor and his aide and a double supermarket killing three weeks
ago.
Residents of Bermuda had 10 days in which to turn in their guns. The
law provided amnesty for all those who turned in unlicensed weapons.
Police Commissioner L. M. Clark said that of the 1,050 guns turned in,
880 were not licensed. He added that this left about 30 registered firearms
unaccounted for and their owners face sentences of up to 12 years in
pran andu S t,e0obdollars toe Itwasn~ot immediately thlear wh the

registrations. Parliament passed the law earlier this month as Scotlnd
Yard detectives counted their investigation in the March assassinations of
Sir Richard Sharples, the governor of this British Islad colony, and his
aide de camp, Capt. Hugh Sayers, outside G;overmecnt House.


staff is unchanged.
Tlhe regular daily meetings.
which had been held since
President Nixon took office,
were ended two or three weeks
ago, press secretary Ronald L
%iege (> said in response to

thut Zie ca ge inpocae rer
is't related to the Watrgt
scandal or Ilaldemnan's possible
involvement.
Hlaldemnan had presided over
the daily sessions attended
by suc~h Nixon aides as John
Ilhrlichman, Ziegler, Roy Ash
and G;eorge Shultz
Ziegler said the change in
procedure camne beLcause it was
decided "we could he mre r
productive by meeting with
individual members of the staff
and with department heads in
separate meetings.
In a long news briefing,
Ziegler was asked about
Nixon s mood as he purlsues
the Watergate investigation.
"Hle is very mnuc~h
concentrating on this matter .
he is a man at work." Ziegler
responded.
When asked whether Nix~n
was angry, outraged, or
saddened by the major new
developments he reported last
week, Ziegler said he was "not
prepared to project that type
of feeling on the part of the
President OCHNG ?

"I have seen the president
involved in a number of
difficult situations in the 40
years he's been in office aind in
each of these periods I have
not detected ... a change in
mood as such," Ziegler saidgae

only limited responses to the
barrage of questions he faced
at his first brief ing since last
Thursday. But he said he


sd)ll ~sl r


Thousands of families from just
below *h hGreatbLakesoto thteoGufle

their homes, millions of acres of
rich farmland are fit for nothing
more than rice paddles and damage

Th ainlWea oer bye vc
says the r c8dstkcer gn rot 20
-43.5 feet, or 13.5 feet above
flood stage is expected sometime
Saturday. The record crest had
been predicted for Thursday.
illinois Gov. Daniet Walker on
Wednesday estimated damage to his
state alone at $50 million and
officials set a similar figure for the
damage in Missouri.
On the other end of the river
system, Mississippi River
commission officials estimated
damage to Loulslana and Mississippi
at well over $100 million.
The current flood situation is the
second onslaught of the Mississippi
and Its tributaries this spring, and
officials say only the elaborate
system of levees has prevented the
flooding from producing even
grnedale dsastur in pperty damage
8 DEATHS
At least eight persons have died
because of the current flooding.
moe esMississippi Rivernobteh
Minnesota and as it joins its
tributaries forms a massive valley of
weateer hatdcut h cou try i haf.
With the normal volume of water
flowing past St. Louis at an
Impressive 200,000 cubic feet per
eceonndjtethe ratemlhanrice ltoea
per second. The normal outline of
the meandering river has virtually
dis feared in some areas as tol e

spreading lakes that alter the
geography of the midsection of the
country.
It will take weeks for the crest to
ride down the Mississippi and weeks
more for water to drain off and
allow life to return to normal in
1 ghredst communities along the
The American Red Cross said
Wednesday an estimated 10,000
families in 25 counties along the
Mississippi and Missouri Rivers in
Missourl and Illinois have been
"seriously affected" by the floods
this week.
The high waters begin ast far
north as Rock Island, Ill. Nearby
Keithsburg, a community of 850,
was under water Wednesday after a
levee broke the previous day.
"About 75 per cent of the town
is in water and families from about
15 homes were rescued by boats,"
the daughter ofhpolice chief Vrail
Rnger said Se oi e ahr
worked through the night and was
not available for comment because
he was sleepingP
RA ID RISE
"When the levee broke, a friend
of ours was drinking coffee in a
restaurant near the river. Before he
could get it down, there were six
Inches of water on the floor," Janet

At Quincy, III, civil defense
officials predicted a Thursday crest
of 29.5 feet, more than 12 feet
aoe floohd lovel Bdutt a spokesman

reinforced levee system guarding
the area was expected to hold the

bllitis irvagriculture officials
estimated some 600,000 acres of
the state was under water, about
half of it "good crop land."
"It is impossible to make a crop
losls estimate now," a spokesman
said, "but the only crop really hurt
would be wheat."
He said June plantings are


markets
can be
lead to
increased
recent
flow of
dealers,
to brand

n energy
consumer
said the
that the
to do
about
asoline."


normal for corn and soybear
Ill is ratfon, MI l, whe
converge, three-fourths
community of 1,000
inundated. Police said the

ra stIl risi W an ep
area's his ory hit. ores
three service stations and
shops normally do a b
business this time of the ya
an influx of fishermen and c
but they are all under water
A force of more the
national guardsmen were m
in various parts of Illinois
with sandbagging operation
guard against looting*
Further south, at St. Lo
43.S-foot crest predicts
Saturday would easily top
foot mark recorded in 1844
The waters of the Missor
join the Mississippl just nor
Louis and the Ohio River li1
the system further south a
Ill.
Some 2,000 Missouri
guarodsmn a 5 rS olsts o a
President Nixon Monday
and hundreds of college
and teen-agers pitched in at
aearsati aide in sane
The flood stages
Mississippi have pI
tributta es~a sur rodf
Francis have caused
around Madison. Ark.,
pent-up overflow of the
ierht rh f71cS 30,0
under water for month*
Farmers in the delta ha

uabl to plant theirmer p
cotton crop this year*
The Mississippi River itse
50.5 feet Wednesday at Vi
Miss., the Highest level the
1937, and a crest of S I.
predicted for May 6.

TAS FOCE OR A
CO SMRS EFOOGEI
DETROIT (AP) -A
chairman of the Federal
Commission says the Unite
needs a standby plan for
rationing in case of possib
shortages this summer. "W
to be making plans now
wait until June or July," 13
told newsmen here Wec
White was commission c
during the Johnson Admini
White said he fears
industry, if left to its own
will restrict sales to the
where the highest prices
obtained, this could well
dry gas pumps or greatly i
prices, he said.
White was critical of
industry steps to cut the
gasoline to independent
giving preferred treatment
dealers.
White is heading up a
policy task force for the C
Federation of America. He
task force "is concerned
President is unprepared
anything immediately
threatened shortages of g


expects he could be more
responsive "at some point in
the future."
Ziegler did say, in response
to questions, that there has
tween 'no h 1an i sth fsa u

mha toeresignat dns h ve been
sumte y aie legedly
involved in the Watergate case.
I~e also denied that Nixon
was warned in August 1972 of
the sco e of the Wat rgte
scandal. "Any suggestion that
the President had knowledge .
art that time ... is not correct "
Ziegler said
WRONG; CONCLUSION?
in discussing the suspension
of the early-morning meetings
of senior presidential aides
Ziegler said the aides still
meet frequently throughout
the day and talk often on the
telephone and that it would be
the "wrong conclusion to
draw" to link the suspension of
the meetings to the Watergate
case
Hialdeman in the past has
usually been the first aide
Nixon sees when he reaches his
office. Asked whether that was
the case today, Ziegler said he
didn't know but that "I think
Bob has seen him.'
Ziegler had opened his
brief ing by saying that the
President was working in his
e ecutive ofice building sie

with foreign affairs adviser
Henry A. Kissinger and
economic advisers Shultz and
Hierbert Stein.
'The press secretary didn't
mention Haldeman at that
pit bte ledi bin th edrief ig
be meeting with other
members of his staff" and that
he was sure that Haldeman
would be among them


*

a ,
S *

8

8 *
'


Tuesday night.
ABC correspondent Bill G~ill
said Rogers, who was U.S.
A attorney General under
President Eisenhower, met
with Nixon at the F~lorida
White House over the weekend.
Gill quoted unnamed
sources as saying Rogers was
expected to advise Nixon on
how best to clean his house of
"tainted personnel" and "how
best to restore confidence in
the presidency.
He said the sources expect
the President to announce that
Roge wl p rsona ly direct an
overhaul of Nixon's staff.
Late last week spokesmen at
the State Department said
Rogers was absent from his
office and taking a few days
off for rest.
Tuesday the spokesmen
wou don't comment on the
report that Nixon had tapped
Rogers to direct a top-level
h ousecleaning in the

ads tuesodnay the lawyer for


presidential aides John D
Ehrlichman and H. R.
llaldeman was spotted by
newsmen first at the White
Flouse and later at the office of
Watergate prosecutor Earl
Silbert.
Sources close to the Senate's
Watergate investigation have
told the Associated Press that
tdey ave evidenceE inia i
9 anticipated in a HWhite House
coverup of the facts behind the
Watergate wiretapping.
Wilson said his visit to
Silbert had no connection with
Federal gand ju y's
investigation of the Watergate

ma troon aftae memt neansm
had left the courthouse.
Wilson was seen at the White
House by a reporter for Mutual
Radio News. At the Florida
White House earlier deputy
press spokesman Gerald Warren
had said President Nixon met
with Wilson last Thursday at
the White House.


PHNOM PENH, APRIL 26
(AP) Cambodian insurgents
overran weakly defended
government positions across
the Mekong and Bassac rivers
from Phnom Penh and now
control a long stretch of the
east bank paralleling the capital
city, refugees said Thursday.
The city's Pochentong
international airport was hit by
more than 20 122mm rockets
during the night, the
explosions killing 19 persons
and wounding 62, seven of
them soldiers.
There appeared to be no
im mediate threat to the
residents of the city, and the
military high command was
not moving any troops or
h avy weapons into the west

The insurgents' numerical
strength was not known, but

tls tsu PnmPepne5 id at d
the high command, which
kedp rm irn00 dBcunita rm <
sorely neglected to protect the


city's right flank.
It also added credence to
intelligence reports the
insurgents were planning a
large-scale attack on the capital
soon, perhaps within the
fort night.
U.S. jets from Thailand
bombarded the east bank
Thursday morning as hundreds
of Phnom Penh residents
watched from the riverside.
East bank villagers coming
into Phnom Penh said the
sparse numbers of government
soldiers defending the east
bank had fled two days ago ats
the rebels were moving in.
The guerrillas, they said,
were permitting east bank
farmers to come and go with
theklrn mk8t produce but Pere
residents enter.
The military high command
ed Ph om Phenh i gce e
were fighting government
so sienroinn teiceKtuth, tt
capital.


Thursday April 26, 1973.

sSOVIET SPACE


if STATAln I


BABlY DAMAGED

BERLIN (AP) The Soviet
space station Salyut 2 apparently
has been so extensively damaged
that a Itnkup with a cosmonaur
craft now is not Ilkely, the director
of the Wilhelm Foerster Satellite
Observatory in West Berlin saidl
Thursday.

Zir ecrh sid U.St spac auh rt
pi River In Colorado Springs, Colo., have
00-mile ascertained that Salyut 2 no longer
is in a stable flight path. Zimmer
said that it appeared Salyut 2 was;I
ns. te turning over its own axis as it
reriver "he Soofet etll c ud send up a
of the Soyuz space ship with cosmonauts
insr to look at Salyut 2," Zimmer said,
IlInid "but if it is no longer in a stable

Id I h im Md hs sttio la
aurants, ard pr daayfrom rSalyuwa2
novelty launched. Subsequently, radar
'omnP observation showed 8 pieces o~f
material floating about Salyut 2,
:ampers* Zimmer declared.
.Zimmer said the pieces outside
an 500 the space station could have
obilized resulted from an experiment or
to help from damage to the space station
,ns and that now appears to have been :Ir.
explosion.
,uis, the Zimmer said Salyut 2 was put
ed for into a relatively low orbit making a
the 41.3 course correction necessary early in
Sthe flight. The first indication that
url River something went wrong, Zimmer
th of St. said, was from the two days delay
nks with before the Soviets themselves
it Cairo, announced Salyut 2 was up.
Zimmer's station specializes in
national observing Soviet space launchles
diszme b from its Berlin vantage point. Hie
nighte by hep exchne i esrmation with
students It IS known the United States
t critical evaluates material on Soviet space
dbagging Hightstroeportted by various stations
of thd It appeared, Zimmer said, thalt
revented Salyut's two solar energy panels,
thrown "Theydaoo like wings,"oeither hav
flooding position to catch sunlight to
andathe produceenergy forelectricity.
zo This would mean they would
00 ares havemteorely on banteri s on bard.

have been so sparing with their
ave been signals, sending only sporadically.

d cam f the space cr ft is dmagtd to

manned craft, it would be another
!lf was at serious setback to an already
icksburg. trouble plagued Soviet space
ere since am
9 feet is prZ mmer said that U. S. stationsl
established that in July, 1972 anr
earlier Salyut space station burnedl
DSOLINE uhport at lEarth's atmosphere
former Zimmer theorized that this time
Power the Russians wanted a space
,d States spectacular to steal the Thunder
gasoline from the upcoming U. S. space lab
,le acute project or to have Salyut 2 in
le ought position as an observation platforml
and not forthe U.S.launch.
ee Whit+ "It cannot servt as ?an
dnesday. observation point unless they bring
chairmann it back into a stable altitude,"
istration. Zimmer declared, adding this was
the oil possible but that evaluation would
devices, _have to await devel pments.


MlISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD!


Millions of acres oI



farmland ruined





By Mike Duffy
The Associated Pren
TORRENTIAL SPRING RAINS have filled the mighty Mississipl
to some of its highest levels in recorded history and created a 1,5
stretch of saganv farmiand and flooded homes.


SINCE WATERGATE SCANDAL


Nixon chief of staff



IIO lORger ()re81des


at ai 4 me g g


By Gaylord Shaw
WASHINGTON (AP) H. R. Haldeman no longer presides at
regular early morning meetings of senior presidential aides, but a
spokesman insisted Wednesday his status as White House chief of


Wil Rogg diec gg gs g ggg





WASHINGTON (AP President Nixon has called on
Secretary of State William P. Rogers to restore "impeccable
integrity" to the White House in the wake of the Watergate
scandal, the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) reported


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Remembe0 fo lq


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
THE YEAR 19)50 was important for me. It was the year in
which I attended my first press conference in a distant country.
The first meeting was a gathering of British Commonwealth
editors and publishers in Canada; and later in the same year
editors and publishers from all over the Amnericas and the
Caribbean met in Montevideo, Uruguay.
The Canadian meeting took my wife and me to the most
important centres in Eastern Canada, from'Quebec City to
Toronto.
My wife did not accompany me on mny South American trip
which took me to some of the major cities in that area. including
Buenos Aires where I saw a harsh dictatorship in operation in a
"frightened society" for the first time. This was during the
Peronista period when Peron's wife Evita . .thought a saint by
some and a devil by others .. was still alive.
**+***
Experience had taught me to shed all my prejudices against my
fellowman. Already I had begun to regard myself as a citizen of
the world and a brother to all mankind .. all except the South
African. This was one prejudice I had been unable to overcome.
Because of what I regarded as the inhuman treatment of the black
African in South Africa I felt that nothing good could comie out
of that country
And so during the entire six weeks tour -- I ignored and
snubbed members of the South African delegation at the CPU
conference in Canada. They tried to be friendly but I would have
nothing to do with them.
These two press conferences were the beginning of an activity
that would take me around the world three times and
criss-crossing it from several directions. It was a channel through
which I would forge friendships all over the world and make the
small island Tribune into an international organ of
communication. **

In 1955 I attended my third big conference. My wife did not
accompany me on this trip because the children were still in
school and she felt she could not go so far away.
This was a CPU meeting which was being held in Australia and
New Zealand. This trip was to introduce me to the Middle and
Far East which I had known in a very limited way in the British
army during the first world war. It was also to take me right
artos LAounta ac d Ne hsan notniastour arranged for delegates
******
South Africa was well represented at the Australia-New
Zealand meeting. I snubbed them for a whole month in Australia
and during the first week in New Zealand.
They must have been conscious of my resentment to them
because one day .. when we were up in the middle of the
country in a hotel at the foot of Mount Cook . .a tall South
African came boldly up to me. He was thin and athletic in
a pearance
'Dupuch," he said holding out his hand in friendly greeting,
"why don't we go for a little walk?"
My first impulse was to ignore his hand anld snub himn publicly
but something inside me told me that this would be a mistake.
And so we shook hands and started on a long trek along the
base of this magnificent mountain which bears the name of
Captain Cook, the famous English explorer who discovered much
of this region of the world.
******
And then he told me a story that made me feel ashamed of my
behaviour and lifted the last human prejudice from my heart.
Although he bore a French name he said he was an Afrikaner,
associated with the Dutch settlers. His original ancestor, a
Frenchman, had gone to South Africa with the first Dutch
settlers and so their family had become identified with the
dominant Dutch element in the nation.
A change was brought about in his family by a grand-uncle
who went to school in England and returned home with very
enlightened views on racial questions. Ever since then his family
had been fighting for greater opportunities and wider freedoms
for the blacks in their country.
ofHtehthenetohi me something m re imp rtant. Hee said tha m s
conference had been to prison because they had fought for the
rights of the black African.
At the final meeting in New Zealand Rene de Villiers made a
very courageous speech on the racial situation in his country. It
was courageous because what he said was certain to reach the
authorities in South Africa and it was the kind of thing for which
he might be sent to prison.
******
Before we parted in New Zealand Rene and I swore undying
friendship. We felt that we had become blood brothers because
our lives had been dedicated to the same cause.
"Etienne," he said to me as we parted, "one day I will bring
my children to your country to show then how civilized people
live "
It was on miy return from this trip that I successfully moved
the resolution in the House of Assembly thiat resulted in breaking
down racial barriers in the colony.
This was a tough year for mec because I lost so much business as
a result of this battle that The Tribunef almost went bankrupt.
But I battled it through and managed to survive with my skin.
The news of my successful campaign against racial
discrimination was published in every corner of the world. An
organization in Malawi (Africa), which was trying to do thre same
thing, wrote and asked me how I hiad mnlltaged to achieve this
greatt reform. the greatest for coloured people in the Bahamnas
since the Act of Emancipation in the blouse of Comnmons.
Among the happiest of all people was mly friend Rene in South
Africa. He wrote me a wonderful letter of congratulations,
For 23 years Rene and I have corresponded. His one desire was
to meet m~y wife and I wanted to meet his wife too because mien
cannot live the stormly kind of lives Rene and I had lived without
having a wonderful wife at their side.


The chance camle three years ago in L~ondon when Rene and his
wife were there at the same time we were visiting. Thle meeting
was warm and spontaneous. Rene rushed up and embraced mly
whf ean ri ewif crushed up adnd embraced me No doubt about it.
In the meantime one of their sons had grown up and mnigrated
to Canada where he could breathe the air of freedoml.
During this meeting Rene told me that at somie timne thcy
would be visiting their son in Canada and thecy would arrange t"
visit me in Nassau.

I have now received a letter fr himn dated Mlarchl 26th,
"It is possible," he wrote, "that I mnay be able to redeem a
pledge I made to myself in New Zealand in 19)55 to visit yolu in


Thursday April 26, 1973.


so y niste m i Mr and to I I arepl lnin a visit 0 0 r
from New York to the Bahiamias about August 12-14 this year.
And, of course, we will only go if the D~upuchles are home at thiat
timle.
"Will you be? Please let mie know' as soo~n as ionlvenient so that
11 it fits in We call do somle air bookings.
"Hlope you and Marie are well and that lif'e inl the Bahamas is
following a tranquil course.
"I suppose you have been to Europe since last we met in
London. It would be great fun to see you borth again. I am
looking forward to, hearing from you."
,,,as.
I didn't write to tell Rene that discrimlination had gone into
reverse in the Bahamas and that the people for whom my father
and I gave our lives in helping to lift out of marshes of
hopelessness had made me one of their victims. I didn't tell him
that South Africans are not welcomed in the Bahamas by the PLP
Government
******
As readers of this column are already painfully aware, South
Africans, who were legitimately in the colony when the PLP took
over the Government in 19)67, had to leave the islands under the
immigration policy admiinistered by the Hon. Arthur Hanna when
he was Minister of Home Affairs. No doubt was left in anyone's
minds as to the reason for refusing to renew the work permits of
South Africans.
Even two Negro Amnericans seemed to strongly disapprove of
Mr. Hanna's policies.
Sammie Davis Jr., the wealthy American Negro actor had
t dA i tobuild a halfrnillior dollar house at Freept sA fm d
building but he was given short notice to get out of the place. Mr.
Davis cancelled his plans for Freeport.
The internationally famous Negro athlete, Jackie Robinson,
who broke the racial barrier in baseball, was an investment broker
for Governor Rockefeller of New York.
Soon after the PLP took over the Government Mr. Robinson
was a frequent visitor to F~reeport and announced plans for large
investments there. Just about the time Davis cancelled plans for
building a house there Jackie Robinson quietly faded out.
And so, even Amnerican Negroes. who have done a great deal to
lift their own people in America, realize the lunacy of
discrimination-in-reverse as it is practised by the Bahamas
Government. And so Minister of Tourism Clemnent Maynard
should not be surprised that what he described as "quality
tourists no longer vacation in the Bahamas.

The racial attitude of the PLP Governmnent is not only bad
business for the colony .. it is wicked, perpetuating practices
followed in a less vicious form by white people in the Bahamnas
before I succeeded in breaking down racial barriers in the colony
in January, 1956.
This practice is particularly unfair in most cases when applied
to South Africans.
South Africa is a very prosperous country. It is bursting with
opportunities on all sides. No native of that country needs to go
abroad to seek a livelihood-
Most of the South Africans who are living abroad have left
their home in protest against the policies of their government . .

nhhen mrHan doe ths peoo le out f te aha aas and 0,
probably punishling men who had left South Africa because their
sympathies were with the black A rican.

My Afrikaner friend Rene de Villiers and I will meet again but
it will have to be in a civilized white country like Britain, Canada
.or the U. S. -- not in Nassau, which is supposed to be my home.
******
FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: I had a phone call from Mr. H. M.
Taylor, founder of the PLP, a few days ago.
Mr. Taylor has left the Bahamas and established permanent
residence in Miami on a Residence Visa obtained for him by his
American wife.
Visas for Bahamians to enter the U. S. will be greatly restricted
after independence but a Bahamian married to an American and
their children will be given easy entry into the country.
Mr. Taylor, who launched the PLP in good faith, left the party
about ten years ago because, he says, he could no longer subscribe
to their policies and methods of operation.
Since then his wife came back to Miami and qualified as a
PracticalNurse. She is kept very busy. He is now busy fixing up
their house in Miami. He will take a job later,
It is interesting that he and I, who did so much to open new
opportunities for coloureld people should now be living in
sel k in l Idt ok my bride of a few weeks to Inagua which I
then represented in the House of Assembly.
SStafford Symonette, who was then the wireless operator at the
island, made some snapshots of us.
Some time later 1 received a letter from Mr. Symonette with an
unusual address on the envelope.

the enve e Ud my it hemwr te as a, Bamasd. pa emile
this letter at Inagua.
This was a gag to see whether I was known by my face in
Nassau.
The letter reached me without any delay.
This wasn't surprising because I should have been known in
Nassau.
Igot a surprise this week when a.letter came to my hotel from
the Ministry of Agriculture in Jamaica.
It was addressed simply.
Sir Etiennte Dupuch,
Coral Gables, Florida
Very few letters with such an incomplete address would reach
their destination. But this letter came straight to my hotel.
Almost every day something happens to make me realize that,
after only a short stay in this city, people are aware of my


presence hlere.
Have done nothing to promote this state of awareness. It has
just happened .. "just so" as they would say in the Bahamas.

CORRE:CTION: A line was omitted from my article "One
Journalist To Another" on Thursday of last week.
The paragraph should have read as follows:
"I don't think the Bahamiian people fully understand what
they will lose if The Tribune is no longer with them.
"I am told by my office in Nassau that there seems to be a
growing awareness among young people.They report that school
children are now coming to Thre Tribunre to gather information
about mie. Some of them are being introduced to my work by
reading mly book The Tribune Story in which I outline the
evolution of the Bahamian society during this century and the
constructive part my family and The Tribune played in the
reformi movement, all of which is now being destroyed by a
vicious G;overnment." ..

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY

power of going out of one's self. and appreciating whatever is
noble anld loving inl another.
THIOMAS HiUGHE'S

The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the
reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it in turn will look
sourly upon you: laughi at it and with it, and it is a jolly, kind
companion.
THACKERAY


Nott~xus ADoomrs JVR IN VERBA MAGISTIR
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Mitaster
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.).
Publisher/lEditor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRONM.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 19 72.


US may well a ccep t Bahamas





THE UNITED STATES, which hasr stealdfast\l objected tot havringl thet Blhalmas definer it\ territotria~l limits o~n ther arc~hipelago theory,
may well be peared to accept a 12-mile territo~riatl limlit.


A~ccording to Miamni herald
Latin Americ~an c~orrespo~nde~nt
Williamr Montalbano,. the Ui.S.
is re-thinking its pohition on
territorial limnits as a result of
pressure fromt Latin Amcrican
nations, and the prospect of a
Law of the Sea coniiterenc~e
next year.
Somel of Ilthese irunltreS. 1ike
Ic~uador, C'hile andi Peru, hiave
enunciatedc a 100)-nlell limlit on 1
grounds either oft \overeignty,
iunisd tt on. f ash eries or
Like mo~st m~ajor maritime
nations, the I .S. has long
claimed so~vereignty o~ver the
ocecans fo~r three miles fromi its
shores, and exclusive rights for
another nine miles.
nalowevcr ten I in ini]<)rican
one sort or anotlher over a
200-mnile limit, and the idea Is
proving attractive~ lir miany of
the newly independentlll naitiois
of Africa and Asiai as we~ll. Mr.
Montalbano sail.
'TUNA1 WAR'
The U.S. government's
adherence to the three-mile
limit has resulted in a
22-year-old "tuna war" with
Ecuador and Peru. Both
c~oun i n regularly slize
found inside the 100-mile
claim.
Since the U.S. governmntcn
reimburses boat owners for the
stiff fines levied by Perur and
Ecuador, the tuna war has cost
the American taxpayer $6.3
million so far, and outraged a
good portion of the Congress
in the aceso caused ill will on
a diplomatic level between the
UI.S. and Latin Amecrica. Lately
the Chinese, in wooing Latin
America, have become great
supporters of the 200-mile
limit although claiming a
thr e-milae liit her Ives.hte


200mile principle has also
been affirmed by Brazil,
Argentina, Uruguay, Panama,
fll Salvador, Nicaragua and
Costa Rica. Guinea and the
Cameroons also accept it.
Mr. Montalbano said that a
second group of Latin nations,
headed by Mexico, Clolombia
and Venezuela in a mediators'
role, is advancing the concept


I 12 male ttnaritmr~ l \ea, m
wh~iih frecdomii ofI navligatr on

I1h1 right of free trarnsit




n ito e r nat onl
agree in e t In < l ud in g




( fr1C setlemen all




Iir n/< ii r ie a iris lictr II sta
Ihe n ite Stte stp far p
iclrict (,f tnorin \ 00 lcf


whlrther latin American or
lurlnean want to protect their
rrght to, the resources of the
seas~ rllt their ioast from fish
tt, minerical wealth,1
Ihc nriu~lurial countries,
whiih Iive on international
trade, wanrt use o~f the steas
urnres~tricted~c b national lines
inl ~the case of the super
powetrs, the right of free
Passage' il as mu1ICh Of the sea as
posablle 1s a m~aJOr security
conso n r tIonnternational
mlcvemnt away from the
tdtinl three~-mile limit
< tf teet~h Iro bot!h the American
,rnd Sovietl navies." Mr.


no s1 werec ti fltly11 aSSert a 12-mile
teiirroriil Iimit free passage of
nava vesels would he
:I~re ittedl inl 151 international
strrits Includling G;ibralter
withl its vital access to the
Mdciterra~ne~an.
I tcrally every ~country in
the wo~rldl is expectibd to be at
the ceas can erencece.


m~il.'s of !1!een t 1 nut1 Iss li






Lal(t hamph not prep fced to on


un~ivrttl 1: noI tae termsonal
111Cr Iha 11(
"~r IaiShe \nwncanI posvinan has l
g~ramul!\ Jiledi aI~ "eries at t'

preauor metng hldin

(d ev w a~ h I,; lll'l IcI'


h BIbtrt















BROCHUIE AVAILABLE ~O SI OTS


I ~lz~wrr~


I~__


INK SMEI


4 Reas ons Why



Out Islcmand Ai wa



is the Best Choice:



toM~amn s"". Lowest fares. For just $38, OIA will fly you
round-trip between Nassau and Miami on our one-day fore. And our
21-day round-trip excursion fares are just as attractive: $42 Nassau-Miami
and $32 Freeport-Miami. These three fares are the lowest of any airline.

2. Better equipment. We fly the BAC-111, the world s most reliable
short-haul, pure-jet aircraft. With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can
stretch out.

3. Beffer service. Beautiful Bahamion stewardesses to see to ygyr very
need. And a complimentary rum punch to refreth) you.

4. More convenient schedules. Three non-stop flights daily from Nossau.
S8:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M. And one at 10:30 A.M. which makes a stop
in Freeport. Plus one direct flight daily from Freeport to Miami of 11:30 A.M.
Returning Clights are just as convenient.

Remember, lowest fares. Better equipment. Better service. More convenient
schedules. That s Out Island Airways. So call your travel agent or Out
Island Airways now for reservations. 7-8222.


OutbkslAndrwarys seres theachomnosest


.: R


BISHOP MICHAEL Eldon
chairman of the Independence
__ Essay Competition Committee,
said that a special brochure
various adult competitions
planned by the Independence
IEssay Competition Committee
.' is now available from Mr.
Clement Bethel or Mrs. Susan
Wallace at the Bahamas
Ministry of Education.
The competitions are in
drama, adult essay and adult
poetry,
The Bishop said that an
encouraging number of entries
had been received, and that the
flow hi ex ected oo thncrease as
Deadline for the drama
competition is May 1, with
poetry and essays due in by
our May 15. All entries should be


. I


MR. ROY SMITH, managing
director of Nassau Motor
C many's c tmer csaidli ic

t nw poore ae utr hi e
diagnose simple faults, how to
anticipae lapossihbee tremble ,
preventative maintenance.


a regular customers and the sent to Mr. Clement Bethel. RESIDENTS of Pinedale in
a response hasd been extremely Ministry of Education. the South Beach District were

ri P ctur d abv fromh et to YELLOWPIRn eFAI rgaet ouie s it y o nc thea
t instructor, Mr. Joe Hepburn, Hlospital Yellowbirds will hold S6ichol Ban avdrey an utoo
y foreman, Mr. Mike Colbey, their annual mini-fair Friday in co Bn a n udr
a tester and Mr. K. Campbell, the lower grounds of the concert, attended by the Hon.
service manager. hoptlfo :0t ~. Carlton Francis, Minister of
Development and M.P. for the
-~District, and Mrs. Francis.
r:)blf~The male and female
student high school band was
under the direction of Mr.
G~eorge Annan, musical
;~ instructorr at the school.
P~ii~The concert opened with the
playing of the Bahamas
National Anthem and was
followed by many popular
tunes.
Mr. Enoch Backford Jr..
headmaster of the A. F.
Adderley High School,
attended the concert. He said
the band was making a name
for itself in the musical field. It
won a trophy last year at the
Musical Festival.
Bishop Eldon,honorary Kiwanian scOr ani ed in 170 the hig


"We have circulated


e


ilt often happens that w
receive a frantic call from
stranded customer, who with

t firs pace cr mn gd t
reach our service department
under his own steam thereby
avoiding the expense of
tow-in fee." Mr. Smith said.


p


CI

I
r~ u*






r*l
1

i.,









Ziil






_..,s-.
--
.x-


club. Pictured left to right atpulc o a nmbr f
temengfloigthe occasions having only recently
induction ceremony are left to gvn a promne a
right: Rudy Moultrie, reeort one of the children
president, Bishop Eldon' nwayhn bu music
Senao the Hon. Paul t lmw srtd 97,

principal speaker at the "now they play by music and
meeting, Oscar Phillips, they can read it well."
president-elect of the club and Mr. Francis said he was
Idris Reid, vice president. Mr. proud of the accomplishments
Sgeid and Mr. Phillips of the students.
;sponsored the bishop. "They are talented young
PHOTO: Gus Roberts people," he said "and I am sure

R ATENINGtheortan rert n obep a naana
development of the
ANTIGUAI Com:::::.:he s we move
Genea duing une. Mr. Francis said he was so
. Highlighting .the Caribbean impressed by the high school
meeting is the formulation of a bn hth se hmt
joint policy and common give a number of concerts
approach to regional matters, throughout his district.
which are to be presented at Sonwt h ihsho
the enev meeing.band are (left to right) Mr.
Before the formal opening
of the conference three days of


... IT ALL ADDS UP


AT` LAST TUESDAY'S
meeting of the Kiwanis Club of
Fort Montagu, the Rt. Rev.
Michael H. Eldon, Bishop of
Nassau and the Bahamas, was
rnutd ase in ucnorary
performed by Rudy Moultrie,
president of the Club who was
assisted by Charles Lunn, Jr.,
Lieutenant Governor of the
Bahamas, Roy Davis a past
presidbnf' of the club, Idris
Reid, vice president of the

LABOUR M)IITE

CONFERENCE. IN
THIE HON. CLIFFORD
Darling, Minister of Labour
and National Insurance is in St.
John, Antigua, attending a
conference of Caribbean
Ministers of Labour.
The Minister was
accompanied by Mr. C. A. P.
Smith, Permanent Secretary to
the Ministry.
The conference is the second
annual meeting of Caribbean
Labour Ministers. The first one
was held in Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad in 1972.

preli inaon sesint th 5t
Plenary Session of the
International Labour
Conference to be held in


your reusablp but unwanted


Items of


Clothing, tools '

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc. .. clear out


Ilri;
~
"CQ*e
~C

II~LIJii
~/711~i
--


your close~ts, garage, storeroom .

all can be of hel


to someone else.

Donate them to


technical background talks
were also held with the various
advisers to the Caribbean
Commonwealth Government
representatives.
The conference will close
TDES
High 1:37 a.m. and 2:09
p.m.
Low 7:51 a.m. and 8:14
p.m.


OF


TWO DOORS WEST
MONTROSE AVE


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8 MI od

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ROSETTA ST REET


TRY IIYOULL LHEIT


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Iruslr *nts D-ng ncl mertou
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SALE OR MEN


SHOIE STORE BAY STREET PHONE 2-4535



EARE D


y adsruhT April 26 19 3


.


She


~i2d~H


By Abigail Van Buren
eD tm or c~ar, ee eae *. mes same., s..
DEAR ABBY: A neighbor of mue loves to sew, and
abe has made some lovely things. She made a beautiful
dress ad bonnet for my daughter's fourtht birthday, so I
took tim child to a photo~raphy studle and had a pleture
taken of her in that outfit. Then I bourgbt a frame for it and
presented it to my neighbor to show my appreciation.
She seemed pleased cad placed the picture on her
piano. A few months later I noticed that she had placed a
pleture of her dog in that frame, and my daughter's pleture
was nowhere to be seen. I finally told her that as long as
she wasn't displaying my daughter's pktrme, I'd like to
have it back. he saild, "Cesrtalaly." Then she got my
daughter's picture out of a drawer aml handed it to me.
I said: "How about the frame?"
She replied: "Oh, you can buy another one for 75
cents **
Abby, I was a btat. 'Itat trame cost me $1.50. I didn't
Want to start an argument with her so I just kept my
mouth shut.
What would you have done? HURT
DEAR HURT: I'd have kept my meath shat

DEAR ABBY: A couple, merely acquaintances of a few
years, have dropped in to see us on three different ocea-
sions. They appear to be Ilike other people, except for the
husband.
He asks to take a both the mkag~e tbey step inekle the'
were on their way home from a day's trip in their car,
even the their home is only 5 miles from ours.
My wife and I have never been in their home but we
maxerqtarxl 3t ha all the cownveniencs art or, tehwavin a
tub sad shower.
On two other occasions when they had come directly
from their home, he again asked to takes a bath. After tim
(Mr~d bath I concluded that he met be some kind of a nut.
Needless to say we s hav. r rdms thl viit -
i:probably never will.
What do you suppose makes our ordinary bathing facill-
Sties so fascinating that the husband cannot wait to use is
ownm? PERPLEXED IN SANTA ANA
SDEAR PERPLEXED: I don't know, but I surely weald
have asked him after the second bath.

DEAR ABBY: I read in your colutmn at a man sand
Woman who seemed to be able to adjust to the fact that
they have grown heavy together and are still happy. I
identified with the woman, asr I have been in the 200s since
I was 16 years old. One thing, the, I did not identity with
was the closing statement: "Who would have us?"
I am sure Ihere are many heavy women who firmly
believe that they wil never merry because bey3 are fat. I
wass in the 200s when we married last year. I was lamenf-
ing the fact that I was being measured for a sBize 22%
werdding gown instead of a size 12 or 14. Mby precous
husband-to-be took Big Me into his very trim arms and
sakl: "The things about you I fled most beautiful are the
things that will never change. Weight can go up or down,
but your love for other people, your kindness, you ravaila.
ability for those in need, your love for God and for me . .
these are beauty, and I fnod you most beutif~l." Needless
to say I cried a bucketful of tears for so understanding and
loving a man.
May I coffr a Hssu advece for ten overwelate~t tee
every mast you have regardlesss of law heavy you are.
Keep your hair well groomed, your face nicely made up,
wear clothes that flatter you, and concentrate on good
manners. Most of all, give of yourself to others in your
community or in your church. Don't hibernatel Someone
han yu Aby fr the opportunity to say what I have
felt, and a special thank-you for the chance to praise my
husband openly before the world.
CONNIE FROM CXIDRADO


ZIG-ZAG SEWING MACHINE MODEL 257


PR ICED AT ON LY

VU.0


ano ecedl hr o da
One will be undertaken
during a four-month period in
a 40,000-square-mile area of
the Atlantic and is described as~
' 'the most elaborate
oceanographic field experiment
ever attempted in the Western
world.")
Sponsored by the National
Science Foundation and the
Office of Naval Research, it
will involve about 50 scientists
from the United States, Great
Britain, Sweden and West
Germany and will be centred in
an area about midway between
Bermuda and the Bahamas.
The purpose is to define the
movements of mediumrange
ocean currents in a 200-mile
area.
Variations in ocean currents
can have major effects on
fishing, coastal recreation and
weather patterns over large
tiest according to project
stThe sconed a osc will be a
South Florida and nearby
ocean areas and includes a
cumulus cloud seeding project.


AMERICAN CHAMP~AGNE & AMERICAN SPARKING BURGUNDY SPARKING WINE CHARMAAT SULK PROCESS NATURALLY FERMENTED PRODUCED & BOTTLED BY THE ANDRS CHAMPAGNE CELLARS MODESTO. CALIF.
Imported & Distribute~d by BAHAMAS BLENDERS LTD.
the Commonwealth's leding Wine & Spirits Melrchant.


e hS Wrthant


ges he pure


kepshe ou s ut
DEAR ABBY: When a wife complained because her
husband was turned on by the sight of beautiful women 1.
pictures, movies, in person, etc., you said those feelings
were natural for a man and be should not be made to feel
Well, it's natural for a woman to feel jealous when she
see her husband enjoying the beauty of other women,
11eial when Ide tfe href in mabso gn e l e
their.
If a man is smart he will forego the pleasure of looking
at other women when he's with his wife. It will pay off,
believe me. Just last night my husband took me out for
dinner, and at a nearby table was a beautiful girl, provoca-
tively dressed. Her tight-fitting, low-cut gown showed off
her best features, and as if that wasn't enough she had a
slit in her skirt which revealed a lovely leg right up to her
thigh! Every other husband in the place coukin't take his
eyes off this girl. My husband gave her one glance, and
pretended she wasn't even there for the rest of the evening.
When we got home, believe me, I gave him a night to
remember! I'll bet all the other husbands got was the cold
shoulder. LUCKY
DEAR LUCKY: How do you know?

CONFIDENTIAL TO B. J. IN SIOUX CITY: She's no
bargain. If she'll cheat WITH you, she'll cheat ON you.
Problems? You'HI feel better if yes get it oft yer obest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. Onle, L. A.,
CaIli, SMGb. Enelose stamped, self-raddessed envelope,

for Abby's new bewLet "What thsekAgess Waas 6
Eaw."n sad SI to Abby, Box sI@, tLes Angele Cal. aggle








ANWNOUNCED
WASHINGTON (AP) New
projects to learn more about
water and weather, including
cloud-seeding, and variations in
ocea n cu rnts we re


PALMDAcLE ) PHONE 28421


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together. But make
It the best Cold
Duck. Make it
AndrqlCold Ducki


Now availabye




your favourite
I~quer store.





AT ONLY






A M1T LE















TOORIno IMSil8ssHI8H fillII $200



0fo iosseSSing mafiju888


AR^IV" ".'DAY eTwpic
SAILEfo Oaer foo ,

ARRIVING TOMORROW:
uhwa rdfroMard u ros f::
St. Thomas

WEATHER
Weather: Mainly fair
Wind: South south east to
south 8 to IS
Sea: Smooth to slight
Temp: Min. 69
Max. 83


i_


MAGISTRATE




REUNION WITII

IIIS 2 880 TERS
MAGISTRATE Wilton
Hlercules and his two brothers
one a noted judge and the
other an author, met in Nassau ~
during the past week for a ~
family reunion.
The Hon. Mr. Justice Ralph
Melville Hercules, a judge of
the Jamaican Court of Appeal
and his brother Frank of New
York, arrived with their wives
Thursday for a six-day stay as
guests of Magistrate and Mrs.
Hercules.
Yesterday Mr. Justice
Hercules sat on the bench with
his brother as he presided over
the hearings in Court No. 3.
Mr. Justice Hercules was
Ti idadinand S s eduecrn d a
Que's Ro al College

the Bar in 1946 and entered


io TORONTO-born busrinessma
C bfore Chief Maisrate W~ton I
The 40-year-old Canadian of
**T1430 Birchmont Road,

Court that he resided in both
Barbados and Canada. He
pleaded guilty to the charge.
He changed his plea from
not guilty to guilty after
consultation with his attorney
who had tried to get bail for
Fhim. The magistrate refused

hid o travel documents to
iln order tor me to grant
him bail, he will have to
surrender all of his travel
documents. Too many of these
people (aliens) don't come
back when you grant them
bail." Chief Magistrate
Hercules told De Vita's
counsel, Mr. Julian Maynard.
De Vita was arrested at
Nassau International Airport


n Vincent De Vits was fined $200 Tuesday whene he appeared
Hercules charged with possessing a quantity of marijuan.


Magistrate Hercules asked the
Inspector as he glanced
sideways at his brother, the
Hon. Mr. Justice Ralph
Hercules, a judge with the
Jamaica Court of Appeal and
chairman of the Jamaican
Police Service Commission.
The judge spent the morning
with his magistrate brother as
he presided over cases in court
No. 3 yesterday.


shortly after his arrival on
April 20. A small quantity of
the drug was found in a
compartment of his travellinS
bag, Inspector Hugh Burke told
the court. Mr. Burke said that
"he arrived here on a
well-known flight 051I.
"It is not because certain
people are here this morning
that you are refraining from
calling Air Jamaica, Air
Marijuana. Mr. Burke?" Chief


MAGISTRATE Wilton Hercules, seated, shown with his
Ralph, who visited Nassau with their wives for a family
journalist and author, lives in New York. Mr. Justice Ralph
Jamaican Court of Appeal.


brothers Frank, left, and
reunion. Frank Herculs,
Hercules is a judge of the
Revolution.
One of those whom the
brothers looked forward to
meeting was Senate president
(;erald Cash, an old family
friend and fellow student of
Mr. Justice Hlercules at Gray's


appointed a puisne judge.
lie held this post for two
years, at which time he was
named one of the judge's of
the Jamaica Court of Appeal.
Mr. Frank Hercules is the
author of the book "A2merican
Society and the Black


private practice the same year,
In 19/54 he was named a
magistrate in Trinidad and
served in this capacity for two
years when he was made
Crown Counsel. A resident
magistrate from 1959 to 1966
Mr. Hercules was in that year


disorder," may be caused by
air pollution.
*Unvented or poorly vented
borne heaters and gas cookmsg
ranges emit enough indoor
pollution to increase illness.
& Exposure to air pollution-
on the job is "somewhat more:
important than ambient air
pollution and half as important .
as cigarette smoking" in
causing illness.
One specific class of
pollutants called sulfates,
which can develop from sulfur
oxides, is damaging to health at
concentrations 30 to 40 times
lower than the sulfur dioxide
limits set under the Clean Air
Act of 1970.
Asthma attacks may be
increased by sulfur dioxide at

lees nyhafashg a h


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Parents who smoke can cause
acute lower-respiratory
conditions in their children,
according to the
Environmental Protection
Agency.
That is one conclusion in
scientific studies that link air
pollution with increases in
respiratory and heart ailments.
Exhaled cigarette smoke
endangers even the health of
nonsmokers, the studies found.
They also found cigarette
smoking to be even more
damaging than pollution.
The EPA investigators
suggested new air-pollution
limits may be necessary.
Other conclusions contained
in the studies included:


Choi rncii,"


attended and took part in the:
opening ceremonies included~
the Rev. Rayburn of
Evangelistic Temple; Evangelist:
Hesketh Johnson; Dr. H-. W.
Brown of Bethel Baptist:
Church; The Rev. William:
Thompson, rector of St. Agnes
Chu~rcrh and the Rev. Edwin~;
Talr -r
The Crusade team members:
were welcomed by Senator
Leonard J. Knowles, C.B.E..
and co-chairman Stunce
1ilas T loualt dr ctor of.
The meetings, beginning at 8
p.m., will continue nightly
until Saturday.


THE TOM Skinner Youth
Crusade for Christ meetings
now being held at the A.F.
Adderley High School
auditorium have been drawing
large crowds nightly, a Crusade
spokesman said.
Among those who have
attended the services which
began Sunday -are
governor-designate Milo B.
Butler and Mrs. Butler;
Development Minister Cariton
Francis and Mrs. Francis;
Senate Lohinvabm tae ar

Religious leaders who


A WEEK-long programme
has been scheduled to celebrate
the second anniversary of the
Southland Church of G~od
Youth Choir, directed by Mr.
R. E. Dean.
The official opening of the
anniversary week is to be held
7:30 p.m. Monday at the East
Street Cathedral at Lily of the
Valley Corner. ZNS personality
Charles Carter is to be master
of ceremonies, and will record
the programme for his "Young
Bahamians Show", radio show.
On Tuesday evening the
programme will be at St. Paul's
Baptist Church, Bias Street,
followed on Wednesday at the


Church of God Temple in:
Coconut Glrove, on Thursday
at Transfiguration Baptist
Church, on Friday at the
Church of God in Christ on
Deveaux Street, and on Sunday
at 3:30 p.m. at Southland
Church of God on Soldier
Road west.
Various singing groups will
perform each evening.
There will be an admission .
charge, with proceeds in aid of .
a church bus.


under
M.P.'s -
Oscarr


The celebrations are
the patronage of
Cadwell Armbrister and
Johnson and their wives.


1 rr. %r;-


-a

t r
-~~ i!i5



5 :I~n
c ~* ""
i C~L i
t
:~Y"r LB~!
MARRIED ON THE BEBCH


, t

-n,


,
:r


ROMANTIC SUNSET WEDDING ON THE NASSAU BEACH
-- As the sun set beneath the water's edge at the Nassuu
Beach Hotel the vows of matrimony were exchanged by two'
young visitors to Nassau, Miss Holly Roe and Raymond Beadle of
Schaumberg, III., who had flown to the Bahamas especliliy for a
romantc wedding on the palm fringedl shoreline. The celremony,,
which was performed by the Registrar of the Bahamas, Benjamin 4
W. Prescott, took place at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday. The bride, who
is the daughter of Mrs. Mary Pierce of Borger, Texas, wo re a
full-length white broderie anglais gown and carried a bouquet offi
white. native bouganvillea. The couple will spend their 4
honeymoon at the Nassau Beach and plan to explore new J
Providence.


Breo ance though the Bhamas.l B n


t.r


Wlho Gribwat


SMOI(RS ENANGE


f'm the lelpfal Banke"


0 21. Skine ot rs
is drawing 18fg8 CF0WdS


Southllandl Church of Godl to


hold week-long prograinne


"Ybr fi nd me at any brands




of the Ide~al Bank"


INK SME


I)




II I 111


Whrt 8~itthern


___


11serr~n catos n ractilmarrd


deceinte efflectivees of

so h o nt nin e sposionrte
Posicatives Protrctionagas embar-ie

rassing problems with their highly
Pota ca tr to in uns laijinl of-
fensive odors with their rapid deodo-
rant action.
Norfolrm dissolve at normal body
temperature, forming a protective
61m, more effective than laternal
dou hing1 are easy to pl rad
Io at hs dlcat in prnackaes


Rotarians help National Trust & Cnipples
ROTARY GIFTS: Anthony Thompson, chairman of the Community Service
Committee of the Rotary Club of Nassau presents cheques at the club's weekly luncheon
meeting last Tuesday to representatives of the Bahamas National Trust and the Crippled
Children's Fund. Left to right are John R. Morley, president of the Club; Rotarian Oris
Russellof the Bahamas National Trust; Mr. Thompson; and Rotarian Clyde Minard of the
Crippled Children's Committee. ..

LAW EVCFONRS3i R1IC 88118mi8HS |1105011 10 SenorI
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157 .tl chHISe SC 80r EaS


Informative booklet, write to:
Nonrwic Pharmacal Co., Inc.
410 ParkAve., NewnYork, N.Y. e*22


r.




AUTEC TO BUILD PLAYGROUND AT ANDROS
FRESH CREEK, Andros: Ground-breaking ceremonies were held last week for the
construction of a track and field playground at Fresh Creek Public School by the United
States AUTEC base. The playing filad, which will occupy four acres of land, is expectd
to be finished before summer vacation begins. Shown at the ceremony, from left to right,
are Rev. Edward Hinsey, Mr. Samuel B. Coakley, Mrs. Eulah Mae Edgecombe, Mr. David
CIeafe, all Of the School Committee; Mr. Edward Lauden, Manager of R.C.A. at AUTEC;
Mrs. Constance Minnis, Mr. Theodore Rich R.C.A. staff at AUTEC; Commissioner
Doddridge Hunt; Mrs. A. David Parker, headteacher; Mr. Edwalrd Railey, of the AUTEC
Sea Bee, and Commander Roland Melcher of AUTEC, doing the honours.
PHOTo: Wenccati Cleare.



HURRY! HURRY HURRY!





FRIDAY 27th, SATURDAY 28th & MONDAY 30th




~~~a~ *OTWIE PIG


ON MAY 1 Mr. W. A.
Shinnan, station manager for
Air Canada at F~reeport
International Airport will
return to Canada to the
position of airport customer
service duty manager,


PonrentlIdnea esd.


i


-- 1~11* -- --- -- --I ------ ------ --------- - -- --- --- --------- ----'-"


Matinee 3 & 5, leAi TS FOR {DhAne 2.1004, 2-1005






I I

I -


I agg
Srescvth meoOns and McelCoans 6eed by Se r gil o SoIIm I
4. s....et.. c....4..a.. e se.. reueocn


Resrvtion rts not 1:5claimed b 8:15wis besl



I nig 8 fo
".THE ~u~E :~E ~:S "PG. "DR.JEoKYLL AND


IErnest Borgnine SISTER HYDE" PG-
I THE BURGLARS". PG. Martine Beswick
Omar Sharif PLUS
Jean Paul Belmondo ".BROTHERHOOD OF

PLUS Late Feature SATAN" PG.
'Phone 2-2534 L. Q. Jones



1 NOW SHOWING

I One Show at 3:00, Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4666





I. 'ECM1 C O* eo .nas E DN BAKER


CHURCH ANNIVERSARY
THE Church of God,
Rosebud and Eden Streets,
Chippingham, will celebrate its
18th anniversary Sunday, April
29 through May 6.
Various churches will
conduct services each night
beginningat 8 p.m.
A public concert Sunday at
3 p.m. will climax the
services. Leading church choirs
and singing groups will
participate .
CHURCH SERVICE
TIME CHANGED
FROM Sunday, April 29,
the evening services in the
Catholic parishes in New
Providence will begin at 7:30
p.m. instead of 7 p.m. This
time schedule will continue
through until the last week of
October.


HOSPITAALTY OFFICERS FOR INDEPENDENCE
HOSPITALITY officers of the-Protocol Department of the independence Secretariat
who will meet and great official guests to the July 10 Independence celebrations of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas are pictured following a tour of the International Airport
and the Government's VIP Lounge. Left to right are top row: Vernice Cooper, Portia
Strapp, Gertrude Kelly, Vandae Babb, Cypriana Wright, Barbara Thurston, Agnes
Richardson, Rose Humes, Gwen Kelly, Chief Hospitality Officer and Julia Burnside.
(bottom row) Thelma Byles, Shirley Smith, Thomasina Higgs, Agatha Bethell, Leah
Johnson, Jeannie Adderley, Juliette Barnwell, Lillian Walker, Allene Powell, Joyce
Campbell, Venita Johnson and Pandorr Gibson. PHOTo- Wendall Cleare.

Brian Brown weds Melody Allan
THE WEDDING took place
on March 17 at Trinity
Methodist Church, Nassau, L
between Miss Melody Ann
Allan and Mr. Brian W. T.
....n
The bride's dress was white
organdie embroidered with lace
and pearls and her long veil was
edged with the same lace and
pearls. She carried white


Winnipeg.
Mr. Shinnan and his wife,
Helen, came to Freeport in the
Spring of 1969. He has held
the positions of reservations
/sales office manager and
station manager for Air Canada
since that time.
Mr. Richard B. Christie,
formerly senior station agent at
Nassau International Airport
will be transferred to F~reeport
on May I as station supervisor,
Freeport International Airport
Mr. Christie was born in Nassau
and is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Buster Christie
He received his primary and
secondary education at St.
Thomas More School, and at
Aquinas College. He is married
to the former Trencina
Wilkinson of Bimini.
A second station supervisor
position at I report
International Airport will be
filled by Mr. G;eorge Ward
formerly senior station agent,
Freeport, and both Mr. Christie
and Mr. Ward will report to Mr.
V. A. Brooks, district manager,
Freeport.


orchids, rosebuds and
stefanotis. She was attended by
a flower girl, Miss Karen
Stewart, and a ring bearer,
Master Bruce Stewart, miece
and nephew of the groom. Ms.
Marsha Stewart, sister of the
groom, was Matron of Hlonour
and the attendants were Mrs.
Beth pBethell, Mrs. Elinor
Roberts and Mrs. Valerie
Hardy, friends of the bride.
They were all dressed in
apricot pleated chiffon dresses
and carried white carnations
and rosebuds. The mother of
the bride wore a deep
turquoise gown of wild silk.
The best man was Mr.
Michael Stewart, and the

Bte mism r. Wi iamM Ro hrt
and Mr. Francis Goodwin-
Davies.
The bride was given away by
Mr. Reginald Walker, a friend
of the bride's family.
The service was conducted
by the Rev. Peter Swinglehurst
and the Rev. Frank Poad. A
solo was sungan by Mr. John
Rosevear, ad r.George


MR. & MRS. BRIAN W. T. BROWN


Nestemu...sml
amasseasyt(oes


Annan played "Panis
Angelicus" on the French
Horn. The organist was Mrs.
Hilda Barrett and the choir,
made up of members of the
Nassau Amateur Operatic
Society, to which both the
bride and groom belong, sang
the "Steiner Sevenfold Amen."

Halc on rBealeira Ho 1l, e s
attended by 200 people.
The bride's going i .ay
outfit was pale yellow with silk
coat and dress with matching
accessories and the honeymoon
is being spent mn Mexico and
England.


Out of town guests
attending were: Mrs. D. Battle
of Ashtead, Surrey. England:
Mrs. Mary Alice Brown, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida; Mrs.
Susan Brown, Fort Lauderdale.
Florida; Mrs. Neville Brown,
Califon, New Jersey; Mrs.
Donald H~arper, C'alifon. New

Wi Plais NI ed tokMin.
Harvey Wood, Ossining, New
York; Mrs. Teddle Hloretz.
Miami, Florida; Mr. and Mrs.
M. Belben, Freeport; Mr. and
Mrs. G~ordon Mosvoid,
Freeport; and Mrs. Jaffery
Stewart, F-reeport.


Distributed in the Bahamas by Bethell Robertson and Co. Ltd.


PROMOTED

EDGAR W. Colebrooke has
been appointed office manager
of Bahama Acres, Ltd., in
addition to sales manager, a
position he has held for the last
several months.
Mr. Colebrooke was born at
Mastic Point, Andros, the
eighth child in a family of
twelve, son of a minister of
religion who is still in charge of
a church at Mastic Point.
First a monitor/teacher at
the Mastic Point Public School
Mr. Cole brooke spent
weekends working as
paymaster for Scott & Madison
farms.
Later, in Nassau, as manager
of Nassau C'arrier Service, Mr.
Cole brook e enla ged the
company's staff from two
(including himself) to fifteen
oitin th etfirst year of his
While on holiday in Freeport
he decided to gg into real
estate. For the next four years
he worked with Bahamas
International Real Estate and
then with McPherson & Brown.
Mr. Colebrook is in the final
year of a inve-year international
correspondence school business
administration course.


MRI 1
RICHARD CHRISTIE


Scotch Whiskzy


Wulff Road, near Mackey St. Tel. 28908

SLADIESI I
BUTTERICK has introduced
smart new decorator ideas.
FGet your patterns now*


E ARED


I




_ ____


Thursday April 26, 1973.


LC~


,


REAL ESTATE FOR RENIT PUBLIC MIC'TION FOR SALE MARINE SUlPPLIES WELP WMT~ED TRADE~ SERVICES TRADE~ SIERVICES


'


I


I


C9590
Ive h.p. Seagull engine.
$90-Hawalin sling-Scuba back
pack-regulator. Phone 77162.
C9599
SAILING DINGHY sixteen
feet fibreglass, safe foam
flotation, good sails, trailer
with winch. Leaving island.
Phone 3-2658 after 6.
C95 88
IRWIN 24' fibreglass sailboat,
sleeps four, 5 sails, outboard
Sportyak dinghy. $4,750 0.n.o.
Call 7-4168 or 7-4063.



C9560
C. W. SANDS ENTERPRISES
LTD. announces the arrival of
1 97 3 Wo rl d Book
Encyclope dia Childcraft,
Dictionary and Atlas for
immediate delivery. Also
desktop and pocket calculators
and a wide range of metal and
mineral detectors. For
information call 23921.


W90 LD MR. KLAUS J.
SOBIECH, FORMERLY OF
WESTWARD VILLAS,
PLEASE CONTACT THE
BAHAM AS HUMANE
SOCIETY AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE.

~9610
WILL THE FOLLOWING
pronst ioteapt onill 9 Real
MR. NATHAN MACKEY
MR. JACOB DAVIS
MR. JOY THOMPSON
Mr. GEORGE JOSEPH.

SCHOOLS
C9583
ENROLL NOW
Typing with Spelling
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier
Night Auditing
Telex Operation
English
Mathematics
Filing
Call the Nassau Academy of
Business today and join any of
the above classes. Phone 24993
(Located at Shirley Street
opposite Collins Avenue.


POSITION WANTED



SPR10R rH USE AI


yaso emlee ed by Mr. wands

hardworking, reliable, and
thoroughly honest. Available
June Ist. Telephone 77854
mornings only.



C9575
HOUSES from $25,000.00 to
$60,000.00 We have clients
waiting. Phone or come in to
list them with us. Damianos
Realty. DIAL 22033, 22035
anytime.
C9609

BtELCY LTEDA isanio~uAT t
receive listings in, FMPERAL
SUBDIVI OO NON, IPROAD

ENGLERSTON COCONUT
GROVE and MILLER'S
HEIGHTS. Call 23921 *

IIN MEMORIAM
C9598


C9311
1 C ONV ERTIBLE COUC H
I Fender amplifier and speaker
1 250 Ib. trunk food freezer
Call 77947.
C95S9
SEC RETARIAL and Executive
desks, chairs, two and four
drawers filing cabinets, desk,
accessory bookcase, Burroughs
posting machine complete with
stand. Call 27612.

C9569
CHILD'S PLAY PEN, cot, high
chair, swing, chair with
canopy, bath on stand, car
seat, English Pedigree pram
with canopy, wicker cradle
with white drapes, table and 2
chairs, tricycle etc. Also
electric sewing machine and
hair dryer. WATERS EDGE.
Eastern Road. Telephone
4-1242.

C9584
CONTENTS OF HOUSE any
evening after 7 p.m., phone
7-7887.
C9548
King size bed, headboard.
triple dresser with mirror, chest
& end table ($ D mpoab%
stye ecan), 85 Dul
bed, headboard, double dresser
with mirror & end table, $200'
stove $180, washer -- $200'
complete livingroom $500. Call
55124, after 6 p.m.


G300NGROOM SET Teak
frame $ 0
Scandinavian Couch $575
Curtain Rods,
Folding Bed
Daby Crib
Papen


B atiete
Miscellaneous household items
Call 42192 after 2 p.m.

C9593
MOTOR CYCLES, Hondas 70
c.c. and Harley Davidson 150
c.c. Call 7-7885.
C9594
HONDA Motor Cycle Model
ST 70 1972. Excellent
condition. Recently serviced
$300.00. Call: days 22497 -
nights 52520 *
C9607
DISCOUNT PRICES
Shop today your dollar buys
more.
Our best sale values


DTE R DA V N IFTS



Armw Art,S Mntr orse Ae
at Arundel Street. Phone.
23709
C9589
BEDROOM SET -- double
dresser & mirror, chest of
drawers, two night tables,
double bed with bookcase
headboard.
DANISH LIVING ROOM SET
2 six foot couches, 2 chairs,
2 end tables.

DINING ROOM SET Table
6 chairs, buffet & glass hutch'

WICKER BAR SET bar, 2
bar~d iseets2bichairs, double

CEILING FANS 1 large, 1
small.

AUTOMATIC WASHER
plus assorted smaller items.

PHONE 3-1025 after 5:30 p.m.
daily or weekends.
C9606
BUMPER -STIC KER S;
POSTER S; DE CAL S;
QUALITY SIGNS in dozens, in
hundreds, in thousands. Truck
signs a specialty.
ARAWAK ART-- Phone 23709
Montrose Avenue at Arundel
Street.


IAST
C9586
BROWN MINIATURE DOG

Willamb's d cS I y Steet .
Reward. Phone 7-8139.
C9604
FEMALE DALMATI AN
answering to "Elsa". Prince
Charles Avenue. Reward
Phone 32556. -


C9491
65ft. Steel Refrigerated Vesset
-- like now. R/V Victory -- Call
Ryan at 1-305-3796990


C9561
ALBURY'S RADIO and, T.V.
Company requires young lady
to take care of shop. Must be
able to type. Phone after five
3-5291.

C9563
INTERNATIONAL AIR
BAHAMA
invites applicants for the
position of
TICKET OFFICE
AGENT
Four years airline experience
required. Only Bahamians need
apply.
IAB TICKET OFFICE
Beaumont Arcade Bay Street.

C9581
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
required by Flagler Inn.
Responsible for general
administration of offices,
handling correspondence and
purchase orders. Must be able
to take shorthand, know how
to use dictaphone and be
capable typist. Some
knowledge of accounting and
statistical typing is essential.
fPo snetcalleM~r. Overend 5-5561

C9549 STENOGRAPHER
The Royal Bank of Canada
International Limited, Nassau
requires the services of an
ex perie nced stenographer.
Applicants should preferabiv
have at least G.C.E. in
English and be High
olspeedgradouates Short
and typing speed of 70
w.p.m. Bahamians on~ly. Apply
io writing to the Secretary. P.
O. Box N-1445, Nassau or call
for an appointment at
telephone 56021.

C956EXPERIENCED person
with a full knowledge of the
handling of investments on an
international level especially
with regard to securities
publicly trades and direct
placement. The person must
also have experience of
international investment
banking operations and is
required to act as Consultant
to ba king and other
institutions in their
administration of loan and
other security portfolio. The
person required must have
extensive experience of the
business in these fields and
most hav. a minimum of ten
years experience. Application
to P. O. Box N-3224, Nassau.


req ieA GoE RoAdbeverag ea
hou e eeing d prcmnt o


previous experience in similar
fields. Must be willing to
relocate in Out Islands. Salary
negotiable. Apply Green Turtle
Club, Green Turtle Cay.
C9596
CAPABLE reliable gardener
Eastern Road. Call 22113.
C9601
SOUS CHEF Experienced in
iFrencahM isie s3 yearsnas m t

have full knowledge of kitchen
and be able to take charge in
Chef's absence. Reply to: Cat

CB nacViusta St loonMiai,
Florida 33137
C9600
ACHARITABLE organization
requires an Executive
Secretary, who has the ability
to organize and is willing to
contribute to the various
services. Preferably 30 years
and over, a competitive salary.
Telephone 2-2454 or 2-4640
between the hours of 9 a.m.
5 p.m.
C9577
STELLA MARIS INN on Long
Island, has the following open
position and ask that
applicants (Bahamian only
need apply) kindly contact
immediately in writing or by
phone:
Book-keeper, female or male,
preferably single, to start

okme-k e g, mus thl da Sitag

least two years experience.

C9602
ATTRACTIVE position
available for a young lady with
a working knowledge of the


securities markets. Banking
experience an asset although
not essential. Salary
c om mensu rate with
ex perienc e. For an
appointment telephone Mrs. B.
Knowles at 21690.

C9597
FIRST CLASS COOK/General
Maid and a capable General
Maid Eastern Road. Must
either sleep on premises or
provide own transportation.
Good references essential. Call
22113.


C9524
2 BEDROOM apartment, Tall
Pines Colony, Gladstone Road,
wate: included. Contact C. B.
Moss 5"191.


3 EI.UROOM 2 bath house
Blair Estate. Furnished. For
further r information call 31288
after 7 p.n.

C95/8
ON F 2 -BEDROOM
unfurnishedl apartment on
Podoleo Street. Hot and cold
water. Phone 5-4643.

C9b80
FU L LY FUIRNISHE: D
airconditioned 1 bedroorn
apartment. $200 per month.
All utilities included
Monttrose Avenue. Call 5-8744.

C9574
FRESH WATER unlimited
Available Immediately secluded
stone two bedroom cottage
furnished. Private estate
western edge Nassau. Phone
owner 5-7224 evenings.

C9572
LARGE STORE off East
Street with lovely display
windows.
Suitable f or any type business.
Call 3-4128.
C9603
IN TOWN furnished rooms*
Efficiency Apartment, and also
25wn property for sale. Phone

C9608
2 BEDROOM HOUSE in
completely enclosed poert .
Phone 23709 and 348 opy.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C9457
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 27th day of April A.D.
1973 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Winton Estate in the Eastem
District of the Island of New
Providence being Lot
Number 218 of Block
Number 4 of the said Estate
and bounded Northeast-
wardly by Lot Number 21 C
of the said Block Number 4
and running thereon One




'84.5) eeth SOUTHWEST fe
NOTEATARDLY byLoNubr
21A rofd thse atid Block
Numb fer 4i and running
thereon Oe ghundfre and
nntwoiv hundredths(102)
feet95 and NORTHWEST-
WNARDLY by aotnother
portio of the said Block
Number 4 and running
thereon OEighty-fou and
4et it hundredths (0.2


bout ndd NORTHEAST-
WARDLY by LotNmber
priBn of the said Block
Number 4 and running
thereon Oe ghundored and
nntwoiv hundredths(002)
feet9 SOUTHESWADY
by the o sid ro and rservation
fort afoeetid e and runin
thmereon o Nnty-ie rand
ninety-fumbr hundrdts
(99.4) eet SOUTHWEST-
WARDLY by Lot Number
1A of the said Block
Number 4 and running
thereon One hundred and
thre hundredths (100.03)
feet and NORSTHWt-bl-
potono the said Bldrsevtock
salmbrt Fourwi and running
thereon Ninety-nine and
ninety-nine hundredths
(99.99) feet SUHET
WAaRDL SO Lat d i e
as aforhesaid bengLot
Number N4~m the aa in

bout ndd NORTHEAST-
WARDLY by a road
preevtion For ty (40) feet
widue Fu and running teen


prEl -fiv l o and fort six


Aundrdh hiDL85.46 fe t
corner of the two road
reservations previously
hereinbefore described by an
arc Twenty-three an~d
ninety-six hu ndredths
(23.96) feet in length
SOUITHEASTWAROLY by
the said road reservations
Forty (40) feet wide and
running thereon Eight-foir
and ninety-four hundredths
(84.94) feet SOUTHWEST.
WARDI Y by Lot Numbe~hr
18 of the said ble .0.
Number~c 4 imdael
heremb.l, fore! describedl 11I
ru nti iin thereon O le
h a nd1 cd and t vi ,


C9523
BUSINESSMEN, Homeowners,
trash and garbage accumulating
at your premises, Contact:
STA R SAN ITATI ON
Trash and
Garbage Disposal
Phone 55191
P. O. Box N3343
Contract and job
lot cleaning.

C9299
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HU RRIC ANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS.
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421-2-3-4-5-6.

C9506

ISLAND TV SERVICE
"For service you can rely on"
Dowdeswell Street
TV- antenna Booster
Sales & Service
Phone 22618 P. O. Box N327
Monday -- Saturday 8.30 to
5.30.

C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes. apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Dourglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.


~GRAND BAHAMAI


Cmmm mmm mmpm mmm mmm


hundredths (100.02) feet
and NORTH ES T-
WARDLY by a portion of
the said Block Number 4
and running thereon One
hundred and nine and
eighty-six hu ndred ths
(109.86) feet
The sale is subject to a
reserve price and to the right
for the Auctioneer or any
person on his behalf to bid to
that price. Terms 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
the sale and the balance
thereof on completion.
Dated this 10th day of April
A.D. 1973
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.

CARS FOR SALE

C9519
1971 FORD SPORTS Curstorn
Cam per/Pic ku p Truick
Standard Shift Excellent
Condition $2600.00. Phone
5 5124.
C9534
1969 CHEVY NOVA 2 door

con nieonO rd o, new tyres fo
Information Call T. Malone
24921 or53859.

c9592
1969 TOYOTA CORONA
automatic very reliable.
Owner leaving island. Phone
77162.

C9591CORVAIR automatic
excellent mechanical
condition rotten exterior.
$200. No reasonable offer
refused. 77162.

C9508


- at --





1971 DODGE AVENGER
DELUXE $1500

1968 FORD STATION-
WAGON white automatic$600
1973 BUICK REGAL


IIELP WANTfED
C7353
Chief Accountant for
Company in Grand Bahama.
Must be A.C.A., C.P.A. or
equal. Responsibilities will
include the production to
management of monthly
reports and quarterly accounts,
etc., the supervision of a staff
and the day to day running of
the accounts department.
The successful applicant will be
requiredd to produce and
implement ideas to increase the
efficiency of his depart-
ment and to assist and advise
management in accounting and
allied matters.
Apply in own handwriting to:

t. o F10 Fr ortt .ra d



ITRrNAT ONo ta RMhaof
vacancies for Staff
Accountant/Auditor for their
Freeport office. Candidates
must have had experience in a
professional accountants office
and must be in possession of at
least University entrance
qualifications and already be
studying to be a Chartered or
Certified Acco un ta nt.
Applicants should apply in
Pic inWa erh se Co. O
Box F-2415, Freeport,
Bahamas.


Q ALtFIED BAKER wanted
for Grand Bahama Bakery.
Must be well versed in Dough
Mixing, Divider and Moulder
Operation and know how to
operate 18 Tray Travelling
Oven.
Apply to Grand Bahama
Bakery Ltd., Queen's Highway,
P. O. Box F-797, Freeport,
G.B.


C3306
ONE EXTRA large two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
aartm ing Withallargbasiving

furnished -- Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

C9310
LARGE ONE BEDROOh
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month.Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.

C9507
3 BEDROOM 2 bath
urnfurnished house. Also 2
bedlroom 1 bo ti: pa tly
furnished house.
Phone S-8803 42193

C9522
3 BEDROOM house Seabreeze

mr fieator. Phones 51703. ad
C9529
3 BEDROOM Cable Beach
cottage, fenced yard'
beautifully furnished'
reasonable rental. Contact:
DAVESON'S REAL ESTATE
Phones 2-1178 or 5-5408.


1969 FIAT COUPE 124 -
white, low mileage $1200
1970 TRIUMPH -
blue, stick shift $850

gE7 nOT A d Et U R A 0


WvAGON -green, $00

VENTURA II -yellow,
good condition $3000
1972 CHEVELLE MALIBU --
very clean $4850
1969 FORD GALAXIES -
blue, reconditioned $1000
1971 CHEVY VEGA COUPE -
green~automatic $2995
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN -
air conditioned $4200
'1968 PONTIAC FIREBIRD -
good condition $1500
1972 VAU XHALL FI RENZA
like new $2250
1969 CHEVROLET CAMARO

1972uDDt G AVENGER 850
like new $2350
1971 SINGER VOGUE -
white, radio, automatic $1500
1973 DODGE POLARA
light blue --automatic $5500
1971 FORD CORTINA -
green $2500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come ir, and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 347 1
C9566
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
USED CAR PRODUCTION
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Radio. Auto. $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000
S/W Auto $850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. Auto. Radio Orange53500
1967 HILLMAN STD.

16 HRYSLER IMPER A

1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD
Blue A/C $2800
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Green $1600
1965 BLUE DODGE $300
1970 VICTOR STD
Red $875
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std. Green $1200
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4600
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue $695
1971 RAMBLER
Auto, Blue $2700
1 969 TRIUMPH HERALD
Blue $700
1968 JAVELIN
A/C 51400
1970 FORD MUSTANG
A/C $2000
Trade Inls-Wo~lcomned
Located Oakes. Field
Opposite Ice Plant
Telep~hone 34G36-7-8


__ __


L_


I





`7


C9511
A LOT in Stevenson
Sub-division, off Twynam
Avenue, 80 x 80, only $4,000.
Telephone 2 2763 day, 5 3801
night.

C9557
WILLIAM'S :OURHT
2 bedroom lit; both house.
built In garage, fulnished, T.V.,
new front roomn ,et ndr( S!tere,
washing machines, cacr poted.
one airconditionrer $20,000-
Phone 5 83595
C9558
Lots in Bel-Air Estates, only
$100.00 down and $90.87 per
month.
Large lots Sands Addition
$200.00 down $100 00 per

mh ic apartment sites and
residential lots Colony Village
East. Easy termisavailable. Call
Bill's Real Estate, 23921.

C9582
COMPLETELY FURNISHElD
and air-conditioned three
bedroom, two bath home.
Spacious living and dining
roor large kitchen, c t letse

H ghla d Park area, off West
Bay Street. Phone 5-7089 after
5:30 p.m
C9576
FOR SALE
OUT EAST -on the
waterfront. Have house
furnished 3 bedrooms 21i
baths only $100,000.00

CORAL DRIVE -GROVE -
Corner plot with large house
Furnished, even a Sauna bath
See by appointment-

SITAMARINAust BEACH

feri ems 2 c sestestre ul
grounds maids quarters
immaculate condition --was
$65,000.00 owner willing seller
for $55,000.00
Substantial mortgage available *

FOUR BEDROOMS 34
BATHS Pool, Patio and
landscaped grounds
2 land, landscaped, f ruited,
newly built. Ideal for large
family. Owner will sell for
$150,000.00

HIGHLAND PARK -- have 3
bedrooms 2 baths, furnished,
f or $55,000.00 with
substantial mortgage. Come see
and be surprised


MOwl Eaite~d o~nGES3R600 .00


thIe ea r

DIAL DAMIANOS 22033'
22305, 22307 NITE 41197.


FOR RENT
C93i8
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 42017.


U93715





Mackey Street
N SRosvi A MSu
P O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
M.F~CHANICAL HANDLING
Er3UIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELt cERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PAC KING
ST' tL BANDI NG
&e SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS

REASONANBTL RRTE
CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PH~ONE: 23795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C8106
WORRY NO MORE! CALL
ABCO TO SOLVE YOUR
CLEANING PROBLEMS.
TEL: 51071-2-3-4.
To Place Your Ad.
Call 21986


$7000

$850


demonstrator
1970 TOYOTA -
green, good milleage


Classified AdvertissmS
Bring Fast Results.


In loving memory of my dear
mother Leah Humes who
departed this life three years
ago today.

Oh, happy they in God who
rest
No more by fear and doubt
oppressed:
Living or dying they are blest.
Hallelujah!
Left to mourn: Her loss
daughter Mrs. Grace Johnson.




C9573
MIDDLE AGED couple for
work in small out island hotel.
Room and board. Salary for
couple $700 per month,
Typing necessary.
Contact:-- Rusty Bethel at
2-2768 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Evenings 7-8074.


C958E5DROOM APARTMENT
out East with extra room for
third bedroom or study, living
room, kitchen, breakfast room,

private patio, private beach,
many closets and cupboards, 2
airconditioners. Furnished, No
pets. Only $325.00 per month.
**+***** * *
LARGE one bedroom
lpartment out East with
over-size bedroom, large living
room, bathroom, kitchen, walk
In closets, utility, private patio,
beach rights. Furnished. No
pets. $275.00 per month.
Telephone: Chester Thompson,
2.4777 4-2035 evenkEtqs


C9512
24ft. Fibra Boat, 160 A~p. Ford
Interceptor E ng ine
inboard /outboard .
ship-to-shore radio, life jackets,
6 b.p. spare engine, complete
with trailer, only $2,500
Phone 2-2763 day, 5-3801
night. '
C9309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxuriou;
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371'


Classified Advertssms

Bring Fast Resu ts.


"I'd like to take the job, but I hate to give up ~the
generous allowance my father gives me until Ifn


br~ 6ribunr


I _______~_____~___~_________I~__ _~~____~~__ ~~~


PII~IC~ gre (Iej ob, done



Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p~m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


REAL ESTAITIE
C7354
FOUR BEDROOM HOUSE,
Hawksbill City with Furniture
and Fenced Yard, CATV on
building Call 352-5635.

IIELP WA 0 E

C7358
INCOME ING RE VENUE
CASHIER: Must have high
school education. Be able to
wealwith the h dlic laa
sm f rioe Must have
t ree to fi e years experience
in General Cashing. Reference
and Police records required.


PATARY CHFP ust hae


oih shool uducto co

and health certificate required.
Interested persons apply: The
Grand Bahama Hotel &
Country Club, West End,
Oin MBahamath Personne)
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Monday throu h Friday. Elon
Martin, Jr., Per onnel Director -

C9307
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of,
Chartered Accountants have
several vacanicies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office
ucdcessexe jndid teasriilia b
bonuses. Applicant should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co. P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.





II I I~


3X. Co;P~e.


BB[r981~~LllrltR


SJ UDGE PARK ER


By PAUL NICHOI.S
I THINK THAT'S THE FCIRST TIME
SAM EVER LIED TO ME,
KATHERINE' I COULD TELL
HE WAS LYING SY THE 3
SOUND OF HIS VOICE!


noW ma~ ''~Ot ola lur r'


S 0 '&***&"svt,b: ."a a;
heknreow 4Y' In chns L~tUP7O an

b used once manl m mati alsmigh nO
word must contala I ie shI Imint matani alsht tantaniu
lettr and there must be art thin thing ties. C3


iT. Es-shpaed. (5)
I1s. Crawlnar cnreture. (4)
lu* Rel t e ts
2t. spuare timae. *C( pti
(4. s)
Down
I. Bloot-trees teana.). (in


a. a srerr.
3. Pbr. sotlely et
[I. ALn bl.(u.) 4


ts. Hlraml



te. et~rtran resensea.


1


APARTMENT 3-G


& o ver gard


No. t.l(H6 by TIM1 McKAY
i. BeetrootsA (n.). (4. 6)
Lattr aosro. (8)
10. It asbult one naaa otable
U troa (bu a)


-- CARROLL. RIGHTER'S


frose tin CarreIttightri InstItute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: The long-rangs
\plans you make now have a good charnc of
success. Got in touch with friends and acquaintances and
discuss with them exactly where they can fit into these plans
that are vital to your own advancement. Show othersyc:* as
aware of their w~ishes and their needs and keep cheerful.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Plan how to gain thow
personal aims that mean a great deal to you and use more
up-to-date system for best results. Fine day for the social side
of life. Meet the persons who can be of help to you in the
future.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Explain your ideas to
associates and other key persons who can help you make
mutually profitable plans. Some public affairs can be handled
with relative ease. Enjoy the cultural
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Get out of that dull routine
which is s~o comfortable and into new outlets that are more
interesting and very profitable as well. Show you can make
changes with ease. Get the data you need from a new

MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Handle your
affairs in such a way that you gain the goodwill of businea
people with whom you deal, and more respect as well. Mate is
more willing to go along with your modern ideas.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You now see clearly what is
wrong in your business operations and can do much to change
them. Civic work handled now can improve your imrag
greatly. Use caution in hll things, especially in driving.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) You are able to handle all
that work ahead of you with such efficiency you will make a
fine impression on bigwigs and coworkers as well. Continue
with the modernization of wardrobe you started yesterday.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You are now able to get good
friends to cooperate more so you gain your finest aims by way
of the social ladder. Do enough in a business way so you feel
secure, but otherwise the social is best during day and p.m.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Pay more attention to what
kin desire of you and try to please them Begin a new project
that can Frove to be most profitable in the future. Keep busy
and you 11sep happy and out of trouble.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Think out how to
make your life easier and more profitable at the same time via
new interests. Speak out honestly but tactfully for best results
with others. Take it easy tonight.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Consult with experts so
you know how to improve your financial status now. Use
intuition and rise above limitations. Make your routinesr more
efficient and easier at the same time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) The right time to get your
personal affairs better organized for the future, combining the
best of the past with the best of the new Strive for more
harmony with old friends. Contact them early.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) If you study yourself and your
interests well, you know where to make the right
improvements that are necessary. Listen to what an expert has
to suggest, also. Avoid the social in p.m.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .. .he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who sees the world
through rose-colored glassres and his fellowman in the finest
light, so slant the education along lines that will place your
fine youngster in the public eye where much success is
possible. Anything from the field of diplomacy to acting is
excellent. Religion will be a natural, although sports will hold
little interest for your son or daughter.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


"We can't drop by Jee and Ann's in hopes of getting a
free dinner. Joe doesn't get paid hti tomorrow,



Rupert and the 1Mixed Magic-40


The Conjurer has Uistened
gravely to his friend a story.
" I now see that nothing but
hrm c~an come frombamixi~no
tyagain. The things that
beel you are a warning to
me." He picks up the rod
with the bell and holds it inside


a small glass cabinet, passing
his free hand over it until a
bright glow appears around the
no?" wh prs iRupeert, dod
he watches with Tigedlily. Me
not know," replies his chum.
" My daddy use that box only
for changing his magic."


Winning

Bridge
Play ~gc Wth SheLOAces by
Ira Uorn, captain or Amenhca 8
Aces, winners of the last two
world championships, has now
been published in br.taiin (Coro-
net books, 40p). The jacktet of
'the first Amer~can edition,
hastily w~rthdrawn by the pub-
afslers, has given rise to a suit,
filed in New Ylorkt, for half a
million dollars. Without Ira
Corn s prior knowledge, the
original ]acket bore the legend:
" Hfere a the System that best the
Famed Irtalian Blue ~Team." The
.Aces nave met the aine Tearn
twice and the Italians won both



tiWest3

Sounte ek h mn
Ksrctv Qad 10la 9 n 8 2
6n 5 mth


Bosth e startedw h
are trmpsan fiese theg
ony op ot w hecu
fies an whe 10, to lost

South pleaded btad land.th

tru trmps, edng fin dummyhele
the 98, and whe East'! produce
these aQ. whe tr the 02. Whalot-
eve Eath reture bd would yiel

sothe e hi 0thre trick1. W


"Well, I've caught MY Ilmit."


14. Mythomaniac
15. Charged
17. Tramp
19. Food for a
20. Tuauu
24. Milkf ish
27. Brew


47. Killer whale
48. Outstanding
49. Spotlight
50. Monotonous
discourse
52. Fawn
53. Leg joint


SOLUTION OF
DOWN

2. Cae edow
3. Scorch
4. Junk


YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE

5. Weak
n6. Stock buyer
8. Poultry
product
9. Compete
to 110. Ampersand
16. Ireland
18. Tibetan
gazelle
21. Seaman
22. Hawk parrot
23. Pewter coin
24. Poorest part
2 Mai Idian
28; Substance
31. A one
33. Transgression
36. Wanderer

40. Suc f pol
Pe ski disease
43. Recent
44. Poem
45 28 tC bird


Per thne 30 min. AP Newsrfootures


t t1$ EM


Thursday, April 26, 1973.


I_


_I


By Alscr Kotsky


SSTE VE R 0PER & MI K E NOMAD by saunders


'I CALLED RM AGAIN, U KE 100 SAID, BUT 1 DON'T
THINK HIE PffAQg!~ IT."

Brother Juniper


Chess
By LSONWARD BARIEN













wh~5e to aky w1hat resuhl?
A mastc eer wrent wont

Paien thnes 0~sla mR ea, t~hd
maste o taH9lpeet; 20 sA~CIend.
rhcut plaer 1 ...iQn yute clu
int~re ;r~s~ 3 notses verge
Ches Solb: u tieon~b ~~
Whister win eastl 10 Bx Pt~
ch! K B1; 2 mP-Bso, avrg; J


P--K7. B xP; 4 P-B71 can M
last pawnr queens. In the ganse,
White chose the routfine 1
K--a27 a agreed a draw twoo


CROSSWORD
EPU ZLZ
ACROSS
1. Come to an 29. Roulette bet
end 30. Tendency
5. Gray's agency 32. Road curve

ea ono the 3 S o gi c ry

13 ',oto s eder aundewmeber












_ __ ~ _~__


I. m

A SIZZLING START In the under ten boys 50 metres breast stroke which Greg Geislman
(4) won in 47.6.


Will any other person (depositor, shareholder or other creditor) who considers
that he has a valid claim against the company which has not been formally
admitted by me as liquidator also contact me at the above address.

SYDNEY MORRIS,
Liquidator.


b..~. F -- --- -- -


5 SWIY RACES
JILLIAN VEITCH, Ute mainstay
enmet sorrca ured enu fie o
events she entered duringt the
m lhin/ amvass *'Y annual swhn
Auglustine's Collese pool. However,
Jamaica was unable to stand up
against the usucht improved
Dolphins who took the metet 33655
223H.
Veltch took the 50 metres
butterfy in 37.0, the 200 metres
individual lnemidley 2n 3 16.2brte
stroke in 43.2 and the freestyle In
35.0. Tammry Cole and Rocky
rdderley too~k the seconds and
Mark Dean was also outstanding
for Jamaica winning four of his five
events. He dropped the SO metres
rreestyle to a detenrmned John
Vanderschoot. f~ull results
are: GIRLS 8 AND UNDER S0m
butterfly Y. Patterson 54.0, J.
Lewis, P. Muirine; 50m back Y.
Ma rie; nsm bat tY. at esnP
52.0, D. Tarmney, J. Lewis; 50m
free Y. Patterson, 43.2, L.
Page,. P. Muirine;
BOYS 8 AND UNDER: S0m
bunernna AGH Ceisman 40.2, L

moonud; 50 br3 ,t .Cedme m
47.6, C. Patterson, C. Deans;
50m free G. Golalman 36.8, I.
Cardenas, C. Deans.
GIRLS 10 AND UNDER: 50m
butterfy J. Veitch 37.0, V.
Anel Ms Ira mJ e00 bck
43.2, T. Cole. M. Ingraham; som
free J. Veltch 35.0, R. Adderley,
T. Cole.
BOYS 10 AND UNDER: 50m
tTsopon, J. V ndrschoot : a
b cansS50m breat A. oBekond -
45.4, L. Fisher J. Vanderschoot;
som Free J. Vanderschoot 34.9,
M. Deans, C. Thompson.
GIRLS 12 AND UNDER:
50m butterfly C. Adderley _
38.0, J. McCorquodale, C.
Patterson; 100m back J.
McCorquodale I4.,K
Adderley, A. Lewis. 100m. breast -
C. Adderley 1:40.3, K. Adderley,
A. Lewis; 100m free C. Adderley
Pati21.5, J. McCorquodarle, C.
BOYS UNDER 12: S0m
butterfly Mi. Ingram 41.9, C.
Lewis, J. Waugh; 100m back C.
Lewis 1:35.9, J. Waugh, N.
Henriques; IO0m breast C. Lewis
1:36.6, N. Henriques, C. Sayers;
100m free C. Lewis I:17.5, C.
Sayers, J. Waugh;
GIRLS UNDER 14: S01m
butterfly C. Knowles 38.7, J.
Beckford, T. Ward. 100m back -
D. Sayers 1:28.4; J. Adderley, J.
Beckford; 100m breast D. Sayers
S13.5, S. Holowesrk, J. N ,y
S. Holowesko, J. Beckford.
BOYS UNDER 14: som
butterfly M. Carey 34.8, Mi.
tlyad, M. Swire. 1Om back M
Martinboroula 00m bres i
C tanrntiae 100 fre 14h. Cary -
Constra~ntn.
SENIOR GIRLS: 50m0 butterfly
- J. McCorquodale 40.5, D.
Hdoloweso, D. Lewis; 100m back -
J. McCorquodale 1:28.5, D.
Lewis A. Davis. 100m breast D.
Lewris 1:37.3, D. Holowesko, G.
Sawyer. 100m fre J.
M ~lo, d s. 1:IS.7, A.
SENIOR BOYS: 50m0 butterfly
A. l hn on. 10O bck '"" J
Lindley 1:14.0, A. Johnson. R.
Madden. 100m breast A. Johnson
-1:25.0, B. M~cWeeney, J.
Mo thsorouah Omfe a uc
MaddeL.


Sportsman of Year Qluant says athletes should



be ambassadorss of goodwill' wherever thef go

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
"AN ATHLETE REPRESENTING HIS COUNTRY should be aware that he is an ambassdor of soodwil1," said Bahamas
Federation of Amateur Sports "Sportsman of the Year" Sterling Quant.. "He must conduct himself in a sport~sman-lke mmaner mad he
must perform at hisi be~st always.


Quant, the Bahamras
Amateur Bask eball
Association's all star most
valuable player was last
night at the B.A.B A.'s first
annual convention speaking on
'Players Responsibility and
Foreign competition
The itonvention continues
tonight at the Anchorage Hortel
:t 1 o' Mlr Louis Adderley
on 'Integration of
nemrrber of the Royal
Bahama~i Police Force speaks
on 'G;ambling and T'rouble at
Games," Radio Bahamas' News
Editor Ed Bethel speaks on
'The Role of the News Media
in Sports,' Mr. Sylvester
Ramsey speaks on 'Officials
and Coaches,' and all delegates
will canvne tin a nip sessiount

explained, has responsrbilities
to, h myself. his I am,. his coach
thle national 3rn i international
association wii: whom his


"When completing in foreign
comlpetition, it is the player s
fi rst responuihility to be
mentally and physically
prepared so that he can
p riorm this bes. Q nn


DOLPHIN DE~BBIE SAYERS (centre) nreceive her wartd
after winning the girls under 14 100 meUtres bnret stroke in
1:32.25. Susan Holowesko came in second and M. Kelly
third. PHOTO: Rikery Wells


gi i




JAMAICA'S PRIDE In h
girl' on and under, Jillian
Veitch, captured first place in
all five events she entered.


Girls & mini basketball





TH'~E BAH1AMAS AMATEUR BASKETBALL Association Is planning to
reinstate girls basketball and mini basketball and hope to include them in
the 1973 74 series
Miss Patty~ Symonette, speaking 5-rninute rest between halves and
on the resumption of girls each half is divided into three
basketball, said she was trying to five-minute periods with a pause of
convince the Association that the two minutes between them.
resumption of girls basketball will Each player must participate for
definitely be an advantage to a least ten minutes and never for
R.A.B.A. There is, no doubt," she more than two periods in any half.
said. "that response will be a good In this way, Dr. Davis said that they
one and it w ill be a good year for Ileave tried to show that the essential
Mis Smonette pointed out that mrdm rmin -bbee tbsH hs aigtsec
the only chances the female equal to that of the others and that
athletes get to participate in the best players do not have
basketball is In high schools. She additional rights. "With this
said that she discussed the idea of measure we haew tried to avoid the
fo~rming a team with her problem of stars like the great
c1 < oodimates and they thought it basketball teams," he said. "This is
a tl~od dea.one of miminl-basketball's
SAt the present time Miss important points."
re~ores nts enre nja "With the increasing popularity
athletes participate "and I feel they o aktalaogoryuh e
,,expect an even bigger response to
can surely do good in basketball." our Invitation to participate in
After it was agreed that girl mini-basketball this year," he said.
bassketbl shi would be resumd M tht In rdeo Dape drpel w
spearhead the committee. sm 0go aktalpaes
Dr. Lawrence Davis, an executive and officials were needed to help
of B.A.Bt.A. speaking about the Association carry out the
rinalbasketball,h san tat w rid bu dn cof tent pr hamme.

sal tnwhich all cuhidren may take attended My some s30n dele ato

Iak tbsl t est edisfore rotms pf Issc aon heak on mA eum a
pre-teen age and it has been versus Professionalism and Mr.
sponsored in the Bahamas by the Livingstone Coakrley, Minister of
B.A.B.A. as a community project Education and Culture give the
durn Th b)r tlo yofre rakebl opening remarks*
"Th obsctve f inibasetbll In his opening remarks, the
coincides with a shortcoming which Minister said that Government,
we saw and continue to see in being lnatrested in sports, youth
Bahamian sport, and, in our specific development and community
finest, ba thal, Dr. Davts develogunent wll soon begi wah

through the vehicle of euathlte o tah phscl
mini-ba Htbl and the goals of thd edcao. oakley said that the
minstill ethe idanovement we co ld Government will also extend their
insil t~ ieas o firplay an sports programme to the Family
acts of courtesy in our youths Islands where a lot of sporting
during their formativeh yars anda potentiall i vident.

Isntrtdaction to organized team
NEW RULES
In mini-basketball, the child is
given a sport entirely made for him,
wiee ehis ow r udt, o dballnhis
The I~nes of the normal court are
maintained except for the a
free-throw line which is two feet
closserh toth ba njte ta turn I
patyars edpat f act teapIay ns JAMAICA is prepared to apl
game is divided into two halves of which their ladies won in Trinid
IS minutes each, there is a ast year to Trinridad, Richard '

knM ldmpliea w mn id


".r




i 1


ri


NEW LY ELECTED
= -SIEIT oof thr Bhm
Arlington Butler M.P. (cntre)
discusse a point with Bahamas
Amateur Basketball
Association's president Mr.
Vincent Ferguson (right) and

Edrd Asary (f) ring Iz
night's opening of the
Association's first annual
Convention.




PORT OF SPAIN ~AP) -
Austol decs e t s21 T ue

T 4 sa asnt the West Indles, here
The declaration left the West
Indles needing 319 for victory.
The two Austrlians still at the
wicket when the declaration came
at 11.50 a~smlocal time were Marsh
who was 21 not out and Jenner II
not out*
West Indles troubles were created
by Max Walker who shot out
Murray Lloyd and Inrshn All while
concedinn only one run. In the
process walker to ped Neil Hawkes
24 Test wickets by an Australian
hol ontu f th7 est Indles.
Terry Jenner the r gt arm
a;ttespasr alobwled e~ndidly,
tptdgteother flv for 91.
Ah rttUI a td ad onert fr m Ian
r~e and ~ Chape cotne do

Fo the ad Jumdman noput a brk
daismssng four for II4 by ive
minutes past five o'clock.
WoGbbs he tured both Chappell
the wl ket. Is thm cas tneb
Kallicharan and Fredericks rsna d
up Gres, ater they had added 1 n
minutes. Walters and Benaud
late in the day continued the
Iutlar tad a o n it run
145 fo 4.

AUUORRLI A Ist innings 419
for 8 dec: West Indles Ist innings
319:
Australia- 2nd Innings, 218 for
7 dec*


STERLING QUANT
on athletes tresponsibilities
er is physFically prepared,
brt i: Ientally prepared."
c'uant, described by the
tl \ B.A. officials as the best
sportsman both on and off the
court said that each player is a
rinit that makes up the whole
,d each man has a job to
,:form and an obligation to
his fellow team-mates. "In

Qun ns8id, "h mustkobl ga
team-mate -ththeir style of
play, mai ly teir moves and
;-:iondly their abilities on the
basketball court."
Of the coach Quant said he
should be one who instructs
player (s) in the fundamentals
of a competitive sport and
directs teamhi strategy s, a

coach should have full control
the situation in foreign
competition. This means
control over his players, and
her bst wa to hav control
demand respect from his
pla!y: by demonstrating that
he i neiws what he is doing and
at the same time give respect to
his players.
"When a player respects his
coach, he will not protest the
coach's decision in an
uiu.portsmanlike manner but

smso nderstan iscius a friendly
way," he charged.
As of the officials whom

Iepaensentatd escr d t
Associations that are conduct ting
the games they were present to
enforce the rules of play during
competition. "During local and
foreign competition the player
must respect the officials
because they are specialists at
their jobs and I can assure that
Sif a team shows respect to the
officials respect will be re-
turned," Quant said.
colpthtongh fans during oef gn
which is expected because the
visitors are competing against
their heroes nevertheless a
player Is expected to
demonstrate good
sportsmanship both on and off
the court. "Also, a player must
be cautious in his play as not
to commit a foul in a manner
that will stir up the crows,"
Quant said "One must
remember it is only a foreign
team against a crowd of fans in
a dispute."
In concluding Quant said
that a player should be aware
that international
Organizations such as F.I.B.A.
Do exist and these lodes set
the governing rules of play and
out national bodies adhere to
these governing rules
nB ahamas Amateur
Bask thall Association "has
estabished local guidelines
with the assistance of
International Rules and te
local coaches and players," he
said. "It is the responsibility of

bythr I se.adeesdaie


TRADERS BAN K & TR US TLIM IT ED

flN COMPULSORY LIQ UIDA TTOIN)


Will the following persons kindly contact the Liquidator, Second Floor,
Bernard Sunley Building, P. O. Box 1491, Telephone 2-1976, in connection with
ClaimS which they may have against the company.


Gardiner, James A.
Gardiner, Patrick
George, Danel


Hamilton, Sandra
Hanna, Frankrlyn
Hepburn, Moiah
Hinsey,Jloel


Jack, Wi~lalm
Johnson, Arlinglton
Johnson, Dorothy
Johnson, George, H.
Johnson, Sidney
Johnson, Vincent


Lewis, Lero


Lightbourne, Leroy
Lightborune, Mildred
Lightbourne, Raymond
Lockhart, Dorothy


McCartney, James
McNeil, Matthew
Miller, Gloria
Missick, Howard R.
Moncur, Isadora
Mosko, Jerry


Adderley, Dearnn
Adderley, Hilton
Adderley, Percy
Albury, Mildred
Argistave, Mavis
Arnett, Marsha



a l,Ao rdL.
Baeden, E. C.
Bethel, Barbara
Brownn, Lawrence
Burrows, Dorothy



Capron, Cyrl E.
Clarke, Norma L.
Coaklrey, Rudolph
Collie, Emerald
Cox David H.
C Agha~m, Paul


Davis, Allan
Davis, James
Davia, Outten
Davis, Paulett
De Costa, Errol
Deleveaux, Emerald


Rahming, Courtney
Rolle, Harold
Rolle, Leo
Rolle, Sylvia
Rose, Cecil A.
Rose, Maxwell



San es, &lbmae
Sawyer, Louisa A.
Scavella, George
Scott, Lisa Ann
Simpson, Charles


Smith, Alfred
Smith, Leona
Smith, Orthniel M.
Smith, Oswald

Smih R ophilus
Strachan, Ernest
Stubbs, Almond Leslie
Stubbs, Rosahln
Starrup, Edric G.


ply themselves with great determination to retain the Phillpacup,
ard last year, and to recapture the Brandon Trophy, which they lost
Thompson, mnaguer of Jamalca's Brandon/Phillips tear said today.


enthustiast, indicated that his
teams would be giving their all
and, this year, with the
leadership of Richard RusseHl -
a world class player they
should demonstrate an
extremely high level of tennis
competition.
The Caribbean Tournament
begins at the Montagu Beach
Hotel courts tomorrow
afternoon 1:t3h Mste bei g

Tourism Mr. Clement
Maynard. Competition begins
each day at 2 o'clock
All competing teams from
Ba~rbados, Guyana, St. Kitts,
Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago
and the Windward Islands
arrived in Nassau on
Wednesday.
For the first time in
Brandon/Phillips competition a
consolation tournament has
been arranged. In the past, first
round losers wenr deprived of
the opportunity to play
additional tennis during the
period of the tournaments.

tnhsol ton To~r~ nts first
roand losers will bee able to
con inue to compete and to
enjoy the thrill of matching
skills with other players.
Another first is the
introducto d hic iBertha

p lasted ao the female plyer
whei the pinion ino the
Lnpist s C mmit ee
sportsmanship and court


SCHLITZ BeEE came alive last
night and beindithed Be ehitdin
first baseman Lore~nzo Lockhart
hlste de ening acc tc ampiond
game at the Q.Er.S.C. Bowles
batt ng k ourkedimels scored thred
collected three hits. Lockhart with
three official times at bat scored
the e, locked in two and collected

for Decl Jane and Henry Wil assr on
fel s or iedsos i h 'ist tw n
before the Btrwers rallied for four
In tkhe diottom of the thinids Buwlo
that inning. Both Lockhart and left
fkieder Mtackrey Bain each got an rbl.
anal tla a tili unable toW I n g
weew bhindh 10 thf th edao t o
four runs. Third bassman G;odfrey
Epne s cantri uted two rth's on a
o ilts streasltint. tle Saints scored
dieir two nth a top oftheW fthm
rhi and the other on a fielder a
choice .
The rtn: no ni hr it si1 inl the
runs as Lockhart gofhis second rbl.
I'cgakhart af irsrt al ten put outs.
JET SEST WIN .

cam up n t a tweerhi rsdlirre i h
bottom of the fourth as Jet Set
collectedi four runs in that inning to
defeat Heuatle L~umber 12 9 lust
ning set. after eliminating the
Luhrtnnen so a rn in spafrant
the pdtcidayg of Coulin Knorwksr. who
Heastie's howeve'Y r po(Ullnd~ on
startling pitcher Frank 1)crunt for sis
rus n stl top cr spsl mu rcoi i
the first ofZ his two rh~i's.


Taylor, Anthony
Taylor, Victoria
Thompson, Edward
Thompson, G~eorge H.
Thompson, Marina
Thompson, Michael McArthur
Thompson, Milton
Thompson, Wellington Jack
Toote, Roslya .
Tonrneblad, Iris
Tarcker, George


RICHIARD RUSSELL
.. Jamalca's No. 1
manners during competition,
Representing the Bahamas in
the Brnd~on will be Leo Rolle
and Bertram Knowles.
Anthony Mluanings, Bob Isaacs
and GeorgeCarey are the
tnserves In the Phillips Cup,
Vicky Knowles and Jane
Wl~berg represent the Bahamas
with S1anda Miller as reserve.
Twenty five year old Lorna
Wood Ttops Jamaica's lady
te m.k Tam gnup with Won
Stephanie Isaacs.
Helping Richard Russell -
the Caribbean's number on
player for many years wHio b
Jamaica's number one ranked


SUSAN BISCOE
... Jamaica's No. 2
tennis player for 1972 David
Pratt. Also on the team is
number five rankedb Francle
B~amett.
St. Kitts will be enterla~g thre
Caribbean Tennis Tourtnaments
for the firt time, and are being
fiipresented in the Brandon
Cut by McNish Jeffers, Lionel
Berridge and Auckland Hector.
Dr. Grahame Barry,
prsdnt of th cBaahamas faf,

jubilant with the great response
from member countries of the
Com~monwealth Caribbean
Lawa Tennis Association and
envisaged the tournaments
c ".l be "axtnnemey


Ferguison, Althea
Ferguson, Freddie
Ferguson, Judy
Fergutson, Norman
Fergusoan, Ted
Fowler, Evelyn


Gaitor, Midrim D.
Gardiner, Bernice


Palmer, Shirley
Pearlygte Singers
Penn, Winston A.
Poitler, Oswald
Poitier, Richard
Pratt, William V.


Gardiner, Cornelius &/lor Myrtis


lo2- dPCj-~~


QWhr iribHRP


Thursday 8 26,JS%


~5rr

g~


~iiC


JOHN VANDERSCHOOT (contr) siting atop the first
place podium shares a joke with a fellow swim mate while~
awaiting his award.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells