<%BANNER%>
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03330
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 25, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03330

Full Text
I I II III II I I I II I '


111


Bank with




~ &rrclays


VO~r-


L. LXX, No.129


.--- -----------


IcL 01~-U
_~F~1RI


r;

I


mtonths 27.1 Silbell1 \aid he



did~rnl t c getth fll story, of the
r~ccrdi1s. until renty whern he~
movd to fin wh te Jen

Wnl~jashingto thtlj \swani wais




perepaigtor rcalto rsted

a 1Socae. JohNE H ( annlly
government to (eviepositthh Lene
anticiptirvon the t some aides
may be forcn l to eae the1,11








Affiliate of the .anal1
Secretaries' Ass~ociationl



Mct H~earmo~t Assoanats p lIc


"HBss of thec You .rl
T`he seneta~r ,riJ In he bocss
of thec yeai were annrounced
d1inl~ the Po\,Cjlaris Ill of tILhe'
Hoclidfa) Inni onI Pa;rathlse Island.
Su~rprise 41howed1 on1 the faces

Kussell :1, 1 1:nt 1 I admitted

the wer at r loss forrc wordcls.
Asontinrc vtlhIos(tIe p 'resdn
awrand tri~ c.,sur ~liot se
Harrics Snuth anoucd h
wner~t s of th~e Assof he e
Awr plnalu ,l na, nor..e
nmed. Mrs Rucel a
Seretsydn(;c~ of the Y alr .





speaker at the lunlcheonl


FR EEPORI T US H






Til Flil PORKT F~ire
Service has been hattlrng a
major hush fire in the Freeport
area for almost three days, and
in the past two weeks have
tackled a total of 55C bush firi\
The Tribune learned today .
As with their New
Providence counterparts.
iFreeport firemnir have bee~n
struggling to, comre to, grips
with numcro~us bush f'ires~
which are thle result o~f the
sixth "absolute' dro~ught"
recordedl in the B~ahnoams for
the last ten years.
A spokesman for1 the
Freeport b~rigadet tolf thle
Tribune they. were first alerted
to a blaze near IFust Heach
Drive, off last Sunrise
thghway,, at ') 40 am
Monday.
~Thei fir~lemn hiave madetl
extenrsive uise ot tracto~r\ to,
create fire breaksi aIroundl the
blaze, but thii\ mocrning the
spo~kesma~n desenhed~l II thc fire s
only "partially onta~inedl."
Firemen are on the~ \cene
again today trying: to comrplete.
a fire break aro~undthe I11ntire
area ofr the fire. abouti onei
square mlile, ther spokesmann
reported.
There has beenr nc p~ropcrty
damagec from an? of the b ush
fires so far.
In N3'assun .I Fire
Department spokesman saidi
this morning that firemern
fought 12 separrate bulsh fires in
the past 2'4 houir\. All are now\\
either extinguishedl or oiriter
Contro~l. the spo~kesma~n Caidf.
TIhere was a call to, a
thirteenth hush fire, but it was
a false alarm.
CAMBODIAN CITY FALLS


SAIGON (AP') North Vietnam
reported Wednesdl) that anti-
government forces in ('ambodia
hsTackaeT,7nd t~rpr< viticial capital
of Phnom Penh.


wirPllrth Postmaswr. oasame re~Ir poeag concessons witthin the ashamo...


Wednesday April 25, 1973.


Price: 15 Cents


Hy ar TFORosn I l
Presidential aide John D
Ehrlichman and former Nixon
campaign chief Clark
MaIcregor disagreed Tuesda
over whether an interns
investigation was ordered in
the campaign organization last
August when the Watergate
affair was unfolding
"Iproposed not only to the
campaign manager but to the

group tha amhe itme wan ri
to make the fullest disclosure
about Watergate, Eriha




administration official request
M ~e~ga nv tico duct any
The differing accounts


ao top adii t ai
Watergate case.
The Florida White House


said Tuesday that President
Nixon was not involved in
making an offer of executive
clemency which Watergate
burglar James McCord Jr. has
testified he received through
mntermediaries.
"he President has not made
such an offer, nor have there
been any discussions with the
President about executive
clemency," said deput-y press
secretary Gerald L. Warren.
Transcripts of grand jury


testimony quote McCord as
saying the offer camle from the
wife of co-conspirator E.
Howard Hunt, and PMcCord
believed it originated with
lawyers for the Nixon
campaign .
DEVELOPMENTS
in other developments
Tuesday:
SA lawyer for the Nixon
campaign said a second hatch
of tardy finance records was
being prepared for delivery to


court officials. Delivery had
been promised last Novembat,
but lawyer Daniel Webster Goon
said Nixon campaign deputy
Frederick C. Larue told him by
letter on Monday that 10 more
manila envelopes, labelled
"bank records" had turned up
in a bottom file drawer.
Common cause lawyers have
asked that Nixon finance
officials be cited for contempt
of the delayed delivery.
SLawyers for common


cause subpoe~n3ae the chief of
U.S. archives for more records
of secret Nixon campaign
finances the believe hiave been
hidden there. Ar government
spokesman said the subpoena
was being studied. .
Lawyer P'eter iI. Wolf
refused to tell d tedleral grand
jury the namle of an
anonymous ilient Wolf said
the client is a low leve~yl Nixon
campaign employee who for
months hid documlents he


rreceved fromn the White House
the day after the Watergate
burglaryr last June 17. Wolf has
said the~ documents include
plans to, hug the Democrats'
Watergate` offices. At a hearing.

chiet ii S. Jlistric~t court judge
John J. Sirica ordered Wolf to
diisclose the name.
'I~v we lawyrs appeared for
the ulnnanmed client whom
Wa'lt Said1 he no longer
represents and sought to be


allowed to intervene in the
case. Sirica denied permisFion
and said "you can go to the
court of appeals but he (Wolf)
if going to the grand jury'. '
Wolf's own attorney,
Monroe H~. Freeman, accused
Watergate prosecutor Earl J.
Silbert of "the grossest kind if
incompetence and "the most
serious coverup in the history
of criminal law." Wolf has said
he to~ld Silbert about his
client s handling of documents


Declared officially open by
Honorary President Sir Roland
Symonette, the ceremonies
ls inluded thsonce presentation
of 11 scroll to the church's
pastor and founder, Rev.
Charles Henry Thompsor.
Participating in the programme
last night were several patrons
of the33-~year-old service club,
founded in 1940 by the Rev.
Prinbe Albert Heoburn.
It :a as eald atls


fra Whale roay Cmp and

atijefunrd ekpaen bj t e
finances was mentioned during
the secretary's report by Mrs'

Mr heD me aial status of the
Star of the Bahamas Charity
Guide No. 35 is: Income
$10,756 and Disbursements
$8,410.52, a balance of
$2,345.48," Mrs. Dames said in
her report.
WORK
During the previous year,
she said the organization had
conducted "lectures in youth
development ... visited some
435 homes with 125 in the Out
Islands and 310 in New
Providence and also paid the
tuition for two girls at Queen's
College and also for a boy at
St. John's College."
Last night's affair was held
under the patronage of Sir
Roland and Lady Symonette
and Sir Harold and Lady
Christie. Speakers included
honorary presidents, Sir
H~arold, Sir Roland, the Rev.
Dr. H. W. Brown, the Rev. O.
A. Pratt, the Rev. A. S.
Colebrooke, and Mr. Henry
Montgomerie who gave the
welcome address. Sir Roland,
the principal speaker, noted
that an investment in the
youth of this country is a
worthwhile one, and also cited
as an example the work that is
currently being undertaken by
Evangelist Tom Skinner.
Presenting the Reverend Mr.
Thompson with a scroll, Sir
Roland noted that this world


years in the Bahamas. A
n on d e no m i nati' on al,
non- political event, the annual
camp outings are conducted
"to help the youth to help
themselves," says Mr. Hepburn.


would be a "grand world" if
there were more people like
the minister. The scroll was
presented to the elderly
minister -- who has spent 45
years as a pastor for his
service to the community.
'i TRIBUTE
"Whiereas the Rev. Charles
Thompson,, founder of the
Transfiguration Baptist


fu hermber nf he 2
B hama Brotherhood, Grarnt


BS ~iro( Chaiy .eu Nog

founder-member, secretary and
trustee of the Goodwill Centre
Orphanage; and whereas the
Star of the Bahamas Charity
Guide recognizes religious and
charitable good works of this
Christian gentleman, be it
resolved that on this 24th day
of April 1973. the Star of the
Bahamas place on record
during the lifetime of Rev.
Thompson, the admiration and
gratitude of many of the
people of the Bahamas," the
scroll read.
The Goodwill Centre and
Orphanage referred to on the
scroll was a hostel and
rehabilitation centre, formerly
operated by the organization
on Taylor Street and Quarry
Mission Road some time ago.
The service club was started
with 11 pe ople in the
Parliament Hall, near Wesley
Street by founder Prince
Hepburn. Its first convention
was held in 1943. The
"convention today is of a very
high calibre of fellowship," Mr.
Hephurn said today.
it has since acquired a
campsite at Whale Cay
provided by Mrs. Marion
Carstairs ,, where to date, some
4,705 underprivileged youth
have received moral,
educational and physical
training.
It is also the only camp
conducted on an annual basis
that has lasted for 20


SERVICES RECOGNIZED The Rev. Charles Thompson, founder of Transtiguration
Baptist Church and its pastor for the past 45 years, receivesa scroll in recognition of his
services from Sir Roland Symonette, honorary president of the Star of the Bahamas
Charity Guide No. 35. The organization held its 29th annual convention last night. From
left to right: Mr. Percy Christie, chairman of the Charity Guide, Sir Roland and Rev. Mr.
Thompson. PHOTO: Philip Symonette







aitSnd l 18Cil80 gil8H





PRIME MINISTER Lynden Pindling was a guest of His
Lordship Bishop Leonard Hagarty today at a luncheon given in
honour of visiting Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen.


The luncheon, held at the
Hecrmitage, Bishop Leonard's
Eastern Road residence, was
arranged to give the
Archbishop an opportunity to
meet the prime minister and
religious heads of the Bahamas.
Archbishop Sheen, noted
\preacher of radio and
television, and retired bishop
of the Diocese of Rochester,
New York, is in Nassau to
conduct a retreat for the
priests and religious of the
Catholic Diocese at St.
A ugustine's Monastery.
Archbishop Sheen returns to
New York on Friday to
continue on to California
where he has engagements.
S Attending today's luncheon
were the Rt. Rev. Michael
Eldon, Bishop of Nassau and
the Bahamas, Dr. R. E. Cooper,
president of the Bahamas
Christian Council, Rev. D)enis
Mlagnus of the Methodist
Church, Rev. John Finger,
Vicar-General of the Catholic
Diocese, Rev. Preston Moss,
Chancellor of the Catholic
Diocese, Rev. Elias Achatz,
Prior of St. Augustine's
Monastery, Rev. Patrick
Hlolmes, president of the
Priests' Senate of the C:atholic
Church, Mr. Keith Duncombe'
chairman of the D~iocesan
P'autoral Council, Mrs. Vernice
Symonette and Rev. Joseph
Perna, members of the Pastoral
C'ountcil in charge of arranging
Arch hishop Sheen s
programme in the Bahamas.
At 8 o'clock tonight
Archbishop Sheen will speak at
ant Feumenical service at St.
F~rancis Xavier's Cathedral. The
service has been organized by
the1 Bahamas Christian Council
andl Imemers of various
religious denominations will
Participated.
At 8 p.mi. tomorrow a
IEuc~haristic service will be held
at St. F~rancis with the
Archbishop as the main
concelebrant.
NOT PEINITINTS
L-ast night the A~rchbishop
prEac~hed at the Hloly~ flour
hecld at St. Francis. Hlis theme
was "without the shedding of
blood there can be no
folrgive~ness o'f Sinls."~ He took
hiis lIstenetrs oni "arn excursion
!hrotugh the scriptures" starting
with Adam and F've and the
world's first sin. Hie declared
that people are living in a time


--probably the first time in the
history of man kind -when
they were denying sin and the
guilt of sin. "We have become
patients instead of penitents;,"
he said.
Bishop Leonard gave the
benediction and said the
litanies. He was assisted by
Fathers Finger and Moss. F~r.
Perna was master of
ceremonies. The service was
attended by all the priests and
religious on retreat as well as
many other members of the
Catholic faith,
After the service an informal
reception was held in St.
Benedict's Hall for the people
to meet the Archbishop. On
the reception line were
Archbishop Sheen, Bishop
Leonard and members of the
Diocesan Pastoral Council.
Refreshments were served,
Archbishop Sheen, who was
ordained to the priesthood in
1919, is well known for his
programme "C~atholic Hiour",
which was heard over NBC
radio from 1930 to 1952 and
his radio and television
programme, "Life is Worth
Living", from 1951 to 1966.
The Archbishop has written
numerous books.
DI SCALA TAKES OVER
AS EMPLOYERS HEAD
MR. ANTONIO Di Scala,
general manager of the
Sheraton British Colonial liotel
and former vice-president of
the Bahamas Employers'
Confederation, is to take over
as president effective
immediately.
Mr. Di Scala's new
appointment was announced
following former president
Vernon G., Collie's application
for a leave of absence from the
Confederation. Leave was
granted.
Mr. Collie and ex-policeman
Leonard Erickson Taylor have
been jointly charged with being
responsible for the death "by
negligence" of landscaper
James Evans.
E~vans' charred body was
found in the fire-gutted home
of Taylor on September 8 last
year.
The manslaughter charge
followed a coroner's inquest in
March. The seven-man
coroner's jury namedf the two
accused responsible in thre
finding of "manslaughter by
negligence."


( .



HONOURED GUEST SERVES: Archbishop Fulton

Bndct s HHl lst riht upases amrt e psondw ns to t-
young guests who had come to welcome him.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette '




rvillilghIillII ChIZ8HSr 8Wef



THE FIRST ANNUAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WEEK,
to be highlighted on Saturday by the "distinguished citizen
awards, officially opened on Monday with the switching on of a
new system of multi-coloured flood lights at the Chamber's
offices on the corner of Shirley Street and Collins Avenue.


On Tuesday chamber
members were sifting through
essays looking for the two
winners of an essay contest
with "the role of the Chamber
of Commerce in an
independent Bahamas" as the
topic. Participating in the
contest were fifth and sixth
former of St. Anne's School.
Queen's College, C.C. Sweeting
Senior High, Bahamas
Academy, R.M. Bailey Senior
High, St. Augustine's College,
Government High School and
the C'. R. Walker Technical
College.
Also on Tuesday, the radio
programme "the Market Place"
featured a dialogue among
chamber members who were to
conduct small business
seminars later in the week. The
programme, designed to teach
the small businessman simple
economics and' sponsored by
Finance Corporation in
collaboration with the
Chamber, is broadcast each
Tuesday at 8 p.m.
On Thursday evening there
will be two seminars,
accompanied by films, at the
Bahamnas Teachers' College-
Oakes Field. There is no
admission charge. At 7 p.m.
Harold Longley will speak on
"the small businessman and his


banker, followed at 8 30) by
Samuel Hlall, who will discuss
"the small businessman and
accounting."
On Friday evening Philip
Pinder will talk about "the
general operation of a small
business", and his talk will be
accompanied by the firmn "the
Business Plan"'. Time will be
allowed for questions at the
end of each talk.
A chamber release saidi it
was expected that Bay Street
shops would complete the
hanging of flower baskets alo~ng
store fronts under the
sponsorship of the C'hambehr 5
Ecology and Beautlfrc~ati~n
Committee.
Chamber Week will end
Saturday night in the Polaris
H~all of the Holiday Inn ~n
Paradise Island, when
distinguished citizen awards for
work in business. government.
civics and the creative and
performing arts will be mnadec to
Mr. Wallace Groves. Mr O)ris
Russell. Mrs. Jenny Mlacky
and Mr. Alpphonzo (Blind
Blake) Iliggs.

STANLEYCUP WINNERS
RN W YORKelAI'athed to I ;
Stanley Cup playoffs last night as Z
Haey bok too the Chicago B~lack


RELIABLE sources said
today that Bahamians will get
not one, but three public
holidays to celebrate
Independence Day, July 10.
The reports said the holidays
would be July 9-11.
George Smith, M.P.
parliamentary secretary for the
Independence Secretariat:, this
morning declined to confirm or
deny the report. He said the
question would be answered at
his press conference at 4:30
this afternoon.




SHIPMENT

BEDS PMA DS

A~ltl FI ggg


SOME 550 high school
students fromt Canada and the
United States are presently in
Nassau to participate in the
second annual Festival of the
Americas.
The students, comprising
two bands and ten choirs,
arrived yesterday and will leave
Sunday, following a heavy
schedule of concerts.
Performances are being held
nightly at the Sound and Light
spectacle on F~t. Charlotte.
In addition various groups
were scheduled to appear in
other parts of Nassau. Last
night a concert was presented
at Farther Marshall Cooper
Park, Mason's Addition. Today
there were luncheon concerts
at Lowes Paradise Island Hotel
and the Sheraton British


Colonial Hlotel, anid this
afternoon a programme was
scheduled for the Ranfurly
Homes for childrenn .
Climaxing the festival will be
a group competition to be held
from 9) a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday at
the Government Hligh School
Auditorium.
Adjudicators will be Mr. E-
Clement Bethel of the Ministry
of Education and C:ulture and
Mr. Freddie Munnings of the
Bahamas Musicians Union,
assisted by Mrs. Kayla
Lockhart E:dwards and Mrs.
Mickey St. George.
The Festival of the Americas
is being coordinated by the
Ministry of Tourism.
The number of students
participating in this year's
Festival has almost doubled. '


~b0


~rilruno


Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading News
paper


2 Nixon aides give varying stories on


Watergate investigation


Church founders







honoured yStar of




Bahamas Char it


By SIDNEY D)ORSETT
OVER 700 PERSONS, representing a large cross-section of the Bahamian community, last nightatnethopinofhe2hanalcvninofheSrofheB amsC rtyGdeN.

35 held at the Transfiguration Baptist Church, Market and Vesey Streets.


CIA W ABI A 9 ln


RERE FORl SALIDAT,




(qOTTF urD HI a bmd



26, since she left their Toronto
home with a girlfriend on April
15 fkor what was to have been a
wee 's visit to Nassau.
Mrs. Gilmore, about five
foot, three inches in height, of
regular build and blonde hair
with white bleached stripes,
was last seen when she and
Helen Carpenter, also of
Toronto, checked out of the
Montagu Beach Hotel at
about 6 p.m. Sunday, April 22.
Mr. Hildenbrand, who flew
to Nassau on Tuesday
afternoon to search for his

Capensta wr rheered sst a
group on a pacinge ttouN. The
Iu erupt walite rt foassau
Itrnatoa Arpor f hl
an hour Sunday evening before
leaving without them.
Mr. Hildenbrand said he was
to have met them at the
Toronto airport at about 10:45
p.m. Sunday, but they were
not on the flight from Nassau.
Mr. Hildenbrand has made a
missing persons report to the
police, who advised him to
contact the press.
Miss Carpenter is about five
foot eight inches in height'

Ans e wiow in mation on
the wh r'bouts f either of
the women is asked to contact

HI ernbrta d, pholiis st ying in
room 140 at the Montagu
Beach Hotel.


3,,1,,,, 5 PULI HOIDY Caala I$t ( d Alth
FOR INDEPENDENCE?


helef0 or festival concert tour




~ __ __ _~_~ _I_____ ~__L_ -- --- I ---- --


2 Wht Edibittit


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION

NORM AN MANLEY LAW SCHOOL

MONA CAMPUS, U.W.I.
JAMAICA

ADMISSION OIF STUDENTS
October, 1973.



1. Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates for
admission in October, 1973 to the Norman Manley Law School,
Jamaica.

2. The Legal Education Certificate will be awarded by the C~ouncil to
candidates on satisfactory completion of a course of study and
prOfeSSional training over a period of two years and will render the
holder eligible to be enrolled as a legal practitioner in any of the par
ticipating territories.

Details of Courses and Qualifications

3. Persons holding the LL.B. degree of the U.W.I. or any acceptable
equivalent from an approved University or Institution shall be eligible
to apply for admission. Full par-ticulars of the qualifications required
tor entry and details of courses 1.are available on request. Enquiries
SilOuld be addressed to the Registrar, Council of Legal Education, P. O.
Box 231, Mona Kingston 7, Jamaica.

4. Application forms are available from the Registrar, or from the office of
the Dean, Faculty of Law, U.W.I., Cave Hill, Barbados. Application
forms should be completed in duplicate.

5. The closing date for the recipt of applications is 30th April, 1973.


Deputy~ Premnier NVguyen La u
Vien Submiitted the plan at the
eighth session of the
d e adloc k edt p oIi ti cal
negotiations between the
Saigon government and the
South Vietnamesce (communists
at thle CIhateau D~e L~a ('elle St

'loule Tole t created Saigon's
demands for withdrawal of all
North Vietnamnese troops from
eot olietnam bu for tihe fi ~
equivalent number of South
Vietnamese troops.
t~he plan specified that the
withdrawal of North
Vietnamese forces and the
c tr resp on di deg nobi / it>
would be concluded before the
elections.
~The proposal made no
referecetc to the present South
tiietna pp a consti)(ut in It
Saigon's previous insistence
that the constitution must
remain in force
PRFL:IIMINAR Y AC(OHI)
Vien suggested that the two
sides should meet the 90-day
deadline set by the Jan. 27
peace agreement by signing a
preiminaryy accord on Friday.
April 27. Hie said thle general
elections should be held
Sunday. Aug. 26 which he
said would provide "a
reasonable delay permitting the
South Vietnamese people to
exercise their right o
self-determnination."
Sou th Vietnam pro-
posed internationally suiper-
vised elections within
foutr months. T~he plan made
no reference to the present
South V iect nam ese
constitution, leaving open the
possibility that the Saigon
Government might be willing
to see the constitution
changed. The Viet Cong's
elec inon proposal c s tuefor

assembly to frame a new
constitution,
The Viet Cong demanded
the release of all political
prisoners and "immediate and
full'd gu rantees of democrat

Viet Cong minister of state'
said these two points must be
settled before there can be any
political settlement.
The Commlunist plan also
called for an immediate enid to
the continuing hostilities and
strict observance o~f the peace
agreement.
TROOP WITHDRAWAL
South Vietnam called for
immediate withdrawal of all
North Vietnamese troops from
South rVioetar t endo bit

S ithalel'etnammese troops in
While the South Vietnamese
an i~eir Cong dailegations wet
n e w smlen, the North
Vietnamese embassy in P'aris
announced that Nguyen o
Thach, North Vietnamese
minister for foreign affairs,
would meet F-riday with
William Sullivan, U.S. Deputy
Assistant Secretary of State for
South Elast Asian Affairs, to





DOWNTOWN MIAMI





Single 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the

AMEFRICANABAHAMIAN
- - -******


--13 I- -C I --- -- L


SAYS RELEASE OF PAPERS COULD HAVE AIDED CHINESE
(LO(S ANGE~LE-S) A former high~ranlking marines officer told the
Pentagon Papers trial Jurors in L.os Angelers Tuesday that release of a
volume of the documents in 1969 could have aided the (`ommunist
C'hinese. Retired lie~utentantgerneralr Victor Krulak s testimony
contradicted statements by Congressman Paul McCloskey.
Krulak said such information would have simplified the inte~lligence
gathering job forr the Chinese. McCluoskey had testified that thle asame
information was well known and useless to, an enermy at thle tmle
defendants D~aniel E~lisetrs nd Anltholny Russo, copied it in 1969.
U.S. REJECT HANOl'S CHARGES
(WASHING;TON) (AP) The Ulnited States has rejected as utterly
groundless accusations by Hanni that the UI.S. and Saigon have sabotaged
the Vietnam peace agreement. The rejectioni was contained in a note
circulated to the tenl other nations that signed thle P'aris Accord. Inl it, the
UI.S. alsoi formally charged North Vietnam with an illegal build-up of its
military force in the outuh.
The U.S. said a vast qluantity- of military equipment shipped secretly into
Smsuth Viet immmwidudcut the least effort to, ohserve the peace agreement is a
Tlhe nlote was in respo~nse to charges h> lianoi that the U.S. is
responsible for the vioilatiorn ofC the peace agreement. (e S1l STOR)KI: S

THAILAND TRAINING BASE FOR CAMBODIANS
it I.Svetubteam nav dnie hCprts tat
receiving Amrrican aviation training inl Thailand .
The officials said the training involved airplane maintenance and traffic

L() AN;:I. I~ NS O frmNTA Oighan~k gE arine orticer
contradictingr testimony by C'ongressman Paul N. Mcd'oskey, told jurors
today that release of al volume of the pentagon papers in 1969 could have
aKrt ced L~. ( ni Victo~r Krulalk testified that a section of the papers
dealing with the 1965i marine landing at I)a Nang shows that the landling
was onlly the first phase of a secret contingenlcy plan for VietLnam
oKrlk now director of editorial and news policy for C.opley
Ne pa"'eini Inc. saft euinfR aiinvns eudf nevtrsis e eid' he ao o
the stand by the prosecution as a rebuttal witness.
Mc('o~skey, who testified in defense of D~aniel lEllsberg and Anthony
R~uss~,, had said the information in the same volume was well known and

twacargnd wi h srimae irrac a du thet a copyin th
"Was that information in the public domsinl in 1969?" asked pro~secut~r
Warren Reesche frua rer dn II dma't kno~w. I don't think so." Krulak

MITCHELL'S QUESTIONED ABOUT VESCO
NEW YORHK (AP') former Attotrney G;eneral John Mitchell says he
answered frankly and freely all questions posed Tluesdary by a federal grand
jury in New York, but he declined to discuss his testimony. The grand jury
is investigating dealings oif financier Robert Vesco, who contributed an
urtp ntr MiOth sunn cdun iari >f f president Nixon's re election
Vesrco and a group of associates have been charged by the Securities and
Exchange Commission of swindling 224 million dollars from Mutual I unlds
controlled by Vesco.
The campaign committee returned the donation three months ago.
appinchdl sai teha fuui idesendsuebpoetnae eotr T~ures s appearance bnud
jury. He said he had testified previously before the grand jury, and that he
had never met Vesco.
QE2'S DOCKING ON SABBATH PROTESTED
JElihUtS rI hel' <)Ae dcnroes ase ih tuur use liner Ou en
protested the ship s arrival with American Jews on the Sabbath.
The OE2 sailed here under massive security precautions against
threatened A~rab terrorist attacks, but so far the voyagle's only trouble has
cot!rne i~gir~u miistee wanted to know why the OE12 was unable to delay
her arrival at Ashdad until after sundown last Saturday.
Transport Minister Shimon Pe~res replied the government had not given
th hp tno kiiareception. Premier G;olda Meir added there was no way
The QE2 steamed 8mst of Ashdad, south of Tfel Aviv, early Tuesday to
the northern port of Halfa under the same cautious security arrangements
that have guarded the liner since she left England nine days before,
Only a few of the! 620 passengers were aboard the liner for the 75-mile

ISREL TAK GYP' m R ATS sMOtRErSER OUtSLe s
rren~wed war from C'airo more seriously than in the past, and alertness has
been incroused alo~ng the Suez Canal cease-fire line, an Israelf newspaper
reported Tuesday, but so far there has been no indication of incre~asd war
rea inenj ontthe E~gyptian bank of te canal, the lealy Manri sai qualified military source said 'not to take it too seriously.
alReers froe mb v'iroscdo he igyptian government has decided to place
Mat arly said the transfer of new jetfighter dro admibya aru Iiraqi tc Iyp'
Egyptians might try to disrupt celebrations of israel's 25th anniversary by
opening fire on the canlal-
Ahrne arlais itr~ tdl ea few isolated incidents o~n the canaul since tle
DESCRIBE DISTURBANCE AS 'FOOD RIOTS'
NE:W DM 111II (AP') The government reported ~Tuesday thlat fo~d
shortages in so~me parts of india, especially in central Maharnsrhtra state, are
grave and that the government is straining to avert famine.
A.P'. Shinde. Minister of State for food, told parliament the situation in
Maharashtra is particularly difficult because drought has continued in that
state for the third year.
in r Min ser's statement arose ot armabdemtand for alstat men a rioth
deaths of four persons from police bullets and injury to 17 others
dS re no sus jarparliaimentriuns he r rcried as Nr rivts' th
other side o~f Mahatrathra.


SUMNER, MISS. (AP) A
tornado ripped apart a Tallahatch~ic
County elementary school Tuesday.
injuring 37 children who had takenl
shelter on the floor just before the
storm hit.
Authorities said a teacher at thel
school was also injured. levenl
persons were hospitalized w~ith
more serious injuries while theL
others were treated for cuts anld
bruisesr and released.
A storm also took off the roof orf
a small elementary school in fippt,
IS miles southeast of Ierre
reportedly leaving two pupils w\ith~
minor injuries.
violent tweat unthsat rakt edpal
Mississippi during the day.
Teachers at west district school
hlere said thle children had pralctised~
a tornadoddrillronly minutes befretr
the torna o sttfc th sol e ili

the nlour.
theO r achedr apt thousc oft said

raqin pn ai smda~sh kwin <\
tro and wls and br ing a ear
"The most pitiful sight was to,
see the children lying in the water
and wb "s i n theh water
e mywer, sea ence teac er L~ewis
nElbert Bur e, tahhistory te Fher
the children received deep cut\
from falling mason y.ha brut
to school to illustrate a science~
project," Burten said. "It was thle

akd up nmd down t hl rit rn
light seemed to help keep themn
from being afraid."
Burten said he "saw the hand of1
a Hittle boy from under the concrete
blocks. He was lying flat and the
bricks had fallen on top of him andt
he was yelling, 'Help me, help me."'
He said the children were trying
eo bulthemselves houti vrmdute
"there was a gas line leaking where
the children were trapped. It made
the situation worse."
Burten said the 824 children
wre evacu ted f om dtile dam god
elementary and junior highl
sections.
Two mobile classrooms were
locnatedanbeohif al d hh emnr\
destroyed.


WASHING TON (AP) Dr-
Henry A. Kissinger and Hanoi's
Le Duc The are expected to
meet in Paris in mid-May to
discuss imple etatio of th
Paris peace accords, White
House sources said today.
This was disclosed after
press secretary Ronald L.
Ziegler made a formal
announcement that Asst.
Secretary of State William L.
Sullivan and a North
Vietnamese official will meet
in Paris on F~riday "to prepare
a review of the implementation
of the Paris agreements and
aproprit mematsurs sptom trna

t on of the agreements."
Sullivan, assistant secretary
fr EastaAsian af airs will meet

lianoi's vice minister of foreign
affairs, Nguyen Co Thach.
StJust Tuesday the lUnited
Saes, in a formal note
accused North Vietnam of
dilatitn oantde inexcumab
agreements on ending the war
in Vietnam.
Sources said Sullivan and
Thach would prepare a review

btweepr Ksin er,a Pme i e
Nixon's top foreign policy
adviser, and Le Due Tho, a
member of the North
Vietnamese Politbe in Paris,
around te mi le of May.
Z legler sa id the
Sullivan-Thach session was
"not for the purpose of
recrimination" but rather to
seek full adherence by all
parties to the peace accord and
an end to the fighting
throughout Indochina.
The United States, he said,
"was doing everything
possible" to achieve these ends.
But he noted that Washington
has complained 'on many
occasions" about violations
attributed to Hanoi.
Friday's meeting was
announced simultaneously by
the White House and North
Vietnam. In response to a
question, Ziegler said the two
parties had not adopted
identical language for the
announcement but that he
anticipattehde Hanoin wto id s y

substance


(By The Associated Press)
SWOLLEN BY HEAVY SPRING; RAINS, the waters of the
Myississippi River and its tributaries kept rising Tuesday, drivinS
hundreds of families from their homes and flooding thousands of
acres of farmland.


although homes or summer
cottages along the river banks
might be damaged.
O fcials in Louisianae sat
that applications for feea
flood insurance policies had
increased nearly 400 pr cenA
during the past 12dys.
spokesman for one company
said about 2,000 applications
had been received daily.
Th6,000 AFFECREd Cos
estimated that 6,000 faiies
in Missouri and Illinois have
been af ctred by th floodbsea


evacuated by boat, "only
taking along suitcase or twost

month. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel
Marlow of Estral Beach, Mich.
Sa community about a
quarter of a mile from Lake
Erie - were forced to flee then
from their new home to Mrs.
Marlow's parents, about 15

mie weare still in a spare
bedroom Tuesday. "Everything
they owned except the pictures
on the wall was ruined," said
Mrs. Marlow's mother, Mrs.
Leon Ham. "The fuel oil tan k
on the outside floated into the
woods somewhere." She said
the water in the Marlows'
home was 20 inches deep for
about four days-
The Marlows who are
expecting their first child in
about a month and a-half
haven't decided whether to try
to move back to their house,
Mrs. Ham said. She said they
had been unable so far to get a
contractor to look at the
house.
Noble said that most of the
flood along the lower
Mississippi had been contained
within 30-foot high levees built
all the way to the gulf coast,
but he added that there was
back water covering more than
7 million acres, mostly
farmland, in Tennessee,
Akansas, Louisiana and




BEAUTY BOX

THELMA CANCINO
BEN ABRANOFF
Beauty Specialists
Specializing in Facials
PHONE 2-6305
FREEPORT ARCADE
PIONEER WAY
DOWNTOWN, FREEPORT


Thousands of people already
have been forced to evacuate
their homes; entire cro s have
been wiped out; and large areas
of farmland are completely
under water because of spring
floods along the mid-section of
America. Damage estimates are
in the millions.
The Mississippi was expected
to hit a record 43.5 feet when

Thursa an m e thouis,7 0
national guardsmen were
activated to battle flood waters
in ea trn Missou vr bena

flood this high on that section
of the river," said Maj. Gen.
C:harles C. Noble, head of the
Mississippi River Commission.
The river crested at St. Louis
erlier tirss nronth eang nthe

estimated at that time that
flood waters caused $40
million in damage.
Three-fourths of the town of

sut west oillChicag andmiles
place where the Illinois and
Mississippi rivers meet, is
flooded and half the
population of about 1,000 has
been evacuated.
SECOND IN MONTH
The flood is the second this
month for G;rafton. On April 5,
the Illinois crested at 29.5 feet
--a record level.
P ofice chief Larry
Newingham recalled that
during the first flood, "most of
the people just moved their
belongings to the second floor
of their homes. With this flood
they're moving everything
out.
Newingham said the river is
at 28 feet now and most
experts expect it to go to 32
feet.
The community has been
sealed off by the state police.
It has f our restaurants, three
service stations and novelty
shops that do booming
business during spring and
summer catering to fishermen

"The flood has changed all
that," said Newingham, "three
of the four restaurants are
under water and all three
service stations have been
GoodeM ~nry County in
northern Illinois the Fox River
rose four inches during the
night and civil defense officials
said it wo dtecrest Saturdayoin
rain. A civil defense spokesman
said, however, that there will
be no need for evacuation


discuss application of the Paris
agreement
Sulliva w o f h
architect was o e ofP es
agreement. He and Thach
hammered out many of the
tech ial details of the aod
pnic North Vietacco e
ano ncm t sai tey a, l

regarding strict application of
the accord "

T~he Unie CHAt es has
charged that the North
Vietnamese have been
consistently violating the
agreement and has stopped the
clearing of North Vietnamese

V ettesm has n onuenered orth
claiming that the United State
and Saigon have failed to keep
their part of the peace
a reement
Tlhen Uniteda Sate hasN h s
Vietnam on economic aid to
rebuild the war shattered
economy.
T'he PRG minister of state
Nguyen Van Hieu immediately
rejected the Saigon proposals
lie told the meeting the 1 a
was "nothing but y anoplan
manoeuvre of diversion and
propaganda containing nothing
concrete or positive and
designed to deceive world
public opinion."
Hieu told a news conference
the Saigon proposals
"deliberately turned their back
on reality and violate the letter
and the spirit of the ceasefire
agreement.
Vien told newsmen Hieu had
refused to agreement to a date
For the next meeting for the
first time since the talks started
in early March.
Hieu said however that the
tal s will continue next week
at a date to be fixed in

offiers fo te to deeg ions


Watergate affair.
U.S. district judge Winston
Arnow yesterday ordered
Mitchell to appear at a pre-trial
hearing for eight anti-war
activists. The eight are charged
wit uplott na to Nisrp te
Convention last summer.
Arnow says the defense
wants to question Mitchell
about whether the case against
the defendants involves
electronic surveillance. Defense

gv rnne nt' scas ais ebase
partly on wiretaps collected by
the Watergate conspirators.
Judge Arnow termed the
possibility "far-fetched."
Meanwhile, Mitchell had
littic information to offer after
testifying before a federal
grand jury in New York
yesterday'
The panel is believed to be
studying a secret donation to
the Nixon re-election
campaign. And Mitchell would
say only that he answered all
the questions, as he put it,
"fully, freely and frankly."
President Nixon reportedly
is reserving decision on
whther sto afireresome t p-letvel
Watergate case. And
presidential spokesman have
denied reports that Secretary
of State William Rogers was
asked to spealrhead a revamping
of thle White Hlouse staff.
M ea while, the past
ca irom n Cm tete IepuDlI a
Shumway says he had
incomplete information when


administration officials knew
of the political espionage plans.
Republican Senator Robert
Dole of Kansas claimed,
however, that the Watergate
conspiracy could have bee n
Pr dent's k owledge


SHOTS FIRED III COD




coastuardAVe els fed tilashlal
and peppered B~ritishl fishing
trawlers with rifle fire in a fiereup
of the cod war.
British trawlerme~n were
described TI sheingfolinwian ut y
overnight clash. No causunilties were
reported.
MTned fishing letetast nmther shi .
the Brucella and the Portla, were
' hit by live rounds.'
^t Hull, England, trawlermen
lenders adgeflshingmboat owners
demanded immediate talks with the
British government. However, they
said they would not press for na y
pro action at tit sti te htts
skirmish since Sept. I when Iceland
extesde 11r fihn aii ero s1 Z
defied that limit since then,
fr tryihy andlina owith the
Austin Laing, director-general of
the Bridish trawlermen's federation.
said, "we've always said our
judgmelrn o the ned ao ean nav l
thle lve!, or our trawlermen.
rep t tiono sul cIons to ato h
presence will have to be thlrushed
out with the go~vemrnme," Lauing
suld.


"'thos're right about
a~il~ntin' s Scotc~h.


"Have I Cver
been wrong?"


;'""~-Y


;il

rC)
/Il~r

;-Q_-

I
i~-~


The more a k now abouut Scotch,
the more lyal you are to Barllanttine's.


Aprd 25 173.

Clll)~l SIlf IVE


Isause1) TaIA'T Wlm


EFFORT TO BREAK DEADLOCK KISSINGER &


Saigon proposes new THO TO MEET


ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER



FIroGIS damae iA AlilliaHS,


IIIICSI PPISSISSI


ASAn In PARIS suesan s alnes wrecked '


10-point plan for


S. V xetnam a future

PARIS APRIL 25 (AP) The South Vietnamese government
today poosed to the Viet Cong a 10-point plan for a final
political settlement in South Vietnam including internationally
supervised general elections within four months.


G ive yourself' happy
relie f om backache,
rheumatic pains, stiff
achmngomuscles or te
disorders due to


you feeling fit and
active.






DOAN'SS
K

Distributed by:
Thompson Drug Co Ltd,
sex d027, centreville. Nassau.


Fore Of lohf AGM i t Chl Ol 10



testify in 80n P ORv GtioR CasSO

PENSACOLA, FLORIDA (AP) Former Attorney General
John Mitc'hell is expected in Pensacola, Florida today in
connection with a trial that the defense is trying to link with the












_ _~_


L15181 BllikSt000 [Cld illill) Ill.


mhr ~ribunt
NvuLLUS ADDICTUS URARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Mlaster
LEON E; HI. D)UPUCH. Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUICH,O.B.E.. K.C.S.G., D.Litt., L.L.I)
Publisher/Editorl9/17-1972
Contributing Editor l972.
EILEEN DUPUCH1CARRON,M4.Sc., B.A., LL.B..
Publisher/Editor1972
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau. Bahamas.


Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices(15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday April 25, 1973.


a








a ,)


h sal. d a h-

At ill In. her wha \
"T R e Pn in th i
Govrm Nt lE d IEsn
So \auI/ FUx-G IEn
Mius Er so, f t t O p t11
otthRO ICA 2ayth rdean


MARINE ENGINES

P. O. BOX 62 75 TE LFPHON E 28488
EASTERN END NASSAU SHIPYARD.


affairs, as saying he told
MacGregor In August he
wanted "a very alligent effort"
to uncover any campaign
committee link to Watergate.
Ehrlichman said he asked
Macrtegor fodar s 3r~b DAYS NLY

Wy Dresi entialh counsel John c
itsel ricmante inlo
reached Tuesday to c~onfirmn his
statement. Mac<;regor issued a OYSE RP
conflicting statemennt thro~ughws$40
his office. He is presently an : a 45
official of United Aircraft ~-NOW $3.50

latj "hr i cma MagcGse d// i P; POLYESTER
that I issue a new statement on *''DOUBLE KNIT
Watergate, but no one could SPECIAL $4.00 and $5.00
provide me with anything new ~
or newsworthy to say I r (
nothing which hadn't been

prededima ot o othdsurin th
"lohn is certainly entitled to ~
his observations and 1;182~ 4.~ 8UINSO
rec ollec tions about what i
occurred during that periodLI
John can speak for himself, bu t. 6~. ' OAKES FIELD
I assure you there was no such
development in the last days ofSHP NGC TR
August," MacGregor said.


ALL THIS WEEK AT ALL SUPER VALUE SUPERMARKETS



'

~lllllllIIIIIIOdL'5llP








It --- plcr~
~s~p it Of











~nw lr~n~~pCO~t







BUY~~o~~ ONE GE TOEFE!









QUALITY TASTE PRICE AND VITAMIN D FO~R EXTRA GOOD HEALTH
-A COMBINATTION HARD TO B EAT


Remembe0 fosop


Hatchet Bay The Baha~mian Wa~y


Wednesday April 25, 1973.


compared to the hours a actually sitting in the House wligt e neape1.a
surgeon stands daily under the and the facilities THE PEOPLE es rnl ndvlta
hot lamps of the operating freely supply and mlembers mmnadlonigh n
theatre or the long days their obviously enjoy under suchl of the~ teni we THE PEOPLE,
brother lawyers stand arguing ideal conditions of publicity a hn ogvrnuot
cases in (`ourt for their clients. pomp and privilege, we miight reutth hidoth
Nevertheless considering the he bold enough to ask: mutholhertidb
great good Me~mbers do whilst "Should Members not he thei (oInnIenttI~'1 I 1.e'. The

RAPS TAXI DRIVERS' COMPLAINTS


lil)IT`OR, The Tribune'
Nicki Ke~lly s report on the
"C'lash Between D~octors and
the G;overnment", March 31st'
opens possibilities on more
tno~ne frnt. au dquot "
of facilities in dealing with
private patients the Minister of
Health now feels that they
should pay to the hospital one
nidthf ith iecll owrne

'os of acititi pro idedT b

similar argument coul l
and should he used against
lawyers in the Magistrate's
<:urtso rnd barr st esind t

>othf en (s ull and nree tsh
clients" in Co~urts of Law
Facilities freely provided "by
the People". Remember? '"The
Government are The People".
That being so lawyers too
"should bc char di a fluticou t

use of equipment and supplies,,
as is proposed for their
professional brothers the
doctors. The Barrister and h s
Junior or lawyer in Magistrate s
Court "would merely inform
the Accounting Section of
,hi charge for pofedsonal
the amount would he retained
by the G;overnmnent i.e. The
People, with twot thiirds being
accredited to the account of
the lawyer.
flow splendid! Justice at
last!! Consider our young
budding politicians rushing to

qalifi atitofijn t As well as the spectre of


bulf I n then tao ve
under those terms how
stimulating! 'who's emnigrat-
ing ? .
Which remninds mie brothers
and Sisters, tallking ,f



People" when they use the
~louse of Assemblly in tle
discharge of their duties when
acting as our elected
Government. The amount of
nes th y actu Ily spend in th


People111~1 \and.1 .1w ,1In1as Ihe



AN OLI) FOOL

kman~il ,Indt I weport.rt


Pl hes rbun e space in
your column to say' a few
words toepthe ily harin n

drivers,
Please don't be mad at your
Moses. 110 came~ to deliver you
all from the hands of slavery -
300 years of it so you have
and must by all means enjoy
your new freedoml.
You taxi people you all
help to create this same image.
People can't set foot in your
cars before you all start telling
them about giving them a
chance d during election
cam paigns.

alt ough >o its edN%.< tis
Al h '~'s are doing is


huy-ing o~ut ever thip etttt in

pricerso that the pooreveclass
can' reach it.kaon Aly

see is the rich kee~p on getting
rich and the poor remrain poor.
'There we hole~ tauces lnd
more taxes. Paul Adderrle says
PLP supporters will be happy
to pay taxes. If ontly he knew
that somei o~f theml ca;n t find a
mnorsel of tocod someii days for
their children rang~ing in ages
from one year to, I8 YeaTs. NO
work andt house rient to pay.
sent oTnis for ifferent
Our Independenc~e starts off
costly and it will he~ more and
niore expensive until those tax:
men will have to park their
taxis in the ya3rd and look


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
YESTERDAY I told you that I made a special trip to
Kingston, after attending the IAPA meeting in Montego Bay,
Jamaica, to see two of my war-time friends .. the Rev. Canon
Dr. J. C. Wippel and George Levy.
George has disappeared and so Canon Wippel remains the only
war-time link left in Jamaica for me of all the thousands of
Jamaicans with whom I served in the first world war.
Canon Wippel joined us in Belgium as Chaplain to the 4th
battalion. He was assigned to D-company. I was detailed to be his
batman, which is the army word for servant.
I don't know why he didn't send me packing the first day
because I completely botched the first job he gave me to do but,
after I got to know this good man, I grew to understand why
nothing seemed to upset him, not even miy incompetence as a
carpenter.
My first job was to make a cot for him. I was provided with the
lumber, canvas asul nails f'or the t yhad ads we Igt

the cot set up no two legs were the same length. The darn thing

rocthehdc sare fo rttim bits off each leg. .and I kept trimming
until it became top heavy. The last time I set it up . .it just
turned over.
This good priest took one look at my job . .and smiled.
He got some more lumber from somewhere .. I don't know
where it came from because this material was very scarce "up thle
line" ... and then he got someone else to do the job.

The Canon and I got on famously. I acted as his assistant at his
services. I handed out the hymn books. I managed to do this job
without dropping anything.
And then the time came when I realized the depthi of1 this-
man's faith
One day he was going to an English unit a couple of miiles away
to hold a service.
To get there we had to cross an area that had been under heavy
frombardment for weisks. It seemed impossible .. certainly
reckless ... to attempt to cross it.
He asked me about the routes to our destination. Told him
about a long detour we could take to avoid this danger spot.
After a moment's thought he said simply: "We must take the
short route if we are to get there in time".
That meant going through what seemed to be an impassable
barrage.
As we approached the danger spot Canon Wippel's lips started
to move. He war, praying.
The shells kept falling until we reached the danger zone.
Suddenly the barrage lifted and we passed safely through. As
soon as we were at a safe distance the shells started to fall again.
We went to the camp and held the service. All through the
service we could hear the shells exploding in the distance.
There was no let up in the shelling on our return journey but
the Canon did not hesitate. He just kept right on praying and
walking. I kept pace with him at a respectful distance in the rear.
As we got in the middle of the danger area a shell fell only a
few yards away. It had been raining heavily and we were walking
through mud and slush a foot deep. I hit the ground and got my
face buried in the mud but Canon Wippel didn't stop. He just
kept marching on. Ever since then I have associated this scene
with the lines in the hymn:
Onward Christian soldiers
Marching as to war
With the cross of Jesus
Going on before.
But nothing happened. The shell, which would most certainly
have killed both of us, was a dud .. it didn't explode!
******
Shortly after this trip across country with Canon Wippel he
was recalled to Barbados to fill the position of principal of
Codrington College. The principal had died.
The Canon and I becamec close friends. He never treated me
like a servant. From the start he showed great interest in my
affairs, especially when he found out that I had comle from a
newspaper family.
******
I will repeat a story I have told before I pick up the thread of
.the Canon's story again.
Capt. George Dawson was the English commander of our
Company. He had been a headman on a cane estate in Jamaica,
dealing with the roughest of Jamiaica's labour. This had made him
a rough man, one of the harshest men I have ever met. He had
taken a special dislike to mle because he seemed to resent that I
had some kind of background.
And then one night he needed a job done for himself
personally. He didn't want to order a man to do it. He called for a
volunteer. When Sergeant Ashley went around to the tents calling
for a volunteer to do the Captain a favour, all he got was the
dirtiest Jamaican curses you can imagine .. I don't think anyone
can curse like a Jamaica mountain mlan.
Happened to be standing in the dark outside the tents when i
'all this was going on. The Captain was standing there, hearing
how much he was hated by the mien. He didn't see me.
When he had been turned down by all his mien, I stepped out
of the dark, saluted, and volunteered. Hec was surprised that I
should be the only one to volunteer.
Under a rough exterior this man had a heart. For thle next 18
months of my service he went out of his way to take care of' mc.
When he was appointed Deputy Assistant Provost Marshal in
charge of the prison compound for offenders froml all West
Indian camps in Italy he had me transferred as hiis clerk. There
were several Sergeants under him in the camp. Although I was
only a Private, Captain Dawson leaned on me as he felt he could
depend on me. He seldom came to the prison and I ran it for himl.
The Sergeants didn't dare push me around because it was
generally felt that I was the only person in the outfit for whom
thefiC pano hae uny ad. He was tough even onl the junior
When the war ended my name cam~e up in thle first unit to be


From Page I
administration. C'onnally is the
former Secretary of the
Treasury and Laird the former
Secretary of D~efense. Both
have re-entered private life.
In New York C:ity, former
Aty 2feene Johna rn M t hell
looking into financier Robert


ca agn. Ate war M i ce
denied he had ever met Vesco
whose financial dealings were
the subject of a Securities and
Exchange Clommission probe at
the time he made his epmpaign
gf.VEISCO PAYM~INT
Mitchell was head of the
Nixon campaign when Vesco's
contribution was made but
resigned July Iafter the
Watergate complex conspiracy.
TuhseaWashir tlon Str hmea
Nixon's assistant for domestic


demobilized. The Captain had to stay to the end. He asked me to
stay and help him with demobilization of the unit. H-e said he
didn't want mec to go back home as a Private. If I stayed he would
make mie a Warrant Officer.
I told him I was sorry. The job I had comec to Europe to help in
doing was finished and I had another job waiting for me back
hiome.
110 did nothing to keep me back but he was deeply hurt by mly
decision and so I never heard from him after the war.
****+*
Now, let me pick up the story of C'anon Wippel at this point.
After he went back to Barbados he kept in touch with me. One
o~f the first things i did when I returned to Nassau after the war
was to start a fund to collect money for Codrington College. The
drive .. which was my first effort tot collect money from the
public .. proved to be surprisingly successful. Since then I have
collected enormous sums of money for deserving public causes,
Through the years the Canon and I kept our friendship alive.
And then the time came foir him to retire and he decided to make
hlis homie in Jamiaica. I don't know why he selected Jamaica. As
far as I know he has not gone back to England since the war.
H-e and hiis wife decided to travel through Nassau so that the
Canon could have a reunion with me. The Rt. Rev. Spence
Burton was then Bishop of Nassau. H-e expected the Canon to
spend the day with him. But he didn't. We went to Addington
House for lunch with the Bishop but thle Canon and his wife
spent the day with miy wife and mle..
By thtis time I had started to score some public successes. The
Canon became my Public Relations mian in Jamnaica.. Every time I
mnade a score he spread the news around among the officers under
whomn I had served.
One day I received a letter fromi himn. He said he had told
C'aptainl Dawson about miy successes and suggested that he should
write to mie. It was only then that I realized hlow deeply the
Captain had been hurt by my refusal to stay and help him with
the demobilization after the war.
"He doesn't want to hear fromt me," was the Captain's gruff
reply.
And so, thle Canion suggested that I should write to Capt.
Dawson. I wrote immiiediately. A long time passed and then one
night on miy way to a meeting of the House of Assemibly I got miy
miail out of mny box atI the Post Office.
Whiile thle Speaker went through the preliminaries of starting a
meeting of the blouse I opened a letter with a Kingston postmlark.
The letter was from Capt. Dawson's wife. She said that the day
my letter arrived at their house, the C'aptain's body was being
mouved out to the cemetery for burial. She said that their only son
had been killed inl the second world war when his plane was shot
down while flying over enemy territory. Hler husband had never
recovered froml this blow. She was sorry mly letter had not comie
earlier. She felt that it miight have cheered hlinllt p to knlow that
someone cared about him. Because of` his brusqlue marnner he was
not the kinld of' m1an who could claims many if anly friends 11.
life.
* ** **
Whien we miet in Kingston a couple of weeks ago the
relationship was warmer thian ever, if that is possible. We were
juist two old menCI looking back over the years and thanking God
forl the gift of frien~dship.
The Canlon was 90 years on hiis last birtluclay . .and so he has
16 years on mec. But he wears his years well.
More important still . thle light of a simple faith in G;od still
shines brightly from this good mnan's eyes.
When we were parting I asked himi to pray for mie. He told me
that I was included in his prayers every Wednesday.
It is really wonderful to find that over all these years, this
saintly mlann had prayed regularly for God to guide my footsteps.
**+****
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
tlioc intelwae to dia b for wt I rut f tisb stat rt
POPE:


-; 1


WhrP Qrthtme


COMMORIS on Tribune's PMH article


NIIOR aideS dIS ? e


WHAT WE




I


glI


IndeperdeRCS eSSay CORIOSt


p --~~ -


OFFERS ATTRACTIVE OPPORTUNITIES FOR
CAREERS IN INSURANCE to meet the Group's future
needs for Technical, Professional and Management Staff
in the Bahamas.
Successful applicants will receive training in both the
theory and practice of Fire, Accident, Motor and Marine
inurabnecee gt leeGfo' rfranchr ffice in Freeeport, and

Kingdom.
G.C.E. standard of educ tion is resurd dit sem has s

eped t r parae fr the pofessional qualifications of
An attractive salary will be paid during the initial
training period, with ultimate earnings commensurate
with ability. Applications should be marked "PRIVATE
AND CON FIDENTIAL" and addressed to:-
The Manager,
Sun Alliance & London Insurance Group,
Post Office Box F-26,
Freeport,
GRAND BAHAMA.


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


...n Nassau

call Nat Dorsett 2-3843



THE DOMedi0N UFE ASSURANCE COMPANY


(1) Two auoaic col crls Se each indpedenly














i.m


Just 20 sninutes andl a




COImplImn @Hrry TUI punch



59pcrrate Nas~sauu and


Freep~rt Out Island Airways now offers 20-minute super-jet service
between Nassau and Freeport. On a schedule designed just for
Bahamions.

That s Out Island Airways' way of expressing its confidence in the future
growth of the Bahamas. Providing the truly Bohamian service expected
of an independent nation. Beautiful Bahomion stewardesses to serve you
.. complimentary rum punches to entice you .. and million mile

co l tai tolyin yr BA C-1 1 1, the world s most reliable short haul aircraft.

With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can stretch out in comfort.
Aboard the Bahamas' own airline.

And to introduce you to Out Island Airways' super-jet Nassau/Freeport
service, OIA offers a special low-cost, round-trip one-day fare just $33.

With 20-minute jet service and $33 rates, can there be any other choice
but Out Island Airways? Call your travel agency or OIA now for
reservations. 7-8222.





Out Islad AirW Y wySserves the sahmas est


lir


I14 I~..~-I~- I::II- I~- I- I Id m mal-il l m lrliigI I ll mmi ll n m alll IM


.


Wednesday April 2t5, 1973.


M1INIST [ RH of ~Tourism

p metnt he I abaMaa cdom 11
p'rogrammliie for 1973 to the
loical ((ourist mdustry in Nassau
at I 10 3 a nti tomorrow in the
(;L.('verl'


11 nurd wl ill make a similar
lT.~~~l~ii ln 11 he I rccpr
hc\"'j,'ll "nd stry "pr
I hose presentatiOnS Will
he Irlloiwed by a Bahamas
clumbllha Sumnmer '73 kick-off
In ~~\rw Yo~rk o~n May ?. At this
Inc a.; presentation will be
matedc to wholesalers, airlines
~fflc~ials,. key retailers and the
travel press.

M itister will ipr sen k ynte
;nidrcss andl the Ministry's


'coomnbay Holiday' film will
besownbay Summer '73
begins June 3, and continues
on to September9'.
G~oombay Summer '73 Is
desi nedoto maintain a h a


::e visit:::::".1,"" :, sta: b
offering special attractions for
the rdnoyommny programnme
draws promotional support
from all segments of the
Bahamas hospitality industry
including the Ministry of
Tourism, the Nassau/Paradise
Island Promotion Board, the
I reeport/Lucaya Tourist and
Convention Board, the Out
B anats Associaatin,r toe
Commerce and the Bahamas
Christian Council.









M R. TE RR ANCE Paul
Lightbourne, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Lightbourne of
Nassau, was married March 3 in
Macon, Georgia to Miss
El beth Jan 01 ik
dag er of r. and k ni
iferbert Murray Olnick o
Maco .

perfohmedca hem oMulbw s
Street United Methodist
Church.

Na~s uR ma btd mn Ushe s
were Richard Olnick of
Columbus, the bride's brother;
Randy Knowles, Nicholas
Damianos, Michael Roberts
and Thomas Roberts, all of
Nassau.
Mrs. Earl Franklin Hilley Jr.

Bridesmaid wereoMisshPonr ria
Lightbourne of Nassay, the
groom's sister; Mrs. Richard
Olnic k of C ol umbus
sister-in-law of the bride; Miss
Sandra Bontemps of Bryn
Mawr, Pa., and Miss Pamela
i Prtied of Macon.
The reception was held at
the Idle Hour Country Club
The couple took up`
residence in Nassau following a
wedding trip to England,
Switzerland and Bermuda.
TIDES
High 12:39 a.m. and 1:11


Education and C~ulture.

an Th n entafeat ripneg onac
plays full-length plays, skits
andheeiewommittee looked
forward to participsati n bytal
age grouping i h
conmrunity lhee sid Winni g
pub lished in a special
Idep Inb ennopu li tioe


HIS LOR DSHIP Bishop
Michael Eldon. chairman of the
Independence t:ssay
( competition ( ommiittee.
reminded Individuals and
achto lioping tanente ohet
contests that deadline for
entries is May 15.
Outlining details of the essay
competition, Bishop Eldon said
that in schools, a number of
age groupings have been
established. ~They are ages 7-9;
10-11; 12-14: 15-18. He said
that entrants should be within
their specified age groups at

t icdeadine itois rM uire thby
all entries be received
All students up to and
meclu ing ag 14Wwill be writi g

To Help Build My Nation,"
andl those up to and including
18 years will be dealing with
the topic "The Privileges and
Responsibilities of A Citizen In
An Independent Bahamas."
Word limits have been set
for the various age
subdivisions, Bishop Eldon
said. Those students 7-9 years
of agetare nlot equiredt wri e

the 10-11 category, not more
than 200 words. Those in the
12-14 age groups should write
essays 300-500 words. in
length and the 15-18 group
should not write less than 500
words.
The subject of the essay



ARRIVED TODAY: Joma
frm FJacpksonville; Freeport
SAILED TODAY: Joma for
Jacksonville; Freeport for
Freeport; Emerald Seas for
Miami
ARRIVING TOMOR ROW:
Tropic Flyer from West Palm
Beach;
S AILING TOMORROW:
Flavia, Bahama Star, for
Miami; Oceanic for New York.
SUN
Rises 5:43 a.m.
Sets 6:35 p.m.


competition for the general
public is "The Tools Reqluired
For Building A Nation and
there is no limlitt to the number
of words in this category. He
bentond tdage lallts~tuten s
f it ted into this category.
Likewise were those individuals
under 18 but not in school.
DETAILS
Bishop Eldon then outlined
details of the national poetry
competition, and said that this
too, had been sub-divided into
contests for schools, and for
the public at large. In the
schools,athe groupings arrest

competition with the addition
that a group for those under
se en ya hasob en created

lengths have been set for the
poetry competition, Bishop
Eldon commented, but the
committee hoped that entrants
would explore the theme of
nationhood for t he
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.
Insofar as the essay and
poetry contests for the general
p hei were concerned, entri s

Ministry of Education and
Culture, attention Mrs. Susan
Wallace by May 15.
Bishop Eldon reminded
those who intended to
participate in the playwriting
competition that deadline for
this is May 1, and entries
should be forwarded to Mr.
Clement Betthel, Ministry of


NASSAU BOY IN
SCHOOL PLAY
l}IWIS A. Symonette, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis
Symionette of Nassau, takes the
part of "Le Beau", the Duke of

at n anti c in ap om de n
production of Shakespeare's
comedy "As You Like It"
presented by the students of
the College of St. Catherine,
St. Paul, Minnesota, on April
27 through 29.
T~he play is the final
production for the season by
the comb in ed th eatre
departments of The College of
St. Catherine and the College
of St. Thomas.
The play is done in modern
orssa s deals with 0< iee '
lib rtin "It's highl
app aprate to our t mes," say
CJeorge Poletes director and
designer of the sets-
BUTLER GUEST
SPEAKER THURSDAY
SPEAkER of the H-ouse
Arlington Butler, MP for
C'ulmerville,' will be the guest
speaker at the monthly
meeting of the Bahamas
Business and Professional
Women's Association at 8 p.m.
ThursdaIy. at the.Sonesta Beach
Hotel.
He will talk on "Parlia-
mentary Procedure."
RED CROSS
ANNUAL MEETING
THE ANNUAL general
meeting of the Bahamas Red
Cross will be held in the
Ballroom of Government
House on Tuesday, May 8, at
5:30 p.m.


p.m.
Low
P.m.


6:58 a.m. and 7:12


Whr iErthamr


GOOMBAY SUMMER

PRESENTATIONS T


BE MADE BY MiNISTER dleadlill is May 15


c)


Wife iS flat impressed


with week end outings

By Abigail Van Buren
cZ 1H BY Chicago Tribune-n. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: Neil and I have been married for three
years. It's the second time around for both of us and I am
determined to make a go of this marriage. Neil is 53 and
I'm 50.
My problem: Every weekend Neil wants to entertain
another couple on our boat. The other couple always turns
out to be a cute young female employee and her husband.

outing is toc iprse st new e ple Rutheast w eed
was the last straw. The girl (about 221 wore skintight pants
Pad a sheer blouse, to show off her figure, which was
beautiful. II am not bad for my age, but I can't compete
with that.l My husband kept calling her "Honey," "Doll,"
and "Babe." The young husband sat like a bump on a log
and tried to make small talk with me.
Should I go along with entertaining such couples? We
have plenty of friends our own age, but my husband pr -
fers these kids. Please advise me. JEALOUS IN NEWPORT
DEAR JEAIA)US: Tell your husband that if he wants to
e traina his emplys u o e will m ln wlihth kan doo

fearsome is boresome.

DEAR ABBY: I cannot tolerate smoke, but it seems
the world is geared for smokers. In waiting rooms, and in
almost all public places, if the nonsmoker wants to escape
the pollution of smokers, he has to find a smoke-free corner
where he can breathe some fresh air.
Why don't they post NO SMOKING; signs in all places
where people gather, and provide the smokers with a
dinky, little, airtight room off to the side somewhere where
they can all cro wd d together, smoke to their hearts'
content, and inhale each other's smoke? Then, the fresh air
will be left for those of us who are mor dKsrvn O f M

DEAR SICK: I'm with you. And to the next smoker
who asks me if I "mind" If he smokes, I shall say: "Why
don't you do us both a favor and refrain?,,

DEAR ABBY: My first letter to any kind of newspaper
but I feel so strongly on the question raised by "Dad ir'
Hackernsack," I must express myself Believe me, the money
loaned to anyone in a family for a friend for that matter)
should be accompanied by a cold hard note. It may seem
unfriendly, but once it is an established fact, it is the most
friendly way to handle a loan, and avoids a lot of problems
in the future.
When my husband and I borrowed from our parents, it
was a businesslikep procedure. True, we paid only 3 per cent
interest, and the note was renewed, but it was all on paper
fa case something happened to any of us.
I know elderly people who have only their Social So.
curity to lve on because they foolishly "loaned" their own
children money, never dreaming they needed a note, and of
course they never got one penny back.
Please print this, Ab~by. Some people are much too
tr~usting. PASADENA PARENTS
CONFIDENTIAL TO "READY FOR A NEW BROOM
IN LAGUNA HLLS": A new broom may sweep clean, but
the old broom knaows where the dirt is.







~Zho ~artbtmo


~J~-~~~RF SH~O~i-p~j~~


i' I


II
rl


1 11:~~11 D111:~1~7I*1. ~jr~


) rl
~II r~


Illr


19-021
PK6,


/


GIANT SIZE
FAB DETErRGEnT



1 9 4

n


/I


Star-M st


U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN STEAK(S



89


STARKIST BLUE LABEL
TUNA


4


\L
Y/ Z
1/2
L 6~WS


U.S CHOICE PORTERIIOUSE OR
T-BONE STEAK......B 1 1.99
CITY MARKET COOKED
HAM e.................a 1.89
BAHAMIAN SNAPPER AND
JALCKS ................Le 79


U.S CHOICE TOP
ROUND STEAK ..
I S. CHOICE BOTTOM
ROUND ROAST ..
MELLOW CRISP
BAC~ON..... ..


CORNED BEEF


12-0Z.
CANS


PRICES GOOD
THURSBAY APRIL
~8, THRU SATUlRDAY
APRIL 28, 1973.


24 02. 01XIE MIXED
VEGETABLE~S 88...... ...6
10 01. MOS EVE
BRUSSEL SPMOUTS ...59
FRITPIES ............155


freh Ihrl tase


HALF
GALLON


PKGS.


QUANTITY
RIGHTS RESETRVED


HALF
LBS.


QUARTS K(ERRY IN SECTIONS
GiRAPEFRUITS........ 1,38
ILe WIW SIXI AME1CAn SLIC o


SLibby
a oru ,



1 H


LB
BAG


18 at. RAINEt PRIME AND


SW OL.


Illrlr


11 1


BLUE RIBBIOM
RICE



8 5


BIG CORNET
DECORATED
TOWELS


W 0. SMOKED
to....B 1.79 PICNIC HAM.... to.TS ..e.7
W 0
...oL 1.69 FRANKS to..... 99.......B ~
W 0
........99 80LOGNA to ........ l. S 19


PINK OR GREEN
PALMOLIVE SOAIP

6
BARS


THRIFTYI MAID
ICE MILK


ITED FLAVORS
JELLO


B AND B
TOMATO PAISTE

100.
Als z


K(ERRYI 60LD
BUTTER


LIBBYI'S DICED
AND SIIM RIING

o~~s


PRIUR


594


ORANGES

IL E oS....c...ous.. 13 *. 1.69
TEMPLE
rs9 ORANWGES..........9 StoR 99
CtlOUMBIERS.... ..2 roR.39
3 LB. SA
ONIONS................ .5g


LIBBY'S VA0 PACK
WHOLE K(ERNEL
CORN


SH T TIE











Hkd~sbv April 2CI, 1973.
F* :b -
.
I
~.~;e.r,,.
v~; r
7 i...'. .. *i
: ..
"i
~?
I?


6lb Who Ebune


The Petition of Eleuthera Adventurers Limited a
Company incorporated under the Laws of the
Bahama Islands and having its Registered Office

and carpn business within the said Bahama

A LL THOSE: two parcels of land together
comprising 40.931 acres situate at G~aulding
Point near G;overnor's H-arbour in the Island of
Eleuthera one of the Bahama Islands bounded
Northwestwardly partly by land the property of
the Petitioner and partly by land the property of
Vernon Demeritte and running t creon TWO
TIhousand Seven Hundred and Twenty and
Forty-eigrht Hundredths (2720.48~) feet
Northeastwardly by land the property of the
Petitioner and running thereon Seven Hundred
and Fifty-eight and Forty-two Hundredths
(758.42) feet Southeastwardly by land the
property of the Estate of the larte Jerome
Pyfromi and running thereon Two Thousand
'Two Hundred and Fifty-nine and E~ighty-nine
H-undrredths (2,259).89)) feet and Southwardly by
the Sea at Highi Water Mark and running thereon
arppro~ximately One Thousand and Thirty-two
(1.032) feet Excepting thereout and therefrom a
Th~lirty (30) foot road reservation separating the
said parcels of land which said two parcels of
landl have such positions shapes boundaries
ma~rks and diimensions as are shown on he plan
~r- diagram filed in this matter and are delineated
on those parts of the said plan or diagram which
are c~~o~lourd Pink
Eluclthera A~dventurrers Limited claims to be the
owner in fee simple in possession of the lands
hereinbefore described and has made application to
the Supreme Court of the Bahamia Islands under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
its title to the saidi lands investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court
in accordance with the provisions of the Act.
Copies of the Plan filed in this matter may be
inspected during normal office hours at the
following places
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square, City of Nassau, Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of Clarke, Albury & Co.,
Second Floor, Masonic Temple Building, Bay
Street, City of Nassau, Bahamas, Attorneys
for the Petitioner.
(c) The Commissioner's Office, The Public
Building, Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera,
Bahama Islands.
Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before 8th. June 1973 file in the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before 8th June 1973
will operate as a bar to such claim.


CLARKE, ALBURY & CO.
Second Floor,
Masonic Temple Building
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


FAMOUS
JUICES


'''
'''
'r ';

: ?.
E
1
r a
;tL~


IN THE SUPREME COURT
OF: THE BAHAMAS ISLANDS
Equity Side.


1973
No.9


NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959


an omelette Boi aixpotatoes

Saute in but ter press them flat
with an egg turner. Add salt
and pepper. Sprinkle with a
little flour and add heavy
cream just to cover. Simmer
until the bottom has browned.
Carefully turn half the cake
ovcer onto the other half. Slide
onto a1 servirig dish and serve at
once.

th nlo sliae ti la ost t es
Shred one and a half cups
Ermmenthal cheese. Butter a
casserole dish and make
allternalte layers of potatoes and
cheese dotting the layers with
butter, salt and pepper. Pour
half a cup of heavy cream over
the casserole and bake at 325
degrees until the potatoes are
tender (about an hour).
MASHED
Top mashed potatoes with
chopped mushrooms sauted in
butter. Sprinkle on top
chopped parsley and chopped
tarragon. Bake at 375 for 20
minutes. Or chill the pie and
add a topping of rolled biscuit
mix. Bake at 374 for 20
minutes.

cliff ren e, sue f rh ch pea
onions in butter until lightly
brow\ned. Add a tablespoon
paiprika, a teaspoon vinegar, a


C AR U


uTpilER1: ispstl oa plentiful
Potter 's 'a y Produ ce
Exc~hange. Last week, we
delved into the mysteries of
stuffed potatoes. This week,
the sky's the limit. Anything
goes with the versatile spud.
A puraley-chive butter will
add mo~re interest toi baked or
boiled potatoes. In a bowl, mix
half a cup soft butter with a

audatblespoonM ppe chop g 3
chives
Potato cakes care mnade
easily by mashing four or five
hoiled and drained potatoes.
Soute two finely chopped
unions until golden and mnix
with the mashed potatoes. Add
two cups shredded Muenster
cheese and divide the potatoes
into about 12Z parts. Shape into
flat putties and chill them for a
quarter of an hour before
frying in hot butter,
Potatoes are a natural for a
barbecue and can be grilled
either sliced or whole. Slice
each potato and butter each
slice. Adld pepper and, salt and
wrap the potato in foil. Bury in
the hot coals and roast for 40
minutes. Whole potatoes
should be brushed with oil or

They too will be cooked in
about 40 minutes.
This potato cake looks like

3 Bahama


teaspoon cornstarch, some
caraway seeds, salt andi pepper
to taste. Stir in three cups beef
stock and bring to a boil. Add

pso at pee. dmme do ere utid
the potatoes are tender.
Spice mashed potatoes by
adding equal amounts of apple
sauce. Season with a little
suigarmesat danudt'megar. Serve
Potatoes Anna is a classic
way to serve potatoes. It is a
mwided di mad by blyedin!

maekt lea very hands e
d sh. Peel and t anl ovie prhe
potatoes. Arrange a layer of
slices in the bottom of the dish
overlapping each one. Dot with
butter and sprinkle with salt
and pepper. Cover with
another layer but overlapping
the slices in the opposite
direction. Dot with butter,
pepper and salt. Continue with
the layers until the dish is
filled. Butter the top and press
down firmly with a round of
buttered foil. Bake at 425 for
25 minutes. Remove the foil
and press the potatoes down
fiR y withheanveg tun b
for 20 minutes more or until
the potatoes are tender and the
top has browned. Remove
from the oven and let the dish
rest for a few minutes. Unmold
the potatoes on a serving plate
and garnish with parsley. If th.
mold collapses, it is not a
disaster. Just transfer to a
vegetable dish and pretend that
f ss I et you intended in the


EA STER SUN RIS SERVICE
A NUMBER OF NEW PROVIDENCE RESIDENTS turned out Sunday morning to
witness the Easter sunrise at 5:43 a.m., from Fort Montagu on East BayAStre t. The
Easter sunrise, serice was sponsored by the Salvation Army, and the 5. A.cr was
present to lead the crowd in hymn singing.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


Bahama Star hosts sales ag eats
CAPTAIN GRANT LAMOTHE eighthh from left), master of the cruise lIner "Bahama
Star", nrecntly hosted a group of 20 senior sales officials of Eastern Steamship Lines,
general sales agents for the vessel. While aboard, the group held daily sales meertings, and
lu hat on~kgtfjm lrzr in a soh h shp an s a d oacadritsc ahr excursions,


MRS. DIANE GAIL SAUNDERS, archivist for the Bahaman
Government, left Nassau on Tuesday for Washington, D.C., where
she will participate in an International Visitor Programme (IVP)
sponoe b h Sa Dpartment.


S wI aso vist oh cit e
to confer with others in her
field and to visit and observe
the operation of selected
institutions, including the
Library of Congress and
National Archives, and other
important libraries and
repositories of historical
documents. dDuring the trip

re earchinag do umentvirelatin
to the Bahamas.
While Mrs. Saunders is to
broaden her knowledge of
a v 10 tina d rVisitt
Programme, Abraham Stubbs,
and Franklyn Rahming
physical education teachers
with the Ministry of
Education, are to leave Nassau
on April 29 for a 16-week
programme sponsored by the
Proug mesofo YInternat oa
and Social Workers. Mr. Stubbs


is also a recipient of the State
1)e part ment 's International
Visitor Programme grant to
participate in the CIP
programmne. Mr. Rahming is
not sponsored by the IVP.
The IVP is designed to
imInprove and strengthen
relatios < the U..wethoother

visit the U.S. to participate in a
specific: professional or
avocational programme.
The IVP grant received by
Mrs n under an sr rt ib
allowances and maintenance,
The CIP programme in
which Mr. Stubbs and Mr.
Rahming are to participate
provides six weeks of study at
a graduate school of social
work, during which
prticipants a ie dtd wo ot

weeks of summer field work.


E E


I

I















I k






rb


i
: I


I
e L
j
-r I


I i


DUISTRIBUOTED IN THE BAHAMAS BY THE GENERAL AGENCY LTD.


rU1


'No.1 Rice in the Bahamas Maherama '

LONO ORAINI rICl I-

ALWAYS COOKS UP LIGHT AND FLUFFY mt-cz Jtd '


AHotierloo10k at Vef Satile sped


the best



on the


market


""""""""""""" . .


1. I


"
`t i .I




I


DNS RMLEAN SPARE RIBS Per Ib


r rl**


,rvnr CARNATIOKN
r ~EVARi MILK
14%-oz

SII


TIDE
DETERGENT
King


JACKS COOKIES
COCONUT DELIGHT/ OATMEAL &
PECAN & CHOCOLATE CHIP
11-oz

2/9 (


e a


Wednesday April 25. 1973.


I ) 1
~~rmEILlP


BA HAM IAN H
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Valuel


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK ENDING APRIL 26th, THROUGH APRIL 29th, 1973.


,( I


U.S. CHOICE CHUCK ROAST
U.S. CHOICE RIB STEAK
U.S. CHOICE RIB ROAST
U.S. CHOICE SHORT RIBS


Per Ib .99
Per Ib 1.89
Per Ib 1.89
Per Ib 8Q4


rC


I~~)Il l:l~~l~lrlll


Per Ib fC


rpJ, *los


HUNTS
TOMATO CATSUP
CHEF-BOY-AR-DEE
SPAGHE TTI
WITH GROUND BEEF 15-oz
HUNTS STEWED
TOMA TOES 14%-oz
LIBBY'S NECTAR


PAMPERS OVERNITE
DISPOSABL DIAPE RS
PAMPERS DAYTIME
DISPOSABLE DIAPERS


12's 1.29


694


26-oz


$1.29


is*,


2/ 89
2/794

4/994


TEXIZE
DISH


32-oz 2/99C

16-oz 2/694


LIQUID


LIBBY'S MIXED
VEGETABLES

SLLM 3 PEAC
REGAL
MALT TONIC
BILLY BEE
HONEY FREEZE


APRICOT, PEACH, PEAR. 12-oz


LIBBY'S FRUIT FLOAT
PIREAAE MNAINE ,NRAR NEGRER Vsoz
KRAFT
BARBECUE SAUCE 1s-oz
KRAFT STRAWBERRY
JELLY 100,z 2/


:HES


594
694
994


16-oz 2/794


$1.29


16-oz 954


JARS


850

SS$


500


EACH


so,

8-oz


3 1b.


$.1


8-oz


16-oz


2 2/800


10-oz

71.4.

20-o


4-lb


12-oz

8-oz 050


550


FREE... FREE!!
HATCHET BAY
HOMO. MILK
tts.
Buy One Get
SOne FREE!~


FRESH WHO LE CHICKENS


WESSON 01L
48-o


COTTON SALAMI

CHOPPED IIAM

BRAUNSCHWEIGER

SLICED BACON


CELERY


BAHAMIAN GROWN
ONIONS

LR PEFR ITS


3/700


CARNIVAL BARS



NWACK TRAY

GREEN PEIS


BUTTER
HOLLAND GLORY


3/090

$. 9


S.00

$1.48


AMERICAN CHEESE

MOZZAIRELLAI IND.WRAP




III


____- _


hl~S~i~'~


ass as


YOU ARE INVITED TO HEAR



















HAROLD ROAD NASSIAU, BAHAMAS


OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

CLOSED THURSDAYS


WEATHER
m.Hfd: Sourthedy at 8 to 16
Weather: F~air
Sea: Smooth to slight
Temp: Min, tonight 65
Ma.. tomono. s s.








g~)


Keith C. Lowe, a Bahamian
educated at Queen's College
has in a sense "returned
home". He worked at R. H.
Curry for three years when he
left school, before going to
Canada for another three years.
Upon his return, Mr. Lowe
joined P'an -Amer ic an,
where he remained until his
recent move to R. H. Curry as
sales manager.
Married to the former
Carolyn Reid, he has two sons,
Mitchell, I2, now at school in
rgaend sand S ott, 6, at St.
Hie has just been made
secretary of SKAL, and is a
member of the Lion's Club of

NWit a total of 17 years
experience in the travel
buientMabLotwe fel qult
new job, and finds himself
getting moroer idnsma



International where he worked
for 22 years, his last position
being that of Business
Development Officer.
Mr. Lowe left his position as
manager of passenger/cargo
sales with Pan American
Airways after 14 years, to join
the ta at R. H. Cu ry












LUTION OF


Wednesday April 25, 1973.


8


LAST DAY THURSDAY
Mhatinlee 2:30 &~ 4:50, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10051

S"BROTHER SUN, SISTER MOON" A
I ~Starring
GR<;AHAM FAULKNER JUDI BOWKER
SU/G'GESTE,D F:OR MA1 TURE AUCDIENCE;S.
I ~~PARENTAiL DI SCRETIOh'NAD VISED.
Sreserv~ationhfniclaim;ed by 8:15 will be sold :
on first come, first served basis.


SNow thru Friday Now thru Friday
SMati~:neStartsatl:IS Continuous Showings from 31

S"THE REVENGERS" PG. 'SSTR f~ HYyL~NDE" PG

SWilliam Holden Ralph Bates
ErnestBorgnine Martine Bewick
ggg PLUS PLUS
S"THE BURGLARS" PG. "BROTHERHOOD OF
SOmar Sharif SATAN" PG.
Jean Paul Belmondo Strother Martin
S'Phone 2-2534 L.Q.Jones



I ~NOW SHOWING
SOne Show at 300, Evens:)ing83 Phone 3-4666 3


I B EB ARD g

soon R JS UIDON BAE

NO ONE: UNIDE'R 1 7 ADMITTED.


at. . CH [ Fy & 0 .
THE APPOINTMENTS of Mr. D. J. Letters as director and
general manager of R. H. Curry and Company Limited, and Mr.
Keith C. Lowe as sales manager have recently been announced by


that company.
Mr. D. J. Letters, better
known as "Bill", is a
Belonger who has been in the
Bahamas since 1953. He is
married to a Bahamian, the
former Elizabeth Collins, and
i the couple have three children.
Two boys, who are at school in
England, and a daughter who is
i, now working in France.
S Recently inducted as a
member of the Rotary C:lub of
East Nassau, Mr. Letters is also
a member of SKAL.
As well as being a director of

dit cto ohe Na sa
Underwriters Agency Limited,
and a director of Bahamas
Stevedoring Services Limited.
chde fn sehisnew psito as
spent his time learning the
m tric te dea el-in Ilved w kh

and travelling in general.



MEN (INLY
by m no me ose mc o t e
zest and vigour they enjoyed
when young. Now therc is good
news for those who are fedeln8
"low" or without zip. A new
vigour medicine is now being
imported, it's called Proplus/ He.
vite Elixir. Yes, He-vite is for
"he-mon". Get a bottle today
and put adult happiness back
Into your life. ot

CROSSWORD
PUZZLE


Ti. rse pitate
7. Buttress 30. Turmeric
11. Turkishcaliph 31. Introduce

14 bs 9ering n.pter ma
17Rommror JI Dnun'sS
lI.Buuet 42moahe'
21 Buffoon 43. Hedera
S22.Profound 44. Affectation
23. Biblical 45. Dowery
Charactebr 46. Girl's nate


jif01185 1 if talllng BalaiaMIsS,sasISBPAI man

ABSENTEEISM AND DROPOUTS are the greatest single problem facing any attempt at instituting training


~~l*r ~ r
*rcr rr
~~~ ~C ~~+~~
+~+*1~~ ~~~~L~r
I t


Oi
: ~ t'


eTh iengN as so operated

em lo e, aannd fot{ others a
ITll i within space and time
Currently there were seven
shorthand classes in both
Piman and Gregg and two
typing classes These were
operated in the Training Centre
in the ICB Building where
there were facilities to operate
three groups simultaneously.
In the power company,
part-time company time -
classes were being conducted in
subjects relating to power line
and in warehousing.
ga niorkdneo to 1il e e xistan
subjects of English and
Mathematics, the Port paid full



Hie hae s bsi d and are
subsidizing non-employees, and
a good proportion of these are
governm nt employees, whoni
we pay f by agreement."
M TAKE BOT amn
individuals took bo h subjects
In addition, also by agreement,
some take lheke aepng ot

mechanical drawing. In
September 57 were enrolled in
this programme. At the end of
the second ri-mester, 35were
anttend past there had been
training icourstesh in Ac outing

characteristics and handling of
petroleum products.
SMore recently, employees
have been trained in Florida in
computer operation and in
programming.
Mr. Ireland said he had not
mentioned on-the-job training
because it was very often used
only as anexcuse for not doing
very much. Coupled with

proe b, fomalM usinin iti

According to Mr. Ireland the
Port Authority plans to
improve and expand its
training, and now has before
the Immigration Department
an application to employ a
"highly qualified" man to do
the technical training at the
power plant.


peM onn l/inmstrial rle ins
maag r for the G and Bahama

nel rstraing s po ts the
interest~ l dn spotho
younger people and teir
parents was needed.
"Absenteeism and dropping
out blunt any training
spearhead. This is our greatest
single problem." he declared.
Outlining the essential
ingredients for an effective
Irel""dnsaidpthrohgannae fivr

""" lpin ee ect on tr ining

sh trainn ned hc

SKILLS
The second area called for

de e o m en f t r allisttic

employee must have. Besides
being trained inwhat hedmust
know why he was doing it,
"Nothing is more frustratinS
than doing work without
knowing this why element,"
Mr. Ireland said.
whe programmes deve opeod

tie n dess--no less and no
The third area involved the
selection of trainees. This
called for several steps. First a
review of the person's
exdpur e efannd work
Mr. Ireland said the Port
Authority had had great
difficulty finding applicants
with acceptable education,
especially in the "basic and
vital subjects of mathematics
and English."
However, he added, the
educational picture was getting
much bet ter, and he knew





THOMAS M. IRELAND
. talks of tral ing problems he s


evalatin ad change. This
could relate to course content,
time schedules, trainers and to
se e tion m eth he ai


Authority, Mr. Ireland said the
Fort trs asretl iperat g
operation.
The first group of trainees
started the programme two
years ago. The second group
started last December.
c Classdr oowmt tr g-plg nats

tann. r ceo tai ees were
operating textbooks and
lessons by an arrangement with
the City and Guilds of London.
A third group were holding
down shift oper ting jo s, bus

and lessons throu gh
registration for them with the
Provmece of New Brunswick.
All costs were borne by the
company and when the time
came, the men would be sent
to New Brunswick to sit the
exams .


there was genui e cne ad
genuine effort, "but a 'BJC" or
'O' or 'A' level in Mathematics
an English aresof gra a rsener

might involve the use of tests,
althopueh or. Ireland sad th t

aptitudes tests as such.
INTERVIEW
The third step in selection,
an d one he considered
important, was the personal
f ntriw ta e sleoom ot agns

e sho e these, itnr acn
prgramme can succeed."
rT he fourth ma jor
consideration was to select and
train the trainers.
ex. rireland said th i h s
engineer was not necessarily a
good choice to be a trainer in
mechanical maintenance. But
the trainer must know the
subject and be able to do what
he is training others to do.
The fifth and last major area
was that of continuing


5. Pronours
6. lursh title
e 8. Ramble
9. Chief Norse
god
10. Hide
1 eath resort

2 Prtugduese
coi
21. Presidential
23. nl leae
24. Meantime

28. Spelling
31conte t
31 ofeges
3 Rcollete

Spanish
34. Attributes
37. Unit of energy
38. Selfishness
39. Girl's name
4-27 40. Color


DOWN
1. Fissure
2. Rubber tre


m time 20 min. AP Newshowtres


Trainial Chlinc


FOLLOWING; their move to
spacious Millers Court on East
Street between Bay and
Shirley, HELP, Limited has
started a Training Clinic with a
variety of courses.
A press release said groups in
secretarial work and office
management are being handled
by Mickey Kimberk, and Bob
Kimberk is conducting courses
for groups in salesmanship,
supervisory jobs and key
management.
Workshops in banking and
hotel work are expected to be
added to the list.
The members of the study
groups, which are limited to 15
people, "do most of the talking


and direct the learning to their
needs," the press release said.
The courses take 26 hours
spread over 13 weeks.
The only requirement for
participating is prior study or
work in the field to be studied.


PllMIACEL CORlSES

ARE lgW FULL
BECAUSE of the large
number of people still applying
for places indboth the Primace

Bhms Aul Stru y Cent e

tC wfPrd cial an unce thad
all places are taken, and the
courses are now running to full

Ina ning students may,
however, register for the next
series of courses which will

FI MS & Ce SRSHIP
THE NASSAU Jaycees will
sponsor a panel discussion on
films and censorship to be held
8 dp m. Th rsday at t. Agne

Cleveland Eneas, Mr. Errington
Watkinis, M.P., Mr. Lionel
careY and Mr. Philip Rarhming.


* SELECTED MENU FOR LATE NIGHT DINING
* COMPLETE LINE OF SELECTED WINES AND LIQUOR
* MUSIC FOR DANCING AND LISTENING TO


Phone 5-3268
FOR RESERVATIONS
ASK FOR MR. TERRY BAIN


BAY & DEVEAUX ST.


Q9tt~ eZt~btfttp


+ C rp t r~
i r
. r C
I*e
* I t~~f~
tl
Il~irsrr

1




h.rr ~r- r?




c $. P


IIELP starts


TIrVI SK INNER



YDUTH CSMS ID fO CHII


w itle a warle tr of c our s s


(UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT)


NOW NASSAU'S MOST DISTINGUISHED LATE NIGHT

RENDEZVOUS 9:00 R M. 'TIL 4 A.M.


THE PAUL HANNA TRIO


INK- SM







_*_


---- rlr


~r = ----- --


fWst~yieedy pi 25, 1973.


Whr Grthatne


reT;nr~R~lbn~ I


'lII


PORK SAUSAGE MEAT,, ..78


SPECIALS FOR WEEK ENDING APRIL 26-29
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED


BIRDSEYE INTERNATIONAL


FOR YoR un uVNvemnrue, uun asuone noune sanc.
MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY 8:30 A.M. 7:00 P.M.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8:30 A.M. 9:00 P.M., SUNDAY 7:00 10:00 A.M.


LB.


L B.


MIF* Aa
WESO
OIL

-9


.


KELLOGGS


II i


h 1\


~~~ EPG E ZST SOAP


, 9. 9
3/.8 7


BATH SIZE


15oz


JELLO PUDDING
TREATS


856


4 K.


I


26o. 4/ 8 8
is. 2 / 8 8


MORTON


SALT


APE SAUCE


CooGTH


594


PASTE
JELLY
MEAT
WA/HEAT


X LRG.


KRAFT SHARP
Cheddar Cheese8-OZS .$109


$"uAVA
LI asY'S
POTTED
SPOPEYE
4; PUFFED


\La.


VIEWNA
SAU SAGE
4-0Z.
3/900


BLUE BONNET
Marrgarine Tubs
KRAFT Y2-GAL.


so4/1.00


1LB. .65


.49


6-oz.
s-oz.
5 b.


3/99 Grapefruit Juice


SUCCESS
DOG ME


RICE


AL S


9.299


MR C EAN


GIANT SIZE


,,oz. 894
T(ENG.2/$1.0 n
o,,,3/.99


YORK PEANUTS


10/$1.00


TIDE DETERGE
LIBBY'S WHOLE
KERNEL CORN
LIBBY'S
CREAM STYLE


FLA. LRG.
3 LB. BAG


CORN 303 3/.99


500


8-oz. $2.79
*23
4/$1.00
303 2/$1.00


MAXIM COFFEE
2 FEE REG. GRIND 2 LB.
APRICOT NECTAR
LIBBY'S
FRUIT COCKTAIL
MARCAL NAP KIN~
MARCAL TO W ftS.
MARCAL
FACIAL TISSUE 200
SPRIGONE
BUG SPRAY


CLEANSER
11-02.


S 2 /
JuMBo


$ 1 O0
.6 5 4


CT. 2/$1.00


.994 HAWAllAN PUNCH

GAL. 6-oz.~ .450


HATCHET BAY


CORnEo BEEF~


WHOLE BROILERS


*




*7


.gAPBLLS `
10-02. L


AMERICAN


12-0Z.


PlCulC S


SMODED


CANADIAN
DAISY CHEESE
MELLO
CRISP BA CON
SAMERICAN
PORK CHOPS


,,. $1.08


LB. $1.38 i

LB. $.1


I


FRK CHOPS END CUT .990,..
PORK i;ROAST LOIN END$1.00
AMERdIlCANSRI N .9


CORN FLAKES


..OZ.


LB. 11.89C


COD FISH FILLEI


ALLEN FLAOURS


a., -oz.


PUIT

BREA


$1.69


ORAIN GES FLA. LRG.


GRAPEFRUIT


ONIONS


12-0E


VEGETABLES
SPMllSI, IfXLl, UVIIlIlM,. I~ll lS.
JAFAREfSE, WIMAHIIIAPAIISISil


11


-1. *


CHINESE,11MIAL


BLANCO IllACH


SE ARE D





C


CLSIII0= V. ft~ ==~SLT I


RnEsAL ESTAT FOR RENT PUI BLIC AUCTW ION CAR FOR SALE i nlr rIN MEMA MARIIW SUPPL7IE uWLPn WATE IIELP n TnED


__ _


I I I _


C9568
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house -
Blair Estate. Furnished. For
further informationn call 31288
after 7 p.m.
C9572
LARGE STORE off East
Street with lovely display
windows.
Suitable for any type business.
Call 3-4128.

C9578
ONE 2 -B BDR OOM
unfurnished apartment on
Podolc hStreet.4 Ho and cold


C9580
FULLY FURNISHED

a ~rmrnt. 200iliger roo h

Montrose Avenue. Call 5-8744.


C9519
1971 FORD SPORTS Custom
Camper/Pickup Triick -
Standard Shift Excellent
Condition $2601; 00. Phone
5-5124.
C9515
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
white, 4-door, must self as is
re-possession, best offer. Call
2-1690 Ext. 156 Monday -
Friday between 9 a.m. 5
p.m.
C9566
ISLAND MOTOLTCOMPANY

USED CAR PRODUCTION
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Radio. Auto. $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000

597 2P NTIAC VENTUR$80

4 Dr Auto.MRadio O ange$ 0 0

1 969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL
A/C Auto. $2600
191FORD CAPRI $80

1968 FORD THUNDERB2RDO

1969 PONTIAC GTO

165 BUEG DDGE 80
1970 VICTOR STD.

di7 VAUXHALL VIVA$85
4 Dr. Std. Green $1200
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4600
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue $695
1971 RAMBLER
Auto, Blue $2700
1969 TRIUMPH HERALD
Blue $700
1968 JAVELIN
A/C $1400
170 FORD MUSTANG200

Trade Ins-Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite Ice Plant
Telephone -- 34636-7-8

V9585
YoVOTAutCmORONAdiSt to&

00a.0Eleautif2l 2condi ion
7-7887 evenings.

FOR SALE
C9548
King size bed, headboard,
triple dresser with mirror, chest
& end table (contemporary
s yle -- Pbman) $550 Double

with mirror & end table, $200,a
stove $180, washer $200,
complete livingroom $500. Call'
55124, after 6 p.m.

C9311
1 CONVE RTIBLE COUCH
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 250 lb. trunk food freezer
Call 77947.
C9559
SECRETARIALtwdEe~rv
drawers filing cabinets, desk,
accessory bookcase, Burroughs
posting machine complete with
stand. Call 27612.

C9569
CHILD'S PLAY PEN, cot, high
chair, swing, chair with
canopy, bath on stand, car
seat, English Pedigree pram
wt wca opd wwictkaer cradle
chairs, tricycle etc. Also
electric sewing machine and
hardryer.RWATERS EDGE.
4-124ern Road. Telephone
4-22

C9584
CNENTSerOF HOmUSE hoy


C9587
LIVING ROOM SET Teak
frame $300
Scandinavian Couch $75
Curtain Rods,
Folding Bed
Baby Crib
Playpen
Walker
Highchair
Bathinette
Miscellaneous household items
Call 42192 after 2 p.m.


ANlNOUNCEMEN(TS
C9304
THE BAHAMAS GOSPEL.
MISSION INC., of Vnontrose
Avenue, Shirtoy Heights,
Nassau N.P. wish to announce
the RE-GJPEN;NG of the DAY


SCHOiOL and DAY NURSERY
on September 3rd 1973.
The Day Nursery will accept
Infants from 6 months old at 8
a.m. to 6 p.m.
The Kindergarten will accept
children from 3 years old 9
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Registration for both Nursery
and Kindergarten will
commence April 3rd 1973
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (On
Tuesday & Thursdays) at the
office of the Mission or contact
Mrs. Nottage c.o. phone
24537. Those wishing to
register their infants and
children are urged to do so
immediately as there will no
doubt be a long waiting list. A
deposit of $10 will be
requested when you register.
For fees and other
information, contact the Pastor
of the Mission at the office or
for appointment call Mrs.
Nottage c/o phone 24537.


to 320. The sale is subject to
a reserve price and to the
right for the Auctioneer or
any person on his behalf to
bid to that price.
Terms 10% of the purchase
price at the time of the sale
and the balance thereof on
completion.
Dated this 13th day of April
1973

KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer.
C955'

KleRKa **: IINSEYe will sell a
th pa9n lo ato h
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street on the 12th day of May
1973 at 12 noon the following

pr L THAT bp re pa cel oa


Erng ers n Addi o os tnuaas
in the Southern D~istrict of
the Ilaend o t ue Pvie

Twev (lo i ohk Amne
(65) in the Diagram or Plan
dd hoen sa ed Enqlers o

Egest tnd Limitff en t e
City of Nassau in the Island
efNew P evidence aforesa d
of land being bounded on
the North by a private road
in the said Diagram or Plan
and running thereon
Twenty-five (25) Feet on
the East by Lot Number
Eleven (11) in the said
Diagram or Plan and running
thereon Seventy-two (72)
Feet on the South by part of
Lot Number Sixteen (16) in
then si Diagram oh planeand
Ninety-three (93) Feet on
the West by Lot Number
Thirteen (13) in the said
Diagram or plan and running
thereon Sixty-seven (67)
Feet
uh erop rty is being sod

cM rttaqanee danted th dntureda
of June, 1969 and made
between Gilbert Smith of the
one part and The Bank of Nova
Scci ef ithe other prt a d
Records in the City of rc~ssau
in the Island of New
Providence in Volume 1454 at


bto e riht f t Aci ner
or any person on his behalf to
bid to that price
Teirmsat /oe ofmth prechse

arim toe balance thereof on
Dated this 13th day of
April 1973.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer


CARS FOR SALE
C9547
1968 MG MAGNETTE
automatic. $650. If interested
call 26th April 31571.
C9534
1969 CHEVY NOVA 2 door
-- One Owner In Good
condition, radio, new tyres, for
Information Call T. Malone
24921 or 53859.

C9508


- -at --





1971 DODGjE AVEIpER
DELUXE $1500

1968 FORD STATION.
WAGON white automatic60
1973 BUICK REGAL


C9511
A LOT in Steven son
Sub-division, off Twynam
Avenue, 80 x 80, only $4,000.
Telephone 2-2763 day, 5-3801
night

C9558
Lots in Bel-Air Estates, only
$100.00 down and $90.87 per
mon th
..arge lots Sands Addition
$200.00 down $100.00 per
month
Choice apartment sites and
residential lots Colony Village
fat. Eaytrms ava i ale. Ca l


C9554
YARD MAN needed at
Bahamian Lumber Building
Supplies Ltd. Salary $45 per
week. Phone 34191.
C9581
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
required by Flagler Inn.
Responsible for general
administration of offices,
handling correspondence and
purchase orders. Must be able
to take shorthand, know how
to use dictaphone and be
capable typist. Some
knowledgeto la c ur ing n
Please call Mr. Overend 5-5561
for interview.

C9573
MoDkDnEsmAGEuD couple fo r

cooome 7n batd eSalary for

Co tnces-Rarsty Bethel at
2-2768 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Evenings 7-8074.

TRADE SERVICES
C9315





Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
AF.CHANICAL HANDLING
ErSUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE

MO IDG. ORRAGE
& PAC KING
STE= L BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
PONR JCK95A2SH76
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
frta omes aparstmerds ad
Douiglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
Dext to Frank's Place.


C9552
REQUIRED: General Manager
for Prestigious Gift Stores.
Knowledge in buying and
Warehouse control, Staff
Training, Book Keeping, as
well as being bilinguist in either
French, German or Spanish is
essential. Salary to be
negotiated with right applicant.
Please write to P.O. Box
N.4801 and enclose resume as
well as police certif icate.
C9549 STENOGRAPHER
The Royal Bank of Canada
Iryte national Limi eds, Nassau

ex per ie n ced stenographer.
Applicants should preferably
have at least G.C.E. in
English and be High
Schoolpegradouates Short


and ti iang opedn .t 7

O. Box N-1445, Nassau or call
for an appointment at
telephone 56021.

ALBURY'S RADIO and, T.V.

t~oomake careur of so Msta b
abe tlo type. Phone after five


eq3TERNATIONAL AIR
BAHAMA
invites applicants for the
position of
TICKET OFFICE
AGENT
Four years airline experience
required. Only Bahamians need
apply.
IAB TICKET OFFICE
Beaumont Arcade Bay Street.
C9564
AN hEXPERnENwCeEdD pers n
handling of investments on an
ine aIoa level es ecially
win trnga ind to securities
pblicly regades and direct
placemen t. The person must
" eo av e e i nen etde o

require to act as Consultant

onstitauntiios ann toh er
administration of loa ad
other secur tn portfolio Te
person required must have
nusives ine teiseencields and
must have a minimum of ten
years experience. Application
to P. O. Box N-3224, Nassau.


C9557
WILLIAM'S COURT

buibt on gge, ur bathedh T..

nw f~rnt ro m a t anca st r o

Phone 5 8595
C9582
COMPLa TcELid (FURNIS ED

bedroom, two bdth home.
spacious avr~g tc ncod dig

g udry rm and fcilit es
Bay Street. Phone 5-7089 after
5:30 p.m.
C9576
FOR SALE
OUT EAST -on the
waterfront. Have house*
urnished 3 bedrooms 2L/2
,aths only $100,000.00

:ORAL DRIVE GROVE -
;orner plot with large house.
urnished, even a Sauna bath.
lee by appointment.
SITAMARINA & BEtACH
~IGHTS house wit
bedrooms 2 baths, testefully
urnished enclosed fruited
rounds maids quarters
mmaculate condition was
i65,000.00 owner willing seller

obstan iat mrta~ge a ailable.

:OUR BEDROOMS 3V2
)ATHS Pool, Patio and
andscaped grounds
i-car-gar ed-- ondtwo frt itof

tewly built. ad at for large
amly O~wner will sell for

HIGHLAND PARK -- have 3
ledrroom555, ato.5 furni t d
ubstantiall mortgage. Come see
nd b~e surprised

IOUSE VILLAGE ROAD -

rih $ i00.0 d. o n6 baO
126,000.00 mortgage at 10%
monthly $353.61. Best deal of
he year.
)IAL DAMIANOS 22033,
2305, 22307 NITE 41197.

FOR ENT
:9522
SBEDROOM house Seabreeze
Estates with stove and
refrigerator. Phone 5-1703.
:9308
)FFICE OR STORE SPACE -
:harlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
nquire 4-2017.

:9507
BEDROOM 2 bath
n rnished house. Als rt2

urnished house.
hone 5-8803 42193

:9524
BEDROOM apartmentR Tall

rater included. Contact C. 8*
loss 55191.
9310
ARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished
250 per month.Call Chestes
homrpson Real Estate
*4777-8.
3306
NE EXTRA large two
edrooms two bath, and one
xtra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
nd dining all basically
rished -- Victoria Court
apartments on Elizaboth
venue between Shirley and
ay Street. Facilities, phone.
undry, parking T.V. antenna.
rconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
9529
BEDROOM Cable Beach
cottage, fenced yard,
ea utiful ly furn ish ed,
asonable rental. Contact:
AVESON'S REAL ESTATE
lone 2-1178 or 5-5408.

585
BEDROOM APARTMENT
It East with extra room for
ird bedroom or study, living
om, kitchen, breakfast room*

ivate patio, private beach,
Iny closets and cupboards, 2
condittenets. Furnished, No
ts. On~ $32ji.0 per month.

~RGE one bedroom


aIrmtmet out East with
er-size bedroom, large living
,m, bathroom, kitchen, walk
losefts Utility, private patio*
chrgt.Furnished. No
s.K. gg o00pr month*
epA isiugeatrl Thompson,
77l7, 4 685 evenins*


1 _


I


_I _ t 1


f
b

C
C
F
S



b
fi
g
ir
$
S

F
B
2
12
n
fi


H
b

sr
at

H

$


t)
D




C
3
E
r
C
O
C
o
I


3
u

ft
P

C
2
w
M
C
L
al
$;
T
2
C
O
be
e,
aF


aI
fu
A
A

fa
ai
Sbe
C!
3

b


Ph

C9
2
ou
thl
roc

pri
ma
airl


LA
ap1
ove
roo
in (


Wednesday April 25, 1973.


0


C9309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.
C9512
24ft. Fibra Boat, 160 h.p. Ford
Interceptor Engine
inboard /outboard *
shrip-to-shore radio, life jackets,
6 h.p. spare engine, complete
with trailer, only $2,500.
Phone 2-2763 day, 5-3801
night.



C9560 SANDS ENTERPRISES
LTD. announces the arrival of
1 97 3 Wor ld Book
Enc y clope dia Childcraft
Dictionary and Atlas for'

dsmo and poe calcult o s
arn naewide rang ee metal a r
I Ioraton al 2921.

WANTED
c9575
$6OUSES frome525,{K)0.00 n
waiting. Phone or come in to
lis tmD 2ihus.3Dam an s
intme.

SCHOOLS
C9583
ENROLL NOW
Typing with Spelling
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier
Night Auditing
Telex Operation
English
Mathematics
Call the Nassau Academy of
Business today and join any of
the above classes. Phone 24993
(Located at Shirley Street
opposite Collins Avenue.

POSITION WANTED

SUP RIOR HOUSEMAID
seeks position in private
household. For last fifteen
years employed by Mr. and

reconsu'.nd Wrier waos
hardworking, reliable, and
thoroughly honest. Available
June 1st. Telephone 77854
mornings only-


In loving memory of my dear
husband Leslie H. Neely who
died April 25, 1960.
Today you are remembered
But to others you are of the

Bupat me who loved and lost

Yobu will always be in my
Sadly missed by wife,
Henrietta Neely.

DEATM
C9570
DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT


C9574
FRESH WATER unlimited
Aoaieable immediately secluded

furshednedge Na eu. Poa
owner 5-7224 evenings.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Kl9550S. HINSEY will sell at
the parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 12th day of May
1973 at 12 noon the following
property:
AT THAT piece parcel or lot
of land situate in the
Subdivision known as
**Gleniston Gardens" in the
Eastern District of the island
of New Providence and
bein oLotNNumberO Tre ( )
the said Subdivision which
said piece parcel or lot of
land is bounded on the
North by Lot Number Two
(2) in the said Block
Number One (1) and

hnr an theanty-thrwo

d23.5)F ee onl ehe Es
by land now or formerly the
property of the Bahamas
Government and running
t~h reon On hn red (10 )

im riatelou he enaftas
d srbed inthe rd Block
N mer iOnees1) and

iunre and Tennty-s wo
and Eighty hundredths
(227.80) Feet and on the
Wus tni soft er Road and

hndedtdhs ( 00.08) E ht
AND ALSO ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land
situate in the said
Subdivision known as
"Gleniston Gardens" and

b ur ( )e isaidheL aiduBmet
Number One (1) which said
piece parcel or lot of land is
tboeundiedd Lon themNor hr b
(3) as immediately
hereinbefore described in
the said Block Number One
(1) and running thereon
Two hundred and
Twenty-seven and Eighty

huntdhe Et b ad nowe o
formerly the property of the
said Bahamas Government
hn drunriln th~e mon O
South by Lot Number Five
(5) as immediately
herdei water desrrbedinnte


Wsti byoc tmer sdSolder (
Rodand running thereon Tw
Oehundred and Twenty hre
hund redthson (10020)eet


AND ALSO ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land
situate in the said
Subdivision known as
"Gleniston Gardens" and
being Lot Number Five (5)
in the said Block Number
(1) which said piece parcel
or lot of land is bounded on
the North by Lot Number
Four (4) as immediately
hereinbefore described in
the said Block Number One
(1) and running thereon
Two h u n dre d and
Thirty-three and Sixty-one
hundredths (233.61) Feet
on the East by land now or
formerly the property of the
said Bahamas Government
and running thereon One
hundred (100) Feet on the
South by Lot Number Six
(6) in the said Block
Number One ()and
running thereon Two
hundred and Thirty-nine and
Forty-seven hundredths
(239.47) Feet and on the
West by the said Soldier
Road and running thereon
One hundred and Nineteen
hundredths (100.19) Feet
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the 29th day
of Janaury, 1970 and
made between Gilbert Smith
of the one part and The
Bank of Nova Scotia of the
other part and recorded in
the Registry of Records in
thre City of Nassau in the
Island of New Providence in
Vof ume 1567 at pages 315


aMR 8EoLLENguLOaU rEeBABeB
April 20th 1973.
She is survived by her husband
Charles, one son Cedric,one
adopted daughter Miss
Dorothy Fernander, 2 sisters
Geraldine and Charlott

oe ert,32 grandchild~lrida 6
get grand and 1 great great
We love her but Jesus loves her
best.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C9491
65ft. Steel Refrigerated Vesset
- like new. R/V Victory Can
Ryan at 1-305-3796990


demonstrator
1970 TOYOTA --
green, good mileage


$7000

$850


1969 FIAT COUPE 124 --
white, low mileage $1200
1970 TRIUMPH -
blue, stick shift $850
1971 PONTIAC VENTURA II-
yellow, good condition $3000
1971 VEGA STATION-
WAGON - green,
good conditions $3000
1971 PONTIAC
VENTURA II yellow,
good condition $3000
1,972 CHEVELLE MALIBU -
very clean $4850
1969 FORD GALAXIES -
blue, reconditioned $1000
1971 CHEVY VEGA COUPE -
green~automatic $2995
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN -
air conditioned $4200
1968 PONTIAC FI REBI RD -
good condition $1500
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
- like new $2250
19369 CHEVROLET CAMARO
red, automatic $1850
1972 DODGE AVENGER ~
like new $2350

whtte, radioE automatic $1500


1973 DODGE POLARA
light blue automatic $5500
1971 FORD CORTINA -
glreen $2500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come i:. and see us
Oakes Field ner r
Police Barracks
Phone 347!11


SWt~ Wrftittt


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


.. ~




~ I


--
---- I


***""- Cog 3p


Wednescday April 25, 1973.


~Ih Mrbn


I


C
L


I -


r 10LD )tU SEFOE\ II'M GOIOIN ACK 70 CYORKC ANDP tTT MLIAM NILEj CANCEL OUIT MY
t--MO ONEGETS IllN SNAPE FOR TWE Sl# IURNA- APPDIfMTMENTSY FOR
JUNEI 'M MIOTATALLSURE A @tstRANTEE MSMS tCOMING UP THIS SUMMER T DDA4Y, MRB. 60WERS/ IF
I NAVE THE RIGHT 70 ASK WWNEN.N'S TNlEY CLAIM THAT THIS GOLF OAME THERE ARE ANJY EMERGiENCIES,
u00 To MARRY ME / AT_ PACED OIJ IS BEVNTY iV PERCENT HAVE DR ADAM SEE THEM I
bSES MY mrutuar' rms EARTH / MEA i /F T orS ,'






Ai ,
iU G P R ER B PAU NICHOLS







LEGAL DETAILS...L.NICO









.HN THA ,S ANOTOMMIBE- ALE TS OT MAPER? QUI NG TH WENTY YAEAR WHTONLIG YOU ANGD ROANO
MAKE ~ ~ ~ 9 HOMRLUC[WE.'E! IMPESIO ONi~r WEL AGO- TWETY O UT SAL(')NE TOME---NP A
G PROFESSOR LON YEAR AOM WONARFUL TIME

LEGAL~W HEALS. U
a~~ ,"


..




-,



.P R M N B lsKtk

STEVER 0PE &MIE K-ET~ NO MAD E bylT s auNT ndAR ersGH &O oN[ verAN ga
(~HM! IPESO N AOTMY OTA6ETMI--NHV


neW many
or more can

her et In

rnb eaeh
word mcut contaln h Iar
letter. and there must be at
11 No dorb;n dint wh
no prope nam~es. TODAY'IS
TAROB : as ~wo sr, 4 00 go




YBy LROARDI BARDEIN:







aainst ainy dfen 'rs prby F 0
01l iegold). oda' puzzlie lois..
atll fist o h ol vn pl PushRover


th s its s t
Per LOAnes miat roble






grand mater; min thres mcprobl
ma~ast ear; 5 minutes pcbve ex-
pet; 15s ~gN mislvnuts, g ad; 3
mitnutes av d~era ge;l hor:.ei-

Ches Solutsoney

K-B4e; 3 R--KSa maot:e. If I
p R; 15 Q-Q3 ch, K-B7; 3 (


Rupert and the Mrired Margic-39

~p~hhllZ .::~~2r '








The Sorcerer makes a account of all that took place
prfecet landing gi theuground on te .ii er pth Wz *
Tigerlily runs to welcome mix ed magic," says the
them. "You enjoy outing. Sorcerer. "It can only brin0
yes ?' she asks. Me glad to disaster. But thanks to this
tell you my daddy has forgiven little bear. he adds, smiling
me now." The two travellers at Rupert, we saved ourselves
are taken indoors, where the by using the rods separately.
Sorcerer gives the Conjurer an it was his idea.

/) *


_ ___ .. ..rL~-_


TRADE SERVICES
C9299
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HURRICANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS,AES

John S. George &r Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
servicee call 2-8421-2-3-4-5~-6.
C9314
TROUBLES small or lar e
call The Plumber on Wheels -
ROBERT M. BAILEY
P.O. Box NS6, Nassau
Telephone: 3-5870.


--CARROLL RIGHTER'S




GENERAL TENDENCIES: No day for
romantic involvements, but beautiful for
listening to the voice of your intuitions. Then make decisions
for future advancement. Make your future objectives known
to an in lential man and get his support. Forge ahead.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You can now get the support
from those you know with background you need, so go after
that early. Then launch that project. Advance socially in the
evening.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You can now get those
business matters well hanrdled that have been impossible
before, since you have the backing of a higher-up. Go through
with that public commitment and get benefits therefrom.
Road tonight.'
G;EMINI (May 21 to June 21) New outlets come to your
attention that you would do well to discuss with associates
and make them part of your future. A new partner has the
right slant for faster advancement. Listen carefully.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You now
understand better how to handle those obligations that a.
strictly your own and can do so with speed, in a sure fashion.
Talk over new ideas with mate. Gain the cooperation you need
for them.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Your deals with others can be fa
more successful now, as you understand them better, and are
wisor. Reconcile with one who has opposed you mn the past.
Take care of that public matter of importance.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Schedule your time soyou
can handle both outside and indoor work with ease and spod
at the same time. Don't neglect some health problem. Gain the
vitality you need for bigger operations ahead.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Search for those persons with
whom you can have greater happiness now and in the future.
Combmne your mntuition with your good judgment and get
right results. Save time for one who has a problem you can
help solve.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Planjust how to have more
rapport with those who dwell with you, and be sure to make
your home more attractive. Work along more sensible lines in
business world and get better results. Avoid one who is tricky.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You are now
wide-awake and can solve those problems that have boon
difficult before. Come to a better understanding with regular
associates. Make this a far more productive day and p.m. than
before
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You have fine judgment
now and can easily see how to add to present prosperity
appreciably. If you have doubts about some monetary matter,
consult with an expert in business. Think logically.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) If you get in touch with
good pals and those who like you, you can accomplish much
that hra been hard before. Either accept an invitation
extended you, or do some fine entertaining yourself in p.m.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Find the best way to get the
goodwill of bigwigs confidentially so you can pull ahead faster.
A more modern way of life as best to look into now. This cran
bring you greater happiness in the future.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she wdll be
one of those intelligent young people who can get ahead very
quickly provided given an opportunity to be in right circles
early in life. The love of people can cause others to give your
son or daughter a boost in the right directions. Whatever us
connected with the humanities canr be a successful outlet for
your gifted child. There are some very fine talents in this
chart. Give as fine an education as you can.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Dowdeswell Street.
TV ntenna Rooster C 105US-FRSF UE

Phone 22618 P. O. Box .4327 CLEANING! ABCO'S NE~.
Monday -- Saturday 8.30 to 'SUPER STEAM' CARPETS,
5.30. UPHOLSTERY TEL:
51071-2-3-4.
mmm mm ma smme eama mm
Glll~l B A 1 11

RANDD BAHAMA

II~~~~ CLSIID
AmmmmmmmmmI mmmmmmmmm


LOST
C7345
LADIES 3-COLOU RED GOLD
BRAI DE D BR AC ELE T,
FREEPRORTTOAREA.DEGOOD

BERNSTEIN (352-6855).

IIELP WIWTED
C7353
Chief Accountant for
Company in Grand Bahama.
Must be A.C.A., C.P.A. or
equal. Responsibilities will
include the production to
management of monthly
reports and quarterly accounts*
etc., the supervision of a staff
and the day to day running of
the accounts department.
The successful applicant will be
required to produce and
implement ideas to increase the
efficiency tofas Iisandd r t

management in accounting and
allied matters.
Apply in own handwriting to:
Electrical Utilities Co., Ltd., P.
O. Box F-170, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas.

G7L3 SBLOWER WANTED
FOR FREEPORT. MUST BE
SKILLED IN BORA SILICA
AND SODA GLASS. WRITE
BOX F-56 OR PHONE
FREEPORT 352-9100.

3 NATIONAL FIRM of,
Chartered Accountants have
Several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent isalarieshoau
bonuses. Applcn sol
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co. P. O. Box F-241J,
Freeport, Bahamas.

INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
vacancies f or Staff
Accountant/Auditor for their
Freeport office. Candidates
must have had experience in a


Certifeieda Accoun ntant ofc

qAplifcaints shoud aplray in

writing to the Staff Partner,
Price Waterhus~e &e CF o. P.

Bahamas.


IIELP WANWTED
C7356
SECRETARY NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY Highest
sertr te sdkil rrea I d a$
experience, plus ability to
represent Department Head in
his absence and ability to use
own judgment and initiative.
Knowledge of public relations
an d artistic sense distinct
assets, as is knowledge of
community planning.
ACCOUNTING CLEAR K/
CASHIER Must have at least
three years experience handling
cash, including large amounts.
Needs full knowledge of
accounts to trial balance and of
payroll, banking and foreign
ex change Ex cellent
educational background
needed at G.C.E. level.
UNDER GROUND
CABLEMAN Underground
cable experience require.
Mut Ibel ablent asst in a ie
maintenance of equipment
used in conjunction with
underground transmission and
d distribution. Should be
q qualified to do splicing
unassisted as may be necessary.
Cables involved have insulation
for up to 15,000 volts'
paper/Iead, Snugrate, etc.
SUPERINTENDENT
( TRANSMISSION &
DISTRIBUTION) Must be
theocro ghlyo experienced in
Construction and maintenance
from 69,000 volt lines through
distribution voltage circuits.
Requires full knowledge of
overhead power line equipment
such as transformers, switches,
capacitors, etc. and proven
ability to supervise line crews,
including live line maintenance.
Must have understanding of
underground distribution and
street lighting.
Apply to: Grand Bahama Port
Authority, Limited, Personnel
Department or Room 30C
Kipling Building, Freeport*
Grand Bahama.





Operation and know: how to
operate 18 Tray Travelling

O py to Grand Bahama
Bakery Ltd., Queen's Highway,
P. O. Box F-797, Freepor ,
G.B.


By VICTOR MOLLO
Bridg Molsaae, cam eun ei t e
trials to .seles~ Ireland a team
now playing in the Common
Market championship at Tle
Dealer SooNh .N/8 Val:


d Q 10 9 8
West Est
A f(10 0 G 0 8 5


38864085
OA
Soth est North East

Manst Eat- sts bdrap tou
reached a slam. As the cards lie.
pt a hopeless, but one declarer,
David Sclanell coturd up at
cnance out of nohn.
West led a dimn.Not see-
Mg t: ,other hands, South
the 4A .Tha all Is wel Alter-
natively. either defender could
have tne + bare. Then, if
the spade honours are spilt, a
guess will suif~ce.
Combining both chances,
David Scanne~l gave himself
anotner. Crossing to the 09, at
trick two, he led the queen of
clubs. Who can blame East for
covemn ?
Going back to the 010, Scan-
nelloo a ruling ftnesse in
clubs, parked two spades on the
good clubs and came within
s~ght of the winning post. The
spae honours bint~g st he
he Pa havn so 171r a uht
guessed wrong.


So. test. 44)

ts. Crying (r

e.~ktar wit Igig.s
ru5.r Pe:t
ratr. (Tb~''~
4. mCo'rae tow. 44)


St. Mo e.


Itu. M **

St. Co 6'*
m selet.
(S) Tessedes* selge


TRADE SERVICE I
C9523
BUSINESSMEN, Homeowners,
trash and garbage accumulating
at your premises, Contact:
STAR SANITATION

Garbage Disposal
Phone 55191
P. O. Box N3343
Contract and job
Iot cleaning .
C9506

ISLAND TV SERVICE
"For service youl can rely on"


REX MQ RG AN, M.D. ,


By DAL CU.RTISI










Wednesday AprHi 25, 191.



CARIFTA'probables' hard


Whrp Grthhat


YA MAHA SU ZIK I






AQINTS FOR BICIC MIS

RALEIGH BRE)GES

OXFORD WESTERN FLYER













IIASESTU BACYCL ST.

next to Symonette Shipyard PHONE 2-8511


~~IFRr MS GO n ~t


FEATURES AND CUSTOMER BENEFITS
E ig-Lag Stitching--Lets you sw buttonholes,
buttons, elastic, tretlCh fabrics, do overedging,
and mena ters enwrithout attachments


Generalpurpose utt Minsfo normal farics, m
anownine c.
O snap-o COruser reetn-saves tmewe you t
swrbhfrom one~ to another ut sinap the d



foric perfect stragto stath~r ur m t

5-mil ladme pter wide l ( 1( so gh f r tigtagan
decorative~l sti~tches Also inctreae caabiy
for makinS lar;nerbttonhles nnl ~twr


Neor(w etliter~ CenrelerHa ansr inflinite aiey
SILnWnr he 1 t ~v~ tr ov* nis aea
cann for arfre ewn


. nrt Ctllr-r ifn rit
or r agl i up n rW
se m usern seasLlh( ln nl~*in ass


LEVANT CAREY of Government High School topped

Mond y' iftm Ga\e el hant onr Id 2o R cky g ts





Mer cury, Thompson's &


I


STERLING QUANT
... into new field


IACK7Y ICKIX WINS MOWZA


MONZA, ITALY (AP) second places in
Belgium's Jacky Ickx drove a championship events,
100 -ki oeter of Mon~ racenh re Mata p ove sbebt
Wednesday to score the first success defeat.
of the Italian factory in this The French cars,
season'so international auto makers taken the champions
c amp Bel in, who teamed with knocked out by mec
Brian Redman of Britain, emerged when d hey appea
as a skul[ wl oer when the Msr toward vcory.

stopped at the pits in the 133rd lap
after leading most of the race.
facoy, rnunmfnghon te eome tracekn
was completed by the second place
of another Ferrari, driven by Carlos
ReutomansmPf A gentina anderard

Larrousse, both of France, in a
Matra finished third.
Through this victory Ferrarl
strengthened its lead in the
championship standings with a total
of 65 points.
Ferrarl, which had scored three


the previous
was back to
she Frncih

which had
ship raceweo
:hanical faults
rted heading


THE, SEVENTEEN ATHLETES picked by the Bahamas
Amateur Athletics Aasociation as "probables" for the Carifts
Games, continue their workouts with high hopes of being picked
to reprweset the Baamas. The squad worked out yesterday, thas
morning and this afternoon.
Consisting mostly of school G. N 800 metres E.Saunders
children and divided into two -... .Ncos-CCS
agdegroups under 20 a ed
next week for Trinidad where
the Games are scheduled to be
held between May 2 and 6.
Although a fair number of 4a -
athletes turned up for the
eliminations on Easter `
Monday. B.A.A.A. president
Gus Cooper said that there
were many more athletes than .,
those who came. For example, r ,t

hepun w o hson of
best quarter milers in his class. '

inted t ttrac chese athlts
by having more track meets.
They also hope to have some
coaching clinics. Their next
track meet is expected to be
during the Independence weeks
celebrations. These track meets

s one to tbhbe edntGa Aeeian


Wt odstpotentialecomn
Schools, the B.A.A.A. has
appealed to all school athletes
not to stop their training
sessions when they leave


Set came from behind and edged out Paradise Island 6-5 in the
only game played at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. The
Islanders however, unsatisfied with the decision, lodged a protest.


Philli De a Ry of G wment
High (contre) breaks the trape
well ahead of his fellow school
mrat Phillip Williamson (at
right) to win the 100 metore in
10.8.
Photo: RICKEY WELLS.


beind 5 Intoett Seth rlid n n
three runsr and followed in the
fourth with two more to tie
urp.
Winning pitcher Isaac Fox'
who, won his fourth
c~onsecutive gamne last night, led
o~ff the top o~f the third with a
walk. I-irt baseman Eddie
MlcOuay followed also with a
walk aIndf both runners
admin~rc.5d(i >n 1d iild pith t

McKiln ne y M K inney
cotntacted the three one pitch
spending it down the middle
driving in I ox. On the play
home~t an error on Paradise's
ca3tcher saw Mc~uay scoring
the second run. McKinney

gondled intto s conGrdinr

one walk n thenib tndm ofte
th rdt and struck out one as the


off l Sts t rn fut
i lyn Gibth ssta tng ptc e
advanced on L~ionel Neilly's sac
hunt With two down, Eddie
Mc~ua pcked "wh c grou d


tooed fcu scoe h

thiri .
7`hr isladersbehind t e


place until they were knocked
by league leaders Big Q
Marketeers.
The Marketeers seek to hold
on to their lead when they
meet Schlitz Beer in the second
game at 9:30 p.m.


I e











on


SpoftSA88 Of Y88[ WIRS


B68 A 808828 601f lOpn

AFTER THE HANDICAPPING COMMITTEE had selected six
blind holes and converted them into handicaps for all players, the
Bahamas Sportsman of the year 1972/73, Sternln Quant we
declared the winner, with a burning 22 under par 48 in the first
BGA "Bonanza Golf Open" at Coral Harbour Golf course. In
second spot was Bill Bonaparte with 52, followed by Bil Cooper
with a 15 under par SS for third spot.Th olwn orpaes

weredknotte ckt 57 n a ye as
-as awarded fourth, Johnny
M addenly 6th) and PRh Fid
(7th).
Bob Slatter ran away with
the only gross award for the


fry whnr secarded a pair of
For the first time since



in an amateur Tournament ~


exiin an pla mn ien as
division of their own. The'
results were not surprising as
"9" walked away with first
place after carding a 40-38...
In the Ladies division young
Theresa McSweeney ran away
from the field with a net 55
six shots ahead of her nearest
rival, Eileen Dean, who carded
a 9 under par 61. In third spot
was Gerry Smith with a 6
un er 6 -
The Juniors saw young
Larry Russell return a winning
59, to i by tw shots oe
theo ner dang er u
Vernon Lockhart who had to

to btter 61 .cn thrd nl t
shots further back at 63 was

During the Tournament, the
beer wagon could be seen
z gzgig frm hl o hoil

compliments of Bethel
Robinson. Bahama Blenders
and William Brewer. Following
play a party was held at which
the awards were presented by
th winne an Sp~eortsmaun of
'h Year Strig Qa
The special Awards were as
follows.
Lonnese a uteon the first hole -
Lonsest Drive on the Sth hole -
Lou Yree hhi nteIt oe
Nearest the pin on the Isth hole
_ Reg Smith
Nearest the pin on 12th hole -
BiM tvanost balls J Hallid y
(Junior) 17, D. Lunn 7. y
oet umber of Putts t Charles
Highest Score Rick Stanmeyer
122
Most Birdles --Valdo Prosa 3
Highest score on one hole N
Wisdom 14, E. Edwardsl 14
Most Ss recorded during round _
T. Humphreys 10


5 T AU GUSTINE S
COLLEGE girl, Cora Hepburn,



Carifta Gamesr.






FOR BRAIDON CUP
TOP SEEDED Bertram
Knowles stopped Anthony
Munnings 6-3, 6-0 and 7-5,
yesterday to win partnership
with Leo Rolle in the Brandon
Cup Tournament scheduled for
Friday at the Montagu Beach
tennis courts.
Vickie Knowles and Jane
Wiberg will represent the
Bahamas in the Phillips Cup
also scheduled for Friday at

curtt. lo anding ea ntons
Trinidad, Jamaica, Guyana,
Barbados, St. Kitts and the
Windward Islands are expected
to compete.


scolMEET RESULTS


WMEN 400 METRES S. Dese

'- G..A.- 20, A 60,eeo A. .
WOMEN 200 metres E.
McFeego S.A.C. D. Symoett A.
Q.C.,y L. Kowe -CH.
MEN 400 METRES2.0 M: ers
Wlimson 20 GHSmPERethel Q .C
Reckley SA.F.A 4:44.0, R.
Ferguso. noe CC.S.; ;
MEN 100 METRES P.Deany
S l.,PWilliamson GHS P eh QC
WMEN 4 5a00 MERELA S
Ploneersn 44.8, ynaos
WMEN DISCUTRS C. Wilson -
B .T.C. 63f. 3n, O. Miortmer -
G.H.S., C. JHepbun, SA.C.
WMEN 100 METRES E.
MPhoeer S4.A.C 12.7, J
WMEN SUS R. Barltte -
B.H.S. 114ft. Sins, B. Cooper -
WOMEN 800 METRES -- E.
Fohe G.HS.REA Poner 1. J

1:32.0 DynmSCU R stce


minated Jet
batters


Ithe first, they eli
Set s first three

Ri~ad BroocKi
out ro~ute. TIhey we
One In the bottom
centre fielder Ke
scored on the fil
(cohin Tlhompson's
Gonmez got on with
let Set again fe
of the second
strikeouts and a
G;ilbe~rt though gs
walks in that innii
islanders again too
four competitive r
them aheaidl e S

orn second follow
and a steal made h
due to an error
baseman in whi
Floyd Watkins was
th(ilbert, the foul
that nnin, lad
accurate bunt to
corners. Gomez fo
a sacrifice fly into
Watkins scored. T
other two runs cam
by Thompson
baseman Basil Hall.
The Islandr c
were short li ed ca
settled down on
and gave up only tv

see ndS lac elet
take on Heastie Lu
first game 7:00 o'
Queen Elizabeth SI
tonight. Jet Set
LEAGUE LE
V nee Albury 40
Fred ~Taylor
(fecks) 4 I
Adlai Moss
(flig 0) 37
IEd Max~y
(BigI V) 38
I~tsk eit Turner39


ggy ggK agg a
MERCURY, THE DEBE KENGAL( MPION OF THE PLAZA
LEAGUE, won the second half of the 1972-1973 season on Tuesday. This
gives them the opportunity of retaining their championship crown when
thMemeuet Cit y Mart in otherllbfs the second half, but Claridge's were
four games. Thompson's won both determined to make Esso bowl well
the first and second halfs and are to win. Claridge's won the first and
therefore automatic champions of second games by comfortable
the Zephyr league. They also won margins but faltered in the third as
by a comfortable 4%L game margin Esiso won by a comfortable margin
over the defending champions, to clinch the second half
Amoury's. championship. Sydney French
It was quite a different case in (580) and Bradley Friesen (590) led
ampl pkweas rIgerm Th Essoband Glaridge's espec ivel .
until the last game when Esso had a default over Pritchard's, Guinness
raoabl das f htimeonbeaing wokethroonk f m H.C uteokend
championship. +sr
MercuPLAZedLEAG the good ROL FF
bowling of Cedric Saunders First half winners, City Market
234(570) and Larry d'A~lbenas (915) will be meeting Mercury
203(SS3), had their work cut-out (887) in the roll-off for the Plaza
lot too CtheMa egameast ley TeC co na ao of Larry
bounced right back to win the d'Albenas (193) and Cedric
second game which was the Saunders (187) for Mercury have
championship clincher. Jerry Fryers proven they can bowl well under
224(S69), Ronnie Turnquest pressure and they will be rough on
20s(s68) and Burnice Sands City Market*
198(563) 1all had good set in a stTammbalRussell ean aIs ln
El where in the league, Out Burnice Sands (197) and Ronnie
Island Airways won two from Turnquest (193) are the tough
Sawyer's while Finco wonthree by combo for the Marketmen, and
default from HomeE Eunture Co. tRe s an Weh t nd h elby Blly
Thompson's only needed to win There will be no roll-off for the
oneogame tocinch the second half iZephkyr league hmbpionsi ms ths
wleth this,nthe went-ont in styleoas Dpt). S oes~r hiethe w~og ot
second place and defending Gloria Bethel, Patricia Sweeting and
champions, Amoury's. By winning Lola Pinder must be congratulated
com sconc harhp tohe b come oninbecomin lesu pcha pi '
league because they also won the winners Albury's Supply will be
fIrs haFrench 191(518) again led Ca ponshipo fms he Luge
Tompho' dto bvictory lae wa dossetboe in fyne Frh
164(473). Rosie Saunders 184(500) erratic, but,' they can bowl well
was highr for Amoury's. sometimes.
New Oriental won two games Esso will be receiving a big 45
from Home Furniture while pin spot pgerame. Albury's, onthe
Maura's won three from Super other hand, who have been bowliag
Value by default. under par lately, has the strongest
EoMAeDIRoA L I GoE town team in the Madir on ague. lhe


,i the stai AE LMAGE
nt aheadhby altimore s .4
p s nMilwauke~e 7 6 .538 lb
:ith G~omez Detroit 8 7 .533 1%
rst baseman e tnd 6 8 as2 3
t wo rib's. New York 6 9 .400 3% 1
a walk. West Division
ll in the top M i y 10a 4 .6 -h
with two Chicago 7 5 .583 1%
ground out. California 6 6 .soo 2%
Oakiand 5 9 .357 4%
ave up two Texas 3 a .273 s
ng. And the Tuesda 's Results
k control on eiaesot8 Nst ok 4
:uns moving Milwaukee 9, Kansas City I

mmy Glover e ltmrd. Clfrdn a 6 (1o inning)
ing a single Toda 's Games
is way home Chtictato (od 32 at New York
on te frstMinnesota (Hands 2-1) at Boston
ich catcher (McGlothen I14)8:30 pm.r*
safe at first. Detroit (Lolich 1-2) at1 Texras (Hand
rthdbatter of 11wake (Sao 1-30 at Kansu s
Clever an p(Tidrow 1-3) at Oakland
stuff the (Blue U)) t p.m.
Allowed with Baltimore (McNally 3-I) at
centre and California (Singer 2-1) II .m.
he Islanders' NATO AL LA UE
re in on rbi's Eas D vbont. GB
and third tit burgh .2
New York 8 7 .533 2
her of Po thilaldelp~hia 7 7 .500 2%
se Iaac Fo t.onLs 2 12 514 7
the mound West Division
wro hits. n intiso

rhegh tey Lsu eles 71 39 6
Timber in the Atlanta 5 II .313 7%
clock at the Tuesday48 Results
port Cetresan f~rancisco 4, Chricago 2, to
held second Montreal 7, Cincinnati 2
ADERS st. Lons 2 os n g le 0

Irl 19 45 oda' Gmes
San F~rancisco (Marichal 3-1) at
14 17 .4IS C'hicago (Jenkins 1-1) 2:30 p.m.
Montreal (Moore Il) at Cincinnati
10 I5 .405 b~iingham 2-Id 2:30 p.m.
Plaas Dgo rilaidwell 02) at
16 15 .395 Philadelphia (Lonborg 1-2) s
Atlanta (Niekro 1-0) 8:0s p.m.


Albury's is a very young team with
tittle experience of bowling under


Sawessre make up ail formidablee
coambiaionsi, ah coambnto which a
sae houl lreadAury's tour' the eaue
Championship thonours.o



sevenr game loin trak nesmdayl
c bnig tin as Rck W aise p hitchda
sixhitter forad 20r shtout oer Losg
CAmposi eles. r


wa t.Lus heCa das, on ro o

s. s',h tael a lP It ga
Mt20ftSn-gm turnr ciack tfinkin t
Chicgo Cus 4-2c Win 10innings
si-htdan fo a 2 suoutned~ Ipht: I.o
In the American Lgst eage, ats -
u d die as Con ,th CaMues
In otee 8 datndlLege N n sot
hmbltea Bdtorne 64. defeated by
Oakl and 4-0andic atimore f hel6
A scaond-inning singl by Joinse
Crt anda doubles by dLoui Brock
acc ountndeetedfo the tw S.Loi


fourd a iv-game losing streak.

rumee 8n4 ani d frain eo
the Relds wa eetd


25 5 .385


let Set edge Islanders



6-5, & Paradise protest

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
CENTRE FIELDER BERNARD BURROWS hit an rbi-single in
e ht top of the fifth inning that broke a five all tie last night as Jet


at work to make the team


o


NEW!""""""""" NEW~!NEW7!


ZIG-ZAG S)EWING MACHINE MODEL. 267


PRICED AT ON LY

"16 0


PALMDALE- Y3PHONE28421


tvrimleG1