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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03329
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 24, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03329

Full Text








u~hrr PRE gRRll
,, ~t
RUSSELt'S
ORANGE JUICE
jviilrblt rt yaur
SUPERMARKET


iR Civil Slit
A SOURCE1 c lose to
international financier Robert
L. Vesco today said the
Sc curit ie s and lx change
Commission has been given a
deadline o~f May 4 to come up
with evidence in its civil case
against Mr. Vesco for alleged
UI.S. securities law violations in
transactions invoking foreign
(non U.S.) companies.
J. Raul t'spinosa, Mr.
Vesco's special representative
In Costa Rica, said recent
attempts had been made by
rep'resentativeys of the Nrew
Yo~rk Ui.S. Attorney's office to
sublpncaJ Mr. Vesco in Nassau
for a grand jury investigation
o n political ca m palgn
contributions.

suAeceordi r to r (Msynnosa, a
to appear in New York City
withinth48 lu urs wass "t ssed

re idence the aSunday before

implement the issuance of a
contempt of court charge
against Mr. Vesco.
Mr. Fspinosabhehieved such
ser vice of a subpoena
"questionable."
Mr. Vesco is one of 42
defendants in a $240 million
SEC suit for fraud involving
four funds of IOS.


VOL. LXX, No. 128 Tuesday, April 24, 1973. Price: 1 5 Centa
'~ '


ABH()1 I C(00 persotns turned
ouit onr I astrer M~nda! l mrningg
to, take part mn the marchh foir


wras sal pcomparedc to the


severall thousands" the~ union

i. (' Symotnette, a union
shop stewrd, reportedly
h~lunedit the smllellr-thlan-ex-
pected`~ rowduc onl thle tatilure of
other union~r leaders t, support
the ma~rilh
Tlhe m~athers left Windlsor
park on W'ulif Road at 10 a.mn.
half ant hour behind
s~chdule and toock o~ver twot
and a half hours to walk : asht
along la3st Street to 1Bay, t
to Blue 11111 Road. south to
Wolfl and east bac~k to Windsori
Park.
The main body of marchers,


to maintain a slow pace

sh n antso banannearknpunnrptu
the column slowed the pace of
the tail-end of the parade.
Spches were scheduled to
her made by severaldpersons
be oe toe macw d ni pered.
liowever, the public spddress
systemi was niot working until
about an houlr fterT the march
ended, and most of the
rnarchers had left the park,
despite the lure orf fooud and
gamle stalls set up by the union.
As at result. union president
D~avid Kinowles, sc~heduled to
make themriajor address of the
event, ca~ncelled hts spe~ch and
said he would make a press
statement later.
flowever, union trustee
Thomas Bastian, shop steward
T`. C'. Symlonette and Lionel
C'arey of the Vanguard
Nationalist Soci;alist Party
who, it is understood,
provided the loudspeaker
system all made brief
speechs.


I SHALL NEVER FORGET THE FUN IVE HAD NOR
THE FRIENDLINESS OF LOCAL PEOPLE'-- SAYS H.R.H.






Prince Charles in l0







fun- filled holiday her e,






RR SS RCH
9


By EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON
PRINCE CHARLES, heir to the British throne, rejoined his ship HMS Fox in Antigua Sunday after spending
what he described as a "totally peaceful holiday" at Windemere Island, Eleuthera.


Lord Mountbatten and his
family returned to E:ngland on
Sunday.
During his ten-day holiday
sP incle Chat les sam Su tse:
provided by Windemere Club.

On SCUB 1 VI aG scuba
diving trip was arranged for
him.
The ketch was provided by

Water lup rrt~s Cet a d
captained by the marina's
manager Lester Lathrop. The
family left at 10:30 a.m. and
returned at 5:30 p.m. Because
of rough weather Mr. Lanthrop
took them to the lee of the
island five miles off Governor's
Harbour. They had a picnic
lunch aboard the boat.
On that occasion the Prince
was joined by his cousins, Lord
Brabourne, Norton, Amanda,
Philip, Timothy and Nicholas,
and Mrs. Sibilla O'Donnell,.
who is the Mountbattens
Nassau hostess.
"The Prince is quite goodat
scuba diving," a friend said
today. "He has done it before
and enjoys it very much.
Before the boating trip, the
Prince drove around the
settlement of Governor s
Harbour. A group of children
recognized him and waved an
enthusiastic welcome.
Sir Harold and Lady Christie
entertained Prince Charles at a
picnic lunch at the club.
One of the highlights of his
stay was a dinner party
organized by Mr. and Mrs. Slee
on Thursday evening in honour
of Lady Pamela's birthday.
Windemere's 15 female staff
members, under Mrs. Emma
Sands, chief cook, entertained
with several songs. The Prince,
his uncle and cousins joined in
the singing of "Telephone to
Glory" and "I've Got a
Mansion", for which sheets of
music had been copied and
handed out. All of them,
including Lord Mountbatten,
formed a Congo line and "had
great fun."
Music was provided by
Charles Cooper's band.
Mrs. Slee rated the Prince
high as a calypso dancer. "He's
excellent", she said. During the
evening a large birthday cake
with candles was wheeled in
for Lady Pamela.
"The Prince enjoyed every
minute of his holiday," a
friend said. "He got a beautiful
tan, rest, had fun and thought
t ha t every thing about
Windemere the club, the sea,
the sand, the whole island -
was beautiful."


The Princ~e thoroughly
"adored" his holiday said his
great-uncle E'arl Mountbatten
of Burma, who arranged the
viThe Prince, who is serving as
a sub-lieutenant o~n a tour of
nut of the Caribbea~naylwr
private executive jet from
Antigua to E'leuthera on
Friday, April 13. Hle left
t~haestsame pl et att i'hin o
ship.
Before leaving the Bahamas
Prince C~harles wrote letters of
thanks to the island's two
commissioners, who on
learning of his arrival, paid him
an official visit on Thursday.
PRINCE'S LElTTERS
Said the Prince in his letters
to Commissioners Grerald
Pennerman of Rock Sound and
Newton Mcnonald of
Governor's liathour:
"At the end of my stay at
Windemere I wanted to take
the opportunity of conveying
to the people of the island
through the Commissioners my
gratitude and appreciation for
the way in which they have
allowed me to enjoy a totally
peaceful holiday. Rarely have 1
had such a relaxed and happy
week.
"I shall never forget the fun
I have had, nor the friendliness
and generosity of the local
people and I cannot wait for
the next time I can return to
Windemere.


By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE OPERATORS OF THE BLUE VISTA HOTEL on Cable Beach may close it down on April
30 rather than invest thousands of dollars to meet licensing requirements while there is a chance
that a court action could result in their eviction from the property.
Mr. G;ustav iFisher, president Expertise re-opened th
of (;ranite En.lterprises of hotel on October 10 last yea
(anada, lessees for the Blue "under an arrangement witl
Vista, told ~lhe Tribune that and as agents for G:ranit
the five partners in Granite will Enterprises.
,make a decision in the next When Granite failed to mee
few days. its alleged obligation fo
'.\The 96 staff members have operational expenses, th
already been notified that they Expertise management tear
~ J ~ 4 ~ may be laid off at the end of resigned, and Eixpertis
P this month. declared the hotel closed o
Mr. Fisher sadl that part of December 18.
Granite's learse-to-purchase However, on the same da
agreement with Expertise Granite claimed it owned th
(Bahamas) Limited, owners of hotel and had no intention o
the Blue Vista, called for closingit.
Expertise to carry out certain Expertise subsequently file
repairs before Granite took suit in the Supreme Court, an
G possession. sought an injunction to restrai
CHARLES S. THOMPSON Those works have not been Granite from remaining on th
completed, Mr. Fisher said, and premises*

of50f BSil85S as a result the Blue Vista is On February 16 the partir
temporaryr" occupancy and before Mr. Justice James Smit
Mg @ j g g [hotel licence certificates. to say they had agreed th;
y @@ emIWa 9 er For G;ranite to do the Expertise would withdraw th
~necessary work, Mr. Fisher claim for an injunction,
lis, Ied 7 said, would cost manyy return for Granite's payir
w w wp a hundreds of thousands of $2,000 rent and $500 fe
dollars." utilities each week.
FUNERAL SERVICES for MYCOE
retire d postmaster Charles G;ranite may decide not to W.GEIAW p.
Swa in Thompson, M.B.E. do the work and to close the W m w *
I.S.O., 76, who died at his hotel instead because they YI I IG H R
home in Blair Estates Sunday would be running the risk
morning were held at Trinity ,,f losing their investment if
Metodit Curh tdayat pending court action goes MR. ALBER.T Osswall
5:30 p.m. .against them. Prm Minise of Land 11ss
TheRev PterSwaglhurt' The court dispute between ries astern od ch essen
assisted by the Rev. Edwin G;ranite and E'xpertise centres West Gemn Lan dea nun
TayortheRev Frnk oad around the lease-to-purchase 11cas a et eaccornnanied b
and the Rev. David Livingstone agree me nt. Each party Mrs. Osswald, arrived in Nass
officiated. Interment followed presently claims possession of this afternoon for a five-d~
in~the Western Cemetery. the I14-room Blue Vista. visit to the Bahamlas
Mr. Thompson is survived by Mr. Fisher said Granite is D hirsa
hims wife Dor thy, two os considering closing the hotel Oswl u il ng y 1 a curtei
Jams nd etr, wo on April 30 because that is the cal on the (wov r or, Sir Jol
daughters Mrs. Geoffrey Brown expiration date of a number of Paul, and he will be received 1
and Mrs. David Lowe, three contracts with C'anadian travel the Decputy Prim~e Minrster ai
sisters, Mrs. Hugh Johnson, agencies and airlines involved Minister of F~inance, M
Mrs. D. C. Anderson and Mrs. in the operation of Blue Vista Arthur D. Ilanna, M.P. Hie w
Arthur Langlois and ix TIours. Blue Vista TIours, a also have discussions wi
grandchildren. Granite subsidiary, has been G~overnment offin~als ai
A Companion of the organising package tours that senior representatives
Imperial Service Order, Mr. have kept the Blue Vista Hotel han king and 1 ananc~i
Thompson attended Queen's at a high occupancy level for institutions in Nassau.
College from where he several months. nAgut1972 It w
graduated in 1913. Hle then Mr ihr ol o announcdthtleis
joind th Royl Bak ofcommit himself on what would Lnehn a curd
Canaa werehe demand happen should the hotel be "meaningful interest"
until July 1917. In that year hd closed. Granite could write off nentoa rdtB
joinsed the Canadianc Ahrmy an terinetetnteBu Geneva, parent company of t

eas bound in atin. Hew iaadr e s Bahanusagroup of sthaednat
From 1923 to 1928 Mr. posbyr-pnataltrdt. essische Landeshank h
Theom son was emHloye drt Tnheasecon a son peay.A fe joile ahned a an iitei internatiomelo nm
pointed cashier at the York, London, Lxmo
Tp t ~~~~until the court action LaaneMxioCy,
reaury a osiionnex in concludes, Mr. Fisher said. Paulo, Bangkok and Manila.
seniority to the Receiver Mr. Fisher said (ranitc has MrOsalwsorn

enECEIVER GENERAL no e aeayfnl 1919 in Giessen, German
D his 2 th. decisions in the matter, where he went through scho
During hi years in tis .NEGOTIATIONS and later taught financing a
office, Mr. Thompson acted as Expertise and Granite have organization at the loc
Receiver General on numerous been trying to negotiate a commercial high school.
occasions. He was appointed settlement out of court, Mr. He entered politics in 19
postmaster in January 1941 Fihrsi returned on and became representative
and retired in January 1961. April 16 from London, where Giessen then Mayor and
One f hs dtiesin his he had been meeting with 1957 Lord Mayor of that cil
period included holding the E-xpertise's principals. Froml1954 he was a mem
position of chief clerk and tlowever, agreement is no of the House of Represen
cashier when those posts were closer than before, tives of the State of Hessen,
established in 1948. expertise bought the Blue 1963 Minister for E~conot
Mr. Thompson was made a Vista, which was closed at the and Trade, 1964 Minister
Member of the Order of the time, from Lambourne Finance, and since 1969
British Empire in 1957 and Investments. Ltd., in October, been Prime Minister of
received the Imperial Service 1971. State of Hessen.
Order in 1961.


2 8 CCusSO Freep or t





POLICE OFFICER SPURG;EON DAMES, 25, and former
C.I. n ppie fLeroy Mc ean,n35, cha ged wit te Feorar t
bail by Mr. Justice Maxwell Thompson pending their trial.


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counsel.
Tile two are also to report to
the Central Iolice Station
twice daily during their bail
period.
Both men have pleaded not
guilty to kidnapping the
daughter of former Manager of
obe toya p nrk ofo('anah
parents horne in Lucaya '

F~r s anrd McLean were
still in custody this afternoon
while attempts were being
made to contact a person
capable of standing as surety
for their bail release.
Neither was present in court
this morning during the
granting of their application
for bail. The matter was heard
in chambers.


The application for bail was
made by their attorney, Mr.
Randol Fawkes, last Thursday.
It was granted by Mr. Justice
Thompson on the condition
that D~ames and McLean first
pay $5,000 in their own
recognisance, and that each

pp roined aby suretRegis rat o
the Supreme Court" for
$5 00.edition each must
Ssurrenuer all travel documents
to the police at Central Police
Station.
The judge also ordered that
all travel companies and
agencies be informed not to
sell tickets to Dames and
MlcLean whom he ordered not
to travel anywhere outside of
New Providence without their


Sinc~lair )ut ten. M.P. for
St. Barnabas, the only
parliamentarian to participate
in the march had to leave to
present trophies at a bicycle
race. He was not present when
the speeches were made.


"Sincerely yours,
"CHARLES"
The le tters, written at
Windemere, were dated April
22, I973.
Also receiving a letter of
thanks was Windemere Island
Club manager Dick Slee. In Mr.
Slee's letter the Prince said he
had rarely enjoyed a holiday
more and he found the idea of
leaving a "desperate" one.
WA LK
The Prince rose daily at 7:30
a.m. for a walk on the beach
before breakfast. He was often
accompany ie d by h is
25-year-old cousin the Hon.
Norton Knachbull, eldest son
of Lord and Lady Brabourne.
The 2,4V-year-old Prince and
his cousin were students
t oge other at Gordonstoun,
Scotland. Also joining him at
times was his uncle, Lord
Mountbatten, whose holiday
was taken on doctors orders.
Most of the Mountbatten
family spent several weeks at
Windemere between their
homes "Provender" and
'Savan nah .' Lord
Mounthatten and Prince
Cha les stayed actl roved un,rd


Lady Brabourne, and her
hushand. Wit rhbt eteresefive

childrenhilipNorton, Amantdha;

eight-year-old twins, Timothy
and Nicholas. The other two
children could not spend
Laster with their family,
because, as Lord Mountbatten
explained, they were busy with
e xam i nat io n s. J oan na
Knatchbull. 17, is a student at
St. Donat's College, Wales, and
her elder brother Michael John,
22, is a student at Reading
University.
Also at Windemere were
Lord Mounthatten's younger
daughter, Lady Pamiela, her
liushund. Mr. D~avid Hicks, and
their three children E'dwina,
11. Ashley. 9). and India, 6.
They own "Savannah", which
is located next door to
"Prove~nder."


AN UN DE TERMINED
quantity and firearms is
believed to have been stolen
from the Customs warehouse
at Arawak Cay following a
break-in over the lon8
weekend.
Informed sources said the
weapons and the marijuana
were contraband confiscated
by Customs over various
periods and held in a special
area at the Arawak Cay
complex.
Police were still carrying out
their investigations at
lunchtime, and Customs


officials were unable to
determine the quantity of
goods taken.
The Tribune understands
that entry was made sometime
Saturday, Sunday or Monday
nights by forcing a lock on one
of the outside doors, then
another lock on the inside, and
the use of tools to force
further entry into the building.
There is no watchman for
the Customs site, and the
break-in was not discovered
until about 6.30 this morninB
when one of the cleaners came
to work*


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MR. JAMES W. Nuthall,
one-time Bahamas resident,
died suddenly at his home in
Miami on Wednesday, April 8.
Mr. Nuthall first came to the
Bahamas in 1950 to handle the
closing of Sir William Butlin's

Baaa, an mhe s bseque tl
became managing director of
it tded Bahama Properties,

sele lived in the Bahmas fh
office to Florida. He continued
to make weekly trips to both
Nassau and Freeport up to the
time of his death.
A memorial service is to be
held at Christ Church Cathedral
at 4 p.m. on Thursday.
Donations may be made to the
Cathedral Restoration fund
instead of sending flowers.









NASSAU ONLY
a


NOEL WILSON, 29 of Step
Street, Fox Hill, was this
afternoon charged before
M agis tra te Em manuel
Osadebay with the shooting
death of 22-year-old Kenneth


s~e fr Ia a28 aniln w
remanded in custody
uBrown re ored~ll ng""" f
i cident in r Loearsd Holidady

Sunday night.

TREASURE HUNT
THIS SUNDAY
A TREASURE hunt to raise
funds for the Duke of
Irdinburgh Award Scheme will
be held Sunday.
The hunt will start at 11
a.m. at the Car Inspection ('ar
Park at Fort Charlotte, ending
at St. Andrew's School.
At the end of the hunt there
will be prizes, swimming and
refreshments sold at the
school.
Tickets are ob~tainable frotun
Mrs. Beryl tliggs, telephone
2-7520 or Mr. Tomi Close,
telephone 4-2621.


Bgys (7)t algis (Og,


Over Easter holiday
A SEVEN-YEAR-OLD boy'
attempting to escape an
attacking mongrel on East
Street, South near the "Below
Deck Club" was killed by an
oncoming car when he ran into
the street.
Traffic authorities reported
this morning that Eneas Bain,
became the Bahamas' 12th
traffic fatality after being
involved in an accident with
car NP 96, which was
reportedly driven by Mr. Israel
Cleare of West End Avenue,
Coconut G;rove.
~The accident occurred on
Saturday, April 21. The traffic
fatality was one of 55
accidents that took place over
the long Ilaster weekend.


5 he


Er 1huna


(Regletered with Postmaster of shames for post per


L ETOH U N UI G

'MARCH FOR



BRLAD'r e'..


HUNRES F ORERStre u atrMna mrigt aepr nte
Bahamas~~~~~h~ Hoe n aeigWres'Uins"ac o rad oaduinmmes



Hunde r E the "W"R inte an r),wsted onlyate p oliic an partiiaing in thke march iThe

march ended at Windsor Park, Wulff Road, where a union-sponsored fund raising fair was
located.


Blue~~~ Vs Htl


stille wt


prol018S,ma Ml S)ow CIS 10W pr il 30

-- 8P ERIT 0RS TO 0 ECID E 'IN AF fW DA Y S'


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St0100 Ifo 0 CIISt ms


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Vec 8 COIV 0 S C


F orarsre side st CHAR GEl IN

ditS in Mali SHOTW DE |ITHj




I __ _s __, -- __ _, ___ ~ __- _- --* ---- agpi g


2 -yn ~u u


LANSKY DENIED NEW TRIAL
MIAMI (AP) A federal judge has refused to grant Meyer La~nsky, the
reputed underworld financial manipulator, a new trial on charges of
ciminaly mo m .recovering from open heart surgery, was convicted Feb.
28 of contempt in refusing to leave Israel to appear before a Miami Grtand
jury investigating a profit skimming operation.
reU district udge Jmes Lawrence Kngr Iade K own an enrer Mm tda
for acquittal flied by Lansky 's lawyer before the 71-year-old Miami Beach
man's trial in February. King had postponed ruling on the acquittal
motion.
peNaot dtla r mt ator sententcing.dThr is 's nmean i Ior miniem m
discretion of the judge.

AFRICAN NATIONALIST TERRORISTS KILL FOUR
SALISBURY,, HHODEFSIA (AP') African nationalist terrorists have
killed four members of the Rhodesianr security forces three whites and
lne d irican cuit ft rat lee I~n atrtnrstr an e tdar .f hodesia, the
This brings to 11 the number of Rhodesian troops or police killed by
terrorists since their last campaign started toward the end of last year.
T'he security fo~rcers statement said thve other members of the security
forces were seriously injured in the latest clash.
A number of others received minor injuries, it said. Three terrorists were
killed in the clash and others captured, said the statement. An African
civilian wats also0 seriously injured during the clash, it added.
The statement apparently backs up unconfirmed reports of major
infiltration by terrorists into Rhodesia during the past week, and it is
understood sections~ of police and army reserve units have been placed on
immediate stanid-by alert.
Observers believe the terrorists may be m g a major etleart in a bid to
try to sabotagre Premier lan Smith's latest bid to reach agreement with the
Blritish government onl a settlement.
Smith hlas said he will base his case on his governments view that the
majority of' Africans atre nocw ready to settle on the 1971 settlement terms
agreed between hiimscif and B~ritish IForeign Secretary Sir Alec
Douglas-liumne.

U. S.TO CONTINUE MILITARY PRESENCE
gONN. <;I RMANY (AP') Ch~ancellor Willy Israndt's government
welcomed T'uesday a statement by UI.S. presidential advisor Henry A.
Kni ngr li rutyres eIS inuro c~an relations ba;sed on a continued
A Ikmn government spokesman expressed appreciation for Kissinger's
statement, made Monday in New York, which included what it called

Te ip~en n w31aco euT Kssinger' Ystaement of U.S. readiness to
Kissinger's speech, at the annual meeting of the Assotciated Press,
announced that President Nixon seeks to, build a new Atlantic Charter with
America's European allies this year based on an easing of economic
frictions and on the continued presence of U.S. forces in Europe.

JAPANESE ANGERED BY SLOWDOWN
TfOKYO (AP)- Comnmuters outraged by a railway slowdown strike
smlashecd train windows, signals and station facilities, bringing key rail lines
in Tokyo to a halt Tuesday night and standing thousands of passengers.
T'he new slowdown, part of a recent series of protest actions, began
icn v nnci gu ynetim ted the te-rio nmm ter inN Toyalolialwy,
Trouble was reported at about 30 Tokyo-orea stations Tuesday night
h ume o nuiw re r ptda, but eac reorts were unavarilable
The JNK( lines in TIokyo usually shut down at about I a.m. but the
railway said It planned to run trains through the night -- once it could
restore operations to help commuters who packed the major stations get
homle.
MARCOS BLAME OUTSIDE INTERFERENCE
MANILA (AP) F~ighting between Moslems and Christians on the
southern island of Mindanao "became aI real danger to the Republic mainly
because external elements have exploited the situation apparently for
selfish motives," president Ferdinand E. Marcos said Tuesday.
Marco~s did not identify the foreign~ elements. Some F'ilipinos have said
that Libya has been responsible for agitating the Ph~ippine Moslems in the
Sophcaking on a nationwide radio and television programme, Marcos said
Otere had been some fighting in Mindanao "but the situation is now under
controll by the armed forces".
~~RUSSIAN SHIPS TRANSPORT MOROCCAN TROOPS
PARIS (AP)- Two Soviet warships sailed the whole length of the
Mediterranean earlier this week carrying a large contingent of Moroccan
motorized and armored troops to be deployed against Israel on the Syrian
front, the newspaperaL Monde reported Sat ra cosdb ln rm
Morocco into Algeria and boarded the Soviet vessels near the Algerian city
of Oran, disembarking in a Syrian port a few days later*
There was no official confirmation of the report in Morocco or Algeria.
King Hlassan II of Morocco announced last February that he intended to
send a strong Moroccan army contingent to reinforce Syrian troops on the
eastern front with israel.

PAPADOPOULOS' STATEMENT WELCOMED
NICOSIA (AP) A C'yprus government spokesman Saturday welcomed
as 'very constructive,' a statement by Gireek prime Minister Geeorge
Papadopoulos denouncing .the underground campaign to overthrow
President Makarios and wreck the talks for a settlement of the differences
between Grteek and Turkish Cypriots. '
The spokesman condemned an attack on the Gireek government by the
leftist Greek Cypriot 'committee for the restoration of democracy in
Greece.' He said this was likely 'to undermine the harmonious relations
between the G;reek and Cypriot governments.'
Commenting on Papadopoulos's statement, the spokesman said, 'the
categorical condemnation of those undermining the talks and dangerously
disturbing the atmosphere for their success, is a very constructive move,
within the efforts being made for the defusing of the situation in Cyprus
and the restoration of Internal unity.
He stressed unity was essential to implement the joint policy of the
Crskmontdi r2 epot tenoments for a peaceful settlement of the C'yprus
The statement by Papadopoulos has been widely welcomed in Cyprus. It
was seen as an overdue move which might deter the rival sides supporting
cMaknkrios and underground leader G;eneral George Grtivas from a major
G;rivas and the opposition ENOSIS union with Greece front have
stated they will accept no settlement short of ENOSIS. They want to oust
Makarioslfor supporting te continuation of the nter-Cypriottalks which


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CHOOSE FROM OUR
WONDERFUL SELECTION
OF GIFTS FROM
~$ THE ORIENT

.






X. b


e * ~





Y. d ****








Bast of Rawson Sq., Next to Chinese Village Rice Hourst
P..O.ox NIV 411 asy Stanot. Nassa, ashrama Ph. i- 1 79


I


1~ -- ---..-~I~-_~- _I- .I-Q-~ ~r .I ___-- ~- ---- - -- -I II- L -I~- --


j


much of the foreign policy
information the Nixon Government
b reqied bylw to iv to
U.S. military aid is too little, too,
late and often incomprehensible.
MTne a427-paget reor leased
Representatives foreign affairs
committee and Senate foreign
relations committee said, for
example:
A mandatory report o~n UI.S.
quarterly spending in Cambodia Inst
sm I ng Iartilo t prpose a munition t shir,e autpplies rand
"upgrade the capabilities of the
armem i forces of the Khmer
-The cost of the U.S. air
combat operations and transfer of
excess American equipment was
left out of a similar report on Laos.
Reports on meeting congress'
2.5 billion ceiling on U.S. military
aid to Indochinar excluded weapons
turned over to allies by
withdrawing U.S. forces. The
omission "also makes it difficult to
determine If U.S. assistance to its
allies is being used by them to
support the governments of
Cambodia and Laos."


frotte ab utt aan 186g la t
it report to Congress arrests or
deden iso of U.Scitizoens abroad
and dti o efrts to free
t em. P C

to Co greas isj tyca sot measure
"serve a public relations purpose
frt m tes of oongrs sri us
oryin to evaluate the effectiveness
ofteprost me.
Adding a wry note, the report
said the Peace Corps' loth annual
report to Congress "Is the first such
report since the 6th annual report."
It said the Peace Corps
contended in the other three years
tat it was complying with the iqw
detailed yearly requests to congress
for funds.
But the report on some loo
aourtss 50dferdnt laws y som
o the are exciellent.ssuch as the
commission's annual report.
coThe study was mnd efor te twee
congressional research service under
the direction of Ellen C. Collier,
specialist in foreign policy.


tests for cancer



100o good to be true
By Frank Carey
WASHINGTON (AP) Dr. Albert B. Sbi~n, developer of the
live-virus polio vaccine, Tuesday reported evidence that two
common and widespread viruses play an knportant role in
canaing some types of cancer in "certain individual under specal
condition. th b ipictd n
In a report co-authored by othr micro es is ipct n
an Italian scientist, Sabin said at least nine human can er
the viruses are two types of the ad noto hw at lat no varus
"Herpes simplex" microbes Up ,n kn a e dfitl
which ordinarily cause cold o n idhsbe eiiey
sores or sores of the genital lne oayfr fhmn
organs. caTher research, featuring
He indicated the viruses blo tet o acratients,
wer inriinaed n ancr y was conducted at the National
strange genetic "foot-prints" Cancer Institute's new research
they left after playing a centre at Ft. Detrick, Md. The
hit-ad-runrole.facility was formerly used by
Reporting to the National the asy a cancer for
Academy of Sciences Sabin bogia rfe sach
said recent studies mnvolving Sabin, a guest-researcher at
human cancer patients warrant the centre for several months
the conclusion that one or the and Dr. Giulio Tarro of the

'61s arupioa abs University of Naples, said there
$SS FI~ti0AS 8 k8 was evidence of Herpes-virus
application in the blood of 56

3 "bcens: 11, mo &h, nonse an
raoI l10st 10WR throat, kidney, bladder,
I w prostate, uterine cervix, and
WILLIAMSBUR G; vuly .
MICHIG;AN ( AP) But negative results were
Williamsburg is virtually a found in 8 other patients
ghost town. afflicted with 20 other types of
stThe doors of empty houses camcer,s iludn such la r
raised. Laundry hung out to breast, liver, ovary, and two
dry flaps unattended on a yes of acute leukemia
clothesline. The sounds of a Negative results were also
community at work and at found in 5 persons without
play have given way to silence. cancer
This village of 200 persons is TOO GOOD'
deserted because of a sudden, Sabin, who reported last
inexplicable series of natural December that preliminary
gas eruptions, indications from his and
gaSince bWe nesdty ou tura Toarrbo's wsr wee "to go d
ground in hundreds of places report:
hndf dseda mile-square area He'Thef rfindindgs ... pen new
"We first told 'em it would cancer. There is a need first of
be at least a week before they all for expanding these
could get back," said Traverse observations on larger numbers
County sheriff Richard Veiler of human cancers especially
to the men, women and in relation to the clinical stage
children who call Williamsburg of the cancer."
home. "Now we're talking of He declared the viruses
at least two weeks." were incriminated in the
But other officials said it positive cases by evidence, in
may be several months before blood samples, of the presence
life gets back to normal in of scH'alled "non-virion
Williamsburg. Nearly every antigens" that is, a kind of
structure in the town is over or genetic "foot-print" of vinruse
bea wh ol cstihebaym which, in certain rndidvidual
eruptions. malignancy and then
Extensive damage already disappeared.

One Iowpl eedu t enea ath
to wn hall, seriously
undermining the structure builtetn
in 1889. Another is etn
away the highway that runs
through town, and it probably i ~rr
will have to be rebuilt.
Several neatly trimmed front
lawns in the village now feature
ugly mud basins as much as 10
feet across and more than five
feet deep.
The 'perimeter of the
deserted village is heavily
patrolled by sheriff's deputies, HEAR: Dr.
both to keep out looters and to
prevent the possibility of an Pastor of Taberr
explosion set off by an Grees
accidental spark.
"We'v bee luckveny so far. SCHEDULE OF SERVI
We hav ns'tihdh ryone mnjured100
Meanwhile, e efforts a
continuedhto plug aanatural gas

have blashied for causing the E Sli
eruptions.HGLAD RK OP





COUNCIL OF LEGAL ED

NORM AN MANLEY LASW

MONA CAMPUS, U.W.I.
JAMAICA

ADMIISSKION OF STSDI
October, 1973.


1. Applications are invited from suitably qi
admission in October, 1973 to the Normal
Jamaica.

2. The Legal Education Certificate will be awal
candidates on satisfactory completion of a
prfleSSIOnal training OVer a period of two ye
holder eligible to be enrolled as a legal practi
ticipating territOrieS.
Details of Courses and Qualifies

3. Persons holding the LL.B. degree of the U.
equiValent ffOm an approved University or Ins
to apply for admission. Full particulars of the
for entry and details of courses i are available
should be addressed to the Registrar, Council a
Box 231, Mona Kingston 7, Jamaica.

4. Application forms are available from the Registl
the Dean, Faculty of Law, U.W.I., Cave Hill
forms should be completed in duplicate.

5. The closing date for the recipt of applications is


COMING11 WAR I
By The Associated Press
THE EGYPTIAN CABINET
has adopted a series of
measure s, in clu din 8
establishment of an operations
room, to prepare the country
to face any emergency that
may arise from a battle with
Israel, the Egyptian press
reported Tuesday.
Reporting on a four-hour
Cabinet meeting Monday, the
controlled Cairo newspapers
said the major decision was to
"place all the resources and
institutions of the state" at the
service of the armed forces*
Operations rooms for all
ministries will also be set up as
wel as a separate operations
room for the Cabinet, the
report said.
Other reported measures call
for regular Cabinet meletmigs in
the operations room and
establishment of ministerial
committees for information,
foreign affairs, internal security
and public services.
Itrior min ser Mamdu
Salem also a dred camp so b

popular resistance operations'
an official statement said.
Parliament approved a law over
the weekend making military
training obligatory in high
schools and universities.
Wo en will take a compulsory

SECRET PARLEY
In Tehran, the capital of
Iran, U.S. diplomats stationed
in the Middle East and South
Asia wound up a two-day
secret conference amid
rumours of a possible change in
American policy toward any
new round of warfare between
Israel and the Arabs. Egypt's
announced intention to
prepare for another fight'
toug oto ulrade in ge ra t
new concern for peace in the
Middle East.
Tehran newspapers reported
the U.S. mission chiefs
discussed, among other things'
the possibility of an Arab oil
boycott, of a new Middle East
war, of more Palestinian
terrorism and of increased
rivalry between East and West
for inof ueceia cohne ara.t Te

th ep ania, a controlled
newspaper fired amither volley
in the propaganda battle
between Moscow and Peking
allies over which country is a
better friend of the Arabs. The
journal Bashkimi claimed there
is a Soviet-American plot on
immigration of Soviet Jews to
Israel
Albania is China's only
ideological ally in Europe. The
article was distributed abroad
by the official Albanian news
agency ATA. It followed by
three days a charge by a
pro -Mosco w S Iova k
Communist Party newspaper
that China is interfering in the
Middle East to prolong the
state of war and the military
tension.




rrles all credit



WASHINGTON (AP)- In a
victory for consumers, the Supreme
reuatiotnarequurhneldiscalofede o
credit costs on items to be paid for
in more than four installments.
The decision stemmed from a
dispute over the costs of magazine
sbacriptions but hits impacen""
$100-billion-plus consumer credit
industry in a variety of areas.
Specifically, the court upheld the
Fedra t serve rBoard' soal e
fashioned a new rule under
authority granted by Congress in
the 19681 Truth-in-Lendinl Act.tht

such purchases are In need of
protection," wrote chief Justice
Warren E. Burger for the majority.
'The four-intlmt rul kevst


isr ht th roe tive db our
mechanism chosen by Congress will
not circumvented."
Four other justices agreed with
Burger's opinion. Justices William
O.Doug s, RPotter Stewart t (1
approved thre four-installmernt rule,
bort frd ocnro titonaown th
facts involved. Justice Lewis F.
Powell Jr. dissented,
The case arose in 1969 when
Leila Mourning, a widow living in
D~ade County, Fla., balked at
p'O'ins the s cord linstalisment on
purchased from Family
P e wo a vcore Inn U.S, district
court but in 1971., the U.S. circuit
court in New Orleans ruled that the
Federal Reserve Board had
overstepped its authority in
formulating the four-installment
rule and had violated due process
guarantees of the Constitution.
The four-installment rule
requires sellers to disclose the total
purchase price, the balance due
after the initial payment, all
additional charges and other
specific information.



1



r

YI(


G;eraed i, W sse saisecNe a
called th h threeclmen Sus r

lieo w d hem did aot know
whether Nixon has since talked
to any of them '
Warren also reported that
Nixon held an hour-long
unannounced meeting last
'Thursday with John Wilson, an
attorney who was retained that
day by Haldeman, the White
House chief of staft, and
Erhlichman, Nixon's domestic
policy assistant.
The deputy White Hlouse
spokesman said the meeting
took place in Nixon 's hideaway
W ec timeofic en bidi ,. nct
door to thcWhite louse.
"I have no report to give
you on the discussions," he
said, saying in response to
another question that he did
not know who had initiated
th ren etnhad no comment
when asked if Nixon might at
some point retain Wilson as his
own personal aornely in te
Watergate matter invo ving last
June's break-in and bugging of
Democratic Nat io nal
Committee offices in the
Watergate complex.
Warren has been filling in for

Ronal L. ie lr, ecretar
reported to have taken on

ceothce here of cn ohr to
Nixon aides,
Another newsman asked if
Nixon might testify before tle
Watergate grand jury or supply
it with a sworn statement.
Warren re lied
"Thats nt mtter I ca
discuss .. because it's not a
matter before us."
CLEMENCY DENIED
Warren also was asked about
reported grand jury testimony
bon onvi J mde Waterga e
that he had been offered
presidential clemency in
exchan e for silence
"The President has not made
such an offer nor have there
been any discussions with the
President about executive
clem enc ," Warren said
Asked if someone else might
have made such an offer,
Warren replied, "not with the
authority of the President."
He said, responding to a
question, that petitions for
executive clemency usually
begin with a pardon attorney,
then go to the attorney general
and, before reaching the
President, are handled by the
White House counsel, who is
Dean.
The spokesman also was
asked if Atty. Gen. Richard ;.
Kleindienst, who has removed
himself from direct connection
with the Justice Department's
Watergate inquiry, had of fered
to resign
Warren said that, hopefully
without suggesting anything
one way or the other, he could
only reply that "it would be
inappropriate to discuss
individuals while inquiries are
proceeding."
W ixon plans to r turn ton g
following an Easter weekend
here that, until today, had
been marked by official silence
on most Watergate questions.
NIXON DIDN'T KNOW?
The White House insisted
a~ga noMon ay that Pesident
knowledge of the Watergate
bugging plot, despite a G~allup
Poll showing that more
Americans think he did know
then think he didn't.
"Of course not . .he did

)1.1 l. Of COCaill6




SA\VANNAH. GEORGH(IA (AP)
More than 1.3oo pounds of
nrirur ad an ~themti@d < e
beenl seved by Ur.S. agents who ,


waded through hilgewater and
crawled through narrow pipes in a
hut raitL dAmericanr freighter,
Thek crwmenmof tther freight
charge of thle sac~rch said.
"We tear sormething up and the y
hide something in it," said a UI.S.
customs agent. "It's been like that
since we stalrtd."
"These drugs were hidden by
masters." said another agent, Bill
Hunlton. "They hid it in tubes deep
in thle bowels of the ship, under thle
eng~ines andl inl fuel tanks that could
1,,.(Itanded it we Ilot too closr.:*
Thell customs agents said Monday
that two of their men suffered
chemical hubris o~n their arms


no~t .. know," said the deputy
press secretary when asked
about the poll. Forty-one per
cent of those interviewed April
6-9) said they thought the
President k ne w a bout
Watergate all along, 32 per cent
thought he didn't and 26 per
cent had no opinion.
T'he poll was taken before
Nixon's dramatic April 17
statement in which he said
"major developments" had led
h im to open a ne w
investigation into the bugging
of national Democratic
headquarters at the Watergate.
PURGE COMING?
spreWn said thedPresident is
on Watergate" as he works in
virtual seclusion at his Key
Bisc~ayne villa, preparing what
is widely expected to be a
sweeping purge of his
administration.

resignatiosnsa ave o crrd a
yet, Warren said, and the
President's own investigation
still is continuing.
Nixon is keeping in touch
with the inquiry by telephone,
Warren said. The White House
probe is headed by Assistant
Attorney General Henry
Pectersen, who took over when
White House counsel John
13can was taken off the case.
INDICTMENTS

iny shigatiolY h t said tou se
totally separate from the
activity of the federal grand
jury in Washington, which has
been hearing testimony from a
parade of past and present
administration officials.
A fresh batch of grand jury
indictments is expected in the
next few days. The President
has promised to suspend any
individual indicteditand toq fi

possibleannhoweverm that ithe

changes without waiting for
the grand jury.
Warren refused to confirm
or to deny a Washington Post
report that Nixon was warned
as long ago as last D~ecember
that some of his own staff
aides deeply were involved in
the bugging a nd in a
subsequent effort to cover it
up.
Hie conceded, however, that
the President learned of
"serious charges" against
mem bers of his staff some time
before March 21 when he
ordered h is own ne w
investigation,
WARNlngs
Warren would not say how
early the warnings came to the
President but implied that
hard evidence was lacking until
March 21.
The date of the warnings is
significant, because it could
af fect t he credibility of
repeated White House claims
that no one on the staff was
involved in or had prior
knowledge of the affair.
Asdrecently as March 30,
nine days after Nixon said his
latest investigation began, press
secretary Ronald Ziegler
declared.
"As we have said before, no
one in the White House had
any involvement or prior
knowledge of that event I
repeat that statement."
Ziegler since has argued that
he was speaking on the basis of
information available to him at

Since April 17, high officials
past and present have issued a
deluge of statements claiming
they were innocent and
pointing the finger of blame at
others*
TO BAHAMAS
The President spent his
forh sdae nd nhe FI rida sunt

Bhaamas rinvtehen cmanyt o
Only two old friends, he
helicopter back to Key
Biscayne Monday morning.
The senior staff official with
him here is press secretary
Ziegler. Ziegler has been too


busy doing other chores for th(
President to face reporters

Nixon's fam ily, which
accompanied him to Florida
for t e Easter weekend,
scattered Julie and David
Fisenho wer bac k to
Washington and son-in-law
Ewar C bc to parac ute
school at Fort Benning G~a.
Only Mrs. Nixon and
daughter Tricia remained with
the President at Key Biscayne.


r'


Tuesday, April 24, 1973.


mt, mr~ku+r~


NIXON DIDN'T KNOW CLAIM ESTIPT CABINET NEW CANCER DEVELOPMENTS FllEISII F$LIEY


PR~EPAES FOR Dr Sabinsa s virus TIZLIY.[P L1'


Nixon calls aides


& has secret talks


In W tor MRte DFObe


By Frank Cormier
KEY BISCAYNE, FLA. (AP) The Florida White House said
today President Nixon telephoned Easter good wishes to H. R.
Haldeman, John D. Ehrlichman and John Dean III, three aides
who have come under fire in the Watergate investigation.





_ ~


Best taste




on the ~sla~id


NVuLxUS ADDICITIS 11RARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH. Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR. ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Pub~tsher/Editor 1917 1972
Contributingy Editor 1972.
EILE~EN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 19 72 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
GeneralOffices(15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, April 24, 1973.


just see how I have run on.
My Kingston war-time friend was George Levy. Hie also had a
brother in the same unit with us. His name was Harry.
Under fire in the field every second is a hazard and there are
too many miraculous escapes to single out any for special
mention.
But I saw something happen to Harry one day that was really
remarkable. This was at a railway siding in Belgiumn. We were
unloading an ammunition train and sending the shells along to the
batteries.
We had just had a luncheon break and the men were scattered
all over the place.
George and I were standing on the railway siding about
midway in the train. Harry was at the far end of the train walking
in our direction when a heavy enemy shell seemed to drop right
on top of him. There was a great explosion and Hlarry disappeared

pioresan t br tn to the spot expecting to find only bits and
When a shell explodes it normally sends shrapnel flying in all
directions and so it seemed impossible for Harry to escape.
Occasionally, however ... depending on the nature of the
ground ... a shell might concentrate all its shrapnel in one
direction.
When we arrived at the spot Harry was lying face down on the
edge of an enormous hole in the ground. There was no evidence
of blood anywhere. Before we could do anything Harry got up on
his feet, shook himself' over and said "'Give me a cigarette". He lit
the cigarette and continued to walk along the side of the train as
though nothing had happened.
HIarry, who was also a volunteer, was "only a private" too.
* ** *** **
Success in life is not measured by what you are when you near
the end of your life but how far you have travelled on the road of
life. And this is why I had Who's Who list me as having served as a
Private in the British Army during World War I.
I have seen these two brothers once since we were demobilized
in April 1919. On one of our visits to New York my wife and I
looked up Hlarry in Harlem and he and his wife took us out to
dinner at a Harlem restaurant.
The last time I saw George was in Kingston when my wife and
I toured the Caribbean about 15 years ago.
He had worked as a salesman in a shoe shop in Kingston ever
since he came home from the war ... and he was still receiving
only Six pounds sterling ($18) a week. He was due soon to be
retired without any pension in a country where 25 per cent of the
work force is unemployed and without any hope of getting
employment.
My wYife and I took one of his sons and brought him to Nassau
with us. He stayed with us in our home at Camperdown and we
sent him to school while he received training in The Tribune
office. When he joined the Catholic Church my daughter andI

stois as hstae godpa us several years. He is now in the U.S. and
we hear from him occasionally. In his last letter to me a few
m~on ths ago he said his parents we re well.
plAnd so2 A zu toakditL eo gane i a s or wh y at hI d
numbers in Kmngston.
When my wife and I drove to the place we found that 12!'
Fitzgerald Lane was a wreck. Only scraps of the small building
were left. People standing around were curious as to what we
were doing in such a run down area. They mistook me for an
American and the women wanted to know whether I would take
them to America to work for me.
One old woman remembered the Levys.
"The wife has gone to America," she said. "Mr. Levy
somewhere in the country" ... which meant that he might be
anywhere or nowhere or even dead.
And so another link in the chain of life was broken.
* *** ** ** ***
C'apt. Keith Isaacs came to the Sheraton Hotel with my dear
friend The Rev. Canon J. C. Wippel to have tea with me. I told
him about missing Levy.
"There are not many of us left now." he commented.
fle wasn't surprised at my interest in my Door wartime friencl
"They talk about Masonry and other friendly societies," he
said, "but there is no comradeship that binds like that of men
who fought together in a war. Whatever the rank we all seem to
be brothers."
+* *** * ** ***
Tomor~lrrow I will write the article I intended to do when I went
off on a tack about Sam Pinder, who has been uppermost in my
mind for some time now because of his illness.
** *as* ***


th ar' wi t deam e Usa a RiT Devncb e to the attacks of
I dream'd that was the new city of Friends.
-- WALT WH(ITMAN


I .


BARCLAYS SAVI1


ICI


_ 1 L


3


II8~L~ll~n~l~B


Tuesday A
42l irp 19


ir ~~ ~r


to by this letter writer is a
photograph in the April 8th
edition of the Sunday Times,
which we cannot reproduce
for our readers.
However, the photograph
shows a group of Africans
stripped to their waists with
ropes around their necks. The
ropes circle one man's neck
and ties him to his tellow
prisoner's neck. The men are
standing in double file, roped
together by their necks. To
the left of the photograph
stands an African dressed in
shorts and a white shirt with


arrows. They cower before
their new masters, roped
together, beaten and
bewildered. The master, in his
tropical clothes stands almost
aloof', ignoring the misery
around him. knowing that
there are buyers with whom
he canl haggle and that an
able-bodiedi African can bring
a goodtly sum. He is a slave
master, the men are slaves,
"This picture, which
starkly reveals that slavery
still goes on, was taken at
considerable personal risk by
anl Italian photographer
Mauro

"'He tracked the slave
traffic to its source, close to
the border with Niger, and
there, through a break in the
busihes he took this picture.
The going price for an
able-bodied African was 285
po~unds. or nearest offer.
"From the village of
Sokolo, the new masters took
awa\ their slaves -perhaps
farther afield to a nearby
A fr ican country. The
p'hotographer did not wait to
find out. He came back with
this astonishing picture ... for
a doubling world to see."
EDi.


Hlere is something that might
usefully be added to the
Bahamas National Archives
Library on the backgroundd to
slavery'.
In the year of our
Independence 1973, black
brothers selling black brothers
into slavery to the Arabs.
Rather puts the question of
'slavery' into proper
prpective, doesn't it
pes A SOUL BROTHER

Api 2, 1973
THE "something" referred d


caption to the photograph
says: "Deep in the Nigerian
bush, hundreds of miles from
the eyes of sophisticated
society. a group of black men
turn back the pages of
African history to the
gruesome days of slavery, to a
time of misery and greed and
human exploitation.
"The Africans are rounded
up in the bush like wild
animals. hunted by men
armed with bows and


staff in his hand. It as
unclear whether the staff is a
stick a bow with an arrow, or
a whip. He seems to be
standing guard over his fellow
Africans. Walking in front, as
though he is inspecting the
prisoners is another lighter
skinned man, followed by
two Africans as part of the
inspection guard. Under the
heading "Black slaves for sale
S285 pounds each" the


to the heights that it is capable
of by its people being all
together,
After independence, I hope
that whenever the opposition
finds reasons to differ with the
government in the people's
interest, that they fight to their
last breath for I have and will
always believe that without a
strong, united opposition
force, a democracy could never
exist in our Bahama land.
LESLIE T. FOX
Nassau, April 15. 19)73


EDITOR The Tribune
As the day of o~ur Bahamian
Independence draws near, we
as Bahamian brothers and
sisters should suggest or offer
constructive ideas so that our
entry should be as pleasant as
it will be memorable.
The suggestion that I offer is
that the national anthem be
played on the local radio.
I would also suggest that it
be taught to the students in
our schools, circulated
throughout the family islands.


If this circulation of our
national anthem is done well in
advance, then, when we gather
as an independent people on
the tenth day of this July, we
shall all sing our proud anthem
together in unison.
In closing Mlr. Editor, there
are many fine men and women
in our Bahamias who strongly
voted against our entry as an
independent nations.
I call upon these good
people to put away politics for
this country can only progress


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
AFTER THE IAPA MEETING in Montego Bay, Jamaica, my
wife and I made a spcial trip to Kingston to see two of mny old
army friends from World War I days.
One had been a Private in the army like me, the other was a
Captain and Chaplain to my unit in the B.W.I., where I served as
his batman and we became warm friends.
nWhe a ril Stevno twae t yng tpnftddc nkftiinn m anity t
said I was ontly a Private in the army. I then supplied the further
information that I had also served as a personal servant to an
Anglican priest in the army, that I had swept the streets of France,
cleaned toilets and worked as a stevedore on the docks in
Taranto, Italy.
Didn't e pct to have to do this kind of menial labour
when 1 volunteered for service in the British army but I am glad
of the experience because no one can say that I do not recognize
the dignity of all labour because I have done it all myself.
* * **
In speaking of my staff I often say that Sam Pinder is one of
the most valuable links in the organization, not only because he
has spent his entire life in our service but because the services he
performs are indispensable.
He is the man who opens the doors in the morning, does
various cleaning jobs during the day and closes shop at night.
We couldn't fiction without someone to perform these
essential services ... and so every man who performs any kind of
service in an organization is valuable if he discharges his
responsibilities well.
I started to write about two army friends and find myself
talking about Sam Pinder at home. I have already told you about
Sam but I will tell you a little more today because he is the kind
of person who daily restores one's faith in humanity.
All my family are very fond of Sam. We feel that he is a part of

Sam was an adopted sqn o my dear friend Sm Cotper tSa
Cooper was a direct descendant of Emperor Christophe I of Haiti.
I have told you the beautiful story of "Pa" Cooper and so I won't
repeat it today.
Sam came to work for The Tribune as a small boy and he
quickly made himself a part of it. I would say that Sam has never
had another love. His devotion to the institution bears evidence
. to this fact.
1Sam has always been in the background cheerfully doing jobs
that most people would like to avoid. He has never complained or
grumbled. He has never asked for a raise or anything else. He has
never shown any desire to want anything for himself. I don't
think I have ever known a more completely selfless person.
SI have told you before how Sam was always the first to arrive
at the office and the last to leave at night. He opened the doors in
the morning and closed them at night.
In the years that we used Linotypes, he had the machines
Cleaned and the metal pots hot by the time the operators arrived
in the morning and so they could start producing immediately.
No one assigned him these jobs. He just knew that no one else
Wanted to come to work at 6 o'clock in the morning... and so he
just quietly undertook to do these and many other similar chores
Sin the organization.
He made himself useful in so many small ways that I have
often said to members of my family that when Sam passes on he
will be very hard almost impossible to replace.
The extraordinary thing about Sam is that he never seemed to

Over The 7)ibune. Any hour of the night I went to the office I
:was likely to hear a noise in the shadows.
S"Is someone over there?", I would ask, knowing all the time

a his des re wuld come the same old reply.
"What are you doing here at this hour of night?", I would ask.
"sIhast en ol tyo ueoe isy dalrght res.w Idgrs rron,
who now heads the firm, decided that Sam deserved something

S d sa she dunsend t asmalloapat m t n tTred Trib le t r
nigh t watching ove r his grea t love.
He was proud of the fact that my daughter had put all new
furniture in his apartment. He insisted on everyone in the
building coming to see his new quarters.
Since I have been in Coral Gables Sam took sick. My daughter
was very concerned for his health because it might have been
serious. She sent him to the hospital in Nassau where the doctors
took care of his case and then sent him to Mt. Sinai Hospital in
Miami where specialist Dr. Ivor Fix also gave himn special
attention.
I spoke with Dr. Fix often about Sam's progress ... I went to
see Sam in his room. He was very cheerfill but it was always the
same story ... "Everyone is good to me here." he always said,
"but I want to get back to The Tribune. When do you think the
doctor will let me go, sir?"
Sam went back to Nassau with my wife a couple of weeks ago
and everyone at the office was waiting to receive him. Dr. Fix
says he is doing well.
"How's Sam?", I asked my daughter a couple ol days after he
returned to the island ... I meant his health,
"He's fine," she said, laughing. "Very happy to be back with
The 7tibune. And all the girls are fussing over him.
I suppose you might say that Sam holds one of the most junior
places in The Tribune but I don't know of anyone who is more
appreciated by the entire staff. And he is appreciated because he
has made his small jobs important.
vn io 1 nvtistnk of ayone as onlyy" an hng be as


I started to write about two soldier friends in Kingston ... and


and age, to listen to our local
radio station, to read our local
newspapers and find that
information, such as passed out
to the American shoppers by
the American news media, was
not carried by the local news
media. Would you believe that
one could not buy a Miami
Herald in Nassau on Thursday
April 5 the day after the
news came out.
As a concerned Mother,
homsnwife abnod shoper plea e
train wrecks or financial
scandal and more news about
how a major food chain cant
attempt to carry out unwa:
selling practices this is
not opinionated their
worthy news.
WORRIED SHOPPER
The Tribune did bring
readers the recent housewives
protest against these Freeport
sueraret -afr gv


EDITOR The Tribune
Would you please, by being
duty bound in your position as
Editor, obtain and publish in
your newspaper the
Supermarket story of
amazement. which has been


admirably presented to the
public by the Miami Herald
and Channel 10 TV during the
last ten days, involving Winn
Dixie Food stores and Food
Fair in Florida.
It is unbelievable, in this day


rtERlao
LI~~"AREhE


\T


6-VARIE-s IES


i~C i~cw***;


GS5 ALlOUNT I


Snhe Grthbnn


Black brothers selling black brothers into slavery


NATIONAL ALNTHEM SUGGESTION


QUeStions lack of food store stories


esoe. ,voe~lS oco omwnow c ~S. o~


Sff


hlOW YOU


...NOW YOU




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60 VERNM ENT TR DINING CENTRE
ARAWAK CAY




FOr information, Call Barbara Lightbourn 24500; Alberlthe
FergUSOn 55467; Bob Kirnberk 21904-5-6. F~or applications,
stop by HELP, Ltd., Millers Court East Street between Bay &
Shirley.


~MAY TAG HOME LAUNDRY CENTRE


-


Remember to ablqo


Hatchet Ba~y -The Baihami~


TA4YLOR INDUSTRIES LTD.
P. O. BO0X N4806 TE L. 28941-5


nlc r Wcl l e ( i gal cl r t l
Jfr:es f mn tl he e~ver popular
netti~lr ;Inr am ndaerclla

1it~alhr and Dolrissaar .
P'antsuits, hikinis, pyjamas.
;rnailablel in the favo~urite styles
slnd clolours. liats and bags,
eloves~c tights. shoes and sotcks
pilill fplent~iful up y tft
Thei harby shop' as Wee C'are
if of ten called offers its
cu ~tomerrs a variety o~f items

chc ping f(,ro hr Aat other s
birthday dress will also find
palrty decorations and favours.
WVith ;tnple parking efaciltiesa

c srt< cp ghoppingdplac fur t
family
TEA TO RAISE MONEY
FOR SCHOLARSHIP

Ka ri ng dcola st pW Fd
held at G~reater Bethel's
~Temple, Rdupert Dean Lane,
aasd90s beor the fund dThe
Mr. Rahmning who is studying
at the Munich School of Music,
West G;ermany.
Members of the committee
are Mrs. Deannie Johnson,
chairman, Mrs. Claroline
Samnuels, Mrs. Marjorie G;ilbert,
Miss Cloral D~orsett, Mrs. Betty
Stubbs, Mrs. Marina Rolle, Mrs.
The~lma Deal, Miss Mary
D~arville. Mrs. Francina Clieare,
andi Mrs. Florence Coleby.
VVEATHE st to south east 5
t m.p. .
Weather: fair
Sea: Smooth to slight
tTemp Man, tonight 63 Max.


Tuesday, April 24, 1973.


i // 1~L~C.-


EACH year Spring announces
... babies!
Although they can't do too
much about the weather, WH l
CARE on Madiera Street has
been helping expectant and
new mothers prepare for and
clothe their new babies for
over a year now.
Situated on the corner of
Madeira and Patton Streets
(just opposite John S. Gecorge).
Wee Care experiences daily the
"patter of little feet". Children
from birth to age six discover a
treasure chest of fashions
playwear, sleepwear, casual and
formal wear.
Of course, rt all begins with
the expectant mother's visit to


maert i ngerie at thet I 1
time the mother-to-be can help
herself to Wee C:are's helpful
laao ertte lise an t e ci urel y

gownsshae ssat inetst blare et .

rots sterilizers, andi many
Wee Care also has a selection
of smaller nursery furniture
high chairs, strollers, Why h
carriers, car seats, walkers,
nursery lamps and even mnusical
rocking chairs. There's ac'tually
no enedaov oift i s wo finl
-- baby record books, n ght
lights, mobiles, practical gift


The above photo shows a fine display of clothing for the I~ttle ones at "Wee Care".


18f0I 'iffGClifG liSitninge


Course here Alpril 25-28
AN "EFFECTIVE LISTENING" COURSE to improve a
persons ability to retain and understand wvhat they hear is being
offered this week by the Bahamas Association for Manpower
Training and Development (BAMTAD).


increased their ability to retain
eha teytobead f ce ?
Executives went from 45
percent to 80 percent, female
clerical workers from 38
preat stor72 pler entsales
9 I percent, production
managers from 38 percent to
7u~pervi ors freonm 38 pdrc offio

Te corse hsbaltr::d be
5 00 ma jor American
corporations, 75 United State:
government agencies and many
colleges and univer ed by

tape recordings with response
books, takes only three hours.
thl3AD Dis to spresn ainti a
Centre, Arawak Cay on April
'25, 26, 27 and 28, beginning
6:30 p.m. nightly.
A small fee is being charged.


Tlhe course was designed by
t~heeor erotxo a(cporaeione
effective listening course
teaches people to:
"Capture and summarize
zitical thrdormation froom htany

analyse what is being said;
"Retain mental 'key-word.
oltlisels of spok en

p and screen out ireelevancies,
'Or ganise length y
instructions, conversations and
lectures into major points; and
s "Cut through distractions
bac ground noise and
eignetional overtones."
Studies have shown that
salesmen taking the course

24 UGANDA ASIANS NOW
WORLD TRAVELLERS
LOND)ON (AP) -Twenty-four
Ugandan Asians, all Jndians, were
not allowed to enter Britain Friday
noutnda he atl bee ske scte
the countries they wanted to go to
would let them in,
authrtides Iet te wery wan ereresn
the arvdmat Ld ns edat = w
They had spent the last two
weeks in a lounge at Orly Airport.
A Home Office spokesman said
~tegroup n-r take to dh te tE

centre was full.
"They will be allowed to remain
over the Easter holiday, but their
case will be considered sometime
tomorrow. It may be several days
before a decision is made because
of the hao deads."Thyhv en
given temporary admissio .rhile
under refusal to enter this
~The Asians apparently flew to
New D~elhi after they were thrown
out of Ugandal under P'resident Idi
Aminl's tough expulsion programme
last year.
But they left India March 29 for
Pa'isand London.a anhee refused
thrown out of Britain fater.
They were shuttled back to New
D~elhi, put refused to get off the
plane amf were taken on to Tokyo.
Japan also refused to accept them
and they were sent back to Paris.


APRIL 25, 26 and 21 of 6.30 P.M.

and on

SATURDA~Y, 28 APRIL, 1973 of 9.30 P.M.


atthe


.>.


u* -


. .


... IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusabis but unwanted


items of


clothing tools

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc. .clear out


your closets, garage, storeroom


all can be of help

to someone else,

Donate them to



Seed~I ea

88 5 r
ROSETTA ST REET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


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PORTABLE WASHERS & DRYERS

WRINGERS WASHERS

DISHWASHER~S & FOOD DISPOSALS.

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'Wee Care' the baby


shop that seeks to


please little ones


BAMTAD


BAMTAD la seeprarefle wi~e IBROX (Belsemes) Ltd

Is sipeasedg as~ a phiek servise, a sew

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I I I 1 111


ZWhr Wrthaunt s






la~~ whenCaribea
London-based, tou oranzes
.nugrae elve ron tripu-irtCi1

and~ ~ ahrow. Airpor inct ff

Lonon I ngland.r i3
,\ lheW hart aers utili ing Air *!l
Jmi carl~ Suervc DC-8in jet aircat ,j I
po ~ndnsatenta fo bsnes andl

~,Interrn atio~nal T`ravel, tol EMNTRTS
memic~J~nbersc or the amaicanr(r4h
Irulel incdustry. I PLACE ofi th uu
'nineppn bccng the Noma '"welyI tn ke
H~preente aneraioa exhiiti o
heSe wud ttaheo offrin h owet Juot h mmeso
d\ the evr f harters twee sng the U.K the Roay C b o
as an effec, openging ia n Seao rtih Cln

e Jia c als Aw r 1ng of jte aicatou Orn Bet Sct Bo

s from cll orga ierm icne to CaribbeanMr Maoe tay lu
International Travel fmarksantl PrsdenO~t-lct AD.(Bl
kFarquharson and Gree
imporanto n g s te, M r. Pucel,' I Beeklt Richard Charlow. M
nsdrigade. MalelaJmac one explaned tha the
the cSta (~ ITi he ofrnly Wes Indian apaernese wor "judit o o
organizationJud in Lodn t en the gentler way
lity e wa ecever suchs a liencte from the which y hi b y oun
juctow nd (LK.la." government. dmnasta torsa priced toe
dast oil Wet are grg a tifie and phraove Brto be on ly
,akthe only ple tase t hea confienet, co prtv tr tog
d befor laced. i s by te JD E O SR TO Stv ussellE de ostae ho to mae noto a e leh l. as a rat .

e oftwoattakerfro therea (Rchar Chrlow crsh o th florcarred her PiHOTOS CAdreow Toogo
Flocrida. goverment andan regular by hs w mmmtm
lc ag encie suc o thene crountrieswih hi o


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e


B~u~t:


* .


__


Tuesday, April 24, 1973.


DONNA JONES, 18,
gathers a happy group of
children around her as she
gets the Nassau Beach Hotel's


Easter Programme for the
Young Set underway. Donna,
who is a student at
Government High School,
and Louise Campbell, social
hostess, organized a seven-day
fun filled programme for the
youngsters. Along with the
activities at the hotel the


children also visited tl
Floor Aquarium ane
Marching Flamingo
climax of events w
Easter Egg hunt with b
of candy f or all. Bah
children at a local hom
received Easter basket!
the hotel.


F.P.&L. TO SET UP OWN REFINERY?
MIAMI (AP') Ilorida Power andi Ligh~t setting up their own refinery as a possible means of holding down ~r
of fuel oil.
FP&L president Marshall Mcl~onald said Monda, thle util
investigating the possibility of building the refinery either in co~n
splh nher Mcl~onald termed the plan "unheard o~f", but said it mright( he
way FP&L could guarantee a continued supply of fuel. Hie testified
a House subcommittee, conducting hearings in Miumi onr thle caus
FP&L blackouts earlier this month that affected most o~f So~uthern


EASTER COMIIES TO NASSAU BEACH












CIWh OrthttBit n





808fil Of DiflCtors elected we


Tueday,~ April 24, 1973.


Girl friend of shot man-says


accused often used threats


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157























$11.45
Offered Price
As Of
April llth, 1973


L. Jse of our Pool and 1-3 mile of Beach cComplimentary)
2. Mats. Towels and Lounge Chairs (Comnplimentary)
:I Four C'hampionship Tennis Courts Night Tennis
( Com pli ment ary,
41 His and liers Sauna Baths (Complimentary)
5. Putting G;reen cComplimentary)
6. to p~c off Weddings. Banquets and Meetings held at the
Resort
7. Additional (cKklail parties held throughout the year
8. Tenmis and Swimming Clinics
9. 10 pce off all special parties and group dinners
ill Managers C'omplimcntary Rc~eption. W'ed. 6:45pm -
11. Jubmia Torch Light Steak Cook out (Wed.)
12. Thursday. Champagne D~ance lipm Fore N' Aft L~ounge
1:1. International Huffet Hiibiscus D~ining Room
14. Sunday Feature Movie 9pm
15. For those of you who like to play bridge, the Nassau
Bridge (`lub meets every Tuesday and Friday at 8:00pm
in the IBird Cage

PLEASE CALL MANAGER'S OFFICE 78001
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION


COMMONWEALTH OF THE
BAHAMA ISLANDS 1972
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side No. 44
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act,
1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of a Tract of Land comprising
Ten (10) acres situate at Sweetings Cay in the
North by vacant Crown Land on the East by a
Public Road on the South by a Public Road and on
the West by a Public Roaid.
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Susan Russell

NOTICE OF PETITION
The Pectition of' Susan Russell of the City of Miami
in the State of Florida one of the United States of
America in respect of:
ALL THAT Tract of land situate at Sweetin s
Cay at the Island of G~rand Bahama comprising
Ten (10) acres and being bounded on the North
by Vacant Crown Land and running thereon
Seven and Eighty-eight Hundredths (7.88)
chains on The East by Vacant Crown Land and
running thereon Fourteen and Sixty-three
Hundredths (14.63) chains on the South by the
Main Public Road and running thereon Seven
and Eighty-eight Hundredths (7.88) chains and
on the West by Vacant Crown Land and running
thereon Fouirteen and Sixty-three Hundredths
(14.63) chains which said tract of land was
originally granted by the Crown to Austin
Leopold McDonald subject to a reservation for a
Public Road Fifty (50) links wide and running
along the Eastern and Western boundaries of the
said tract of land.
The said Susan Russell the Petitioner in this matter
claims to be the owner in fee simple absolute in
possession of the said tract of land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas
Islands under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act
1959 to have his title to the said tract of land
investigated and the natu~re and extent determined
and declared in a certificate of title to be granted
by the Coulrt in accordance with the provisions of
the Act.
Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places: _.
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Sqluare in the City of Nassau aforesaid;
(b) The C3hambers of David C. Bethell in the
Bernard Sunley Building, on the second Floor,
Bay Street, in the C'ity of Nassau aforesaid;
Attorney for the Petitioner.
.(c) The Office of the Commissioner for the area
of the Settlement of Sweetings Cay at the
Island of G~rand Bahama.
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognlised in the Petition shall on or
before the 29th day of June, A.D., 1973 f'ile in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim or before the 29th


J.r4 of! anit A..D., 1973 will operate as a bar to
such claim.
DA VID C. BETHELL
Chambers, 2nd Floor, Bernard Sunley Building,
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.


she said she did not think it
important as he never used It.
Miss Clarke said she admitted
having a cutlass when police
officers investigating the shooting
had asked her about it. She said
that Addertey had given her the
cutlass "quite a long time ago." She
used it around her yard.
Consulting surgeon, Dr. Nirnal
Patha, also testified that he
operated on Adderley after he had
been admitted to hospital at about
11i p.m. on July 1.
The docttor, whose evidence
sparked objections by counsel who
described it as hearsay being
based on reports made by intern -
told the court it was impossible for
him to say the distance from where
the bulletse were fired by examining
the wounds of his patient as he "is
not a ballistic expert."
Mr. Justice Samuel G;raham,
rule d the doctor's notes as
"derjy because mthe am de
named McDavidt ... nobody knows
where Mcl)avid got it from" he told
Solicitor G;eneral Langton Hilton
who, had called the witness.



ARRIVED TODAY :
Bahama Star, Flavia, Emerald
Sea funn Miami;Oceanic from

SAILED TODAY: Staniel
Cay Express for Staniel Cay
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Flyer from West Palm


MR. GEORG;E H.C. Griffith of
the Attorne (e eral'stchtasm a7
general meeting of the
Ftreeport/Lucaya Real Estate Board
held at a luncheon at Xanadu
Princess Hotel. Freeport.
Mr. G~riffith s address dealing
with proposed real estate
regulations provoked a lively
question and answer period. "The
whole tone of the meeting, which
was well attended by the board's
affiliate and active members, was
one of optimism and confidence in
the future growth and expansion of
the industry," a press release said.
T'he following members were
elected to the Board of Dlirectors:
Mr. C'linton Moultrie. vice
president of Intercontinental
Realty Ltd., was re elected to the
office of president and director of
the Board. Mr. D~avid P.L. Hunter.
vice president of McPherson &
Brown Real Estate Ltd., Ist vice
president and di ector. Mr. Preston


Stuart, Jr. president of First
pr sid t Itald drecto Mrs Er a
G~rant-Smith, executive secretary
treasurer and director.
The eight directors are:
Mr. Roger Butts, vice president
of Princess Properties Ltd., Mr.
Harry Dann, president of Universal
Properties &r Investments Ltd., Mr.
Herbert Dasvidson, president of
Lawrence Investments Ltd., Mr
Ric~hard Johnson, president of
Beahamas International Realty Ltd.,
Mr. Henry Kallish, president of
TIennant &r Cooper Ltd., Mr. Lionel
Lel)uc, president of Sunshine
Realty Ltd., Mr. Benjamin Platt.
president of Freeport Realty Ltd.,
Mr. F~rederick Walter, assistant to
the President of the G~rand Bahama
Development Compnay Ltd.

SUN
SUN: Rises 5:43 a.m
Sets 6:35 p.m.


SHIRLEY CLARKE, girt-friend
lfVnen lbAdde ley, a Srachan's
times in the upper right arm and
left side during a July I argument
testified Thursday that Hasting
Bethetll accused of the shooting,
had threatened the people at her
house on several occasions.
She made the statement against
the wishes of defence counsel D~avid
Bethell who reminded her that he
was only interested in evidence
concerning the day of the shooting
as he questioned her inl his
cross-examination.
Clarke, the mother of Vintcent
Adderley's young son Terrence, r
who, the court was told was playing
in the yard when a bottle was
thrown from the direction of
Bethell's home, said she did not
harass B~ethell after the incident. "I
only told him he must remember
Vincent got six brothers."
She said that she had offered a
'shuot)ng, but Aedid ynot a cpt the
H~e told her to put it away and call
an ambulance.
Bethell, a 44-year-old lumber
yard clerk, went on trial in the
Supreme C'ourt Wednesday, charged
with attempted murder. Accused ofr
shooting Adderley on July 1, hie
pietehdounot gulfamiliar with bullet
holes Miss C'larke said she noticed a

h9 luedhuas ndosd by let a
shooting.
Questioned by defence counsel
as to why she did not give the
police any information about her
offering ai cutlass to her boyfriend.


Cr~~~s bL







CH AS E ST AFF AID HOME FOR AG ED
MONEY FROM COOK-OUR: Staff of the Chase Manhattan Bank held a cook-out on
Saturday, April 14, and raised $265.30, which they in turn presented as a cheque to Mrs.
Persis Rodgers on behalf of the Persis Rodgers Home for the Aged. Mrs. Marina Dames,
chairman of the cook-out committee, presented the cheque to Mrs. Rodgers. Pictured
from left to right are Theodore Levarity, member of the Chase Bank Club, Mrs. Francelia
Bosfiled, committee member, Mrs. Rodgers, Mrs. Dames, Mrs. Theima Strachan and Mr.
Henry Laney, Chase Manhattan bank manager. PHOTO: Philip Symonette


LONDON FIRM
LON DON: West Ind. n
Industrialists are being
offered credit facilities for
trade with most countries
of the wo rl d by
International Finance &
Services Ltd. (IFS),
London. Mr. D. K.
E~mmett. a director of IFS
will be in Kingston,
Jamaica, from May 8 to,
12, before spending three
days in Nassau. His visit
orl gi gaton a bussini a
on April 7 followed by
visits to Brazil and
Mexico.
IFS are specialists in
the I innancin g (
international trade, aInd are
ahlP to arrange credits fo~r
all classes of impo~rtedl
goods. They are also,
Interested in pro~vjtidin
export finance fr
traditional local exports.
such as cof'feec, te
agicr tural products and
Apart from the financing
of large projects for whlch~
finance may be arranged
for WVeryP long periods,
export credits fall into
two main categories: short
term purchases of capital
eq rn ment.arShorntortaelr

offered to distributors,
enabling them to import
products and hold them
in stoe k pend in g
distribution. Such credits
may also be provided for
manufacturers ah imird

components to be incorporated
into their own products.
EXPORTERS RELIEVED
OF FINANCIAL RISK
An exporter can obtain
total payment for goods
on presentation of the
shipping documents, thus
relieving himself of any

Enn isn eriia 1 itsk Brit i
Information Services release
said. Conversely, importers
are able to negotiate the
best cash terms from their

knwede that tF s 1
be making payments to
them on their behalf. IFS
3re able to arrange such
credits for all classes of
goods in almost all
countries of the world,
and provide advice and
assistance on all matters
relating to the finance of
international trade, the
relen isaidhe aim of IFS
to relieve the exporter of
any liability for the credit
risk as well as for any
risk resulting from political

tel txoter is scon erneas
therefore, the goods are
sold for cash," the release
said.
International Finance &

brvitse Unitedr D min s
Trust Group of Companies,
wh ich has member
companies in Australia,
g'anadnad Ir lad, Af a
Nigeria, Hong Kong and


Hunting for fun? It's here.
Andre' Cold Duck. A happy
blend of fine champagne
and sparkling burgundy.
With deep pink bubbles
to tickle your tongue
With a surprisingly
refreshing taste.
Serve Cold Duck
When the flock gets
together. But make
it the best Cold
Duck. Make it
A deCold Duck~ I


Now available
in the
Baha s
BUY ama
chilled from
your faVOUrite
liqUOr Store.







AT ONLY








A BOTRLE


AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE & AMERICAN SPARKLING BURGUNDY SPARKLING WINE CHARMAT SULK PROCESS NATURALLY FERMENTED PRODUCED & BOTTLE CtY ithe ANiDRE CHAMPAGNE CELLARS MODESTO. CALIF.
Imported & Distributed by BAHAMAS BLENDERS LTD.
the Commonwealth's leading Winre & Spirllit Merchant.


0 FFERS CREDIT F ACILIT IES


TO EXPORIES al WES W U g










uedyApi l 2, 97.


___ _


--- '







By Abigail Van Buren
o Im k Chicage T~- -ne. Y. Narm Synd. Ie.
DEAR ABBY: I cringed when I read the letter from a
man who was looking for a nice lady with some sort of
physical handicap. He should look for a nice psychiatrist
[handicapped or otherwise] to help him get over the idea
that he is superior to one who is physically handicapped.
The poor man is obviously handicapped himself in that he
is disturbed.
However sad, there are more people than most realize
who share this man's sick point of view. It is this attitude
which has made secondclass citizens of physically handi-
capped people.
I know a lovely, bright young woman who has teaching
credentials, but because she is blind she cannot get a
teaching position. The reason is simple. An employer will


"My airline is bene~r, Fastr and cheaper to London.

IF it wasn't it wouldn't be my airlines"~


7


I-


u jE 1(!b tilit'


D)EAR HLC: Offharnd. I'd say you didn't have a very
good insurance polley. And if you accepted tesre losses
under the circumstances you describe without teasarltnlg a
lawyer, you are salve.
Problems? Youll feel better if yea get It eff year hest.
For a personal reply, wrtes to AlBB: Ben Nok. Gdite, L. A.,
Calif. 90089. Eacle esne C stm et elf-adresd6#~ envelop


not hire a handicapped person if he can get one wH.o is
"normal." ANOTHER 2D CLASS CITIZEN
DEAR CITIZEN: Not ALL employers discriminate
against the handicapped. Some [G~od bless 'em I give them
preference. And one of the reasons I am such a rootin'
tootin' booster of The Goodwill Industries is because they
exist in order to give the physically handicapped an oppor-
tualty to be self-supporting, self-respecting first-class citi-
snM.
DEAR ABBY: May I reply to "Dot in Chicago," the
waitress who wondered why customers take their wraps to
their tables instead of checking them in the checkroom?
My mink coat mysteriously disappeared from a restau-
rant checkroom. Ou r inurace did not cover theft of items
in restaurants or theaters. The restaurant's insurance did
not cover customers' belongings. The restaurant manage-
ment refused to reimburse me on the ground that the
checkroom girl didn't remember me or my coat in spite of
the fact that I had a claim check! My loss: $1.995.
AClso, during a period of two and one-half years, five of
my husband's hats disappeared from restaurant hat racks*
with "not responsible for loss of personal property" si s
His loss: $185.
Try using these s-called "free" checkrooms. Any tip
less than four bits results in a scream of "'CHEAPSKATE!"
RU


C


RED CROSS
DONATIONS
Till Bahamnas Red Cross
have recened~ the following
donations in1 response to Mrs.
Rowena I Idon s appeal of
January 1.
KRd ('ross Junior Link Alice
Town Bimmsn. $9.44; Mrs. Lilah
Stratton, $10; Mrs. Enid W.
Bethel, $20: KRd Clross G;roup
1)undas T~own Abaco. $23;
Staff-Pupils Government Hig~h
School. $38.13; Red Cross
Junior Link Roker's Point
lIxuma. $15 and Red Cross
Group Nicholls Town Andros,
52s.


Ij II


1973
N~o.6,


BAHAMA ISLANDS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


IN THE MATTERF. OF A LL THATI

':,', setemn of"' ',; c
Castle in the island of
Ficth x::: ""e o t


P


ANDI


"My name is Gerry Smith. I'm
with BOAC in reservations. I'm proud
of my airline. Here are just some of
the reasons why.
"You want to fly to London? Mly
airline will f ly you there every day
but Monday, aboard our very special


VC 10's. And we'll get you there hours
faster than any other airline.
"You want a comfortable fl ight?
My airl ine takes off from here in the
evening, and after a relaxing night's
sleep, you'll arrive in England the
following morning.


"You want to go to Europe? My
airline has 747 service to London
from nearby Miami beginning May 6th.
"You want allI the facts? Ask the
people who know my airl ine as wellI
as I do. Our Travel Agents. They'll
tell you."


IN lTill MAl~TTE~R OF The Quietmp
fIitles izct. 1959


Irl 311I


AND


IN THEl MATTER OF The Petition
of` Charles and Viola Smith


NOTICE
To: (u) All1 Adverse Claimants
(b) Adjoining Owners, Occupiers and occupantss
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, CHAPTER 133
The Petition of Charles Smith and Viola Smiith
of the Settlement of G;reen castle in the Island of'
Eleluthera one of the Bahama Islands in respect of`:

A LL TH1AT Piece p~arcel or lot of' land situated in
the settlement of G;reen Castle in the Island of1
El'euthera one of the Bahama Islands which saidl
piece parcel or lot of land is bounded
Eastwardly by a Public Road separating it from
land the property of the Bahamas G~overnlnent
and running thereon Two hundred and
Sixty-two and Eleven hundredths (262.11) Fect
SOUTHWARDLY by a Public Road Thirty (30)
Feet wide and running thereon One hundred andt
Twenty-eight and Thirteen hundredths (128.13)
F'eet WE.STWARDLY by land the property of
G~ladstone Smith and running! there~on Two
hundred anid Fifty-six and One hun~dredths
(256,.01) Feet and NORTHWARDLY by landt
the property of Frederick Decveaux and running
thereon Ninety and Ninety hundtredths (90.90)
Feet.
The said Charles Smith and Viola Smith the
Petitioners in this matter claim to be the owners in
fe~e simple in possession as joint tenants of the said
piece parcel or lot of land and have mdeli
application to the Supreme C'ourt of the Bahama
Islands under the provisions of Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have their title to the
said landcl investigated and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the C'ourt in accordtance
.withi the provisions of the Act.
Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following place~s:-
(a) The Registry of the Supremec Court, Bank
Lane, in the City of Nassau.
(b) The Commissioner's office at Rock Sound,
E'leuthlera.
(c) The Chamibers of Isaac~s. Johnson and
Thompson, Attorneys for the Petitioners,
situate in Frederick House (2nd Floor)
Frederick Street, in the City of Nassau.
Notice is hereby given thiat any personi having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claimi or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the 29th day of May, A.D). 19)73 file in thle
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the
undecrsigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an of'fidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of anly such person to file and
serve a statement of hlis claim onl or before the said
29th day of May, A.D. 1973 will operate as a bar
to such claim.

ISAACS, JOHNSON & 'THOMPSON
Att rneys f'or thle Pectitioners,

F:redecric~k Hlo~se,
Fre~derick Street,


We'll take good care of you.
BOAC-British Airways, Boyle Building, Bay Street, Nassau. Tel: 2-8600 and International Credit Bank Building, West Mall, Freeport. Tel: 2-9622


C1


Handicapped canl be first-clalss citizens


j]| 1IIX


=IC BOAC
Br~itsh Ainrwys


SI | L


2-4267


51.0 ;2


YOUR SINGLE SOURCE SUPPLY FOR:


PR IN TIN C


ALL




I mlg I a l 1 a g m l IHIlI IUi RIlg ~ i M


s Qtto ributhit


__ I I


I


Glage Applances

LIIMS EAMMAOS nllkMI~ g

r------AIApplances---------9
I Rerigeratrs Drpers
SSteves Air Coniditoe~rs
Freeers Ice Malers
Wahrs Water Ceelrs
DishWashrs
SALE &4SERlVCE

SALE VDESCY- S PDCAY
SSHCNVROOWI
igigd de tI If allsI


"~~ BERnODVI

1, SETS






Large Assortment of BEDROOM SETS & LAMPS
at Reasonable Prices

ISLAND FURNITURE
Christie and Do~wdeswell Sts
Phone 2-1197 2-3152 P.O). Box 4818


ALL SIZES & COLOURS AVAILABLE


EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP
BAY STREET PHONE 22246


C


PHONE 2-3811


* AFRICAN PRINTS
* MEN'S PLAID POLYESTER
PANTS WITH CUFFS "
* CHILDREN'S EASTER
OS' PLYESTER PANTS q a~~s~':,
plu MAY OHERITus




MADE RA SHOPPING CENTRE (next to Cole's Pharmacy,


I


Thompson's Dept. Store "


BAY ST .



Large Assortment of Girls Dresses,
Only $3.00 Each


A complete line of Infants Wear

CURITY DIAPERS $5. 5






000 s
PREE A STREET S NEWEST DEPARTMENT STORE



e....rorinm.


~~ OPPOSITE STOPAN -W


OUT ISLAND ` """' """" isE
TRADERS BUILPlNG
ooP PST OFCE Parking at rear of store on Queen Street. PHONE 2-8800


with SWIMWEAR &
BEACHWEAR from .. .


LOVABLE BIKINI BATHING SUITS
with your own bra size *
CHILDREN'S SWIMWEAR e TERRY
KNIT SHORT JUMPSUITS DENIM

AOuE PAS US Tro FArK mbk

Wulff Rd. near Mackey St. Tel. 2.0008


** AT THE



BAY ST. next to John Bull


i
!
P

B


Tuesday, April 24, 1973.


*


? BY AIR FOR SPRING


c .;


ALL LADIIES
SHO3Es .


Large Assortment of


NAVY & WHITE


THE PARISlIAN
BAY STREET


s'41


([~ity ~


WILLIAM'S
Established Since 1926
Quality SHOES from around the wvorll.


New Stock from London


FOR MEN
a CHURCHES Famnous English Shoes
* TECNIC Footwear of Destinction
e RIVIERA Finest Italian Shoes
FOR LADIES
e MISS HOLMES of England
* BANDALINO'S
* AMALFI by Rangoni of Italy
* DR. POSNER Scientific Shoe for Children
Situated on Bay St. near Elizabeth Ave.


EST. 1970
BAY & GEORGE STREETS


SUITABLE FOR
NURSE

HOME WORKERS


WAITRESSES


MIES SHOE OR
BAY STREET


for Sav/ibys,Shop at
Clonan s KUTE KIDDY
Dr. Esfakis Building Market Street
NVew Shipments Arrived Including


Received new shipment of
P'OLYISTER SUITS sizes 3 18
in assorted styles and colours
ALSO new shipment from Italy
BOYS'& G;IRLS' SANDALS
in assorted styles and sizes.
* Girls' Cinderella Easter Dreusse
sizes 3 14
* Girls' pant Sets & Polyester
Pants -- sizes 3 14
* ays' Polyester pants
assorted colours sizes 4-18
NEW SHIPMENT
SANDALS AND SHOES


Phone


T S2 WEE
ONLY!!
AVA/~nILALIN OTHER ST'YEIS
AND COLOURS~ ONLY~




Madeira Shopping & Next To John Bull, Bay St.


1'' .. -~-~ -~----.~r,, ~~
~"~' "


SPECIALS


IL. 0


ISLAND FURNITURE
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STS.
Phone 2 -1197/2-3152 P.O.Ben 4818


at Reasonable PriceS


SPECIAL
PROF~SSIONAL
SHOES


BAY STREET* MADEIRA SHOPPING CENTRE


0ATE TP




III


I


_ __


FREPRT Grl i bikinishtazonSdy an d h wigo Dixielan d adae l at

ofal th e seart th Sir Winston Chrcil Pb.


.B Superb
DINING
In The Greart

CANTONBSE


From 7I p~m.
Dancing til 1.30 a.m
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


luncheon and dinner menus
have been extended. Earl
Basden has been promoted to
manager and h; father,
George, and younger brother.
Duke, tend bar and are the
ma nsasp ofhthe Sira merto
since it lasts from five to seven
p m. Saturday to Thursday and
hieto ege dp.m. ondFiriday, a
reduced prices and hot hors
d'oeuvres.
Many other changes and
additions are planned in the
next few months, but Baker is
giving away no secrets.
"We intend to continue to
improve in order to keep
Freeporters' interest in the Sir
Winston," he said.
TIDES
TIDES: High 12:16 p.m.
Low 6:07 a~m. and 6:13 p~rm.


5'/


_ ________ ___


I


I


NOW SHOWING THRU THURSDAY -05
Matinee 2: 30 & 4:50, Evening 8: 30-'Phone 2-1004, 210

S"BROTHER SUNSISTER MOON" A
I ~Starring
GRAHAM FAULKNER JUDI BOWKER
SUGGESTED F;OR MAiTURE AUID/IENCES.
SPA RENTA L DISCRETION ADV~ISE~D.
Reservations not claimed by 8: 15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Wednesday thru Friday Wednesday thru Friday
Matinee Starts at :15 Continuous Showings from 31
Evenin 8:30"DR. JEKYLL AND
"THE REVENGERS" PG. SISTER HYDE" PG.
William Holden Ralph Bates
ErnestBorgnine Martine Be~swick

"THE BURGLARS" PG. ".BROTHERHOOD OF
SATAN" PG. Ag
IOmar Sharif
JeanPaulBelmndoStrother Martin
'hl21Un L. Q. Jones




One Show at 3:00, Evening 8: 30 -'Phone 3-4666SAT ENDY

mornallinenT~ a





NO ONE UNDER17~ADMITTEDL.


i_ ~~-~ ---~ -- -


1


I











E


9


I~
I
r
r
I
r


DISEASE THREATENS WOUNDED KNEE OCCUPIERS
PI'Ni' RIDGE. SOUTH DAKOTfA (AP') A professional nurac who
\pent three weeks with thle insurgent Indianse who torok over the hamlet of
Wounded Knee says the occupiers appear to have enough food but face the
possibility of disease.
"I would say their morale is quite high Iconsidering the circumstances,"
said Lynalnne Jacob, "b~ut a cotntinuarl problem is boredom and a future
thlreatIs disease."
injured amngnt about 200 persotns in the village. Shte said her "hospital" was
formerly the home of the owners of the trading post, which militant
Indians inlvaded on Feb. 27th and have h~eld since.
"At oner point they faced an acute shortage of food but that is no kmgter
the case. WYhen I left they were eating quite normally."
Miss Jacob said the threatened disease was scurvy because they have not
haud an? fresh vegtetables, or lemons or limes. A dlctor on the medic team
in the village said he believes a very real threat is disease. hecuase they are
quite susceptible.


Since taking over the
establishment earlier this year
the Sir Winston's innov t .
new proprietor, Les Bakve ,
has added a new dimension to
the pub's typically British
atm sphre trying to have a
variety of activities and
entertainment so) that both
residents raedtuit c b se

like," said Baker.
Girls in bikinis may not
Seem to be part of an English
tpub, but when you add the
beautiful Bahamas climate it
Seems only natural for bikinis
tto be around.

fashions from Europe _are
Smodelled every F iday
beginning at 12:30 p.m


courtesy of Lafaee t h
newest store in F;reeport's
InternationMIOBazaaS

Models parade the clothes
while diners enjoy fish and
c ipsoan radpent or any one of
the mtenu vicious items on
Sunday are jam session day
in the Sir Winston when
Freeporters bring their own
instruments and join in the
fun.
"Everybody has a great
time," said Baker. "They arrive
about two o'clock and for the
next several hours you can hear
some of the finest and hottest
jazz ever heard in Freeport. It
has proven to be an extremely
popular feature at the Pub."
theT ixmmyb Smitthap Set
aoasrd the Erneraled Seas whi Jr
the Sir Winston Every
Thursday afternoon and thrill
the clientele with their music.
The band arrives about 2:30
p.m. and play until they return
to their ship for the return trip
to S vae other changes have
been made at the Pub since
Baker took over.

beCew WAldto the s~tefsand t


MEMBERS OF THE DIXtELAND BAND FROM THE CRUISE SHIP "EMERALD
SAS"e..bdouring Jam Session, held every Thursday afternoon in the Sir Winston Churchill


Once upon a time .. (,5 years ago
The Royal Bank set up shiop in Nassau.
Before long we were known as
"THE BANK"
Years passed .. the Baharmas grew
and so did we.
Today, the Bahamas is
thle tourist centre of the world.
and Royal Bank is the
Bahamias' biggest bank withi branches
throughout the Islands.
Isn't it nice to think we did it together?
And we're now giving Insp ily


CrOCOm (ES.. an


he Bank


The Royal M The Helpful Bank

ROYAL BAN K
Branch throughouN~lt f~th Bahama111S














V ~rrr ~-r------

I' ~CIE~ I ~Cil


_ ~


AMEER AND LIGE

salti >re 9 s 64
Milwaukee 6 6 .500 2r
testonor 6 8 422/
Cleveland 6 9 .400 3/
We~ln western Division.0 /
uasas City 1o s .667
C nnesota 8 4 .6 /
California 5 6 .455.8

kdMonded's tes It s
19~ew York 5, Mi waukee 2


Sunday's Results
Cleveland 8-2, Boston 7-5
nwkimre 5,I troit
Minnesota 6, Texas 4
auln d 3, California 2,
o~nin )day'C~ s~ae
C~hicag~o (Bahnsen 1-1) at New York
(Pecterson 1-2), 2 p.m.
Minnesota (woodson o-o) at Iaston
(Mittinkee()(11-2) t Kansus City
(Splittorff 3-0 p.mn.
D~etroit (IFryman 1-0) at Texas
(Il ourman 2-1), 1 t p.m.
latmoe (Alexanderl 2- ) atl
NAT OAL L AG E
Eastern Division


st. Lobuih a 12 .807 ab


Western Division
San F'rancisco 13 5 .722
iein nati s15.8 ,
Los Anlgeles 7 10 .412 SV/
Sun neiego 6 I2 .333 7'
Aln Monda 's Re ilts '


San ranciso 4,Sa L~eos Anee 2

sun1 Tday's Gaesulsi
L'tsuRI1-,Chicagno s W1 4-10 )


Cni nert r ii Atlanat
)lutn De SArn b)ig at Pitbug


SREAL ESTAITE FOR RENT 1 FOR SAILE 1OW HlRIIIELP WANTED TRADE SERVICES 1 TRADE SERVICES II ELP WATED


I


C9311
1 CONVE RTI BLE COUCH
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 250 Ib. trunk food freezer
Call 77947.
C9458
King size bed, headboard,
triple dresser with mirror, chest
& end table (contemporary
style --Pecan), $550, Double
bed, headboard, double dresser
with mirror & end table, $200,
stove $180, washer $200,
complete livingroom $500. Call
55124, after 6 p.m.
C9417
HUSEHmL EFFECTS


Sto ve Fridge and
mi ellaneous items. Telephone


C9569
ChILD'S LAY PEN icot, hih

et, Engisth Pdigtand pr "
with canopy, wicker cradle
rsvv hitteiciales, table an~d 2
electric sewing machine and
hair dryer. WATERS EDGE.
Eastern Road. Telephone


59C R9ETARIAL and Executive
desks, chairs, two and four
drawers filing cabinets, desk,
accessory bookcase, Burroughs
posting machine complete with
stand. Call 27612.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C9484
KIlRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 28th day of
April 1973 at 12 noon the
following property:-
1. ALL THAT piece or parcel
of land being part of a lot of
land situate in the City of
Nassau in the aforesaid Island
of New Providence which said
piece or parcel of land is

dopta I ne taendW tnni g
there T'wenty-five Feet and

Foo (25158undrhed Nortoh ba
other part of the said lot of
land reserved as a Footpath
and running thereon
Eighty-eight Feet and
Twenty-five Hundredths of a
Foot (88.25) on the East by
other part of the said lot of
land about to be conveyed to
Ivy Zonah Mackey and running
thereon Twenty-five Feet and
Fifty Hundredths of a Foot
(25.50) and on the South by
land formerly called Henry

poppht f sthbuEstat wof te
late Hel n anrgaret th in

Eighty-nine Feet and
Seventy-five Hundredths of a

p ei (97boathda aid pieme o

shape and dimensions as are
shown on the Diagram or Plan
hereto attached and being
delineated on the Pink portion
of the said Diagram or Plan.
2. ALL THAT Iot of land
situate Gleniston Gardens
Subdivision in the Eastern

N Povid ean havn t e

Bomk number Twent ev
(27) .... on the said plan of the
said Subdivision the said lot of
Iand being bounded as

NO TWESTWARDLY by
Lot Number Twenty-two (22)
in the said Block Number
Twenty-seven (27) and running
thereon Eighty (80) feet;
NORTHEASTWARDLY by
Lot Number Twenty (20) in
the said Block Number
Twenty-seven (27) and running
thereon One Hundred and
Fifty (150) feet;
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by a
road known as Elizabeth Street
and running thereon Eighty
( 8 0) feet ; and




(27) and running thereon Fifty
(50) feet and in further part by
Lot Number Twenty-five (25)
in the said Block Number
Twenty-seven (27) and running
thereon One hundred (100)
feet; the said lot of land having
Such positions boundaries


ar sow o ete la anee

Mortgage dated April 28th,
1970 Sydney K. Whitfield to
the Bank of Nova Scotia.
Recorded in Volume 1615
pages 123 to 133.
This sale rs subject to a
reserve price aod to the right

prson or his pral ttoobid up

t ha pieM tnep

DATED 4th DAY OF APRIL


C9299
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HU RR ICANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS.
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.*
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421-2-3-4-5-6.

To Place Your Ad.
Call 21986


The following lots at
Yamacraw Beach Estates will
be placed back on the market
for re-sale on the 1st May
1973:-
Lot No. Names
63 Norma Bain
85 Dennis Williams
226 Benson Brown
378 John A. Munninq5
432 amsvemne Bethell &

C9560


19 3 n c er o k

Dictionary and Atlas for

dsmo and poe calculatolso
am na ride ra ee rn etal and
information call 23921s.or


WOLD MR. KLAUS J.
SOBIECH, FORMERLY OF
WLESTEWACRODNTAVTILLTAHSE
BAHAMAS HUMANE
SOCIETY AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE.

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C9456
WHOLESALE SHOES. Deliver
same day. Men, women or
children's shoes. Telephone
31295 evenings. Island orders
to Box 6104, Nassau
C9455
WELL ESTABLISHED SHOE
STORE on Collins Avenue.
Financing available. Telephone
31295 evenings. Write P. O.
Box 6104 E. S. Nassau,
Bahamas.


MAINIIE SUPPLIES
C9309 '
PACEMAKER 44ft. L xui 5
Cruising Yacht. Phone u2r3 *
C9512
24et abra Bo ,rl160 h~p. Ford
inboard /outboar d,
ship-to-shore radio, Iife jackets,
6 b.p. spare engine, complete
with trailer, only $2,500
Phone 2-2763 day, 5-3801
night.
C9491
65ft. Steel Refri rated Vesset
like new. R/V Vctory Call
Ryan at1-305-3796990

SCHOOLS
C9544


C9541
MANAGERESS required for
business in Antiques and Works
of Art. Applicant must have
the sound knowledge and
experience in the International
market in Antiques and Works
of Art to enable him or her to
purchase and sell such objects
and to control the staff, stock
and finances of the business.
Apply in first instance in
writing, giving fullest details
and references, and educational
background, to P. O. Box 920,
Nassau.


anRDMLNm B Id al

week. Phone 34191.
C9549RoSTENOGR PHEaRoa

International Limited, Nassau

rex ereienteds stenophe.
appeli ants sotuid H fral

School graduates. Short
hand te pee 90 owp.rn0

w.p.m. Bahamians only. Apply
in writing to the Secretary. P.
O. Box N-1445, Nassau or call
lephoane 6ap ointment at

c9552
REQUIRED: General Manager
for Prestigious Gift Stores.
Knowledge in buying and
Warehouse control, Staff
Training, Book Keeping, as
well as being bilinguist in either
French, German or Spanish is
essential. Salary to be
negotiated with right applicant.
Please write to P.O. Box
N.4801 and enclose resume as
well as police certificate.

C9563
INTERNATIONAL AIR
BAHAMA
invites applicants for the
position of
TICKET OFFICE
AGENT
Four years airline experience
required. Only Bahamians need
PApB TICKET OFFICE
Beaumont Arcade Bay Street.

C9564
AN EXPERIENCED person
with a full knowledge of the
handling of investments on an
international level especially
with regard to securities
publicly trades and direct
placement. The person must
also have experience of
international investment
banking operations and is
required to act as Consultant
to ba king and other
institutions in their
rm e isratin rtf I.=: an

(et nivereuiren mustM ha e
business in these fields and
must have a minimum of ten
yans O xpene. 2Applic lon

C9561
ALBURY'S RADIO and, T.V
Company requires young lady
to take care of shop. Must be
able to type. Phone after five
3-5291.


TRADE SERVICES

C9315





Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MFACHANICAL HANDLING
ErQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE

MO IDG S ORAGE
& PACKING
STECL BANDING


REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHJONE: 2-3795, 23796
2-3797, 23798
Airport 77434

C9506


"For Devies YO Elon"

TV antenna Booster
Sales & Service
Phone 22618 P. O. Box N327
Monday Saturday 8.30 to
5.30.


BUS2NESSMEN, Homeowners,
tras andgarbge acumlati g


Garbg hDi posal
Phone 55191


C9568
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house -
Blair Estate. Furnished. For
further information call 31288
after 7 p.m.

C9529
3 BEDROOM Cable Beach
cottage, fenced yard,
beautifully furnished,
reasonable rental. Contact:
DAVESON'S REAL ESTATE
Phones 2 1178 or 5-5408.

CRS FOR SALE
C9534

Oe Owne In Go


24921 or 53859.

(195b 1
w'7 tl AUXHALL SVICTO s

16-ossession, best ofeond II
Frkiay between 9 a.m. 5



1971FORD SPORTS Cuistom
Cam per/Picku p Truick
Standard Shift Excellent
Con~d ion 82600.00. Phone
5-5 2.

C9508


at .





1971 DODGE AVENGER
DELUXE $15i00

1968 FORD STATION-
WAGON white automatics600
1973 BUICK REGAL


C7349
(2) WELDERS with ability to
read blueprints and drb~wings
and able to pass strength x-ray
test. L. & A. Industries,
Freeport 352-5422.
C9307
ITERNATONoALt IR Ma of

several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office
Successf uI candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicant should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhoulse &
Co. P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.


GIVING DETAILS OF PAST
EXPERIENCE ALSO ANY
EXPERIENCE IN VEHICLE
DISTRIBUTION.
MANAGER, P. O. Box F-34,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS.
C7348
QUALIFIED BAKER wanted
str G andel e ema iBakey.
Mixing, Divider and Moulder
Operation and know how to
operate 18 Tray Travelling
Oven.
Apply to Grand. Bahamna
Bakery Ltd., Queen's Highway,
P. O. Box F-797, Freeport,
G.B.


C7356
SECRETARY NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY Highest
secretarial skills required as
demonstrated by training and
experience, plus ability to
represent Department Head in
his absence and ability to use
own judgment and initiative.
Knowledge of public relations
and artistic sense distinct
assets, as is knowledge of
community planning.

ACCOUNTING CLERK/
CASHIER Must have at least
three years experience~handling



edxcchutaio tia b~axac en

nee ed atEGRC.E. leveO UN

CABLEMAN Underground
cbl bexperincaesisreurd

mint anc o eqi r6 t

underground transmission anp
dsajI ution Should Ud
unassisted as may be necessary.
Cables involved have insulation
for up to 15,000 voltt,
paper/lead, Snugrite, etc.

SUPERINTENDENt
( TRANSMI SS ION &
DISTRIBUTION) Must be
thoroughly experienced th
electric power T & D3
Construction and maintenance
from 69,000 volt lines througI)
distribution voltage circuit(
Requires full knowledge of
overhead power I~ne equipment
such as transformers, switches,
capacitors, etc. and proved
ability to supervise line crews
including live line maintenancB(
Must have understanding of
underground distribution and
street lighting.

Apply to: Grand Bahama Pori
Authority, Limited, Personnel
Department or Room 30Q
Kipling Building, Freeporti
Grand Bahama.

C7352
GLASSBLOWER WANTED
FOFLLFREEPOBRT MUSS LI
AND SODA GLASS. WRITE
BOX F-56 OR PHONE
FREEPORT 352-9100.


I --


C9511
A LOT in Stevenson
Sub-division, off Twynam
Avenue, 80 x 80, only $4,000.
Telephone 2-2763 day, 5-3801
night.

C7351
FREEPORT BARGAIN
pay only $9.50 per week one
FULL ACRE in b atiful
LUCAYAN ESTATESeauFull
price $3,500. Only $350 down
Write cmoe oromail in ch qtude

REAL ESTATE
P. O. Box F 93, Freeport.

Bahamsna Lt edP he w th


B LLS REAL ESTATE
AG NCionof aLaT met st es in
good rental areas on New
Perovidenva biheeasy lfin~anca

ecu t nat t eow c s r es o

easy monthly instalments.
dAlaerge Iote Iea f or comrnercnal
200' x 430'. Price $10,000.
For information and
appointments call 23921.
C9558
Lots in Bel-Air Estates, only
$100h00 down and $90.87 per
Lar e lots Sands Addit o
$200.00 down $100.00 n r
month
Choice apartment sites and
residential lots Colony Villa ge
Iat Es terms a~v 1 ale. Call

C9557
WILLIAM'S COURT
2 bedroom 11% bath house,
built in garage, f urnished, T.V..
new front room set and stereo,
washing machine, carpeted,
one airconditioner. $20,000.
Phone 58585-

FOR SAL1E OR RENT
C9532
FUReNI nHEDarthreddibedrooom
sale or rent,. beautiful
kitchen. Call 5-1199 evenings


FOR RENT
C9308
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediat"
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C9492
FULLY airconditioned 2
bedroom apartment
Ce~nteville near Z.r S tchr

C9496
UNFURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath, house with carport, lawn
and p ivate yard. Call 32731.

O)NE EXTRA large two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished -- Victoria Court
Apartments on Sh lizab d
Avenue be ween Sily an

anodry prkn gcV an 4on3 ,
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

C R E ONE BEDROOM

h rtmnt nmcl frihd

2-4777-8

C9507
3 BEDROOM 2 bath
unfurnished house. Also 2
f riedhousebath: partly
Phone 5-8803 42193

C9524
2 BEDROOM apartment, Tall
Pines Colony, Gladstone Road,
water included. Contact C. B.


s 5109OO house Seabreeze

refrigerator. Phone 5-1703.
C9533
2 bedroom apartment -
Norfolk Street, Shirica,
furnished $185 per month/ or
unfurnished $150 per month.
For information 5-5441 Ext.
7 94


586ESDROOM APARTMENT
oht da with extra u om fo
room, kitchen, breakfast room,

private patio, private beach,
many closets and cupboards, 2
airconditioners. Furnished, No
pets. Ordy $325.00 per month.

apArRGE toute Ebedr o

rov, izt room, itch wl
In closets, utility, pishted Nc i


1969 FIAT COUPE 124 --
white, low mileage $1200
1970 TRIUMPH -

197 P NIC VENTURA 10
yellow, good condition $3000
197 t VEGA STATION-

good condition $3000
1971 PONTIAC
VENTURA II yellow.
good condition $3000
1,972 CHEVELLE MALIBU -
v'ery clean $4850
1969 FORD GALAXIES -
blue, reconditioned $1000
1971 CHEVY VEGA COUPE --
green~automatic $2995
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN -
air conditioned $4200
1968 PON IAC FIREBIRD -

1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
- like new $2250
1969 CHEVROLET CAMARO

197 D TGE AVENGER 2

1971 SINGER VOGUE
white, radio, automatic $1500
1973 DODGE POLARA -
light blue automatic $5500
1971 FORD CORTINA -
green $2500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us

OPo ice Barda r
Phone 347!11

C9566
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
9USEDACUAXRHPRLODUCTION
2 Dr. Radio. Auto. $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000
S/W Auto $850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. Auto. Radio Oran e$3500
1967 HILLMAN STD ge
Green $450
1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL
A/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPBI
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD
Blue A/C $2800
1969 PONTIAC GTO

T95BU D DGE 80

1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std. Green $1200
1 972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. A/C Grey $4600
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue $695
1971 RAMBLER
Auto, Blue $2700
1969 TRIUMPH HERALD$70



CO7 FORD MUSTANG $40
A/C $2000
Trade Ins-Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8

C9547

au9 68atic. 850. GE ineE t
call 26th April 31571.


_ _


Tuesday, April 24Z, 1973.


C9540
YAM AC RAW
ESTATES


C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC, Mack~ey Street
(lext to Frank's PlacA.
C8105
TRY US FOR SAFE SURE
CLEANING! ABCO'S NE\'
'SUPER STEAM' CARPETS*
UPHOLSTERY -TEL:
51071-2-3-4.


BE ACH


CLASSIFIED


REAIL ESTATE IIELP WANTED
C7354 C7355
H ~ iBE ROOM HOUtSE, GTOORAGCLUCLEAANNERCA

ad dFenced ald 5 AT n u f sra is resoonsi le fsr u

with the servicing and storage
HELP MNYI TED of gol ub s rAptpli ant sol
C7353 around the clubhouse as
Chief A cutnt fo instructed
Company in count Bahama SECRETARY Individual is
Must be A.C.A., C.P.A. or required to have past

ic ue Fe prons t on wo Pereetarniale unties, gene b
management of monthly accuracy in typing at least
reports and quarterly accounts, 50-60 w.p.m. and excellent in
etc., the supervision of a staff shorthand. This is a responsible
and the day to day running of position that requires one who
the accounts department. is able to work on own
The successful applicant will be initiative.
required to produce and Please apply to: Devco
implement ideas to increase the Personnel, 18C Kipling Bldg.,
efficiency of his depart- Box F-2666, 'Freeport, G.B.I.
ment and to assist and advise
management in accounting and C7350
allied matters. WAN TE D AUTOMOTIVE
Apply in own handwriting to: M ACH HIN IS T/ T ECHNICIAN,
Electrical Util ities Co., Ltd., P. MUST H AV E VA LID
O. Box F-170, Freeport, Grand M AST ER M AC HINIST
Bahama, Bahamas. CERTIFICAE AT EE


,


demonstrator
1970 TOYOTA --
green, good mileage


$7000

$850


Classified Advertising

Bring Fast Results.


Saturday.
The Pros after the second
inning led 7-4 before the
Dods rst amo urtp itthofour

8-7 lead. However, for the
remaining three innings, the
Pros outscored their opponents
7-3 to win.
Kendal Wright secured the
win and Herman Johnson
picked up the lOSS


Amst as ifiAfLjfiLmen Eof
te A's wiishes,b91aude Lynden
sot a two-rb homer into
Pinewood Gardens Saturday as
Lee's Cardinals upset the then
undehfeatedoA.L.D. R yals 9 8.
through the first round
undefeated including a win
against Flamingo A's are now
tied for first with the A's both
having a five and one record.
The A's manager Chris
Ferguson vowed that they will
be on top following the second
round.
The Cardinals led 9-S until
the fifth and final inning when,
with bases loaded and two out,
Anthony Neeley slammed a

the-b htds e inter ih

thrown out in a close play at
first. Neeley batting four times
collected two hits and knocked
in four.

BOSTON1 BLACKIE
From Page 12

menue bhille fmsle ada

Thompson, the only man to
threaten Miller's winning steak,
felt that without his aching
feet, second place was all Miller
might have gotten. "I was
aching," he said. "But you
can't beat Boston with aches.
He is really good on the

Bsh.r tram 'Co wbo y 's
onuaroven to the av uri e
his four months lay off and


From Page 12
Becks lead
With one down after centre
fielder Keith Gome truck aut

Sammy Johnson were on base
following errors, first baseman
Colin Thompson cracked a
two-rbi single into left to bring
the Islanders three behind.
From the second inning to
the top of the fourth, when he

Hal sMtte~ddow unn naihm e
awarded with a save.
The Islanders collected four
winning runs in the bottom of
the third including Hall's rbi

n .eritte co ppestop an ar
double in that inning also.
With Smith on the mound in
the top of the fourth, Para ise
Island continued to keep BeckS
scoreless and Hall, who
collected the win, ended it all
with a two-rbi single into
centre..
*+***ee
FLAMINGO WIN
Left fielder Mario Ford _
following in the footsteps of
his brothers Eddie and Wenty


Inre offi ial tim wsat bh
Saturday as defending Junior
League Champions Flamingo
A's defeated Bahamas Blenders
Junior 17-4.
The A's star pitcher, Isaac
Fox, who already collected
thre wis th his senior
de pawinsdclub Jet Set, came

uo t As r sc anh src

Farquharson took the loss
while giving up 15 hits.
Walter Farquhatson topped
the batting for Blenders. He
went two for three, scored one
and knocked in one.
The A's, scored four in the
first, one in the second, four in
the thid ,tw sxn the fourth


KILL R EY WIN
The Killarney Pros out to


TH NASTSACU~g CI

sicommeTc is yS pin 4erm:
1973 For information
telephone 5-2353.




C9562








"' j







in loving metnory of our dear
father Mr. Leonard Evans, who
parted this life 16th April
161.
Once they were mourners here
below,



fears-
Missed by: two daughters, Mrs.
Sheila Evans-Vanderpool, Mrs.
Sybil Evans-Miller, 2 sons
Phillip and Leonard Evans, 3
sisters Rosalie, Elsie and Olive
Evans and I brother.


POSITION WANITED

c03500
IF YOU need a young girl to


Clas8ified Advertiring
Bring Fast Rr~ulta.


Whr Grther


enolab oje htt e


Come by Classified Cutra h rbn rcl -96Et5i asu32-68i reotfo am o5~.Mn oFi a.9~.t pm


Del lane Islank Heastle





CI II I I I -- ~ L_


i <== t... I


Sidd~ishH*n1f


3x~Cn~c~9 *


King Featuree Synd late Inc., 1913. We rightsI reere.


SUD GEPARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS
SUT I THOUGHT NOT REALLY! I'D WE ACCEPTED A PLEASE, SAM,.. CAN'T YOU I SUPPOSE
AAUST WE EGO OUT YOU WANTED TO RATHER SPEND LUNCHEON DATE CLL HETREALNDESET USHOUT I COULD i
FARMS, SAM ? WITH YOU! A ~AN APPOINTMENT WITH THE








~-ar





A As TMENT 3- U By Al e~r K otsky


so~no O YSED' PfL
o.o $


Ilt~~c~r


s


STE VE R 0PER & MI KE NOMAD by saunders & o ver gard


-'BOr 040s! You sUR@ 100K GQ00 \M IEW1~N }M00
HA'SE No SAu. To WrrT*


Brother Juniper


Chess
By LRONARD ARDEN


e










Todany s position ddefeted a
roj a trcyItseol you eil a i
analysiss Wh~te is to move, and
th:e puzzle is to find the proo-
a5.e result with best play on
both sides. White is a rook down
in the dliagram. Few readers will
gent n~~thi right ts !rn


mInuI1Ltes, club strengtin 3
minutes, clveragse; 1 hour, nlovtice.
Chess Solution
It' sa probable draw, Expertl
so;e~ nlu Iaves thouUh E Cat
V RS, K-4(if1 ...K-3
Z R-d,2 and 3 H-KR2 toins); a
(da Kt! P x 9, 3 Kt--RO ch,
Kt-R1; 4 R-KKIl and Black has


Sx Kt black can laYI 962 ..
pp.P! 3 Rx 9 (i 3-R
Ix htott bepctan Jlrol
,r y Kt-K Ph -l
RQ to sl:e tir Plc r

rrd 11 Kt-RG ch.


ACIAIN ... APOLOGI11NG
FOR WHAT COULD TURN
OUT TO 15E THE800-600
OFTH CNT U ...
HAVE AN *INJURY 5

't--~hPsRI I


Tue~sdy, April 24, 1973.


,7CARROLL RIGHTER'S



keenl the CarroM RIghtr leastItute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Unique and
\unusual results can follow whatever activity
you now place in motion, so be sure you do not insist on
routine and usual conditions A big chance to show your true
talents aind special aptitudes of an up-to-date mature nature.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Relatives, acquaintances ,nd
allies now understand your needs and g o al out to show you
their generosity Discuss a problem quietly and honestly and
get right results. Keep sober and avoid accidents
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Fmd more up-to-date system
for handling work at hand and get it done in half the time.
Cooperate more with higher-ups and co-workers, too Some
new discovery can pep up your health considerably
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Delve into some new kind of
amusement that could give you a great deal of pleasure, added
vigor. Some new attitude will bring more rapport with closest
ties. Stop being so opinionated
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) If you use more
modern methods, mechanical gadgets you can get all those
tasks behind you much faster and with less wrist Juice, more
accuracy. Prove your loyalty to associate. A greater use of
imagination is wise.
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) If you first get proper tools
ready, you can then fly through tasks ahead of you easily
Listen to the ideas of co-workers. They can be most helpful.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Forget those unimportant
tasks and be off to the places that give you real incentive or
pleasure. Later in the day get into that creative work that
expands your horizons considerably Impress others with your
fine ability.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Use a more modern approach
if you want to improve the conditions at your home, with the
help of family ties. More time should be given to the personal
side of life. You are just in right mood for that today
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov 21) Do those things that bring
you the active assistance of good friends and allies so that
there can be more success and rapport in the future. Improve
routines. Evening is fine for working on your favorite hobby.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) Contact persons who
are practical and get their aid for your finest aims. Use good
judgment if you want the backing of financial experts,
bankers, etc. Visit with some sack friend in p m and cheer up
this person.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) You are very magnetic
today and can make those you like very happy and can get
into whatever you most ergoy. Dress well and make a fine
Impression on others. Gain the benefits you want
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) Take a good part of this
day to make right plans for whatever it is you have in mind for
the near future. Talk over with a good adviser whatever your
aims are. Show you are a stable, intelligent person.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) Get together with that good
pal who has your welfare at heart although of a serious and
blunt nature, and get good advice, help Attend social affairs
that can be both pleasurable and profitable In the future.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those practical thinking young people who seldom
indulges in wishful thinking and will handle every situation
that comes up in a straightforward and direct way Give the
finest religious and ethical training you can early in life,
although it may be somewhat hard to do The latter part of
life is apt to be spent mn philosophical study. A good marriage
is indicated. Some travel in early hfe is wise.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


"(~- I


I
'7
h


1 nder the spl ftetpy
Sturdy magic sth flin e ce
Remains upturned, warding off
: the downpour like a giant
t umbrella, while it passes
through the storm. As soon as
Soue rfd ag ra theS cea
waves the wand again, causing
Shis craft to turn the right way
ALL RIGHTS


clai yat was w ne fuld I'
seem strange travelling upside
down I" Let us hope we
have no more dangers to face,"
says the Sorcerer in relief.
ery sotoh, nd befor pr e
they glimpse the Conjurer's tall
house in Nutwood.
RESERVED.


Einning


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
Acting on the principle- 'tis
better to false card and lose than
never to false card at all--some
players spurn true cards. Decep-
tion for its own sake, however,
can be disastrous. Like every-
thing else, It calls for forethought
as here :
North
Kg965


West East
QCB 18 2 + K 8 4 3
0 10 2 OJ8 3
4 A Q 10 7 8 43
South
+7
Q 47 6 4
QA 5 4
6 K L 6 5



Clearly. destiny intends defen.
ders to take three spades, a heart
andketoe c ubs--and South to
Batting West, mntent on thwart-
cmedest, 1n the Hbetr Phhla p
Bowl, was Nicola Gardener, now
playing for Britain a women at
the Hague in the Comnmo '
Market Championship. She won


the +10. declarer Inserted
dummy s +6. losing to East's +8.

No twa at"'oth.Y ," ehn
co ank earto 8 ne d.l wie ro

scoms even Sotrik befor he
could collect his own seven.


"Don't strain too hard, girls. Egg prices are falling off."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROss
L. Check 27. Soft
4. Craggy hill 28 Size of shot
id 0l nm for c arctist

1. Mysterious 34 Statute
14. Coach 35. Pepper plant
15. Martial 36 Mystery
16. Ripening agent 37. Spellbinders
8 l Archaic 40. Man's
19. Palm lilies nickname
0ao Grasping 41. Fee
22. Epidemic 42. Bullfight cry
?3. Italian river 43. Paradise
-9j. Opponent 44. World War II
75. Subsidy area
26. One in German 45. Glowing


least one eight-letter word in the
11 t. No pllrn: ano forell wo rt+
ii or ds er godr d ,EL wods.
excellent. so utionl tomorrow.
YESTERDAY' SOLUTIONS :
lIerv devoir dire dive diver doer
do e doure drier drip drive
dr v dread drove drover border
Ird pr a ed pr setdel V itI'b
redo ridle rider riped rived rode
royped rovecd vie~d void.


5. Bird
6. Assemble
7. Except
oms 8. Happy

9 rents
10. Rendezvous
11. Spanish hero
ll. Alter
21. King Arthur s
-lance
22. Quitter
5. English
bullfinch
26. Landed
property
2927. Turkish inn
28. Close
29. Bent
30. Motlt er of

311 Hool

F33. L ss~

38. Hdl 3f twine
4 26 39- Thieter sign


1. Clear out
2. Slow ballet
dance
3. Fixed custe
4. Male turke


14 Unalse. (4)
IT. Aetor's additional lne. (O,
19). Anser. (3)
pLO ne kdnd sl paniel. (6)
?S. Clevrrnesr. (O)
24. Vieldins. (4)
SGi Por cnsine all in crar. t3,
Uown
I.~Ch~ral)yk osc onr. (U,
Pk Hle wi fixative. 46)
.i. For the pupilsr' desks. (5-4)
is Unlwell. (3)
7. Gardenl features. (4-5i)
I. Request.


HI. Cu
181. Not too
we llI
(2-2)
Yl Gea r.B
(3) Iesterday's solutleel


No. 7.104 by TIM McKA;Y
I.CoI ured rtcr t3. (O

10. Riskry alatter, its. 4)
II. Hrctained. (4)
IS. Mr. Miller. for Instance. (Ts)
13. Hclhnit (II


AP Newsfealtures


Par time 24 min.


Qlhe (atrttimn


By DAL CURTIS_


SREX MORGAN, M.D.


rrer: se tisis going to be more than just an
Argument over increasing my household allowance!"

Rupert and thre Mixed Magic-38


HOW many
l ouro Itste
or more ar
fr sthe
E enters known
her 'r In
in1 akn I n a
lbettuer Iula
onl >. Earls
w\ordl must containl the large
letter, and1I there must be at





nrEAWTERN The Wings ofMan.
**He Wings of Mun" ir a regisucred service ma~rk of Eastern Air U~nes, Inc.


Tuesday, April 24, 1973.


1


NO.


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
AFTER STAGGERING HIS OPPONENT in the second round and dropping him to one knee in
the sixth, Bahamas welterweight champ Elisha Obed strode to his twe~nty-ninth consecutive victory
last night with a unanimous ten round decision over Jamaicca's number one welterweight contender

AZ pac~ked Nassau Stadium
saw Cos sconded by
Jhinrai;;a' s weter king Bunny
Grant. give ()bed his: toughest
fight yect while the number
three arb heavyweight
icontende~r Jimmiiy Elllis kept ** sg- I


DO LPHil WINl

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
FOURTEEN.YEAR-OLD
Mario Carey captured five firsts
in the boys thirteen and
fourteen division Saturday as
the local Dolphins Swim Club
topped Jamaica's Y.M.C.A.
3361% 223%/ during the
second annual Nassau/Jamaica
'Y' swim meet held at the St.
Augustine's College pool.


o~rtlmnnce~ In the ring.
Refercce I .llis scored the fight
7 2 1 for Obed, judge
Kenyovcn Me~l)iegan got the
:L11w~ result as\ Ellis and judge
AlI 13utlecr salw it 8 I I for

Yet, the mrore one wins, the
mrel~r one finds there is yet to
win andl a confident Bunny
Grant poised a threat to Obed's
undefeated record in an open
challenge following the victory.
"I don't think I'm ready for
himii (G;ranl) right up to now,"
said Obecd while cooling out in
thle dressing ruoom. "But if he is
readfy within the next six
months, 1I'l fight himn."
I ven Jimmlly E'llis might find
that hiis journey to regaining
the world he~avyweight
chamlpionnshlip title mecans
having topass through
Hlahamas heavyweight champ
H~osto~n Blackie. Boston last
night made at face to face
challenge. "I'dl like to come
,ver here and fight him," said
lillis, "but it ain't going to bc
too goocd for him when Ido

poud the sae ij Gosis4
used an effective left jab to
pound (;oss from a distance.
Tihe veteran training of G;rant
showed in G;oss though as by
being fast on his feet he evaded
many of Obed's punches and
r nedtiiost tielscon oe-two
SorbnTAGGERE lil t hcy
Obed in the second round of
the ten rounder kept his
oipponent on the defensive
with his continuous flow of
lefts and an occasional right to
the body. Finding the opening,
a sharp right to Goss's jaw
staggered him.
It was not until the fourth
roundl when G;oss, stepping up
the pace, landed a right to the
jaw. This he followed with a
sharp right to the midsection
and another right to the jaw.
Seeking to battle it out at
close range Goss in the fifth
round moved in on Obed's
midsection. However, Obed
brought himself together and
returned to his offensive left
jab
Like the fifth, G;oss again
sought a close range fight and
seemed to have Obed giving
him the respect as he scored
with a good left to the head.
Again Obed found the opening
and a solid right to the jaw sent
,~s down don onti ke. Up
pound away at the unsteady
GosMORE AGGRESSIVE
G;oss, however, used the
eighth round to find his head
and came out more aggressive
in the ninth round. Not even
that could have stopped the
welter king whose work with
tMoccFI ischer nealay showed in
Goss at the end of the
fight admitted that he lost the
bout. He said that being his
first ring appearance out of
town, he felt "crowd shy"
But, "he don' tam e s nytr


the distance. "He (Obed) needs

5 -"5 ," ote ood gy '
Fleischer said that he has Obed
working with some of the best
middldlinwe Macel Inlay, Etant
Burns and Nat King.
'TOUG;HE:ST TO DATE ,
Although Goss never had
him in any real trouble, Obed
admitted that the bout was his
toughest purptygo date .n"le

plenty of experience in
boxing," sai O ed. Aeualilyt

with the way things were
going, "but I still have a lot to
learn," he said.
In other supporting houts,
Otis Clay scored a split
decision over Kid Cruz in a
four round event. Clay won
three to one.


Al Moss, who suffered an
injured arm in the first round
was unable to withstand the
pressure of Kid Barr who went
on to score aI unanimous
decision.
Welterweight contender
Cleveland Williams in a
c"m" ""t o? n top us nus
unanimous decision over
Jamaica's Don Frarzier.


ght
nd
aw



-0


Ik


The Dolphins last year
during their trip to Jamaica
came through by only three
points, but under the excellent
coaching of Miss Betty C'ole,
the home team greatly
improved -did far better
times than they ever did
be fore.
C'arey won the 50 metre
butterfly in 34.8, the 200
metre individual medley in
2:52.1, the 100 metre
backstroke in 1:22.3, the 100
metres breast stroke in 1:27.6
and the 100 metr free style in
1:06.0.
Jamaica was able to
$, dominate in the girls eight and
under and 10 and under only
as Yvonne Patterson and Jillian
Veitch took the firsts.
Dominique Tarmey of the
Dolphins got the seconds.
G~reg Geiselman and Ignacio
de Cardenas controlled the
boys eight and under events.
G~eiselman, who captured four
o-teriywon th 0.50 tmetr5
metres back stroke in 43.3, the
50 metres breast stroke in 47.6
s and the free style in 36.8
Cardenas took all the seconds.
Also outstanding for the
Dolphins was John Lindley
wyo tstp tdhetraniortho?&
metre butterfly, Lindley
clocked 28.0. He won the 100
metre backstroke in 14.0 the
200 metre free style in 15.8
and paced the Dolphins to a


I e








A l


on


aI i

WELTERWEIGHT CHAMP ELISHA OBED power~
convincing right to Jamaica's number one welterweiS
contender Roy Goss' head during last night's ten rou
main event at the Nassau Stadium. A packed Stadium s
Obed win a convincing unanimous decision.
PHOTO: R ickey We


De 0lan 188 llSHk 508stia l 8


P SfdilSo beat 2nd place Bec


PRO CYCLIST Leonard "Boston Blackie" Miller in an .all out
effort to capture the Bahamas Professional Cyclist Association's
1973 championship chalked up his fourth consecutive win in as
-many races yesterday when he won the Sinclair Outten-sponsored
S42 miles Easter Monday road race.
,Miller, one of the finest was third.
tkee~ lht s i th npn B h B h ddAl i ~h~


oto a nield of neand
with Christopher "Deuce"
Thompson on his heels even
left the pack for miles at a
time. Thompson came in
second, Noel "Donna" Brown


chanap Ren Fne sol
making a name in the B.P.C.A
took first place in the "B"
division with an overall fourth
place.
Starting from Ace Barber
Shop, going south along
YarktoS~todet aned onto
the journey all the way to the
Eastern Point before Kingsley
"The Bratt" Rahming took
over, dropping Miller in second
and Thompson in third. "l had
the thing going good but they
ma e me outpeda wat
had," commented Rahming.
Miller from FORt Montagu
outpaced Thompson and held
on until they reached British
Colonial Hotel when
Thompson again took over the
lead.
However, not the athlete to
settle for less than first place,
Miller again took over the race
and while he and Thompson
increased their speed, they left
toe remainder of the team
three miles behind. The others,
eventually caught Miller as the c
race rounded Lyford Cay.
Among those who were
dropped in the three miles lead
was Noel "Donna" Brown,
who changed cycles twice in,
On Page 10, Col. 7


Do pA Rs Swi Clu A a
dominated his division with
five firsts Saturday as the
Dolphins defeated Jamaica 'Y.
for the second consecutive
year.


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
DEFENDING LEAGUE CHAMPIONS Del Jane Saints, still
stu0gi rn yh ht lfteg bttlefran throughdHeastie Lumber

Frnkel Swne' star pitcher Thompson each collected one
win. He set ingtc elected the hit for Heasti 4,
one and gave up two hits while BECK'S PROTEST
facing 15 batters. Le ft field e S mm
At going blank for the "Bookie" Johnson collected
first inning in which both sides two hits during his three times
collected one hit each, Del at bat, scored three and
Jane rallied for six runs in the knocked in one as fifth place
seod inludin shr stp Prds sadsopdsc
Brea ey mJohn 8n'sht sto-b rladisBeck' sndB 8- secoin8
single. Johnson with three the first game on Saturday It
official times at bat scored is understood however tat
fire eanoe M Ph e hithtRhlit Be ks potested thardgame.
of his three rbi's in that inning without the assist aynge
a so. Bat ting four times. captain Roosevelt Turner and
McPhee scored three runs and manager Bummy Turnquest,
collected one hit. Becks took~ a five run
Third baseman John c ad while facn t
Adely hghlight Dl pitching of Basil Hall. Short
Jane's three-run third inning stop Sonny Haven, who faced
with an rbi single into left. the pitcher three times during
Although the Lumbermen the game, scored one ald
utilized three pitchers they knocked in one in the first.
were still unable to stop the Seven errors accounted for
Saints who exhplo drtfor nine On Page 10, Col. 6

baseman Michael Major shot a
three-rbi triple int olnght centre

Williams, who replaced Penny
Bhain -rcedm an in the park
First baseman Stephen
Burrows and left fielder Robert


'L.ANS FOR A POSSIULE~ title
defence between middleweight
champ Rennie Pinder and number
one contender, Sherwin Johnson,
was thrown back last night when a
traffic accident in Nassau sent both
Pinder and his manager, Marty
r lstito, to hospital with
Also injured in the accident was
middleweight Claudius Woodside
and Johniny Hudgins' manager Pat
'unoldstein, it is understood,
received aI disincated shoulder and
15 stitches in his head. Vinder's
mouth which hlit Curry's headl in
the collision was badly cut. Curry
received seven stitches in his head.
According to Curry who came in
to see the Obed/G;oss bout, they


were driving at about 30 miles per
hour when a car that was speeding
rammed them from the back.
Gioldstein's car spun around three
times while the other car rammed a
telephone pole,
Another driver on the scene of
she acc dentc tok them to ho ptul.
and walked away unhurt after being
out for about five minutes," said
Curry.
MI hns~ou d vho is rnanoaged hbly
D~undee .- is presently in Miami
working out in preparation for the
bout. "His winning the Bahamas
middleweight championship will
make him a different guy "
commented Mike. "It will give him
all the confidespee in the world. He
has potential fighting ability.**
Mike said that his uncle Angelo
eho saw Johnson train thinks that
once he otnootbrush. "Terf t" n
reason to rush with the kid," said
Mike. "He has natural boxing
ablt .r boson is being trained


. -


come from behind victory in
the 4 x50 metre medley relay.
in spite of a moderate
breeze the competitors swam
well and look forward to the
third annual meet next year in
Jamaica.
The Jamaican team, which
was hosted by the Dolphins'
parents, dropped a second
competition Sunday when
Freeport 'Y' defeated them by
324-309 points.

Ie Full Results and pictures
tomorrow


THE BAHAMAS Federation
of Amateur Sports holds their
annual general meeting on
Thursday night 8 o'clock at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.


All member federation and
associations should send two
representatives. Other
interested parties are also
welcome,


17 A (gI J|


PROBABLES FOR

UltITgg g H Agagg
THE BAHAMAS Amateur

t oen t e etenR m b

CARIFTA Games hosted by


at the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre.
aE ntr ns isitod tthle Carita
years and 17 years and under,
As a result other athletes,
including Danny Smith and
Derek Cambridge, will be
unable to attend.
The B.A.A.A. were to hold
further meets bgnniang today

finaliz.ation of the team is
e pected to be announced

The team under
consideration consist of Levant
Carey of G,.H.S., Phillip
Willialmson of G,.H.S., Ralph
Johnson of A.C., Bernice
Pinder of G.H.S.., Anthony
Newton of C.C.S. Mark
Williams of P.W., Phillip Bethel
of A.C., Emmett Saunders of
(;.H.S., Michael Cooper of
S.A.C'., Peter Pratt of R.M.B.,
and T. Archer in the mern's
division.
In the ladies division there
are Linda Woodside of S.A.C'.,
Celestine Wilson of B.T.C7..
Cora He b~ur e f S.
Dela-Reese Symonette of
S.A.C. and Shonel Ferguson of
L..W.Y.


Q$tt Grillitit


"IElisha Obed dismisses Jamaican


usele canRY


CAPTURES 5

W81tef COnedR Gin 1 10 rounds neRsts InI Bl


: I





7 .


R0HRIS PIiltie & mSHagef

*nue *n ut id


BFAS MEETING


Bahama Express.





We have 9 flights a day to Miami from Nassau (4 more than any other
airline). 9:30 and 10:30 am; every hour on the half-hour from 12:30 to 5:30 pm;
and an extra flight at 8:00 pm.
PluS One flight to Ft. Lauderdale at 6:30 pm.
And five flights daily to Miami from Freeport.
For information and reservations call your travel agent or Eastern
at 2-1461 in Nassau, or 2-231 1 in Freeport.
Or stop by one of our ticket offices at the Sheraton British
COlonial in Nassau, or the International
Shopping Bazaar in Freeport.


-----1 I_


t kru;r~cCrl