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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03327
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 19, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03327

Full Text

I i


ENJOY FREE CHAMPAGNE
ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
-T.ELEPHONE 77303/77778-


eretsigel d we a*ostmaster per


VOL. LXX, No. 126 Thursday, April 19, 1973. P ice: 1 5 Cents


I '.~I.--. __ _ _~ _ __ c - -- ----.- --


CS Apaign CO5 Mitt G

REPRESENTATIVES of the service clubs of New Providence
and of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, serving on the
Clean-Uip Campaign Committee of the Independence Secretariat,
today jointly appealed to their fellow businessmen to "start the
cleanup ball rolling in your own yard."
Committeemen involved are strockeepers to cram full with
Dr. Lawrence Davis, Bahamas cartons, burned-our flourescent
Chamber of Commerce: Kirk tubes and such, yet some
Kinsey, West Nassau Rotary merchants dlo just that and
Club. Lloyd Iffil, Lions C'lub: leave the pedestrian no room
Mike' Stubbs, Montagu Kiwanis for his litter. This must stop.
Club; George MacLeod, 1:ast Merchants should keep their
Nassau Rotary Club: and John refuse on their premises unt:I1
Morley, Rotary Club of th brh~ truck arives not
Nassau. on te r s e walk a 1 day or
"There's no point asking the night.
Ministry of Health to redouble 13<. D~avis also, stressed thlat
its efforts to keep our streets merchants should press boxe~s
and highway verges clear of flat before delivering them to
litter if owners of unused the trash collectors. and that
property bordering the storekeepers should keep the
highways allow trash and rear of their places of business
unsightly litter to accumulate, clean as well as the front.
which in time will be blown by Other members of the
the wind onto the roads and committee mentioned the needl
verges," said Rotarian for householders purchasing
President John Morley. ade uate L~)Covere receptables
"We are asking all local for trash and garbage and
property owners and agents for securing theml so, that Jogs
absentee owners to clear such cannot tip then o~ver andf strew
areas at once of litter, trash the contents in the street.
and over grown weeds. As we The C'lean-Uip (ampaign
say, if you want to live on a Commit tee, under the
beautiful island, start the chairmanship of Mr. Alexander
clean-upd ball rolling in your McCorquodule. Chief Inspector

oOt /r service club eetheev re es ntny eso- steasn ftin Independence Secretariat.
retail merchants, particularly
on or near Bay Street said:
"We have placed some 80
larg litter bins on Bay Street,
four to each side of each
gbock. hai elr. Larry Davis of

"Tah ne ae hfo rp detnansn toa
cigarette packages and so forth.
They are not there for


a a' kl
GERALD BARTLETT PAUL THOMPSON
... No. 2 on force ... to head Freeport



8 fal Bartt ao 8



Dept Polc tP IC8 Ie

POLICE COMMISSIONER designate Salathiel Thompson
today confirmed reports of more movements of senior officers on
the retirement of present Commissioner John Hindmarsh on May
31.


brought undetlr iontrrl andl

tineal pt out\ by treme nc~ u




large bush fircs. \(o a in!
appear to have
extinguished~ during the no,
but the heat of the day causer.
a1 fresh flart up anid diay tllme
w~~ind spread spar~ksb

'Ihe fire at (;lads~tone Roadl
only Fftarted at abhout 11 4F
a.mt Wedinesday. but for a time
ye cs t er J ;ly sulrro und i ng
pro~pertiesc were in dange~r.
aiccording to, the F-ire Chief.

Hweno~rmou marrlnpwere and t

quantity oft equipment that
would he needed to actually
pult out a 'ery large forest fire.
the F-ire Brigade instead
co(nce~ntrr te oinly on
containing the fires. protecting
property and letting the fires
burn the~mselvesocut
Hie said bo~th the Stapledlon
and Gladstone Road fires are
now "under controll` and being
watched care~fully.
Mr. Baillarge on emphasized
that "until we get some rain
the public will have to be extra
careful."
Earlier this weekL he said
most of the bush fires are the
result of carelessness cigarettes
thrown from cars. and sparks
flying from rubbish heaps set
alight in high winds. 11< urged
the public to report all bush
fires as soon as possible. so
firemen can put the flames out
be fore the y reach
uncontrollable proportions.


"If the situation doesn't get
any worse we should be able to
c~ope with it, but the loss of the
water carrier certainly depleted
o1a nl. FIr this morning
The Fire C:hief said that
"fortunately" the wrecked
tanker is one of the brigade's
smaller water vehicles carrying
500 gallons. The Brigade has
carriers with a 1500-gallon
capacity.

nu beer orer, as beng friuck
west along Carmichael Road by
Constable Maurice Williamns at
about 3:30 p.m. when it was
involved in an accident with
car Nr. 6543 being driven by
Charles Ingraham of W'est



Baillargeon. Police had no
estimate of the damage to the
other vehicle,
Discussing the battle witlly
bush fires, the Fire C'hief to~ld
The Tribune
NOtT GOOD
"We aren't faring too well.
Under the conditions we are
doing what we can, but the
men are overworked and I
don't expect much change
until it rains."
Bush fires have been
springing up all over New
Providence as the result of a
serious lack of rainfall, the
sixth period of "absolute
drought" reported by the
Meterological Office in the past
ten years,
The bush fires which are
causing the Brigade most
concern now are in the
Stapledon Gardens and
Gladstone Road areas
The blaze in Stapledon has
been particularly troublesome


FOLLOWING CORONER'S INQUEST

LAST MONTH INTO MAN'S DEATH





Contractors Assn. chief






& ex-policeman charged






Wit IRR S uh ter



CONTRACTOR VERNON G. COLLIE, president of both the Contractors' Association and the Bahamas
Employers Confederation and ex-policeman Leonard Erickson Taylor were jointly charged before Magistrate
Emmanuel Osadebay yesterday with being responsible for the death "by negligence" of landscaper James
Evans.


Mr. Thompson, who is
presently force D~eputy
Commissioner, will take over as
Commissioner, as announced
by Government earlier this

wM ving into Mr. Thompson's
post will be present D~eputy
Commissioner for F~reeport
Gerald Bartlett,


Paul Thomipson, this week
confirmed as an Assistant
Commissioner, will move to
Freeport to head the police
force there.

takeo efectapber mMays 31 t
ensure a smooth change in the
chain of command, Mr.
Thompson told The Tribune,


Evans' charred body was
found in the fire-gutted home
of Taylor, a former police
corporal, on September 8 last
year.
The manslaughter count


followed a coroner's inquest
conducted by Magistrate
Osadebay in March. The
seven-member coroner's jury
named the two accused
repnsibl inmathlei 4teto b3
neglienee "
Siadine ite jury was Mr.
Both Collie, who had
declared that he "ain't getting,

poflc"atrbing albpono::e
and Taylor, the recipient of the
Colomial Police Medal in 1970

Firearms, frwerre Regs es '
during the inquest.
$2,000 BAIL
They were released by
Magistrate Osadebay on $2,000
bail in their own
recognaisance when they
appeared before him yesterday.
Collie was with his counsel Mr.
Randol Fawkes, after being
arrested at 6 a.m. that day by
police officers.
Taylor is to be represented
during the case by attorney
Cyril Fountain.
The Magistrate yesterday
adjourned the matter until May
28. at which date further
instructions will be received
from the Attorney General's
office as to whether or not he
will want to proceed to trial in
the Supreme Court with just
the depositions taken during
the inquest.
Magistrate Osadebay also
declined to set a preliminary
date before the matter comes
up again on May 28.
Taylor's home was destroy-
ed last September, reportedly
in his absence. The building
had been insured for $48,000
with a local insurance firm.

SPEAKER DRESSES

DOWH MPs 01

DRESS In HOUSE
HOUSE~ Speaker Arlington
Butler on Wednesday warned
House members that they must
adhere to the House rule which
stipulates striped trousers and a
short dark coat as the basic
apparel to be worn during
meetongs.
"The House has the ability
to change the rule any time it
wants," Speaker Butler said.
"But until it is changed we
must adhere to it."
Very few House members
have in recent months been
wearing the prescribed clothes.
Many have opted for dark
suits, and at least one has on
occasion attended a meeting
wearing a light tan suit and a
brightly coloured shirt.
Speaker Butler said that
while the rule did not specify
the colour of shirts, it was
"hoped" shirts would be
"conservative in colour."
The Speaker made his
remarks on the motion for
adjournment. The House is
next scheduled to meet on May
6This is not the first time
members of the House have
rees h dedheor hai manner
In 1971 then Deputy
Speaker Clifford Darling also
rose on a motion for
adjournment to complain
about the laxity in the matter

soul oserv tfeltrulms oft
rHous andnpr serve itsadign ty

oTh H use is next scheduled
to meet on May 16.


T RA NSPO RT M minister
Darrell Rolle Wednesday
::":::0attebau ne~de ot hI l
represented a navigational
hazard in Clarence Town
harbour.
Mr. Rolle was answering
questions tabled by Clarence
Town representative Michael
Lightbourne, who wanted to
know what action had been or
was being taken against the
owners to have this vessel
remrloved.
The member also wanted to
know if there was any reason
for the delay in having the
vessel removed
Mr. Rolle said he was aware
the New Day was still in
Clarence 'Town harbour but
had been advised that her
present location did not
constitute a navigational
hazard
In order to remove the New
Day, he added, it would be
necessary to use a tug which
was not available in the area.
According to the Minister
the owners claimed that they
were experiencing much
dufficulty in securing one for
this purpose.
The New Day was destroyed
by fire in July 1972 while at
Clarence Town, Long Island.
The fire was believed to have
started whecn the fuel line to
the port engine burst, setting
the exhaust ablaze. The
generator then cut off and the
fire spread to the engine.


REVELATISH 01



The v.v. Church Bay was
awaiting inspection when it
was destroyed by fire at
Potters Cay dock on January
ll this year, it was revealed in
the House yesterday.
Trhe disclosure was made by
Transport Minister Darrell
Rolle in answer to questions
put by Shirlea representative
Sir Roland Symonette (FNM).
Mr. Rolle said the vessel had
heen inspected up to December
31, 1972 and was awaiting
inspection for 1973 when the
fire broke out. It was, he
added, registered in accordance
with the boat Registration Act
at the time of the fire.
bAske lif an inveshtiga ion hd

b~nsee requested to in eig ta
tAs forwhcompensationtheo
belongings, Mr. Rolle said this
wsi e ma ttherc i teen the

Slie namedl the boat's
beeica owner n' th Cb rc

The Church Bay served as
mailbout for Cat Islanl.


Phil Gailey, Miami Herald
Wa shington correspondent,
reported in his column,
"Around the Americas", on
Saturday :
"The question was raised
subtly this week in a
routine-sounding resolution
calling on the OAS General
Secretariat to report on the
status of non-independent
states and territories in the
Western He~misphere.
"More specifically, the
resolution is aimed at a number
of small Caribbean colonies,
small in population and poor in
resources, which may want to
join the OAS as they become
independent countries."
DILUTED
"With the Latin nations in
the process of restructuring the
OAS to bring it more in line
with their surging nationalism.
the concern is that the
'Latinization' of the
organization long dominated
by the United States, will be
diluted by the admission of
more 'mini-states' having little
in common with the white,
Spanish-speaking countries.
(The same concern was
expressed some time ago by
members of the United
Nations).
"Currently tere re ons,
three black, English-speaking
states in the OAS -- Barbados,
Jamaica and Trinidad. The
Bahamas, which will be eligible
for membership when it
becomes independent in July,
is eager to join, but there is
some concern that the
resolution could be used to
delay its admission."
Ambassador Vale rie
McComie of Barbados is
concerned that the study called
for by the resolution will be
used to establish additional
requirements for membership,
Galley reports.
"I see no need to vary the
pre se nt cr iter ia for
membership,' McComie said in
an interview. 'What concerns
me is that such a study may be
tidmbne 'the admission of new
Gailey writes:
of her eiss nothing in the text
that it is anything more than a
legitimate study of the status
of non-independent states in
the hemisphere. It reads:
'Evolution of the situation in
gaeAmericas, prti ularly wi h
rgars tno th olon ad oi

possible consequences
concerning participation by


new independent states....'
"The only public clue that
there was more to the
resolution than met the eye
came when the United States.
in voting for the study, insisted
that 'it not serve as a pretext
for delaying consideration of
any membership application
which might be presented
before its completion.'
"At the OAS, the
implications of the 'mini-state'
resolution were not discussed
officially. However, in the
corridors and a few blocks
away, at the State Department,
the matter was lively topic of
conversation.
"Argentina submitted the
resolution, and it was approved
unanimously by the OAS
Juridical and Political
Committee earlier this week.
"The controversy surrounct-
ing the 'mini-states' resolution
began late last year when
Secretary General Galo Plaza
asked the OSA General
Assembly to study the
question of the admission of
small states with little
population and economic
resources.
"The one-point Argentine
resolution, which replaced the
One proposed by Plaza, was
more subtly phrased, but its
ptwpose is the same.
"The admission of more
English-speaking states, which
have little in common with
Latin countries except
geography, could create a third
bloc at a time when the Latins
are trying to restmecture the
organization and reduce the
influence of Washington in the
mnter-A~merican system.
"Why, some Latin diplomats
say, should a small state with a
population of 175,000 have
the same influence in the OAS
as Braz~il, with a population of
100 million?
"Talk around the Pan
Amecrican Union here, where
the OAS G;eneral Assembly is
meeting this week, is that the
'mnini-states' mayoe should be
admitt d asassociiat nienierss
might want to form their own

a~rhc these diplomats say,
the OAS could concentrate on
legitimate regional issues that
the Spanish-speaking countries
have in common.
NO TRIBUNE TOMORROW
pu Ills eRltBUmNo will noto b

Tiuea uilbb pubbihe nex
on Saturday and readers will be
wihu aeir hT ibune on


The Wo khop, o refa
series fne y t Fr
Foundation, will look into the
"Haza sb of Maritim Trans~itt
an wl be attne 3 to
35 participants from various
parts of the world, including
government and international
agency representatives, and
spokesmen from the shipping'
oil, insurance and other
industries. .
Among the countries
expected to be represented will
be several which are in a
position to control strategic
straits.
The Law of the Sea Institute
takes no position of its own
with regard to topics presented
at the meetings it sponsors, but
rather seeks to provide an open
forum for meaningful
discussion and information
exchange.
Included in the subjects to
come under discussion will be
pollution of the sea by oil and
other substances and the
regulatory problems arising

$4M. TREASURY
BILLS TAKEN UP
THE $4 million Treasur
Bill tender held at the
Monetary Authority on April
17 was over-subscribed an
Authority release said today.
The average rate at which
successful tenderers obtained
Bills was approximately $98.44
per cent equivalent to a
discount rate of approximately
6.2 per cent per annum.

MORE FUNERAL
FUNERAL services for Mr.
Garnet Moree, 56, of Montagu
Heights, will be conducted at
Calvary Bible Church, Collins
Avenue, at S p.m. tomorrow
by Pastor David T. Cole.
Interment will be made at
MnezeM mete ded at the
Princess Margaret Hospital at 7
a.m. yesterday.



VELVET

THROW

CUSHIONS

'I1 so~ mal FaE


from construction of
"superports.
ADDERLEY OPENS
The Workshop will be
formally opened by External
A ff air s Minister and
Government Senate Leader
Paul Adderley.
The first paper at the
morning session will examine
the nature and intensity of
Maritime Commerce in selected
areas at high congestion and
traffic. Included in this will be
a discussion of the physical
nature of the important
international straits, and the
possibilities of alternative
routes should a particular strait
become closed.
On Monday afternoon a
paper will be presented on the
conflict between the right of
coastal states to regulate traffic
in straits and thle areas near the
coast, and the need for
maximum vessel mobility on
the part of the international
community .
The theme at the Tuesday
morning session will be
"Pollution of the Sea by Oil
and other Hazardous
Substances," to be followed by
a panel presentation. The
afterno on program mme,
beginning at 1.30 o'clock, will
deal with Bahamian maritime
problems.
Wednesday morning will
focus on the problems of risk
and will include two formal
papers. One will concern itself
with present and future
approaches to the creation of
systems for reducing risks
through improvements in
technology and regulation.
The second will be on
economic analysis of risk
allocation including the
economic impacts both on new
regulations and extensions of
Coastal State jurisdiction.
Thursday morning, the last
day of the Workshop there will
be a paper on3 jisdisctio anrii


ofrfhore 'euperonsrtsti flatiof
or fied This is totbbe followed

dis passion an nthe proh erynet
po rtion of tdhae seaorso il
be concluded with a panel

dic sin on nticpirid

before and during the: third
Law~ of the Sea Conference.


~ttP


~ritrunp


I


/ L

I5~"L \1


SITUATION FOR FIRE

BRIGADE WORSEnS




Water carrier is's write


off' after crashing



en route to bush fire


By MIKE LOTHIAN
A FIRE BRIGADE WATER CARRIER wats damage~cd beyond
repair Wednesday afternoon whenr it overtulrned on Ca;rmic~hael
Road. The loss of the tanker comes at a time when the Brigatde is
overworked trying to control numelcrou\ bush fires.


f


g


NEW DAY 'NO



LEONARDRD TAYLO


18tlR AmlflCasS mS)



Seek 0 Sely SaaasS





THERE IS TALK IN WASHINGTON that concern expressed
by Latin members of the Organization of American States (OAS)
as to whether the role of the black, English-speaking Caribbean
*(Fifni-states" in the organization should be restrie~d, might
diiay the Bahamasl' admission after independence.


$811858$ Waritimae problems

.il .e dsusd L






BAHAMIAN MARITIME PROBLEMS are to be discussed at
next month's Law of the Sea Institute workshop to be held at the
Paradise Island Hotel from Monday, May 7 to Thursday, May 10.





GE2 ENTERSil


MEllTIRIERAHE


WITIIOUT TROUBLE

By Rodney Pinder
LONDON (AP)- The Queen
Elizabeth 2 approached the
troubled waters of the Middle
East on Wednesday with 620
American Jews en route to
IsraC1C 25th anniversary
celebrations.
Britain's defense minister
wished "Bon Voyage" to his
soldiers aboard to guard the
passengers and crew..
"I hope that members of the
defense forces aboard the ship
will have a very agreeable
time," Lord Carrington told
peers in the House of Lords.
The 65,800-ton liner,
sroned forwesb
rm nrsdo kosibeAra
guerrilla attack, turned into the
Mediterranean ear 1
Wed eday with Sove
warshp to starboard ad
Israel lying ahead.
The sea that laps both Arab
and Israeli shores was clam and
bathed by sun, it was reported
from on board. Perfect boating
weather said a spokesman for
the Cunard Lines.
"The only military activity
we have seen came when two
Russian warships, heading for
the Atlantic pasd by
between us ad th~eAfrican
coast," the spokesman said.
"We did not exch nge
si nals. "
At least 30 security men are
on board, including British
Marine commandos. The ship is
reportedly shadowed, out of
sight, by British airplanes and
the Royal Navy.
The Southern Mediterranean
coast is Jined with Arab states
like Algeria, Libya and Egypt.
But the Queen's route was
changed- Monday to keep as
broad si buffer of water as
possible between the liner's
starboard side and the coast of
North Africa.
Lord Carrington told the
House of Lords he could not
discuss the cost of the security
operation "since this would
indicate the nature of the
measures being taken."
fle rejected suggestions from
other peers that the British
ta paer was subsidizing "the
xih" for Middlen East
vacations.
Carrington said the QE2
could go wherever she pleased,
particularly as she was flying
the British flag.


L_


customer.
Independent service station
operators are feeling the pinch
of the nationwide gasoline
shortage. Unable to get enough
to meet motorists' demands,
some are rationing gas, some
are closing.
For the motorist, the
shortage means higher gasoline
prices. The oil daily's weekly
survey of 100 cities last week
showed the average price for
major brand regular gasoline
was 26 cents a gallon before
taxes. The year before it was
22V24 cents. The Ohio
petroleum mark ete rs
association estimates gasoline
prices in that state will rise 5 to
7 cents a gallon this summer.
The independent station
operators are hardest hit
because they are frequently
unable to find bidders for bulk
purchase contracts.
The Georgia independent
oilmen's association estimated
on Wednesday that more than
100 of the state's 1,800
independent stations will close
this weekend for a lack of fuel.
In Roanoke, Va., all 14 Save-X
stations closed last week when
they ran out of gais, but
reopened on Wednesday.
Owner Roy Pollard Jr., said the
shortage "is still a very real
thing."
Detroit officials say the city
may have to pay as much as $1
million more because they
can't make adequate bulk
purchases. In Texas, two
trucking firms have filed
separate suits, against Texaco
and against Shell, over bulk
purchase contracts.
10 GALLS. LIMIT
The 11 Sears, Roebuck gas
stations in Southern Florida
and Montgomery and in
Baltimore have limited
customers to 10 gallon
purchases. Robert Sheppard,
owner of 13 Robin Stations
near Albany, N.Yi., has closed
two and stopped selling gas at
three others.
"For the first time in
history, except during the war
years, we have no assurance
that future fuel needs will be
met and the future is right
around the corner," says a
spokesman for Commercial
Motor Freight, the largest
trucker in Ohio.
The director of the
mid-America gasoline





I)owNTowN MIAug






Single S 9
Double SII

urple 61


Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


LADIES SOUL
PLATFORM MOVIN'
SANDALS BOOTS
hundreds of ~- ..with
Style St CIO~fSdynamic
platformlTI














BAY STREET* MADEIRA SHOPPING CENTRE


~L--iuh- --.-----'- -~~ -- - -- .- ~--~-~-~~ -C-- ----- - --- C_.,r _ .._ --F I ~---C1 --~- -- --L--~ -- ~ __ __ __ ~__ ~ __ ~ _ --CI_


US. HLT MIWWEEPING OPERATIC imstatAercn
minesweeping( operationsr have been halted off the! coast of North Vietnam.
The reasonl: C`ontinued C:ommunist cease-fire violations in South Vietnam
and L~aos. The P'entagon statement also mentions North Vietnamese
infiltration into South Vietnam and the continued fighting in Cambodia.
The halt of the minesweeping operations was condemned by Radio
H-anal. Tlhe North Vietnametse alsot charged that even when the
minesweepers were working, they weren't working very hard.
SMALLPOX SUSPECT ISOLATED
L.OND)ON (AP) A 52 yer old ma a slated Tlhursday asa
cmallpox suspect. hospital authorities reported.
Tests on four other patients isolated after last week s death of a married
couple so, far have proved negative, the authorities added.
SKY LAB STILL UNMANNED AFTER THREE WEEKS
Mosc'ow (AP') T`he Soviet sky laboratory Sayut 2 entered a third
wee ond spc ednef 1y srt cl unmanned by a cosmonaut crew and its
It wals latunche~d April 3 in what was widely believed to be the first step
In a major manned space venture T~hen followed a spate of unofficial
reports about he dimmin nt launch of a Sohur spaceship that would put

DEVASTATING, TORNADO HITS DACCA DISTRICT
D)AC'CA (AP') At least 1,000 people were killed Tuesday in a tornado
aninathlse 4rvilla s in the IJacca DIstrict of 13angladesh, the Bengall
Several thousand other persons were injured, of whom I 16 were sent to
Dacca Medical College Hlospital for immediate treatment, the paper said.
The first unofficial derath toll had earlier been estimated at 500 but this
urs epected to, go much higher with a survey of the damage starting
Prime Minister Sheikhi Mujibu Rahman was flying Thursday morning to
the devastated area where some IS,000 people were believed directly
hffctn nby the searing w\inld the second tornado to hit the country
Relief Mlinister M~.R. C'howdhury, who visited the new stricken area
Wednesday said 12 villages were completely destroyed. The latest tornado
is the worst natural calamity since independence In January 1972.
inl November 19)70 an estimated one million people perished in a
cycke ianikganj subdivision in Da;cca D~istrict was the worst affected
Tuesday and eyewitnes~fs reports said the whole area there wase fattened.
The wreckage of homes and human corpses reportedly were strewn over
the land for severnI miles.
anTh ju naderin Iar dpu c~sric I at n fek klae nure than 100 people

'ASSASSINATIONS & BRUTALITY' CHARGES
BELFYAST' (AP') Terrorists attacked police and British troops in Belfast
with grenades early Thursday amid mounting Roman Catholic charges of
assassinain and butalit n ecrc trnop yn terNorthern Ir lnd c apt l
Lower Ialls quarter of Belfast. a Catholic D~istrict where the Irish
Republican Army -IRA operates.
The grenade did not explode. Another was hurled at a police car in ).ast
Bealbfa, bustnomr with the Irish Republic, moments before a bomb wrecked the tavern.
Two masked mene were spotted planting the bomb outside the bar.
Everyone inside ran for their lives. They got about 50 yards away when the
bomee vodened came es sahhulecs in the Ardayne, a Belfast flashpoint,
planned a protest march and rally against the Parachute Regiment a crack
army unit baped in the district.
They charged the paratrooperss with murder and brutality and demanded
they be removed.
ALLON PLAN MAY REVERT 65% OF LAND TO ARABS
G;IL;AL, ISRAI-Il- O~CCUPIED) JORDAN (AP) Deputy Premier
Yigal Allon Wednesday described in unprecedented detail his plan for a
new lranian nnfsrsal uod w*nb wch Israel could relinquish up to two

Allon spoke while conducting newsmen on a tour of 12 Jewish
settlements built along the Jordan river as a security belt against possible
Arab attack.
The so called Allon Plan' has never been officilaly accepted nor rejected
by Premier G;olda Meir's cabinet, but it is the only concrete territorial offer
to be made by an Israeli official since the 1967 Mideast war, and Allon said
it had the support of most of the public and his fellow policymakers.
The 12 outposts, manned by farmersoldiers of the paramilitary 'Nahat'
i /hCC~, stretch from Mitspeh Shahlrm overlook ag the Iad Sea. omMbehu a
;'their inhabitants is kept secret.
Allon envisaged withdralwinlg from the heavily populated core of the
west bank but leaving it salndwsiched between Israel proper in the west and
Wieithhtthe 50 do0-atcr b, plus s ebr ales ner e Isalem which Israel
wants to keep, roughly 65 per cent of the west bank would revert to Arab
rule under Allon's planl.
POLICE KILL ONE OF FBI'S IEN MOXST-WANTED MEN
SNI'W YORK (AP) A robber killed by police! while trying to escape
from a lHarlem balnk was one of the 10 most wanted men on the I;BI list,
the IBI Jaid. Two other bandits held 20 hostages for up to three hours
before surrendering.
outinceI crw a fi etties ed thruhfinge prints after the dredtin crssfifth
Avenue.
Brown, 30, o~f B~irmingham,. Ala., escaped from a Washington, D).C., jaril
last Octo~ber while appealingl aI death sentence for a murder conviction, the
IBrow was a hired killer who shot a potential witness In a narcotics case,
according to the VBUI.
SHe and seven others broke out of the century-old maximum security
SWashington jail by cutting bars, breaking through a metal screen to a roof,
lower ng th aslvs to the ground on fire hoses and scaling a 12-foot

TWO YEARS TO PROVE SAFETY OF DRUGS
SWASHING;TON (AP)- Raising questions about potential health hazards
par letsical ceman es as > yer toprovne t sfetw o ineen1 ctani"
drugs used in animal feeds.
Any antibiotic or sulfonamide drug failing to demonstrate safety and
,efficacy as a low level feed additive will be banned. In addition,
rnanulnfaciureenand pen itccin eilbe r uied ao pve wthin ne es rtn
They do not promote an increase of salmonella bacteria, a major cause of
food poisoning.
SWISS GIVE AID TO N. & S. VIETNAM
BEIRN, SWITZE.IRLAND) (AP)- The Swiss cabinet Wednesday agreed to
Make available a credit of 15 million francs, about 4.5 million dollars, to
O fnance humanitarian aid both in North and South Vietnam.
DISCOVERY OF ANCIENT CITY DISPROVES THEORY
COLUMBUS, OHIO0 (AP) -An Ohio State University anthropologist
says his discovery of the ancient city of Anshan in southwestern Iran,
:disproves the theory that Mesopotomia was the exclusive location of early
Seastern urban civilizatfor.
SDr. Wtillam M. Sumner said his excavations show the city existed as far
.,back as 3,000 tto 3,200 BC. This is about the same time, Sumner said,
1s~t~tribtd to the first cities In Mesopotomia, an area in the lower valley of
Sthe tigris and Euphrates rivers.
S"Anshan is as old as Mesopotomla," Sumner said. "Whether it is
older we won't know until we make further dins "


museum


By Fred Coleman
LONDON (AP) -- The orgy
was a bore. Then he even lost
patience with it all and went
home to bed alone
So wrote the late Evelyn
Waugh, one of the foremost
British novelists of the century
in his private diaries now
being serialized in the Sunda 7
Observer newspaper.
His diaries cover all facets of
the author's life for 50 years,
but attention has focused on
references to orgies, drunken
parties, naked parties,
homosexual parties, lesbian
parties and various
combinations thereof, often
with some famous people
participating,
"No recent Sunday paper
serialization can have enjoyed
such intense readership as this,'
the Spectator~ magazine
declared, and few would argue
with that assessment.
Partly to protect the
innocent, and partly to avoid
libel suits, the Observer has
edited out the names of many
of the players in Waugh's
accounts of party games. But
the curiosity over who did
what to whom is only one
reason for the interest in the
diaries.
Waugh began them at the
age of 12 and probably never
wrote a dull sentence in his
life. In the process he seems to
have bridged some kind of
generation gap.
The author died in 1966, at
the dawn of the current
permissive age. But his diaries
show he didn't miss a thing.
The hottest passages are from
the 1920s.
DEPRAVED
An entry for April 1925, for
example, recounts "a most
depraved scene," at one of the
house parties Waugh attended.
"Everyone was drunk or
pretending drunkenness except
who was sitting in the
middle of it all," he wrote." -
almost naked was being
slapped on the buttock by -
and enjoying herself
ecstatically ."
Another entry for March
1927 says "the situation of a
distinguished old man's
illegitimate daughter receiving
in his house her black lover and
her black lover's black wife and
baby might seem improbable in
a book. However, there it
was."
In the 1920s,, Waugh was
one of the so-called brightt
young people," many of whom
went on to become prominent
in politics, business, the arts,
society and the church. Many
are still prominent today and
there has been some discussion
of the propriety of linking
them even by implication, with
the parties in W~augh's diaries.
The author's son, Auberon,
a critic and journalist, is one of
those who favour publication.
"I think it is an entirely
beneficial development and
could make a useful
contribution to frankness and
honesty in public life," he said.
"Personally, I feel it adds
something, rather than
detracting from their present
convictions on things like
pornography if we know
that these same gentlemen
spent their early youth
sodomiting and flagellating in a
drunken or dru gd stu or "
In an article n the "New
Statesman," Auberon Waugh
invited anyone libelled to sue.
No one has SO far.




WASHINGTON (AP) Italian
Prime Minister Giulio Andreotti
said Wednesday he presented U.S.
President Richarrd Nixon with "an
idea which could lead to a gradual
solution of the Middle East
problem."
Andreotti declined to go into
uny details at a Blair House news
conference for American newsmen,
sayngth to one crch needed" If
"We are going to pursue this idea
but we know that the solution itself
is up to the Arabs and the Israelis,"
he said, adding that President


Nixon wase interested in his
proposals and promised that they
will be studied by U.S. experts on
the Middle East situation.
Me la, rAndreott outtressed,hain a
friendly relations with both sides of
the perennial Arab-Israell dispute
an et think we have a certain
He admitted that a dialogue is
needed between the two sides and,
referring to various earlier
international conferences where the
shape of the conference table
created so much initial difficulty.
said "thus far only the table was
not invented at which Arabs and
Israelis could sit together."

U.K. TO CLOSE REFUGEE
CENITRES SOON

LONDON (AP)- The British
government said Tuesday it plans to
close "during the next few months"
al e egncho relscttlamns camp

Br n a. passports expelled from


marketeers association, Walter
Wiegand, estimated that 30 per
cent of the independent
stations in the St. Louis area
will close in the near future. He
said about 30 station operators
a day call his office asking
where they can purchase
gasoline.
The shortage has been
attributed to a number of
factors, including a shortage of
refineries and the general
energy crisis refineries that
were forced to concentrate on
winter heating fuels instead of
gasoline.
The major companies have
indicated they don't expect
shortages for their own dealers*
"Our information is that we
can meet our obligations at this
point in time, but with the
tight supply we don't know
how long we will be able to
meet our commitments," said a
spokesman for Atlantic
Richfield Co.
"Generally speaking, it looks
as if gasoline supplies in the
United States will be tight this
summer," said a Mobil
spokesman.
TO RUN FOR HUSBAND'S
C GCRESSIONhAL SEATadn

Collins is a strong revourite to win
Tuesday's Democratic Party
primary for congress in Illinois' 7th
dst ito hsc dwas represented by
Mrs. Collins, 42, was picked by
the regular Democratic organization
to run for the seat held by U.S.
Rep. Gecr poln rwho as Milld a
Airport .
Mrs. Collins is opposed by Otis
Collins, ss, a former four-term
s to upwand Ifttn Gadr, 2nj a
Columbla University law student
who hase been campaigning on
weekends.
The only candidate for the
Republican nomination is Lar Daly
perennial and unsuccessful
office-seeker.
Victory in the Democratic
nrmr theaelic arlably thneant
district which includes Chicago's
Downtown and West Side areas.
The district is predominantly
bak kcatcnd overwhelmingly
All three Democratic candidates
are black.


Kleindienst didl not
elaborate.
The Washington Post
reported today that Jeb S.
Magruder, the former No. 2
man in the Nixon campaign,
had told federal prosecutors
John Mitchell and John W.
Dean III approved and help
plan the Watergate wiretapping
last year.
Kleindienst served under
Mitchell at the Justice
Department before Mitchell
resigned as Attorney General in
order to head the President's
re-election campaign.
Magruder said Mitchell and
D~ean, who is President Nixon's
Official lawyer, arranged
payoffs to defendants in the
Watergate cast to buy their
silence, the Post reported.
Kleindienst said he decided
to withdraw from the case last
Sunday because he was advised
then "of information which
relates to persons with whom I
have had personal and
professional relationships ..."
Hie said, "I concluded on
that basis it would be entirely
Inappropriate for me to
exercise control over the
sensitive matters being
developed by the Department
of Justice in connection with
the Watergate case."
K leindiens t, in a
three-paragraph statement
issued at the Justice
Department, said Assistant
Attorney G;.N. Henry Petersen
will take over full control of
the administration's Watergate
probe, reporting only to
President Nixon.
Magruder was absent from
his home in suburban Maryland
Thursday morning. His lawyer
said late Wednesday night that
he would testify voluntarily
when called before a federal
grand jury. The Post said that
would be Thursday.
Mitchell, a former U.S.
Attorney G;eneral and chief of
President Nixon's re-election
campaign, called the Post story
"~nonsense."
"This gets a little sillier as it
goes along, doesn't it," he told
a newsman as he left his New
York City apartment. "I've had
a good night's sleep and I
haven't heard any of this
nonsense."
Dean, who is counsel to
President Nixon, could not be
reached.
At the White H-ouse, deputy
press secretary Gerald L.
Warren said, The White House
is not prepared to react to a
story based on sources. At a
time when the rights of
individuals would not be
jeopardized by a comment, an
appropriate comment will be
made.
N. L. Shimway, spokesman
for the committee for the
re-election of the President,
said he had no knowledge of
the matter.
The Post quoted sources in
the executive branch as saying
Dean might soon resign from
the White House staff, and that
presidential chief of staff HI. R.
Haldeman might follow sulit.
The newspaper quoted sources
as saying there is "no known
evidence" linking Hlaldeman to
criminal involvement in the
Watergate affair.
The Post said it gained its
account of Macgruder's
statements from three sources
in the White House and in the
committee for the Re-election
on the President. Maegruder
had been second to Mitchell in.


the campaign hierarchy, and
retained the number two spot
after Mitchell resigned in the
wake of the Watergate raid last
year.
'Those re portedl y facing
indictment include present and
former members of the White
House staff and the Nixon
campaign, the source said. The
second-hand report could not
he c~onfirmed-
A~lso Wednesday, the
Washington Star-News quoted
a "top justice department
official" as predicting "major
new indictments." Justice
department spokesman John C.
Ifushen said he knows of no
indictments being written, but
added, "I'm sure that anybody
could predict that something is
up by what the President said
T 'ucsday night.
Nixon had said he
considered no administration
of ficial exempt from
prosecution, and that he would
suspend anyone indicted and
fire anyone convicted.
The Justice Department and
the White House declined to
discuss the Watergate case
further.
in other Watergate
developments:
Democratic chairman
Robert S. Strauss said
Republicans are indicating guilt
in the Watergate case by
offering a reported $525,000
to settle a multimillion-dollar
package of lawsuits arising
from the wiretapping. A
spokesman for the campaign
organization said the offer
didn't necessarily admit guilt
but conceded that the
settlement would favour the
Democrats.
SThe former finance
chairman for Nixon's
campaign, Maurice Stans,
arranged a meeting with
lawyers for common cause, a
nonpartisan citizens group
suing Stans and the Nixon
campaign for full disclosure of
its secret finances. Common
cause lawyer Mitchell Rogovin
struck a tough bargaining
posture. "We want them all,"
he said, referring to Nixon's
campaign financial records.



sent to 5. Vietnam
WASHINGTON (AP)
Spokesmen for the military and the
U.S. embassy in Cambodla have
denied a report that U.S. marines
are b ingdsenoufrhomstO nowan o te

The report was repeated
Wednesday night in a House speech
by Rep. F~ortney H. Stark,
on-Clif, mtairnkfor the reonetwd
antiwar group known as the
Okinawan project of National
lawyers.
thA Pentagonsopnoke mana leclar d
that Marine units based on Okinawa
have been engaged in exercises at
seal Phonm Penh, the U.S
embassy emphatically denied
reports that American Marines had
landed in Cambodia. Embsassy
spokesman Stewart Olsen said only
>but too military vapesantnlarehan
the embassy in various capacities.
Olsen said he knew of no plans
to bring in Marines.
He noted that an operation of
the size mentioned in reports from
the United States would require
coordination with the Cambodian
government through the embassy.
The embassy's reaction left open
the possibility that the marines
might have embarked on some
training operation or a top-secret
contingency pinn.
Units of the 3rd Marine division
are stationed on Okinawa.
Also in the Falr E~st is one
reinforced Marine battalion
attached to the Navy's 7th fleet.


WASHING;TON (AP) The
Soviet Union has formally
notified the United States it
has suspended all attempts to
collect payments from
educated Jews wishing to
emigrate, Senate Republican
leader Hugh Scott, said
Wednesday.
Returning from a White
House meeting with President
Nixon, Scott reported th
Soviet leadership has sent the
White House two formal
decrees stating its new policy.
"I now understand
permission to emigrate will be
granted except on very limited
matters of state security
alone," Scott said.
"It is saying it is suspending
that decree," Scott said of the
Stovt tte Jlicywh re uirin


leave the country for Israel or
elsewhere to pay the value of
their state education,
In a capitol news
conference, Scott called on
Congress for restraint in the
consideration of new trade
legislation. There has been a
strong movement to tack
amendments on that legislation
penalizing the Soviet Union for
what some senators have called
its discriminatory policies
against its Jewish citizens
Scott called the apparent
decision "very important and
significant" and stressed what
he called the necessity that
President Nixon not be placed
in a position by Congress in
which ongoing negotiations
wtphrithde Soviet Union are


Thursday, April 19, 1973.


Zlk ZEdi u


NEW DISCLOSURES, AND~-


AUT~Il'S DIARIES CRISIS COMING HOME


US Attorney General On 'gyPggygg


Gas stations in US


withdraws from



V te rga te (FO be


By Lawrence L. Knutson
WASHINGTON (AP)-Attorney Gen. Richard G. Kleindienst
Thursday withdrew from the Watergate investigation because it
involves people with whom "I have had personal and professional
relationships.


20's IISCLOSED are closing; due to


la ck of fuel supphie s

By The Associated Pres
THREE SERVICE STATIONS in upstate New York are open
for repair work, but they won't sell you any gasoline. In Florida,
there's a chain of II stations that limits sales to 10 gallons per


Russi8aS Stop payments


fOr 81 1 WiSil 8 mig f SRS




- :--~-- --- ----- ---;- --- I. J-T-l -- -Ir---: - -7- ---~---~ r -~~-----:-+rl: ___~__::I:_ :___~


Wh0 Grthanet


Thursday, April 19, 1973.

WJhP Gribunt
Noutrus Analcros JVRARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEO)N E. H1. DUIPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1 903t- 1914
SIR ETIE~NNE DUIPUCri. O.B~.E., K.C.S.G;.. D.Litt., LL.1).
Publisher/Editor 1917.19)72
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DI1PU1CH CARRON.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.=
Publisher/Editorl9~72 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street. P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

EDITORIAL


One journalist to another


By E~TIENNE D)UPUCH
DURING our stay in Montego Bay my wife was interviewed in
the lobby of the hotel by a staff writer of The Daoily G'leanler
I walked up in the course of the interview and made a f~w
casual comments by way of introduction to the young woman
reporter who I thought was charming.
The interview was illustrated with a picture of a group of news
pe :l wi:H au hs te eai hftehe hentahd u of thi
Convention ... Sir Etienne Dupuch and Latdy Dupuch at Open
House".
The Gleaner reporter also heard my report at the meeting and
.so she included me in the story.
I had no intention of reprinting this story because it is purely
tisoalbut Tea uardian p blis ienn bit of itunder the
Sup r-Confide nt?""
I don't think it was necessarily done on purpose but such a
heading might well destroy the spirit of what was clearly intended
to be a friendly story in The Gleaner.
And so today we reprint the full story ... heading and all ...
exactly as it appeared in The Gleaner,
+** * ** *
I was sufficiently impressed by this young Jamaican matron to
feel 1 should write and thank her for the kind references she made
to my wife and myself. And especially to try and help her to
understand the kind of journalism I have given the Bahamian
people for just over 54 years.
It was April 1, 1919 All Fools Day that I returned homne
from active service in the first world war to occupy the chair
vacated five years earlier by the death of my father and to try and
raise high his banner on which he had inscribed the challenging
motto: "Being bound to swear to the dogmas of no master .

I feel that it might be helpful for readers of this column to read
an extract from a lengthy letter I wrote to Mrs. Lorna Simnms in
the hope that it might touch a spark in the bosom of a native

rura t naneing hbrourinthde thing sh said about my wife, I
"I also want to thank you for your kind references to me. You
s plepzle you. I am not surprise < tAll ny life lIhave pu zled
reckless .szy at least, unusual but that is normal behaviour
for me.
"You are not sure whether I am rrogant or super-confident.



"Nor does it flow from my own strength. It is the reflection of
a simpf faith in God who has promised that He will never allow
truth a.e honesty to fall aothe gouln lyi o no tIdnt

necessarily play to win. I just play the game according to my
conception of truth and justice and, whether I win or lose, I
enjoy the exercise.
""' a see, dear young lady, I do not labour under the conceit
that I am necessarily right in anything but I have the assurance
that any man or woman who pursues truth diligently over a
long period of time will have a high average in life.
' I do the things I believe in with vigour but in everything I
pray to God several times a day even while walking on the
street --to guide my footsteps and to let me win only if He feels
that w tli amdin ofibliind fat I ad't ever os bektcou accept

ev ge tihais st eghnd ts faith because I can now look
back on 74 years of life and say with conviction that nothing has
ever gone wrong for me.
'Oh yes, I have had bitter moments. But, seen in retrospect'
they were the right things to happen at the time they took place.
"I am glad you have thought about my bit of philosophy that
it is important in life to know when you have enough of this
world's goods. If you follow this philosophy you will not crave or
seek an over-abundance of material possessions which often
become a burden and destroy avaricious people who are most
often miserable in the midst of plenty.
"There is another thought I would like to impress on you. It is
that no power on earth can hurt you except yourself. Do what
you believe to be the right thing and you have nothing to fear.
Even though tyrants may seize and imprison you in a dungeon
:they cannot control your immortal spirit.
"Under God's guidance you can make yourself master of your
own soul. When you have done this you can look out on life with
a calm assurance that will help you to laugh when most other


People cry.
"You probably wonder why I am taking the trouble to write to
:you.
"I am writing to you because you are a journalist. People who
;have access to the public's mind have a great responsibility. It is
Important that they should be honest in their search for the truth
- even though they know they will never find it absolutely --and
then they can be fearless in following their star.

:re orth aend dtiteontial rit r Ho e Tribe But mypreoa e
:boast is that at no time have I ever written a sentence that I did
not believe to be true and fair at the time I wrote it.
"Oh yes, I have made mistakes. Many of them. But mistakes
don't upset me. My vanity is not hurt when I unintentionally fall
`into error. I am not God. Only God never made a mistake. The
important thing is that, whenever I find I have made a mistake, I
:correct it in the most prominent place in thle paper. I tell mly
:readers when I have made a mistake and so they trust me. Many
People think I am a fool but no one has ever accused n:e of
insincerity.
"I consider it a crime when a journalist is aware that he has
:made a mistake and fails to correct it. This is the worst form~ of
Cowardice because it springs from human vanity.
"A journalist writes history every day and so it is important
that, as far as it is humanly possible, he should try to be accurate
in his information and honest in expressing his opinions.
** ** *
So there you are.
In this world where most things are measured by mat~erial
standards it is easy to confuse a simple faith in God andJ hlumble
submission to His will with arrogancec. It is difficult focr mnost


2 E i(i GREI $ISN CRUS

From '1221:00sqs

FREN\CH LINE~ Mn/s D E G3RASSE


LEAVE PORT EVERGLADES MAY; 6th
ARRIVE MARSEILLES MAY 17th

TRANSFER TO CANNES FOR 2 DAYS ON THE FRENCH RIVIERA.

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RETURN TO CANNES AND TRANSFER TO NICE. JET HOME VIA AIR FRANCE ARRIVING
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FOR FU RATHER INFORIVIA;TION CONIITACT:


R.H. CLERY STEAMSHIP DEPARTMENT

PHONE 28681-7





THESE ARE THE PEOPLE



WHO CAN HELP SOL VE




YORMNYPOLM


people to understand how I canl walk out on so miuch in the
Bahamas without heSitating to look back.
i don't think the Bahamnian people fully understand what they
will iose if Ther Tribunelc is no longer with them.
Iam told by my~ office in Nassau that there seems to be a
growing awareness among young people. They report that school
a idren are now cominieg to 7re T i i ne to, gtier blformlati n

hdou nie he sfthe te rh B huia inrdc t I wr til


detIoaveednbo lae tio in syn t at Thte Tribun~e will be sorely
missed if it is no longer there ... and then it will be to~o late.
Some of my own children are deeply concerned over my
decision to pass out of the picture at this stage.
"Daddy," Etienne Jr. protested one day, "The Tribune has a

sol hhr i nothing lk it anyhr W a' lt iGt di.

will accept as God's will whatever the outcome mnay be.
We must recognize that there is a time and a place for
evrtfTIn eHe 11l serve a p~uir God.
Feel that perhaps our family have served their purpose in the
fabric of the Bahamnian society and that the time has com~e when
we should move to another part of the human stage where we
Inay still be allowed to make a contribution to life.
I am being greatly influenced in my decision by my own
father's deathbed scene. Its mecmory is indelibly impressed on mly
nmind.
When he was dying he summnelund me to his bedside. 110 told
Ine that he had given his life to the service of thle Bahamiian
pe 1e. bThey did ort understand d or app eciatbeuwhat he had done.

handed me his banner with the injunction that it was mly duty to
carry on the work for the people he had pursued in the columns
of The Tribune and on the floor of the House of Assembly.
Didn't want this job but I took it. I have done it for over 54
years. I feel that I have completed the task my father set mie 5')
year agobj.. and still th tpetuple ae eb indenwoepepeIws

instrumental in lifting from second class citizenship, have done to
this newspaper but I have niot received a single letter of protest
from a Bahamian, no questions have been asked in the House or
Senate. Just nothing.
Know that many people are concerned because they have
written me personal letters and they say so to me privately. But
because of their chilling public silence the Government feels that
it canl play the role of a Franikensteinian monster without fear of
any display of public resentmecnt.
** ** * *
My job was finished the night in the House of Assembly when I
was instrumental in breaking down barriers of racial
discrimination in public places in the colony.
Cannot be part of a community tha3t quietly accepts racial
discrimination in reverse.
********
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
A people get the kind of Govertnment they deserve.
ANONYMOUS
. .
A soul stood on the bank of the River of Life, and it had to
cwoss it.At li titi fund a ee and tit ried to rotse with it. bt

when it leaned on it.
Thien the soul found a staff and it tried to cross with it: and the
sharp end ran into the ground, and the soul tried to draw it o~ut,
but it could not; and it stood in the water by its staff.
Then it got out and found a broad thick log, and it said, "Withi
this I will cross." And it went down into the water. But the log
was too buoyant, it floated, and almost drew the soul from its
feet.
And the soul stood on the bank and cried. "Oh1, River of Life!
How amn I to cross; I have tried all roads and they have failed
mec!"
And the river answered. "C'ross me alone.
And thle soul went down into the river and crossed.
OLIVE SCHRE:INER
* ** ** **
Oh death, where is thy sting? Oh grave, where is thy victory? !
For thle wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is life everlasting
thlrough1 Jesus Christ.
THEFIR`ISTEtPISTLE:` OFP A l!L TO THE~CORINTHIANl, S
* *** * **
T~he~r is triumlph even in death for the faithful. DP~UC'Il


SOev~n D~ay Ca11

Deposits


I


By L.ORNA SIMMLS


of the Mfontego Hac~h Hoctel
witlh ite pa.noralnic~ view5 wasf ;t
fitting place for the Open
Ilouse heldh l~ lr G;A liom)
Sherllrn, it an,,l ingl I~lecto~r of
th (;lanelr (0 andt Mrs
Sh ermna n. on M on day
aftern nught together' r a fine

delegates to, the IAP'4

after. uith~~ t was i a god
oppo-rtuniity ito say! Happy
Birthday to Mlr Shermnan,
Irh~c hirthl) r~.p
iv nsell thda isArly .' I tl
c~ont rv sial egr I'pent .
D~upuch and La3dy DLP1C~h.
Ihad met Sir I tc~rene that
niorning in the lobby of the


110ntegc, Beach whilel I spoke
to his wifer. the petite and
pretty I adv D~upuch, and I
thought howu ~oo~l and duapper
he seemed~ mI his c~ool nav' b~lue

nealr his 74 ycars

explzlrnedt to the F~reedomll of
the P'ress ( committee why he
halt mptr i~ti ll rseah tl a
Bahamna\. and his new~spaper the
'Tribune which he has owned
aind run f or 50 years.
As his ctronig v'oic~e
re~souinded.. "I ami a fre~e ma~n.
will notl be held down." 1 got
the feeling that that was the
motto1 of( his who~le~ hfe it Is no )
wonderr they say that1 In the


Bahamas,~ he is regarded as
strmerthlngg of a legend, because
of his hattle, with his pen as a
sharp) weapon against
injutllfices of all sorts
tikeauslcofcertainresrctions ~n
o~n hi\ paper he is \celling out
his ne~wspaper and hals retired

plans to, live in L~ngland. ie
still wril' daal coirnsn tret i

paper Iro the B~ahamnas
L~ady [)upuch, who stays In
the Bahamias and ties In1 ends


herselt. an1d wecll loved in the

I olr years she has been active
wsith the Sandilands Mental


Home welfare committee. With
her voluntary services she and
the other committee members
have helped, at a time when
the G~overnment did not have
the funds to provide
occupational therapy and
rcreat on(l hlespec aol donT
develop rretall oe rti
:gge). Thrugby o era certa
pla ing fie ,lt and a swimming

Sir IEtinn/e and Lady
D~upuch are parents of six
children three boy ad thre
girls and twelve and -three
dequ rtert gran cidren,"
due soon."~ nn elained.o wt
Page 9, Col. 3


EDI ITORK. T~he Tribune,
Would you kindly pernult mie
to use a mall space In you~r
valuable c~olumnii to, express .
few thoughts
Much is being talked abo,(ut
our new "Nai~tio~nal Flag" '
today.
Personally, I hlave no
objections concerning the
new r~opoe tTg I
iswilling and ready to do Iis
will, come what mray. I kn~w
of a good gentlemian who gave
birth to the idea somet vars
ago that the church should
have a flag also. Just like the
nations of the world have their
national flag
The difference Is that the
Church flag is supposed to
represent the truthi oft God's


wordil. The question I woulti
lIke~ to? ask 1\ what IS the '
( hurih'l or who, rs the ( hurch?
A stone o~r wo~cd b~uIlding?. An
organvaIon"1(,1' Or can organism? l
Note pleas~e I \aold earlier that I
,1m1 a hel]iever r i ( birist, andi n~t
Solomlon. Andl It I should live
to bc 3Ii old~ aS Metfhuselah I
\till w1Il notl have all the
an 1 er (;od s will for Hlis
Church to have a flag'l What
about Psalmi (>0. 47 D~oes that
verse o~f scripture meican a literal
hanner or flag? If It doecs then I
think thiat that particular
banner otr flag should take
precedence over any. other flag'
don't you? 1
A LOYAL CITIZEN AND
BELIEVER IN CHRIST
Nassau.. Aprl 18, 19)73


AIRlPORT `
ou ahead.
ou did it in
tim~e. with


TAXI
EDITOR, ~The Tribu
May I have spae
stale b cr iti le
blowing again,
Those Taxic~ab i)
bright lot! Talk abo
off your nose to
face" that's as
thinking goes. T1
they're driving the
riding in them.
As soon as a bit
crisis presents itse
BLOCK OFF: Till.
ROAD. Sure, g
Remember when ye
19.58. But this


BYSTANDER


Nassau,
April 18, 19)73.


RUDY DIEDRICK
BAY STREET


TREVOR THOMPSON
PALMDALE


CARL M SS
PALMDALE


r'


WEDAL SMIT
BAY STREET


Palmdale opp. City Market
Phone 21421

Bay St. Dunmore Lane
Phone 21154

Fr**,ort churchinl squar.
Phone 28307


00 ,


oH


Sir Etienne Dupuch & Lady Dupuch at


SOMIE THOU GH TS ON

NA T10 NAL FLAGS


Open house at IAPA convention


A BRIC KBAT IFOR


CAB DRIVERS
ne speeded up international
ce in your communicattions watch how

hitr stojrt gi ds to a iat. urn thn i
back and grumbhle until it
rivers are a slowly eve~r so slowly, starts
ut cuttingg to come bac~k again.
spite yo~ur If you were using your full
far as their "Lwit" instead1 of o)nly half of it
hat's why you'd think of something that
tax(is, not doesn't affect I OURKISTIS and
yo~ur bread and but ter, to say
at a major nothing of yo~ur c~hildfren's.
iitkhe < nly br 'l 1 have lots of time for


PETE WALKING
FREEPORT


COMMONWEALTH INDUSTRIALL BANK LTD.



i.08HS For Any Useful Purpose


COAMMONWEALTH
FAMILY


We Pa














FURD'5 GRAN TORINO is available in four models at ABC Motors in Centreville-
Three models above are (top) Gran Torino 4-Door Pillared Hardtop, (centre) Gran Torino
Wagon and (bottom) Gran Torino Squire.


noti to obtain ecuisiv ctonitro ovr

poet, dlies to Missolonght aidin
* reieksagint ure
1810 Junta in VenUS.agezel
under tooinflenc of Simono Bolver,
prcognised Joseph Benapat, n

Hauet, subs 1 idizes60,00 Prussla
ande Dnfutch roop imn coalition
a~rgainst Frane.hBnprre


L CENTREVJILLE PHONE 2-8944


BENEMBER1~~ M01%7 B
HE BROUGHT YOU THE BOYS' BUSH JACKETS FOR CHRISTMAS
... NOW FOR EASTER HE COMES ON STRONG WITH ...
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Collins Ave., next to FREDERICK STREET
Wilmac's Pharmacy


Just 20 minutes and a



complimentory rum punch111111111encryrmpnc


. separate Nassaulcr and


Fr@@pOrt. Out Island Airways now offers 20-minute super-jet service
between Nassau and Freeport. On a schedule designed just for
Bahamians.

That s Out Island Airways~ way of expressing its confidence in the future
growth of the Bahamas. Providing the truly Bahamian ~service expected
of an independent nation. Beautiful Bahamian stewardesses to serve you
.. complimentary rum punches to entice you .. and million mile
captains to fly you.

You II be flying the BAC-1 1 1, the world s most reliable short haul aircraft.
With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can stretch out in comfort.
Aboard the Bahamas' own airline.

And to introduce you to Out Island Airways' super-jet Nossau/Freeport
service, OlA offers a special low-cost, round-trip one-day fare just $33.

With 20-minute jet service and $33 rates, can there be any other choice
but Out Island Airways? Call your travel agency or OIA now for
reservations. 7-8222.




Out Island Air ways servesthe shomas sest


-


QUALITY -TASTE PRICE AND VITAMIN D FOR EXTRA GOOD HEALTH
-A COMBINARION HARD TO BEAT

Rellllllllmembe to shqo


Hatchet Bay -The Bahamian Way


Thursday, April 19, 1973.


I~WLB~Bl~u~UI~f~aB~~


Gr an


Providence. ABC Motors in Centreville has available now the Ford Torino line with II models.


alum in i zed mu ffler ,
zuic-coated, underbody parts,
and the car runs on regular
gasoline.
The Torino line offers the
motorist many more standards
and options to make each
model practically
made-to-measure for the
owner. See the handsome Ford
Torino models at ABC Motors
in Centreville.


powered by a 302 CID 2V V-8
engine. There are five optional
engines ranging up to the big
429 CID 4V V-8 and the Select
Shift Cruise -o -Matic
transmission. The wagon also
has power front disc brakes.
The Torinos have built-in
quiet because of the special
body design and the
five-crossmember frame. There
are plenty of cushioning rubber
mounts which eliminate
metal-to-metal contact to
greatly reduce noise. Strength
comes from the special body
design which acts as a second
frame. Heavy sheetmetal
crossmembers, front and rear,
plus a rigidly designed floor
section add even more
strength. Rubber insulation in
both fr ont and rear
suspensions, and improved
acoustical insulation all around
the body take up the noise and
harshness of road sounds.
In the area of safety, Ford's
Torino has steel guard rails
built into the side doors. There
is an energy-absorbing steering
column and a strong
crossmember frame which help
protect the driver and his
passengers. The bumper is
energy-absorbing as well.
The Torinos offer economy
of operation as well as all the
comforts of ho me.
Specifications call for 36,000
miles or three years between
major chassis lubrication. Oil
filter change should be done
initially at 4,000 miles or four
months, and at 8,000 miles or
eight months after that. The
brakes are self-adjusting. There
is a t wo-year engine
coolant/antifreeze, long-life
battery, corrision-resistant


The most popular in the
Bahamas is the Ford G~ran
Torino with four models, each
one the result of the
imagination of Ford's idea men
who have made the best of
1973 standard in all these cars.
The G;ran Torino is available
in a two-door hardtop, a
four-door pillared hardtop, the
versatile Squire, and the
Wagon. All four have comfort,
strength and quiet. The Torino
is solid, smooth and practically
vibration-free. The handling is
responsive thanks to the
steering mechanism and the
full coil suspension.
All new for 1973 are the
low-back bench seats with low
profile head restraints. On the
road, comfort is perfected by
deep cushions and plenty of
head, leg and shoulder room.
'There is of room for six adults
to ride comfortably and a
special acoustical materials
package helps soak up road
noises.
The pleated cloth and vinyl
bench seats come with
adjustable headrest,
colour-keyed carpeting, vinyl
door panels, padded armrests
with integral door pull handles,
Available as an optional
interior in the Gran Torino
two-door hardtop and the
sport models is a sport cloth
trim. There is also a pleated
vinyl seat trim and high back
bucket seats as options on
some models, standard on
others.
MANUAL
thThe standard power team on
t Cran Torino is a stur y
250 CID six-cylinder engine
with a three-speed fully
sy nchoni zed manual
transmission. The wagons are


Il~"IP


By The Associated Press


date:
pbi ote totheUUn tndmSta n
accusing American bombers bf
damaging four Soviet ships during
attacks on Halphong, North
Vietnam.
1971 Charles Manson and
three women companons i
', nt nre todnt forl oth say~n
1968 United States and
European allies reject proposed
anti-ballistic missile system for
Western Europe.
1967 Former West German
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer dies
1963 Despite Soviet appeals,
Spain syas there will be no
clemency fri rComm nist lader
executed by firing squad the
following day.
1951 General Douglas
MacArthur appears before U.S.
Congress and attacks administration
of Harry S. Truman.
1946 U.S. recognizes Republic
of Yugoslavia.
goldsandare U.S. goes off the
in2 a- Japan occupies Shantung
1921 Government of Ireland
Act goes into force.
194 I Separation of church and.
state io Portugal.
19*09 Turkey recognizes
But aln Independence.
1898 U.S. issues ultimatum to


BARBECUE GRILLS


*
d ; r
.r


@ ll$ Edilittit


Tor in o lineispr ide of For d's flee t


Oralee's Fashrions


Ladies Easter Dresses.
HatS, Mand Bags,
ALSO

Easter Dresses, For Girls
MADEIRA STREET
PHONE 2-1744
opposite John S. George


,


THE GENERAL HARDWARE


CCHMPANY LIMITIIED


WHAI W


ALL THIS WEEK AT QUALITY MARKET


,pVr*s

'~ied '"~"~''ia~a
L~L'

--r- ~


SE TONTE FREE !!


BUY 05 I





PUBLIC NOTICE

To the presidents of Earst E3nd and High Rock.
This is to aInnounce~ that L.B.I. Excavation and
Engineering will be carrying out extensive
construct tioni wo~rk which will' include daily
Blasting anid exscavation for the Bahamas
Trans-shipmntci Tecrminal, located on the William
j Russell tratct.




:- NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

Land at Long Isla!nd known as "Comez" located
Immediately north of G;ray's Land on west side
Sof stre ell11is Iland is o)wned yn Etrro Foxdarbd

Anyone else. Anlyonle who thinks they have any
interest in thi\ lanid p~leas~e contact owners.

Signled: ERKROL FOX and
C'. A. WELLS I
In mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm el


JUST ARRIVED'

THE LATEST FASHIONS OF
LADES' SHOES
A large selection in
WHITE* BLACK e MULTI-COLOURS

ALSO -



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JUST
ARRIVED
Men's Polyester Bush Jackets, Suits, Slacks
Ladies' Dresses latest fashions
FO R Q UALI TY &r ST YLE VISIT


ON ELI ZA BETH AVEN UE


Arrived today: Tropic Flyer
from West Palm Beach;
Southward from Miami; Joma
from Jacksonville
Sailed today: Emerald Seas,
Flavia for Freeport; Bahama
Star for Miami
Arriving to morrow:
Skyward, Mardi Gras from St.
Thomas, Virgin Is.
Sailing tomorrow: Skyward,
Mardi Gras for Miami
TIDES
High 8:48 a.m. and 9.07
p.m.
Low 2.44 a.m. and 2:39
P~m.
WEATHER
Wind: North easterly to east
10 to 19 m.p sty ai
sea: smooth to slight
Teanp Min tonight 62


TO giVe Or get...
the New Jean Nati Gift Set!


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distributed by
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PHONE 2-2201


L


- I I I : I :I:::: I: 11I~ I:II-I 1 r IIIIIIIII:: I -- -I r~ --~~ ----~~--~'' II -- ~ ~- ~~I~I~~~I-III-`-I -T : -II---I- --- ~~-- TT --~'~


a


a


t


Thursday, April 19, 1973.


By Abigail Van Buren
DEAR ABBY: Concerning that woman in Twin Falls,
Idaho, who wrote complaininrg that no doctors in that to n
wouki debier her baby whaout Stall payment in advance:
rsh said a neighbor at here who had been seeing a dodtor
all along suddenly found that he refused to deliver until be
was paid in full.
I was a bit surprised that she hadn't gone to the news
paper. A newspaper is the public watchdog. It is the obliga-
tion of newsmen to bark when the general welfare of the
public is endangered.
Sunds Uke ad wa uc mney hadqhy nes
become the controlling element of the press.
This situation should be fully covered in stories and
a eotr an h r try put into odnt Ihi ectiond bt i
Likely that one or more will turn up that do not subscribe to
the mercenary policy described.
Wlhat is our society coming to It money, or the lackr of
it, determines if you have the right to live or die? Nowa-
days, the colleges that give these doctors their education
and the hospitals in which they get their experience are
largely supported by our tax dollar.
If the newsmen in that area lack the latestinal fortitude
to get this story in and get it in accurately, they have no
right to call themselves newsmen. They lack commitment
tothe prfsinad to b pubi Mthey serve. They are an
That woman should camp on the mannaing editor's


Afflicted? Try the


pOWer Of the press
desk until he puts one or more competent reporters on the
story and either proves her wrong or exposes the situation
for what it is. This is the obligation of the paper to the
community. AN OLD SCHOOL MANAGING EDII D
DEAR OLD: Hold it! The TIMES-NEWS la ITwl Falls
did exactly that. With no prompting from me or anyone
else.
DEAR ABBY: Our son, Ronny, will be 5 on Dec. 27,
1973. According to the laws of this state, a child who is 5
years old by Jan. 1, 1974, is eligible for kindergarten in
September of 1973.
I'm afraid if we start Ronny in kindergarten in Septem-
his helwill not only be the youngest, but the smallest child
He is very bright, but his father and I are both small,
and Ronny is very small for his age. Do you think he will

wilhv extra ye t rw an ab he wo'tRb s
much smaller than his classmates. One problem is that all
of his playmates in the neighborhood will be starting kin-
dergarten this Septme and he wants to s ar, 'S MO

DEAR MOM: Let Ronny start school with his friends.
His mental growth la more important than his physical
growth. And stop making an issue of how small he is. It
may not occur to Roany to feel handicapped because of is
size unless yea suggest it.
Prolems? Yea'll feel better If yes get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, wrbe~ to ABBY: Box No. GOTO, L.A,
Calif. sues. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
Fw Abby's beaklet, "How to Have a Levely Weddtla,"
send SI to Abby. Box WMm, les Angoele, CaL 80085


Rises 5:47 a.m.
Sets 6:33 p.m.
MOON
Rie s8.443 p.m.


Nuow Pilklngtonn are uptdating their clear i
p'atterned glass range witlh somne exciting
contemporary designs: Patchwork, and O~rbit
- with more to f ol low.
Even more important -many patterns will
no~ also, be available In a range of tinted
glasses. Among them are O)rbit, in amnber, and
Patch'vork, In the full range of blue, green
,Ind aImber. Others, are Rattan and Autumn (all
c olours) and Deep Flemish~ (5mm, amber
otnly). The design offering the widest cboice
Is Cotswold, now in all colours in both 3 and


5m11m t hick nesses. PilIk ington patterned glasses,
clear or tinted, are practical for use indoors
or out. They are non-linfammable, fade-free
a nd sc ratc h-res istant --u nlike so me substitutes.
So they are ideal for use with concealed light-
ing,~ as well as In window and door panels
and partitions.

A handsomne new tolder can be got from
yo~ur gilass me~rchant or Nassau Glass Company
Ltd., M~ackey Street, Nassau. Phone: 2-8165.


AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE & AMERICAN SPARKLING BURGUNDY SPARKLING WINE CH1ARMAT BULK PROCE SS raTURALLY FERMENTED PHODUCED & BOf I I[fD BY THEC AnORE CHrAMPAGNE CELLARS MODESTO. CALIF
Imported & Distributed by BAHAMAS BLENDERS LTD.
the Cofmmonwealth's leading Wine & Spirits Merchanot.


NCK


Whrf QWrther n


.. ~


Hunting for fun? It's here.
Andre Cold Duck. A happy
blend of fine champagne
and sparkling burgundy.
With deep pink bubbles
to tickle your tongue
with a surprisingly
refreshing taste.
Serve Cold Duck
when the flock gets
together. But make
It the best Cold
Duck. Make it
Andre'Cold DuckI


Pilkington new patterned glasses

And a new range in colour.


Pllrhwarl whlt sp..

I f --- ru


Now available
in thre
Bahamas
BUY IT
chilled from
your favourite
liquor store.






AT ONLY







A 8 0T H.


PILKINGTON


lead te world in g a~ssrna ing




~'-.~---~- ---- -~ -' --~ ------~T1 ~C I:I-II :- 1:~ ~ I-~::-~- *1T~--- -- ~ -- --- ---------- ---- ---- -- ------- -- ~- ~ ~~- - -


_ __ _________


I IJ


-- --- ALSO ----,
BOYS' POLYESTE R SHI RTS
long and short sleeve
BOYS' POLYESTER DOUBLE-KNIT
SUITS SIZES 6 to 18
HANES UNDERWEAR *
SOC KS TIES BELTS



ARAT ESI


DRY GOOD STORE
228 BAY STREET PHONE 2-2943


iM~Bs1 &# 5I"ll
BAY STREET PHONE 2-4535


I I I -- -I -- -~~~i~--p~F~Fr e~


Thursday, Aprtil 19, 1973.


tov
or
oth

"Be
hap
Dol
to i
an
*Ma
Ent
aml
adm
Ro]

of
Mat
neu
cast
Eng
'CUT
TAKE

Pre
those
budl
tresp
Sort
redu


reline..."
The only exceptions to the
It ca=seare henaboiats are
rina, dock, jetty, wharf or
er installation intended for
ats, when~ travelling at less
in three knots, when towing
skier in a specially marked
wring lane, or when in distress
rendering assistance to
lers in distress.
The spokesman warnS:
coating accidents don't
,pen. They are caused.
n't let an accident happen
you."1
Mr. Burn, who has been in
unconscious condition sincp
rch 20, was flown back tO
gland on April 14 by RAF
bulance plane. He way
Fitted to the Radcliffe
yal Infirmary at Oxford.
He and accomp ned y,7tuj
Staff at the Princess~
rgaret Hospital, who was the
Irosurgeon in charge of hiS
e.Dr. Duffy is still in
gland.
DEFENSE BUDGET &
:RESPONSIBILITY-NIXON

i ent INio saidNMondaA tha
re who would cut the defense
get will have to take the
onsibility for "sabotaging" the
hese np dn sota nsmuon
Fiction of forces in Europe.


Bahamian waters.


t





e


The March 10 accident in
which a fast-moving motorboat
ran over British Trade
Commissioner John Burn and
left him with severe head and
back injuries brought a strong
warning from a Police
Department spokesman, who
emphasized that the provisions
of the Water Skiing and Motor
Boat Control Act "will be
vigorously enforced."
"The recent mishap wherby
a bather was struck by a speed
boat operating in shallow water
off NemuPr evidence has once
need to bring to the forefront
!he existence of the Act," the
spokesmann said.
"During the warmer summer
months in the Bahamas,"
explainedd the police official
"there is a marked increase in
water sports activities such as
;kiing, and with such sports
here is an attendant amount
of danger to bathers and
;norkel divers should a boat
operator act in a careless and
negligent manner."


The 1970 Motor Boat
Control Act came into effect
following the death of a boy
who was scuba diving off Cable
Beach and was rnm over by a
water ski boat. The Act is a
stricter version of the 1965 Act
which it replaced.
FINES
.Under provisions of the new
Act, fines of up to $500 can be
assessed against people who
operate boats "in willful or
reckless disregard for the safety
of any other person or
pro ertyandodrc "t ontd

at a speed or in a manper likely
to endanger the life or limb or
to damage the property of or
injure any person."
All motor boats in the
Bahamas, under the Act must
now be registered. They must
carry their registration
numbers on both sides of the
bow.
The Act also spells out the
requirements concerning water
skiing. They provide that skiers
must wear a flotation device.


A GROUP OF 17 ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE STUDENTS left Nassau today for a
ten-day visit to Washington, D.C. Making the trip are, seated from left: Andrea Fox, Kim
O tten S ron Carrl Marg art aulr dLind d are r n Vat Critfls stn g i

SAC headmaster Lou Adderley. At the rear are Julian Russell, Huel Moss, Peter Isaacs
Edwin Grant, Dale Grant and Maceo Coakley. PHOTO: Philip Symonette. '



SAC suet gru vii Wah go


TWO WATER SKIING REGULATIONS are being
broken in this photograph. Under the 1970 water Skiing
and Motor Boat Control Act, skiers must wear a flotation
device or Ilfe vest, and the boat towing the skier must have
at Isast two persons aboard, one to seIrvea a lookout for
the skier, the other to drive. It is also dangerous to ski in
the congested harbour where ainchor lines could easily foul
a propeller or trip up a skier,
that at least one person of 16 shall water ski or drive any
years or over must accompany motor boat, whether or nol
the driver of the boat as a with a water skier in tow,
lookout, and that "no person within 200 feet of the


SE~VENT EEN fifth form s
history students at Saint t
Augustine s College are to leave
Nassau today to begin a 10-day s
visit to Washington, D.C*
Accompanying the students n
as chaperones will be Mr. Paul
Christofilis. head of the
school's history department,
and teacher Sheila Clarke.
Mr. Christofilies said while
in Washington the group will

Memorial, and U.S. officials in
Nassau have obtained passes
for them to visit the Capitol
""fidinr tandt i ink on a

sm'nenaddi ion, the SAC
tour the Argentine Embassy in
Washington, where they will
meet the Argentine
Ambassador to the U.S. and
will be shown films on
Argentina.
They are also to visit
G~eorgetown University and
their attendance at a play at
Catholic University is also
scheduled.
The students are preparing
for GCE examinations.

MORE BAD NEWS WHEN GOVT'S
GNP FIGURES RELEASED
WASHINGTON (AP) U.S.
Secetar of the Te sur Gesge V.
think a general across-the-board
wage-price freeze is under active
consideration by President Nixon.
In a statement to newsmen
Shultz said such a freeze "is not
under active consideration by the
President as far as I know."
H-owever, he seemed not to rule
out announcements this week on
wage-price controls.
Asked if major anti-inflation
announcements could be expected
this week, he said, "well, I don't
want to make any headlines. I
pass."~
The Secretary's statement that a
general price freeze apparently was
2tot being conskiewed acdivl vca
economic news for the Nixon
administration.


SIZES
4-6
YEARS ...

SIZES
8-18
Y EARS ."'


* ALL LEATHER FROM ITALY &( BRAZIL
e HIGH PLATFORMS


* EXCITING COOOURS
e MAGNIFICENT STYLES


ggyr Zir r


Police say walter safety replations to be
osh



'VIgof0HSly 800foCed' ma
othl
THE SERIOUS INJURY TO A SNORKLER last month off I boc
Brown's Point has renewed concern over the uses nd abuses of d pear tha


FO R BOY S


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POLYESTER


S AK
Available in WHITE, BLACK
& ASSORTED COLOURS


PAIR



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B~OW~~ ~Y~3~~3~u~f~il~




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~ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ __


Thurday, April 19, 1973.


amued of th a tor handh wer
made to share in their delight
in role playing and they in turn
sensed out appreciation. There
was a sympathetic communion
over the footlights.


from tred 988~
GRA disCOER Ort


quote flushing of impurities
ra be rleed wth and dn
ile8 Dd d' cont in on efitc
flow of urne and

10alo impu
feel better.p o
Dodd's Pills
For relief from
tiredness and
discomfort.



embamrrtassn prbles


FELIX MU5GROVE and RICHARD GENARO


AI~lilRl PESI O11111 BIIICE
TENT FUMIGATION
e RODENT CONTROL
INSECT CONTROL

R LAWN SPRAYING
fo~r FREE'l inspector --- phone
NASSAU -- 4-1332
FREEPORT --- 2-5521

Rentokil Laboratories Ltd.


By DRAMA CRITIC
SCHOOL teachers who visit
other schools in order to watch
dramatic productions put on
by students of that other
school are often hyper-critical
- maliciously and gleefully
aware of the least shortcoming.

Arofesciert n rivar aoextists, of
supS e.haH visit ed ot n 's
TuesdaymeApshle 10tetob wa

students and came away
captivated completely won

etusiabm a e zessnfect h
spirits of the youthful actors
and actresses i ao ved.co dy

with a strong Bahamian
flaor "Th LotAa
E erald", was wr ten Ara l
by the students themselves -
I1-year-old students of Fornt
1B.
It was sternly and uncom.


_ u'Lertws uASTIAN


promisingly unsophisticated,
with a stage bare of scenery
save for a large chair of
ponderous and ornate
antiquity which doubled as a
shoe-shine stand and a throne!
Signs advised the audience that
"IThis is a jail" or "This is the

aobt "th dHrald ,Th ri
little ghil with a formi asl ait

deniey etnjoined yus


oThis the and eoaen hbI ul
was soon rocking with laughter
at the antics of "Yancu", the

i'ng "niran mthehm sea, t
Prime Minister (who made his
dramatic entry on a scooter!)
and such unlikely characters as
Lord Lightbourne of C'at
Island, Lord Ferguson of
Exuma and a sinister
bodyguard in dark 'Ishades' a la
Ton Ton Macoute. enjoye i

the refreshing spontaneity and
boisterous exuberance of the
large cast.
The second comedy, a West
Indian version of the comerdy
by Moliere, "The Doctor in
Spite of Himself" was put on
by older students and was.
und erstandably, a more
polished performance with a
well constructed stage set and



furious. I have refrained from
singling out for special
comment any one of the many
people, staff and students,
involved both in stage and
behind the scenes because I
feel it would be invidious to do
so -- everyone did a splendid
job.
However, I feel sure his
fellow students will not mind if
1 mention Blanton Kemp who
seod ply 1o hee n thit
ebulient young extrovert, lies a
richly comic talent. True, he I
overplayed his part on

enain chabj an itdy rsui h
thatshis colleagues on s age hid
laughter at even his most
extravagant excesses. His every
action and particularly his
emp loy me nt of a rich
Bahamian dialect brought
shouts of delighted laughter
and applause from the
audience. The rest of the cast,
sensmn his mastery of the
and ie nce pla yed wi tt
admirable restraint and
sklfunlyvefed' him Uiln e_ --i

dramatic 'teamwork'.
And so ended an evening in
which, for me the keynote was
enjoyment the enjoyment of
the audience and the
enioyment of the actors. I
would doubt that one was
greater than the other and
herein lies the secret of
successful comedy. On
Tuesday night we had
communication we, in the


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'' ~B- *nc~hes thiroughiout thet Bahiamas a



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The can ious n p atil married:
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Poshiv Prscess lnst embarr
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fenr odon writer nid doo
Norforms dissolve at normal body
temperature, forming a protective
hlm, more effective than marerr.al
douchins. They are easy to apply and
do not harm delicate lternal tassues.
Sold at all phrodrIn packages



Neeormsr...amll
anod r ea to m*






NOP rffl18'




Informative bookklet write to:
NonrHe runnaes co., Im..
41n Park Ave, New York, N.Y. 18022


Once upon a time .. 65 years ago
The Royal Bank set up shop in Nassau.
Before long we were known as
"THE BANK"

Years passed . the Bahamas grew
and so did we.

Today, the Bahamas is
the tourist centre of the world.
and Royal Bank is the
Bahamas' biggest bank witht branches
throughout the Islands.
1sn't it nice to think we did it together?'
And we're now living happily
65 years after.


i


1;2

)( r
:\ +
,



~
,r
tl*'
p
i r'
~jrt

irr~


HOLIDAYV IAN

APPOINTMENTS

MR. FELlX MUSGROVE,
assistant food &t beverage
diirc or recently welcoHeodd y .
Inn, Paradise Island. Mr.
Genaro recently joined the
hotel's management team as
food & beverage director. Mr.
Genaro comes from Miami
where he was with the King's
Bay Golf & Country Club.

rece tly G ert p mtnd ht
Maitre d' hotel at Holiday Inn.


AH eV8Hilg Of BailamiaR COMOIII



Ilit 00 117 St. AM8e'S StudeRIS


COCOllti t S . Thak


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157












___ ____ __



Mr. Willie, Bahamian designer in New



York, shows his first Nassau collection
By SIDNEY DORSETT
SCLOTHING specially designed for the fashion-consions
Bahamian female may shortly become an everyday happening
here following Saturday night's successful debut of Na~ssu
fashion-designer Mr. Willi, whose collection of afternoon and
~ ~d~~C~e~gt- ~i~s~ evening wear was displayed in the Loew's Hotel Crown Ballroom, t


I


NEW REVENESCENCE

POWDERGLOWC
REVENESCENCE POWDER-
GLOW is the first combination of
moisturizers with powder in the
entire industry. An incredible prod-
uct. The first of its kind anywhere.

by Charles of the Ritz
AT THE CAR IB SHOPS


t


BAHAIVAS GAS
SP.O. BOX N1653 THOMPSON BOULEVARD PHONE 5-6401
OAKES FIELD, NASSAU.


f hursday, April 19, 1973.


Paradise Island.
The showing of clothing for
Spring-Summer also included
changes for the office-girl
featuring the new look in
pantsuit ensembles some with
matching hats, all designed by
the 3 I-year-old F~ashion
Institute of Technology
graduate. Mr. Willi. whose
name is actually William
Ferguson, is the youngest of
nine children of Mr. D~aniel and
Mrs. Delia F~erguson of l-ast
Street, South.
Hie has a distinct taste for
the F~rench search for the
hemnline and the short-type
cocktail dress
T`he fashion designer, who
has also travelled extensively in
Africa and tiurope, has
somethingp about him for
lighter thbric ma~terials Hlis
favourite, it seemns. is the matte
jersey which was a feature. Hlis
sho~w closedd with t we
silhouette changes of the same
material o~ne in black the other
white.
"Tlhey were my pride and
joy," says 2r. Willi whose
inspiration for the the pieces
s t em med from In
attemptt to emphasize the
beauty to be seen in black
people and white people. If
fabrics go along so well


together, then what about
people?" he asks.
NEW YORK
The two were just a taste of
the full show which featured a
special performance by the
Darryl Rochester Dance
Troupe from New York and
also a showing of clothing from
the collection of 19-year-old
Fashion Institute designer
Jaime McDonald, modelled by
Wander, Sharon and Marcia
Vaughan.
The elegance of Times
Square, all chic and cool,
presented itself in the silver-ice
blue creation by the young
designer who also designs
men's wear. The baggy
trousered suit with matching
vest also presented itself again,
reminiscent of the era long past
giving viewers a taste of the
'30s look.
flis creations for the
well-dressed man also included
a display of suits which he
mnated with matching sweaters
to give the multi-layered
appearance.
~The Saturday night show
also gave the audience a
look at hats to be worn during
the Spring and Summer with
some emphasis on the Easter
bonnets, of which there were


MOST PHOTOGENIC MODEL FINALIST - Princess Hanna
sets the pace with this black and white outfit from Mr. Willi's
Spring collection. White patch pockets and high neck new
variation of Kabuki sleeves and matching strap highlight this
gown worn with straw hat, also a Mr. Willi creation.


several.
Fifty hats were included in
the show many giving the
audience a feeling of nostalgia
at seeing again the "Gardener's
Hat" and even a red reversible
type hat with its curved
half-brim drooping in the
centre and gaily decorated with
flowers. Reminiscent of the
'30s, Mr. Willi was inspired by
the Billie Holiday life-story
"Lady Sings the Blues" in
creating it.
"It was a delight for me to
have been seen here and to
have you participate, it is my
first, but it shan't be my last.
.. I promise that the second
shall be much better," Mr. Willi
told his audience after
Bahamian models Princess
Hanna, Paulette Brown and
Ruthie Lightbourn had made
their final appearance on the
projecting catwalk.
Returning to his 321 E 45
St. fashion studio in New York
Wednesday. he had said earlier,
that his return to the Bahamas
"will depend upon the
demands from the Bahamian
women."
The desinger, who has "only
the sky as my limit," first
started fashion designing after
completing a course in window
trimming with the Pan
American School of Art five
years ago.
"My advisers thought that it
would be better for me to go
into fashion designing as it was
the belief that I offered much
potential in this field." Mr.
Willi said. Finishing his studies
in window trimming some five
years ago. he went to Fashion
Institute where he received his
Associate Arts degree in June
1972.



gratitude to his former
employers K. S. Moses, Bay
Stic '' er~cow~ners. Mr. George~L
Ageeb and his parents.


1






L
5

f
t
I

1
f
t
I


i

t
1
I
r




i
r

a





t

i


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1
t


MODELS COLOURS
FEATURES & PRICES AT OUR SHOWROOM!


e llE EdittUtt


a~~ CIHAS FA ASE 19l



~SrMAGCCHEE 11


r.









Thursdy, April 19, 1973.


OFFICERS GRAND BAHAMUA

HOTEL WORKERS' UNION

HURIE BODIE. riaht. and Leo Douglas, left, were last
Thursday returned unopposed for their second tenrs as
chairman and secrtary respectively of the Grand Bahama
branch of the Bahamas Hotel and Catering Workers' Union.
Also lected during the annual general meeting of the
branch in the King Henry Room of the King's Inn Hotel
were, from left, trustee Inez Rigby, treasurer Ena Stubbs,
trustee Hanna Bowleg, vice chairman Emrnet Forbes and
trustee Essie Duncombe.


I PYll- 7 & 10:35 p.m.


I


t --
i


II~B~I~EBgU~ _


YOU ARE INVITED TO HEAR







April 22dl to April 28th illS







A.F.ADIIERlfY III SCIIIII AIIUIIllill
HAROLD ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS


Extranaganza


OT TIT



TOO5THER


in CY ff rtS


,t th MOlitagU B08Ch HOt##









rtLittle JOhnny Kenyq

~wBiosis NOW
&:00 per Matinee
10:00 pm show & dancing


L. Use of our Pool and 1-3 mile of Beach tComplimentaryl
2. Mats. Towels and L~ounge Chairs (Comnplimentary)
:1 Four Championship Tennis Courts Night Tennis
. ~is a ice~res auna pBan hs complimentary >
6. 10 p~c off Weddings. Banquets and Meetings held at the
Resort
7. Additional Coc~ktall parties held throughout the year
8. Tennis and Swimming Clinics
9. 10 p.c. off all special parties and group dinners
to. Managers C'omplimnentary. Ireeption. Wed. 6:415pm -
7:30~pm
11. Jumbala Torch Light Steak C'ook out (Wed.)
12. Thursday. Champagne D~ance lipm Fore N' Aft L~ounge
I:1 Iater nuona not et me Ii enscs IoninW Htoom
IS. Fo'r those of you who like to play bridge. the Nassau
Bridge ('lub meets every Tuesday and Friday at 8l:00pm
in the B~ird Cage
PL~EAS CALL MANAGER'S OFCICE 78001
FOR FURTHER IN FORMATION


Last Day Friday
Continuous Showing

"BANDOLER30" PG


I


10:00 P.M. SUN~ WED
10:00 & 12:00 P.M. FRI & SAT
CLOSED THURSDAY



laslede *** drink pies flp
available art


Inr~rc"MI Ia c ol


C C;il


10 4 2

4 10 6
North, taken by surprise,
pop ed fig riwithatthhe Kings
being conned into something.
returned the 10. And from that
moment, the contract was
doomed.
The great majority of the


II H1'4


es :1 Ib


Last Day Friday
Matinee starts at 1:15

I"HIC Ewn n BO S" PG.
Bill Cosby
Robert Culp
PLUS

"R hnO WaneP.
orge Rivero
'Phone 2-2534


~
I~d~rrm~rm~


LAST DAY FRIDAY
One Matinee Only at 3, Evening 8: 30-'Phone 3-4666


THE TEN



starrring
CHARLTON' HESTON YUL BRYNNER


i .
61


PL


LI;L


that each hand plays an exactly
equal part in determining who
is going to win. A humble
contract of I Club carries just
as much weight as a Grand
Slam. A 'top' or maximum
score is allocated to every
hand quite irrespective of what
cards that hand may consist of.
This means in practice that
most of the hands will stay
alive just that bit longer than
the same hands dealt and
played at Rubber Bridge,
because the result will largely
be decided on tops and
bottoms, and players tend to
remember the hands that
served them well, or those
where they crashed, just that
bit longer than at Rubber
Bridge, where the cards are
scooped up and shuffled in at
the end of every hand.
Basically, there are three
forms of strategy in use at
duplicte eoYou han ,o al-
means living dangerously; this
appeals to a minority of bold
or mercurial players, but is not
the general approach. Or you
can 'play straight down the
middle' on every hand, seeking


score.~ This appeals to the



The bulk of players mix
their game. They will
occasionally shoot for tops,
and -fst so tno 'o wt the


t och is bnete thn


declarers used their Spade
entries in dummy to lead
Clubs, and they were thus able
to make their contract with an
overtrick. The one West who
made two overtricks set about
his task in this way. He could
see the obvious line of play.
and therefore thought that it
would not be difficult for
others to see it as well. Quite
early on, he took a chance,
which is the kind of thing a
duplicate player must do now
and then, as distinct from the
Rubber player, whose first
duty is to secure his contract.
The successful West, after
taking the first Spade with the
Jack, led a small Diamond and
inserted dummy's 8. South,
not liking it very much, took
the trick with his Ace and
returned a Spade to dummy.
West took advantage of being
i~nodtuhm tre lead aa 1lb wnd
the King winning,
Dia~moo d, an m orth hdoltittl
alternative but to clatter up
with his King and press on with
a third Spade, taken this time
by te Ae Ad Daoln t h
dummy, South again playing



small Club, which brought
down the Ace and Jack in tire
same trick. At last, and much
to ate hoh fon h


Hear s youcan ee West ddn't
mdo ayhing espec ially d bllant
h but e assembled hi m st
ianformation carefully tmed


h it de hse b ed h


auh hter l y f eirst saw and li tened
makclaed upm ind whether
pardtt, ofhs dfemea nour was
arogac top re superofdne


wfeo left e wihafn i f
phlosophyhoeer y
when yous hav hand lsenough
tooSi muchnn of anything qis d
Those who hav midetthe
man will no doubt eel wasIdo
tha't hew contibutd ai lot t hi
country and as the a fnnals of
histr" claim him, I ilalways ko
when yo= hv a nu,


another.
Let us look at a very
ordinary hand, the kind that
would be forgotten five
minutes after it was played at
Rubber Bridge, but a hand
which in fact went a long way
to deciding the result of a
duplicate tournament.
A JS K Q 5
A 2 J 7 6
10 95 3 Q 82
K 0 8 9 7 5
At Love-All, West finished in
1No Trump at every one of
ten tables, which in itself is not
surprising, because no other
contract commends itself. But
at duplicate, you must do
better than the others in order
to gain points, and obviously
West must not merely be
content to make his contract if
he wants to score on the hand.
It so turned out that every
Saes,Nsorthhatled compa is n
between the 10 declarers is
quite valid in this case. There
was a spread of results, ranging
from I down to 2 overtricks.
The unlucky West who failed
to make his contract got a

H"" did i apn
Before seeing all four hands,



will have to be manufactured
somehow. If South has the Ace
of Clubs, you will make at least
sui tic fm eomy If t


le ai the re s ningowhi h
l:" kb oe tkng doh ant

ralise dat if the e He
could be induced to open up a
suit other than Hearts, it would
work to his advantage. So at

trc ,'tina sall Heart!
Jhi 4a 3h fl ad


109 5 3
K Q8 2


K7 53
Q 8 2
0 7 5


.L ,t~ r





GEN\IE BRENNiER


SMatinee 2:30 & 4:530, E~vleE~lEve~nip~ng:30-Thon 2-1004, 2-10051




Starring
i R HAMF ULKNER (JDIBOWKER

IPARENVTAL, DISCRETION ADVISED.
Reevain nxma oot lrbaime by8:5 ill be sld -
I on first come, first selrvedbasis.~ '


r.



PG




s


at the


James Stewart
Dean Martin

"THE VIKINC LrEaEN"

arits


Cornelius Bros a sister Rose


Brook Benton


0.C. Smith


QtrbtilMI


THE: MAKING OF A TOP


TOMV SKINNE~R



VO01 CUSAD I O Sll I


LYNN ROGEllS


CWilfierald Beacit


BAH AM IIAN H AL L


- 30th


APRIL 2


Patti Jo


Billy Eckstine












10 Whr Qlrthat m


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 bn Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p~m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


1 I L


__


M TOR Bike-Lambreta. In
good condition. Price $275.00.
Phone 54278.
C9548
COMPLETE FURNISHINGS
OF 3-BEDROOM HOUSE -
LIEVINGROOMN3-BGD O M
DRAPERIES. LAMPS. ETC .
CALL AFTER 6 p.m. 5-5124.

CASFOR SAILE

C9508








1971 DODGE AVENGER
DELUXE $1500

1968 FORD STATION-
WAGON white automatic$60C
1973 BUICK REGAL
demonstrator $7000
1970 TOYOTA -
green, good mileage $850

t9e9 oATrCitUPE 12410 -
1970 TRIUMPH -

191P NIC VENTURA 150
1 1lw, EoG conitoT N.3000
WAGON reen, $00

1971 PONTIAC
VENTURA II yellow,
good condition $3000
1,972 CHEVELLE MALIBU -
very clean $4850
1969 FORD GALAXIE -

197 CHV VEA COUPE 0
green,automatic $2995
172 CHEVYdVEGA SED2N0 -

1968 PONTIAC FIRE BIRD -
goo c ALL FIRE$1500
like new $2250
8669 CHIEVROLET CAMAR 00

1 72 DODGE AVENGER25 -

1971 SINGER VOGUE -
white, radio, automatic $1500
1973 DODGE POLARA -
light blue automatic $9500
1971 FORD CORTINA -
green $2500
FINANCING AVAILABLE

Oakes F ied see us
Police B nar ak
Pone 3711
C9398
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1972 VENTURA


1097 VAUXALL VIVA$450

Au o.RBlu $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W
Automatic $850
1972 VIVA S/W
Automatic White $2400
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE,
4 Dr. Sedan
Blue/White $1850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
4 Dr. Auto. '
Radio. Orange $3500
1967 HILLMAN
Std. Green - $450
1989 FORD TORINO
Yellow/Black $1200
1969 CHRYSLE IMPERIAL
A/C Auto. $2606
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD,
Blue A/C $2800
1971 FORD MAVERICK,
Auto. Red $1950 .
1989 VIVA
4 Dr. Auto. Green 5695
1971 Rambler,
Auto. Blue $2100
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Green $1600
1968 FORD ESCORT,
Blue $695
1985 DODGE,
Blue 8300
Trade-mns Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34646-7-8

C9519
1971 FORD SPORTS Custom
Camper/Pickup Truck -
Standard Shift Excellent
Condition $2800.00


$200 each. Call 4-1659 after 5
p.m--
C9501
CA5 LLAC, O90,whi e, Lic.

failr4 condition. $1,000. Call
4-1 6


IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
Adv. C8500, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau.

MA 9RE WOMAN desires
work. Housecleaning and/or
babysitting. Honest, highest
references. Phone 7-7644 for
appointment.

TRADIE SERVICES
C9315




Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
.P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
IVIECHANICAL HANDLING
Er3UIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PAC KING
STECL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTC LYMAN FNDER


2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434


C93R3 YOUR building needs
Rei eCta Rm delln q
Budget Builders 32656,
C9299
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HU RRIC ANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS,

John S. GeorAN LCo. Ltd.
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421-2-3-4-5-6.
C9506

*FISLAN D TV SEaRVreCEon
Dowdeswell Street.
TV ntenna Bcoeoster

Phone 22618 P O. Box N32
5.30.

C8105
TRY US FOR SAFE SURE
CLEANING! ABCO'S NEWY
'SUPER STEAM' CARPETS,
UPHOLSTERY -TEL:

C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes. apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.


BU-dNSSM ,e Homeou ers,
at you Aremi~seN, Co Nta
Trash and
Garbage Di posal
Phone 55s191
P. O. Box N3343
Contract and job
lot cleaning.



C9544


C9310
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely f urnished-
$250 per month.Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.

C95BEDROOM Cable Beach
cottage, fenced yard,
rbeeaon fleulena fur shed,
DAVESON'S REAL ESTATE
Phones 2-1178 or 5-5408.
C9522
3 BEDROOM house Seabreeze
Estates with stove and
refrigerator. Phone 5-1703.
C9524
2 BEDROOM apartment, Tall
Pines Colony, Gladstone Road
water included. Contact C. B.
Moss 55191.

C9546
One bedroom apartment
completely furnished, Village
Road area. Phone 3-1328.

C9533
2 bedroom apartment -

uN is ekd $18 r r mo risr r
unfurinifre a15 '05 44ntnox

7094.

U L45MITED FRESH water

hoschi drn' do21, lanrm
seer eddg aou $20estpate
month. Phone owner 5-7224
evenings-


NAS7S4AU EAST 3 bedrooms,
2 bathrooms. newiv decorated
Rent includes gardening service
B$500 per month. Fully

WuEnT hA STREE e-o3 beds
3 baths, on waterfront. Wall to
wall carpeting throughout,

uTREE -OF nicel ESrnish~ed
3 beds, 2 baths, available 1st

DELAPORTE POINT 3
aes 2r b 1hs M town house,
SAN SOUCI just off Eastern
Road 3 beds, 2 baths -
furnished or unfurnished.
PROSPECT RIDGE
CONDOMINIUM 3 beds, 3
baths, town house, available

WESMT ARD VILLAS 3
beds, 2 baths, available 1st
May.
CONCHREST 2 beds, 2
baths, beautifully furnished
apartment, available Ist May-
No children, no pets
NEAR BALMORAL 3 beds,
2 baths, good family home -

has A shwash~e E- av i Ab e 1 t


cottage colony available
now.
TOWERS OF CABLE BEACH
AND CAREFREE -2
bedroomed and 1 bedroomed
apartments available now -
no children, no pets.
ARDON COURT, OFF
MARLBOROUGH STREET -
one 2 bedroomed apartment'
one 1 bedroomed apartment -
no children, no pets.
BEL AIR, WEST BAY
STREET one bedroomed
apartments available now.
Dorothy L. Atwood Limited -
'Telephones 28763/4/5/6. Call
during office hours, 9-5,
Monday to Friday.

FOR SAILE
C9535
1971 SUZUKI 50ecc
motorbike, handclutch. $175
ONO.
Boys clothing white shirts'
pants etc. 10-12 years very
cheap. Tel. 77764.

C9311
1 CONVERTIBLE COUCH
1 Fender amplifier and speaker*
1 250 Ib. trunk food freezer
Canl 77947.

5-9P4 EE BEDROOM Set.
Bookcase headboard, dresser,.
mirror, night stand, double
mattress and box spring
$225.00. Various baby Items
and swing set. Amana air
codtinr $200 Cash Only.


Two Hundred Sixty (260) in
the said Subdivision and
running thereon Eighty
(80.00) feet."
Mortg age da ted 23rd
September, 1968 Stafford
ad Louise Albertha Noewbold

Bahamas Limited
Recorded in Volume 1329 at
Pagesl252 to159
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
A ct oneer tor any persontho

price-
Terms: 105 the purchase*

balance on completion.
Dated this 17th day of April
A.D. 1973
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer

H RRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
Lane, situated five (5) doors
from Shiriey Street, South on
the Right hand side on Friday
the 4th day of May 1973 at 12
o'clock noon, the following
property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot
number Forty-five (45) m
Block Number Three (3) on
the Plan on the Subdivision
called and known as
"Regency Park whi r said

L n s Ofice ofbthe4 Bham

Mortgage dated 29th
u tebrm d96 r e George

Woirlrnoen to Fn nc

R crdedd in Volume 1102 at
Pages 17 to 23.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Act oneer tor any person o

price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balarc eon com letiaon.ofArl

A.D. 1973.
HARRY DA MALONE
Public Auctie r


MARIIE MMPPIES
C9512
24ft. Fibra Boat, 160 b.p. Ford
Interceptor E ng ine
inboard /outboard ,
ship-to-shore radio, life jackets,
with.p. tsparee engine, c mp51e
Phone 2-2763 day, 5-3801
night. '
C9309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-s?371.
C9491
65ft. Steel Refrigerated Vessel
like new. R/V Victory Call
Ryan at 1-305-3796990
C9514

YACHTS AND BOATS LTD.

CHRIS- CRAFT

CONCORDE

IRWIN SAIL YACHTS

MAGNUM MARINE

AVON INFLATABLES

20 foot Westerif twin keet
fibreglass stoop with a 15 hAp.
Evinr es aund sry yOn ob t

we ever offered. Has all dacron
sails and equipment too much
to I~st, from a barometer to an
Avon dinghy. At our dock
753 .0 Mathew's double cabin
flybridge diesel cruiser. Has G.
.6-a7kl diesels. A older ba

equipment and ready to go.
$11,500.00 1

AT THE DIVE SHOP

SCUBA UNLIMITED

Th newest submersible Fish
Bos, ~p us Diving Books*
Esca lating Pole Spears,
fUnderwtI nGugs pFan .culic
kinds of new equipment for
the beginner and enthusiast.

P. O. Box N 1658
STelephone 24869

PUBLIC AUCTION


at hi reme son OA bur L

Estehre D ric of t islnia
of New Providence on Friday

h19en2 h12 o'c ock pri A t
nlo ig property:
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Winton Estate in the Eastern
District of the Island of New
Providence being Lot
Number 218 of Block
Number 4 of the said Estate
and bounded Northeast.
wardly by Lot Number 21 C
of the said Block Number 4
and running thereon One
hundr ed and four
hundredths (100.04) feet
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by
a road reservation Forty
(40) feet wide and running
thereon Eighty-four and
ninety-f ive hundredths
(84.95) feet SOUTHWEST.
WARDLY by Lot Number
21 A of the said Block
Number 4 and running
thereon One hundred and
two hundredths (100.02)
feet and NORTHWEST.
WARDLY by another
portion of the said Block
Number 4 and running
thereon Eighty-four and
ninety-five hundredths
'(84.95) feet.
AND ALSO ALL that piece
prcel or oitdof lad situa e

Number IB of the said
Block Number 4 and
bounded NORTHEAST.
WARDLY by Lot Number

1Bo h ad Bl

feet SOUTHEASTWARD Y
by the said road reservation
forty feet wide and running
.4ey-o Ninetyredtnhd
R9.4 LYe bSOUT WESTr


1A of the said Block
Number 4 and running
thereon One hundred and
three hundredths (100.03)
feet and NORTH~RsT-
WARDLY by another
portion of the said Block


preservation ne two goo
hereinbefore described by an
arc Twenty-three and
ninety-six hundredths
(23.96) feet in length
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by
the said road reservation
rForty (40h)e fert wi -fao
and ninety-four hundredths
(84.94) feet SOUTHWEST.
WARDLY by Lot Number
IB of the said Block
Number 4 Immediately
hereinbefore described and
running thereon One
hundred and two
hundredths (100.02) feet
and NORTHWEST T-
WARDLY by a portion of
the said Block Number 4
and running thereon One

nihd dsixan hunderedand

Iheaefest subject to a
rserv price and to the ria t
persopr .nhisebehall to bid t

euch ee price at te ttia nof

ter oft sco pletiaon.ofArl
A.D. 1973
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.

C9538
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
Lane, situated five (5) doors
f om Shhirlhe Stsreee, osnh rd

the 4th day of May 1973 at 12
o'clock noon, the following

prL THAT Pitec~e parcel o

Subdivision called and
kowrn is *vnhoehe in ahe

mb Newd Povidenc ua d
Eighty-two (82), the said lot
of land hereby granted and
conveyed being bounded on
the North by Lot number
Eighty-one (81) and running
thereon One hundred and

hnrdthsan1d11.65S -fee
Sthe East by a road Thirty
(30) feet wide and running
thereon Fifty-two (52) feet
on the South partly by Lot
number Eighty-three (83)
and running thereon One
hundred and Three and
Seven tenths (103.7) feet


nubrSixty-two (62) and runn
ahend Seven tnh (367) feet o
and partl baty lo uber L


Sixty-three (63) and running
thereon Fourteen and Thre
tenths (14.3) feet.
Mortgage dated 17th May,
1967 John Edgar Sands to
Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Volume 1125 at
pages 332 to 339.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 17th day of April
A.D. 973
'`HARRY D.MALONE
Public Auctioneer.
C9537
HARRD D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
Lane, situated five (5) doors
from Shiriey Street, South on
the Right hand side on Friday
the 4th day of May, 1973 at 12
o'clock noon, the following


THE FAMILY of the late
Clyde Fraser wish to thank all
uhos who show d syrnpahy
bereavement. Special thanks to
Rev. Bishop Donald Knowles
C nd Mh sta ar Sweeting's



C9540
A MTACRA W BEACH

The following lots at
Yamacraw Beach Estates will
be placed back on the market
for re-sale on the 1st May
1973:-
Lot N~ormaN es

85 Dennis Williams
226 Benson Brown
378 John A. Munnings
432 Laverne Bethell &
James Clarke




R9E 10A5L Mpart-time maid,

C9541
MANAGERESS required for
business in Antiques and Works
of Art. Applicant must have
the sound knowledge and
experience in the International
market in Antiques and Works
of Art to enable him or her to
purchase and sell such objects
and to control the staff, stock
and finances of the business.
Apply in first instance in
writing, giving fullest details
and references, and educational
background, to P. O. Box 920,
Nassau .

C9531
HONEST, reliable married
Bahamian lady aged 40-45
required to work as a full time
maid for a family with small
children. Reference from
previous employer is essential.
Apply giving fult particulars in
writing to Adv. C9531, c/o The
Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207,
Nassau.

C9463
WANTED Married couple to
run small Out island hotel. No
children, minimum of two
years experience in food and
beverage, front desk and
bookkeeping, after formal
training. Mechanical knowledge
of motor vehicles, appliances,
and diesel ge~npeatorinplan als

including picture and
references to Mr. Moxey, P. O.
Box 1216, Nassau, Bahamas.

C VR SLuESsMAN do ad


Salry pluse Cm issmon. Ap s.
in writing to Solomon Bros., P.
O. Box N3218, Nassau giving
details of past experience.


C9476
FOR SALE
4 bedrooms 1bath house.LIot
80 x100. Phona 4-2786-
C9499
8 EL CY RETAL oSTSATE
selection of apartment sites in
good rental areas on New
Providence with easy finance
terms available. Also a
.selection of choice residential
lts int theo cEa hm es anod

e asye m t idea l for co mmerc ial

m0'x4 0'. Price 810m0 S
For int norml 2 9n2 an
appo nmen s call291
C9539
FOR SALE
1. Attractive three bedroom
two-bat rmoas ila ssa

suitable prospect. $45,000
furnished
2. Outstanding city hinlt
res id ence overlook np
Nassau harbour and
ocean. Three bedrooms
three baths, living room'
dining room, maid's roog
and bath, breakfast room,
etc. Fully airconditioned
and ceiling fans. Three
separate outside terraces,
attractive swimming pool
Excellent residence for

3.$180,00 furoirshed.mi
tw o-st orey hilitol
resident eio bMro sau


spearabth, ding ro m

HapoteSTc $27,000

REAL ESTATE
309 Bay Street
P. O. Box N8164
Nassau
Tel: 2-1041, 2-1042
C7351
FREEPORT BARGAIN
pay only $9.50 per week one
LUCAYAANC EST TEbeauFu l
prices 3,500. Only $350 down.
*rte idone o manl in cheque


P. Q. Box F-93, Freeport
aBahdmas Let ashelp youwih'
Investments.
C95i28
LOT 110 x 150 original San
Souci hiIlside. $7,500 cash.
Call McPherson & Brown Real
Estate 2-2682 and 2-2683.

C951LOT In Stevenson
Sub-division, off Twynam
Avenue, 80 x 80, only $4,000.
Telephone 2-2763 day, 5-3801
night.




FR ISnHED threebdi o

Kitchen. Cdatt 51199 evenings
or wee en s.



C9516
RUST-FREE station wagon.
A.,H.D. pref erred : Under
~$1000. Details to Adv. C9516,
c/o The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau.

FOR rRET
9365
RNISHED 3 bedroom 2
house with airconditioned
bedroom in Bamboo Town.
.Phone 36959.
C930
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
elharlotte near Bay. Immediate
rccupancy, ample parking
SInquire 4-2017*
'C9462
PALMDALE
12 bedroom furnished house
with carport, utility area has
Snew automatic washer. Phone

~C9492
FULLY airconditioned 2
bedroom apartment -
Centreville near Z.N.S. ring
i8679 ask for Mr. Pritchard.
C9496
UNFURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
~sh, hours with carport, lawn
and private yard. Call 32731.


I


THE NASSAU CIVIC
BALLET SCHOOL
will commence its Sprn Term
Session on Tuesday Apri1 24th
1973 For information
teep one 5-2353.

C9517



REVISE CO URSE
BI OLOGY
BJC 6 lessons $24
GC3 lvel 8 lessons $30


ZStoQt~ibr thn

CL ASSIFIED ADVS. 8 RING RESULTS -FAST

TO PLACE YOUR ADV.

TELEPHONE 21986 -EXT. 5


I -


I


__ _





I I


I I


-I I


PUBLIC AIUCTION


1 i


C9507
3 BEDROOM 2 bath
unfurnished house. Also 2
bedroom 1 both: partly
furnished house.
Phone 5-8803 42193


C9525
MOTOR CYCLES, YAMAHA
60. $195, Honda 50 $80
miscellaneous parts. Also
Scalectrix parts. Phone 58647.


C9515
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
white, 4-door, must sell as is
re-possession, best offer. Call
2-1690 Ext. 156 Monday -
Friday between 9 a.m. 5

C9543
1967 CHEV. MALIBU Super
Sports -good running
condition, comfortable bucket
seats, licensed to March '74.
(670 0.N.O. Call 4-1291 to see


Number Four and running
thereon Ninety-nine and
ninety-nine hundredths
(99.99) feet
AND ALSO ALL that piece
parcel or lot of land situate
um aforeslai obeitnge s
Block Number 4 and
bounded NORTHEAST-
WAR DLY by a road
reservation Forty (40) feet
wide and running thereon

gun re thes a(5.46 rety
EASTWARDLY at the


the Bank of Nova Scotia.
Recorded in Volume 1615
pages123 tol133.
This sale is subject to a
reserve price and to the right
for the Auctioneer or any
tpertson or his behalf to bid up
Terms: 10 percent of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on completion
DATED 4th DAY OF APRIL
A.D., 1973.
KIK S.HNSEY'


ENTERTAINIMENT
C9486
ENTERTAINMENT SPECIAL
at
SEAFLOOR AQUARIUM
Easter Monday only.
Chldre in4 1 yrs.s$1.00
$1.75
Good clean fun for the
entire family
Spend the whole day.
Snack-bar with delicious native
food & drink.
Go west Bay Street to
Chippingham Road and follow
the red Dolphin signs.

CARD OF THARNKS
* '9542


KIK S. HINSEY will sel a
the parking lot east of the

Strat ron tohe 28t tday o
Aplwl 173o rtl12 noon the
1. ALL THAT piece or parcel
of land being part of a lot of
land situate in the City of
Nassau in the aforesaid Island
of New Providence which said
piece or parcel of land is

H spta Lnne taend eudnni g
thereon Twenty-five Feet and
F~iftyaight hundredths of a
Foot (25.58) on the North by
other part of the said lot of
land reserved as a Footpath
and running thereon
Eighty-eight Feet and
Twenty-five Hundredths of a

ton hbu t e id eo bo t

thereon Twenty-f ven Fee tn
Fiftv+Isrdredths of a Foot
(25.50) and on the South by
land formerly called Henry
Stephensons but now the
property of the Estate of the
Iate Helen Margaret O'Brien
and running thereon
Eighty-nine Feet and
Seventy-five Hundredths of a
Foot (89.75) the said piece or
parcel of land having such
position boundaries marks
shape and dimensions as are
shown on the Diagram or Plan
hereto attached and being
delineated on the Pink portion
of the said Diagram or Plan.
2. ALL THAT Iot of land
situate Gleniston Gardens
Subdivision in the Eastern
District of the said Island of
New Providence and having the
number Twenty-one (21).... in
Block number Twenty-seven
(27) .... on the said plan of the
said Subdivision the said lot of
land being bounded as
follows :
NORTHWESTWARDLY by
Lot Number Twenty-two (22)
in the said Block Number
Twenty-seven (27) and running
thereon Eighty (80) feet;
NORTHEASTWARDLY by
Lot Number Twenty (20) in
the said Block Number
Twenty-seven (27) and running
tFeeo O150 Hundred and
SOUTHEASTW~ARDLY by a
road known as Elizabeth Street
and running thereon Eighty
( 8 O) feet; and



k2)and ruum ng The eo Fi y
(50) feet and in further part by
(Lot Number Twenlty-five (25)

nwen y-saedn (7 caknd rum i
,thro Ondeohuojedi v70
.such positions boundaries
marks shape and dimensions as
are shown on the plan annexed
hereto and thereon coloured
pink.
Mortgage dated April 28th,
1970 Sydney K. Whitfield to


property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the said
Wes ernoDistr t ofm thsad

comprising a portion of the
said Subdivision designated
as Lot number Two
Hundred Flfty~nire (259) on
the said plan which said
dlc prel or lot lan i


Sports Centre but now
known as and called Queen
*Ellzabeth Stports Centre and

r4.d meetr Estowardlyd b
Fifty-eight (258) in the said

S Mron istghty (80.00u fe
Southwardly by a portion of
Derby Road In the sa d
Subdivision and arunno g
hundredth (40.01) feet
Wastyardly by Lot number


O~~~ou 0 x RT.Sitsuat
fomtontlphone 2-4782.

ONYE EXTRA large two
tied irga r e bat, droonm

WUCI dn hgalil arphas S
f urnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
iAvenue Itween Shirley and
BSay Street. Facilities, phone,
Agundry, parking T.V. antenna,
itrconditiored. Phone 54631
,Maa 8 a~m. and 5 p.m.


G97


FOR SALE

OLF CLUBS


C9534
196i9 CHEVY NOVA 2 door
- One Owner In Good
condition, radio, new tyres, for
Information call T. Malone
24921 or 53859.


I


Thursday, April 19, 1973


L


PUBIC AUCTION nco


REAL ESTATE


FOR RENT


FOR SAILE


CAIRS FOR SALLE


PUBLIC AIUCTION


1 complete setTieit
Golf Clubs, 6 monhs
ld, i'k neW. Reguat
shafts, D-2 swingweight*
Canl 31393 after 6 p.m.




















REX MOR GAN, M.D. By~ DAL CURTIS

tiOHOU NEsOIC A~lT I N~o'T nEED jUNE t to TNAT )100+
THAT SE W tAY TO FlMp Twrs MO NLING 15 A L WERE ARE FOU F
ec00on Atoom I'M UP ovT' MART ALECK
K)VI'RE UP EARLY EARLY NURSE'
T~~~lb~ bIW E!EY ~ 4[
MV' A MY AGEI I



&P ,








IUDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS


,rt'lYu~ i
ii


as LIONARID BsARDN













White to movre: howr does he
Etn rhe usvou n 1
holds on. White found the win-
nint move. but blundered in his
fotllow-co and lost the gamec. Can
You do betrtert
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master; 45 seconds, chose exper;
2 minutes, countyrr plyr
minutes. club stegh:8
minutes. average; 20 minutes.
novic.

- SOLUTION NO. 908 -- -

Chess Solution

C- K2; Kt3 q 1f hiO
4 Kt xP mate. In theac


it 4 ExO Ch. Rx 8 and Black
witnse ttth a blakop for a pcawn


Iy VigTOR9 MOLLO
The exoert relies on technique
to solve his problems. ILess ex-

"*9'"{ Wst: Bath .as:
North




+J
qtQJ9752
OJ 10
B A 10 8 4
West Not 4at south
10 D 1
West leads the BK. How
should Booth 7
The will ask him-
self: did West lead the
SK 9 not a diamond ?
IThere can onybe one explan-
stion. He was loi for a ruR.
He would t have led snleton
~I3 bfe, l ,c~e when h
East in w ~he amen to gv
him that rub.
can' navai lsin Iric sn ?o tuh
re cPbut if he an eet ri o

Wie Ithe BQblocks Ithecl

has cashed the +Q, East will
have no entry.
West Est
69852 fCK74
QA 6 10
K9Q832 K8Q3254





S L ""


soa IrIa seh

Z EN ?be used ~tac

terst onea elsht-ltter were la the
uist. No plorals; as foreignwords;

SS words, very good; ST worbr
exceuesnt. solation tomorsew.
YasTsaDAY's BOLUTIONJ :
Alons sense usooer scn sea
rarew rown roase (r rore easaw
lras orase mew lao Wro
wrons.


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUIZLS


;I 1nuirsay, neyes as a, we a.



IRAND BA8




LOST AELP MAIIT~g
ir C7345LDE 3-OORDGL 90
LADES -COOURD GLD INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
BRAIDED BRACELE T, Chartered Accountants have
1 FREEPORT AREA. GOOD several vacancies forChartered
REWARD TO FINDER. S. or Certified Accountants in
BERNSTEIN (352-6855). their Freeport office
Successful candid atsriwilln b
HELP MNTE bonuses.Applicant shud
apply in writing to the Staff
C7341 Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Caalytic West Indies, -td. Co. P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Grend Baxhama, Freprt Baaa.a
job opportunity available for a C9527
Bahamian in their Ref inery WAREHOUSE MANAGER f or
Ma nte ancoer torgani *to Wholesale Grocery Business.
position: Mature person required with at
BAHAMIAN INDUSTRIAL least five years experience.
ENGINEER Recently Must have knowledge of stock
qualified from an Accredited control and accounting and be
anlg ho utraiu si g PaCnp r abl ei su ervise manual oa d
other network Maintenance handwriting giving details of
Management systems. No past experience to Box F318,
practical experience needed Freot
als euatioa cqua I~fica loo sd Freo
repluy tito: Dleputy, Chief C7348
Inusril ffce Mnstry of UAIFIED BAKER wanted
Labour Freeport, Grand for Grand Bahama Bakery.
Bahama, Bahamas. Must be well versed in Dough

C7350 Opir loni rdknan Mouw to
WAN TE D AUTOMOTIVE operate 18 Tray Travelling
MACHINES T/T ECHNICIAN, Oven.
MUST HAVE VALID Apply to Grand Bahama
M ASTE R M AC HINIST Bakery Ltd., Queen's Highway,
CERTIFICATE WRITE P. O. Box F-797, Freeport,
GIVING DETAILS OF PAST G.B.
EXPERIENCE ALSO ANY

DXSTERBEUNCIONIN VEHCL C ELDERS with ability to
MAENEERR, P.AOA Bo F-34, a da beu rints sand drawinags
test. L. &r A. Industries,
Freeport 352-5422.



Rucpert and the M1ixed Magic-34


STE VE R 0PER & MI KE N 0MA 0


7.
8.
gg, 9.
13.
18.
7 19.
22.
24.
25.

27.

32.
33.
35.

38~
39


--CARROLL RIGHTER'S




GENERAL TENDENCIE8: An excellent day to
'\arrange your affai rs o that you are able to
achieve the necessary backing that will pave the way for future
success. Employ modern ideas and methods so that greater
prosperity can be assured
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Think of whatever has been
successful in the past and use same methods for bigger results
in the future Your mate is in an excellent mood and your
happiness increases. Think along modern lines.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Ideal day to be with
oasociates and plan how to be more productive in the future.
The evening is fine for entertaining others or for attending
public functions. Do something nice for mate.
GEMINI (MAY 21 to June 21) You can organize the work
ahead of you now so it can be done efficiently and with the
approval of co-workers Find the right clothing that will
impress others. Show more devotion to mate.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Plan the
recreational activities you eqjoy which can remove mounting
tensions. Presenting a charming gift for the one you love csa
be rewarding. Put more romance into your life.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) If you cannot be at home think
of ways to make conditions there more harmonious in the
future. Consult associates about futate plans. The evening is
fine for entertaining home. Be happy
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Make sure you buy wisely
today while shopping and make this a most satisfying time.
Talk over with associates how to makes the future brighter and
successful. Exchange good idea with friends.
.LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Handle monetary affairs most
wisely today and through a new system, if possible, find a
better way to add to present Income. Give good, practical
advice to one who comes to you for it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You are able to have a
delightful time with persons you likre and make now
acquaintances as well. You can improve your appearance and
charm all those you meet. Relax at home tonight.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) A good day to consult
with a business expert and make long-range plans for the
future. Apply yourself more and gain those personal aims that

'"AP mC RN (Dc 2 o Jan. 20) Try to figure out which
one of your clever friends has the right answers to your
problems and contact this person. Engage in group activities
tonight and meet an interesting person,
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Talk with a respected
'"**,,*;*,abou wh t yur is nmc cad gan his su por inr
fitted is fine. State your objectives.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) You have a clear vision now
into the future and can go ahead and make plans that are best
for you. A new associate has the data you require but you
have to be tactful to pry it out of him
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who is determined and
mentally alive with curiosity. Be sure to have good books
around as well as other clever children Help select the right
sports so that your progeny develops well and quickly. There
can be fame in this chart, provided the education is adequate.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


DO YOU KNOW WHAT THAT LITTLE
6AL HAD THE NERVE tO TELL Mej
LAST NIGHT? THAT SAM THINKS
ABBEY AS HE WOULD A SISTER
HE NEVER HAD.'
~i~3 ~ 74/APyouP


~AL~ ~3


WnA 00~i~ AL ICAN SAY iS THAT 9 SAM
YOu TH NK \ 54 CAREFUL. SH~E LL. HAVE
OF HER BY HMN R.AU'GHTERED DRESSED
NOW AND EATEN BEFORE HE EVEN
REALiZES nE' SA A FEED LOT!


-



growling and snarling as they
giechase. Along the pier
thybound, swiftly gaining on
Rupert, who has not yet
" cur I"ecallngout au
Sorcerer, as he works fever-
ishly to start his craft. "They
are almost upon us I"
RESERVED


by saundes&ov

BEEBE!c~ --w D DY WNRNEL

NWOMADE THIJ SEER I$N /
UORTH A BUK A


Rupert and the Sorcerer are
no more than halfway along
the pier when the Wizard turns
to his fearsome animals,
ra nd ng lieeate mnA t
cries Hold them fast until
I an weave a spelll" And
the great creatures leap down,
ALL RIGHTS


"Do you have a small, inexpensive one? My friend just has
a slight touch of spring fever."


1. Hereditary 2 ~i. Bar legally
class 28. Hydraulic
6. Harts pumps

14. Of an areac 31. Infants' food
15.Our country 34. Oriental lute
16. Among 35. Roll of money
17. Fed-up 36. Trance
18. Branch of 47. Cornreltive of
learning either
19. Onvacation 38. Inocuous lie
20. Establish 39. Wild card
21. Confusion 40. Summethouse
22. Chrismas 42. Catkin
23. Integument 43. Large African
25. Irrigate antelope


3.
4.

5.

6.


~I


onlooker
East Indian
tigiber tree
Old measuor*
of length
Disain
Ordeal
Indian title
Hanit0Rile
Smother
Construe
Trouble
Explicit
Candle
Sweet potato
Succession
Entrance
Od trustinS

BaSton
,Forbidden
,Correct
SFiesta
. Flight
. Advance
. Fish's propeller
. Chatter
. Accordingly


44. Barrie
character
DOWN
1. Stupid
2. Penthouse


to. renow.l thoun l t I
9 %alc I enmno.45
St. Newspaper buyer. ((0
sa.,o ore nseat. to,
t4. Intermlatlon to
i. winner, ts, as
4. Navisator. (~8-
Y. Fcns ror rp..n to> O
cr. wecnt ahorec. to)
'1. Mtai dorkrs. (8s
to. Plrsuder.
la. It c J


In Idiit er
ness. 44)


No. 7,100 by Tt~ Ic MeAY
crtoss
a. rne train.l runl hy so. <0
LI lcstenr Il. to
a~ Trlish Inters tLonasily ('J
1s. Part ofl spech. to)
14 Cold place. (3-.0


*ar IIm. J mn.


A& Newsho1res


Bbt drbtato


By Ales Kotsk~


APARTMENT 3-G


Brother duniper











Thurrday, April 19, 1913.


C.S#IEETIWG


61RlS STILL


IUWDIFEATED


Roy & Randy Rodgers in



gf881 lnf5 1880 Big I






By GLA DSTONE THURSTON
FIRST BASEMAN ROY RODGERS in great form last night
scored two runs, knocked in two a second inning two run
homer --and collected two hits during his four times at bat as Big
Q Marketeers cut Jet Sets winning streak to six in a 9-3
showdown during the second game at the Queen Elizabeth Sports


MACKEY STREET TELEPHONE 2-3713


__


the store with the Bahamian flair





Easter Dreass








BI.OU~ halters, smocks,
body blouses

/BlZe/8


COME IN AND BROWSE AROUND






~e~ki~fen.BAY, STREET


Centre.
Big Q hocwever still maintain
a two and a half game lead over
s~c~ond place Becks Bees. Jet
ke*~ Itrapped to third with an
fouir recor()d three and

Abou parkling for Big Q last
night was~ short sto)p Randy
Ro~dgers who scored two,
knocked in one and collected
one hit during his three times
at bat. Andre Rodgers, who
collected the win, gave up six
hits, struckoiut five and walked
one
It was no~t until the sixth
inning with Big Q leading 9-0
that Jet Set taking advantage

eror sco ed te f pon. nt r
gave Jet Set their second.
Both sides fell scoreless in
the first inning as Big Q faced
the pitching of K~enneth
Woods. A fielder s choice put
Kendal Munroe o~n and with
two down Roy Rodgers
slammed the second pitch over
the centre field fence for the
Marketeers 2,-0 lead.
Randy Rodgers was Big Q's
ngjnallunin the third inning
the first inning Rodgers was
issued a base on balls and
advanced to second on a steal.
Second baseman Adlai Moss,
who also popped out in the
first inning, went down on a
sac bunt. However, left fielder
Vine Albury the third batter
of the inning ripped a triple
deep into right driving in
Rodgers,
Jet Sets in the bottom of the
third collected their first hit on
a a~:gle by Sidney McKinney.
M~oss collected the first of
his two rbi's in the top of the
fifth when his sac fly into right
drove in Ben Rolle. Rolle
reached base on a walk and
le second.
Jet Set again picked up
another hit in the bottom of
the fifth on a single by relief
pitcher Earl Thompson,
With victory in sight, Big
O rallied for five big runs on
seven hits in the top of the
sixth. Four rbi's and an error
gave Big Q the runs.
Ed Moxey led off with a
single into left and was driven
mn bow unroe's single itod es h
ground out to third. Roy
Rodgers picked up his second
lort when he drove another
single into night. Thirdbaseman
Ben Rolle loaded the bases
when he too got on with a




ar L1~


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct. ;B
Baltimore 7 3 .?oo
a~tot 6 2 .0

iw rdkee .7
ana iWest Divisi n
Minewcta ,, .5
onicag 4 4 .50 2V2

Taexs 2 s .286 4

Wednesday's Results
MItaluk e Cleveland 0
Chicago 6, Texas 5
California 3, Minnesota 2
New York 7, Baltimore 4


Clevean ( lG eL) 6 o~m .
(Dunning 0-1), 6 p.m.
Dtof>ifo- (Fynn po-) al Roston
New York (Peterson 0-2) at
Baltimore (P~almer 40), 7:30 p.m.
Oakland (Odom I-20 at Kansas City
(Splittorff 2*0), 8:30 p.m.

NATI NtADL LAGUE
W L Pct. GBU
Pittsburgh 7 I .875
Chicago 6 3 .667 I Y
New York 5 4 .556 2%
Montreal 4 5 .444 3K
Philadelphria 4 S .444 3%
St. Louisr I 9 .100 7
West Division
San F'dciso 1 4 ,7114
Cincinnatl 9 4 .692 %


Houston 5 8 .385 4%
Atlanta 3 9 .250 6
kWednesda 's Results
Yotreal 2, Philatdelphile I
g Francisco 4, Atlanta 3, 11

annMa 4,l Cincin 22
Houston 7 Los Angeales 2
Hooton 0-1 and Reuschlel
ago ow York (McAndrew 01
Koosman 1* 2, I:05 p.m..
Mon o-te~nso I at
Pibtutsb LBftr Ie at St. Louis
Splaks ) 1:30 pm*
Asrj Fnbos eMicr -o), I at Los


C. C. SWEETINGC High Senior
Girls found Government High
another notch in their winning
streak as, undefeated in four games,
they stopped G.H.S. 15-4 and IS-7
as the Inter-School Volleyball series
continued yesterday.
"They are coming on slowly,"
conmnt d oach fham Grat. d h
time to give them the proper
traininS, but the time that we had,
web pt into prcoperhacti at i
concentrating on a lot of defence.
"They ae very good on de enes"
department is coming on good," he
said. "It is being led by Laverne
Jackman a member of the Ladies
Nationha Tdeam. aAlsom rnha e. I
is Erica Jackman and Deborah
Foster. "In the second half of the
series, fans will really see? the
of> s ve clicking," Grant
As Sweeting's won the serve
yesterday, Foster went to the line
and rallied off eight consecutive
poins ,"ludig btahrentac before
Erica Jackman added another two
points and Sweeting High was
ahead 10-0.
Catherine Brown taking the
service for G.H.S. contributed the
first two points on an ace and a
serve deep into C.C.'s back court.
Sweeting's mis-serve resulted in
orHSe pcin ahup anotherG pit
McKay gave! the winners the ball.
Patricia Minus saw Sweeting High
to garne point when G.H.S. picked
up their final point of the game
then Lae sne Jakman enen itS.o
the service ran to a 3 0 lead. Debble
Foster was able to give sweeting
High only two points before? she
~..S. agi Tta leds a ircletthr.
points and led 6-2. Realizing their
need for defence, Sweeting behind
the service of Erica Jackman took


their offence and went to 11-7 on
serve by Jackman. With G.H.S. still
unable to maketuse of their serve

M snuise t r June Minter)I't la e
th ae USSIES BEAT TO1
SCARBOROUGH' TOBAGO
etP te re Am rlannetouleng
unbeaten record here Wednesday
by defeating a Tobago XI in a
40evetr ame.


single
Randy Rodgers. Adlai Moss
and Vince Albury all followed
with three consecutive rbi's
mnovlng the Marketeers 9-0.
Battling hard for the win,
first baseman Eugene
T'hompson made use of a two
base error by right fielder
Eiugene ifiggs to reach second.
Another error at right field saw
Thompson scoring the first run
and catcher Les Gardiner on
base. G;ardiner scored on Louis
McQuay's ground out to
second.
As Big Q went scoreless in
the seventh inning Eugene
Trdompson' ri, ybringil8 Ji
Set were allowed as time ended
the game,
Roy Rodgers at first base
collected eight put outs.
Moxey behind the plate got
five.
** ** **
BECKS WIN 19-1
BECKS BEES came alive last
night and avenged their loss to
Del Jane Saints on Saturday

Hanestic Lbdr hand to oildkth
a 19-1 victory last night at the
Q.E.S.C.
Becks remain in second
place two and half games out
while Heastie keep the cellar
with a one and two record.
Becks rallied for 12 in the
first inning, one in the third,
one in the fourth and five in
the fifth. Heastie got their sole
run from Nickie Miaoulis who
stole home in the bottom of
the fifth.
Facing 19 batters, winning
pitcher Gilbert Moncur struck
out four, walked two and gave
up three hits
Short stop Sonny Haven
with three official times at bat
scored two knocked in three
and collected one hit. First
baseman, Anthony Huyler also
scored two and knocked in
three during his four times at
bat.
BIG Q MARKET
ab rh rbi
Ran Rodgers 3 2 1 I
Moss 2 0 I 2
Albury 4 0 2 2
Maxey 3 1 I o
A. Rodgers 4 O I 0
Munroe 4 2 I I
Ho ggsedgers 4
Cooper I 0 0 0
Rolle 2 2 1 0
JET SET

E. Mcquay 4 o o o
McKinney 4 I 2 o
EuThompslon4 I I o
Brooks 3 0 0 0
Barrows 3 o I o
L. Mc~uay 3 o o I
Nree 3 o o o
Ea Thompsont I 0 1
Dean I 0 0 0
LEAGUE STANDINGS
W L
B~ig Q Market 12 I
Btck tsees 10 4
D~el Jane 7 7
Pa aise Is nd 6 7
Bahamas Blenders a 1

UK SOCCER ARESULTSutof
Wednesday Night's British Soccer
Games:
Leeds 0 Manchester United I
Manchester City 2 Newcastle o
madff uee' Park o
Crewe 0 Southport 2
Hereford I Stockoort o


FINALS NITEE
By MIKE AL ~URY
AS THE SECOND HALF of the
1972-73 season comes to a close,
we find a combination of things
that could happen in all three
leagues on the final night, which is
position night. (Position night is
when the teams bowl in the order
in wh:hd Che st nd e r gu)
lead the really tough contenders,
('ity Market, by three games with
o~nly three games remaining. City
Market will be meeting Mercury,
ilnd must win all three games to go
irto a tie feon first place. If thi dofs
start.
In the Zephyr league,
Thompsoln's hold a sliml IK game
lad o ps thh demndin sj a posT,
olnly one game from Amoury's on
position night while Amoury's must
II1t e Md~eima Pcaue r~s e
three games. Claridges will be
bowling Esso and must win all three
games to go into a tie for first
plc l f thisoldoof aae toentaa
pinfall will be necessary to
determine the championship.
However, Pritchard's could be tied

ntme snd IfI itdhgees win II the
from the Tigers.
PLAZA LEAGUE
Mercury won allI three games
from Hlome Furmiture to maintain
the etthre rrpd lead over C~it
led the Mariners to victory. City
Market kept their hopes alive of
ging it gathuen deat m r-o
Out Island Airways. Ronnie
Turnquest 223 (601), Burnice
Sands 224 (596) and Billy Roberts
Ollket n.a Mulb Obren rof d
in the best score for the flyers,
Finco handed Sawyer's an up-set
as they won two games from them.
Percyd Knes andc Ro ert Taylor

respectively.
ZEPHYR LEAGUE
Eleanor Darville 174 (458) led
Maura's to a two game (up-set)
victory over first place Thompson's.
This is a case where no team should
p be taken too lightly. Lola Pinder
ted Thompson's to their lone win.
Amoury's moved a little closer
to= ds the torpm as epyrwo alu
Rose Saunders 203 (505) and
Pallas Roberts 182 (469) starred for
Amom y' wieaAnnie Russell was
Home Furniture won two from
New Oriental after losing the first
gme by fault. Joan G~r sam was
Lee Malone was high for the
Lalundry ladies.
MADEIRA LEAGUE
leEsso mhowedo kt al t ee gmms
from Guinness. Sydney French led
the Tigers while Jeff Albury
struggled to be high for the
toritmc a d's dropped into second
place as they lost all three games to
the tough Claridge squad. Claridge
moved mnto a tie with Prichard's by
winning the three games. Bradley

ctee (3 (69 and I swrt
Pritchard 's.


PHOTO: Rickey Wells




08Illill 0f r


Pro/Ani tourney
SUNDAY is the closing day
for entries for the Second
annual Bahamas International
Pro/Am Invitational Golf
Tournament to be played at
the Bahama Reef Country Club
May 3 to 6
The tournament, offering
purses and prizes totalling
$7,500, is co-sponsored by the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism,
Ifer Bhms atorofessiotnae
host Bahama Reef Country
Club.
A $50 entry fee will cover
four days of golf, carts, club
storage and three golf balls, as
well as three cocktail parties
and a gala awards banquet.
Special rates for competitors
have been arranged with the
Holiday Inn, across the road
from the golf course.
The field of 50 teams
composed of one pro and three
amateurs, will compete for pro
prize money of $5,000 and
amatu up ies totouin me ,S

be a 54-hole event. Amateurs
must have a verified handicap
of 18 Or less.

Entries may be made at the
Bahama Reef Country Club in
Freeport, or through host pro
Howard Archer of the Bahama
Reef Country Club.

alio jo e


47 O*pi s or a m eet







Saturday at the St. Augustine's College pool during their second
annual swim meet. The meet starts at 9 a.m.


de Cardenas, G~reg G~eiselman,
Patricia Muirine, Michael
Redwood, Dawn Waugh, Karen

Vnd erV hootna Chor s
Thompson, J ulie
Mc Cor uodale, Camille
Adderley, Jef Waugh, Donald
M a rt i n b or ou gh, Diane
H olow we sk o J a ne
McCor uodale, Gerarda
Sawyer, Dominque Farmey,
Lourie Page, Rocky Adderley,
Michael Palmer, William
Jorgenson, Michael Holdon,
Francisco de Cardenos, Susan
JH lwson tin k u lowesko
McCorquodale, Mark Norton,
Tony Carey, Ronnie Norton,
Debbie Sawyer, Charlotte
Knowles, Mario Carey, Bruce
Knowles, John Liadley, Tauxmy
>oe Cli*o Sayr 7h
Adderley, David Griffiths, Sean
M arny, aGee gP hipot,
Philly Holdon, Fiona Holdon
and Douglas Palmer.


It was pretty difficult for
coach Betty Cole to pick the
team as many turned up for

to who sam toe bes y
cnsis ety were cosen and
the Dolphins are hoping to
retain the cup they won last
year in Jamaica.
The Dolphins committee,
giving coach Cole great
support, has organized a full
schedule 'for their visitors
one of the highlights being an
Underwater Tour courtesy of
Mr. and Mrs. Bronson Hartly.

Fre port oisitro ay wee the
will compete against the
Freeport Swim Club.
The Dolphin competitors
are: Jennifer Lewis, Ignacio

BAGO
Put in to bat after losing the toss,
the Austrla os Letr e gan J~or
Chappell enabled the tourists to
reach 170 for 4 at lunch. '


BONANZA l
The BGA 'Open Bonanza' 73
b pns at Corall Harbour tomorrow:
d eo folwn re wthe starting times
No.I TEE
G.IT0 rD.q st, Roall Roy Bowe,
10:10 N. Radford, B. Govan,
A. Shaw, T. Lancaster.
smith P. stewart, HDend J.Nel ly
10:30 --A. Johnson Jr., S.
Quant, Robers M. amliton.
10:50 A. FeLlla, E. Dean, B.
sdiet. Law ce R.

11:10 A. Aitken, C.
Bernar~dirm,L ft Hli, C. Cardnaer.
H. Bethel, B. Cooper
s14- T rsM re ,R. Keity,
R.:5 Hise M. wolestencroft, B

Hig2s. RoI unfgit,wt C oper, B
L. 10 Ms I efndAlanrn tunn, 8
latter, C. Rogerson.
No. 10 TEE
Hep u n, R. A. MHSweey TonL
Parker
..,50d ol rA.R InidSri B. Smith,
10:20 P G. Sealy, M. Lockhart,
S. Bennett, R. Astor.
Be ja n, G.. Eir s, BB. I;
Nc ils, i. Btel, L. R san, e.
II:00. -B. Halliday. E. Dorsett,
D. A. Cartwright, B. Bonaparte.
He:1 un- R. T fqust, D
Ad~cerley. I1:20 R. Nichols, C.
Miller, F. Robertth F. D
Murlan, D.% bierdT Mc e ny
5.:5 r sR RCariton, H. Stewart.
12:00 F. Wolestencroft, G. K.
Smith, K. Willis.
12:10 F. Higgs, C. Saunders,
M. Taylor.

Gary Bai c


NOW ONLY


CHAM PION J OC K EY
GARY BAIN chalked up a
total of fifty six wins this
season and outclassed his
fellow jockeys for the third
consecutive year. However due
to his suspension, it is still not
certain whether he will be
named Champion Jockey of
1973.
Bain was suspended on
March 27 because 'of
"indifferent riding" on Spanish
Contessa. An unsuccessful
appeal was made to the
Bahamas Racing Commission
but the Commission allowed
Banto ride only in CupoRac s

to victory in the Bahamas
Racing Commission's'
Thiree-Year-Old Cup Race. (See
picture below).
Lollipop's win gave trainer
Melvin Godlet a 31-30 winning
edge over fellow trainer Larry
Demeritte as he was awarded
the Trainer of the Year award.
Both trainers were tied at 30


wins each prior to Saturday's
meet. Demeritte did not have
any wins on Saturday.
Marring the final meet,
which was attended by a
record 3050 people, was the
suspension of jockey Geoffrey
Griffith. G~riffith, who rode
favourite Jungle Pie, was put
down for the first 12 meets of
next season,
Winchester ended up the
winner and El Pulsar came in
second. That combination
(7-6) paid $140.80 the
biggest payoff of the day in
the seventh quinella.

Jubl I as ano so spendhdu tie
properly trained after she
crossed the finish line three
minutes after the end of the
race. In the three-year-old cu~p
race she took off well with the
pack. Shortly after that on
reaching the four furlong bend,
Jubils stopped, turned around
and walked away in the other
direction.


s '~~~' r a i








WiNS;-TON KNOWLES, second from left, holds the huge floating trophy presented to
him by Bahamas Racing Commission chairman Wensell Nichrols, left. Knowles' horse
Lollipop out classed a four-mount field to win the Bahamas Racing Commission's
Three-Year-Olds Cup Race. Jockey Gary Bain rode Lollipop to victory..


a~~ ~~~o~a


ON ALL APPLIANCES


') '


but will he get the title?


Z_ nI' I~'1J1

~~x""~


m