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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03324
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 16, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03324

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ENJOY FREE CHAMPAGNE
ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
-TELEPHONE 77303/77778--


cIu


L rthun?


teid with Potmaster of ah.amas for postage concession within the B.hama.s Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


'DRASTIC MEASURES NEEDED OR THERE COULD BE

SERIOUS REPERCUSSIONS ON ECONOMY' WARNING


Lack of business reaches crisis 4--


By NICKI KELLY
BAHAMIAN HOTELIERS will have to change their
approach to the tourist industry if they are to weather in th e
the present crisis, a prominent member of the Bahamas -g-


LNALY MAIXiSN fLII ii
NASSAU ONLY


Hotel Association said today.
The Tribune spoke with
several Association members
today, and the consensus was
that the Bahamas is running
into heavy water in
competition with other resorts,
and that unless drastic
measures are taken there could
be serious repercussions on the
economy.
Both the Ministry of
Tourism and the hoteliers are
sufficiently concerned by the
first quarter's poor showing to
consider an in depth study of
the hotel industry a matter of
urgency.
While some of the hotels,
notably those on Paradise
Island, are managing to stay
afloat, all of the large ones on
New Providence are having
financial problems, the severest
of which is being experienced
by the Sonesta Beach.
However the manager of
the Nassau affiliate of another
international chain admitted
that business at the moment
was "miserable" and that after
Easter it was "alarming".
CRITICAL
"This hotel has been given
number one priority by the
chain, but it is still regarded as
the really 'critical' hotel in the
international division," its
manager said.
All the hoteliers questioned
said it was difficult to pinpoint
any one area or situation that
could have brought about the
present occupandw- crisis.
They named a number of
possible considerations a
shift in popular taste, high
room and food prices in a
predominantly package
market, news stories tending to
show the Bahamas in a bad
light and more recently, the
increases in customs duties and
emergency tax, which will send
food prices still higher.
The hotelier, urging a new
approach in outlook, has
managed to keep his hotel
filled with group business.
"'The crisis being
experienced in the Bahamas is
really the crisis that exists all
over the world," he said.
"More and more people are
going in for group travel and
spending less and less.
Unfortunately hotels here are
used to catering to the
wealthy, unlike the hotels
which have sprung up along
Spain's Costa del Sol.
"We have got to accept the
fact that we are definitely
moving towards a mass market,
and this is what is going to
make or break us."
TRAINING
The hotelier pointed out
that if the Bahamas was going
to be selective and aim for the
so-called "quality" market,
then it would have to have
trained bodies.
"There is a shortage of such
people everywhere," he said.
He also exploded the myth
that only people in the lower
income bracket fly charters.
"When I started dealing with
such groups I was surprised to
find that there were many
professionals such as doctors
and lawyers among them.
Everybody today is very
money conscious.
"Previously a doctor perhaps
took only one vacation a year,
but lower group rates have
made it possible for him to
take two or three vacations a
year for the same money," he
noted.
Hotel administrators also
had to consider the economics
of trying to maintain full
facilities in the light of low
occupancy, The Tribune was
told.
"If you keep five bars open
with exactly the same number
of tourists spread out between


/ RATTAN

SOFAS
AND CHAIRS


Nassv

them you're not making any
more money only adding to
your expenses.
TRIM OPERATION
The only alternative, he said,
was to trim your operation and
shut down unprofitable areas.
"It is not entirely right to
blame the government. We in
the industry are very much
responsible for what is
happening because we have
failed to adapt and assess our
problems in their true light."
Other hoteliers agree that
after Easter they will probably
have no alternative but to close
down certain dining and bar
facilities.
"We're lucky if we catch our
guests for breakfast. After that
they look for the inexpensive
places in town to eat," said one
hotel man.
He admitted his operation
lost "a fortune" last year and
expects to sustain an even
bigger loss this year.
While New Providence hotels
are going begging, Montego
Bay, Jamaica hotels are
packed, as are hotels in Aruba
and Hawaii.
Students comprise the
largest part of the Easter
business in Aruba, The Tribune
understands. Certainly the
student deluge has not hit
Nassau this Easter so far.
GOOD BOOKINGS
One of the small New
Providence hotels, which
appears to have adjusted to the
package trend is the
Anchorage which is able to
report good bookings for
Easter.
Manager Rudy Moultrie said
that his hotel had a number of
individual groups coming in
from the U.S. and Canada, and
early in May would be offering
accommodations for Bahamas
World Airlines charter groups
brought here from Belgium.
Since all the hotels admit
they are facing serious money
problems, what is the answer?
The large hotels are
convinced the answer lies in
another casino on the Nassau
side.
George Myers, whose Nassau
Beach hotel has been able to
maintain "a reasonable
volume" of business, feels that
the Cable Beach area with
the Nassau Beach,Emerald
Beach and Sonesta requires
some kind of stimulation to
keep visitors on this side.
The Sonesta management
has already openly stated that
without a casino it cannot
hope to operate profitably.
CASINO
Pointing to the discrepancy
between Nassau and Paradise
Island bookings one hotelier
said that with Nassau's greater
attraction the reason for the
difference had to be the casino.
One dissenting hotelier,
however, does not anticipate
that another casino will bring
more business to the Bahamas,
only spread it a little bit
thinner.
"It is better to run one good
casino than three poor ones,"
he said.
Furthermore he felt that
there were many people who
came here who were not
attracted by the idea of a
casino.
The government is
committed to the policy of no
more casinos. As an alternative
it h as proposed the
constru action of an
international convention centre
in Nassau.
Hoteliers agree that such a
centre could tap new markets
and bring larger numbers to
Nassau.
The Tribune understands
that there have been numerous
offers of property in the C('able
Beach areas. Government,
however, is hoping that a
private group will build it.


Wrong attribution

in food story
THE STATEMENT that "it
is impossible to sell goods for
less than they are costing us"
was incorrectly attributed in
Saturday night's Tribune
report on food costs to Mr.
Vincent Iliggs of the d'Albenas
Agency.
Mr. lliggs denied making the
statement to the press.
It was also incorrectly
reported that Mr. Higgs was to
represent local wholesale food
dealers in a meeting Tuesday
with the Prices Commission.
Mr. Hliggs said this morning
that he will be representing
only the d'Albenas Agency.
Other wholesalers will have
their own representatives at the
meeting, he said.
He added that the
Wholesalers' Association will
be making no press statement
on food prices until after the
meeting on Tuesday.
The Tribune regrets any
embarrassment the errors may
have caused Mr. Higgs or the
Association.


Caribbean area be restored.
The resolution passed at the
34th Board of Directors
ineeting at Roseau, Dominica,
on October 19-20 last year.
was released today. Mr.
Holland G. Smith, president of
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce. attended the
meeting.
It was pointed out in the
resolution that many of the
underdeveloped and developing
countries of the Caribbean
depend partly, and in some
instances, entirely on "U.S.
tourists as a means of
bolstering their economy." It
was 'possibly the largest
source of their U.S. dollar
earnings, which in turn enables
these countries to purchase
manufactured goods from the
U.S.A."
'The lowering of U.S.
airfare rates to '1urope and
other parts of the world, which
reduction has not been
extended to include this area,
has been the means of diverting
many potential U.S. visitors to
other countries where air fares
have been lowered."
The resolution said that the
exchange of trade between the
Caribbean and U.S. "shows a
tremendous favourable balance
to the U.S., estimated to be
over 250 million dollars
annually. "
ASSISTED
The tourist industry "at its
inception was considerably
assisted in this part of the
world by the Government of
the U.S. permitting returning
citizens $500 of merchandise
and one gallon of liquor free of
duty which was subsequently
reduced to $200 and one quart
of liquor."
These reductions "have had
a telling effect on U.S. dollar
earnings in the area and have
been the means of a lessening
in the purchase of
manufactured goods from the


Price: 15 Cents


HOTEL WAITER

T DIES IN CAR

SSUNK IN LAKE


1 I 1


1i hotel industry


UFierce competition faces


CLEMENT MAYNARD
.. assesses tourism future

The matter is now under
considerations and is one of
the areas to be explored during
the feasibility study.
Tourism Minister Clement
Maynard, who has been
travelling extensively to
promote travel here, admitted
at a Miami press conference
recently that the Bahamas has
not "licked the problem of
poor service" to tourists, but
said his Ministry began a
programme about three years
ago to provide improvement.
"I don't think anyone will
ever lick the problem
completely," he was quoted.
The Florida paper "Today,"
which carried the story, said
that the 1973 "Fielding's
Guide" to North Atlantic and
Caribbean tourist attractions
gives the Bahamas "poor
grades" in the category of
performance and attitude,
which were described as
lackadaisical and resentful.


Bahamas, Tourism



Minister warns in speech

MIAMI, Florida: The Bahamas Minister of Tourism, the Hon.
Clement T. Maynard, said Thursday that the Bahamas is involved
in the .ercest competition ever to attract holidaymakers. But the
Minister added that his country had something "extra to offer"
and that bit was a quality product with a special component
the friendly Bahamian people.


Speaking at the weekly
luncheon meeting of the
Rotary Club of Miami, Mr.
Maynard said air travellers are
enjoying an unprecedented
explosion of promotional and
reduced air fares which have
completely eroded the
Bahamas' competitive
advantage of proximity to the
major United States markets.
"Not only can prospective
visitors travel to Europe on
very inexpensive package tours.
but sun. sand and sea
holidays are springing up
everywhere," he said. "I am
sure that Miami and Miami
Beach are conscious of the
situation. However, the
Bahamas has something extra
to offer, and that is a quality
product with a special
component which is the
friendly Bahamian people."
Telling the Rotarians that
the Bahamas tourism forecast
for the 1970's was optimistic.


Mr. Maynard said his ministry
was not interested in numbers
alone.
"Our chief concern in the
1970's is total visitor
ex penditure," he said.
"Attention is being paid to
attracting quality business.
This approach will benefit the
entire business community and
the Bahamian people."
The Minister added that
more emphasis would be put
on air arrivals.
SERVICE'
Then turning to the question
of service, Mr. Maynard said,
"The success of the Bahamian
tourism has rested for many
years on the quality of service
and the pleasant atmosphere of
our islands, supported, of
course, by our outstanding
subtropical climate. But as we
expand it is becoming
increasingly necessary to
concentrate on training
programmes so as to keep our
standards of service and the
right attitudes at a good level.
Training, of course, will
improve efficiency and should
help to motivate those involved
in the tourism industry.
However, it is only time which
provides experience and
engenders professionalism. I his
year of independence will bring
about a fresh approach as the
Bahamian people accept the
challenge of Independence and
gear themselves to new efforts
in the national interest."
Mr. Maynard added that
scholarship grants would be
continued to be awarded to
Bahamian youths interested in
pursuing training in hotel
administration and tourism. lie
also sopke about plans for
implementing a hotel training
school.
Mr. Maynard invited
Floridians to come to the
Bahamas for this year's
Goombay Summer which starts
June 3.
"There is an extra bonus this
year to Goombay Summer in
that our Independence
celebrations will add a new
dimension during the period of
July 4 to II," Mr. Maynard
said.
"On lulv 10 we expect
that there will be many
thousands of visitors to the
Bahamas from the United
States and countries all over
the world. We believe that
happiness is to be shared and it
is our hope that our neighbours
will be close to us at that time
to help us dramatize our belief
that a small country can make
its contribution of peace. love
and fellowship. We feel that at
least where tourism is
concerned, we have a real
contribution to make."


JENNIE SMITH DIES


MRS. Jennie Smith, 29 of
Hawthorne Road, Oakes Field.
died last night at the Princess
Margaret Hospital.
She is survived by her
husband Leslie, a son Paul; a
daughter Michelle; her father
Mr. Eugene Moree and
stepmother Mrs. Cassandra
Moree; three sisters, Mrs.


Lorraine Cancino: Mrs.
Winnifred Wells and Miss Ella
Bee Moree and four brothers.
Delton, Vernal. Eldon and
Eugene Jr.
Funeral services will be held
5:30 p.m. tomorrow at St.
George's Church, Montrose
Avenue. Interment will be
made in St. Anne's Cemetery.


SOME WEALTHY VISITORS
ONASSIS' OCEAN CRUISING YACHT Christina paid a
brief visit to Nassau last week. and amonq the passengers
who disembarked for a stroll downtown was Princess Lee
Radziwill, sister of Jackie Onassis, the former Jacqueline
Kennedy. Princess Radziwill is seen here in white slacks and
check shirt on Prince George Dock. She arrived with her
children, Antoine and Anna, who flew to Miami shortly
after arrival. Mrs. Onassis remained aboard the Christina,
and her husband flew in by private jet Friday evening to
join the ship for a cruise through the Bahamas
PHOTO: Lorenzo Lockhart.



5 to 10 percent surcharge

on overdue property taxes


A ElIVIF percent surcharge is
being added to all overdue
1,73 real property taxes, a
Mlinistr oIf Fiannce press
release saii. The tax payment
was due on January I, and
tinder the real property tax
regulations non-payment
within 60 days automatically
results in the addition of the
surcharge.
The Act also provides that if
tax is not paid within 150 days
of its due date (Jan. 1I) the
surcharge is increased to ten
percent.
The press release said
"notices stating the amount of
the additional charge and the
new balance payable will be
issued towards the end of
April, and for those persons
with post boxes, will be
forwarded to the Post Office
for distribution.
"Those persons without post
boxes are requested to collect


their notices at the Public
Treasury, ('hurchill Building.
All such notices which have
niot been collected by May 7
will be placed in general
delivery mail."
The surcharge does not
apply to persons who have
exercised their option under
the Act to pay the annual
assessment in quarterly
instalments, because persons
wishing to make quarterly
installments indicate their
desire to do so by paying the
first quarter within 60 days of
the date on which the payment
was due (Jan. 1).
The Ministry press release
added that "those taxpayers
who exercised this option and
who have post boxes should
have already received a notice
reminding them that the
second quarterly instalment of
tax became payable on April 1,
and stating the amount due."


TII-F BODY ) ft 2.3 year-old
hotel waiter '.A, l.hidnl in a tar
submerge 11 in e r d I 1 ake
Cunningham early Sund:i.i
Percival Hiarcourt Ialias Jackie)
Johlnsoi. of I (sit'r Slt'i't hai s
been tentatively listed is the
isla ,d's levenlh trafii.
Sat iit( pcnLidin' p lice
invest i t itlion
Int ,rinit n recivii'd h.is led
police tO behlet-'I ,Jn)hnson;'s
blout Volkswagen number
7602. *' Iitc!Ier!i I 10 ad and
pliun iLdli m tilt' lake .it .about
I0l pit. S itirdl\
P ,I 's.idl ihrcIe cre 34
0i t1 t I ril l J .itI tiL'rnIt s ,vtr tihe
wsCseeki-.,' inV1 lVin g cli'lt cases
of inimir iriuiry.

23 BUSH FIRES

OVER WEEKEND
TW IN'I Y-three bush 1:,.
two building fires, a vehicle tize
and a false alarm kept the I it'
Brigade busy 0,ver tlie
weekend. A child received
minor burns in ie (if tilt
building fires
Two-year-old Rich ard
Gibson was burned when a
kerosene stove exploded in the
home ot his other. I'atricia
Gibson, oin Lewis Street West
early Fnridas morning lie was
treated at the hospital for
minor burns .anid discharged
Police were called to the
scene at 9 08 a.in and found
t he three room wooden
building aiieady engulfed in
flames. I he building. owned by
iel ena I homnpson. was
completely destroy ed No
estimate ol its value was given
to police It was insured
A mattress worth $135 was
damaged when it caught tire
Satur'alVy morning Il tl hihome
of John Rataty on Cordeaux
Avenue at Fast Street. Firemen
extinguished the blaze before
further damage was done.
A Commier bus owned
the Jitney bus service a
being driven by Basil Woodsi e
suffered $70 damage Sunday
morning when an electrical
fault in the voltage regulator
started a fire in the engine
while the vehicle was being
driven along West Bay Street
near Brown's Point
I-ire Chief Joseph
Baillargeon said the large
number of bush fires over the
weekend was "by and large"
the result of carelessness on the
part of the general public
during the current dry season.
HIe said the main causes have
been cigarettes flicked out of
moving cars into parched
bushes, and people burning
rubbish in high winds.
"By and large it's just
carelessness," the Fire Chief
said.

DISCLAIMER
T F I BA AMAS
Wholesalers' Association today
rnade it clear it had no part in
supplying the information on
which newspaper reports on
food prices, published
Saturday, were based.
The Association also denied
that it has asked the Price
omnmission to remove ceilings
on the prices io essential
"hr eadbasket" items as
reported in Saturdlas 's morning
paper.
A spokesman said a
scheduled meeting Tuesday
between wholesalers and the
Commission is being held at
the C('ommission's request, and
not because of replresentations
by the wholesalers.
A press release said that at a
meeting of wholesalers last
Wednesday ''it was
unanimously agreed that in the
interest of co-operation no
statements would be made to
the press at this time."
Association secretary Paul
Norton said the Association
has made no press statements,
and that the information on
which Saturday's reports was
based came from other sources.


NFW^^^
M ish '11V'Vt-,I
^^ et-sm koi^^^^^

PANTSUITS

MA MN I I-


U.S."
The Caribbean region,
"normally referred to as
neighbours of the U.S. and
regarded by them as their
weaker brothers in the Western
Hemisphere, should be assisted
when they need help and
should be given special
treatment especially when the
assistance will ultimately
benefit both the giver and the
receiver.
"Be it resolved that steps be
taken to place before the
Senate of the U.S. the plea
from this region for the
restoration of the original
concessions of duty allowances
to citizens returning home
after visiting countries of this
area and further that a copy of
this resolution be sent to our
respective heads of state to be
taken up by them at
Government level and also to
all international organizations
operating within this region
soliciting their support."

JIONN BURN FLOWN

HOME TO HOSPITAL
MR. JOHN BURN, the
British Trade Commissioner in
Nassau, who suffered serious
head injuries in a boating
accident while snorkeling off
Brown's Point on March 10,
was flown home in a Royal Air
Force Britannia aircraft on
Saturday morning.
A press release from the
British Trade Commission said
a fully equipped medical team
was in attendance throughout
the flight.
The aircraft was met on
arrival at Brize Norton, and
arrangements were made for
Mr. Burn to he transferred to
the Radcliffe Royal Infirmary
at Oxford.


VOL. LXX, No. 123


Monday, April 16, 1973.


NASSAU GLASS CO.
NEW SHIPMENT ANTIQUE MAPS
DATED FROM 1730 TO 1870
IN VARIOUS SIZES
PH: 2-8165- 2-2723 P.O. BOX N563


Blue Vista hotel lays off


13 percent of its staff

THIRTEEN PERCENT OF THE STAFF at the Blue Vista
Hotel on Cable Beach were laid off today, and the smaller of the
hotel's two dining rooms might be closed soon as a result of the
influx of guests who are spending less on hotel meals, general
manager Gregory Prescott said this morning.


Caribbean wants tourists'


duty free allowance back

A RESOLUTION from the Caribbean Association of Industry
and Commerce will be placed before the U.S. Senate asking that
the duty free allowances for returning U.S. citizens from the


Di


lIe categorically denied an
earlier report that the hotel
intended to lay off half of its
99 staff members.
Mr. Prescott said "12 to 14
people from all the
departments" have been
temporarily laid off because at
this time of year the hotel is
hosting guests who are not on
the Modified American Plan.
MAP guests pay for two meals
a day in advance.
Lay-offs were necessary
because there are fewer meal
commitments, even though
occupancy is steady at about
80 percent, Mr. Prescott said.
For the same reason
management has been
considering closing the
Mediteranean Room, which
caters primarily to
breakfast-eaters.
The room may close
tomorrow, Mr. Prescott told
The Tribune. lie is awaiting
orders, which he expects to
arrive tonight, from Granite
Enterprises of Canada, the
hotel's operators. There will be
no further layoffs if the dining
room closes, he said.
The manager added that
"about a month ago" he
informed depart ment heads
that lay-offs or staff rotation
might become necessary. He
said he issued a staff memo on
Monday last week giving notice
of today's lay-offs.
CATHOLIC BISHOP AT
TRINITY METHODIST
iISHOI' I'AUL LI:ONARDi
IIHAARTY of the (atholic
Diocese of Nassau and the Bahamas
will be the guest preacher 8 o'clock
tonight at Trinity Methodist
Church for the first of the HIoly
Week services.













0Iht rihbunt


Monday, April 16, 1973.


SAILS WITHOUT INCIDENT


S VIETHAMESE BLOODSHED IN BELFAST


MAN CIARIEI IN


NIXON WILL VISIT EUROPE IN THE FALL
WASHIINGTON (Al')- President Nixon said Sunday that he plans to
make a tour of Europe in the fall.
The President has said that he considers 1973 "The year of Europe" and
has mentioned that he would be making a foreign trip, but he gave the first
word that it will be in the fall in talking to members of the Press he invited
to a Sunday worship service at the White House.
Deputy Press Secretary Gerald .L Warren said that Nixon probably will
visit G(reat Britain, Italy, Itrance and Germany, all ol whose top leaders will
have visited him first at the White House.
The Italian Prime Minister is to be here this week and Warren said that
I-rench President lompidou will come to the United States before Nixon
goes abroad.
The exact dates of the fall trip were not announced. It appeared that
Nixon might go to other countries as well but they were not mentioned at
this stage.
TORNADOES KILL NINE IN TEXAS
I'lARSAI.L. TEXAS (AP) Nine persons are reported dead as tornadoes
and flash floods struck Sunday in widely separate sections of Texas. The
twisters reportedly also injured over two do/en other persons. A pee-dawn
tornado killed two persons and injured more than 20 others in Plalnview in
western Texas, and two late evening twisters killed five and injured eight in
Pearsall, near San Antonio. Police say a 15-year-old boy and a woman in
her 20s drowned in flash floods in a section of San Antonio in the
aftermath of heavy thunderstorms.
Police say the tornadoes in Pearsall also heavily damaged or destroyed
ten airplanes and nine homes. Military helicopters evacuated those injured
in the Pearsall twisters Officials say the injured were evacuated after power
went out at Pearsall's Frlo County hospital. Officials estimate damage in
Sunday's twisters in the millions of dollars.
TWO INDIAN LEADERS ARRAIGNED TODAY
WOUNDI)I) KNEE, SOUTH DAKOTA (AP) -American Indian
Movement leaders Russell Means and Clyde Bellecourt are scheduled to be
arraigned Monday in Pierre, South l)akota. The two leaders are to be
arraigned on charges stemming from the -ebruary 27th take-over of
Wounded Knee, but Meians has expressed confidence he won't be convicted
on the charges.
Speaking near Syracuse, New York Sunday, Means said he will base his
defense on an 1868 Sioux treaty with the federal government, and Means
said he wants his trial moved from South D)akota. Means said South Diakota
has what he calls a frontier r mentality."
DENIES TROOP CROSSING OF CAMBODIAN BORDER
SAIGON (Al) --South Vietnamese border guards and Cambodian officers
confirm reports that South Vietnamese troops have crossed over the
Cambodian border lBut the Saigon Command's chief spokesman denies
such a crossing has been made. lield reports indicate the South Vietnamese
incursion is a defensive measure designed to drive North Vietnamese and
Cambodian Communist troops back from the frontier.
The saigon official says Communist troops have attacked South
Vietnamese infantry positions near a border town on the Mekong river.
The official says government losses were three killed and 38 wounded,
while enemy losses reportedly were 22 killed.
TROOP MOVEMENT TOWARD CAMBODIAN BORDER
SAIGON (AP)--More South Vietnamese troops are reported moving
toward the Cambodian border today, but field reports claim that the South
Vietnamese operations along the frontier are a defensive move aimed at
driving Communist forces from the border. Reports say the attacks are not
part of a major offensive to lift the threat to the Cambodian capital of
Phnom Penh.
Meanwhile, the U.S. Command in Honolulu declined to say If continued
American air action over Cambodia was in support of the South
Vietnamese attack, the command reported that B 52s and other aircraft
kept up their raids on Cambodia Sunday.

DEBATE ON ROLLBACK OF RENTS, PRICES
WASHINGTON (AP)--Dl)ebate begins today in the IlIouse of
Representatives on whether to enact a rollback of prices, rents and interest
rates, and all sides predict a close vote sometime between today and
Wednesday.
One of the two principal alternatives is a bill backed by Democrats that
would roll prices and consumer and home mortgage interest rates back to
the March 16th level. It also would return rents to the January tenth mark.
The other alternative is a bill continuing the President's authority to set the
pace of three phases of economic control.
F.B.I. AGENTS ON CHARGE OF RIGHTS VIOLATION
WASHINGTON (AP)--F.B.I. agents who used columnist Jack Anderson's
telephone records in an alleged attempt to uncover his news sources have
bevn ordered to appear in federal court today. The columnist and his
associate, Les Whitten, charge that the FB1I violated their right to gather
ne by using the subpoenaed records.
The newsmen claim the long distance phone records were used to harass
nwws sources, and they say their function as investigative 7.porters was
^hibited as a result.
S SCUEDFROM COFFIN 'MUCH IMPROVED'
LONDON (AP)- Mrs. Rose Hanover was reported "much improved"
Monday after being rescued from her coffin.
Mrs. Hanover. 85. was certified dead after collapsing at the weekend and
taken to a mortuary. Two hours later a horrified undertaker heard snores
coming from the coffin.
Her physician, Dr. Alfred Leselau, said: "By all normal tests of breathing
and heart she certainly appeared dead."
North Middlesex hospital said Mrs. Hanover was now sitting up and
talking. "These things happen," said Leselau.
APPEAL CLOSING OF MILITARY BASES
WASHINGTON (AP)--Defense Secretary Elliot Richardson meets with
leaders of his home state today to hear a final appeal on the closing of
military bases in Massachusetts.
Senator Edward Brooke and Governor Francis Sargent both
Republicans are reported concerned that planned base closings in
Massachusetts will cost local jobs. The formal announcement of the
closings is due tomorrow.
TRUDEAU AT THE DRUMS
OTTAWA (AP) -They laughed when Canadian Prime Minister Pierre
Trudeau sat down at the drums during a party for provincial Liberals in
Ottawa Saturday night. The one who laughed most was Jean-Guy Morin,
regular drummer for the rock group "Renaissance." "Baybe if I practise,"
says Morin, "I could be Prime Minister." Trudeau gave up the drums after
one number and went back to dancing with his wife.
CANADA-U.S. ECONOMIC UNION?
TORONTO (AP)--Former U.S. Undersecretary of State George Ball says
economic union between ('anada and the United States is possible, and the
former U.S. official says neither country would have to lose Its cultural and

political identity in such a union. Ball spoke in Toronto on a Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation television programme.
Ball says, "it seems almost Inevitable that Canada and the United States
are going to have to face the same problems.' and Ball adds, "these
problems will more and more be solved only in terms of common decisions
and common action."


Security blanket on TROOPS CROSS Protestant housewife llll KILLIENGS


QE2 on $3 million INTO CAMBODIA killed in her home -ehrd
SAGO (A S t with murdering a four-year-old bov
SAIGON (AP)--South and his two baby sisters whose
Vietnamese troops have pushed kniA fe-hacked bodies were found
Israel passover cruiseacrossthe Cambodian border by I A revenge grouped spiked o railings near
for the first time since a Detectives declined to identify)
Vietnam ceaseifre went into the accused man bui. said he will
SOUTHAMPTON, England (AP) The Queen Elizabeth 2, a effect 2 months ago, field BELFAST (AP)- A 59-year-old Protestant housewife appear in a Worcester court
floating fortress carrying hundreds of American Jews to the Holy reports said Sunday. answering a knock at her door was killed about midnight Sunday Monday to face the murder charge.
Land, sailed from Southampton Sunday as if going to war. Fighting was reported at two by gunmen who didn't even see their victim. cathe horrific killings stunned this


Midlands. Police said the murders
were savage and barbaric beyond
belief.
The three dead children were
Paul Ralph and his sisters Dawn.
two years, and Samantha, nine
months. Detectives said they were
dragged from their beds late Friday
night while their father was out
bringing home his wife, who works
as a part-time barmaid.
The children were later found
impaled on the rusty railings in a
neighbour's back yard. Their
throats were cut. They had been
beaten and sexually violated.
The parents, 29-year-old truck
driver Clive Ralph and his wife
Dorothy, 24, spent most of
Saturday at Worcester's central
police station. So did the couple's
lodger, identified by police as David
Anthony McGreavy, 22.
Mrs. Ralph was allowed to leave
the police station shortly before
midnight. Her husband and the
lodger were kept under questioning.
Detective chief superintendent
Robert Booth, leading the hunt for
the killer, told newsmen Saturday.
"The father says he left the
children with the lodger when he
went out at 10:30 p.m. Friday
night to collect his wife.
"The lodger say the children
wire alive and perfectly happy
when he himself left the house
later."
"I have never known a more
brutal murder in all my life," said
detective chief superintendent
Robert Booth. One of his
colleagues, white-faced and
trembling, kept muttering: "It was
the most terrible sight you could
ever see."
Detectives said the children had
been dragged from their beds late
Friday night. Their partly stripped
bodies, hacked by a knife, were
found on the rusty railings only 25
yards from the back door of their
home in Worcester


Fears of an Arab guerrilla the ground and from the roofs
attack during the voyage to of neighboring buildings as
Israel prompted the strictest the vehicles began to fill.
security ever imposed on a Fach bus was fitted with
British passenger ship in two-way radio and each was
peacetime. clearly marked on the roof to
The 65,800-ton liner was 40 aid police helicopters escorting
minutes htehind scheduled in the convoy.


casting oft her dock moorings
because one of six special jet
planes bringing passengers from
the United States and Canada
was late landing at London's
fleathrow Airport.
The Cunard Shipping Co.
said 620 booked passengers
were on board the ship hound
for Israel to attend
celebrations marking the 25th
year of the Jewish state's
independence.
The National Union of(
Seamen said about 600
crewmen were aboard the liner
and at least 30 security nmen.
No one would say how many
were soldiers and marines.
Sightseers were banned from
Southampton docks and
reports watched the departure
from behind barriers 200 yards
away.
NO FUSS
The ship pulled out without
fuss or incident.
First port of call will be
Lisbon Tuesday. The Qi 2 then
will sail for the Mediterranean
where the British Navy and the
Royal Air Force will take up
escort duty. Their assignment
will be to protect the liner
against possible attempts by
Arab guerrillas to damage the
Most of the 620 passengers
had landed at lleathrow in six
jets through the morning. They
were taken through the normal
customs exits to a parking lot
where 15 special buses were
waiting.
Airport police and Scotland
Yard detectives watched from


SKYLAB SPACE

STATION MOVED

TO LAUNCH SITE
CAPE KENNED)Y, FLA. (AP)
The giant Skylab space station that
will house nine American
astronauts for a total of five
months in Earth orbit moved to Its
launch pad Monday for
preparations leading to a May 14
launching.
The station, as large as a
five-room house, was cradled under
a protective metal shroud atop a
Saturn 5 rocket that stood upright
on a large tracked transporter
vehicle. The transporter moved out
of an assembly building at
1200GMT for the 3.5-mile trip to
the pad, expected to take several
hours.
The Saturn 5 is to hurl the
unmanned Skylab into orbit 270
miles high. If there are no
problems, the Skylab I crew,
Charles Conrad Jr., Paul J. Weitz
and Dr. Joseph P. Kerwin, will be
lofted into space May 15 by a
smaller Saturn 1B rocket.
The astronauts will ride in a
modified version of the Apollo
Moonship which is to link up with
the Skylab to form a clustered
combination 118 feet long. The
Saturn I B was moved to its launch
pad on Feb. 26.
Conrad, Weitz and Kerwin, who
is a physician, will enter the
two-storey orbiting lab for 28 days
to conduct extensive medical.
scientific, earth resources and
engineering experiments.
In August and November, the
Skylab 2 and 3 crews are to rocket
up to the same station, each for a
56-day stay in orbit.
MANY COMFORTS
They'll have many comforts not
available to earlier American
astronauts. Each has his own
bedroom, and there's a pantry,
shower, stereo, a library and
exercise gear.
The presence of Kerwin will
permit extensive checks of health
and evaluation of any medical
problems that might arise.
The Skylab launching nears as
mystery continues to surround the
launch of Russia's second space
station, Salyut 2, hoisted into orbit
April 3.
Last week, in its first statement
since the launch, the Soviet
government said Salyut 2 was
functioning normally, but the
government gave no indication
when or if a space crew would be
sent ot join the space station.


Along the 80-mile road
journey to Southampton, each
of the 15 buses was
accompanied by two police
cars with three officers in each
car. One car preceded and one
followed each bus. Trucks with
police handlers and tracker
dogs were on hand, too, and
plainclothes policemen
accompanied the travellers
inside the coaches.
JUST A GLIMPSE
Reporters watching the
convoy arrive at Southampton
caught just a glimpse of the
passengers as they were
whisked to the embarkation
shed.
Passenger's luggage was
screened before being hoisted
on board. At one stage,
stevedores went on strike
because they said some of the
cases had been taken to the
ship without screening.
The stevedores als(
demanded the same danger
money as the QF2's crew will
get for the voyage reported
to be $125 each. After
bargaining by union leaders
with management, it was
announced that Cunard had
given way and that the
longshoremen would get the
same premium as the crew.
The search was so strict that
even flowers sent by friends or
relatives to passengers on board
the liner were screened.
NO FEARS, BUT -
Most passengers said they
had no fears. Jacob Hoening, a
23-year-old student from New
York City, thought too much
publicity had been given to
possible Arab attacks.
"I am confident everything
will go well. I have no
trepidation,' he told reporters.
Mrs. Htilda Millstone and her
14-year-old grand daughter
Sacha, from St. Louis, Mo.,
were among a few passengers
who left the ship before
departure.
Mrs. Millstone said the girl's
father had telephoned,
ordering his daughter not to
sail.
"We are both ready to cry.
It has been such a
disappointment," she said,
explaining that Sacha's father
had been worried by publicity
about security arrangements.
Hie had seen television pictures
of frogmen examining the
liner, she added and that
made up his mind.
SECURITY BLANKET
The security blanket was
ordered Thursday after the
QE2 docked at Southampton
and began preparing for the
Passover cruise.
Police maintained a
round-the-clock guard at the
dock gates and on approach
routes, while Royal Navy
frogmen made regular
underwater searches of the
vessel's hull to ensure that no
attempt was made to attach
explosives.
At night, the sleek $113
million liner was floodlit as
were the docks.
Cunard is footing a $50,000
bill for the 30 guards on board
the ship and is paying the crew
considerably more for this
voyage than for any other.
But the charter probably
will bring the company some
$3 million.
The company equipped the
dining room and the kitchens
with a complete set of new
pans, crockery and cutlery
essential for the strict
observance of Passover, which
begins Monday night. Eleven
American rabbis were on board
to make sure the Jewish
dietary laws are fully observed.


points along the border and
hundreds of refugees were said
to have fled from Cambodia
into South Vietnam.
Lt. Col. Le Trug Hien, chief
spokesman for the Saigon
Command, denied the border
crossing today, but the Saigon
Command has denied such
incursions in the past until
weeks after they took place.
The troop movements were
confirmed by South
Vietnamese border guards and
by Cambodian officers on the
scene.
Ilien said Cooo',iunist
troops attacked South
Vietnamese infantry positions
northwest of the border town
of Hong Ngu on the Mekong
River. lHe gave enemy losses as
22 killed and government
casualties as three dead and 38
wounded.
DEFENSIVE
Field reports indicated the
South Vietnamese plunge a
half-mile into Cambodia was a
defensive operation aimed at
driving North Vietnamese and
Cambodian Communist troops
back from the frontier.
At least 25 armoured
vehicles manned by rangers
moved across the Cambodian
side of the border, for the first
time since the Vietnam
ceasefire, on a line about half a
mile deep, in an operation that
began Friday.
The crossing was made from
the Vietnamese town of Tinh
Bien.
Twenty miles to the
northeast, Communists
reportedly were attacking the
Vietnamese district town of
Tan Chau on the Mekong River
six miles from the Cambodian
border.
Tinh Bien is in the centre of
the Seven Mountains region, a
staging area of the North
Vietnamese First Division, and
field reports said the combat
was intense.
The South Vietnamese were
striking suspected Communist
positions with artillery and
.50-caliber machine guns
mounted on armored personnel
carriers. Cambodian
government troops also were
reported to be engaged in the
battle, allied with the South
Vietnamese against the
Communists.

Dispute aver dmned

centerss continues
SAIGON (AP) The Canadian
supervisory force proposed Sunday
sending survivors of downed
peace keeping helicopters to
determine whether the choppers
had strayed off course or were
moved from the original crash site.
Canadian ambassador Michel
Gauvin said an on-the-spot
investigation by the II survivors is
the only way to settle a growing
controversy between the Americans
and Viet Cong on where the
choppers went down. Nine persons,
including four members of the
International Commission of
Control and Supervision, were
killed in the April 7 crash.
Two American pilots contend
the helicopters were on course
when one was hit by a heat-seeking
missile and crashed about six mites
west of Khe Sanh. The second
chopper, which they were piloting,
was also hit by Communist
groundfire.
The Viet Cong claim the aircraft
was off course and "met an
accident" and crashed 15 miles
southeast of Khe Sanh. Pilots Hank
de Voll, 23, and Mark Hotchkiss,
24, said they signed a statement to
this effect.
The Canadian, Polish and
Indonesian representatives on the
four-nation ICCS who survived the
crash also were reported to have
signed, apparently as the price for
their release.
"There is reason to believe they
signed it under duress or
intimidation," Gauvin said. "I think
there was some implication they
might not be returned."
Four days after the crash, Gauvin
said, an eight-member ICCS
investigating team found the
wreckage just where the Viet Cong
said the chopper crashed. He said
no survivors were on the
investigating team and the Viet
Cong refused to permit any aviation
experts to go alone.


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Security forces believed
Margaret Miller might have
been shot in -'venge for the
slaying 24 hours earlier of
Robert Miller, 23, one of the
few Protestants in the Irish
Republican Army.
Four bullets ripped through
the front door of Mrs. Miller's
Belfast home, hitting her in the
chest as she came down the
hall to answer the door. Her
killer jumped into a waiting car
and escaped.
Millen was shot from a
speeding car in Belfast
Saturday night while on a
vigilante patrol with other
members of the IRA's Marxist
official wing. He was believed
to be the first Protestant
member of the largely Roman
Catholic IRA to die since
communal warfare broke out
in Northern Ireland nearly four
years ago.
The deaths of Mrs. Miller
and Mullen raised the


CHICAGO CRIME

FIGURE SLAIN
CHICAGO (AP)- Sam De
Stefano, reputed crime syndicate
figure, was shot and killed Saturday
at this home, police said.
At the time of his death, De
Stefano, was under indictment for
the 1963 slaying of Leo Foreman,
an alleged informer of a syndicate
loan operation.
The body of the 63-year-old De
Stefano was found lying in tie
garage attached to his home on
Chicago's far west side, police said.
The garage door was open and two
expended shotgun shells were
found nearby, authorities said.
In February, the 7th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals upheld De
Stefano's conviction of threatening
a government witness during a
narcotic trial.
De Stefano has been convicted of
conspiracy to sommit perjury,
assault with a deadly weapon,
contempt of court and illegal
voting.

Pernists sweep

ri-eff elections
BUENOS AIRES, APRIL 16
(AP) The Peronists, outlawed
politically for 16 years, proved
again Sunday they are still
Argentina's strongest party with
crushing victories in a score of
run-off elections.
Their Justicialist Liberation
Front, which won the presidency
and a majority in the House of
Deputies March 1I, captured
control of the Senate and 20 of the
22 governor ships in the final round
of voting.
President-elect Hector J.
Campora and his Peronist
government will have 41 of the 69
Senate seats and 145 of the 243
seats in the House of Deputies. The
new civilian government is to be
installed May 25, ending seven
years of military rule and beginning
a new era of Peronism that was
banned after Juan DI. Peron was
ousted by a military coup in 1955.
Run-off elections were held in
the 14 provinces and federal capital
where no party gained a majority in
the senatorial and gubernatorial
contests in March. With nearly all
of the six million votes counted,
the Peronists and their allies had 61
per cent of the ballots cast for
governors.
The only bright spot in a grim
string of defeats for the Radical
Party was the election of its
candidate to the contested Senate
seat in the federal capital of Buenos
Aires. Radicals, who form the
second largest political party,
swarmed to their headquarters to
cheer the winner


confirmed fatality toll in the
strife to 774.
British troops reported
nearly 20 shooting incidents in
Northern Ireland during the
weekend.
In one, soldiers shot a
Catholic boy and his sister in
the Andersonstown area of
Belfast and admitted later they
probably had made a mistake.
SERIOUS WOUNDS
The 15-year-old boy
suffered serious chest wounds.
His 19-year-old sister was hit in
the leg and side.
An army spokesman said a
military patrol saw a sniper
preparing to fire at them and
fired at the man. Immediately
afterward, a car was seen
speeding away. When it
stopped, the youth, his sister
and a third person jumped out
and started to run. The soldiers
shouted at them to stop; the
trio kept running; and the
troops opened fire.
"If, as now seems probable,
the three people were not
concerned in the incident, the
army expresses its deep
regret," a spokesman said.
In Londonderry, Northern
Ireland's second .'.', a bomb
exploded without warning in
the back of a supermarket.
Two girls working near the
closed shop were treated for
shock.
In England, a Catholic priest
and eight other men faced
court charges arising from
nationwide raids by British
police cracking down on the
IRA.
Six of the arrest men,
including the Rev. Patrick Fell,
were held in the Midlands city
of Coventry, charged with
conspiring to cause an
explosion. Father Fell, '2, was
described as an assistant priest
at All Souls Catholic Church in
Coventry.
The arrests were made
Friday as more than 500
detectives raided Irish homes
across Britain in the biggest
security operation since
guerrilla bombers struck
London on March 8, killing
one man and injuring 243


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Monday, April 16, 1973.


Uh, Oribun,


Uhp 0 ribunt
NuLUus ADDICTS JUtARE IN VEBBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR FTIFNNE IUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G.,D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Monday, April 16, 1973.


I EDITORIAL


We shall see


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
I AM constantly amazed by the kind of information that is
handed out by the Government in the Bahamas. They feed the
people on hope that is seldom fulfilled.
I thought of this practice while I was talking with a taxi driver
in Kingston during my recent visit to Jamaica.
He kept on repeating what independence was going to do for
him. Jamaica has been independent for over ten years. This man
was driving a taxi that would have been on the dump pile years
ago had he been in Nassau but still he was looking for the silver
lining.

Mr. Alfred Maycock (PLP Fort Fincastle) told the House
during the Budget debate that Government has under
consideration proposed investments in the Bahamas of over
$1,000 million, and has already signed agreements in principle for
investment projects that will yield about $31 million a year in
additional revenue.
This sounds terribly good.

If this is so, surely the Minister of Finance was aware of this
fact. In that case, why was it necessary for him to impose
crippling taxes in his recent budget on items that are considered
essential in the daily lives of the Bahamian people and important
to the accommodation of tourists visiting the colony?
Like the former Minister of Finance, Mr. Hanna is so limited in
his knowledge of business that he doesn't seem to realize that
consumption of goods in the areas he has taxed will shrink
enormously ... and that, like all their other estimates of revenue,
will fall far short of the mark.

All this big talk about foreign investments coining to the
colony had better be true or they will be forced into imposing
more and more taxation until they find that income tax will be
their last resort. That will be the end of a grand period in the
story of the Bahamian people.
Every opportunity they get they parrot the promise of "no
income tax". In a speech at the opening of the Legislature only a
few years ago the Governor pledged on behalf of the colony that
there would be "no independence, no income tax ".
Well ... independence is now only a couple of months away.
What will the next broken promise be in the great pile of
broken promises already to the credit ... or should I say discredit
... of this Government?
Income tax?
We shall see.

I will not suggest that Mr. Maycock's statement is not correct.
But doesn't it seem passing strange that whoever might be
behind this money has to wait for the break in the link with
Britain?
Surely any fool must realize that the Bahamas was a better
investment bet while Britain exercised some influence in the
islands than after her steadying hand has been removed.
But now we are told that people are rushing into the island
with a $1,000 million dollars to spend.
If this is correct ... who are these people ... where are they
coming from ... are they Mafia or Communist or just plain fools'?
You will recall that the former Finance Minister avoided the
question asked in the House of Assembly as to whether any of
the Government's loans came from Communist sources.

It would be interesting to know why these people ... if they do
exist ... have waited for independence ... and the terms on which
they are coming into the colony.
If this report is true ... and I am not questioning it ... I have a
feeling that the Bahamian people may find themselves sold to a
power that will eventually gain control of the colony.

Now let us see the sources from which the Development
Corporation expects to draw rich revenues for the Treasury.
Among the industries to be started in the Bahamas are a
furniture factory, a feed mill, an asbestos cement factory and an
assembly plant for small flashlights and electrical components.
All very excellent. But the items to be manufactured in these
plants are all imported into the colony. And the Customs collects
revenue on these imports.
After these operations get started here they will cease to


produce Customs revenue in the local market and, under the
Industries Encouragement Act, all material imported into the
colony for goods manufactured for export will be duty free.
So, on these items at least, the Customs will lose revenue.
Unless, of course, these people are prepared to enter into
another kind of agreement ... and this would destroy the whole
object of them operating in a tax free area.
If there is some new form of agreement that will wipe out the
tax advantages then there is good reason for asking who these
people are and where they are coming from.

This business of light industry in the Bahamas is nothing new.
The Bahamas was the first in this hemisphere to place ans
Industries Encouragement Act on its Statute Books. It was
introduced in the House of Assembly by the late lion. Donald
McKinney.
Several industries were started but they all quickly folded up
because the first essential to the success of this kind of enterprise
was not to be found in the colony ... and that is, plentiful and
cheap labour.
This condition is still worse today.
When light industry was first started in Nassau there were no
unions and labour was cheaper and more plentiful than it is
today.
In order to accommodate these enterprises will the
Government allow these people to bring in a lot of cheap Haitian
labour?
I don't see how they could decently make such an arrangement
when they refuse to allow me to employ a single Haitian to keep
my ten acres of land at Camperdown clean ... and so an orchard


Ludicrous attitudes of govt. scorned


II )ITOR The Iribune
BecI use' t tilh iiianl y
chauvinistI c charades ii nows
being enacted w it hi n
government and departments I
fedl impelled to voice a long
restrained urge to have my
"pennyworth". small though it
may be, in an effort to bring
some light on the mian,
ludicrous attitudes heing so
blatantly displayed toward a
long suffering public, a public
which, during an emotional
outburst, put their faith in the
present members of the
administration.
From the toip to the bottom
within government circles their
seems to be an attitude of
mind that come independence
day all will be well, and the
streets will flow with "milk
and honey" .. what an
awakening! And the poor
susceptible electorate who
"tagged along" with this
honeyed talk will realise how
many false promises were fed
to them during the last is
this a significant reference"
election.
To illi state my points let
me deal with certain
statements made during the
election, and since that tune.
During the campaigning for
the election in September last
year we heard many of the
ruling party, and this includes
the prime minister himself,
speak of 300 years of "slavery"
under British rule, yet recently,
in the publicity given over the
radio we are told, very clearly,
that Britain abolished slavery
in 1833. Question which ofi
these statements is correct"'
Either way, the government
must be blamed, as during the
election they used this as a
"gimmick' to gain a popular
vote, while now the radio, I,lso
a government agency, is telling
an entirely different story.
Next we have thie vindictive
policy of immigration, tinder
the control of the deputy P M.
Ilanna which has driven away
many people who, by their
skills in many facets of
business and administration
could have been a boon to the
economy, moreso at this time
when employment is scarce,
and wage packets scarer still.
The farce in this attitude is
now manifest in the rapidly
declining confidence investors
and others are showing in
doing business with the present
administration. The biggest
laugh over this attitude is that
whereas Mr. Hlanna insisted
that at any cost Bahamians
should be given employment
at whatever cost to the
business community we now
hear our guide, philosopher
and friend of radio, Ed Bethel,
exhorting everyone to "work
harder" and. to use an old bit
of phraseology, fit "round pegs
in round holes" where jobs and
responsibility re concerned.
Isn't that an admission that the
former policy has failed'?
This reminds me that some
time ago a commission was
given the task of assessing the
need for continuing to employ
ex-patriates, and they found
that it would take many years
for this need to become
obsolete if the expansion of
that time, and the forecast for
the future, were maintained.
Now, of course, the situation is
such that there is hardly
enough work available to keep
even the qualified Bahamians
fully employed; apart from
government departments,
where efficiency 'nd effort
seem to be at a minimum.
The situation thus created,.
and now being given plenty of
radio publicity, is similar to
that about which Sir Etienne
Dupuch so often warned, and
for which he was branched as a
"traitor to the Commorn-
wealth" by the same Mr.
Ilanna. What would he now say
to Mr. Ed. Bethel of radio
Z.N.S.?
Incidentally, while still on
radio station Z.N.S. I am
amused to hear the frequency
with which the new
"Independence" tune is being


played, and especially when
one listens to the words of the
song, quoting, as mentioned
above, the fact that at last
there is a "new day" dawning
following "300 years of
slavery". This in itself is


understandable in view of the the old age pensioners beirn
"brainwashing" already well given priority no il..'ht I his
established throughout, but the outlook is most commendable
whole song, and meaning, takes but what pu//les the writer is
on a farcical outlook if one this. how, in al n
listens carefully to the theme business trallsa.ctlon. c,Aln An
of the music; seems to me iten be sold to e user at, C ,st
reminiscent ot '"Rul' so that t unds cl be utiltsed
Britannia". which would seem for anoth er 1 s11ur0' It il
ludicrous in the circumstances. nicllio n 0 ,t liaps three
Another idiosyncratic bit of things, either the items are ,
verbosity was when the being sold at ost otherwise
Ministry of IHealth announced how are i-eplaheninti items
some months ago that they bought If funds .ire available,
would allow drugs and other after sales,. Io jssis other
prescribed medicines to be source, then lthe ,,T ginal teims
purchased by the public at MIS IIA VI [ tI \ ,. U A.
normal "cost" prices paid by A PROI11. or ihos iln stocks
the M.O.. I fhe proceeds from be replenished It by iatie
these would then be funded to this assumption i
help other welfare problems,


PLASTIC GLASSES DEPLORED
EDITOR, The Tribune, having a proper drinking glass
If the Paradise Island i have also nolticd that
complex is to be taken as the this most recent piece ot
social pace-setter for the new tastelessness has been emulated
Bahamians. as it apparently is at the I ieraild Heiaith lotl-
what with the Ileart Ball, the in their ('oMnvni n Ii tall, or
Prime Minister's Birthday Ball, Baliami I tall. i, whatever
etc. being held there, then may other name thlic now choose
I register a complaint regarding to call tIhis acoustically
their recent trend of using imi possible ,Ilt hl ect ual
plastic glasses for drinks, not abortion. The haibit may even
only on thlie beach where one be catching ,on illn other
can understand such things, establishimenits, likt ,I disease
but also in the hotel bars at Perhaps it youi publish this,
night. letter it nmay ieach lithe eyes ot
Sure:i the patrons of such somlieolne in llte Min\iistry of
places have outgrown the 'Tourism whso iiiglht eeIt l soie
necessity of childhood training pressure on thie hotels that
and can handle a proper glass. have introduced this ridiculous
Having been forced to pay $2 piece of pennyy pichliiig" tild
to get on the island and having get then to kick tlie habhit
to pay $2 and upwards for INTERUSTEI) BAHAMIAN
each drink, surely one is Nassau.
entitled ;o the courtesy of April 12, 19731


WANT BETTER MOVIES
EDITOR, The Tribune: felllowmen.
The Interdenominational It appears to fle IC Y A.
Christian Youth Association is that "Theatre Operation",
very concerned about the types apart from takin, al iantage it
of movies that are being shown the la|,iness of lith censor
to our pre-18-year-olds. hoard, are s sing Ir ,have lost
We say pre-18-year-olds all sense of moral
because, we believe, a person responsibility, andI if iot
tinder the age of 18 years does stopped, are determined to
not normally have the arms to spiose our young men aind
defend themselves when ,women to destructive forces
challenged by movies that knowing that they cannot lace
depict and portray, such as: the challenge for want of
'The Pusher-Man', 'The Dope preparation.
Smokers', 'The Motorcycle The I.C Y.A believes, if our
Gangs', 'Sex Oriented' and youths are properly prepared
others in a glorified manner, when attained the age of 18,
The arms of which the they would be in a position to
I.('.Y.A. speaks pre-l -year- Iicet and conquer: the abuse
olds not having sufficient of sex. the smoking and taking
knowledge about the dangers of drugs. violence, and ain
of drugs not realising that sex other destructive force that
is for a special purpose and not may challenge them.
to be abused and not The I.('.Y.A. contends that
understanding that violence it is imperative for those ill
only breeds violence, authority to take immediate
The I.C(.Y.A. pledged to steps to stop the present trend
develop the whole man, and is .of derogatory movies that are
desperately anxious to find now in our midst, and do their
means and ways of winning the endeavour to formulate a
youths of this country to proper age identification
devotion to the cause of their policy
country and the service of their We in tle I. (C.Y.A. are
convinced that if we "are going
NO BIG JOKE to progress as a nation" we
iiust check the negative
EDITOR The Tribune guidance and direction that is
A BAHAMIAN voter would being given to our youth in
like to know if we are going to many areas or the final analysis
have water for Independence, will show us all being engulfed
so that we may get a shower by a monster we all helped to
after we come home after create.
Independence? Right now ALFRED M. SEARS
sometimes we can't get enough President
to brush our teeth. If I forget Alice Beckford
to turn the taps on in the Secretary
morning so we can go in the Basil Johnson
same water, one after the Treasurer
other, it's just too bad for us. Leslie Fox
Think of going in the same Committee Members
water after each other. The Berkley A. Pilgrim
other night I came home after Vice Chairman
a day's work and could not Dehavilland Newton
bathe, was so disgusted I Vice-President
thought "What kind of Yvonne Strachan
Independence this is going to Assistant Secretary
be'?" No water, sometimes Catherine Brown
no lights, no telephone and Assistant Treasurer
when we do call one number Basil O. Johnson
get another and worst of all Chairman
not even private! A BIG JOKE. Nassau,
When I first came to Nassau April 5, 1973.
and we had a telephone, we
called Central and a lovely


voice would immediately say
"Number Please". Don't think
I am an expatriate you can't
send me out of Nassau, I'm
A BUSHED BAHAMIAN VOTER
Nassau.
April 2, 1973.


that used to make large gifts of fruit to places like the Ranfurly
Homes for Children will now have to grow up in weeds?
Did I use the word "decently" In reference to the
Government?
I'm sorry I made a mistake.
Anyway, decently or indecently, we shall see what we shall see.

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Let all things be done decently and in order
The First Epistle of Paul to the Corinthiansl 3-40

When I consider life, 'tis all a cheat;
Yet, fool'd with hope, men favour the deceit;
Trust on, and think tomorrow will repay;
Tomorrow's falser than the former day.
Lies worse, and, while it says, we shall be blest
With some new joys cut off what we possest.
DRYDIN














G he Obrimbtw


91 nations are divided on rights over sea


By DON SHANNON
UNITED NATIONS the
91-nation committee meeting
here this month to prepare for
next year's Law of the Sea
conference appears divided on
the basic issue the limitation
of territorial waters.
The increasingly familiar
two-against-one pattern has
already emerged on the key
topic, with the United States
and the Soviet IUnion
advocating a 12-mile limit and
China on the side of developing
states which want
to expand their territorial
waters up to 200 miles to
safeguard fish and other marine
resources.
Since there appeared to I e
little hope of compromise,
special subcommittees debated
subjects more likely to win
agreement, such as scientific
research, combating marine
pollution and prctectin r.
archeological trcasuies on tIhe
sea bottom.
Till MAJOR U.S.
contribution of tile tirs-,' wek
was a statement by )r. Jolnm
Albers to Sultonuirnirlleie III
which is dealing' \ithll resci I i.
Albers said I .S. deep s.i
drilling il wh1Ii Soviret
cooperation was recent 'l
announ rced and inlial
researIch are iroducL iinimuchli
new information aboi t lith
earth.
"Miucth (d tlns nicw
knowledge has teen robtalincd
through scientific research in


the oceans," he said. "The
ocean floor provides us with
means to gain a better
understanding of geological
hazards such as earthquakes
and volcanic eruptions, and
hopefully it will lead to the
ability to predict them."
Albers said ocean-floor
studies confirm the theory that
the earth's surface is composed
of seven major "plates" on
which the continents rest
The separation and pressing
together of the plates has now
been observed on the ocean
floors.
At IBIRS UR(,I)D all
part cipating nations to
support the three international
research Jprograiimmles now
under way to test the "work
ing model'" global-plate theory.
I hlsc include Ithe ocean-bed
drilling the international
decade of ocean exploration
and the international
ge' ti na nit Cs project.
While no opposition to
co)ntine'd seabed research was
voiced. Subcommittee II of the
Preparat or Co mmittee,
dealing with legal matters,
rein.iined sharply divided on
the limits of territorial waters
and special extensions to cover
seabed resources and fisheries.
Nor was agreement visible on
proposals to give landlocked
states a share in the world's
marine resources.
Subcommittee I which is
charged with planning the
administration of the seabed


Monday, April 16, 1973.


z_::-L










Monday, April 16, 1973.


he lrithunt


CTUE grYaI. *m


FWr th itrell Fily It Easlet


1'


-. 4



LADIES
PLATFORM
SANDALS
hundreds of
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SOUL
MOVIN*
BOOTS
with
dynamic
platforms


UWl sponsor lecture series on


'Implications of Independence'


BRIEFED ON PROTOCOL MATTERS


BRIEFING SESSIONS on
all phases of protocol for the
protocol section of the
Independence Secretariat are
being held weekly at the
Secretariat.

S FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


T he officers include
employees of Immigration,
Customs and Ministry of
Home Affairs.
Within the next few weeks,
bi-weekly and tri-weekly
sessions will be held.
Seated in the front row
(left to right) are: Mr.
Andrew McKinney, Protocol
Officer; Mrs. Juliette
Barnwell, Chief Liaison
Officer; Mr. Ernest Strachan,
Chief of Protocol; Mrs. Gwen


Kelly, Hospitality Officer;
Mr. Berne Evans, Deputy
Chief of Protocol and Mr.
Sammy Dean, Liaison
Supervisor.


THIF DEPARTMENT of
IExtra Mural Studies of the
University of the West Indies
w ill sponsor a series,
ot lecture/discussions on "The
Implications of Independence"
to be held 8 p.m. each
Wednesday from April 25 to
May 30 at the Bahamas
Teachers' College. Oakes Field.
Mr. Rex Nettleford, director
of lxtra Mural Studies, will
launch the series on April 25
On May 2. I-xternal Affairs
Minister Paul Adderley and Dr.
Vaughn Lewis, a specialist in
International Affairs at the
University of the West Indies,
will discuss "The Role of the
Bahamas in World Politics."
Dr. Davidson L Hephurn
will serve as moderator-
On May 9 there will be a
panel discuss o on "The Role
of the Church." Taking part
will be l)r. the Rev !I. W
Brown. Father Preston Moss,
Canon William Thompson and
the Rev. Fmmette Weir.
Moderator will he Mr.


Winston Saunders.
On May 16 "The
Constitution" will be discussed
by the lion Eugene Dupuch,,
with Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadehay as moderator.
On May 23 "Finance and
Banking" will be the subject of
a panel discussion. Mr. T.
Baswell Donaldson, chairman
of the Bahamas Monetary
Authority and persons
representing commercial
banking interests and others
from the trust corporations
will participate.
Mrs Francelia Bosfield will
serve as moderator.
On May 30 a panel group
will discuss "Education."
Taking part will be Chamber of
CommerLe president Holland
Smith Mr. T V Arnett from
BAMIAi), Mrs. Gertrude
Collymiore, Ministry of Labour
and National Insurance; and
Mr Leroy Bailey of the
Bahamas Hotel Association.
Mr Rodney Bain, Cabinet
Secretary, will moderate.


Hunting for fun? It's here.
Andre Cold Duck. A happy
blend of fine champagne
and sparkling burgundy.
With deep pink bubbles
to tickle your tongue
with a surprisingly
refreshing taste.
Serve Cold Duck
when the flock gets
together. But make
it the best Cold
Duck. Make it
AndretCold Duck!

Now available
in the
Bahamas
BUY IT
chilled from
your favourite
liquor store.

AT ONLY
$2
A BOTTLE


AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE &AMERICAN SI'AHKhLINtG BURGUNDY SPARKLING WINE CHAPAl R UILK PROCESS 'NATURALLY FER FN!FL) I'HUIDUiU & I!IILL UIBY ,E A.L ,N CELLARS MODESTO CA I
Now available in the Bahamas. Buy it chilled from your favourite liquor store.


Rental car loan to Traffic Department


NASSAU'S THREE
rental car agencies have
loaned three vehicles to the
Road Traffic Department to
be used in the Driver
Education Programme.
The three firms loaned
cars last year which
resulted in the training of
400 high school students
past the age of 17 years old.
Pictured above when keys
to the cars were turned over
on April 12 are: from left to
right, Mr. Allak Forbes,
Driving Examiner of the
Road Traffic DeDartment;


Mr. George Minus, Manager, Manager, Avis Rent-a-Car;
Hertz Rent-A-Car; Mr. Mr. Arthur Maycock, Chief
Eugene Cartwright, Driving Examiner, Road
Operations Manager, Traffic Department and Mr.
National Car Rentals; Mr Theodore Quant, a driving
Leo Rogers, Operations examiner.


A .










wIE Wb W@4"W


Independence Clean-up Committee


reaches its half-way goal donations

WITH DONATIONS TOTALLING about $8,000 and pledges of an additional $2,000, the
Independence Clean-Up Campaign Committee has achieved 50% of its goal $20,000 for 1000
permanent public trash bins, a press release announced.


POETRY BOOK BY

LOCAL TEACHER
'LOVI- goes a long way' is
the title of a greeting-card-
booklet ( published by
A in erican meetingsgs
Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio)
which features two poems
written by Mrs Leslie Willard
Johnson, formerly Mary L
Christiansen
I he poems "Mountains,"
and "Water". were written and
submitted for publication prior
to here marriage on January 30
last year to Leslie Willard
Johnson, a Bahamian by birth,
Attractive illustrations
provided by the publishers
accompany each poem The
book is one of a line of
booklets suitable as greeting
cards.
Mrs. Johnson is an English
and Business Mathematics
teacher at St. Augustine's
College and is also preparing a
series of poetry booklets as
well as a series of children's
story books about the Bahamas
for young Bahamian readers.


These are to be located
bordering the main highways
of New Providence, in the
parks and playgrounds, on
beaches and in picnic areas, the
Bahamas information Services
release said.
"Complete steel bins with
re-inforced concrete bases and
wide-mouth steel-mesh tops
will cost the Committee $20
apiece, a very reasonable price
made possible only by the use
of prison labour. The bins will
be painted yellow, set in red
concrete bases with black mesh
tops," the release said.
The Committee consisted of
representatives of all the
service clubs of New
Providence and the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, under
the chairmanship of Alexander
McCorquodale, Chief Health
Inspector of the Ministry of
ilealth.
Donations received and not
yet publicly acknowledged are:
Sheraton British Colonial
Ilotel, $400; E. D. Sassoon
Banking Corp., $200; Malcolm
Tyre Service, $200;
International Bank of
Washington (Bahamas) Ltd.,
$200; City Markets, $200;
Barclays Bank International Ltd.
$200;Bank of Montreal, $200;
World Banking Corporation


Ltd., $200; Sir Robert
McAlpine & Sons (Bahamas)
Ltd., $100; A.I.D., $100;
d'Albenas Agency, $100;
L.T.D. Surveying and
Engineering Ltd., $100;
Com monwealth Industrial
Bank (Bay Street Office),
$100; FinCo, $100;
Hemisphere Agencies (1972)
Ltd., $100; Chase Manhattan
Trust Corp. Ltd., $100; Peter
Cole and Associates, Ltd.,
$100; Price Waterhouse and
Co., $100; BiTco, $100;
Solomon's Mines Ltd., $100;
Trust Corporation of Bahamas
Ltd., $100; The Perfume Shop,
$100; Montagu Beach Hotel,
$80; Bay Street Garage Ltd.,
$80; First National Bank of
Boston. $60; A.J.T. Gooding,
$60; Carib Insurance Agency
Ltd. $50; tinkers Paint &
Wallpaper Supply Ltd., $50;
Bolam, $50; Swiss Bank
Corporation (Overseas) Ltd.,
$40; Amanda Furs Ltd., $40;
Rawson Trust Co., $40;
Scottish Shop, $25; Dann H.
Lewis, $20; Gramco


Management Ltd., $20; J. S.
George, $20; Harry B. Sands,
$20; Bank of Nova Scotia
Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., $20;
Dorothy L. Atwood Ltd., $20;
Bahamian (Whitecap) Co. Ltd.,
$20; R. E. W. Bryan, $20; Basil
Burnside, $20; H. H. Mace, $5.
In addition, Audley Kemp,
who originally pledged $200,
sent in a donation of $300, and
Burger King, who pledged
$200, sent in $240.
Further pledges and
donations should be sent to the
Independence Clean-Up
Campaign Committee, P. 0.
Box ES6241, Nassau. For the
Family Islands, donations
should be sent to the Island
Commissioner concerned.


WIIAT WE


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HELP

WANTED
PARADISE ISLAND LIMITED requires two Chef de Partle
to prepare all types of food for gourmet restaurants. Must
be able to make estimates, supervise and co-ordinate work
for personnel in kitchen. Must also assist in the
menu-planning, etc. Must be able to relieve at any station in
the kitchen. Should have done three years' apprenticeship
at major hotel or recognized restaurant or hotel school.
Should have at least 3 years' experience in preparation of
continental cuisine. Salary commensurate with experience.
Apply to Personnel Department or call 5-7511 for
appointment.


"BAHAMAS GAS"

WE WILL BE

CLOSED
FOR THE

Easter Holiday

For 4 days from 5:00 p.m. Thursday, 19th April
Until 8:00 a.m. Tuesday, 24th April.

PLEASE ORDER YOUR GAS EARLY

"BAHAMAS GAS"
THOMPSON BOULEVARD, OAKES FIELD
NASSAU, PHONE: 56401


BUY 0E


Mara


I I


I I II F I II II .. ..N J


.j


Monday, April 16, 1973.


MTiho 7iT4htmi








Monday, April 16, 1973.


IWht rtibwe


Magistrate attends American

International Law conference


STIPENDIARY and Circuit
Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay, who presides on the
bench in magistrate's court No.
three, left Nassau Wednesday
for Washington, D.C., to attend
the 67th Annual Convention of
the American Society of
International Law.


ABBEY
INTImATIONAI

FUND








$11.60
Offered Price
As Of
March 13th., 1973


The magistrate, who is a
member of the society, is
expected to return to Nassau
on Tuesday
The meetings, held at the
Statler Hilton Hotel, 16th and
K Streets, N. W., Washington,
D.C., will end Sunday. Also
attending are members of the
American Bar Association.
The three-day sessions
include a meeting of the
Executive Council of the body
as well as panel discussions on
certain current legal issues
"The Future of the 'Socialist
Commonwealth': Prospects for
Legal and Institutional
Development in Relations
Among Communist States,"
with a Philip C. Jessup
International Law Moot Court
Competition taking place on
April 14.
The society is also expected
to participate in this year's
United Nation's International
Law Seminar, which will be
held during the forthcoming
session of the International
Law Commission.
The U.N. International Law
Seminar will take place May 21
to June 8 in Geneva. Chairman
for the opening session of the
annual meeting of the
A.S.C.I.L. on Wednesday was
Sir James Plimsoll, C.B.E-.,


WANTED

Bermuda Professional Office requires Chartered
Accountant with post qualification experience
preferably including insurance and re-insurance
audits.
Please reply with full details to Moore, Stephens &
Butterfield, Chartered Accountants, P. 0. Box 788,
Hamilton, Bermuda.






TRAINEES REQUIIRED
BY BAHAMAS OIL REFINING CO.
Matured men disirous of pursuing a Career in the Oil
Industry, are invited to apply for the positions
available in: Oil Movement, Process & Laboratory
Departments. Applicants should have a good
knowledge of Maths and English. Knowledge in
Chemistry is required for Laboratory applicants.
Apply or write to: Personnel Office., P. 0. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand Bahama.




HELP

WANTED
PARADISE ISLAND LIMITED requires one
Chinese Chef to prepare gourmet Chinese dishes in
the Cantonese and Mandarin styles. Must have had 5
to 10 years experience in frist class Chinese
restaurants preparing Chinese and Mandarin dishes.
Must have also worked as a Sous Chef. Salary $200 -
$250 per week depending on experience.
Interested persons may call Personnel Department at
5-7511 or write P. 0. Box 4777 for appointment.


Widow upset about

neighbor's advances

By Abigail Van Buren
0 IMW1 y Ccs Trukme-N. Y. News Syue., Ice.
DEAR ABBY: I have been a widow for one year. I
have been told often that I'm a nice looking woman and I
don't look my age, which is 49.
Yesterday, a neighbor rang my bell as he had done a
hundred times while my husband was alive, and asked if
the coffeepot was on. He said his wife was shopping.
I made him welcome, but it didn't take me long to
figure out he wanted more than coffee. He said: "It's too
bad you live next door-the neighbors don't miss a thing.
Now, if I could meet you somewhere ... "
I looked out the window and said: "Oh, I think your
wife just drove up, and she'll need your help with the
groceries," then I jumped up and op emd the- door.
Abby, I like this man's wif very much, but I don't
think I can ever be in her company without feeling guilty. I
am a terrible actress Must I move? I really don t think I
am up to handling tls. A LADY ALONE
DEAR LADY: Why should you feel guilty? Go about
your business as the it never happened. One of the differ-
ences between a man and a woman is the man's ability to
forget such a rebuke. He has probably blocked It out al-
ready. I suggest you do the same.
DEAR ABBY: I have been dating an attractive gentle-
man who has a very annoying habit. He keeps looking at
his watch every 15 minutes or so. What conclusions would
you draw from this annoying habit? REDHEAD
DEAR RED: I would conclude that he is eager to go
somewhere. [Possibly home.]
DEAR ABBY: I am in the 8th grade but I'm very
mature for my age. I've got a real big crush on this dude
named Johnny who's a senior and hangs around with my
older brother.
I am very good at expressing myself in poetry so I
wrote six real neat poems telling Johnny how I felt about
him, and I mailed them to him. I waited a whole week and
never heard anything. I know 'he got them because I put
my name and address on the envelope, and it never came
back.
I finally couldn't stand it any more so I wrote Johnny a
long letter explaining why I wrote the poems and telling
him if he thought I was too young for love, I would settle
for friendship but I just had to play some role in his life. I
poured out my heart in that letter. I haven't heard a thing
since, and now he doesn't even come to the house to see
my brother.
I am going out of my mind wondering what he thinks of
me. Should I call his mother and take her into my confi-
dence and ask her what to do? I've talked it over with
some of my friends but they're no help. I'll do anything you
say to get him, Abby. Please help me. SECRET LOVE
DEAR SECRET: Don't call Johnny's mother. Boys are
inclined to avoid aggressive girls, so cool it for a few
years. And the next time you feel like pouring your heart
out in poetry or prose, go ahead-but don't mail it.
DEAR ABBY: I have heard that an ex-convict is barred
from holding public office. Is that true? Also, does he lose
his right to vote?
I was convicted of a felony, and served my time. That
was nine years ago. I am straight now, and nothing in this
world could make me break the law again.
Thank you in advance for any information you can give
me. WONDERING IN MASSACHUSETTS
DEAR WONDERING: Thru the prompt and courteous
cooperation of your very able senator, Edward W. Brooke,
I have learned that the conviction of a felony in Massachu-
setts does not thereafter bar one from holding public office
or voting.
However, an individual convicted of corrupt practices
for bribery] with regard to elections is barred from voting
and holding public office for three years.
Problems You'll feel better If you get It eff yr ehesrt.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. PW, L. A.,
Calif. 366. Eaclose stamped. self-addreed envelope.
For Abby's new booklet, "What Tem-Aps Want to
Eew." send $1 to Abby. Box WI. Le Aageles, Cal. 3M6.


U I


(UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT)








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Phone 5-3268
FOR RESERVATIONS
ASK FOR MR. TERRY BAIN


OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
CLOSED THURSDAY


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LANTERNS FLASHLIGHTS FLARES
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GLASS HOLDERS CLEANING AIDS
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Opp. Pilot. House Club
TELEPHONE 2-8173


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Monday, April 16, 1973.


FRANCIS XAVIER'S
CATHEDRAL
West Hill Street
MONDAY of Holy Week:
Masses at 7 a.m. and 6 p.m.
TUESDAY of Holy Week:
Masses at 7 a.m. and 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY of Holy
Week: Mass of Blessing of Oils
7 a.m., 7:30 p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY: Masses
at 7 a.m. Lord's Supper 7:30
p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY: 12 p.m.
Bible Vigil and Sermon
Stations 1:30 p.m. Solemn
Liturgy of Good Friday.
HOLY SATURDAY: 10:30
p.m. Ester Vigil Service
EASTER SUNDAY The
Resurrection of the Lord
Sunday Mass Schedule 7; 8:15;
9:45; 11 and 7 p.m
CONFESSION Saturday 5
p.m. to 6 p-m. 6:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. and 15 minutes
before each Mass.
ST. BEDS CHURCH
Sutton St.
MONDAY Penance service
in preparation for Easter will
be held at 7 30 p.m. A number
of priests will be available to
hear confessions.
HOLY THURSDAY: First
Holy Communion will be
celebrated at the evening Mass,
beginning at 7:30
GOOD FRIDAY Service for


children at 9:30 a.m. Service
for adults at I p.m.
HOLY SATURDAY: Easter
Vigil and Mass at 10:45 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY: Masses
will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m.
MARY, STAR OF THE
SEA CHURCH
FREEPORT
CONFESSIONS: Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday at 7:30
a.m. and 5 p.m. Holy
Thursday: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and
during 7 p.m. Mass Good
Friday: 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Iloly Saturday: 5 p.m. to
Midnight.
OTHER SERVICES DURING
HOLY WEEK
Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday. MASS at 7:45
a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY: 7 p.m.
Mass of the Last Supper;
Washing of the Feet.
Procession to Altar of Repose.
9 p.m. All night vigil at altar of
repose (until 2 p.m. Friday)
GOOD FRIDAY: 8:30 a.m.
Good Friday Pilgrimage
"Witness to Calvary." Several
religious denominations join in
walking from the Torii Gate at
the International Bazaar to
Mary Star of the Sea Church to
give public penitential witness
of reparationon other day when
Christ walked to Calvary for
us. 9 a.m. Ecumenic Service at


Mary Star of the Sea Church
Forenoon to 2 p.m.
Adoration at the Altar of
Repose 2 p.m Good Friday,
Liturgy (Holy Communion
may be received) Adoration of
the Holy Cross (Collection to
be taken up for the Holy Land)
7 p.m. Stations of the Cross
HOLY SATURDAY: 6 p.m.
Blessing of Food I1 p.m. Vigil
Service: Lighting of Sacred
Fire; Prophecies; Blessing
Baptismal Water; Renewal of
Baptismal Vows. 1 2
MIDNIGHT MASS of the
Easter Vigil (Those who receive
Communion at Midnight Mass
may receive Communion again
during the day)
EASTER SUNDAY: Mass at
8:30, 10, 11:30 a.m. and 6:30
p.m.
CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL
George Street
MAUNDAY THURSDAY:
6:45 a.m. Matins and Holy
Communion. 12:30 p.m. Low
Mass 7:45 p.m. Sung Eucharist
and Watch of the Passion.
EASTER DAY: 6 and 7 a.m.
Holy Communion. 9 a.m.
Family Eucharist. 7 p.m.
Evensong sung by the John
Hopkins Singers. 8:45 p.m.
Sacred Concert by John
Hopkins Singers.
ST. MATTHEWS
Shirley Street
M AUNDY THURSDAY
6:30 a.m. Sung Mass
GOOD FRIDAY: 7 a.m.
Matins 9 a.m. Mass of the
Pre-Sanctified. Noon to 3 p.m.
Three Hour Devotions.
EASTER: 6:30 a.m. Matins
and Mass 10:30 a.m. Sung Mass
4 p.m. Children's Service. 7
p.m. Solemn Evensong,
Sermon & Benediction.
ST. MARY THE VIRGIN
Virginia Street.
THURSDAY 8 p.m. Sung
Mass
GOOD FRIDAY: Noon to 3
p.m. Three Hour Devotions.
SATURDAY: 10 p.m.
Easter Vigil and First Mass of
Easter.
EASTER DAY: 7 a.m. and
10:30 a.m. Sung Mass 7 p.m.
Evensong.
HOLY SPIRIT
Chippingham
GOOD FRIDAY: Devotions
- 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.
EASTER DAY: 8:15 a.m.
Sung Mass.


ST. AGNES
MAUNDAY THURSDAY: 8
p.m. Sung Mass and Procession
to Altar of Repose.
GOOD FRIDAY: 7 a.m.
Stations of the Cross and Good
Friday Liturgy. Noon to 3 p.m.
Three Hour Devotions.
SATURDAY: 10:30 p.m.
Holy Saturday Liturgy.
EASTER DAY: 7 a.m. Sung
Mass and Sermon. 10:30 a.m.
Procession and Sung Mass 7
p.m. Solemn Evensong,
Sermon and Benediction.
ST. BARNABAS
Wulff Road
MAUNDAY THURSDAY:
7:45 p.m. Song Mass;
Procession to Altar of Repose.
Watch of the Passion.
FRIDAY: 7 a.m. Good
Friday Liturgy. 10:30 a.m.
Stations of the Cross. Noon
to 3 p.m. Three Hour
Devotions. Preacher: Canon J.
Pugh
SATURDAY: 10 p.m.
Easter Vigil and First Mass of
Easter.
EASTER DAY: 7 a.m. Sung
Mass and Sermon 10:45 a.m.
Procession and Sung Mass 3:45
p.m. Children's Festival
Service. 7 p.m. Solemn
Evensong; Sermon and
Benediction.
ST. ANN
Fox Hill
MAUNDAY THURSDAY:
6:30 a.m. Sung Mass and
Procession to Altar of Repose.
There will be a twenty-four
hour watch of the Passion.
GOOD FRIDAY: 9 a.m.
Litany and Mass of the
Pre-Sanctified.
EASTER DAY: 6 and 7 a.m.
Low Mass. 9:30 a.m. Children's
Service, 10:30 a.m. Sung Mass.
7 p.m. Solemn Evensong,
Sermon and Benediction.
ST'GEORGES
Montrose Ave.
MAUNDAY THURSDAY: 7
p.m. Sung mass
GOOD FRIDAY: 7:30 a.m.
Mass of the Pre-Sanctified.
Noon to 3 p.m. Three Hour
Devotions. 6 p.m. Confessions.
EASTER DAY: 7 a.m. Sung
Mass 8:30 a.m. Procession and
Sung Mass. 4 p.m. Children's
Service. 7 p.m. Solemn
Evensong, Sermon and
Benediction.
ST. MARGARET'S
Kemp Road
MAUNDAY THURSDAY:


7:30 p.m. Sung Mass and
Address. Watch of prayer
before the blessed sacrament
until midnight.
GOOD FRIDAY: 7:30 a.m.
Morning Prayer and Litany.
8:00 a.m. Mass of the
Pre-Sanctified Noon to 3 p.m.
Three Hour Devotions.
SATURDAY 11:30 p.m.
Easter Vigil and the First Mass
of Easter. 11:30 p.m.
EASTER DAY: Procession
and Sung Mass 7:30 a.m.
Matins 10 a.m. Procession and
Sung Mass 10:30 Procession
and Sung Mass. 4 p.m.
Catechism, 7 p.m. Solemn
Evensong, Sermon and
Benediction. Preacher: Fr. D.
Strachan.
CHRIST THE KING
Ridgeland Park
MAUNDAY THURSDAY: 7
p.m. The Holy Eucharist
followed by Watch of the
Passion.
GOOD FRIDAY: Noon to 3
p.m. Three Hour Devotions.
EASTER DAY: 7 a.m. Holy
Communion 8:30 a.m. Family
Eucharist 4:00 p.m. Children's
Service 7:30 p.m. Solemn
Evensong, Sermon and
Benediction.
HOLY CROSS
Highbury Park
MAUNDAY THURSDAY:
7:30 p.m. Sung Mass;
Procession to the Altar of
Repose; Holy Hour Devotion.
Watch of the Passion until mass
of Pre-Sanctified. GOOD
FRIDAY: Noon to 3 p.m.
Litany: Mass of the
Pre-Sanctified: Meditations on
the Passion.
SATURDAY: 7:30 p.m.
Easter Vigil. Blessing of Paschal
Candle, the Font and Renewal
of Baptismal Promises.
EASTER DAY: 6 a.m. Low
Mass 7 a.m. Sung Mass. 9 a.m.
Family Eucharist and Coffee
hour Fellowship 4 p.m.
Children's Festival Service. 7
p.m. Solemn Evensong;
Sermon and Benediction.
Con sessions and
consultations by Appointment.
HOLY TRINITY
MAUNDAY THURSDAY:
6:30 p.m. Celebration of the
Lord's Supper
GOOD FRIDAY: 9 a.m.
Stations of the Cross;
Meditations; Address; Holy
Communion.
EASTER DAY: 9 a.m.


- m h


HOLY WEEK CHURCH SERVICES


at Mary Star
FREEPORT: ON HOLY
Thursday the only mass
offered at Mary Star of the Sea
Church, Freeport, will be the
Passover Mass of the Last
Supper, which will be offered
at 7 p.m. In imitation of Christ
surrounded by his Apostles,
the priests and people of the
parish will commemorate the
Last Supper of the Lord in the
sacrifice of the mass.
The celebrant, as did Christ,
will wash the feet of twelve
men of the parish representing
the Apostles.
At the conclusion of the
mass, the Blessed Sacrament
will be taken in procession to
the Chapel of Repose where
the traditional all night vigil
will begin. Throughout the
night, men and women of the
parish will spell each other in
prayer and meditation.
Throughout the night, and
continuing until 2 p.m. on
Good Friday, men and women
of the parish will break their
night's rest to join Christ in
spirit through His long hours of
trial and suffering.
literldssm inatioial

Goied Frilday service
FREEPORT: The sixth
annual Good Friday "Witness
to Calvary" will again be held
this year on April 20. the
service, sponsored by the
Grand Bahama Clergy
Association, will be slightly
different this year.
It will begin at the Torii
Gate ir the International
Bazaar, where a short
preliminary service will be held
at 8:30 a.m. This service will
be followed by a silent
procession along East Sunrise
Highway to Mary Star of the
Sea Church, arriving
approximately 9 a.m.
At the church, an ecumenic
service will be held which will
include hymns, prayers, the
solemn reading of the Passion
of Our Lord Jesus Christ, and a
sermon by Rev. Eric St. Clair
Clarke of the Methodist
Church.
Ministers and laymen of the
various denominations on
Grand Bahama will participate.
Venerable Archdeacon Foster
Pestaina is president of the
Grand Bahama Clergy
Association.


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ALL STOCK


* STEREOS

* REFRIGERATORS

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* DRAPES

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* ELECTRIC FANS

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DONALD'S FURNITURE & APPLIANCE CENTRE
COLLINS AVENUE AT 6TH TERRACE
OPEN 8:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. MONDAY TO THURSDAY/8:30 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. FRIDAY & SATURDAY.


IBM

DATA CENTER SERVICES
Has an immediate position available in Nassau.


PROGRANNER TRAINEE
Applicants must have high school education or better
and will be required to successfully complete a
Programmers Aptitude Test prior to employment
consideration.

IBM OFFERS: Hospitalization and Insurance
programmes, paid vacation, attractive starting salaries
and excellent advancement opportunities.
Interested applicants should contact Mr. McFadden at
32351/4 for personal interview.




BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
CORPORATION
COMPUTER PROGRAMMER
The corporation has a vacancy in a challenging ,
position within the Computer Programming and
Systems Section.

The successful applicant will be responsible for
assisting in the writing of programmes for new
computer applications in addition to maintaining
and updating current programmes.

Candidates should have a high level of numerical
ability along with recognized training in
programming and systems. A minimum of three
years experience is required with knowledge of at
least two computer languages including BAL.
Knowledge of the IBM 360 system would be an
advantage.

The position offers excellent opportunities for
future progression and starting salary will be based
on the qualifications and experience of the
successful applicant.

A comprehensive fringe benefit and pension plan
is established within the Corporation for all eligible
employees.

Applications in writing should be submitted to
the Actg. Assistant General Manager/P&IR at
BaTelCo's Head Office, Oakes Field, P. 0. Box
N3048 to reach him not later than April 23, 1973.


NOTICE


PUBLIC AUCTION


A QUANTITY OF MISCELLANEOUS GOODS
WILL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
GOVERNMENT WAREHOUSE, ARAWAK CAY
WEDNESDAY APRIL 18th, 1973, AT 10:00 A.M.


By

Belgrave Auctioneers


UIASAMAN IbI&I I-n M


,q


19


i


F,


ht hrthami












Monday, April 16. 1973.


National Arts & Crafts Exhibition will



be part of Independence celebrations

THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION is to be an integral part of the National Independence


;Celebrations.
The primary aim of the
-exhibition, to be held from
July 4 to July 14, is to
:showcase the visual arts for
-international guests.
-: The exhibition is expected
:to display the spiritual quality
Spf the Bahamian people as
.translated through the plastic
.arts, a Bahamas Information
l:ervices release said.
. A selection committee has
been established to choose
works for the exhibition.
The exhibitions will be held
:at Jumbey Village as well as
other exhibition centres in
*New Providence. The
,exhibition at Jumbey Village
'will be representative of all
phases of arts in the Bahamas.


HSNAUIF BELMONDO
DYNCAN CANNON








AND REFER MADNESS
7:00& 10:35
7-oIn,


One-man shows will be divided
into two categories adult and
child art category. The adult
category is open to all
professional and amateur
Bahamian citizens and
residents of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas at home
and abroad.
Works may include drawing,
painting, prints, sculpture,
woodcraft, shellcraft
photography and others. All
paintings and other artworks
must be framed so that they
can be easily hung.
FOUR EACH
Entrants wishing to display
works at Jumbey Village will
be limited to four entries each.
Anyone wishing to hold
one-man shows or joint shows
must notify the Bahamas
National Arts and Crafts
Exhibition Committee by April
31.
Gallery owners wishing to
display works in private
galleries must notify the
Bahamas National Arts and
Crafts Exhibition Committee
not later than April 30, so that
the information can be printed
in the exhibition brochure.
Exhibitors must provide
with each submission the
following information on the
official entry form: Name of
exhibitor; address and
telephone number of exhibitor;
title of work and date when
work was completed; sale price
(in cases where the work is for
sale); name of owner (if work


NOW SHOWING THRU THURSDAY
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2.1004, 2-1005


SHAMUSS PG.

Starring

BURT REYNOLDS DYAN CANNON

SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES.
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISED.
reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Last Day Tuesday Last Day Tuesday
Matinee starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3
"HANNIE CAULDER" R. "SOUTH OF HELL
Robert Culp MOUNTAIN" R. mI
Raquel Welch Martin J. Kelley
PLUS Anna Stewart
"BARBARELLA" R. PLUS
ane Fonda "THE INVINCIBLE
John Philip Law S
No one uncer 17 will be admitted. SIX" R.
PLUS Late Feature Stuart Whitman
Tuesday night. Elke Sommer
'Phone 2-2534 No one under 17 will be admittedly



LAST DAY TUESDAY
Matinee Continuous From 1;30, Evening 8:30-
'Phone 3-4666


b ,,,o. wirit unTmi I

-PLUS-


"SHAFT I i
No one under 17 will be admitted.


has been borrowed from a
private collection or
institution).
Entry forms may be
obtained from the Community
Development Division
Ministry of Education, Shirley
Street. All entries must be
delivered to Mr. James Rolle,
chairman, Bahamas National
Arts and Crafts Exhibition
Committee by May 31 at the
Youth, Community and
Culture Development Division.
Ministry of Education and
Culture.
Works from abroad should
be addressed to the Ministry of
Education and Culture, P. 0.
Box N-3913, Nassau.
MEMBERS
Bahamas National Arts and
Crafts Committee members
include: Mr. Hervis Bain, Chief
Personnel Officer, B.E.C.; Mr.
Horace Wright, Senior
Education Officer, Ministry of
Education; Mrs. Juliettee
Barnwell, Protocol Liaison
Officer, Independence
Secretariat; Mrs. Cherry Bethel,
Bahamas Information Services;
Messrs. Donald Cartwright of
Donald Cartwright and Robert
Stokes Architects; Max Taylor
of Bahamas Print Makers
Gallery; Brent Malone of
Aquarius Boutique; Angelo
Roker, Angelo's Art Gallery;
Bob Brome of Queens College;
Franklyn G. Ferguson of
Franklyn Ferguson
Photography and Eddie
Yarnowitz.
The committee is also
assisted by Mr. Patrick


From Page 3


reference to a figure in the
region of 65 million dollars,
which, after heated debate, he
amended to a figure of more
than 100 million dollars ...
mark you this is after only a
little more than six years of
this government's stewardship.
enmt -thW -eoiraw a repu"t:e ,
figure of 14/15 million dollars
credit balance from the U.B.P!
The minister boasted that each
year the revenue has shown an
increase, yet apparently each
year also the expenditure has
shown a far larger increase.
What business could survive in
such a manner?
The crowning feature stems
from the fact that he stated
that 35 million of this debt was
inherited from the former
government of the U.B.P. The
big question-mark here is 'why
did not Mr. Carlton Francis,
after so many years in the
Finance Ministry, find this
"plum" to fling at the
opposition?".Is Mr. Hanna
such a brilliant financial wizard
that he can, in a few weeks,
unravel and reveal this
miscalculation? Mr. Francis,
shame on you! Don't these
details, if true as Mr. Hanna
states, reveal a certain amount
of inefficient management?
When will the heads begin to
roll?
There are now several
ministries of dual character
which initially went singly, and
for which the ministers and
presumably senior officials
received salaries commensurate
with these individual
obligations. As an ordinary
"Johnny Public" I would be
most interested to learn, if
anyone could kindly enlighten
me, whether these "dual
ministerial positions" call for
dual purpose salaries! Perhaps,
if this is so, it would help, in a
very small way, to explain the
tremendous rise in the debt.
Some years ago there was a
"team'. well known in the
world of he opera, comic style,
as Gilbert and Sullivan. They
were responsible for many
amusing opera's. No doubt, if
they were still around, and
could produce a suitable opera
based on the antics and
behaviour of the present
legislature and members here
they would find "Dr. Jekyll
and Mr. Hyd'e" a very suitable
title for their production.
Lastly, a few words for the
opposition,You are very quiet
indeed, and many matters
which could be "voiced" are
either ignored or considered
too insignificant. Unless you
become more vociferous the
electorate will wonder why
you seem to lack the urge to
"fight". They expect more
from you !


Rahming of Donald Cartwright
and Robert Stokes Architects;
Mrs. Jennie Rahming, Ministry
of Tourism; Mrs. Telator
Strachan of the Straw Vendors
Union; Mr. Freddie Maura; Mr.
Homer Williams; Mr. Arthur
Grant of Grants Coconut
Crafts; Mr. Lorenzo Lockhart
Jr., and Mr. Rickey Wells.
In conjunction with the
B.N.A.C.E. Committee, a
pre-Independence Art and
Craft School Exhibition will
take place at the A.F. Adderley
High School from June 24 to
June 30 opening daily from 10
a.m. to 8 p.m. All schools are
eligible to enter this category
both from Nassau and the
Family Islands.
The Exhibition, which is
non-competitive will have three
sections, "Past" "Present"
"Future". The subject matter
can include themes from the
sea and land and the uses of
these; or from religion,
historic al periods, the
contemporary period, or
themes inspired by the future.
Work for the pre-Indepen-
dence exhibition should be
submitted to R. M. Bailey High
School no later than May 18th
for Primary Schools, and June
19th for Secondary Schools.
Posters should be sent to the
Bahamas Teachers' College by
April 14.
All works must be
presentable for display, and
should have the following
information: Name of School;
name and age of exhibitor; title


of work.


TWO MEMBERS WERE INDUCTED into the Rotary
Club of Nassau at last Tuesday's weekly luncheon meeting
at the Sheraton British Colonial Hotel. From left to right,
T. R. (Randy) Hall, a former Rotarian sponsored for
renewed membership by Harry Scates; President John R.
Morley; new Rotarian Max Gurney, local Pan American
Airways Manager; and Vincent d'Aguilar, Mr. Gurney's
sponsor.

ELSEWHERE IN THE NEWS ...
Singer, actor and political activist Paul Robeson was honoured Sunday
night in New York on his 75th birthday An audience of nearly
three thousand filled Carnegie Hall for the ceremonies. Robeson wasn't
there to hear the tributes, but in a taped message he said, "I pledge to go
on singing in my heart."
The P'ulitzer Prize winning biographer of poet Robert Frost Dr.
Lawrence Thompson died Sunday in Princeton. New Jersey. He was 67.
Police in Tokyo say an antique tea bowl worth more than 61-thousand
dollars has been stolen from a department store showcase. The bowl was
made in the 16th century, a period regarded as the golden era of Japanese
pottery making.


Planned Savings

with the Commerce.Together


we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".





CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


SI CONFUC U


lht irtbumn


NASSAU ROTARY INDUCTS NEW MEMBERS


HELP


WANTED

PARADISE ISLAND LIMITED requires one Pastry
Chef to take complete charge of pantry. Will be
responsible for all pastries (french style especially).
Must be able to supervise production for variety of
restaurants and to instruct pastry cooks to maintain
high standards of quality and presentation.
Salary commensurate with experience.
Apply to Personnel Department or call 5-7511 for
appointment.












Monday, April 16, 1973.


REAL ESTATE


II


C9476
F9R SALE
4 bedrooms 1 bath house. Lot
80 x 100. Phone 4-2786.


C9499
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LTD. offers a
selection of apartment sites in
good rental areas on New
Providence with easy finance
terms available. Also a
selection of choice residential
lots in the East, West and
South at low cash prices or
easy monthly instalments.
A large lot ideal for commercial
development or apartments
200' x 430'. Price $10,000.
For information and
appointments call 23921.

WANTS TO RENT
C9443
EXECUTIVE requires large
three or four bedroom
furnished home in East to
lease. Prefer ocean view. Phone
4-1150 for Mrs. Thompson, )r
2-3367.
C9502.
BRITISH HIGH COMMISSION
require four bedroom house on
long lease. Tel: 21008.

FOR RENT
C9310
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month.Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C9308
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

C9365
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom in Bamboo Town.
Phone 36959.
C9482
Two-Bedroom House in
Shirlea, Essex Street.
Unfurnished. Call Patsy Key -
22446.
C9445
ATTRACTIVE well located 2
bedroom apartment. $325 per
month. Phone 4-3017.

C9462
PALMDALE
2 bedroom furnished house
with carport, utility area has
new automatic washer. Phone
58201.
C9479
TWO STOREY open span
warehouse 100 x 80. Situate
on Farrlngton Road. For
information telephone 2-4782.

C9477
BRIGHTLY FURNISHED
TWO- BEDROOM
APARTMENT, CAREFREE,
CABLE BEACH. BALCONY,
TELEPHONE, AIRCONDIT-
IONING, GRECIAN POOL,
PIR VATE BEACH.
EVENINGS 77849.
C9306
ONE EXTRA large two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C9496
UNFURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath, house with carport, lawn
and private yard. Call 32731.
C9492
FULLY airconditioned 2
bedroom apartment -
Centreville near Z.N.S. ring
5-8679 ask for Mr. Pritchard.


C9433
GLASS BOTTOMED BOAT.
State price, size and
description in letter. Apply:
Adv. C9433, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

FOR SALE
C9434
CHEST OF DRAWERS, cream
coloured. Mahogany single bed,
chest of drawers, bedside table.
Dishwasher, electric can opener
garden chairs, records 45
r.p.m., wrought iron glass top
table, four chairs, glass top
wrought iron coffee table. All
In good condition. Phone


5-3477.


C9487
GARAGE SALE
2 p.m. 6 p.m. daily
Tuesday April 17th thru
Thursday April 19. Many
various household items
including adult and baby
clothes, and household
appliances. Smith. 1st. Terrace.
Centreville.
'C9471
,TWO TWIN BEDS (one new)
5150.00
.t. Speed Boat, 50 H.P.
MdcuryoEngine
i970 Ford Cortina
SttlAnwM on$1500-..00
Phone 29w (Day) 57905
nIt-


FOR RENT


F


1972 FORD 3/4 TON PICKUP
as new Cash $3,750.00 --
Down $950.
J970 FORD TRANSIT VAN
bargain price at Cash
$875.00 Down $300


BARGAIN BASEMENT
CASH ONLY
YOU BUY AS IS
WHERE IS
1969 Fiat 850
Sports Coupe $525.00
1969 Vauxhall Viva $150.00
1970 Ford Cortina $300.00
1969 Chevy Malibu S.S. $700
1970 Morris Mini A/T $700
1968 Dodge Coronet $750
1970 Vauxhall Viva $450
1970 Ford L.T.D.


Saloon $350.00
1968 Ford Falcon S/W $800
1968 Triumph G.T. 6 $375.00
MOTOR CYCLE
FOR SALE
1970 Honda 250cc $225 Cash


CARS FOR SALE


C9465
1970 FORD MAVERICK with
extras good condition
$1500. Call 41553 after 6 p.m.


C9432
1971 F ORD) SPORTS
CUSTOM ( AMPLR/PICKUP
TRUCK STANDARD
SHIFT $2600 PHONE
AFTER 5 30 P M. 5b124.
C9311
1 CONVERTIBLE COUCH
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 250 lb. trunk food freezer
Call 77947/.
C9504
MOTOR Bike Lambreta. In
good condition. Price $275.00.
Phone 54278.
C9459
5-PIECE BEDROOM Set,
Bookcase headboard, dresser,
mirror, night stand, double
mattress and box spring
$225.00. Various baby items
and swing set. Amana air
conditioner $200 Cash Only.
Call 55124.
C9372
1-6 yard Dump Truck. Like
new
1-1 bag used concrete mixer.
Good condition. Call 22098.

NOWIE
C9426
BAHAMAS YOUTH
EVANGELISM FELLOWSHIP
invites you to see "BELOVED
ENEMY" at the Epworth Hall,
Shirley Street, Saturday April
14th 8 p.m. No Admission
-harges or collection.

CARS FOR SALE
C9460
New Providence Leasing
Limited have the following list
of used cars for sale.
Immediate financing and
insurance cover arranged. Our
lot is located Gibbs Corner
opposite laundromat. Please
check our prices and low, low,
down-payments.
1972 DODGE AVENGER,
Automatic Azure Blue, Black
Trim. Very Clean Car Cash
$2,850.00 Down $700.
1969 CHEVROLET IMPALA,
White Black Trim, Exceptional
Value, ideal Taxi Cash
$1,550.00 Down $500.
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W, Automatic, White, Black
Trim, Absolute Snip Cash
$1,475.00 Down $450.
1971 DODGE AVENGER
Standard, Green Finish, cannot
be repeated at Cash
$1,650.00 -- Down $500
1972 JAVELIN SST Candy
Apple Red an absolute beauty
Cash $4,850.00 Down
$1,250
1972 TOYOTA CORONA
Automatic/Gold in tip top
condition Cash $2,750.00 -
"Down $700
1970 CHEVROLET MONTE
CARLO, Midnight Blue. Look
at the Price Cash $2,550.00
- Down $750.
1970 CHEVY MALIBU 4
door, new paint job. Excellent
buy at Cash $2,250.00 --
Down $700.
1971 DODGE AVENGER
Standard. Another give away at
- Cash $1,650.00 Down
$500
1970 CHEVY MALIBU 4
door, new paint job Cash
$2,400.00 Down $700
1970 FORD MAVERICK.
automatic, blue/blue trim -
Cash $2,150.00 Down $700.
1971 FORD PINTO automatic
red/black trim Cash
$2,250.00 Down $700
1972 FORD CORTINA
A/trans. Top condition -
Cash $2,650.00 Down
$750.00
1970 FORD ESCORT,
Standard, new paint job,
bargain price Cash $875.00
- Down $300.
1969 FORD FALCON
automatic good buy Cash
$1,275.00- Down $400
1970 FORD MAVERICK red
white trim Cash $2,250.00 -
Down $750.
1970 MERCURY MARQUIS
new paint job/good taxi -
Cash $2,850.00 Down $800
1972 CHEVROLET IMPALA
gold white trim, smooth car -
Cash $4,700.00 Down
$1,500
1972 TRIUMPH 2.5P.I. In
immaculate condition Cash
$4,650.00 Down $1,500.
1970 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
good shape Cash $1,800.00
-- Down $600
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT


STORE on Collins Avenue.
Financing available. Telephone
31295 evenings. Write P. 0.
Box 6104 E. S. Nassau,
Bahamas.

C9473FOR SALE

FOR SALE


GOLF CLUBS


1 -- complete set Titleist
Golf Clubs, 6 months
old, like new. Regular
shafts, D-2 swingweight.
Call 31393 after 6 p.m.


SECTION


MARINE SUPPLIES


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


I I I I I U


I


I I


C9433


- at -

'Central Garage'
TODAY'S CIAL lJ!iJ
1969 Chevrolet Camaro
$1850
1972 CHEVELLE MALIBU
very clean $4850
1971 VOLKSWAGEN BUS
12 seaters $1600
1964 CADILLAC LIMOUSINE
black, radio $500
1969 FORD GALAXIES
reconditioned $1000
1971 CHEVY
VEGA COUPE
green, automatic $2995
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN
air $4200
1968 PONTIAC FIREBIRD
good condition $1500
1972 VAUXHALL
FIRENZA $2250
1969 CHEVROLET CAMARO
red, automatic $1850
1972 DODGE
AVENGER $2350
1971 SINGER VOGUE
white, radio,
automatic $1500
1973 DODGE POLARO
light blue, automatic $5500
1969 TOYOTA CORONA
yellow $700
1967 PLYMOUTH FURY I
blue, automatic $400
1970 CHEVROLET IMPALA
green $2500
1971 FORD CORTINA
green $2500
1964 CHEVY II NOVA
blue-automatic $500
1968 FORD S/W
white, automatic $600
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 34711
C9398
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1972 VENTURA,
A/C Bucket Seats
Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Radio
Auto. Blue $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W,
Automatic $850
1972 VIVA S/W
Automatic White $2400
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE,
4 Dr. Sedan
Blue/White $1850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA,
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio. Orange $3500
1967 HILLMAN,
Std. Green $450
1969 FORD TORINO,
Yellow/Black $1200
1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL,
A/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI,
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD,
Blue A/C $2800
1971 FORD MAVERICK,
Auto. Red $1950
1969 VIVA
4 Dr. Auto. Green $695
1971 Rambler,
Auto. Blue $2100
1969 PONTIAC GTO,
A/C Vinyl Green $1600
1968 FORD ESCORT,
Blue $695
1965 DODGE,
Blue $300
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34646-7-8

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES-_I
C9454
ASSOCIATE DESIRED
inflation hedge. Right party
could control extensive Cereal
and Beef Cattle Farm, also
seaside land with resort
possibilities. A stable area, 25
in. rainfall. S. W. Australia.
ALSO
Ranch and Farm, Alberta,
Canada. Write:- Adv. C9454,
c/o The Tribune, P. O. Box
N3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
C9456
WHOLESALE SHOES. Deliver
same day. Men, women or
children's shoes. Telephone
31295 evenings. Island orders
to Box 6104, Nassau.

C9455
WELL ESTABLISHED SHOE


C9312
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE
World-famous postal tuition
for the GCE, School Cert and
Accountancy, Banking, Law,
Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinations.
For details of our specialised
courses write for FREE copy
of YOUR CAREER to The
Rapid Results College Dept.
TNI Tuition' House London
SE194DS


HELP MNTED


C9503
COOPERS & LYBRAND have
vacancies for Bahamian
Accountants whose
qualifications make them
admissible as members of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants. The positions
offer a good salary and
working conditions and
extensive experience in
auditing and other financial
areas. Applications should be
sent in writing to the Staff
Partner, P. 0. Box N596,
Nassau, Bahamas.

TRADE SERVICES
C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.
C9299
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
HURRICANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421-2-3-4-5-6.
C9363
FOR YOUR building needs
Residential Remodelling -
Maintenance Call G. Patton,
Budget Builders 32656,


TRADE SERVICES'


C9315

Pleder's Castem

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELiVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STE'L BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2.3798
Airport 77434
C8105
TRY US FOR SAFE SURE
CLEANING! ABCO'S NEV,
'SUPER STEAM' CARPETS,
UPHOLSTERY TEL:
51071-2-3-4.


heLY STRbunt
SHIRLEY STREET -


f


-7


C9309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.
C9461
17 FOOT THUNDERBIRD
with 80 h.p. Mercury
outboard. New seats. Fast,
reliable boat. $1,950. Phone
206, Georgetown, Exuma.
C9442
14 foot Glastron excellent
condition. Ideal for fishing and
skiing. $500. Night phone
4-1429. Day 2-8262.
C9483
8ft. SPORTYAK Lightweight
Dinghy with oars, paddles and
outboard motor in need of
repair. $60 O.N.O. Phone
57019 after 6 p.m.
C9491
65ft. Steel Refrigerated Vessel
like new. R/V Victory Call
Ryan at 1-305-3796990
C9497
IRWIN 24' fibreglass sailboat,
sleeps four, 5 sails, outboard,
dinghy. $5,000 o.n.o. Call
7-4168 or 7-4063.

PETS FOR SALE
C9475
DACHSHUND PUPPIES both
parents AKC registered. Phone
4-1485.

CARD OF THANKS
C9488













THE FAMILY of the late Errol
Delisle Lawrence of Windsor
Estate express their heartfelt
thanks to all those who so
generously gave their time and
showed their sympathy in
every way during their recent
'bereavement. A very special
thank you.

POSITION WANTED
f8500
IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
Adv. C8500, c/o The Tribune,
P. .0. Box N3207, Nassau
C9430
YOUNG AMBITIOUS single
Bahamian man with 10 years
Accounting and office
management experience seeks
responsible position preferably
with international firm. Willing
to work anywhere in the
Bahamas or abroad. Most
interested in opportunity for
additional professional training
and thence advancement in
company. Salary and incentives
open for discussion. Will have
to give reasonable notice when
leaving present employ.
Kindly reply to P. 0. Box
N7351, Nassau, Bahamas.

WANTED
C9500
USED BOAT in excellent
condition. 18'-20'
inboard/outboard or outboard
with canopy, comfortable
seating for 4 adults, suitable
for water-skiing, fishing. Call
7-8089 or 7-4086.

I HELP WANTED
C9435
AN UPHOLSTERER with at
least 3 yrs experience Call
22481 for further information
C9481
YOUNG BAHAMIAN FI RM of
Chartered Accountants require
Chartered or Certified
Accou ntants with
Post-Qualification experience
in a Professional Office.
Excellent prospects and good
working conditions. Five day
week. Reply in confidence to
Messrs. Pannell, Fitzpatrick
and Company, P. O. Box
N-4665, Nassau, Bahamas.
C9463
WANTED Married couple to
run small Out Island hotel. No
children, minimum of two


I --.- -- I I IsoL


... THE FULL INFORMATION MEDIUM...


As world events move at a
quickening pace ... the need for
thorough, fast coverage becomes
more vital.

Whenever, wherever news is
happening....The Tribune speeds
that information to you.
Information brings knowledge.
Knowledge gives all of us freedom
of choice.
WE TELL IT LIKE IT IS!




Tfe Tribune

The Bahamas Leading Newspaper




Te Tribtumne

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ERRORS
Advertisers are requested to check the first
appearance of ads for corrections. This
newspaper will be responsible for only one
incorrect insertion. ANY ERROR SHOULD
BE REPORTED IMMEDIATELY. As with
Cancellations above a number will be issued.

PHONE 21986 EXT. 5

In the event of an error in advertisement on
the part of the publisher, it will furnish the
advertiser a letter so worded as to explain the
said error and the publisher shall be otherwise
relieved from responsibility thereof.
No adjustment will be given unless, in the
opinion of the newspaper, an error in an ad
materially affects the value of the
advertisement
After copy has been given by advertiser, ad
will be read back for correction of copy,
classification and schedule. Upon verification
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COPY
This newspaper reserves the right to refuse
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it deems objectionable and to change the
classification of any advertisement from that
ordered to conform to the policy of this
newspaper.



I TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD I


CALL 21986 EXT. 5


CLASSIFIED


If;


. i --mIiI


Phone 2-1986



GRAND BAHAMA


I CLASSIFIED .


. 0l


1 I


I


-r


LOST
C7345
LADIES 3-COLOURED GOLD
BRAIDED BRACELET.
FREEPORT AREA. GOOD
REWARD TO FINDER. S.
BERNSTEIN (352-6855).

HELP WANTED
C7347
EQUIPMENT INSPECTOR
Must have 6-10 years recent
equipment inspection
experience In a refinery or
chemical plant. Work involves
the inspection of refinery
fac i cities utilizing latest
methods and procedures
involving Ultra-Sonic,
Radiography, Dye Penetrants,
Magnetic Particle, Eddy
Current, Fiber Optics,
Boroscopes and vibration
equipment. Such inspection to
be performed on stream and
during turn around.
Prepare comprehensive lists for
turn around; plan and assist
major unit turn around work.
College or High School
diploma required.
Mail resume in confidence to:
Personnel Office, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, P. 0. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7341
Catalytic West Indies, Ltd..
Post Office Box F-2544,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, has a
job opportunity available for a
Bahamian in their Refinery
Maintenance organization,
Freeport, for the following
position:
BAHAMIAN INDUSTRIAL
ENGINEER Recently
qualified from an Accredited
College to train as a Planner
and Scheduler using C.P.M. or
other network Maintenance
Management systems. No
practical experience needed
just educational qualifications.
Qualified applicants should
reply to: Deputy Chief
Industrial Officer Ministry of
Labour Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas.

C7344
Bahamas Supermarket Ltd. has
vacancy for an experienced
stock clerk who can order ana
merchandise all dairy products.
Only Bahamian need apply.
Telephone 352-7901 or address
correspondence to: The
Manager, Box F-457, Freeport.


HELP UNITED
C7321
ACCOUNTANT
Required by Bahamas Oil
Refining Company to assist the
Treasurer in various aspects of
Management Accounting and
Internal Audit procedures with
particular initial responsibility
for the Financial Accounting
of the construction of new
facilities. Applicants should be
Chartered or Certified
Accountants with not less than
three (3) years post
qualification. Experience
including audit or other
experience of industrial
accounting.
Bahamians only need apply to:
Personnel Officer, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, P. 0. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C9453
PERSONAL LOAN OFFICER
The Royal Bank of Canada
Freeport, Grand Bahama
requires the services of a
personal Loans Officer.
Applicants must be Bahamian,
possess at least G.C.E. '0' level
in Maths and English and
should have previous
experience in the loaning field
of banking. Applications
should be directed to The
,Assistant Manager,
Administration, The Royal
Bank of Canada, P. 0. Box
F61, Freeport or call for an
appointment at 352-6631.

C7340
Catalytic West Indies, Limited,
Post Office Box F-2544,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, has a
job opportunity available for a
Bahamian in their Refinery
Maintenance organization,
Freeport, for the following
position:
FIELD MACHINIST Must have
a minimum of five (5) years
experience in trouble-shooting
and repair of all Refinery
Rotary equipment, including
pumps, turbines, diesels, large
centrifugal compressors and
transfer equipment. Qualified
applicant should reply to
Deputy Chief Industrial
Officer, Ministry of Labour,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.
C7342
STEEL BAND DIRECTOR/
ENTERTAINER TO ASSUME
RESPONSIBILITY, ALSO
SINGING/DANCING MC.
CONTACT BOX F-2735,
FREEPORT.


years experience in food and
beverage, front desk and
)ookkeeping, after formal
training. Mechanical knowledge
of motor vehicles, appliances,
and diesel generator plant also
necessary. Apply in writing
including picture and
references to Mr. Moxey, P. 0.
Box 1216, Nassau, Bahamas.
- - -


C7346 SITUATION VACANT ,
A NUMBER OF MALE CASHIERS ARE
REQUIRED BY BAHAMAS AMUSEMENTS
LIMITED, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.
QUALIFICATIONS:- Good educational standard.
Minimum of 2 years experience as a Bank Teller or
equivalent. Applicant must be willing to work at
night. He must be over 21 years of age.
Apply in person or in writing to BAHAMAS
AMUSEMENTS LIMITED, Box F-787, Freeport,
for an interview.






UIr w

Uribuue

Nassau and Bahama Islands

Leading Newspaper


I


11 1 M6


I .


L---


(ght (oributw












Monday, April 16, 1973.


hpt Wrilbimw


QKie Fr.tur.. Syndict,,. In.. 11.9 / ,,,1>,. W -r....h |
"Gee, Dad, if I'm expected to take over all that some
day, I'm not so sure I WANT to grow up."

Rupert and the Mixed Magic-31


Intent on preparing his
magic carpet, the Wizard does
not realise that the Sorcerer
and Rupert are on the steps
above him. "Quickly, give me
the rod that makes things
shrink." says the Sorcerer.
" Er-let me see, it's the
middle piece," m urmurs
Rupert, and with trembling


fingers he hands the rod to
his friend. Whispering mor
words ofmystery,the Sorcerer
waves the wand towards the
Wizard, but nothing happens.
"Alas," groans the Sorcerer.
It Is too far away to wreak
ita power. Yet If we go closer
the Wizard will see usand put
us under his own spell."


oOW UT MAKJN'ME A PEANUT 6rTER Sa WHICH 8
YOU SETU DOE OWN HERE FOR THE MORNING, MXV1?"


Brother Juniper


/<' ^--^^ J --------


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
Dealer South: Both Val:
North
4 3 2
0 K J 4
4KQJ4
South
t Q632
AK
A 532
South West North Fast
10 1i 24 Pas
2NT Pas 3Prw
West led the QQ and South
could see at a glance that he
would need three diamond tricks
lor his contract. The 02 to
dummy's QK brought the 05
irom West and 08 trom East.
How should South continue ?
ANALYSIS : Declarer is In a
dilemma. Ii the diamonds break
3-3. all is well. But to guard
against a doubleton QA with
West, the suit must be led again
irom the closed hand, and en-
tries are short.
Suppose that South gets back
with the .&A. West goes up w-th
the OA and drives out both's
second heart stopper. The OJ is
still in dummy, but how will the
OQ come into her own?
The pips in clubs give the
answer. Alter the OK. South
cashes the &K and 4Q. Ii all
hlolow, the 44 will be overtken
lIter with the 45 to provide an
entry.
West East
4AK10 99875
Q Q J 10 9 6 a 5543
OA5 010987
S109 4876
Should the clubs be 4-1 the
chance of a 3-3 diamond break
remains.


"At least he's HONEST about It."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Cockboat 30. Yes in France
4. Qualified 31. Conceit
7. Grandparental 32. Pair
11. Fourth calif 33. "Gloomy Dean"
12. Nominal value 34. Dictum
13. Nevada resort 36. Call at bridge
14. Sheeting 38. Soft masses
material 40. Awareness
16. Salver 44. Period
17. Arctic 46. Emoton SOL
18. Opponents 48. Epic poetry
20. Boil on the 49. Australian bird
eyelid 50. Youth
22. Philander 51. Faction
25. Languish 52. Color
28. Pixie 53. Forage plant


Wr.IIFMF [JIM"
P-,rlc3nrk:ll LIVE
ME, r1mr."Mirziomki
RIM I-InTVA
RUNM L-Mx UQUI
nunuw UL111-3
ME., r*Alr-ljrT-1
MUM Mul: 1;;L-AU
"FluH LIMA rlkjci
9,5-IMOL. "Olul-11.1 'A'A
F-IMMA 'ALK!1011-1
LIMMIM MEMr,!;;3
a *I Ki ll i A


DOWN
1. Cartoonist
2. Bread spread
3. Lass
4. Secluded


5.
6.
7,
8.
9


r- 10

a -- I W 7- 15
a19
__ i6 21

24
25
-.26
27
29.
32
33
35
- ---37
39
I 41
43
45
F - -. V


4-18 "


Playmate
Ue itn:
Jewish law
Cooperative
. Paraphrase
. Literary
fragments
. Post-hole
spade
. Satchel
. On vacation
. Red-berry
evergreen
. Runner
D. raw
. Gorged
. Yore
. Osier
9. Tennis stroke
. Youngster
3. March date
i. Parsonage
'. Edition
I. Accelerated
I. Color green
2. Glide
I. Intentions
A. Roman bronze
i. Finial
7. Feminine name


NO. 7.097 by TIM McKAY
Acros
t. It' usrful for serving up
dibuers. (4-3)
7. Ced. (4) 8. Ieer. (5)
10. BInoemers, for Instance.
have them. 34)
1i. This wine Is dry. (3)


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN











(9635)
Today's diagram may be a
good omen for the chances of
our young players MLchael
Stean (Canbridge) and Tony
Miles (Birmnninghm) in the
Junior namplionshlo o the
world in Teesside this summer.
Por Black. under hewy pressure
is their top Soviet rival
Alexander Belyaveky.
Belyavsky's opponent P gaetz
(White. to mow) found a way
to smash through the Black
defenses and wna at least a
piece. How should play continue?
Par times: 10 seconds chess
master: 30 seconds. ch expert:
2 minutes, county '.&er: 4
minutes, club strenx th: 7
minutes. average: 15 minutes.
novice.
- SOLUTION WNO. 9635 - -
1 P-KS dis ch. P-B3: 2
P-K7! wins even though this
pawn can be captured by any of
five Black pieces. If 2 .
(either) RxP, 3 BxP ch mates
or wins the aueen. If 2 . .
KtxP; 3 0xP mate. It 2 . .
BxP: 3 Rt-B7 oh wins the
Queen. In the game, Black
nlayed 2 ... 0 x P; 3 B x Kt. and
White wo^ 1qukiclv because Rlaok
cannot reompure 3 . Px B
because of # BxP oh iinnming
'.he queen.


words of
E N rour letters
you make
V from the
letters shown
making a
o r d. each
r I oR letter may
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word In
the list. No plurals; no foreign
words rno proper names.
TODAY'S TARGET : 38 words.
good ; 48 words, very good: 8
words, excellent. Solution on
Monday.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Lore loWe loser lost ostler resort
role roll roller rose roster rote
Mloe slot sole sore sorely sorrel
sort sorter stole store stroll
STROLLER toll tore torei troll.


14. Think on thee things.
Ia. Trtese(4) es. ailt.
17. Piston applying pressure.
I41. leuon river. (4)
to Away from the coast.
s PIatterm. (a)
22 Meadow-land. (3S
23. Part of the week. 44)
24. Expand. 4()
Down
1. Novel thoughts. (, 4)
.. Cheers favourite. 0()
;. OM name for lives. (9)
4. Speak untruths. (3)
.. Blue e irn (snag.). (9)
6 Ne sIary. (9)
,00101i. foro
to) e.
f Morn. i

t itr e 5.a


( 31,a retde.,g' *ul


2
-;u
I Uz



I (


5Jhe Comic Pale


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


C CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HOROSCOPE
from the CarroT RihWW Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: You are now able
to get together with a good friend you really
like and can easily impress this person with your charm. A fine
day for engaging in those pursuits requiring social tact, plus
ability at precision work.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You understand the aims of
those you are devoted to. Take the time to help them before
handling own affairs. Come to a better understanding with
mate tonight. Strive for more harmony.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Think of a better way to
make all those duties ahead of you more workable, so that you
please associates. Find the right apparel that will improve your
appearance, but watch your budget.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Make plans for a good time
you wish to have in the future. You have fine talents which
can be put in motion now with excellent results following.
Express the best part of your nature.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) A good day to
make your home more charming and have greater harmony
with kin. You have a good opportunity now to use a special
talent you have that can bring success in the future.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Let business associates know that
you appreciate their loyalty and friendship. Also, take the
time to buy appliances that make your mutual operations
more efficient. Act without delay.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Get in touch with a monetary
expert who can assist you to have more income in the future.
You can enjoy taking part in whatever is of a physical nature
and improve your health.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) An ideal day to be active so
that you improve your position in life and bring more
happiness into it. Dress nicely and make a good impression on
others. Attend the social tonight. Be poised
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You are able to obtain the
data you need to clarify a situation that is puzzling right now.
Make arrangements to see the one you are romantically drawn
to. Take it easy tonight.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Go along with good
pals who are interested in your welfare Being extra friendly at
this time brings many new friends within your orbit of
endeavor. Choose with care. Be wise.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) If you go straight to
those persons who can assist you to gain your finest aims the
results will be excellent. A good day to entertain an important
higher-up Do so in a charming way.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) New doors of opportunity
will soon open to you so be prepared to enter them Make the
right arrangements for a trip you want to make in the future
Find the data you need tonight
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) A good time to talk over
business prospects with associates. Know what it is you want
the most and then follow your intuition for best results. Enjoy
company of good friends tonight.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those charming young people who can reach the top of
whatever profession that is chosen and later branch out and do
well in other activities. Give as fine an education in the most
modern schools to prepare your progeny for the coming
events. Fame and fortune are definite possibilities in this chart
Don't neglect religious training early in life,


WHAT DID BETSY 5-E .Ae
TH!NK OF iER M.E"T;
FORMER HO\AE
To\\'47 r,


By PAUL NICHOLS


PER-AP6 SHE WAS MORE WHO AM I TO
N PRESSED BY HER GUIDE ) QUESTION
THAN -HE TOWN ITSELF, EXQUISITE
SCOJN5ELOR! --1- TASTE, JUDGE?,


I APARTMENT 3-G


I STEVE


ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


F AS LONG AS I CAN KEEP MY SECRET,
I AM PREPAREPANP SO LONG AS I STAY
OUT OF THE BULLRING... MY SCRET
BELONGS TO ME... AND )OU, MAESTRO.


/,uj~1


HE WANTS
ME To YEAH.
GO ON A
O/ET !?


by saunders & overgard I


Par time 23 min.


G^wEOcE -uirfe^
MOVE TME GAWAS
FufRTUMEFROM
Tge MOM"E
1a








OW-1


AP Newsf.aoures


mums


JUDGE PARKER


HELLO, SAM! DID YOU COME IN
HERE FOR REFUGE ? WHAT ARE
THE WOMEN DOING ? r---


By Ale x Kotsk y j


I7


I


I












(Whe arihunt


Monday, April 16, 1973.


the







I 1


Montreal 3 4 .429 21'/
Philadelphia 3 4 .429 2'%
St. l.ouis 1 7 .125 s
West Division
(Cincinnatl 7 3 .700 -
San lrancisco7 4 .636
Houston 5 6 .455 2%1
Sa.n Diego 5 6 .455 2/
Los Angeles 4 6 .400 3
Atlanta 3 6 .333 3V,
Sunday's Results
New York 2, I'hiladellphia I
Pittsburgh 8, Montreal 3
Chicago 8. St. Louis 6
Los Angeles 6. Atlanta 2
San Diego "-4, Houston 1.0
Cincinnati I 1-7, San Irancisco 0-3.
Saturday's Results
Montreal 6, Pittshurgh 4
Chicago 4. Stt. Louis I
Cincinniati 3, Sail Irancisco 0
Philadelphia 7, New York 3
Houston 8, San Diego 5
Los Aiigeles 2. AtlstL. I
Cincinnati (Billinghamn 1-0) at San
Diego (Norman 0-1). 10:30 p.m.
Houston (Forsch I-I) at Los
Angeles (Sutton 0-2), 11 p.mn


the fourth and fifth innings for
Neilly and Gardiner to pace the
team to victory.
(;ardiner, who got on after
being hit by a pitch, scored the
winning run on an error.
Brooks followed with a single
and went to third on stolen
bases. With two down, Neilly
shot a fielder's choice to short
stop at the same time driving in
Brooks.


F 1 Lady volleyballers win
.1i A ^


Upsetters let Set blitz



Schlitz 9-7 to tie second

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
CATCHER LES GARDINER scored three and batted in two
during his single official plate appearance as Jet Set, "the
Upsetters". stretched their winning steak to six in a row with a
9-7 victory over Schlitz Beer Saturday at the Queen Elizabeth


Clearwater YMCA tourney
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE BAHAMAS' NATIONAL VOLLEYBALL SQUAD, paced
by the superb all around performance of its members, stopped
the stalwart Miami Golds 15-2, 7-15 and 16-14 on Saturday and
emerged victors in the Clearwater Y.M.C.A. 1973 Women's
invitational Tournament. With their sole loss going to Miami
Golds, the Bahamas ended with an excellent 11-1 win-loss record.


"The first game
Golds was our best
of the day," comm
Dr. Norman Gay.
lose one service."
However, going
second game against
the Bahamas slippe






THUNDERING AROUND
the bend and heading into the
stretch, jockey Stan McNeil (8)
skillfully guides Horan Shoran
through her paces and on to
victory.


I

4


, '
7^i .!9**


Sports Centre.
( mntrlini, an eight and
three wti" lss record, the
I'psillers rest in second place
two and a hll gailies out and
tied with Bt'cks Bees
Altlhiiugh Gardiner faced the
pitcher three imes, he was
walked in tile lirst inning,
slaiimlcd ,t two) rhi double in
the third nd was awarded a
hbat "ho bil pitch" in the fifth
of lilt' i ltlng contest
With hiiih sides tied at seven
ill h thI e end of the third
inning. Jet Set picked up two
in the tilth including an rbi by
I lonel N\'iley pacing them to

I rankic DeIan in picking up
the win gave up two runs, two
hits struckout four and did
not walk any. In the third
inning lie relieved three game
winner Isaac Fox who was
peppved for seven runs and
seven hits Fox struckout three
and talkedd three
Ior Schlit/ it was Mackey
Bain wlho went two tfor three
urnin tlie plate scoung one run
and batting in three.
Pitcher Vincent Strachan
also i had a giood part of the
slick as at two times at bat he
collected one hit and drove in
two runs Strachan was relieved
by Bertram Murray in the
fourth inning.
Schlit/, hitting first, saw
Llo hyd Howleg with one down
reach first on a walk. Lorenzo
Lckahrt followed with a
single and both runners
advanced with stolen bases.
With Itwo down following
(Gtllres lIneas' strikeout,
\lackey Bain drilled a single
deep into right centre driving
in IBowleg and Lockhart.
let Set started off their
inning with Eddie McQuay's
walk lie too advanced on a
steal for Spoon McKinney to
drive himt home on a single to
light McKinney who reached
third on a wild pitch was cut
dov wn trying to steal home.
les (;ardiner the fourth
batter following Eugene
Thompson's strike out took a
walk to bring on Richard
Brooks who drove in the tying
run on a single into right.
Both sides fell scoreless in
the second inning and Schlitz
again started the rally in the
third. Bain picked up his third
rbi in that inning when he
drove in Bowleg. liHe got on
with a walk. Strachan also
picked up his second rbi in that
inning when he cracked a single
deep into left.
Jet Set in no way eased the
tempo and rallied for five
equalizing runs in the bottom
phase. Gardiner's two rbi
double into right
complimented that inning.
As Dean settled down on the
mound, he shut out Schlitz in




E
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L P'ct. GB
Boston 4 I .800 V/
Baultiniore 6 2 .750
I)etroit 3 4 .429 2 V
Cleveland 3 5 .375 3
New York 3 5 .375 3
Milwaukee 2 4 .333 3
West Division
Kansas City 7 2 .778 2
Minnesota 4 3 .571 2
California 3 3 .500 2'/
Texas 2 3 .400 3
Chicago 2 4 .333 3
Oakland 2 5 .286 4
Sunday's Remists
Kansas City 12, Chicago 5
Cleveland 7, Detroit 0
New York 6. Boston 2
Milwaukee 3-4, Baltimore 2-5 first
gamne It innings
Califiornia at Texas, 2, ppd., rain
Oakland at Minnesota. ppd., rain
Saturday's Results
Boston 3, New York !
Detroit 8, Cleveland 2
Oakland 2, Minnesota I
Kansas City 3, Chicago 0
ialtimniore S, Milwaukee I
California at Texas, ppd., rain
Today's Games
Detorit (tolich 0-2) at Boston
(P'attin 1-0), 11 a.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet. G.B
l'ittsburgh 5 I .833
New York 5 2 .714
Chicago 4 3 .571 1


' 5


-- -y-
VIVIAN THOMPSON'S PRIZED STEED Horan Shoran, ridden by Stan McN
top honours in Saturday's 12 furlong feature race to capture the Horse of the Ye.
in the final week of the Hobby Horse Racing season. Mr. Thompson above rec
trophy from Race Track general manager Garth Kemp. McNeil sits in the sad(
groom helps in the handling. PHOTOS: RICKEY


HEASTIE LUMBER'S FIRST BASEMAN, Robert
Thompson, here commits a costly error allowing Big Q's
Randy Rodgers to reach first safe. Rodgers went on to
score on Ed Moxey's rbi triple.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells

Ed Moxey in form for Big Q"


BIG Q'S PLAYER/MANAGER ED MOXEY drove in three
runs, scored three and collected three hits including two triples
during his three times at bat Sunday as Big Q Marketeers whipped
Heastie Lumber 10-1 to take a two and a half game lead in the
Bahamas Baseball Association's 1973 series.


Paced by Adrian Rodgers on
the mound, Big Q kept fleastie
hitless until the fourth inning
when they picked up three hits
and scored their sole run.Allen
Minus scored on Robert
Thompson's rbi single. Heastie
later picked up one hit each in
the sixth and seventh innings.
Batting second, the
Marketeers scored three runs in
the first, one in the second,
two in the third and four in the
fourth innings.
Big Q now reign with an
eleven and one win-loss record.


HEASTIE
AB
Burrows 3
Minus 3
McPhee 2
Knowles 1
Thompson 2
A. Thompson I
Carey I
E. Carey I
Knowles 3
Phillips 3
Miaoulis 2
Hamilton I
A. Rodgers 0
Turnquest 2


LUMBER
1 H
0 0
1 1
0 1
o 0
o 2
0 0
0 o
0 o
0 0
0 I
0 0
0 0
o 0
0 0


BIG Q MARKET
AB R if RBI
Cooper 4 0 2 1
Albury 0 0 0 0
R. Rodgers 4 2 2 1
Bradshaw 4 2 2 0
Moxey 3 3 3 3
Martin 1 0 0 0
A. Rodgers 2 1 1 1
Munroe 2 0 1 2
Higgs 2 0 1 0
Huyler 3 0 0 0
Moss 0 0 0 0
Rolle 2 1 0 0
Stuart 2 1 0 0
DEL JANE EDGE
.BECKS BEES 8-7.
Del Jane Saints gained
strength in the fourth inning
and tallied in four runs to edge
Becks Bees 8-7 dropping them
two and a half games out. Del
Jane moved to third place with
a seven and six win loss record.
Batting first, the Saints took
an early 3-0 lead before Becks
came back and edged them out
4-3. Becks again picked up
three runs in the bottom of the
second and controlled the lead
7-4 until the fourth inning.


A.I.D ROYALS DOWN CHAMPIONS


A.I.D. ROYALS after knocking
off defending junior league
champions Flamingo A's stretched
their undefeated winning streak to
five in a row one game ahead of
the A's Saturday when they
overcame a 4-0 lag and stopped St.
Michael Dodgers 12-7 in the second
game at the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre.
Leading the way for the Royals
was relief pitcher Cecil Forbes who
came on in the second inning to
score two runs and bat in four
including a three run homer while
facing the pitcher only twice in the
five innings game.
The Dodgers, determined to
shake up their opponents picked up
two runs in the first and two in the
second before A.I.D. bounced back
with a big nine-run third inning.
After eliminating the Royals in
the top of the first with two
strikeouts, and a pop fly, short stop
Andre Woods and first baseman
Jesse Farquharson saw the Royals
ahead by two.
With one down, Woods was given
a base on balls. A wild pitch saw


him to second. A two base
throwing error on secondbaseman
Gassman Miller who fielded
Farquharson's shot gave Woods the
opportunity to score and
Farquharson second. Farquharson
later stole third and another error
on the catcher sent him home.
Allowed only one hit in the top
of the second, the Royals were
again eliminated scoreless.
Bradley Braynen, on a throwing
error, put the Dodgers up to three
in the bottom of the second and
Van Rolle's rbi saw Derek
Farquharson home for the fourth
Forbes returned in the fourth
inning to crack his three run homer
deep into right and the Royals were
ahead 12-4.
The Dodgers made a brief
comeback in the bottom of the
fifth when they scored three runs
off two hits. Bradley Braynen got
an rbi In that inning.
Bahamas Blenders Juniors came
up with five big runs in the top of
the fifth inning to edge Lees
"a..rAin.. i R


T ^)T' V









UNDEFEATED HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP Billy Lee (second from left) recer
first place trophy from Mrs. Don Malone following his victory in the first annut
tournament last week. At centre is second place Edward Robinson and right is third


Lambert Albury.


Richard Charlow, green belt,


wins ludoka of Year award
FOURTEEN-YEAR-OLD RICHARD CHARLOW, a green belt
holder (Sankyu), was awarded the Judoka of the Year award by
the Bahamas Judo Association following his triumph in the junior
boys heavyweight division during the B.J.A.'s first annual
tournament last week.
After losing his first match for her victory in her weight
against David Dorsett who did division in the last Florida
not place in the competition, Tournament, defeated three of
Charlow went on to defeat her four competitors to take
Louis Singh, Courtney Bunny the 76-105 pounds girls
and Steve Russell. Russell and competition.
Bunny ended second and third The 14-year-old junior
respectively in that division, started her judo career over a
"I am very impressed with year ago and at present holds
him," commented B.J.A. an orange belt.
president Don Malone. "lie is Mr. Malone is satisfied with
showing much improvement," the overall progress of the
he said of Charlow who started Association. "They are putting
judo 15 months ago. At good things into it," he said.
present, he is the highest As judo is fast becoming a
ranked junior in the Bahamas. popular sport in the Bahamas
In the same tournament, and the Association
Billy Lee captured the senior membership begins to swell,
boys heavyweight division the B.J.A is expected to form
undefeated in three matches. another club next month in
With only four in that order to accommodate the
competition including himself, extra members.
Lee, a senior green belt holder The following are the first,
stopped Edward Robinson, second and third place winners
Lambert Albury and Claudius of each division: boys pee-wee
Anderson. Lee is presently Ryan Cromb, J. J. Carey,
working on his brown belt. Paul Grimsey; girls pee-wee -
Helen Carey, remembered Theus Colebrook, Linda
.... Thompson, Madonna Malone;


JUNIOR BOYS HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION Richard Charlow (centre) is shown
being presented with the Judoks of the Year award by Bahamas Judo Association
president Don Malone (right). At left is Mrs. Don Malone, a co-ordinator of the club.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


Boys 54 lbs Gordon Bowe,
Sean Solomon, Kicky
Colebrook; boys 55-641bs
Kirk Knowles, Robert Roberts,
Mark Grimsey; girls 55-75 lbs
Jenifer Smith, Stephanie
Bowe, Lisa Smith; boys 65-74
lbs. ANdrew Fsfakis, Marco
Wells. Damon Pinder; boys
75-891bs. Scot Brown, Scott
Dorsett, Tommy Hiall; girls
76-1051bs. Helen Carey,
Kathy Hendrick, Linda Smith;
boys 90-109 lbs Gus Singh,
Dave Carey, Victor Duffield;
Jr. boys IH. W. Richard
Charlow, Steve Russell,
Courtney Bunny; girls H.W. -
Angela King, Linda Carey,
Penny Schipmann; Snr. boys
L.W. Bruce Thompson,
Rickey Wells, Steve Sweeting;
snr. boys H.W. Billy Lee,
Edward Robinson, Lambert
Albury.
TODAY'S BALL GAMES
DEL JANE Saints, seeking
to recover from their straggling
losses, take on Bahamas
Blenders 2-10 in the first game
tonight 7 o'clock


PHOTO: Rickey


- ~#.


... IT ALL ADDS UP




your reusahla hut unwanted I

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc... clear out

your closets, garage, storeroom ...

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to








ROSETTA STREET

TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


-J -m~


"BAHAMAS GAS"

WE WILL BE

CLOSED

FOR THE

Easter Holiday

For 4 days from 5:00 p.m. Thursday, 19th April
Until 8:00 a.m. Tuesday, 24th April.

PLEASE ORDER YOUR GAS EARLY


"BAHAMAS GAS"
THOMPSON BOULEVARD, OAKES FIELD
NASSAU, PHONE: 56401


II


e with the services and the experienced
single game Golds took advantage of the
ented coach situation to win 15-7.
'We did not Although the Bahamas had
won the tournament at that
into the time it was their sole intention
st the Golds to cut down the Golds. "The
d up on six momentum that the Golds had
was difficult to overcome and
they were leading 9-0," said
coach Gay. "Using our two
time outs wisely we came from
*,. '..,.l behind to deuce the score 14
all and went ahead to win
16-14."
Dropping their sixth of
12 played, the Golds entered a
three way tic for second with
Jacksonville and Miami Blues.
In the playoffs, the Blues
dominated and took second
place.
The Bahamas entered two
teams in that tournament and
although the second team
ended in the cellar, accurate
serving by Glen Miller gave
them their sole win of the
competition against the
Golds.
The Bahamas played the
Miami Blues in the first game
ell, took and defeated them 15-13, 15-1
ar Award and 15-8. Dr. Gay pointed out
-elves the marked improvement in the
die and a Miami Blues squad who,
Y WELLS strengthened from the
Bahamas' flogging, took three
straight sets from the Golds.
Jacksonville was the
Bahamas' next opponent and,
although they tried hard, they
were treated to a 15-5, 16-14
and 15-8 defeat at the hands of
the victors. Jacksonville
threatened in the second set
when they came back and
deuced the game.
Not even their sister team
was able to stop the robust
Bahamas Number One. The
Bahamas second team fell
15-10, 15-13 and 15-11.
Standouts on the National
Squad were Margaret Albury,
Florence Rolle, Winsome
Davidson, and Celestine Wilson
all very good hitters. Basic
setters included captain
3 Barbara Knowles and Elsine
Thompson
The National team will
ves his disband briefly and go back to
al judo their regular teams in
d place preparation for the coming
Wells. season which begins in May.


o-

* ,-i


-AMIN.