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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03319
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 10, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03319

Full Text













OR UG JU CE
available at your
SUPERMARKET


EJOY FqREE CHAMPAGNE
ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
-~-TELEPHONE 77303/77778- .


PMH STAFF TECHNICIAN 'ALMOST SCUTTLED

ESSENTIAL OPERATION RECENTLY


Price: I 5Cents



Sgggtg ggj gyr



says '72


rvne 'u *


few tlll


here & there'
IN 192ACTUAL,
REVENC:E is ani estimated
$104mrillionl. It may be afew
dollars out here andf there, but
ertainly not t t anc essen, of

(b Tvenrunent SenarI lllander
Pad(1 At~ddrley, Minister of
Externial Aflfairs. declared late
Mlonday.



Orville Turnquest. Sen
Ilurnqui' ct niecnt rio deny th the
197llr[.'t~t .Ilount. htiw ben


compn leted, ;nd Ashows!




neveI~r mente.ne the accunt



th l~t '11111~(lrevenue t h hmaws
193ndis I.lt ndllul (nfatl nodgt th


Indf Ih atti Ihi tt Ir athi tl
of ~ l the Pu urea ursyt


llno~thtr pace <~' the Ho~use o~f



fiur a d vd. hi

o~nel oft(c R11 UN ~l
"lEither inicrilfo~rmaio wdS
give'n to hirn by someone, or it
has comnle to, himn srco~nd. third
orn nhdirl could not see
a members\~ of1 thle Senate
corning t, the c~hambecr with
seod, thirdf I, bor h nd
r < o nation 'I'theIref T ahe
reasoned somenc~n must have
given Sen T`urnquest the
information
"As a matterIC of fact the
Leader is in no, position to
state that as a po~sttive fact. It
mnust be as the result of
wico~llne repo~rtinge it to himl.
110e must b~e aware that they
(the Opposition) may be
supplied information by
somlleone who does not know
but who they mlay not know is
not In a position to know
"It may have heen supplied
by someone who, is an cernem
o~f the O)ppo~sition and who
wanted tot mlislead them
'I can1 informn thte leader thiat
whatever his sou rCe, his
Information that actual
revenue last year was $93
million is notl the case. hut it is
in fact that actual revenue last
y'ear is an estimated $104
lnilllon, It miay he a few dollars
(,ut here and there, but
certainly no~t to~ the exutent of
Ibeing: $93illiotn," Sen
Adderley concludedi.


'1WO ANI)ROS Islanders
suffered leg inluries and a
woman parssenger was taken to
the Prllncess Mararetr Hlospital
when they were involved in
separate trlffic~ acc~idents last
nigh t
At 10 37 last mg~ht Harris
(;reen. 33. o, fMangrcove 'ay,
and Hubert Rolle 57, of
Smith s Hlill. Andros, were
walking along Shirley Street
ricar Victoria Avenue when
they were involved in an
accident withi car no. NP'B 701
driven by C`hristoipher Dillett
of Rose L~ane. Palmndale. T`he
accident occurred opposite the
Princess Margaret H~ospital
wher th m wr det nd.
( ren.e rer* rwer in a"fair
conditionn, has injured his left
legF Rollle' Ic' let leg has been
fractured. Hlis condition is
reported as "fairly


VOL. LXX, No. 118


Tuesday. April 10, 1973


sea sea;rc~h round the clock for
Andtrea Spenlcer. 4V2. BASRA
was \elecr~te for the bank's
app~rlciation, he said, because
it was~ an or~anliZation that
<%si uni the entire Freeport

"It is withi deep gratitude
thiat I present IIASRA withi this
special dlonationl for the
untirinlg efforts that members
o~f their association played in
the \earch and rescue
operations following thle recent

Spenlccer's daughter, A\ndrea.
;I1 amSOrry that Mr. and
Mrs. Spenicer are not here
todayl~ to participate in this
presenattatin but they


conveyed to me many tim~s
how deeply they appreciated
the assistance they received
from BASRA and the whole of
the Freeport community' in the
safe returnho their dau lterl

Bank and of the Spencer
family, it iswith great pleasure
that I present this cheque to
BASRA."
Shown above from left to
right: Bill Metcalfe, senior
director of BASRA in
Freeport, Orville Holden.
President, BASRA, Mr. Minard,
District Manager of the Royal
Bank of Canada in the
Bahamas, Chris Allison and
Fred O'Brien, both senior
directors of BASRA.
PHOTO: Ernie's Studio


THE ROYAL BANK of
Canada paid off the debt on
Bahamas Air Sea Re~scle
Association's boat inl Freeport
yesterday with a cheque for

pr sn ed Iyhtehe bahj' dist 1 t
manager in appreciation of the
role played byv BASRA in
helping to rescue the
kidnapped daughter of former
bank manager Robert Spenicer.
Mr. Clyde Minard, who was
in Preeport attending a dlistrict
manager's conference, sarid thiat
the bank's donation wa\ their
way of thanking the entire
community of Freeport for the
way in which they helpedl in
the kidnap catse. He said
BASRA maintainedt an air and


r"FNM charge blood bank
















By NICKI K A PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL staff technician was accused in the Senate yesterday of attempting to
"scuttle" the recruitment of blood needed for an essential operation and overriding the instructions of doctors and


The charge was miade by
Opposition Senate Le~ader
Orville Turnquest in the course
of debate on the 19)73 Budget
Appropriations.
Discussing allocations for
the Ministry of Hlealth. the
FNM Leader said that
information hadl come to him
about the Bloodl Bank which
made huin shudder at what
could happen as a result on the
"indiscipline" in this particular
departmennt.
"There was onc occalsion in
the last few dlays when the
Blood Bank hvas dev< id of any

for bloody for arn essential
ope at/n," Mr. Tu~rnquest

fle faold dlonors were
obtained fromn the Nassau

aee ae inni te blo t o I
technician sought to overrile
the doctors and the C'hief of

"'"Alun relfrm the entire
operation was almost scuttled
and only four or five pints of
blood were obtained just


FRIEND?
"That individual was able to
challenge authority cithcr
because the person is a memnber
of the government party or has
friends in government," Mr.
'Turnquest declared.
110 suggested that instead of
blamning the doctors for certain
problems at the hospital the
Minister should see whether
the difficulty dlid not lie with
ot her officers in his
rtepartment.
Tlhe doctors, he added, were
only trying to establish the
proper conditions in which to
work.
I NM Senator Arthur
Foulkes, who opened the
dchate, said everyone was
concerned abloult the
administration of the health
services, and personally he
would like to, see it removed
from the realm of politics.
Ilowever certain government
members "should cease to
niake the health services an
area for their own witch huints
and vendettas."
The Senator thought that
present Hlealth Minister Loftus
Roker had the country's
welfare at heart, but he warned
him that he was "being set up
by his friends andi that the
dagger has been seen by C'aesar
himlsel`."
110 cautioned that the
trouble at the Princess
Margaret Hospital was not
being caused by the F:NM
doctors and nurses, and
recalled the 1970 garbage
inquiry which though aimed at
the then Hlealth Minister (Dr.
Curtis McMillan) "showed that
there were some people in the
Ministry of Health that were
considered untouchable".
WATCHW BROTHERS
As for the new Minister, Mr.
Loftus Roker. Senator Foulkes
warned huin to "watch his
brothers. Hie should seriously
investigate and discover why
there is a problems at the Blood
Bank. 110 m-ight he surprised to
find out who is engineering the

rt nm giving a ( itendl n ord

L~ook out for treachery.
governmentnt Lecader Paul
Adderley refuted the
allegations by the two
Oppo"Sition Senato~rs claimiing
II1;m the hatcs spersions
niot supported in any way ant
hadl the object of creating a

"Noteio si tld hiad they


o~ffe~red any explanation for the
charge of "witchhunts or
personal vendettas.
"They are taking advantage
of the privilege of this
Chamber to, cast aspersions,"
the~ Setuitor arsserted.
As f(r the galrbage inquiry'
he suggestedt that Senator
F~oulkes co~nsult his colleague
Senator T~urniquest.
Senator Addlerley insisted it
was not tale the Blood Bank
hadl been devoid of blood at
aIny times, andt suggested that
Se na tor Tiurnquest was
sp akibng oela subnect about

m isin fo rmned .

expl reatills > n by s eo n
innocent of the facts or
someone who wanted to make

usiu pu p se bh odth
half truths that will leave the
people under a misappr-
chenc government Leader
argued that Mr. Turnquest
might well be "the victim of
the same cruel hoax that has


he saidf, "owes a higher level ot.
responsibility to this Chambcr.
NOT 'TRUI
"If he wants to criticize the
hospital on the basis of fact
that is welcome, but in this
particular matter of the Blo~od
Bank what has been alleged is
not true and has no basis in
fact with regard to the
a dmni nist ra tion of that
particular department.
T`hey are speaking on
misinformation supplied to
the m.
Senator Foulkes challenged
Senator Adderley to give an
assurance that there had been
no postponement of operations
because of a shortage of blood.
Senator Turnquest informed
members that his information
has been brought from sources
he had reason to respect. "I am
noit given to glibly referring to
any bit of rumour without
reference to the source," he
decclared.
He pointed out that the
Opposition did not have access
to making all the requisite
checks that government could,
but it was their duty as a
responsible Opposition to deal
with such matters in the only
place which was their forum,
that is, the legislature.
It was not enough for the
government to say that the
Opposition's statements were
based on misinformation. It
was the Minister's duty to set
the record straight "and tell us
the truth.'
Senator Adder le y
maintained that the matters
raised by the Opposition were
the proper subject for
questions eithdfr in the Senate
or the House and repeated his
remarks that the allegations
were based on "misinformation
and half truths."
CARIBBEAN HEADS OF
GOVERNMENT CONFERENCE
GEiORGEfTOWN, GUYANA
(AP)d Th e eighth osmnferentee of
Commonwealth Caribbean,
rudntr es op ned here Monday with
cooperation and regional
hre a nfrence has be bcaale

hcmm n market fr er a>1a jhr
set up in 1968. The decision to
make the move toward regional
integration was made at the seventh
Casribbean summit in Trinidad last
October when the fifth anniversary

^h arget dte orinagurationrd
Howe~ver, the CARIFTA Counc i
st Ministers meet ge her over h
past f(,r asi haev r it


MR. TREVOR SCOTT (left) executive director of the
ine ntiona society ao t Poetio ofAn mals, ho is


president. PHOTO: Gus Roberts








118[8' With 18s~ SOf





By MIKE LOTHIAN
IT IS "MIRACULOUS" THAT RABIES, wiped out in the
Bahamas some years ago, has not already made a comeback
because of the increasing number of stray dogs, Dr. Cyril Holmes
of the Bahamas Humane Society declared today.
"If you take the law of Mr. Scott said "I think a
averages we are getting closer common sense approach would
and closer all the time" to an show there most clearly is a
outbreak of rabies, the most health risk in this area." He
feared of animal diseases, Dr. asked Dr. H~olmes to elaborate.
Holmes said. The veterinarian said "there
It was revealed that the is the worry of rabies, which
Society has been waiting at sooner or later must hit the
least nine months for the island."
go-ahead from Government to Private boats visiting the
put a plan into operation to Bahamnas often come from
reduce the stray dog countries where "rabies is
population. endemic," and often have dogs
Dr. Hlolmes voiced his aboard, he said.
warning at a press conference "If the owners take these
called at Society headquarters dogs for a walk and they
in Chippingham this morning happen to bite another dog."
to discuss the visit to the rabies could be contracted by
Bahamas of Mr. Trevor Scott, the local animal.
executive director of the The disease could spread
International Society for the rapidly through the packs of
Protection of Animals. stray dogs, and dealing with
Mr. Scott was called in to the outbreak could be made
give new insight to the three much more difficult if local
main problem areas in the racoons catch the disease.
Bahamas: stray dogs, surrey Racoons are good latent
horses and the abbatoir. carriers of rabies, he said.
Mr. Scott said "the stray dog A second danger, Dr. Hlolmes
problem seems to be closest to said arose from the increasing
the hearts of the Society, importation of larger German
Government and individuals Shepherd dogs, which are "in"
here. pets and fine guard dogs.
TOO0 MANY Unfortunately, when the
"The problem is that there Shepherds are not properly
are really too many dogs, with controlled by the owners, they
the result that you are having a mate with stray dogs, with the
situation where many are result that the individual
becoming strays, getting into animals in packs of stray dogs
packs and, quite apart from are generally getting larger and
possible health problems, are a taking on the traits of the
nuisance. The problem appears German Shepherd.
at this stage to be larger than He said at this time
can be contained by existing fortunately there is enough
services." garbage around so that strays
He said to solve the problem generally do not go hungry.
there must be st ric t But if' the stray dog
enforcement of dog licensing population continues to grow
laws, an increase in the and hunger sets in "the dogs
operations of dog control will not just pullchildren front
services and "thirdly and most bicycles, they'll eat then.
desirable, for the Bahamas Another problem. D~r.
Humane Society to be able to Hlolmes said, is the fact that
implement somte of its ideas." "you have a continuous
"Asss de cal letail oblethe out reak ofdister perwiriwh


$110flag8 Of falHISil 188Ch8S
e a a e

Cf ISIS |110j)0ftl08 10 MSSSSII

liv NICKI KELLY
N ROV NCE recently in the sixth period of "absolute drought" to have occurred


her i h at tel yer
'Iesortage af rarin l
which has assumed crisis


iaas en refnntd h n t s o ,1
five Central Ame~rican
countries, which have declared


droug t in 50 years

declre s jus ad el ~rcii
this week. Nicaragua. ill .
nto lb erene rgenecy statm e
earthquake, had serio~us
financial problems because ,f
drought long before the quake ~
struck
Lighter than usual rainfall
duringg last year's rainy \season
left water tables below their l
normal levels. TIhe situalllcon
became acute as the region l


entered~c Its culrrent1 dry season


proe atiri niht hasr afce
other farm products which
halve hiad toi be supplied by


increase In the cost ofr living for
flthabi t1 inl' 10ar ni Ilical
dfrinkinrg waLter is rationed.
15 DAYS
A1 spokeitsmn fo the
liahuanras Meteorological O)ffice
Mo~nd:,y defined dlrought as an
"abso~lute period of I5
iconsecutive da~ys. nlonec of
which is rcrdited withi 0.01 of
an1 inich o~r more of ruin."
OnI the ba;sis o~f that
de~lin~ition, New P'rovidecnce has



n011 hif MS8 t


WatBr FSilofag0
ALTHIOUGH;~ consumers in
Ne~w P'rovidlence may be
com~nplaining about a lack of
drinking and bathing water
there appears to, be no shortage
of water at least for bottling
soda becverage~s arul processing
miilk
Tlhe only company that has
beenr experie~ncing somre
problrlems because of low
p'rescure is Nassau Bottling
wh~fichI lacks the storage tank
taic~ilities of the two other
niialoir bo~ttlers Caurihbban
Hortling ndHhama I1S

A \pokesman~ l(im Nassaul
Hac~llingF aidj thle company
hopedt to, put in a water unit
thait would co~nvert the well
wales onr the premnises into
,urtable water
(; ar ib hean I Roft ling,
manufac111~ ItuerS of C~oc~a (cola,
fiave a one miillio~n gallon
sto~rage tank dlivided into four
ccompa'rtmennts. ~These are uised
princi'allly fo~r the collection of
rainwater. ini addition to which
thecrc are two wells andt access
to the city supply.
A comitpany representative
said that rainwarter is used
prnnei l 11l in the manufacture
r1 thec cwcas, but this is often
supyplemented by distilled
water from the prlant's water
tfistillatlion subsidiary, as well

11 5aIIwat r ;Ind city water

750).000 gallon ralinwater tank,
;nd so urlementslt this with cit P 7
wa;1Ct e~r we the p~ressure is up.
fh`)us IMr the~re hais ben no
problem1I1 :t goldenn1 isles dairy

wulur~~l lentise~t an nplteral Ci~

wa~ere ly s spokesman said

wllst nuthh retsur aump


been in a state of drought frorn
March 18 to April 8, Sundlay a
totrdll if sidays, with no sign

Even so, rainfall for the first
quarter of 1973 can still be
regarded as normal, as there
hav :::- sx yer in the ps
first quarter was less than the
3.88 inches recorded thus far
this yetar.
Looking over the ten years
beginning January 1, 19)64,
the Met official said that there
were no periods of partial
drc ught recorded. ,
"Partial drought" is by
definition 29 consecutive days
in which the mean daily
ramlfall does not exceedl 0.01
of an inch.
L)ROUHT~7S
T'he six periods of absolute
drought recorded between
January I through April K in
the last ten years were in lose,
from February 24 through
March 13, when there were 18
days with only a trace of rain
In 1968 the drought period
was between March 24 through
April 8 and covered 16 days
with total of nil rainfall.
In 1969 there was only a
trace of rain between Janiuary
19 through F~ebruary X-
representing 2 days
In 1969, March 4 through
March 31 ?X day"
produced only a trace of rain.
In 1971 there was only a
trace between January O0
through F~ebruary 7 a period
of 19 days.
hDuring the llouse debate on
te 197 3 B ud ge t
Appr pr ation, much w~as miade
hy th ppositio~n of the fact
t at so many c~onsumecrs hael
been experiencing ~considerable
inconvenience b'causef ofC thle
water shortage.
[lhis was blamned principally
on difficulties arising at the
Blue Hfills desalination plant
which had to be shut down for
mamntenance.
During the ensuing debate
Works Minister Simeron Bowe
pointed out that consumer
de mand 'had always
e needed production, and sant
thtgovernment was e~xploring
various met ods by which it
could improve the situation.
When there was insuffiesent
rainfall the water wells would
inevitably run dry and the
sal nty pcoontent loauld ab


attempt to bring water from
Andros would only deplete
that island's own supplies
wit in two years.
jle called for a national
effort to thonserveh waet I ds

cooperate in doing so. He was
sure, he said, the government
wa ong itrsaikstbu y d


'Thet 11are-up annually begins
inl January or Febru~ary. and
continues to about Ma .
"The present packs miust he ~
reduced in size." 1)r. liolrines
sad."and when yon have I
prop rtions prevent It frmn i

He said t ere is no atldt


WAT [R WA STER $

IW M WIIR TV
EMPLOYEES of the
Ministry of Education on
Shirley Street spend several
hours each morning using
gallons of city water to wash
the cars of senior Ministry
officials, while some New
Providence residents continued
to suffer from a water !;horta~e
and are often unable 10 wash
themselves, let alone their ca!rs.
A recent G;overnmnt ~n
Information Services pres
release reminded c~onsumelrs
that "city water is supphedc f~r
domestic use only. 'Domest~~ic
use' as defined by the Wate1r
and Sewerage Act melans~ '3
supply of water for use on i
premises for the reasonable l
drinking, washing, cleaniin@-
cooking and sa n i t ry
requirements of the co~nsumor
"Domestic use does n~t
include car washing, garden
watering or any water fr
swimming pools." the (;IS
release pointed out
And when the recent wat~r
supply problem was at a c~ris'"
point, the Ministry of' Works
appealed to all consumers to
concerve water by, amng ~n
other things, avoidling washing
cars and watering gardens.
Even though the worst ,f
the water shortage is over for
most of New Providence, the
Ministry has asked consumers s
to continue observing the nrules
to keep water wastage at at

Ye for several houida each

Ministry of I:ducatloln
employee can he seen with a
garden hose, soap and a
sponge, cleaning cars, inciditing
Ministry of Educationr car
NP20 driv ni pl Ed w~atum

Coakley.
As the employee cleans


o sodsShire Sptreuert


ill fto


~ritrun~


stered with Positmaslter of Bahamas for postag econcesions within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


) Sl? L-!T! r daia Z

ROyal Bank cheque for $3,650 says

thanks for BASRA help in kidnap case


PLASTIC TREES














__


TO APPEAR NUDE IN THISI'
NIW ORLIANs (Ar')
Soprano Carol Neblett, whor drewv
widespread attention in ai sparsel,
clad performance with the Newr
York City Opera, soid Monday shec
')rle appear ndurs in the Ne v
<)rle ** pro ucion

















It is well known t tas years go
by many men lose much of the
zest and vigour they enjoyed
when young. Now there is good
news for those who are feeling
"low" or without zip. A new
vigour medicine is now being
imp rteit's calleH Pr plus/Her
"he-men". Get a bottle today
and put adult happiness back
into your life. on2


WE WILL BE




FOR THE


Easter Helldeg


Tuesday, April 10, 1973.


NIXON ASKED TO COOPERATE IN WATERGATE PROBE
WASHIING;TON (AP') The chililarir ofT the Sena~te comlrmi~tte
investigating the Watergate affair has called o~n iPreiidelt Nixorn to
cotoperate in the conttinuing probec. Demclnrlrtic Senactor Stn, I rvin, of
INorth Carolina said te ny N nr' retuwlts ids th ht< r"\ igatortsuggests,
The P'residen~t has refused to, let presentt Ir former White Ho~use rtaff
aides appear before I .rvin'si committee for qlue4tio~lnin under oath*
In a related development. James ,Mct'ird's lawyer rlaim~s the conrictd
Watergate conspirator has no, direct kno~wicdgr e that anyt highl-l~vel official
an the P'resident a re lectio~n campa,;ig knew o~f the h~uggr~i nglan s
Attorney Hernard I ens erwall r~asc ttlle staternfl n~t jdapeytia n
1 as Angeles today. ~aniel I Ilsberg's Irc-deendarnt \ummen~d u, his
telrlinuny yse-way a ub tating that hehadl taken I acrt mn the a~v~in >Irethg
the Ventagorn study before he helped reproduce it.

STALEMATE AT WOUNDED KNEE CO NTINUES
W ASHIN(T) (0 t--he ) alena ntiar e),uc t re <, ic te s ego

Indian leaders saly theyt are noc clotser to, resollving thle co~nflict which is oiver
wheni thte indians wellI surrenldcr their armsl.
The issue has delayed Washingto~n talks o~n In~dian treaty rights hctweecn
<= eicn in nt. Ninver~rnr leader law< 8ell hean r pr side n up adel "'

PICASSO'S FUNERAL TO BE PRIVATE
MOUG(INS. I HAN('I. Al'Kl I 0(AP)~h The dy o~f Ypablo P'icas~so, the
r mou inary artist reth did Sunday at thrn~ ciC a I w/aust m/v c |t no

near Airen, P'rovince. in Varuveneorgues
The date for tuneral services have noit been atn~, nounced It was learned
Monday, however, that the family wanted the funeral to, be a private
affair 7und rea I'i tou,
grounds.
A hearse houring thle body left for vauvenarguers at os4o1 a.m,. Iccal tiine.
ro~llo~wed h, cars carrying I'icawso'e widow. Jacq~ueline, her daughter Iv a
previcnu\ marrilage, rath rin rand (i cannsson' bi y hids frt uarritage Iirl,t
Another roadblo~ck sealed ofTf the rorad leading fromrr the village to, the
thatenu set on a hilltop. (* SI` STORY PAGEl 9)

7 MILLION ACRES FLOODED BY MISSISSIPPI
NLWYOK (P)A springs storml sweecping Amelrica s midsectionr has
brrought new dange~tcr to, weekend Icvers along! the rain swollen Missihsippi
river Fysternl and flooding along thle La;ke t~rie ashore near Tolledo. Ohlio-
>),lia nageda~gtitu l MiSsii~i dw~ estilmated at tho mil >n dollar I nar

thier coinfuenice in Missouri, the sto~rm whipped up five fooct waves on the
Mississippi.
Alo~ng the Missiwsippi system,. somne seven million acres in lnd are undJer
water and an estimnated h~ooo families halve beeni evacuated fro~m their
otmes.

RECORD APRIL, SNOWSTORM
cif cA~o(AP itter-cold weather extends over thle Mid west todus .
The co)ld comnes inl the wake of a; rec~rdl April \Inowsf~torm that Ileft large
Kcritems of finva an Wisccnirit parano/cd 'Ianperlt~uresidrlpe anpdar Ino
in~to, Te'xas.
T~he storm that preceded the co~ld dum~ped heavy snoiw in portion\ of
Msciui Ina u2eth entc Minniesota, ntuhwesternj@ Ilnis an rsuth so
stretchles of interstate highways tremain closed to~dly
CHARTER FI IGHT CRASH I 1 DA hre ilne ligls

to~urists t, Itacsel's spring falir crashed in a blinlard outside I~nsel T'ues~dus
and police announced 106 were killed. Thle plane hlad a crew ofr seven.
So~me o~f the 40 survivo~re escapred withoullt injury, the report oft t~e

Th pae a noregn Vica f phVangard tu hoprop c te Ivct

The police source said one wing caughtl fire but the fusclagye apparently
rema~ined largely intact, expl~aningn thle large nIumber o)f SUrovers reote')1d.
atAbout 15 people were reported :ot have escaped without any intjuries at

ANTI-THIEU DEMONSTRATIONS IN W. GERMANY
IOND)ON (AP') South Vietnaml's P'resident Th~icul was in L~ondon
SMllnday fore a meeting with Ilritish P'rime Minsitor ifeatth. While the
meetingf was in progress at lieutl's country residence,; a group of~ about so
demonstrhrators ma~ssed in front or' the P'rime Minlister's locndln
headquarters at No,. to D~owning: Street.

dsr cnnt at rs.Pole mlcllt sctc estare a di-lhh iu pctrtc' cr Ikmnn City Hlall aI few hours before Thlieu's s~chduled aIrrivall fro~m Londonl.

THIEU CALLS ON WEST GERMAN PRESIDENT
no(NN, GER'MA\NY (AP1) South Vietnamese P'resident Nauyen Vn
Thicu arrived for a courtesy visit T~uesday amid violent demonstrations in
which at least 14 polircemen anld dozrens of detmonstratorrs were injured.
T~hie~u and hris party, which in~cluded hris wife, Focreign Minister Tran Van
irmc antd special foreign plmi y ;hned military advisers arrivI umheraided by
chatnce~llery forl a rie~f visit o~n west (;ermln P'reuident (;ustav Heine~malnrsa
.'rmid strict security measures, his private plane hadf earlier latnded at tle
sente(d-off cl~ologc-kne- n military airport.
S >sd(tl hefe re he arrived, police bat~tledl withl democnstraltors oecup~ying
U,n' (iy tal

NO POLITICAL PRISONERS IN S. VIET SAYS THIEU
VATIC'AN ('ITY (Al') whi le police and Laetist demonstrators hauled
near St. Peter's scluare. Pope)L eniuI VI mlet Jreside~nt Nguyen Vanl Thieu ,f
South Vietnasn here Monday anld urged hlim to, releasepoclitia~l prisoners.
Intu ITpr icllic lsa tot I allunr. andpl Vtci l ndomninusituc issu a
humain problem of political prisonecrs o~f both sides in Vietnamn.
The P'resident galve detailedl infocrma~tio~n and expinplution s o~f th~is subject.
Whlat he toldl thle Pope). Thlicu told a, news co~nference later, was thlt
there are nro political presimencrs in South Vietnaml ind thlat such reports
were "onnl grosu ( ctru~st p~ro~paandal.
"Thlere are no poclitical p~risoners in Soucthl Vietnaml." Thlicu, a Hroman
C~atholic, said in re~spon~se to; a question. "Thellre are only two, kinds of
prisc~mers 2 1.007 o~f Fcnlommo Inw anld 5.081 ('ommunist criminalls."
GAS LEAKS TRIGGER CHAIN EXPLOSIONS
TUII~N, ITAL.Y (AP') Thlousaindls ofC punic-stric~ken Turin residents
barraged po(lice and fire headql~uarters withl eme~rg ncylr phocne calls Monday
aft r gas kiks triggered cha~int explosions thlroughpout thle city over a

At least so apoartmlents were damalged and 12 persotns were hocspitalized
withl hurns, police repocrted,. but the toll in frayed nerves was mluch1 higher
as rumours anld m~isinlformationi spreadt falster thaun thle expltnsions.
At thle so~ccer stadiumr Sunlday. thousands~ ofl perrsons put out their
cigarettes wen lear io r< aa nrter salid a hruge gas cloud was floa;ting in
The gas leaked o~ut ofl antwrt~ork oft undergrorundl pripes into, I;hasements
and apcrartmnts, fo~rming! explosives mixtures,

LIFE FOR KICKING/BEATING DEATH OF VERGER
th ily~ tr i teelagr were sent need tc, litkj iplriso~nllil ;,t
79-year-old mlan to, derth.
Thomasl Nolan. 19. andJ Williamn Chlallis. 18, pleadedf guilty to, killing te 11L
.elderly chlurchl vergetr last Ok~ctber inl order to robl h~imr ~f 60) poundlrs.l, abut
i sf lonlumbar cig rette lightr~ltl cimad t cilga "som er ..

ANSWER TO TREATMENT OF OIL SLICKS?
ToI VV PI o(r Isacteria thlat feeds o~n o~il rcoal l
A ersial r t rudee rduce ancnci lik lt V11(r~l~ imailll fee~d. two (
SThe scientists I)r. tEugene Rolsenblurg. 317, bolrn in Lo~s Anleals. and I~r.
D Avid G;utnik, 37. formerly of Milwa;ukee said on Mondaliy that thle>
Shad isola rd thle bacteria in inh~oraltory 1*tests an tried its efc(rtiveness onr an 1


Thec Tel Aviv Ulniversity Iprofessors said tI1he balctria, usedl withl entinueIls
bro~ke down crude oil into pIrotein anld a hiend of( water and of(il pa;rticles So,
mtisropic they would "never cocagulate in~tuta stic~k."
They suggersted thte hacte~ria rcouldt IK used to) JC~llause tC ()ltlint \\lter
thatt talkers use! to fill their tanlk after unina,;dingC Itheir olil. Whencc ther wa;ter
is emptied fromn a 200,004tonl tanlker., about 500 Itons of' residual~l cil goes ~
With it.
p orm nhurgtsuist stir (Hpryctj*s In~t~lst \\;terdra nb2ll ~0 00 t(o Fitits c <1 t
and 200 tonsr of blended olil for recyclina.
G;utnick said tll hech p~roblemcl is developingg; a we to supphl~ their air
neededl by the~ bacteria wh~il in a sh~ip's thanks. 11< aidc that,~ inl their
experiment, they pumpeKd in air fromlt the shil's engrine s


""J y The Associated Press
TRIBUTES CONTINUED to
9 pour in Monday for Pablo Picasso

CeOpter by heat nusedlewhic mh oa is voe che uoifo i aieSan
never return until a Republic was
restored .
By Dennis Neeld In Mallra, Spain, mourner
SAIGON (AP)--A Canadian peacekeeping investigator charged placed black crepe on the house
Monday that a cease-fire commission helicopter was shot down in where PIcasso, one of the
flames by a heat-seeking missile while flying over Viet Cong-held pweemnosnts painters of the
territory in South Vietnam. owilcially in spain there was no
word of any commemorative acts
Mlaj. Gten. Duncan MtcAlpine doubts about the usefulness of rvern tiuo. wof op eradtiim
sharply disputed a Viet C'ons our presence." Franco to the end. governmentt
claim that the helicopter met He said this was the result of television did run a story on the
with an accident in which nine the "rather dismal record of paite nh dea cSunday, as did
of its passengers, including a the ICCS so far in fulfilling its Tpnihe ndepsendientSans
Canadian and two American responsibilities objectively and newspaper Informaciones said:
civilian pilots, were killed impartially. "This country is obliged to take
Saturday h"But we are remaining in the so~ne "uey, with everyone in hope that within a relatively Spadniars atd the dah ofthe maor
the area knowing this was an brief period of time the parties artist of the age."
approved flight, and with to the conflict will move F~rom Chile,. Nobel prize winner
verbatim reports of the, towards a political settlement Pablo Nerrudal said Picassn's death
survivors, i think otherwise," that wilmkeorpesne muur .' the world into
snapped McAlpine. unnecessary." Neruda, who, won the Nobel
"The fact is that the Cnda ofcas hve Prize for Literature in 197 1, said he
helicopter did in fact sustain a stated repeatedly that the and Picasso were friends of many
heat-seeker.'Polish and Hugain years and that PicasPso had more
The helicopter was on a delegations have refused to tch nceengudd i n i pei
mission in South Vietnam's patiat seouyin n Aohr Nobbel winner. Miguel
northwest corner for the ivtiaonftrevoltns Asturia of Nicaragua, characterited
International C'ommission of ecp hs eaddb h Picasso as "the only 20th century
Control and Supervision Communist side. g tiunss, ci k tc h demi s tntiu
CC In neighboring Cambodia, and his original work. was able to,
Among the dead were four it was reported that the United erupt into the 20th century, leaving
commission members, three Sttshdduldisar us a new imnage of man and of art."
crwmn ndtw VetCog shipments of military Mex,,~ >'si ing artis sa d 'wi 1l
liaison officers. equipment since the beginning the death of Picasso, something has
A second commission of the Communist offensive died in every painter in the world.
helicopter was hit by eal nFbur.I rst Neizvestny, promlinent
"sustained ground fire" and Mit socesadUS Soviet sculptor anld graphlic artist.
made a forced landing near the Cl 30 Hercules freighter atdst Picuss lived a rt ie as an
first in what McAlpine called aircraft from Thailand have but P'icarsso as a phenlomenlon is nor,
"desperate circumstances." Its been averaging 20 deliveries of dead; He will live and contin~ue to
11 passengers and crew were arms and ammunition each lIvrtveti, the Soviet Union 5
not hurt. week to Phnom Penh's government newspaper. called
McAlpine said the pilot of Pochentong Airport. P'icasso "a progressive put lic leader
the second helicopter reported "Although there has been a who activeysruge agdrmainsetl
seeing a missile. He quoted the slight acceleration of deliveries, ir y ,,i ~ble to nhe Fra aiyman as saying: "I saW it go there has been no increase that up to the last days of his life."
by -- POW! then it burst in a P'icasso in~ined the I Trench
ball of flames could remotely be called an omnsrrta tendo
Reports that the aircraft was airlift," said a U.S. embassy a t~iv mbe. b4 ls I ct > n o
hit by a missile were a s, >kesman. Lenin peace P'rize in 1962.
"distortion of the truth," the Khmer Rouge insurgents and In F~ranrce, Poet Louis Arago~n.
Viet Cong declared in a their North Vietnamese and 76, said "I had hoped to die first. II

STh C mmunists also denied al'shiC g walli t e cail tne diffck dd odst ftt
that their forces fired Monday fuel is running short. Food and Poet and novelist Jeanl Cassou.
on a third helicopter which other essentials, however, are like Picasso Spanish-born, said in
South Vietnam reported was said to be ade uate. FroancVe: Piassoe is th alsl of.
hit by six rounds of enemy AMBUSH CONVOY (;ec ."vlaue n alo I
small-arms fire while on a Communist forces along the Veteran bullfighter Luis Miguel
peacekeeping mission over the Mekong River ambushed a 1)ominguin, said Spain should to?
Meko eltato recover Vicasso's works. The
Meon 8 la supply convoy at the weekend bunr~ighte~r often performed %"'"Frer
The Saigon military but five vessels got through to Picasso in plazas in southern
command spokesman, Lt. Col. Phnem Penh to ease the food IranceE. (* StJ STORY PAGEI 9)


WASHING;TON (AP) While
Indians toiok their grievances to, a
::::,ngesoa hern ..::ndtal!;
stalemate on nego~tiations to end
the o~ccupation of W~ounded Knee.
sm. i)
Russell Means. a leader o~f the
American Indian Ifovement, said at
rmi as ~cnt'u\ i~r there II at th
agreed to1 stack all uniawcful arms if
the w\hite ho~uw will meet with
their r prescitat ess pepredto

continue the siege at Wounded
Knee fo~r the rest oif his life if the
Whittethlu~ dialk y di scuins
their treat! rights.
Ithe government has objected to
meectings unless the Indians
Iuren Wu Ie Kne. Kent Frirzell
IIos. Assistant Attorney Generni
said there would be noi talks until
he gets an answer tor a message he
sent into, the village Sunday night.
Ir tell saiddthe Indiansnsenatwrd

treper C'hapel at Wounded Knee.
I~riltell said he replied the
government wants acceptance or
rejection of plan worked out
sAturrda('uyol, the House indian
Afftairs subcommittee opened three
days o~f hearings on the Indian
prc~hirms.
isull aont me g~lwa Siu tr a
Iifficer who, spoke fotr the tribe
rulers.
"O)ur reservation has been
invade~dt cyoutsitders." saidnj~ghq
and so~me aren't.'.
le characterized the AIM leaders
as "a group of goons or gutter rats
if yu want to call them that.

brcllta en in, uro, I "~They have nothing better to do
H~ut this is the heart of the matter.
in~rs whatab need on our
"The issue at Wotunded Knee is
iobs," he said. "G;ive us jotbs and
yo~ub won't have any indian
"About so per cent of the Oglain
Sio~ux Indians are unemployed,
Iagle IHull said.
lie sued the AIM takeover caused

rsrvutiorehan prr isly enxiste :
children are forced to stay away
from schoo~ls. businesses are
inoperable and "we: face: financial

te.Lly Mcehens n ,Washt)dthe
half doen groups including the
civil rights groups and the
lanldowlers g cup odn atsedO e l
Bul t g,sr caract r we them or
identify any common deno~minator.
fagle Hull salid all are enmeshed
in "tribut politics.
in his opening statement, Meeds
said hie didn't intend to ix, blame
for either Wounded Knee or last
full's Indian takeover of the Bureau
af indian Afnairs buildng he e.rte

admin~istration, the C'ongress and
the public to share for
the mismanagement of Indian,
affairs extending over 100 years.
lie said the goal o~f the hearings is
to determine the facts and seek
solutions.


ARABS STRIKE IN CYPRUs



Israeli building is


bombed & El Al




plane attacked

By Alex Efty
NICOSIA, CYPRUS (AP) A hand of Arab guerrillas blew out
the entrance to the apartment building housing the Israeli
ambassador with a powerful bomb Molnday, and then attacked an
Israeli airliner in an apparent attempt to hijack it before take off


Nonec of the te~nant\ of1 the
three-Ftorey buildlng was hurrt.
An Israei ~sc~urity gualrdl on
the 1:I:21 aircraft ;It the
international airport wocunded
three guecrrill;as as they fired
fromr a car spei~c~lng around the
four-engine Viscount.
A C'ypriot police man was
seriously wounded in a
shootout with guerrillas at the
ambhassador''s residence in
downtown Nicosia. TIhree
Arabs were capturedt thcre.
poise~ satid.
A (`yprio~t go~verrrnment
spo'kesmian reported one Arab
was killedl but there was no
confirmation of thj is from
police later
Tlhe po~liceC \aid they tcound a ;
no~te indic~ating thiat the Arabs
intended tohilack the
Viscournt. It wais signed by a
group calledl Natiolnal Arab
Youth.
It was not~ Immnediately
known If the group had any
ties wit h the Black
Septemberrists who carriedl out
the O)lymnpics Massacre andi the
slaying of two U.S. dliploma~t
and a belgian envoy ini Sudlan
last month,

it was the fourth atlac~k on
israeli dliplomnats aboardl since
Septemberr and the first majr ~l~
A~rab-Israeli encounter on
C'yprus. a Medliterraneanl island
with deep troubles of its own.
Security wars tight here after
a weekend o~f ho~rnhings carried
out b~y members of1 (;n.
(;eorgze G;rivas' underground
armiy which seeks to force
lnon (, (yrs wistu (reen

(;rnvas' four-mnonths camiipaign
camc during a gini battle
Monday miorning: in the village
of Koutraf'as.
Police gave this alccournt of
the Arab guerrillas' attacks:
A group of Arabs drew up in
a car in front of the Israch
residence, a three-storey
apartment house. One ran up
tothe firon dloor mid 1ef 1 hti I
rushed back to the car, but
C'ypriot security guards opened
fire as the car started away and
three of the Arabs were seized.
The bomb went off, tearing
open the front of the building
and blasting out the rear wall
on the ground floor, so that it
looked like a tunnel.
Thei Israeli amibassador,
..athalllin Thilor, saidl later he
h~ad left his residence on the
thiird floor for his office just
before the blast.
Timor reportedly in a
telephone interview with the
Israeli Radio that the embassy
was aware of the possibility of
a terrorist attack.
He went on: "I heard a
powerful explosion and a


sec ondl one immediately
afterward.
HO(MI: AHIRI
"Just us I was about to cnt~r
thc emblassy building my staiff
ltold me they saw smoke
comingn from my house. I ran
home~ . and saw the first floor
wasf almInost completely
desctroyed,
Just then they were
po'licemnan."
Shortly after the explosion,
Arabs travelling in (WO cars
crrtshedt through the gates of
the airport. One car reached
the 11I Al Viscount which was
w~alting to take on passengers
lor Te'l Aviv in Israel. Police
forcedl the other car aside and
It crashed into another gate.
TIhe mlenl in the first car
o~pinel tire on the plane and
( yp'riot police and the Isracli
Security men started shooting
In1 return.
Witne~sses said the Israel
lirst firedl a revolver, then ran
intor the aircraft and emerged
wilth a submachine gun. He
o~pened fire and hit all three
Acras as they scrambled out of
the car which by this time had
c~raushed into a mobhile generator
near the tail of the plane.
O)ccupuntts of the second car
Jumllped outf and one of them
knlocked o~ut a policeman by
hiitting himi on the head with a
Win;rd grenatle.
After a brief gun hattle two
Arabs were captured.
Unconfirmed reports said a
third man in the second car
mal~naged to escape.
On pof th tawko sreu p d i
seecn outside the Israeli
ambllassadlor's residence shortly
before the explosion.
DYNAMITE BAGS
Police recovered two large
travelling bags filled with
dynamite sticks from the first
car. AZ omb isposal expert
said they contained 50-60
pounds of explosives each.
bT he airporan butle la ted
bullets whizzing around the
aircraft parking area, all
passengers andi staff were
moved from the terminal until
the captured Arabhs were taken
away.
Police said the note, found
in the car that made its way to
the l~I Al plaine, was in
aIlternate lines of Arabic 3;id
Ilnglish and that part of it .s
to have been read to the
aircraft passengers after the
plane was seized.
The note said: "We are the
new pilots and commanders of
the plane. Please don't force us
to utse violence. remain in your
seats. We are representatives of
the National Arab Youth
organization.,,


and fuel situation. Two ships
were set ablaze, a dozen others
turned back to South Vietnam.
Capt. C. S. Lo reported the
convoy sailed up river under an
umbrella of U.S. warplanes
which strafed the river banks a
quarter of a mile ahead.
Cambodia's Prince Norodom
Sihanoik, who heads a
government in Exile in Peking,
claimed in a message read over
Hanoi Radio that he narrowly
escaped being killed by U.S.
BS2 bombers during a secret
visit last month to rebel-held
areas of his country.
Sihanouk, who was ousted
in 1970, claimed many air
strikes were made about a mile
from where he was sheltering.
He said the raids were far
from the battlefront ad fro
the Hlo CIhi Minh Trail and
other Communist supply
routes.
"I have seen with my own
eyes the U.S. Air Force kill our
civilians," he charged. "U.S.

su ont atn forsts,o rvrsd
canals, rice paddies and roads.


Le Trung Hien, announced that
the chopper flying for the
Joint Military Commission -
JMC now made up of South
Vietnam and the Viet Cons
sustained slight damage but put
down at VI Thanh, 100 miles
southwest of the capital.
He said that in principle no
aircraft flew under the joint
commission markings unless
they carried both South
Vietnamese and Viet Cony
representatives. Hle said he had
no specific information on who
was aboard the helicopter.
Canadian sources reported
an International Commission
helicopter flying at 3,500 feet
in the same area also was shot
at Monday but escaped
without damage.
"This is another fabrication,
because the JMC had no
representatives assigned to that
area today," a Viet Cong
spo esman sai .
McAlpine, who investigated
the downing of the peace
mission helicopters with his
counterparts on the Hungarian,
Indonesian and Polish
delegations, disputed a claim
by the Viet Cong that the
aircraft failed to follow a
prearranged flight path.
SEVEN BODIES
The bodies of seven crash
aictima F tponAmericant pilots
Canadian, an Indonesian, and
two Hungarian officers -- were
brought back to Saigon from
the jun as crash ste aMo dy

House spokesman said
President Nixon views the
attacks on clearly marked ICCS
helicopters as "extremely
serious." The State
Department sti athe incaide

flaunting" of the cease-fire
agreement.
In a speech to the Saigon
Lions Club, ambassador Michel
Gauvin, chairman of the
C ndia del gatin sad that
C nada had aree toaiextend
its original 60 days of
participation in the truce
observer body "with grave


PETERS FILES FOR DIVORCE
FROM SVETLANA
PHOE1NIM, ARIZO)NA (AP')
Williaml Westey P'eters has filed for
divorce Fromt his wife, Svetlalna
hliuyv laceters9, dnlulh e r the
The two, hadl been legally
separated since early last year nld
have lived apart for 18 months after
mrs.e'tertshdeclared she could no
Taliesin West. where r'eters serves
as chief architect for the F~rank
L~loyd wright foundation. Peters
attorney filed for the divorce
Monday in superior court here.


2 MAN KILLED


BlIlRUT, L E'BANON,
APRIL 0 (AP) Israeli
commnandos invaded the heart
of the Lebanese capital early
today, killing three Palestinian
guerrilla leaders in their
a partmne nts and attacking
refugee camps.
It was thought at first that
the raid was in retaliation for

aypbus anttadkresiMdene of t
israeli ambassador and an
Israeli airliner. But an
authoritative Lebanese source
said there were indications that
preparations had been r iale .

Beirut several days ago.
Al Fatah. the bipggst
i' a les t in i a gacirrilla
organslation, said the victims
Included its No. .' ma1n.
dohammnned Yussef Nia.
known ats Abu Yusse~f. He~ was
one of the founders of Al
I atali
The L~e a n ese de~fense
allinistry said 11 pe~rso~ns wecre
killed and more thanl a dozen
wmain is ortly af tersIntrl nig (
The statement indicatedl the
casualty total might rise.
The Israecli chief of stuff. Lt.


(;en. hai Elzar, said in DvdEa d Tel
Avise t at two Israe is were
killed in the 2V/2-hour raid and
two were wounded. He warned
that Israel may hit Beirut
again, saying: "It is impossible
to honour the sovereignty of
(Leban snco pltse caria nwfeon
the terrorists, their bases and
commandos in Lebanon
territory."
Another group of Israeli

in Sdn n thewco t 24p 1 e
south of Beirut, but there were
no casupities there. The Israelis
said the garage was used by
guerrillas.
President Suleiman Franjich


held an emergency session of
the Lebanese cabinet, and a
protest to the U.N. Security
Council was believed
imminent* .
The Israelis, some dressed in
civilian clothes and some in

I ndd bm helimo tera a~et y a
a village three miles south of

Beirut, and split into two
groups.
onBoarding una ednsedo carhse
centre of the city and the
apartments of the three
Palestinian leaders. The other
went to the Shatila-Sabra
refugee camp near the airport.


IPI URGES RELEASE OF JOURNALIST
/UnHic'M swlITZI:KLANI) (AP) The Internitionnd Press Institute
(II'l) ulrrged Rho~desil 'Tuesdayl t, f'ree jo~urna~list Peter Niesewan~d.
"SoI longI us sec~rees~ surro~unded~ charges and e~vide~nce in (his) trial he can
"n~l\ b~e *ceen as$ conslisted and for doing h~is iob." the institute said in a
staltement reflecting "the co~nsidecred view\s" of its 1.700 miembers in 62
~countries.
"Thec re~strictionsl anld s~c~rec) aIre all o~f thec go~vernment'st' own makingg"
I rgu (Tllintittiinot I, d'~itorS11~ IndPulisherS defe~nding press freedomll alli over
'Ilf suchl an appa,;lllng senltenlce on a .cuncr journalist o~f international
FtandinF andl reputationr for inteerity is justified, then thle governments
shoultld reCon~)s(Ider the necessity for restrictions which lead tot such
IPolice-stater secret trialls and sentenrc.


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ru s y, pyr l, 753 ~


M,:ture, responsible female accounts clerk
with some previous experience in
book-keeping to assume position of
responsbihiity with Mademoiselle Ltd. Apply
in own hanldwritinlg stating qualifications in
detail to Mr. E. Baldwin, Mademoiselle
Ltd., Box N. 4882. Please list telephone
contract whenever possible.


Tuesday, April 10, 1973

EDITORIAL

They travel hopefully


ST RO N G LY

RESENTS

CO 0I MMNTS


gru .--


TO AAheisA TI :SIAY ,APRIL
Ioth, the 00th day olf 1973. There
are 265 day leftS ils th s ar. date.
1972 United States andi Soviet
Uin~i 1971 A rebel force of about
is.oo0 in (eml fi ht against the
1968 - Ab~ramrs is named Commanlder ~f
/IeS itce i mVienm t u ceding
1967 u.s. President la)ndon
ie. Johnson leaves for uruguay for a
western~ hemisphere sumnmit
nIcetht It is disclosed that the
uI.s. atolmic submarine '*Threrher'
tie tinisth N-rt Aleantc with I w


I


In any event these people have plenty of fruiit in evidence in their
yards.
Thle island is sensible, in the way the people use a great deal of
fruit but the one thing I noticed was ... although it is ant island of'
coconruts ... this delicacy is not being used very mnuchl in thle
preparation of deserts.
The flavours in ice creamn, for instance, seemed to be limited to
vanilla, chocolate and rum raisin. The most delicious of aniy ice
creamy flavours are coconut, soursop and guava. I expected to, find
these flavo~urs in the hoctels. But no ,.....!
*** *, .
nImust congratulate the Island on the people they have selected
for broadcasting, both on radio and TV, They all have fine voices
and they speak beautiful English, without any trace of accent. It
was a pleasure to listen to them. Those who appeared on TV were
also gooid looking.
But the news they broadcast was not cheerful. There was a lot
of` crime. The police were greatly concerned with threats being
miade against church property. Thle reason for these threats was
not clear but I gathered that it had somclithing to do, within stopping
a lottery.

Juilaven onmener dn theialtit t1 < le t ey k ibe ausc the
dialect it is like a foreign tongue.
T h e a t e r e s o a sx i o ts t n pai / r h i i n dp < 1 n



looked hard but all I saw everywhere was dust and po~verty.
It is now being suggested that Jamnaica should have a lanlglag!e
based onl their owni dialect with IEnglish, as a second language but I
discount thiis report since listening to their radio and TV
broadcasts whiich sho~w that the authorities reallize thle imiportance
of clear speech in areas of commrlunication.
Ouir hotel was in thle area now known as thle New Kinlgsto~n. it
is anl extension of' the old city. In this section someii modern bantk
anid insurance company buildings hiave been erected but thiey do
nothing to changes the overall atmiosphere of thle place.
* .
Stevenson wrote that1 "fo travel hopefully is a better thing than
to arrive, and the true success is to arrive".
There mulstt he somec chance for the Jamiaicani people because 1
miust say thiat they seemi to be travelling hopeful~ly.
THOUGHT~I S F~OR TODAY
lIc who has never hoped can never despair.SlA


This sad vicissitude of things. STEVElNSON


-yN. A BACAS


MOM~Y DOfSN




~ROW ON




TRffS ...


T eda A il 10 19


mhe Bribune
Nvunrxs ADDIcIIS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bounad To Swear To The Dogmras Of No Master


Publisher/Editor I19-1(7 I 7
Contributing Editor 1972
EILEEN DUIPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publishecr/Editorl9 P72.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau. Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260


i


EDI~TOR The Tribune
I teel compelled to tell Sir
vfrneces Duputhhe stsistant
Manager of the Montego Beach
ilotel. and his family. in the
Tribune's leading articles of
April 6 &1 7, are mostly
inacleuratee f ntrue fact at :
E~nglishman having been born
in Jamiaic~a. Hle was only two,
years with The Royal Bank of
Caaa(not five) and resigned
of his own accord, aged 20, to
take a trip around the world.
Hie was NOT, repeat NOT.
turned out by immigration,
and never applied to become a
Relonger as he was never
eligible.
so) 2 s 1et i ferenc r hate at
erroneous since he joined the
Montego Beach Hotel as a
mlanagemnent trainee on a three
year course in July 1971. Hie
wastanto e er, appointed
months
m(3) While my wife and I might
be leaving Nassau some time
next year, this is for purely
priso Is anodt fimincialdrease n
immigrationn. have always
enjoyed a most satisfactory
rmela sh f the Ithmig nt
Department and have no
expectation of being "kicked
out". F~urthermiore while my
application for Bahamnian
Status has not yet been
approved, it was NOTf turned
down.
rel ernkdorse te c >m inicte y
on the Montego Beach Hotel
and its personnel, but strongly
resent his making completely
untrue statements about my
family as a means of criticizing
the G~overnmnent, and col sider
a retraction de iaLGLES.

Nassau,
April 9,. 19)73

(The information referred
to by Mr. Dalgliesh was based
largley on a conversation with
his son. Sir Etienne mistook
the young man for an
En lish an --Ed)


GeneralOffices(15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768


LADY SASSOON, left, chairman of The Sir Victor Sassoon
(Bahamnas) Heart Foundation tries to keep young Andrew
Redwood amused at the annual children's heart Clinic held at the
Princess Margaret Hospital. Meanwhile Dr. Francisco Hernandez
and Dr. James R. Jude explains x-rays to Mrs. Redwood as Dr.
Maude Stevenson, pediatrician at PMH, looks on.

3 mo0 he8 r 1188 I j81tln HS t


PM H SIaerat e 8 I 00F I8t ClilHIC
THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL CHILDREN'S HEART clinic was
held at the Chest Wing of the Princess Margaret Hospital recently,
sponsored by The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamnas) Heart
Foundation.


By E~TIENNE DU1PUCrl
KINGSTON, Jamaica, April 4 In two of my articles since I
have been in this island I said that these peoplle were really trying
... and for that reason I wanted to put in a plug fo~r themn. But t~e
deeper I looked into the situation there, the more I realized how
far behind they are in many important areas.
I am afraid I must rept rt it as I see it.*
The hotel at Montegot Bay was located on the beach. We had a
room that overlooked the beach and ocean. I didn't take a bath
suit because I knew I would be busy but the swimming looked
most attractive. I was sorry I didn't bring my swimming trunks.
mThe sent ce tin thethdininganno i was p infully slow butailt was
extraordinary way of serving one thing at a time. The waiter
would pour the tea. You then asked for mlilk and he would realize
he had forgotten~ ... and so he would have to got and fetch thle
milk, which took a long time ... and so oln, and so on.
They didn't seem to have been trained in carrying heavy trays.
"They are delightfully unorganized," an American woman at
our table commented one morning at breakfast.
later she remarked that she had found this kind of service at
another island she had visited and since then she had not
complained because one day a waiter brought out three drinks on
a tray and let the whole lot tumble before he could serve them.
And so ... it was better that they should bring things one at a
time.
As I said earlier, I found this condition interesting ... almost
amusing ... certainly not annoying because in a place like this a
person is not supposed to be in a hurry.
The mornings and evenings in the island were beautiful but the
mid-day heat was oppressive and the airconditioning in the rooms
was too weak to be effective. .
The people at the hotel realized this fact. They advised in a
notice in the room against swimming between the hours of I 2
noon and 3 p.m.
* ** ** *
Kingston has been a surprise for us. My wife and I have been in
this city several times ... indeed, on one occasion my friend
Eustace Myers placed a car and a chauffeur at our disposal and we
were driven all over the island. But somehow something seemed

wItn a sbte tht our people have advanced so much since my last
visit to this area that I was struck by the evidence of poverty to
be seen on all sides.
As I said in an earlier article, the young people were not as well
groomed as in Nassau and there was nro evidence of joy among
them anywhere.
Oh no, they were not unpleasant. They seemed to be a people
who had very little to be happy about. They were not a laughing
people. I suppose there isn't much to laugh about in an island
where over 200,000 people have no jobs and see no prospect of
improvement ahead for them. I suppose those people who had
Jobs lived on the very edge of anxiety.

I think that the one thing against the island during our visit this
time was that, as a result of a long drought, everything,
everywhere was parched.
Ordinarily this is a green, colourful island but on this occasion
the mountainside was white with dust,
In some sections along the route from the airport to the city
the dust seemed to be inches thick.
A mountainside in one area had been carved out to obtain
material for road building, presenting the appearance of a great
scar on the landscape.
A cement factory on the roadside along the route was belching
smoke and the added dust this operation created made the air
heavy with smog.
Further on there was a flour factory but this had been closed
down by a strike, thereby creating a flour shortage in the island.
Other strikes ... and rumours of strikes ... were also reported on
the radio*
With the exception of one small area the drive from the airport
to the city passed through poor villages and slum settlements.
In the better area were some attractive cottages.
"These were the homes of English people," the driver of the
taxi explained, "but now they are owned by Jamnaicans. The
English have left the island."
One cheerful sight was the presence everywhere o~f fruit trees.
Every small yard had its own fruit trees so that the people were
able to get some food from this source. This is something our
people should do in the Bahamas.
Breakfast in this island is delightful. In1 addition to itmls
usually found on the menu of a hotel a large variety of native
fruit was served ... pawpaw, watermelon, tangerine, pineapple,
cantaloupe, bananas, to mentionl a few.


Conductingl the clinic, as he

'inid me f I clevec calinds
National C`hildren's C'ardiac
Ilospital in Mliamii. Assisting
himi was ~r. James R. Jude,
Professor of CaHrdiovasc~ular
Surgery In Miami t he clinic is
annually o~rganized at the C'hest
Wing by D~r. M2audle Stevenson,
p ed ia tric~ian at Prinlcess
Mlargaret Hfospital anld she was
al sdistd not I)rl. N< n a
Weshing.
Diagnosis of the cases by the
heart specciahists cocnfirmned that
several will need hecart su~rgery
in the immediate future. It is
planned that at least three o~f
these will be shchduled for
Mugr et titple I w nnet
rest going to Mliamni as the
surge~ry requiredc would be
open-heart surgery which
cannot0 be done here.
Dr. Jude performed the first
heart operation sponsored by
The Sir Victo~r Sassoon
(Bahamnas) lleart F~oundation
at the Princess Margaret


inspcir.-tal ni January. athe hld
Jue ln~ e~ r 101trJ! I'< < t

pos~t operative ch~ck up. She is
dolngF fine .Ind cho~uld have no
heart probhlemn m the' fulture,
the dc~to~rs sayV
l he heart d~c~to~rs for the
children 5 clinic were
enI1tlrained~ ;t ;I lunc~hco n at
(;overinmenr I t House by) als
I ce~lle~nev~ the cGove~rno~r. Sir
Jo~hn Paul andl Lady Pa~ul I.d
>lt~ n. han ,( n < lial am1 nast)
Ikeart I-oundlatio~n attended the
clinic ars we~ll ac Ithe lunc~heon at
governent Huse. r.
Ilernand r aIndl Dr. Jude were
~ouls e uests ofr lady~ Sassoo~n
dourinig their ctay~ m NaSSauI.
MOON


MOCON: Kises 12.15
Sets 1:08 a.m


P.m1.


I


of a 29 lives the worst submarine
disaster in U.S. histo~ry.
1956 Peotple''s United Ircent,
e hyl ele)ti 1Uandurannike, winls
1952 Kussia pro~poses
alII erma, cle > r ri s he ie n de
ofunder United Nations
supervisio~ns, and rejects West s
views on (;e".ury' f el 2/vour
mocderate parties.
lia or, but G arniis rsipst Itat
Ism Iremen; Ui.S. soIldiers liberate
Naii concent ntratio canii at
netwr was.is eighth Arm)
occupies Sfux in T'unisia.
nutdi931 socialist, <(rl mlinjlsd)irt
I-rance with~ support o~f ItLeon Issumn.
Page 5, Col. 7


C~i


M A/L (?~


I ut a t wat nh evc inth houltin iKingstom wasd sood

We had no electrical difficulties while we were here but in the
hotels, both in Montego Bay and Kingston, candles and matches
were provided in the rooms to be used on occasions w~hen the
power fails. Apparently there are frequent power failures.
The real problem area was in the phone service. The phone~s
just didn't seem to work in Kingston. For a whole evening I was
unable to get any connection from miy roomn and the one topic of
conversation everywhere was about thle terrible telephone lc
situation.
Water was good and plentiful in the hotels. It was dlrawni from ll
rivers that flow down the mountains. But even so, thle prolonged
drought had created a problems for some areas. It was stated in a
radio news broadcast that it was necessary to truck water to, these
spots.
** ** ** *
There must be an element of agitation against thle preseclce if
expatriates in the island because a news broadcast stalted~ that
there were no more expatriates in the island than whenr a iertain l
law was passed some time ago.
There were complaints about the rising cost of living, of l
course. This seems to be a common complaint everywhosei todla!.


Lt


Whr Grthant


~~Y~y~at~u~


Naturl I~etho a


e..n. 11 .1*110 11,<. ro..... .,.,... ll


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I I


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Large Assortment of Girls Dresses
Only $3.00 Each
ou AS ERdS OK ohas not arrived ,
A complete line of Infants Wear
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__.


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*~~ ~ ~~ Lae hos n heIses
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shop IXES..Where else


I


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~Tbo ~lrtb#no


Tuesday, April 10, 1973.


*i


WHY NOT DO YOUR EASTER SHOPPING NOW
Use Our Lay-Away Plan

JUST ARRIVED
LADIES' DUSTER SETS
LADIES' NIGHT GOWNS
LADIES' BABY DOLLS
Asst. Colours up to siz~e 5x with Matefung! Shippers

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BAY STREET


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MADEIRA SHOPPING CENTRE (next to Cole's Pharmacy,


For Sa Os~g,Shop at
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Dr. Esfakis Building Market Street
New Shipments Arrived Including a
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I I 1 111(


From Pagle 3


WhrP Grthistte


Tuesday, April 10, 1973











By Abigail Van Buren
f 1973 Br Ccaea Trthene-N. Y. News synd, Inc
DEAR ABBY: My asses: I am? 18. have long blonde~c
hair, blue eyes, am 5 feet, 37, with measureme~nts of~ :i 2c
38. I graduated from high school with honors. I own1 over-
$700 worth of jewelry gifts from my parentss, a ster!eo. a~
color TV, and a closet full of beautiful clothes.
I got my driver's license and am giiven thl ulst o th:;
family car whenever I want it.
I've gone steady six times, have, receivedl fivet cla:ss
rings, a bracelet, a necklace, a sweetheart ring, fiver andf a
half dozen roses, two boxes of candy and ma-ny. mnany ilove
letters.
Now, why am I miserable? I 11 tell you why Be'~ltcas I
live in a small town. and I mean really small, alnd! either i
no one to date. I've gone through 40 boys in 2'2 year I
found only one that I wanted to keep. And he didnl' t w u~t
I'm not stuck up, but I'm never satisfied with .I1o.. r
As soon as I get it I don't want it. I'm proud of thec fact
that I've never gone all the way.
All my friends have dates, but I don t hlav anyrone .net
P~m so jealous I could die. Please help mne. WTAILPIDWER7:
DEAR WAI~LFLOWER: (You sound more like a tigerr
lily to me. ) Unless some new talent comes to town. You~ hadl
better start redating some of your rejects. P~erhalps when ~
you look at them through more mature eyes, thev'll look
better to you. And you to them.

DEAR ABBY: My mother is a 4fi-year -oldf widow who ,
has been seeing a very nice man her age for four months.
My older brother thinks Mamma is being disloyal to, Datt,
who has been dead for a year.: My brother says; Ma~rcl
ma's lived her life."
Abby. Mamma raised nine kids practically single haslt
ed. Dad got sick seven years ago. The lajt three he hardly
left his bed and Mamma nursed him like a baby, kn~ow~ing
it was just a matter of time and he'd die. The last yelr
was awful, but Mamma never complained and she did all
she could to make Dad happy and comfortable.
My brother says Mamma should have rcespc~ctcd thl
memory of Dad enough to stay home for a wh~ole year anl~d
wear black. I say Mamma is entitled to as much happintess
as she can get now. How can I convince my brother that he '
isP wrong? OIN MAMZMA S SL!)E
DEAR ON: You may not be able to Blut don't wo~rry
about it. Your mother did all she could for your father
while he was alive, and any happiness she finds now she's
earned.

DEAR ABBY: I just found out that a real neat guy I
used to know in high school is stationed at a Nalval base
near here. [He's an officer.) I haven't been in toluc~h with
him for a couple of years, but I hear he's not married
anymore. [Neither am I.1
I've always had a thing for this guy, and he liked me.
too, but the timing was never right. Anyway, now that
.we're bpth free do you think it would be a good idea if I
-dnroe over to the base and surprised him?
I'm afraid if I called him up first he might think I was
chasing him. BROWNIE
DEAR BROWNIE: And if you just drove over to the
base and "surprised" him what do you think hc'dl thiink: If
I were you, P'd skip the surprise, and chase him on the
telephone first.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 21-year-oldl, reasonably altrtrative
girl. I live at home and work in a large office.
How can I refuse a date without hurting the man's
feelings, and at the same time keep him from askmc mle
again? If I say I am busy, he asks me again, or worse yet
he'll ask for my first free evening, then I am really stuc~k.
You see, I don't want to date anyone outside my o~wn
religion. I'm not that hung up on religion, but my parents
are so much against it, I decided it would eliminate lots of
arguments at home if I just dated men of my ownr faith
My parents have been wonderful to me and I don't contsidei
it too big a sacrifice for me if it will make them happy.
So, how can I politely turn down a date without appear
ing rude, and at the same time discourage that fellow
from asking me again? THERESA
ruDEAR THERESA: What's wrong with telling him the

DEAR ABBY: I'm married only four months to a felow :
I'll call Mac and I've never been so miserable irln y life.
Before we were married Mac was so sweet and kind,
but he's changed now. Mac has beaten me on three differ
ent occasions, and I don't mean just a slap. Hie 5 knocked
me around until I looked so bad I'm ashamed to go to
classes. [We're both in college.)
The first time he beat me because I insisted we leave a
party where he was drinking too much. 110 beat met agiain
because while I was trying to study he had both the televi
sion and radio blaring away so he could listen to t wo
games at once and I turned off the TV
Yesterday Mac gave me the worst beating of all when I
refused to give him the car keys because he always takes
off and leaves me all day and half the night. IThe car


belongs to me. My parents gave it to me so I'd have
tarasportation to and from school.]
What am I going to do, Abby? I'm all black and blue
again and I can't go to school like this. My parents live
near here but I can't go home to them because they were
against my marrying Mac in the first place. When I begged
Mac to go to a counselor with me to try to save our
marriage 'he laughed in my face. Please help: me
ALL, MESSEDI UP;f At 2r
DEAR ALL: Go home to your parents and admit thlat
either you weren't ready for marriage, or you chose the
wrong fellow. There is little hope of having your mnariiage
unless Mac cooperates, and he appears unwilling.. Aman
who beats a woman is sick. And a woman who sticks
around for repeated beatings is sicker.

DEAR ABBY: Recently when my sisters and' i were -!
faced with closing the house in which our parentll t:.A bied r
for many years, we came upon several boxes of oildi pl
tures and snapshots. Many were of friends our parents hiad
knovwn over the years, but whom we barely knew. We hlated l
to destroy them, even tho they meant nothing to us, so we
hit upon the idea of sending them to the faminers of thus~-
involved. In this way we contributed richly to thle pictu" l;;
collections of many families. The letters of gratitude~ w-e
received more than compensated for our efforts.
SENTIMENTAL INJ ABILENE, 'E:X.
DEAR SENTIMENTAL: What a beautiful idea:

DEAR ABBY: To the correspondent who said wedding
presents were out of style-that they just passed th-e tr sy
and collected money instead:


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CONFIDENTIAL, TO WEDDING LIST PROBLEMS IN 1936 r.\ident Akjala Zarnora ~~rcncessins in (`huna.
WATERLOO, IOWA: Do not send ano ivitation to anyone 1" '"i`( odnur Autrtlcpr til tau I ce c~~ o
hoping she will decline. She may not. rlearl~~ cn ,anun P Irlsldrlt me\r txn

Herrot lter amiies o~f (harles X and Napotleon
Cali. see. Emelee stamped self-addmreed envelpe. 92 unnn wmrece fromn Itrancer Tulrkey declares war
please..;" t Penn pors otpen\ .1t Genoa1. <,I Nichalrnled Ali, Khedive of
For Abby's newr bekiet "What Tees-Agers Waat to 1919 at, break out in 1741 frederick lI of( Prusia
Portgaldefeats\ Austriarn forcesat Mollwitz
know," sed SI to Abby, Bex WWW,1 aasAelesr, Cal. Smo. Isys- )I nc.e bin "er sti.


1)atinR re jects may be

:Last summer we attended a wedding where the festive
dtinner was prepared by friends who were members of a
eoulrmet cooking club. Their "gift" was preparing the din.

Itrsing to he ol os hr h rd n omwt
Soliciting gifts of money would be considered bad form
in our ci e.'. and we are by no means the idle rich.
Imean llatii rifts suitable to the circumstances rate
tto' BIL


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Irm n
ARRIVED TODAY: Tropic
Flayer from West Palm Beach;
Emerald Seas, Flavia, G;rand
Turk, Bahama Star from
Miami; Oceanic from Nejw
York.
SAILED TODAY: Tropic
Flyer for West Palm Beach
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Plm des fto mmmste~rdaepot:

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


Red Cross raffle and P'1
aine alt tpil I:


__ ~~~____


by Solomon Mines: food
voucher, donated by
prtabbe Aadser tApgeeni er,
donated by Business
Systems; dinner for two at
Ft. Montagu Hotel and
mnythather va uablz prize
the family islands.
Mrs. Brenda Barry, who had to
resign as chairman due to
illness was succeeded by
Mrs. Marina Glinton. She is
being assisted by Mrs. Muriel
Eneas, vice-chairman; Miss
Valeria Ingraham, secretary;
Mrs. Deanie Johnson,
assistant secretary; Mrs.
Sherry Wilson, treasurer'
Mrs. Barbara Thurston,
assistant treasurer; Lady
Prescott; Mrs. Prisca Pratt,
Mrs. Miriam Butler and Mrs.
SAgnes Richardson.


__ _


Applications are invited for the position of
Personnel Office Assistant


The applicant should possess a University ,
qualification in Human or Industrial Relations
or equivalent and ideally should have had several
years experience in Personnel Management and
Industrial Relations.
A knowledge of Personnel Management, Staff
Training, Salary Administration, Benefit and
Group Insurance Plans would be an asset but is
not essential.

The salary will be within the Corporation's
established Salary Scales and will be dependent
upon qualifications and experience.

Applications in writing stating qualifications
and experience should be addressed to the
Acting AGM/P & 1.R., Bahamas
Telecommunications Corporation, P. O. Box N
3048, Nassau, Bahamas.




claims Telseaemunicathes



Applications are invited for a
Telecommunications Training Supervisor

ihe applicant should possess a University Degree
in Engineering or Science or other similar
qualifications.
The applicant will be required to provide basic
instruction courses for the Corporation's technical
staff and to develop suitable training programmes.
He must be qualified to teach Telephony and
Telegraphy up to fourth year in the City and
Guilds of London Institute's Telecommnunications
Technician's Certificate Course.
The salary paid will be within the Corporation's
established Salary Scale for Executive Engineer:
$10,920-513,820 per annum plus 5%o Housing
Allowance, the entry poih~t is dependent upon
qualifications and e experience.
A comprehensive fringe benefit and pension plan
is established within The Corporation for all



Assistant General Manager, Person nel and
Industrial Relations, Bahamas Telecommumnictions
Corporation, P. O. Box N3048, Nassau, Bahamlas
to reach him not later than April 13, 1973.


Tuesday, April 10, 19713


ALL SYSTEMS ARE GO for the annual Red Cross Grand
Raffle and buffet dinner dance to be held on Friday, April 13 at
the Central Highway Inn beginning at 8 p.m.


Music a ll bewprovided by the
F lris p ar daoniat by Mre
Aileis Nihon. Other prizes
are: a ,MayTag washing
machine donated by Taylor
Industnies;ban OM ga wat h
Ltd.; Silver Tray, donated


OFFICIAL NOTICE


PROPOSAL TO CHANGE
A SHIP'S NAME


MRS. MARINA GLINTON, Chairman of the annual Red Cross Grand Raffle (left) and
Valeria Ingraham, secretary, grace the 19'73 Dodge Polaris car, donated by Mr. Alexis
NIhon and first prize in the raffle to be drawn on Friday, April 13 at a dinner dance at
the Central Highway Inn. Raffle tickets and dance tickets may be purchased from
committee members.


I, BERNARD ANG; US T' HOM PSON,
Attorney-at-Law of the City of Nassau hereby give
notice that in consequence of the Owner's
preference I have applied to the Board of Trade
under Section 47 of the Merchant Shipping Act,
1894, in respect of the ship "S.S. CARL
SCHMEDEMAN" No. 15/1963 of Nassau, N.P.,

108870Ntuoms rreg ste rt no ae 5 6.2t6 t nse
hereto owned by CREOLE LINES LIMITED of P.
O. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas for permission to
change her name to "Pyramnid Venus" and to have
her registered in the new name at the Port of

NLa IED. Any objeocwi ds to theCprEOposEd c ang
of name must be sent to the Registrar of Shipping
at Nassau, N.P., Bahamas within Seven (7) days
from the appearance of this advertisement.


Dated at Nassau,
A.D. I 973.


Bahamas this 4th day of April


(Signed) .
BERNARD A. THOMPSON


Once upon a time .. 65 years ago
The Royal Bank set up shop in Nassau.
Before long we were known as
"THE BANK":
Years passed .. the Bahamas grew
and so did we.
Today, the Bahamas is
the tourist centre of the world.
and Royal Bank is the
Bahamas' biggest bank with branches
throughout the Islands.
Isn't it nice to think we did it together?
And we're now living happily
65 years after.


The RoYal M The Helpful Bank

ROYAL BAN K
Branrchess thlroughout the Bahsmasi


$15@ QSrtilittt


from sand and




coconut tr~s The Bank




I -- I r


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TRADERS BANK & TRUST LIMITED

flN COMPULSORY LIQUIDATION)


Will the following persons kindly contact the Liquidator, Second Floor,
Bernard Sunley Buiilding, P. O. Box 1491, Telephone 2-1976, in connection with
chrtirui whic thcy ngv have against he company.


WETIE EIRICIIED

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i


Tuesday, April 10, 1973.

P. AHLEY~ltfl TlELLS~ FEEPOR CHMBE



PFoblemus Freeport



most overcome for



SuCCOSSill Integration

THE FREEPORT business community must recognize that
"the Bahamas is ripe for development, not exploitation,"
External Affairs Minister Paul L. Adderley declared Wednesday in
a speech to the Freeport Chamber of Commerce.


Adderley. Mervin L
Alburs, Irma

Allan, Vayne
Allen. Iris E:.
Ash. Robe~rt


Beare~rcot. Michael W.

Bethecl. C`lyde Paul

Bowel' Bertram
Brie, Preston
B urn4, Eugene

Butler, Mildred


Carrol:. Jobs>

Cartwright. Agnes
Clare. Helen
Colebrook. Rollinls
Co~nliffe, Andrew M. G.

Cooper. Sharon Daphne

Darville, Vivian M

Davis, Pearline
Dawkins, Stoney
Dean, Arthur
Deveaux. Myrtle E.

Deveaux, Verdell


Ferguson. Bernard V.

Fergluson, Eliakim

Forbes, Audley
Fowler, Wilmore Van Buen

Francis, Patsy
Fyne, Ethel A.


Gaitor. Ethel

George, Wil'e
Gibson, Nathan
Gibson. Rudolph James
Glass, Sheila

Gospel Echoes

Hamilton, Timothy

Hannia, Harvey W.

!l!enfield. Lewtle

Henfield, Mazuel
Hopkins, Nathaniel

Huyler, Ernest

John, B
Johnson, Bertram
Johnson, James

Johnson, James T.
Johnlson, Joseph
Johnson, Willie R

Lighthourne, Ekice

Lighthourne, George L.
Linden, Rudolph
Longsworth, William A.

Lynes. Ephefrom

McKinney, Robert

McPhee, Lero y.
MCaajor, Cavin
Manfield, Morgan

M'osko, Michael

NarHarold, A

Nixon, Arnold


Nixon, Frank
Nixon, King & Howard Smith

Pants E izabeth

Patton, Herbert
Penn, Jeanette Lucille
Pollard, L. E.
Powell, Ona &/or
Patrice Baily
Rahming, Harcourt
Riamsay, Joseph
Robins, Sidney
Rolle, Arnett

Rolle, Kiathleen M.

Saunders, Cleome G.
Saunders, Georg~e R.
Silva da John

Smith, Cephas
Smith, Eugene
Stuart. Meona S.

Taylor, John D.
Tinker, Joshua
Tinker, Leana
Thompson, Moses
Thompson, Vernika
Thurston, Robert

Weir, G aspernE.

Widin~ls, Janet
Williamson, Rupert E.
Wilson, Corrigan
Wilson, Dorothy L.
Wilson. George &/or Paula
Wilson, Howard
Wilson, James
Wilson. Julius K.


majo addes snceinhis Msar hs 1
apponm t to External
Affairs, listed some of the
problems which must be
overocme if Freeport, a largely
expatriate community, is to be
successfully integrated in the
Bahamian nation.
Mr. Adderley discussed the

maing poe Bha ans "pl odin
of economic development" and
a model of international and
inter-racial relationships.
And he expressed the view
that Freeport could not have
.developed as as ns ithsd

by the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, obut d eli te


e'coonellldd" the am~rendig o
the Agreement to give
Goernment more voice in
Freeport's affairs.
IMAGE PROBLEM
Mr. Adderley told the
Chamber that his Ministry is
concerned with the economic
development of the country
"in so far as such development
m be iflune b h
image ef teu daanas which
exists outside the Bahamas. We
cn only pr ject an in ed of a

dame acountryobj te ein its

sondmeisontaproblemties a

Chamber of Comec i
Freeport," he said, as the
organisation's interests are
primarily commercial and
economic .
"But I believe that your
Chamber has the potential
today to be able to make a
valuable contribution to the
Bahamas," he added.
"You have been here lonS
enough to know that the
Bahamas is ripe for
development not
exploitation. You have certain
problems to overcome and,
while it is not expected that
your commitment to the
sa nam ama Mamm:Im t.14


Bahamasbcan be tdoy Tns that

need also to remember that in
time that could be so."
He said Freeporters "must
overcome the legacy of
hostility between the merchant
community here and the
Government in Nassau. I
believe that you are capable of
doing tshoe at least you se m t

who took no part in, or viewed
the events of the past with
some objectivity, and I believe
you have already made some
efforts in this direction.

"SN oN 1 yo uAhave to
re alise that the business
com-Ba in herandis bsic ll
has ahliatle longer to travel than
th hmer in Nassau.
He said the business
community in Freeport "must
make a positive commitment
to the Bahamian community.
Freeport has had its share of
too many fortune hunters who
looked for killing 1n r
es ae or w ever an
disappeared.
Fourthly, Chamber members

ammb ssador of th o a 2 a
here and abroad,h an tatasthe

matter of p licsy, perseise who

participa in in business in the

TRAINING
"Fifthly, the Chamber ought
to exert a positive influence in
the employment, training and
upgrading of Bahamian
employees. By this, some of
your members will be in the
way to escaping the charge
which I have heard levelled of
"tokenism" here and in
Nassau, by which I mean the
employment of a basically
unqualified black Bahamian as *
window dressing only.
"At the same time, you will
be able to justify legitimate
standards in employment
practices so that you will not
be burdened by the indifferent
and lazy who believe that they
are owed a job because they

haF nll to eh Mnias r said,
"you have to cultivate a state
of mind, and create a new
attitude towards the life of this
community and the role which
it can perform in the Bahamas.
What is needed now is not a
negative, destructive attitude,
but a positive, constructive
::::::: .obuild noth estroy
promote Freeport."
iThe Minister et n qto sa
Bahamas to imagine that it
could play a major role in the
political affairs of the world.
"But, small though we


studies; mental organisation
and logical reasoning; and
communication skills and
techniques,
The first intake of Primacel
students started work in
January of this year, and on
Sturdy M nigtc they a de
suc cessfulI course with

werde oedn in tex c arise Hi

of the original provisions of the

rmlctv w Iso tba t e
creators of Freeport and their
suce sors diadnnot pe iv thael

consequences of this novel
development.
"F-rom the beginning, it
ought to have been seen that
there were the elements of a
Grecian drama in the clash of
cultures, races, economic
interests, nationalism and
objectives implicit in the
creation of a new town
motivated by the free
enterprise system, populated

scarene nau mret andtihn a
Ba amasd gon t athrion a

Freep y uI o nt think eha

fah as it htas so quicklynb a y
pattern of developments
evolved amendment to the
Hawksbill Creek Act became
inevitable, too. I believe that if
the United Bahama Party w
tthe (;vr n toay adnd aeds
by Si rSe mfor Sands b now
that Act would have been
meu nel: I elv ta
compelled it," the Minister
told the Chamber members


of the Holiday Inn-
Some time ago, Mr.
Crawford stated his intention
to give graduates
opportunities for public
exposure by inviting some of
themuto be trea ges speakers
Sturdayw grad ates an th i

by Mrs Vicky Grant, now an
executive secretary to a real
estate company, and then by
Mrs. Janet Dean, executive
secretary to the Controller at

rvnng oes t e~se oai
by Mrs. Gwen Forbes-Kelly,
onMof. t ra oke on the
theme of theauds anrd d wns
stressed the need for full
community involvement at
the dawn of Independence.
Mr. Crawford also addressed
the gathering on the role
played by adult education in
developing the full potential
of the individual.
Those who received
Primacel Certificates
included: 'E' Level: Mr.
Elliott Greene, Miss Barbara
Pratt, Miss L retta ca 'O

Saun nr, Mr.CE.ET nkerm M


Sa under, Mrs R. Sads, Mrs.
EmundW Rahming, Mr. G.Sm
Elisto Rahmibs ng (wt C ith
rdi)Miss Pret Burnside, M C
(witchar Distintin Mrs.) Gwen
Forbes-ellyt, Miss Valdeine
Butler, Mr. lns DevSaney, M
EMr.Buce RaMore, Mr.
D cison)Farrin gt(wwith
Marshall (with Creit), Mniss
Creit) aitndton Mr. ri Rusell.
The~-aly secon Pedrimae
cout rse beinis at the Suy
Centren th ris go week.
Pisictur aov how Mr. Roln

Crwourde weinth the graduae.


TOWARDS THE END of
last year, Mr. Richard
Crawford, Principal of the
Bahamas Adult Study Centre,
announced the introduction
of Primacel, a new type of

Baias fr mdanaoge rea anrd
speantiso yo rsponsibilit es
to range over four main areas:
human relations and public
relations; English language

may be, it is conceivable that
vethoe m khodah e chousec t
become an example, indeed a

meelo dement unless e a pe
cu uriesr in this hms 1 re, i
capital from the more
developed nations of the world
in the development of the
physical and human resources
of the Bahamas. "I do not
conceive that in so doing the
Bahamas will become a colony
or an economic dependency of
any nation ,,
alle bsea mthe Bah Ia can
international and inter-racial
relatiouhipsig nuinl forged'

face iously onseructde met


Hawk bil Crek Andeemethe
M Adrey sai :
"Perhaps it was once
thought by some that Freeport
was the conspirat onal result of
a devil's brew concocted by
Mr. Wallace G;roves and the late
Sir Stafford Sands. Remarkable
though both may have been in
legitimately 'conspiring to
create Freeport, I doubt very
much that either knew or
anticipated the effects of many


Wood, Gregory

Will any other person (depositor, shareholder or other creditor) who considers
that he has a valid claim against the company which has not been formally
admitted by me as liquidator also contact me at the above address.
SYDNEY MORRIS,
Liquidator.


PAUL L. ADDERLEY


real estate & rental Offerings...
j opportuni les....
As a result, The Tribune now
reaches 33 1/3% more readers
than any other daily distributed
in the Bahamas. That's a lot of
doors. And they're opening
more every day.


FIRST PRIM ACEL GRADUATION


R.CHALffW OW0

SOF~llnTEllENT

AT lRilISHYIIAERICAR

S. RUDOLPH CHARLOW,
has been promoted to the
position of Superintendent of
Agencies of the British-
American Insurance
Co mpany's number one
agency. This new responsibility
encompasses the direct
supervision of the company's
district offices in the Bahamas,
Bermuda and the Cayman
Islnd Charlow has been with
B itshAmerica eo ri26N yars

He then became an outstanding
staff manager, a trophy
winning manager and last year
area manager, Bahamas. This
latest promotion to
ue fnetet en omo pAgencies

in tne ccaompan 'sb cosodr t
office on Frederick Street and
resides at his home on
Woodlands Road with his wife,
Fay, and three children.

WEATHER
WIND: Northwesterly 10 to
25 m.p.h.
WVEATHER: Partly cloudll.
SE:Slight tton ide ate~a.
tomorrow 79

TIDES
HIGH: 1:14 a.m. and 1:48
p.m.U Ro 7335 Se :3 ~;
6:28 p.m.


We trarke things happet.
The Tribune opens doors to
homes, apartments, hotels,
stores and offices by providing
latest up-to-the-minute news
both local & foreign...







8 ~Tuesday, April 10, 1973


i~~v~~s--~~~i=-1 IIII 1 I III_.r._.r Irrrrrrr !pm n--- --- --- - a- -L


I-- ~ I - ----- --- -_ r


AYAI


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In The G~reat
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~cD~TRADITION
Frorn 7 p.m.
t -- Lq I Dancing til 1.30 a.m
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

CLOSED THURSDAYS


:I(

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April 10th through 18th


10:00 P.M. SUN WED

10:00 & 12:00 R M. FRI & SAT

CLOSED THURSDAY




TICKETS $5.50 & $71.50
IWcLeess oNWI INIIK PLUS1 TIP

u00 0 1 & Of


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T~lspon~ 80I


Matinee 2:45 & 4:55, Evening 8: 30-'Phone 2-1004, 210



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M~atthan Burnett AY
r) "Pt nTlle Baha mian wins
-- -All abotll ove and marriage'- inSurance award
A Universal PIcture Techmicolor' Panavislon 9P MAITL.ANI) WI:LLIS, (abolve, a
mm lishamian agernt fo(r Amlerican, ~ife
1 SUGESED OR ATUE ADIFCESInsurance (comapny, has been
PARENTAL. DISCRE:TION ADVISEDL. Il"'"urd I '"f~hmeer c~he if ure top
Reservations not claimed by 8: 15 will be sold 1972 Thle treognitiont was
on first come, first served basis. M anlI,( nun(1ce d y wi nial1


Wedneday hru Fiday Wednesday thru Friday fo~r persistency orC performance for
Wednsda thr Frdaythie year 1972 far the same
One Mtineeonl Conltinuous showings from 3I comlpaln y.
g Oe Mtine olyAIU (Ilahamulls) Limnitedl is the
"PRIME CUT" R,. JcarL compan)ily fo~r Amlerican,
at 3:00 International ulnderwriters, a
LeeMarirtdivision ofC Americann Internatio~nus
Evening 8: 30 (;ro)UIp IlC., in insurance holding

"BORSALINO" PG. Genec~t) Hackmany an ni r
Alan DlonPLUJS inlsurance in thc Ulnitedl States,
Jean Paul Belmondo "TWO LANE BLACKTOP"R~i ,,r es as;,,, iurisi 4 et .1 eign ls
I week thle vicec-presidient of` AIUl
PLUS James Taylor (Itbans 1iie. ar lie
"SOMETHING BIG" PG. Warren Oates Arten l, left ocr nintwo miont h
Dean Martin Wvr1 imington focr Amnericanl Life
.No mur ucll~ in~surancer companyy and in New

-CBrian Keidl: a, Yer adirdrt American International



::I +FINAL NITE *
Vou llisd M~ toelem AT 9:00 ONLY
sohtbakw~amn' DIANA ROSSS
BILUIE HOLIDAY




h( t b~SING THE
~1 u~uBLUES
-PLUS- .

"LEGEND of
R. NIGGER CHARLEY"
Starring No, onel under 17 Adfmitted.
RI'HARD) ROUNDTREE~~- GWEN MITC.I iIllrr LLil hc.n11 'rc Sl>< r owin ~
No, one under 17 win he ad nitt~d.


Lynn Rogers


Tuesday, April 10, 1973.


Picasso's


WhrD iribtutO


By John vinocur
PARIS (AP) Pablo Picasso. painting sometimes until 3 in the
morning, produced just up until his death Sunday at 91 a series of
still unshown canvases that suggest his work had entered a new
period-


sometimes works until 1 at.t."
The paintin~gs have been
trucked to Avlgnor. where
elght-mlan teams guard them
around the clcik. Puaux would
give no details onl the amount
of insurance that has been
taken out. describing it only as
"a lot Other sources
sgetd tha i noly s
svea 1milion doil rs iv
Pic~asso made very few
suggestions about how the
exhibit should het organized,
P'uaux said. adding he
considered one to be very
revealing. before it was deciided
there picue caT d hi s un
recommended that "perhaps
we should hang canvasses with
children alongside a wioman
lying with hier legs spread "
"WhatI think he was trying
to to P v u t e sm d ~ 3 "

life. In anly case the niew sholy
has less of whtat was being
callledl erotic.
Think what Picusso liked
be~st are his painting otf
children. 110 askedl mel. 'Don't
yo1u think they're ~retty?' I
was struck by the wo~rd
\hOdt. helt Te mvivtng. rods


Joulrnarlitst wecre unwe~io ltcoe at
his gre~en-~alled villa called la
Notre Damer de Vie P'uaux said
thel homie was it "tota1~l uiverSe
fo~r P'icasso. HeI hadf everything
that Interested hrm there. T~he
rest was *uprthaml~~l "
201 C`AVASShS
in all. there will be 201
larlvass a at A"~~ 31 ~V~u

subec~t. Puaux said in an
Intervieww "is mani as always
children, a number of mothers
with c~hild. but also musical
instruments, trumnpets and
flutes. birds and one very.very
jeatiful uatsc ide /which is
Tlhe dominant c~olour. he
feecls, is hlstre. awrm
bro~wnish blaick
"Picacso Is senldlng us
everything In his utelerr from l
()cc~cr 1')1 n u the endt c~

ivill be able to, see his work day
by dlay. How hie began ~r
stopped. really ho~w the nuind
of1 the master wocrked. The id~a
is not tot sho~w masr'te'rpie'LCes
not all o~f themi are but the
birth and evo~lutio~n of themes
It's qluite exc~iting ~
intred t uit IPrce sso w0
fromi the pa;inittr himlself,
Pualux said.
"Hle just < alled~ mec up orne
day. 'C'ome over to, Monqlcuins
tiext wreek."i I( are. hl f
thing he said was. "When canl
we do it?' Ihadl to do a little
mental countdlown, figuring
out how long It would take to
do the moving, the hanging.
getting security people
together and making up the
catalogue and then I gave himi a
date o~ff the to~p of mny head.
He said 'OK' and that was it."
FINI: SI:TTINI
P'uaux believes the setting, in
the Palace of the Pope at
Avignon, where Picasso had his
last exhibit in 1970, was
particularly attractive to him
because it is relaxed and open
to a wide group of people who
usually don't go to art shows.
Talking about his visit with
Picasso, Puaux said: "I found
him as remlarkable as ever. You
couldn't dare call himn an old


T'Ihere wa\ somelthing
something more een,
something less tortrre~d in
certain paintings." said PaJul
Puaux, director of the Avig~non
Arts Festival. who Faw huc~se ,
little more than a week agt
The festival is scheduled to
exhibit next month Picassc a
production sin e 19)70.
"on feltere is a change,
a new period," said Puaux,


who visited Picasso Iin his home r
at Mouglns, near CaHnnes, where
he die~d.
There is mluchh less
ero~tic'iSmI and mnuch mocre
softness. Hir wife told mec that
he was working mnuc~h more
slowly. miore deliberately now
searihing: and diggring int, ecih
canvas
Pu~aux's account of P'ic~assct'
work was a rare one because the
master saw no one but friend


~`11I~1---- -L' --------I


* SELECTED MENU FOR LATE NIGHT DINING
* COMPLETE LINE OF SE ELECTED WINES AND LIQUOR
* IVIUSIC FOR DANCING AND LISTENING TO


BAY & DEVEAUX ST.


Phone 5-3268
FOR RESERVATIONS
ASK FOR MR. TERRY BAIN


I


cornelius aros a sister Rose


Brook Benton


Pa.ti .


O. C. Smith


Billy Eckstine


recent paintings were


(UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT)


'Js 9 S O NUred'


NOW NASSAU'S MOST DISTINGUISHED LATE NIGHT

RENDEZVOUS 9:00R M. 'TIL 4 A.M.


THE PAUL HANNA TRIO


CI


"E


THEE


GEmiierald Beach.
HOTEL


AT THE


Ba ha m a nHall of




M


_ ___I I


___


N FX TRA large two
bedcrcooms~ two bath, and one
cxtralarg one bedroom
,Ip,,rtmen~r t With large living
.11i dininrg all basically
f unshedVictoria Court
ApaJlr rlorts oni Elizabeth
A~venuel~ between Shrley and
d!,v treet. Facinities, ahnpt
,t udirltloned.1 Phone 54631
be~twecn 8 a m. and 5 p~m.


( ON~V ENIENT downtown
"~lrnshedl apa'tmenits. One or
two, bedrooms. Utilities
iru luded Telephone 2-2836.

WANITS TO RENT

JIF.:TIVE requires large
three or four bedroom
fulrnishedl home in East to
lease P'refer ocean view. Phone
4 1150 for Mrs. Thompson, or
2 3367.

SCARS FOR SALE
C9398
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1972 VENTURA,
A/C Bucket S"ats
Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Radio
Auto. Blue $1600
1 969 VICTOR 2000 S/W,
Automatic 5850
1972 VIVA S/W
Automatic White $2400
1970 PONTIAC PA RI SIENNE,
4 Dr. Sedan
Blue/White $1850
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA,
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio. Orange $3500
1 967 HILLMAN'
Std. Green $450
169 FORD TORINO, $20

1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL,
A/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI,
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD,


A7 FRAD MAVERIC ,

4 Dr. Auto. Green $695
1971 Rambi r
Auto. Blue er 2100

6/C8V nyl Gren R1600
Blue $695
1965 DODGE,

Trade-ins Welcomed$30
Located Oakes Field
O psit th c n8


C9413
1968 BUICK SPECIAL, fully
loaded newly painted and
reupholstered. See at Malcolm
Tyre Service, Bay Street or call
2 2745.



C9371
KODAK CAROUSEL 850H
Slide projector with case. As
new, only $255.00 Phone? Peter
Robinson at 2-1064. daytime.

C9311
1 CONVERTIBLE COUCH
1 oede n~pli'e"! e' spekr


C9406
A WIDE RANGE of Metal and
Mineral Detectors available to
you at factory prices plus
freight and duty. Fr
information call 23921.

C9408
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
before 20th April, 1973
1 Refrigerator 16 cu. ft.
1 Dining Room Suite
3 Bedroom Suites (one French
Provincial)
Furniture in very good

Te ehoe 4-1243 after 6 p.m.

C9432
1971 FORD SPORTS
CUSTOM CAMPER/PICKUP
TRUCK --STANDARD
SHIFT $2600. 1956 G.M.C.
STEP-VAN AUTOMATIC
$300.00. PH-ONE AFTER 5.30
P.M. 55124.

C9417
HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS


1/






In loving memory of our de <
rbno'ied Su nr Deelaney wlh0,
1968
Oh how we miss her, but Jesus
loves her best.
She is gone to live with Jesus in
that bright and
~lapray land, where you never

Left to mourn: Four sons,
Joseph, Leroy, John and Lloyd
Delaney; two daughters
Lowrena Wilson and Caroli~e
Rolle.

POSITION WANTED
C3500
IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
Adv. C8500, c/o The Tribunt.
P. O. Box N\3207, Nassau.


Y90TNG AMBITIOUS snl
Bahamian man with 10 yasnle
Accounting ad years
management exp rience seece
responsible position preferably
with international firm. Willing
to work anywhere in the
Bahamas or abroad. Most
interested in opportunity for
additional professional training
and thence advancement in
company. Silary aond i cen ie
to give reasonable notice when
leaving present employ.
Kindly reply to P. O. Box
N7351, Nassau, Bahamas.

IIELP WANTED
C9375
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY


h 5aidag in i 2au S cesu
applicant will be paid attractive
salary and enjoy congenial
working conditions. Applicants


ehul apl n fisuti~nosta c
toFa, Marwick, Mitchell &
Co., telephone 2-8551.

E ECOUTIVE SECRETARY
with previous experience in the
mea nsatate biusinehss.traianry
Must know typing and have
own transportation. Apply
DOROTHY L. ATWOOD LTD.
in persohn.A Lctdndo~hrnre o

Street To lep ho nes :
2-8763-4-5-6.
C9411

BAERBETR SHOP eq~uires- ND
4 highly qualified hairdressers
with at least 5 years
al tiene. h(pable of doing
2 hihlyM qu li iead barber .

1 Manicurist

MpA DEiEnS peB AUTto
SALeON, Boyle building, Bay

C9421
MAINTENANCE
CARETAKER for large Estate.
Must have at least two written
references and clean driving
licence. Knowledge of
gardening and general property
maintenance essential
acaommodatio sncussep o
Adv. C9421, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.


C9414

25 d~.swraaht2 divyexta
sleeps 4, 85 watt Simpson. For
appointment call 58311.

C9434
CHEST OF DRAWERS, cream


Diswshr ectic c per
garden chairs, records 45
r.p.m., wrought iron glass top
table, four chairs, glass top
drugtiron onfe etabi e. A




C9433
GLASS BOTTOMED BOAT.
State price, size and
de cri 3,onin lettr.T n ly

P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C9217
PLANNING TO BUY
A LOT?
Act now! Hilltop lots,
corner lots
Easy terms
Call Frank Carey
at 27667
FRREANLKESAREE
Bay &ADeveauxDStreets.




FR LTURESBTUABNLESSSHED
sale. Owner wishes to retir .
Replies to: Adv. C9377, c/o
The Tribune, P. O. Box
NV-3207, Nassau

C9425
AGENCY OFFERED. $1,000
needed for first order of
Canadian cigars. Money mak ng
agency. Write to Econ~o 4
Sale AgTny S. O.Bx6

OFFERED"


MAIRINE SUPPLIES
C9309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C9441
1968 20ft Glastron trailer,
radio, accessories. 160
inboard/outboard mercruiser.
Phone 3-2739.

C9442





ENMY aot Gathen Epot Hacll,

14h 8 pm. Nogh Admson
chages ory collctio.


C9439
2LABOURE RS mal~le ,Ind
femalle must hevc oni foirm. Male l
$30 andrt femalre $20 per wee`'k.
Telephone~ Rev. Ryod
Gfbs~on J.P. 3-23 78.


TRADE SERVICES j
C9315






&oeve t Arfe ue
NT SSAUI, RAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUlCKING
FO RK NICT R N DALNG
Er)UJIPMENUT
I AT A CARGO3 AGEfNTS
C CUSTOMS C L EARANC E
MO I)E LtdFRY
MOICSK R AGE
STL'L BANDING
& SHIPPING G
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONAiLCF RATES
CONTACT LY MIAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHIONE 2-3735. 2-3796,
2-3737, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C9 299

PATIO AWN ING;S ANp
CARPORTS
AWN INGS, SHUITTF- RS,
PANELS
John S. George & C.o. L~td.,
For free estimatres drd prompt
service call 2-8421.

C8105 RSF UE
TRY USNGFOR SEE.9 gS R

5SPE S nAM~' CARPET ,


C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Rooster

tsr h es.Jaannrt 0 R

OF MUSIC, Mackey Street
next to rFrank's Place,

C9428
FOR CONSTRUCTION of
fresh water wells 01I rain water
tn .S Cordact Antrn Pinr di
opposite QuarryV Mis ion
corner.




HELP WANTED
------ ---
C7322
GRAND BAHAMA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
LTD., has an openrinlg for /
houseko rosekceprn < d lig t
janitcwial duties Inldn g

bathrooms, kitchen areas and
furnitu incOf dthosurs a ~k


Affic 2CGKinp ng Bii a age o
write P. O. Box F 2478,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C7321
ACCOUNTANT
Required by Bahamnas Oil
Refining Company to assist the
Treasurer in various aspects of
Management Accounting and

patc arA inial repib lt
for the Financial Accounting
of the construction, of new
facilities. Applicants should be
Chartered or Certified
Accountants with not less than
three (3) years post
qualification. Experience
including audit or other
experience of industrial

aBcahoa ia only need apply to:
Personnel Officer, Bahamas O;Il
Refining Company, P. O. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahamna.

C7310



guard rails for stair cases and

SCETA V: M~ust be ablV E
doshorthandran n type atleast

speak French fluently.
FOUR ELE VATOR


TECHNICIANS: Muist be
experientced in insta~llinig glaSS
elevators.
Inte~resteG pAon m 83 I Ado(

HOTEL & COUNTRY CL (1
BAHAMA. Eloni Martin, Jr.
Personnel Director.


CLASSIFIED




REAL ESTATE
C9362
UNFURNISHED HOME FOR
SALE 131 DAMPIER 3
bedrooms 2 baths with carport,
room air conditioners,
dish washer and garbage
disposal. Price $28, 000
m inmm down payment

Contact: SYNTEX Phone
352 8171.



C7320
FOR LONG TERM
LEASE
EXECUTIVE home 4
be dr oom, 3 V2 bath,
Unfurnished, $550 per month
f urnished, $700 per month.
-94lF~reeport 373-2032 or
3291, Mrs. Madsen.


HIIEP WANTED
C7323
GRAND BAHAMA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
LTD., Freeport, has an opening
for a Personnel Supervisor
(female). The successful
applicant must have typing,
filing and other general clerical
skills but be motivated to seek
additional responsibility and
rewards. Previous experience in
per onneposmatters leaeuired

management responsibility.
Apply: General Manager's
office, 2C Kipling Building
(352-9352) or write P. O. Box
F-2478, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.



PLUMBING SUPE RVI SOR
Lay out jobs, order materials,


ny ie ngee ode p rep
estimates on all types of
construction, maintain
mentor prepare billingF165

Freeport.


C A2CHER for Junior Highi
Science classes. Must have an
excellent background in Marine
Biology, Chemistry, Physics

Icrc (Snr euva cont desir:::
Apply Headmistress, Mary,
Star of the Sea School, P. O.
Box F-2418, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C7324
BROILER COOK WITH THE
ABILITY TO BUTCHER.
MRAMS MNNDM PORTION

EXEPEARRENCE RSEQMIRLDA R
APPLY TO: PUB ON THE

MA331L FreepD t, Bha as.Bx

C7312
INTERPRETIVE NATU RAL-
IST Must be college graduate
v/ith B.S. degree or equivalent
in biology, botany, zoology or
ornith oIo gy Career
employment for the right man
with the right references and
experience. Dedication to
nature conservation essential.
Hhs iaw prred .Ap lcn
and maintenance when
necessary. Starting Salary:
$7200 per year.
Rand Mnemorial Nature Centre,
P. O. Box F2954, Freeport,
Grand Bahama. Telephone
352-5438.

C7313

s~hORE b A~ble to use fnd' ier
and other chemicals and
maintain growth of plants.
Should also be familiar with all
types of plant material and be
able to prune and trim. The
applicant will be responsible

fo uerv~isi a gr up of me


Apply to: Devco Personnel,
18C Ki, rnee r GBPI. O. Box


Iivin i hh i~~ccl ned, o block

x 140(, fru! :I, Ilndscap ed and
> us w P T O. Was
550,00.00 wnel~ might
owinr r B/4 ~!000.00. Comec see
Tin; a1.1t an surprise you.
:IGI(;(il, /\ ARK AREA
Unhanllistua~l house with three
>erool~, ii b aths, spacious
iivingl, !Ytia largo kittChen,
ulnhanishedf l with Air Condo.
'clclcnr,, t or, rftove, hultters,
andi wcine drape(,s. Redluced to
$50,000.00.
Consedatc t ied ,ublstant ial built
hlouli.r, an hiss pump for well
wa~tra UIAL D>AM~IANOS
01) i, ??305, Evenings
C41 i

I(, OT lRICINAL. Sans Souci
habu~llr l) If x 150. $7,500
Cah I l cPH1ERSON &
BR~OWN~ HF AL ESTATE
2-2680 2 2C83.


9 frointic ra n auth sidle of
AII in i. l l'e miles west
ihou circle.

Pr3tiirr Ino oloprdent NC


Oppm ~tunrity for development
or Ip truer l t inr detail it l




P'. O. co x 8 t Nassau




Be your owr L )NLORD, on
prof itable BAY STREET, Size
571/ on Bay andf oni Harbour
Side, by 240 depth. Store 40 x
60, Offlccs, Apartmlents, Upper
Floors, W~rehousing Two
outside buiildlings used as ART
GALLERIES~,lo Ils or parking,
event waeosi finance

DA INO D SM 0
INOVESTM FNTT i L 0 3
even nlgs 4119,/


FOR RENT
C930b J
LARGE F2HOP) for re~nt. 3000
square feet~ G~th Terrace
Centrovtlle Can be used 3,
store and warehouse. Has side
ctrlte:ace call 2-1731 or

C9310
LARGE ONf B3EDROOM
Jap.rtmen~t, lrlCO\ utrn shed
Th omps ~o Real Estate
2-4/77 8

C9382
BASICALLY FUIRNISHED
house 3 be~drooms 2/2
bathrooms. East $375
monthly. Phonec 42228, 42198
evenings, weekendsl. -
C9415
ATTRACTIVE 2 bedroom
furnished JaposTmentf Eastern
District. Phoneri 2 1149-

C9308
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlott no 1ai U.Impm da




AeRCON)DI TIONED Sh r

er pAvemu~e. $175 per month.


C9438


- at -





1969 Chevrolet CamarO
$1850
1972 CHEVELLE MALIBU

s91VLKSWAGEN B 500

1964 CADILLAC LIMOU IE

1969 FORDdGALAXIE $00

1971 CHEVY
VEGA COUPE
green, automatic $2995
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN

a968 PONTIAC FIREBIRD20
good condition $1500
1972 VAUXHALL
FI RENZA $2250
1 969 CHEVROLET CAMAR

1972 DODGE
AVENGER $2350
1971 SINGER VOGUE
white, radio
automatic $1500
1973 DODGE POLARO
li ht ble uoai 50
1 69 TYOT AC RON $50
yellow $700
1967 PLYMO TH FURY40 I

1970 CHEVROLET IMPALA
green $2500
1971 FORD CORTINA
green $2500
1964 CHEVY II NOVA
blue-automatic $500


FIN NCN AVAILABL600
Come in and see us

OPolc Ba~ranc sr

C9422
1968 M.G. Magnette
automatic. $700. Available
April 18th. Telephone 31571.
C9418
1969 BUICK SKYLARK 2
door hard top, green, black
matradio,ai newndit <
only 22,000 miles -- BS2750
Call Mr. Page 24276.


iahD arthur t


g I


I I


__


I


_ L_


SURINISHEDD 3 bedroom 2
bothl house w!th airconditioned
bedroomr in Bamboo Town.
Phone? 36959.


I 'r rall








I ) offer s
po ua


C9440


C94136
LADY TO MIN'U tone blbyy
from~ 8 a.rn to, '.30 p rn. 5
days a weetk. F-or Irfnf~tormato
call Mrs. Ben~eby 2248 1.

C9435
AN UJPHOL5Ti RF R with at
least 3 yrs etxpe~lcriec~e Call
?2481 for further Informnatun r


r'or Page I

that there has to be an increase
in dog control measures, and if
nothing is done for much
longer "it will come down to
mass extermnination."
Mr. Scott added that "there
has to be a humane destruction
p program me until existing
facilities can control it."
Hle asked Mr. Jack Rycroft,
inspector with the BHIS for the
Royal Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to
^,nimasns stao elao~rbate cu th
population,
Mr. Ryeroft said "the
problem isn't so much one of
stray dogs as one of too many
dogs owned by too
many people," and he said
initially plans call for clearing
out the city area first, and that
is where the health problem is
greatest.
"There is a plan which
hasn't started and which we
hope to start when we get the
go-ahead from Government.
"Ilt would involve lots of
publicity, one large vehicle
going from street to street, and
the co-operation of the
community.
G;IVEliI~GHT
"We will tell residents, if
you have ten dogs and you
only want two, give eight to us.
People would co-operate if the
vehicle was right there on their
doorstep.
It was said that in the
middle of last year the society
contributed to a report on
various animal problems
submitted to Cabinet by the
Commissioner of Police, who is
charged with enforcement of
dog licensing.
The report recommended
the plan outlined by Mr.
Rycroft, and also proposed
that the number of dogs that


can be owned by a family
should be limited.
The Society has heard of no
reply from C'abinet.
It was explained that the
Society did not want to
implement the plan without
Government approval.
Mr. Rycroft said other
methods would have to be
devised to deal with the packs
of wild and semi-wild dogs that
lived in thinly-populated areas
of the island.
"a. itcott t led th press tha
are in good condition. The rest
are in indifferent condition;
that is not to say they are sick,
but they could be better." He
said because many surrey
drivers own only one horse, the
horse is overworked, and
forced to stand for long hours
in the sun, without shade.
SHlEDS
However, "I am advised by
Government sources there are
plans for extension" of the
erection of sheds like the one
on Frederick Street.
As for the abbatoir on
Farringtonr Road, "the most
unsatisfactory aspect was
pre-handling," moving animals
slated for slaughter from
holding pens to the point at
which they are to be killed.
P'igs, for example, are
sometimes dragged along by
one leg, he said.
The ISPA ma ad the
solution of that problem is
"largely one of demonstrating
more humane methods," and
Mr. Rycroft has already begun
a programme in that direction.
Mr. Scott, who arrived in
NassFau on April 4, is scheduled
to leave on Thursday.
He has met with Police
Commissioner John Hindmarsh
and officials of a number of
G ov ernment m inis tries
aInd de artments


Roi ' n


NE c 9~f I LOT


1 Irving room suite
1 dining room suite
2 bedroom suites
Sto ve, Fridge
miscellaneous items.
Telephone 5-2272.


and


II HMININ~






a IN TER EST ED


PER SON S

PLE AS E CO NTACT


Mr. E. Cambridge
AT THE TR19BUNE



MONDAY Tad.OUNH ONTURDAY


C9419
FIRST NATIONAL CITY
TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED Oakes
Field at Thompson Boulevard
P. O. Box N-1576 Nassau,

CH R ERED ACCOUNTANT
Chartered Accountant or
equivalent required to perform
internal audits, liaison with
outside auditors/Control
Depart ment, and conduct
inhouse training programme.


aspri nc on ao m has i

and have management ability

Genepote i .ger ont 2 241/ .

H PL DA Y IN N OF
PARADISE ISLAND Seeks:
Sous Chef
Jb ducescript Iitc fue vs
Has to be knowledgeable in all
kitchen departments.
Educational Requirements:

Momtphaea ser ed 11ithles th Id
3 years apprenticeship. 5 years
experience.


C9388
oT eRASC i eLYi furnis e
Sans Souci --3 bedroom (2
airconditioned) 2 baths, study,
resid's rroom,, wall to wall

c drlined ilsts o ghAvailab e
for lontg lease May 15th. Phone
David Hudson 3-6262-3.


TO PLACE YOUR ADS.

GRAND BAMAMA

PHONE 26608


gg~11S g g( g Pm Jnnn


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.l

T-REALESTAITE T FOR RENT CAIRSFOR SALE IN MEMrORl lIA HELP WANTED nlr r llrt


llAblC3, ~CI ntAL rnntrri~


GRAND


... IT ALL ADDS UP





your reUSabia but unwanted

itemS Of

CIOthing, toolS,


appliances, clocks,

fanS, etc. .. Clear out

your Ciostts, garage, storeroom .

all can be of help

to SO 90eoemel e.











ROSETTA ST REET

TWO DOORS WEST OF

MONTROSE AVE





_ ~_


I I Ir rr~r~r I Ir -


SREX MORGAN, M.D.


By DAL CURTIS


i mvOUr1H vOI~ L;5 rSll- Ha MAY WH4T HoULP )oU W, H YOU'RE THAT GOLFER WELL
NEVER ASK, MR. C AN I PO FOR >OLI SIA) TO FOUR FELLOW /I 64W >UOU ON THANK)
44 GnrETT wu~ery, e44ROrJ. BURGERk ,TH TELEVISION LAST YEAR OU
aruW / How ABOV A tEC THNi r uneWL my~ s~or uT mar1
NAM6URGER t L ORAMN-WS OTN
TrLountM~r- meS w~ItQII









*** -- '. ,- .Ll .s\ A ar za *


Tuesday, April 10, 19


Chess















The clockt was sticking away in
this position from Anaeraeon v.
Ivkov in the Palma tournament,
and both grandmasters had only
two minutes left for their next
14 moves. So Andersson (White,
to move) played the cautious
1 R(QB2)-Q2~ and the Iplayers
shook: hands on an atreen draw.
White mlased a good chance
in the diagram. Can you find It?
Par times: 10 seconds. chess
master or expert; 1 minute,
county player; 3 minutes, club
strengths: 6 minutes, average: 15
minutes. novice.
SOLUTION NO. 9630 -- -

Chess Solution
I Kt x KBPI toins at ke~y paton,
for if 1 .. B x Kt or 1 .. K x K1
2 P xP and Whifte regcains the
aclrificed picce tobile smashingl
the Bjlack king's position.


UI V



OVL TH






,UTION OF EEDA L
DOWN
1. Highwa~yman 6. Public
2. Stout announcement
3. Famous 7. Listen
aviator: short 8. Coin ofMacao
4. Engllish painter 9. Cultivated
5. Parts of a 10. Wolverine
whole State

o a S Wkr uit
17. Season
19. Mostern
commander

18 22 e s g
24. Solicit
25. Overdo
26. Water: French
6 28. 0iscernin.
o29. Crony
32. Dove's note
33. Civet-like
animal
6l~ 34. Nick Charles'



as 4-2 43 C lgedre:


I N fo awoeters
ro moe ae l
A S *it,""~.n'."
here 9 In
O H lW **uer on,
oe land on
word must contain the large
Icrtone ndlr -lter tvor a that
lst. No plaral; no forett words:
no p~r anames. TOY1


TARGT in to tn ta


L. Inr a hurt (.r~
(f. o ealal for a door. (4)
I. Wlt ralr (
13. H cash 0 4. (S)
I. Tr7lr fruit.
9 Ml en statement. (II)
ta. ashton, ctame
29. blhln (6) )
Down
L. Uobs on. crer after rear.


1: as"M'lc s dro. 9
4. Pond erestore ( )
a. Tctr~ venue. (6)
L0. Companion of Htlekr. (4)

'" acll rspcale 8

IG a elr
tio f L



at. a r sin.resrs* ee,


STE VE R 0PER & MI KE N 0MAD by saunders & o ver gard


)73.


CARROLL RIGHTER'S



teen the Carret Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Keep a charming
smile ever present. Otherwise you may have
considerable friction with others and can get into some
troublesome situations that make it difficult to accomplish
your aims. Steer clear of making side remarks yourself, e..d
avoid those who have a tendency to be critical.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) There are problems at home
that need wise handling in a diplomatic way Add articles of
beauty to home and make it look more charming,
comfortable. Impnres those who visit there.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Pleasing allies more opens
the way to greater success and happiness. Some letter or
telephone call may not be as distressing as you think. Study it
well and you may find it isjust the opposite.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) A little effort and money can
make your property more comfortable and valuable now. Talk
over some money problem with experts you know and get good
advice. Don't forget to show proper appreciation.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Doing favors for
good pals makes you a more delightful and happy person.
Think more about the romantic side of your life and brin
more happiness into it. Get business deals handled wisely.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Plan time for doing what will
help those you like very much. Make arrangements now for
social affairs in the future. Find the right way to make
yourself more charming and please others more.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) See what can be done about
pleasing good pals in a social way and get better results with
them in the future. Get into group meetings that are pleasant
and charming now. Think.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Show true ability at whatever
your duties may be today, whether of a business or personal
nature. Acting in a sour way can be very bad now. Prove you
have wisom and to good sense of humo mythn ha e

ideas are good, but it is wise to carry through with whatever
has been found acceptable and worthwhile now. Get into the
studies that can be most helpful to you. Avoid that person
who gets on your nerves.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) If you handle present
tasks wisely, you will save both energy and time, as well as cut
down on expenses. Do not scold attachment, but u.
diplomacy for best results. Capitalize on your finest talents.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) If you study how your
partners treat you, you know exactly what should be done to
establish greater rapport. Do not get into that public affair
that could lead to a big dispute. Avoid that person who argues
too much.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Before you tackle all that
work ahead of you in the outside world, improve your
appearance. Let your relationships be pleasant. Use common
asnse in handling any health problems you may have.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Don't argue about that
financial affair and do the things that really please you. You
need to be more creative, but don't get others involved.
Working alone is your best bet now. Get to bed early tonight.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those delightful young people with understanding and a
charming smile that bring fine success in dealing with others,
plus the ability to help ease the burdens of others. Show
appreciation for the devotion your youngster gives you as
parents. An ideal chart here for the big government person, a
religious leader, teacher, lawyer. Give as fine an education as
you can. Ethics early, too.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


..;r `L





under my control. In the end it
beoake ao coeM andm ra
now stands outside the cage
and the Wizard shuMes
towards It. Well done*
QOcerl' he snes. buYoau

great cost to yourselves I"


W~hen the display of magic
I eas away. mhe lrcerer an
the oage. W-we've changed
places with the vase I" cries
Rupert. This isn't right, is
rt7 "ay a rclundere~dh"
mixed magic would notsa


A L RIfs REE)E


APA RTMENT 3- G By Alex K ota lcy

I THINK WE'D L DON T UNPERSTANa VCUI 1-~ JUST CAME TO THE DEOSKION THAT
SETTER HAVE A PEOPLE!T'VE BEEN L.EGETATIING YiOU RE NOT GOING WITH US TONIGHrT,
LITTE TLK WTH HATHUSBND OR YARS NO TH^ I ANTJOROAN!I I HAVE THE FEELING THAT
/ OF MINE, POCTOR! M~TA TO CRA~WI OUT OF L.LV COCOONhi ~ ALL YOt.YLL DO IS CifAMP MY~
/A MRTHAYOU RE TRYING TO sHOWC McE ,STYLE.


Winning


B~r V3CTOlR MOLLO
SIONALL INGLL~~~~LLLL~~~ is a cherished
weapon of the defence. By fol-
ee eghi hlow inpa neuithaa
he has an even number of
cards. Following in the natural
order shows an odd number,
aThe Iinormation es oie d invalu-

defenders can false card, each
side trying to deceive the other.
And occasionally, a defender~
may set out with ;good reason to
mislead ha~ partner, as in this
examl 1sa hrg vMaazine.
North


S10 76


153 (
0outh
81haA QO 6
OA QJ s


West
7 3
K 8 4
K 10 8
A 8 2


Eart
K 5 4
J7 3 2
6 4 2
p 4


28o th N rth
West leads the 05. South wins
and leads the +A, then the +10.
It doesn't take an eroert East
to hold up the +K, but only an
Imaginative West could prevent
him doing it.
West is in a position to count
declarer's tricks and knows that
lour spades won't suffice him.
So he wants East to take the
se*::r spa:^ *n le d t u hdi
m on. beo re cl b =." el tou h e
that South has twospdsol
To make him think that, West
plays the +3 before the +7, an-
nouncing t at he has the miss-
ing +8 himself.


"Where's it going to end?"


ACROBSS
1. Brownish red
color
7. Injures
12. Wing-footed
13. Utilize
14. Blue jean
fabric
:15. Beethoven
symphony
16. Land
118. Diffident
~19. Feminine name
21. Urge
.22. Mountain
banana
23. Retire


24. Land measure
25. Candy
27. Hoard
29. Normal
30. Rough lava
31. Arctic native:
abbr.
32. Cheetah
33. Antelope SOL
34. Social insect
35. Meteos
37. Atefier
39. Crews
42. Instructor
43. Escritoire
44. Alter
45. Confirm


Par time 27 min.


Bhrit rtistan


r


311 """" '3t


Rupert and the Mixed Magic--26


'I'LL SE OVER SOONJ ASMY 040D
ARtM ears some!'

Brother Juniper


.CROSSWORD

PUZZLE


BUT WE DON' T! r C( MO
N"E'rD Fo:ED~l A NE
SE O SE





THE BAHA~MAS Cric et
Association's 1973 series is
scheduled to begin on May 5


byte Ascatien The regular
series begins the following




Saturday or Sundays
according to schedule.
The deadline for registration
of Clubs and payment of
registration fees is set for April

16Entries may be submitted to
either Mr. Bernie Turnquest at
Bahamas Auto Parts or Mr.
Everette Evans at Thrifty
Jitney.
JET SET HAMMER
BLENDERS7 -1
mT tSETi"th nUnpsetters"
second place Becks Bees when,
behind the pitching of rookie
David Johnson of Flamingo
A's, they defeated Bahamas
Blenders 7-1 in the only game
played at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre.


CRICK ET SEAS ON
rUC Dr~U LIA r;. LIk


WTE HAVE IO VED




150MPSON G ASSOCIATES Ill.






C





ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF
THEIR NEW OFFICES UNDER THE OWNERSHIP AND
MANAGEMENT OF












OUR STAFF WILL BE PLEASED TO WELCOME YOU TO
OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT STEEL-PERKINS -
FIRST TERRACE CENTREVILLE

P. O. BOX 6167 PHONE 21871-2


I I


LIC-- -- I~---~~-.IJC_ _.I-.-1 _~~ ~ ~IC--- ~I
.,;.,,. -- c--~-"-I:


r




























I


I~ I

I~ I
I~ I


IMAMAIANI WARD O



ADVERTISING SALES I

I~ PER IM I



I I86O 87&8

I)' Mf/Of Co fe Offe, I


II I
I Interested persons please g

( COntact : I

I I
i MR. H.R BE THEL I
I I

g Phone 2-2768 The Tribune, I

b between 9a.m. & 12 noon I

SI Monday through Saturday. g

I Salary open. g
mamammmeagemmemmmmemmm


Tuesday, April 10, 1973


d1
j





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s


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a
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VISITORS LOSE SECOND MATCH



~Luxembourg take Nassau



achampions into double

avrie~oeb a pon:


By GLAD)STONE THURKST(N
T 71 SANICHAUFER, after beingp takenl inito double overtime
by the defending Nassau Leaguel( Champlllionsl, crumtbled on tlo
free throws by guard Anthony Bos~field aIs Becks Cougars
triumphed 75-74. handing the visitotrs their seccond game loss in 8
two games in the Baha mas/L.lclbuxebor baske~tbarll tournament at


Y Inote 5 4

58 I


the A F. Adderley G;ym.




the ~ 1 J 1 edl~l (; ki l <1
As~rl~s ocia~tion5 wad
present anoI(n 1\ also~.1)1 ex e te 'to :
be stlated fo~r tconigit

played. the~ L~uxeu rglhl~r team
has imlpre~ssed Inuinyr oI the
Iale le~c~ c~ I I l I r p Itsi
bscmmente eteriri~ran emell


shts. I hope~l someii of the
BahanuanlI pl~igeri can learn
sinwt'hingu In thttting I 3n

teams were~ 11nt ,ut toi \Ce the

(;oin~ Intoi last knight' s game
cone docwn flwng the
Ke~nttc~ky ooel 52
victory oni Sundaly. the visit~rs.
accurately passing andi working
for the Sur~e vho~t, o~peneld a
22 12 lead at 8 04 in the first
half aid Icontrolledl the lead
33-26 by the end of the half'.
Peter Brown, the high
pointer of the homeic teaml. witlh
a 19-pointf conltributionn
sparked an early rally in, the
second half that brought thi
Cougars three behindl at 35 ?32
\s they played without cen~rtre
Allan Ingraham, who is out r
writh an iniury, Gaury Newbold
tok he load1~ of the
rebhoundcing and, teamiing up
thl Browni. brought the
( ,uiars ahead 39)-37. Newborld
* ak 18 rebounds. Brown had i
seven assists
Although Andlre' Perka. who
scored a games high of1 28r, arnd
G;uy Simon, who scored 15 and
:ave seven assists, carried a hot
pace, it was not until with 5:56
remaining that' the ('ougars
were forced into mnany
turnovers and Rol Schumadwr

lie tie te gme at 52r amtle
Q ni ckening the paice-
Luxembourg on baskets by



With the C'ougars behind




"Bookie" Johnson edged the
league champions ahead by
two, but the visitors replied
and with eight seconds
remaining the C'ougars was

ullt alasr th gam tiwevnt int
overtime.
Luxemnbourg irmmediattely
took a 69 65 leadf in thie first
overtime, but Newbold and
Bosfield cut it on baskets to
move the game into the second
overtime
siIn the adcndboy trtlrmeevbn
until the final 17 seconds when
Bosfield at the line went two


THE VISITING T71 SANICHAUFERS OF
LUXEMBOURG abovev) play their final game in the best of
tre tou nameantaagainst tihen Baama tonight when stha
from left (standing): Jean-Pierre Gilbertz, Pierre Claude'
Mathais Kiewel, Arthur Muller, Andre' Perka, Jean-Paul
Schumacher, Arthur Junker (coach); (Kneeling); Roland
Schumacher, Frank Krier, Yves Ueberschlag. Rene Bausch,
Guy Simon and Jean-Paul Kremer.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


1973 volleyball series.
Sweeting High had little
trouble disposing of A. F.
Adderley as behind the
six-point service of co-captain
Mathew Leckey they jumped
to an 8-1 lead before Adderley
called a time out.
Returning to the court, Max
Smith took over and with C'. C.
Sweeting playing good defence,
moved ahead 11-2.
Inaccurate shots troubled
Sweeting High for a time and
Adderley H~igh with Rudiolph
Edgecombe at the line moved
five behind at 12-7. However,
Bradley Clooper came in and on
a well placed spike broke
Edgecombe's service for Ray
Johnson to take over and serve
three winning points.
A. F. Adderley in the second
set took an early 2-0 lead but
again with good ball playing by
Denis Forbes and Leckey along
with Bradley Cooper and Kevin
Rolle, who served four points
each, Sweeting allowed them
three more points,
H-aving A. F. Adderley
already figured out, coach TIom


s




l


(;rant then put on his
secondary team for the third
set and the over confident A.
F. Adderley ran ahead 10-7.
On seeing a little weakness
in his team, coach Grant called
a time out and following a
little pep talk C. C. Sweeting
paced by Keith Wells and Kirk
Lewis, who served six points,
scored eight unanswered points
to win.
+******
PRINCE WILL WIN
Defending champions Prince
Williams H-igh put down
Government H-igh School easily
15-9, 15-0 and 154 yesterday
at G;. H.S.
Prince Will, showing their
experience, rallied to an I1-1
lead before serving difficulties
stopped them. With this, Greg
Rahming, Eardly Moss and
Phillip Mitchell took over and
saw G.H.S. three behind at
12-9.
Leslie Cartwright however at
the line gave P'rince Will three


ANDRE' PERKA, the high pointer for Luxembourg last
night, fakes to evade the defensive move of David Rotte of
Becks Cougars. Cougars gave the visitors their second defeat
in a close 75-74 victory last night. PHOTO: Rickey Wells


R. Schurn' 3 3 o
Krier 2 0 0
IPShum' o 3
BECK:SCOUGCARS
fg rb f

Brown 9 s a
Bosfield 2 2 3
Adanu 3
EForbes 1 7 I
Rolle I 0 0
Jhson 4 2 4


Becks\ CougarsT had help
frmtheir former junior
lea;gue~r Hennett D~avis. D~avis
icontribulted I2 rebounds and
eight points
Simoiln gave the~ visitors 15
points and seven assists.

fg rb f tp
I'erka II 12 0 28
Krme 4 4 8
Simu 6 I 1


~I


UNABLE TO GET HIS SHOT OFF Jean-Paul Kremer,
tries to seek the open man while Beck's Peter Brown gets
set to intercept the pass. Becks Cougars after double
overtime stopped Luxembourg 75-74. PHOTO: Rickey
Wells.


ndon Cup here




the doubles game. With a powerful
service, she is reputed tobhethe best
female doubles player in B~arbados.
This is her second year as captain of
the Barbados Phlillips Team.
Ruby Browne, holder of the
National G~rass Court Singles and
Doubles Titles has in her favour
great powers of concentration and
boundless energy. H-er favourite
shots are deep drives on both
forehand and backhand.
Sandra Browne is a three-time
winner of the National G;rass Court
title and recently won the
President's Invitation for the third
consecutive year. She plays a good
all-court game and is a skillful


'Inations to compete for Bra



f."'hutianshipJowtd h arh tb h
courts April 27 through May 6 are D~r. Barry said that the B.L.T.A.
progressing extremely well and had not yet made the final team
response from member Associations selection to represent the Bahamas
has been virtually one hundred but he felt that the Bahamas stands
percent, commented D~r. Grahame an excellent chance of winning the
Barry, president of the Bahamas Phlillips Cup. As to the Brandon,
Lawn Tennis Association. with the event being played in the
In the Brandon Cup men's Bahamas, the psychological
ennt -1 Barbados, Jamaica, advantage should belong to the
Windward Islands, (;uyana, local team, thus giving them that
Trinidad and, T'obago, St. Kitts and competitive edge, he said-
********
the B~ahamus are! slnted to compete. Barbados has selected G~regory
in the Phittips Cup t adies event Adams, their number one tennis
all the above named countries with player and David Highland, their
the exception of St. Kitts are! junior champion for the Brandon
expected to compete. Cup competition. For the Phillips
This is the second time the Cup, Michelle G~oddard, Ruby
buhamas has been the host country Bro~wne and Sandra Browvne were
fo~r the Brando~n Cup, the first time selected.
heingp in 1968 when only four Adams, who is a player with a
countries took part. polished style and capable of
NltW TROPHY playing~\werll on any surface, will blr
In respect of the Phillips Cup making his third appearance In the
which is bring held for the second Brandon. Although he apparently
year. 1)r. Barry went on to say that lacks some of the killer instinct
theh 10 hun >r a contribute the necessary for todecompetition, th s


r'in il '' owf th m e om idtte in hi firt rnHo ghla9n7d2p. Hei
has dispinved the besit sporting powerfully built and displays great
spirit on the courts. This is the first power in his service and ground
year of the Phillip Sportsmanship strokes. Highlalnd is presently
A~wardl anld the trophy will be! attending college in Florida on a
naumed in ho~nour of Mrs. Bertha tennis scholarship.
isumes, who was a founding and G~oddard, the captain, was Queen
active member of the G~ym Tecnnis of the Barbadian tennis courts but
('lub. at 30 she is concentratina now orn


vollever. This is her second year on
the~ Phillips team.



ROYAL MAIL REGULAR FREHT THEPACIFIC STEAM


LINES LIMITED D U.K. TO NASSAU NAVIGATION CO.

FOr infofflation COMBaCt t)M agAntS

n.M.CUUKN Is 50., Ltd.
PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


Else Eribittit


THRILLING CLOSING ROUND OF MASTERS



Tommry Aaron wins Masters title,


his 2nd. win on pro tour in 13 years

AUGUSTA. Ga. (AP) -- Tommy Aaron, a quiet, curly-haired Georgian who once scurried from
Augusta National in cheek-burning shame strode proudly past golf's greatest players with a
final-round 68 to win the Masters title by one stroke Monday.
His 283 total, five under par, Snead's 18-foot putt for a chipping po~orly and then
dissolved his image as a birdie on the final geen, which falling to his knees when a
perennial runnerup and helped would have forced a playoff 10-foot. nar-saving outt refused
rasee the haunting memory of today, barely slipped past the to drop.
his slip of the pen that cost hole. And Snead could do no
Roberto de Vicenzo a chance Aaron had earlier rounds of better than par the hole thai
It the Masters crown in 1968. 68, 73 and 74. Snead, the yielded dozens of birdies in
A~aron, winner of only one 31-year-old nephew of Sam this tournament that wa!
ournament in 13 years on the Snead, shot a tw ~under 70 postponed when Saturday'i
'C; n p c fiac m rtib di4 and fnishe ds tnh ew h 284. schsedulledouthirbd round 6-i
wo short par-five holes on the for third at 285 among rainfall.
back nine to slip past J. C. defending champion Jack
jnead undo ern the trad tional Ni kaus, J n Jahmicson thS eh medh an

championss and a $30,000 Oosterhuis, who began the 12h adctie15-r
par-three hole. It cost him
:hec~k. final day with a three-stroke double bogey, and he had te
Aaron saw Sne~ad sink a who began the final day with a rebound with a birdie on the
pressure puttt for par on the three-stroke lead and faded next hole to make his thrilling
17th to stay alive. Then with a74.bu unucsfl haeg
a Victory came in gritty, down the stretch.

Impressa-ol inro 2:'"" t.. edtha CLUB TROUBLE
gallant, surging charge by Snead second-guessed hi:
eyball openerNicklaus, the famed Golden decision to change clubs at the
8f 11811 Open ron t:wo wainleld mt the fnl 12S ead planned to hit
power of his awe-inspiring six-iron but said when he too
game. it from his bag. "My cadd
ost likely to upset defending NICKLAUS' SURGE looked like he was gonna pas
and stopped last year's second Nicklaus, eight strokes off out. I went back and took
first game of the Inter-School the pace, shouldered his way seven-iron and he was al
into contention with eight smiles," Snead said.
straightt points including an birdies and a sparkling, He hit the seven-iron, th
ace. six-under 66 for a 285 total. ball hit short of the green ane
In the second set, GHl-S was He leaped high in the air and rolled back into the pond.
unable to stand up to the brandished his putter after "It kind of makes some o
powerful spiking of senior holing a 30-foot birdie chip on the near-misses not to painful,
leaguer David Bullard, Alpheus the final hole to go Aaron said.
Forbes and A\rlington Wright as three-under. Arnold Palmer, Lee Trevine
Cartwright again at the line Aaron, playing the 520-yard, and Australian Bruc
reeled off 15 straight points p~ar-five 15th, was only Crampton -- high among th
including four aces. four-under at that point and tourney favourites -neve
Moss took the service for faced the subtle, multiple really got into it. Th
G;.H.S. in the third set and dangers of the famed finishing 43-year-old Palmer, lik
pushedt them ahead 4 0. holes. Nicklaus a four-time winne
Terrance K~ing camec to the He replied by chipping here, had a final 70, his bes
rescue for Prince Will and delicately to about 18 inches day of the tournament, fo
served 10 straight points before and tapping in the birdie putt 295.
his service was broken. G;.H.S. that in the end won it. Trevino, the current Britisi
was unable to do anything with H-e managed to par the next Open champion and leading
their serve and Forbes and three holes, twice making money winner, went to a 75 oi
Wright gave Prince Will two nerve-testing little putts and the course he still insists h
and three points respectively. just missing a birdie on the cannot play and was tied witl
Coach George Shilling was 18th. Crampton far back in the fiele
pretty impressed with the But he still had to endure at 299. Crampton, a two-tim
performance of Prince Will. "I the nail-biting anxiety of the winner this season ane
don t think anybody is going closing bid of raw-boned Snead considered the No. I foreign~
to beat them for a long time," and lan ky, freckle-faced threat in the absence of Garl
he said. However, "considering Oosterhuis. Player, closed with a 74.
the opposition that we had, the Both were four-under and Player is still recuperatin
boys (G;.H.S.) played well." were three holes behind Aaron. from surgery at his ranch hom~
The six-foot five-inch near Johannesburg, Soutl
OP ENS MA Y 5 Oot:'erheuioo x ohh hi che e Aora He Hr se nh nM se
missing the green in three, decades.


R00kil C.C. WSwetlng 1885




By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE ROOKIE TEAM of C. C. Sweeting High --- the team me
champions Prince Williams High got off on a good foot yesterday ~
place winners A. F. Adderley High 15-7, 15-5 and 15-10 during the