<%BANNER%>
(Ehe (Eribunr
Monday, April 9, 1973
FASHION FOR HEALTH
FINAL MANUSCRIPT OF MARK TWAIN MADE PUBLIC

Sueanne Dunkley No. 1
B] RK1 LEY, (ALII. -
Mark 1 wains final manuscript,
made public- Sunday after 62 years,
MOWS 'he author kept his wit -
Utd Ins temper until the waning
months of his life.
The 30-page document,
handwritten in clear black writing
i now-y el lowed letter paper,
dj tails bow the author believed his
secretary and business manager
conspired to swindle him.
The University of California
announced the book-length
manuscript has been donated to its
vt.nsiu- Mark Twain collections
by descendants of the family of the
author, whose real name was
Samuel Langhorne Clemens. Also
included in the gift were other
papers and some 70 Twain letters.
Twain finished the manuscript
la moatfal before his death in 19)0
at age 74. In the foreword, the man
who chronicled American life
before the tum of the century
MffOtt
"There are three conspicuous
characters in this true tale of mine,
this queer and shabby and pitiful
i.l. to wit, a pair of degraded
ind sufficiently clumsy sharpers,
and I the born ass, their easy
victim."
Twain tells how in 1909 at his
home in Redding, Conn., he began
to suspect his business manager,
Ralph W. Ashcroft. and secretary
Isabel Lyon, of misusing his funds.
Suddenly Ashcroft and MLss
I.yon married and went to Kngland
for their honeymoon.
On an envelope of a letter from
Ajhcrofl also included in the gift.
Twain scrawled:
"Letter from a simtlini
hypocrite who is also a skunk.
and a professional liar. It is
precious, it has no mate in polecat
literature don't let it p i lost."
Frederick Anderson, editor of
the U.C. OOlft tit n which includes
80 per cent of the original Twain
enormous value hingraphkally but
limited value as literature He
explained in an interview that thr
manuscript was meant to be
Informal and private.
Hut Anderson said the papers
give a real sense of the last years in
the life of the author, showing he
retained his "unreallable temper
and clarity of wit" until just before
his death.
"This was his final burst of
energy and the last we had of him.
This was Twain's last rocket and it
went off just beautifully."
The author's falling health (bread
him to retreat after this tin.tl
outburst in a life which was marked
by business and legal entangle
ments" Anderson said. He added
Khobn still debate whether
(WO were guilty as Twain eccu
therrr-and if so what their motive*!
were.
lot iimrnts show how Twain '
i,! hi-. financial and busp
ill.ins (,. oihcrs VfhM they began*'
|0 bore him in later >.
Anderson said. "They show how he
n Hod owrwhelmingly on
business associates,"
The documents were a gilt of.
Mrs. lugene Lada-MocarsKi anil
Ituv.ird Schieffclin. both of
New lersey, granddaughters
I vrain'l brother-in-law.
Anderson estimated the
documents' value between $40,000
and S80.000, although he said it is
difficult to guage.
In the manuscript, Twain himself,
predicted what he was writing
would Increase In value,_____________.'
Pat Paul- No. 4
Florence Humphreys No. 6
Florence Humphreys No. 5 _____
(UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT)
ZJne ^kow LJub
NOW NASSAU'S MOST DISTINGUISHED LATE NIGHT
RENDEZVOUS-9:00RM. 'TIL 4 A.M.
SELECTED MENU FOR LATE NIGHT DINING
* COMPLETE LINE OF SELECTED WINES AND LIQUOR
* MUSIC FOR DANCING AND LISTENING TO
ABOUT THE FASHIONS
A FASHION SHOW and painting auction was held in the
Nassau Beach Hotel's "Tiki Village" on March 30 to raise
funds lor the Bahamas Mental Health Association. Philip
Symonette caught the models at work. At photo No.l is
Sueanne Dunkley, showing off a slacks outfit with pullover
blouse, sweater and matching clogs. (2) Iris Donaldson,
photo No.2 modelled a colourful floral print wrap-around
skirt with matching halter top, while another floral print,
this time a maxi-length gown, was modelled by Effie
Strachan in photo No.3. Pat Paul modelled the men's wear,
including (in photo No.4 a smart, modern look, check suit,
with a matching vest. Florence Humphreys was also hard at
work, showing off (in photo No.5) a full-length gown with
knee-high slits in the side and colourful overlay on the
front, and in photo No.6 a pant suit with dark slacks and a
wrap-around top with a floral pattern.
TODAY IN HISTORY
lit Hi.' Associated Press
[1 |DA\ H MONDAY April 9th,
the '-Mh da) erf 1973. than it.
266 da) i lofl In the year
HIGHLIGHTS in history on thin
date:
l<71 Kin*; Hussein <>t Jordan
,ii i apu .i S) dan proposal to and
two weeks ni fighting with
Palestinian guerrillas La Jordan.
I96S clashes between Indian
and Pakistan troops on
KtlU h Indian border.
1963 Britain's Prima Minister
Winston Churchill bat omes
honorar) cltlscn ol United suits.
South African Pramiar
Hendrll Varwoerd is wounded b)
David Pratt.
1949 United Nations,
International Courl ol Justice
iis ins) d.-. Uon, holding
Mbanla rasponslbla tor incidents m
Corfu Channel and awarding Britain
i ijo German forcas fnvsdc
Norwa) and Denmark In world War
rwo
1943 A inerican-Filipino forcai
ABBEY
INTERNATIONAL
FUND
S11.69
Offered Price
\s Of
March 6th.. 1973
I92H Utaffl hi ii" longer
recognised as state rallglon in
1918 British third army opens
attack against dermans at Arras,
Franca; Canadian troops launch
attack i.n Vlmy Kidge in I-ranee.
i7H.i Tlppoo ol Myaora forces
llntish to surrender liednorc.
1691 French forcai capture
Metis HI lirlt'ltun.
I6H2 La Salie, French
axplorar, reaches the (iulf of
Maxloo sftat travelling down the
Mississippi River,
1609 Spain signs u nin.-M.ar
truce with Holland.
1553 Francois Katwlais.
French writer, dies.
TODAY'S BIR1 HDAYS Chartes
Pierre Baudalalra, French author
i i H27-I867); Nikolai Lenin,
l< us si.m statesman (1H70-I924)
DUKES RETURN IGNITES
PARLIAMENTARY ROW
I DINHURCill. SCOTLAND (Al'>
The Duke ol Argyll, 69-year-old
head "f Scotland's Clan Campbell.
died in a nursing home here
Thursday, following a stroke
sultervd several weeks ago at his
home near I'aris.
Hie Duke is survived hy his
widow, who was his fourth wife,
tWO sons and a daughter. Two ol
his previous wives are still living.
An announcement from Inverary
Castle, the lamily seat on Loch
Fyna said merely: 'His (.race pavsed
.may llus morning."
Ilu- Duke was flown home from
France following his stroke and his
return ignited a row in the HoutJ Of
Commons,
Friday, I aftist labourite
legislator William Hamilton asked
the government i>r a statement on
ths circumstances in which the
Duke id Arg>ll, having left this
country to reside permanently
abroad to avoid taxation, is allowed
to use the National Health
faculties.'
The Dttka1! son Md heir, Lord
Lome, immediately called the
Scottish lawmakers question 'an
unwarranted and cowardly attack
on my father.'
As a result, he said, he was
conaldaring taking his family into
exile I r >r11 Britain.
YOUR SINGLE SOURCE SUPPLY FOR:
ALL YOUR PRINTING


Monday, April 9. 1973
IS RIGHT FOR YOU
available at
AHAMAS BEVERAGES LTD
P. 0. BOX N756
PHONE 3-5555


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03318
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 9, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03318

Full Text
_________ _; -7 -------~--1-. ------------ ----I--- -------- ----------- -- -~---1C-~ __ --- ---- __ __~ ~___ _~,___


ONEALLO F EHSCT FRA PRT
-TELEPHONE 77303/77778


NASSAU GLASS CO.

NEW SIllPMFNM ANTIQUE MAPS

IN VARIOUS SIZES
PH: 2-8165 2-2723 P.O. BOX N563


,,,


Priet l 5 Cents


SEN ATE OPENS

800 GET DE BATE
< GOVERNMENT Leader in
trie Senate Paul Adderley,
Minister of External Affairs,
this morning opened what is
expctedd te bof athlen th

Appropriations Bill.
ofSehne A der eyss innrodo a on
was largely is reetitio tor

flanna's introduction of the
measure in the House of
Assembly last week.
Sen. Adderley said "'it is
sgiiant ad aport ht



realiaticeally bal ncd bde



m8 mne t ioin measures an
Hie said the budget reflected
Government's philosophy that
"the existing taxation structure
ought to be preserved. In that
policy the basic elements so for

best able to bear a higher
percentage of taxation should
be required to do so."
He said "expenditure this
year has been kept under
control at a level to satisfy the
social needs of the country and
the irreducible minimum level
of social development."

Fift Chill's Wrrlill

eA bush fires
THE PUBLIC should be
"extra careful" with doing
anything that would start a
bush fire, Police Chief Joseph
Baillargeon warned today.
"People should be extra
careful," Mr. Baillargeon said,
"because the undergrowth is
extremely dry. With high winds
-- the type of weather that we
have been having lately a
bush fire can spread very
quickly." Vacant land, he said,
was the most often hit.
A Meteorological Office
spokesman said today that
Ne w Providence was
experiencing its sixth period of
"absolute drought" in the past
10 years.
Over the weekend the Fire
Department was cale o ut

fires, two homes and one truck

SALE
COLOURFUL
HAITIAN

25% OFF





FEAR ED


I


23-YEAR-0LD

GETS 18 MIONTHS






A 23-YEAR OLD)
Farrington Road dish washer,
who appeared in court charged
with unnatural carnal
knowledge this morning, was
sentenced to 18 months
imprisonment after pleading
guilty to the offence which was
heard before Chief M~agisitrate
Wilton Hercules.
(`i e1 Mu igrl,\e o~f



befolre~ hel SuIpremeI (court as
he mu Jlt receive .I 20-vear


lie pl chl e aniy atc


Inispccto~r Hlugh Burke. ca art
proseccutorr told~ the cocurt that1
11us~grcave ha~d been arrested




She~ told~ police thiat her son
had beenl cexuall\ moile~sted in
St. Joscph 5 ( hiurc~h cemelctery..
Whenl qusc'tioned~~ an~d placed
unlder c~autlc~n. Musgove
adm:itted~ the o~ffence. the court

11ulsgrlrve told porllicet that he
Inet tl~he bo af ter beinglL asked
f or a qluarter by~ hlim He said in
his statements that after the
Lo ...d hal 3golfirtercney.

W~hen asked by (`hief
N agistie onller lt e tr explain

morning. the~ ,3 year old mnan
dtid ie had b~een drinking at

The Inaig >trat sentetnced~
him to 18-mlonths ini jail with
hard labour






TOP I.S. BAHKlf

BOC'A RATON.. FL.A., April
9 AP '.S, commercial:
banks are opening branches in


acetab tx haven say


"an recnt m nths, however

nh Bahamas asom wat less

Brimmer.
"T~he principal reason cited
by some of them relate to
uncertainty on their part
regaring teq futur poln'm'
aporoaches full1 self
government." Brinmmecr told
the Bankers' Assoc~iation for
Foreign TIrade at the Boca
Rato~n Htotel here M-onday.
The Cayman Islands, a
British possession off the north
cocast of Jamaica, has now
beco
establishing branches there.
"In both instances the miove
recently has beent miotivated
niore by) a quest fo(r a tax
haven thani because of the
presence ofI ecllonomic and
finanetlal connectiocns normally
expected in principal banking
cent res." he added.
Brimmner said the F~ederal
Reserve Board had started a
review of international banking
operations and expects to
p'ropose new regulationS and
possible legislation
Walter Page. president of the
Morgsin (;uara.., vmrst (o..


told rlhe banker\ that despite
the devaluration it will still be a
"dollar world" throtugh the
19,70s
Plage called rhe dollar
dev al ua lion a 'helated
TcCOpnition Of cl3Dclps in
t co n om ination[at o s
past 25 years."


VOL. LXX, No. 117


Monday, April 9, 1973


THE BURNT-OUT LIQUID ASPHALT TRUCK OF JAMES MORLEY



Quick-thinking owner drives blazing



ifHc Ch lea 8fOf PaF SiSe 8|18 fI5801

A LIQUID) ASPHALT TANK TRUCK, which was destroyed by fire, was driven by its owner
from the side of a new semi-occupied apartment complex on Paradise Island last night as flames


million, and the 1972 fiscal
year ended with a deficit of
$19 million, not the 57.5
million claimed in the budget.
Up to s :n. -toda:1when
lunch, no government member
had replied to the Opposition
Leader's charge.
Senator Turnquest was
countering a statement from
Government Senate Leader
Paul L. Adderley Minister of
External Affairs, who spoke
this morning at the opening of
the 1973 budget debate in the
upper chamber of the
legislatu re.
Senator Adderley said

aoen nr att revenue proeod a
Opposition charge that the
Pconmyadhnaisndteci und r
"no more than an allegation "
th pointed out that in 196 ,
former UBP administration,
the revenue totalled $52
million, against the $104.5
million revised estimate of
revenue for 1972.

go ernmeach estbumdat s t e
revenue expected to be
collected during that year. In
the next budget the figure is
changed to a "revised
estimate," and in the third year
an "actual revenue" figure is
given.
Govern men t originally

us i a e t ht 1 9 39 re v e n e



houanaht this mmorn5 g Ft he
iak n the ands of ovrnent. t


etmillo ord eventh revised t
esti.5mate iof$0.5mlinw

I actul Trevnque lst year
weatos $93s million the ostion
ofv revenuemlee and exenitreis
drstic ally diffGerentrm nthe
buge wol hleg h
Thve bdent claims tha dn
revenue lastua yener wa 045
million and expendituere $112
etmill on, leavng a eicitof, w
millionn heedofte
Goenmn expects revenue latya
in 1973 to cli mbh pstio
$114,003,500.d expenditure for
mrsicllon so thaet Grovnment
expects to aen in $h 9.738
milio morget thanit ilspend
onrecurenlat yexpenitus 59 4.
million o tatd suplus istor be
deelopmnt, leaving a surplus o
Acc mllodng to the budget, h
the dfctcare ve rm
197 down to $6,71,78 t
But.0350, according tor Seaor
Turnqus est actual rveue last
yerws$3million. PutatGveet
against the $12 milon 19.72

usedio tor begn coret ing that
dn efcitethi ear a teendiue of
1973o o thet Govrnment willt fe
a carry-over deficit of
of$138,26,0.

19 orei ,Uo sh bugt
lhe der Kendcale Isaac chrgedin

The Houese ofua Asemblye last


million revised estimate given in the 1973 budget.
If Senator Turnquest is right fell $17.5 million short of the
Government revenue last year original estimate of $110.5






crtcie ao e r







THE NASSAU GUARDIAN was severely criticized by
Government Senate Leader Paul Adderley and Senate President
Gerald Cash for reporting that the 1973. Appropriations Bill was
bled fr first readng in the Senate before it was passed by the


years revenue had fallen a total
of $30 million short of
Government expectations, and
deficits in the three years

add Sato Tr qes is tight
about the 1972 revenue,
Government between 1970 and
1972 had a $42 million
shortfall and $38.9 million
deficit.
Senator 'Turnquest, basing
his remarks on the failure of
revenue to meet expectations
three years in a row, charged
that the economy in fact
presents "a gloomy, dark and
dismal picture.
"There is no hope," he

eom edawaeM f th efaycte t
not until this Opposition takes
poerowill thererbe a change in
Referring to the fact that
Govern es ha itodeuxc

revenue this year, Senator
Turnquest said "it is no
wonder that Government finds
it necessary, to meet the
existing level of expenditure
tori an additional $13.
"The original estimate of
revenue for 1972 was $110
million. It was revised to $104
million and it was actually $93
million. That is an exact
pattern of the previous two
years .The pattern in 1972 is
merely a repetition of what

happeness c tel1 and le3 .

we antc t it hapnn
3.5 m ion axe, tere

HWe said this was the resul of
Gh voea n insm agew fIgu d
coml ,etelinep without et

fund.5 Theyi hn aves the e
effronter andug adacity otel

thead 'thes Baaas hsthe besut o
government thtiths everl had
in all its history" wih
Senate or T rnqeslty sad et
u nst nthy wsi pb
Gunsove Tet e hico nis
bywrodin eery hod usehtyold It
rhe peonsle ar te bcoming less
tand ltes discreet h t bs
ioencentivs atract ing moere h
cnaplital and simulting
proecs top pt more mtone in
Governments ahc tiona is to
imposdne more taxes." ld I
Hes rieferread toe what
rpnew iscle policyitoduing ls

wold placems of thfe i
burden ofs attaxtiong ontose
wcan best affod sit. ti
"Theret are suomee pley in
the Gvernment' heon isad
"whos have thxe tel ne o

be pased one to th oo an "
Hoe dmen hs tribed it e
G ernen fiscal policy, as oucn
"We in the Opposition warn
ths ountr thac ot ove thenet
cotiured erosxaion of thoe
ehcnoy unemplaoyment wll
inc ereae the problem whoure i


yno thee n at inra
threy will cninu toe sfer, i ato
be budened by aes of


ACCUSED KILLER



PHILIP ("Polka") 11 es
21, (ABOVE) accused me)
murder and armed robbery and
scheduled to be tried during
the April Criminal Sessions, is
still at large today after
escaping from the Supremet
Cor sdabasehmenth is he cin
with 14 others.
Humes, a plumber, escaped
with six other prisoners by
locking two police officers into
th supreme Court basement
q slt uster prisoner had
Humes, con si dered
dangerous by police, is 5ft
mis, ta ll e y o rw s




we as rv d police for si



Anmoemn seoeinge fumessinoer
having knowledge of his
whereabouts, is asked to
contact the police at telephone
2-2561 or 2-2562
BISHOP E LDON
PREACHES IN
THE GROVE MIAMI
THE RT. REV. Michael
Eldon, Bishop of Nassau and
the Bahamas, was the guest
preacher at Christ E'piscopal
CIhurch, 3481 Hibiscus St..
Coconut G;rove, Fla.. at the 8
e erdand 4 p.m. services


Jamies Mo~rley of last Street
Southi and~ Iwner of the truck
ras < s clily asphalt praayin
GrToSVenor, ( ourlt ApartmntZIS
on P'araldise Islandl Dnve at 7
p.ntl when thec rear end of his
vehlc~le burst Iito flamnes
With hrndfreds of gallons ,f
highly flammabl~lle liquid asphalt
parkedt onrly a1 few feet f'rom
the aparrtment. Morley called
to hiis two mrenl crew to, Ftand
iclar. andc huinself go~t into his
truck and( drocve It to a deSerted
stretch of roa3d about a 100
yard\ away. Densel flames leapt
30to oz fe nt th ai sh
and lumlped clear

fe g~io n trf < e Para~dit Is e
Security staff was equally alert
Spotting the glow of the fire,


he radioed the island's fire
brigade which quickly arrived
to join Morley aind his men in

th lames aA seon taoar nn '
sent o~ut. bringing additional
help' from the Nassau Fire
D~epartmernt. T`he firefighters
fought the flames for over an
hour
The truck~was valued at ov~r
$10,000. It was c~omplltely
destroyed .
As he surveyed the
smnouldering, twisted ruins of
his vehicle. Mlorley was
comnplimecnted by onlookerrs


time to think of the personal
danger," he said h" here wa n't

realized what I'd escaped
fromt"


SEx raAdderl y, Minisdter t
report which appeared on the

Guardia auno e the sen ing
"Senate Meets Today."
STle: reportsail;
"The Bahamas Senate meets
today at 10 am, at which time
a marathon debate is expected

Appr pranions Bill.th 93
The Bill, passed
unanimously in the House of
Assembly last Thursday, was
read for a first time earlier that
day in the Senate although
the Bill had not been officially
passed through the Hlouse.
Sen. Adderley told the

i am n one of t oseewho


cmes toothe facts we hae a


the news. N~ tc eot


purported to say a bill was read

cam er b fe itmwasinpasts
in the House. That is not the
fact. That was just not true. It
was passed by the House
before its presentation in this
chamber.
"I would merely say that the
(British) parliament from
which we derive a great deal of
our rules has very severe
penalties to deal with matters
of this kind."
Senate President Cash said
"I am indeed grateful to the
Leader for drawing to the
attention of the Senate the
report in this morning's paper.
"I feel the remarks made by
the Leader are entirely
justified, and those reporting
the news, particularly in
relation to procedures in this
body, should be careful and
ascertain the true facts.
"From this report it would
appear the Senate had done
something improper. This is
absolutely untrue. I am
concerned and worried that a
report of this kind would
appear.
"I trust," Sen. Cash said,
"that those responsible would
see to a speedy correction.
"The bill was passed through
all its stages in the House
before it was presented in this
chamber. I would advise those
responsible that a correction be

B EF BOYCOTT BY
JAMAICAN HOUSEWIVES
KINTSTON, JAMIAC`A (AP') -
Flousewives in Kingstn, St.
thr ~lout lamii.c stepc ~
boycott uguinst highl prices of beef
otver the weekend and refusedc to

Th Prtcr Iro~se frcunn theIsr lfii
fcamtto rels msI rets ofC beer wa ~1
bee~f used by the porc* ~r segmenllt s
of the commur~lnity.


FREE PO RT PROTESTERS

EVEN THE CHILDREN GOT into the act Saturday
when 200 of their parents picketed Food Fair and Wynn
Dixie Supermarkets at Freeport to protest rising food
Prices. A Ministry of Finance spokesman said today that a
Ministry representative was expected to fly to Freeport
tomorrow to investigate the allegations. Both stores
reported things quiet today following Saturday's
demonstration.
PHOTO: Erne's Studio


IN FOR REPARlRS
Although Mr David
Sweeting, manager of the
Blue Hill Road depot, denied
that garbage collection had
been affected by these trucks

repis resirde s it the Kem

aRoa ca pla nee b tterl lare
week about the lack of
service .
One householder who went
over to the depot last week to
find out the cause of the

emplb ee totak Id Ioo fa,
hm ilf fur trucks were in

mechanical problems and
althoughl we call we can't


get anyone to come out to fix
them." he was told.
The householder told The
Tribune that he had to take
hlis own garbage to the depot.
He said he drove around his

Sr et a s evenryone stel
garbage ein m "oe n r g

complained about "the filth."
in his area
Mr. Sweeting last week
denied that these areas had
not been serviced for any

ga tageo ma colleect ad fo
Cable Beaahdon Tue days a d

truek was off for a day for'
repairs, but no longer. He said


the Kemp Road, St.
Margaret's and Village Road
areas were also probably
missed "once because of
rWeprs have to service th s
tr uc ks Ms. S 5 in
commented wy wee in(

erxup ksn tw en outs df o ri
for six weeks and another
two for four weeks. But in no
way, he maintained, had this
affected collection. He
expected all trucks to be back

as service byotkodabysebl

re pres en native C dwel
Armbrister (PLP) agreed that
garbage col section was not
what it should be


week that over the last three increasing proportions."


~tto


~ribun~


(ReIstred with Postmaster of Bahama for posage concession within the BahamasJ Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


FNM SENATE LEADER DROPS A BOMBSHELL

IN FIRST DAY OF SENATE DEBATE ON BUDGET






liur n q est cla im s $19 m.


















OPPOSITION LEADER IN THE SENATE, Oril KTurnqu~e~st ,Ais morning challenged Government to deny tun
the 1972 accounts have been completed and show a total revenue for last year of only $93 million, not the $104.5


~Y
'
'

.
r


rS Off ro0 81 ifg 10SCO mjlalinS




I


9


AFTERl $2.5MILLIGH

IAIIIW LASTf WEE(,

AlluI MI~fil IW

I.AllES KISHAPPE8

BU ENOS AIRES ,
ARGENTINA, April 9 (AP) -
Another executive of a foreign
company has been kidnapped,
and the kidnappers were
believed to be left-wing
terrorist groups who collected
$2.5 mmlion in ransom from
American companies last week.
Police said three or four
young people seized Francis
Brimicombe, a 57-year-old
Briton outside his suburban
home Sunday night as he
returned from the golf course.
He is President of the
Argentine subsidiary of the
British American Tobacco Co.
and had lived in the country.
for 30 years.
.An official of the company
said there was no word last
night from the kidnappers, but
it was eieved tey w re
left-wingers seeking another big
ransom to finance their
underground activities.
Two such terrorist groups
extracted $1.5 million from
the Eastman Kodak Co. and SI
million from the First National
Bank of Boston last week in
exchange for the release of two
executives, one of them an
Amenican.
Kodak announced on
Sun ay dna An man dao teu

firm's Argentine subsidiary was
released Saturday night a ter
six days of captivity during
which he reportedly was
treated well.
Like Kodak, the First
National Bank of Boston said it
paid its ransom in dollars and
peeo paked in s atas s.

of the bank's branch in
Rosario, was released
unare on We nesday after


ADeantCruz,s rtois oleavmng
ransom demand, was the first
American taken in nearly 100
kidnapping in the past two
years. His ransom was a record.
Da Cruz was kidnapped by a
*group known as the Liberation 'I
Armed Forces, while Scalmazzi
was grabbed by the People's
Revolutionary Army,a
Trotskyte group. The latter
group also kidnapped a retired
Rear Admiral, Francisco
Aleman, last Monday and said
he would be held until the
Peronist President-elect, Hector
Campora, fulfills his campaign
promise of amnesty for all
political prisoners.
The outgoing military junta
o poses the am ety, and h

after Campora takes office on
May 25.


2 Whot artitma


EFFECTIVE APRIL 1 1 1973 ALL
UNAUTHORIZED VEHICLES PARKED IN
THE RESTRICTED AREAS AT FREEPORT
INTE RNATI ON AL AI REPORT WI LL BE
REMOVED AT THE OWNER'S EXPENSE*

GRAND BAHAMA AIRPORT COMPANY LIMITED


DOUBLE MURDERS MAY BE BYOUTSIDER
HAMILTON, BERMUDA (AP)--The Soctland Yard detective heading an
investigation into this British island colony's second double murder In four
weeks said Saturday the killers might have been outsiders.
Police said the two victims of Friday night's murders Victor Rego,
ers4 aO an MrthDe 2 ch r sistv snpsand the shot and killed by
Police Commissioner L. M. Clark said "these were the most vicious, cold
and callous murders that have ever occurred in Bermuda."
Scotland Yard's Chief Supt. Bill Wright said the murders were "too
brutsi we believe, foron Be mudian to hae committed them. It could well
Rego and Doe were counting the money from Friday sales were the
anles struck, police said. It was not known how much loot they made
The bodies of Rego and D~oe, his accountant, were discovered about 9
p.m. by a member of the Rego family who became concerned when Reso
did not come home at the normal time, Clark reported
IHEY MOURN PICASSO'S PASSING
LONDON (AP)-- British artists paid profound homage to Pablo Picasso
Sunday, the day of his death at 91.
of lpo n Hstnay tcoraidr hS anish-born pa nto 'obablyrwas oe
master. 'Picasso was a remarkable phenomenon and changed the way
people see things,' Moore said. He added that artists 40 years younger than
Picasso had been Influenced by him.
Sculptress Barbara Hepworth said: 'We think of Pcasso's Ilfe as a light
gongaou but taken as a matter of light years It's not gone out, it's an
Sir John Rothenstein, who organized a major exhibition of Picasso
works at the Tate Gallery in London 13 years ago, described the painter as
beyondd coSplariaon the most original genius on the century.' (e SIEE

HIGH'S 12TH FACT-FINDING TRIP TO INDO-CHINA
SAN CLEMENTE, CALIF'ORNIA (AP) -The Western White House
announced President Nixon is sending army general Alexander Haig to
Cambodia and three other S u hast Asian nations fotr an assessment of tthe
prompted by administration concern over military activity around Phnom
Penh, Cambodia.
Haig also will visit Laos, Thailand and South Vietnam before returning
to Washington next Thursday

NO U.S. GROUND FORCES FOR SOUTHEAST ASIA
SAN CLEMENTE, CALIf;ORNIA (AP)--Presidential News Secretary
Ronald Ziegler said the United States has "no plans. no interest and no
desire to reintroudce U.S. ground forces in Southeast Asia." Ziegler spoke
in response to newsmen s questions as he announced the White House is
sending General Alexander Haig for a close look at the situation.
PEACE KEEPING; HELICOPTER STRAYED OFF COURSE
SAIGON (AP)--The Viet Cong asserts that the peace-keeping helicopter
that was shot down this weekend In South Vietnam near the Laotian
border had strayed IS miles off course. According to the Communists, It
had entered an area often overflown by South Vietnamese reconnaissance
craft. All nine persons aboard, including two American civilian pilots and
two Viet Cong liaison officers, died.
The other victims were a F'ilipino crewman, one Canadian, one
Indonesian and two Hungarians. A second helicopter of the International
Com isin tnor t on ho andtSnu a r rs n Ladr to have landed safely in


dP NM PEN (aP-Respl FI n I hav a ri edt inP n Ph
into Cambodlan territory from south Vietnam. Two other vessels one
Talwanese and one Filipino were destroyed. The fate of their crews is

the t10 Cammbon l sn dk le iet wa tda nto soe te arrival o
first convoy In 20 days. All seven major highways linking the capital with
outer provinces have been cut by insurgent forces.
INDIA ASSUMES CONTROL OVER SIKKIM
NEW DELHI (AP)--The Indian government formally assumed full
control over the administration of the disturbed kingdom of Sikkim, in
response to a written request from the Choglyal, its ruler, it was officially
annonca Gajan, k1n ica pt it cal ofleer in Sikkim, told a news
conference in Gangtok that the Chogyal had also asked the Indian
government to assign an officer to head the Sikkim's administration.
Until the officer arrived. Bajpal would be in charge of the
adMinitratdlon. The takeover became effective at 1300 hours local (0730
The political officer said New Delhi acceded to the Chogyal's request,
"In the laterest of the early restoration of law and order and tranquility,,
in the strategic state.
NIGHT OF TERROR IN PAPHOS
PAPHOS, CYPRUS (AP) -This small Cyprus town was Hittered with
wrecked cars and debris from shattered shop windows and houses Sunday
adhera25 bomb attacks durn nn~tf hn he. d fcasate wre reon d b"
attributed to Groups who oppose the antigovernment underground
movement of Gen. George G~rivas, which wants to unseat President
Ma svesr an acsh eve NdIS muojion) whoGntern Elsewhere on the
Pa lve hocugh~ a terrible night o error,"dsaid Kdyrlao Sapr s te n
Sageas' lys al fally car at his front door was blown to bits and nine
other aso wrplwrecked. An dten simps in the marketplace were shattered
carpeted with broken glass and all 12 of the town's street sweepers were
onlted tat a kks eel ainst supporters of the Enosis movement or
an ner of ah governments on ositio ," sad Andonis Kalogirou, General

PRESIDENT THIEU SEES P.M. HEATH ON TUESDAY
LONDON (AP)- President Nguyen Van Thieu of South Vietnam arrives
in London Tuesday for talks with Prime Minister Edward Heath centering
on Salgon's claims of Communist violations of the cease-fire in the
war-torn country.
Strict security precautions were ordered at Heathrow Airport for the
President's visit, which is expected to last only aI few hours.
Thies is arriving from Rome after previous visits to West Germany and
the United States where he conferred with President Nixon.
LONG-DELAYED REPORT OF SUCCESSFUL OPERATION
MOSCOW (AP)- The Communist party newspaper "Pravda" reports
that noted American heart specialist Michael de Bakey performed a
successful operation on the president of the Soviet Academy of Sciences,
and U.e p r says the Rusa scientist is back at work. Akdmabdout the
two months a e.


Has a full service branch

On ThoR~pSO BOUllVald in the

Oakes Fiekl Shcgaping Centre.






Bring your banking

business to Barclays today














Open; 9.30 -3 Mon. to Thur.

9.30 5 on iRidays.


V OOS FOM O
WONDERFUL SELECTION
OF GIFTS FROM
THE ORIENT












~a I

Bast ofI1 RasnS. ettoCieeVlaeR)icefou
g g (g $ySret asaBaaa -P.2-19


I


Ik~k ---- 1 --- ~-- I --~I -~-' -~-- ~---~-~--~ -~- -~-L~~ ---~ -' - ~- _


j


painting,
The Spanis h- born
revolutionary who changed the
course of 20th century art died
Sunday at has walled estate
overlooking the Mediterranean*
Death was attributed to a heart
attack brought on by
collection of fluid mn the lungs.
I uneral arrangements have
not yet been announced.
Picasso had been reported in
good health and working with
his usual zest despite recurrent
attacks of grippe during the
winter. He recently completed
arrangements for the showing
in Avignon next month of all
his paintings produced since
1970, a total of 201 canvases,
Saturday night, the artist
and his wife, Jacqueline,
entertained friends at dinner.
Picasso was reported in high
spirits, eating heartily and
entertaining his guests with
stories. After heo guests left, he
went to hs s ak oo wor d
When he aw kened Sun ay
morning, he complained of a
pain and his wife called a
doctor. Blut by the timlet he
arrived dearnnu es laer,
Picasso was ded
Picasso died among one of
the greatest troves of 20th
century art ever amassed in
private hands.
GREATEST COLLECTION
He was the greatest collector
of his own works, releasing
nly a smal I rt sof his pnr if c


were stacked away in a
strongroom built onto his
two-store ehro~m Hen Ie th

only a few outsiders ever had a
look at his hoard. What
disposition he made of this
collection in his will was not
knOWn yet.
Estimates of Picasso's wealth
weeconsidered the wildest
sort of guesswork, but he was
undoubtedly one of the richest
artists who ever lived, and
probably the riichest.h dl
Te art st s rewdl
contri uted to this by selling
only about 40 canvases a year

IR Wln 7 gg


LIFTED F OM



BELFAST (AP)- Northem
ireland's guerrila fighters were
ceport re rean thea way wear
pl inet oftheloupolitia narm is

Irish ul blicue Aom esald a r
could be announced at Easter -
providing the British odoperate. te
IRA's dieharrd 'Provisionall' wing,
said its bomb-and-bullet campaign
would end immediately after
British authorities ift thpik han on
the Sinn Fein political section.
"The Provisionalls don't want the
fight to go on indefinitely," one
Informant said. "But some sort of
gesurse st kom f I etn fot e
outlawed Ilst could be the required
sesture."
Any British gesture, however,
seems likelyt he d terisiv coof r
before," a senior military officer
commented.
The British say the guerrillas
dumrto negru d nd rtrreuin.a A
the same time, they embarrassed
Secretary of State William Whitelaw
by disclosing that he had held
secret negotiations with their

the senior officer said. "In any case
hpeotectanntsfel h s giingletay th
IRA demands.,,
ladicetion asf go la rews ree o
the IRA to lay down its weapons
and switch to political activity in its
campalg ro envctre nd Brit anho
Republic la the? South,
Suggort for the IRA seems to be
dwindling as'nong the Roman

potc Ifo the Potr an ;
repeatedly have urged a cease-fire.

sppr th Poe on 1il hv
no alternative but to declare a
truce."
The e aistno immediate tetup*


taken at least 768 lives since 1969.
The IRA provisio~nals admitted
setting off a land mine that blew up
Samuday nigatt kilirng aw Agg is
soldiers.
Early Sunday, troops shot dead
an 18-year old youth and seriously
va ase an o e in sre h

opened fire on one of its foot
patrols.
fIn th Cathodcsim~ower Hals are
hurt in the blast of aI 10-pound
in onbe pcr pa romlibng soldes Th
boys were not seriously injured.


Frank D. Register, executive
director of the National
Association of Retail Grocers,
summed up the week-long
boycott by saying: "It could
cause a temporary dislocation
in the supply and demand
situation, but it doesn't alter
the basic fact that production
of meat is not increasing as fast
as the consumption."
Consumer groups said the
boycott was a success in
showing the power of the
average citizen, but agreed that
it did not lower prices
substantially and said further
steps were needed.
One week wasn't long
enough, said Mary Conti, a
leader of Stop Stay Together
on Prices a boycott group
in the Philadelphia Area.
"What we're talking about is
a reseducation process," Mrs.
Conti said. "It will take a while

to convince people they just
don't need to eat so much red
meat."
The Stop Group is starting a
Dial-a-Meal service with
volunteers giving telephone
callers recipes for meatless
menus
John L. Huston, vice
president for beef programmes
of the national livestock meat
board, said meat slaes may
have dropped, but people
bought more of other item .



switched some of their buying
to fish and poultry, prices have
nret tupmconsiderably in the
DOWN 40 PERCENT
A spokesman for Pathmark
Supermarkets, with 99 stores
along the east coast from
Philadelphia to New England,
said meat sales throughout the
chain dropped 40 per cent
during the boycott. 'There was
no blanket lowering of our
meat prices," he said, "because
wholesale prices of meat did
not come down."
Farmers withheld livestock
from market last week, cutting
supplies at some stockyards by
as much as 60 per cent and
causing concern that there will
be a serious shortage of red
meat in upcoming weeks*
President Nixon imposed
prie celn onm bef, lmb an
the processor, wholesaler and
rtie a- not the farmer or
Several boycott groups
urged meatless Tuesdays and
Th rsddays fore a n eint

Rosenthal, (D-N.Y.) said
repres ntatives ou consumer
oganiain ol go
together in Washington on
Wednesday to discuss future
plans.
Jac q ue yn Ken all,
co-director of National
Consumers United, said
"before we even got into this
thing our organization did not
think it would have a long-term
effect of keeping prices down.
col problem is much more
She said the boycott was "a


symbolic thing, a show of force
and consumer outrage to let
the President know that we're
just sick and tired of what's
going on and something has to
be done."
National Consumers United
has urged the federal
government to stop serving
meat in cafeterias in its office
buildings, military installations
and other facilities.
'The government purchases
more meat than anybody,"
Mrs. Kendall said. "If they cut
out meat at lunchtime, the
supply could be increased
drastically across the country."
Spokesmen for several stores
said they were surprised at the
ef fectiveness of the boycott
SURPRISED
"I didn't think it would
affect us much," said the
manager of a Thriftway Market
in Kansas City, but "we're
down 45 to 50 per cent on
meat and 10 per cent on
~over-all grocery items."
Tom Violanti, owner of the
Holl wood market in Royal
Oak, Mich., said, "I lost about
25 per cent of my business
and that amounts to a few
th uad dollars I am
surprised at the outcome of t
boycott. I was not worried at
the beginning, for I did not
think shoppers would stick to
it u he did ',
it, tt ager of a Clawson,

sich supermarket sdohehhad

surprised at the shoppers," he
sad
s I thought the woulgo g t

without meat.
Spokesman for Buttreys
Meat Market in Helena, Mont.,
disagreed. "People bought like
mad the week before the
boycott, probably to stock uP
enough to tide them over," he
said. The spokesman said
Buttreys sales during the
boycott were down only 10
per cent from normal; the
week before the boycott, he
said, sales were up 10 to 15 per
cent.
Wholesalers butchers,
meatpackers and processors _
were among the most seriously
affected. Union officials
estimated 20,000 meat cutters
in seven states were laid off
during the boycott as both

met de rase mandd the sl
that when reports are in from
all 550 s ates the total could rise

Farmers argued they wer
not to blame for high food
costs.


from his huge output so as not
to depress the market. There
were many years in which he
took in more than a million
dollars.
CHILD GENIUS
Born in Malaga, on the south
coast of Spain, Picasso was a
child genius who seemed to
never stop imagining new ways
to present his universe. He
mastered representational art,
invented cubism to give new
dimension to painting, then
turned to distortion, with the
face and body taken apart and
then reassembled in accordance
with his own vision. Despite
the wide appeal of his
representational work in his
Blue and Rose periods, it is the
distortions that the public
generally associates with his
name.
"In my case a picture is a
sumn of destructions" Picasso
said in an interview in 1935. "I
make a picture --then I
destroy it . .a picture is not
thought out and settled
beforehand. While it is being
done it changes as one's
thoughts change. And when at
is finished it goes on changing
according to the state of mind
of whoever is looking at it,
Picasso's new view of his
subjects led to vehement
criticism and controversy. His
paintings were called ugly and
unworethyhof the wnoardt art


understand art. Why not try to
understand the song of birds?
ehydoes ecme th e thea n gt
one, without trying to
understand them? But where
art is concerned people think
they must understand it.
WON ARGUMENT
In the end Picasso won the
argument, a success with the
critics, the general public and
the museums and wealthy art
buyers who could afford his
prices.
Picasso first came to France
in 1901 and settled in Paris in
1904. He made frequent visits
to his native Spain until the
end of the Spanish Civil War,
when he vowed never to return
as long as Generalissimo
Francisco Franco was in
power.

love oo tlee s ni ht poleo wt
the gift in 1970 of 900 of his

ben f undedm Tim hi aoo Md
Barcelona. And he gave his
anti-war masterpiece inspired
ytlhe Fascist bombing in t e
"Guernica," to the people of
Spi dwath ted% civil liberties have been
restored." Meanwhile, it
remains in the Museum of
Modern Art in New York
where it has been on loan since
1939.
P ic asso joined the
Communist Party in 1944, but
never participated actively in
party affairs. He told an
interviewer in 197 We

poor and very aware of how
people had to live. I learned
that the Communists were for
the poor people. That was
enough to know. So I became
for the Communists."
MANY MISTRESSES

an bet een ismmarr dges ha
a series of well publicized
liasons. He married Olga
Khoklova, a ballet dancer, in

1 ul, Sbeore t my dritend
apart in the late 1920s.
His wife was succeeded by
Marie-Therese Walter, who
bore him a daughter, Maya, in
1935. Dora Maar was the
painter's next mistress, and she
wans scceedned iu 1944t by
I 1-year liaison she had a son
Pn oa daughter, Claude and
Jacqueline Roque became
Picasso's last mistress in 1955,
the year his wife died, and he
married her in 1961, when sle


was 35 and he was 79.


Vl[T C~Igg $gggT FURTHER STEPS NEEDED


PICASSO DIES, AGED 91


The world's greatest, son conission Week-lon meat
RETPICILEH HINE 8


,


AIbARI KILLIs
SAIG ON (AP)- A
Helicopter carr yin g
peacekeeping officials was shot
down Saturday after it was
reported to have wandered off
course over Communist-held
territory. All nine passenger
died.

"dehpe r ge" Sounnday x the
loss of the American-piloted
International Commission of
Control and Supervision
aircraft.
A South Vietnamese
military sokesman claimed it
was sho down by Communist
ground fire, and an ICCS
official said the helicopter was
.it b a missile, pbably
Rsinmde S ro ya
u ssicomad he io ter carrying
peacekeeping delegates landed
safel ts 10 pa snger and to w
were taken to Gio Linh, 40
miles away the Viet Cong said
here '
claed 17et hon nopStatemeln5
miles off its approved flight
path, entered an area often
overflown by South
Vietnamese reconnaissance
aircraft and "met an accident."
Communist forces dug in
along the banks of the Mekong
River, meanwhile, ambushed a

Iel to cth v mabdian cp tad
of Phnom Penh, setting two
shi s ablaze '
Five vessels, sailing under an
umbrella of U.S. warplanes, got
through the ambush and were
created in Phnom Penh by
hundreds of excited

Cambdoodianother ships turned


kae odhe anth a eptb t
run the 60-mile gauntlet


Ch u
Tan Chau itself was hit
several times by Communist
rocket fire, apparently aimed
at the ships. Cambodian
refugees streamed across the
border into South Vietnam
where authorities were said to
be turning many back
The official North
Vietnamese government
newspaper said President Lon
Nol's a administration in
Cambodia "js going to collapse,
even though the United States
is concentrating its air power"
there to save it
CAPITAL IN DANGER
In an editorial broadcast
Sunday by Radio Hanoi, Nhan
Dan said the situation in

deht romated tht the sUnite
States is considering an
eagec a rit utoF save the
'The air power the United
States is using latest the
B52s mans Fi s will no b
able to gain victory, but only
defeat," Nhan Dan asserted.
The four ICCS delegation
chiefs went into an emergency
session in Saigon Sunday night.
Prime Minister Pierre Elliott
Trudeau of Canada announced
in Quebec the Canadian
contingent will not pull out u
a result of the incident.
The other members of the
International Commission of
Control and Supervision ar
Hungary, Indonesia and
Poland.
An ICCS official reported
the military chiefs of the four
delegations were in Gio Linh
but had not yet received Viet
Cong permission to visit the

e )1e in the do ned airft
pilot ad Filin cem,
onetCanadian, oeipolvnesian;
two Hungarians and two Viet
Cong liaison officers.


The two Air America
helicopters, flying for ICCS
and carrying ICCS markingts,
disappeared over rugged
mountains near the Laos
border while on a flight from

HTheyL wr o an authorized
recon naissance mission in

co ce k ein itha sie gatus;
Bao to check on the flow of
Communist troops and war
material into South Vietnam in
accordance with the Paris
Peace Agreement.


and richest artist



By Michael Goldsmith
MOUGINS, FRANCE, April 9 (AP) Art Lovers around the
world today saluted the genius of Pablo Picasso, dead at 91 after
one of the most noble and influential casters in the history of


boycott ian US



By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BUTCHERS, BUYERS AND SUPERMARKET MANAGERS
looked back Sundsy on the nationwide most boycott nd
planned future food cea trategy.


MERCHANTS CONCERNED AT SPATE OF DOWNTOWN FIRES
KINGSTON. JAMAICA (AP)- Merchants in downtown Kingston are
perturbed at the spate of fires which haew boken out In that section of the
city since last Saturday. Some twelve fires causing estimated damages of
the arlteri million (Jamaican) dollars have been reported during the

Winston Meeks, president of the Jamaks Chamber of Commerce said the
matter will be discussed at an executive meeting of chamber on Tuesday.
Commissioner of police Jack Middleton, sweenwhile, said police patrols
will be stepped up in the area.
Thne blaners haew seen accompanied by looting, in some cases, and by th.




I I II ,


_ __ _~__


Monday, April 9, 1973


Bhe Gribune
Nvunxus ADMUTUvS RARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Mlaster
LEON E. H DU PUCH Publisher/Editor I 903 I 914
SIR ETIENNE DUfPUCH, O.B.E.. K.C.S.G., D Litt.. LL.D.
Pubidsher/Editor /917-972
Contributing Editor I 972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON.M.Sc., B.A.. LL.B.'
Publishr/rEditor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (IS Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Monday, April 9, 1973


20 3M E3 ENNAt 13.50

BUY YOURSE LF ONE ALSO Y OU' LL BE GLAD YOU DID!




P. O. BOX N-4806 TE LEPHONE 2-8941-5


2 : ---** -



SALIGARO 0 SHO AT B C

paSPECisA SN cWos SMraE. P. T Ilorno ened an exhbition o
Victoria Room of the Sheraton British Colonial Hotel. Part of the
proceeds of the sales of paintings by the young artist will be in
aid of the ninth Bienniel Conference of the Caribbean Federation

an 5 stia H alth to hl in n ssa I i Jl From his fist
those of Aristotte Onassis and the National Geographic Society in
Washington, D.C. Others who own paintings by Saligaros are Lorc'
Grey, former Governor of the Bahamas, Mr. Harry Oakes, the late
Stisfford Sands Prime Minister Lynden Pindling and Mrs. Helen
Shown from left: Mr. & Mrs. E. P. Taylor, Miss Sandra Dean,
president of BMHA and Mr. Saligaros.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette


Incdrint lly e dw mn bibecaus in Jea aia. e mrag t to ask the
reason but it was evident that they are not allowed inl the island.
******+****
On the other hand, the business community, who are near to
the reality of things, are not so cheerful.
A Jamlaican newspaper friend of miine who declared he could
not leave the island when he retired has changed his mind. 110 is
going to miake aI home in England.
Another senior newspaper mnan mn the island is now seriously
thinking about leaving.
One of the problems for people of means who have been
accustomed to travelling, is that only 250 pounds sterling a year
is granted for travel.
They want to be free to live beyond thle reach of this kind ot
pressure.
*********
And so .... there you are ... the glories of independence are nlot
so rosy after all.


The Condition upo OU ic Gd hthO AYv liberty to man3 is
eternal vigilance; which condition if he break. servitude is at o~nc~e
the consequence of his crime and the purushment of his guilt.
*****JOHN PHILPOT CURRAN.

The D~odo never had a chance. H~e seems to have been invented
f;in the sole purpose of' becoming extinlct and that was all he was
good for WILL CUIPPY.


4 Reasons Wh













to~rcmtr, Lowest fares. For lust $38, OIA w II fly you
round-trip between Nassau and Miami on our one day fare. And our
21-day round-trip excursion fares are just as attractive: $42 Nossau-Miomi
and $32 Freeport-Miami. These three fares are the lowest of any airline.

2. Better equipment. We fly the BAC-111, the world s most reliable
short-haul, pure-let aircraft. With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can
stretch out

3. Better service. Beautiful Bahamian stewardesses to see to your every
need. And a complimentary rum punch to ref resh you.

4. More convenient schedules. Three non stop flights daily from Nossau.
8:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M. 8:00 P M. And one at 10:30 A.M. which makes a stop
In Freeport. Plus one direct flight daily from Freeport to Miami at 11:30 A.M.
Returning flights are lust as convenient.

Remember, lowest fares. Better equipment. Better service. More convenient
schedules. That s Out Island Airways. So call your travel agent or Out
Island Air ways now for reservations. 7 8222.



Outsla~ndAirways serves thesuohmassest


Zght Qributme


This of course i\ my~ own
chory for su~ccess
Let us return to our
analysis: 'T~he government
denies that It is fo~rclngg the
editor to sell at all. to sell at
half price or to close down.
Literally, this is probably
tmue. As I see It, the choice to
continue running! the ~Tribune
or to sell out o~r to close down.
is solely thait ofI Sir L~tienne
Dupuch.
Itowever. wrhat L~ynde~n
Oscar Pmndllnc carefully'
omitted to .1dd( 1\ that Sir
Etienne does\ no(t have a free
hand to dispose oft his business
utt e pleas. pr) ed urhat'e
government. In other words, as
I interpret it, he must not only
be Bahamnian, but he mlust be
the RIGHT' 1 KINI)u of Hhamnian
one whio will remoudel the
fTribune's editorial policy along
fle lines o~f the curiously
'.lneritical NaSsau1 Guardian or
the sy co phanltiC Radio
Bahamias.
".. we do not wish to see
the TIribune It seh Tm ( cus

Press might wake up and take
notice if that were to, happen.
Ilow much tidier It would be
to complete the hat 1tric'k by
having t he ownership
transferred to 'symlpathetic
hands.
I.nfourtu~nately Mr the
government. however. Sir
litienne is a ma~n of principle
(LOI' for the meraning of
princec lu 0las dee hgaep v

Golden Rules outlined above
may not be capable of
application in this case.
Sir litienne has repeatedly
said that he refuses to tell what
he knows to the World P'ress.
TIhere Is really no need ftor him
to do so. It Is commnion
knowledge that several of the
large nwpaeper gr<^tis emplo
true situation ini the Bahamas
today is so self-evident that it
would not take such a reporter
long to gather the information
required for a f'irst-class expose
which would make hiis
reputation and destroy the
credibility of the present
Bahamas government in
international circles forever.
American e itors, p ease 11 tc


EDITOR, The TIribune
Mr. Pindling is reported as
saying in the Hlouse: "The
government denies any
harassment whatsoever o~f the
Tribune. The government
denies that it is forcing the
editor to sell at all, to sell at
half price or to close down."
"..we do, nolt wish to see
the Tribune close.
This must surely rate as the
Quote of the Year and a
ma sterpiece of political
doubletalk. It certainly will not
go unnoticed by the members
of the business community
(present or would-be) with

hahvembete t yin to ieestabm s
the credibility of his
government by means of his
recent C:abinet reshuffle.
Unfortunately, Mr. Prime
Minister, many businessmen
are rather more cynical and less
gullible than you apparently
believe. This bralzen distortion
of the facts, which has been
attributed to you, will serve
only to strengthen the beliet
that you have been fully
congnizant throughout af the
mnanoeuvring which has been
tkng plascs sreemitly, with the

Immigration Dept.
Let us analyse your words:
'The government denies any
harassment whatsoever of the
Tribune.'
Mr. Prime Minister. if the
BAHAMIAN owner of a
BAllAMIAN business decides
that, foi the de el rment a d

requires persons with special
skills and experience, is it not
highly probable that he will
first seek a suitably qualified
person among his
fellow-Bahamians? Only when
it is evident that such a person
does not exist locally will he
cast his eyes elsewhere and

epkatriahe servi hs all t e
necessary attributes.
Then comes the crunch. L
bsinessa na ple sfo m dWol

some junior or senior civil
servant, who may never have
set foot inside a newspaper
office in his life, that the
Immigration Dept., in its
infinite wisdom, has decreed
that it is quite unnecessary to
'1 I elB~


recruit someone with years of
practical experience and that
he should train a Bahamian (in
presumably a few short
months) to do a job that it has
taken the expatriate a lifetime
to learn.
If this 'harassment',
Mr. Prime Minister, I politely
suggest that either you do not
know what your government
departments are do~inu or that
you are In need or acquiring a
good dictionary.
Of course, the persecution
of the TIribune is only the tip
of the iceberg. One does not
have to be c~lairvoyant to see
t ea same pthr 0 nt being
business commnunity.
IHere are a few simple rules
as I see it on 'Illow to Succeed
in Business Without Really

(trIng~irstly, the would-be
executive must he Bahamian
(black, of course) and staunch
PLP.
2) Next. select1 the business
you wish to a~cquir~.
3) Arrange for Iimmnigration to
apply pressure to the owner by
declining to renew the Work
Prmitts Pe rm its f or expatriate
replacement t~
4) Arrange financing with the
XYZ bank.
5) Approach the owner of the
crumbling business with an
offer to buy at a sacrifice price.
6) Complete the purchase and
install yourself and a few

reo stitutr n Boast toe
Directors
7) Advise Immigration of the
necessity of having experienced
expatriate staff to run the
business (since YOUl don't
know anything about it).
Immigration will be so
enamoured by the lucid
presentation urancasun eniable
number of Work Peirmits will
be immediately made available

8)St back in your plush office
and let your expatriate staff
run the business successfully
for you while you occupy your
mind with the weighty
problem of what to do with all
the profits which are pouring
in.


RO YAL G GUEST AT LY FO DCA Y
ROYAL GUEST His Royal Highness, Bernhard, the Prince of the N~etherlands spent
two days in Nassau to meet with members of "The 1001", a special group of influential
persons from around the world who had been specially invited by the Prine to meet and
support the World Wildlife Fund of which he is international president. Before flying to
New vork Thursday morning he played nine holes of golf He is seen above with Mr.
Charles de Haes, the Prince's honorary assistant on conservation matters, Commander
Rick van der Lee, A.D.C., and M. de Meir, general manager of KLM in Menico. The Prince
is pointing with his golf club. PO : nr Togod
.-k ~
-, i





***i* 'b

newI
--- c
CICd I


ByETIENNE: DUPUCH
KINGSTON. JAMAICA, APRIL 4 On Saturday I said that so
many planes were flying into Montego Bay that the island must
be having a bumper tourist season.
Apparently I was wrong because the news on Jamaica T.V.
tonight reported that the tourist season had fallen far short of
what had been expected.
The reason for the fall off in travel at the start was attributed
to bad publicity in the American press and to moderate weather
in the New York area.
Reports coming from all directions suggest that the entire
Caribbean area ... and when I say Caribbean I mean to include
Nassau and Bermuda .... have earned a dark image in the eyes of
the American, Canadian and English travelling public who are the
principal visitors in this area.
Vicious happenings like the assassination of the Governor of
Bermuda and his A.D.C., the unprovoked shooting of tourists in
the Virgin Islands, the kidnapping case in Freeport, rape of
foreign women, acts of violence generally and an arrogant
attitude by a formerly friendly people, have all combined to
cause island resorts to lose most of their charm for the traveller.
Remember ... it is the people who make or break a country.

There is another factor, of course. It is so easy and so cheap to
go to distant places nowadays that it is no longer a great
advantage to be near the American market from which most of
the tourists are drawn.
Europe is now within the reach of working people and
certainly this area would provide a great attraction for people
who are interested in history and the arts .... and also good
service and good manners.

This must be the beginning of the summer season for Jamaica.
While we were~ waiting for our plane in the airport at Montego
Bay I went to a shop that displayed local products. I asked one of
the clerks whether they did a good business in the shop.
She said that they did very well in the winter but now the
sununer season is starting there was practically no business,
"Most of the summer tourists are black people," she said
without showing any emotion. "They come in large groups. They
have no money to spend."
I find the Jamaicans in public places of this kind very
unemotional. They are polite but they wear a mask on their faces.
During our entire stay in Montego Bay I was unable to raise a
single smile from anyone.
They went out of their way to make us feel that we were
:dnte c r th ilndr ddu ta hc .war sy that we left .. .
All their statements are matter-of-fact. You can't read in their
faces how much they really mean what they are saying.
m he girl Sin te shonC h n lyn trated haterbltaek peor le blad ano
on the island or not was not revealed either in this black girl's
face or in the inflection in her voice.
This is by contrast with people in the samne position in Nassau.
I was at a hotel on Paradise Island some months ago when a large
group of black tourists were leaving the hotel.
The coloured girls and boys behind the reception desk were
lagif an hea en sa ongnthemselive I could read on their
"You seem happy," I commented to one of the girls as I passed
through the lobby. I was sure I would get a reaction .... and I did.
"Yes," she said. "We are glad to see these people go. They have
no money to spend, they are loud, they make a nuisance of
themselves, and they keep spending people away."

By comparison with the g and sphisticated young working
people in Nassau I get the impression that people of the same
class here are not very happy. They don't seem to be sure of
themselves. They are polite, they give service but they don't
rsode li any attempt todraw them out mna c Iversation. You
Our young people in the Bahamas have travelled and they are
very fashion conscious. The girls you see in the hotels and on the
streets in Nassau are all well-groomed. The young men are
well-dressed. They walk with an air of confidence. Our girls are
really pretty.
But one does not get a feeling of great uplift here and this is
understandable when it is realized that nearly 25 per cent of the

unmp oed.iA great man f those who a pl ye earn va y

(al fr dy's editorial it was stated that "Jamaica has several
hundred unemployed people." This was a typographical error. It
should have read "Jamaica has several hundred thousand
unemployed people).
****+******
This is the thing that disturbs me about our people in the
Bahamas. They don't realize how fortunate they have been. They
don't realize that they had been the envy of the world. The new
generation of our people are too young to remember that it isn't
so long ago when poverty stalked our islands and our people had
:no future ahead of them.
Because they have lost touch with the past they don't realize
that only a thin line separates them from the poverty that
haunted their fathers. Its dark spectre is still lurking just around
the corner.
*+*********
It's really amazing how easily people are fooled.
A courteous taxi driver took care of us in this city. We liked
him Hel anu to rtoengage him fo our entir either butwht

independence is going to do for them.
Jamaica has had independence for ten years and this man was

sthe ws n videoncd ta it ha doedmuc himnso far.
The taxis in Jamiaca are not nearly up to the standard of those
in Nassau. They are in bad condition. This man's car was
particularly bad. It felt like it was ready to drop to pieces but we


HAZARDS FOR THE
M TORISightI thoeucar' re

Mount Royal Avenue and
Madeira Street just look a little
harder, we assure you it's
threligMotorists aproachin
they are right at the corner,
and even then it is difficult as
poincianna branches obscure it
from view. ABOVE: almost
completely hidden and
RraGches a rn the m tr st hae
run over the stop.
PHOTos: Philip Symonette


---


Gill


fhil is DiSffilill


Reader slams PM ' bra ze n


d istorteen of the facts'


G118 I FrielII




I


I I r


___ _


~ ~ ~ I~~ t


ON A WESTING HOUSE BLAC K & WHITEIV .


PRICED FROM JUST $400.


Florence Humphreys No. 5r


dtOilBGOMIltltEil


I


~I~-----~I:- ~:::~: --Y~~I I --'-~~-- - --- -~--'- --~-~~ ~-~-~-----~ 1 ~--~I--TI ~I ~-----II ---II~II


I
L
L

i
1


ABOUT THE FASHIONS
A FASHION SHOW and painting auction was held in the
Nassau Beach Hotel's "Tiki ViIlage" on March 30 to raise
funds for the Bahamas Mental Health Association. Philip
Symonette caught the models at work. At photo No.1 is
Sueanne Dunkley, showing off a slacks outfit with pullover
blouse, sweater and matching clogs. (2) Iris Donaldson,
photo No.2 modefied a colourful floral print wrap-around
skirt with matching halter top, while another floral print,
this time a maxi-length gown, was modelled by Effie
Strachan in photo No.3. Pat Paul modelled the men's wear,
including (in photo No.4 a smart, modern look, check suit,
with a matching vest. Florence Humphreys was also hard at

front, and in photo No.6 a pant suit with dark slacks and a
wrap-around top with a floral pattern.


Monday, April 9 97


_


PUBLIC i
by business and legal~ entalngle-
ments" Anderson said. He added
scholars still debate whether the~
two were guilty as Twain accusedl
themr~lnd if so what their motivesl
eCS~ documents show how. TwaIP;i
detegated his financial and business
affairs to others when they began~
to bore him in later years,
Anderson said. 'They show how he~,
relied overwhelmingly on his!
busin ess associates."
The documents were a gift of:
Mrs. Eugene Ladad-Mocarski and
Mrs. Baryard Schieffelin, both of
New Jersey, granddaughters of'
Twain's brother-in-law.
Anderson estimated the
documents' value between $40,000
and $80,000, although he said it is
difficult to guage.
in the manuscript, Twain himself
predicted what he was writing
would increase in value,


bERPKELEY, CALIF. (AP)-
Mark Twain's final manuscript,
made public Sunday after 62 years,
shows the author kept his wit -
and his temper until the waninS
months of his life.
The 30-page document,
handwritten in clear black writing
on now-yellowed letter paper,
details how the author believed his
secretary and business manager
conspired to swindle him.
The University of California
announced the book-lenth
manuscript has been donated to its
extensive Mark Twain collections
by descendants of the family of the
author, whose real name wars
Samuel Langhorne Clemens. Also
included in the gift were other
papers and some 70 Twain letters.
Twarin finished the manuscript
six months before his death in 1910
at agle 74. In the foreword, the man


who chronicled American life
before the turn of the century
wrote :
"There are three conspicuous
characters In this true tale of mine,
this queer and shabby and pitiful
tale to wit, a pair of degaded
and sufficiently clumsy sharpers*
and I the born ass, their easy
victim."
Twain tell how in 1909 at his
home in Redding, Conn., he began
to suspect his business manager,
Ralph W. Ashcroft. and secretary
Isabel Lyon, of misusing his funds.
Suddenly Ashcroft and Miss
Lyon married and went to Enganmd
for their honeymoon.
On an envelope of a letter from
Ashcroft also included in the gift,
Twain scrawled:
"Letter from a snivelins
hypocrite who is also a skunk*
and a professional liar. It is


precious, t has no mate in polecat
Hterattrae don't let it get lost."
Frederick Anderson, editor of
the U.C. collection which includes
80 per cent of the original Twain
documents, said the last work has
enormous value biographically but
limited value as literature. He
explained In an interview that the
manuscript was meant to be
informal and private-
But Anderson said the papers
give a real sense of the last years in
the Ilfe of the author, showing he
retained his "unrealflable temper
and clarity of wit" until just before
his death*
"This was his final burst of
energy and the last we had of him*
This was Twain's last rocket and it
went off just beautifully."
T~he author's failing health forced
him to retreat after this final
outburst in a life which was marked


r,


Sueanne Dunkley No. 1


Iris Donaldson No. 2


Effle Strachan NO. 3


t


* SELECTED MENU FOR LATE NIGHT DINING
* COMPLETE LINE OF SELECTED WINES AND LIOUOR
* MUSIC FOR DANCING AND LISTENING TO


It'I


Phone 5-32168
FOR RESERVATIONS
ASK FOR MR. TERRY BAIN


BAY &DEVEAUX ST.


OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

CLOSED THURSDAYS


Pat Paul No. 4


C.


n!llllC


*







r

r
,

e
g
n


Ily T~he Associated P'ress
TOD)IAY is MONDAY, April 9th
the 99th day of 19737. There are
266 days left in the year
HIGHIG;I,( HT S in history on third
dat :
1971 King H~usse~in of Jordun
acc~epts a Syrian proposal to, end
two, weeks of fighting with
Ple81stinianl guerrillas in Jordan.
1965 Clashes between Indian
and P'akistan troops on
Kutch-Indian border,
1963 Brtitain's Prime Minister
Wins\ton Ch urchill become!
honoraryu citizen of United States
1960, South African P'remnie
Htendrik Verwoerd is wounded by
IDavid Pratt.
194 United Natio~n,
Internatio~nal C'ourt of Jubtice
dlelive~rs its first decision, holding
Albanlria responsible for inlcide~nts ir
damag~es.
1940 German forces invad~
Norway and Denmark in World WaI
Two.
1942 Ameri Vn-ilipino forces


ABE YA

I MAT ag


FUND












$11.69
Offered Price
As Of
March 6th.. 1973


on Bataan surrender to Japanese.
1928 islam is no, longer
recognized as state religion in
Turkey.
1918 British third army opens
attack against G;ermans at A\rras,
F~rance; Canadian troops launch
attack on Vimy Ridgle in IFrance,
1783 Tippoo of Mysore forces
B~ritish to surrender Bednore.
1691 F:rench forces capture
Mons in Belgium.
1682 La Sallle, F~rench
explorer, reaches the G;ulf of
Mexico after ttravelling down the
Mississippi Rivher.
1609 Spain signs a nine-year
truce with Holland.
1553 Francois Rabelais,
French writer, dies.
TODAY'S BIRTHD)AYS: C'harles
P'ierre Baudelaire, French author
(1827-1867); Nikolai 1Anin,
Russian statesman (1870-1924)


e UKE'S RETURN IGNITES
PARLIAMENTARY ROW
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND (AP)
The Duke of Argyll, 69-year-old
head of Scotland's Clan Campbell,
died in a nursing home here
Thursday, following a stroke
suffered several weeks ago at his
home near Paris.
The D~uke is survived by his
widow, who was his fourth wife,


Castle, the family seat on Loch
Fyne said merely: 'His G;race passed
away this morning.'
The Duke was flown home from
F~rance following his stroke and his
return ignited a row in the House of
Commons.
legitdoa y ll Leftis amLaboudite
the government for a statement on
'1the '?runnan ha inngwhi h t hi
country to reside permanently
abroad to avoid taxration, is allowed
to use the National Health
Thc tIe.uke's son and heir, Lord
L~orne, immediately called the
Scottish lawmakers question 'an
unwarranted and cowardly attack
on my father.'
As a result, he said, he was
considering taking his family Into
evile fenan Rritsain.


C.


' 1


PALMDALE


PHONE 28421


r


ghy Qt Brigggy


FINAL MANWUSCRIPT OF MARK TWAIN MADE


AlliR II


UNDERR NEIW MANAGEMENT)


NOW NASSAU'S MOST DISTINGUISHED LATE NIGHT

RENDEZVOUS 9:00RMI.'TIL 4 A.M.,


THE PAUL HANNA TRIO


, hl~~


CAL L


ALLYR IR PR IN TIN G


2-4267




5s:17222




I I


I~ - - ;;r


.


. .


Momley, April 9, '1973


1


YOU


IS RIGHT FOR


available at


a


PHONE 3-5555


e O BOX N756












I _ ~


Monday, Apnt 9, 19713


furkL~II from 11iann


" ~i 7~1.'a B


NOTICE OF SITTING OF THE PORT AUTHORITY
To cONSIDER APPLICATIONS FOR LICENCES
UNDER
THE BOAT REGISTRATION ACT (CHAPTER 289)

Notice is hereby gciveni tha~t a sitting~ of the Porit Authlc~ rit\ f oll th~ bland1( (1I i\ew
Providence will be held at thle Port Ot~lice oI 'ThIlr-Fdaa ~-l Ap lril Lt 1',73 :l .3 1 nI
for the purpose of' grantingr lice~nces unldcr the~ Boa,;t Regist rationl bI (la~1Ptcr .3')G

Any person entitled and wishing~ to, obhjct to, any appl~llcationr 41houbrt lo so at, leas 1~;
6 (six) days before the dat; \et for~i thet hearinlr by. \Iubmittingl hlis objel~CtIIIn inl wn ting
to The Board of' the Port A2uthority, Nassauo. and by fcr~~l-lrwunhn ,I rcopyli n tlw
objection to the aipplic~ant.


The undernientioned pecrsons ha~ve applliedf for at Irrant of th 10l new.lii spec'lial
below:


Children shouldn't suffer



husband's irritability

By Abigail Van Buren
a rma o cease rrtous~n. v. unws synI e. .
DEAR ABBY: My husband is very hard to get along
with. He is also a very poor sport. I was in my ninth month
of pregnancy with our first child when I started to get
pains. We had planned to go to a football game that day, so
my husband got mad sad laid down on the couch and told
me to wake him up when it was time to go to the hospital.
I kept telling him it was time, but he stalled around
just for spite and I had the baby in the parking lot outside
the hospital.
Another time we took our five kids to Disneyland. My
husband likes to go on all those wild rides but I get dizzy,
so he took the kids while I watched. The big one got a
nosebleed on the Ferris wheeland bled all over my hus-
band's suit, so he gave the poor kid a licking just like it
was his fault.
The reason I'm writing this is because yesterday I
scraped the fender on his car and he got mad and broke my
Yucca tree.
If I weren't pregnant with number six I'd leave him.
Any advice? TRAPPED
DEAR TRAPPED: What's done is done, but you should.
give some thought to turning off the "baby machine." It's
not fair to saddle children with a father Wle that.

DEAR ABBY: I love to cook, but I recently married a
man whose hobby is cooking. Every night he fixes a differ-
ent kind of dinner. He's gone from Chinese to Hungarian to
Italian. I hate to complain, but my hutsband's cooking is
terrible and I can't take much more of it.
How can I tell him to please stay out of the kitchen and
let me do the cooking? UPSET SI'OMACII
DEAR UPSET: Unless you speak Chinese, Hungarian, or
Italan, tell blm in English.

DEAR ABBY: After 25 years of a happy, suburban
marriage in ultra luxurious circumstances, with thre chil-
drea now in graduate schools, my wife and I are undergo-
ing an amicable no-fault divorce because [as she puts it]
"we have nothing in common except the children."
She's already found a future husband Ea former college
friend whom she rediscovered a year agol, has left our
home awaiting the time when she can remarry. No alimony
involved.
Frankly, Abby, I am bored with the sub~urban rat race,
and want to start a new life elsewhere. The question is
where? And with whom?
My children are into yoga, meditation, guru, helping
others, rejecting material things, and status. I am seriously
consideringl adopting their lifestyle.
What do you say about my making such' an abrupt
change in my early 50s? Is this a passing fancy, or would it
be a wise choice for me? And how do I find a partner while
doing so? Or is therapy the answer? REEVALUATING
DEAR RE: Frsnt things first. Don't look for a "parter"
while you try to determine which route to pursue in your
search for peace of mind--which is what yea're after. Get
into therapy and once you find your head yea will know
who yea are, Then you can change your lifestyle if that's
what yea want
DEAR ABBY: I hear they are trying to pass a law
making it legal to let people die just by discontinuing
treatment. They say it will be used so old people who are
incurably sick won't have to linger and suffer after all hope
for recovery is gone.
The thought of this is frightening. WHO will decide who
18 old enough and sick enough?
If you know anything about "euthanasia"--which in
plain English means "mercy killing," please state your
vies. CNE E IN~ MIAMI
DEAR CONCERNED: "Euthanasla" ILterally means
"the good death," and I am all for it. I believe it is cruel
and senseless to prolong IWe by artiflelal means when there
is no hope for recovery.
The right to die with dignity should be everybody's
right. The Eulthanala Education Council [whose meetings 1
have personally attended] in New York, has made available
"A Living Will." It reads as follows:
"To My Family, My Physician, M~y Clergyman, My
LawyercIf the time comes when I can no longer take part
in decisions for my own future, let this statement stand as
the testament of my wishes:
"If there is no reasonable expectation of my recovery
from physical or mental or spiritual disability, I [name]
request that I be allowed to die and not be kept alive by
artificial means or berole measures. Death is as much a
reality as birth, growth, matarity, and old age-it is the one
certainty. I do not fear death as much as I fear the indignity
of deterioration, dependence, and hopeless, pain. I ask that
drugs be merellully administered to me for terminal suffer-
ing even if they hasten the moment of death.


"This request is made while I am in good health and
spirits. Althe this document is not legally binding, you who
care for me will, I hope, feel morally bound to follow its
mandates. I recognize it places a heavy burden of respossti-
bility upon you, and it Is with the intention of sharlag that
reponsibility and of mitig ating any feellags of gallt that:
this statement is made."
81ga decament in the presence of witnesses, and6 give tit
to year family physician, attorney, and-or a member of
perfamiy. [Better yet, obtain three copies, and give each
":(A Living Will" de~mnent may be obtalaed by writin
THE EUTHANASIA COUNCIL
Zs* W. Tsth St.
New York, N. Y. 10019
The document is free, but since this is a nonprofit
organhration, donations from $1 and up are gratefully ac-
cepted. One woman sent 8500 saylags "'I~is i the most
marvelous thing I've ever heard or!" I agree.
DEAR ABBY: Forty years ago I fell in love with my
first cousin. I was 17, and he was 19. Our parents [wisely?]
broke it up.

may 9'm reetlywdowbed, and he' divocd We would
likes to marry as we truly love each other. I am thru
menopause which means there will be no chiklren.
Can first cousins marry in the state of Arzona, where I
live? If not, how about Illinois, where he lves?
WALKING ON AIR
DEAR WALKING: A clergtyman or lawyer in year state
eas quickly give you the yea or the nay.


YIork: U.SS. Compass Islander
mne atd seas. Bahama stair

TIDES

and 12.3 pm w 0 .26 8a.m
and 6:.39 p.m.
WEATHER
W'IND: Southwest to we~st 8
to, 18 m.p.h.
WI ATIlFR: F'air


SEA: Slight to Moderate
oTEMP Min. tonight 75 Max.


SUN
6:S8UN: Rises
6.8p.m.


5:S7 a.m. Sets


MOON
MOON: Rises I1:11 a.m.
Sets 12: 16 a.m.
First Quarter at 11:28 p.m.


Robin Towinlt corporationn,


I'. (). Box 5703




I arry~~ Bu, iirnsie


P.iiic O. E x 5t il79.


"Vincent J. Robin"
85' Tug


"Dolly Wog"
25' boat


Namie and Addtress
of Applica~nt


ofI Vc use1


f low of
I wena
Applialls


M~-iss E-u re ka
55' Wooden Hull


RINI WALS NI WPR VVI, I) I ( 1


NP: 1385 Windijammecrr (`ruises. Ltt.
P'. O. Box 431,
Miami, F:lorida

NP: 1382 Fantome Limnited
c/o Lib Johnson '
Nassau, N.P.
Bahamas.

NP 1349 James Johnson,
Driggs Hill,
Andros, Baham~as.

NP: 1223 Elecuthera Constnruction
&i Gas C'o. Ltl.
Governors H~arbo~ur-
Eleuth era.

NP: 1190 Wilfred Hurt,
c/o P. O. Box 5877 M.S.
Nassau, N.P.,
Bahamas.

NP 1293 Edgar O. Moxely,
P. O. Box N-1947,
Nassau, N.P.,
Bahamnias.

NP: 2171 Nassau Shipyardl Ltd.
P. O. Box N-370),
Nassau N.P.,
Bahamas.

Carib C'ompany Ltd.,
P. O. Box N-3709
Nassau, N..,
Bahamnas.

New England Petroleumn,
825 Third Avenue
New York 10022, U.S.


I9)7' schooner lc~



"Funonic


"Lady Nire"
34' boat


"No Name"
2-12' F-iberglass Boat


Pa~ii. O. Box 5636 .


"No Name"
10' Glassho pper

"the Eleuthera"
I 8' boat


8.3' Hou;t


(;urf~ield Mc(';rtney,
~I;Tarpunia y IV
I lluthera.


"M2argaret1(1 of ~I man
84' BulrCe





I 10' 130~t




"C'aptaini Maxey"
65' ouat




"(orahne c
35' Moto~r fu~e





118' Bar e


RI M:WA LS M ASTERS LICENCES
NEW PROVIDENCE


I enfre'cd (;ib~son
P'. O.. Box N-3675



P'. O). Box 223
Miamii. F-lorida.




Narssau,. Bahiamas c
J a mels W. D~ean

AbumL~(. Bahl~lamS.

W5illiumn Turtle,
P'. O). Box N-663
Nalssau. Bahames,

Verlnon1 A~lbury,

hAbum. Baihamas.

Idtwa r-d La c kh art,




P'. O. 13 oxu 5 22,


Abumii. l~ihabmas




Spanishl Wells,


"F:ileenr C'"
1 1S' tughout


TRANSf R & REN FWAL.S
NI1 WPRO VID F NCE


From: Theadore Knowles
Nassau. Bahamias

To: Gilbert Smith
P. O. Box 16,51
Nassau, Bahamias.

From: Ervin Knowles
Nassaui, Bahamias.

To: Garnet Rolle,
P. O. Box 5693
Nassau, Bahamas.


"(;rouper Ill"
38' Bout


"G;ila
38' bort


NI W APPLICATIONS


NEW PROVIDENCE


From:


Sammey Sawyer,
Nassau, N.P.'
Bahamas.


Naissau. Barhamnas.
(;eorge!c W. YoungI,
P'. O). lIox 458,
NS~isau.. Bahlamas.

WVarw le k Outt n,
TIropiic~al Shlip Co.,
81 Ave~nue,
Lf. Rivie~ra Beach, Florida

P'. O). Box 4407
Nassau. Bu hamnas.
(;eocrge Rubmring,
Ni\aiiau Bahamlas.
Kenlthl H. Wilson
P'. O,. Box 2012, '
Nacssau. Bahamas.
Jamecs Johnson
P. O). Box 8 9 '
Kemnps Bay, Andros
Co`lyin T`. Kemlp.
co PI. O). Box N-1505.
N~raii.u Bahiamus.

lctRodney M. Lockhurt-
P'. O). Box 4174,
NaIssau, Bahamas.

Chlarles G;lidden,
13380 NE 10th Avenue,
Northi Miamli, Florida 3316 I


9)05 South Amierica Way Off "C"
Dodge Island, Miamni, Florida 33 132

Rudo1(lphi Grant
RI ul T'. c10 ut he ra.
Halunnrias.


To: Frank Smith
P. O. Box 569)3,
Nassau, Bahamas

RENEWALS
AD: 6043 Chub Cay Club,
Chub Cay,
Bahamas


"Bahaniia Blule Marlin"
34' boat


G;R EAT H1ARKBOURK C'A Y
"Perdue Dea~n
22' BoneI'jSh boat


"Work Bout,,

"~, Nlc

SI 14' Bonef Iisi h~o t

"No Name "
8' D~ingIy

Mumnild "
32' boat

TRANSFER &: REINEWAL
NEW PROVIDI:NCE


i

I

r
r
L
1
I


: From:
r
r
r
r
r
'To:
r
r
r
r,
r
r
c
r
r
r
c
a r

r
r


i


Renaldo Venturi,
Nassau. Bahamas.


Homer Lowe
P.O. Box 5636,
Nassau, Bahamas


"No N ame ~
-'-14' F-iberglass Boat


"No Name' "
3-10' F-iberglass bort

NtlW PROVIDENCE 1

"J and~ B"


NEW APPLICATIONS
Ronald Nelson Watkins.
Rock So nd
E'leuthera.
Ted Knowles,
P. O. Box 5693
Nassau, Bahamats.


Signed: L. H. FLOWERS,
ACTING PORT DIRECTOR.
DATED 21st MARCH, 1973.


"h` i an ~l


t hg Edh###








Monrday, April 9, 1973


QSb SYRSlfttt


WIE HAVE MIOVlED


.HMPO B .S SOC uS L.


April 10th through 18th

I0:00 P.M. SUN WED
10:00 & 12:00 R M. FRI & SAT
CLOSED THURSDAIIg



TICK HTS $5.50 & $7.50
INGLUDRS ONWI BINIK PLUS TIP
available at

The Pmerald Beach Hotel
Te~lephone 7.8001


Lynn Rogers

Cornelius Bros & sister Rose

Brook Benton

e.,,.. J

0.C. Smith

Billy Eckstine


I _


THE MARRIAGE took
place on Saturday, March 31,


at St. Andrew's Church.
Nassau. between Mr. Allan


Gee, only son of Mr. and Mrs.
R. T. Gee of Rossendale,
Lancashire and Miss Jennifer
Evelyn Mortemiuise, only
daughter of Superintendent
and Mrs. Mortemore of Nassau
'Rnd Wrhng Susx a he
performed the ceremony.
The bride, who was given
away by her father, was
attended by Mrs Addie
Callender as Matron of
Honour, friend of the bride
and the bridesmaid was the

The Hion Mlichael Morris was
the best man.
The ushers were Mr. lan
Mortemore, Mr. Bradley
Callender, Mr. Michael Hulbert
and Mr. Peter 'Topping. The
reception was held at
"Hunraken ', Marlin D~ive and


i*





MASTER
MACKEY STR


ENGAGED
MR. JAME~S F: Logan of
C'leveland Tennessee announces
the engagement and
fortheonunge wedding of his
daughter f~rankie Mae to Mr
Herbert Hugh Tlhompson son
of Mr. and Mrs. Bertie
TIhomlpson of Alic~e Street
Nassau


Miss L~ogan is a graduate of
the University of Tennessee
with a Bachelors of Science
Degree In Transportation and
Business Administration. Mr.
Thompson is the Controller at
Star Insurance Company.
A June 'nd wedding is
planned for the couple.


the honeymoon is being spent
touring Me xico.
The bridal dress was of
'cr white silk organza with
attached chapel train. The
demure neckline, accordian
pleated sleeves and front of
dress were lavishly trimmed
with guipure lace. The triple
Ltiere log ei fllfrm


gL SU. g g

IILOEI IduTl ll

NOW ONLY


herbouuetwasorcidsan
carnations
The Matron of Honour wore
a turquoise empire fitted
ladsoen owiemhbaoidueredk dtted
turquoise chiffon; her bouquet
was pink carnations. The
bridesmaid wore an empire line
dress of a lighter shade of
turquoise chiffon trimmed
with embroidered dotted
chiffon and she carried a muff
of the same material covered
with baby pink carnations. The
bride's mother's dress was of
silver lame lace bodice with
deep rose chiffon skirt; her
corsage was orchids.


MR. &r MRS. ALLAN GEE


I


IWWWWW~i
DRUMBEAT FOR HEART
RAISES $1,200 FOR FUND
TOMMY ENJOYED THE SHOW A small, but
enthusiastic audience turned up at "Drumbeat for Heart"
on Friday night to see Tommy the talking dummy and raise
about $1,200 for the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart
Foundation. Internationally known ventriloquist Kay
Carole was Tommy's date for the evening. This was Miss
Carole's and Tommy's fourth show in Nassau for the heart
found aCion bhich is put on annually at Peanuts Taylor's
rum .PHOTO: Philip Symonette
BRITAIN LAGGING BEHIND IN POLLUTION CONTROL


Wins Open
Scholarship
ANNETTE M. S. Burrows
eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs'
Preston S. Burrows has just
been awarded a scholarship to
Millfield School, in Street
Somerset, England. This was an
open scholarship examination
held in England and was highly
competitive.
Miss Burrows attended St.
Andrew's School in Nassau and
then entered St. Margiaret's
School in Bushey, England, in
September, 1971.


tougher action by the government
rto reduce lead levels in the
evironment especially in auto
exhaust fumes.
It claimed that there are an
estimated 7,000 tons of o~rgnic
lead spewed out of auto eghausts
every year, and it claimed Britain
which has some of the most
cngstr rrad sn ofe erorld, wa
eliminating the poisonous fumes
Trf m the air.


LOND)ON (AP)- Britons are in
grave danger of b~eingp slowly
poisoned Lto death by lead in th~e
air, walter and food, the British
Consumers' Association c~laims.
Lead levels were so hligh thle only
way to survive was to live in tle
depths of the country and raise all
your own food it said in a report
published F~riday in its magazine,
w he .Association demanded


cooLea z Z
FE.A_ ~T'T TIZ INGJ


ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF
THAEN GN OFFICES UNDER THE OWNERSHIP AND



MANAGEENT *


OUR STAFF WILL BE PLEASED TO
OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT
FIRST TER RACE CENTREVI LLE


WE LCOMIIE YOU TO
STEEL-PERKINS -


P.O OX 17-PHOE 287-


Gee-Mo~rtemore 'wedding


~~~OM ~ ~oa

ON ALL APPLIANCES


~r
CI II


~T~~THIS

u --- Irlpool


oilallrm

IP -

, a~9


TECHNICIANS
~EET TELEPHONE 2-3713


ft


CI


G
FF


C01


AT THE


LIE


Bahamian Ha II of


1Emerkald Beacit
HOTEL




II I I I


Pauline Hawthorne gives Rotarians the lowdown on 'highs'


whom it is geared but can also
be an invaluable education for
adults as a clear, concise

prbesfcd 'by te ym ng


THIRD WORLD GROUP
PRESENTS ...
A DANCE and raffle,
organized by the Third World
Group, will be held at Central
Highway Inn at 8 p.m.
Saturday under the patronage
of Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling and Mrs. Pindin~g.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2167


SUNDAY PORTRI~AI3Z

TOOGOODS..

OPEN SUNDAY
FROM 2 to 5

Especially for the
families.

/ ON THE WATERFRONT
IOOC*on..,,,, East of the Bridge ---Pehone 54641























INTERESTED

PER SO NS

PLEASE CONTACT


Mr. E. Cambridge
AT THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
Ammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm~


- -- ---' -


SM


------- ------------WI- --I ----~-- I-----~-~- L--'L~~~ --- ~~-~----__ ------I __~ -.I .---~- -I-- --


A YOUNG WOMAN, who has worked with drugs and herself
tested them to see "what it was all about", but never became a
user because she did not like it, talked about drugs to members of
East Nassau Rotary Club on Friday.


kine.
I could go on talking for
hours about these experiences'


bo hea s rns
The immediate and most
urgent problem, naturally, is
those kids who have gone too
far to help themselves. T i
will increase, especially if 'pot
is legalized.
I have worked with several
programmes, but there is one
in particular which I would like
to use as model.
The Seed is a programme
run by an ex-junkie and the

Lauer ale.sits group claom
88% success and from my
personal experience with
friends in the programme it
really works!
And it is really tough.
Most kids who enter the
Seed are brought there
orceful btyg merparents
They~~~~ dontg oefr
least three weeks, very often
longer. Instead, they spend
the evenings in the homes of
ex-addicts until they are
sufficiently dried out to want
Toh gvedup dope on titei ownd
with constant discussions
between themselves. Those
who are off drugs literally
brainwash those who are
newcomers. They make
them realize that drugs do not
impress, that they care more
w tttthe person is lumself and
to stop newcomers from going
the route they went
themselves,
coAs a newcom r gains enough
cofdne thog hs
"rap" sessions to realize what

vlun eers to elnl the rents o
the buddies he took dope with
so they too can bring their
ch dhren to the progrnahmme.

a ivted to attend. At these
sesimn the kids talk oenly to
a eir parents, ansad hnp ahe
admit to every hing they have
taken and how they felt while
doing so. This then serves the
double purpose of building
self-confidence in the kids and
educating the parents, helping
thme understand what has
Finally if we can bei na
program e of prevent ion,
perhaps we will notoneed 1


isrueceti is 3 dot nl p sible

real facts and reasons behind
ergab se inste o mm el


Miss Paublne Hlawthorne. 24,
younger Jaunghter of Major and
Mrs. John Hawthorne, has
tale toanruembelr~s ofN both
Rotary C'lubs.
Julst before she delivered her
talk to Nassau Rotary Club
t we, weeks ago Fhe got word
that da\ that a friend of hers
had been killed. Ile was one
of the few caser who had a
relapse after taking a course
withi Seed. On1 thc micrning of
his deatth he was "high" and
walked straightrinto amnoving
vehicle
Miss Hlawthorne,. who was
~lucic anthe atnited Stat s
a course in drugs She worked
with the Seed programme for
ccome timec during her training.
Following is the text of her
talk to rlast Nassau Rotary:
'I HAVE been asked to

s- p rietnoc whilen cop sonin
contact with drugs both with
miy own friends and with
younger children with whom I
worked In various drug
p~rogrammes. Children like
yours perhaps? But that's a
ridiculous thing to say. Your
children don't come from that
sort of a home. You have
give them something any
good parent would -- care,
love, sufficient money and
clothes, perhaps you are even
lucky enough to feel your child
is complex ela doje dgwith dm

problem today along these
lines I would not feel the need
to say anything here today.
But whether you like to hear
the truth or not you must
helieve that drugs can concem
your child, and unless you, as a
parent, understand this, they
almost certainly will concern
your child.
I am not going to burden

st istica thalkaon nreuds aTheor
are others here far more
qualified than I to do so.
Instead I want to try to talk
about drugs from the point of
view of others my age, in the
hope that I can make this very
real problem among young
people a personal reality for
you.
I really believe the greatest
wayutohcombntthis problem i
this we cannot begin to find a
solution.
yWhend ws isn college three


widespread asn hy ar h das

very cheaply at that! An ounce
could beapdurchhasedofor onla

long way at a party.
There was always at least
one group smoking at any
party. More of my personal
friends than Ilike to
remember finally dropped out
of college, due to constant use
of pot, THC and speed. I
would like to add, also, that
this was a small, private, strict
girls college -- certainly not
Among public college leagues in
this field.
It is true that much of my
experience was in the States,
yet I was very much aware six
and seven years ago where I
could pick up a joint here in
Nassau. And today I believe it
is easier to pick up speed, pot
and THC here than in the
States. I have been offered pot
on the streets, in hotels, even
in my own office by strangers
passing through. With the lack
of knowledge among the adult
community here today, the
drug traffic has increased at a
terrifying rate. While you sit
watching the U.S. news on

a lacdkh se onntro amn th
young of that country
marijuana is growing like
weeds all over this island.
HIGH PATCHES
How many are aware that
approximately three months
ago if you had the opportunity
to walk around Browns. Point


immediately after a rainstorm
you could get high just
breathing the air someone
must have made a mece profit
on that patch. Or that not long
ago there was a healthy patch
Sat the back of Collins Avenue?
Where hundreds of cars pass in
a dav!
On that you may still be
lucky enough to find some
around Sunshine Park, behind
Blue Hill Rd. But why do kids
use this? We have all heard pot
can lead you on to harder stuff
but why start on pot? Or
anything else?
With older kids over 16 -
4,= **, be just plai emri st
friends who smoke and really
enjoy it without anything bad


happening, we go to a party
and maybe as many as 75%0 are
smnoking. (There is no
"outcast" hsy tiemusin st

healthy curiosity about what
all the fuss is over. And it is
true one joint occasionally is
not going to hurt anyone.
However, pot feels great. I have
seen friends get high on three
drags if it is good stuff. And it
is an extremely pleasant high.
One never really feels unable to
think cleverly as liquor may
do. There is no nausea or
hang-over when you wake up
the next day -in fact you feel

Lq or wen yus artoa pat
With younger kids even as
young as 2nd grade reasons
can probably be fairly well
summarised under these nine
slogans: Let s slave a real
party; don't be chicken; we
ought to rebel; you've got to
try it; the 'inbgroup' is using it
it' not as ,a asboeo
tobacco; it's a 'drug scene
today; you'll just get probation
if you're busted and they don't
tell you the truth,
But basically, any normal
kid is curious and looking for
new tricks to teach his friends
without really understanding
what he is doing.
I remember when I was
about ten someone in the
group learned that karate type
chop at the vein of the neck
tpa puts one tosleep Ititw
one another so we all tried.
Little did we know we could
have killed each other through
brain damage. Today it is the
same -- only new 'kicks' or
'fads' are being used. Did you
know it is possible to get high
on can deodrant? Or hair
spray?
One of my 4th grade
students in Miami had to be
rush d tPAthe hos ftl na an

coating in an aerosol can she
found at home in the kitchen.
Practically any product in an
aerosol can, when sprayed into
a plastic or paper lunch bag
and sruffed produces some
kind of a 'high often
enough to damage the brain or
kill through suffocation.
Other products include glue,
nose sprays -a (teseta ien

gasoline ke rosene, pant
lacquers, paint thinners, lighter
fhtid and latianin dluidsband



d ud i amy eBphsmian

even croton. This can give a
pron utied uau Ig but those
something else pretty fast as
they were quite sick
afterwards.
When I was in high school
one of the most popular pill
experiments, apart from diet
pills was with a capsule called
Darvon.
MOST COMMON
As you can see these
capsules are either pink and
grey or orange and grey one
a little stronger than the other.
These pills are probably among
the most common to be
distributed among women in
the U.S. for general aches and
pains of all sorts. Until
recently, if these capsules were
opened and the contents
spilled out there would be a
tiny silver ball in the centre. If
this were removed and
dissolved in a small glass of
water and then drunk they
produce quite a powerful high.
I understand the FDA became
aware of this and have since
removed the silver ball.
Unfortunately, when a child

e ciande cabis stuff is usnud y
strung out on uppers and
downers before he knows what
is really happening.
In a well-known junior
school I visited in Miami the
younger children could be seen
covering their milk glasses as


they went through the lunch
line in case another kid
dropped a pill in while they
weren't looking. Why? the
other kid has a habit to
support.
But one of the greatest
problems here in Nassau is pot,
because it grows so easily and
can be taken by all1 ages. It is a
very unusual child who has
never seen a joint.
You may be wondering why
the teachers don't reai~ze if
students are passing pills or
joints. Can you guess how
many teachers do it with their
students? Either for money, or
;to be accepted as "one of the
kidsO how ensyi is dj sip

between the pages of a1 text
book? I caught one of mny 5th


could be avoided.
I would like to recommend
this book, "Drug and You" by

Che nl yon geaae to stu en
health education.
It iseclient for students to



PROSPECTIVE ON
INDEPENDENCE
DR. EDDIE Green, lecturer
in Government and Politics at
the University of the West
Indies, will speak on
"Prospectives on Independenc

erachter TrIS h na Clicae ath 8
p.m. Friday.
The talk is sponsored by the
Third World Group.


DRUGS AND YOU Miss Pauline Hawthorne warns Rotarians of the dangers of drugs
to their children. Here the is seen recommending a book on drugs by Chancey
Kirkpatrick.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette.


grade students passing a
baseball glove full of joints.
(When you "old men" were
children and wanted to smoke,
all you had to do was get
behind a barn. Today
techniques are much improved.
Two years ago I found that
some of the students in my '
drama school ranging
between 10 and 15 were
flunking out of school. These
were normally very bright kids,
yet they lost all interest in
work. I later found out after
phs aid mee enrot ed ena
had deliberately flunked out so
as to be sent to summer school.
At summer school they would
all sit around together getting
high with the teacher.
Apart from being introduced
to drugs outside school,
students themselves usually
have extremely efficient
organizations set up to increase
their using friends.
son tga youbn ces ist o
things:
1) He is doing a friend a
favour by turning him on
2) He knows the more
friends who take dope the less
chance he will have of being
caught
3) The more friends, the
greater the supply.
My observations during the
tm calwas'orteacher showed a
following this pattern:
The main pusher (high
schooled ) has rep ineal


ST e $1pwatches for 1 no

He then invites prospects
out tto itrhe field at break tobe
fun).
NlOT SQUARE
Newcomers are thrilled to be
friends with bigger, more
important kids and don't want
to seeml square or babyish
when offered a joint. Having
taken one, they are even more
afraid to refuse the second.
If one tries to get out the
others commonly put some
drugs in his food or drink to
scare him even more.
Although I understand pot
itself is not addictive
physically, I doubt whether
anyone who has used it
steadily can truthfully say it
had had no effect.
Many classmates were heavy
smokers and eventually had
what we call a "head". This
means with constant use there
is always some of the drug in
the system resulting in a
continual 'high' of varying
degrees.
So much as a glass of water
can intensify this "high", as
with champagne to some

sac icaly imp sssib ea to sis?
the compulsion to maintain the
high by continuing to smoke
uh~less one has help. Also. to
intensify this compulsion a real
"pothead" is extremely run
down and tends to become
depressed when he is not hig
and has very little confidence
in himself.
In school we used to take
No Doz when studying for an
exam. This could be bought in
any drug store. Then, since we
would feel a little shaky
afterwards, a regular "sleeping
pitt" or, if we were lucky, a
prescription pill such as librium
would calm down the shakiness
and so we could get some
sleep.
At college it was methodrine
or amphetonial sulphate during
exams or what was often
called "peaches, hearts, roses,
pennies, cartwheels, whites,
footballs. hearts oranges." etc.
edthmy gru ee raigg s
that was available. I never paid
for any thing. But somehow


there were always one or two
inl reserve for exam time.
Speed is often referred to as
a magic pill because of the
energy which suddenly
appears. But what so often
happens, one becomes
dfependenit on them to get
through a day, and quantities
continue to increase. The result
is: nervoursness, hligh blood
pressure, insomnia. .
When this happens, it is easy
to start on barbiturates, or
downers to counteract the

fen tr anterman e fo nd
in most medicine cabinet.
there are all sorts: yellow, red,
or red devils, etc., the list is
endless. They are prescribed
for heart disorders, insomnia,
post surgery and so on.
Yet, what so few kids really
understand is that a barbiturate
use~r canl die while kicking the
habit. It can he worse than
hero~in, y et hy thle time the
usr relulizes tin snwaolonger
die-
Another drug similar to pot,
but much more dangerous, is
the. This does create a
psychological addiction.
Basically THE is the
hallucenogenic agent of
marijuana placedl in a capsule
for more intensive action. Most
LSD and cocaine users started
onTHE1L tetra hydra canna
TOO LATE
Of course there were always
those braveo fs kids what ue

so vsn' hve t ebe a fs

your realizing! it until it is too
late ki c1>nitoanktrick p ay


about other users. .
When I was a sophomore in
college I had a roommate who
took it because she was afraid
her boyfriend would think her
square and leave her otherwise.
Unfortunately she took a
"hummer" trip. For 18 hours
she tried to kill herself because
she saw monsters all around
her and a car was continually
running over her. We had to
literally tie her down. Luckily
she came out safely, but today
she still has the occasional
retla et uc vednithough she
Cocaine, mad fom te
leaves of the cocoa plant, is
also, quite popular among
Iten se suoalla sniffed and is a
strong stimulant. Sometimes
lae f the coo lan ma
ec eowed.eOccasoo ll p t ma
mixed with heroin to make a
speedballl" combination of
u cer and downer. Cocaine
ady also bem dssolved in wae
directly into the blood stream.
Approximately 70% of the kids
in the 15 -- 18 year old range
at the drug programmes I
worked with used cocaine.
As far as heroin i
concerned, I am lucky enough
not to have had direct contact.
But I have seen enough needle
scarred arms to persuade me of
its gravity.mL ekily ahah ne
While working at the Youth
Hall Centre in Miami I was
chorfe ch se rlO- ar-old


D M ~ rt e ar id in Th
Tribune saying that Bahamians
aer till afr id ofe d the nede


We have 9 flights a day to Miami from Nassau (4 more than any other
airline). 9:30 and 10:30 am; every hour on the half-hour from 12:30 to 5:30 pm;
and an extra flight at 8:00 pm.
Plus One flight to Ft. Lauderdale at 6:30 pm.
And five flights daily to Miami from Freeport.
FOr infOrmation and reservations call your travel agent or Eastern
at 2-1461 in Nassau, or 2-2311 in F~reeport.

OrStop by one of our ticket offices at the Sheraton British
COlonial in Nassau, or the International

Shopping Bazaar in Freeport.


L~EASTERN The Wings of Man.
**nse Winys of Man is a resisterest service mark of Eastern Air U~ncs. Inc.


Whr Wribut


Monday, April 9,
M


in drug scene talk


~Y~------ ~i~--~-~--~


I INK
.1...~-1.- I ~-.- -~L~ _._.- __ ---- -L~i LL~ __i-i-~ L~-i~_ ~ .- C_ Lr rr_------l~~-~-if~L1-~l-~.~ ti It -.-- I- -. -l.~-II _- 1_ it.. - -....--~..-(3- -1--~ ~ -(.- ~l~r. ,




IM I I I am mame I g I


sassALe asAcn cABANAI cLee

1 U~se of our Pool and I 3 mile of Beach.I Complimentary I
2L Mats. Towels and L~ounge Chairs c(Compblmentary)
;l Four C'hampionship Tennis C'ourts Night Tennis
c(Complimentary ,
41 His and Hers Sauna Baths c(fompllmentary I
5 Putting G;reen cComphmnentary I
6 to p~c off Weddlngs. Barnquets and Mleetings held at the
Resort
7 A~ddltional Cox ~ktal parties held throughout the yealr
8. Tennis and Sw~imming Clinics
9. to p.c. off all special parties and group dinners
to Managers ('omplimnentar\ Ht~eption. Wetd 6 45pm
7: 30pm
II. Jumbala Torch Light Steak C'ook out c'Wed >
12 Thursday. Champagne Dance Ilpm F )ore Ni Aft lou~nge
1:I Internatiional Huffet Hilbascus tulnlnd Room
14. Sunday F'eature Movie 9pm
15. Yor those of you who like to play bridge. the Nassau
IBridge (lub meets every Tuesday and F'riday at I copm
In the IHird Cage

PLEASE CALL MANAlGrE'S OFFICE 7800)1
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION












ADVERTISING SALES

PER SON




MB/O Or fema/8*

experience preferred'.


Interested persons please

contact


MR. H.R .BE: T HLL


Phone 2-2768 The Tribune,

between 9a.m. & 12 noonI

Monday through Saturday.

Salary open.


__


--- --T-u


___


Y


I I


InV w so..s.,ww..U .. . -
Mantin~ee 2:45 & 4:55, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005




CW








MHatthan / Burett

9k"Pete~n*Tillie"
--All about love andmarriage'

5 A Universal Picture T echnicolor' Panavlsion' PG
SUGGESTED FOR MA1TURE~ AUD/rIENCES a
PA RENTALI DISCRETION A D VISED.
-.eservations not claimed by 8:dl5 will be sold




Last Day Tuesday Last Dady Tuesday
Matinee starts at 1:45 Continuous sowings I
Evening 8: 30 from 3 -
"THE BROTHERHOOD
OF SATN" PG"THE LIMIT" PG.

Strother Martin Yaphet Kotto
L. Q. Jones Pamela Jones
PLUS PLUS
"ACE HIGH" PG.
Eli Wallach "THE MERCENARY" PG.
Terence Hill Franco Nero I
PLUS Late Feature .
Tuesday night. Tony Mu~sante
'Phone 2-2534



LAST DAY TUESDAY i
a~tinee continuous from 2: 30, Evening 8: 30 'Phone 3-466


"THE DOBERMAIN CANG PG.

Starring

IBYRON MABE HARE)

)- PLUS 8


S"THE TWILIGHT PEOPLE PG.

Starring
JOHN ASHLEY PTWOEL

SUGGE'STE~D FOIR MCA TUREI: A UD~l.:INCs


hlonday, April 9, 1973

HOESTRTHK BYOSW FBE
SHIMONOSEKl, JAI'AN (AP)
As lh A mn e h7n \r j I'l c a d u p
home ,
that sfirstkI thtumght it w 1 s~ truck ilAI
who also lives nelrt to,; a highway l
police said no, injunle\ were
reported to the Amine famllilt of
eighlt, whose home lies on the ledge
of the treacherous Kammonl Strait


swerved and struck Amnine 1


d3i
I I I


F OR CANCER

(A)') Hrecovredl Jicacer p~atients are
being recruitedl here for blood

Hhich -" iirlt hp \1I help

Cainerni 11t ihson ;iosptal
hopes to, mi.de fo~rmer cancer
patients~ Immune to .I returrencer of
the diseaseC
befre~i the immullnva~thio theory
(rcan he esCtbishe through~l~r tesing
ther~ I t hers tI(\I Lahmatoo()I) tam


t a least th ears


as


flong treatment
T'he scientists theorize that a
chemical substances within whit
factor" could boost the immunity
ofC patients re~covering from cancer.
hiochemicali \pearated from the
blo ot a orzn "?,mo,'"" l
sat mechdnismrndise resec in TI

ontcfe ingat ent thas Ieuted t
Normal responises oif the donor for
six months to two years
T F1 thus retains the memory of
its/ sunctiedn in, thtehtior a ter iti
defective immune mechanisms.
restoring normal functioning.
Some dliseases caused by
congenital defects in children 5
immune systems have been
success nuly trr eete b nbecrjonrs o
in a number ofr laboratories and
clinics around the country,
according to, Ir. H. Sherwood
Lawrenrce oft the NewH York
Il vest of >ol o~f medicine'
The canrcr l~l research team
believes the first cancer cells to
form in normal people are probably
destroyed by white blood cells.
In fact, so~me researchers think
the human body is repeatedly
challenged by cancers, but that a
weth-functioning immunity system
continually amount\ a defensive
barrier.
recovering from serious bouts with
the disease had their immunity
systems damaged by the cancer or
weakened by radiation or chemical
Stheraphy. Canlder recurs because all
the malignant cells were not
eradicated during treatment and
natural defenses are unable to
prevent their spread.
The Sani I rancisco research team
said it hopes to strengthen the
natural immunity system with
transfer factor from recovered
Patients, thus preventing
recurrence.
At Mt. Zion, the research is
headed by D~r. lErnest f.
Rosenbaum, medical director of the
hospitals Saroni Tumor Institute,
and Dr. Myron Blume, chief of the
immunology research laboratory.
on Ior. Hlugh I'undenberp. professor ofT
ses medicine and a nored
tte. immunologist, heads the U(
medical cancer research.


RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
Engaged in pulse taking are
students of Aquinas College,
who are explaining the respi-
ratory system. From left to
o'oi.,1' s"','"sryn Martn
Lightbourne, Adrianne Cash
Bete an eNsoels d ops
NUTRITION -This section
(AT RIGHT) was an important
one in the Aquinas College
selence fair. Pictured from left
Holriaghtaare itha~rldF~arrineg on'
Kay Turnquest, Lynval Ireland.
PHOTOS: Philip Symonette.


rli saw ii


Whr Fr that


~S;:-bL~ riiBLOOD FACTOR P::l;

,I~8 MA Yr HELP CURE


anls scuset rai
OPENS SCHOOL FAIR -
":::.:'. o' aklEduca on
opened T. Gibson Primary

Street. Proceeds from the fair
are to go towards' raising funds
for text books and other
school materials .for the
students and to make a
doun tion to tea Ba ~mian
PHOTO: Philip Symonette.


NOW SHOWING
AT 9:00 ONLY

DIANA ROSS4
BILLE HOUDAY ~





SNGS THE
BLUES


PLUS at 7:00 ONLY
"LEGEND of
NIGGER CHARLEY"
No One Under 17 Admitted
Owing to length of F~ilm t
there will be Only One Si howlnw


SCIENCE FAIR A two-day science fair at Aquinas College included a section
drug abuse. Shown here explaining the different parts of the brain and the nerve impul
to the brain is Treven Darville. Looking on is Ephraim Cargill. PHOTO: Philip Symonel


-- w-




Allrfias8 FF10MIS Of

Bahainas directors
SPRING MEETING of the
Board of Directors of
American Friends of Bahamas
Foundation Inc. was held last
week in Nassau. The Board
normally meets twice a year in
New York City and twice in
Nassau, when applications for
grants to local charities are
received and acted upon.
Charter limitations are that
grants must be for specific
objects or projects, not for
operating expense, and may
not be made to religious
organizations or charities
sponsored by denominational
groups. Shown in the
photograph (1. to r.) Leonard
Daisemer, W. Wilson Holden
(Treasurer), Robert E. Blum
rnmmed itrekia t President)

William C. Decker (President) t,
JmkeseyD. L~anddauer and2in
Vice-President)h Absenti Iri m

Robbins (1 st. Vice-President),
Frederick Eberstat, Thomas L.
EvyansdiRoya indihe, Arthur T.
Perkins.
OVERHAUL OF WORK-HOUR
PATITERS RECOMMENDED
l1IOi~~\.1 (llllll 0 10)? IAil sun

I!r\ u less bl~(1 netedII h> the Br Iitis
""111 1,' '"1, ""~(r ri~ '"'rl~i(
tol~ii~ the re\ s Brt( ,l1 1 r1\ \\1. J~s strill s ..ll Cil

11m\ n .2 s: ,,2 ass,,o


EARE D





Monday, April 9, 1_973


T NE FOR SALE HE P


I


T


1 _


P LEH WANTED


CPA2CHER for Junior High
Science classes. Must have an
excellent background in Marine
Biology, Chemistry, Physics
and General Biology. Masters
Aegee or e uivalent desirable.
Star of the Sea S hol, Pa O
Box F-2418, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7325

PLUMBING SUPERVISOR
Lay out jobs, order materials,
10 years ex perience,
knowledge of hydraulics and
existing codes, prepare
estimates on all types of
9 nnsttruct pnar blnmaintain
Write P. O. Box F-265,
Freeport.

C73A ND BAHAMA
TELEPHONE COMPANY,
LTD., Freeport, has an opening
for a Personnel Supervisor
(female). The successful



rewards. Previous experience in
pe sonnet ositters leaeuiretdo

management responsibility.
Apply: General Manager's
office, 2C Kipling Building
(352-9352) or write P. O. Box
F-2478, Freeport, Grand
Bahama .

C7322
GRAND BAHAMA
TELEPHONE COMPANY,
LTD., has an opening for a
gnr housekeh rseke p d ligh
janitorial duties including
floors, walls, windows,
bathrooms, kitchen areas ank
furniture. Off hours work
re aired i eluding S turdays.

office, 2C Kipling Building or
write P. O. Box F-2478,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

TO PLACE YOUR ADS.

CRANYD MIHAMA

P 0 E 26608


C9390
ON MARKET STREET South'

Pitna, rus rnsS WrpkshS n
For information, 3-4999
evening s *

C9365
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom in Bamboo Town
Phone 36959.

C9399
eIRCONpDrteONED Shfire
Park Avenue.$8175 per month.
Telephone 58134.

C9415
ATTRACTIVE 2 bedroom
furnished apartment - Eastern
District. Phone 2-1149.

C9388


San Toci YR bd oom (

maid'st room, wal oto wa l

cdaprelined cirooet Available
for long lease May 15th. Phone
David Hudson 3-6262-3.

FOR SALE

C9311
1 CONVERTIBLE COUCH
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 250 Ib. trunk food freezer
Call 77947.

C9371
KODAK CAROUSEL 850H
Slide projector with case. As
new, only $255.00 Phone Peter
Robinson at 2-1064. daytime.

C9406
A WIDE RANGE of Metal and
Mineral Detectors available to
you at factory prices plus
freight and duty. For
information call 23921.

C9408
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
before 20th April, 1973
1 Refri erator 16 c ft
1 Dining R r Sui cu .
3 BedroomoS ites ( ne French
Provincial
Furniture in ver go
condition. er god
Telephone 4-1243 after 6 p.m *

C9192
2 WEEK OLD HONDA, 50cc,
owner leaving Island soon. Carll
Glen Hepburn, 5-7102.

C9372
1-6 yard Dump Truck. Like

11 bag used concrete mixer.
Good condition. Carl 22098.

CAIRS FOR SALE

CSL ND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1972 VENTURA,
A/C Bucket Seats
Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Radio
Auto. Blue $1600
1 969 VICTOR 2000 S/W,
Automatic $850
1972 VIVA S/W
Automatic White $2400
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE,
4 Dr. Sedan

97.2/ eOTIAC VENTURE 50
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio. Orange $3500
1967 HILLMAN,

199 FRD TORINO, 40
Yellow/Black $1200
169AC RYSLER IMPERI2AOLp
1971 FORD CAPRI,
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD,
Blue A/C $2800
1971 FORD MAVERIC K,
Auto. Red $1950


C9432
1971 FORD SPORTS
CUSTOM CAMPER/PICKUP
TRUCK STANDARD
SHIFT $2600. 1956 G.M.C.
STEP-V AN AUTOMATIC
$300.00. PHONE AFTER 5.30
P.M. 55124.
C9418
1969 BUICK SKYLARK 2
door hard top, green, black
top, radio, new W/Ws'

may 2t, 00 miles TB $75n0 --
Call Mr. Page 24276.

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C9217
PLANNINGTTO BUY

Act now! Hilltop lot ,
conrlot s,

Call re k Crey

FREANLKESAREE
Bay &ADeveauxDStreets.


C9377
WELL ESTA BU SHED
FURNITURE BUSINESS for
sale. Owner wishes to retire.
TepliesT to: Adv. C9377, c/o
N320 Tribune, P. O. Box
N30, Nassau
C9425
AeGEeNdCYt (FFRED rd1r,00
Canadian cigars. Money making
agency. Write to Economy
Sales Agency, P. O. Box 6104
E. S., Nassau, Bahamas
"OTHER AGENCIES
OFFERED"

IIIRIIRL SUFFLILO
C9420
10 ft. fibregiass Orlando
Clipper runabout. $120. Phone
4-1240 after 7 p.m.

C'J309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.




B HAMAS YOUTH
EVANGELISM FELLOWSHIP
invites you to see "BELOVED
ENEMY" at the Epworth Hall'
Shirley Street, Saturday April
14th 8 p.m. No Admission
charges or collection.

POSITION WANTED

C8500

w~ork in ur nshop pu ase wri e
AdvO C8500, c/ h T abs e

C9430
YOUNG AMBITIOUS single
Bahamian man with 10 years
Accounting and office
management experience seeks
responsible position preferably
with international firm. Willing
to work anywhere in the
Bahamas or abroad. Most
interested in opportunity for
additional professional training
and thence advancement in
company. Salary and incentives
oen or discu sion. Will han

leaving present employ.
Kindly reply to P. O. Box
N7351, Nassau, Bahamas.


IIELP MN#TED
C9400
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
with previous experience in the
real estate business. Salary
commensurate with training.
Must know typing and have
own transportation. Apply
DOROTHY L. ATWOOD LTD.
in person. Located corner of
Elizabeth Avenue and Shiriey
Street Telephones :
28763-4-5-6.

EP RIENCED S CRETAnRY

Bahamian subsidiary company
operating in Nassau. Successful
applicant will be paid attractive
salary and enjoy congenial
working conditions. Applicants
should have a minimum of four
years practical experience and
shoo ed tappr in kfirs in tnc
Co., telephone 2-8551.


gN FEPR
`TL 3260


F 59T NATIONAL CITY
TR US T COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED Oakes
Field at Thompson Boulevard
P. O. Box N-1576 Nassau,

CH sERED ACCOUNTANT
Chartered Accountant or
equivalent required to perform
internal audits, liaison with
outside auditors/Control
Depart ment, and conduct
inhouse training programme.
Applicants should have
experience in Bahamas in
auditing companies and
personal and pension trusts
and have management ability
or potential. Contact the
General Manager at 2-4241/9.

C9421
MAINTENANCE
cARETAKER for large Estate.
Must have at least two written
references anK wlean driving

ga eing and geneeral poper y
maintenance essential
accommodation provided.



C9429

HAORLAIDSA ISLAND Seeks
Sous Chef
Job Description: Supervise
production of all kitchen staff.
Hjas to be knowledgeable in all
kitchen departments.
Educational Requirements:
Completion of high school.
Must have served not less than
3 years apprenticeship. 5 years
experience.

TRADE SERVICES
C9315



BrokrageJ Ltd*
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
FARCHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELtVlERY
MOVING, STORAGE

STC FPAB DGNG
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PH~ONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3737, 2-3798 '
Airport 77434
C9299

PATIO AWN WINGS AND

CARWORNTGS, SHUTTERS

John S. GePANe & o. Ltd.
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.

C8105
TRY US FOR SAFE SURE
CLEANING! ABCO'S NEVL
'SUPER STEAM' CARPETS,
UPHOLSTERY -TEL:
51071-2-3-4.
C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. 8 ot r
for homes. apartment oaerd
hotels. Sales and services. Call
DouglasU Lwe 5-9404 WORLD
net to Frank's Plac ey

C9428

FresR waCer wells oC ran wat r
tanks. Contact Amon Pinder
Tyler Street on the main road
opposite Quarry Mission
cor r


LA= URER/SEPTIC TANK
DRIVER/CLEANER -
Honest, reliable, hardworking.
Bahamians only.
Ex per ienced SE RVI CE
PLUMBER capatle of r pir ns

pumps; run electric drain
machines; trouble-shoot for
sewer/septic tank/well
problems. Fast, honest,
reliable. Bahamians only.
CURCIE BROTHERS, Box
F-727, Freeport.
C3O9
PROMOTIONAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE ABLE
TO COOR DI NATE AND
UNVOEW LTEOUR EGROUOPSF
PROMOTIONAL FILM
TEC HN IQUE IN THE
BAHAMAS AND FIVE (5)
DEARSN EXPERIENOUR IN
PUBLIC. COMMISSION ON
VOLUME ONLY.
APPLY FOR INTERVIEW IN
WRITING ONLY TO P. O.

RHA F- 5AM REEP RT

C7321

Require CbOU BAhmas Oil
Refining Company to assist the
Treasurer in various aspects of
Management Accounting and
Internal Audit procedures with
particular initial responsibility
for the Financial Accounting
of th. construction of new
facilities. Applicants should be
Chartered or Certified
Accountants with not less than
three (3) years post
quaul icationdi Experincre
ex eri nce auof o nduotrial
accounting.
Bahamians only need apply to:
Personnel Officer, Bahamas Oil
Ref ining Company, P. O. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C7324
BROILER COOK WITH THE
ABILITY TO BUTCHER.
TRIM AND PORTION
MEATS. MINIMUM OF 3
YEARS SIMILAR
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED.
APPLY TO: PUB ON THE
MALL LTD., P. O. BOX
F-331, Freeport, Bahamas.


__


The Bahamas Telecommunications
Corporation wishes to announce that Telephone
Service is now available in K ndy
Sub-division.

Residents living in this area, who are
interested in obtaining service should contact
the Corporation's Commercial Office on
Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Telephone
Number 349 1 1, at their earliest convenience.

Information regarding Lot Number should
readily be available when applying for service.


liELP WANTED
facilities are adequate to serve
customers; mee sak h a

prepare work orders, read
drawings and prints, operate
gindergroond dctableocdetector
company's underground
electric facilities, investigate
customer service complaints.
MAINTENANCE ENGINEER
(HARBOUR) Must be a
."aified ca d ce difie E r ina

vxeine I n sthes.rust la

tod mainain ofleet of Hyst
faorlift trucks tor ansp
vehicles and boats. MtAlso


required to take complete
charge of the Harbour Garage,
including the care and
maintenance of th. inventory
of spare parts, fuel, oil, etc..
Ove rti me hours may be
required.

COXSWAIN (HARBOUR) -
Must be experienced
boat-handler, capable of
handling 38 foot Pilot boats in
all weather, all hours.
Responsible for the safety of
pilots boarding or
disembarking from ships. Must
have experience with
maintenance of diesel engines
and should be a competent
ship-wright, able to splice wire
and manila ropes. His duties
will include care and
maintenance of Pilot boats,
paint and survey floats, use of
mooring boat. Must have
knowledge of Radio/Telephone
procedures and communica.
tions between Pilots, boats and
ships and of the regulations for
preventing collision at sea.

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANTS 2 (LEGAL)
(1) One must be fully capable
of reviewing legal documents
for accuracy and completeness,
such as purchase and sales
agreements, lease agreements,
co nve yances, licences.
Roe po eesse forofvaliditd and
needed and for recording of
transactions at Government

iniiuals ustd crorawi ns

c so ae easing oir puchasin.

corporate records of an
ex tensive number of
companies. Must maintain
registers of members and
directors of all companies,
share certificates, corporate
seals, etc.. Must record and
establish filing systems for all
documents and correspondence
and have full and accurate
knowledge of them to supply
executives with information.
Records minutes of all
meetings w ich requires above

App ly to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority Limited, P. O.
idii~-2666For p3rT K iang
Bahama.

C7312
INTERPRETIVE NATU RAL-
IST -- Must be college graduate
with B.S. degree or equivalent
in biology, botany, zoology or
ornitholo gy Career
employment for the right man
with the right references and
experience. Dedication to
nature conservation essential.
Bahamian preferred. Applicant
must be willing todo gardening
and m ai ntenance when
n ces ey iSta r e Cg S a t e

P. O. ($ox F2954, Freeport,
Grand Bahama. Telephone
352-5438.


C978WNER LEAVING
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
completely furnished, recently
painted Johnson Terrace.
Price: $25,000. Telephone
42462 after six

C9344 $75 DEPOSIT secures
a lot in YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. Payments from
only $80 month. Priced from
$5,800. NO INTEREST. From
70 x 100. Utilities soon
completed. Lake front lots
from $7,500. $100 deposit.
Tel: 2-3027 or 2-4148
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE


8 LLS REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LTD. offers
attractive lots in popular
subdivision. Prices commencing
523835902000. For information

C9407
BEAUTIFUL CORNER LOT
on St. Michael and Soldier

Resona pxi 05,d. Cot

C9423

Be your oFORLANLDLORD, on
profitable BAY STREET, Size
571W on Bay and on Harbour
Side, by 240 depth. Store 40 x
60, Offices, Apartments, Upper
Floors, Warehousing. Two
outside buildings used as ART
GALLERIES, loads or parking,
even warehousing. Finance
available. Inquiries to NICK
DAMIANOS, DESMOND
INVESTMENTS LTD ,
MORTGAGEE. Dial 22033
evenings 41197.

C9416
LOT ORIGINAL Sans Souci
hillside 110 x 150. $7,500
Cash. Call: McPHERSON &
BROWN REAL ESTATE
2-2680-2-2683.

C9424
FOR SALE
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, maid's
quarters, spacious sitting,
Lavishly furnisne4, one block
from beach rights, grounds 80
x 140, fruited, landscape and
Outside PATIO. Was
$50,000.00 Owner might
considerr $46,000.00. Come see
This deal can surprise you*
HIGHLAND PARK AREA -
Unfurnished house with three
vedr ooms t2 baths, s ac ous
unfurnished with Air Condo'
refrigerator, stove, shutters,
and some drapes. Reduced to
$50,000.00.
Considered substantial built
house, and has pump for well
water DIAL DAMIANOS
223, 22305, Evenings

C9427
CORAL HA BOU1 2AREAet


f eaFd Rad. 1 / mile we t
Opposite land of New
Providence Development Co
Ltd.

Opportunity for development
or investment. For details and
terms contact H. G. Christie
Real Estate.

309 Bay Street,
P. O. Box N8164, Nassau
Telephone: 2-1041, 2,1042

FOR RENT
C9305
LARGE SHOP for rent. 3000

Ceunat villfeetCan tbe use ac
store and warehouse. Has side
enra~nce. Call 2-1731 or

C9306
ONE EXTRA large two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking T.V. antenna,
a rcondltlond r ane 5m54631

C9382
BASICALLY FURNISHED
house 3 bedrooms 21
bathrooms. East $375
monthly. Phone 42228, 42198
evenings, weekends.


LRGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month.Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.


Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34646-7-8
C9422
96o8 mat.G.p Magn ifb--
April 18th. Telephone 31571.


_ _


IIELP WANWTyn
C7308
MARINE ACCOUNTING
SHIFT CLERK Must have
General Certificate at 'O' level
standard preferably with
En lish Langua e and
HMa muas os sAn /or C stems
Brokerage and/or previous
clerical ex perlence in
Accounting and/or Shipping
Company an advantage. Must
be of a mature outlook,
cnai bem sf erking with
Res onsiblempor anoR ui

Product Export cargos.
Reconciling ship and shore
f ig ures. Preparing and
distributing numerous shipping
documents. Completing
necessary Customs Entries.
Checking and completing
Bunker delivery receipts.
Maintaining numerous records
for analytical purposes
42 hour week on a shift basis
rotating over a 16 week cycle.
Apply in person or mail resume
in strict confidence to:
Personnel Officer, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, P. O. Box
F-2435, Freeport, G.B.


,- ...... .. .


I I I


|


Th e Ba hamas Te le commun ic nations
Corporation invites all Architects, Building
Contractors and Owners of proposed building
construction in any area of ew Providence and
in the Family Islands, to come in to discuss your
telephone plans with our Marketing Division of
the Corporation, (Telephone No. 3491 1
Extension 228), in advance of starting building.
In so doing you will minimize loss of timec and
money.

Your fulst co-operation in this respect
would be appreciated.


I


g


'I


I


I


SRrn OF R


I I


I I


O FO8 E OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.


C9413BUICK SPECIAL, fully
loaded -- newly painted and
reupholstered. See at Malcolm
Tyre Service, Bay Street or call
2-2745-


D


REAL ESTATE

C9362
UFEURNI3SHEDD PMERFOR
bedrooms baths with carport,
room air conditioners,
dshiwsasher Prard g2 ,TO
minimum down payment
$5,000.
CS 71ct SYNTEX Phone




C7320FO RET
FOR LONG TERM

EXECUTIVE LEShome 4
bedroom, 3V/2 bath,
Unfurnished', $550 per month
furnished, $700 per month.
Call Freeport 373-2032 or
352-9414, Mrs. Madsen.

IIELP WANTED

C7314
CASHIER /BIL L1NG

;1E hKH Safkeping of and
accounting for Petty Cash.
Shortages, if any, have to be
made good from her own
pocket.
(2) The preparation of weekly
Cash Deposit and Petty Cash
Statements
(3) An extensive knowledge of
the various charges connected
with Demurrage and Storage,
so as to compute these and
collect the charges from cash
customers.
(4) Preparation of the monthly
billings for Storage and
Rentals to Firms and
individuals with credit
facilities.
(5) The computation of
charges and the monthiv
billings for goods in Cold
Storage.
t(6 A knowle ge of tt va io
the Harbour and the related
charges so as to compute and
invoice the charges for 'Hire of
Equipment'.
(7) A knowledge of the various
rates and premiums, for casual
(hourly paid) personnel so that
theirpwa es ha b rnnachmputed

In addition, the apphrcant
should have a RadiofTelephone
tOperator' eLicencte, issued b
Bahamas and be a good typist.

LAWYER (Legal) Must have
experience .in handling
commercial leases and land
development registration (in
the United States and
elsewhere abroad). Must know
legal collection procedures and
be able to prepare documents
relating all phases of areas
inyol ved Substant ia I
knowledge of U.S. Federal and
State laws required.

RADITOORTELEPOHUONE

Must be able to communicate
with ships, sending and
receiving messages. Knowledge
nd Morse Code ian mitility o
messages distinct asset. Night
work required on rotating shift
basis

STE VEDOR E/ FOREMAN
(HARBOUR) Must have
ability to supervise several
gangs in loading and unloading
vessels, including fragile and
dangerous cargo. Requires
extensive experience in work
and allocating men; knowledge
of rigging, wire rope and
derricks.~ Must know
thoroughly work of Winchman,
Oe o .a men and Crane

L IN ESMAN /G R OU NDSM AN/
CLEANER 5 -
(HARBOU R) -- Must clean and
weed outdoor areas and indoor
including washrooms and
toilets. Handles ships lines in
docking and casting off. Must
be available for night calls.
WINCHMAN/GANGLEADER
(HARBOUR) -Requires
substantial experience as
Winchman/Crane operator and
proven ability to operate
machinery efficiently and
safely. Must know derrick
rigging. Prior experience as
seaman or stevedore involved.


1 969 VIVA
4 Dr. Auto. Green
1971 Rambler,
Auto. Blue
1969 PONTIAC GTO,
A/C Vinyl Green

19 8 DODG ESCORT,
Blue


$695

$2100

$1600

$695

$300


C 1ROEE ALUMINUM

inst IMpecTiau ad auam a
guard rails for staircases and
inside building.
ONE EX ECUTIVE
SECRETARY: Must be able to
do shorthand and type at least
75 words per minute, also to
speak French fluently.
FOUR ELE VATOR
TECHNICIANS: Must be
experienced in installing glass
elevators.
Interested persons apply to:
THE GRAND BAHAMA
HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB,
WEST END, GR AND
BAHAMA. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.


C9411
BEAUTY SALON AND
BARBER SHOP requires:
4 highly qualified hairdressers
with at least 5 years
experience. Capable of doing
all types of hair.
2 highly qualified barbers
Capable of doing all types oi
hair.
1 Manicurist
Apply in person to
MAR -DE E'S BEAUTY
SALON, Boyle dulding, Bay
Street.


C9312
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE
World-famous postal tuition
for the GCE, School Cert and
Mcac nta cy, Banking, Law,
Making Company
Secretaryship Examinations.
For details of our specialised
courses write for FREE copy
of YOUR CAREER to The
Rapid Results College Dept.
T Tuitlon House London


C9431
FURNISHED country estate.
Two bathroom stone hilltop
colonial overlooking western
edge Nassau. Convenient
beaches, airport, unlimited
private fresh water supply.
Children's swimming pool,
Hwahing machine, television.
Acres flouwer trees. $400
monthly. Phone owner 5-7224
evenings.


TECHNICIAN (FREEPORT
POWER) Applicant must
verify that service installations
conform to Company
standards and electric code;
survey Company's electric
facilities to determine if


fht grlutbit


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Free~por rm am o~ 5pm o.t r. a.9 .tp.m.


P LEH WANTED


r


E TATSEL AER


Srln RCV 3L


L WANTED


(R AND BA HAMA


CLASSIF


NOTICE


N( I S













__II~


r -- I_


r
I


58u,, C .;3~


REX MOR GAN, M.D.

THAT'S ONE THING HOW CAN
DO M)U FEEL ANYTHING FO0 0O, iE ANCLE
POR ME OTHER THAN 1 sUCCE5
PITY, JUNE~ 7


-vB r


.7


By DAL CURTIS~

lON PIT I C'; APi~~1 T;APE\ Y~OURE ASKNlG FOR THE ~U'RE RIGHT/
OU)R A 0 NEC P Ff RCA O ICAN VEPC IF n A p
56 t r PM A F)iiL HEALTWI -NLOT EVEN FOR~5 B -DAY SAdSIS

HE VE GOT A 197 OF
TWNG Ts to oo

2I


J UD GEPARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS
IF YOU MEAN AM BUT I AM MYIA O ON THE OTHER HAND, O'
HOW ABOUT IT, SAM... 1 COMMITTED INTERESTED `aT PERS N S5? ANSwER THAT QUESTION, SAM! IM~ A
15 THERE ANYONE ~-~TO ANYONE... iiIN SOMEONE, C FIERCE COMPETITOR... AND IF I WERE
IN YOUR LIFE THE ANSWER BETSY TOMEEBT THE W MAN, I
--~5 pr / ((L VERY NICE TO HER!


white mates in two mo s.
against any~ deence thya J.A
Schurmann). Earlier sleso

to orin eymo pised White' a
maserti s: m nte, problem
expert; 7 minutes, aod 15
mnts. averale: 30 minutes.


--SOLUTION NO. 9620 - ,

Chess Solution
1 B--K8 fthreat 2 Kt--K3). T AN
II 1 .. P--BS: 2 Kt--Kt. or I 0 1
IlQxB8; 2Kt--K15,or ffK--BS:
2 KNx Q or I/ K---qB: 2 ~Cc







w ord. ea ch
seGr.tter noa ,
word ~ ~ o mut onan he lars
leterandthre m nUstbea



*. ord ms, weonodn : a ords.
Chester CSNUT nherest sen set
acut oe scllt sntttl sita n shnt
lh t, th' thlnr ino octn such su
no~~~ ~~ C.9rnrc. Tod'


UINOF YESTERDAY'S PUIZLS


APA RTMENT 3- G By A1 a K otsky


DelerM Zo: Bet Val:

VgN



AEJ1032




West he 9. How
should declarer plaY 9
ANALYSIS : With an inescap.

hp. Assumnhowom th
South' clubu canI bI e dis-
carded on dummy's fourth

bloe, then, that wanting

asateeete ple iaabu,

neads~m. hr~m out W Q

Wes East
O QJl0882 0943



-..... ou









hl o. 7001. .Rn ~ by e TIM cK
1.Ise a in )to tind oneces. ts
mene (6)egKnn h e
u. Accept the Job. (0)ttrp
on~tasiono anas.). tene)a~
Iet.Ters. ) t.ernl.(







Sl. Soeldtr.b (3 T. Iobn. (4)
*a. onea ant tim pe. er (s)
O. Geaoir. we s eies
a. They rely needfo
n. oilc~o nrul. (U)
4I. GlbeLrtola panrine. (3)
If T~r. (1 79.10EtM (8
II. Foe tr b inswaer In.(
L'. Pa rent. dd u
ta. ael rbon


18. Th oay rJ 0 ltr I
I I t o bters. te I. 1
lU. Sitremt.
(3) rsera' slto


STE VE R 0PER & MI KE NOMAD by saunders & o ver gard

YES, BO" -1tJU THAT'S WHY I'M HERE, DON'T JIST STAND
"B0 ST/LL SAID THA;T JEVEPAL DA~RLING -TO BECOME THERE, JOKER.'
/NSISTING ON ZY S TIMES. i MRS "BO" BEESEj Klf5 THE BRIDf.

MIE< AS *
THE Ir cr
PROS&~T/Yc

1 THINK IT'S
GREAT, HONEY! I ALwAYS~ RJ IAND I HouGHT You
SAID YOU'D MAKE 60ME ~'C BI~I/-1M MhlEANT 10D BE A~
MAN AIGOOD WIFE./ GOOD WIFE

FcR.O.


Monday, April 9, 1973


cARROLL RIGHTER'S

Hf"cOIK R'OPE
treen the CarroN Rihter Institute

GENERAL TENDENCIES: Much activity
getting in supplies, taking steps to improve
home or office. Beauty treatments, or other measures to
improve personal appearance favored. Be happy
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Do whatever will improve your
appearance and show thoughtfulness for others that will bring
good results. Get into business matters that are important and
handle them well. Stop being so belligerent.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) If you show admiration for
your good allies and friends, you make big strides forward
now. Do necessary shopping today. Avoid some situation that
could get you into trouble later
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You may feel a lack that is
not true at all, so analyze your situation well. Go over your
budget nr eehmina e whtvryo n onthger need. Plan some

MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Do whatever will
make those you admire feel more important instead of
criticizing them. The social is fine as long as you stick with
cEo niul 2v2atm Aug.'l 2 dy h eornth ams you hve
and quietly go after them, but with vim and vigor Take care
of those home affairs that require your attention. Show you
are conscientious in allyou do.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Begin the week properly by
Getting in touch with good friends and showing you can be
helpful to them. Some new friend or associate may be of
assistace to you mn the future, though now somewhat of a
bore.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Get into the outside tasks that
can give you the success you want and the respect of those in
mig c ito~n. aeyourD talents eo iaobag atd me sur
others.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Look into new outlets that
could become part of your living and make new associates of
value. Get into the studies that give you the information you
want. Don't permit others to intimidate you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) With the new week
you can delve right into the tasks that are important to your
welfare early and get them behind you quickly. Talk over with
mate those fascinating ideas Get the right slant for the future.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Don't start any argument
with mate or an associate or you can certainly regret it later
on. Keep the promises you have made scrupulously and do not
lose your temper with anyone. Avoid one who talks too much.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Show enthusiasm at your
work as you start the new week and make a fine impression on
co-workers who then cooperate. Plan rest periods so you do
not get too tired, can do your best. Think.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You have plenty of energy and
should use it constructively instead of just running around
having a good time. Avoid that jealous individual. Plan time to
smooth out that hobby you like so much.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . he or she will be
one of those individuals who will want to destroy almost
everything around him or her while young, or take things that
belong to others, so teach early to have respect for the
property of others as well as own belongings Give as fine an
education as your child will take, and fit for a good career in
whatever the forte may be. Fine ability at languages here.
Sports are also a natural. Handle with wisdom
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


I I Oki Q r Fu.Snl..s,. .. ...s.. Vson w ~l na1...,
"Hopkins is no longer with us, but his empty chair will
serve as a reminder to: ; yone else who disagrees with
me.

Rapert and the Mixed Magic-25


It shall be done Eager
to take up the Wizard's
challenge, the Sorcerer stands
in front of the cage, "Keep
wit m little bea, h

Rupert clings to his friend's
robe, nervously wondering what
will happen. The Sorcerer


swings the fishing-rod to and
fro, at the same time uttering
magic words that Rupert
cannot understand. The room


the fis~ hing-od.~n OhdearI
hopete nothing-rd goes"O drwrong,"
gasps Rupert. .


"It's next to impossible."


1. Grape
S4. Greek letter
.7. Arrears
:11. Ardent citizen
:13. Hebrew
.measure
. 14. Declining
:15. Disclaim
10. Clip
11f. Glorify
:19. Encomium
'22. Channel
24. Hypothetical


28. Legal action
30. Division of a
poem
32. That man
33. Represent
34. Oil of rose s
35. Cotton thread
37. Ophidians
41. Isinglass SQL
42. Perfume bag
44. Black
45. G.I.'s
protection
46. Turkish titles
of rank
47. Potato bud
48. Handle roughly


DOWN
1. Poisonous tree
2. Idle
3. King of the
Huns


4. Secure
5. Boar
6. That thing
7. Extinct bird
8. Loom
9. Underground
10. Irritate
12. Mature
17. Go-between
18. AIluvial deposit
20. Specific
21. Egg-shaped
23. Article
24. Medieval
money
25. Dwindle
29. Glutinous
31. Mountain
spinach
36. Utters
38. Boutique
39. Chinese wax
40. Predicament
41. Marble
42. Oriental sauce
4 Tomahawk
ChefmiStry


016@ Irbther


Ch8s
Br LIONARD BARDEN


WI~PE BXR FEET.


Brother Juniper


OC(, MR. D!TeERS iM SUR
SSH E woNJ' BuY ANY THhJ G
SWEl
DOEShiN
weep


ACROSS OR




rr I I I I


~- ~ ---- ------~~ ---~


luy--i 1- -- -~ -~ -- -- -


The following is the lineup for
tF SoRrov'st'r cing.urog.
ISc.HalfUDally Double I3
2. Fair Lady I13
3. Dusty Wind II 3
4.S uthern Star I1
6. Ladv Rolle 113
HI arn~k sun Ihw I1
9. Connie II3
Sub.
Tamet Dial 1
Forest Fire II I17
S CNDAC 4V2 Furlongst l
2nd. Half Dally Double
2. LayL cks I1
3. Glory Stopper I13
4. Lady Fly 113
5WnteddMan I1
7. Mrs. Conch Salad I16
M. ellDw F:der 1
Sub.
drat Surprise I16
Re iggy Bank I16
THIRD RACE 9 Furlongs.
I.Mlentone 1as
2. Magic Woman 112
3. Miss Lene 112
4. Young Bahamian I15
5. Lady Sunshine I12
6. Royal Son 115
7. Coloured G;irl 112
8. Hydra I16
9. Last Hope I12
Sub.
Big Deal 115

Rockola I12
FOU RTH RACE 4Vz2 Furlongls.
1.Scorpio I16
2. Ring O Fire (Zipporah) I16
3. Wild Fire 113
4 o Marry Go I1
6. Golden G;uinea 116
7. Arles Moon 116
8.Miss Brite 1
Sub.
FIT RACE 6 I'urlongs.
IS~pans sohohn I
3. Lucky Girl Ill
4. Spanish Contessa 116
5. Gur~smoke I1 1
6. Sweetness I t6
7. Four V's 116
8. June's Joy II 11o
SIXTH RACE 9 IFuriongs.u
1. VIlrt I 13
2. G;o Blily G;o I13
ub jni Belle I1
S. Anonymous 111

8. Ugly 113
h. county ll3
PIe Child I
Miss Constance II 3
SEVENTH RACE 9 Furlongs:
t. Roman Dancer 117
3.I ed Heat 1
4. Tam Twist 114
5. Miss GIT O Ill
6: :l,9pyr 1:4
EIGHTH RACCE S Fudlongs.
1.Chinat~oll 112
2 ilge ueen 11
4. Lady Marina 112
5. King Fire 116
6. Sir F~rancis I16
7. Miss Sharon 116
8. Consider Me I16
9. Step in Line 112
Sub. Daothe ia 11
NINTH RACE 4Vz Furlongs I
Her Heel, 2 --Leaping Lena, 3 -
Lady Cleo, 4 Miss Marshabor. 5
Black Magic, 6 Little River, 7
Sansouvina, 8 Fail Safe, 9 -
Sugar


~) ~ r~l t I~ r

,JI~ L~ I ~J1


12


Action continues tonight
whe mstN a au Latue

A.I. Adderley gym.
Luxembourg's Mr.
Basketball of the Year,
Jean-Paul Kremer, led a brief
second half attack and scored
16 of his 18 to move the
Sanic~haufers three behind at
63-60 following a 14 point
deficit. On a Colonels' turnover
with less than one minute
remaining, Guy Simon saw
them one behind (63-62) on a
jumper.
Player/coach Wenty Ford
whm returned setenipora il
training in the United States,
controlled the last point on an
assist from Dewitt Hanna. Ford
contributed nine assists and ten

s".':d by Quant and Keith
Smith, who controlled 14
-,. ~- ---,.-


rebounds and scored 12 points,

ith olonels34-ump If toia

However, Kremer and
Andre' Perka who scored 10
and added nine assists sparked
a rally that moved the visitors
four behind at 60-56 before
Quant came through on a field
goal and free throw moving the
Colonels to 63.


Nassaa Stadium.
I`hls figurer s to, be Obed 5 '


,1d~Issor of1 ()ed. "(;ross should
sawri.l I I th 4leptical1 fans who
Iceel thati Obe~d Is being brought

(Irow~ whoi is raited next to the
Jamen hampion Bunny
GIrant
Co II ~ l t is." saiti b r


obaig the experience
nesry to, mee(t ralted
rIlyhter\ 1:lisha ha4 the theory.


However,. in his three fights
this yourr, Obed has really had
o~nly one test. a January thriller
against l'uerto, Rico s Sanly
loirrrs. Ii subseqluert nt mtc~hes
with ( anada ns ~lerry Hlaywood
in1 I ch~rruary and Al ('ook ,f
Flolrida~ last month, Obed
sipl otclassed his

lr < oakley was quick to
point11 ou1t through that
lIIrccc vod nd ()) were no
\ u p s.' "o tese
l'ighters." he said "camer to
a~ssau highly regar ed.
Hlaywoocd, the C'anadian junior
miiddleweight champion, had
the added distinction of
lighting world rated fighters. '
lr. ( oakley went on to say
that they brought himi all the
way from~ Luabrador at great
expe~nse anid "I was the most
surp'rlse person in theplace
when he went out so early,"
in reference to C'ook. Mr
( oakley pointed out that he
h ad eaten F; lor ida
State mridcdleweight champ,
D~enis Riggs, and was an
amnateur champion before he
tulrnedc pro. "On looks alone he
f'iguredc to mlake Obed step
lively but again, Illisha won as
he pleasedl," Mr. C'oakley said.
"Pecrhaps we juist don't realise
how good Obed Is "
WINNING; BOXI:R
In selecting G;oss as: Obed's
opp onent Mr. Coakley
explained that for three years
they have been trying to make
that match. Like Obed, G;oss is
a winning fighter having lost
only three of his 20 fights. le
is coming off a unanimous 10
round decision over Jose
Mlerlndez of Puerto Rico in
Kingsto~n on March 31-
"'Jamnaicans who have seen Roy
tell me that I amn taking a
gamble fighting him. But Obed
has aI timnetable for a British
I'm~pire fight this year and Roy
Gross is a good test to see if he
is ready," Mr. C'oakley said.
Tradition, however, is on
Roy's side since rarely has a
top Jamaican boxer lost to a
Bahamian. Allan Hlarmon
demolished both K. O. Parris
and Tidal Wave in the early
sixties. while Bunny Grant
battered Ray Minus in 1968 in
t we most notable
manifestations of Jamaican
superiority. However, the age
of I'lisha Obed is here with the
authority to change things
dramatically.
Obed returns to Miami
today to continue his training
at the Miami F:ifth Street Gym
under trainer Moe Fleischer
who had him for his past few
fights. Hie had already started
his road work here, but Obed
explained that he would rather
train in Miami where there is
better equipment and sparring
partners.
BRITISH1 TIT'Lf
Obed said that he loves his
work and finds IFleischer a very
good trainer. "Hle is one of the
best trainers I have ever been
around," commented Obed. "I
understand him and he
understands me.'
Obed disclosed that he is not
concentrating too much on the
middlewreigh division because
at that weight he is slowed
down considerably. However
his sparring sessions consist of


WINDIES DISHISS
G;I ORG;ITOWN. G;IlYANA
(AP') TheI West Indtics gainef a


first innings lead ofT 25 runs ~ver
Australia o~n the thiird day of the
fourth Test Mutch here Sunda hv
dismissinge the Aussies for 34I in
their reply to the islnoder 5s 366.
It lo~okedl at onei times ;r if
Australia, 99 for 2 o~vernilrht, would
secrure a comfo~rlrtabh- leeway.
especially when lunl (IhaI(PpeI ~ll nd
D~ouF Walters hadl taken the totusc( to
226.
IBut Charrppll wasl~ df~ljihmisse after T


I e









on


mniddleweights. Once he gets *6
past G;osF, Obhed said that the
British Emn-pire welterweight
division will be his next step.
Hlonouring the boxing
potential here in the Bahamas
Obed said that what is needed BAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT CHAMP ELISHA OBED,
here is adequate trainers. rated number 10 in the British Empire welterweight
Moreover. "most of the division, signs the contract that will put him against
fighters around here when they Jamaica's number one welterweight contender, Roy Goss,
sart tto make itthin bohx ng, the on Api 3 he cobn act emyc na cin at ahe Trbun
and start nrnning around doing year. Looking on is local promoter and Obed's advisor,
foolishness .. like drinking," Wilfred Coakley. PHOTO: Philip Symonette-
Obed said.



let Set knock Becks into 2nII. spot
JI.Tl SITl "lTHE UPSE.TTERS" stretched their win streak to four in a row Saturday when they crossed the
plate for two in the bottom of the seventh inning and defeated league: leader-, Beck'e Bees 7 6 dropping them in


KENTUCKY

smith 6
Hanna 5
Turner I
W. Ford 5
u. ~twick 10


COLONELS

142
9 3
4 0
7 1
27 0


fereport llfiurneane andI thl
Nassau JCts bing/l relunded.
said B.~l`A. IA resident Jeffrey
Williamsi in a press release
Alter anl exCcultive' meetings
on k~nuary 9t wrhn thie New
P'rovide~nce Amenricanl Iootball
La lit han~lgcd its name to te
Associa~tion, a deadline for fees
for the 1973 season was set for
payment on or before Mlarch
-1. the releasC explained.
However. ,r on Mrch 17 when
it becamen apparent that only
one team te F~reeport
Iluiirrnean were prepared to
meet~r the \iiadhneir thc e~lecited
ullic~ers ex~crtendd the6 dedline

"Meetilinus iihedulled for
SApril 1, thenI April 8 could not
'be held due tot the fact that
only represenltatives fromn th~e
Jets along with telectedl officers
were presentl thie release said.
Ais a results,; a meeting Is now
schedule~ l ed~ fotr dncsda~y knight
Ri fu nd 'I h1ere by
ngSmyserve naheecc thait if the
sigenoteals Iia 1 ~ it lit to
nis re d a tcd this 111 etinig on April lo
d Watkins. all electedl offiers will resign
Johnson s
t field anid an1d fund1S paid by the I report
ier Sidney H~urrica~nes anid Uassau Jets will
defeated be refunded."' Williamns said


AMERICANW FOOTBlLL

ISO UTlRIlUW IlLRL



A;?ILU RE by member teas
of the Ba~ham~as Amrlerican




a~ll eletctd officers lozling their
posts and~ fundsJ paiLd b\


LUXEM 3URGH(
Perka 5 8
Klewel 4 5
Kremer 9 5
Scumacher I 7


Multier 1 s


second place a half game out.
liig Q Marketers continued their
stride for prominence and scored all
the runs they needed to win In the
bottom o~f the first inning to defeat
Paradise Islalnd S-2 Saturday and
take a half game lead in the
Ilahamas Baseball Association's
1973 series.

soent on inn th sec and one
the third before Jet Set came uP
wthtwatin aahne bottom of the
Roosevelt Turner scored his third
run of' the game and Sonny Haven
and F'red Taylor both scored one
eac:'h in the top(~ of the fifth as
Becks otscoed et Set 3-1 In that
inn g aend moved ahead 63botm
phase moved Jet Set to four on a
ilde pitcthhantitLoul.s Mhce ax s
drove in Eugene Thompson fo~r the
tipselttrs' fifth run.
Jet Set continued to keep Becks
scoreless and came up with two
winnitnhl r shlandthe koo mori t
fly into right field knocked in E.
Mcq)uay who got on with a single.
McK fseyoncfjirt end uth dwn
error from short stop sent him
h paradise hurler Billy Gilbert got
off to a slow start and walked the
first two batters Kendat Munroe
and Randy Rod ers. He however
stopped Vince Abury on a strike
out but crammed the corners as Ed
Motxhee was given the third free pass
Continuing his complimentary
passes, Adrian Rodgers and Eugene
Hilggs, the fifth and sixth batters
respectively, were also walked and

ane dg s ain doe uo she th
run. Adlal Moss cracked a sinle
into left field which afforded him
edo rbis andn Bi.Q a 5-1 lead at the
Sammy Glover scored the
isa derother run In the top of
Adrian Rodgers, the winning
pitcher, gave up one hit and Roy
Hegrs inoe au the bedtunnp fi
outs. Randy Rodgers at shortstop
contributed five assists.*
Paradise Island took back their
loss oneSdund y adepo cesd onitheh
fielder Sammy "Bookie" Johnson
shot a two rbl single into his
postilvnthn tle a tm oftec fth
over the Saints behind the three-hit
pit iane~ eirk mi first bit as
centre fielder Eddle F~ord, who
double, pushed the saints ahead
when an error sent him home.
~The islanders, however, evened
up in the bottom of that inning on
arun by first baseman Colin
Th~lompson who scored on a walk.
D~el Jane fizzled out one, two,
three in the top of the fifth to bring
on Paradise's two run fifth inning.
Errors put 11oyd Watkins and
IDewitt Johnson on base! to bring up
Summy Johnsonl with two down.
With two down, third baseman
Richard Lockhart doubled into
riaththfefled an asttdriven inlbso
followed with a double.
Jet Set take on Bahamas
Blenders in the only game
scheduled for tonight 7 o'clock at
the Queen Elizaabeth Spoets Centre.
STAND)INGS
Big 0 Marke 8 I
Becks Bees 8 2
Sclth Beer 6 4
D~et Jane 6 6
randmas sBlennders a 8
Hearstle Lumber I 9

Brt$ I($dj Mlst) $
AUGUSTA, GA. (AP) Peter
Goster huis. a, gloe-trotting
E:nglislman of nutch heritage who
plays out of the! Fiji Islands, stalked
out of a scramblingl pack with a
four-under par 68 and established a
thre rostro e ld Suonudnay in
37th Masters golf classic.
oA ilank yte un ser wto nu
Ousterbuis posted a 54-hole total of
21I, ie funde piar on the Aultustu
J. t'. Sneud, a raw-boned 31
ya-li nephew star vteahno San
came to national attention when he
challenged in the 1972 Mansters, and
veto n oBob is mtet, t e 16
next at 214.

AUSSIES FOR 341

playing a magnificie~nt knock for
109. and Willett wo~n an appeal for
LBW against Rodney Marsh to put
the score at 306 for 6.
P'lay after the interval erupted as
West Indles spinbowlers and
seumers Bo~ycer and Holders, aided
hv magnificent fielding, erased the
rest ofthe Australian tail, despite a
capital effort worth 81 by Walters.
Hle struck eight fours before
being splendidly caught by
w\ickletkeeper D~ervck Mutrray off
(;ibbs.


1)


-%





1;\-6


C'OMINC IN O`
WINNING RUIN follow
DBoke" Jon hrbi
at the plate by Floye
Waltkins also scored on
single. Looking into lef
partly hidden is catch
Iel an~e 3P-2 POT :a


4 1


THOUGH CLOSELY GUARDED by forwards Teddy Muller
and Andre' Perka, Bahamas Amateur Basketball Association's
Sportsman of the Year, Sterling Quant, found enough room to
pop 23 points and take 27 rebounds to lead the Kentucky
Colonels to a 65-62 victory over 71 Sanichaufer of Luxembourg.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


Monday, April 9, 1973


Whr Eribrune


RATED W0. 10 IN WELTER DIVISIGH



Ehisha Obell signs to




fight Jamaican W0.2





By Gladstone Thurston
liAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT CHAMP ELISHA OBED,

we -intly r Jeds nub10 among tht gto ten contenders of t e

championship of which is vacant takes yet another step
towards international recognition when he takes on Jamaica's
number one welterweight contender, Roy Gonss April 23 at the


Quant stars in Colonels



win over Luxembourg

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
BAHAMAS AMATEUR BASKETBALL Association's all-star
most valuable player and Sportsman of the Year Sterling Quant,
in a command performance yesterday, ripped 27 from the boards
and scored a game high of 23 points to pace B.A.B.A. champions
Kentucky Colonels to a ,65-62 victory over Luxembourg's T 71
Senichaufer, in the first of a three game tournament.