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The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03315
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 5, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03315

Full Text
I I I I I I I


ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
-ITELEPHONE 77303/77778-


Price: 1 5 Cents


Thursday, April 5, 1973-


VOL. LXX, No. 114


I ll 1 1> l 0 \


will111 par~t ( nIn I Nati on al

11 hew he lBs of New~
and ~Lclns the Ba~nll T~ .~( hama


to, mnustr thc \trenecth oft all


. cle~annrg New\ P'rovalice of alll



( ommlllitter. promiesC
Schooll ch)Ildren1 ( J1 al ages
will bc Inlvolvled. no~lrt merely' to
help corllect litter, b~u

c~hildl re~lalvanon ofI the need
fo~r every c~jiturn to heliP keep

"We II ncve~r L
jtltter reel 1'()and( untrl New
I'rovidenlt' haS for o~nce a base
( cleanliiness to start from."
slo d Alexande~r \tc( orquaddle..
itelf Hecalth Ins~peitor of the
~imiistr y of 11
T~lhats whyt wec feel thiat our
scheme lo S national
( lean-lip Weekl 14 so important.
If literally e~cveryne on thie
Iislanf man,Ii wom~ran and child
pitcher\ rin thlat week to do
lus or hrhit to~wards
surppleme~ntingl the Iutine
clean up rcah of the( MlInIItry, of
Health, the Ialandf will be
clean by Sunday, Juner 3rd
"Onice hait I\ ac~comrlplhshed,
wVe believe that~ the Lamlpaignl
ofI con1Stant1 reIndersllC we are
planning for allmendriaand the
stne~t enf~,oricemen of the
antl-hltter law whlch It wCIll
thecn he fea;sible fot the police
to, carry out will mlakce the
careless latter bug a Conslpleous
Iellow whio wrill sooln mlendl his

After Natiocnal (`lean Up
Week. the (collnunittee s themee
will bc "You icaleand It up!
Now let s keep It ile3n!"

I. plned M atio~nal

\~ic(' orcluotiate iconcluded.
1)etails will be~ alrctnnouced later.

FUNE RAL SERVICES
I UNI RA L Ser vices for M rs.

('alrmichael Road,. who died at
the Prin ess 1 I~rare!rt 110 pit I
con Mona? lolt wingC a tafc
;r < tll h r h B li Id std St.

Sundayt) at 30( p.mn. Father
(;icrge Wallk will oftiC~iate and
intenlrment will follow in the
('at holic Comee lr \




ChurchL W'ilhm I wr rn

Mrs. Grant is Fturvivedl by
one mn.lhol~' Hirt sn. one

tour grandson~is. (;reg~ory
Ke~vinl, laone arnd Scan, f'ive
sisters, one brotlher and a host
of relatives andi friends.


COSDEE DNERU -P:li "oka" Hme
remains thre sole escapee still at large this evening after
making his getaway from Central Police Station along wit
six others at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Accused of armet
robbery, he is jointly charged with Freeport bartende
Wendell Burrows.



P011Ce b Il8tSH & 0 C k O


By NICKI KELLY
A TRIBUNE ARTICLE on the Princess Margaret Hospital, based on information
provided by a staff medical officer, Wednesday provoked a furious counterattack
from Health Minister Loftus Roker, who warned that the government would not
allow any group of individuals to carry on any unethical practice in or out of the
Ministry of Health without putting a stop to it.
Furthermore, he added, important it is for as much of will say that I offered it to
those who were trying to use the time of these officers and every senior Bahamnian
the "routine problems" at the other members of' the service consultant btthey
hospital to bring about its should be used for general refused."
collapse for political purposes health rather than for a Mr. Broker said he had his
could not hurt the government restricted clientele," the Prime reasons for believing why they
only the Bahamian people. Minister observed. had turnedl down the post1.
"There are those who would He claimed the article A~LWAYS OPI N
seek to blackmail this distorted what the Ministry of As for the question of
government, but the Health was trying to do, and communication between
government has no intention of said there was somec indication hospital personnel and the
bowing to any threats from that the information provided Ministry,. he saidl that at no
whatever quarter they come," the paper had come from an other time in the history of the
he declared. expatriate officer who was hospital had there been greater
"I don't think the Prmncess leaving soon. (The officer communication between the
Margaret Hospital should be quoted in The'lribunestory is two groups "dlown to the
used as a basis for political NOT an expatriate, but a janitor."
unrest. It should be used for all Bahamian doctor E'd.) "Anyone can approach me
the people of the Bahamas. "I would have thought that at any time, and I challenge
Whenever they enter that a responsible journal would any memernc in this House
institution they should not have been more responsible in outside or in the Ministry of
have to worry if they are UBP, dealing .vith such a matter," Health to disclaimr that
FNM or PLP," Mr. Broker the Prunce Minister said. statement."
asserted. He was particularly Mr. Broker said it was the
The Minister's indirect concerned that these remarks government's intention on the
reference to the March 31 should have comne from this advent of independence to
article was more specifically particular branch of the public provide an even better Ministry
spelled out by Prime Minister service- of Health than it had before.
Lynden Pindling, who first LEAKAG(E and no group of individuals
brought the matter out when 'One area where there has would be allowed to carry in
House representatives began been some leakage has been the any unethical practice in or out
debate on the 1973 Ministry of Health and the of Ministry without having a
Appropriations for the Minister is determined to stop put toit.
Ministry of Health. eliminate or reduce whatever Referring to the Budget, the
DISTURBING leakage, seepage or flowage Minister pointed out that the
Declared Mr. P'indling: "I there is." salary of the six senior
would not have raised the Declared the Prime Minister: consultants at the hospital was
matter except for a disturbing "I would hope that the over $14,000 yearly plus the
story which appeared in a remarks attributed to this usual 5 per cent housing
certain section of the press." unknown officer is not a allowance.
In this story, he said, an reflection of the attitude of "But it would be interesting
unnamed doctor, presumed to other officers, because it would to note that every consultant
be on the staff of thcPrincess indicate a serious lack and in that category is allowed to
Margaret, was castigating the dedication to duty." do private practice." With this
Ministry of Health. At this stage Mr. Pindling he said, the consultants gtot a
Since the matter had been questioned whether in fact secretary, offices, electricity
brought to the public's there was such a;n officer or and telephone, all supplied by
attention in this manner, Mr. whether the story was not just the government free of charge
I'indling felt it should be dealt a rehash of a matter brought to IRRESPONSIBLI
with, the Hiouse previously by Cat It was true that a
The article quoted a hospital Island representative Oscar Memorandum had been sent to
doctor as saying that the Johnson. certain officers at the hospital
profession had been totally "But if there was such an with a view to holding
ignored by government in officer, then I feel it is a sad discussions regarding
those areas in which they were reflection on the medical consultants' fees, but there was
most actively concerned. profession of the Bahamas nothing final about it, Mr
4 ISSUES which would hold itself out to Roker emphasized.
He named the four basic be humanitarian and "Some irresponsible person
issues of contention as the dedicated." in that group took it upon
question of a Medical The Ministry of Health, he themselves to give it to the
Practitioners' Bill, formation of said, had organized itself to newspaper, but the newspaper~
a hospital doctors union and give a better standard of didn't do them much good."
the absence of any medical service to all part of According to the Minister
consultation either on the new the Bahamas. The standard of the Princess Margaret has never
hospital extension or the medical service at Kemp's Bay been in better shape, and he
National Insurance Act. (the Prime Minister's made it a point to visit the
In addition hospital constituency) had improved various department of that
consultants who were allowed considerably, he said. hospital frequently.
a certain amount of private That did not mean that It was also true that it war
practice on hospital premises there was 100 per cent service, his policy to restrict the
were angered that the Ministry but the Ministry was working recruitment of non-Bahamian
of Health was now thinking of towards this. nurses to attract more
asking them to pay a third of Taking up the thread, Mr. Bahamians as he felt they
the income earned from these Roker explained that there was would have more concern for
patients. a plan to introduce a change in the Bahamian people,
thf wul are cored CP ou tecoho ptal structure relating bWhilethle pa nodejs ilkision
medical officers to the public, "I will not delegate the hospital, Mr. Roker noted thai
members can see how operation of the hospital to facilities had imlproved


any private group unless it is
the government's intention to
sell it, which it does not intend
to do. So long as this
government owns any medical
facility in this control of this
government which has to be
responsible to the people for
the spending of their taxes."
Mr. Roker said that when he

d cdmd toe clohe hiin es t
what hadl transpired in the past
ad diea dih each situation as

Referrn BAH TeANTribune
article, he said that there were
those "irresponsible people" at
the hospital who claimed that
government had got rid of a
Bahamian Chief of Staff and
brought mna white expatriate.
"But it is our responsibility
to keep the medical facilities
operating, and so long as the
PLP government is in power
Our medical facilities will
continue."
Announced the Minister
bluntly: "We brought in an
expatriate Chief of Staff
because there was no Bahamian
willing and capable of
performing that function, and I


sufficiently to make possible
the first heart operation several
weeks ago, and just recently an
orthopaedic unit hadl been set
up
"No one will tell you that
because it is not in their
interest. It is our intention to
further supply the Bahamnian
people with a better medical
oevc on ce t a Han Ho itta
becomes fully operational.


r


















r

,


By SYDNEY DORSETT
SEVEN PRISONERS detained in a Supreme Court basement
cell along with eight others and guarded by two police officers of


ruse that included beating the
to make a daring escape at 3.20

youngt Mlarket Street moicther
andh~ouIsemC'I whIleshe was
returning homle from a public
water facet o~n Wulff Road.
G;owie was arrested after becing
spotted ini a car park lot at the
side of the Generlral P'ost Off'ice
building, lIast Hlill and 1:ast
Streets somie miinuites after his
escape.
Between 9) p.ml. andl 11 p~m.
Wed ne sday, police Ilso
re-captured Lockhart anti
Tucker whomi they miet ini ;n
abandoned house on
Hlutchinsotn Street, liain's
Town aInd Neely was
reca~pturedl near Oakes F~ici
early this morning.
Jamiaican Frrol Hlayden,
with his feet showing signs orf
blistering as he limped into the
Central Police Station today
clad ( in ligh t brown .
long sleeved shirt atnd
maroon-coloured trousers ant
harefoot with hair disheveled, .
hadl bee~n caught nealr the
McAlpine Clonstruction firnt
Farrlngton Road in the vicinity
of' the Royal Air I oce ~c
Cementery. He was bro~ught to
Central P'olice Station at I 1.15

110 smiledl as he got out of
the Land Rover van to submnit
himself to his escorts who hekl
onto his arms and led himi into
the police station to be
charged f'or escape.
DANGEROUS
Still at large, ~lulums is
considered dangerous h>
police.
Charged join ly with"c'
Burrows with armet irobhr r
he washa so committd fNM tra
on a c arge 0f mur cring 1:
Supporter ScIayrnbon d Hat y
Major on Sp cmbr .5 >nl
accused with him in the charge
is bartender "Red Burrows.
I-lorse-groomn Neecly,
Lockhiart andi Tuicker were
jointly chargedt with Herniard
Green, 21, of' no fixed addltress
of robb~ing Ulrick Armbhrister
of a watch andt $30 cash.
.The men are erxpctedl to be
diargid .later with unlawfully

L~ockhart, G;reen andTucker l~
who, along with Ne~ely, were
supposed to have their case
tried hdrc~e Mr. Justice Samul lll
G;rahami this morning, with
Solicitr G;eneral Lntn
Hlilton prosecuting, hiad thcir
cases adjourned until April 26
instead.
M i. Just ice (raat
remrandedt the three rrn custody. S
jugt mc~ntns hetir ti~l t ai
following his re~ipiicpu thI


Sol mo n Baud I 34-yce o~
Blue Hill Road eardener. who
was arrested on a becrl l
warrant, was allowedl an
extension of his hail whien ie
appeared in the Supremlle ( court
this morning following Mr.
Justice G~raham's adjournmntcn
of the case of armed rohhery
against the four youths.
Accepting an explanation
that he was madle to, believe
that the sessions would he
opening this coming
Wednesday, Mr. Justice
Graham allowed an extension
of his hail and set a trial date(
for his case as Friday April 16.


Central Division worked up a
policemen badly injuring one
p.m yesterday.
The seven. Gilbert G;owie,
19, a Wulff Road
laboulrer-mecha~nic, Wendell
Le~roy Un~rrows,2, 5, alas "Redf",
P'hillip' llumets, 21I, alius
"Polka". a waiter, Jamiaican
F;rrol Hlayden, 18, o~f Tlaylor
Street. ('urtis Neely, ll, a
horse groomr, andt high-schoo~l
dropo'uts Leotnard Lockhart
andi Leo~nard Tucker miale
their bul for freedom and won
it, tempilorarily, while they
waitedt to be transported back
to Il. M1 Prisonr after being
brought to enter their first
pleas at Wednesday's opening
of the A~pril A~ssizes by Mr.
Justice Samnuel Graham.
O>nly Hlumes "Polka"
remains at large this evening
since the most recent recapture
of Jamaican E'rrol Hayden who
is charged with the shooting
murder of gas station Haitian
attendant, Emnile Pierre, 26,, on
January 31.
According to police reports,
the sevenment had heen locked
up in the Supreme Court
basement cell along with eight
others while their warrants a
type of admission document to
the prison were being signed
by the Supre me C'ourt
Registrar.
TOILET 'A LL
An unidentified accused
reqluested to urse the basement
toilet and after being let o~ut of
the cell, with help fromt the
others, ove'r-po we re d two
police officers, Constable 240
Dorsette and L~ance C'orporal
489 Rolle.
The two officers attempted
to resist the men, fighting back,
but were shoved into the toilet
aIfter being beaten up. The
accused used no weapons or
any other object during the
fight, police said.
I)lsputing reports that the
o office rs were found
"'unconscious", a police
inspector said thtat "that
account is entirely untrue and
not foundecd onhfact ad ()nc o
the guar s who ha een
b~eaten however, lusd beed

tl sc arget aft pi receiving
trea mlent or an mnjured nee ,
he suit.
f`h e remnta ining eight
prisoners dlid not leaive the cell
with the others although they
were not locked in. The two
policemenn were Ilater found
lockedt up inside the to~ilet and
were let out by police corporal
240 Sidney Decveaux who had
discovered that the toilet keys
had also been taken by the

l'cl G;owie, accused of raping a


walked into the room and
forward to the Speaker's
rostrum.
Mr. Bootle signalled for
everyone to take his seat.
Mr. Rose then positioned
himself to one side and
prepared to take photographs
of the Dyputy Speaker..
The Prime Minister
immediately hand-signalled to
Mr. Saunders to straighten Mr.
Bootle's wig.
Mr. Saunders climbed the
rostrum and started to make
adjustments. Mr. Pindling,
apparently not satisfied with
the effect, stepped smartly
forward, politely pushed Mr.
Saunders aside and gave the
wig a good tug from the rear.
It was perfect, as was
attested by the apliroving
sounds rising from the benches.
WIGGLING WIG
But it didn't stay that way
for long. As Mr. Rose started
to snap away the wig was
observed to shift slyly to the
left, despite Mr. Bootle's effort
to remain still as stone.
After some 15 shots from
both angles, Mr. Bootle and the
House were released into the
outdoors.
As this reporter departed the
confines of the House, there
was the Deputy Speaker
outside, still in his robes and
wig, faced by Mrl. Rose, who
was still attempting more
photographs.
Walking discreetly up behind
Mr. Bootle, Mr. Saunders gave
the wiggling wig another pull as
Mr. Rose took his final picture.
RED CROSS RAFFL 6
DRAW CHANGED
THE BAHAMAS Red Cross
drawing of its Grand Raffle,
which was to take place on
April 7 will now be drawn at a
dance on April 14 at Central
Highway Inn, Wulff Road.
Tickets will be on sale until
this date.
GEORGE MACKEY AT
LONDON SEMINAR
MR.GCEORG;E Mackey, M.P.
for St. Michael's, is attending
the annual Commonwealth

pr et cs and pro edrdT wh
opened Friday in Westmiinster,
London.


Smiling benignly, Mr. Bootle
walked towards the rostrum
completely oblivious to the
convulsive .laughter from
mecmbers whe'n they realized
that the side flaps which
should normally rest on the
shoulders of the Speaker were
sticking forward Like a pair of
blinkers.
The diminutive Mr. Bottle's
wig problems began with the
departure for England of the
tall, Mr. Arlington Butler who
usually occupies the chair.
Tuesday the rebellious
headpiece all but obscured the
Deputy Speaker's one eye as he
fought a valiant but losing
battle to keep it perched
straight on.
In the end ;rl. Bootle was
forced to seize ooth end!! ano'
clutch them tightly under his
chin on threat of having the
whole thing fall straight off.
At 1.50 p.m. today Mr.
Bootle was summoned from
the Speaker's room to preside
over the third reading and
passing of the 1973 Budget
Appropriation.
SURPRISE
It was then that ite made his
surprising appearance. As he
reached the Speaker's rostrum
he was met by chief clerk
Percy Saunders who also
towers a good foot above Mr.
Bootle,
Mr. Saunders, trying to hide
his amusement, lifted the wig
off and turned it right way
round.
In the southern corner of
the government's front bench,
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindlinl and Deputy Prime
Minister Arthur Hian a were
wiping the tears from their
eyes
Mr. Bootle continued to
sil aglicallya he et
trouged te fo kr'
P 11rbe routine fr passage
S .NOT OVER
But the tale of the wig was
not yet over as members and
the gallery were soon to
discover
No sooner had the

te ln ton sau pnmi n than
Ministry of Tourism
photographer Roland Rose


STRICT SECURITY
CONTROL over Ministry of
Health expenditure and
supplies is to be instituted to
make certain that allocated
funds are properly spent for

seniste Lfus RI e re 11 e
in the House yesterday during
the uRgket debaitd that through
the assistance of the World
rylt pOrganizatton t uha
security unit and would recruit
a Director of Public Services to
streamline the operation of the
country's medical facilities.
The security unit would

SALE
Damaged Goods
1 Buffet Server
1 Hutch
1 End Table
1 Night Stand

)B1 rU11 Rlt
NASSAY ONLY


comprise one chief security
offcr three se ior seu tc

officers.
ar"We wnanta e rhw ttsth w
that the people's money and
tasst aedprop rly spent," te
Mr. Broker said that last year
the Ministry had saved just
over $3 million of its $14.25
allocation by the end of the
year "because we instituted
certain changes, certain checks.
Practically all expenditure had
to be authorized by mne before
the money could be spent."
He conceded that this
"slowed down the process a
little," but this would be
corrected by the appointmelnt
of a security mnan.
Mr. Broker asserted that at
no time while he was Minister
of Health was there any


shortage of drugs due to a
shor sy ar' propriation for
drugs was almost $1 million,

spplie r 3,0 anme
supis Mi 0001r will see that
any unauthorized loss is cut to,
a minimumm" Mr. Broker
promised.
Outlining something of the
streamlining procedure he had
in mind, the Minister noted
that over $70,000 was spent
last year on charters alone for
the F'lying D~octor Service, and
he was unable to do a
satisfactory job alone.
"For that amount we can
get at least six medical
officers he informed.
members. it was hris 1:inistry's
intention to divide the
Bahamas into six areas and
have doctors stationed in each


"MY FISHING; VILLAGES :
idea is not as silly as people
thought, because a time will
come when our economy will
be buttressed by agriculture
and fishing," Developmecnt
Minister Carlton E I raneis
declared in the Hlouse this
morning.
The remark followed hlis
statement that, in addition to
the U.S.-financed $10 mnilli~n
agricultural project stated f~r
Andros, an 511 miillion
pork-producing project "is luct
beginning" also on Andros. and
a group of farmers in Abaco
are "reaping huge amounts by
the application of modern


tec~hnology .
The Mlinister w~as discussing
the Gove~rnment a' plans for
agricultural and fishing
industry development,
dliscussed In detail last night by

p'ariame~ntary secretary to the
Mlinistry.
lcre ferre d to a
cont rovercial statemlentt in
Novembel~r. 1970. when he
dec~laredl he wouldl rather the
Bahamra\ return to fishing
village status than continue
being ecclonmicalll controlled
by fore~igners who Invested in
the Bahamias on their own
te rmls


I


ab~


~ribuno


(Resistred wth Potase ofBhma o saeconsson witin the Bahamas.) NassaU an1d Bahama Isla&nds Leading Newspaper


YOUNG



Swonmas





THE RO)I)Y of a young
womlan.. belirted to be~ that of


s ohlu Strcr Nsa u th51

liafter be`Ing \Ipottedi by a
d member of thr Pubhic.
!r Police are investwlaling the
apparent dro~wningp deathi.
Thie b~ody\ was3 takenI to Ilhe


signed ur II 1.o amii


PM# & HEALTH MINISTER HIT BACK AT

TRIBUNE'S STORY ON PMH DOCTORS






Roker raps attitude of some






'irre posible peop at PMH


DEPUTY SPEAKER MAK(ES IIISTORY






HS8 000 W rh H e


his~~~ gi bakad



By NICKI KELLY
ACTING SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE Scherling Bootle made
history today when he became the first Speaker to enter the
Chamber wearing his wig backwards.


toda ony on atlarg;;;~,~CLEA N-UP WEE K


Healt ~~hhi MIttr to ttgte up 0


hsial a ple


FISHING VILLAGE, NOT SO SILLY-FRANCIS












____ _________


n.S. ROL I

OAS IS B11llS


CH ALLENGED
WASHINGTON (AP) The
Organization of American
States general assembly
co-ene ednes~day in a s rit
combativeness over the United
States role in the 23-nation
body.
OAS Secretary G~eneral Galo

Plaza gave expr sion to thi

a odess o Ong ines ecern
pervdsteOSi h area
develjoin action for
Although he did nt
mention the United States by
name, Plaza's remarks were
interpreted assa message to te
Nixon a mini taion thtte
hemispheric community is
unhappy with its performance
in promoting Latin American
social and economic
development.
slz sai the 'aidn of

has increased steadily over the
past year and he recommended
a complete overhaul of the
existing system.
Plaza said that while the
U.S.-mnspired Alliance for
Progress has brought some
benefits, its chief failing "lay in
excessive propaganda that
raised false hopes of results
that could not be reached
overnight."
"Would it not be better for
all, and more realistic, to
replace the alliance with
regular, permanent relationship
between Latin America and the
United States, one that is mn
constant, progressive evolution,
requires no special labels, and
does not aspire to miracles?"
Plaza asked,
Of particular concern to the
Latin Americans is their
chronic trade deficit with the
United States, which has
averaged some $600 million
annually.
American officials, claiming
the U.S. has balance of
payments problems of its own,
have deferred implementation
of a 31h year old pledge to
establish a sche me of
generalized tariff preferences
for the manufactured products
of the developing world. There
,were unogficial reports,
however, that Secretary of
State William P. Rogers will
notify the OAS meeting on
Friday that the Nixon
administration will seek
implementation of this pledge



g g gg g gt
I)OWNTOWN MIAMI






Sige 1o
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


t he c on sumers are
''accomplishing a destruction
of normal business."
At the wholesale level, Dick
N~utfer, president of the Village
Packing Co. in Columbus,
Ohio, said sales to independent
grocers were down 15 to 20
per cent this week, although
sales to restaurants have
remained steady.
Several wholesalers and meat
processors complained they
were caught in the middle
between the farmer and the

DOWN 50 p.c.
Arnold Rosen, president of
the Greater New York
Association of meat and
poultry dealers, said
wholesalers "are being hurt
fantastically." He said business
was down 50 to 60 per cent.
Alex Weinstein, owner of
the W. Grenebaum wholesale
meat market, said "I normally
do about $30,000 a day. Last
Monday and Tuesday we
barely went over $10,0001"
Among the new retailers
happy with the boycott were
fish salesmen.
"We're going crazy down
here," said John Tonneson,
president of a fish wholesale
firm in Portland, Maine. "We
can't cut them fast enough. If
we had the fish, we could sell
10 times as much."
Not everyone agreed with
the boycott.
Mrs. Thomas J. Qualtere of
Schenectady, N.Y., bought $22
worth of ground round pork
loin and chicken, then
complained of the boycotters:
"Why didn't they scream and
holler when other rices went
up? It doesn't make sense.
Farmers should be entitled to
make a living too."
Mrs. Qualtere, one of 10
children raised during the
depression, said she was
harassed by boycott supporters
when she began selecting meat
at her supermarket.
BRITISH COMPOSER
ENTERS HOSPITAL
LONDON, APRIL 5 (AP) _
British composer Benjamin Britten
hats entered a hospital here for
treatment a a heart ailment, his
The 59-year-old Britten was
reported planning to cancel all
engagements for the next three






by many e lso uho t e
when young. Now there is go
nw or thosee wo are Aceling
vigourtem, i's cled P plus He
v~ie Elixir. Yes, He-vite is for
"he-men". Oct a bottle toda
and put adult happiness bac
..... unlr. li


STORM BRINGS FL D DEAtTHSareundtNw nad.T
National Weather Service says an intensifying storm is centered off the
coast of New Enngland and is moving rapidly northeastward. flash flood
warnings have been issued for western New York and flood warnings f~r
n~ortwhoeon New Jeret Mississippi and Missourt rivers have stabilized, but
the situation still is said tol be critical. Levees that have held back surging
river currents are soaked and weak from days of pounding heavy rain and
floodwates.
the saknown deaths thl fomdth flo ds stands at flve. andiabou~t four
Illinois alone.

LODO GA)-h Mrie of gl u peOUmore than one-dollar an
ounce on European markets today. The American dollar was
correspondingly weak. The spurt of gold to 92 dollars an ounce is
attributed to reports that the U.S. Senate has approved an amendment that
wouldsallow American chtizens In the House, and the Nixon administration is believed opposed to the
measure, at least until the international monetary system is restructured.
PLANS TO RELIEVE BESIEGED RANGER BASE
SAIGON (AP)- Military sources In Saigon claim the North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong are are preparing a major military offensive. The
government Military Command today reported the heaviest ground action
since the cease-fire was proclaimed January 28th. The most casualties were
reported In a two-day fight in the northern Mekong Delta. Other ground
and artillery attacks were seoted innthe Cambodian border area north of
Military sources report the Giovenment Command has drawn up plans
for a division size operation to relieve a besieged ranger base north of
Saigon. The operation reportedly is being held In abeyance until all efforts
to end the slege through the truce machinery have been exhausted
FRENCH INTERCEPT SOVIET CARGO SHIP
saBRESr n hRANCn trPerAoineto tcargc yeselapp hd smyramm and
halted the Russian ship and put a boarding party aboard. The Soviet vessel
Is now being escorted to the French port of Brest.
nav asixh te board teS thing trawler were oto wit their h Apu Iench
gave no details. The Russian ship is said to have remained in the area for
about three hours and then resumed Its course. At this point a French air
force helicopter took pictures of the freighter which is said to clearly show
tadesor cololiskon tm ittshull Fench lavy authorities say this was when

ARMY COLONEL ASSASSINATED OU'ISIDE HOME
rCARDOBA, ARGENTINA (AP)--Two young terrorists assassinated a
e1-rusl army cottonel outsidehi a me Wed e day, apparently when he
Police said the terrorists crashed their pick-up truck head-on into the car
of Col. Hector Alberto Iribarren a few yards from Iribarren's home in a
suburb of Corkdobdae Aragentina's auttomakikng cstet n it h
the other with an automatic rifle and found Colonel Iribarren, si In,
dazed by the crash, clutching his briefcase to his chest, behind the wheel of
the family car.
WthWnemses aid Irlbarrn resisted the effort of one terrorist to wrest away
Iribarren was chief of intelligence of Argentina's third army, with
headquarters in Cordoba. He was a leader of the fight against leftwing
guerrillas in Cordoba, Argentina's second largest city.
PIONEER II READY FOR LAUNCHING
CAPE KENNEDY, FLORIDA (AP)--Ploneer II, a 50-mlillion-dolla
interplanetary payload, Is ready for launching Thursday on a
620-mlllon-mler journey to probe Jupiter, largest planet In the solar
system.
pearain onn scheduemn fohe~a launch of the Atontau rocket a
The spacecraft will follow the same trail being blazed by Its twin,
pioee i, wic ws lanhe a moth et pn etic s scheduledhto
la early 197s. '
in the vicinity of Jupiter, both satellites are to survey the atmosphere,
ra iattion, htemptratursl, magnetic fields and chemical composition.
supportings sope the a dies Il fulp deptl ine if conditions exist for


I I II


r~~i~~bt~6~481


NO POWER TO ARREST WHITE HOUSE AI DES
WASHINGTON (AP)--A new dispute has arisen over the Watergate case.
Attorney General Kleindlenst says the Senate has no power to arrest White
House aides who refuse subpoenas to testify before the Senate Watergate
invertigatesg committees. But committee chairman Sam Ervin says the
At lrre tat ben was issued by the committee chairman declaring the
committee had no evidence linking White House Chief of Staff H. R.
Haldeman to ilelegl political espionage. Republican committee member
L~owell Welcker said he concurred with the committee statement, but he
would notantetractil haeinu ateentr tea Hadmn okne mf ra
headquarters.

OWMHSNHGO HELD I leN Htt Nepament said today It has no
credible information to support the claim that at least 200 Americans are
stIll held as prisoners In Indochina. This follows a published report that the
Reverend Paul Lindstrom who lead the "Remember the Pueblo
Comrniatee" had learned from secret intelligence sources there still are
The Manchester, New Hampshire. "Union Leader" reported that
Lindstrum learned that the men were held in Laos, Cambodia and China.
Lindstrom said his information came from sou ces in the CIA, South
Vietnamese intelligence and the State Department.
LIFE SAVED BECAUSE OF FATHERS RANK ~
JACKSONVILLE, FLORID)A (AP) -The son of an American admiral
says his Ilfe was saved by the Nolrth Vietnamese because of his father s
rank. Navy Lieutenant Commander John McLain Ill was badly Iinured in
1966 when he parachuted into enemy territory.
McCain told a news conference in Jacksonville, ~lorida Wednesday that
at first his captors did not want to take him to a hospital, but they did
after realizing his father was the commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific


BUENOS AIRES, APRIL 5
(AP)--Argentina's military
po::::"':::ow hat n"::: is
will not block the inauguration
of a Peronist President on May
25
"Nothing and no one will
stop the process which

elcion slh ru igM Jtahsaid
afe h lying Wednesday of
anl army intelligence specialist,
the fourth major terrorist
c~rimne in a week.
"The decision of the people
will be respected at any price,
and the government will be
delivered to the new
authorities on May 25."
liowever, the navy, in a
separate announcement, said
the incoming Peronist regime
"should define itself clearly"
on the issues of terrorism and
guerrillas.
As parteoon heir e action

said guerrilla violence was
justified because of the
"military's violence" during its
seven years mn power.
Thousands of young radicals
and four groups of left-wing
guerrillas supported the
Peronists, but Peronist leaders
say those guerrilla groups
ceased their terrorist activities
after the election.
President-elect Hector J.
Campora met Wednesday night
with interior minister Arturo
Mor Roig, but neither issued a
statement afterward.
In addition to the killing
Wednesday of Col. Hector
Alberto Iribarren, two
businessmen and a retired
admiral have been kidnapped in
the past week by persons who
identified themselves as
members of left-wing guerrilla
groups.
Some observers believe that
the increase in leftist terrorism
is an attempt to provoke the
military into remaining in
power with the hope that this
would provoke a Peronist
uprising and chaos which the
Communists could take
advantage of. Others believe
the guerrillas are trying to
foment an open break between
the Peronists and the army
over the Peronists' campaign
promise of amnesty for
political prisoners.
SHOT DEAD
Col. Iribarren was a key man
in the government's fight
against the left-wing guerrillas
He was shot by five or six
young men who crashed a
pickup truck into his car as he
left his home in a residential
area of Cordoba, 500 miles
northwest of Buenos Aires.
One of the kidnapped men
was freed Wednesday. He was
G~erardo Scalmazzi, an
Argentinian and the manager
of the Rosario branch of the
First National Bank of Boston
Informants in pRa arior said

release.
Am~nthonny R.e Dcuz i 43, oan
Eastman Kodak's Argentine
operations, and Adm.
Francisco Aleman were still
being held by kidnappers.
They were abducted
separately in Buenos Aires
Monday by young men
identifying themselves as
members of the People's
Revolutionary Army.

Peopleso Rmvuoluqt nar oAr y
said the admiral was being held
hostage for the release of
political prisone s.


SUPPLY' WORLDWIDE
LOS ANG'ELES (AP)--A tight
supply of oil will continue to drive
rpth npydc a trolum pr act
chairman of Standard Og Co. of
Caltiornia. "In the foresearble
future, oil will be in tight supply
Trd i pe to t he as

Miller said the corporation was
reducing its marketing budget
because the situation would exist


"for years to come," but added
that more money is being spent on
exploa in a prod action,
H. Haynes said that the company's
t .a. atiere paen noueatn cl""
gasoline stations without rationing.
Miller said the California
steghnodOb its patclpation? I
prod ars tpming s ppliepe o Sad
Arable.


may snag sear ch


for missing G Is

By D~ennis Neeld
SAIGON (AP)--North Vietnam and the Viet Cong said
Wednesday torture stories from former American war prisoners
dhratien to itierferedwith retur of the bodies of prisoners who


packer s & r etadler s

By The Associated Press
FARMERS KEPT THEIR CATTLE AWAY from market and
consumers kept their shopping carts alway from the meat counter
on Wednesday. t fourthday of th eek-long meat be cott.


Memphis, Tenn., said receipts
were "well below normal for
hogs and cattle both; only
half as many cattle were
delivered to the union stock
yard in Portland, Ore., this
Monday and Tuesday as were
available the same days last
week.
Retailers and wholesalers
said business was down, but
there was no clear picture of
whter prices were lower.
A staff report of the Joint
Economic pCommittee o

grocery store prices would go
up 10 per cent this year and
possibly more under certain
circumstances.
The study, released by Sen.
Hubert H. Hlumphrey,
(D-Minn.) disagreed with a
report of the Nixon
administration's Cost of Living
Council which said the rate of
increase in food prices retailed
near zero by the end of the
year.
Kroger stores in the
Roanoke, Va., area advertised
Sirloin, T-Bone and Club steak
at $1.49 a pound, compared to
$1.89 in previous weeks, and
ground beef at 89 cents
compared to $1 09 earlier.
A spokesman for the
Virginia Citizens Consumer
Council was optimistic about
the long-range effect of the
boycott. "I think the results
will show that the boycott has
been very effective," the
spokesman said.
In contrast, however, Joseph
B. Danzansky, president of
Giant Food Stores, a
Washington, D.C., retailer, said
that although business in meat
is down, prices won't
necessarily be lowered. "We'll
drop prices when prices drop
for us," he said.
DOWN 15 p.c.
A spokesman for Jewel
Food Stores in Chicago said
the chain's meat sales are down
15 per cent, but added: "Our
concern righ t now is
maintaining adequate supplies
of meat because of reduced
selling by packers and
farmers."
Dyal Bachr, director of meat
operations for the Big Bear
supermarkets in Ohio, said
sales were down slightly, but
added, "the withholding action
of the farmers appears to be
overriding consumer boycott.
Market figures show that both
cattle and pork prices have

inBeaherd Iso said that about
75 per cent of his stores

blrur hs S tu ea and ar e
that the real test of the
boycott will come then.
Maine retailers also said they
would wait until the end of the
week to assess the boycott's


missing
American officials tended to
play down the statement in the
belief that the Comnmunists
made their statement more
"for the record" than as an
exact indication of their plans.
caThe at'ommurjjst fa n n









SAIG;ON (AP) In
Cambodia, Communist forces
continue to tighten their hold
on supply bines to the capital.
Phnom P'enh the last big
government outpost south of
the city on highway two at
T~akeo is reported surrounded,
Ame rica n B-52 s and
figh te r -bo mbers continue
inassive bombing attacks, and
North Vietnam has accused the
U.S. of a "very serious step of
war escalation" that amounts
to an "invasion.
In Washington. President
Thieu says his government in
Saigon would be threatened if
Cambodia falls to Communist
military pressure. Thieu arrived
in the capital last night after
his two days of summit talks
with P'resident Nixon at San
Clemente
His first official act in
Washington will be to lay a
wreath at the tomnb of the
unokno wns at Arlington
National cemetery. He'll also
meet with Congressional
lead ers and fina nc ial
authorities about post-war aid.
The Senate today moves
toward its first test on whether
U.S. funds should be used to
aid North Vietnam's
reconstruction. There are
indications the matter will be
shelved, at least temporarily,


.1H~n FIf


meeting of the four-party
military team charged with
accounting for hundreds of
missing Americans and with
recovery of the remains of
bhs killed sein action or who
died while heki p ioeo ad
the Communists have very
little leverage in this matter "
said a spokesman for the U.S
teami. Hie added that the
Communist statement reflected
their "extreme SenSitivityn
ovea mte lOqu tosn Tf he NT
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
delegations referred to what
they called their "humane
treatment" of POWs and
pro tested Americ a' s
"distortion" of that policy
S veal fore A ca
pris nes hav rmomplaimerace
their return home that they
were beaten, tortu ed and h l

confinement. Hanoi charged
before that their complaints
were o ce estrated by the U.S.

PROVISIONS
The Jan. 27 Paris pace
agreement provides that boch
sides will help get information
on military and civilian
personnel listed as missing in
action, seek out graves of the

'oteir cd nrs eo oi nmins
flanoi has given the United
States a list of 55 American it
c aims didin captivity. The
United States has listed 1,100
sr iceme wh ower akile o

bodies have never been
recovered and another 1,328
simply as missing.
The North Vietnamese said
they would discuss the return
of remains when their team
chief, Col. Tran Nguyen Do
arrives in Saigon, probably
Sunday. That and the status of
top m sng are th U.S. team's
BIG~ PLANS
South Vietnamese military
sources reported that the
Saigon command has drawn up
plans for a division-size

obele nueed tRangerb cmp the
Tong le Chan 50 miles north of
the capital. The camp has been
under siege for nearly six
wee ks.
The sources reported South
Vietnam is holding up any
relief operation for fear of
t uc n of a n eao natl ta

The Ranger base, garrisoned

surrounbed bon a regmn '
North Vietnam's 9th Division.
Heavy artillery elements and
several other regiments also are
in the vicinity.
North Vietnamese sappers
penetrated Tong le Chan's
defense perimeter under cover
of heavy artillery, a Saigon
spokesman reported. He
claimed the sappers were
driveln2 out, leaving three dead

FIRED BROTHER
In neighboring Cambodia
the Indochinah country where

poe nt a peoane settlements
reported to have fired his

Prig.~n Lo Nor as itro
minister in charge of
pacification and national

meunifcts on.tcut ha

Nol to broaden the base of the
right-wing government but Lon
Nol is believed to have been
instrumental in blocking any
such move. Observers in the
tl bela capital ofNPhnom
have lost only his title and not
the influence he wields over his
ailing brother.
The Lon Nol government
also anno acetd it wilty1

bombing of the presidential
palace .


S AlGO N ( AP)--Nort h
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
forces, reportedly in
preparation for a major
offensive, touched off the
heaviest fighting since the Jan.
27 cease-fire agreement, the
Saigon government announced
Thursday.
In Cambodia, all highways
to the capital of Phnom Penh

Gomenmdent fo ces came un
persistent artillery and ground
at anck atth utel scatS re
Vietnam in what military
sources described as 'probing
activity' to test Saigon's
reactions and feel out weak
links in the defensive chain.
Attempts by Canada and
Indonesia on the International
Commission of Control and
Supervision to put a stop to
the new flare-up of fighting
bogge e down in oprocedund

Hungary, the commission's
other two members.
oH no aRacho cl ied V e

it called South Vietnam's
"'military operations to
encroach upon and take
control of liberated areas."
The broadcast charged
Saigon --"under American
instructions" had been

respo sib1 fi r hu,0 0 nu ta

Government casualties in the
fo ur main clashes reported
Thursday have climbed to
more than 300 and field
reports sai onedpositilon im te

From the provincial capital of
Pleikum was overmun.nfnrmn

stormed in behind an artillery
barrage, driving rrout thd

wouruling Sl government


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.


BeginnerS NO. 2 begins Tues. April 17 6:30
8 p.m.

Intermediate -- Monday April I6 8-9: 15 p.m.

Advanced Tuesday, April 17 8-9:15 p.m.

For further details call
Sylvia Laramnore Crawford
35862 (days) 36351 (Evenings)


Phone! 2-1041


Our beat the heat fraourites from
Europe.
Lefit to right.
Long sleevd, cotton knit, striped
shirt 55.95
Backless, halter, cotton rib. $4.95
Multi coloured buttons trimmed with
peek-a-boo front $49.95


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Nassau and Freeport.


$3.95
$5.955


U-Neck striped T-shirt
Striped skimp tank top


Thunrsdy, April 5i, 1973.


Whr Grthant


TERROR KIlD#APS NOW INTO 5th. DAY


REDS SOUND WARNING


US torture stories &KILLINGSWONT 1Meat boycott in US


P OTS P ERONISTS .
s a hur tan farsners


F RP t


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a162-foot frontage on W~est Bay Street

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I II I I -- I r r


Thursday, April 5, 1973.


~he Zrthtune 3


Thursday, April 5, 1973.


Inrdep8Rd8nC8, a 'pricGIGSS COMMOtlity'



not to 11 measured in dollars & cents


At the hotel he parked and we had a long talk.
He hadn't been to Nassau for a good many years, Hle recalled
his last visit to the island. He went there to form a company.
"I was told,'' he said, "that if I wanted anything done in tle
Bahamnas I would have to deal with Stafford Sands. I felt this was
wrong. No man should have that kind of power. I felt that this
was a condition that had to be changed. Now it has beeni changed
and it has gone to the other extreme which is also wrong and will
ultimately destroy itself."
All of which confirmed a statement I have made on more thln
one occasion in this column that Sir Staf'ford Sands did more
than any one man to build the colony's economy and in the eld
he did more than any other individual to destroy it ... simply
because he didn't know when he had enough.
The most important thing in life is to know when you have
enough.
Unfortunately ... the Pindling crowd are following the same L
line. They aire abusing their power even more viciously than
Stafford Sands and his crowd ever dared to try.
And ... sure as death ... they will destroy themselves and many
other things at the same time.
+********
One night last week I returned to my apartment to find a note
from Dr. Charles R. Burbacher telling mle that Percy Pinder, a
Bahamian living in Miami, was trying to trace me;
He didn't give Mr. Pinder my address because he knows that I
am seeing only my friends while I am here. And so he got Mr.
Pinder's phone number and told him I would call.
wat ha pens th Mr. Pinder is a very old friend of mine. I

I phoned him. He said he had a problem he would like to
discuss with me. Could he come to my hotel?
I told him I would visit him in Liberty City (a new section of
Coloured Town) because I wanted to see what he was doing
Then he could drive me back to my hotel.
Mr. Pinder was a very successful business man in Nassau. ie
was going places wh~en he suddenly made up his mind to leave the
colony and go into business in the U.S. This was 22 years ago. In
all these years he has been a faithful subscriber to 1The Tribunc.
After the Rotary meeting I went to visit my friend. We had a
most interesting reunion.
I asked him whether he was now an American citizen.
I was surprised when he said he was still British.
I asked him why.
He then told me an interesting story. From Nassau, he said, he
went to New York where he made a substantial investment. le
soon found that he had been swindled.
He took his complaint to U.S. authorities in the city and w~as
given the grand run-around.
lile then went to the Llritish Consul General in New York.
Within 24 hours the British Consul got his money back for him.
The case got into the newspapers. The man who had swindled
him was arrested, tried and sent to prison for 20 years.
"I value my British citizenship," he said.
A tragic fact is that he will lose this valuable connection when
the Bahamas goes independent on July 10th.
******t**
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Of man's first disobedience, and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world, and all our woe,
With loss of Eden.
MILTON


EF FEC TIVE APR IL 8,1973

Subject To Gov. Approval.


AHl times are local times.




For Reservations Ca// 77303,77778




Flmre er~a


to increase old age pensions.
"That," said Mr. Pindlling,
"is the difference in
philosophy and its application
to independence. We do not
put a price on independence. It
is priceless."
Mr. Solomon argued during
yesterday's debate on the 19)73
Appropriations that an
additional $673,000 was being
allocated to the Ministry of
External A\ffairs this year that
Night be better applied~ to the
9,000 old age pensioners who,
he claimed, existed in the
Bahamnas,
"The people have been led
to believe that the cost of
independence wo~uldl be
comparatively little, but it is
something that will costl themt a
great deal of money before it is
all over,
"The fact that we are going
into independence at this timre
when the country is not in a
position financially for it, all
we can expect is increasing
taxation, and as long as the
people understand that that is
fine "
MATERIAL, BE'NEFl'TS
ple maintained that there
were many thousands of
people in the country who did
not have the material benefits
catered for in the Budget.
"I don't know what they
would have to say given the
choice. Perhaps the old age
pensioners would like their
pensions doubled to~ $26 and
forego July 10.
Countered Prime Minister
Pindling: "A lot of people do
nott have te Imaterial benefit
appropriations for members of
the House) but I never heard
the member say that the
provisions in H-ead I should be
abolished.
Mr. Pindling referred to
remarks made by Mr. Solomon


last year that he 'vas
d et er m in ed to see
independence work. "but what
he is saying is that it must
wo~rk with little or no
provision."
The Prime Mc-Inister said that
time after time he had
compared the overseas sales
offices of the Ministry of
Tourism to the Ministry of
External Affalirs and said that
the latter did no~t have as many
offices.
"The Budget of the Ministry
of External Affairs has nothing
whatsoever to dlo with the cost
of independenlce,", hre declared.
it was a priceless commodity
which couldt not be mecasured
in dollars and cents.
PENSI)NIIRS
F~urtherimore the Mlinister of
Labour had madeCIC it repeatedly
clear that the old age
pensioners would he provided
for in the Nationial Insurance
Act.
Continuing htis debate in the
afternoon, Mr. Pindling said
the London, United Nations
and Washington missions
would be actively concerned in
the Law of the Sea! Conference.
Preliminary conversations
with Washingto~n had indicated
that the major problems
between the U.S. and this
government o~ver territorial
limits would he overcome.
Countering Mr. Solomon's
remarks about old age
pensioners, Labour Minister
Clifford Darling said there were
6,a2hl8 Id age ensioneommi the
in New Providence, 310 at
Grand iuhamna and the
remainder in the Out Islands.
This was contrary to Mr.
Solomon's allegation of 9,000.
Adding his own particular
brand of tongue in cheek


reaste,1 Marsh Harbou
r ePre se'n tatIive Err ington
Watkinls (FN11I) 4;aid he agreed~

should~ live~ inl spl1endl o ur.
f hi\ is t he wish of t he
peopl who wa nted
imlll~lt~lependenc. Let theml make
their dutlc~l ahmad in style", hie
trumrrpeted.
G;rants~ To~wn representative
Franklin Wilson (PLP) said he
f~thought the' (POppfosii was
m1aking1 ;1n errorT inl thinking
that1 the Harh;rlanua people were
tr!ing to avold paying taxes.
Mlr. Wilso~n aIrgued this was
not~ thie casze ocie they had1t

a re cm ttd to, the
development1~" of the counrtry

to, making11 a1 contlributionl to
the TIreasurv. but they want to
know,~ thart their mloney is being
p'rope'rl) ac~counted for. I feel
o~ur people looking at this
Hrudget canl he assured of this."


Oscar Johnson raps


GiullC~i00 Seb l08Siips

CATI ISLAND) representative
Oscar Johnson (PLP) today
complained that the parents of
most of the children who
received go ve rnIIm eit
sch ofarships ap pe ared
financially able to meet the
cost themselves.
Mlr. Johnson s comments
came in the course of debate
o he tirnl73r i, opriationse
House that he had obtained a
list of scholarship recipients
and drawn his conclusions
from this.
lie urged that the Minister
of' Education take into
consideration the financial
factors involved in connection
with the families of applicants.
"What could easily happen is
that government could end up
subsidizing the education of
the wealthy and rich, andh
don't thid f tsat owa ever Mre

Johson declared. ip.
fle also said he would like to
ask those in the Ministry of
Education to pay a little more
attention when members of the

public and particularly
students from the family
Islands had reason to go there.
The Cat island
representative pointed out that
children were sensitive, and the
staff should not make fun of
them because they were not
dressed in the most modern
ashiohy should treat them as
first class Bahamians. not
snicker and laugh at them.',
Mr. Johnson said he was not
mak ing a blan ket
condemnation of the Ministry,
but students had been turned
around there.

stafl-eto t ndMe nis petopl
right or there will be more
problems. They have to pay
more attention to the
sensitivithoan nne strown t

Out Islands Mr. Johnson
declared.




ftl0Vrtt Il0fal Vic
THEl~ MINISTRY of Finance
is to spend $37.000 for
renovation of one of the
buildings in the Royal Victoria
loel agr uands as part of th
department, Finance Minister
Arthur Hanna disclosed
yesterday.
Mr. Hlanna told Hlouse
members during the Budget
debate that the reorgan was part of an effort to
exercise further control mn the
are ofrM iuisr offered his
ex plan ation after F:NM
represent ta tiv e Nor man
Solomon asked if the


renovations were necessary
because the former Finance
Minister (Mr. Carlton Francis)
left in a temper.
The Royal Victoria Hlotel
property was acquired by the
genernm nt hastt yar ad eit t::

certain of the buildings
adjacent to the hotel itself
would be used for government
offices.


By ETIENNE DUTPUCH
THJIS HAS been an interesting and pleasant day for me,
For the first time since I have been attending Rotary meetings
here I sat with a young man who had pleasant things to say about
Bahamian people
Bill Sheldon has been a spo~rts writer for The Miamni Herald for
five years. His contacts with Bahamians have been limited to the
sports field ... and they have all been pleasant.
First he talked about Association football which is generally
considered a British game. He thinks this is a fine sport ... one of
his favourites.
"It is growing in popularity in the U.S.," he said. "D~id you
know they have a professional Soccer team in Miamli?", he asked,
I told him that the English games, such as Soccer, Cricket and
Rugby were still popular in Nassau, but it seemed that the
American games of Baseball, Basketball and Softball were now
out front
"This is a great pity," he said. "Soccer is growing rapidly in
popularity in the States and I believe it will soon be one of the
leaders here."
And then the conversation turned to young Bahamians who are
earning place for themselves in the sports world of America
"You inalve a number of fine young athletes here in Miami," he
said.
He then spoke particularly of Danny Smith in hurdles and
another young man in basketball whose name he could not
remember.
"Danny comes from Bimini," he said. "I think he is related to
G~omeo Brennan and Yama Bahama. It's an athletic family. I have
written a good deal in my column in The H~erald about Danny. I
think he is the finest athlete from the island. I believe that he will
go right to the top in hurdles,
Danny, who is 6 foot 1 inch tall, has left Miami and gone to a
university in another state where he continues to star in sports,
Sheldon said.
He told me that Jackson High School has one of the strongest
basketball teams in Miami.
Bahamians, he said, are among the strongest players in the
team. Some people here suspect that the school's coach went to
Nassau to recruit players,

On several occasions I have told you about unfavourable
comments on the Bahamas I heard at Rotary meetings here
These were all on the political, business and social level. They
were all bad.
Today we touch another level of life in the islands ... sports.
And it is all good.
I found this information encouraging. This conversation leads
me to hope that a rising generation of Bahamians may, in time,
bring a healthier attitude to human relations in the islands.
From time to time I have told you the bad news which some of
you probably suspected as being biased. Now I tell you the good
news which I am sure everyone welcomes.
This is honest. unbiased reporting. This is how a responsible
newspaper functions.
U~ntortunately many people don't appreciate this fact.
*s****+**
Rotary meetings are open to people of all races. But today for
the first time I saw a black man in the group when I arrived at the
Country Club.
I was interested and went up and spoke to him. He was not
wearing a badge and so I knew he wasn't a member of the club.
"He is our speaker today," a member with whom he was
standing told me.
"What are you going to talk about?", I asked him.
"I don't know yet," he laughed.
"Boy," I advised, "you'd better make up your mind soon."
"I'm not worried," he said in a confident voice," I can take
care of it. I can talk about several things."
I was concerned for him but I relaxed as soon as he stood up
and started to speak. From his opening sentence I knew that he
could take care of himself and that he had his audience with him.
I was sitting with my friend Dr. Milton Coplan who saved my
life when I became gravely ill after an operation at Doctors
Hospital in August 1966. Early in the speech the doctor
whispered "He's good".
*+****~**
A Rotary member introduced him as Harvey Wallace,Pubic
Relations Officer with Eastern Airlines.
It was revealed that Mr. Wallace took a degree in Joumnalism
and Education and taught school before taking the job with
Eastern. He served in the second world war as a Major in the
Corps of Engineers. He is now a Reserve Major in the Engineers.
***+*****
Mr. Wallace revealed that he was employed by Eastern Airlines
to protect the rights of minorities under Civil Rights laws in the
U.S. He deals especially with Negro problems.

I was interested in some of the things he had to say because I
had written on these subjects.
He condemned the double standard usually applied in dealing
with Negroes. He felt that there was no excuse for inefficiency. A
Negro can either do a job or he cannot. If he can be should have
it. If he can't it is damaging to the development of the group if
his incapacity is excused.
He indicated that he thought too much importance was
attached to school qualifications in measuring the capacity of a
man.
"I'm more interested in people who say 'I will' than in people
who have high 1Q's and don't deliver."
That's it. In life the only human quality that counts is ... "I
will".
He kept his audience in stitches of laughter with stories of how
he had overcome racial problems in doing his job.
*******
This man's talk ... and the job he is doing ... make mne think of
two bitter racial letters that appeared in The 7>~ibune recently ..
especially one written by an American woman living in the


Bahamas.
What he had to say showed the great extent responsible people
in the U.S. today are going to bri ge the gap between the rac~es.

After the meeting a Rotary friend drove me back to my hotel.

He was a former Mayor of Miami ... and he may be its Mlayor
again.


THE BIGH1T TO: (BlF) FREQUENCY


DEP:T

2.45 p.m.
2.45 p.m.
2:45 p'.m.



11.05 a.m.
3.00 P.m.
11.00 a.mn.
11.05 a.mt.
3.10 p.mi.
3.00 p'.m.



0.35 at.m.
1.00 p.m.
5.30 p.m.
7.45 p~m.
1.00 p.m.


10.30 a.m.
2.45 p.m.
1030 pm
10.30 a.m
2.50 p.m.
11.30 a.m.
10.30 a.m.
2.45 p.m.
3.25 p.m.



5.30 p.m.
3.10 p.m.


ARR FLT. NO) STOPS


Mo/We
Mo/We
Mo/We


G~eorge Town
Nassau
San Salvador


3.50 p.m.
4.40 p.m
3:05 p.m.



I1.20 a.m.
3.15 p.m.
11.40 a.mi.
12.05 p.m.
4 00 p.m.
4 00 p.m.



9.05 a.m.
1.30 p.m.
6.00 pm.
8.15 p.m.
2.55 p.m.


10.4 a.m.
3.0p.mn.

11.40 a.m
4.00 p.m
12.05 p.m
12.05 p.m.
42.00 p.mn.
4.00 p.m.



6.45 p.m.
3.55 p.m.


DEADiMAN'S C'AY TO. (DMhC)


George Town
George Town
Nriass~au
Nrassau
N assau
N assa u


Fr
Sa
Tu/Th/Sa
Fr
Fr


FREEPORT TO: (FPO)

Nasstu
Nassau
Nassau
N assau
Port-au-Prince


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Fr/Su


402
404
406
408
404/501


GEORGE TOWN TO: (GGT)


Deadman's Cay
Deadman s Cay
Mayaguana
Nassau
Nassau
N assau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau


TnI/Th/Sa
Fr/Su
Mo~e
Tu/Th/Sa
Tu/Th
Fr
Su
Fr/Su
Sa


202
210
23

202
200
214
216
210
212


INAGUA TO: (INA)

Nassau
PoJrt-au-Prince


Fr/Su
Fr/Su


502 0
501 0


MAYAGUANA TO: (MYG)


MofWe
Mo/We


George Town
Nassau

NASSAU TO: (NAS)

The Bi ht
Deadm n's Cay
Deadman's Cay
Deadman's Cay
Deadman's Cay
Freeport
Freeport
Freeport
Freeport
George Town
George Town
Gerg Town
George Town
George Town
George Town
George Town
Inagua
Mayaguana
Port-au-Prince
San Salvador
San Salvador
San Salvador
Stella Maris
Stella Maris


11.25 a.n;. 12.10 p.m. 204 0
11.25 a.m. 1.00 p.m. 204


Mo/W
Tu/The/Sa
Fr
Fr/Su
Sa
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Mo/We
TujTh/Sa


Mo/We
Fr/Su
Sa
Tu/Th
Fr/Su
MofWe
Fr/Su
Su
Mo/We
Fr
Tu/Th
Su


2.00 Pm
9.45 a. .
9.45 a.m.
2.00 p.m.
2.00 p.m.
7.45 a.m.
12.00 noon
4.30 p.m.
7.00 p.m.
9:45 a.m
9:45 a.m.


2.00 p.m.
2 00 p.m.
2.00 p.m.
2.00 p.m.
1.45 p.m.
9.45 a.m
I.45 p.m.
9.45 a.m.
2.00 p.m.
9.45 a.m.
2.00 p.m.
9.45 a.m.



3.30 p.m.
3.30 p.m.
3.30 p.m.




10.35 a.m.

II.25 a.m.
3.20 p.m.



3.20 p.m.
10.55 a.m.
10.55 a.m.


2.30 p.m.
10.45 a.m.
10.55 a.m.
3.00 p.m.
2.45 p.m.
8. 15 a.m.
12.30 p.m.
5.00 p.m.
7.30 p.m.
10.20 a.m.
10.20 a.m.


3.50 p.m.
2.35 p.m.
3. 15 p.m.
2.35 p.m.
3.00 p.m.
I1.15 a.m.
2.55 p.m.
I1.15 a.m.
3.05 p.m.
10.25 a.m.
3.05 p.m.
10.45 a.m.



7.30 p.mn.
5.15 p.mn.
6.45 p.m.





12.05 p.m.
12.05 p.m.
4.40 p.m.



4.00 p.m.
12.05 p.m.
1 I.15 a.m.


PORT-AU-PRINCE TO: (PAP)


Freeport
Inagua
Nassa u


Fr/Su
Fr/Su
Fr/Su


502/407
502
502


SAN SALVADOR TO: (ZSA)


Nassau
Nassau
Nassau


Fr
So
Mo/We


STELLA MARIS TO: (SML)


Nassau
Nassau
San Salvador


Tu/Th
Su
Su


The will to do thle soul to dare.
4,4,4,44

All is not lost, th' unconqlue rable will.


SIR WALTE R SCOTT.


MILTON


Nuu~nms ADDICTUS UVRARE IN VERBA MACISTBI

Being FOun Ho Sa To H The Dogrnas Ofh~o~asrte

SIR ETIENNE DUCPUCH, O.B.E K.C S.G D Litt., LL.D)


EILE EN DnUPU CH CAR RO .S. o.. 'L 972
Publidaer/Editor 19 72 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


F LAM~INOO


Airlines Limited


.-PM CIIIDES FWM's SOLOMON

By NICKI KELLY
INDEPENDENCE CANNOT BE COMPARED TO DOLLARS AND) CENTS, declared Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling Tuesday, in reply to remarksl by Opposition representative Norman
Solomon that the additional money being appropriated for External Affairs could better be usoed


FLLIIHI


Airlines Limit~ed










-~-~ ~TICm~


rn






get professional counseling. Smile, and hold your head high.
And get to know the Lord. He does wonders. Good Iack!n
Abby, it's people likes you, reaching out to help other's
who makle this a better world to lve in. God bless you and
keep you wpell. NOT LONELY ANYMORE
DEAR NOT: And it's letters like years that make my
day. Theaks for writlag.

DEAR ABBY: I am a 35yearo1d unmarried woman,
living at home with my parents. They are semi-invalids and
depend on me to keep house for them. I also work away
from home from 7 a. m. to 3 p. m., so you know I have
plenty to do.
I don't get many really, I don't get ANY] inviltations
to date, but I am nomt lonely and I'm not complaining. My
problem is that I am considered a convenient free baby
sitter for the entire family.
I have thre sisters rad two brothers, all marred with
children. WAhen they need a sitter trhey make it "easy" for
me and bring the children to me. When the kiddies wsee
infants, I enjoyed them, but norw they are wki and haul-to-
handle, and they wear me out.
'Iheir parents no longer esk me, they call and say:
"We are dropping the kids off tonight because we know you
have no plans."
sude y n s'c wau just sport for so long how ean I
tonight"? DEAD TIRED
DEAR TIRED: You've already come up with the right
comblastion of words, now all you need is the courage to
say them. Practice la front of a mirror, rad deliverr them
loudly rad clearly at the first opportunity. [It gets easier
with time.]
Prohleast You'll feel better if yes get it oR your obest*
For a perseml reply, wrlie to ABBY: Bez No. (mM, L. .,
Calif. Mees. Enelese stamped, sef-ddresed envlope,


For Abby's ekoleat, "How to Rave a lavely Weddlag,"
seed SI to Abby. Son smTW, lesr Aageles, Cat s. M*


DEAR ABBY: I wonder how much longer these girls
will wear their bair long and straight as a borse's tall?
The other afternoon we went to a friend's home for a
barbecue where the daughters served the food. It was a
thrighbt sunny day and I could see HAIR shinag in the food.
I assue you, I didn't eat a thing.
RATHER STARVE IN FLORIDA

ADTEAR MRATHER You should have eaten. It's what you
CAN' se tht'srlsy.

DEAR ABBY: This is in response to "Iaonely Guy"-
the 19-year-old who couldn't get a girl friend. I would like
to tell this fellow what YOU told mes when I wrote to you
with the same problem eight years age--when I was his
age.
"Take a good, long, Ihard look at yourslf and take
inventory. Find out who you are, and get to Ule that person
because you'll never be anybody else. If you have hangups,




MLIWBS WIW SHO



There are still a few places available
for children to enter the Reception Class
of St. Andrew's in September.
Age limit 4 years old by September 1st
Apply to the Admiso Off r

PHONE 4-2621


By ALFRED N. FORBES
"HATS OFF" to the
University Players for their
magnificent production of
"Happy Ending" by Douglas T.
Ward, and "Wine in The
Wilderness" by Alice Childress.
As a critic one can only
encourage this group to
explore their talents and
perpetuate them in their
Bahamian culture.
Much too often we
Bahamian drama clubs venture
out of our realm to find
identification. Let us begin
now to stay at home and
cultivate our heritage.
The two plays "Happy
Ending" and "Wine in The
W il derne ss" were both
American plays with typical
"Black American" situations.
The cast of "Wine in The
Wilderness" consisting of
Charles La-Roda as Bill,
Loletha Saunders as Tommy,
Charles Bowleg as Old Timer,
Earl Lightburn as Sonny-Man
and Claudette Allens as
Cnt ia.t Tey thre ullgood

play, their Bahamian accent
became obvious. One must
remember that the actor has a
double role to play, that being



BAHAMAS TO BE
REPRESENTED AT
'SELLERS' CONFERENCE
THE BAHAMAS is expected
to be represented among the
I50 "sellers" attending the
I973 Caribbean Conference at
the Europa Hotel in London
on Monday May 14 and 15.

prhoemotCs br dae betoneren hee
Caribbean and Europe.
ELEUTHERA FAMILY
FIRE RELIEF FUND
A FIRE relief fund has been
opened to raise money to help
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Johnson
and their six children of Lower
Bogue, Eleuthera, who lost
their home and all of their
possessions in a fire last week.
Donations can be sent to the
Richard Johnson Fire Relief
Fund, Royal Bank of C nda
Main Branch, or to Mr. Noe 1
Roberts P. O. Bo 3950
Nassau s x 0


II I - II '


a BWDSHIEosr BErSTBOTIIwRIDS!


DODGE DART
2-Door Coupe and #*Door Sedn with auto transmission, disc braks, power steering,
radio, A/C optional*


8 IK-SM


I


Thurdsdy, April 5, 1973.


4


IParty just another


learn to play more to the
audience.
Sylvinia Stubbs as Ellie was
excellent, and this can be
attributed to her many years of
drama experience.
I am sure that the Bahamian
public would like to see a
produciton in which they can
associate themselves and
possibly find their identity
through drama.


actor- as -act or, and
actor-as-character, You must
perform as an actor because
you are amateur actors and
actresses, and you must
perform as a character because
each actor is a character in a
play.
In their respective roles both
Lolethe Saunders and Charles
Bowleg were outstanding with
just a little over-seting from


the latter.
The cast for "Happy
Ending" were Sylvinia Stubbs
as "Ellie" Venola Rolle as
"Vi", Tony Wright as "Junie"
and Alexander Curry as
"Arthur".
This cast seemed much more
relaxed than the first, and as a
result captured the audience
with their smooth control.
However Rony Wright must


DEAR ABBY: My husband aind I just returned from an
analversary party given by a charming and lateresting
couple who live nearby. They had canapes, dips, and drinks
plus a lovely buffet supper.
As the guests arrived, they greeted the anniversary
couple, filled their trays, and then the men disappeared
into the den to weath a ball game on TV. They paid no
attention to the women for to the host and hostess for that
matter] and broke away from the TV only long enough to
refill their glasses,
I wonder if this is the social pattern we may expect in
the future? Of course family dinners on the Big Game days
like Thanksgiving and N~ew Year's are suffering more than
parties. How do you feel about it? GRANBY, CONN
DEAR GRANBY: The ideal host and hostess permit
their guests to do what they want to do. If the men gpral-
tate toward the TV. let them. But I wouldn't knock myself
out preparing an elaborate dinner for them. I'd serve the
TV erewd beer, pretsels, and froese TV diners.


a

a

1
.5
*


1V shw he b y

8y Ab' 'IlV191an Lifen
e Ites k causessttt~~~ttt~~~ttn re e . Nws sme., te.


ROTARY SPEAKERS
"RAMBLING through the
Records" will be a talk given
by Mr. William P. ("Bill")
Holowesko to the Nassau
Rotary Club in the Sheraton
British Colonial Hotel on
Tuesday, April 10. Mr.
Holowesko will be delving into
interesting stems of title
research in the Bahamas.
Miss Pauline Hawthorne will
be the guest speaker at East
Nassau Rotary Club's luncheon
metn on Friday. Her topic


T. GIBSON SCHOOL
FAIR FRIDAY
T. GIBSON Primary School
will hold its annual school fair
at the school's grounds on
Friday at 4 p. m.
The Hon. Livingston
Coakley, Minister of Education
and Culture, will open the fair-
Numerous stalls will be on
display to raise funds for text
books and other school
materials for the children and
to make a donation to the
she amc Centruseum and


DODGE AVENGER
4-Door Sedan and Station Wagon. Coming soon 2-Door Coupe with & without aluto
trans; dic brakes.


$tt EdilMNt


Hats off to University Players


I


ICR~~i~nCID... .IUw)


Bil leaasmas~l iks di hAl h I e la Adg...eklleln an It.



CENTRAL GARAGE LTD. m~8
Lkr~AUHOR25 DEAomo tul CHRYSLER
OksField Phon~e 3-4711 IteNIOA
P. O. Box N~r-1526 Nassau, lBahamas




I I


I


AT APRIL ASSIZES OP~lWill b



15 pleallnot guilty, three plead



guilty & 2 others fall to appear i

By SIDNEY DORSETT y
FIFTEEN ACCUSED PERSONS, called on to anser to charges at Wednesdays opening of the -n
April Assizes by Supreme Court Justice Mr. Samuel Graham, entered not guilty pleas. Three others
pleaded Guilty and two had bench warrants issued for their arrest. (


I. Use of our Pool and 1-3 mile of Beachtc~omplimenrtary,
2. Mats. Towels and Lounge Chairs (Comnplimentary)
3? Four Championship Tennis Courts Night Tenntis
4. Hi mpn mtee Sa una Baths cComplimentaryl
S5 Putting G;reen (Complimentary,
a. to p c. off Weddings. Banquets and Meetings held at the
7I Additional cocktaill parties held throughout the year
8. Tennis and Swimming Climecs
I 7 O of all sp ca pl a rin an g op di 6:4pm
11. Jtabala Torch Light Steak Cook out (WCed.

14~ Sunday Feature Movie Spm
ISi For those of you who like to play bridge, the Nassau
Bridge Club meets every Tuesday and Friday at 8I:00pjm
its the B~ird Cage

PLfiASS CALL MANAGER'S OFFICE 18001
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION


'''- I----- --


to say. There is a very good
reason for doing :t." Mr.
Justice Graham said.
This was follow-up of a
charge read against Bertram
Bown, accuse gf stealing
Wilton Hanna. Brown had also

ci um tances tha athe PI.t i
the magistrate's court was not
fair," he was refusing to answer
to the charge.
He also put up a fuss when
told that his case would be
heard on May 25, and left the
court shouting "I been in
custody since December. I
been here from December.."


The 21 cases which were
filed by Attorney General
Gerald Collett and Solicitor
General Langton Hilton had
tentative trial dates set for
their hearing.raeaantWlf

Road mechanic Gilbert Gowie

s otlived,dis asoeto beehe r
during the sessions G~owie was
not called on to plead, however
his case will be heard on
Monday following the
sentencing of. Freeport
residents Jerome Watson and
Johnny Martin charged with
the February 6 armed robbery
of the C'anadian Imperial Bank
of Commerce of $22,572.
They had pleaded guilty.
Accused Bank robber Dennis
Knowles, 23, of Deveaux
Street also pleaded guilty to
robbing the East Bay Street
branch of the Bank of Nova






i '













Irnbafflasing rbes
NORF01~S

peMME raM n

t0? 8rOrclliV rltil

doeadint

Tiecauto adrac~cal mrid
woman of today. places her confi-
Oec RM te renfct vnoeost o
because they offer:
Positive Protection against embar-
resin dp beb} cditfoher highly
Positive Protection in avoiding of.
fensive odors with their rapid deodo-
Naotdctiondissolve at normal body
temperature, forming a protective
film, more effective than internal
uo nothr dercte ista toom uesuial
Sold at all sharmacles in packages
of 6, 12 and 24.

Here's a
Norfonrm... amnul
Se emy~l 1m P


Thursday, April 5, 1973.


Scotia on September 29 last
year. He is to be sentenced on
April 11 when his attorney,
Mr. Oswald Isaacs, will plead
on his behalf
mu r g Mo enc, charged with
November 13 at Mangrove Cay,

Anso hareeda dihnesser loun
of manslaughter to which he
pleaded not guilty, he is
represented by attorney Ruby
Nottage. He is to be tried on
May 3.
Wellington Scantlebury
charged with killing in the
course of dangerous driving
pleaded not guilty. His trial
was set for May 14.
THREE COUNTS
Haitian Jacque George alias
"Jack George" pleaded not
guilty to three counts of
housebreaking and stealing and
maliciously damaging property.
He entered the same plea on
another count of stealing with
his co-accused, Haitian Willie
George of Grand Bahama.
They are to be tried on May
17.
Alvin Hinsey, charged with
burglary and stealing from the
Alice Town, Bimini home of
Mrs. Anne Sherman on
February 11 pleaded not

Sfour-member group of
youths, Curtis Neely, Bernard
Green, Leonard Lockhart, and
Leonard Tucker had not guilty
pleas entered to a charge of
armed robbery. The accused
were to stand trial this morning
accused of robbing Ulric
Armbrister of $38 cash and a
Seikoewrist-wate g ncor
with his shirt half-buttoned
and tied at the waist of his
brown trousers, refused to
plead. Ignoring repeated
questioning from the court
bailiff who read off the charge,
he refused to answer Mr.
Justice Graham who also asked
hug his name andhis plea. The
judge entered a not' guilty plea
on his behalf at the request of
Solicitor General Hilton who
said that such cases had been
provided for in the Criminal
Procedures Code to which he
referred the court.
Also pleading not guilty
were Hastings Bethell, charged
with attempted murder,
Bertram Brown, charged with
stealing, burglary accused
Murphy Scavella and George
Smith and Phillip Humes
charged with the November 4
armed robbery of the Texaco
Service Station on Bay Street.
REFUSES TO PLEAD -
Bradley Lightbourne,a
resident of Alice Town, Bimini,
also refused to plead,
informing the court at the
outset that "I refuse to answer
to this charge because of the
P.I. in the magistrate's court."
Asked if he had anything to
say by Mr. Justice Graham, he
replied that he had nothing
more to add. "I want it noted
that in all circumstances such
as these, I always ask the
accused if he has anything else


r
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Informative bookrle, write to:
Nomrwih Pharmacal Co., Inc*
410 Park Ave., New Yorkr, N.Y.100e22


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Ir
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NEW JUDGE OPENS APRIL ASSIZES ii$

MR. JUSTICE SAMUEL GRAHAM, C.M.G., O.B.E., who was appointed a P gt
Judge of the Bahamas Supreme Court on January 30, inspects his first police hw
guard at the opening of the April Criminal Sessions of the Supreme Cou~rt Wd
The opening ceremonies were rather solemn without the colourful RoyalBaa s
Force Band, which left for Atlanta, Georgia Tuesday to perform at that statil's
"Dogwood Festival." Shown above with the judge are Police Inspector Keith
(left), Police Commissioner John Hindmarsh (hidden) and the 21-member honour .
PHOTO: Philip Sy ~ l.'


WWpp t


" You'll find me r





of the Royal Ban









The Royal ~The;. ..

ROYAL BAN K
Branches throughout the Bahanrtaj


Bank


;MEARED





A WIDE RANGING ART
organketd for early Mary by Ste
It is to be held in the old
3 thell Robertson offices, two
kn..ld.'tgs' east of Maura
Lumb r on Bay Street.
Opening night is set for May 4,
from 6 to 8 p.m. The show will
continue for a week, open each
day except Sunday from 11
a.m. to 9 p.m.
At least 14 Bahamian and
resident artists will be showing
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


__


a\~~ UE




















SENSATIONAL INTERNATIONAL VENTRILOQUIST








Also Featuring:
SPAUL HANNA TRIO
Q ELOISE
d? PAT ROLLE
P THE COMPLETE
DRUMBEAT CLUB SHOW

18IIUI %

TICK ETS


Duml dn ofe an extenieUI~~lU V1~'~U

Asis nd esvdtern~ hemsphere AVAILABLE AT THE DRUMBEAT CLUB
ftOADS AND
-~ MMES TAYLOR B TES'Ds relat SHOW PRODUCED BY SPACE KINDLY DONATED BY
.?^.1 5 ebivrt ood enndr
Mge DENNIS WILSON portfolio of the Ministry of Q raor-ar sTTER F OC-CL
NO UNE ONDEGR 17A~laTTlER. ereore rshrn I m the


SNGWS THE G




BLUES

PLUS at 7:00 ONLY
"LEGEND of
NIGGER CHARLEY"
No One Under 17 Admitted.
owing to length of Fam
there winl be Only One Showing p


II rr ~


,Matthau

-Allabout lov
IA nulwrePicture. T
SUGGESTED FOR n
PARENTAL DIS
Reservations not claim
on first come, fi


Last Day Friday
Matinee Starts at 2:00
Evening 8:30

SI TR tYE G. .
Martine Beswick
PLUS
"BANDOLERO" PG
Jamen S aint
PLUS Late Feature

'Phone 2-2534


LAST DAY
Matinee continuous fro
-'Phone
Klua


e nmrr iaie!--.




led by 8:15 w81l be sold




Continuous Showings

"THE GIROL WHOHKNEWR-

Adam West
Nancy Kwan
PLUS I
"A LON RIDE FROM I






FRIDAY I
,m 1:45, Evealag 8:3016 1

ISIleTIMEVSUPIRYWUV, I



1
IOr m~ayr
ulmrn~ g .
Us~ 8 Y -


am

L


Thwursdy, April lt, 1973.


SHOW, probably the largest ever
phanr Bed~ne Cousins.
a variety of forms, including oil
and water colour paintings,
acrylics, wood sculptures,
ceramics and pottery, pen and
ink and crayon drawings,
batiking, linocuts, mobiles and
semi abstracts, fantasy
drawings and experimental art.
Etchings, sdlk screening art and
photography will also be
among the artwork on display.
"I just thought it world be a
good idea to try and organize
one big show for all the artists
mn Nassau who have been
having smaller private shows
themselves over the past several
years," says Stephanie.
VERY EXCITED
"I'm very excited about it,
and I really think it will be the
biggest art show we've had
around here for a long time."
Among the artists whose
work will be on display
throughout several rooms of
the spacious old building, will
be Brent and Steven Malone.
Brent, who is well known for
the versatility of his work in
several media, will be showing


fantasy drawings for the show.
Denis and June Knight will
ash w daeir s Mu silspotter
decorative figure plaques.
While Mrs. Nellie Higgs will
have a display of her well
B2llS SIISIBIZE
BIAI ARTf SI8W
THE BAHAMAS financial
community has responded
generously to an appeal to
subsidize the Bahamas Mental
SHealth Association's share of`
the Nikos Saligaros show, to be
opne by Mr. E. P. Taylor
oDonationro havtehbegun to
various banks as well. These
donors will be privately
thanked when the show is
finished.
Scheduled to open officially
at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, at the
Victorfp. Room of the British
Colont Hotel, the exhibition
will remain open throughout
the weekend from 10 a.m. to 9
pE nb shtula and Su daon
and members of the general
public are invited to attend the
opening tomorrow taking place
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Nikos Saligaros is a talented
young Greek-Bahamian painter
whose work is in the
collect onsNo AiAtotl onas:
Society among others. One
third of the proceeds of the
show will be donated to the




announcd Tuesdathsleo


interest in, two food products
companies operting in the
United Kingdom and New
Zealand.
ths two tras ton aer
eqi alenwhito 1.6 million
availa ble for fu rt he r
development of Deltec's
banking activities, Deltec said.


'Ites anU.Krest o nta wa rol
at book value to Deltec's
partners in this enterprise.
Deltec reduced its
Ishreolding in Swift New
Zealand from 70 percent to
46.4 percent by means of an
Swf ew Zthand sha enged
in meat processing activities for
distribution primarily in
fri ma kts


Dlel ne rational Limited
is principally engaged in
inedmn a merhn


staged in the Bahamra is be r
known flower water colours.
Photo grap her Eddie
Yanowitz will be showing, as
will Lisa Sullivan with her
mobiles and semi-abstracts.
Bob Broom and Max Taylor
will show a variety of artworks
including silk screens, etchings,
Lithograph work and linocuts.
among other forms. Eddie
Minns will have some of his
familiar Bahamian over-the-hill
pen and ink and oil sketches.
Leonard Seaman will have
several fantasy drawings, Mike
Pilgrim some experimental
colours. Tommy Goodwin will
display some of his acrylics and
water colours and Georgina
Cook her black and white ink
sketches of boats and faces.
Several other artists are
expected to have work ready in
time for the May 4 art show
opening.


NIKOS SALIGAROS at work on his paintings in Nassau. A one man exhibition of his
work will be on sale at the Victoria Room of the British Colonial Hotel over the weekend
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Part proceeds of the Sales are to be in aid
of the Bahamas Mental Health Association. AII members and supporters of the association
and interested members of the public are invited to attend the official opening of the
exhibition by Mr. E. P. Taylor at 6.30 p.m. tomorrow.


I

1
5
1






I





I



I


- P


Wht Wrthatte


LeCaL an'IST

PSAINTIMSOA Tilstr
to:.:ds theE om~monw Itt'
Independence celebrations,
Nikos Saligaros will this
Sunday night donate one of his .
paintings to an exciting and
worthwhile cause.
Nikos is returning home to
Nassau from school in New
York to host an exhibition this
weekend, Friday April 6 to
Sunday, April 8, in sid of the
Bahamas Mental Health
Association.
However, he has also
.announced that on Sunday
night he will donate one of the
paintings from his exhibition
to Mrs. Anatoll Rodgers,
headmistress of Government~
High School.
The painting will hang along
with others given by local
artists in a special Arts and
Crafts Independence
Exhibition to be held at the
school in June this year. This
exhibition, although being
staged expressly for In-
dependence, will be a
permanent feature in the
school.


Alrt Show set for early May,


14 resident artists to exhibit


TC3lV~IORROVV


NIGHl-T


CONTINUOUS ENTERTAINMENT FROM 9.30 p.m.


IIIUIM~A g g g


SI RVItTOR M~S SOON


HEART FOUNYDATIONI


~2 r,
u;



iMI




~-~-- ~-. - _-_----_ -- - ---- __ I ___


I_
____


~S~I r~ 1 4


mm rrr O IW O CE IIIY OI ~ fPWWE TRADbE SERVICES IELP WAINTD WLP WAN~TES


I


PUBLIC RELATIONS AND
AD VERTISING SALES
STAFF wanted by leading
publishing house.
ETIENNE EUPUCH JR.
PUBLICATIONS Telephone
35666, 3-5667 or 3 5668.

C9376
EXPERIENCED CREW /or
Sailing Yacht. Must know
cls re eecaes Sd res~u



C9385
GARDENER between ages 25
and 40 to work hours from 8

rqestoed. Phoand 2-1 dyn
7-8065 nights.

C9400
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
with previous experience in the
real estate business. Salary
commensurate with training.
Must know typing and have
own transportation. Apply
DOROTHY L. ATWOOD LTD.
in person. Located corner of
Ei~zabeth Avenue and Shiriey
Street Telep ho nes:
2-8763-4-5-6.

TR ADE SERVICES
C9317
r. V.oANTENpNAtSmeBooste s
f h ms eanrd m et an

next to Frank's Place.

C9363
FOR VOUR building needs
Residential -- Remodellina -
Maintenance Call \7. Patton,
Budget Builders 32656'


C7295
COLOUR TV TECHNICI AN -
minimum of five years
experince including circuit
modification and sweep
alignment. Must be able to help
and train others. Must possess
ownr tools, good salary and
hours.
Write f or interview: Bahamna
Musi Copora ion, P. O. Box



INERNdAT ONLt sRMh o

several vacanclesc fr Chartere
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excel licasaltarieshoau

apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co. P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamnas.


C7305
JOB TI TLE: Repairman
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School or equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years repair and weslding
DU T IES/A ESPONS IBI1LITI ES:
Assist in the performance or
performs work of Itmited
nature in the Inspection, repair,
mnstlasinnoc oand cm eral


oplany, P O. BaI'ox F 100


Freepor .
C7300
sMEc H ICAIL EN INER
heavy duty laundry n
airconditioni g. Kindly anpl
L & A Industries phn
352-5422 n n


LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely f urnished.
$250 per month.Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C9306
ONE EXTRA large two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
aartm ing With ilargha lI i
fu nsed Vctora Cur



a rconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.


CARE SHOP for rent, 3000
square feet, 6th Terrace,
Centrevlille. Can be used as
;tore and warehouse. Has side
entrance. Call 2-1731 or
3-1583

C9308
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking
Inquire 4-2017.
C9391
450 square feet office space
available. Bayparl Bidg.
Pa ida ert S ree


C9388
ATTRACTIVELY furnished

Souse S hr~e2 R dge Roa ,

maid's room, wall to wall
dapretne throu hout ailab

fo lnH lease May2 1t. Phone

C9379
NEW LISTING, Nassau East
Three bedroom, 2 bath,
f urnished, air-conditioned,
large landscaped lot, near St.
Andrew's Schoof $500.00
month. Call owner, 4-2095.

C9382
BASICALLY dFURNISHEz
bathrooms. East $375
monthly. Phone 42228, 42198
eve~ning~s, wyeekentls. ,~

C9384
ONE THREE bedroom 1 bath
house in Cool-Winds Fox Hill.
Phone 42299 anytime.


C9333
FOR SALE
HOUSE VILLAGE ROAD
AREA. Have hous 4
bedrooms, 2 baths unfurnished
- wooden structure spacious
corner plot Village Road area.
Only asking $22,000.00. Come
see any ime.
DIAL DAMIANOS for Action.
Phones 22033, 22305, 22307
evenings 41197.

C9353
HUE FO AL H lsd

No. 3.

UN3 SUAL HOUSE on


Bahama room leading to
terraceS padiosr overton d ng th

master suite, two bathrooms,
cathedral ceiling throughout,
teastefully furnished, 2 car
garage and two cabanas. Price
$100,000. Telephone 4-2239.

C9344 .$75 DEPOSIT secures
.a lot in YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. Payments from
only $80 month. Priced from
$5,800. NO INTEREST. From
70m eted00. Util nti son
from $7,500. $100 deposit.
Tel: 2-3027 or 2-4148
MOR EY O'BRIEN @E q~
ESlT E
C9404
BARGAIN
2 bedoom 1 study 1 bath.
04T3T lasi r felony. Call

C9405
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LTD. offers
attractive lots in popular
subdivision. Prices commencing
lat $3500.00. For information
Call 23921.


IN FORMATfION

CLASSIFIED HOURS:
9:00 a~m. 6:00 p~m. Monr.-Fri.
Setaladys 9:00 a~m. Noon

CLASSIFIED AD RATES
DAYS Per Word Per Day

4 ...........................*********9 c









PHOTO IN CLASSIFIED
(Maxtimum 1 col. x< 2 bIn.

plu nuffitr of word


NO REVERSE PRINTING IN CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY (with border)

~pprorists Display Advortising Rate plus
charge for special Position of 50c per col inch
per ingrtion.

TRIBL*NE BOX NUMBERS;..50c extr

DEADLINES FOR PLACING
CLASSIFIED ADS

day s paper
12No t orNn.Qpr
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY
2 Dys prior to pubieationr.




AdortI$rs are fqueted to deck tin first
appeana t of drfor o orS*ton TM
agggpag Will ha fspnsitate for only one
Ioncoret insertion. ANY ERROR SHOULD
85 flEPORTED IMMEDIATELY. As with
CaioGlgIans aboean nmtser will be issud.

PHONE 21986 EXT. 5

(rr gag ggggt g) g rr orr in advertilitant OR
do put of the publisher, it wMI furnish the
duralr a In 6 wr ao orn al te
adb eonr wed the publisher shal ta otheirw

No agu$rm WHI b giver n UwS, in ltho
Opinion of the newspper, as mror in m al
flgtrially aft~Ct the Vohu of the


wil be ned teac for correction of copy,
coleatiedon ad chduleN. Upo verifiedon

earlet rtd nro ad utmt w b1 made unles
of Wric witS cWI If tas advertisr does
n0t 800W the MI to be nd k, RO odo
for inearnct copy wil ta soooptd.





Sviging or 190ftgn ty advrtisement aghich

clagifltigBMn of my advrtigantent from that
orn d to crom t b pD Cy of ti
*oooo




gaLe 1g eu gn g


L9315




Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING



STEFAICL BANDING
SPEAC ASHO NGETOS
ECDELLENTERVIE
REAOVNABL RATES
CONTACT LYA INDE
OR JCK CASH


PH~ONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2.3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C9299

PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS

F"ohnre Gs ir ~es and tdompt

C8105
TRY US FOR SAFE SURE
SPANG MABC' PNE

ston1-2-a-4.


I -


IN FREEEPORT

TL 352-8608


C7296
TELEVISION AND RADIO
TECHNICIAN experienced
in all types of electronics. Must
be completely familiar with
transistors and other Solid
State devices. Must possess
own hand tools, good salary
and hours. References
esetial
Baamas Music Corporation
Ltd. P. O. Box F-769,
Freeport.
C9394
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
wanted. Island leading
publishing house looking for
best secretaries in Bahamas.
Publishing is challenging and
exciting. Please apply only if
Eo Eare seasUPe Cperso ,
PUBLICATIONS Telephone
3-5666, 3-5667, 3-5668.
C9397
MULTI-LINGUAL MANAGER
(English, German, French)
required for Real Estate
Development Company to
manage company properties
in ement ativi ieur nm da l
operations. Applicants please
wapy in wr song stating
experience and salary
requirements to Love Beach
Clubs Ltd., P. O. Box 6202,
Nassau.


LT a ejnOakees Fe d
Opposite the I n~t


Tel 0 ESS I
OPPORTIUNITIIES...

PLANNING TO BUY
A LOT?
Act now! Hilltop lots
corner lots
Easy terms
Call Frank Carey
at 27667
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
Bay &r Deveaux Streets.
CALL TODAY

W LL ESTA BLISHED
FURNITURE BUSINESS for
sale. Owner wishes to retire.
Replies to: Adv. C9377, c/o
the Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau

FOR SALE

HOM0 STEREO turntable

sT e euen tapteune order Rp
8 Movie Projector. Call 22836.
C9328
TYPEWRITER, record player,
sewing machine, heater, fan,
toaster. AII perfect condition.
Write P. O. Box N8009.
Nassau.


HIELP WAITED

C7296
TELEVISION AND RADIO
TECHNICIAN experienced
in all types of electronics. Must
be completely familiar with
transistors and other Solid
State devices. Must possess
own hand tools, good salary
an d hou rs. References
essential.
Bahamas Music Corporation
Ltd., P. O. Box F-769,
Freeport.

C7306
EX PERIE NC ED M AID
WANTED. Apply to: Mrs.
Regina Martin, Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama.

U H LSTERER required with
a minimum of 5 years
experience in this field. Basic
salary plus ommis ion Hfe d.
complete resume to island
Fashion Limited, P. O. Box
F-2621, Freeport.

C7304
ELEuCTRICAoL ENGINEERS
BORCO Refinery Expansion
Project. Must be able to
supervise the Electrical
Installations during
Construction of Refineries and
Petrochemical Plants and to
plan and schedule the work of
Sub-Contractors. Must have at
least fve 5)Cyearts merlea
be able to prepare Job Progress
Rel B hamlans need apply in
writing to: SNAM PROGETTI
S.P.A., P. O. Box F-2405'
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C9401
FOR SALE
1. Attractive three~bedroom,
two-bath residence in
quiet cul-de-sac off Village
Road. Three bedrooms,
two baths, living-dining*
porch, patio, laundry,
Iarge utility, carport. etc.
Fully a ir conditioned.
$67,000 furnished.
2. Outstanding residence
Montagu Heights, hilltop.
Three bedrooms, three
baths, i~vin cho di b
laundry, two-car garage,
ara ondi iortedi ang s p
with bearing fruit trees.
Delightful swimming pool
area with barbeque, bar
etc., all conveniences,
changing room etc.
$150,000 furnished.
3. M eylitop rersiela F
bedrooms four
bathrooms, living room*
dining room, family room,
porch, patio, kitchen*
laundry, carport, etc.
$80.000 furnished.
H. G. CHRISTIE
REAL ESTATE
3 B Sre t
Nassau
rTel: 2-1041, 2-1042

W~rTS T RENT
C9383
EX PA TRIATE Co mpany
Secretary requires attractive 3
or 4 bedroom, two bathroom
funihedr, 4asirconditioned


FOR RENT


EFIIENCYan a rme~n
further particulars call 5-8679
ask for Mr. Pritchard.
C9337
One Efficiencydapartment, aso
for two reserved ladies or men.
Phone 5-1044.

2 BE1ROOM ~1 bath home,
separate dining room, fully
furnished airconditioned, f We
minutes walk to Montagu
Beach in quiet area. Phone
28504 day 51647 night.


C9357
1 Waltz Organ
Oldsmobile 68 Delmont 4
door excellent condition.
Reduced owner leaving.
Phone 57324.
C9311
1 CONVERTIBLE COUCH
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 250 Ib. trunk food freezer
Call 77947.
C9371
KODAK CAROUSEL 850H

neol $5.0 I ocj Pet r
Robinson at 2-1064, daytime.

A WIE RANGE of Metal and
Mineral Detectors available to
you at factory prices plus
ifrmation cdail 23d For

LOST
C9381
BLACK FEMALE DOG red
collar vicinity of Village
Road. Phone 31130. Reward.

FOUND
C9386
YOUNG GERMAN
SEPHERD in Hig land Park,


MARINE SUPPLIES
C9309
PACE AKE 44t neu ur o





R. EALVID AND MRS. DE a
persons that Alfonzia our son
it under age and cannot marry


POSITION WANTED
C8500
IF YOU ned a o Irl t
w rk inyu hpTpeae wr b e
P. O. Box N207, Nassau.


QStfr Srthunt


FEARED


g I


I


IThurdry, Apil 6, 1973.


3 BEDROO 2 bath house,
completely furnished, recently
painted ohnson Terrace.
Prce: 2 5,000. Telephone
4246 atr x
C 9334
FOR SALE
SEM -- H LLTOP OUT EAST

bedrooms 24 baths frnisase 3


au ntDEN MIANS CMLTHE

ACTION REALO -f we unsell

real estate. Phone 22033
22305, 22307 evenings 41197.


I


ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1972 VENTURA,
A/C Bucket Seats
Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Radio
Auto. Blue $1600
1989 VICTOR 2000 5/W,
Automatic $850
r omticAWhite $2400
197 PNa AAC PARNTSIEN E



Radio. Or nge $3500
1967 HILLMAN,
Std. Green $450
1969 FORD TORINO, $20

1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL,
A/C Auto. $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI,
Auto. Blue $1850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD,
Blue A/C $2800
1971 FORD MAVERICK,


FREDERICK S. COOPER
formerly of Grand Bahama*
resident of East Street Nassau
clied7 Mndak Atpril 2nPH e7s3
Mar aret Hospital.
An Ex-Police Sergeant with 24
years service, he is survived by
his wife Idell, three sons
Fletcher, (Customs Officer),
Bill (Building Contractor) and
Clifford (Real Estate Agent),
and four daughters.
Funeral services will be held at
4 p.m. Sunday April 8th at St.
Francis Xavier's Cathedral
West Street, Father Wolff
officiating. Interment will
follow in the Catholic
Cemetery, Infant View Road,
Chipp ORham WA TD.




CAD WITH over 20 years

emplo.7d as madd. Tke e ho


IIELP M(TED
C9356
REQU IRED one Project
Salesman to reside on Family
island. Applicants must be
college graduates or equivalent
and possess Real Estate
Mark eting and Sales
Administration experience.
Please send resumes to Box
N-7782, or telephone 24596.


$1950

$695

$2100

$1600
$695


Auto. Red
1969 VIVA
4 Dr. Auto. Green
1971 Rambler
Auto. Blue
1969 PONTIAC GTO,
A/C Vinyl Green
1968 FORD ESCORT,

e95 DODGE,


TO PLACE YOUR ADS.
CALL 2-1986


II


I I


EXP RIENCED SECRETARY
required by foreign owned
Bahamian subsidiary company
opera~ting In Nassau. Successful
applicant will be paid attractive
salary and enjoy congenial
working conditions. Applicants
should have a minimum of four
years practical experience and
tsho e tapMly In firs ir tncf
Co., telephone 2-8551.


C9390
ON MARKrET SToREET So th

Painting, Musician's Workshop.
For information, 3-4999
evenings.
C9365
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom in Bamboo Town.
Phone 36959.

C9399
At CONDITIONED Effi.
clency apartment Shiriey
Park Avenue. $175 per month.
Telephone 58134.

CARS FOR SALE

C9374








1970 CHEVROLET IMPALA
$2,500
ALSO AVAILABLE


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C7301
FOR SALE PROFITABLE
ESTABLISHED CHARTER
SAILING YACHT BUSINESS
IN FREEPORT, INCLUDING
YACHT, CORPORATION
AND LICENCES, $25,000
CASH. COASTAL CRAFT
LTD ., BOX F 47 7 ,
FREEPFOR T.

REAL ESTATE
C9362
UNFURNISHED HOME FOR
SALE 131 DAMPIER 3
bedrooms 2 baths with carport,
room air conditioners.
dish washer and garbage
disposal. Pr Ice $28, 000
mnimum down payment
Contact: SYNTEX Phone
352-8171.

IIELP MNITED
C7288
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY-
For General Manager of
Oceanus Hotels Ltd., Must be
latadaccur te at shor ha
duties related to Executive
Secretary. At least three years
previous experience as
Secretary necessary for this
position.
CREDIT MANAGER: To
handle all Accounts Receivable
for both Hotels. Must be

com os, crdittcrds,agetncts
Compose and type own
creu t ene CR 4d post
ASSISTANT MANAGER: To
assist General Manager with
Oceanus Hotels Ltd.. Direct
supervise and train personnel.
Must have at least five years
experience in Hotel and
Toudst fbe.anus Hotels Ltd.,
Personnel Dept., Royal Palm
Way, Freeport, G.B. P. O. Box
F-531.

REIERY OPE ATORS

Bahamas Oil Refining
Covmpa leaApplicnth sh ul
education, however, experience
esnta th n ernu hton.n r
have seven to ten years
experience in operations of
large scale petroleum
dis Illat nitieq ipment and/or
Mail resume in confidence to.
Personnel Of ficer, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, P. O. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. '


1969 VOLKSWAGEN
radio, tape, yellow $1000
1989 RAMBLER REBEL _
2 door $1000
1970 CHEVY IMPALA -
good condition $2450
1970 CHEVY MALIBU $2200
1972 DODGE AVENGER
SUPER- exellent $90

1972 DODGE AVENGER G.L."

11CHEV YVEGA SEDA3N0
like new $2000
1971 SINGER VOGUE _

radio, automatic $1500
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA S/W
good buy $1950
1969 CHEnVY CAMARO15 -

1970 CHEVY IMPALA -
reetly pi d $200
197n DOpDG nPOLARA SW

199 FOR FALCON 5
1989 CHEVY MALIBU -

1967 PLYMOUTH FU RY -
blue, automatic $400
1967 MERCURY COUGAR800

1970 CADILLAC LIMOUSINE
black $7850
1969 BEAUMONT CUSTOM _

blue $1700
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 34711.


C9396
qAurAdGINo RIREETOR
Development Company to
planmp een a df oa g e
in connection with company
projects being developed for
tourism and investment.
Previous experience and
success In management director
position essential. Applicants
xe eeriapply in writing s 9 in
rquirements to Love ea~ch
Cu Ld, P O. Box 6 0,
Nassau.


MNMTLE ReE UCATION:
High SchoolE Pr eqI aE: -

years repair and welding
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
A sst in tho efrmac I

nature in the inspection, repair*
installation and general
maintenance of all cement

Ms thav weld lg o princn
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTAC T: Pe rson nel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport.


C7307
DATA READING
SoUPoErV SOaRd Mst ~be as d
train operators of Data
Recorder and to operate IBM
System 3, Model 10 Computer.

Aco nig kwecdg a f
cash, general ledgers and utility
prAedresCHIEF/SURVEYOR
- Must be qualified to
sprvie susrves of p ope ty
to oversee maintenance of
road wa ys, include ng
determination of work to be

dopne.y to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority Limited. P. O.
Box F2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


I

I
1
r


r
r
r
r
r
r1


ZZlk, aCrtbttnr


meby Clssified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 bn Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport frm Qa.m. to 5prm. Mon. to= Fri Sa.I~.tp.m.



















REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTI

I HAVENT THE I ENHL TRY TO OET HOW ABOUT SPRINGING ME OUT
WERE ARE WE WTTERS wa.L, AS I LIE ANDb SPR NDSOH N f RED W ATO LEAS W
GOWOI KENJ t GOO CHANCE BARELY BREATHE --- CHEER / TWO) FLOORS OF EXACTLY
WE'LL SE OONE IF IT 15N'T DR RICE TNIS HOSPITAL / WHY T'M
oR DAYS AA MI WHA NRW HERE













J UDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS

I SUPPOSE THAT $ IAM, YOU CAN CALL IT WOMAN' LET'S NOT DISCUSS MRS. PARKER
WHAT MAKES YOU ~. DISLIKE ISN'T THE INTUITION... BUT I FEEL THAT L ANY FURTHER! I WANT TO KNOW
THINK THAT K(ATHERINE WORD... BUT I DO r KATHERINE RESENTS THE ~~ MORE ABOUT YOU, MR. DRIVER!
DISLIKES YOU, BETSY ? THINK SHE TIME YOU'RE GIVING ME! I WANT A BLOW-BY-BLOW
RESENTS ME[J 1)c ; DESCRIPTION OF WHAT 5
YOU RE HAPPENEDD TO YOU IN
~ll~~u.'iVi~tW RONc~A THESE SiX YEARS!












APA RTMENT 3- G By Ale K ofaky
JcaF~~~~~c'T~, YI_ .NHLDWSAR I DON'T KNOW! BUT I'D LIKE TO
I CAN'TTALK TO YOU TOMORROW! SHE SEEMS
SLEEP/1 P.LA? HSi ORA AH TO BEGETTING HYPERACTIVE -AND
194 GETTING TIRED JUST HI R TOp.. I'M CALLING ABOUT MARTHA! WILL I'M WORRIED!
WATCHING You, MAarTH! EBU~PT~P~ Y G OU~ S STOPPING BY TO SEE HER
f I U HUP O BED, YS
SLEP GNO~W ,M TOMMIE. JORDA IS
ANYTHING
wRONG?









STE VE R 0PER & MI KE NOMAD by saunders & o ver gard


o


~4 C~3~corr
11 ~----~71 ~ Y-S


r~~rnlrrm:n


li~R


,r'staYingl after' I could retire."














SOLUTION OF YESTERDAYS PULIZL


H ow ase
8 1 orou ters
or more can

hcc oo\ m e-
a ren a -or
0 A K each letter
on y e on y.
Each word
munt cotoi the lar a Ict re
as t-letter word I the Ilat.
Ro olnr II s relan w~ore
see in er namr 2 orDs.
YESTERDAY'S BOLU N :
asser c~ro n 8 vto errta ert
rest roast rota rate sate seat
sort star stare starve stave store
store strove tare tear tore toss
trass tress trove vast vert vest
vesta veto VOTARESS vote
voter.
1 Fr 1)ki shipmlents. (3-6)
.@ a 4.ptlsa aodsr

t3. Breathe through themn. (8i)

L. For holdianu motor sDirit.
a.oldusn ctp (4)
4. Uplannd* tree. to)
eo It ectatcl to)


10. Fr isht-
enae d.

III T a b.
IG.I
19 1Is


I'LL BET YOVouR tolE ou oH,,,
COTTAGE, EVE! AND WHAT'S NOTHINGG.
WITH THE. MYSTERIOUS GARDENER
WITH THE BURNED FACE ?


.
II ft I

(4 8





I
SE*
9 go so us a
4 ses 4
4g


Thursday, April 5, 93


SCARROLL FIGHTER'S

Q's "HOR(ECOPE

from the Carrol Righter lastitute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: A wonderful day
Sto put in motion whatever practical plan
appeals to you. Make sure you use your fine and accurate
intuition to make your surroundings more attractive. Discuss
with experts a new plan for more prosperity.
ARI:3S (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Get together with new
friends who are interesting and make plans for the future.
An associate can show how you can cut expenses and make
new investments that will pay off in the future.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) A good day to make
improvements where your personal life is concerned. Look
to a long-time ally who can give you good ideas for your
financial advancement. A neighbor could help you now.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Get the advice of experts
and thenisakb s lu" tig lanso ou have in mind. Quiet
extravagant in any way. Think along practical lines.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Friends you
know and admire can now give you the advice you need to
get ahead faster in life. Contact a social leader who can help
you make the acquaintance of important people.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Get together with bigwigs
today and make your life more interesting. Show that you
have fine talents. Avoid one who is jealous of you and could
put a crimp in your style. Relax tonight.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Find new outlets that are
profitable and fascinating. You can now gain the goodwill of
higher-ups. There are clever ways of adding to present
knowledge. Keep busy and you keep happy.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Handle those affairs that
are very important to you. If you have some matter to
discuss with mate, this a good time for such. Don't praise
one who doesn't deserve it. Attend social tonight.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) A good day to talk over
moot points with associates and come to a true
understanding. Strive for more harmony with good friends.
Try not to get upset over th, actions of others.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) A good day to
handle those tasks ahead of you with enthusiasm and get
them behind you quickly. Plan time for improving your
health. Make improvements to your wardrobe. Be wise.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Engage in the hobbies
and amusements that you enjoy. Get together with
congenials and try to please them. Avoid a new situation
that does not look very promising to you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Any problems at home
can be handled with wisdom and efficiency now. More
harmony can exist there. Find the right items that can add
to its beauty. Spend more time on your hobby.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Contacting persons you like
and showing your affection for them is fine. Strive for more
goodwill with associates. Avoid a dangerous situation that
could lead to trouble.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . .he or she will be
one of those charming young people who can be most
successful in business and cultural affairs. Direct the
education along such lines. If your progeny feels things are
going slowly, )Fout can analyse the reasons why and do
something constructive about them. Give as much academic
training as your child desires.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make
of your life is largely up to YOU!


KinlFsurea sdl+I. ise 197 3Woldrldnsit .......a

"L stop in here every night. It gives my wife an extra
hour to pull herself together before I face her."

Rispert and the Mixed Magic-22


*/





the long flight of steps. The
Wizard is a wary man and
protects himself well." They
reach the level of the dome
and, striding forward, Rupert a
finends cals outaudpen th
the Wizard."
RESERVEo


But how do we get in ?
I can't see a door anywhere."
Rupert does not know what to
make of the eerie surround -
Ings. There's no one about,
eter," lie adds av
the Sorcerer, leading him up
ALL RIGHTS


Bridge
No crag "playr (1e b e a

always so say. Herd's an example

io t BliNorth zac

7J597K1
09871


OK 10
Wc 4 4 ~t32Er oh

West lad the Q. then te
6~'. Asat over l~~and con-
Linues hearts. Sou 8 6 8 ;~iNs
West discarding the 42, (
next?
oA spadde Mrs to damy' +

Hnue, .rsw to the BK Ra
.No a aond club. Earst
Jolows banH he haead


Oen **~b i 9n a the mlr b
ha' a ti c b o gr
b tas hm ith

aggeh r



t~~~ u s s ko a r, 2

J1098n7 A .)7


This was a decisive position in
last month a playmff tourns-
Inent for the United States
championship. Re sh evsky
(White, to move) :s a pawn uD
against Byrne. White has to
cos id :e th aterl a vano


thr a ~ase $Reshevsky made
ete erong decision: can you do
Par times: 10 seconds, chess



solution 9626
Chess Solution
(U,1S asorrect. 1 R--K2 gives
Whrite witnning chances with his
extra. paronl. Reshersky chose
'b, 1 B--Kt3? QxRP; 2 B--KS
lind vot a shock when By/rne
replied 2 . QxP ch! Alftr 3
K xO B x dia ch: 4 K--B2.
B6 Black is a bishop up and
Rrlelkesky resigned. This wtn
:iare Byrne the chamlpionshfp.


(1)


1. Refuse
2. Pleasing sound
3. Totally
confused
4. Daisy


4.7


5. Spotlight
S.Clth trainer
8. Wrd
9. Feast
10. Brood of
pheasants
16. Exactly
suitable
18. Yellow ocher

24. Bushmen

neckpiece
28. Title of
address
32. Published
33. Shipworm
35. Container
3 S esttions
Wales
41. Cupid
42. Bolus
43. Weaver's reed
4 R dcdtea
45. Lm8rr


80WN


No. i.oss . ., by~ Talel sAY
Across
r. Steektly wale. (3. UI)
LI /lvr t unather address.

Is rlUt dink. (3)


AP Newsleete~re


Per Mem 5 sala.


Whr Grthtme


Che~s


MAKE A SIG FUSS OVER HER DOLL. .L HER IT
LOOKS MrUS AS 400ARiAS &/E 00ESP


1. Sablratgaa 30.Proutise to pay
Baden 31. Changeable
5. Cunning 34. Steady
8. CPrra advance
11. Sucealent 37. Take to court
S12. Brown kiwl 38. Sp"
13. 5hate 40. Pitfalls
14. Elaborte 44. SluiC8
nll 41. Man's name
15. Oij 48. D~rone

20. Incline sparingly
22. Promethuas 51. Span of life
25. S~on e Dvid 52. Finramet
29. Gatll 53. Pabrisarport




_ I I


_


Pilkington new patterned glasses

And a new range in colour.


WALKATHOg
AIQD


7@~~ [LY

INQ AID O1F

Tom Skinner Youth Crusade For Christ


Saturdegl 7th. AprilI
STARTING AT: 3:00 p.m. FORT MONTAGU
ENDING AT: A. F. ADDERLEY AUDITORIUM
(Walkers Must Be 10 yrs. Old or Over)


AN EXCITING FINISH: Little Paulette Davis edges
ahead of Mary-Ann Crothers during a sprint at the annual
St. Andrew's School Sports.


1. FIRST PERSON TO FINISH THE COU RSE 10-13 YEARS OF AGE.
2. FIRST PERSON TO FINISH THE COURSE 14 YEARS AND OVER.
3. THE PERSON WHO COLLECTS THE MOST MONEY.
4. THE CHURCH WH ICH COLLECTS TH E MOST MONEY'
5. THE CHURCH TO ENTER THE MOST PERSONS IN THE WALKATHON.


SODAS -- CANDY BARS POTATO CHIPS COOKIES CONCH
FRITTERS SANDWICHES CONCH SALADS


ALL AFIE VVELCOIVE


- --


Thursday, April 5, 1973.


NAN CY
ALBURY takes her
mount Apollo over

th ird place in
Sunday's Horse
Show. PHOTO:
Rickey Wells.


FHE FASHION
HUT BOUTIQUE
cuP winner anret
Surprise at the
presentt io n
Saturday, from left,
eFan inde('ha Hra''
Lockhart of Fashion
Hut, owner Jim
Fernander, jockey
Kevin Johnson and
assistant trainer
A OO: Rckr
Wells.


LISA DIMBE RO is a picture of concentration in this fine
shot by Rickey Wells as she guides Frackles over one of the
jumps in the Fault and Out competition in Sunday's horse
show at the Camperdown Ranch.


Ille rriW






* ENVELOPES

* LETTERHEADS

* BOOKLETS

* INVOICES

* SALES BOOKS

e VOUCHER
CHEQUES

* MICR CHEQUES

* ANNUAL
REPORTS


SPECIALIZING








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* DELIVERY
TICKETS

PAYROLL
CHEQUES

. PURCHASE
ORDERS






kul
ASSRlTMET~







STATEMENTS


tREAR VE
ALRTWORIK


CALL







5-4011


Associtionr


I-- --


~
R
1


STEVE NORTON displays a fine
forehand as he went on to win Montagu
Beach Hotel Amateur Invitational Tennis
Tournament beating Peter Isaacs 6-1,
ce1 64Woover the weekend. PHOTO:


STaHE NA rAU Is n S
Young, Brenda Zeese and
B intalne he~r u ef:= e
record by winning all her
games and tche cham lonship.
WEATHER
Wind: Variable 5 to 10


Ill5 SH IM






SNAP-A-PART
FORMS

REGISTER
FORMS

GUEST
CHECKS

CONTINUOUS
STATEMENTS

CONTINUOUS
ENVELOPES




MARGINAL




AND

LEDGER CARDS











PEGBOARD
SYSTEMS

NCR FORMS

STATEMENT
MAILERS


SPECIALIZING
IN


luliness




CREATIVE
ARTWORK
AVAILABLE
CALL



Pindle


2-4267
5-4011


5-4022
Member
National Business
Forms
Association


m.p.h.
Weather: Mainly fair
Sea: Smooth
Temp: Min tonight 70
Max tomorrow 84


ammesrI ,
a- 4


Nuow Pilkington are updating their dedr
patterned glass range with some exciting
contemporary designs: Patchwork, and Orbit
- with more to follow
Even more important -many partterns will
nowv also be available Io a range of tinted
glasses. Among them are Orbit, in amber, and
Patchwvork, in the full range ot blue, green
and amber. Others, are Rattan and Autumn (all
colours) and Deep Flemish (5mm, amber
only). The design offering the widest choice
is Cotswold, now in all colour!, in both 3 and


imlm thiknesses Pllklngtonn patterned glasses,
( lear o)r timed, are practical for use indoors
or out. They are non-intiammable, fade-free
and scratch-resistant unlike some substitutes.
50 they are ideal for use with concealed light-
ing, as well as In window and door panels
and partitions.

A handsome new tolder can be got from
your glass merc hant or Nassau Glass Company
Ltd., M~ackey Street, Nassau. Phone: 2-8165.


PI I


ON SALE F


FROIVI 5 TO 7P.IVI.


PILKINGTON


lead the world~ in glassmaking


Whtr (Pthi~th


8


.r
~2LI
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e r~T,
*-
i-.-~ x~
`~*a~L~


'C


'
I


trrhwrl Whie -''QWS
.. I~II


L'/ u r,1.'lt.a ~ dBNT ER




I I


10 $ll@ 3dilitar


SUNDAY PORTRAITS

TOOGOODS ...

OPEN SUNDAY
FROM 2 to 5

Especially for the



IOOCIsonw East Of heH ri gce -hnON54641


I--


a theHEW.MODELS COLOURS
We lil MLW FEATURES & PRICES AT OUR SHOWROOMI



BAHAIVAS GAS
P.O. BOX N1553 THOMPSON BOULEVARD PHONE 5-6401
OAKES FIELD, NASSAU.


C.. ------- ----- -- -~ -""-


months but a lot of that time
we were handicapped due to
lack of place to practise."
However, the men's team
looked great as they worked
out Sunday during an
exhibition at Paradise Island.

ITALIAN CHAMP KO's
CHALLENGER IN FIRST
CAGLIARI, ITALY
(AP)- Antonio P'uddu of Italy
scored a first round knockout over
French challenger D~ominique
Azzaro Wednesday night to retain
his European lightweight boxing
title.

in es uhan to minames eo pu

landed a vicious left hook doubled
by at right to t re aht ptut Azzaro
thut anas h nd of the fight.
The bout, however, ended in
utter chaos as dozens of fans
stormed the ring before British
referee Sid Natan had completed
the knock out count.


Thursday, April 5, 1973.


The Ladies Team, however,
has one more goal to achieve
before the tournament and
that is a match with the
competent Miami Golds when
they meet in the Clearwater
Invitational Tournament on
Aprll4 the past few

tL laments, the Bahamas
Ldest ave th enh co ing
second wit te standing between them and
championship. It was the Golds
who stopped them in the
Jacksonville tournament when
although both teams ended
aiha 1 I-2 recBd dmhein;olds
sets. "eve got to break to
Golds spirit before the
championship," said coach Dr

o en Gla aas after t ying up
one all when they won the
second set 15-3 was leading 8-1
in the decidling set until the
experienced Golds with
six-times mvp winner Joyce
Burg .nd former Dots player
"Aggie" Agnes bounced back
to win I5-9. "Once they begin
to build up the momentum
then the pressure is on us,
commented Dr. Gay.
Incidentally the acquisition of

e us former Doub pitye o I

with both hands. "Very rarely
can we contain her on a good
set," said Gay.
MORE H1ITTERS
a o wer,ath aBahamasrlia
Golds in that they do not
depend on one hitter on the
front lIne. Dr. G;ay explained
that he usually ea th ne of i


Davidson rotating with
Margaret A~lbury, Celestine
Wilson and Linda Davis.
Even the se~tups that the
Bahamas uses the six zero

whimho tea nose e.thlat' ns
time before we take adva:ntlgE
of the G;olds' miistakes and
nullify their weakness Dr

GL ok ng at the progress of
the team, Dr. G;ay said that
knowledge of the game and
positions are greatly improved
but lack of proper preparation
is the only thing that is against
them. "Our biggest drawback
has been the constant
readjustment of practice sites,"
he said. "Defence is the name
of the game and that is what
we have been working on.
Moreover, there is still room
for improvement."
Alth ugh the Bahas ma
be theououngest tea arin' t
Championship Tournament,
their chances of coming out on
top are very good, commented


Dr. Gay. Players like Davidson,
Davis, Wilson and Wendy
Jackman, who~ were first year
players last year, have
improved tremendously over
the months.
VERY COMPETITIVE
DrIf they co lne at ti tace
Bahamas will have two ve y
competitive teams come t e
Central Am erican and
Caribbean Games during
February and March next year.
In that tournament, the teams
they will be looking out for
will be from Cuba, Mexico
Ven zuela and the United

The Men's Team with only
the Region Six Tournament at
hand do their best with with
only one practice session each
week. They have been allowed
the G;overnment High School
Auditorium each Wednesday
when it is free.
This lack of practice courts
is effecting the team a bit.
"What I'm hoping is to have
about three weeks with about
two practices per week," said
coach Leonard Archer. "I have
had the team for about six


Centre.
D~el Jane Saintts in, the first
game, unable to maintain a
fourr run fourth inning rally
suffered their fourth defeat In
ten game\ played 5-4 at the
hands of Sc~hlitz Beer
Ilhis, however. does not alter
the standings as Decl June is still
t uird place behind Big Q
withl ecik s Beecs \till
.ith an eight and o~ne
in reenrd
OnI .r unll by rightf'ielder Ken
Smiith w~ho singled to right and
took~ third on twc bas erc

Nn e d in I a we us ,f te fir
when Smith scoredl oni Charles
Smith s ground out to thir.
Short stop Mark D~emierate,
however, came up with a two
rbi-double Iin the bottomll of the
second that pushed the
Islanrders ahead 2- I Cohn

with a \In~gle anld wentf to
second when pitlchr P'aul

2 FREEPORT TEAMS

TO JOIN AMERICAN

FOOTBALL ALSSH *


thelNOfit isl a sF nRcc i
sports, the Bahamas Amecrican
Football Assoc~iation have duly
accepted the Freeport
Hurricanes and the light Mile
f bal All teams wishing to play
during the upcoming season
have been asked tobe

nre itg Sna taf arnoo at .
aidt~ting~ Sunday is, the
rta:dline for submitting entries
'he YCeTreS
e a re progressive
led, commented Gecoff
W luans, presidewnnt >n t
explain that things have
progeressed far beyond their
ams. TIwo of their players

< oessiobeti teael ete t e
United States "for trials" and
there is a possibility that
another player will get a
scholarship due to his ability to
play football
"There is so much that this
port can do for the Bahamas,"
said Williams advocating that
the game should be taught in
schools. "Once we get those
people in schools interested in
that (football) a scholar can
)sibly get higher education
through it "
The B.A.F.A.in conjunction
with the Nassau Jets will be
holding football clinics on
April I7, I8, and 19 at 6:30
p~m. at the Queen Elizabeth
Spa~ ('entre. All players and
those interested in learning the
8 ame should attend
SH4N'E GOULD WINS
c~uod te Autraian teenageh gri
who won three Olympic gold
medals last year, easily led her heat
in~ 500-freestyle qualifying In
opening qlualifying of the amateur
athlete c union indoor short course
swimming cham pionships
Wednesday.
Miss Giould, who is studying in
SCalifornia for six months, turned in
4:57.3 and set up a rematch with
eena Rothhammer of Santa Clara.
C alifornia. Miss Rothhammer, who
beat Shane in the Olympic
800-metre freestyle, was timed at
4:Is.J.


Johnso~n gave right fielder
Summyll G;lover a base on balls
W'ith o~ne down after Clharlie
Mortunelr grounded out
1)emeiritte smashed the thred
two, pitch deefp into left driving
in T'hompson and G;lover
Pitcher Smiith settled down
and disposed of the Blenders
one. two, three for Tlhompson
to but inl the first of his two
rbi's in the bottom of the third
mo~vinl the islande s 3-1. It
was c~e tre fielder Ke th I somez

wa rifice fr into effhmpons
THREIAlTEN
TIhe Blenders, trying hard to
imnproive their standings came
up with three threatening runs
in the top of the fifth, that
mocvedl them 4-1 in the lead.
I eittfie~lder P. L. Saunders led
off with a single followed by
I verltte Neily who was hit by
the pitch. Paul Johnson
cracked a double into left
centre driving in the first run.
Neily. trying to make it two,
was thrown out ait the plate.
A ficider s choice saw Ken
Smrth on, and crippling errors
h~y the Islanders carried him
;Iroutnd for the second run.
'IhlrdbadsemanisKse mitbC~raham

game in his two official times
at bat when his sacrifice fly
into left drove in Moss who got
on by Smith's second "hit by

pit rown into full throttle by
the Blenders' performance, the
Islanders rallied in their seven
winning runs. Complementing




that inning, Gomez and
Thompson secored their
second run of the game.

aSidnebd slkinsonl) ccrion

BRurth inning ralyorafther the
three ~innings. Richard Lockhart
gr I ed out butsgrentre fe ud


Catcher Sidney Outten's
single into right gave the Saints
their third run as first baseman
Glenroy Saunders scored it
Benny Bain followed with
another single and an rbi that
ended the inning tied four all
With two down, Adler M nu
drove a single down the mi dl
and this coupled with an error
on the second baseman saw
Benny Bain crossing the plate
for th e winning run.
thIel lanemagi at re teed m
outfielder Anthony Roberts
svd the gaewe eto
be utifule garnh dee n ceto
field off Ford.
Contrary to reports that
Schlitz has lost when they gave
up last season's 'best shortstop'
Sonny Haven, "we have a team
of players that are prepared to
work together," commented
manager Eusene Slmon. "As
far as I am concerned, we have
not lost a prominent player."
The series is a long one and it is
possible that any team m sht
come up and beat Schlitz
explained Simon, "but when
the smoke clears Schlitz will be
on top," he said.


VICTORIES A ND
VICTRICES LUDORUM -
Outstanding performers of
the St. Andrew's College
track and field meet in which
Carib House with 133 points
topped the junior division
and Arawak House won the

S46 points. dro IftWin wth
Thompson of Carib Hourse
and lan Smith were both tied
for top honours in the under
14 divisions. Thompson won


the 100 metres, 200 metres
and came second in the high
jump. Smith came first in the
high jump, long jump and
second in the 100 metres.
Doreen Butler of Lucayan
was the top girl in the under
14's after she took honours in
theta discusoshot putt ad h 0
jump, the 400 and 100
metres in the under 16 was
Rhonda Smith of Taino
House. Raleigh Butler of


Arawak House won the 100
metres, 200 metres and high
jump to top the under 16
division. Next to him is Mrs.
Ron Strange who presented
the trophies. Richie Phillips of
Arawak House was first in the
long jump, high jump and
10 am tr s ia an t und r
Arawak House topped the
under 19 girls having won the
long jump, 200 metres and
100 metres.


UltilMWI IE |


TIhe Third Annual Bahamas
In terna tional Open Tennis
Championship will be staged
December 10 to 16 at the
Ocean Club, Paradise Island
bThte dates were lannour ce~d
Maynard, Minister of Tourism,
and Steve Norton, tournament
committee chairman. The
Ministry of Tourism and

cosponorsisin theta S5,0 0
tournament.
rThe four-day main event will
he preceded by a pro/am
tmarn mnt to whi h sevear


tournament the week before,
says Norton, "to qualify
Bahamian amateurs who might
like to enter."
The main tournament will

obdees, rneo minn'~s sin le
and women's singles events*
Among the pros expected to
compete are Eddie Dibbs of

t ur ament tho paswotwo y the
whien it was played at the
Lucayan Towers, Bath and
Racquet Club in Freeport, and
veteran Gardner Mulloy, who
has won the seniors title the
past two years.
Local pros will include Leo
Rolle, who made it to the
semi-finals in last year's
tour nament, Bahamian
champion Fritz Schunck,
Bertram Knowles of the
Holiday Inn and Jack Daniels,
of the Lucayan Towers Bath
and Racquet Club.


THE BAHAMAS Second Annual Invitational Pro/Am Golf


Tournament co-sponsored by
Bahamas Professional Golfers
Country Club, will be held at
FreTohi M r~n ent is the
first to be co-sponsored by the
Ministry of Tourism and the
B.P.G.A., and is the Second
Annual B.P.C.A. Tournament.
frTheallield will nclud golfer
Canada, as well as both
professionals and amateurs
from the Bahamas. The purse


I a eusn ei b e 0,otng fo
Closing date for entries is
April 22. The all-inclusive
entry fee of $50 includes four
days of golf green fees, cart
fees and club storage. Each
pricipan R al auso recei e

balls
Tree complimentary
cocktail parties plus a gala
Aomapldmset Banquet pa(also
for participants. And special
rates have been arranged at the
luxury Holiday Inn adjacent to
the golf course.
Those interested may sign
up at either Bahama Reef
Country Club, or, stateside, by
writing: Bahama Reef Country
Club, P. O. Box 1058, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida. Further
information may be obtained
from Roy Bowe, President of
the Bahamas P.G;.A., at the
Paradise Island Golf Club
Nassau, New Providence; or by
telephoning BRCC head pro
Howard Archer at 373-1055,
Freeport.
Pream teams for the event
--whidh will consist of a
54-hole golf tournament and
practice round -- will be made
up of one pro essional and


the Ministry of Tourism, the
Association and Bahama Reef
Bahama Reef Country Club in

three amateurs names to be
drawn from a hat. All amateurs
will have a verified handicap
with a maximum of eighteen.


IICKLAUS 88HNING

FOR HIS FIFTH



ACUSTSA, Ga. (P) The 37th
Masters Golf Championship, first of
the wo rld's four major
tournaments, opened Thursday
de ediag brh mpio nJaks Ncklth
gunning for an unprecedented fifth
tile gallery estimated to reach
25 00 t 30 000 during te da
jackets to guard against a chilly
northwesterly breeze at 15 miles
p hour. The aemprtr e d a h h


Tw~o oldtimers, 90-yearuld Fred
McLeod and 88-year-old lock
H utc hiso n, launched this
prestige-laden event In their
traditional urolls m utlon rary
the field of 82 began first round
competition in the 72-hole event.
First players of f the tee on the
famed AugustabbNa 1 na Club
Ceasar Sanudo.
Nicklaus,, playing in a two-some
with amateur Marvin G~iles of
Richmond, Va., had a noon tee
time. Nicklaus claimed the green
jktp that gaes3 to e M~astn"
1972.
Californian Gene Littler, who
underwent surgeraster wca n
among the early starters. He played
the first six holes in even par,
taking a bogey on the 400-yard first
but then getting a birdie on the
555-yard, per five second.


WBC AGAINST RETURN
FOREMAN-FRAZIER BOUT
MEXICO CITY (AP)--The
World Boxing Council (WBC) wrote
Dick Saddler, trainer of world
'oran, uringhi o to orep
return bout between F~oreman
and ex-champion Joe F~razier.
WBC president Ramon G.
Valanquez, reminded Saddler that
return bouts are prohibited by WBC
rules.
"Foreman must defend his title
against number one contender and
Frazier must score some victories to
prove that he is in shape to be
considered as a contender for the
world title", said Valarqu~z.
The WBC's message to Saddler
and F~oreman was prompted by
press releases that claimed that the
Foreman-Frazier return fight was
being organized in New York. This
fight would not be approved by the
WBC.
DURAN STRIPPED OF
LIGHTWEIGHT TITLE
NEW YORK (AP) The New
York State! Athletic Commission
suspended the license of lightweight
champion Roberto ~u ran
Wednesday and warned the
Panamanian that his title
recognition would be withdrawn if
he does not defend against Ken
Buchanan of Scotland in Madison
Square Garden within 90 days.
Commission chairman Edwin B.
Dooley said in aI statement that
Duran is being "given 90 days to
fulfill a contract agreement entered
into on Oct. 25. 1972. to defend
his title against Ken Buchanan in
Madison Sqluaew Garden on or
before June 30, 1973."
Dooley said that Duran agreed
June 28, 1972, two days after he
won the title from Buchanan, to
defend It against the Scot Oct. 20,
1972, but that he did not defend
on that date because the
government of Panama would not
let him leave the country until he
had a championship fight there.
Buchanan Junehn un 28, ~dDoole said,
but after knockingl out JImmy
Robertson in five rounds in Panama
last Jan. 20 Duran notified Madiso~n
Square G~arden Boxing, Inc., that he
would be unable to fight In New
York in June because he had agreed
to defend against Antonio Puddu of
Italy June 2 in Panama.
oD ran cuirrientir ded st nt hav
Ifor BG nngalC unci cognizes
TOSTAO HAS EYE
HOP SO A I NS ddAuPrd-

hAndrad ny theth se anosindiecatsitn
will remain in the hospital after
surgery for recurrence of a retinal
detachment in his left eve.


AUCiUSTfA, GEORGIA (AP)-
Peter Oosterhuis, one of Br tain's
best, is toying with the idea of
plying the U. pro golf tour on a
fultime basis.
"I've thought about it each of
the last two years," the 6-foot-4
Oosterhuis said Y. .nesday after a
practice round over the Augusta
National Golf course, site of the
Masters tournament that begins
today.
"I may try to attend the PGA


players school and get my card this
fall, but I'm just not sure yet," he
added. "There are a number of
things to be considered."
The Masters will be the last U.S.
a arance t~ his season or ,
teh~.He's used up all his
exemptions, three as aBritish
Ryder Cup player and three more
me non-approved player on the
tour. To play steadily, he must
attend the players school.


Paradise trounceBlenders; a


Both Men's & Ladies Volleyball teams



seek titles at Miami' 'sletioSix tourney

By GLADST~ONETHURST'ON
ALTHOUGH THE UNAVAILABILITY pof gyms has handicapped much of their practice
sessions for quite some time, the Bahamas' Men and Ladies National Volleyball Teams are highly
confident of placing in the Region Six Volleyball Tournament scheduled for May 12 in Miami.


Schlitz edge Del lane

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
,PARADISE ISLAND behind the four-hit pitching of
right-hander Kirk Smith rallied for seven runs in the bottom of the
fifth inning to trounce Bahamas Blenders 10-4 their eighth
defeat in ten played -- last night at the Queen Elizabeth Sports


TOP ST. ANDR EW'S SCHOOL AT HLET ES


Baaa Pra 6l


Turu es slateu MSy 3-D FOR DECEMBER


IS PROUD TO PRESENT



IN AN ORGAN RECITAL
WITH
KALA LOCKHART, guest soloist
GEORGE BETHEL, saxophonist
GEOFFREY WATTS, violinist
COUNT BERNADINO, steel drummer

under the patro~nage of
Sir Roland and lady Symdinette

Monday evening, April 9th 8.00 o'clock
Luthera Church of Nara
John F. Kennedy Drive

Admission: Adults $2.00 Children $1.00
In~aid of the church 's PIANOFU;LND


BAHAA1AS 611S HIIS THE 1973


MAGICCHEF~ RANGE


YOU NEED i


OOSTERHUIS MAY PLAY PGA TOUR FULL-TIME


EMsn tor D~OWef


****75