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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03314
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 4, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03314

Full Text
I I II I I I I I


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his way to Nassau.
in Nassau he Is a guest of
Mr. and Mrs olumnbus
O'D~onne~ll Jt their homet on
West Hlill Street. He plans to
return to E~ngland "Just before
I aster."
Lord Mountbatten. who is
president of the Internatloonal
( ommrttee of the Unlted
World C'olleges of which St.
Donat s is the first college, will
meet with the local branch of
the c~ommittre this afternoon
at Government Hlouse.
There are now four
Bahamian students at St.
Donat 's


egstere wtus ostmaster of Bahamas for po
VOL. LXX, No. 113 Wednesday, April 4, 1973. Price: 1 5 Garts


-~-~ ~ ---- ------ -- -'-- -- ~- -- ~e "- ------' ` -I- T:II


worth or close it down.
"And when The Trlbune
goes, it will be the end o~f an
opposition press in the
Bahamnas." the 74-year-old
publisher told T~he Freedom~ of
the PrCes C.ommlnittee of the
In t er Amne r i c an P re~ss
AIssociation (IAPA\) at its
rni 1 ari enletibnat eha en
offered 57 mlillionl for his
newspaper in 19)70 b~ut thart he
hlad refused to, sell because he
felt he was neededl by the
Bahamiian people "even through
Already knew what the
g o v e e n n n t w a s on t n o h n

reconsidered and was willing to

sA enc ntp blis icewh m h

diBot ru said the Bahlamiari
government refused to let him
sll tobea oetignemo Thu, ke
close the newspaper rather
than sell to someone approved
by the government h ai,

his voice quivering with
emotion.
The publisher said he has
gone into voluntary exile,
temporarily living in C:oral
Gables, Fla. Hie said he would
move later to E~urope,


Mr. Alfred Maycock
(PL P- For t Fin castle),
recently-appointed chairman of
the Bahamas Development
Corporation (DevCo), made
the disclosures during debate
on the $325,550 appropriation
for the Ministry of
Development in the 1973
budg address was
foreshadowed yesterday by
former Finance Minister
Carlton E. Franciis who said
the DevCo chairman "'will be
revealing the manner in which
Government proposes to
bridge" ethe er jete $6

revenue and expenditure. Mr.

Dvlpmee j spoes brtt

ert at in the ou973 budget
Mr. Maycock addressed the
House almost exactly 24 hours
lae'overnment is committed
to the people," he said, "to

eoemi~c snudperset tnudre t
our country and to make
better use of our natural
resources."
One step in G;overnment's
bid to meet that commitment
has been the realisation that
"our geographic location is an
asset we had underestimated."
The DevCo chairman quoted
sesran hpeornts tS theeneagy
particularly on the projected

Amn ia'solack f deep- atto

'aco modat na pl rge tanke s
PEAK PERIOD
"We have been told," Mr.
Maycock informed the House,
"that the years 1970-78


represent the peak period when
this country can take full
advantage of its geographic
location in the marine lanes of
the western hemisphere.
"Government has already
made a commitment to the
establishment of an oil
re-transhipment centre on
Ghrean ihoaml. 7Begimaln 8ie
about $6.5 million in revenue
each year.
"In the last few weeks," he
continued, "we have been
discussing at the Ministry of
Development investments
tollallin eS750xpmillist, and

with some more potential

b3etos inne dadlekingofhe e


on f dnee inwt is cousuftriend
in this G~overnment to
demonstrate that confidence
withthlong-taern tu mmitment0
million each.

was sgne onM ruin 2pnn 17
whereby Government has had a
commitment from a firm to
put into the coffers of this
country some $7.7 million
annually, and after 12 years it
will be SI1.3 million a year.
"Put this against the present
deficit of $6.7 million.
"With two additional
projects to which pn plve also

are talking about $31 million a
yat in new revenue, rising Ito

yeassiThere oare also
participation in these
operations."
FOUR PROPOSALS
Mr. Maycock said that "in


addition to these big projects, I
have four proposals which have
been analysed by a man from
the United Nations. assigned to
the Ministry of Development.
"They are for enterprises in
which the Government will
also retain equity, and
G ov ernment will make
n amlbl etsfhein n cesstary
collateral for Bahamians not in
a position to do it on their
own, to allow the people to
engage in partnership with
investors.
Mr. Maycock said the
.projects to nwhicehdha hd tbee

manu fac turning plant, a

abstbols c p nt fa odry ad a
flashignh ts and electrical
copo ns
thfe also revealed that dur ng
"I have received an additional

croom tomea tee omillapleman .
nothe d oilschairman gave


HOUSE PAYS


gT g g gg g g

HOUSE members paused
briefly at the start of the
si rul day Tf sta7 tiulge
aspects to the late George Kt.
SandsL fistnwece-chairmanro
Martha Tyns,r mother of FNM

Err ington Watkins
(FNM-Marsh Harbour), the
first scheduled speaker when
the debate resumed at 10:30
a.m., said both the PLP and the
country have suffered a loss at
the death Monday afternoon of
Mlr. Sands, and expressed
condolences to Mr. Tynes, who
despite his mother's death was
in the House.
Opposition Leader Kendal
Isaacs (FNM-Fort Montagu)
said he had been unaware of
the deaths, and also expressed
regret.
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling thanked the
Opposition members for their
condolences on Mr. Sands'
death, and in turn expressed
his own regret at Mrs. Tynes

deMh. Tynes (FNM-Acklins
anodus(rooked leslandfothan id
sympathy.


Sir Lnone111 that go~d that the


aloul\ dstra!ing; the
euninst)(l rt Ifth couni~try~ but
wo~rse the Iharacter of the


a slaveC ico a l) Fill n1 tj.

110 atlleged~ that the~ present
Bah mian m ver nmet wats
dterm1inedlcc to1 lnve foreignerr s
<>nt o~f Ithe i\;Jllnd and called this

the I gaindoni knul."

m~tn ths' de l tru tru d er

only from externarl Fcurces anld
phai readq there thas beenou

Sa t re trm has been no,
open suppression o~f thle press.

hd us il re~~~ uhtl nict inb
Hie saiid the go~vernment did
not call for te~nders as is tl e
(r cto mc tt wr tn ttoe
(;cV.< vernint ntotictS and had
ret used to issueo a "gaming
licence" allowing the
publication of at crossword
puuile, which had1 been used as
a circulation booctetr.
lie also was pro~hibited from
bringing qluahlfiedl staff to
Nassa u froml outside the <
Baba t,.....as..
told by "a highly *relfable
sorc" -',1at .. t Iidine

Be tictivt pebe mlai d ted te
next July 10.
PLAYING; COOL
A~t the moment they are
playing it cool, to use an
American term, because they
need a certain amount of good
will fromi Washington and
L~ondon."
Pointing out that he ran T'he
Tribune for 54 years and Ithat
his father had devoted,. his
entire life to the paper. Sir
I tienne said he was "walking
out on a large estate."
"This is no~t my adopted
country, he said. "My family
has been here forr six
generations."
Sir Itie'nne said he was not
no~w prepared to tell in detail
what was happening in the
Bahamnas.

stor Therbe itsold an s *deime
Iwilli tell thei stry htehsaid th

Pintdlinjopi vernmeonttator

tiennc sad he felt that the
United States and British
governments were aware of the
situation but that it "might be
expe~dient for Washington and
aodo ftc close their eyes and


make the asppointmon "e y

have finalised things
preliminary work will proceed
in consultation with Dr
K oles "
Lawt month Mr. Coakley
released Government's White
Paper on Education, in which
the set-up of the proposed
Clolle e was outlined
The programmes of te sit

School are to be developed

Dini sio Pof th C Idegec C.

be tkh nuls a f th Ile hi
Division, and the Teacher
Education Division will be
built around the Bahamas
Teachers Training College in
Oakes Field and the San
Salvador Teachers College.

On March 23 the Bahamas
Union of Teachers issued a
Wr ss release dealing wth th
present the structure the
college will take is vague," and
that "the appointment oth a
principal is a pniontly so tat
policies can be formu ate tl
thlr.Knowlespr i pee t ng in
training sessions for liaison
officers who will be responsible
for assisting official foreign
guests at the Bahamas
independence celebrations in

foT e b~uo ee npr riaton
yar is o yD S6,000, indica i

epe esdto ata ly rtake t
year, or the money is only a
MretaeCoakley had not, up to

theluonu onp adournaete of
from Opposition Leader
Kendal Isaalcs (FNM-Fort
Montagu) for specific
information on when the
College is scheduled to become
a eaThts is something which we
have talked about for years,
but nothing has ever
materialised," Mr. Isaacs noted.
Err inat on Watk in a
(FNM-Marsh Harbour) charged
that nothing exists but a
"paper college."
He said "we need the
buildings and the facilities so
we don't have to send our
students abroad to be
contaminated. You borrow
money for everything else," he
told the Government. "Why
not borrow money to build a
nat io nal educat ion al
institution?"
Mr. Coakley made his
disclosures on the College of
the Bahamas as he was
summing up Government




II NIHT I
STANDS


aa~~~~ Ul Allf
NASSAU ONLY


DR. JOHN KNOWLES
... son of Bishop Knowles

policy during debate on the
nea rl y 2 4 m il lion
appropriation for education in
the 1973 budget.
He said "the need for
training more Bahamian
teachers is still very acute." ie

Poid ateprir ry euca io
system 85 percent of the
tachers ase alahamianf wi n

about 87 percent ilexss o

import teachers at this level as
well as at the secondary level'
he said.
The figures brought from
Joseph Ford (PLP-Inagua) the
comment that "90 per cent of
the expatriate teachers are only
here on a vacation. They aren't
really concerned with the
education of our people. They
are here to get what they
could. As for the ten percent
that is good," he said,
"Government should look into
retaining them."
Mr. Watkins rapped
Government on its policy in
general.
..EMPLOYMENT
Ilf you are going to educate
the Bahamian children, make
provision to usefully employ
thm atedaFre saey've been

Co lilowinstate ent ot at hi
Mini mr ihta* f i o hd

o gs rrnf ovies at Babaanti
exception to American films
portraying the life style of
American Negroes.
"Not all American Negroes
are bad," heasaid, "but nthoe

example any race should
foll ,,
Tht remark brought a
demand for its withdrawal
from Oscar Johnson
"PP-a olsland), awho said i
American Negro.',
Mr. Watkins replied "I don't
think the remark was

t 1at i ont th aks th says o
lf f the Ameia Ner i
sistable for usrnrca gr s
He withdrew the remark
however, when House
committee chairman Henry
Bowen (PLP-West lind and
Bimini) ruled that it was
derogatory .
Noel Roberts (FNM-St.
John's) rose to "congratulate
the G~overnment for the great
strides they have made in
education."

Trrffic~~ ritll~
MRS. ANNA Grant. 59, who
was involved in a traffic
accident on Carmichael Road
last month, died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital late Monday
from her injuries.
Mrs. Grant is survived by a
son Thomas Basden of Basden l
Elevator Company, an adopted
son, Franklin Adams, and f'ive
grandchildren.


Minister Arthur Hanna revealed in
The disclosure by Mr.
Hanna, who is Finance
Minister, came during debate
on the 59.84 million
appropriation to service the
public debt in 1973.
In his budget communica-
tion last week Mr. Hanna set
the public debt at $65 million,
and during debate yesterday
Government came under
Opposition fire for not
including the debt of the
G;over nment-owned public
corporations in the figure.
Opposition Leader Kendal
Isaacs (FNM-Fort Montagu)
had earlier charged that only a
Ldesdpertinuel Gover om 8

w ept ssenation's economy

thlplying, Mr. Hanna told

(;ovrneto had 19 rroed
some $32 million and that is
part of the $65 million was are
paying off now, although some
of it has been paid off."

Most oB tRRO$32 Eillion, he
said, was borrowed by the UBP
administration between 1965
anlie said the public debt at
the nd of 1966 included loans
for pro erty pu chas~es loan;

o'n do and the Import Export
Bank, and outstanding treasury
bills worth 5S mi lon.
'At the present time," Mr.
Hanna said, "the money we are
trying to pay back which was
CHURCH OF SCOTLAND
OFFICIALS VISITING
MISS Betty Walls. Geeneral
Secretary of the Overseas
C'ouncill of the C'hurch of
Scotland. and the Rev. Peter
Logan Ayre, Vice-Convenor of
the Overseas Council, are
visiting the Bahamnas. They
have spent several days this
weeLk in F~reeport where the
Lucaya Presbyterian C'hurch is
located,. and will return to
N~assau this weekend to visit St.
Andrew s Kirk.
Trhe Rev. Mlr. Ayr will
preach the sermon at the
morning service at St.
Andrew's Kirk on Sunday.
SURVIVAL AT SEA
DR. R. PAUL Poad will
show a filmi and give a talk on
survival at sea at tonight'
monthly meeting of BA\SRA
BASRA members will meet
at their headquarters at 8:30


the House Tuesday.
borrowed by the UtlP Is
something in the nature of over
$21 million."
A~nd he charged that "the
last Government used to
borrow money for suspicious
purposes. Stories could be told
about money which was
borrowed for equipment for
BaTelCo which had to be
thrown away, about Arawak
Cay and there were consultant
fees and finders' fees and
blackmail fees.
"Some of the money we are
paying back now is for money,
which went under the table to
various individuals.
ge"Nearly al e of uvve didn't

Ibacso meocaste we ae opa ind

I'mT nt talking abr cin er s.'r

9em dandhaa l'$32 million in
of --what was it then
$50-odd m million or
thereabouts? 'These are things
sober-minded men should bear
ah mind wedn Ce trn nto


The salt mines atmosphere is
created by the non-existent
air-conditioning system which
has been that way for some 18
months.
mThroug gebr ex rie b

invedomanagedea site wi h
cof dent in te spring bre zes

anemical y-moving ciling nanof
'itn diecl hie f clerk
the Speaker's stan che lr

cnee sion Sat te watherois a
Ipns-tl fa which h
Spcasnishst waans across hi
be-wigged features.
In the chair Deputy Speaker
Scherling Bootle is having a
rather difficult time with his
own wig, cut slightly longer
tlhatn that of Mr Saun ersaand
head of Speaker Arlington
Butler.
The wig has a propensity for
shifting to the side every time
Mr. Bootle moves his head
At one stage yesterday, the
poor Deputy Speaker found
one eye almost completely
obscured by the unruly




AT TIllS MORNING'S
opening ceremonies of the
April Criminal Sessions,
Supreme Court judge, Mr.
Justice Samuel Graham,
C.M.G., O.B.E., told attorneys
present that it is important
that accused persons he
brought to trial quickly in the
admninistration of justice.
Twentiy-four cases are to be
heard during the sessions with
others expected to be added.
The judge issued bench
warrants for two men,
Jamlaican Raldo Clarke accusal
of houisehreaking and stealing,
and A~lfred Baulld charged with
rape, when they failed to
aopper.


headpiece.
Descending from the
rostrum at the luncheon
suspension Mr. Bootle finally
abandoned any effort to keep a
straight f ce ont in s. sto

uond end he gripped itl tig l
ceremonial procession out


not they had ever debated the
Head.
Clarence To w n
representative Michael
Lighthonurn ( NMh brought the

when he asked whether the
revenue was to be discussed
alongside the Appropriations
or afterwards.
Opposition Leader Kendal
Isaacs, who is serving his first
term in the House, after many
years in the Senate, maintained
that it was his understanding
revenue had always been
debated head by head.
Finance Minister Arthur
Hanna, who is also government
Leader, said he could not
recall. If such was the case,
then it would be going against
practice to ignore such debate
but not against the law.
Mr. Hanna argued that the
only Bill before them was for
Appropriations, and suggested
that members get around the
problem by dealing with
revenue when dealing with the
individual hea ds of
expenditure.
The government Leader and
the Opposition Leader then
consulted the House Manual of
Prlocsedureeand s reed that tt
particular point.
Mr. Isaacs contended that


Estimates of Revenue Head by

where the rules were silent
established practice was

fol on red Mr. Hanna:
"Where the rules are silent the
House of Commons rules
apply.
Mr. Isaacs continued to
argue that the Head by H~ead
procedure was one which had
been followed in the House
"from time immemorial" and
called on the previous Finance
Minister and other mlemberss to
offer their comments.
Neither side appeared to
have any recall.
it was agreed to defer the
matter until the
Appropriati on s were
completed.
Bimini and West End
representative Henry Bowen
(PLP) was in the chair during
the exchange, which occurred
while the Budget was being
debated in committee.
House Speaker Arlington
Butler, who could, under
House rules, be consulted for a
ruling, is presently in England'
The Tribune understands.
Mr. Butler left Nassau
Moda os mi e Hous h n
to debate the 1973
Appropriations.


10fil M011ltiattSH & ISmlly.


118?8 00 |1e- East or vac ation


daughters, sons-in-law and eight of ten Grandchildren ar


vacationing in the Bahamas.
Lord Mountbatten, who is a
frequent visitor to the
Bahamnas, arrived in Nassau
yesterday and will leave for
Eleuthera on Friday to spend a
short holiday with Lord and
Lady Brabourne and Mr. D~avid
and Lady Pamela Hicks and
their children.
Trhe two families own homes
at WNindemere Island. The
Brabournes have "Prove~nder
and the Hic~ks own
"Savannah."
Lord Mountbatten said
today that two of his
grandchildren had to be left In
Eng~land, where they are
preparing for examinations.
One of them, a girl. is at St.
Donat's College. Wales, and the
other, a boy, is a student at
Reading Ulniversity. They are
both children of Lord and
Lady Brabourne.
NLord MountS ttn nle ba
Caledonian airline's inaugural
flight froml Gatwlick airport on


~rihun


abD


R i d P t nceselons within # per


(N


BUDGET DEBATE 3rd. DAY: SOME BIG DISCLOSURES







$1,000 million in inlvestnents for here ?


Sir Itienne Du och



tells IAPA about




govt. harassment
By JOHN KOEHLER
MONTEGO BAY, JAMAICA (AP) Sir Etienne D~upuch,
publisher of The Tribune, Nassau. said today government
harassment is forcing him either to sell his newspaper fo~r half its


By MIKE LOTHIAN 80VT. POLICY TO
GOVERNMENT HAS UNDER CONSIDERATION proposed investments in the *
Bahamas of over $1,000 million, and has already signed agreements in principle fo CUT FINDS TO
investment projects which will yield about $31 million a year in additional revenue,


it was revealed in the House Tuesday.


Dr 'ohn Ko00e WIS 0




CIh68d nl eegg g gg



0 hf th 8 h SM0

ByMIKE LOTHIAN
A BAHAMIAN UNIERSITY PROFESSOR wil1 "very
shortly" be appointed principal of the College of the Bahamas'
and preliminary work in establishing the College will begin
immediately after the appointment, Education Minister
LivingZston N. Coakley disclosed in the House this morning.
Mr. Coakley said Dr. John
Knowles, professor of
lan uages an Siman dFrase ~~' .s

already expressed his
11i n nes t take the nost

D KnohwlesM ~ s id thee are o


waorfew minor things" n wlesP
has "further commitments at .)
Simon Fraser" heepcs o.


gn 55gg U Tp g TgUg p
THE PLP's F~t. Charlotte
representative Earl Thompson
suggested yesterday that those
Out Islands which had not
voted for the gtverning party
should have their
appropriations cut until they
were willing t<, fall Im s n s
recommendation was made
after C'larence Town
representative Michael
Lightbourn (FNM) questioned
the cut 'for his district under
the head Local Government, in
the l973 B udp p t h o

demonstrated that they are

goenieontoshal get th t
lbenefits. ns ed ofagiving thhem

they did the government
souldn ha give r th emda lot
come along "
Mr. Thompson claimed
Opposition gemerm were

complaining.
Ma r sh 11 arb o ur
re prese nta tive E rr ington
Watkins (FNM) reminded Mr.
Thompson that it was "easier
to catch flies with honey" than
otherwise.


A.0. M 8Ra blames UBP for


thif IIOf til0 R ti00a 81 8t
THERE WAS ALREADY A $32 MILLION national debt when
the PLP came to power in 1967, and although some of that has
now been paid off, almost a third of today's national debt was
incurred by the former UBP administration, Deputy Prime


1101 r81181 10 till 50118 i
By NICKI KELLY
ANYONE VENTURING INTO THE HOUSE of Assembly this
week must have discreetly wondered whether he had accidentally
wandered into the salt mines of Siberia or a pretty poor
production of Gilbert and Sullivan.


10 ISClill 01 BIIIg at r sling

REPRESENTATIVES OF THE HOUSE yesterday appeared to
suffer a case of "amnesia" when they could not recall whether or
















Erl"ir~lli~ 0lb li~l I


of E gland's no-hite
i..,,,..": liy. .. Ln~don,
according to latest census
figures.

become Bhrm capi 6,5h0
people from ne w
Commonwealth" countries in
Africa, Asia and the West
indies.
When the mnflux from older
Commonwealth countries such
as Canada, Australia and New
Zaa and fom Wsern
Europe and Ireland is taken

n pulatio rses tt onemimm nt
more than an eighth of
London 's inhabitants, the
chens s t tsis, contained in
an official report, are based on
returns from the nationwide
census in I 71.
The report said most of
London's non-white
imm i ants lived in the lesss

such as Hackney and Brixton.
SThey included 106,380
immigrants born in India and
169,695 from the West Indies.
That total represents 6.4 per
cent of the capital's


imgatin a from Ir kand
with nearly 200,000 from the
Republic. There were 203,000
European-born "Londoners."
A total of 14 per cent of
London's population is now
non-British.
Th capital I dl 7,452,346
in abtants mn17 a dop
during the preceding decade of
540,000. But during the same
period, the population of the
surrounding south east area
increased from 16.3 million to
17.1.
"London remains the centre
of an expanding population,"
the report said. According to
the figures, 664,000 London
homes a qh ree of te total

of one or more of three
amenities hot water, fixed
bath or shower and an inside
flush to toilet.


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Wednesday, April 4, 1973.


BE REIESTED

AS FBI DIR~ET)1
W.vHING ON (A)Va. Scad
Tu day t Senate shouludneject L



Byird told the Senate that
regardless of what happens to Gray
"'">es ut determine thnafto e
ment powerful investigative agency .
"No ency coul sim threaten
citizens if it is misused, he said.
"And no agency can be of more
benefit to our citizens, if properly
fnet maiing th anr the rFB i,
crime in our rccietp."
"These isbues concerning the
direction and future of ihe FBI are
avn more cucal o loano rocis
to head the bureau." he added.
upr < las bee t .* le ding Sen '"
which tthe Senat judiciary
<>mm ed. (appehas been acting
director since the death of J. E~dgar
lioover last May .
(Tit)(L < rntin te'were ajurn d
insch 22 with no date set for their
resumption.
I~uring the past weekend the
W hts Iouspr ) rafroe Pres sonj

(flat the nomination might be
wItyd rrwnho contends Gray has
been "too political" and "too
\ubservient to the White House,"
said hki expects the nomination to
hemmittee n ah ju iciary

le sai i doi 't beiev th

the nomination would fail on a tie
votr
lord. the assistant D~emocratic
lead r. toind tre 'Senale th
far easier than finding the answers
to such questions as:
'What kind of FBI do we want?
alo an a official law enffircemena
free s~city without threatening the
foundations of political freedom?
flo(w can Congress and the
President retain a check on the
thirnityit orntto a bp 1 inal > li
forcee"
Ityrd said the judiciary
committees or one of its
sub cmmitte ch sqheuston hao
should make legislative
recommendations to the Senate.

SOVIETS SPACELAB


MOSCOW, April 4 (AP)-- A crew
of Soviet Cosmonauts was believed
preparing today fo~r a chase through
space to board the orbiting Salyut 2
Spacelab for a long-duration flight.
Western experts believed the
Russians would try to upstage the
American Skylab mission scheduled
to begin at the end of the month.
The experts expected a Soviet
crew, probably three menl, to lift
off in a Soyuz spacecraft within the
nleext three days to join the Sarlyut
station. It was fired into orbit
Tuesday.
Sources said there has been
evidence in recent months that
Soviet C'osmonauts have been In
intensive training for a space
mission.
The last Soviet manned flight
was In June 1971, when three
cosmonauts went up in a Soyuz,
linked up with a Salyut and then
rturnedtttoE ch. eo~r t the
endurance record of 23 days in
space but died on their re-entry
flight because a hatchet on the
Soyuz was, not properly closed.
IExperts think the Russians will
try to repeat the mission
successfully. Since the fatal 1971
flight, Soviet space scientists have
been concentrating on flight
security measures to prevent
further accidents.
The Skylab launch is scheduled
for April 30. Three U.S. astronauts
are to follow the next day in an
Apollo craft for a 28-day flight.
Two successive 56-day missions by
other crews are planned later.
There is an outside possibility
that the American and Soviet crews
will be performing similar
operations in space at the sam~e
time. But it seems more! likely that
as the American crew is going up,
the Russians will be coming down,
timing their return to coincide with
the May D~ay celebration that is one
of the major events of the year in
Moscowr and the tradition workers'
day in FEurope.
Western experts speculated that
the Soviets had several reasons for
manne~dhlight at thi kno i ate
nearly ton yarsuo rteh xraiin
programme. This is the scientific
amPrestige is involved. The timing


ofs Ienm as cinde re cth t.Skl
-There is a question of hono~ur.
Huskiunnucientitat waruat rusr til"'
-The~ Sovie~ts probably also
watnt to demonstrate to the
Americans that they are reliable
partners in space. A joint
Apollo Soyul flight with mixed
crews is planned for 1975.


M1^ I EPA RA) LortiosofFoKTIidaLOReaIl populated gold cost
were hit by a power blackout Wednesday for the second straight day as
generators faboured under heavy, hot weather demand,
."0,::: an the ieped problem, said asrpokesmanhfour flonde :::1
know the dimensions or the cause just yet."
Power was reported out from B~oca Katon, south of West Valm Beach, to
Ft~ sadm Tuay' bek ovnn, c bea 9:3 am.and lasted
caused by a breakdown at its 760,000 kilowatt nucicar power station south
of here.
The breakdown triggered a blackout which snapped off electricity to
8,000 businesses and homes along 60 miles of coastline.
AGREEMENT IN WOUNDED KNEE IMMINENT
WOUNDED:I KNEE, SOUTH) D)AKOTA (AP)- The ~governme~n t chief
negotiator at Wounded Knee, South D~akota says a peaceful settlement of
there 3dl cxacupation apears mminent Arssi ntrAtto ney 8Genemir K n
an agreement could come today.
Frizze I said yesterday he was optimistic about a settlement because the
laosisd a had resolvedHalu ron f car lis *tenndemards presented by the
Ramon FRoubideau would discuss details of the demands.
NIXON WINS --HIS VETO STANDS
yeW tH esTO (An)--e a dnt ilxn h wn th oti t big test of t
not to override his veto of a controversial two and a half billion vocational
rehabilitation bill. The volte was four short of the needed two-thirds.
Since b~oth H~ouses of Congress must vote to override a veto, the Senate
action kills the measure without need of a House vote. The action came as
Ssar ditr p intment to Democratic congresskmnal leaders,nwhouchos the
domestic prograrmmes.
FARMERS' REACTION TO MEAT BOYCOTT
to IC(; (A)r The natoniewide m t> byoft ao indoh is futuf e
market. Lay offs continue at slalughterhouses, and retailers have cut their
beef orders in response to the consumer protest.
A supermarket in Cleveland, Ohio reports sales off 40 per cent yesterday
a us e. < sitanea,wa lgslaiv diued er h dteo b30 produced seafood gumbo in support of the boycott


ha bengienan aditna snte of apt 8mnttosin pisonn i e
additional sentence came today after Liddy refused to obey a federal
judge's order that he talk about the Watergate case to a grand jury. Liddy
must serve th contempt sentence before he begins the prison term of six
to 20 Yanas <>9 1i conviction inthe Wattergateocuarst de Jh iat ak
freely before the grand jury investigating the case. He was granted
Immunity from prosecution; but In a transcript read in court today of only
one session before the grand jury, Liddy claimed his flfth amendment right
a epu li an Snaom owel Welcker of Connecticut called today for the
resignation of White House Chief of Staff H. R. Haldeman. A member of
the Senate committee looking Into the Watergate bugging case, Welcker
said "I think it would be quite proper for Mr. Haldeman to offer his
resignation to Mr. Nixon."
OPERATION HOMECOMING H.Q. CLOSES DOWN
CLARK AIR BASE, PHILIPPINES (AP)--The operation homecoming
headquarters at Clark Air Base in the Philippines has closed Its doors. Th$
operation that sepherdede 50 forme rtprsonersted war through th fnrt
Captain Robert White of Newport News, Virginia. White is due to arrive at
Mc~uire Air Base in New Jersey today.
Hano and ntohn r 17 rleasebrarSo th Vtnall6TCh aind ng dow oedt e
operation began last Thursday as the last group of POW's arrived at Clark.
U.K. STRIKING UNIONS BACK UP
LONDON (AP)--Britain's coal minetr voted against a national strike and
other labour unlonts apparentlymbetganu to marrk In their bitter feud with the
The apparent backoff by the unions in their battle against the
government's anti-inflation wages freeze sparked swift claims by
Conservative legislators that the government had won a major Victory.
The moves rrked the London ~Spk Exchyl qut of month-long
r~thy. Coupled with a drop In bad ~ntterst rats the news brightened
prospects and many major stocks malde gains.
SThere were signs, too, the Trades Union Congress, the high command of
Btritain's organized labour, would now resume talks with the government
on hammering out a voluntary programme of wage and price restraint.
Karlier talks ended in deadlock because the government refused to meet
union demands for statutory price controls alongside its wases freeze.
MEAT BOYCOTT IN JAMAICA
KINGSTON, JAMAICA April 3 (AP)--A consumer boycott is planned
for this weekend In Jamaica, the National Consumers League announced
today.
A spokesman said that 'all consumers are urged to buy no meat this
weekend in a protest against high prices of all varieties of meat.' "Durins
this meat boycott, substitutes can be used, such as fish eggs, cheese, peas
and canned food.'
The boycott comes after the Minister of Commerce and Consumer
Protection, Wills O. Isaacs, said Monday that controls had been lifted on
the price of beef, except for meat used for stew and soup.
U.K.'sWHITE PAPERONIRELAND 'HOPEFUL'
WASHINGTON (AP) A U.S. Senator said Tuesday he hopes the
British go'verment's white paper wUI be the beginning of a peaceful and
free new Ireland. "There have been signs of hope, satell signs, perhaps, but
nonetheless evidence of what I feel can be eventual triumph of reason and
justice," said Senator James L. Buckley, a New York Conservative
Republican.
'The white paper is another of those signs of hope. While I have not yet
had the opportunity to examinne that paper in detail, its general outline
seems to me to be more reassurin."
Under the plan, Buckley said, the minority, Catholic, group would be
assured a share of the political power in a new 80-seat assembly and a new
governing body.
B~uckley said the paper would guarantee civil rights for all*
SOVIETS LAUNCH ORBITING LABORATORY
MOSCOW (AP) The Soviet Union launched an orbiting laboratory
Tuesday in what may be the firt step in a manned space venture involving
a Syuz craft*
TASS announced the launch of Saint 2 la routine fashion and said it was
to "perfect the design of onboard systems and equipment and for
conducting scientific and technical research and experiments in space
flight.,,
A senior US space official said last month the Soviets might stage an
extended manned space flght before the American skylab mission is
launched in May.
Solut is an orbiting laboratory that has housed cosmonaouts sent aboard
Soyuz vehicles to dock with it.
Soyuzr II, launched one June 6, 1971. then linked up with Salut and the
cosmonauts established the first manned orbiting space laboratory. The
three died June 30 as Soyuz 11 returned to earth when a hatch failure
calusd a fatal decompression. The Salut burne~d up inl the atmosphere in


of communications

By JULES LOH
agVIRr INI BAwcC, rVa. -whht rninens atemmu dh ion
secret meaning, served as an underground newspaper for
American captives in North Vietnam, keeping them informed of
camp activity and bucking up their morale.


TO FORCE A PEACE PACT


Massive US air


strikes launched


in Cambodxa

By D~ennis Neeld
SAIGON (AP}--American B 2s andTFI1 swing-wing fight r
bombers pounded insurgent frces Tues ay in some o h
heaviest air attacks of the Cambodian war, U.S. sources reported.


"dangerous consequences."
The broadcast claimed
"Amenrica's aerial blitz is being
extendled to densely populated
arear of C'ambodia, especially
around the capital of Phnom

NO POINT?
Senitdr UI.S. officials in

(` riibnunit xn theyliref t
thch Irink of victory, and
cotnsuecuntliy see no point in
peace negot nations
"The C:ommunists in
C'ambodiaa thiink timet is on
their Fide snd that it will bring
themi complete victory," said
one senior U.S. official in
Pihnonl Penh.(uad bombing
theyv could be wrong.
'The sources compared the
massive raids in Cambhodi to
the bomibardment of H-anoi
andi Haiphong last December.
That Ibombing was designed to

fcrc tai cnNo tna).ctnarnase

The Inited States has about
300 B 52 bombers on Guam
and mn Thailand and normally
about 60 per cent of them are
otperational at any one time.
t-ach of the eight engine
atircra~ft carries 30 tons of
born U.S. Pacific C mad
in Htonolulu issued its usual
sparse communiques confirming
that B52 bombers continued
Operations over Cambodia for
the 27th consecutive day but
giving no further details*
OFFENSIVE
U.S. air attacks have
concentrated on Communist
force edging closer to thd

iso ting it fromot e resn of te
country by cutting of f
highways leading to it,
Military hs urees re orted
some of th s and fghter
bombers in action Tuesday also
supported a rare Cambodian
government offensive in the
K iritomn plateau 60 miles
southwest of Phnom Penh.
A day after the Vietnam
cease-fire: Jan. 28, President
Lon Nol dec ared his frces
would cease offensive action -
something for which they had
not made a name for
themselves anyway -- to permit
the withdrawal of North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
troops from the country. T'he
insurgents replied with their
heaviest offensive of the war. It
was blunted only by U.S. air

continued Amierican
bombing has raised a storm in
the U.S. Congress, where critics
of the Nixon administration
have questioned the President's
authority to continue bombing
now that U.S. troops are out of
Vietnam.
The Khmer Rouge are
nominally headed by the
onetime chief of state, Prince
Norodom Sihanouk, who now
lives in Peking. The insurgents
have about 40,000 combat
troops mn the field. They are
trained, supplied and led down
to platoon level by North
Vietnamese, of whom there are
about 23,000 in the country*
S. VIET BOYCOTT
In South Vietnam, Saigon's
Lt. G~en. Pham QUOC Thuan
abandoned an announced
boycott of the two-party joint
military y commission
supervising the Vietnam
cease-fire. But he wavered

reued sh discuss the i tuatong
at Tong Le Chan, a government
Rangc base 50 miles north of
teec pitalxthat has been under
A communique reported
Tong le Chan was hit by 333
artillery, rocket and mortar
shells and Communist suppe~rs
twice triedl unsuccessfully to
breach its defensive perimeter
Monday nght


Every available B52 in
Southeast Asia participated in
the massive bombings,
apparently designed to beat
Cambodia's Khmer Rouge
rebels and their North
Vietnamecse allies into
accepting a peace settlement, ll
the official Ameorican sources

adhde wide-ranging aerial
assault was reported to extend
beyond tactical support for
Cambodian government ground
forces and suggested a new
turn in the three-year war.
The homibing got under way
Monday night and continued
until shortly after dlawn
Pue 1a, the sou ces said ?`c
Washington, however, that
there has been "no dramatic
change in the last few days' in
the bombing level.
"We have had a major eff'crt
for some time," he added,
w thou d sel sidn tf n d cr


attacks as a "crimiinal act
against t he in n oc ent
Cambodian people" and
wamed the United States of



S.V IE THAM HOT

18LED 08T 1
WASHINGTON (AP)
Secretary of Defense Elliot L.
Richardson told Congressmen
Tuesday that if Hanoi launched
another massive invasion of
South Vietnam the United
States would have to consider
"reintroduction of air

supt r'Richardson told the
House defense appropriations
subcommittee he considers an
invasion by Hanoi unlikely and
said there is every reason to
believe that North Vietnam
would want to consider peace,
Richardson made the
comment on consideration of
reintroduction of U.S. support
in response to a Congressman's
question a ter first emp asizing
that he believes such an
invasion would be unlikely.
The secretary also told the
Con rssmen that President
Nixon's authority for bombing
in Cambodia is the same
authority that he had to secure
the successful Jan. 27 cease-fire
agreement wi th North
Vietnam.
The Cambodia bombing is
only "residual" fighting from
the Vietnam war, he said.
"If the President had the
authority to pursue the
cease-fire agreements ,,
Richtardson said, "he has the
authority to secure adherence
with those agreements."
President Nixon would have
to seek Congress' approval of
any new bombing, Richardson
said, but "in light of North
Vitnam s vi lions o h
cease-fire agreement" the
Cambodia bombing is only a
continuation of the President's
Vietnam war authority.

lirr llg l


SAN C LEMENTE ,
('ALIVORNIA (AP')-- President
Nixon and P'resident Nguyen van
Thieu threaltened "vigorous
rrtox u visagust TCommuni t
Ni xon promised sub stantial
postwar economic aid for South

ntwiudthe communitgue rownvj
Western White House made no
miltor in r~vnt nr anedw veU s
epcific dollar figur dey twhatn i
substantial" economic aid
phre~ mpmidents of the nations
nillied in a decade of war also
pledged In farewell remarks and
toasts with F'rench champagrne that
they would make full joint efforts
to consolidate the fragile Indochina
proceleu camer to Nixon's occtunsidle
compound seeking a guaralntrr that1
the Unltitedl States would intervene~c
militarily inl rreponrse to, am~ Naltant
violations oft the cease-fire
algreemlent signed two months agoc.
In the i deo-wordl communique.


Nixont ruled out none of' his
options. But the document did not
~ontain a precise gualranlte of
renewed UI.S. military involvement.
Ther two, Izleadrs. meeting~ less
than a week after ther United Sltate
firmally endedf its military mission
inl South Vietnaom. Jiaid therv

sitable numberrs from North
Vietnum into South Vietnam. .."


Pairis "would edul for appropriatel,
vigorous trecti ll.


The amo unts of
information we passed along
would amaze you." said Lt.
Cmdr. William M. Tschudy,
who spent nearly eight years in
seven different prisons in and
near Hanoi.
"For instance, if they had a
big transfer of prisoners from

kow i 4 hurs the nme of
everybody there and where
they were located."
Tschudy said the prisoners'
main concern was in keepinS
track of one another' names,
continually refining lists of
captives, which they
mem didtion, however, they
swapped jokes, chatted about
old times, mocked their
captors, spent endless hours
discussing food, and shared
such useful tips for survival as
how to pick handcuff locks
with a wi3 m


elements of it have been
disclosed, the Pentagon asked
that its details not be divulged
mn case some men missing a
action might be using it.
"We also whistled a lot, '
Tschudy said. "I've been in
places that at times sounded
like a bird cage."
Tschudy said the day he was
driven into the Hanoi Hilton
compound, June 20, 1965, two
days after he was shot down
over Thanh Hoa, the camp
burst into whistled renditions
of "America the Beautiful,"
"It's a grand old flag," and
"God bless America "
"That did two things," he
sad "'ld infornwdmpria ner
that a new man was in camp
and it let me know that I'
wasn't alone. I tell you it
sounded awfully good to me at
that point."
NEVER BROKEN
As the months and years
passed, Tschudy said, the
communications system grew
gradually more sophisticated.
"We developed a sort of
shorthand for our tap code,"
he said. "It not only made it
much faster to pan
information, but also much
more difficult to break. If they
ever broke the code, there's no
evdenc of it "
Major aim, Tcuy said
was simply to keep track of
everybody. Their cells were
shuttered although some had
tiny cracks and the men
themselves constructed other
peepholes. They had to keep
track constantly because there
were periodic transfers of
prisoners as well as new
arrivals.

clothes, for instance," Tschudy
said, "I would snap them in the
air. The guards thought I was
just dryn them. But I would
snap out. 'WT-SM', That would
tell everybody that William
Tschudy and Scott Morgan
were in the wash area W
would just let everybody know
that we were still around."
Further, the former prisoner


said, each man had a personal
song.
"If somebody heard a guy
walking past whistling 'the
yellow rose of Texas,' he'd say,
'there goes Bill Tschudy."
In their cells, the men gave
priority to information such as
details of "quizzes," their term
terinterog~iontsessions tha
passed the word about answers
they had given so that the next
man, asked the same question
could give a consistent answer'
ENDLESS TALK
But the prisoners also
chatted endlessly simply to
toccp one mild ind break
"I taught four guys how to
extract square roots," Tschudy
said, "solely by tapping on the
walls. First I had to teach
myself. I spent hours trying to
remember how it was done,

ne ea n woul rom i'
square roots. If he said no, I'd
teach him, then we'd give each
other problems to solve.
"We also passed the time in
games like naming the States in
alphabetical order, state
ca 1al, tte t orld's highest
"And if a guy was down
w'd buck him p Durn
some of the rougher periods we

dsene un ty, ofc mgads supa
It's the way a lot of us were
able to survive. .
o ehudy said ever devic

communica ce. mtoen canp
nuts that grew on a tree in
camp.
"We stole everything we
could get our hnds owhe~

penci s every oy h is
own cache.
Tschudy said a great morale
booster was mocking their
cators' fractured English
"Whenever they would say
something like 'me don't
change horseshoes in the
middle of the stream,' or that
somebody had 'let the cat into
the bag,' we'd spread it around
and get a big kick out of it.
"One guy told me that
during an interrogation by a
certain V (Vietnamese) who
was particularly proud of his
English, the V leaned back and
said most profoundly, 'you
mrus g7umbe sutthat right or
HIDING 30 YEARS DID NOT
KNOW W.W. II WAS OVER
PORT MORESBY, NEW
GUINE:A, APRIL 4 (AP) A
naked amaciated Papuan emerged
from the jungle Tuesday and
disclosed in a garbled, disJointed
story that he had been hiding from
the Japanese for 30 years. "He
stayed there completely alone,
living off berries and snakes, not
knowing the war ended 28 years
ago", said lan Holmes, District
Commissioner for the island of New
Ireland.
Villagers who found him on a
roadway 14 miles from Kavoing
thought he wars some sort of wild
man and panicked. He later
identified himself to Australian
authorities as Boni Meki, about
-

Whro Qrthamr t


SAYS 6I ll $eli HeOW POWs KEPT UP MORALE 14 PERCENT OF


US POWs devised


L8ogg8 PEOPLE


IDgelliORS RetWOrk HOW HON-BRITISII
LONDON (AP)- Nearl half


An Unbelievable Opportunity For The




* ALL LEATHER FR OM AR GENTINA
* HIGH PLATFORMS
* EX CITING COLOURS
s MAGNIFICENT STYLES


MUIKP'S SHOI SITORI


BAY STREET


PHONE 24535




_ __ _~ ~ __~____~_~ I_ --,1 I__ __ ___,-- ~~_


Applications are invited for the position of
Personnel Office Assistant


The1~ arpplic~ant sho~uki poissess a University
clualif~ica;tion~ in Humiran or Industrial Relations
o~r eqcuivalent andt ide~ally should hav'e hatd several
yearl cs experience~ inl Pe~rsonnel Mal~nageme~nt~~ and
Industrial Relatio~n\.

A knowledge~c of Personnel Marn~~naement Staff
TIrainingl. Salarry Adminisitrrti tion. Be~neftit and

niot essenitial..



-s~tablished Salatrt Sc;le~srlt \nd ill be Ele sendentt
upocn qual~lification~s and expe~ri nclc~

Appllicutio ns in w~ritingl starting qulalif~ic~ations
anid expelrience~ shou~lld be add~ressedc t, thle
Sc t ing A( Pt & IK.R Bahantus~
I eclecommunl~l~c~atiolnsl ( o~r~oration,ll ) Hox
3048. Nassau,, Bahiamas.


iShe Gribunt
Notuns ADDIcrUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGURTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUC(, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH. 3.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt.. LL.D.
Publiithr/lEditor 1917-1972
Contributing E'ditor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRONM.Sc., B.A., LL.e.,
Pubusher/rEditor 1972.

EDITORIA L


Ofha i8 equal tr $

By ETIENNE D)UPUCH
THE EQUAL Rights for Women issue has been hotly contested
in the U.S. in recent times. It has become almost as bitter,
irrational and explosive as the racial issue.
A news despatch from Augusta, Maine on March 6th reported
that "with some women crying and others shouting joyous
approval, the Maine Senate refused by two votes Tuesday to
approve the U.S. constitutional amendment extending equal
rights to women.
"The action placed in doubt its ratification this year by the
necessary 38 states. So far, 28 states have ratified the proposed
b 1 giblt 11 including Maine, have now rejected it in one or
"St leiltv ouses,
statess have seven years to consider the amendment before it
is considered rejected.
"The vote by the Maine Senate, following lengthy debate, did
not kill the bill outright in the current session, but proponents
held little hope that it could be reconsidered and adopted this
year.
The article pointed out that older women were those who
shouted for joy while young women wept.
***********
What do these young women mean by equal rights?
Equal pay for equal work ... equal opportunity for
advancement in business?
Yes, that's fair enough. Some time ago I read an article in an
American newspaper that revealed that women in the U.S. ...
either through inheritance or alimony ... now control mlore
money than men in the nation.
Men here claim that a law giving so-called equal rights to
women would eventually lead to women being required to bear
arms in war ... the removal of Ladies Powder Rooms in public
places ... the bunking together of men and women on active
service, thus breaking down all barriers of restraint and
self-res ect among the sexes,
This would reduce society to the level of dogs on the street.
Judging from the way some young women appear in public
today, thabseis oabl ifa they want.ticmsbu.
It illbea sd ay f., and whe... thscmsaot
I don't understand all this talk about equality. Personally, I
have always regarded women as superior to men in the things in
life that really matter.
No one can suggest that I am prejudiced against women. The
articles I have written in this column about my mother, my wik
and my daughter who is now running The Tribune are proof
that I place women on a pedestal for special reverence by inferior

One of the first books I plan to write when I am able to give up
the chore of producing a daily column for The Tribune will bear
the title: "The Women In My Life".
It will be a beautiful story emphasizing the old saying that "the
hand that rocks the cradle rules the world".
** ** **** *
The story of creation in the Bible records the fact that woman
was made to be a companion ... a helpmeet ... for man,
I never use a dictionary. If I am not sure of the meaning of a
word I use another word that I feel everyone will understand. I
don't look it up in a dictionary because I feel that, if I don't
know the exact meaning of a word, the average reader may not
know it. The best way to lose a reader is to use unfamiliar words.
I stick to the smallest and commonest words in the language
because I want to reach the minds of my humblest readers.
On this occasion I broke the rule, I had read the word
helpmeett" in the Bible on many occasions without knowing its
exact meaning. I wanted to know its meaning and so I looked it
up. The dictionary definition of the word is "one who is fitted to
help; a partner: a companion;a wife;a helpmate".
* *** ** *
"A partner" ... that's the right word.
Marriage is a partnership between two people who were created
different because God intended each of them to perform
different functions in life
The woman's place is in the home. She is the homemaker. Hers
is the hand that rocks the cradle and rules the world. The man is
supposed to be the provider.
This arrangement does not mean that a mnan is entitled to any
sexual privileges that a woman should not enjoy. A man who is
unfaithful to his wife is committing a breach of the partnership.
He doesn't deserve a good woman.
+* * ** ***
All this talk today about the generation gap is nonsense.
Western civilization is headed for the rocks because of a
break-down in home life.
When the average child is let out from school in the afternoon
he has nowhere to go because, for one reason or another, his
mother is not at home to receive him. And so he finds himself' uP
some back alley with youngsters like himself who ... because of
the lack of a restraining influence at home ... are looking for
mischief.
Even mothers who stay at home and look after their children


have a problem because the influence of the back alleys today has
a stronger pull on most youth than the wholesome influence of a
home that tries to exert some discipline on their children. These
"home" children see other children running loose on the streets.
They feel that this means freedom and so they want to be free
too. They are too young to realize that there can be no freedom
without discipline.
American society has been greatly weakened by the breakdown
in farming life and the disappearance of small towns. Some of the
greatest men in the history of America came from small towns
and the farm where they had learned discipline, hard work and
developed a sense of responsibility.
These are the qualities that give strength to an individual and
endurance to a nation. What is commonly known as Education
today ... the be-all and end-all for most people ... is only the
window dressing for a man. It has no value without the basic
qualities of discipline, hard work and a sense of duty and loyalty
to any way of life the individual chooses to pursue.
The only place these qualities can be cultivated is in the homne
... and when the home is broken up by divorce, abortion.
licentious living and mothers who want to be men, there is no
foundation in the bed rock, as my friend Bosfield Johnson would


Women have been a great influence in my life and so I hold
them in high esteem.
My mother has been dead 64 years but her memory is
constantly with me. I never make a single decision in life without
consulting my wife, she shares my every thought. And today mly
daughter feels that she has the right to tell me what to do. And I
suppose she is right because I do mostly what she says. But ait Ino


reported Friday.
The New York finanlcal 1
aav e t t00 t'v cr 1 dn
Nixocn s re election furnd I st

"ttr h ugh acued I ody th
Secunrties and I xchange
(`o,1 om111 s1(on oft master mlll ndnlg
a1 E4 million dollar \securitles
trqnd "
t~he Icurnal says (`lifford,
folrme1r U Sc~cretary of
Iet neicc and Intlrnate adviser
t/o()r Rocratic presaletnts s ne
be wca4 f (wr lo t r"DlssllLec 4
one~ week after the Sl:C suit
was brought against Vesco
lic said thait af ter aissssing
Veso s "very dlfffiCullt and
complex probhlems' he
declined to enter the case,
because~ Vesilt had already
surrounded himself with
batteries ofI vetry fine
attorneys and did not need
another lawyer,
Meanwhile a Puerto Rican
businessman testified in
Mlanhattan Fecderal court
I riay that he cop uattd ftal

I change ('ommnission in
co~nnectiono with a $225 million
fraud case intvolving finaneser
RobeLrt L.. Vesco. but added
that the publicity hurt his own
firml "tremnendoutsly. '
Ariel I'. G;utierre/l oft San
Juadn, president o~f EllfB
r'nterprises. a real estate
development firm in the



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AIR It,7`1 the 94th dy of19A7
There are 271 days left in the year.
manuarrr(~(~ s in history on thes
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inHclsuling ('nress Ia rt! i
support insurgents in EaRst Pakistan.
z., c9re IIS. Soiet. uriissh and
vairk to discuss Middle East
sInh n Startin luther Kiing. U.s.
ci hi fihslea er assassinatedd in
1964 Archbishop Makariose
abrorgates 1')o treaty hetweeni
G;reece. TIurkey and C`yprus, and
heavy righting occurs in northwest
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1')60 Sultan of selanpcor
,1\\ aes head of federation of
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of agreements with Niger, flaute
Vcla ned Ur~abomey to forml
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~ ---' L- ~ -- -- -~- ~-1 --'--~-- ~ ~-~I'~'-" --~-'~'~


Wednesday, April 4
1973.


time has my mother or my wife or my daughter been anything
but a woman in our relationship.
This is the way it should be ... a man holding a responsible
position being helped and guided by a capable woman.

Under the pressure of life in a materialistic world today many
women ... removed froml the simple life of a small town and a
farm ... are obliged to go out to work to help finance the home.
This is un for tunate but it is not the only reason why many
women fail to take care of their children and give them the
guidance they need.
When our children were attending school in Nassau we drove
them to classes every morning and collected them after school in
the afternoon and took thlem home. My wife didn't become
actively engaged in my work at The Tribuner until all the children
had gone away to school.
A little English girl was also a student at Xavier's College. She
lived on the Eastern Road. We passed her house every day on our
way home with our children and so we took her home at the

samhit was during the war. Her father was serving in the British
armed forces overseas. Her mother was in what was then known
as "the Windsor set". The Duke of Windsor was the colony's
Governor
One day this child told our daughter how fortunate our
children were. She said she hardly ever saw her mother. She was
being takenl care of by anl ordinary servant.
This is something I have never been able to understand. This
woman belonged to a society that at that time despised all black
people and yet she handed over her most precious possession to
the care of an un trained woman in this despised group.
"When I go hlomle f'rom school in the af'ternoon," the child
said, "my mother hias already left for a game o~f golf or something
else. By the time she comes home to dress for dinner the servant
has already put me to bed. She doesn't comei home until late and
3o she is still asleep when I leave for school in the morning. I may
catch a glimpse of hier on weekends.
This was a wealthy, socially prominent famiily, but.this little
girl was unhappy in the miidst of plenty.
** * * * *
Fortunately there are still a great mianiy women who have a
sense of responsibility to their children.
In our home no servant ever touched any of` our children. My
wife gave her entire life to them.
Since I have been in Florida I met Joani Walker, a young
woman who had a responsible job in one of the leading banks
here. She is married to a young lawyer who is making a fine
career for himself because she says he will take only clean cases
and so major business men seek him out because they feel that he
is an honest and responsible person.
When I last saw her she told mne that she was leaving her jobin
the bank because she felt that her young children needed her at
home.
I salute her decision.

One of the problems or me in The Tribune today is that my
daughter, who has the training and ability to mnake any kind of
career for herself, wants only to be a housewife. She feels that her
first duty is to her child. This is the main reason she wants to get
out of The Tribune.
Ican t argue with her onl this point because I kntow she is right.
Furthermocre, because of the inability to find enough
competent staff in Nassau she and her husband are obliged to
work 18 hours a day. This is why my wife can spend only the
weekends with me in Miami. She has to stay in Nassau to take
care of the child until his parents come home in the evening and
to see that this devoted couple get at least one good meal a day.
Two of the greatest men in the world during this century are
Sir Winston Churchill and Lord Mountbatten of Burm3.
Although their mothers came from vastly different
backgrounds, they both acknowledge that their mothers played
an important role in shaping their liveS,
Sir Winston's mother, Jenny Churchill, was one of the
beautiful American women who married into English nobility
during the last century. These American women had more than
beauty. They had brain and vitality with which they introduced a
new dimension to the social and political life of Britain. Nancy
Astor, the first woman to> win a seat in the House of Commnons,
was another example of the American wives who made a great
impact on the life of Britain during this period.
No matter how busy Lady Churchill was, she always found
time for her two sons, especially Winston, who was a bit of a
problem child. Nothing wrong. Just a hellion bursting with ideas
and activity, that's all
By contrast, Lord Mountbatten's mother was a grand-daughter
of Queen Victoria. She was connected with every Royal house in
Europe. His Lordship is a cousin of Queen Elizabeth II and an
uncle of the Duke of Edinburgh.
In some cases this kind of background is a handicap to a young
man who might easily feel removed from the mainstream of life.
Lord Mountbatten became a great leader in his own right
because he learned the responsibilities of his position in life at his
mother's knee. More important still ... she impressed on himl the
importance of selecting men for what they really are and not f'or
what they are supposed to be.
I have no doubt that His Lordship is very conscious of his royal
lineage but he recognizes the dignity of man and so the
commonest of the commoners are not beneath his notice and are
embraced in the interest he has shown in humanity.
Lord Mountbatten is a second son and so he did not inherit his
father's title. Better still ... he is the first Earl Mountbatten of
Burma. This means that this great man of royal blood won his
spurs on the field of battle. Now he is engaged in an activity by
which, it is hoped, he will help to remove some of the causes of
past wars and thereby lessen the dangers of armed conflict in thle
future.
** ** ** **
Families and nations have grown strong as long as the home hias
been recognized as the corner-stone of society ... as long as


women fill their true role in life and men place moatherhood on a
pedestal to be loved and worshipped.
Easy divorce, legalized abortion and what is now called "equal
rights for women" are all paths to destruction down which the
great democracies are travelling today.
The end result can only be total disaster for our Christian
society.
** ** ** *
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Have watched this famous island descending incontinently
fecklessly, the stairway which leads to a dark gulf. It is a fine
broad stairway at the beginning, but after a bit the carpet ends. A
little farther on there are only flagstones, and a little farther oni
still these break beneath your feet.
WINSTON CHURCHILL
** * ** **
The sober comfort, all the peace that springs
From the large aggregate of little things;
On these small cares of daughter, wife or friend,
The almost sacred joys of home depend.
--HANNAH MORE.


cfaribben," a'ilso hai ;that ;10
ured hri nr with the S1 (


tes it< 1 Iht ter` p4 tC~~I J .L<

inlunict(ion to, \ltp aIllege~d


furthur Linaution a;IT Its




satid, he appeared voluntarrily
and "turnedt o~ver e~verything !
we hall" including motre
documentcns thain werre askedl


volunt only," saidt Gut terrei "I
~oo~peralted fully"
Judge (`ha:rles F. Ste~art Jr
then adlourned the case to10 It
a mn. T~uesday


1 REE OSLATION.. W WL (1e 71YORHOEWIHSAP.


And hec who gives a child a treat
Makes joy-bells ring in Hleaven's street,
And he who gives a child a home
Builds palaces in Kingdom comne.
And she who gives a baby birth
Brings Saviour Christ again to Earth.


VERA RITCHIE. Mgr.
TELEPHONE 2-4169
ELIZABETH AVENUE
Free Parkinge


JOHN MASEFIELD


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Clak Ciffrl low




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Bhas tsuimee RobertL clo, against htl I.Si amthon iz


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Nassau, Bahamas






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Try celery and mushrooms.
Saute a sliced bunch of celery
in six tablespoons butter until
barely tender. Add a thinly
sliced onion and cook until
celery and onion are tender. In
another skillet, saute half a
pound sliced mushrooms in
butter until tender. Combine
mushrooms with celery and
onion and season with salt and
pepper.
Or celery and mashed
potatoes. Boil in salted water, a
sliced bunch of celery. Drain
well and saute in a little butter
until the moistu re has
evaporated. Put through a food
chopper and combine with
three times as much mashed
potatoes. Season with salt and
pepper.
The last recipe combines
celery and smoked sausage. In
a bowl, combine half a cup of
salad oil, three tablespoons
wine vinegar, two teaspoons
Dijon mustard, a teaspoon salt
and half a teaspoon pepper,
Thinly slice a bunch of celery.
Cut half a pound smoked
sausage into little cubes.
Combine the celery, sausage
and sauce and mix in a quarter
cup capers. Serve at room
teprture.


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I


Wednesday April 4, 1973.


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8


By NICKI KELLY
"QUALITY is going to be the watchword from now on,"
Tourism Minister Clement Maynard declared in the House
Monday as he defended the $8 million Budget appropriation for
his Ministry during 1973.


on the road without breaking a

Go mby sum~mer)aluio o
The Minister reminded
members that many thousands
of visitors would be coming to
the Bahamas from all over the
world to witness the painful
birth of a new nation.
"We have no quarrel with
the British or with each other
as demonstrated by the
Constitutional conference ith i

country to set the top and
hope these visitors will be
accorded all respect and tell
their friends about the
Baham s ands, he continued
were concentrating on the sale
of a three-faceted product.
"This is a unique country in
that a Bahamian can be
rubbing shoulders with a head
of state or a world leader and


we do not know who they are.
chr u he wne should be
NO GRINS
While the era of the
"'grinning Bahamian in the
hotel" no longer existed, Mr.
Maynard said he still believed
Bahamians were a friendly
people, and they should regard
tourism as a hospitality
profession
Lo don a mmen add r sd t
open his car door, "and it
never occurred to me that he
felt subservient." The British,
he said, he had a tradition of
se r own traditions should
show us that what we learn in
Other countries should be
tailored to our own needs
here.'
His Ministry, he continued,
wanted to maximize the


benefits to every individual in
thbe ountr spr tad vtha dollar
spectrum.
"We have to find more
attractions for our visitors who
are extremely conscious of
what they should get from
their dollar."
The Bahamas was being sold
on three levels the unique
and colonial charm of Nassau;
freeport asa new c mplex hd
offered the best holiday
because of their unspoiled
charm and unpolluted waters.
"If we can maintain this,
t~hehre s no reasonmtotbypass th
holiday a visitor wants."
Tourism in the Out Islands
had shown a 25 per cent
growth rate in the last year
Mr. Maynard said. '


Outlining his department's
plans both for upgrading
product and maintaining its
No. I position in this area, Mr.
Maynard said he was aware of
the decline inl the quality of
visitors to the Bahamas, but a
more high priced business had
come this year than last
because hotel people were
mor seleettivehin their selhing

the Bahamas were to retain its
reputation as a year-round
resort, efforts would have to be
made to attract summer

visi Mi ser pointed out
that the funds allocated to
tourism would affect everyone
who lives in this country.
GCovernment has continued
to strive to strengthen tourism
and great efforts will continue
to be made in this field," he
said.

ImplemenAt~ionRof a hotel
training school, while not
expected to completely
overtake the Bahamas's
training problems, was a start,
to be supplemented by other
pro gr ammes, including
university training in hotel
administration abroad.
"The Ministry has only
rece lod opened Department
take a closer look at what we
are offering our visitors and to
improve and preserve our
historic sites.
"Furthermore it is our
intention that the Bahamas as a
resort should continue to be
the number one island resort."
Mr. Maynard emphasized the
need for finding new ways of
satisfying visitors. One of these
ways, he suggested, was by
having them come to know the
Bahamian people on a person
to person basis.
The Ministry was arranging
pedestrian tours and had
engaged an experienced
Bahamian to write a script
incorporating information on
the history and sights of
glassau. There would also be
car tours of the old villages of
the city.
According to the Minister
domestic tourism, started two
years ago, was developing well
and his Ministry was hoping for
an increase this year. With
independence in the offing, Mr.
Maynard said he felt it
incumbent on Bahamians to
familiarize themselves with
their country.
"From here on in," he said,
"the promotion of tourism
should be a national effort
transcending political barriers."
FILMS
In addition the educational
programme begun in 1971 to
make Bahamians aware of the
importance of tourism to them
and their families would be
revived and promoted through
film showings-
Although it was hoped
Nassau itself would rack up
one million visitors this year,
there were certain difficulties,
of which the Minister felt
members should be made
aware .


He listed these as the sale of
the Sunward and the Freeport,
both of which would have to
be replaced if cruise passenger
totals were not to fall off, and
the recent boycott of cruise
ships from Miami prompted by
the jailing of three Cuban
fishermen.
The boycott cost the

Baasheanmers, Mr bM nard7,000
Another problem had been
the weather. With the U.S.
experiencing the mildest winter
in 100 years, there had been
t es incentive by isiltorstso
In addition "certain
unsettled social and economic
conditions in the Caribbean"
had cast a reflection on the
Bahamas and affected tourism
here, even though this country
had not been involved.
DIVERSIFY

the greatchia duer fv sithas
came from the U.S., but the
Ministry would like to diversify
so that it was not totally
dependent on one market.
More travellers were now
able to travel from Europe, and
the continent had now become
the third best market for the
Bahamas. Canadian travel was
scn tan hdr grown by 50
In line with all the changes
coming about in the industry,
was the new types of
accommodations being
demanded by visitors. They
were bypassing hotel
accommodations in favour of
apartments and floatels where ,
an entire family could be ,
accommodated.
This was being promoted
particularly at Freeport.
"Attitudes and service
deserve a little more comment,
and one of the problems we
face comes from our own
domestic turmoil," Mr.
Maynard continued.
This domestic propaganda
became fodder for foreign
propaganda. The Minister said
he found himself faced with
the same questions over and
over wherever he went.
One of these always related
to the presence of British
troops in the Bahamas and how
visitors would be protected
once these withdrew after
independence.
UNAWARE
Mr. Maynard said that while
such troops often carried out
exercises here most Bahamians
were unaware of their
presence, and protection of the
public was the responsibility of
the police and would continue
to be so after independence.
Another question often
raised, he said, concerned the
matter of racism.
Declared Mr. Maynard: "The
races in this country get along
better than in any other
country. Generally speaking,
we get along very well as
Bahamians even though we
have our little problems, But I
don't know anywhere else in
the world where changes have
come about so peacefully, or
where 15,000 people could get


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The plant belongs to the
carrot family which is a very
important family from the
cook's point of view. Carrots,
celery and parsnips are the
main vegetable members but
the family also contains such
necessities as dill, caraway,
fennel, coriander, parsley and
anise. Celery, which originated
in Europe and Asia, belongs to
the genus Apium, the Latin
word for parsley. Since the
Romans had used up the word
for parsley, they left it to the
Greeks to name the real thing.
They were a bit more
fl amboy ant and chose
Petroselinum meaning simply
rock parsley.
Too many people feel that
celery is merely a salad
ingredient or a low-caolrie
muncher for dieters. If it has
fallen into such a dull rut, it is
up to the cooks of the world to
unite and place celery back
where it belongs on the
table.
Celery is a natural for salads,
a member of the "rabbit food
family" according to the
scoffers. But try these salads
for a different touch.
Split four celery hearts in
half and cut off most of the
leaves. Put them in a saucepan
and add chicken sftoCk.iustG to
cover. Add a tablespoon of
tarragon and simmer until
tender. Drain and chill. Serve
with mayonnaise.
Again, split the hearts and
remove the leaves. Cover with
broth and add a few sprigs of
parsley, some sliced carrots and
onions, and salt. Simmer until
tender, drain, arrange on a
serving platter and chill. Make
a dressing by combining one
cup of olive oil, half a cup of
white wine vinegar, a pinch of
chervil, salt and pepper to
taste. Pour the dressing over
the celery and garnish with
parsley and pimento.
Here are three soup recipes
made with celery -a clear
soup, one with cream. and
another, with beets.
For the clear soup, chop a
bunchdodf celery leaue abno 1 1

beef stock. Simmer for half an
hour. Add salt and pepper and
garnish with finely chopped
cele I sam of celery soup is
a bit m etlinvolved. Psute in a

chicken, a bunch of celery cut
into three-inch lengths, and a
large sliced onion. Add water
to cover and cook until the
bird is tender. Remove the
chicken and set it aside for
ante use BnotI don nthe
six cups remain. Chill and
remove the fat. Melt six
tablespoons butter in a large
sauce pan and stir in six
tablespoons flour. Add the
stock and cook until the soup
has thickened. Cover and
simmer over boiling water for
20 minutes. Add a little
nutmeg, celery salt and pepper.
Here come the calories add
two cups heavy cream and
reheat the soup without letting


ofbet jih e andsfiba y
chopped celery, stalks and
leaves, with the crushed shells


and the whites of four eggs,
two teaspoons salt and a half a
teaspoon pepper. Whisk until
frothy. In a soup kettle, bring
eight cups of chicken stock to
a boil. Pour two cups of the
hot stock into the celery and
beet juice mixture. Stir and
slowly pour the celery mixture
into the remaining broth. Stir
just until the soup comes to
the boil. Simmer undisturbed
for an hour covered. Line a
sieve with cheesecloth and
carefully put the soup through
into a large bowl. Cook a cup
of thinly sliced celery in
boiling, salted water until
.tender. Pour the soup into a
pot and reheat. Add the
drained celery.
Celery is an excellent
vegetable dish. For braised
celery, split four celery hearts
lengthwise and steam in half a
cup butter and a teaspoon salt
until tender. Turn once
carefully. Add two teaspoons
meat glaze and let it melt.
Season with pepper and
sprinkle with chopped parsley.
Here is another recipe for
braised celery. Put a sliced
carrot, a chopped onion, four
washers of bacon, three whole
cloves, a bay leaf and some
pepper corns in a Dutch oven.
Wash and trim three celery
hearts and place on top of the
vegetables. Add four cups
chicken stock and bring to a
boil over high heat. Place the
Dutch oven, covered, in 375
degree oven and braise the
celery for an hour or until
tender. Let the celery cool in
the stock. Drain them and cut
each in half lengthwise. Place
in a buttered serving dish
sprinkle with Parmesan cheese,
dot with butter and heat in a
400 degree over until the top is
lightly browned.


*






Q


Aiax Cleanser Large.29c
Palmolive Liquid King Size .98c
Green Giant Sweet Peas 33.5
Green Giant Asparagus 3503 .35c
Raid House & Garden Bomb 140 $1 19
Star Kist Tuna
Crisco Shortening 3 Ib. $1.10
Ovaltine
V-8 Juice

Maxw1V osae nustan Coffe 31t bn $21
Del-Monte Fruit Cocktail 2%mo .8


SHIRLEY STREET

OPEN SUNDAES
8 A.M. 10 A.M.




O.S. CHOIClE BEF ROAST

LI. $1.75







WI EWIELAND LAll LE~S



FRES# elT ) eCHICKEIS Li. 15t


...... an c


Elit Grtilitttt


.L~ufthmisa


Minister calls for 'national effort' in


Our O Hris l8I n dustr y


WeIcomle appearance OI celery
CELERY is now appearing at the Potter's Cay Produce Exchange and it is a welcome addition
to the growing list of vegetables and fruits a~vailable at this time of year.






Wednesday, April 4, 1973.


I1H


rsmn rs~msr m6~


11II:


II


. ,


U.S. CHOICE
DELMONISCO STEAKS


CAM


RIB STEALK.... ...is 1.189
00OKED HAM... <.....1.899


FRANIKS .......-- ...l99
MELLOW CRISP
8ACON .....o.... .......u 99
NATIVE ALL CUTS
PORK .......s...... .....B 99


...... B 1.79


;CJ


QUANTITYI RIGHTS RESERVED


~z~i008 CRE~E) ELEFM


-12-02


lo-oz. PKS.


KRALFT
CIlTRUS SALAD


3-


PRICES GOOD
'THURSDAYI APRIL 5,
THRti SATURDAY APRIL 7, 1973


1 LB. IN QIUARTERS SU"ERBRANO soFT
MARGrARINE.... 24 1 Ib ....39
f 12 2 IMAFT SLICED AMERICANI
VE~GETABLIES ............99


EACH


CAMPBELLS


CELERY............ ....149


\@iV~b
aggy ,*~~+~f~


Lbl
llQ


DETTOL...... ..........65
NAPKINS .2 o .99
MAISHED POTAlTOES ... TT1
MR. CLEAN ......... ......99


6 OZ.
PKSS.


rll
II I


I: II~~


11;LI1


MAXWYELL IIOUSE
ALL GRIMODS AMS
ELIECTRA PERK
COFFEE
) 3


KING SIZE
DRIVE
DETER;ENT


PURITY
FLOUR


LBA


BAKERITE
SHORTENING


U.s enOCE
CHUCK ROAST
RsiB OAST ....


... o1.99 B;OLOGNA.... i,.89


GREEN GANT
BROCCOLI


BLUE RIBBON
RICE

89g


240Z. DRIE
PEAS AND CARROTS .. .55~
10-02. SWASON CHICKNM AND TURKEY
T.V. DINNERS ..........179
2-2. ozS nssmaIT
FRUIT PIES ............185
8 OZ THOMAS
GLUTON BREAD .........65


~ij~rJ/ORANe G RPEMA ILE OR
(my pial FLORIDA PUNCH
4~i~Mb~DRINKS

402*
0AMS


REGULAR SIZE
WHITE, GOLD, AqUA AND PIK
DIAL SOAP


BAS


ORAWGIES


SAWYERS
PlIGEON PEAS


TOMuATO SOUP


ALL FLAVORS
RIEGULAR
JE~LL-0


ORANGE,
GRAPE AND GRAPEFRUITI
TANG6


6 e


onar~IOn
TOMATO PASTE



89 ,


~I.IJIIi ~l ilirl Illl:





---- -------~~- i


C.,l ......... ...n
....,,. C...
Lynrn Rogers;
Cornelius Bros Sister Rso
Brook Benton
Patti Jo
0.C. Smith
Billy Eckstine


II U


ri.-. ~ ~ -I~^~~-Ll_~, -~------ ~.---_~-I~


VWednesrday, April 4, 1973.


Wht Wrtilittle


available at
The Amerald Bc~h Hotel
PART PADCilos POR IIPCOIADIICS DiCeuaRATD
*- ~1~ II~I~~ir ;-


I

:
*



* *


LUFTHANSA GERMAN AIRLINES, using its Bo*ing 707 aircraft, madeg its first
landing in Nassau on Monday night to begin a thrice wekly sevrvc between Nassau and
West Germany. The official inaugural flight will be made tomorrow when a party of
32 German officials and pnres representative will .arrilve her for a week of activities.
PHOTO: Fred Maurs.
Lufthansa begins Hlassau service
L (1FT liANSA GE RM AN $363 shoulder season (April May, flight travelling via Merida and one
AIRLINES inagugurated non stop June westbound and September via Monterrey. Lufthansa
a matce between Germany aand rh psbud 4 sme sao previously flew to Mexico via
in om A rakfu to tohasa July September westbound). With the addition of Nassau and
nigh frm Nuau o Fankurt Flights will depart from Nassasu Toronto to Its route network in
fith trome Nasta t ave skfuirs on the following schedule: April, the German carrier now flies
Tuesday, 5:50 p.m.; Fridays, 3:50 to 113 passenger and cargo
Co ogr e fo asut rnfr Sunday, 5:05 p.m. (With destinations in 68 countries. With
willopeateon uesdysFriays daylight saving time beginning April more than 2SS,000 route miles on
a dSu tes wlhtTr Crdjafr si 29, all Nassau departures will be itsworldwidenetwork, Lufthansals
going via Coon lgt rm one hour later.) All three weekly the world a fourth largest IATA
Frakfut t Na~u illbe fl ights from Frankfurt will depart arln
Frnankf Turt o ayssand will be ont 1:25 p m. with the Thursday New Station manager for
ndt shurs~dhaur a tsy va CoI dne departure from Cologne at 2:50 Lfhinr In co sutes Bael m
far~herriew 45 dgThe flights between Germany from New York where he had been
(effective April 15. subject to and the Bahamas will also service the carrier s assistant operations
government approval) are: $342 Mexico. Flights will be three times manager for North American since
winter season (November March); weekly to Mexico City, with one August 1968.


~sr ~ EZ


C>EF ~~583 1'.T7~. ~ECZ;L3tEC~S


Bahamian Hall






Sunday 8tle April


J
: rila


a ran 4.Arl 415, CRnaw Allu aS awARumana on 5.unnanser srst nassau tu~nt puoe
on landing for our photographer. PHO)TO: Andmre Toogood


Two


snowa


The R ADD FOXX SHOWY
with -
Special Guest star SLAPPY WHITE
TALYA FERRO
ANDT I


tS ETI NG I R` r


OR~EtCH~E S 3 It R


TfrY-cars 'Fl~c


exo .A~zvo





The


B ig


Me n's


comn .. I. ..





"Sanford & Son"


9:30 p.m.and I


:30 p.m.


Henry


"Sweets" Edison, Musical Conductor


ADULTSONOLY


'**hor **00




I I


"SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK
ENDING APRIL 5TH,
THROUGH APRIL 8TH,
1973."


i~ (rlliIi


*l I


I eg


Wednesdy, April 4. 1973


ggyP Qjrirutt


).rl
a~fl~Fm~~illlC


BA HAM TAHNTW
SUPERMARKETS
If it s value you really want,
you really want SuperValuel


11g g a

t


HUNTS
SLICED PEACHES 29-oz 594
WAGNIER GAE&
FRUIT DRINKS ORANGE 32-oz 554
SWEETHEART
DISH LIQUID 32-oz 594
HEINZ TOMATO
KETCHUP 14-oz 2/954
LIBBY'S VIENNA
SAUSAGES 4-ot 2/794
EATMOREWHOLE
KERNEL CORN soZ 6/994
HUDSON ASST. 2 Roll
BATHROOM TISSUE 2/894
HUDSON ASST.
PAPER TOWELS sgn~o112/994
CAMPBELL'S
BEANS & FRANKS 1e-ot 634


TA NGGRAPE & GRAPEFRUIT 18-oz $1 .19Q


W ilI dl5 31 0


MF :rl h'd I


Perlb


'i n


*1*~


%-Ib


530


37C

22C


%-Ib


Each

Per Ib


ST. IVAL WENSLEYDALE
CHEESE %-lb


DONALD COOKS
STEAK &L KIDP
IDRIS
GINGER BEER
FAY TABLE
PLACE MATS


12-or 4/894
20's 3/994
28-oz 694


DULCIOR
COOKING OIL


JOHN WEST
HERRING FILLETS 7-oz 2/994
SAVOURY SAUCE, TOMATO & CHILI SAUCE


JELLO GELATIN DESSERT


6-oz 294


HIIM


GAI NES
BURGERS


694


1s-oz


I
r
I; r:1ni:
15
ir
zF 1.
i-~rsi~ti


1-lb Q


age

2/880

2/80(


:1un


12-oz


730


10o...


...


10or,


TSO


9-oz


SIRLOIN STE AK


Pe b$1.88 SIRLOIN TIP ROAST


Perm Ib *


TOP ROUND STEAK


ROUND ROAIST


Perib $1.79


*17


KRAFT
OR ANGE IIICE
NEW ZEALAND
BUTTER
ST. IVAL CHESHIRE
CHEESE


. $1.45


FLORIDA
ORANGES


3/890


10 for SS$


CELERY


550 TOMATOES


N(EY 12-oz 2/99C


**


FRA~nKS ALL MEAT

SMOKE LIN(S

COTTON SALAMI


SARA LEE
CK CHO OAONE, BANANA z
GREEN GIANT
GIBLETS CORN ,o...


$.00


" ~II


GREEN GIANT
GRIEEN PEAS


VEGETABLES
BI RDSEYE
ORANGE PLUS


OSCAR MAYER
65C FR ANKS PURE BEEF


~
Illr ~


1-b $1.08

1-b $1.00


OSCAR MAYER
WEINERS ALL MEAT




I I I I I


By ~ ~ ~ g Abgi a ue

* lnm o Ir ce. trm...n. v. News syn., (L.


PLUS AT 7:00 ONLY
"LEGEND of NIGGER CHARLEY"
Owing to length of Film there will be Only One Showing.
N~o O)Ne U/nder 17 Admritted


THE

A RE
SMA


3 1


WeFdnesday. April 4. 1973.


thin gs apart.
DEAR ABBY: A former neighbor phoned me yesterday
and the first thing she askedl me was: "Howcn much did
you get for your old house?" I told her. Then she arsed me
what we paid for our new house. I was so shocked at her
nerve, I told her.
I mentioned we wpere try~ng to adopt some childrenl
from Korea or Viet Nam. She said: "Can't you have any
of your own?" I told her we felt the world abouki provide
for the children that are here. 'llae she told me she thought
we wRere out of our mlads to "borrow trouble."
Abby, we lost a pair of twin boys when our home
caught fire six months ago, and I told her we felt so guilty
because we survived and they didn't. She sakl we were
"ridiculous" to feel that way. I told her wel had talked to
our minister and a psychiatrist and they agreed our feel.
lnOgs of guilt were normal, and only time would erase them'
She said ah psychiatrists were crazy, and ministers are
stupid, and we could get aoer it it we wanted to.
Then abe said: "Bill and I want to see your new house.
If you don't want to make a dinner, have us~ over for
cocktails soon, wml you?"
mysIa d: 2, I wml." Atr hn w u as gr wi
promising to have her over. Should I jutt "forget" to invite
her over? Or am I committed nowr? SECOND TH[OUGITS
DEAR SECOND: Don't "forget" to invite her. Remem-
her to avoid her.

Problemt Tee'll feel better if yes get tL off year chst.
For a penrsml seply, write to ABBSY: Be Na. 8870, L. A.*
Clif.I r008. 1aetese stampeC selfeddrse envlop.


TIDES
High 8 09 a.m. and 8 31
p.m.
Low 1:57 a.m. and 2 04
p.m.
SUN
Rises 6:02 a.m.
Sets 6 26 D.m


LAST DAY TH S


PProducIIn ........ ~n~
E DON BAKER ELIZ
NO ONE UNDER ~
reservations not claimed
on first come, fir


iw thru Friday
lee Starts at 2:00
Evening 8: 30
R. JECKLE &
ER HYDE" P.G.
!alph Bates.
'tine Beswick
PLUS
DOLERO"' PG.
mes Stewart
Dean Martin
hone 2-2534


NOW THRU
Itinee continuous fro
'Phone


S8:34-'P~hon~e 2-10i04, 2-10051
re of a manis
l he walks.


give them law
and order or
dile trying.
i I
ELEASING presents
1



17~TADMTE I
ed by 8:15 will be sold I
st served basis. I


Now thru Friday I
Continuous Showings
from~ 3
"THE GbROL WUHO KNEW R~
Adaml West
Nancy Kwan
PLUS g
".A LONG RIDE FROM
HlfELL"Y; R.




FRIDAY
)m 1:45 Evening 8: 30
:RS AND THIEVE81 IF THEY UVE,
4EY LL END UP AS HEROES





: 1
..-,JMEST~LOR


Ill IllI


MISS JEAN ELIZABETH TOOTE
who is to be married to
MR. WILLIAM JAMES FRANCIS
on April 21, 1 973
has chosen as her Weddin~g China
"TURQUOISE FLORENTINE" by Wedgwood
her choice of Crystal is
"CAPRI" by Baccarat
and for her Silver
"REFLECTION" by International Silver
frorn
THE GENERAL HARDWARE


BAY STREET


NOW SHOWING
9:00 ON LYI

'LADY SINGS


DEAR ABBY: My husband is 34 years old, and I am 35.
We've been married for 12 years. I am a school teacher,
and he does counseling. About six months ago he started to
buy me some rather expensive presents. At the same time
he himself came home with an expensive gold watch, some
tailor-made suits, and finally a new expensive automobile.
I knew he couldn't afford all those things on what he
made, so I had a long talk with him and he confessed that
he h been ettn M2 1ge'aanuntic of oney it m a sa
was helping her to work out her problems, that his inter-
est in her was strictly professional and in appreciation for
helping her get her head together she kept giving him large
amounts of money.
He has been spending a lot of evenings away from
home. Does this sound professional to you? SUSPICIOUS
DEAR SUSPICIOUS: Not very. An ethical counselOr
usually charges, a set fee, and doesn't ecapt "lare
amounts of money." It's all right for blan to hetp her get
her head together as long as he doesn't take too many


2: 30& 4:55, Evenin
The measul
how tall


M~atinee







1







I JO
R







rMar

"BAN
I Ja
1
I 'PI




I MI
I ,


Once upon a time .. 65 years ago
The Royal Bank set up shop in Nassau.
Before long we were known as
"THE BANK"
Years passed .. the Bahamas grew
and so did we.
Today, the Bahamas is
the tourist centre of the world.
and Royal Bank is the
Bahamas' biggest bank with branches
throughout the Islands.
Isn't it nice to think we did it together?
And we're now living happily
65 years after.


The ROval The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BAN K
Bralnches throughout the Bahamtas


QWhP GrthMbut


B LUE~S
I~~~
I IS
ED HO y
rSH!" SINGS
Hsc-T ry E
BLUES


From sand and



coconut te~s.. he Bank





~


, April 4, 1973


Wht 6tibftt


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK APRIL 5 8
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED


FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, OUR STORE HOURS ARE:
MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY 8:30 A.M. 7:00 P.M.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8:30 A.M. 9:00 P.M., SUNDAY 7:00 10:00 A.M.


SIMOKE HA


(Val leydale
Brand)


KNllGO YZE
LIQUID DETERGENT


LB.


12`~
~`4k`~,

~2~ ~sS


Cat11833


m


FRESH


LB.


LITON A


LAMB CHOPS LOIN



RO CASTING FR YER S



PORK SAUSAGE
(BROWNS) LB. 99


AERSOL
SARDINES


994
6/856
$1.39
2/9
3/634
$1.29
794

2/75'
3/994


20-oz


100 CT.


PI NESO L
DISINFE CTANT 28-oz
9tEINZ
KETCHUP 14oz
SA PLAIN OR IODIZED 26-oz
R AI D HOUSE & GARDEN 14 oz
R AID ANT & ROACH AEROSOL 16 oz
GREEN GIANT
SWEET PEAS sos
CREAM STYLE CORN os


DOLE


EMERY
CORNED BEEF


"'" GREEN GIANT
CtORN NIBLETS
MEXICORN
TRIA RA N S LA

) APELSBEANS & FRAN
CAMPBELL'S
TOMATO SOUP
IVORY SOAP


79'


~2/$1.00


/


4/994
3/"9
3/99t
2/ 99 C


12 oz
.... o
6/2 oz
12 oz
12 oz


KS16-oz


2/$1.00
5/59 9


10oo,
LRG.


TATE &LYLE
SUG AR 5-Ib
WNE LC H ADE 46o c
L ISTE R INE ANTISEPTICl4 oz


MAXWELSLT
-NT


HOUSE


4 t
694
$1.29
$1 39


FI EENNAH


MU STARD 6 oz 5 /~1.00


CO(FfE


$1.88


MINUTE MAID
ORANGE JUICE
BRUSSEL SPROUTS
:IR S ((f


1202. 79c
oo.59c
10-oz. 59c


0 RANGES

:CARROTS

IiLEMONS


.00


0/


~aa,


MILK

TALLCAN


T URKE Y


69C



99C


14 LB. UP


~`MUTT 0N


~aa,


SALT PORK


LB. 39


GT. SIZE .


~f~


.Ilr
.
.
J
~ ~h~y~y7; ~
~i~ilita
~s -


BABY FOOo
7/st.oo


APPLE & GRAPEFRUIT


2/75 sD AlSY CHEESE


LB. $1.08

,. 250:


PIGS FEET


BLUE BONNET
Ma rga rine


S59e


FLORIDA 8-oz.
3/~: CitrUS Punch 5/95(4


PILSBURY CR ESENIT
Dinner Rolls 80o. 494
KERRYGOLD 1/2 LB.
BU TTER 3 /99
GOLDEN ISLES
MIL K GAL $1.59


TSS UTI EL

2/$1.00


1 2/ $1.0 0
LB. 3/7




II I II


0 Elit Edilttit


Wednesday, April 4, 1973.


~


1 1


C9353
HOUSE FOR SALE Hifiside
Estate. Contact Jerome Bethel
Tedder Close, Palmdale, House
No. 3.

C978WNE R LEAV ING
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
completely furnished, recently
painted --Johnson Terrace.
Price: $25,000. Telephone
42462 after six

C9344 $75 DEPOSIT secures
a lot in VAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. Payments from
only $80 month. Priced from
$5,800. NO INTEREST. From

cmpxetel00ak~etimi nt ltn
from $7,500. $100 deposit.
Tel: 2-3027 or 2-4148
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE

C9 33
FOR SALE
HOUSE VILLAGE ROAD
AREA. Have house 4
bedrooms, 2 baths unfurnished
wooden structure spacious
corner plot Village Road area.
Only asking $22,000.00. Come
DIL DAIANOS for Act on
Phones 24201337 22305, 22i3o0
evenings 49.

C9334
FOR SALE
SEMI HILLTOP OUT EAST
2 miles from town. Has 3
bedrooms 2Vr2 baths furnished.
Us TDE1N, PLUS COMPLETE

kitc~henetteE last butuno I 6 t
some views of sea. Come see by
appointment.
D LION REMLO NO we sH l
real estate. Phone 22033,
22305, 22307 evenings 41197.

C9373

waNerfSonALEasternORoa~d,40 t
lounge with fireplace and
minstrels gallery, dining room,
Bahama room leading to
terrace patios overlooking the
sea, 3 bedrooms including
master suite, two bathrooms,
cathte ral ceilirg A ougho r

gr ge0 nd ew sobaenas. Prce

C39 FOR SALE
SECLUDED gorgeous western

hlt h m e it~e, 2 facilit e isn

C9364
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
runni 2 o~n Bernard Road
road rservation.el7,0 no. ate
Cas PriceB$17 500. .EA

Phone 24862 31273 at r
5.00 p.m er

FOR REST
C9342
EFFICIENCY apartment
separate bath and toilet. For
further particulars call 5-8679
ask for Mr. Pritchard.

C9207
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom In Bamboo Town.
Phone 36959.

C9337
One Efficiency apartment, also
fo etwo r servddroad es sui b
Phone 5-1044.


SE1DROOM l bath home,

funs ed I cnond t onmed, ful
minutes walk to Montagu
2ec dan q 64tarea tPhone

C9310
LpARt nt ONIE BEDRO M
$250 per month.Call Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C9306
ONE EXTRA large two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shiriey and


Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking T.V. antenna*
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8a.m. and 5p.m.

C9384
ONE TREE bWenrdomo 1 bt
Phouse 42299 anytime


AVAI8LABLE ind of April a
two bedroom aircondition d
house Twynam Avenue.
Phone 5-1881


I _


'


S ACOUS SPACE suitable for
office or school with ample
parking at a very reasonable
rate. Chesapeake Road and
Jerome Avenue in Pyfrom's
Addition. Phone 2-4536.

NEW LISTING, Nassau East
Three bedroom, 2 bath
furnished, airtonditioned'
large landsca ed lot, near St'
An rew's School. $500.00
month. Call owner, 4-2095.
C9382
BASICALLY FURNISHED
house 3 bedrooms 21/2
bathrooms. East $375
monthly. Phone 42228, 42198
evenings, weekends.

C9388
ATTRACTIVELY furnished
house Sapphire Ridge Road,
Sans Souci 3 bedroom (2
airconditioned) 2 baths, study,
maid's room, wall to wall
carpet throughout, all
cdrlne asciosetsl.tAvalaob e
David Hudson 3-6262-3.
C9391
450 square feet office space
available. Bayparl Bldg.,
Par liament Stre et .
Airconditioner, partitioned to
3 offices. Tel. 22836.


ST R9E AND OFFICE sae
Madeira Street Patrmd l
Completely furnished I and 2
birec dit omed, caapet dm$21
per month. Phone 23010
C9387
CORAL HAR BOUR

bdxrrom use n dCna.Ver3
reasonable. Phone 23010 and
41301. .

FOR SALE OR RENT 1

COU TRY ESTATE western
edeN ssau. Furnise in


C nmmin tpool,eacre sg uno
shopping. $300 month lease.
Phone 57T24 even gENT




EXPATR IATE Company
Secretary requires attractive 3
or 4 bedroom, two bathroom
funs ed 42rconditioned

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNIITIES
C9217
PLANNING TO BUY
A LOT?
Act n w! Hilltop los
oo ner lotospot,
Easy terms
Call Frank Carey
at 27667
FRANK CA REY
REAL ESTATE
Bay &( Deveaux Streets
CALL TODAY

C9377
WELL ESTABLISHED
FURNITURE BUSINESS for
s .IieOwner Awishe t~o7 retire.
The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau

LOST
C9381
EILACK FE ALE DOGill

Road. Phone 31130. Reward.

FOUND
C9386
YOUNG GERMAN
SHEP ERD in Highland Park,


FOR SALE
C9328
TYPEWRITER, record player,
sewing machine, heater, fan.
toaster. AiI perfect condition.
Write P. O. Box N8009'
Nassau.
C9327
HOME STEREO turntable
speakers, tuner amp.
Telefunken tape recorder Reg.
8 Movie rojector. Call 22836.
C9192


2 WEEK OLD HONDA, 50cc
owner eav 9g Island soon. Call


1 CONVERTIBLE COUCH
1 250de b mnplif ier nd speaker
Call 77947 rezr
C9357 -
1 Waltz Organ
Oldsmobile 68 Delmont -- 4
door excellent condition.
Reduced owner leaving,
Phone 57324.


C9363
FOR YOUR building needs
Residential --Remodelling -
Maintenance Call G. Patton,
Budget Builders 32463,

CTOUBLES .... small or large
call The Plumber on Wheels:-
ROBERT M. BAILEY
P. O. Box N56,
Nassau
Telephone: 3-5870-
C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes. apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
oF USC Mce., Street

C9299

PATIO AWN INGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTE RS,
PANELS
Foh f. corge & Co. Ltd.,
er iceee ests atels and prompt

C105
CRY US FOR SAFE SURE
CLEANING! ABCO'S NEVL
'SUPER STEAM' -- CARPETs,
UIPHO- 3TERY TEL:


C9366
MORRIS OXFORD 1968 ~
only done 27,000 miles very
good condition $850
Also full set of golf clubs $80-
Tel. 31324.
C9371
KODAK CAROUSEL 850H
Slide projector with case. As
new, only $255.00 Phone Peter
Robinson at 2-1064, daytime.


C- yard Dump Truck. Like
new
1-1 bag used concrete mixer.
Good condition. Call 22098-

CAIRS FOR SAILE

ISA9ND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD *
1970 FORD ESCORT,
Blue Std. 4 Dr. $995
1972 VENTU RA
A/C, Bucket Seats, Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Radio Auto. Blue $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000 5/W
Auto. $850
1 972 VI VA S/W,
Automatic White $2600
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE,

Blue/White $2000
1972 PONTIAC VENTU RA,
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio, Orange $3500
1969 FORD TURINO $1200
1969 FIAT 124 S/W
Std. 4 Dr. $550
1971 FORD CAPRI AUTO.

198 DODGE DART, $80

1 e8nFORD THUNDERBI5850
Blue A/C $2800
191FORD MAVERICK


CLASSIFIED HOURS:
9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
Saturdays 9:00 a.m. -Noon

CLASSIFIED AD RATES
DAYS Per Word Per Day





2g- ............................................7C


7 Or moro *****************************************5

PHOTO IN CLASSIFIED
(Maximum 1 c01. x 2 ins.)
in Memoriam................$2.50 per insertion
plus number of words


NO REVERSE PRINTING IN CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY (with border)

Appropriate Display Advertising Rate plus
Charge for Special Position of 50c per col. inch
per insertion.

TRIBL*NE: BOX NUMBERS....50c extra

DEADLINES FOR PLACING
CLASSIFIED ADS
12 Noon Daily for following
day's paper
12 Noon Sat. for Man. Paper
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY
2 Days prior to publication.


CANCELATION PHONE:

NUMBER 21986 EXT. 5




matter invoving this canellation will be
.eld o the basis of the adertiser'
rlbmitting 'the cancellation number for
VerifiCation. Ads scheduled for Multiple Days
will, wvhen cancelled, take the rate for the
number of days the ad actually appeared.


TO CARcel 1gular ClmSifled ad for nxtt
day call Mon. 1hru Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
Sat., 9 a~m. to Noon.
C8000188$100 Of Classified Display:
2 days prior to publication



ERRORS
Adveriser are requested to check the first
appearance of ads for corrections. This
newspapr will be responsible for only one
inoorr@Ct 188Brtiorn. ANY ERROR SHOULD
BE REPORTED IMMEDIATELY. As with
Cancelltions above a number will be issued.

PHONE 21986 EXT. 5

In the event of an error in advertisement on
the part of the publisher, it winl fumish the

said error and the publisher shall be otherwise
relieved from responsibility thereof.
No adjustrant will be given unless, in the
opinion of the newspper, an error in an ad
materially affects the value of the
advertisment.
After copyt has been giaen by advertiser, ad
Will be read back for correction of copy,
clesfication and schedule. Upon verification
by autIR nOrmatio mill b prmum @
corrct and no adjustment will be made unles
of varrimeo with copy. If the advertiser does
ROt al d to betead back, no claims
for incorrect copy will tm accepted.


This nespapr nresre the right to refuse
mny ad for any nreaon andf the privilege of
"Ving or re oing my adwrtiosennt which
it deems objectionabe and to change the
CIMriiation of ry adnrtisement from that
orderd to conform to the policy of this
newgpaggy


C9315




Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MFACHAENICALMHANDLING

IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELtVE RY
MOVING, STORAGE
st PA K NGNG
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JAC K CASH
PH~ONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3737, 2-3798
Airport 77434


IN FREEPORT

TL. 352-6608


IIELP WANTED

C7296
TECEVSO AND RiADIO

i a ty es oelettronlis. Mus

Shaedvictor sMot er Ilisd

and hours. References

Bhm Music Corpora ion
Freeport.


cosas
BEAUTICIAN TO OPERATE
BEAUTY SA LON AT
TREASURE CAY.
Qualifications Required. At
least two years experience ~
Capable of running beauty
salon (one Beautician
operation), preferably
experienced in both men and
women hair cutting and
styling, but not essential for
men.
K ticiasend resuOme t:
N-3229, Nassau, Bahamas. or
te phone 2-2415, 2-8730 Ext.


TELEVISION AND RADIO
TnECH Nelect-experieucesd

an completely fao liar S" h
State devices. Must possess
own hand tools, goede salary
essential.
Bahamas Music Corporation
Ltdo, P. o. sox F-769.


G 8DENER between ages 25
and 40 to work hours from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. and nights when
requested. Phone 2-8511 days
7-8065 nights.

C9376
EXPERIENCED CREW for
Sailing Yacht. Must know
Bahamian waters well. First
class references. Send resume
of training, experience and
references to Box No. N7529,
Nassau
C9393
PDBLI ERTFLAGIONS A D
STAFF wanted by leading
publishing house.
E BELNNET EUPUCH eph.J
35666, 3-5667 or 3-5668.


OFFICER: With 10 years
sPopc resrexpe inee and
ONE LIFE GUARD: With
three to four years experience
in Pool and Beaches.
ONE RESERVATI ON
SUPERVISOR: With four to
five years experience and to be
solely responsible for all
reservations and convention
groups.
Interested persons apply to:
THE GRAND BAHAMA
HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.


COL UR TV TECHNICIAN -
minimum of five years
experience including circuit

amigd et i ust be ble tso up
and train others. Must possess
o tools, n ewod salary ha d

Mui Corporation, P. O. Box
F79 reepor .

C7298
LABOURER to clean septic
tanks, dig ditches and keep
yarclean. Only Bahamians
McConville Plumbing, P. O.
Box F-227 (352-2367).

C7300
MECHANICAL ENGINEER
specializing in boiler work,
heavy duty laundry and
airconditioning. Kindly apply
L & A Inrdustries, Phone
352-5422.

C7303
REFINERY OPERATORS
GRADE "A" Required by
Ba hama s Oil Ref in ing
Company. Applicant should
have at least a high school
education, however, experience
considered much more
eseential thum educat on. Mst
experience in operations of
d tleatiscale m etroleum
related facility 9
Mail resume in confidence to:
Personnel Officer, Bahamas Oil
Ref ining Company, P. O. Box
F-243S, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C7301
FORASALE PROH2R BLER

ESANSDL OHEA CR OF


LTD., BOX F477

FREREIIL ESTTfE



U F RNISHED HOME FOR
SALE 131 DAMPIER 3
bedrooms 2 baths with carport,
oohmwh air acondit rnbea
disposal. Pr ice $28,000
minimum down payment
$5,000.
contact: SYNTEX Phone
352-8171.

IIELP VWANTED
C7288
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY:
For General Manager of
Oceanus Hotels Ltd., Must be
fast and accurate at shorthand
and typing. Proficient in all
duties related to Executive
Secretary. At least three years
r tiorus experience r th
position.
CREDIT MANAGER: To
hndle all Accounts RM eitvab e

familiar with travel agents

eopos ncraedit cards, etc .

accounts onTNMR A ER To
assist General Manager with

sucpeean se eidtsraiLntd rsD 2 l
Must have at least five years
experience in Hotel and
stly gO anus Hotels Ltd.,
Personnel Dept., Royal Palm
Way, Freeport, G.B. P. O. Box
F-531.
C9307
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicant should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co. P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.

T 9NED MAN with minimum
5 to 10 years experience in
wallpapering, painting and
decoratinthAble top woronn

Write: Adv. C-7299, c/o The
Tribune, P. O. Box F-485'
Freepor .


Ig


I


_1


I


L


M _


I i


i I


C9308
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.


C9304
THE BAHAMAS GOSPEL
MISSION INC., of Montrose
Avenue, Shiriey Heights,
Nassau N.P. wish to announce
the RE-OPENING of the DAY
SCHeOOLman DAY NURSERY
The Day Nursery will accept
Infants from 6 months old at 8
a.m. to 6 p.m
The Kindergarten will accept
children from 3 years old 9

Reistroatlo pror both Nursery
and Kindergarten will
commence April 3rd 1973
from 9 a.m. to 5 p~m. (On
Tuesday & Thursdays) at the
of"ice of th ssion or contac
24537. Those wishing to
register their infants and
children are urged to do so
immediately as there will no
doubt be a long waiting list. A
deposit of $10 will be
requested when you register
For fees and other
information, contact the Pastor
of the Mission at the office or
for appointment call Mrs.
Nottage c/o phone 24537.

POSITION WANTED
C8500
IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
Adv. C8500, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau.

WORK WANTED
C9322
LxADrYenVITH ouerli2o years

er 2o~yed as maid. Telephone


HELP VWNIT~o

E EXPERIENCED SECRETARY
required by foreign owned
Bhmiii subsdsurycrmpnefu
applicant will be paid attractive
salary and enjoy congenial
working conditions. Applicants
should have a minimum of four
years practical experience and
should apply in first instance
to Pteat, Moanrewk 5Mitchell &

C9321
EXoRIdeNCEDotCOOK kiith

r feerences yeq i rd oCal

C 35
REQUI RED one Project
Salesman tpo reside on Famil

college graduates or equivalent
and possess Real Estate
Ami is t aon e pedience.a s
Please send resumes to Box
N-7782, or telephone 24596.


TO PLCACLEL OUR6ADS.


At. Re
1969 VIVA
4 Dr. Auto-Green
1969 C CVELLE


.G1 A~BLER
Auto. Blue
1969 PONTIAC GTO

198VFnORD r nORT
Blue

2 Dr0 AutoA Black


$1950

$800


$1400

$2100

$2000

$695

$500


Laed nksO F eld

I lphneh 36 n78
C9374


...g ...





1970 CH EVROLET IMIPALA
$2, 500
ALSO AVAILABLE
1969 VOLKSWAGEN
radio, tape, yellow $1000
19d6o9RAMBLER REBEL -0@
1 970 CHEVY IMPALA -

170CHEV nMALIBU 4 20
1972 DODGE AVENGER
SUPER- exellent
de ostaexc 850
197 DOD E AVENGER G.L -
god coditio 830
171 CHEVYnVEGA SED N5

li7 SwNGER VOGUE $200

radio, automatic $1500
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA SWO

169 CuJEVY CAMARO -

re97 C EVYIMPALA15 -

e97ntDOpG n eOLARA 00
good saving $5500
e69d uFORDtiFALCON -120
1969 CHEVY MALIBU -
red $1200
'",'a PLYOUT FUR Ia --0
1967 MERCURY COUGAR-

19 0 CADILLAC LIMOUSINE
black $7850
1969 BEAUMONT CUSTOM -

blue $1700
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Olake Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 34711.

C9320
1 968 COU GAR V /8,
airconditioned, Vinyl top -
excellent shape only $1250.
Day phone 35673 Nights
31909.


SARIW E SUPPLIS
C9309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.



C9389
MR. DAVID AND MRS. DELL
B)ETHEL glye notice to all
persons that Alfontia our son
is under age and cannot marry
without our consent.


C7283
ONE CHIEF


SECURITY


C9394 -
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
wanted. Isf and leading
publishing house looking for
best secretaries in Bahamas.
Publishing is challenging and
exciting. Please apply only if
you are seasoned person,
ETI ENNE DUPUCH JR.
PUBLICATIONS Telephone
3-5666, 3-5667, 3-5668


C7302
UPHOLSTERER required with
a minimum of 5 years
experience in this field. Basic
salary plus commission offered.
Applicant is required to send a
complete resume to Island
Fashion Limited, P. O. Box
F-2621, Freeport.


C9305
L.ARGE SHOP for rent, 3000
square fett 6th Terrace.
Centravlle. Cn be used as
store and warehouse. Has side
entrance. Call 2*1731 or
31583.


For Best Results
Use

The Tribune Classifieds.


Coeby Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from Qa.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


REAL ESTATE i


ANNI MnnuCEMENTS f TRIDE SERVICES


STRADIE SERVICES


FOR SALE


OR~l REIT


IIO~A~i** **@ HW~

SAL 2188 rs.Elr 5
















~1


, 7 -


_ __ I __


REX MORG AN, M.D. By DAL CURtTIS

FOR A DRIVE / PHOED WHN LASTLLI5W SA~ r )Ta AL I MTDT NW
)CI AD ~rY ome ow ON t r usat A TOLD MErf ASArED ME 10 sTaufID MAYE A PRtNA
JOCILRI*Et TE KEYSI pr K) 6M QNWmn IC YFlt M ET HER














UD GE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS

MAY WE HAVE A RAIN CHECK, PERHAPS I'D BETTER GIVE YOU DO YOU tHINK KATHERINE ?
wHY DON'T YOU KATHERINE ? I'M GOING TO A KEY, BETSYI SOMETIMES SHE DISUIK 9 DISLIKES YOU?
BOTH PLAN ON HAVING DRIVE BETSY DOWN PAST THE JUDGE AND I GO ME, SAM WHATEVER
DI NER WIH US HERE EAAGL' SP INT... AND WE TO 8D BEFORE alMKES YU
GETTING BAcK




g




if~~I I aa


A PA RTMENT 3- G ByAlaz otsis


L


Winning

Bridge
e~g.7%E 1 M.,

gSJ 10 8
r0 R 2

Se9332 AK71 65
Ob 5 032
*QJ75 AI032i l

8A e J 9 b

Peagg Pgs grragggg
Paas Pa P~ass
West h the 02. East vins
laW1 abO~ nd contiates witt

bL~tuo ber a
dbefends. With the over~ the
the cQ ara2 c
Plus i.. Is".r? "si" '
Wt~ cato hh b a
io work ot pesentages.u Declser
attachb asr a~b ni
to em te down th
hmoreu it n' wothrr
hkaot u and aot eis anese &Bs
dinS whdr o rml lhas
shown~ srta Ie nt he
(rAs as hadr it~n h
imtb kme iSat Shelyto have
tdm ulba way the cotractfl



0b 8a to beP. rr so
r~~mm ~ cPrtt & OmakI he
be he~Q h Lurbuhs ereI
8 LA R as An itI20 hr
wor must con lta to thrve b
ltter, and therely utk befart



e~~t can a 1rn

no r nmes. n To '

uner t
ma~rse MARRIG coraot~e ulre
Itrase rnk rare ream rear
rearm orim clh-ctr s rr. n


ii. Conseens. (s>
1(s. AILstatant to use vicar. tO,
as. Rcn umes. to)
YY.ot trustaurths rbaracterr.

1. o *omethibns outrastous :
4,ap. 44
Y. G~ood vision. st, as
rr Tasty bakedQ Ltem. 45-4>
m~easure. UIW Llrt

(I. Iou
asehc. ts>
rl4. Du e
t to R. In~o~
(to
15. A1l e raedsssa


gYI.t FeatursSndwr .lt in 1973 World notes. resrved ~--I
A~ compliment that I'd REALLY' enjoy hearing about
my work is, that it merit a raise in my salary "

Rupert and the Mixed Magic-21


STE VE R 0PER & MI K E NOMAD by s au nders & o ver gard


I 5 10.
16.
9 I 18.
20.
'7 21.
22.

9I -I 1 I" 26 2
26.
281 211191 1 go 27.
29




.9 qY I" 41 36
Y91 1 ~~ L ~ 3
qI 1?


_ _


yadse April 4 1973


, ~r~l'


SCARROLL RIGHTER'S

)'HOl@K'OSOPE
trom de Carrol Righter estitkute
'j GENrERAL TENDENCIES: Unless very
Careful, you couki become involved in an
argument that would only leave scars. Avoid any discussions
about money or material matters. Carefully study ~your
expense and assts, and dense a more suitable budget plan.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) If you plan your time
wisely you are able to handle monetary affairs to your
satisfaction. Forget a social matter if it's too expensive.
Show that you have your feet squarely on the ground.
TAURUS- (Apr. 20 to May 20) It would not be wise to
find fault with a higher-up because you don't agree on a
object, so keep mum. Don't takte any chances concerning a
civic matter. Home is your best bet tonight.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You have some
canfiddna omir aer to rtten Ito Mn essonl god t un Athr
the future. Study plans most carefully. Relax tonight.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Fmrd a better
way for taking care of promises you have made. Try not to
earrelt wt h ap tsoit aryucudfind trouble. Can a
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Show more pride in your
work Carry through with what higher-ups expect of you and
gain their goodwill. Several duties are not to your liking but
they have to be performed Take it easy tonight
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Study new ways to get
ahead in the future, and then everything works to your
advantage. Newcomers you have met recently could get you
in trouble, so avoid. Concern yourself with old friends.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) With bills to pay and other
duties to perform, an early start on getting them behind you
is wise. Don't pry into the affairs of others and you get
along better. Strave for good health.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) Tell associates what you
desire of them in a quiet and positive way, and gain their
cooperation. Don't argue for best results. Moot points can be
studied carefully before taking action.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Give co-workrers the
benefit of any doubt and get along better with them Try to
understand their viewpoints better. The evemng is
particularly good for the social side of htfe
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) You are able to have
entertainment that you enjoy provided you don't spend too
much money. Try to express special talents, but don't force
them. Show more devotion to mate.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Try not to lose your
temper at home and you avoid unfortunate circumstancs.
Eliminate whatever Is causing friction. Don't forget to pay
important bills. Take health treatment.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Be particularly careful in
travel and you can avoid accidents. Cut down on expenses
instead of addmg to them. You have to be more efficient in
handling routines. Don't waste time
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . he or she will be
one of those young people who will be aggressive and will
require discipline early If the life is to be successful. Teach
to think before talking or acting. A new type of individual
here who will like to do the practical part of any new
ventures. Give fine religious training. Sports can be missed.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make
of your life is largely up to YOU'


*Th Moraftdland set theuend rof
unfastensl his safety belt the
Soroerer smiles and says
" In the hands of a child this
wand of mixed magic could
rno wiIdBut I bae se pee
in the world beyond my
command" They make their
ALL RIGHTS


wazy ao g the pp r, wit Ruc
ahead of thlem. What a
strange place," he remarks.
SLook at all those steps and
those statues of animals."
th Theyoare not satua repli
Wizard s guard and will come
alive at his bidding "
RESERVEo


Chess














White metes in two moves.
against any ddefene tbyv A.
Bottac~hi,. Sheer variety at
choice makes the key move

Ir md ms~r 3 2mints prb
m nuts avemae 30 minuzs
novice.
-FRIDAY SQLUtlon No, 925

Chess Solution

or if QJ Kt rBS;; 2 Ex B. or i!
B -42; 2 Q-B6. or if B-92:
2 Q--BI. or if P xR: 2 B--Kts


Cr


"We tried our best, sir but we condn't get the stains out...


1. Political
patronage
4. Marsh
7. Scoter
11. Title
12. Remorse
13. Father superior
14. Artificial

15. Minor plaet
17. Sand
19. Athletic
20.cDio ared
22. Snaffle
23. Elliptical


1. Greek letter
2. Help
3. Agenda


24. Muscle
28. Baking dish
30. Vegetable
31. Treasure
32. Hangs
33. Orienrtal
36. Ice mass
37. Albert's wife
39. Chafe SQ1
42. Sheltered
43. Audition
44. Coin of Macao
45 Nobleman

47. Man's
nickname


DOWN

r.4
5.
a.6
7.7


-


Pigtail
. Ejct
Receive
Custodian
Heckelphone
. Death notice
SSpreds to dry
Give fort
Banished
Pro
Marsh elder
Kidney been
Perimeter
Chinese puzle
Antique
SLegal matter
Game of

seckels

F~ roster
i.Prejudice
8. Turmeric
0. Gralpe
1. Crate


arms a
1. s>* o soud warntl. e >>
W. (.nslrlOtsoraY fe.Is;
0. kec~ounter. 17)
Io )uwo-yr yuu on panlce tU
r Iurlser elarrn u awrs, lusut,


AP Newsfeatures


)r tlme 20 min.


mh rt mo


310 C~ 13~,


QIUE asD anano 'hek( SIE NWlt
' s1TTraoAn* &/1as'

Brother Juniper


AMD S TcIE
flME IT tuAs
MY TURNJ...







o


CROSSWORD

PU Z ZLE


W

PD





Bahamas champ Baby .;~4P;~BTP'c,~~ e bb~~~: .~~



Boy gets newr manager -;

By GLADSTONE THURSTONL
AD)VOCATING THAT BOXERS be in top notch condition all i .

year round and that they have a strict and clea cut imag, Mart / 5pa
Goldstein, known for his work with the Bahamas Volleyball *f-EC :7;.d4i' 7 4c
Federation, has taken over the management of lightheavyweight ~
champ Baby Boy Rolle and middleweight champ Rennie Pinder. \


I


Iisllr BikllkS1018 Millli L1. CAROL


Sens"tionl
Interncrt
t~sibe: ~entriloquist




gL-SA SHOW
VU\-TH LADING

ENTERrANR



MARINEN~T ENGNESORs

MSr
P. O. BOX 6275 -TELEPHONE 2-8488 5 -5507
EASTE RN END NASSAU SHI PYARD.


NE""""""""""""""""""" NE~! NE~!


OlVI1~ SJINGER


FEATURES AND CUSTOMER BENEFITS


Ex iclus ve Front Drop in Bobbin-Isr easy to see
and reacse Eliminates fumbling with a
g Zoned Presser Bar Control-Allows you to
select the setting for a complete range of
'fab'"\ wights by sm tforning. a rial
plus extra settings for heavyweight fabrlcs
and darning.
Q Suap-on Presser FM tSaves tme wn you

@ Quake eneedepaedk ateMkl taensd sytov
(b One-War Nudle fusertion-Ellmmnatessany
possibllty of insedting needle backwards
@ Needle-Plate Guidellnes-Eye saving guides
for perfect straight stitches.
O Lltra*d w 1 ttzas sk mm)- Cver
deoeratv rtths uAt Inases capabilhty
0) Aebb n Winder Release-Prevents overwilndlng
4b non-uetatllic contronerr-nas an Infinite variety
of speeds and ,s rugged and durable
O gseinstill)-iht-L th entrresewing ere*


heavier.


SI1N GE R...Sure we're best. We taught the world to sew.





MIB~ egilIMFsMIIW
*I $5$Y UY



r


I _


Wednesday, April 4, 1973.


Arawak and Carib win




St.Andrews sports titles

CARIB HOUSE, with a total of 133 points, and Arawak House
with 146, took top honours in the junior and senior divisions
respectively during the St. Andrews High School annual sports
meet last week.


In the junior division. ~Tainos
Hour wa scandll< th 1."s
thirdl with I 20 andl Arawaks
came in fourth with 108. Curib
House with 135 points came ~
se~condl in the senior division,
Tainos was third withi I 29 and
Lucayan was fourth with 104
points
'The four houses ente~red
c~om pet itors for a large
selection of events ranging
from "sack" and "egg, 'n
spoon" races to the mnore
conventional track and fieldl
events.

as onzt shonind nsair tobt
whom the Hiouses were named.
Support was massive and loud.
adri tesiown ws terrifthe for the
were not established until the
very last race was over.
Richard Phillips of Arawak
House took top honours in the
senior boys division by winning
thet ""? j nlptnehigh juntp


senior girls division, Diana

M leru na Iop wnrinds the
metres.
Othesr outstanding
performers were Clintonl Sayers
of' Tainos, Ann Strange of
C'arib, lan Smith of A~rawak,
Doreen Butler of Lucayan.
Raleigh Butle~r of Arawak and
Rhonda Smith of Tainos.


These boxers, however, still
retain the same trainers
Rolle with E~dward Taylor and 1
Pander with John Alfred
Skinner
"I think that Baby Boy is
being held back by not having
enough exposure, commented
(;oldstemn "lhat is what we
are going to give him more
exposure If' we can't get it in
the Baihamas~ then we'll have to
goI Sltateide T Ihe samne is in


Schlitz Best meet



WII II~ BliCK'S BEES
commrlranding the lead at least
until Saturday action
continues at the Queen
1 l izabeth Sports Centre
tonih J hen S hits nBte t k
game at 7 o'clock. Del lane,
who were leading the series
unltll they were stopped by Jet
Set. were further set back by
becck s Bees and Big Q Market
1 rest in third place two games

Sc~hltl/ who lost last year's
bestl sho~rt stop Sonny Haven to
Beck s Bees. rest in fifth place
four games' out having won
onliy thiree of their seven
p'layed
in the second game at 9:.30
\ev e n th place Bahamas
Blenders take on fifth place
Paradise Island. Trhe Blenders
(2 7) are six games out while
Paradise (2 6,) are five and a
half games out
Big O s star hurler A\ndre
Rodgers. who was named
player of the week, will be
presented with gift certificates
frani solel lane aStore.rAllan

Rodgers with a gift certificate.
William Brewer, wine and
spirits m chants, w lithpre re

homner before Easter with five
cases of Beck's Malt Tonic. For
the player that hits the second
homer before Easter three
cases will be awarded and two
cases will be awarded to the
player of the third homer.


for a few more tune up fights
to get back up to the mark.
Both fighters are up against
foreign opponents on Friday at
the Nassau Stadium when Baby
Boy seeks to cut Johnny
"Hlud" Hudgins' three win
streak in as many Nassau
appearancesland Pinder, in his
first appearance in eight
months, takes on Miami's Slick
Mitchell.
"fetw activities and failure
to train regularly," said
G;oldstein, "has been the fault
,og ourBah ian boe s. Yu

aloperantedet ut tra

pn gr xe hse essential to the
PRO)MISI NG
Looking around the boxing
scene, G;oldstein noticed that
there are many promising
boxers who need someone to

centers ae sh w thnec esae
to go. Among these are
Cleveland Williams and Sugar
Ray Sears. Although it has not
aeen Sul rsiconfirmd,o tupar
Friday night's card.
Confident that Hudgins'
reign will end on Friday night,
G;oldstein and trainer Taylor
had Rolle besides doing the
regular workouts on the bags
and ropes sparring rounds
with Cleveland Williams and Al
Moss. Williams was working
with jabs and Al was working
on the hooks and uppercuts.
T`he day before, Pinder was
working on his midsection.
"After we get past this
fight," continued Goldstein,
"we are looking to take on one
of the top contenders in the
British limprn elating 'raed
number three in the light
heavyweight division of the

B.IR/ Rennic it is a possible
defence of his title should
Sherwin Johnson maintain his
challenge, and then on to some
rated fighters so that he might
gain some international
recognition. "We hope to bring
international recognition to the
Bahamas," said G~oldstein.
BACK ING
"We have the fighters, all we
need is the backing," he said
advocating that Bahamians
should always back their
representative in the ring. "It
has always given me a great
feeling to help in any way I can
ew orle ahamas," hsaidb th
doing public relations for many
sporting bodies in the

Ba im iday night's card, "I'm
trying to give the best rounds
of boxing they have ever seen
in years 32 rounds,"
G~oldstein said. Unlike many
other promoters, Goldstein
promised that everything will
be right on schedule with the
gates opening at 7.15 and the
first bout starting promptly at
8.30.
Rolle is expected to enter
the ring at 185 pounds and
Hudgins will probably come in
about eight to ten pounds


I ~












I e


JUNIOR VICTORS CARIB HOUSE and senior victors Arawak House topped St.
Andrew's High School Sports with 133 and 146 points respectively-


III:NRY BURHows was
re-elected president of the Uahamas
('ricket Association during the
annua I ene a i n e in atnd ea ptrion

release, had decided not to run but
after a draft movement was carried
tjut on his behal sytt e withdraw his decision
The B.C.A. holds a special
meeting tomorrow night at 8
o clock at Our Ladies School for
the purpose of collecting dues anid
insurance for 1973, discussion onl
plans for the coming series, and
registration of all teams
The following are other officers
elect nt Roy Arrnbrister vice
se rtary, Gevrore e urn tes
assistant secretary, Bernard
Turnquest treasurer. The Board
rn irbers a ColinD Ien 'ales
Ingraham. Sidney Wilson and A

ROMNBEATS WRIGHT
MIAMI BEACH April 4 (A')
Vcnl eihtondhonmp formsraredgha

Tusay n ght oer Oider Wdgh It !
h~e v wesiht box ng mch. i


TIGHT RACE

IN MADEIRA
By MIKE ALBURY
THE MADEIRA league has the
teams. Esso and Pritchard's are still
tied for first place, with Albury's
and Cladldge's only one half and
two games behind respectively.
Truly a real tight pennant race.
In the Ladies' Zephyr league
Thompson's maintains a four game
lead while Mercury still leads City
Market by three In the Plaza league.
Mercury retai dA t~hElt three
game lead over City Market as both
teams won two games in Tuesday's
action. Home Furniture managed to
put thiug ssogtr e In an tf as
victory. Tony Zervous and Herbert
HR ert paved theu ceyfora th
212 Sf thham aakms respectable
Larry d'Albenas 256(613) shot a
Me ursectnd tw >vic orie oveod
"io uTennawrriusseni 21 IS1)
Knowles managed to score high for
the financiers.
sawyer's moved into a second
place tie with CitymMarket las they
O.I.A. C'harles Cooke 194(545) was
the high scorer for Sawyer'b as
Migluel Obregon shot high folr the
nuyrs.
ThomZslWYR addd A(Uanother
notch in the victory column ats they
completely out-bowled the
slumping Home F~urniture team
rinng aI (he gadm(s oasily Iv
did all the damage for Thompsorn's
as Joan Haylinlg was the high scorer
forM furniture ladiesbeoe at

upsetaing t ar. thi aim the h u
team, this game could put
Amoon althopes of wningentcht
Pallas Roberts led Amoury 's while
Virginia Schippmann was top f'or
Maura's.
New Oriental Laundry, who last
week won three big games from the
league leaders. were nrot n te sume
sometimes tough Super Value.
Joyce Waugh set the pace for
N. Lfo hs Saunet a iggs did the
MADIRIIA LEAGUE
The second half has turned out
to be quite a race as only two
@ham s eerae bietop four tearns.
first place tie with Esso as they won
the game from the sometimes tough
K.(. Auto. They proved on
Thursday night that they could be
mighty tough to heat.
Tom Stubb ried KhC. as Mann

for P Msm ved two within one
half game o~f both Esso and
Prikchar's gaes rIe son Mko
So yr stru k high for Aleburys aso


o h w tre thr e rhat sgan e
from Tinker's Paint. These victories
moved Claridge's to within two
games of the leaglue leaders. Tery
Russel and Matty Culmer were the
top scorers for Claridge's and
Tinker's respectively.
In the only games that made no
dfeenjfe to eths hus four ste ms"
Heinekens. Winston Parker and Jeff
Albury rolled-in the high scores for
Heinekens and Giuinness
resec eLER OF MONTH
Donnie Eldon (535), Donna
F~ryers 202(499) and Mike Albury
o5(61 frM howe f sh a, t

respectively.
ANNUAL MEETING
The Annual G~eneral MeetingR ,f
he rB.lB.A tdf helt ona Irddaf

Si.OFFER TO FOREMAN
NE W 1' ORK ( AP)-
Heavywreight champion Gerorge
Foreman got a"money-in-tft-
bank" offer of I million dollars

Midaro o~uan e a;t~ amn 2
option of rematch with Joe
Ftrallr,. also on June 20, w\ith terms
to be negotiated.
There was no immediate
comment from the Foreman camp.
titurnman has s t to d eend rthe
the second round last Jun. 22 at
Kingston, Jamaica.


e


asse.Jud


TEAM BATTING


IIAve
65 .31 I
59 .3oo
47 .264

30 .184
33 .174
I6 .105


Big Q Market
b~cks Icers
I'aradise Island

Schlit/ lcer
llen ders
Henlstie L~umb~r


INDIVIDUAL BATTING


Keithh Gome;AB
Vin~cent Al bury
(13ig Q) 24
Hoosevelt Turner
(lkcks) 22
lEd Moxey22
I ed T~lylor
(Dercks) 23
Willie Knowles21
Le*ster (ardiner
(Jet set) is
Adli Moss
(tig V) 22
I ;l~si lIls.) 22
Ken~ Rodgers
(Derl Jane) 17


.37s
.364
.364
.353


GOING CAMPING?
See Western Auto
For your Supplies


FEATURES AND
CUSTOMER BENEFITS
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Tents S24.00-536.00 -5S105.00

Sleeping Bags $12.50-$15.50


...t 10 falllily stole

an11CATALOGc C: F


I Stoves $30.00

Lanterns $20.00 530.00.
Rosetta Street
Coleman Fuel $2.35
Tel 28857
Air Mattresses 59.75- $15.00


Ice Chest $2.25 55.50
$12.75 $24.00 $34.50


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