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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 3, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03313

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ENJOV FIE H~-A'4P
ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
-IITELEPHONE 77303/77778- ~


itesistered wth Postmaster of Bahames for postage concession within the Bahamas ) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


__ __


'ABUNDANCE OF





STAF SA Y SPM
BARRING; exceptional
circumstances. public service
staff will this year be kept to
the same number as in 1972,
P'rim Mnc ministerr L~ynden
Pi'n dl ing said yesterday
afternoon in the course of the
Budget debate.
Mr. Pindling said Ministries
and departments had been
asked to keep their
complemntons at the 1972 level
because It was felt that "the
service had an abundance of

Changes mnight e met, he
said, by a movement within the
service rather t an by going
outsi e. Meantimg ose
already in the pubile service
were being encouraged to
improve their standards to
what would be demanded by
Inp 1970, 19)71 and 1972 the
Minister of Devel mnentt had
inistituted a very efficient
expenditure control system in
the Mlinistry of F~inansc which
11ut liade itself felt in 1971
NOf U1'
Although more monies may
hw;1,e beein approved, the Prime
111n u.1 r argued, actual
xpe~nditure did not come up
to the estimated expenditure
oft tis incubi2 1 e me to
say again that there is a need
f:,d us tournde wur oa nd h:
the era of slackness is past ,,
Mr. Pindling declared
hu we are about to 1
become; a mermber of the
international community of
nations this is an opportune
turne to standl on o~ur own two
leer. and the Budlget is an
examplle >f' this .
( 'an t inued the Pri me
Mfinistei: "We must face the
realities of life. The fact is that
we do have a system whereby
we have expected others to pay
fo~r our luxuries ... Our high
standard of living or high
quality of life that we aspire
to





0 F CO MMONWIEALTH
T IF BR IT'rIS 11
C'ommonnwealth o~f nations has
ulnalnmously agreed to accept
the Bahamnas as the 33rd
member of this worldwide
organization.
'The news was given to tle
House this morning by Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling,
whio said the Information had
been released simultaneously in
New Zealand anid London by
C'ommnno n w e alt h
sercrtary-general Arnold
Smith.
"As a result of certain
discussions held with the
leading citizens of Mash
Harbour I have reason to
believe they have abandoned
their secessionist cause and
have broken with those
espousing it in the United
Kingdom." Mr. P'indling added.
le then asked if Mlarsh
Harbour representative
Errington Watk/ns (F:NM) had
any comment.
"'I will mnake a comment in
due timee" retorted Mr.
Watkin .
ETHEL KENNEDY IN
BAHAMAS FOR HOLIDAY
MRS I:TIHIl Kennedy and
three ofI her younger children
arrived In Nassau last week on
vacation. Mrs. Kennedy is the
wife of' thle late Senator Robert
Kennedy, who was killed by an
avsassinl' bullet in L.os Angeles
(,n June .' 1%S~. IMrs Kennedy
Is the mother ut eleven


children



3-Pc. Contemporary
Living Room Suite
$()00
1 ONLY
re" pp' n :''"" !''r


thnis attowed un~der a 1920 w


Price


ce: 1 5 Cents


VOL. LXX, No. 112


Tuesday, April 3, 1973.


VICE-CHAIRMAlN

OF PLP DIES



Lower ~lzHugue 1~ luthr ath



. 0 m 10d irSad









use (I, in i denwth r


S cltt n \,d first \w car maron,
At In re he u be lasa

I~ ~~~~i alrtmo rd Ins
repesnunv on tuhe~~ PLP~
Ilcifhl. 110 wasals S members
of hthe A Ianspor lcning



M' s cOhiefdRkrm


(ctlch l un Nst the vassauth
Illit~\ sandsiTI b II l at a mS



)ionr twoto Jraughters hoe
wtwo haers Magtrs Deres

Ih Irn ndr vv b e
hiannnced ('rl\ te es J.

MP'lls MOTH irr sneR1)4


o otand 11111.~d t NAchs. and
( et rex l s N as. u dwdrtt inth
Prn3S3e si Margaret Hlospt at
antmlr Inda athe arng suffring
vlrok at Satrdayt Mrs
Tyvnes Baho had bn Iling for
vears Agoto make herhomed
withnd herdauht. Mrs.n

Amandaehls Jones S i
aSheo survived by' hr
husb-gand ( ulrtis lyes JP.
I)nact arraus et and whct~ moved oNssua

hrtmasO tob ith his wife,
paLorntcka, Fla, Chaunceay, ah
Nassnaue bus ui inesmn CNoansa
exser g eant ofo poice d now ai
membernc of the Gamng Bord;t
Cyaril vice0 prei Sldent. and
secrvetar of the eps Pahenny
Savngs ankevie and NM-M.P.
fortur Ack aln and t crooke
Island. twanins, .Aidan
compthrole fCvl Aviapm.tion;y
andemn Doald secretr to the
daugt~i (er, Mtrs. onest Soheis
aloso surived byo 26dee
grandchirlderen and 1

graPrII(Oandchildren
Im unra aer pranents, wil bed
annouSinced latridcae
,;cdl S $ $$$ $ $f

Lrnigt sen, asmaofNorway, who
hads madgewac hi hm iasau
ovcetry 25 yhear ago di at is
residenceig ShonNlso tet

I uneral services forl Mao

Canuthedral da at 3 p.m. toay
Io. nterment was l mae in thei
Wethehrnh cemetery ex o i
SECosIO wife whopredIeae


W'ASHINlNTTN (Ar') without
~cnunenedt. tle do.S. Supremn e (c~ur
the c~ontr~versial trante.lahska
pipelinle. Thle su(,rree court left
thre final decisionr o~n the ptipeline up
fo he pipetine to be
constructed, Congr~eess will have to
ex(lten the right-ofT-waiY further


?


THE SUGGESTION BY FNM REPRESENT T VE Norma Solomon that "Certain Ministers" were "in the


back pocket" of a particular individual served to stir up i
Although Mr. Solomon attack of' their own at former
subsequently agreed to Milnisters of the previous
withdrew the remark at the Ulnited~ Bahamian Party
request of T~ourism Minister government
Clement Maynard, it provided Although M.Solomnon
government members with mentioned no names. it is
ammunition to lau ch an believed he was alluding to fr.








NEW YORK (AP) U.S. Businessman Robert L. Vesco has
filed a suit in San Jose, Costa Rica, charging a New York City
Attorney, Simon Nusbaum, with "malfeasances of defamation
and calumny" against Vesco in Costa Rica, a Vesco spokesman
said Monday.
The action contends Nusbaumn said he went to
Nusbaum, appearing in San San Jose March I and
Jose's First Criminal- Court "submittedl a complaint for
March 1, made "an incoherent criminal deeds" against Vesco
and disorderly string of on behalf of some IOS Mutual
unla w ful and offensive Fund shareholders who had
accusations against the credit retained him to represent them
and honour of Mr. Vesco," the against Vesco.
spokesman said. The Vesco spokesman said
Nusbaum. reached by the San Jose criminal court
telephone at his off ice here, concluded there were no
termed the suit "amusing" and grounds for prosecuting any
nan intimidation attemptt" malfeasance whatsoever nor for
Vesco, former board bringing suit and the case was
chairman of IO)S, Ltd., a( dismissed."
Xiutual F~und complex, and Nusbaum contended
International Controls Corp., Monday the court's action was
was accused along with other "a rejection based on
defendants in a civil suit filed technicalities of procedure."
by the Securities and E change 110 said he continues to
commission last November of' represent IOS Mutual Fund
draining 224 million dollars shareholders in court actions
from IOS Mutual F~unds. here against Ve~sco.



Frni F8 CS plaIRs S F8SOR S



10f 8 fICit 5 dgIS
By MIKE LOTHIAN
APPARENT BUDGET DEFICITS are the consequences of
Government's deliberate choice to move money earmarked for
recurrent expenditures into capital development programmes,
former Finance Minister Carlton E. Francis declared in the House


a hornet's nest in the House yesterday and this morning.


So bert Ve sc o whose
association with the iOS
mutual fund complex and
Bahamnas Commonwealth Bank
has been the source of a steady
stream of internationally
adverse articles concerning his
association with this country.
Mr. Solomnon, debating the
1973 Budget yesterday
afternoon, said there was a
particular individual who was
"systematically and slowly
buying this country, and has
certain Ministers in his back
pocket. When hie is ready to
move he will squeeze, and
when he squeezes..."
The member for St. George's
got no further before he was
cut off by Mr. Maynard, who,
on a point of order, said he
thought the member should
not refer to Ministers in that
fashion, and called on him to
retract.
Mr. Solomon did so, but not
before Works Minister Simeon
Bowe threatened certain
disclosures of his own about
"Ministers in back pockets."
DANGEROUS
This morning the PLP's
Grand Bahama representative
Kendal Nottage described Mr.
Solomon's remarks as
"dangerous, deliberate and
diabolical," the innuendo being
that black men were in the
pockets of white men.
He argued that when the
UBP was in power it controlled
certain banks. But because a
particular banking institution
had the god sen e aend he

philosophy of this country to



PRE-CHARANCE


OF CISTOMS TO


ItElRIH 1 I LRR


TH-E BAHAMAS will be able
to maintain pre-clearance. This
at least is the word received
from Washington by Tourism
Minister Clement Mtsynard.
Although full information
was not yet available, Mr
Maynard told the House
yesterday that it was likely
preclearance here would '
maintained by U.S. Customs
and Immigration for at least
another year.
Hie added that the
government expected to
improve inspection facilities at
Nassau international Airport to
meet international standards.
Discussing the $8 million
Budget allocation for Tourism
in 1973, Mr. Maynard said it
was hoped the national flag
-arrier would get off the
ground before independence.
'The two local airlines had
agreed in principle to the idea
"snd we are hoping to work
something out." The Minister
Fsaid the' proposal was now "at
the finish line" but indicated
efforts to work out a
management arrangement with
a foreign carrier had not
miatenliriaisd
WEATHER
In his debate Mr. Maynard
underscored the importance of
the Meteorological Department
whose activities were of
sufficient consequence to now
be classified separately.
As a tourist resort the
Bahamas need to know about
weat er conditions in advance
asd rics, those nprognosisth,
islands had n bingm "a b
i dustr ."no eom ig
Aonin y to the miit
ovecc2 O0 private lnu e
had been made in the Bahamas
last year by foreigners.
In addition boating in these
waters had also grown and this
group needed to be informed
about weather conditions.
Although the Bahamas relied
heavily on the U.S. Weather
Bureau, "it is our duty to
develop our own facilities and
take on more responsibility."
the Minister said.


Xieteorology would also be
of assistance to agriculture and
genecrall land use as it woubt
assist farmers in their planting
operations, Mr. Maynary
addedl.


help the poor black Ba~hanluan
to better himse~lf tilus bank was
attacked and inniuenldo cast on
governmentt Mlinisters.
"This,' he d~c~lairel. "I\ an
unjustified attack o~n a
financial institution and the
leadership of this icoun try .
Mr. Nottage demlandezd an
apology from lr. Solomnon anti
asked the memlbe~r4 of his part)
to censure him
Dev el o pmne n t Urt Inst~r
Carlton Francis obse~rved th~at
the member for St. Geourge s
was only echoiog the
sentiments of luis patrtv .
inasmuch as Opposition Leader
Kendal Isaacs had cllaimecd
outside the H-ouse that the
only money coming into the
country was 'hot mone?
"The member f'or St.
George's was the only one with
the courage to stick his neck
out and say it." Mr. I rancls
said.
STILL SMOKIlNG
Jumping to his feet Mr.
Bowe claimed that the FNM's
1972 election campaign
"whether Whitfield told them
or not" was financed by
$3.5 million "for which they
promised to sell this country,
and that money was so hot it's
still smoking "
Mr. Bowe charged that the
FNM had made an agreement
with the people who put up
the money that they would
name who the Minister of
Tourism and the Minister of
Immigration would be.
MWhe~no ol.saachanote ethah
apologized but the government
was proceeding to do the same
thing, Mr. Bowe declared he
would have his say and then
apologize.
Bimini and West End
represent..ive Henr now.n,,
who was in the chair at the
time, did not intervene in the
verbal skirmish.
Continuing on what was
supposed to be the committee
debate on Head 12 Office of
the Prime Minister Mr. Bowe
asserted that the former
P rem ier (Sir Roland
Symonette) had been a
director of First National City
Bank.
He then alluded to the
company connections of
former UBP Finance and
'Tourism Minister Sir Stafford
Sands and his connection with
the granting of the casino
licence at Freeport.
Mr. Bowe declared that the
salaries of the Ministers were in
the Budget for all to see unlike
the case with the previous
government.
He then alluded to the
consultancy fees paid certain
individuals during the UBP
administration.


By NICKI KELLY
REPRESENTATIVE Norrman Sotlomon
S) challenged government Monday to deny that
58 million either from the Port Authority. the
at Freeport or a large private firm there and


because it needed money "s"

drop over the past twor years,
Mr. Solomion a\serted
On the ma1tter of cemernt, he
said the amo1(u. 1 pr~duc~el by
one firm had dropped fromr a
high in 19)70 of 70.00)0 cuble
yards to, 26.000) in 1',72
Mr. Solomlonl pointedi out
that In June the economyn
would be assaultd by niew
waves of hrgh school graduates
who would he told there was
no work for them.
AL.LOWANCELS UP
"In the Budget we see thit
the e~ntertainment allowance ~
of Ministers are going up about
$2,000. In fact they are vo~tin8
for themselves more than any
old age pensioner will receive
in 152 months."
Mr. Solomon then went ~n
to enumerate the losses
government could anticipate an
the coming year.

encroad men a forte gn
vessels, he expected the
crawfish industry would lose
$2 to $3 mintion. Tlhe
purchase of tourist Itemis
would also be off because the
differential between U.S. and
Bahamian prices was shrinking
The revenue, he said, was olff
16.9 per cent in 1971. While
67 million had been predicted
from customs duties less than
$50 million materialized.
"Now we are told that these
duties will exceed what we
were promised in 19)71 but did
not materialise."
Mr. Solomon estimated that
the first year of independence
would cost $2 million and that
this would go principally on
ambassadors. As for the
"educational leap forward,"
this would continue to produce
poorly educated Bahamians.
He also predicted that the
new rules preventing
doctors from participating in
private practice would lead to
deterioration in the quality of
medical service.
"The people will stand for
only so much. The Bahamas
and ts peo le wil pass troug
a va e o' h privation not yet
known," e crie .


OPPOSITION
(FNM-St. George'
it had borrowed
casino operation


discounted it aIt $1.5 million
des erately "
~I. So\ allegations o~n a telephone iall
which he said he received from
F:reeport during yesterday's
luncheon break In the Budget
debate.
With Derputy Speaker
Scherling Bootle in the chair
the St. G;eorge's mlemberr ra/
through the various Budgets
dating backL to 19)70 to prove
his contention that this year's
Budget was designed to
"positively and malevolently
mislead the Bahamian public
into a1 hate "
Time aInd again government
members tried to get Mr.
Solomon to deal with the
present Appropriations, but
the FNM representative said
that the miscalculations made
by government in the past all
"intended to deceive" were
the key to what could be
expected in the future.

Bu lanestna em nes opt fri
Finance Minister Carlton
Francis against actual figures,
the member claimed that far
from the "innovation and
forward planning" theme of
the 1970 Budget, the only
innovation was a steadily
increasing stream of taxation
and a steady decrease in the
economy.
Mr. Solomon predicted that
on the basis of what had
occurred in 1972 the shortfall
for 1973 would be $18 million.
"You can tax beer and liquor
but you cannot make the
tourist buy it, and you may tax
cars but you cannot stop a man
from laying off staff or not
stocking parts."
WITH TAX
"If you balance the Budget
in 1973 you will do so by
taxation, but you will have to
balance subsequent Budgets,"
he declared.
Referring to the Building
statistics, the St. G~eorge's
representative said in 1967 the
value of such permits was over
$83 million. In 1972 it was
$8.415,000, a difference of
$75 million.
in 1971 building permits
were valued at $20 million,
-ndicating the extent of the


Monday.
Defending the 1973 budget
and its projected $6.76 million
deficit on recurrent accounts
Mr. Francis. now Development
Minister, said the estimates this
year are the beginning of
Government's reorganisationn
of the revenue system and
reconstuc t io n of' the
budgetary systemi" The end
result wourlld be a closing of the
gap between revenue and
expenditure, he said.
And he warned that while
neither the budget itself nor
last wee k 's Bu dge t
Commlunic~ation "specify how
the gap will be filled or over
what period of time ... I don't
think next year anid the year
after we will be faced with the
same kind of taxes we have
now.
"We have stretched that
kind of tax to the limiit." Mr.
F~rancis said chairman of the
Bahamas Develop men t
Corporation Alfred Maycock
(PLP-Fort F~ineastle) "will be
revealing the manner in which
Government proposes to bridge
the gap in this era of
reconstruction."
The means would he
revealed by Mr. Maycock
because shortfalls in capital
development funding had been
responsible for apparent
deficits on the recurrent
account, he said
There was an estimated 57.5
million deficit last year. While
the budget show an estimated
$9,73 million surplus of
reve nue over recurrent
exeditr thi $9a 5'
exillt n turehe ts rplus ha been
allocated to capital develop-
mecnt, leaving arn estimnatted
deficit on recurrent account at
the end of' thle year of $6.76
million.
Addressing the Hlouse near
the close of the first day o~f the
1973 budget dbt,1r


o~n thiis particular oc~casio~n one ~
of the miost significant budge~rts
the country should present .I
this timel.



Paper, and should ~utlilne the

11<. ~ lI Hacs s Id \h 1 I
goermntcmet pwr n


1467 it did so on the promise
"to provide the basic
necessities, into those areas
which in early 1967 I described
as being in impenetrable
darkness.
"After a course of five years
we should try to see whether
we have fulfilled those pledges
and see whether we should
emnbark upon a new course for
finatncing as we move towards
the era of independence."
tie said capital development
was financed only by special
funds. When those funds are
insufficient in any one year to
meet the cost of committed
projects, the money must be
found elsewhere. As an
example, he said when there
was a need to upgrade
standards in the out islands,
Covernmelnt had to obtain
legislative approval for the $15
m il l i on Out I sl and
D~evelopmecnt Loan Act.
"In spite of the failure in
raise $10 million of the $15
million abroad. the resources
of the country were still used
to fulfill those promnises."
Those "resources"' were
mioneys originally allocated to
the recurrent expenditures.
"Caupital Development now
owes so much to recurrent
accounts. That is why ther I
no derllt on recurrent

u~ctnhe ree srr nt ac us, Wi
show what a pears to be that
deficitt "
.te aite as an exampleo a
simurrii procedure a situation
where one branch in a chain of
stores needed extra financing
which obtained from
another store in the same

I ihn{ sluw ve ~isl as ab reslb
of the Ion buti fac i
assets in lau ed then eva ( a
r gt~iii l ourehe loan by the

110 addedd however, that "by
some means or other that $6
miillion gp~l must be filled."
IIhe mea~nsi wlli be spelled out
by\ Ihle 1)e~v(o chairman
f1~ le ointedl out that as part
Iii the~ "'rm~nstructic ion"
(;menanentC11 has5 this year made 11
.I hlnlll honI inl the budget 1
riai ll uswn t d capital

.Indl the~ <1pendlll ture sides.


THE BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION has been accused of aefuoing to pay
negotiated wage increases until August even though, the workers claim, Prime Minister Lynden
Pindlin last Wednesday withdrew his February 15 call for a six-month wage/price freeze.
BEC shop stewards, international monetary crisis According to the snop
members of the Bahamlas was endling much sooner than stewards, mia nage mecn t
Engineening,kFuel,US rvice an he dal exdpncted.'i ol ei immediattelwith tas sdtr oa

The Tribune Saturday they order for employers and Labour. charging the union
have been negotiating a new workers to resume the with breaking off the
salary structure with discussions they might have negotiations.
management since December. been having with respect to The shop stewards, however'
Last Thursday mianagemecnt wages. having due regard to the said that as they cannot meet
said the new wages would not overall economic situation." with the Board "we have no
be effective until A~ugust. FI:B. 15 HOLD)S alternative" but to continue
because of the Prime Minister's The three shop stewards meeting with the management
statement in February, the who brought their story to The negotiators.
umionists said. tribune, representing some They made it clear, however'
Following the devaluation of other shop stewards, said the that they would not sign a
the U.S. dollar and the' day after the Primez Minister s contract. even if all
re sult ing intcr national speech to the Chamber negotiations are cotmpleted,
monetary crisis, Primei Miiniste~r mlanagementt in a negotiation unless all its terms, including
Pindling addressed the nartio~n session, expr~ssed the intention wage increases, take effect
over Radio Bahamas. to, continued following Mr. immediately.
"i feel that we must P'indling's Feb. 15 statement. Management, they said,
endeavour," he said. "to holdl When the union negotiators wanted them to sign the
the line as near as we can on tollowed "'routine g~ri'evance contract as soon as its terms
wages and salaries for say, six procedures"" and asked to see are agreed, but wanted to
months, until we see how the the Boa~rd of Directors, withhold the wage increases
international situation settles ma1nagementnt refuse to arrange until August.
down." the meetings, they said. The previous union-mnanage-
In a speech to the Bahamlas As a rlesult,. the unionists ment work contract expired on
Chamber of Commnercer on dec~clared they would not December 31.
Wednesday, March 2-1. the negotiate until the Board had B.E.C. management saidi
Prime Minister said the clarifiedl the mastter. today it will issue a statemnirt
at a later date.


.. .1


63~L;~r;~:


L


~he


GIribunto


BUDGET DEBATE CONTINUES FOR SECOND DAY


'Certain Ministers'in someone's back


3010mo 50RCIIS110ge 8 g 0Vt.



over~~~~ 'eprt $m


FreOr Voa 0 f 8 8 8 5





I


I I


2 Wil ~t W


NO SPECIFIC PLAN, BUT --


ITT chief admits


*I have al opening folra

RESElglRQWIS/TICK(ET AGENT

Thorough knowledge of Lufthansa Reertvations and
Ticketing Procedures rqu~isd. Also must be fluent in
German and Englih larguages.

if q fleid please send your resume to:

P. O. Box N-f754
Nassu, Bahamas



USED USED










S tL











DOWDESWELL StREET (Formerly BESCO Building)
Teleophone 28012 OUTf ISLAN~D ORDERS TO
P.O. BOX( 6104 E.S., Nassau, Bahamas.


d)r~L I1C ~-~8.~5


L -- "-- --


FARMERS KEEP WARY EYE ON BOYCOTr
anA HING OdNb yo) atedsdus w ndo>nu i me ares on Mon ,
mensus, supermarkets advertised fish specials and farmers kept a wary
watch on the situation,
The week-long boycott officially started on Sunday. B~y Monday, an
Aasociatd Press survey showed that many shoppers were bypassing the
meat counters in supermarkets and turning to items like fish, vegetables
and cheese. Newly imposed price ceilings on beef, lamb and pork appeared
tohave little effect on consumers' determination to boycott high-cost

HOWLING WINDS WREAK HOVOC OFF ENGLISH COAST
LONDON (AP) Winds howling to hurricane strength swept England's
east coast Monday night bantd whipped p imnse waves in therNorth edeun
distress.
The sudden winds brought havoc to four English countries, tearing down
pwe li er andsmashinN pro ertyag fw oenu nid wh in a traes cra he
in the resort of G;reat Yarmouth were hurled on to a beach and wrecked.
The U.S. Air torce was involved in one rescue operation In massive seas
off the English east coast. It sent a 'Jolly G~reen Glant' helicopter to the aid
of 16 crewmen aboard a British freighter drifting helplessly under force to
In the end three Royal Air Force helicopters lifted off the 16 crewmen
of the 1,900-ton Amberley, listing heavily and taking in water.
Four other vessels were reported In difficulties, including the pirate
aio ehpverorncid wich is saffed by disc jockeys sendingapop music to

CLAIMS & COUNTERCLAIMS IN U.K. DOCK STRIKE
LONDON (AP) London's docks were shut down Monday as

sawpl enfsc eredm tha 70 0 s evde esp Itedroa ru of dcs In
Tilbury had walked out. Stevedores claimed the employers locked them
out.
The dispute centred on a weekly increase of 2.60 pounds*
HEAVIEST BOMBING IN CAMBODIAN WAR
SAIGON (AP)--Sources in Salgon say U.S. bombers launched
unprecedented attacks against Communist-led forces in Cambodla during
the night. The sources say the attacks were the heaviest pounding of
opboston frces ie nCaml dtao say jus how many strikes were flown by
U.S. pilots, but they indicated about 120 & 52 bombers were used in the
attack, and that could mean a total of three thousand, 600 tons of bombs
dropped.
Nixo no lnges nas csti tunl lath rity nouse Aedica rasid er
Cambodla; but D~efense Secretary Richardson has contended that they are
wrong.
AGREE TO ESTABLISH EUROPEAN MONETARY FUND
LUXEMBOURG (AP) The nine foreign ministers of the Common
Market agreed late Monday to slig Tuesday the document providing for
thThsea dclis on weei shol h e sa was po tponed until June 310n
satisfying the Luxembourg government's claims to have the fund
headquartered in Luxembourg. They decided to establish its administrtion
temporarily in Luxembourg City from April 6*
EEC & NON-ASSOCIATE AFRICAN STATES
ADDIS ADABA (AP') Eleven European parliamentarians from seven
countries discussed Monday with Emperor Haile Selassi and several of his
ministers, the prospects of non-associate African countries of the European
4 mo~noi Cornunt d- EEC. Ethlopia's Interest in associate status with
Earlier in the day the visitors talked on the same subject with Premier
Akrlilou Habtewoed, Foreign Minister Dr. Menasse Ha~e and Commerce
and Industry Minister Ketema Yifru.
The group arrived here Sunday from Kinshase after attending last week's
meeting of African and European parliamentarians which made
arrangement for negotiations next August for renewal of the Yaounde
convention, presently linking 18 Afro-Mallagay countries and Mauritius
with the Common Market.
FOREIGN ACTIVITIES OF U.S. BANKS UNDER REVIEW.
BOCA RATON, FLORIDA (AP)--Risky loans made abroad by U.S.
banks are causing deep concern, nmerscan oankers sid at a meeting here
Monday*
Bankers attending the annual convention of the U.S. Bankers
Association for Foreign Trade said they welcomed closer inspection of
international banking operations by U.S. authorities. One said the banks
have extended large amounts of credit which wil1 not be repaid at
maturity. James R. Greene, vice president of Mniufacturers Hanover
Trust, sal4 growing competition for Eurodotlla business had encouraged
lower credit standards for borrowers.
Andrew F. Brimmer, a governor of the U.S. Federl Reserve System,
said American commercial banks were significant participants in the
foreign exchange dealings that culminated with the dollar devaluation of
Feb. 12
Brimmer said the banks participated in dollar outflows from the U.S. of
I.2 billion dollars between Jan. 3 and Feb. 14. He added that they
contributed on balance some 2.5 billon dollars to the outflow during the
exchange rate speculation earlier this year*
U.S. agencies and branches of foreign banks also, participated in the
outflow, he said. They are not subject to the same restraints as
American-baeud banks. He said the Federal PReerve Board is reviewing Its
regulations on the foreign activities of U.S. banks.
CLEAN-UP OF OIL SPILL MAY COST $2.5 MILLION
SAN JUAN. P.R. Apr. 2 (AP) The U.S. Coast Guard said today that
$1 million had been authorized to clean-up an oil spill dropped into clear
Caribbean waters by a Greek tanker 16 days ago.
A spokesman said the money was authorized by the commander of the
Seventh Coast Courd Disetrct in Miami. Funds come from a special
pollution hand*
Part of the money would go to the Under Technics, Inc., a New Jerey
oilspill removal company, contacted by the Coast ~uard to take thick oil
Ifom mangrove trees on Point Cabo Rojo, off Puerto Rico's most
soAh6 foo tt reek tanker, 'Zoe Coloctroni,' rammed an underwater reef
ealty on March 18 east of that point, and then discharged an estimated two
million gallons of oil into the Caribbean Sa.
Capt. Anastaso Michalopoulous, the captain, testified earier that the
action was taken to save the vessel from a break up.
An estimated 600,000 gallons had been gathered to date, according to
the Coast Guard. It would take an additional two weeks to rid the beaches
of oil.
Before the SI million authorization, the government expense on the
ecla-up had reached $1.5 m~ilon. The additional money would push the
figur $2.5 million. The spokesman declined. however, to comment on the
total bill to be accumulated by the Coast Guard, Puerto Rico, and federal
government agencies.
He added, however, that the final tally would be turned over to the
owners of the ship, the Marbonanza Company, of Greece.
* *ggg IIY~A-AN.FIN NCE TERRORIST MOVEMENT SMASHED
RABAT, MOROCCO (AP) The Moroccan government said Monday it
has broken up a Libyan-financed terrorist movement which tried to kIl the
amlr kComrul eneral in Casslc cad made other unuccessful bomb
An Information Ministry communique seld scores of Moroccans,
Includingl students, lawyers, educators and "some government offcilsl"
sle .uder areret, cuseged wsth plottmg the violent overthrow of the
government of King HasanII.
The communique said the movement was inspired, finaned and directed
by the Libyan regime of Col. Moammar Khadary. Its leadership was closely
Ilhakd with the radical wing of the Leftist National Union of popular

dee Lunc by u3e AbR ? : ,L :: .: Mntr ofc fial b

T bomb attacks were coordinated in many part of the country during

,t eplouka Msl hods annmud ar Mmore dwbol o ed plcre
manning an isolated poslt at Moulay Bustzz In the Atlas mountains*
Among the bombs which did not explode uwa one under the car of


CUfford Rt Nelson, US Consul Gteneral in Casablanca, the communique san
Other bombs weres planted in Americal House in Caseblance and outside the


LONDON, APRIL 3 (AP)-Mexican Preident Luis Echevrmra adtved in
brtiist sunshlae at London's Heathrow Airport for the start of a four day
tttt ~lrtrtesdt tob his island kingdom by a chief of state from the

The President and hl1 wife flow in from Manchester where they had



Qegelgo's~t 1 esart o househol cavalroyr wasy Iid on to cor the
tw~f o dee of d ster gtothe cate. Dtachmelnts o haedownou rr ~gurd from te

:arakY, the Royah Navy and the Royal Air Force lined the? rute the
procsgaln took
STATI' 0d 17 MDOM OF PRESS DISTURBING IN .W.I.
MBONTEGOK BAY, JAMAICA, (AP) "Ther state of freedomt of the pre~ss
In cosanrh teariories In the Carthbon area continues to be unsatisfactory
sad qisie disturblar." G. A. Shemrma of the Jamaica Daily G;leaner told
ther latermamercn Pres association meetila today.
Season, who s vice guesident for the Caribbean are, mentioned
eanlbg 00tee that "la TIalded rad Barbados there is a tendency to regaurd
foreign mned newspaper a un~desrble for these countries". He added

ner inu h ma HPhpO thb ims sl d ar dthat bcr the owmllcd
are forced owned they cannot do a proper job of reporting atnd
commrnS es fearlesl on developments on the country.,,


BUENOS AIRES, April 2
Allend(AP) Left-wing guerrillas
All end kidnapped today a U.S.
executive of Eastman Kodak
Co. and a retired navy rear
lephone and Telegraph admiral. The executive we
lay acknowledged the believed the first U.S. aitizen
nment to try to block evehe Pin ppee' Revoirupinn
s Pesaentof hil in Army (ERP), a Marxist group,
claimed credit for seizing Rear
Cause economic chaos Adm. Francisco Agustin
in an attempt to block Aleman, 50, who had retired
ion of Dr. Allende, nor last December. ERP slogans
vocate that any others painted on the walls of
h steps." Aleman's apartment called for
LY OUR RIG;HT' "Popular justice for Trelew" -
n added that "all that a reference to 16 guerrilla
was to present its prisoners killed last August at
concerns, and ideas to the Navy prison in Trelew City.
departments of the 227.
ernment". The authorities said the 16
id: "This is not only were killed trying to escape but
but also its obligation, the ERP and other guerrilla
It is a very important groups say they were taken
:ional right, and I from their cells and executed.
hope that this The U.S. executive, Antony
ee would agree that it R. Dacruz, 43, technical
ong for a citizen to try manager for Kodak Argentina
proach government S.A.I.C., might have been
to discuss with them injured when seized while
ems and concerns, and driving alone to work.
e possible solutions Witnesses told police a pickup
~t with government truck smashed violently into
Dacruz's car near the entrance
,ly to questioning by to Kodak's suburban Buenos
W. F~ulbright, (D-Ark.) Aires plant. They said six or
said "the meeting was eight young men, some
nly to get information. shooting they were terrorists,
li Mr. McCone had in piled out of the pick-up truck,
'hat's all I had in pulled Dacruz from his
damaged vehicle and drove off
ponse to Sen. Frank with him in anothercar.

ahneele adon fndn wtel Hours Iater KoDak officials
Nixon, vice president said they had not heard from
T. Agnew, John Dacruz's kidnappers. The
n or Charles Colson. executive was born in Portugal
n is assistant to the and became a U.S. citizen as an
for domestic affairs. adult. His wife, Helen, is a
was then a special Greek citizen. They have one
son, at school now in Britain.
The double kidnapping
list 'rerryr created a problem for Dr.
Hector J. Campora, the
e ation int, Peronist who won Argentina's
presidential election March 11*
R @itic' Despite the objections of the
n w . outgoing military government,
Dr. Campora has promised an
NrTnk Church Rays th3 amensty for political prisoners
llar "dual-purpose" offer after his May 25 inauguration.
national Telephone & The kidnapping today are
Corp. to support U.S. likely to strengthen the
nt action in Chile
s improper intervention military's resolve to resist an
politics." amnesty. Many of the political
made the comment prisoners are accused of
after the Senate foreigh kidnapping and other terrorist
sub-committee he heads
pa seven-day hearing on acts.
that ITT attempted in The ERP is anti-peronist,
block the election of but four other guerrilla groups
Allende as President of oeratin in Argentina lairm
irman Harold S. Geneen, alliegance to Juan D. Peron,
witness, denied that I~T, the former Argentine
ok any steps to block strongman,
ut confirmed a SI-million Police said 11 guerrillas
suppot any U.S.seized Admiral Aleman at his
~t action. The offer, he
"dual purpose." downtown apartment, gaining
was a possibility that a entrance during the night.
Eu hiv leenfrmd Aem a' boe Mra, d hs
presentation "~that would i-year-l son were bun ,
fine," Geneen testified. gagged and locked in a
,roved unfeasible, he said. b bathroom. Mrs. Aleman
It the government might managed to remove the gag
a plan, including "some fo h lt h o
onstructive joint private fur hours laer, te p lce


for presidential aides in the
Wateapte affair.
Ervin repeated his vow he
will seek the arrests of White
House aides if they do not
honour subpoenas to testify
under oath mn formal private
and public sessions.
He also told a news
conference that he believes
White House counsel John W.
Dean III was involved in a
"conflict of interest" because
he apparently represented ky
presidential advisers whl
trying to learn if they were
involved in sabotage and
espionage attempts made on
Democrats.
Erymn, the chairman of the
special Senate Watergate
investigating committee, said
he had accepted an offer by
Atty. Gen. Richard G.
Kleindienst to give committee
members access to the FBI
Watergate investigation.
He said this access includes
raw FBI files which he said
would be safeguarded from
public exposure and would not
themselves be placed in
evidence.
Ervin called Nixon's claim of
executive privilege "spurious."
He said it d esrenot apply i



THIES SEEKING

11| AIB FOR
W***# VIT



SAN CLEM ENTE, CALI F.
(AP)-President Nixon and South
Vietnamese President Nguyen van
Thieu pledged a joint effort
Monday to build a lasting
Indochina peace, then began
dtlewussn pU. omis for
After the leaders completed an
initial so-minute meeting at the
Western White House, officials
ladicated that Thieu had collected
Nixon's pledge of an infusion of
U.S. aid for postwar reconstruction.
But Indications were that Nixon
was frowning upon a Thlon request
for a specific U.S. guarantee of
renewed military intervention if
North Vietnam blatently violates
the still-fragile cease-fire agreement.
As he gave Thleu a full military
welcome, Nixon voiced hopes their
two days of summit talks would
produce "great steps forward in
building the lasting peace, the real
peace that we have fought together
for ..."
Thieu responded by expressing
"heartfelt gratitude" for past U.S.
assistance and said he hoped the
t~nmoml tion o peace in Iochina
and a new era of constructive
cooperation in peace among all
parties concerned.,,
After the two leaders' opening
meeting, White House press
secretary Ronald L. Ziegler said
they had reviewed the situation in
Indochina and had "stressed the
importance of Implementing" the
ce epfheapeement signed two
months~~~ a I us
The two Presidents, Ziegler said,
"reaffired the continuing strong
friedly ties" between their
countries and discussed the
development of their postwar
relations.
The spokesman said the talks
were held in "an atmosphere of
friendship and cordiality." Sources
reported the summit was bringing
hard bargaining on economic issues.
Zbller acknowledged there was
"substantial discussion regarding'
I vloment asi tne ... which
the United States could continue to
provide to South Vietnam as we
move into the postwar period...
He said the leaders wem
discussing "in depth' and in detail"
such other questions as efforts to
account for U.S. troopsstalmissinS
in action, reported Infiltration by
North Vietnam and the presence of
North Vietnamese troops in Laos

s'"e amb d whtbrthebUnite
North Vietnam blatantly violated
the ceasefire, Ziegler declined to
answer, saying, ''it won'ti serve are
the United States' response to
hypothetical developments."
This statement appeared to
reflect Nixon's reported view that

an mto nta i epons fomT i 's
intervention. Rather, Nixon is said
to be ready to repeat his
not-soqr xnpctsmrnin gop Haco
Mith the cease-fire agreement.


Senate's invesdpgtion of the

allegations of illg al r
unethical conduct. Calling
Nixods extension of the
doctrine e"Ee x e tiv
poppycocZ k, il said '
think he's shooting the
so-called executive privilege
doctrine way out past the
stratosphere.
Ervin said if he were
President, "I would fire in not
less tha utd o mutg nad

and testify.
CONTEMFI

Liddy forr lega coune d
the Committee for
Re-election of the President,
was expected in federal district
court Monday afternoon to
answer a contempt citation.
Liddy refused to talk to a
federal grand jurh inve thgang
W tergate even though h a
been given immunity from
prosecution for anything he
migh say.fudt nt
E~n as used o comm n
on reports that convicted
Watergate burglar James W.
McCord told the Snate
committee last week he could
corroborate his testimony that

Mitchell and other key Nixon
advisers had prior knowledge
of the break-in and wire
tapping attempt at Democratic
n..son., com minte
headquarters.
In seeking testimony from
Wht onus a es E'ei sa
invitations." These will b
followed by subpoenas and
then a request for arrest
warrants if they are ignored,
Ervin said.
He said there are
"mul iudes" of casesuhph l
by t courts in whc h
Senate has issued such warrants
and tried persons for
contempt
UNLIKELY ...
Asked if federal courts
would not free those arrested
on writs of habeus corpus,
Ervin sai i was an iey
because the Senate clearly has
jurisdiction.
"If the courts found the
S nto had jurisdiction," he
said, "tha wouldbh end o
the pea picki~ilg.
White House press secretary
Ron Ziegler suggested last
wee a the Pre dent might be
wiling toallo som of t s

Watergate committee privately
ad informally.
Ervin said this was
unacceptable and that all
witnesses should be heard
under oath and be subject to
closs-examination. "The only
w yotu can lib a peron rv
their conduct' on the witness
stand," said the form~erNorth
Carolina state jkidge.
'The divine right of rulers
prished in Amrc with the
revolution," he said, "and it
doesn't belong to White Hous
aides "


1970.
Testifying before a special
Senate foreign relations
subcommittee, G;encen said the
offer to the White Hlouse and
the State Department had a
dual purpose -to defeat
Allende by uniting his political
opponents or to induce
Allende to permit American
firms to recover their
investments in nationalized
properties
G~eneen said the government
did not take him up on the
offer, which was made while
Allende's election hung in the
balance in the C'hilean
Congress
"Of course," the chief
executive of the International
Telephone and Telegraph C'orp
said, "our thinking was ve y
preliminary and we had no
specific plans.
But, he went on, "we did
think that some socially
constructive joint private
industry and government
projects could be part of the
overall plan." .
This, he said, might include
building houses for the Chilean

peG en also acknowledged
discussing with a CIA official
the possibility of supporting
the spy agency controlled plan
to block Allende's election.
But Geneen told a special
senate foreign relations
subcommittee that while he
"accepts" this description of
the conversation sworn to by
William V. Broe, the CIA
official, the idea "died right
there" in the conversation they
held in a Washington hotel
room for less than an hour.
The dark-haired corporation
official said that if he had
thought about the proposal
seriously "I might have
rejected it myself."
Geneen said e was not
aware that Broe was head of
clandestine operations for the
Central Intelligence Agency in
Latin America when they met
in 1970 at the suggestion of
John A. McCone, a former CIA
director and an ITT board
member
Broe testified last week that
Geneen offered to make a
substantial contribution to a
CIA-controlled election fund
fr Jorge Aessandri, h
presidential candidate of the
con ervativ Nati nlisa Part .

rejected the o fr.
A year after the Marxist
took office the government
appropriated ITT's 70 per cent
interest in the Chile Telephone
Co., which ITT said was worth
about $152Z-million.
G~eneen said "the bulk" of
the purpose of his discussion
with Broe "was to find out
what was happening in Chile "
"2. ITIT's concern was based
on the possibility, which later
became a fact, that its 70 per
cent owned telephone
subsidiary would be seized
and expropriated without
compensation.
"3. ITT did not encourage
or participate in any way in
any alleged plot for military
coup in Chile to block the
election of Dr. Allende.
"4. Nor did it contribute
money to any person or to any
agency of any government to
block the election of D r.
Allende.
"5. ITT did not take any


nd government projects,"
Allende, a Marxist, to pay
:propriated American
Million, he said, was
"to show serious intent
attention" from U.S.
nt officials. But nothing
, he said.
, (D-Idaho) told newsmen
res Geneen's testimony
"dual purpose."
either of these purposes,
as it was, represents
Intervention in Chilean
Church said.
chairman said the
ttee will make a report
TT-Chile case, involving
tchontacs trndinae gon
before proceeding to
,hase of its Inquiry into
uence unt nudanadoaml

said he Intends, as ;
the ITT hearing, to
legislation to make It
for any corporation or
to offer money to the


action to
in Chile
the elect
did it ad
take suc
'ON
G;enee
II1T did
views, c
various
U.S. gove
He saj
its right,
The righ
constitute
would
committee
is not Wr
to ap
officials
his probl
to rais
consistent
policy "
In rep
Sen. J. ~
G~eneen i
set up or
That s al
mind. T
mind."
In res

dihscu bd
President
Spiro
Erlichma
Erlichma
president
Colson
counsel .









(AW HSn1.
million-do
by Inter
Telegraph
government
"represent
in Chilean
Church
Monday r
relations
wound uI
allegations
1970 to
Salvador
Chile.
ITT cha
the final (
Itself, toc
Allende, b
offer to
government
said, had a
If there
coaH ipin t

better rep
have been
If that p
he though
work out
socially c
industry a
to induce
for ex
pro~phetie
basically
and set
sovernmer
came of it
Church,
he believe
about the
"But ei
offered
improper
politics,"
The
subcommi
on the I
ndmtted

Agency,
another p
they inn
Church
result of
Introduce
unlawful
Individual
CIA


said.
The guerrillas apparently got
into the apartment by claiming
they were police, although
some officials told newsmen
they gained entry because one
Or more of the guerrillas wef8
known to the Aleman family.
Dacruz, assigned to
Argentina three years ago, was
in charge of construction of
Kod k's near Argentmne
factory, opened last year.
Kodak grosses more than 10
million dollars annually here
through the manufacture and
sale of cameras and film, and
the processing of colour film.

SHERRY TO CELEBRATE
IIOth BIRTHDAY
BRIGHTON, ENGLAND (AP)
- Georgina Colyer celebrated her
I10th birthday with a glass of
sherry today and advrsed peFople to
"keep cheerful and happy."


Belgian ammunition and even 245
Biihmad Wh I tir volvebrs. For
by their origin.
One of the Claudia's West
German owners. G~uenther
Leinhauser, was quoted as saying
te shi shol har tee uhs)py n

dumped overboard. British officials
are skeptical, but Irish navy divers
eae been scotrn C ud se rcdesn
around midnight lais Weednesdlaa g

tn aN thern Irelano mnt rlt


To he Nor hCEn Irela~nd cisI, rhed
Commonsh withomt poppositin*
thedy hav b een able to susrne fr t
pst~m sof yeas. stiteegnyp
But bchause thrsee Britishwih to
oeliiaeitiiainofwtess
b e extremist roups they want to
f that permt trial without jur ubse o
up illns ritshou re 1 me t o
sousp etsine certain crumstances


musetprvemitgop their inncece t


One big change is provided for:
ith mpdSdci P surnAct of 1
new .emergency. proylsions bull is
intended only for crisis situations
and will need to be renewed by
P~rliment yearly.

wkth adene ivlvin vle c
cases to avoid intimidation of
jurymen.
int mdaienessessub it vdience f
wdt aple found with weapons in
to pr he hd nokoldge o
Unde new hil ofic wle


eoup tofourohours. Both will have
questioning and to search homes
even without specific suspicion
in situations where crimes of
violence have occurred.
The bill also makes membership
of certain proscribed organizations
an offense organniatiosis such as
the IRA and its potstical wing Sinn
Fein, the Protestant Ulster
Volunteer Force, the Republicin
Youth Movement, which is Roman
ahs goup be l d e bore nro '
openly contesting doming local ad
provincial elections.


By Arthur L. Gayshon

of mNW arssimnt sclr dan t y
Irish coast last week deepened
Monday, with Britain probing
whether Egyptian, as well as Libyan
authorities, could have been

knp te eurci tgo arnmn ts b
carrying five tons of weapons
bound for the outlawed irish
lephia tdmy mhprobablyn fr use
aftovernm nt cmensnher repo te

-th harre cs t sfed thenClau it
atoo on e cat oH I h o i na h

Presidet MOammar Khad ~y

A sizahI prt of the ams
shipment w as made up arof
So viet -ty pe Kalash ni k ov
semiautomatic ~asault rifles which
can fire up to 600 rounds a minute
accurately over 1,600 yards. Libya
buys no arms from Communist
countries, and so inltelligcnce
experts are trying to dlisover if
they could have been filtered
through to L~ibyii from
nei ghoringen Etake contained a
mixed hag of Amerienn explos~ives,


rttttPTuesdlay, April 3, 1973.


2 KSHPPIGSWATERGATE CHIEF WARNS 'gullEl MIllAY'


I1 S 1 A .lI



LONBO F(AdPm-he British
government spent roughly $2
million in recent weeks on ads
explaining its new Value
Added Tax, (VAT), but even
the experts were confused
when VAT took effect
Moenday kind of sale a
Thaned n ces on most good
over the weekend, with many
hundreds of categories marked
up and hundreds more
reduced. Shops opened
Monday to thousands of
complaints.
"Muddle Monday," the
London Evening News called it
in big black headlines.
For weeks, the government
had advertised, showing which
goods were to become cheaper
under VAT, and which should
go up. Learning them was
about as easy as memorizing
the telephone book.
Regina Dollar, national
organizer of the Consumer
Protection Council, called for a
team of watchdogs to be set up
to make sure shops don't take
advantage of the confusion by
unduly raising prices.
Despite all the publicity, she
said, buyers and sellers alike
are still mixed up about the
changes.
"Coffee percolators are
they going up or down?" she
usked. "I simply can't find
out.")
SWAMPED
Local government offices all
over the country were

cutmr tho I petd mhe
had been victimized by price
changes under VAT.
Many of these offices
claimed they were investigating
each and every complaint. But
officials at the Nottingham
office admitted there had been
so many complaints about
unjustified price increases that
they simply had to leave the
phones of the hook.
In the world of VAT, it is
not only what you buy that
counts, but what you do with
it.
*Potato chips cost more if
you munch them in a pub than
if you take them out. The same
cup of coffee bought in a
railroad station costs less if
yoiff drink it on~~the platform
than if ao take it on the train.
This is because take-out meals,
travel, and a host of other
factors enter into VAT pricing.
Candy bas for exam 1e
were supposed to come down.
Government ads particularly~
stressed this sweet side of the
chan as Sho prs found,
however, that candy cost
roughly the same under VAT.
The reason manufacturers
decided to inrease the size of
bars rather tmMn drop prices.
Stores reported record
spring sales last week, because
of pre-VAT hoardin Shoppers
even bought things like records
and washing machines which'
come down in price under
VAT.

whe it joe dtohad tropeAn
Common Market. The tax is
charged on the value added at
each stage of production.
Although more complicated'
than the ordinary sales tax,
charged only to the final
customer, VAT makes cheating
tougher.


Nixon aides must


IN ARGENTIMA


gbl IilliOR Offer to BY TERROMISTS testify or face


Se 88te 8 RD Oen8 8

by Lawrnce L. Knutson
WASHINGTON (AP)--Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr., (D.N.C.)
Monday rejected White House effot to obtain special reatment


tJ 7 to bloc k

By Barry Schweid
WASHINGTON (AP) International Tel
board chairman Harold S. Geneen Mond
finn offered SI million to the U.S. govern
the election of Marxist Salvador Allende a!


MY STER Y DEEPER S INl AllS SHIPHEWT TO IRE LAND
















































I~n~YRmEIDII __


the Heart Foundation; The
Governor; Dr. Norma
Theobold of Princess
Margaret Hosp fel;Dor Jame
Cardiovascular Surgery from
Miami; Lady Paul; and Dr.
Maude Ste ven so n,
Pediatrician at Princess
Margaret Hospital.


1


She Gribunt
Nvuu~s ADDmerus JUlRAME IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Ma~ster
LEO(N E. H. DUIPUC'H, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E~., K.C.S.G., D).Litt.. LL.1).
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILE-EN DUPUCH CARRON.M.Sc.. B.A., LL.B..
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shlirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesar~y, April 3, 1973.


EDITORIAL


What is memor ?



By ETIENNE DUPUCH
MANY people comment on what they describe as my
"phenomenal memory". Some of them try to figure out how I
cnl temcmeh en details of things I read, saw or did from my
The other day a friend told me he had found the answer. He
felt I remen1 tredd ehg ebe aui el b we teom dow mn mthas

eye
I didn't dispute this suggestion at the time because I wanted to
think about it. Now I know this is not so because I have never
written down most of the things I write about.
The things I remember just seem to suddenly pop to the
surface of consciousness. Sometimes I wake up during the night
and find that I have remembered a long ago incident, sometimes
walking on the street, on my knees in church and often, while
writing an article, I suddenly remember something that fits right
into the theme and I weave it into the pattern without having to
hesitate to organize my thoughts.
Some people think this is a phenomenal achievement but it is
not really.
This raises the question:What is memory?
The answer is that memory is the child of necessity.
We remember those things that are necessary to our job .. to
our existence . .sometimes to our very survival in times of crisis.
I am constantly disturbed by the things I forget. It can be
embarrassing sometimes. Especially people's names.
1 never remember names, even if I write them down. IfI were
introduced to a stranger every hour on the hour, every time I
would have to ask him his name.
Nor do 1 remember dates. If I wrote a date a dozen times a day
on each occasion I would have to consult the calendar.
Why is this?
The reason is that names and dates are not important to me.
This wasn't always so in the case of names. As a child I met
very few new people. Because I have always been involved with
people every new contact was important to me and so I
rememberied face and nameple. Some years ago I was driving
through the southern U.S. with an American friend. We stopped
at a restaurant in a small town for lunch.
"Thait is Mr. E. E. Duvalier at that table across the room," I
said to my travelling companion. "He used to be a neighbour of
ours when I was a child in Nassau. I haven't seen him for over 30
years," I said. "Have you ever met him?"
"Oh yes, I know Mr. Duvalier," my friend said, looking across
the room to the table I indicated with a twist of my head, "I saw
him not very long ago. But that's not Duvalier."
"Yes, it is," I insisted, looking directly at the man.
He waved a signal of recognition to me. He also recognized me
although I was only a child when he left Nassau.

Na s mem eredloMhn shaler se rad bee leadinidtailor id
tailoring was an important industry employing a large number of
people. He lived just around the corner from us. His wife and my

m rbue lfief ane was nky oder barsot e'soclots t drin The
And so Mr. Duvalier had been important to me. My American
travelling companion, who had seen him only a short time earlier'
had forgotten him becuase he had no reason to remember.
We remember only the things we need. This is a good thing
because it is estimated that every man has stored away in his
memory box billions of small and big things that have happened
to him or have come under his observation in the passage of time.
If a person tried to remember everything I should imagine that his
memory box would become so crowded that he would find it
difficult to sort it all out.
The remarkable thing about memory is that it is not an
exercise in conscious effort. Seldom do you have to try to
remember something. In 99 percent of the cases memory is an
unconscious experience. It just pops up to the conscious level
without being summoned.
You probably wonder why . .if as a child I remembered
names .. I now fail to remember names,
It's my own fault.
When I started to travel I found myself meeting thousands of


people. It was unlikely that I would meet most of these people
again and so I started deliberately eliminating names from my
memory. I found the best way to do this was by not listening to
the name of a person when I was being introduced,
When I meet new people today we shake hands, we laugh, we
talk and we part without the name registering,
What does register is what the person says or does .
everything I read, see or hear is important to my work and so I
remember. Very often I remember everything that was said or
done .. and where it was said and done . .at a particular timc.
I can recall the faces of all the people who were a part of' thle
scene . .but I can't remember their names.
I can produced a doi! c~olumnn for Thle Tribun~e because I wo~k
at it 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Even while I sleep mly
sub-conlsc~ious mind is looking for thoughts I canl use. Somletimles
in conversation I find my mind divided. I canl be talking with a
person with half mny mlind while the other hall' is working on
something else.
I learned to do this in the early days of Ther Tribunerl when I
couldn't afford to employ staff and I had to do every kind of job
on the paper. I had a telephone booth with a writing board Iinsideu
it. While I would be talking with someone on the phone I would
also be writing an article on an entirely different subject. I could
also break away from writing an article ... return to it hlours late,



different things at the same timne. The writer of' thle ;rliclle


Z1 ~III~


SI.ANDREW'S LOWER S~HOOL


IM IAM HADV

A DROP In the cost of
clothing and footwear was a
major contributor to the .66
per cent decrease evidenced in
the official Retail Price Index
in January.
The Index for New
Providence fell 0 7 of a point
5rml ilnOS u December to

bythn nand texotwearcefell
Food declined by 2.0 points.
Although the other items in
the index advanced, the
increases were unable to offset
the large decreases recorded on
clothing, footwear and food.
thTheedother it ms n otubs idO
per cent; transport 1 0 per
cent, health and personal care
1.04 per cent, recreation and
reading 1.0 per cent and other
goods and services 0.1I per cent.
The All Items Index stood at
105.1 or 5.1 per cent over the
base period of November-
Decembe index fell by 2 0
points or 1.9 per cent to 104 7

Se~cebr Tim pont cnet o
overall declinerof 0 7 ofaa point
A decline was shown in the
cost of cookies, pork, milk and
fruit juices.
The housing index advanced
0.3 of a point to 104 7 in
January from 104.4 in
Decem er. Thpe iniatorsprte

increases were detergents 0.23
of a point, paper and paper
products 0.17 of a point, and
refrigerators 0.05 of a point.
On the other hand, sewing
machines recorded the highest
decrease of 0.56 of a point'
while tiwashingh omsacie

appliances, and towels
declined by 0.04, 0.05 and
0.08 of a point respectively.
The clothing and footwear
index fell 2.9 points or 2.6 per
cent to 108.5 in January from
111.4 in December. The
principal contributors to the
large decrease of 2.9 points
werp boys' clothing 2.2 points,

eils' cl thig O.1 ofa nintand
Women's clothing and boys'
foo e soe iia


Tuesday, April 3, 1973.


thought this was a pheonomlenal ac~hievemecnt.
I can't do flus any more because I haven t been obliged to do it
for so long, but I still can carry o~n a lively conversation with
someone while one half of mny mlind is roamning in distant places.
There is nothing remarkable about this. It is simply a child o;
necessity. I do it because it is necessary to my) job.
a******
There are people who are trained in this exercise.
I worked with the Duke of Windsor while he was Governor of
the Bahamas. I wouldn't say he was a clever man. Quite the
contrary. Because of his sheltered upbringing he was almost
juvenile in the everyday affairs of life. But he was considered
remarkable because he had the reputation of never forgetting a
name or a face.
This was a part of' his job. It was a part of his training. It was
important that he should remember names :d faces because he
was often used as a goodwill ambassador for Britain and people
were pleased and flattered when they found that the great Prince
of Wales had not forgotten them. Incidents of this kind also made
news for the newspaper. This kind of thing built goodwill.
*+****
I saw one of the most impressive exercises in memory in
Australia in 1955.
Let us digress for just a minute before I tell this story.
You probably wonder wYhy, if I say I forget dates, I can
remember that I was in Australia in 1955.
The reason is that I seriously started travelling in 1950. In that
year I went to my first IAPA conference in Montevideo and later
to my first CPU conference in Canada which was really a big and
impressive year. Because the CPU meets in London every year
and goes to some distant place in the Commonwealth every five
years I can remember that the Australian meeting was in 1955,
particularly because thalt was the only occasion when my wife
was unable to go with me.
I have attended many conferences in many places in the world
since then but I have forgotten the dates. I can t even remember
ah ear the CPU cam to N sau fo their conference. This was a
whenever I want it for any reason.
Many times people ask me when I was knighted by the Queen
and they are surprised when I say I don't remember. But I
remember when I was knighted by Pope Pius XI1 because I
received the news while I was supposed to be on a dying bed in
the Catholic hospital in Miamli Beach .. I remember it because
that was the year Queen Elizabeth 11 was crowned and I was
taken gravely ill after coming home from the Coronation in
London and from my Girst private audience with Pope Pius at the
Vatican in Rome.
You only remember things when there is some special reason
for remembering.
**+****
And now for my story about Australia.
One night the delegates to the CPU conference were invited to
a reception at the home of the British High Commissioner in
Canberra.
Counting the delegates and their wives along with the local
dignitaries, there must have been 300 people at the reception.
We were introduced to the High Commissioner as we entered.
He circulated among his guests during the evening but he could
not talk with all of them. I was one of those with whom he did
not talk.
But as we filed out to leave his house he called each of us by
name without making a single mistake.
He could do this .. and thereby create goodwill among his
guests ... because this was a part of his training.
***+***
I started writing this article after reading a news despatch from

cLeo roan pting e 0t birtra squ ctly us 1 ig fr A vt 0o t
West Indies where her name had long been associated with the
University of the West Indies. She was present at the laying of the
corner stone of the University and was its Chancellor until she
retired a few years ago to make place for a West Indian who had
been a Chief Justice. I have forgotten his name. He was a member
of a recent Commission held in Nassau that condemned certain
Practices by the Pindling Government.
During the time her husband, the Earl of Athlone, was
Governor General of Canada they visited Sir Bede Clifford at
Government House.
Interviewed her and she allowed me to take pictures of her
with the Clifford children on the guns at the top of the steps in

Sir y yersltr. t n. t was duig tnhue administration of
I was one of many people in line at a reception given in her
honour at Govemnment House. The reception was held outside in
a dim light. When my name was announced she held out her
handremember you," she said. "You took pictures of me witn
the Clifford children on the guns in front of Government House
when I was here with my husband."
Princess Alice is a remarkable woman in many ways but this
was nothing unusual for any member of the Royal family because
they are trained from infancy the importance of remembering
names and faces.
******
I remember almost every detail of my early life in the Bahamas
because there was practically no contact with the outside world
... very few things of importance or interest happened ... and so
anything unusual was a memorable occasion and so the memory
stuck.
Today wre ale in constant contact with the outside world ..
especially mna newspaper office with the Teletype rolling all day
.. and many things also happening on the home front . .that
nothing seems important any mocre .. and so no effort is made
to rememiber.
***+***
You know .. if you try hard enough you can tune the human


mind in on anything.
I remember the year 1922 because during that summer I went
to New York to study the Linotype machine, both as a machinist
and an operator. This was an important occasion because I
introduced the Linotype to Nassau. I then trained operators ..
all Bahamnians .. on the machine. I emphasize Bahamianls
because the Governmnent now tries to tell me I should train
Balhamnians. We even sent several of them to New York for
training.
I made myself so expert at the operation of this machine that I
could be writing an article in another room and hear it a letter
didn't drop when an operator touched a key. It was just a
thousandth part of a second but the skip in the rhythmic beat of
thle mnatrices dropping into position registered on my mind
although I was in another room with my thoughts focused on
somecthing else.

And so ... don Ir ever give up trying. You can learn anything ...
an1d dou anyth11ing ... in life if you rind the subject interesting and




A THOUGHT FOR TODAY




WILLIAM HICKSON


HIS EXCELLENCE THE
GOVERNOR, Sir John Paul,
and Lady Paul entertained
ch hart cl1 ic d~o or nat
House on Saturday. The heart
clinic for children was held at
the Chest Wing of Princess
Margaret Hospital and was
sponsored by The Sir Victor


Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart
Foundation.
On the terrace at Govern.
ment DrHouisee,Wern to
Nassau; Dr. Francisco
Hernandez Clinical Director
of the National Children's
Cardiac Hospital in Miami;
Lady Sassoon, chairman of


increases that were unable to
offset the lugher reduction in

thedht itemnsprt Index edged
up 1.0 point to 103.3 in
January fromt 102.3 in
December. Bicycles and repairs
and sbmenintetnhaencrele wr
thb section of the index
The health and personal care
section of the index advanced
1.1 points to 107.3 in January
from 106.2 in December.
Beauty salons, medicines and
razor blades registered
increases while dental expenses
and deodorant declined over
last month's prices.
inRtecreeat n 0.an reading
102.6 in lanuary from 101.8 in
December. This was an increase
of 2.6 points since the base
period November-December
19'71. Snorts equipment and
magazines contributed 0.1 and
0.04 or a point to the rise in
this section of the intlex.
rh other goods and services
index stood at 105.71 fr
January, an increase of 0,1o a
point over the Decemnber index
of a0p. nBeer contribu ecd 0 2
while school equipment fell by


orclCd () n h kin Alowinia
11o I s ono






on~ l etorsiatt Ircomes capitaln


the yd rT rtheit c ~s
272 daiys lft( in the erar.
daitlglights inl history~ on ()h
l9h7 uritish troo(P\ inl Aden
snig day long t ho bth twi
tererats I'resident J~;on (coulart
of Brazil arrives in Washington for a
six d4USTydsitU.S. allocates 5.33
billion dollars in foreign aid for Is
I94 ur nutecll l~ov't Rovermment '"


There are still a few places available
for children to enter the Reception Class
of St. Andrew's in September.
Age limit 4 years old by September 1st


Apply to the Admission Officer:

PHONE 4-2621


A


~~


crcni


~(1D ~rtbuttP


BIGGfST


TClf


CI AD


SMALL


BfGINING *


CULT IVATf


TUf


BARCLAYS


AMD WATCU YOUR


MORY


GROW!.





JUST ARRVp

*MOH'S

PolyeSter Pants
White, Black & Asst. Colours


A large assortment er
Polyester shirts

Do your Easter Shopping
Where The ACTION IS


ISLAND FU RN ITURE
Christie and Dowdeswell Sts.
Phone 2-1197 2-3152 P.O..Box 4818

WILLIAM'S
Established Since 1926
Exquisite Footwear from Around the World
FOR MEN
* CHURCHES Famous English Shoes
* TECNIC Footwear of Destinction
* RIVIERA Finest Italian Shoes
FOR LADIES
e MISS HOLMES of England
* BANDALINC 'C
e AMALFI by 1: Ingoni of Italy
* DR. POSNER Scientific Shoe for Children
Situated on Bay St. near Eliabeth Ave.


~b~


~i~d:


PHONIE 2-3811


BAY STREET'S NEWEST DEPARTMENT STORE
PRESENTS
M#RADE IN NR EASTER C


*Girls' Easter Dresses
Ladies' Sport Suits
Ladies' Shoes in the latest
styles with 5" heel in Easter
pastel colours with Matching 2
Handbag.
Shop PIXIE'S...Where else
OPPOSITE STOP-N-SHOP


Walk, Work & Play with Utmost
Comfort
* Genuine Top Grain Cow Hide Uppers
* Completely Cushioned comport over
* Steel Shanks for added support


MIKE'S SHOE STORE
PHONE 24535 BAY STREET

Thompson's Dept. Store
and Boys Centre
BAY ST. 'e


Large Assortment of Girls Dleresss
Only $3.00 Each
$2.00 $4.00 & $6.00~n::dOudb~ho Rul
A complete line of Infants Wear
CURITY DIAPERS $5.25


BAY STRLEET NEWEST DEPARTMENTS STORE
GIRC SEASTE R DRESSES SHOES
GIRI.'SHANDBAGS & GLOVES.
8(rC) BUSH JACKETS -- POLYESTER
SSLACKS SHOES.


MAS THEC MARICS AND MOTHER ITEMt YOU NEED OR0 EASTERN.
900 EARLY AND SAVE WHILE OUR STOCKS LAST



JERSEYS.. BROCADES FANr~CY MATERIIALS
UNDERWEARI FOR THE WHIOLE FAMILY
HANDAAG & GLOVE SETS PORI THE KIDDIES
rancy useumasno

Vey rrred-M:M Io w


Cahi rdiit~tle


Tuesday, April 3, 1973.


WHY NOT DOYVOUR EASTER SHOPPINGNFOW


JUST ARRIVED
LA IES A TRO STS
Asst. Colours up to siz~e 5x with Matching Shippers

EDDIE'S DEP'T. STORE
BAY ST REET


UNLESS THEY ARE USED IN THE RIGHT
APPLICATION, PROPERLY INSTALLED
AND CORRECTLY SERVICED.

THEN CALL US:-
Phone 6-71268

CIllWRilUIlS Mil tS Wil
7The most experienced in Alarm systems in Narssau


THE PARISIAN

SPIECIAl.


EDDIE'S DEPISTORE LTD.
Y ~ ~ .I\NEXT TO THE STOP-N-SHOP, BAY STREET


10 C.F.


WAS *258?o0
NlOW *230.*


~


se; 4


New Stock from London


IVEN S CLOTHElRS
EST. 1970
BAY & GEORGE STREETS


Men's Sports Coat
$15.00 and $20.00
New Lhne of
Men Sports Shirts --
JUST ARRIVED

MADE RA SHOPPING CENTRE (nexnt to Cole's Pharmacy,








SHEER TERYLENE & COTTON
SUMMER DRESSES
SIZES 10 -22


*Steel Safety Toe


Far Savig,Shqop at
Clonari's KUTE KIDDY
Dr. Esfakis Building Market Street
New Shipments Arrived Including
* Polyester & Velvet Sport Jackets sizes 7 f8.
* Girl's Cinderella Easter Dresses --
* Gir's Pants Sets and Polyester
Pants -sizes a-14
* Boy's polyester Pants ,
asserted Colours sites 4-18
* Nkic Selection of Boys and Girl's Shoes
and Sandals from Europe.
PRe-Easter Sale 33 1/3 off on
Boys Salissizes 2-20 Phone


Its rwr r~r


IRSIIPBP lD'l

DE IVERI 6 PFM ~
rcau trans woys


s5.00
Look frfutum6 Colours -
AdPvff $@####ft


Madeira Shopping &r Next To John Bull, Bay St.


SHIRTS TIES SLACK KS SHOES.
Shop PIX IE'S .. "Wherre else"
OPPOSITE STOP-N-8HOP


ON BAY


y


SPECIALtS


*BaggieS


REFRIGERATORS


Platform Shoe


.~?
.,


SHOES IN BL ACK


$9.99


FISH


NE T


`SAWDALS


MEiN'S




I I I I


She Giribtunt


Alton Lowe called


a modern day


Winslow Homer

By WINDSOR SA1WYrER
A PREVIEW of Mr. Alton LowH~. fourth exYhibitio o~f
paintings was held in the Victoria Roomn at the Shera~tonl-British
Colonial Hotel Friday, March 23.


CHOICE TO CRIEDITORS
ESTATE OF THE LATE
WILLIAM IMITCHELL MUN ROE

All persons having claims against the above Estate
are requiredl to send the same duly certified in
writing to the~ unde~rsigned on7 or before the 30th
day of April, A. D)., 19)73 after which date the
'xecultrix will proceed to distribute the assets
having regard only to thle claims of which she shall
then have hadl~ notice. Also all persons who are
indebted to the said E~state will make payment to
the undersigned onl or before the above-mentioned
date
D~atedc theu 28thi day of March. A.D., 1973
JAME'S M. THOMPSON
Attorney for tle E~xecutrix
C'ham~bers, F'rederick Street,
Nassaun, Bahamias.- r


i PHBMr AUcTION


KIRK & MIMMSW wlM **8 e te pat~ing let eas of Mie IInrbeer Meen lie**I, Bey Stree

on Setweday Tea Apil I193 a) 12 meem the fellowing propertiess


Ihrrr r 'r r ~ r r r r r


rl~lli~TsL I -- '~ e -~


Tl*wday A ril 3, 1973.


1.
r
t
i
i
C
f
I
L
41


r
r
ct
I
I
i
:
-1


IS~
h L~Z~j


I I~I


More than 500 guests
attended, among them Sir
Roland and Lady Symonette,
Lady Roberts. Mr. and Mrs
E. Hindmarch, and Dr. and
Mrs. J. J. Merger, as well as
many of Mr. Lowe's friends
from aboard and from the
Bahamas.
The Rev. Charles Curry, who
ishalso 'so Cr en ITurtlheoCay
expressed the view that Mr.
Lowe excelled in his portraits
on he Bahamian people,
This was the general opinion
of the majority of people who
attended the private showing
of the new paintings. Everyone
commented that the artist had
not only rendered remarkable
likenesses of the sitters but.
more importantly, had
captured in oils the true
chhrlacea of the persons
Two particular favourites
:'",'. the po o:1,""n d Rpr
Seadog" and Virginius Burrows
in "Beyond the Horizon".
Many people remarked on
the fine detail shown the salt
and sweat on the seadog's
brow, and the patience and
inherent dignity of Mr.
Burrows .
Those who were fortunate
enough to attend Mr. Lowe's
1971 show were stnuck by the
similarity between the portraits
of Miz' Maybelle and Mr.
Burrows.
MrelaanditMrs tiindma~rc es
annual shows, have been
collecting the artist's work
sincel1969.
They now have 12 of Mr

Hnd arch npiant icularr i
enchanted by the artist's floral
studies. In her opinion they are
not only technically masterful
but, with the characteristic
misty background, they evoke

pai tipg ae mu mr t an 1
faithful visual rendition
The only non-Bahamian
sbone, apart from paintings of
flowers, is that of a pastoral


in Berkshine TI1I pailntr ngr was


Minister, ~ th 10 L


Pindling. 111 If A~ (`eophas
A\dderleto d i Orfilio,
Place priircn well as by many
ot~hl epg~ral < t ~lp l ~:in
night s special preview~ was that
M1r. lowe~t Ip ssewesc a unique 1


its mulllti- colured waters. Its
landcf~apes.. and above.r allI its
people
At thle enld of the p~re~vlew a
of the 28 works~ of1 art onr show
had arlready been slid. It is
especially~ gratifying to note
t h at BaIh amIi an s in
cvericcln n1unI irs ake

This d sprroves the o~ld adage

hcron inl h on ouwat o I
is iCrta3in that Mr Lowe will be
numbered amrong the truly
greatf Bahamson~l artists of thi'
Country who have cadPtured the
essence of a way of hife thart is
unfortunately, disappearing
too rapidly
Mr. Lowe is a1()lso `InceSingly.
being rccogwlcd abroad Tfhe
m~ornlng following the
exhibition Mr. Lowe received a
congratulatory telegram froni
J;Ick (;ry,t the noted~ Amelricln
painter of marine scenes, who
IWinslow). Better, beCaLSe you
were borni there andJ really
know Itsincerely.



iFlyer from West P'almn Beach
O)lymnpla froml f-reeport .
I merald Seas. Fla3via, Bahan, 3
Star froml Mliani.
SAILEDI TOD)IAY: Queen
)nn nilarlr lor Ne Po k
Haiti
ARRIVING; TOMO1RRO)W
Ittersum fromt West' Palm
Beach; Jome from Jacksonvtlle


MINNESOTA COUPLE FETED AT WEST END
JUDGE AND MRS. HARKNESS of St. Paul, Minnesota, (left) were back at the Grand
Bahama Hotel and Country Club, West End, recently for their 12th consecutive annual
vacation there, and the staff presented the couple with a plaque and gave a party to help
Mrs. Harkness celebrate her 75th birthday, in appreciation for their loyalty to the hotel.
Pictured making the plaque presentation are, from right, superintendent of servicesat the
hotel Joseph Cartwright, secretary to the manager Rosalins Topper and food and beverages
manager H. Fernander.


110 Wef B s~kOIS 01 Bay St. really


ARTIST AND HER WORK: Mrs. Gloria Talifero Banks surrounded by a 'ew of he
portraits, has left Washington, D.C. to capture the charm of the Bahamnas

W Sh xng ton ar tist &- he r son


Iike It 18 sHnn III ana Ias
H\ SIIDNCIT DORSE~TT
THE ARTIST, ta a iircaatrwt a luhdt n e tteIslu hot
sweater and~ painlt spotted (Trousers. ;1\ he wo~rks; a I~t rl has o n on l orr r'ln/ I1 up en .ll ni a I,.11~(
antlt er, I\ ntlr lolt r at ns shse


i


streatydltote nnodernill i \I


in;~ oxedl. helllll' 1~11

1i1. 1 t 1 illl I~l. 41
1111~ 1[1. 11\~\. 1 i


II1In Ill ri:I! 11 iill i R< ti

\IlfuneXin.l who in t I~11I.



She~~ 1 lso 1 nds \ a1( )1a. [,lllll
<~ ll~1l' at( in1. tra~ nd111

.linc~ .i\lic: (1 111

11'; 1 a(~ weIII her nthel \naI

.1.1 11k 1 but11 ,lan~.1 shop th




n nc~l s sing boat walu



beiting at xl;reptionals ri.;le.



child., she recalls Theslce was


st~rc t a~ppe~a o a Str"
as part of the C:hamber of
Commerce's Ecology and
Beautification Clommittee's
beautification of Bay Street
project. The committees' job is
to improve the general
appearance of Bay Street from


i i i i.i


i ( I~ i I I )
it


ill i;.


position clusters of potted
plants at designated points
between Parliament and
George Streets. These flower
baskets are to remain
permanently as long as they are
maintained.
The cost of providing the
hanging flower baskets and the
potted plants is to be borne by
the individual store owner.
'This project," said a
Chambe f re mec rla e
Commerce suggestion to Bay
Street merchants. Each
individual merchant, however,
is free to purchase his potted

whr ver hd so chohses a t
make his own arrangements
with the nursery of his
choice."
Town Planning has given its
approval in principle to the

Behdumieicat dn C mm tee o
the Independence Secretariat.
SUN
SUN: Risek6:02 a.m., Sets
6:26 p.m.


Victoria Avenue to Nassau
Street.
The committee has decided
to hang flower baskets along
the front of all buildings and to


li II~:


excutive ~


a unlest <


lie~ivr. goa IrI



Mrs. HankI11 S .IIme to 10~ I
Providence. til l ifst !l Note ),' 2
thronih Whingtons li IM il~ll?

fulfill wullon tes de t~hllio it
the Bahamsrll lct \and l othe




ilc t In tlir< ~ llearllll a tionin

'lor ion o ther Barianll cw

Iirc w sh empi fcln It,
L1.S Itnals citr Reveueiia~ Se n


n i I !~; Ii i i~
5i

\h- I' Iili. i
111to! )

-l : abou


ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Prqvidence being Lot Number
Three hundred and Fifty-two (Lot No. 352) of Pyfrom Sub-
division Phase itI bounded on the North partly by Lot Number
Three hundred and Forty-eight (Lot No. 348) of the said
Subdivision and partly by Lot Number Three hundred and
Forty-nine (Lot No. 349 ) of the said Subdivision and running
thereon jointly Fifty (so) feet on the East by Lot Number
Three hundred and Fifty-one (Lot No. 351) of the said Sub-
division and running thereon Sixty and Forty-three hun-
dredths (60.43) feet on the South by Edward Avenue and
running thereon Fifty-three and Eighty-one hundredths
(38 ft tt and To tte N e31by ofL hNsme TruT sh n r

Srmnirg thereon Eighty-five and Thirty-three hundredths

Mortgage dated 26th September 1966, Ivy Alberthe Clarke
to international Bank and Trust Co. (Nassau) Ltd.
R coded in Volum 1032 pg 122-128

TA m onr or t an en o c hisbh tno bi up o tat pie
balance on completion.
Dated 8th day of March 1973.







1) ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land having the Number
Nine (9) in Block Number Five (5) of a Subdivision laid out in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence known
as "Millar" Heights" a plan of which Subdivision has been
prepared by Norman F. Aranha & Associates dated 9th of
June 1958 (and filed in the Registered Office of Isles of June
Limited in the City,of Nassau) which plan is known as "The

yo rube neen(j n dthe ad lc tb nrpr t w V
Eighty-five (99.85) feet Eastwardly by Lot Number Ten (10)
in the said Block the property of James Rispah Lowe and
run tng therw t Svny five e75 fe oth adiy by e g
parcel or lot of land has such number position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions as are shown on the said Plan.


2) ALL THAT Piece parcel or lot of land having the Number
Two (2) in Block Number Twelve (12) in the said Subdivision
as shown on the Sale Plan and bounded Northwardly by High
Street Eastwardly by Cenltre Drive Southwardly by Lot
Number Four (4) in th e sid Block the property of. Prince A.
Ellis and running thereon One hundred (100) feet and
Westwardly by Lot Number One (1) In the said Block the
property of Arthur J. Balfour and running thereon Seventy-
five (75) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has such
number position bounderles shape marks and dimensions as
are shown on the said Plan,

3) ALL THAT piece parcel or lot land having the Number One
(1 innB ock Nuber Eigh een (e In the said SbdiviRi n a
Street Eastwardly by Lot Number Two (2) In the said Block
the property of Willa Mae Saunders and running thereon
Seventy-five (15) feet Southwalrdly by Lot Number Three (3)
in the said Block the property of Kenrick Murray and run-


nuber posito I undre rp mark In desisu a

4) ALL THAT piece prcel or lot of land being Lot Number
Twenty-six (26) in Block Number Four (4) on the said plan of
the Subdivision known as Regency Park and bounded
Eastwardly by Lot Number Twenty-five (215) in the said
Block Number Four (4) on the said plan and running thereon
Fifty-five (55) feet Southwestwardly in an arc along a Road
for a distance of Thirty-one and Forty-one hundredths (31.41 )
feet Westwardly by a Road Thirty (30) fat wide and running
thereon Fifty-four and Two hundredths (54.02) feet Nor.
thwestwardly in an arc along the said Road Thirty (30) feet
wide for evilstance of Thirty-one and Forty-two hundredths
(31.42) feet and NORTHWARDLY by a Road Thirty (30) feet
wide and running thereon Fifty (so) feet the said piece parcel
or lot of land having such position boundaries shape marks
and dimensions as are shown on the said plan.

Iotgg knte et ma .eDvdJacob Strachan to

The sale is subject te a reserve prices nd to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on his behalf to bid up to that price.
Terms 10 per cn f the purchase price at time of sale and

Dated 8th day of March 1973.


ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence being Lot Number
Thirty-seven (37) of Pyfrom Estates Subdivision bounded on
the NORTH partly by Lot Number Seventeen (17) of the said
Pyfrom Estates Subdivision and running thereon Fifty and
Seventy-nine hundredths (50.79) feet and partly by Lot
Number Sixteen (16) of the said Pyfrom Estatesi Subdivision
and running thereon Thirty-nine and Seventy nine hun-
dredths (39.79) feet on the EAST by Lot Number thirty-eight
(38) of the said Pyfrom Estates Subdivision and running
thereon Eighty-five and Five hundredths (85.os) feet on the
SOUTH thy Lot Number Thirty-nine (39) of the said Pyfrom
Esta es Sub dv ison and runninW t~herbeonH Sxy nin tand

Sbdiv sion an~d rurm ng thereon Ninety three and Sixty fou

Motonee dated 28th April 1966, Cleveland G. Cartwright to
Rec ded lBank of the Ba~hamas 7 1




Dated 8th day of March 1973.





ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate on the
SOUTHERN side of Milton Street in the Southern District of
the said Island of New Providence and bounded on the
NORTH by the said Milton Street and running thereon One
hundred (100) feet on the EAST by land now or formerly the
property of one Ethel Davis and running thereon One hun
dred (100) feet on the' SOUTH by land now or formerly the
property of one Joseph Deveaux and running thereon Onle
hundred (100) feet and on the WEST by land now or formerly
the property of one Thomas A. Pedican and running thereon
One hundred (100) feet

Mrta N satseu kntAu us 1972, Ha~rrdy Smith and Weavis

Recorded in Volume 1989 pages 456 464.
Ae sale issubject toraorn hie pie atnodbtd tuetro at iorthee
Te m 10O per cen of the purchase price at time of sale and
bln on comp eion.

Dated 8th day of March, 1973.


ALL THAT piece parcel lot of land being a part of a lot of land
situate to the East of Mackey Street South in the Eastern
District of the so id Island of New Providence which said
piece or parcel or land is bounded on the South by a reser-
vation for a road wight (8) feet wide leading East from
Mackey Street Sotth and running thereon One hundred (100)
feet on the West by land the property of Blanche Mortimer
and running thereon forty six (46) feet on the North by land
the property of the Estate of the Joseph O' Nopre Johnson and
running thereon One hundred (100) feet and on the East by
land the property of Albert Thomas Clarke and running
thereon forty six (46) feet.
Mortgage dated 28th April 1965, Shervin Laroda to National
rakof Bahamas Ltd86 ae 9 9
The sale is subject to a reserve price and to the r aght for the
Auctioneer or any person on his behalf to bid up to that price.
Terms: 10 per cent of the purchase price at time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated 8th day of March 1973.





ALL THAT Iot of land situate in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence being designated by the No. 99 in
the Sub division known as "H IGHBUR Y PARK E STATE" a
plan of which said Sub division is attached to an Indenture
dated the 13th day of August 1960 and made between Emily
Limited of the one part and Camiliar Ltd.of the other part and
now of record in the Registryof Records in Nassau, Volume
356 pages 528 to 534 the said Lot being bounded Northwardly
by a THIRTY (30) foot road reservation to be known as
Haslemere Road and running thereon Sixty (60) feet East-
wardly by Lot No. 100 on the said plan and running thereon 78
feet Southwardly by a part of Lot 101 on the said plan and
running thereon 45 feet Southwestwardly by a part of Lot No.
97 on the said plan and Westwardly by Lot No. 98 on the said

Motoaeda r0t Ooa r 19e6, Altamond B. Gray to
Recorded in Volume 921 pages 293 298.
The sale is subject to a reserve price and to the right for the
m cioelerr rary perstohne un hs hal itoebiu mt tha anied
balance on completion.
Dated 8th day of March 1973


~ct pn;rr;t
[)


0fo hil8|18Hil8C8 88)





DEAR ABBY: Cigaret smoke makes me alck. Yet It
someone asks, "Do you mind if I smokee" I find myself
saying, "Not at all. Go ahead." Then I could kick myself.


__


SPECIAL .5. _

PING PONG ANYONE?

KN dHT TABLE -TENNI!

Cs tol tenlSET
COMES
COMPLETE I
WITH NET d
4 PADDLES O
& BALLS
RE G. $6.95 -
NOW K

'5ss


Tuesday, April 3, 1973.


that in the marriage service, people will laugh, and I don't
want anbdyelaughing during the marriage vo .EGN
DEAR ELSIE: Tell Randy that Uving in Oregon is a
privilege-naot a duty, and to leave it out!
Prolemst Trust Abby. For a perseaal repl, wrlie to
ABBY. BO: wIn. L A., CAIUr. sege am8 emeesea
stamped, addressd enveope.

Per Abby's new boorkle "What Tees.Agers Wast O
..r, send SI to Abby, Bez @TM, Les Angeesa, Cal. MSMa.


There must be a better way to handle ths.


NO GUTS


DEAR NO GUTS: There is. The next time someone
asks: "Do you alad if I smoke?" reply: "Not if you dee's
adad if I choke!"
DEAR ABBY: Randy and I both attend the University of
Oregon and plan to be married sometime this summer.
Randy has been writing mou marriage service and he has
one part in there I am not so sure of. He wants me to say,
"I. 1my name] promise to love, cherish, and live in Oregon
with [his name] in sickness and in health, poverty anld
wealth, etc."
I love Oregon, too, Abby, and I'm afraid if he includes


~E DEGRAPH
Amity, 3rd runner-up

MISS O.C.

CONTEST
THE YOUNG lady who
appeared as the Bahamnas'
national flower, the Yellow
Elder, became Miss Queen's
College, 1973, in a beauty
contest held in the Polaris
Room of the Holiday Inn on
Saturday night.
Miss Carolyn Christine
Rolle, I 5, led the eleven
teenage Queen's College
students, with Miss Valeria
Crroll, first Irunner-upsecME
runner-up, Miss Marguerite
De graph, third runner-up and
Cyprianna Ingraham, fourth
runner-up.
All the girls entered under
the name of a flower.
The successful show was
organized by Laurence
Carroll, also a student at Q.C.


. t


S/

7


/as Let's Play



D~1'4" Red Gloss
Sponge Ball Sealed
in Poly Bag
No. F-13 Spca


YOUR BABY"
IN A


UGl N


_

I )
;1F~n I


Shoot 'em Up


No. 124-20.


4


;pecial
C7!5


A-R 15 Recoil Muzzle


NEW! WET LOOK, LEATHER
PRODUCT


This Doll says
"Take My Hand
Walk Together"
WENDY
WALKER
IIULL
Reg. $13.95
Maura's Special


11


.o -yF gl' Peg. $3.99
4 Colours Special
Triple Position:Bo p $ $@


-~i


With a:


SReduced .-
Let's Play With
METIL

Reg. 49c

p Special 9


21eed rm wthnenameled
SRed & Blue Finish.
Reg. $3.99
Special Lr29


MAURA'5
SUPER SPECIAL
SET OF 6 GOLDEN BOOKS
* WILLIE LEARNS A LESSON
* BROWNIE & PUFF PAINT THE
DOGHOUSE
e PADDY & THE BEAR CUB
LIONS BIRTHDAY PARTY
CHIPPER'S ADVENTURE
BILL BUNNY'S SCRIPTURE
ANY ONE BOOK
REG. $1.50
~i- STO SPECIAL AT f4.4


FOULKE
2nd runnar.an


Play Like The Pros.
h tiW a LIBERTY


'


S .. 32 s


MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LIMITED
P. O. BOX N-8177
TE LE PHONE 24001-24101-NASSAU '


... also entered


Znbt Eht~tlit


KEEP YOUR MOST MEMORABLE
MOMENTS AT HAND IN THIS
IYI~ Qr~Y~PI.;.%H AN DSOM E

SCRAP


Maura Special
Low Price,


CAME
COMPLETE
/ SET
R EG. $3.99

AS SPECIAL PRICE


50 Shot Real Sounding
AUTOMATIC RIFLE


BABY AND N ~
~RADLE SE Tlli~l~' HOLST ER
Special price SE T
$ 95 g~


s
S:


EVERY LITTLE
GIRL
WILL LOVE


LIZIA
THE DOLL WITH OTE
WASHABLE
NYLON HAIR
REG. $6.25


GET A SET O
v......s LONG


eI B D PCA3ARTrS
r REG. 99cb


HOOP
21 Bright Colours
Reg. 65c


"P PAL &
"P SHOVEL
(. Assortment.
Rope Handle,
f4 Plastic Shovel
D with a D Gripeg $23

jl SPECIAL


:::dCe Inrful


Reg.
Value
75c
S, Mauras
Special
Price


SPIN FOOTBALL
TOP l COMES WITH
AZND LINE Tee & Pump
g Reg. 35c Reg. $4.75


Our Io w pri 2 5 4





















eleasi~ je ada cloMA du



Coeby Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.
urrrrrr I ,, -, ~ I I~ I~r I I r~UU1 1I


I , - -- --- I 1I


C9328
TYPEWRITER, record player.
sewing machine, heater, fan.
toaster. All perfect condition.
We ite P. O. Box N8009,
Nassau.
C9327
HOMEr STEREOe turntable
Telefunken tape recorder Reg.
8 Movie Projector. Call 22836.
C9357
1 Waltz Organ
Oldsmobile 68 Delmont 4
door excellent condition.
Reduced owner leaving.
Phone 57324.

C9311
1 CONVERTIBLE COUCH
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
I 250 Ib. trunk food freezer
Call 77947
C9366
MORRIS OXFORD 1968 -
only done 27,000 miles very
good condition $850.
Also full set of golf clubs $80.
Tel. 31324.
C9371
KODAK CAROUSEL 850H
Slide projector with case. As
new, only $255.00 Phone Peter
Robinson at 2-1064, daytime.

C9294
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
befr i20tht April, 1973
1 Dinirg Room Suite
3 Bedr om Suites (one French
Provincial)
Furniture in very good
conditions Telephone 41243


LOST
C9367
PRESC RIPTI ON GLASSES,
square lens, gold rim, in red
case, Friday, March 30th
between 8:30 a.m. and 3:15
p.m. at Government High
School or Oa kes Field
Shopping Plaza. If found please
936l frle6 pR llins-Gi~bs n
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 3
p.m. to 5 p,m.

MARINEW SUPPLIES
C9309
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


NOTICE i
C9332
WILL MRS. MYRTIS
MONCUR FORMERLY OF
CAT ISLAND PLEASE
COLNTACTAESSO SA DARD
TELEPHONE NUMBER
28401 AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE-

POSITIONY WAlTED
C8500
IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
Adv. C8500, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau.

WORK WANTED

CAD WITH over 20 years
experience would like to be
employed as maid. Telephone
5-4420.

IIELP MNIITED
C9321
EXPERIENCED COOK with

f rwe se rf roe cooking
2-8395
C9335
BEAUTICIAN STAOL OPERATE
TREASURE CAY.
Qualif catioy as x cued.e A

Capable of running beauty
saona t o ne pBe r cia
experienced in both men and
women nair cutting and
styling, but not essential for
Kindly send resume to:-
"Beautician" P. O. Box

tel phne 2as 15,a 2-70E jr
158
C93t;(
RESERVATIONS MANAGER

experience twitfdvlarg~e hoteta


Complete and thorough
krmwle ge ofoRerseervat onsr d
tours a nd conventions.
Supervise and train large staff.
Please submit resume to
Manager, Emerald Beach Hotel,
P. O. Box N7108, Nassau.


IN FREEPORT

gE has a wen"W


CLASSIIED AIDVERTISIIMS

RATES AND

INFORMATION

CLASS IF lED HOUR S:
9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
Saturd sr 9:00 a.m. Noonl


CLASSIFIED A
DAYS

1 ................******** ~


C9278
OWNER LEAVING
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
completely furnished, recently
painted Johnson Terrace.
Price: $25,000. Telephone
42462 after six

934 FOR SALE
SEMI HILLTOP OUT EAST
2 miles from town. Has 3
bedrooms 2'6 baths furnished,
plus DEN, PLUS COMPLETE
UNIT. 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
kitchenette, last but not least.
ONE ACRE of grounds with
some views of sea. Come see by

aDpIpntDA PIANOS, THE
ACTION REALTOR we sell
real estate. Phone 22033,
22305, 22307 evenings 41197.
C9333
FOR SALE
HOUSE VILLAGE ROAD
AREA. Have house 4
bedrooms, 2 baths unfurnished
wooden structure spacious
corner plot Village Road area.
Only asking $22,000.00. Come
see anytime.
DIAL DAMIANOS for Action.
Phones 22033, 22305, 22307
*venings 41197.

C9353
HOUSE FOR SALE Hillside
Estate. Contact Jerome Bethel
Tedder Close, Palmdlale, House
No. 3
C9344 $75 DEPOSIT secures
a lot in VAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. Payments from
only $80 month. Priced from
S,800. NO INTEREST. From

completed. Lake front lots
from $7,500. 5100 deposit.
Tel: 2-3027 or 2-4148
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE

C9373
UNUSUAL HOUSE on
waterfront Eastern Road, 40ft.
lounge with fireplace and
minstrels gallery, dining room'
Bahama room leading to
terrace pato svro I kindg th

master suite, two bathrooms,
cathedral ceiling throughout,
teastefully furnished, 2 car

S0,00. T~e eo en .-2 3

FOR1 RE'T

Ao sRASC VEre Ridrnishae
Sans Souci 3 bedrooms (2
airconditioned) 2 baths, study,
maid's room, wall to wall
carpet th rou ghout, all
cedar-lined closets. Available
for lng lease May 15th. Phone

C9207
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom in Bamboo Town.
Phone 36959.
C9342
EFFICIENCY apartment,
separate bath and toilet. For
further particulars call 5-8679
ask for Mr. Pritchard.
C9341
2 BEDROOM 1 bath home*
fu nsed aic nd t med* fi
minutes walk to Montagu
2ec i n q 64tarea Phone
28504~~~~ d 56 ngt

C9337
One Efficienc apartment, aso
for two reserved ladies or men.
Phone 5-1044.


C RGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely f urnished.
$250m pronmonth.e II ChE er
2-4777-8.
C9306

OeNroom t~wo bath arend o e
extra large one bedroom
aartm ng.With large living
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
na Sre t. FaIItir le oaned
laundry, parking T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C9308
OFFC OR ST REm SAed to

occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.


C9318
eNfi TOWN frih rooms
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.
C9358
AVAILABLE end of April a
two bedroom airconditioned
house Twynam Avenue.
Phone 5-1881


2-3 ************************* 7C

4-6 ------********------ ....

7 Of m ore ****************

PHOTO IN CLASSIFIED
(Maximum 1 col. x 2 ins.)
in Memoriam................$2.50 per insertion
plus number of words


NO REVERSE PRINTING IN CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY (with border)

Appropriate Display Advertising Rate plus
Charge for Special Position of 50c per col. inch
per insertion.

TRIBU~Nt BOX NUMBERS...50c extra

DEADLINES FOR PLACING
CLASSIFIED ADS
12 Noon Daily for following
day's paper
12 Noon Sat. for Mon. Paper
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY
2 Days prior to publication.


CANCELLATION PH ONE
NUMBER 21986 EXT. 5

When cancelling an ad, the advertiser will be
cvsR 8 CaRcellation number as a receipt. AII
matter involving mthi cancellation will be
Settled On the basis of the advertser's
submitting ~the cancellationr number for
verification. Ads scheduled for Multiple Days
will, wvhen cancelled, take the rate for the
number of days the ad actually appeared.

CAACELLATISO HOURS
Tocanl nglar classified ad for next
day call Man. thru, Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Sat. 9 arm. to Noon.
Canoaliation of Classsfied Display:
2 days prior to publication



LWWURU
Advertiser are requested to check the first
apearncew of ads for corrections. This
na rar will be responsible for only one
lno~rtSot inwertionr. ANY ERROR SHOULD
BE REPORTED IMMEDIATELY. As with
Cancellations above a number will be issued.

PHONE 21986 EX T 5



..Mriara atr ao worded ar to ex lan tte
siad error and the publisher shall be otherwise
relieved from responsibility thereof.
No adjustment will be given unless, in the
opinion of the newspaper, an error in an ad
materially affects the value of the
adertirment.
Afaer copy he been given by advertiser, ad
will be read back for correction of copy,
CIMtification and schedule. Upon verification
by advertiser information will be presumed
correct mnd no adjustment will be made unless
of variance with copy. If the advertiser does
not allow the ad to be read back, no claims
twr incorrect coy will be accepted.

COPY
This newspaper reserves the right to refuse
mny ad for any reason and the privilege of
revising Or rejecting any advertisement which
it deems objectionable and to change the
classification of mny advertisement from that
ordered to conform to the policy of this
news~papr.



TO PL ACE A CL ASSIFIED All

CALL 21988 EX T. 5


REALI ESTATE
C9362
UNFURNISHED HOME FOR
SALE 131 DAMPIER 3
bedrooms 2 baths with carport
room air codit oes
dish washer a cnd grnb
disposal. Price $28, 000
minimum down payment
$5,000.
Contact: SYNTEX Phone
352-8171.

IIELP MNITED
C7297
J AN ITOR /Cus todian and
Maintenance Man required for
downtown office building.
Duties to include routine
building maintenance, office
cleaning, trash removal, etc..
Apply Mercantile Group, P. O.
Box F-456, Freeport.
Telephone 352-9761.

C7295
C LOUR TVoTECHNICIAN -

experience including circuit
modification and sweep
alignment. Must be able to help
and train others. Must possess
own tools, good salary and
hours.
Write for interview: Bahama
Music Corporation, P. O. Box
F-769, Freeport.

C7283
ONE CHIEF SECURITY
OFF ICER:x rih en year

supervisory capacity.
ONE LIFE GUARD: With
three to four years experience
in PDool and Beaches.V T N
SUPERVISOR: With four to
five years experience and to be
solely responsible for all
reservations and convention

Inec sted persons apply to:
THE GRAND BAHAMA
HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB*
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.


correspondence anld post
accounts on NCR 4200.
ASSISTANT MANAGER: To
assist General Manar~ger with
Oceanus Hotels Lftd.. Direct.
supervise and trainr personnel.
Must have a; least five years
experience in Hlotel and
Tourist field.
Apply: Ocranus Htotels Ltd..
Pe sonnel Dept. BRoyaO. oam
F-531.

CE ENVISION AND RADIO
TECHNICIAN experienced
in all types of le tronis. Mut
transistors and other Solid
State devices. Must possess
own hand tools, good salary
and hours. References
e sential Music Cor oration
Ltd. mP. O. Box F-769,
Freeport.
",7299
NJANTED MAN with minimum
waitlpap0r ,ars epe "riencea i
decorating. Able to work on
own without supervision.
Write: Adv. C-7299, c/o The
Tribune, P. O. Box F-485'
Freeport.
C7298
LABOURER to clean septic
tanks, dig ditches and keep
yard clean. Only Bahamians
need apply
MC 17e(3ePlu bng. P. O.


in loving memory of our
beloved wife and mother Sarah
Belinda Cartwright who
dpalrted this I~fe April 3'

Safe in the arms of Jesus
Safe on his gentle breast
There by his love o'ershadowed,
Sw..tlv my soul shall rest.
Left to mourn: Husband
Cleaveland, one son, four
daughters, grandchildren and
great grandchildren.

TRADE SERVICES
C9315




Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
rAFICHANICAL HANDLING
Er3UIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELi VE R Y
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STE'L BANDING

SPECA ASHQTONTIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATEs
CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHIO : 2-3795 23796'

Airport 77434
C8105
SRY G FOM RA E SR

UPHOLSTERY -TEL:
51071-2-3-4.

C9317
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
rotels.oma s and sevines Ca
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OeFx tMUICk' laackey Street

C9299

PATIO AWN WINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTE RS,

John 5. GeorAN LCo. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.


C93R3 YOUR building needs
Residential -- Remodelling -
MaintenB lede 26l G Patton,


" th b Ig SWItch


Trade-ins welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8
C9374


* *at .



TODAY'SEPIT~ ~i\.L10J
1968 PONTIAC FIREBIRD
$1100.00
ALSO AVAILABLE
1969 VOLKSWAGEN -
radio, tape, yellow $1000
1969 RAMBLER REBEL -
2 door $1000
1970 CHEVY IMPALA -
good condition $2450
1970 CHEVY MALIBU $2200
1972 DODGE AVENGER
SUPE R- excellent
demonstrator $1950
1972 DODGE AVENGER G.L.-
good condition $2350
1971 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN -
like new $2000
1971 SINGER VOGUE -

radio, automatic $1500
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA S/W
good buy $1950
1969 CHEVY CAMARO -
1OCE d IMPALA (150

17 ODG POLARA 500
good saving $5500
1969 FORD FALCON -

rlee automatic,MraAi BU$20000

1967 PLYMOUTH FURY I -
bi e, au omatiRYCOG 80
green $800
1970 CADILLAC LIMOUSINE
b96 BEAUMONT CUSTOM -

bI NANCING AVAILAB1700
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
PPolice B~arratcks

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

PLANNING TO BUY
A LOT?
Act now! Hifitop lots,
crnete ro s
Call Frank Carey
FRAN C REY
REAL ESTATE
Bay & Deveaux Streets.
CALL TODAY

C9377
WELL ESTA BL ISHED
FURNITURE BUSINESS for
sale. Owner wishes to retire.
Rpiesto: Adv. C9377, co


,


I


ROE~TA ST E T

TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


__


Tuesday, April 3, 1973.


I I


I I


I I


C9361
WANTED:
Bar Waiters
Bar Waitresses
Bar Boys
Apply Personnel Department,
Emerald Beach Hlotel between
the hours 9:30 a.m. and 11.30
a.m.
C7296
TELEVISION AND RADIO
TECHNICIAN experienced
in all types of electronics. Must
be completely familiar with
transistors and other Solid
State devices. Must possess
own hand tools, good salary
esnsdtahours. References
Bahamas Music Corporation
Ltd., P. O. Box F-769,
Freeport.
C9375
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY
required by foreign owned
Bahamian subsidiary company
operating in Nassau. Successful
applicant will be paid attractive
salary and enjoy congenial
working conditions. Applicants
should have a minimum of four
years practical experience and
should apply in first instance
to Peat, Marwick, Mitchell &
Co., telephone 2-8551.


C9380


C9305
LARGE SHOP for rent. 3000
square feet, 6th Terrace,
Centreville. Can be used as
store and warehouse. Has side
entrance. Call 2-1731 or
3-1583.

CARS~0 FORSAE
C9320
1968 COUGAR V/8'
airconditioned, Vinyl top
excellent shape only $1250.
Day phone 35673 Nights
31909.


CSLA9ND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1970 FORD ESCORT,
Blue Std. 4 Dr. $995
1972 VENTURA'
A/C, Bucket Seats, Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Radio Auto. Blue $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W*
Auto. $850
1972 VIVA S/W,
Automatic White $2600
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE,
4 Dr. Sedan
Blue/White $2000
1972 PONTIAC VENTU RA*
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio, Orange $3500
1969 FORD TURINO $1200
1969 FIAT 124 S/W,
Std. 4 Dr. $550
1971 FORD CAPRI AUTO.
BIu $1850
196e8 DODGE DART,
Green $850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD*
Blue A/C $2800
1971 FORD MAVERICK


IIELP WANTED
C7288
EXECUTIVE SLL RETARY:
For General Mana~ger of
Oceanus Hotels Ltd .. Must be
fast and accurate dt rhorthanid
and typing. Ps of it snt in all
duties related to Executive


Secretary .
previous
Secretary
position.
CREDIT
handle all
for both
familiar
coupons,
Compose


At least three years
expeneince a
necessor v for this


MANAGEF:R: To
Account: Receivable
Hotels. Must be
with travel agents
credit cards, etc..
and ty pe own


$1950

$800

$1400

$2100
$2000

$695

$500


A to.Vie~dA

4 Dr. Auto-Green
1969 CHEVELLE
2 Dr. Vinyl
Auto. Gold
1971 RAMIBLER
Auto. Blue
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Green
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue
1970 VIVA
2 Dr. Auto. Black


.. IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusablp but unwanted


items of


clothing, tools'

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc. .. clear out


your closets, garage, storeroom .


all can be of help

to someone else.


For Best Results


C9_35G
REQUIRED one Project

cSo esap aore e uu Fml


Ada ri~snt aon expnedienc aes
Please send resumes to Box
N-7782, or telephone 24596.


a 3 on iB o d, Iuly furn sh

ilnclu edr T.V anda m epo
Brooklyn Avenue. Phone
3-1329.


Th** Tribune Classifieds.

Ghp Gr~ibure


TO PLACE YOUR ADS.
CALL 2-1986


Sfhp $*.*(htit


E TATSEL AER


P LEII MNTED


E LASR OF


T NERR OF


ID RATES
Per Word Per Day


, ~"-"e~
-


SHIRLEY STREET -




---~- -- ----. --. --- ----- --- -- ------- --- -I _,~__ __ __ __ -.-- -----. --_ --,---- --- ~-- --


Tuesday, April 3, 1973.


e 7nhr Grtbittit


II -- -- --


REX MOR GAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS~

YES, I witt, MR. IF SHE WDIN'Y LIKE ME, SHE WOULOHsy
BARON / NOW I'D HAVE COME ALL THE WAY DOWN TOD SEE
WOULD YOU SETTLE SETTER GET TOME*SECAL FRTE AWI
SFOR A DRIVE TODAY MY ROOM I'LL -'~ GOT iC_~;"E'I-1~f ~ Z INTO ASIT
---THE BEACH AND MEET YOU 1IW THE oNG
GOLF TOMORROW, LOBBV INJ EXACTLY ;iNgT
JUNE ? THIRTY MlWUTESl A



q \/




J UDG PARK R By AUL NCHOL


. .


I


U

F


C
I


I -
Y.ou may see faces In those cloud formations. I see an
unemployed clerk unless you get back to work.

HRispert and the Mixed Magic-20


ItAPARTMENT 3-G


By Ales Ko taky I


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


By .RONARD BARDEN




'..



(O't I




A grandmaster boob In today's
position decided top prize in
the Novi Sad international
tournament. Pal Benko (United
tik p enist his 8 ve~t opa
nenrt Anatoly Lein. Lein (`White.
moving as usual up the board)
has advanced his QKtP In a
final attempt to draw.
Benk~o filed to win; can you
dPa i es~i: 10 seconds. chess
master: 30 seconds, chess expert;
2 minutes, county player: 5
minutes, clash strength; 8i
miu s. average, 15 minutes.

TITBURSD)AY Solution No. 9624
Chess Solution
I -- R wins alter 2
x-~go 2 P t7, K )(7.

hinsea Benko blundered bu
daQ1 x dis ch : K xP

,ar,@ktoha g up his are w


SLOOK-1 POIJ'T IKE TH~AT STOP
WEIRP0. LET'SSWITCH. YOU1 FRETTING,
TAKEI MY HOTEL ROOM ANP EARL. THE
I'LL SUNK HERE. POOR MAN
Y ;;f\LOOKS THAT
WAY BECAUSE HE
O tO SCRCE Is
O KTO Me.
u o


0.K, HAVE IT YOUR OWN~
STUgBORN WAY, I'L HAVE
YOUR LLIGGAGE SENTOVER //
ANp PICK YOU U1P ABOUT
NINE FOR DINNER- THEY t ~ I
DINE LATE IN SPAINj.


r(





21 2 3


SCARROLL RIGHTER'S

I3HOR(E COPE
from the Carroll Righe Institute
~I GENERAL TENDENCIES A day when you
have much charm and are able to impress
others with the quickness of your mind and your ability to
find the answers needed to put in motion a fasemnating plan
Be more open-minded in dealing with any problems.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Talk over with others how
best they can fit into the picture for the future for you
You can express your charm at the social tonight. Dress
nicely and make headway easily Be poised
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You can plan secretly
with others and the future will be brighter, but don't
confide in anyone. Study those plans confidentially with the
right persons. Avoid a troublemaker.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Attend those social
functions that can bring you advancement in a refined way.
Entertain and please the persons you like. Handle only
important business affairs now Go to bed early tonight.
MOON CHILDRE~N (June 22 to July 21) Find a better
system for handling promises you have made to outsiders,
and gain the acclaim of powerful persons. Know what your
true ambition is and take steps in such directions.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Contact out-of-towners who
have the know-how for helping you to advance. New friends
enter your life and can help you become more successful.
Impress them with your intellect Relax tonight.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) You are anxious to get
into the many duties ahead of you, so be efficient in so
doing. Your mate is highly romantic at this time, so make
the most of this. Avoid one who likes to argue.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) If you want to have greater
rapport with one who means a great deal to you, be more
willing to back this person in whatever the aims are. Accept
invitations that can be beneficial to you
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) A new outlook where
your own work is concerned can bring about greater success
with it now. Go on a shopping spree for new clothing that
can make you look more charming to others.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec. 21) Ideal day for the
amusements that you like so much with congenials. Buy a
nice gift for the one you love and get good results. You like
to be happy and this is the right day for that.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) If you try to be more
thoughtful of kin and please them, you get better results. Do
some entertaining that brings the right people into your
home. Think constructively.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Contact those persons
who can help you to live a more successful and happy life.
Take care of transportation matters that are important now.
You are thinking cleverly now.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You want more monetary
security. This can be achieved by right actions now. Clever
advisers have good ideas for your advancement. Make sure
you are practical in all that you do.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .he or she will be
one of those young people who can handle emergencies
cheerfully and with precision. Success can be attained in
pioneering activities. Teach early to finish whatever task is


astound him. "But will the
wand work says Rupert
' ohok wehv rr ved i The
Sorcerer breaks in wtth a
shout and sends his craft in a
steep dive towards a domed
bu ldingthes eon hapl tfotrhm
Wizard s home he cries
R)ESERVEo


As the flying saucer speeds
on, now across an ocean, the
Sore eir explainsW ars purpose
envies my skill and has
challenged me to perform
untried wonders,' he says
Thnk mo Mthema onjurer s
show my rival things to
ALL RIGHTS


a most successful life, with
Give good spiritual training.


started, and then this becomes
much prosperity and happiness.
Sports are fine.


&idge
'The Lws odde Preo evietd
every ten years or so and a Com-
mlseion of the Workld Bridge
Federation, engaged on hs
task, la now in seeston. A point
derserving its attention is to
aestbiah that no one abould
benefit from laf~ormation derived
tnmelwhether with malice
BZIMIY or othemisee.
An tocl in New York a
Bridge Werd fhtnaa
ill ts howthe existing lawr
can be bent.
Dealer East: Love All
North
d %t10 6 3

West East
9 A 5K2 7 5 1

O 5'510 9 6 3 2 7
38R J 10 8 3

AK J
West Needs EaSt Seath

WsP~a~ad~~as 09t Pass as
Te ot r to tig s K. fld

Ahe d, but an oddaen o
ruffs the ahr ond of heart's
with he +J and waits. As West
fvrarn, partner asks: No

admib BouW 4om an
aeo en mh eoke has been
IMndn sd lays to the nt
tlaL, th:r ff no pnly
can pronrt handsomely from his
,. lapse."

TAR GET

A or IIOC et
I,- ",,, t ?'i
A M lelttrs shown
hrerel In

swordwrd mut onala

letter, anld there must he at
laNu on carc-ttr ortlt h


peat. h'oate petal late~ rortes

.reanlt t elt tae Inl


"I said: Stlek it in youlr ear."


29. Cut of meat
30. 81usterins
32. Eat te evening
34. Racket
e5 P ionus shrub
39. Reddish yellow
44. o ress S
47. Immediratly
48. Edible root
49. Sooner than
50. Waste allowance
'51. Sports hall
52. Rocky cliff
53. Predicament.


5.C piod fish
8. Hosttel

1 Run vIage
13. Misfortune


17. Christmas
decoration
19. N~ot
withstanding
20. Equitable
24. Ember
27. Name


4.5


5. Stimulus
6. Course of
**tinS
7. Fumble
8. Frigate bird
9. Assent
10. By birth
16. Film
18. Went first
21. Chunk
22. Hawk parrot
23. Explosive
24. Danish island
25. Old French coin
26 Sn wi ps

2 Clumsy person
33. Parson bird
36. Mishipman
38. Indignation
40. Roman fiddler
41 Japanese
girdle box
42. Christmas
43 Grafted:
heraldry
44.Gear tooth
45. St ppery


DOWN


1. Assuage
2. Turkish regiment
3. Quantities
4. Deplete


No. ;ose .. by TIIIM MelAV
Acrorrs
f. I tnr (8)
0. Architectual sup ort. (ln
so. Too, late for a dr nk ? (3. 4)
I?. Part of a warnlsent. (ft)
14. Publicants. (ll)
16. The Indyls. (;),
IT. Plrhouse. (3)
lIt. Ham rd; wel.(4, )
to. willlow tler. (3)
21. phn channuer. (n~

o n na hras
I. (1* ea w ertv .I. 4,nc .
It \ar~lnv (3l. t;. 0
n. Farml animal. (3)
(I. Amrds..or o~r cones. l. an,
rn. EIL
(3i)
13. Y'o r k
IA. ird o
i ll s. u r r e tr.e v o m m


per tate 7 Iie*


AP Newrfeatunre


2*~ *-mi ?"/*


Chess


Brother Juniper


CROSSWORD

PUIZ ZLE


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


I





A large selection of

PHOTOGRAPHS

from Sunday's

CAMPRI)OWH HISElf SilW1

nolw available from 5"x7" $2
RICKEY WELLS
Phone 3-6170 8"x10" $3


1/1
Llr\~~t PU~~III~I~ T01311 ~Ulle~Q~AV


Zli~41~1~1P


*


Tuesday, April 3, 1973.


NEARLY one thousand people
turned out on Sunday to
attend the second annual
Eastern Equestrian Society's
Horse Show staged at the
Camperdown Ranch.
Over SO horses and nearly a


Z


hundred riders took part in
the all day show which is


Patrick Balfe. The hot dogs
and bar did a brisk trade.

Mrs. Jerome Pyfromn was
chairman of the show
committee. Other members
of the committee were Mrs.
Eugene Pyfrom, Mr. Terry
Russell, Mr. Pierre Dupuch,
Mrs. Elise Toothe, Mrs.
Diane Taylor, Mrs. Maurice
Kelly, Mrs. Colin Callender,
Mr. Gordon Lomer, Mr. Ray
McCadden and Miss Angela
Brown.


thought to have been
latrgest ever put on here.


Judging the show was William
Whalen of the American
Horse Show Association, an
experienced recorded judge
for hunter, jumper and
hunter seat equitation
events. He is head riding
instructor at the Golden
Hills academy in Ocala,
Florida. Also judging was
Mr. Jaimne Salzedo of
Nassau.
Mr. Whalen was very impressed
with the skill and standard
of the riders. "You could
put this on in the States
giving free entry and free
beer, but you could never
get such a crowd as this, nor
t he enthusiasm," he said
after the show.


i;


JUDGE William Whalen and
Eugenl Pyfrom caught on
Eqmn ridurin oci Eah rrn
show.


Under blue skies and in perfect
weather the spectators
enjoyed the well-run show,
ably compered by Dr.


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157

Open 6:30 Shows Start 7 P.M.
No One U.nder 17 Admitted!
See 2 features late as 9 p.m.
EXCLUSIVE -
*FINAL NITE!'
"I10 STREET" at 7 &r 10:40
"HAMMER" at 9 p.m. Only


if you steal 5300,000
fromthe mob, it's not robbery.
It's suicide.


? IN-CAA


ALEXYA SOLOMON on Rum Raisin who came second
in the Division B Hunter Seat Equitation during yesterday's
Camperdown Horse Show. The all-day show attended by
nearly 1,000 persons was the second staged by the Eastern
Equitation Society at Camperdown Ranch, owned by Pierre
Dupuch


IP-~
PONY JUMIPER Marina Esfakis on Seabreeze took this
class. She is presented her trophy by Mrs. Peter Albury.


HANDY WOR KING HUNTER Allison Albu ry holds the two
winners in the handy working hunter class Left is Sergent
Major, owned by Mrs. Albury, who took first prite, and Cosmos,
owned by Patsy Gape, who came second.


YOUNG ROBERT MISSELBROOK lead by his mother, Rosemary Missebrook from
Freeport, during the Hunter Seat Equitation for children 10 years and under at the Horse
Show vesterday. Photo: Pierre Duouch.


HUNTER SEAT EQUITATION
DIVISION "A"
P'LAC') E-iXHIBITOR`C1 and HORSE
I Eve Notrton -Miss Toot
2 Tammy Allen Flreckles
3- Philip williams
4- Richard Mailion ~ady
DIVISION "B"
I -Jandii Pursons Macho
2 --Alelya Solomonl Rum Kaisin
3 Micha~el Harris Fbocny cash
4 Marina 1\fakis Se~abwcere.
WORKING HUNTER HACK


4 ineN8 CI JPER
I Marrinat tsfakis Seabrene
2 DaYvid Knight Rumr Raisin
PONY WORKING HUNTER


4- Rs summr I'n lu,~ enllsstop
HANDY WORKING HUNTER
I Alison Albury Serge~ant Maljor
2 Alison Albury (`osmo
3 Nancy Alburv Apollo
4 -Besus Plummler Frosty Kreel


.BAHAMIANPLEASUREPONY
I-Robyn Hood-Georgina
2-Galnl Kelly-Widgeon
3-Sand~ra Munsey -Hiawaths
4- G;inny Mallion-Lady
FAULT AND OUT
I esus Plummerr Frosty
2 Nancy Albury -Apollo
3-Jandii Parsons-Macho
4 -Marina Esfakis-Seabreeze
HUNTER SEAT EQUITATION
L-G;all Kelly-Widgeon ("A")


I D~ebbie Simms-jEsther ("gB")
2 Chris Esfakis-Sieabttreez
4 eerr ldho Pe'nny
PONY JUMPER

I acOPEuN JUMPER
2 Michael Hariri-Ebony Caslh
3Jalndii Prsons,-Macho
4 Becsus Plummer- IFrosty Rebel
ADULT EQUITATION
I-Rosemary Misselbro~ok-Esther


She Qrthtbmar


CAMPERDOWN


SHOW


HORSE





I


Ball Boy believes win over



Hudgins will take hint to op

By GLA DST'ON E 1 1Ukt\ rON
IN A CAMPAIGN to improve his standard in the
British Empire lightheavywelght dayssion of which he is rated
number three contender, Bahamas Ich;.mnp Halby Boy Rolle
expressed confidence that a win aIgainst Miamni heavyweight
Johnny "Hud" Hudgins on Friday night will be a big step towards
one of the big breaks he has been waiting for.


Tuesday, April 3, '1973.


c~' sSuperb
DIN ING
In The G~reat


CAN TI NSE


For Rent


PARKING LOT SITE


* 162-foot frontage on West Bay Street

e 26i,000 sq. ft., sufficient space for 100lag
American-type cars.

A 2-minute walk from 902 hotel rooms.


WOT ICE




PUBLIC AUCTION


I


A QUANTITY OF MISCELLANEOUS GOODS WILL BE
SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, GOVERNMENT
WAREHOUSE, ARAW~AK, CAY WELNESDIAY. APRIL
4IFI, 1973, AT 10:00J A.M.'





g gr 0V 9 AUCli oneers


FOR FULL DETAILS, CONTACT -





m as s,,..




sa, ,iL`1 Td [


R.H.CURRY & CoM., Ltd.
PHONE 2 81683 2 868B6 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


-.~L


itto ErtittnP


111'` 1. srtce their
winlr str .k tot sia in a rowu last knight
,',r l tht ~prn tjj, > sole mctinon
big ta Zlarkrtrters by, defe~titg
Uahamac file~nders 10 4 in the
secondl game at the VUren
I lilahcth Spoits entiree ..
"'~s i tlii usual i rst sent n
mendel~rs tar touir hip runs. Lead off
halle~ (, unuev l unvier tairtya s
c\atche :I11mn Johnon ttr yling ato
pick him not roverthrew the hall.
piuded Ico \hrt st<, Surdern
Johnsonr wrho, on another throwing
error \;aw Havenl sale at first and
~Turnerr comningl home for the first
rune. Another erro~r on the short
sto, sann faven was afe at second
second basemen C'harles Moss was
another routine orut but again M1oss
dr (wpd te cech to, bring u6 Ird

racrificer (y illntright field drove in
flaven, :end JIlutrT Jtnd raylr
r he Islenders replied ine the
bo~ttom oft the first wvith unis one
runl als lad offT batter Keni Smiith,

Iwho ore rulhl base(l) onu.11cae ino
rb rte in cicnic Vaiz





who pitched hiis first gamne last
night, the Bllllendrr gct onily onei
mant onr first as IDavis recorded twPo
strikeouts undr cdie pto of th
third gave beck s an 8 2 lead by the
bo~tto~m of' that phase as keni Smith
sc)er J erseco~nd ofI his three fo)r
Smith sco~rcd his final run in the
topl of ther fiftht inlningp on aI sacrifice
abun ? Icenitrzfleielder eliernmit
already recorded two, mo~re to put
then far o~ut olf the reach ofC defeat
Joer Pennermar. the losing pitcher
gave utp ight runs arni foeur hitswa
their fourth ini seven played when
the) blanked Hleastie L~umber 4 0)
bhclindl the Pitchting o~f Ilavid



thtroiugh Saturdla) n rpe
their first inl four played wheni
As I). I(oyals ilC~reased their
undletrated r~cocrd to, three in 3 row\
inl a 4 3victor\ over the A'\.
Ilue~l Kiley s first inning triple
dro~ve in Welling~ton Bullard. The
A's howeverr to~k advantage orf an
error by thec second baseman and
scored .t timing run in the bottom of
the~ first
(;ning ll o1Iut tol silence thee A4
tlthe Royals chopped three runs inl ther
((Pilthee hrJ. I sclu as hit. a n,




hborn nat thein rnite as short *top


('cil I ort' wcas the inine~ii
pitcher and k~endall Dvie~S took th
*it**1*****
In, other games Saturday: St.
Mlichaerl n~odger\ defeated unhtamab
Hlileders Jr. 4 3. P'erc) Pauls too(k
thn Ics uer van Roclle was the
**********
R. IEarcluharsone and C`. Kingp
Irtened up for seven runs and the
Killarney Priic defeated Lee s
(':rtlinals IS s. Tlhe P'rou olul hit the


g Hullolf00 titl
FIVE-FOOT NINE-INCHES, one hundred and nintyfive
pounds Freeporter, Dwight Palacious, was named Mr. Bahamas
International during the first annual show at the Government
High School Auditorium Saturday. Baldwin Darling, making his
debut in the senior division, won the most muscular award.


in the junior division Jeremy
Knowles dominated a he was
named Mr. Junior B amas and
was awarded the most
niuscular award in that
divs packed auditorium saw
over twenty of the top
bodybuilders in the Bahamas
vie for the coveted title.
Mr. Hlubert Wong, organizer
of the event, said that
bodybuilders have been
improving r el ha he fellp

need now is size and more
training." said Mr. Wong. "The
boys only train when they hear
of a contest. They have to train
a year around.
in the senior division, Neil
Decan took second place and
Uarlig c "" inthirdAnthnh


came in third.


I"arling. a favourite in the
contestthaexplained that he

place so he just trained for the
most muscular award. Right
now he is training for the Mr.
Caribbean contest scheduled
for July. Bodybuilders from all
over the C'aribbean are
expected to compete in this
contest.


Ir think that a win over
Hludgins will give me the right
to fight any in the world." sued Role "He
(Hfud) is a tremelndousll fight~r
"I fell fike I would kntiokot
Hutdens~. siaidl Rolec although

1(,1 Rollc \antl rrtht
i on Hudlcgr ls Is not .r
e~~i 11 fl UonBrem ln anlli
respecritilve defcfated andl drew
wali .nd!halvinlC been wit lh
some oft the best in thel ,rld
"I feel my) chances against~l him
aIre goodc.' Rolle want 1

which looks like one ofl the



1.. sSik' itlingens

I'in~~~t~~r. wh il hcc
cight months ofi no alt!,on,
bitterly corI~plaine~d Jboutct tht,

maitch '1 ,ast r ouldn t get rrn
fights," said Pllnd~rr as to, his
eight months' layoff The
piromoters jus~t pass ine by Hut
"'y that Ihave a manager, t'T
ar t'y G~oldsteini) he Is Ilooking
out for these thingss"
With that new conccpt rn
mind the veteran middleweight
who has had only 15 fights
during his six years of boxing is
now taking a positive step
to wards inte rna tional
recognition. "I was just waiting
for the chance," he said. "I
believe it is now and I c~n't
ifell to lose any fights.'
A native of Sandy P'oint
l\baCO Pinder wnth
.'dleweig~ht title in F~ebruars
n hX and since then no, ~
seem.1l iterestcJ ni
.nginglr him. All the others
.dleweights) Pinlder said
iol brag and make noise ust
to mlake the people believe that
Iam afraid of defending iy

Presently trained under John
Sred Skinner Rennic Is
S..eeking to put back that
stamina which he lost during
his layoff. As far as experience
i concerned, Pinder sold that
will be in shape. "'I dlont't
1IKe 'o brag so I'll just ;:o out
There ind do my thiing," he
aid. "111 just do like what my
trainer tells me to do," he
added, stating that that has
always been profitable.
Baby Boy, an Exumian,
started his boxing career at the
T. of 14 and since then has (
.,ed 29 of 36 fights.
rlI HAS OPERATION
ON BROKEN JAW
SAN D~IEGO, C'ALIFORNIA'
April 1 (AP') Mtuhamm:1l Ali wats
S.untr heckrr a spitoa
to; 1 LL butl **ill ea3t nothing but
(i.,u JI so~r ?tix weeks because of a
or oken raw, doctors said.
I're fo r mer heavyweights
;r Iamiron was injured Saturday in
a o( r ofuss to Ken Norton of San
D~iegce All, 31, underwent a
I1r hour operation Saturday night.
IDr. William Lundeen, the state
Ath leic Commission physician who
1as supervised All's treatment,
dez ibed the injury as a compound
ha~ ~ur** of the lower left jawbone
between the second and third
c,l: ..= .. wold' seua


CloUSely observe.: nt IIhe three of
Iludgins' lossau victrories,
Rolle sarid he learned one thing
thart Perry andl Boston did not
realv YL yo press him l
( HIu dl he is just as
ihicke~n heartedJ as they are.
thus,. Roll: \Iaid that his object
will be ts,1 pr as fludgins~ to se
what he~ really has5 In himn

Fridu a 1 ht extrd 1 < e ule the Narssau Stadium. Bob
Freez~e will take on Jamnes
Fountain in a tour rounder and
Al Moss mneets Ki ony in
ano Ithr tour rou nder.


MIDDLEWEIGHT CHAMP RENNIE PINDER, after an eight months lay off, works
out with Kid Barr in a sparring session to build up lost stamina. Pinder takes on Miami's
Slick Mitchell Friday in the eight round semi-final at the Nassau Stadium. Photo: Rickey
Wells.


saidl NeCwton, a Stabl' mnate of
former world heavyweight
champ Floyd Patterson. "Im n
looking for the big guys like
Ellis, Foreman, Quarry anld Ali
too .... we're in the satie
business, aren't we.
When asked if he canl tap
Hud, Newton replied with
confidence that whenever he is
in dut he doesn't fight
anybody. 'What's the use ,f
going into something with
doubt."
Match against Newton, who
is now 30-4-2, will surely me~can
the end of Hudgins' Nas~sau
reign, say local boxing f'ans
Looking over the bo~xrng
scene in Nassau, Newtonl feels
that boxing does not get the
right backing from fans. What 1
is needed is a show almlost
every week to get the people
interested, said Newton.


(;iven the loss in a ten round
split decision, Newton felt that
lie won that fight. "It was a
very controversial thing," he
said. "I did not think I lost it
bu I liut wa in the guy's home
.iown ... so what more do you
expect. it is understood that
I'rice is in Nassau
Ilowever, Price is the last
thing~ on Newton s mind. After
nestring o~f fludgins' successful
esgn overL Bosto~n and Perry,
Newtotn cancelled all other
engagemntcns to rescue the
B um from Ilndgins.
"N, 'mldy s going to comes over
licre and I~ke over the
heavywe~ights," he said. "I am
the heavyweight king here.
PI'LLEDnOUT
rAfter bemng contacted by
promoters inclurding: Charlie


WENDELL NEWTON the
Bahamas' pride, seeks to end
Johnny Hudgins' reign over the
Bahamas' heavyweights.
Major Jr. and Moon Ramsey
concerning a bout with
iludgins, Newton said that he
agreed and they were aiming
for F'ebruary. Pat Currey,
Hludgins' trainer. later pulled
out of the deal, it is
understood.RKealising that he is
a better boxer than H-udgins,
C'urrey feels that if Hud gets
beat he will lose his popularity


LAIES TE I SW NR
BEULAH RICHMOND, winner of the ladies division of
the Montagu Beach Hotel Tennis Tournament, over the
weekend, receives her trophy from film star Sidney Poitier.
To her left is Bradley Demeritte, tennis pro at the Montagu
B:::h and to Po lies' leRt moB mer Pron gnea
6-4 to win the title.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells

PEPSI COLA 881F EnTrY DEALINE


IFrom I p.m.
Dancing til 1.30 a.m
PARADISE ISLAND


both days as well as overall winners.
plntries os non Wedn sday end
Saturday and 12 noon Sunday.
AUSSIES 261 FOR 5,
AF ER GUYANA'S 458
(A ) G uol Tadh a fir erUYANA
tA trelicrickMon ay claimn fv
second innings wickets for 261 runs
at tes on the third day of a three
day game.
The home team declared at 458
frtn8e id des~pdi a fitne ope ig
diket sand of6r byatohn &a our
and G~res Chappell they were able
to snatch the initiative towards tea
time by dismissing Benaud. Marsh
and lan Chappell in quick
succession.


BOB SLATTERK who this year
cra die Cof Cl ui, willntry the
repeat another victory whenl he
competes in the Second Annual
d('njnoleTourna nett slhate fo
Ocean Golf Club.
fclo ing seulan pla d rin la
year's toutrnment, Slatter in a
sudden death playoff which ended
onl the first hole shot a birdie four
to win the playoff and the two day
tournament.
Ins "ad of pay bisng avr3 moe
only, (i.e. Saturday and Sunday
combined totast) membes may
enter for play either on Saturday or
Sunday. There will be winners on


eA 5-minute walk from 4 large modern
DUIldings.


office


Irrfir L troRes Dwvight Palacious wins

N0 W 8E CK'S toll rrE


LUXEMBOURG


TO PLAY CASE


TOURNLEY HERE
';I X 1 001 ~ NINI INCHES
S Ainateur B~asketball
\ctilir,j a Spo~rtsman of the oir
n tA champion s Kenitucky
< olonel\ ini the first of three games
I~u~crihtrr~ Ntien nnal Iivis ct
Ilmn ;t the A. I. Adderley ()m
~unda~t at 3 p~m rn Th team is
l ea~ul~r a t arrive inl Nawsau
lin thie second game Monday
Iuipht ;It X c, clock Luxembourg take
nI Irckok ( cougars Nalssau League
hunlp n >nd in the thtr egamethj
I!hamasd Nattional Teaim
4 r~c~iprocall invitations is aissured
I\ thr visitor\ wvhen the Bahamnas
is a Nnna it r~h tht" ar ~ery
Ima, timer when two or ith kes
player/colaches IFred "P'apa" Smiith
- 1 Heckh s Co~ugars an~d Wen~lty lord
1 Ken~tucfky. Colonels~1 are o)ff the
I~. Und. Iour~ve\r, wsth thle tallent
.Itithough they were robbed of a few F
amsthe Unhamn\' side should
fare well against hLuch experrienced
it i\ expected thlat a1wardh won (
Iluringp the 1972 `73 II.A.II.A. xceries
w\ill be awardedd at the end of( the
ni'e ftnow,\ing are the playetrs
a lccth~ 1te rrpnrucll2 Ctve/R Ianl
(Ir L. sterliamn(: Cuant (Colonel

'trinr Inghrlcm (I.gls), alorcnel E an
I'aradow~ Ieagur andJ coached b




(( irawaks). Peteri urown (Icousurs).
vernal "l'ugh~" Me I;I a~ll iders).
Practice sessions for the
lIahamus' team has been culted ftr
~cdy cm Trw d rnde luraday
TITLE FIGHT
(;RI NoItIE. I HANC'I (Al)
World werlterweight champions Jose
Napoles of Mlexico) will defend his
litle ;teainl~ a oger Menletrey of
IHarran n i leet~r ncldun he


800011l NOW100 WSHIS 10 Si0W



Johnny Hudgins Nassau canMsS

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
HEAVY WEIGHT CHAMP BOSTON BLACKIE tried twice and failed. Not even the "new" Bert
Perry was able to withstand the competence of Miami's Johnny "Hud" Hudgins. But if lightweight
champ Baby Boy Rolle fails to cut him down this weekend then surely Hud's spectacular reign
over the Rahamas' heavyweights will be detrimentally threatened as Bahamas' top heavyweight,
Wendell Newton, has come to the rescue.
What brought Newton to the in Nassau and mloreoven .
Bahama\ was a return bout I~ Currey is a guy who, likes
with 'h iladel phia's heavy IC Bahamas sunshine, cocmme~nted
weight Wilheo Pri~e to whom Nwo,
N wton has lost one of his four Although he never Gail
in c h es in 36 ring 1udgins work out before, "if I
appeaance. Thi math iscan't beat a guy like Hludgins, I
tentatively scheduled for April migt a we l so ighin


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