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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03311
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 31, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03311

Full Text














rithutt


(Regiatrea with Postmaster of Baiham for postage conioons within th Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 110


MINISTRY SEEKS TO CHARGE

CONSULTANTS FOR PMH FACILITIES


Doctors angered; not







consulted on PMH annex







or national insurance



By NICKI KELLY
DOCTORS AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL, involved in a long-standing battle with officialdom,
are now claiming that they have been totally ignored by government in those areas in which they are most actively
concerned.


The doctors' complaints
revolve around four basic issues
the question of a Medical
Practitioners' Bill, formation of
a hospital doctors union and
the absence of any
consultation cit 'r on 'the new
hospital e -tension or the
National Insurance Act.
According to one leading
member of the medical
profession, the doctors'
problem with government
began in March 1971 when M'r.
Oscar Johnson. the PLP
representative for C(at Island,
verbally assaulted Dr. C. W. M.
Bethel on the floor of the
Ilou,,e of Assembly.
The accusations levelled by
Mr. Johnson against Dr. Bethel,
then Princess Margaret Hospital
Chiet of Staff, stemmed from
the case of Mr. Johnson's
foster-mother. Daisy Gaitor,
who was discharged from
huipitit in ;co.uary o0 that
year and died five weeks later.
Mr. Johnson claimed the
hospital refused to have her
re-admitted and that Dr.
Bethel's letter to the Prime
Minister stating he would not
tolerate any "political,
administrative or personal
interference" in the staff's
medical duties was an "insult"
and tantamount to
"treachery."
It was subsequently revealed
in the House that both Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling and
then IHealth Minister Clement
Maynard had brought pressure
to bear on hospital staff to
have Miss Gaitor re-admitted.
TERMINAL
The Medical Association of
the Bahamas, in a statement to
the press, pointed out that Miss
(;aitor's case was terminal and
that she was sent home to be
surrounded to her loved ones,
as medical treatment was no
longer effective or indicated.
Fight months later, in
November 1971, the Medical
Association called for a
Medical Practitioner's Act
comparable to those of other
progressive countries. At the
same time the Association
voiced concern over public
criticism of the profession
"levelled at them unjustly
because of some administrative
problems."
It envisaged that any such
Act would make provision for
a Medical Council with legal
powers over the profession of
registrations, discipline,
maintenance of the Medical
Register and supervision of
medical education.
The Association pointed out
that in other countries the
Council is elected by the local
medical association and the
Minister of Health in such
manner as to ensure that
control of the Council lies in
the hands of representatives of
the Association, and thus the
profession.
The Tribune's informant
said that the Medical
Association of the Bahamas has
spent hours drafting medical
laws on the disestablishment of
the hospital so as to remove it
from politics.
"We want it decentralized
with greater emphasis placed

EYE CONTACT
TEST' LENSES

ROBERT T. HIRST
Optomeirist
Savoy Bldg.
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on community care," he said.
The doctor maintains,
however, that although the
government has drawn up a
Bill, the crunch has come over
the question of who is to be on
the Medical Council.
COUNCIL MEMBERS
The government, he said,
wants the members to be
appointed, while the medical
profession insists they be
elected and thus representative
of the Medical Association of
the Bahamas.
As a result of the frictions
arising between government
and the doctors over the
Johnson-Bethel espisde, Dr.
Bethel resigned as Chief of
Staff last year and was replaced
by Dr. D. P. Duffy, an
Australian specialist in
neurosurgery and neurology.
Dr. Bethel, however,
contii.Aes as a consultant on
the staff of the Princess
Margaret.
The Tribune's informant
said it was ironic that at a time
when the government is
emphasizing Bahamianization
at all levels it should replace a
Bahamian Chief of Staff with a
"white expatriate."
The second complaint by
the doctors is the government's
"disregard" of their application
to form a union.
BARGAINING
A press announcement on
April 5, 1972 said doctors at
the Princess Margaret Hospital
and Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre had banded together in
a bid to form their own
collective bargaining agent.
Application for registration
of the Bahamas Hospital
Doctors Union was made in
March 1972 to the Ministry of
Labour.
"We have yet to receive a
reply," the doctor asserted.
Claiming that such an attitude
on the part of the Ministry was
unconstitutional, he said the
doctors had no legal position
from which to negotiate as a
union or Council and were "at
the mercy of politicians."
Regarding the hospital
extension, the doctors
maintain that they were not
informed officially of the
government's plans or asked
for their recommendations as
medical men having to work in
the new annex.
Nor, said The Tribune's
informant, "were we consulted
on the National Insurance Act,
which is in effect socialized
medicine."
He did not see how such an
Act could be enforced here
without leading to a mass
exodus of skilled staff from the
hospital.
'ATLAS SHRUGGED'
To support his argument he
quoted the words of a
distinguished brain surgeon in
Ayn Rand's book "Atlas
Shrugged."
Commented Dr. Hlendricks
in "Atlas Shrugged":
'1 quit when medicine was
placed under State control.
some years ago.' said Dr.
Hlendricks. 'Do you know what
it takes to perform a brain
operation? Do you know the
kind of skill it demands, and
the years of passionate,
merciless, excruciating
devotion that go to acquire
that skill? That was what I
would not place at the disposal
of men whose sole
qualification to rule me was
their capacity to spout the
fraudulent generalities that got
them elected to the privilege of


enforcing their wishes at the
point of a gun. I would not let
them dictate the purpose for
which my years of study had
been spent, or the conditions
of my work, or my choice of
patients, or the amount of my
rewards. I observed that in all
the discussions that preceded
the enslavement of medicine,
men discussed everything
except the desires of the
doctors. Men considered only
the 'welfare' of the patients,
with no thought for those who
were to provide it. That a
doctor should have any right,
desire or choice in the matter,
was regarded as irrelevant
selfishness; his is not to choose,
they said, only 'to serve'. That
a man who's willing to work
under complusion is too
dangerous a brute to entrust
with a job in the stockyards
never occurred to those who
proposed to help the sick by
making life impossible for the
healthy. I have often wondered
at the smugness with which
people assert their right to
enslave me, to control my
work, to force my will, to
violate my conscience, to stifle
my mind yet what is it that
they expect to depend on,
when they lie on an operating
table under my hands? Their
moral code has taught them to
believe that it is safe to rely on
the virtue of their victims.
Well, that is the virtue I have
withdrawn. Let them discover
the kind of doctors that their
system will now produce. Let
them discover, in their
operating rooms and hospital
wards, that it is not safe to
place their lives in the hands of
a man whose life they have
throttled. It is not safe, if he is
the sort of man who resents it
and still less safe, if he is the
sort who doesn't.' "
INCOME TAXI D?
Yet another thorn for the
doctors is the March 22
Memorandum circulated last
week to Consultants at the
Princess Margaret Hospital.
Where before these
consultants were allowed the
full and free use of hospital
facilities in dealing with their
private patients, the Ministry
of Ilealth now feels that they
should pay the hospital one
third of the income earned
from these patients.
The Consultants, according
to The Tribune's doctor
spokesman, are against having
their private income "taxed."
The Ministry Memorandum
noted that there were four
types of consultants employed
in the Ministry of lHealth. They
were: Senior Consultants (with
private practice); Consultants
(without private practice):
Consultants (with private
practice) and part-time
(Consultants.
C('onti nu ed the
Memorandum: "The basis on
which the Senior Consultants
or Consultants (with private
practice) are expected to work
is that they devote not more
than two tenths of their
normal working hours to their
private patients and the
balance of their time to
patients on the public wards.
"There is however, a
decreasing relationship
between this provision and
actual practice.
"The Sentior Consultants and
(Consultants (with private
practice) have the full use of
the facilities of the hospital in
which they work when dealing
with their private patients. This
extends from office space to
utilities, equipment and even


staff and no return is made to
government in respect of
these."
CONTRIBUTION
It was the view of the
Ministry, the Memo said, that
the present system was
unacceptable and an
arrangement whereby the
Senior Consultants,
Consultants and Part-Time
Consultants (with private
practice) contribute some part
of their income to cover the
cost of facilities provided by
the government be instituted.
The Memo then went into
the details of how this would
be worked out administratively
through a central appointments
and accounting section where
appointments to see
Consultants would be made on
referral from a General
Practitioner or the Out Patients
Department.
Monies due from private
patients would be paid directly
to this section which would in
turn deduct the government's
one third fee and pay the
balance due to each doctor on
a monthly basis.
In the X-Ray Department
and Laboratory, two bills
would be issued, covering cost
of supplies and the professional
fee. The full amount of the
former would be kept by the
hospital and one third of the
latter.
In the case of operations.
there would be a flat theatre
fee charged by the hospital
which would include the use of
equipment, supplies and
anaesthetics.
The surgeon and the
anaesthetist would merely
inform the Accounting Section
of their charge for professional
fees and again one third of the
amount would be retained by
government with two-thirds
being credited to the Account
of the Consultant.
DISCUSSION
The Medical Chief of Staff
was advised to discuss the
proposals with all consultants
allowed private practice, and if
there were any points requiring
further explanation, the
Ministry said its representatives
would be pleased to meet with
a small committee representing
the consultants for discussions.
In speaking with The
Tribune the doctor claimed the
government was refusing to
recognize the position of
medical practitioners at the
hospital and interpreted this
either as "spite" against
specific individuals or the
medical profession in general.
"The politicians are trying
to fracture the medical
profession because they are the
only ones offering resistance to
their policies," he declared.
Ite also charged that the
blood bank recruitment facility
was no longer operative, and
elective surgery had to be
cancelled over the past two
weeks.
Another complaint was the
shortage of skilled nurses and
the government's decision not
to employ any more
expatriates, and the operation
of the Renaissance health clinic
at the Balmoral Beach Hotel.
The doctor claimed that the
medical men associated with
the clinic were not licensed to
practise in the Bahamas, and
that the American Medical
Association, the British
Medical Association and the
Canadian Medical Association
had questioned their activities.
He said the AMA had
protested directly to its British
counterpart.


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CHURCH IDEA

FOR 'GOOMBAY

SUMMER' HERE
THE TOURISM Ministry is
compiling a list of church-going
Bahamian couples willing to
participate in the 1973
Goombay Summer "take a
visitor to church" programme.
The directory, intended for
distribution to hotels and other
businesses connected with the
hospitality industry, is being
compiled with the help of the
Bahamas Christian Council.
Council co-ordinator Canon
William Thompson has urged
pastors of the various New
Providence churches to
compile a list of "reliable
couples in their congregations
who are qualified and prepared
to become a part of this
exercise in welcoming strangers
to our community and way of
life."
The pastors' lists will foit n
the proposed directory.
It was hoped that
participating couples "would
invite their guests into their
homes for perhaps a typical
Bahamian breakfast or lunch."
Goombay Summer, a
Ministry promotional scheme,
is slated to begin on June 3.


MAYCOCK IS

MADE DevCo


CHAIRMAN


MR. ALFRED Maycock,
M.P. for Fort Fincastle, has
been appointed chairman of
the Bahamas Development
Corporation, it was learned
today.
While the appointments of
several other PLP backbenchers
in the House to various official
positions was announced late
yesterday, Mr. Maycock's
name was not on the list.
However, in a Ministry of
Development press release on
another matter Mr. Maycock
was said to be the chairman of
the Corporation.
A Government statement
said yesterday Mr. Lionel
Davis, M.P. for Fox Hill, has
switched from parliamentary-
secretary to the Ministry of
Education and Culture to
parliamentary secretary to the
Ministry of Development
Taking Mr. Davis' former
position in Education is Mr.
Sinclair Outten, M.P for St.
Barnabas.
Mr. Cadwell Armbrister,
M.P. for Killarney, has been
appointed Government Whip,
replacing Labour Minister
Clifford Darling.


TV PERSONALITY

INJURED HERE

MIAMI, Fla. (AP)-Televi-
sion personality Ed MctMahon
was flown to a hospital here
today by helicopter from Cat
Cay in the Bahamas where he
suffered a head injury, the U.S.
Coast Guard said. McMahon's
manager. Jack Drury, said
McMahon slipped and cut his
head while boarding a boat at
Cat Cay where he had been
helping to raise money for the
heart fund.
Drury said McMahon was
admitted to Parkway Hlospital
where he was reported in good
condition. McMahon, Johnny
Carsons' sidekick on NBC's
tonight show, was expected to
be released from the hospital
later in the day Drury said.


ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF TOURISM, Basil H.
Albury, coordinator of Goombay Summer '73, outlines
some of the Ministry's plans for this year's summer
festival to Canon William E. Thompson, rector of St. Agnes
Anglican church, and the Bahamas Christian Council's
representative on the Goombay Advisory Committee. The
clergyman is coordinating the "Attend Church with a
Bahamian Family" segemnt of the Goombay programme.
PHOTO: Wendell Cleare.


MPs agree films being


shown to our youth


are a national disgrace

LEGISLATION is in the drafting stages to prevent Bahamians
from being "demoralised" by certain types of films shown in
local theatres, Government revealed in the House Wednesday.


The disclosure followed a
move by Errington Watkins
(IFNM-\arsh Harbour) for the
appointment of a select
committee to investigate the
showing of certain films here.
Government did not oppose
the motion, and Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling said the
committee "'can do this House
and this country, if it is
serious. a good turn." by
formulating a philosophy on
what kinds of theatre
entertainment Bahamaians
should be exposed to.
House Speaker Arlington
Butler appointed to the
committee Mr. Watkins and
Cyril Fountain (FNM North
Long Island, Rum Cay and San
Salvador) for the Opposition.
and Ilomne Affairs Minister
Anthony Roberts, Alfred
Maycock (PLP-Fort Fincastle)
and, Kendal Nottage
(PLP-Grand BAhama) for the
Government.
Introducing the motion Mr.
Watkins said:
NATIONAL INTEREST
"I am quite sure that this
matter is of national interest.
One need only go the theatres
today to hear the type of
language on the screen one
would expect to hear on a
naval ship. The films being
shown to our youth are a
national disgrace. A strict
censorship should be put on
films being shown, especially
to young people, in our
country.
"If something is not done
and done quickly to curb this,"
he warned, "we will in a very
short time have a nation of
degenerates and dope addicts."
Noel Roberts (FNM-St.
John's) seconded the move.
"The censorship board
examining films ought to be
ashamed of themselves," tie
said.
Ilome Affairs Minister
Anthony Roberts told the
House:
"Government is mindful of
the situation and has taken
notice of it for quite some
time. The Government has in
the drafting stages legislation
giving the Minister (of Hlome
Affairs) more say in matters
dealing with movies.
SMALL
"'the present committee,"
he said. "is largely in the hands
of the ('onunissioner of Police
and it is small The legislation
will broaden the scope of the
committee and it will consist
of persons from various areas
of the community.
"We don't intend to infringe
on the constitutional rights of
any citizen, but I believe
GoveTrnment has a right to
l o tec t people from
themselves, and that is the case
in this legislation," the Minister
said.
Norman Solomon (INM-St.
George and Dunmore) said "in
my personal view Government
must take whatever steps are
needed to control the garbage
appearing on our screens,
without infringing on
constitutional rights."
lie pointed out the need for
a proper system of
identification, so that judging


the age of a prospective patron
of a restricted film "would not
be left at the discretion of the
cashier "
Mr. Pindling noted that the
Bahamian society is "volatile"
and not literary, "so it is all the
more important to ensure that
what they see and hear is
educational, or, more basically,
wholesome.
GUIDl)ELINES
"It is difficult to legislate on
morals," he pointed out, "but
we .l to establish
guiderfnh') which our people
are not demoralised."
He felt that one of the
"unfortunate features" of the
problem is that
"profit-motivated" theatre
owners and operators show
films in "very selective parts of
the island.
"Many of the films the
members regard as
objectionable are not shown at
the Shirley Street Theatre, but
at over-the-hill theatres."
lie noted also that "a high
proportion of the films now
showing feature black artists,
but I know many black artists
who wouldn't even accept a
role in them.
"Certain films, produced
mainly in America and
portraying life and times in
America, do not relate to
non-industrialised nations
"The dress, speech, life-style
and mannerisms of our young
people are being very highly
affected by these films.
"If we are to really find a
solution members would be
deluding themselves if they
think it could be done without
infringing on what some
members think are the
freedoms to see and hear what
you want to see and hear," Mr.
Pindling said.

POLICE BAND TO

ATLANTA TO 'PAY

OFF ITS DEBT'
THIE ROYAL Bahamas
Police Band those marching
goodwill-ambassadors will
participate in this year's
"Dogwood Festival" parade in
Atlanta, Georgia, it waW
announced today by tho.
Ministry of Tourism.
The band leaves Nassau April 6 for Atlanta and will
return on April 8.
While in Atlanta the hand
will give a special performance
in Lennox Square.
The 36-piece band was
offered as a prize by tlhe
Ministry of Tourism at last
year's American Society ot
Travel Agents (ASTA)
convention held in Las Vegas.
Mr. Walter Bun/I, an Atlanta
travel agent drew the lucky
card and won for his home
state a free, all expenses paid,
performance by the Royal
Bahamas Police Band.
Bahamas Assistant Director
of Tourism, F. John
Deleveaux, called the
forthcoming promotion, a
"timely one," in that it
coincides with the Ministry's
plans to extend its facilities in
'hat city.


.ItAIAMAS CRUISE LINES
of Florida yesterday
announced that the ir v.
Freeport has been sold to the
Birka Line of Finland for $14
million and will leave the
Florida-Bahamas cruise routes
at the end of April

o Ne e'.t nit' s aitr I t, ti llt r \b.tr, ,li 1 p nll pn 111na
p, ti(' t- 1"hip owncr, I ti-
Sh 1 11 i .i I 1ci pura ry
r .' p I .1 a illcn 11 t N h I I c'
"prcpaii.in, w~it is, r IT C tlW11 1 l r,!,t
tor t) i mtl1I1 11 ia ptrinlinl r' l
shlip." ,1 prci s I0 C dl'(isC s,,i,.
T'hl s"f t'llieitI l said lhiI
Ireeport will lc'.vc Miami at
the cid 1I \prl to begin "i
IHelsinki Stl, k ,iolin nin
13,iha Iii ( 'rise Lines is
(\n ed wiiwly by the Grtnd
H.lhi.imiii I'IrtI Authority and
thit' I' I reighlt C(ompany.
1lit ill Freeport, 446 feet
Iing. 14.0fI( gross tors ard
illih t sle''"pii!' ,1lcco(nllnodations
lfoi 750( passeng'iers. was built at
o1 Lisl ot ibo l S I i million.
I lhe luxury liner was
launiichd I ronm uebeck. West
(;erlnnan. on April 20, 96b8
and christened by Mrs.
Marguerite Pindling, wife of
Prime Minister L. 0. Pindling.
ThI e Freeport made her first
call at Freeport. Grand
Bahanm, on December 7. 1968
In the middle of 1970 the
ireeport's route was switched
froil Miami-Freeport to
M imi-l :reeport- Nassau.
Yesterday's press relea.,e said
the I-reeport 's permant nt
replacement "would be
specifically designed for
Mianii-Bahamas tide It wqjld
otter more cabins and larger
public, re-"ms, than i-le m.v.
Freeport 1, minc4tiV?'a larer
night club. rest ltant and
duty-free shopping facilities "


GOVERNMENT

REVIEWING TERMS

OF DEVELOPMENT
T Il MINISTRY of
Development is "reviewing the
terms and conditions under
which major developers have
had a p p ro v al fr om
Government,." a Govemment
Information Services press
release said today.
The review, "to ensure that
progress is made and that the
economy gets tlie desired
benefits" from land
development. is believed to
have been sp:trked by the
controversy\ over the Pinewood
gardens s development, which
PLP backbencher Oscar
Johnson charged was
"sub-standard."
The GIS release continued:
"At the same tune steps are
being taken to assist small
businessmen, to accelerate the
progress in agriculture and
fisheries, to attract more
economic activity to less
developed islands, and to
Ilmoilise Flaniily Island
residents into business units to
take advantage e of business
oppo. ..,ties.
"As part of this immediate
programme, Minister of
Development Carlton L.
Francis, parliamentary
secretary to the ministry
Lionel Davis, M.P., chairman of
the Bahamas Development
Corporation Alfred Maycock,
M.P. and officers of the
Ministry of Development have
planned visits to development
sites, farming and fishing
communities and I'.inily Island
communities. Several such
visits have already been made.
"The real objective," the
(;IS release salt,. "is to help
realize (;Government's pledge to
the people to senate conditions
for useful employment and to
help Bahamians participate in
their economy."


NEWivaLl
RANTi Y

ll^n i ihJ


lll[ l


Saturday, March 31, 1973.


_ __ ____ ~_ I I ---


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ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
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THIEU VISITS U.S. TO SEEK BILLIONS IN AID
SAIGON (AP) South Vietnam's President Thieu left Saigon for the
U.S. today. American source say he will seek a commitment for billions of
dollars in American aid to keep his government in power. Thieu will meet
President Nixon Monday and Tuesday at the Western White House in San
Clemente. The US. visit is the first stop on a five-nation tour to establish
what Thieu termed a new era of peace."
A cheering crowd of several thousand, many of them civil servants and
military offloess, was on hand at Jan Son Nhut Airport to see Thieu off.
BUNKER RESIGNS AS AMBASSADOR TO S. VIET
The White House announced yesterday the resignation of Ellsworth
Bunker as U.S. ambassador to South Vietnam. The I-year-old Bunker will
be replaced by a career diplomat, Graham Martin. Bunker is to be back in
the U.S. to participate in the talks between President Nixon and South
Vietnam's President Thieu.
FINAL WAVE OF POWS ON WAY HOME
TRAVIS AIR BASE, CALIFORNIA (AP) Another 48 freed American
prisoners of Wa are aboard three return flight today heading to air bases
In the .5. A final wave of 69 former POWs is expected to leave the
Philippines by tomorrow. They are the last of 587a men released from
Communist prison ini Vietnam and Lame.
The planes carrying today's 48 returnees are headed for Travis Air Base
in California, Scott Air Base in Illinois and Kelly Air Base in Texas.
Additional lp of two of the flights will continue on to Andrews Air Base
in Maryland and Sheppard Air Base in Texas.
An army captain the Communists say Is the last American captive they
hold Is expected in the Philippines tomorrow if present negotiations are
successful. The commanding general at Clark Air Base says the exact arrival
time will be announced later for Robert White of Newport News, Virginia.
N. VIET DELEGATION BLASTS U.S.
SAIGON (AP) The North Vietnamese delegation to the Joint Military
Commission left Saigon for Hanoi today, but not without a blast at the
U.S., charging it had sabotaged the cease-fire agreement.
The Hanoi delegation chief repeated the Communist charge made
yesterday that American service men disguised as civilians remain behind to
assist the South Vietnamese army.
The Viet Cong joined the North Vietnamese today in charging the U.S.
with cease-fire violations. The Viet Cong deputy chief claimed that
17-thousand U.S. military personnel remain in Vietnam.
The U.S. embassy in Saigon says about nine-thousand American civilians
remain in South Vietnam. the largest group about six thousand are
said to be contract employees of the Defense Department. Many of them
are former G-I's. U.S. officials say the contract employees perform such
tasks as maintenance, logistics, communications functions for both the
U.S. and some segments of the Saigon government.
DENIES U.S. MILITARY ADVISORS IN VIETNAM
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS (AP) Defense Secretary Elliott Richardson
said yesterday there are no U.S. military advisors left behind in Vietnam.
He Mid there are civilian personnel, but none is involved in what he called
"a military capacity." Richardson made his remarks during a visit to San
Antonio, Texas to dedicate an army medical training centre.
NEGOTIATORS TO MEET IN TEPEE
WOUNDED KNEE, SOUTH DOKOTA (AP) The first negotiations in
almost two weeks are scheduled today at Wounded Knee, South Dakota. A
government negotiating team and representatives of the American Indian
Movement ae to meet In a tepp near the village.
The location .Is In what's been called a "demilitarized zone" between an
Indian blockade at the edge of Wounded Knee and a forward roadblock
manned by U.S. marshals.
A cease-fire between the two sides has been in effect since Tuesday, and
Interior Department spokesman Tom Evans says he's hopeful the new talks
can bring a peaceful end to the 32-day-old occupation.
FLOODS HUNDREDS OF FAMILIES HOMELESS
ST. LOUIS )AP) Hundreds of families in eastern Missouri are homeless
today. The swollen Mississippi and Missouri rivers flooded several areas
yesterday. The National Guard stood by to aid in the evacuation of
families, but so far, volunteers and civil defense personnel have handled the
job.
EEC TARIFF CUTS EFFECTIVE SUNDAY
BRUSSELS (AP)--The first Industrial tariff cuts between the old six
Common Market countries and their three new partners come into effect
Sunday.
The treaty whose sgdnlnj January 1, brought Britain, Ireland and
Denmark into the European Economiq Community provides for a 20 per
cet out In Industrial trade tariffs on April 1. followed by four more 20 per
cent cut on Jmanuary 1 apf uccedve years starting in 1974.
At the same tane ejoths duties wiUbe cut by 20 per cent between the
six and Ireland.ethe one hand and Sweden, Switzerland, Portugal and
Icelasin of the dqthr. All.four on-member countries signed a free trade
agreement with DMh enlarged EEC.
The Interim agrehient with Austria, which went into effect on October
I, 1972, provided for a first cut of 30 per cent. There will be progressive
duty cuts in Industrial trade between the EEC and Austria until duty-free
entry is effective July 1, 1977.
Meanwhile free trade is being maintained between Denmark and Britain
on one hand and the non-member countries like Sweden, Switzerland,
Antria and Portugal except for newsprint and paper products.
The duty cuts also apply to processed foodstuffs, in as far as its
industrial element is concerned. Certain so-called sensitive products are
exempted from the tariff reduction.
The two countries that do not yet benefit from such duty cuts are
Finland, which for political reasons has not yet signed the accord, and
Norway which Is in the process of completing negotiations for a free trade
agreement.
Duty cuts on canned fish products from Iceland will only take effect
July 1, pending a settlement on fishing limits with Britain and West
Gemany.
McCORD'S SENTENCING POSTPONED TO JUNE 1
WASHINGTON (AP) Sentencing of James W. McCord Jr., the source
of new Allegations that top White House aides knew of plans for the
Watergate breaking, was postponed Friday until June I S.
Chief U.S district court Judgp John J. Sirica delayed the sentencing to
.give- MCord .tim to complete testimony to a Senate committee on
Watergate ad to a federal grand jury looking into the same thing.
McCord, 54; the former security chief for President Nixon's re-election
committee, was convicted Jan. 30 of conspiracy, burglary and wiretapping
of Democtatl headquarters in the Watergate office complex.
Five of his co-defendants all of whom pleaded guilty and also won
delays in final sentencing to give them an opportunity to cooperate with
Investiaton.
0. Gordon Liddy, described as the organizer and boss of the conspiracy,
was sentenced a week ago to serve at least six years, eight months, in
Judge Sirias Friday ordered him to testify before the grand jury,
planting him Immunity from prosecution for anything he might say.
Liddy's lawyer had opposed compelling Uddy to testify.
Sourwes quoted by the Baltimore Sun ware reported IFriday to have said
that McCord told Senate investigators that presidential aide H. R.
Haldeman was fully aware of the Watergate wiretap plans.
ARCHBISHOP RETURNS FOLLOWING ASIAN TOUR
LONDON (AP) Dr. Michael Ramsey, Archbishop of Canterbury, came
ho-e Friday from a tour of 10 Asian countries. It was his last major trip to
the Far East before he retires.
The Church of Egland Primate is to retire in November, 1974, on his
70th birthday, according to a spokesman.
His Asian tour began in India and ended ain Japan.


SOME HOPED FOR DEATH


WHITE IRUSE


Saturday, March 31, 1973.


SUBPOENAS SERVED ON TWO DREAD PLAGUE


More tales of Reds NilTA I Nixon aide 'had to ON INCREASE,
WATERGATE PROBE


torture & treatment



of US prisoners

By Louise Cook
MORE FORMER U.S. PRISONERS OF WAR discussed on
Friday the torture and brutality they underwent at the hands of
their Communist captors. "after about an hour or two" said one
man, "I actually hoped they would kill me."


The men had kept silent
until the last of the POWs
originally scheduled for release
in Indochina landed Thursday
at Clark Air Base in the
Philippines.
At news conferences and in
interviews on Friday, the men
provided fresh details. They
did not discuss reports of
servicemen who coperated with
the enemy or possible
retribution. Military sources
said earlier they had been told
by the Pentagon to maintain
their silence on this issue.
Air Force Lt. Col. Kenneth
North of Welfleet, Mass., who
spent more than six years as a
prisoner, said he was tied with
wire, kicked and slapped
around, then was trussed up
and hit with rifle buts until he
wished for death.
During his interrogation,
North said at a news
conference in Chiocopee,
Mass., "I showed them (the
North Vietnamese) my Geneva
Convention card" with the
rules on treatment of prisoners.
"They tore it up."
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Paul E.
Galanti of Richmond, Va., who
was shot down June 17, 1966
said he was surrounded by
about 50 North Vietnamese
peasants when he reached the
ground.
"I wasn't prepared to
become a prisoner," he said,
"and had decided I would
never get captured. 1 was going
to fire five bullets into the
Vietnamese and use the sixth
on myself, but then I decided
being dead lasts a long time."
TORTURED
Galanti said he surrendered
and later was interrogated and
repeatedly tortured with ropes
by the North Vietnamese. He
said he finally answered
questions with fabricated
answers.
"I had talked under torture
and was assured by them that I
was the only guy ever to do
so." he said. "I was sure I was
the only guy who had
cracked."
Later, Galanti said, he was
taken to Hanoi and marched
through the streets. 'The
people along the line were
about 30 deep. I was the last
guy in the parade and some of
the people surrounded us and
somebody gave me a soccer
type kick in my groin. It was a
grim situation. They kept
chanting "Son of a bitch, Son
of a bitch."
Galanti said his doctor at
Portsmouth Naval Hospital
confirmed he had been
subjected to an LDS-type
drugging. For months
afterward, he said, he heard
voices telling him of people
who were coming after him.
"To counter them," he said, "I
began to talk back to them. I'd
say, 'Well, look, this isn't real,
so go away.' "
Hospital officials declined
comment on the drug.
Air Force Maj. Russell
Teperly of North Falmouth,
Mass., and Goffstown, N.H.,
said there were ups and downs
in the prisoners' life. As a
result, he said "We became
completely dead inside. The
day of the actual release, if the
airplanes had just turned
around and taken off,
I probably would have just
shaken my head ..."
Teperly was shot down in
October 1967.
Charles E. Willis, a civilian
worker captured during the
1968 TET offensive in South
Vietnam, said the "pulse of the


war" determined his treatment.
"If the Communists were
winning at a certain time,
things went fine," Willis said in
Honolulu en route from Clark
to Kelly Air Force Base in
Texas with 17 other newly
released POWs. "But if things
were going bad for them, it
went bad for us."
Willis, of Pocatello, Idaho,
was the manager of the Voice
of America Station in Hue,
when he was captured by the
Viet Cong on Jan. 31, 1968.
He said he was held by both
the Viet Cong and the North
Vietnamese, but usually didn't
know which they were and
couldn't say who treated him
more severely. "One thing is
for sure," he said, "there are
kind and humane people all
over the world, and I
experienced both types."
Air Force Lt. Col. George
Robert Hall of Hattiesburg,
Miss., who was captured Sept.
27, 1965, said he learned one
thing: "If you have will power
and determination, a human
being can go on and on and
on, living a day at a time, a
meal at a time, just one thing
at a time."
He said a typical day in
prison for the first four years
of his captivity had six main
events: two meals, three
cigarettes, one bath.
"We lived pretty much at
the whim of the turnkey.
Sometimes he'd place our food
outside the cell door and it
would be 45 minutes before he
gave it to us," Hall said.
"When you are truly hungry,
this a frustrating thing. I mean,
you could look through the
vent in the door and see the
food out there.
SUDDEN CHANGE
"In October 1969 things
changed for us. I feel it was a
result of world opinion .... the
change was sudden. Almost
like day and night. The torutre
ceased ... the food increased.
The attitude of the guards
changed ... the treatment still
wasn't good, but to us it was
great relief."
Another air force officer, Lt.
Col. Bobby R. Bagley of
Sumter, S.C., said some of his
worst moments came after his
capture and before he was
taken to a prison camp in
September 1967.
He said North Vietnamese
peasants "were going to hang
me, but an old man talked
them out of it."
Bagley told newsmen that
President Nixon's nationwide
television address Thursday
night brought tears to his
eyes," because Nixon "brought
us back with our heads held
high."
Air Force Lt. Col. Richard
P. Keirn of Tampa, Fla., who
was shot down July 24, 1965,
said that American prisoners
who failed to bow to their
North Vietnamese guards were
thrashed with sharp, jagged
pieces of rubber tire. 'They
broke me many times," he
said. "I'm no hero.
"Guards would peer into
your cell every five minutes. If
you didn't bow, they'd come
in and beat you 'til you did.
They did everything they could
to humiliate and break a man
mentally and physically. They
obviously enjoyed the
degredation."
Keirn, 48, is a70-year Air
Force veteran who spent 10
months in a prison camp near
Barth, Germany when his plane
was shot down during World
War II.


WASHINGTON (AP) The
White House opened up the
possibility Friday that
members of the White House
staff might make informal
face-to-face appearances before
Senators investigating the
Watergate conspiracy.
At the same time, press
secretary Ronald L. Ziegler
said any White House
employees who might be
summoned before a federal
grand jury that is currently
conducting a parallel inquiry
have been ordered by President
Nixon to appear and testify.
In the past, the White House
had suggested that any
exchanges between White
House staff members and the
Senate select committee
investigating the Watergate
conspiracy should be in
writing.
Ziegler said Friday, however,
"there were other ways
perhaps that can be worked
out."
He said the White House
pledges full cooperation to the
committee and is "ready to
work out a procedure" that
would permit staff members to
provide information and*
answer questions, short of an
appearance at a formal
committee meeting.
Ziegler volunteered at a
news briefing White House
policy regarding the twin
Watergate inquiries.
He said he did so "to dispel
the myth....that we seek to
cover up."
MISUNDERSTANDING
Ziegler repeated the White
House position that "no one in
the White House had any
involvement or prior
knowledge in that event" the
early summer 1972 bugging of
Democratic national
committee headquarters in the
Watergate complex.
The Nixon spokesman
was asked if he was
volunteering his statement
because several Republican
Senators have publicly
suggested the White House has
not been fully cooperative in
furthering the Senate inquiry.
Saying he would not want to
relate his remarks to anything
said by an individual Senator,
Ziegler said there has been
"some misapprehension or
misunderstanding" of the
White House position.
Nixon has said he would not
permit present or former
members of the White House
staff to appear at formal
sessions of the senate
committee because that, in his
view, would violate the
constitutional doctrine of
separation of powers. Ziegler
was asked to draw a distinction
between members of the
executive branch testifying
before the legislative branch
and before a grand jury, an
arm of the judicial branch.
When he gave no clear-cut
reply, a reporter asked if the
distinction might be that grand
juries meet in secret sessions
whereas the Senate committee
plans televised public hearings.
"I wouldn't want to draw
that specific distinction,"
Ziegler responded.
At the outset, Ziegler said
that "conflicting leaks" out of
preliminary proceedings of the
Senate panel have involved "a
series of unsubstantiated or
uncorroborated charges."
The targets of such charges,
he noted, have included
members of the White House
staff and he added that "it is
evident that the personal rights
of individuals have been
violated in ways that violate
orderly and judicious
procedures.
"The public media and the
briefing room (at the White
House) is not the place to try
such matters," he said.
Ziegler said that quite the
opposite from attempting to
cover up on Watergate, the
White House stands ready to
offer full cooperation and
seeks "the truce facts, but in


an orderly way."
As for arguments by some
that Nixon is exceeding his
constitutional authority by
forbidding formal Senate
testimony by present and past
employees, Ziegler said that if
anyone wants to challenge the
President, the challenge should
be made through the
established system, meaning
the courts.

Reactils toe H1im's

meat price ciur
WASHINGTON (AP) Federal
Reserve chairman Arthur F. Bums
had high praise Friday for President
Nixon's meat price ceiling but
AFL-CIO President George Meany
said it does not go far enough.
Meany complained that it also
falls to do anything about rent
increases and high interest rates.
But Burns told Congress that the
ceiling will help tremendously in
curbing the rise in food costs but he
conceded that some increases will
continue for several months.


be aware' of bugging W.H.O. REPORTS


charges conspirator

WASHINGTON (AP)- Convicted Watergpte conspirator James
W. McCord told Senate investigators that presidential aide H. R.


Haldeman "had to be aware" of


national headquarters, a source
investigation mid today.
The source also said that
McCord had refused to answer
four or five questions about
possible involvement in other
espionage activities on grounds
of possible self-incrimination,
during his 4'/2-hour appearance
before the Committee
Wednesday.
Meanwhile, subpoenas were
served Thursday night on two
former employees of President
Nixon's re-election campaign
committee as part of the
panel's check on McCord's
testimony about the alleged
involvement of high White
House officials in the
Watergate bugging.
Efforts by federal marshals
to serve a third former
employee of the campaign
were unsuccessful, the source
said. The witnesses were
ordered to appear next
Wednesday afternoon.
In federal court today, the
sentencing of McCord for
burglarizing-bugging the
Democratic offices in the
Watergate building was
postponed until June 15.
SENTENCE DELAY
Chief U.S. district court
judge John J. Sirica delayed
sentencing to give McCord time
to complete testimony to the
Senate committee and to a
federal grand jury also looking
into the case. Sen. Howard H.
Baker Jr., (R-Tenn.) said after
Wednesday's session that
McCord's testimony "named
names" including those of Jeb
MaGruder, a former White
House aide who was special
director of the re-election
committee, and John W. Dean
Ill, President Nixon's counsel.
Sen. Lowell P. Weicker Jr.,
(R-Cinn.) another committee
member, confirmed Thursday
that McCord had told the panel
that former Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell, who headed the
re-election committee until his
resignation July 1, approved
plans for the bugging of the
Democratic Party
headquarters.
Mitchell denounced that
report as "slanderous and
false." Presidential press
secretary Ronald L. Ziegler has
repeatedly denied that any
White House officials had
advance knowledge or
participated in the Watergate
operation.
However, Weicker told a
news conference Thursday that
the Watergate incident was part
of a larger Republican
espionage and sabotage effort
directed against the Democrats,
directed by someone he said
was still in the White House.
There were unconfirmed
reports that Weicker was
referring to Haldeman, but the
Connecticut Republican


the plans to wiretap Democratic
close to the Senate Watergte

refused to confirm that.
The three persons
subpoenaed by the panel were
identified as Sally Harmony
and Sylvia Panarites, both
former secretaries to G.
Gordon Liddy, one of
McCord's co-conspirators, and
Robert Reisner, a former
administrative assistant to
MaGruder.
Which two of the three had
been served was not disclosed.


The source reporting
McCord's identification of
Haldeman also said that the
Watergate investigation has
discovered that top White
House personnel were
"involved in 1972 espionage
and bugging activities" and
have a "history of being
involved in similar activities in
past elections."
"We're talking about ...
people working around Nixon
from 1962 on," the source
added.
According to a judgment
filed Oct. 30, 1964, by the San
Francisco County superior
court, Nixon and Haldeman,
manager of his 1962 campaign
for Governor, had approved an
effort to undermine the
campaign of his Democratic
opponent, former Gov. Edwjrd
G. Brown.
Judge Byron Arnold ruled
that a postcard poll organized
by the Nixon campaign
committee and aimed at
undermining support for
Brown "was reviewed,
amended and finally approved
by Mr. Nixon personally" and
that "Mr. Nixon and Mr.
Haldeman approved the plan
and project....."
Neither Nixon nor
Haldeman were defendants in
the case, which named several
persons who worked in the
1962 Nixon campaign.
At his news conference
Thursday, Weicker said he has
"absolute confidence" that
President Nixon knew nothing
about the Watergate tactics.


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NOTICE




PUBLIC AUCTION



A QUANTITY OF MISCELLANEOUS GOODS WILL BE
SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, GOVERNMENT
WAREHOUSE, ARAWAK CAY WEDNESDAY. APRIL
4TH, 1973, AT 10:00 A.M.,


By

Belgrave Auctioneers


II


_ )


Saturday, March 31, 1973.


GENEVA (AP) The
Plague, the dread illness that
has been sharply reduced over
the past 100 years, appears to
be on the way back, according
to the U.N. World Health
Organization.
It said some traditional focal
areas where the disease had
been considered extinguished
have recently become active
again, and hinted the incidence
of plague was likely to be well
above the official statistical
reports.
The organization's statistics,
compiled from reports of its
member countries, reveal a
total of 1,738 cases (103 fatal)
last year 75 in Africa, 392 in
the Western Hemisphese,
mainly Latin America, 1,271 in
Asia, and none in Europe.
The totals compare with 829
(47) in 1970, and 958 (47) in
1971.
But the World Health
Organizations weekly
epidemiological report warns
that most countries report only
cases confirmed by tests in
laboratories and these are not
available in many affected
areas. Thus, it explains
"under-reporting is not
uncommon", meaning the
actual number of plague
infections may be much higher.
The report says traditional
plague areas where the disease
appears to be reviving are in
Libya, on the Yemen-Saudi
Arabian border, the Khmer
Republic, Burma, Indonesia,
Nepal, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador,
Peru,'and Lesotho, Madagascar,
Tanzania and Zaire.
The report does not identify
the plague specifically except
to say that the outbreak in
Tanzania, including 21 cases
with nine deaths, was
suspected to be pneumonic
plague.
The report advises national
health authorities of known or
suspected plague areas to keep
a check on the population of
small mammals and their flea
parasites.
It says wherever plague
should appear in humans, every
effort must be made to control
the flea population and,
particularly in urban areas,
keep the rodent population 'at
a consistently low level.
"The need for constant
surveillance of natural foci has
been recognized for many
years as a means of preventing
wild-life plague from extending


D AL











Saturday. March 31. 1973.


Xhp Uirtbune


bt Urribunt
NuLu.us ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTW
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E.. K.C.S.G., D.Litt.. LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917.19 72
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc.. B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Saturday, March 31, 1973.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the second article in a brief discussion of sidelines
arising out of the new Minister of Finance's presentation of the
budget in the House of Assembly on Wednesday. I will examine
details of the new budget later at my leisure.)

IN THE September 19th General Election Prime Minister
Pindling won a sweeping victory at the polls. The people of the
colony gave him a strong vote of confidence.
With such a vote of confidence the public had reason to believe
that he would return to office with the power and the strength to
correct the obvious faults in his administration.
It was perhaps this situation that gave rise to the widespread
belief that Mr. Pindling would either dismiss or reduce the power
of the Hon. Arthur Hanna who, as Minister of Home Affairs with
Immigration in his portfolio, had been almost entirely responsible
for destroying confidence of foreign investors in the colony, with
a great flight of capital to such new places as the Cayman Islands
as a result, and the almost complete collapse of the construction
industry that employed thousands of our skilled workmen.
This seemed to be the logical thing to do unless, as many
people believed, Mr. Hanna was only the P.M.'s hatchet man
carrying out policies outlined by him in two of the early speeches
he made after taking over the Government when he declared his
intention to change the complexion of Bay Street and, later, to
get control of the economy.

In spite of all these facts many people hopefully believed that
Mr. Pindling didn't approve of Mr. Hanna's policies and would get
rid of him when he had the power to do so.

It seemed that the people gave him that power in the returns in
the September election because there can be no doubt that the
victory of the party came as a result of hard campaigning in all
the districts by Mr. Pindling.
And so every week rumours were put in circulation that Mr.
Pindling was going to take action.
The time came when people gave up hope that any action
would be taken. It had all been an illusion.
And then suddenly the announcement came out that Mr.
Hanna and Mr. Francis had handed in their resignations from
their Cabinet posts.
The public were led to expect sweeping reforms to correct the
'Immigration situation when the Prime Minister announced that
he had taken Immigration into his portfolio.
The local and foreign press was fed this information. After
they had spread this hopeful news to the world the Government
came out with the information that Mr. Hanna had been given the
Finance Ministry and that Mr. Francis had been demoted to
Development which had been a part of his portfolio as Finance
Minister.
But Mr. Pindling cleverly created another illusion by setting up
a new Ministry-an Economic Ministry with himself at its
head. The impression was spread abroad that, under this new
arrangement, Mr. Pindling would sit astride Immigration, Finance
and Development. At least the Editor of The Miami Herald
swallowed this bait hook, like and sinker.
I was prepared to accept this possibility too. But when I saw
little change in Immigration policy ... so far as The Tribune is
concerned anyway ... I began to look deeper into the situation.
What I found was that, in actual fact, Mr. Hanna had not been
placed under any control at all. He appeared to be stronger than
ever.

Was the new structure in the Government only a ruse to try to
mislead the foreign press and the governments in London and
Washington who I happen to know from reliable sources were
concerned about the local situation?

It wasn't until the departments of Government now controlled
by Mr. Hanna, Mr. Francis and Mr. Anthony Roberts, the new
Minister of Home Affairs, had been disclosed that it became clear
that the Home Affairs Ministry had been reduced to a mere
puppet ... that Mr. Hanna is stronger than ever ... that Mr. Francis
has been demoted ... and that there appears to have been no
visible change in the Immigration Department under Mr. Pindling.
I can make this statement on the basis of The Tribune's
experience with Immigration under the new structure.

And now Mr. Hanna's maiden speech as Finance Minister
suggests that the colony's finances are in a critical condition and
that Mr. Hanna has been called upon to be a hatchet man in
Finance as he was in Immigration where his dark shadow
continues to hover.

In its game of finding a scapegoat for covering up its sins of
both omission and commission the Government has often blamed
me for its failures abroad.
Government members have accused me of giving false
information directly to the Foreign Press.
I have frequently stated that for several years now certainly'
since the PLP has been in power I have refused to give any
information direct to the foreign press, except at the time in
1969 when the Government tried to cripple the Press with an
oppressive Powers and Privileges Bill in the House and I felt
obliged to call for help from the world press in a fight to maintain
the freedom of the press in the Bahamas.
In reply to the Government's accusations I have pointed out
that I don't make the news. The Government makes the news. It
is my duty as a public newspaper to bring the truth to the public.
And so, if the Government makes ugly news they have only
themselves to blame if the local press publishes the simple truth
and the foreign press picks it up.
An article written about me in The Coral Gables Times by the
editor of that paper a couple of weeks ago stated flatly that I had
refused to give any information about my country to the foreign
press. He had to come to the Bahamas to pick up information for


What is cause of the



Indians' unrest in US?

By LARRY THORSON
NEW YORK (AP)--"We once owned all this great country," the great Sioux Indian leader, Red


Cloud, told the U.S. Army about
selling."
Red Cloud was right about
having "owned" vast amounts
of land, but wrong in
predicting how the Indians
would benefit from the loss of
it.
He presided over the Sioux
nation's loss of thousands of
square miles of rolling plains,
but it was just one of hundreds
of similar episodes that began
in the early 1600's when the
first European settlers arrived
and did not end until 1890,
when several hundred Indians
occupied the U.S. Army at
Wounded Knee in the last
chapter of the Indian wars.
Wounded Knee has been
back in the headlines since
Feb. 27, when a group of
militant Indians seized the
historic village in South
Dakota. That armed takeover is
the latest in a string of militant
actions Indians have taken in
the past few years, including
the occupation of Alcatraz
Island in San Francisco Bay,
camping on top of Mt.
Rushmore National Monument
in South Dakota, and last
year's invasion and seizure of
the Bureau of Indian Affairs
(BIA) building in Washington,
D.C.
In each case, the militants
have demanded revisions in the
Indians' relationship with the
federal government. And each
action has been flavoured by
apparent attempts to
strengthen the Indian's identity
as an Indian, rather than as an
ingredient in the American
ethnic mixture.
SACRED
For instance, at Alcatraz,
the occupiers tried to set up a
university to study Indian
culture. At the BIA building,
Indians took items that they
said were scared to them and
should belong to them, rather
than be displayed in
Washington. At Wounded
Knee, the militants built a
lodge where they could take
purifying sweat baths, and
some of the negotiations
between the Indians and
Federal officials have been held
in a tepee. In another recent
incident, Indians disrupted
archeology students who were
digging in an Indian burial
ground; the Indians said that if
they themselves tried to dig up
a cemetery, they would be
thrown in jail.
Most of these actions have
been carried out by the
American Indian Movement
(AIM), which was founded in
Minneapolis, Minnesota, in
1968. Most of its members are
young, urban Indians who, as
shown at Wounded Knee, have
little respect for the established
Indian hierarchies on the
reservations.
AIM claims to have several
hu ndred thousand
sympathizers, but it has few
actual members, among the
800,000 Indians in the United
States today. Of that total,
500,000 live on or near
reservations, and the rest live in
cities and small towns.
In the background of AIM's
militancy are these conditions
of the modern Indian:
Indian literacy rates are
among the lowest in the U.S.
Seventy-five per cent of
Indian families have incomes


80 years ago. "We have sold it to you. We will live well by its


below $3,000 a year, abou!
one-third of the national
average.
Nearly 40 per cent of
Indians are unemployed.
o Thousands of Indians who
leave their reservations find
themselves untrained for jobs
and unprepared for urban life.
o Fifty thousand Indian
families live in unsanitary,
dilapidated dwellings; many in
huts, shanties or abandoned
automobiles,
o A report to Congress in
1972 said Indian education was
"getting worse, not better."
COLLECT RFNT
Dennis Banks, a leader of
AIM, got heavy applause in
1971 when he told an Indian
convention: "We are
the landlords of this country.
Let's put America on notice
that it's the first of the month
and the American Indian has
come for the rent."
AIM has also tried to
increase Indians' pride, much
as the "black in beautiful"
slogan has been effective for
some American blacks. Last
year AIM members defaced a
snow statue which depicted an
Indian hockey player at the
University of North Dakota. A
great many American athletic
teams have carried the name
"Indians," or have been named
for Indian tribes.
Banks, a Chikpewa Indian,
said the use of Indian emblems
for athletic teams was
derogatory and pointedly
added, "why don't they call
them 'the fighting Negroes'?
we are trying to recreate a
better image of the American
Indian and destroy that
demeaning stereotype.'
Despite the heavy publicity
AIM receives, it is a minority
group ignored by many Indians
and disliked by many others,
especially those with
connections with the BIA.
Richard Wilson, the president
of the Oglala Sioux Tribal
Council, calls the AIM
militants "vagrants" and says
the best way to get rid of them
would be to "offer them a
job."
Wilson himself is the subject
of one of the demands made
by the militants at Wounded
Knee, who want new elections
be held for Oglala tribal
offices. About 11,000 Oglala
Sioux live on the pine ridge
reservation, which includes
Wounded Knee, a place of
tremendous symbolic
importance to Indians because
of the 1890 massacre there.
AIM charges that Wilson's
administration features
nepotism and corruption.
The other two demands at
Wounded Knee are for the U.S.
Senate to investigate the BIA
for its handling of the Oglala
people, and for the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
to investigate the 371 treaties
between the Federal
government and the Indians to
show how the government has
failed to live up to them.
None of these demands were
met.
Alvin M. Joseph Jr., the
author of several books about
Indians, believes that the
present high level of militancy
among Indians is the result of


the story he wrote about me.

When I left Nassau in September I rented an apartment in
Coral Gables for a month. I anticipated no difficulty in quickly
settling all my affairs in the Bahamas.
I have now been in Coral Gables over six months because it has
been impossible to deal with this Government.
I feel that I have shown a great deal of restraint in keeping
away from the press where I have friends all over the world.
I have done this because, even though I may be withdrawing
from all public activities in my homeland, I have no desire to hurt
the Bahamian people.

I have been hanging on only because I feel a duty to try and
protect the interests of my staff.
Surely the Government must realize by now that when I left
Nassau on September 19th I turned my back on the large estate I
left behind in the islands.
I am a free man. I have never been a slave to possessions and
I will never allow myself to be. And so they can't hurt me, nor
can they exercise any control over or influence any of my
decisions. I am prepared to go and never set foot on the rock
again.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
A government that sets out to abolish market prices is
inevitably driven towards the abolition of private property; it has
to recognize that there is no middle way between the system of
private property in the means of production combined with free
contract, and the system of common ownership of the means of
production, or Socialism. It is generally forced towards
compulsory production, universal obligation of labour, rationing
of consumption, and, finally official regulation of the whole of
production and consumption.
LUDWIG von MISES in "The Theory of Money and Credit".


;Ih- go-ernment 's failure to
implement far reaching reforms
that President Nixon proposed
in 1 970
Nixon said then in a special
message to Congress. "The first
Americans the Indians are
the most deprived and the most
isolated minority group in our
nation. On virtually every scale
if measure ... the condition of
the Indian people ranks at the
bottom."
The President announced a
series of executive decisions
and sent bills to Ctongress,
which together would have
gi.en Indians control over 400
million dollars yearly in funds
that previously had been
administered by bureaucrats of
thile BIA
It is time, Nixon said, "for a
new era in which the Indian
future is determined by Indian
acts and Indian decisions "
Josephy i trte in a recent
article, "though this sudden
turn iof events seemed hard for
Indians to believe, their
incredulity began to give way
to enthusiasm as tlhe
administration drove on in the
new direction."
The BIA got a new
director, Louis R. Bruce,
himself an Indian, and
"brilliant and dedicated young
Indians were brought in to
head BIA activities as policy
makers," Josephy said.
"With all these things,
including most importantly the
publicly stated objective of the
President, going for them, the
Indians soon began to feel that
maybe this tune there would
be no broken promises,"
Josephiy wrote
But Congress did not enact
the legislation, old-line officials
at the BIA resisted the reforms,
some Indians also balked, and
the Nixon government showed
little further interest in getting
its proposals made into law,
Josephy said.
lie added that the Indians'
hopes for improvement have
also been hurt by the
President's recent budgetary
cutbacks, which have stopped
or reduced expenditures on
programmes which were just
getting started on the
reservations.
By the end of 1972,
following the, occupation of
the BI A building in
Washington, the Indians' bright
hopes had been dashed,
according to Josephy's
analysis.
RED CROSS
DONATIONS

BAHIAMAS Red Cross has
received the following
donations in response to Mrs.
Eldon's appeal.
Red Cross Group Fox Town
Abaco, $25; Navios
Corporation $500; Anonymous
$15; Government High School
Form 2B $75.


FURI Il R air links with
western U urope and the
Bahamas will come into effect
on Monday when Lufthansa
German Ai lines begins its
thrice-weekly service between
Nassau and West Germany.
A It hough the official
inaugural flight from West
Geimany to Nassau does not
take place until Thursday,
April 5, the tirst scheduled
flight of the new service arrives
here on Monday at 7 05 p.m.
non-stop from Frankfurt.
A Lufthansa German
Airlines spokesman said two ot
the three weekly flights from
West Germany will originate
trom Frankturt and the other
roin ( Cologne.
Using ,one of its Boeing 707
aircraft, thie airlines's Frankfurt
flight will arrive here each
Monday and Saturday at 5 50
p.m. A flight originating at
Frankfurt and stopping at
Cologne- will touch down ini
Nassau each I hursday at 7 05
p.m. All flight-s will continue
on to Mexico.
Return lights to West
Gclerlann will be as follows
Tuesday, non-stop to
Frankfurt. departing Nassau at
5 50 p.m. aid arriving tlhe
toll ins g tdai .it -45 a.in.
Friday, non-stop to (ologne
and then on ItoI rankfurt,
departing Nassu at 3:50 p.in.
and arriving at (Cologne at 6:40
a. lithe following day.
Sunday, non-stop to Frankfurt,
departing Nassau at 5:05 p.m.
and arriving at Frankfurt the
following morning at 8 o'clock.
The of icial inaugural flight
arrives here from West
(;ermany on Thursday, April 5
at 8:05 p. m. Included in the
inaugural party will be officials
of the West German
government and a contingent
from the press and radio
A full round of activities has


SPECIAL ISSUE

.OF MET. STAMPS


TWO special postage stamps
will be released on April 17 to
c o m in e in o ra te the
International Meteorological
Organization and World
Meteorological Organization
( IMO/WMO). The
denominations will be 15 cents
and 18 cents.
The Postmaster is now ready
to accept orders and
applications should be made to
reach the Postmaster by April
12. Order forms are now
available at the counters of all
Post Offices in New
Providence.
These forms may be
completed and left with the
required amount at Post
Offices. Postal applications
should be addressed to the
Postmaster, Philatelic Section,
General Post Office, Nassau
and be accompanied by
Banker's Draft, Money Order,
Postal Order or certified
cheque to cover the cost of
required stamps.
If covers are enclosed for
service they should be
addressed or include a
self-addressed label.


service here on Monday


been arranged tor the visiting
(Irnirans dui ing their live-day
slay in the Bathamas by the
Ministry of Touiism and other
segments of the hospitality
industry. These activities
in hlude a reception tor the
inaugural guests at the VIP
lounge of Nassau international
Airport, sightseeing toirs
L u ktails at (Goermnent IHouse


and visits to some of the
resorts in the Family Islands.
On Friday, April 6, the
visiting German
parliamentarians will call on
the Prime Minister, the Hon.
ltnden 0. Pindling, in the
Churchill Building.
The official inaugural flight
from Nassau to West Germany
is planned for early May.


Lufthansa German airlines begin


AN EXTRA $20 TO $200 PER WEEK
COULD MEAN GREATER INDEPENDENCE
It is not difficult to build an agency business capable of
paying you this remuneration. We show you how to start an
export-import agency, beginning in your spare time, and
gradually increasing the scope of your work if you wish to
expand.
Here is no investment in goods, no risk, and no
interference with present employment. We offer the very
latest tot hmqitis, and no special talents are necessary to put
thps, to vour own use. We have been established 25 years
aind have ( hents in 35 countries. A booklet (free and past
free) will be airmailed on request.
ANTHONY WADE (CONSULTANTS) LTD.
Rylstone, Holdershill Crescent, London N.W.4, ENGLAND.


SPECIAL SALE


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ARTI'S DRY GOODS STORE
228 BAY STREET






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proudly presents

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Beauty Consultant direct t from Paris

Skin Care Specialist

MARCH 30TH APRIL 7TH
APRIL 16TH APRIL 21ST.

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.Yhe NasNau Shop

PHONE 2-8405


Out Island Airways







Nassau and Freeport



faster than another



"air lini e That s right. Beginning March 22, Out Island Airways
inaugurates super-let flying island service between Nassau and Freeport.
Cuts travel time to 20 minutes with a convenient daily schedule especially
planned for Bahamians.
You ll be flying the BAC-111, the world s most reliable short haul aircraft.
With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can stretch out in comfort. Served
by beautiful Bahamian stewardesses. Aboard the Bahamas own airline.
It s Out Island Airways way of expressing its confidence in the future
growth of the Bahamas. Providing the truly Bahamian service expected
of a future independent nation.
And to introduce you to Out Island Airways super-let Nassau/Freeport
service, OIA offers a special low-cost, round-trip, one day inaugural fare-
lust $33.
What are you waiting for? Call your travel agent or Out Island Airways
now for reservations. 7-8222.


Out Island Airways Serves the Bahamas Best


I I I I- 1


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I I I


II I









4

BISHOP El

ISLAND Fl
THE Rt. Rev.
Eldon, Bishop of the I
(of Nassau and the Baha
.,;Aresently in the Turl
Lanaicos Islands for con fir
Sand renewal 1973
services.
Accompanying the B
the Rev. David
Diocesan Youth Officer.
They will visit South
Grand Turk and Salt C;
parish of Turks and Cai
always been a part
Diocese. The Rev. (
nes is priest-in-charge



CAREERS
AIRLINES need Re
Stewardesses, Grour
FREE plus many ot
18-35.
HEAVY EQUIPMEI
draglines, backhoes,
money in a man's jot
HOTEL MANAGER
Excellent opportunity
Housekeepers, Desk
followed by practical
Mail coup
ALPHA TRAIP
139 N.E. 54th St
I Nam e..................

I Address..............




u















FOX IIOHE
DOWDESWELL STI
Telephone 2-8012
P.O. BOX 61






















On P
U -- |- M
; -- -- -


I'


Graham's


judgement on


important and indeed necessary at the outset to
two things in mind. The first is that this ap-
lion is not an application to restrain the defen-
from flying, nor is it an application to restrain
defendant from advertising simpliciter."



inquiries to: Trans Oceanic

Airways
International
Hotel
P.O. Box F-2623
Freeport, G.B.I.


Need Offlke M nsie, m-hamme.


Bght rtbtmt


)age 2 of Mr. Justice
:h 22, 1973 he stated,


Marc



"It is
bear
plical
dant
the' d



All ei


LDON IN TURKS

OR CONFIRMATION


Michael
Diocese
imas, is
ks and
mation
mission
ishop is
Hlartry,
Caicos,
ay. The
cos has
of this
Clifford
of the


Turks and Caicos.
The church of St. Thomas,
Grand Turk, celebrates its
150th anniversary in August.
The church opened for divine
worship on August 31, 1827.
Loyalist refugees from America
who settled in Grand Turk,
supported the Anglican Church
and did much to further the
faith.
The first part-time Minister
was the Rev. Henry Jenkins.
The Bishop and Father
Hartry will return to Nassau
T' -sday.


ARE AVAILABLE
servationists, Ticket Agents, Stewards,
id Hostesses, Ramp Agents. TRAVEL
their benefits. Young men and women

NT OPERATORS needed to operate
cranes, dozers, loaders, etc. Earn big
b.
IENT offers good pay, many benefits.
ties for Managers, Assistant Managers,
Clerks. Begin training at home now,
training in the States.
pon today for free information.
NING SCHOOLS, INC.
., Miami, Fla. 33137

........................................ A ge.........
...............................Ph o ne ...............
........................................ Baham as


SED USED






-'I
SELL






IRS FHURITURE ilTlT
REET (Formerly BESCO Building)
2 OUT ISLAND ORDERS TO
04 E.S., Nassau, Bahamas.


PASTOR REX MAJOR


NASSAU GARDEN

CLII WINNERS
THE NASSAU Garden Club
held a Placement Show,
"Tropical Splendour", on
Thursday when artistic
arrangements were shown at
the residences of Lady
Roberts, Lady Pritchard and
Mrs. Godfrey Higgs and
horticultural exhibits were
displayed at Mrs. Fred
Hazlewood's.
Members of Garden Clubs in
New Providence were invited
to view the show during the
afternoon with the
presentation of awards at 6
p.m. by Mrs. Victor Horan to
the following winners:-
Artistic Division: Tri-Colour,
Mrs. Geoffrey Armbrister;
Creativity, Mrs. Frank
Hazlewood; Distinction, Mrs.
Raymond Lawson; Miniature,
Mrs. Geoffrey Johnstone;
Nature, Art & Industry, Mrs.
Fred Hazlewood; Award of
Merit for Horticulture, Mrs.
Frank Hazlewood
Grand aggregate winner was
Mrs. Godfrey Higgs and
runner-up for grand aggregate
was Mrs. Frank Hazlewood.

RENEWAL SERVICE

WELL ATTENDED
AN APPRECIATIVE
congregation of Catholics and
non-Catholics have been
attending the mission renewal
service at Mary Star of the Sea
Church, Freeport conducted
by the Jesuit priest, Father
Charles Dolan of New Jersey
The services are held every
evening from 7 to 8 p.m. at
Mary Star Church.
Father Dolan also gives a
homily each morning at the
7.45 a.m. mass.


ON GOSPEL

MISSION TO U.S.
EVANGELIST Rex Major ot
the Great Commission Gospel
Crusades, Nassau, has left
Nassau on a 12-day promotion
trip in prelude to Key 73, a
national programme intended
to promote Christianity in the
'United States.
Among its aims Key 73
hopes to apply the message and
meaning of Jesus Christ to the
issues shaping man and his
society in order that they may
be resolved and to assist the
efforts of Christian
congregations and
organizations in becoming
more effective.
Pastor Major arrived in
central Michigan Friday to lead
the campaign in that area
during the next 11 days.
His activities will include
mass rallys, meetings with
interdenominational groups
and taping sessions.
The July 15 to August 5
evangelistic crusade has been
titled "Central Michigan Key
73 Reachout."


Saturday, March 31, 1973.

TEACHERS COLLEGE HOLDS
OPEN HOUSE APRIL 4


THE BAHAMAS Teachers'
College will hold its annual
open house Wednesday April
4 through Friday April 6 at the
College.
The open house, which will
feature exhibitions of work
and practical demonstrations,
will be open to the public and
all those particularly concerned
with education.


The opening ceremony will
take place April 4 at 6.30 p.m.
continuing until 9 p.m.
On Thursday the exhibition
will be open from 9 a.m. to 9
p.m. and on Friday from 9
a.m. until noon.
The guest speaker
Wednesday will be Mr. Lou
Adderley, headmaster of St.
Augustine's College.


VISITORS WELCOME I
S JAMES N. COOPER, Pastor
P.O. Box N4450 Phone 2-1586, 5-4320
Sunday Services at 9:45 and
11 a.m., 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Service -
7:30 p.m.


- IU 11 KLF
MR. AND MRS. ARLINGTON ALBURY of Blair Estates
announce the engagement of their dauther, Cheryl Ann, to
Michael Roberts, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Wesley Sawyer,
also of Blair Estates.
The couple plan a September wedding.


Zatsunfest Fair at Freeport
BALLARD Jones of
Petroleum Products Company
in Freeport turn s over the keys
to the 1973 Chevrolet Vega he
donated to Sunland School's
Zatsunfest fair which opened
yesterday and continued
through today at the
International Bazaar car park
behind El Casino. The
co-chairmen accepting the keys
are Mario Donato and Dr.
Richard Stacy. The fair
included carnival rides and
games operated by the Jack
Royal Amusement companyy
of Miami who will remain at
ORONLY $1 YOUCthe parking lot through April
lFOR ONLY YOU eC n t ilrumNp
S Ar A "15 for two weeks of
S ,,,_ continuous entertainment in


HIGHLAND PARK-DOLPHIN DRIVE-North of Y.W.C.A.
8 Nassau Christian and Missionary
ALLIANCE CHURCH
Sermon Subjects for Sunday
ar March 25, 1973.
Temporarily Meeting At Y.W.C.A. Building
Dolphin Drive at John F, Kennedy Drive
Hour of Worship 11 A.M. Hour of Evangelism
"THINGS THAT I "ANXIOUS ABOUT
MUST DO!" TOMORROW"
Evangelical interdenominational International
Weldon B. Blackford, Minister P.O. Box N8313 Phone: (Hall) 3-4082


Baptist 8blii Church
At Soldier Road & Old Trail.
NASSAU'S FRIENDLIEST CHURCH!
BE THERE SUNDAY AND DISCOVER
THE DIFFERENCE.
SERVICES: Sunday School 10:oo a.m.
Reaching: 11:00 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Power Hour 7:30 p.m.
Pastor: H. MILLS PH. 5-1339 BOX N3622


Free ort. 1 i




l i m ii 1.Y 1w -fIoII

ii~lil~llm m llml ICA r-) i r{ A i~lliNlI~l


CLAIMS ACHE INDIANS
ALMOST EXTERMINATED
GENEVA, March 30 (AP)- The
small nomadic tribe of Ache
Indians in Paraguay has been almost
totally exterminated, the U.S.N.
Human Rights Commission was
told Thursday night.
mo


P. 0. BOX N1469 1
MONTROSE AVE. Opp


WHERE THE




















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I


ihr lribmun


soe --Abb




Put yourself in her


place, then decide

By Abigail Van Buren
1m73 I CcaMM TrNMe. Y. NemW Si, la5M .
DEAR ABBY: A group of couples have been attending a
Saturday night dance together for a number of years. We
are all good friends. Recently one couple divorced and the
lady continued to attend these dances as a "single."
For a while the group accepted her to help her over her
adjustment period. The gentlemen In the crowd continued
to dance with her as they always had, but this created a
problem, for one of the wives was always left to sit out the
dance while her husband danced with "Single."
Abby, don't you think "Single" should realize that she
is creating a problem and should drop out of the group until
she obtains a partner? How can we end the dilemma, but
still be friends? "SFITING DUCK"
DEAR SITTING: Put yourself In "single's" placee and
be a lttle more charitable. The life of a ingle lonely and
difficult and those Saturday night dances are probably her
only opportunity to socialize.
Ask your husbands if they can't come up with a single
man who could be her partner mo toe Saturday alghts.
Singles need all the help they can get.

DEAR ABBY: I have a wonderful hairdresser with
whom I have a standing appointment once a week. I am a
busy woman and like to get in and out of the beauty parlor
as quickly as possible. My problem is that my hairdresser Is
a chatty person, and he talks with his hands! He just
about drives me crazy, wasting all that time gesturing.
How can I tell him to WORK WITH HIS HANDS, NOT
TALK? No names, please. I need him more than he needs
me. IN A HURRY
DEAR IN: It's time you did a little talking. Wth the
VOICE, lady.

DEAR ABBY: I am writing out of concern for youtg
teen-aged girls who find themselves burdened with unwant-
ed pregnancies.
Please, please encourage mothers to provide birth
control measures for their teen-aged daughters. Fear of
pregnancy does not always prevent girls as young as 13 or
14 from having sexual experiences. Many girls do not stop to
consider the risks when they are confronted by strong sex-
ual desire.
At 17 I found myself hitchhiking to a hospital to have,
fortunately a safe, legal abortion, about which I felt I could
not tell my own parents. Since then I have been taking
birth control measures and seeing a doctor regularly for
venereal disease checks. No, I am not promiscuous-both
V. D. and unwanted pregnancy can happen to the nicest
people
Now, at 19, I see similar heartbreaking, terrifying ex-
periences happening around me. Please, remind girls that
there are free clinics. And if they are lucky enough to have
understanding parents, they should ask them for help. V
this is printed, and I hope it is, sign me ...
SADDER BUT WISER
DEAR SADDER: I'll print year letter, altho I will
probably be accused of condoning pre-marital sex, which I
am net! However, once that decieon has already been made,
the price some girls pay Is so tragically out of proportie1 to
the "crime." I believe an ounce of prevention Is better than
eight pounds of unwanted baby or a venereal disease.
DEAR ABBY: My problem is not knowing how to
introduce my boy friend. He is a doctor.
Do I say, "Mrs. Brown, I would like you to meet Dr.
Smith"? Or do I just omit the "doctor" and introduce him
as "Mister"?
I always feel so foolish introducing him as "Doctor." It
sounds like I'm bragging. UNSURE
DEAR UNSURE: He has earned the title, and sheuM
be Introduced as "Dr."-not "Mister." But if you are self-
emselmes about it, simply introduce him as "John Smith."
They'D seem fild oat he's a doctor.

CONFIDENTIAL TO WILLIAM R. HEROLD-whe
wants to translate my booklet, "What Teen-agers Want to
Know," into French: please write to me and send me your
address.


CREATIVE DRESSMAKING

COURSE AVAILABLE AT

ADULT STUIY CENTRE

IN HER FORMER CAREER as a broadcaster, Sylvia
Laramore-Crawford had the opportunity of talking to Bahamian
women from every sector of society. Many of them complained
of the lack of thinp to do in the evening, and thib pve MrM.
Crawford the idea of starting a course in creative dressmaking at
the Bahamas Adult Study Centre, where her husband, Richard
Crawford, is the principal.


At first women were
encouraged to come in twice a
week any time they felt the
need, and they were taught the
basic skills of sewing by Mrs.
Mary Laramore, and smocking
by Mrs. Rose Thompson.
These days Mrs. Crawford is
able to put all her time and
effort into training Bahamian
women to become first-class
dressmakers; one only has to
pay a visit to the Centre on one
of the Open House sessions to
see what has been possible. The
large classroom is full of
dresses of every kind, all
finished to a high degree of
precision. This matter of
finishing is insisted on; no
matter how well a dress is
made, if there is one seam
which does not match or line
up with another, the dress goes
back to the student until it is
finished perfectly.
Mrs. Crawford has
personally prepared the
instructional material of the
course in such a way that the
average student, with little or
no previous training in
dressmaking,can make rapid
progress. A number of
professional Bahamian
dressmakers are also taking
advantage of this new
opportunity and of course
many ex-students all over the
island are wearing clothes that
they have made at the Centre,
while some have even turned to
dressmaking for a living.
At a recent ceremony at the
Centre, students who had
completed their First Phase
were presented with cards
acknowledging that
achievement. At the end of the
third and final phase, the
students who qualify are
awarded the Centre's Diploma
in Dressmaking.
In addition to supervising
the training at the Centre, Mrs.
Crawford also designs dresses
privately, and the results of her
work have been seen on several
stages during the past year.
Meanwhile, work at the
Centre goes on: Second Phase

POSSESSIONS STREWN
ABOUT STREET OWNER DIES
WASHINGTON (AP)- A man
who collected stamps and books
and objects both valuable and
junky died shortly after he found
his belongings of a lifetime strewn
about the street.
When Burgess Thomas, 53,
returned to his apartment building
in northwest Washinston Tuesday
neighbourhood people were picking
over his prized possessions.
Minutes later he collapsed on the
street. He died a short time
afterward at George Washington
University Hospital.
The District of Columbia medical
examiner's office said the cause was
congestive heart failure; but some
of his neighbours said he died of a
broken heart.
Thomas had not paid his rent for
several months, a neighbour said.
His landlord said he did not want to
discuss the eviction. Neighbours
said Thomas had been given several
warnings before a Deputy U.S.
Marshal and a crew of men began
moving his possessions out of the
apartment and placing them on the
sidewalk.


Have a


I


SUPER SUNDAY SESSION
WITH BALMORAL AND PAN AM

12 -3:00 p.m.

Enjoy all you can eat from a
Delicious Bahamian Buffet Lunch
for $6.00 per person, plus gratuities
Children under 12, half price.


See a Travelogue of "GRAND TOUR of EUROPE
Compliments of Pan American
beginning at 12:00 Noon.
Cecil Dorsett's Steel Band plays all af-
ternoon!


*PanAm


I BMLmo nB hHo iI

t AREDs toIonM M Ip


(EARED


classes on Monday. April 16th
at 8 p.m. Third Phase classes
begin on Tuesday/April 17th at
8 p.m. Those students who
intend to continue with their
training in one of these classes
should contact Mrs. Crawford
as soon as possible.
The following students
completed the First Phase in
Dressmaking on March 23.
Rosalie Moss, Oralie
Johnson, Bessie Johnson, Judy
Armaly, Mizpah Collie Elaine
Pinder, Arlene Ching, Lillian
Major, Judy Ferguson, Annie
Arthur, Monica Williams, Ellen
B. Thompson, Peggy Bigham,
Jenny Morley, Ethel Knowles,
Keva Darville, Halson Pinder,
Elvie Hanna, Antonette
Thompson, Ethel Thompson,
Dotlyn Storr, Isadora Johnson,
Judith Huyler, Dorothy Hanna,
Vanrea Wilson pass with credit;
Joan Huber pass with credit;
Zelia Thompson with credit,
Olive Smith with credit; Doris
Powell pass with distinction
and Maulese Walker pass with
distinction.


Crippled Children's Clinics now to be


weekly

MEMBERS of the Crippled
Children's Committee attended
the orthopaedic clinic for
children held at the Princess
Margaret Hospital Wednesday
afternoon by the Professional
Committee for physically
handicapped children.
Dr. Graeme P. Duffy,
chairman of the professional
group said that clinics will now
be held on a weekly basis. The
first clinic was held on 22nd
February.
At Thursday's clinic Mr.
Hugh Panton, a director of J.
E. Hanger Inc., an international
prosthetic corporation
attended with Mr. Thranhardt,
a leading orthotist and Vice
President of the company.
J. E. Hanger Inc. has been
selected by the Professional
Committee and the Crippled
Children's Committee to
supply and fit the prosthetic
and orthotic appliances needed
by the children. The orthotist
will attend the clinics once
every month or more
frequently if required.
"J. E. Hanger is a contract
supplier for the State of
Florida, the Department of
Health and Rehabilatation and
the Division of Vocational
Rehabilitation. The company
also supplies the Bureau of
Crippled Children of the State
of Florida. The firm was
selected after bids had been


PICTURED at a clinic held for crippled children this week are from left to right Mrs.
Lionel Chapman, a member of the Crippled Children's Committee, Dr. Granville Bain, a
member of the committee's professional team, Mr. H. E. Thranhardt, vice president of J.
E. Hanger Inc., the firm that has replaced Arthur and Alan Finneston as the committee's
bracemakers, Miss Vernietta Mott, a member of the committee, and Mr. Hugh Panton, a
director of J. E. Hanger.


received from various overseas
firms in the U. S. and Canada
and all indications are that the
retention of this firm will
provide a more viable and
regular service and will also
reduce the cost of individual
patients so that the maximum
number of children can benefit
from the funds raised by the
Committee for the clinics", a
release from the committee
said.


The Professional Committee
is composed of Drs. Graeme P.
Duffy, Michael Wallace,
Granvillc Bain, Earle
Farrington, Mr. T. L. Darling.
Mrs. D Phillips, and Mrs.
Shadrach Morris.
Members of the CCC plan to
assist with transport of the
children to and from the
Physical Therapy Department
of the hospital in the future.


MANHATTAN CORPORATION


Consolidated Statement of Condition


ASSETS

Cash and due from banks
Investment Securities:
U.S. Treasury Securities
Federal Agency Securities
State and Municipal Securities
Other Securities
TOTAL INVESTMENT SECURITIES

Trading Account Securities
Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and
associated companies
Federal funds sold and securities purchased under
resale agreements
Mortgages
Loans
Premises and equipment
Customers' liability on acceptance
Other assets
TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES, RESERVE AND CAPITAL FUNDS


DEPOSITS:
Demand
Savings and other time
Overseas offices
TOTAL DEPOSITS


Federal funds purchased and securities sold under
repurchase agreements
Other liabilities for borrowed money
Acceptances outstanding
Accrued taxes and other expenses
Other liabilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES
Reserve for loan losses

CAPITAL FUNDS:
Capital notes (4.60% due 1990)
Convertible capital notes (4 7/8% due 1993)
Convertible subordinated debentures (6% due 1996)

STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY:
Preferred stock (without par value)
(Authorized shares 2,000,000; outstanding
shares none)
Common stock (par value $12.50 per share)


1972
Authorized shares 50,000,000
Outstanding shares 31,920,385
Surplus
Undivided profits


1971
40,000,000
31,881,628


TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY


TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS


TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVE AND CAPITAL FUNDS


DECEMBER 31, 1972


$8,037,939,687

648.299,499
78,362.096
2,399,735,437
226,841,398
3,353,238,430

418,038,537

70,061,675

44,897,947
1,899,520,072
15,431,849,406
221,168,721
552,552,983
674,342,644
30,703,610,102


$10,366,274,251
6,493,705,483
8,172,054,333
25,032,034,067


1,710,182,200
678,252,136
560,680,752
226,717,111
403,198,220
28,611,064,486

306,518,682


174,470,000
149,438,700
200,000.000
523,908,700


399,004,812
500,102,737
363,101,685

1,262,118,234

1,786,026,934

30,703,610,102


PHOTO: Philip Symonette

YllTI DAY SERVICE
THE YOUTH Department
of Cooper's T,-rrace, Church of
God will celebrate their first
Youths' Day Service on
Sunday. Deacon Robert
McPhee will be the speaker for
the morning service and the
speaker for the 7:30 p.m.
Worship Service will be
evangelist Olive Turnquest
from Bethel Baptist Church.
The public is invited to attend.


O


DECEMBER 31, 1971


$5,750,911,479

867,625,410
6,000,000
1.566,734,675
286,304,929
2,726,665,014

444,157,230

62,645,375

10,908,500
1,544,189,091
12,748,713,950
212,091,774
556,360,555
450,219,461
$24,506,862,429


$8.619,130,214
4,954,361,593
6,799,532,405
20,373,024,212


893,331,684
252,734,453
564,543,856
208,727,387
201,810,212
22,494,171,804

305,062,724


182,445,000
149,480,300
200,000,000
531,925,300


398,520,350
500,145,594
277,036,657

1,175,702.601

1,707,627,901

$24,506,862,429


Of the above assets, $2.8 billion on December 31,1972 and $2.5 billion on December 31, 1971 were pledged to secure public
and trust deposits and for other purposes. I


THE CHASE


k


I


"-m l,,l ,O T WV 0 ,1 ..q-- -


--


yadruteS March 31 19 3


;1-- -~~ -'


!F






A~ut fw^t


Saturday, March 31, 1973.


WULFF ROAD THEATRE


Starts Saturday night 8:30
and plays thru Tuesday, "What
the Peeper Saw," plus "Soldier
Blue" Sundays showings
continuous from 4:30 Monday
& Tuesday matinee continuous
from 1:30, evening 8:30. No
one under 17 will be admitted.
The new film will turn you
on -- to terror! Called WHAT
THE PEEPER SAW, it tells the
chilling story of a charmingly
evil adolescent boy who
destroys the love of his
parents.
The Joseph 1". Levine
presentation for Avco Embassy
Pictures stars Mark Lester as
the boy, Britt Ekland as his


attractive stepmother, and
Hardy Kruger as the father
who stubbornly refuses to
believe anything bad about his
son.
Also starred are l.illi Palmer
and Harry Andrews. It was
produced by Graham IHarris
and directed by James Kelly.
Mark Lester comes to WHAT
TillH PtPlEIR SAW from a
roster of important and
diffic It portrayals. He played
Olivt Twist in OLIVER, and
appeared in Francois Truffant's
FARENIIl IT 451.
Against the background
of the brutal and unfair
treatment meted to the


NOW SHOWING THRU TUESDAY
~~'~*-


NOW SHOWING THRU TUESDAY
Matinee 2:30& 4:55, Evening 8:30- 'Phone 2-1004, 2-1
The measure of a man is
I howtall he walks.

I. H eHe was going to
a 9 give them law
and order or
di e trying.


CINERAMA RELEASING N eC. os







on first come, first served basis.


S Now thru Tuesday Sunday thru Tuesday
Matinee Starts at 2:15 Sunday continuous from 4
Evening 8:30 Monday continuous from 3
"PRIME CUT" R. "JOE KIDD" PG.
Lee Marvin
Gene Hackman Clint Eastwood,
John Saxon
PLUS PLUS
"SOUTH OF HELL "YOU CAN'T WIN
MOUNTAIN" R. THEM ALL" PG.
No one under 17 will be admitted. Charles Bronson,
I 'Phone 2-2534 Tony Curtis


INOW SHOWING
I Sunday continuous from 4:30- 'Phone 3-4666
Monday Matinee continuous from 1:30, Evening 8:30







I AN AVCO EMBASSY RELEASE COLOR FR
MARK LESTER BRITT EKLAND
I -PLUS-

CANDCE BEEN-PETER STIAUSS
I soum mum
TE(HNICOLOR PANAVISION"
S N O ONI NADRELEASE ,W


NO ONE UNDER 17ADMITTED.


1005O

I
1



















^:50
I
I








1:00



I



I












I
I












I
I






I
:501



















I
I
II
I

I








!I



I

I




I


American Indian by the U.S.
Army a century ago, a savage
annals in history is re-created
in the filming of the 1864 Sand
Creek Massacre and the 1889
Battle of Wounded Knee, in
Joseph F. levine's spectacular
western saga presentation of
SOLDIER BLUE a Ralph
Nelson Picture starring lovely
Candice Bergen, Peter Strauss
and Donald Pleasance in
technicolour and and
Panavision, through Avco
Embassy release.
The climatic armed
confrontation between
Calvalry and Indian that
highlights the picture is a
composite of the two historic
battles. It explodes on the
screen as one of the most
remarkable cinematic
documents of unprecedently
savage battle scenes ever filmed
about the Indian wars
between red man and white
man.
Photographed on locations
in the high sierras of Mexico,
with a cast of 400 including
principals and extras,
SOLDIE1R BLUE brings to the
screen with dramatic ferocity,
the Sand Creek Massacre in
which between 300 and 700
Indian warriors, women ard
children were slaughtered and
the Wounded Knee Battle, the
last stand of the long and tragic
years of Indian resistance on
the western plains.
Miss Bergen plays the
heroine, a cavalry officer's
finance who has spent two
years as a Cheyenne cheif's
squaw.


M E .. .


AND AT 8:50
"ULZANA'SRAID"
No one under 17 admitted.


Wednesday thru Friday.
"BURY ME AN ANGEL" plus
"THE BIG BIRD CAGE"
matinee continuous from 2:30,
evening 8:30. No one under 17
will be admitted.
The New World Pictures ,
release THE BIG BIRD CAGE
stars Pam Grier, Anita Ford,
Candice Roman, Carol Speed
and Sid Haig in a sequel with
imprisoned females so hot with
desire they melt the chains that
enslave them.
Revolutionaries, under the
guise of a nightclub band are Beautiful Cande Bergen stars rk Leser, fresh from his
responsible for the robbery of in Joseph E. Levinea thriin in the hit Broadway play, '
their employer and kidnapping western presentation, "Soldier Rothschilds," has an lmpoi
of a sexy American girl who Blue." part in "What The Peeper S
had run-ins with the SAVOY THEATRE
government through sex SAVOY THEATRE
scandals. Starts are night 8:30,
scandaThe grl is kidnapped in turn Starts Saturday night 8:30, Calgary, Alberta, Canada,
Thegirls algrl isrough a nd tough. Thurn the Tuesday, dingy skid row area of Ka




revolutionaries in preparation d plays n Academy portray an under
must utie revolutionaries of the TPRIME OUT" plus "SOUTH City, Missouro and the bus$
f emal e inmates of the prisnment OF HELL MOUNTAIN" streets of Chicago as back
officerswho psmuggle in other in Sunday thru Tuesday matinee to one of the most exci
friend of their leader and continuous from 2:15 evening screen stories in recent yr
he himself enters arthe terisonble 8:30. No one under 17 will beInruthless leader of the Ka
wiandth the guards all gay and the admitted. Plus late feature Pictures release, Maho no
girls e ll rough and tough. The Tuesday night. portrays an under,
revOIlutionaries in preparation Lee Marvin, Academy "enforcer"ays rebunder
for a rebellion find themselves Award winner Gene Hackman,"eorcer" hired by a Chit
short on help and decide they Gregory Walcott, Angel mob cheftain to go to Ka
must utilise the energies of the Tompkins and newcomer Sissy City and collect $500
fernale inmates of the Prison.Spacek head the stellar cast of wed them by their assoc:
They smuggle in the girl Cinema Centre Films' PRIME there.
friend of their leader and soon, C U T, h a r d h iit t i n g Hackman plays the scher
he himself enters the prison conterhporary action drama ruthless leader of the Ka
and the get-out is staged. about a fued between two City gang who no to


SHIRLEY ST. THEATRE
Now showing thru lif, they live with their son
Thursday, "Walking Tall" Ch(iirl born sometime after.
matinees at 2:30 & 4:55. 1 heir son's death after he
evening 8:30. No one under 17 l'e,- IInes stricken with
will be admitted. ni.L g.nincs cones just before
Starts Friday, "Pete they decide on a separation after
'N'Tillie" matinees at 2:45 & hlvi'nr faced the stresses and
4:55, evening 8:30. Suggested siiims to which all marriages
for mature audiences, parental ire ilbhiect.
discretion is advised. I hey eventually meet each
PETE 'N' TIl-..11 is ,1 tIlk i'gain as time passes by
Universal Pictures iclease aid knowing that their
starring Walter Mattlihu and in.i-..irii'ion hasn't worked out
Carol Burnettt in a true-to-lite d teIidle to go home together.
story of love and marriage. JI h. Jcn nings Land
two, after an unsteady start. pr odulimin. the movie co-stars
soon get themselves hitched It (Seroaidine Page, Barry Nelson,
each other and begin loving th~ I R e Auberjonois and Lee H.
Monti'iomeiry


RE-OPENING TONIGHT
(UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT)









NOW NASSAU'S MOST DISTINGUISHED LATE NIGHT
RENDEZVOUS 9:OORM. 'TIL.....

SELECTED MENU FOR LATE NIGHT DINING
COMPLETE LINE OF SELECTED WINES AND LIQUOR
MUSIC FOR DANCING AND LISTENING TO

THE PAUL HANNA TRIO


BAY & DEVEAUX ST.


Phone 5-3268
FOR RESERVATIONS
ASK FOR MR. TERRY BAIN


YOUR CHILD'S HEALTH IS IMPORiANI TO YOU...


ai YOU an h patt to US!
so we are pleased to announce that
we now have the exclusive agency
for ....




SHOES OF CANADA
.... WELL RENOWNED, QUALITY
MANUFACTURERS OF SHOES
FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY -
COME IN AND SEE FOR .
YOURSELF GOOD QUALITY,
REASONABLY PRICED,
FASHIONABLE SHOES FOR
SCHOOL, WORK OR PLAY!
available only at


FOX'S SHOE STORE
COLLINS AVENUE & 6TH TERRACE CENTREVILLE


N


L OPEN TO THE PUBLIC


ghe t Qbunt











Saturday, March 31, 1973.
Ir -


ghtr itrtbunt


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT 5


REAL ESTATE


I I


I


C9291
LOT 50 x 100 Golden Gates
section one. $4,200 or nearest
offer. Phone 24436 or 34879.

C9353
HOUSE FOR SALE Hillside
Estate. Contact Jerome Bethel
Tedder Close, Palmdale, House
No. 3.

C9344 $75 DEPOSIT secures
a lot in YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. Payments from
only $80 month. Priced from
$5,800. NO INTEREST. From
70 x 100. Utilities soon
completed. Lake front lots
from $7,500. $100 deposit.
Tel: 2-3027 or 2-4148
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE
C9364
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
90 feet on Bernard Road
running 210 feet on private
road reservation. 17,900 sq. ft.
Cash Price $17,500.00.
PHILIP BROWN REALTY.
Phone 24862 31273 after
5.00 p.m.

FOR RENT
C8938
ONE EXTRA large two
bedroom two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished -- Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

C8959
IN TOWN furnished rooms
Efficiency apartment, also
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.
C8939
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C9185
BASICALLY FURNISHED
bedroom, 1 bath, kitchen,
living and dining area.
Montrose Avenue. Telephone
2-1722-5 and 2-3865.


C9288
ATTRACTIVELY furnished
house Sapphire Ridge Road,
Sans Souci 3 bedrooms (2
airconditioned) 2 baths, study,
maid's room, wall to wall
carpet throughout, all
cedar-lined closets. available
for long lease May 15th. Phone
3-6262-3.


FOR RENT


I I


FOR SALE


I I CARS FOR SALE' I


I IIEF uSPPUF I


I . -- .. . I 6 . . I wI- ..... .. ...-- I Vv.... ... . .. I I g .. .. . .


C9269
1 BEDROOM apartment --
Highland Park. $200 water
and gas included. Phone
35729.
C8942
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, attractively
furnished. $250 per month.
Call Chester Thompson Real
Estate 2-4777-8.


C9278
OWNER LEAVING
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
completely furnished, recently
painted Johnson Terrace.
Price: $25,000. Telephone
42462 after six
C9334
FOR SALE
SEMI HILLTOP OUT EAST
2 miles from town. Has 3
bedrooms 21h baths furnished,
plus DEN, PLUS COMPLETE
UNIT. 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
kitchenette, last but not least,
ONE ACRE of grounds with
some views of sea. Come see by
appointment.
DIAL DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION REALTOR we sell
real estate. Phone 22033,
22305, 22307 evenings 41197.

C9331
FOR SALE
1. Attractive three-bedroom,
two-bath residence in
Vista Marina. Living
room, separate dining
room, Bahama room
porch, patio, carport, etc.
Large lot, fruit orchard.
$85,000 furnished or
nearest offer.
2. Buy of the week in
attractive three-bedroom,
two-bath residence in
quiet cul-de-sac in
Montagu hilltop area. A
short walk to Queen's
College and Montagu
beach. Low price of
$49,500 furnished
includes brand-new
washing machine, new
freezer and new stove, as
well as T.V. and Hi Fi. A
bargain at that price.
Terms available.
3. Outstanding buy in
delightful hilltop
residence near Montagu.
Three bedrooms, two
baths, living room, dining
room, patio, kitchen,
laundry, two-car garage
etc. Favourable terms
available to suitable
prospect. $60,000
furnished.
H. G. CHRISTIE
REAL ESTATE
309 Bay Street
P. O. Box N8164,
Nassau
Tel: 2-1041, 2-1042
C9333
FOR SALE
HOUSE VILLAGE ROAD
AREA. 'Have- house 4
bedrooms, 2 baths unfurnished
wooden structure spacious
corner plot Village Road area.
Only asking $22,000.00. Come
see anytime.
DIAL DAMIANOS for Action.
Phones 22033, 22305, 22307
evenings 41197.


C8955

TRAVELLING ?

For efficient friendly
advice on Worldwide
Destinations by Airline or
Steamships, Contact
MUNDYTOURS at 24512.


IAP TA
APPROVED PASSENGBR AGoKNTF


C9277
MAHOGANY CHINA cabinet;
two end tables; child's
battery-operated power-drive
car. Phone 3-2732. Two Aqua
recliners Phone 3-1251


C9267
ATTRACTIVELY
FURNISHED large 1 bedroom
apartment out east with private
entrance and secluded patio.
Beach rights. Bachelor or
couple only. No pets. $275 per
month. Call CHESTER
THOMPSON REAL ESTATE
2-4777 or 4-2035 after hours.

C9207
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom in Bamboo Town.
Phone 36959.
C9030
1-BEDROOM APARTMENT,
furnished, on Eastern Road,
opposite Blackbeard's Tower.
Beautiful beach and gardens.
Occupancy May 1st through
December 31st. Married couple
only, wife unemployed. Low
rent for consideration of
supervision of premises. Phone
4-1476.
C9176
AVAILABLE April 1st
airconditioned, fully furnished
1 bedroom apartment,
including T.V. and telephone -
Brooklyn Avenue. Phone
3-1325
C9184
BASICALLY FURNISHED 2
bedrooms (1 bedroom
airconditioned) 1 bath,
kitchen, living and dining area,
washing machine. Montrose
Avenue. Telephone 2-1722-5
and 2-3865.
C9021
LARGE SHOP for rent, 3000
square feet, 6th Terrace,
Centreville. Can be used as
store and warehouse. Has side
entrance. Call 2-1731 or
3-1583.
C9342
EFFICIENCY apartment,
separate bath and toilet. For
further particulars call 5-8679
ask for Mr. Pritchard.

C9341
2 BEDROOM 1 bath home,
separate dining room, fully
furnished airconditioned, five
minutes walk to Montagu
Beach in quiet area. Phone
28504 day 51647 night.

C9337
One Efficiency apartment, also
one furnished room suitable
for two reserved ladies or men.
Phone 5-1044.

C9349
STORE AND OFFICE space,
Madeira Street Pal mdale.
Completely furnished 1 and 2
bedroom apartment,
airconditioned, carpeted. $210
per month. Phone 23010 -
41301.
C9198
APARTMENTS on Blue Hill
Road south, one block south
of Soldier Road. Washing
machine. Drier and master T.V.
antenna on premises.
Telephone 23287.

C9259
SPACIOUS SPACE suitable for
office or school with ample
parking at a very reasonable
rate. Chesapeake Road and
Jerome Avenue in Pyfrom's
Addition. Phone 2-4536.
C8956
MAUDONNA APARTMENTS
- Corner Mt. Royal Avenue
and Durham Streets, two
bedroom apartments,
completely furnished with
telephone and all modern
conveniences. Telephone
daytime 2-8152 -- after 6:00
p.m. 5-3418.

1 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES---
C9217
PLANNING TO BUY
A LOT?
Act now! Hilltop lots,
corner lots
Easy terms
Call Frank Carey
at 27667
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
Bay & Deveaux Streets.
CALL TODAY

FOR SALE
C9056
1 CONVERTIBLE couch
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 2501b. trunk food freezer.
Call 77947.


M.G.B. G. T. 1970. Good
condition. $1500 O.N.G. Call
22836.


C8954

MOVING?
For Expert Packing &
Forwarding by Sea or Air,
Contact E. H. Mundy &
Co. (Nassau) Ltd., P. 0.
Box N-1893, Phone:
2-4511.



API'ROVI ) CAKRO AU; N Fb


C9347
1966 FORD MUSTANG
Convertible 6 cylinder. Good
condition $500.
1965 FORD ANGLIA -
standard shift, right hand drive,
good condition. Taxed and
tested. $450 O.N.O. Phone
Miss Anderson day 2-1025
evening 2-1679.
C9329
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1970 FORD ESCORT,
Blue Std.4Dr. $995
1972 VENTURA,
A/C, Bucket Seats, Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA,
2 Dr. Radio Auto. Blue $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W,
Auto. $850
1972 VIVA S/W,
Automatic White $2600
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE,
4 Dr. Sedan
Blue/White $2000
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA,
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio, Orange $3500
1969 FORD TURINO $1200
1969 FIAT 124 S/W,
Std. 4 Dr. $550
1971 FORD CAPRI AUTO.
Blue $1850
1968 DODGE DART,
Green $850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD,
Blue A/C $2800
1971 FORD MAVERICK


C9325
RECORD PLAYER
Motorola solid state stereo
with AM, FM radio in 5ft.
console. Beautiful piece of
furniture. Excellent sound.
$250. Phone 32019.

C9294
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
before 20th April, 1973.
1 Refrigerator 16 cu. ft.
1 Dining Room Suite
3 Bedroom Suites (one French
Provincial)
Furniture in very good
condition. Telephone 41243
after 6 p.m.
C9328
TYPEWRITER, record player,
sewing machine, heater, fan,
toaster. All perfect condition.
Write P. O. Box N8009,
Nassau.

C9327
HOME STEREO turntable
speakers, tuner amp.
Telefunken tape recorder Reg.
8 Movie Projector. Call 22836.

C9339
BARGAINS BARGAINS
(1) 13 ft. Tuppen's Torino
fiber-olass boat with trailer and
25 H.P. Johnson sea-horse
engine. $1,100.00
(2) 66 Volkswagen 1500
perfect condition with trailer
hitch. $1,200.00.
(3) 19 In. Motorola TV b/w
new $200.00.
(4) Lawnmower 3 hp B/S
engine $65.00.
(5) Pye Radio/Hi Fi
combination with records
$80.00.
(6) 4 draw Chest of Drawers.
You select finish $25.00
(7) Boy's "Chopper" bicycle
$45.00.
(8) 51h H.P. Johnson Sea-Horse
engine $275.00
Extra bonus: purchase items
(1) and (2) for $2,000.00.
Call 3-2054 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.

C9210
1 6 yard Dump Truck. Like
new.
1 1 bag used concrete mixer.
Good condition.
Call 22098.

C9355
9 PIECE RATTAN Set, full
bedroom and living room,
single bed with head board.
Briggs & Stratton heavy duty
lawn mower.
Oasis water cooler, electric
drill, washing machine and
various electrical appliances.
High Vista. Telephone 42724.

C9357
1 Waltz Organ
Oldsmobile 68 Delmont 4
door excellent condition.
Reduced owner leaving.
Phone 57324.

C9354
STAR Telescope $40. Tent 16'
x 10' $150. Skis $15. Mink
Stole $175. Cocktail Dresses,
sizes 10/12. Boys clothing
Xaviers blazer $7 etc. Days
77766, evenings 77764.

PETS FOR SALE
C9345
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPY
Thoroughbred Male 3
months old. All Shots. Classic
Markings. Telephone 2-1741 -
Business hours.

LOST
C9348
REWARD. Return of jewellery
lost Feb. 17th near Sheraton.
Mail, registered S. Warren,
General Delivery, Hicksville,
11801, N.Y. U.S.A.
C9367
PRESCRIPTION GLASSES,
square lens, gold rim, in red
case, between 8:30 a.m. and
3:15 p.m. at Government High
School or Oakes Field
Shopping Plaza. If found please
call Orville Rollins-Gibson
3-6936 after 6 p.m. or 2-2722
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 3
p.m. to 5 p.m.

CARSFOR SALE
C9320
1968 COUGAR V/8,
airconditioned, Vinyl top -
excellent shape only $1250.
Day phone 35673 Nights
31909.

C9326


$1950

$800


$1400

$2100

$2000

$695

$500


Trade-ins welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8

ANNOUNCEMENTS
C9127
THE BAHAMAS GOSPEL
MISSION INC., of Montrose
Avenue, Shirley Heights,
Nassau N. P. wish to announce
the RE-OPENING OF THE
DAY SCHOOL and DAY
NURSERY on September 3rd
1973.
The Day Nursery will accept
Infants from 6 months old at 8
a.m. to 6 p.m.
The Kindergarten will accept
children from 3 years old 9
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Registration for both Nursery
and Kindergarten will
commence April 3rd 1973
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (On
Tuesday & Thursdays) at the
office of the Mission or contact
Mrs. Nottage c/o phone 24537.
Those wishing to register their
infants and children are urged
to do so immediately as there
will no doubt be a long waiting
list. A deposit of $10 will be
requested when you register.
For fees and other
information, contact the Pastor
of the Mission at the office or
for appointment call Mrs.
Nottage c/o Phone 24537.

CARD OF THANKS
C9290
THE FAMILY of the lat
Diana Francis wish to thank all
who expressed and showed
sympathy and words of
encouragement during their
recent bereavement.


I MARINE SUPPLIES


C9336
20' BERTRAM 1969, fully
equipped, 160 Mercruiser.
$4,300 or nearest offer. Tel.
3-1020 after 6 p.m.
C9351
YACHTS AND BOATS LTD

CHRIS-CRAFT

CONCORDE

IRWIN SAIL YACHTS

MAGNUM MARINE

AVON INFLATABLES

21font Barcone runabout of
fibreglass with center consul.
Has 115 h.p. Evinrude for
power and many extras
$3600.00

25 foot Bertram Flybridge
sport fisherman with twin 160
h.p. Mercruiser in/outboards.
Boat and engines have just had
a complete overhaul and are as
new. Asking $14000.00

25 foot fibreglass Cobia with
twin 160 h.p. Mercruisers. Has
ship-to-shore, outriggers, fish
chairs and more $6000.00

AT THE DIVE SHOP

Now is the time to buy your
Scuba Gear. All Scuba and
Snorkelling equipment at the
same low price. Everything for
the beginner and pro available
at Nassau's most complete Dive
Shop. See us.

P. O. Box N1658
Telephone 24869


C9281
25ft. BERTRAM only fourteen
months old -- just like new.
Call days 3-5673 after 6 p.m.
4-3037.
C8944
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.



C9332
WILL MRS. MYRTIS
MONCUR FORMERLY OF
CAT ISLAND PLEASE
CONTACT ESSO STANDARD
OIL S. A. LIMITED AT
TELEPHONE NUMBER
28401 AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE.

POSITION WANTED
C8500
IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
Adv. C8500, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau.


I WANTED
C9300
USED PAPER BACKS wanted
for Aquinas College booksale.
Please deliver donations to
school office.

WORK WANTED
C9322
LADY WITH over 20 years
experience would like to be
employed as maid. Telephone
5-4420.

HELP WANTED
C9321
EXPERIENCED COOK with
knowledge of hotel cooking -
age 30 years and over
references required. Call
2-8395.
C9212
Esso Standard Oil S. A.
Limited has a vacancy for a
Graduate Engineer to work in
the Bahamas. Applicants must
have a University Degree in
Mechanical or Civil
Engineering, preferably with at
least three years practical
experience, and must be
Bahamian citizens. Qualified,
Energetic, keen men willing to
make a career with Esso should
apply in writing stating their
qualifications to the Manager,
P. O.'Box N-3237, Nassau, N.
P., Bahamas. As there may be
Bahamians now working
overseas who would be
interested in returning home to
fill such a position Esso would
appreciate this being brought
to their attention.
C9335
BEAUTICIAN TO OPERATE
BEAUTY SALON AT
TREASURE CAY.
Qualifications Required. At
least two years experience -
Capable of running beauty
salon (one Beautician
operation), preferably
experienced in both men and
women hair cutting and
styling, but not essential for
men.
Kindly send resume to:-
"Beautician" P. 0. Box
N-3229, Nassau, Bahamas. or
telephone 2-2415, 2-8730 Ext.
158.
C9338
OFFICE MANAGER
TECHNICAL
ADMINISTRATOR
The above position is
immediately open to
Bahamians who are
experienced with Architectural
Planning and Engineering terms
and have high secretarial skills
in Shorthand, Typing,
Bookkeeping to Trial Balance
and Lease Preparation. The
applicant must also have
experience in the Property
Management field and would
be responsible for the running
of a small office and the
supervision of Field Staff and
would be required to recruit
and train young Bahamians.
For appointment call W. T.
LOWES & ASSOCIATES
2-1741-2
C9343
LABOURER to engage in
maintenance and landscaping
of large property. Must be
willing to do rock work,
levelling, cleaning and
gardening. Contact Mrs.
Turnquest at phone 2-3228.
C9346
WANTED: Gardener to live in


year round. Must have
references. Telephone 41078.


C7293
JOB TITLE: Foreman
Mechanical Maintenance.
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the mechanical
maintenance in the installation,
assembly, repair, inspection
and testing of equipment for
the entire cement plant. The
facilities include hammer mill
crusher, cranes, conveyors,
kilns, coolers, pumps,
compressors, ball mills, piping,
boilers, oil handling and firing
equipment and dust collectors.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.


NFIP NTFrO


C9350 FULL TIME live in
maid. Telephone 5-6219.
C7291
JOB TITLE: Conveyor Cleaner
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Secondary -- Must be able to
read and write.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
Experience not essential.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Clean conveyors and transfer
points. Interested Applicant
Contact: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport.
C 7289
JOB TITLE: Instrument
Repairman
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years industrial instrumentat-
ion experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Install, repaircalibrate test and
adjust any type of integrating,
indicating or graphic electrical
or mechanical instrument.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.
C7290
JOB TITLE: Payloader
Operator
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operates payloader to load
limestone into trucks and
charge clinker, gypsum and raw
materials into feed system.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.


C7292
JOB TITLE: Appropriation
Clerk
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school or equivalent.
Accounting or basic
book-keeping is desirable.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 2-3
years practical accounting
office experience of clerical
work.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITI ES:
Handling and accounting for
petty cash working funds,
control and reporting of capital
expenditures, preparation of
monthly journal vouchers,
posting and balancing I.C.C.
general ledger, prepare
preliminary financial
statements, posts and
reconciles subsidiary detail
accounts and prepare reports as
required.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.

C9356
REQUIRED one Project
Salesman to reside on Family
Island. Applicants must be
college graduates or equivalent
and possess Real Estate
Marketing and Sales
Administration experience.
Please send resumes to Box
N-7782, or telephone 24596.

C9359
WANTED: Labourers for
farmwork. P. Michael, P. O.
Box 8204, Nassau.

C9361
WANTED:
Bar Waiters
Bar Waitresses
Bar Boys
Apply Personnel Department,
Emerald Beach Hotel between
the hours 9:30 a.m. and 11.30
a.m.
C9362
UNFURNISHED HOME FOR
SALE 131 DAMPIER 3
bedrooms 2 baths with carport,
room air conditioners,
dishwasher and garbage
disposal. Price $28,000
minimum down payment
$5,000.
Contact: SYNTEX Phone
352-8171.

C9360
RESERVATIONS MANAGER
- At least five (5) years
experience with large hotel.
Complete and thorough
knowledge of Reservations and
Front Desk operations, group
tours and conventions.
Supervise and train large staff.
Please submit resume to
Manager, Emerald Beach Hotel,
P. O. Box N7108, Nassau.

C7296
TELEVISION AND RADIO
TECHNICIAN experienced
in all types of electronics. Must
be completely familiar with
transistors and other Solid
State devices. Must possess
own hand tools, good salary
and hours. References


essential.
Bahamas Music
Ltd., P. 0.
Freeport.


c Corporation
Box F-769,


For Best Results Use

The Tribune Classifieds.

TO PLACE YOUR ADS.
CALL 2-1986


TRADE SERVICES
C8947



Mickey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
iEAVY DUTY TRUCK(
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING(
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINE
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-37!
2-3797, 2-3798
Airoort 77434


I
Ig


IRAND I


CLASS


S FOR RENT
C7249
3 BEDROOM, 2 Bath Duple,
$200.00, CATV included.
1 Bedroom, water, garbage,
CATV included, $150.00
Freeport 352-2126.

HELP WANTED
C7286
REFINERY ENGINEER
Must have minimum of six
years recent experience as
Project Engineer in an
operating refinery of chemical
plant; work involves the
development of a variety of
capital, expense and
maintenance projects for
proposed and existing facilities,
providing technical advice to
operating departments and
trouble-shooting plant design
problems. Degree in
Mechanical Engineering
required.
Mail resume in confidence to:
Personnel Officer, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company P. O. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Bahamas.
C7287
MANAGER OPERATIONS
CO-ORDINATION
REQUIRED BY GRAND
BAHAMA PETROLEUM
COMPANY, A PARTNER OF
BAHAMAS OIL REFINING
COMPANY. ENGINEERING
DEGREE AND AT LEAST
FIVE YEARS EXPERIENCE
IN REFINERY PROCESS,
PROJECT, AND/OR
PLANNING FUNCTIONS
REQUIRED. MUST HAVE
PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE
WITH CRUDE OIL
EVALUATIONS, WORKING
KNOWLEDGE OF FUEL OIL
QUALITY, BLENDING
CHARACTERISTICS AND
UTILITY FUEL
REQUIREMENTS. ABILITY
TO ASSIST IN PREPARA-
TION OF CRUDE SUPPLY
AND PRODUCT
CONTRACTS. CO-ORDIN-
ATE DEVELOPMENT AND
EXECUTION OF SUPPLY
AND MANUFACTURING
OPERATIONS PLAN,
PERFORM RECONCILIA-
TION STUDIES OF
COMPANY'S OPERATIONS,
ASSIST IN THE
DEVELOPMENT OF
COMPANY PROJECTS. A
MECHANICAL ENGINEER-
INO OR CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING DEGREE
PREFERRED.
PLEASE REPLY STATING
DETAILS OR PREVIOUS
EXPERIENCE TO: P. O. BOX
F-2515, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.
C7284
TRAINEE: (1) Computer
Draughtsman and Print Room
Operator. Good mathematical
background necessary.
(2) Chainmen with at least two
years experience.
Apply to: R. Warren &
Associates Ltd., P. O. Box
F-836, Freeport.

C7285
ONE MAN TO RUN
CHICKEN FARM, GROWING
BIRDS AND TAKING CARE
OF LAYING HENS,
BAHAMIAN PREFERRED.
CONTACT: BAHAMAS
POULTRY CO., LTD., PHONE
352-7897.

C7283
ONE CHIEF SECURITY
OFFICER: With 10 years
Police experience and
supervisory capacity.
ONE LIFE GUARD: With
three to four years experience
in Pool and Beaches.
ONE RESERVATION
SUPERVISOR: With four to
five years experience and to be
solely responsible for all
reservations and convention
groups.
Interested persons apply to:
THE GRAND BAHAMA
HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.


TRADE SERVICES


C8941
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS AWNINGS
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and
prompt service call 2-8421.
C8105
TRY US FOR SAFE SURE
CLEANING! ABCO'S NEW
'SUPER STEAM' CARPETS.
UPHOLSTERY TEL:
51071-2-3-4.
C9282
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street, next to
Frank's Place.
C8958
TROUBLES .... small or large
call The Plumber on Wheels:-
ROBERT M. BAILEY
P. O. Box N56,
Nassau
Telephone: 3-5870.


BAHAMA


'IFIED

IELP WANTED
C7294
RADIO TELEPHONE
OPERATOR (HARBOUR) -
Must be able to communicate
with ships, sending and recei-
ving messages. Knowledge of
Morse Code and ability to send
and read incoming code
messages distinct asset. Night
work required on rotating shift
basis.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority Limited, P. 0.
Box F-2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7293
JOB TITLE: Foreman
Mechanical Maintenance.
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILI TIES:
Supervise the mechanical
maintenance in the installation,
assembly, repair, inspection
and testing of equipment for
the entire cement plant. The
facilities include hammer rill
crusher, cranes, conveyors,
kilns, coolers, pumps,
compressors, ball mills, piping,
boilers, oil handling and firing
equipment and dust collectors.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.


C7289
JOB TITLE: Instrument
Repairman
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years industrial instrumenta-
tion experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Install, repair, calibrate test and
adjust any type of integrating,
indicating or graphic electrical
or mechanical instrument.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.
C9352
COST ACCOUNTANT Must
have a minimum of 5 years
experience in Cost Accounting
and Administration. Must be
familiar with banking records
and procedures, maintain
corporate books and records,
prepare accounting statements
and reports, perform cost
accounting and various
complex accounting matters,
must also have excellent typing
and secretarial skills. Must have
the ability to function without
supervision. Bahamian status
required. Salary to
commensurate with experience
and ability. Successful
applicants will be called for
personal interview and all
applications will be kept
confidential. Please reply in
writing giving a complete
resume of training and past
experience, to Corporate Bank
and Trust Company, Limited,
P. O. Box F-2748, Freeport,
Grand Bahama Island. No
phone calls accepted.
C7292
JOB TITLE: Appropriation
Clerk
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High school or equivalent.
Accounting or basic
book-keeping is desirable.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 2-3
years practical accounting
office experience of clerical
work.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Handling and accounting for
petty cash working funds,
control and reporting of capital
expenditures, preparation of
monthly journal vouchers,
posting and balancing I.C.C.
general ledger, prepare
preliminary financial
statements, posts and
reconciles subsidiary detail
accounts and prepare reports as
required.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.


II-


I


r 1


---- --


I| I


-- -


-T-


I -


Auto. Red
1969 VIVA
4 Dr. Auto-Green
1969 CHEVELLE
2 Dr. Vinyl
Auto. Gold
1971 RAMBLER
Auto. Blue
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Green
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue
1970 VIVA
2 Dr. Auto. Black


,


I


II I I


I I


I II


I














GRAND BAHAMA


I CLASSIFIED


IELP WANTED
C7288
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY:
For General Manager of
Oceanus Hotels Ltd., Must be
fast and accurate at shorthand
and typing. Proficient in all
duties related to Executive
Secretary. At least three years
previous experience as
Secretary necessary for this
position.
CREDIT MANAGER: To
handle all Accounts Receivable
for both Hotels. Must be
familiar with travel agents
coupons, credit cards, etc..
Compose and type own
correspondence and post
accounts on NCR 4200.
ASSISTANT MANAGER: To
assist General Manager with
Oceanus Hotels Ltd.. Direct,
supervise and train personnel.
Must have at least five years
experience in Hotel and
Tourist field.
Apply: Oceanus Hotels Ltd.,
Personnel Dept., Royal Palm
Way, Freeport, G.B. P. O. Box
F-531.
C7297
JANITOR/Custodian and
Maintenance Man required for
downtown office building.
Duties to include routine
building maintenance, office
cleaning, trash removal, etc..
Apply Mercantile Group, P. 0.
Box F-456, Freeport.
Telephone 352-9761.


HELP HINTED
C7291
JOB TITLE: Conveyor Cleaner
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Secondary must be able to
read and write.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
Experience not essential.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Clean conveyors and transfer
points. Interested Applicant
Contact : Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport.
C7295
COLOUR TV TECHNICIAN
minimum of five years
experience including circuit
modification and sweep
alignment. Must be able to help
and train others. Must possess
own tools, good salary and
hours.
Write for interview: Bahama
Music Corporation, P. O. Box
F-769, Freeport.
C7296
TELEVISION AND RADIO
FECHNICIAN experienced
in all types of electronics. Must
be completely familiar with
transistors and other Solid
State devices. Must possess
own hand tools, good salary
and hours. References
essential.
Bahamas Music Corporation
Ltd., P. 0. Box F-769,
Freeport.


HELP WANTED
C 7290
JOB TITLE: Payloader
Operator
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operates payloader to load
limestone into trucks and
charge clinker, gypsum and raw
materials into feed system.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F-100, Freeport.


I4 i W


I ELP WANTED
C7270
FREEPORT CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY LTD. requires or.e
mechanic foreman with five
years experience in repairing
diesel and gasoline engines.
cars, dump trucks and
ready-mix trucks.
Also needed is one mechanic
helper with previous service
station experience.
Interested persons should
contact Mr. George Stockdale
at P. O. Box F-2410, Freeport,
Grand Bahama. Phone
352-7091.
.-


I'M NOT SLEEPY,EITNER ...WHY DONT WYOUJ'ME
PLAY CARDS OR SOQMiIN '?"o


9". %Saturday, Marcn 31, 19/3.



The Tribune Comics Pge


STOP J'RE I'M SORRY
BR !KIG ABOUT THAT TO,
MY HEART! UR
,'I t YOUR HONOR!


I'M SORRY ABOUT
I THE WHOLE THING!
I DIDN'T MEAN IT,
SHONET I DIDN'T/!


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Saturday, March 31, 1973.


lhrt Umribmt
kk


"You were so pleasant yesterday when you hired me
that I didn't think ou'd mind my being a couple of
hours late this morning."

Rupert and the Mixed Magic-18


Your need is urgent, friend
Sorcerer," says the Conjurer.
"But remember, the wand is
untested. Be warned! He
- glances at Tigerlily, who has
followed him to the door.
Back. daughter!" he
cries angrily. You are in
disgrace The Sorcerer looks
thoughtfully at Rupert. I had


hoped for Tigerlily as my
assistant," he murmurs. But
now you must come in her
stead." "Who, me?" says
Rupert in surprise. With-
out explaining, the men of
magic lead him to the flying
saucer. "I have fitted safety
belts," says the Sorcerer.
" Now two can travel on it."


'THe GS ON mTLSHnION AU EAT IT! MAYBE
IF WE LET HIM WATI THE C(OMICIAL...

Brother Juniper


"Relax. Today's the only chance he gets to go out like
a lion."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Cattle 2 Cancel
5. Enervate 29. "Lights out"
8. Fitch 31. Seize
11. Rose's love 33. Fairy queen
12. Shoshonean 34. Animal fat
13. Anything 36. Deep sleep
highflown 38. Instinctive
14. Still water 42. Prolonged
15. Astrodome applause
17. Inactive 45. Temporary star
19. Malay 46. Adjust
outrigger 47. Bushy clump
20. Russian 48. River to the
revolutionist Baltic Sea
24. Samuel's ,9. Retainer
mentor 50. Chicago
26. Soldiers transportation


SOI


IUTULON OF


51. Hotbed
DOWN
1. Beanies
2. Hautboy
3. Trachea
4. Passover fea


5.
6.
7.

8

ast 9


16.
i -i13 18i
21
S- - 22
I I 23.
24
S25
P242I 2 26 227 28 7
S- i 32 a - 330
32.
1 1 e 35.
37
iias 140 I
42 43 44 40
- 147 41
41
p io 1 42
43
At f 4 &A


. Uphold
Sweetsop
Old size of
paper
. Mountain
banana
SEskimo knife
SCollide
. Recolored
. Egg drink
SEelworm
. Worldwide
workers unior
.Beak
.Greek long E
.Adolescent
. Duelist's
aides
. Falling-out
.'Male turkey
.Apartment
. Massenet
opera
. Implement
. Patron saint
of lawyers
.Haul
.Absent
. Compete
. Hatchet


F] [Isriol[


Winnit


word must contain the large
NOW many letter, and there must be at
words or least one a" 4aUr word In the
four l e rte list. No plurat ; no Os word
or more cn no Proper names. TODAX'I(
,on make TARGET: 18 words good;
rem the 17 words, very good; 22 words
letter on excellent. Solutiontomorrow.
here? In
makiln a SATURDAY'S SOLUTION :
word, each Aloe also carol clry clay olear
letter may cloe eley eoIt ealy COARBELY
be used once cole cora erte ers lasse
only. Each lacy laur layer loe 165a oe
loser lyre o oral rma reseal
relay rl royal sale soale
e al sla iol ae slayer sloe soele
Iolaselase solr sole sOrel sorely.


ryg


Bridge

mattcs nasi never be
tdat rt the anup m c tiIe. nteor
t'gures, as lhei:
Dealer S~ei : N/8 Vil.
Nerth
J 10 9
K 8Q J5
K5 42
We


Q 10 8N 83
,. u North
iNT (1-17) 3NT
on Yaw o10 "d
~adeanr teada ianwowd Ito
end ftth end
dumanyb oJod B3ats OA.
at artubn the 43. South's
crsd a the t art you come
in wilN tOe 4Q.
What do youdo next ?
LOert count. owg South
the 'A tfr his ll r. he has four
harts to ah, thne ditu and
ti 4A. eight trk *a &i aU. A

quidgd.
taell di arde O l the 4 at
trick one, dnyng an s nour,
but tm h played the+ 43
ohty ihowinig four qpfeit im
ftouh sat 6 wdth fa doutBe-
ton A. A .w spade, *tate we
"M the ICOK, wO, te rfore,
dte it out and IdM l the combat.


A76 2
South
SA8
A 4 2
SQ 10 8 4
No. A J 7
No. 7.084 by TIM MI.hAV


Across
1. Measurenent. (9)
h. Fowl. (3)
9. Sea. (5)
10. Pots and pans, posslhly. (8)
13. Long for (5)
14. First World War ligurr (9)
1. Cornish river. (3)
17. Parts of flowers. (6)
19. Liveliness. (U)


Chess
By LEONARD GARDEN


S-I i_1*1









1 5122)


Palma tournament, but White's
?.- :.-A










next few moves forced a decisive
material advantage. LJubojevic.
the loser, is a Yugoslav reckoned
by many the top young player
in Eurpeoutiside the USSR. but
he failed to spot White's win-
netn plan. Can you do better?
Par t.mes: 10 seconds, chess
master: 30 seconds. hess
exoert; 2 minutes, county
player: 5 minutes. club strength:
8 m.nutes. average; 20 minutes.
novice.

Solution No. 9622

Chess Solution
1 B3-B. RxB: 2 P-aK,
-3; many the top young plttackng
Black's rook on 3e USR. R3u-
RI; 4 P-B4 and Black resigned.
here is no defence to the
threat plan.P-K Can otting off his
qoeen's protection of the knight.

1. Lexoeel-;headd. 14)
'3. Viteor (3, 6)
Down
laker; 5 minp ourtes, club strengklth.
(5, 4)
i. The lady. (3)
m. Sketched In. (2, 7)
novice.

















SSolution Noap. (3)
C. on the side of your head
(3)
SExpresses hI se un-
pleasantly. (6)
It. First lady. (3)
S-B. 1r3 Q-'
Bl ack's rookn e.on R3
(5)
l. 4 P-B4 and Black resvened..
oueen's protection o/ the knght.









a1. iel-iriaded. It)
lI. clw. (n )
Victor (3. 6








(4)
.I Is r one.
(3) "stur. y, s. uluton


I RX MCoic. By D CRI


REX MORGAN, M.D. By PDAL CURTIS


CARROLL RIGHTERS

IHOROOSCFE
from the Carrll RitlWr Iaitute
1 GENERAL TENDENCIES: A fairly
unimportant day and p.m as far as anything of
major importance is concerned. Time is best utilized to get rid
of all chores and behind-the-scenes personal duties so you do
not have to use oncoming important days to complete such
things. Be understanding
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Get rid of those small
accumulated tasks early, then secure data you need. Plan to
help those who are truly in trouble Don't be fooled by
moochers, though Think logically.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Plan social activities now and
try to please good friends more; do whatever is helpful to
them Those aims you have can be reached more quickly
thereby Stop stewing over some situation; do something wise
about it.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Study those civic affairs that
can prove to be most helpful to you in the days ahead. Look
into your credit and government responsibilities and get them
handled well, or plan how to do so Relax tonight.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Look into the
information you already have so you know how to expand
more quickly in the future Make those new contacts who have
the knowledge you need Spend more time with mate in p.m.
LEO (July 22 to Aug, 21) Follow your hunches today, since
they are apt to be more accurate and will lead you properly,
help you to communicate better with others. Cooperate th
an associate and don't be disappointing to him or her. Avoid
moochers.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) You have to be conscientious
in handing problems today, especially where money is
concerned Mate can be most helpful. Show tact in
straightening out some situation with one who is important to
you
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) Show more thoughtfulness for
others and more mutual happiness results Handle those
personal matters well without further procrastination. Show
you are an efficient, kind person.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Get into the ordinary things
you like to do which are easy for you and be happy. Improve
the state of your present health More attention to mate brings
excellent results now Show you are indeed devoted.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Although home duties
seem boring, they are important just the same, so get them
done quickly and well. Make sure that utilities are in fine
running order. Don't take any chances with anything today or
tonight.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Keep busy at shopping,
running errands, handling correspondence, chores that are
difficult during busy work week. Then contact friends and
relatives you have not seen in some time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Plan a better budget and
get your financial affairs on a more practical basis. Study how
to improve your property. Fun with friends in p.m. Think.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) Ideal day and p.m to improve
your health and charm so you can be at your best when out
socially later in the day and p.m Budget your money wisely
and do not spend too much Avoid one who argues.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be a
born humanitarian and should be given a chance to help
playmates early in life with their problems so as to bring this
quality to the fore early. Give good spiritual training and teach
ethics early so your child does not get side-tracked and
involved in using this fine quality of compassion to help
entirely selfish people. Send to the right schools and the world
will be much better for the birth of this youngster. Build up
bodily energy through diet.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


IN SPAIN TO MAKE
SOME FASHION SPREAPS FOR "VENUS"
MAGAZINE, EVE INSPECTS THE COTTAGE
RENTEP FOR HER....

HEY- WHAT'S
EATING YOU .

1 KNOW FOR
SURE EARL


Par time 25 min.


II


-


JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS

WE LL CANCEL T I'M DE BACK IN COURT I FEEL AS THOUGH I'M BACK
I'VE MADE A I'LL CALL KATHERINE AND SHORTLY' THE TWO OF YOU HOME, SAM! I NEVER
RESERVATION AT TELL HER THAT SAM WILL BE GET ON YOUR WAY.' REALIZED HOW MUCH
THE HOTEL, TAKING YOU OUT TO THE KATHERINE WILL BE I'VE MISSED BEING
JUDGE! HOUSE, BETSY EXPECTING AWAY UNTIL NOW














APARTMENT 3-G By Ales Kotsky

S WELL, ITS BEEN QUITE. A IF TOMMiE ANP THIS YOUNG MAN HOW ABOUT IT, TOMMIE? WILL YOU
LONG TIME,MATHA--- HAVE A PATE TOMORROW, WE CAN'T CALL ROMANO AND ASK WHETHER
JORDAN, WEN'5 UT YOU REALLYJUST IMPOSEOURSELVES- JO AN I CAN JON ? AND
THEAST E RTo R HAVEN'T BEEN UP < WE'LL PICK UP THE TAB!
THE LAST TIME To IT---
YOU TOOK ME WHY KNOWING ROMANO,
DANCING NOTAD T I'M SSR HE'PgBE











STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


I TARGET j


_ -t, -- L-


-J 44


AP Newseetwes











Uhr Urtbunt


Nassau 'A' team set



to win squash tourney

NASSAU SQUASH CLUB's senior team seem certain to clinch
the "A" team trophy and Jamaica the "B" team trophy following
last night's matches in the International Quadrangular


Tournament being played at the
Last night, in some keen
squash competition, the Nassau
A team beat the Jamaica team
3-2 and the Nassau B team lost
to the Jamaican B team 3-2.
Both Nassau and Jamaica
had previously defeated
Bermuda teams in both
divisions.
Bob Montgomery played
some fine squash in the A team
tourney to dispose of
Jamaica's number I player A.
Joton in three sets. Tony
I ancaster lost to J. Simmonids
(the Jamaican No. 2 player) by
3 games to 2, while R. Ashton
(Nas) had a bad fall and lost to
J. Briers 3-1.
Keith Parker (Nas) beat
Lindsay Murphy (3-2) and
Ivern Davis (Nas) beat R.
Howieson (3-1).
in the B team tourney P.
Perry (Nas) lost to young Bob
Jennings, the 17-year-old
Jamaican star and R. Rowson
(Nas) lost to Ken Barnes. The
other loser was Earle Bostwick,
while the two Nassau winners
were Eric-Wilkerson and Dr.
Grahame Barry.
WOMEN'S PLAY
In the open women's
tourney, Freeport's Doreen
McNeil beat Hilda Morrison of
Jamaica 3-0, Jill Farley of
Bermuda beat Bernadette
Mickle (Freeport) 3-1, Brenda
Zecse of Nassau beat S.
Hartley of Bermuda 3-0 and
Enid Young of Nassau lost to
Denise Wood of Jamiaca 3-1.
The women's semi-finals
were to be played at 5:30
today with the finals tomorrow


BODYBUILDING

CONTEST AT

GHS TONIGHT
WITH FAVOURABLE
criticism and encouraging
backing from the Bahamian
fans, the Bahamas could have
some of the best body builders
in the world, commented
veteran bodybuilder Sam
Williams. Williams is among 20
bodybuilders who tonight will
be viewing for the Mr. Bahamas
International Contest at 8:30
at the Government High
School auditorium.
With his gym in Hawksbill
Creek Grand Bahama, Williams
has trained noted boydbuilders
like Dwight Palacious and Neil
Dean, both of whom have
entered tonight's contest. He
also trained junior winners
Victor Lockhart and Tyrone
Armbrister who will also be
entering the contest.
With other noted physiques
like Baldwin Darling, Hercules
Rolle and Amos Saunders
competition should be exciting
and fans will have a chance to
see the best in the Bahamas.
Frankie Knowles, Shorty
Styles and Steve Burrows will
perform strength feats and the
National School of Self
Defence and the Bahamas
Wrestling Association will put
on exhibitions.
Williams said that Glen Wells
could have been the best in the
world but all he got for his
efforts was criticisms and very
little encouragement. "In my
gym," said Williams, "I teach
people how to be proud
Bahamians."
Following this tournament
tonight, the Bahamas
Bodybuilding Association is
planning a "Mr. Caribbean
Contest" later this year when
contestants from the Bahamas
and other Caribbean countries
will vie for the coveted title.


Blue Hill Squash courts.
at II a.m.
Both Nassau teams meet the
Freeport teams tonight, with
Bermuda playing against
Freeport tomorrow.
GRAND NATIONAL WINNER
AINTREE, England (AP)- Red
Rum won the gruelling Grand
National over Crisp by
three-quarters of a length today.
Both were joint favourites in the 38
horse field. L'Escargot was third.


Saturday, March 31, 1973.


Del lane Saints hammer


Heasties lumbermen

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
OUTFIELDERS EDDIE FORD AND JOHN WILUAMS
teamed up for five runs to pace defending league champions Del
Jane Saints to an 8-3 victory over Heastie Lumber last night in
the second game at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.


4t 4


BERMUDA LADIES
SQUASH TEAM Pictured
from left to right are L.
Sechiari, Jill Farley, B. Wilson
and C. Harker, who arrived in
Nassau to participate in the
International Squash Rackets
Quadrangular Tournament,
which opened on Wednesday
and continues through
Monday. Miss Farley yesterday
beat Freeport's Bernadette
Mickle. PHOTO: Rickey Wells.
aLirP.: C-PYSU .I .-. -


JAMAICA LADIES SQUASH TEAM Rosemary
Lethbridge, D. Wood and Hilda Morrison make up the
Jamaica ladies team competing in this week's squash
tournament. Miss Morrison was beaten by Freeport's Denise
McNeil yesterday. PHOTO: Rickey Wells


CAMPERDOWN

HORSE SHOW


TOMORROW

THE biggest horse show to be
held in the Bahamas gets underway
tomorrow at Camperdown Ranch
when 90 riders and over 50 horses
take part in the day long Eastern
Equestrian Society's second annual
horse show.
The show opens at 10 a.m.
Camperdown Ranch, which
started out as a small clearing in the
bush on the property of Pierre
upuclh two years ago, has matured
into an attractive riding ranch with
stables and stalls for at least two
dozen horses.
A large cleared riding ring is
partially enclosed with a chain link
fence, and surrounded on the two
other sides by a wooden rail fence.
Bleachers border the south side of
the ring, and part way along the
west side. A smaller collecting ring
on the west side opens Into the
main ring.
Covered redwood stables stretch
along the north side of the ring and
include cross-ties for washing down
horses. The stables include a
separate feed room and a tack room
for storing saddles and gear. At the
back of the main stable are half a
dozen additional stables, each
opening out into its own corral.
Future plans call for the
construction of a clubroom for
members, with the addition of a
first aid room and lavatory
facilities. It is also hoped by
Eastern Equestrian Society officials
to install lighting throughout the
area and to provide night riding.
Currently under development is a
riding trail which is being cleared
through the underbrush to the
eastern side of the main ring. It will
eventually stretch about a mile and
a half.
"We really tried to develop this
place for the kids," says Mrs. Kris
Kelly, president of the EES, "and
I'm happy to see so many kids
making use of It. We don't have any
lofty ideals, we just want to have a
place where the kids can ride and
learn to ride properly and have fun
doing it. Some of the young ones
who came along a couple of years
ago to watch the older ones riding
are now riding themselves, and this
is what the place is all about.


LONDON (AP)-Results in
British soccer league games
Saturday:
ENGLISH LEAGUE:
Division One:
Arsenal 0 Derby I
Coventry 2 Ipswich I
Crystal Palace 2 Chelsea 0
Leicester 0 Newcastle 0
Liverpool I Tottenham I
Manchester City I Leeds 0
Norwich I Birmingham 2
Southampton 0 Manchester U. 2
Stoke 2 West Bromwich 0
West Ham 2 Everton 0
Wnlverhamoton 1 Sheffield I
Division Two
Aston Villa 2 Oxford
Blackpool 4 Hull 3
Brighton 2 Preston 0
Carlisle 2 Luton 0
Fulham I Cardiff I
Huddersfield 1 Millwall 0
Nottineham 3 Bristol City 0
Queen's Park 5 Portsmouth 0
Shettield Wed. 2 OrientO
Sheffield Wed. 2 Orient 0
Sunderland 2 Bristol City 2
Swindon I Middlesbrough 0
Division Three
Blackburn 2 Tranmere 2
Bristol Rovers I Southend 2
Charlton I Bournemouth I
Chesterfield 2 Rochdale I
Grimsby 0 Wrecham I
Oldham I Notts County I
Plymouth 2 Port Vale 1
Rotherham I Bolton 0
Swansea 2 Halifax 0
Watford I WaIsall 0
York 0 Brentford I
Division Iour
Bradford 3 Gillingham I
Bury 5 Doncaster 0
Cambridge 0 Workington 0
Chester I Torquay 2
Darlington 3 Crewe I
Exeter 4 Northampton 1
Mansfield 0 Lincoln 2
Newport II Bamsley I
POITIER LOSES TENNIS
AFTER taking advantage of
Bruce Delancy's injured arm to
move into the second round of the
Montagu Beach Hotel Amateur
Invitational Tennis Tournament
film star Sidney Poitier was
eliminated 6-1, 5-7 and 6-0
yesterday by Harris Smith as the
tournament entered its quarter
finals today. The semifinals are
tomorrow at 10 a.m. with the finals
at 3 o'clock.
In action yesterday, Steve
Norton defeated Neil Headly 6-0,
6-1; Cecil Bethel defeated Bertram
Knowles 2-6, 6-2, 6-2; Don Hodge
defeated Al Block 6-3 6-1; Nine
Rolle defeated Van Miller 6-1, 6-2;
Charles Donaldson defeated Ernie
West 6-4, 6-3; Percy Munnings
defeated John Thompson 6-0, 6-2;
and M. Vincent defeated Harris
Smith 6-3, 6-0 to advance to the
quarter finals.
Sidney Poitler and Bernard
Perron will present the awards after
the finals on Sunday.


NEIL DEAN, SAMUEL WILLIAMS AND BALDWIN DARLING are among 20 others
competing tonight for the Mr. Bahamas International contest 8:30 at the Government
High School Auditorium.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


VOLLEYBALL EXHIBITION
THE BAHAMAS Mens' and
ladies' national volleyball teams
will be playing exhibition matches
at the Britannia Beach Hotel courts
tomorrow!, beginning at 3 p.m.


Third baseman Fred Taylor
drove in his sole rbi of the
game in the bottom of the
sixth inning, when he sent
centre fielder Philip Huyler
home on a single into left to
give Beck's Bees a 3-2 victory
against Paradise Island in last
night's first game at the
Q.E.S.C.
With Beck's and Big Q both
leading the Bahamas Baseball
Association with a seven and
one win-loss record, Del Jane
are in the next position six and
three having lost to Big Q,
Beck's and Jet Set.
The Saints, making use of
three errors in the first inning,
took a three run lead before
Heastie replied in the bottom
of the second to score their
first run on a Del Jane error.
Pitcher Michael Moss then

:~ ~ ~ 1 "*/'j^


ii ii, Ii1
WINNER AND LOSER: DENISE McNeil (right) of Freeport
beat Hilda Morrison of Jamaica, 3-0 yesterday in the ladies squash
tournament at the Blue Hill Golf and Country Club. Pictured
with her is Bernadette Mickle also of Freeport who was beaten by
Jill Farley of Bermuda, 3-1. PHOTO: Rickey Wells


Perry raps fans for not rooting



for him; promises 'I'll be back'
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE TENDENCY OF BAHAMIAN FANS to back foreign competitors more than Bahamian
competitors can actually "paralyze the Bahamian's urge to win," commented former heavyweight
champ of the Bahamas Bert Perry. "Nothing helps a fighter more than when he knows that his
people are behind him," Perry said.


Also national coach of the
Bahamas Amateur Boxing
Association, Perry said that it
was not right for Bahamian
sport fans to put themselves
out of the way to cheer on a
foreign sportsman especially if
a Bahamian sportsman was
involved. "Although the
foreign sportsman might be
better, it is up to the Bahamas
fans to cheer on their
representative," Perry said.
"We have to live together and
not be the underdog to some
foreigner."
Perry, who lost the first of
two comeback fights when he
dropped a fourth round
technical knockout victory to
Miamian heavyweight Johnny
"Hud" Hudgins, pointed out
that "every time you have a
foreign fighter come over here,
there are a certain set of
fighters who tell the foreigner
the faults of the Bahamian
opponent."
'HURTS ME'
This, Perry said, was evident
in his bout with Hudgins in
which he (Perry) suffered a
broken jaw. Such unscrupulous
acts "hurt me more than any
punch in that fight," he said.
However, one should show
reception to the foreign fighter
and such can be done by taking
them around the island
showing them some of the
historic sites, beaches and
other interesting things about
the island, For example, during
the Canada/Bahamas Amateur
Boxing Tournament, the
Canadian competitors were
treated to a variety of
interesting features but never


at any time was the weakness
of the Bahamian competitors
exposed.
Of his experience in sports
in other parts of the world
Perry said that most other
countries ardently support
their sports representatives.
Besides that, they also show
appreciation to the visitors.
Continued Perry: "The only
people who could help sports
in the Bahamas are us, the
individuals, and to those who
were criticizing they should ask
themselves 'what have I done
to correct the situation.' "
Another thing Perry pointed
out was that some fight fans
are against him because he is a
police-officer. Something that
interests him most, Perry said,
is his public relations between
the people and the public."I am
a fighter, I am a policeman but
most of all I am a Bahamian,"
Perry said.
Although he is still
recuperating from his injured
jaw, Perry has already started
training. Looking back over the
fight, Perry said that Iludgins is
a very smart fighter. "I
expected him to be punching
harder than that. If he did not
break my jaw, he never would
have knocked me down," Perry
said explaining that he went
down because of the pain.
Actually, Perry added, it was
because Iludgins caught him
with his mouth open that his
jaw got broken.
THANKS GIVEN
As everything is progressing
satisfactorily Perry said that
regardless of the outcome of
the fight he still retains Garth


wright as trainer/manager. ne
is the best in town," he said.
Special thanks went out to
Dr. Norman Gay who although
he was not the right physician
was with Perry from the time
of his injury until he was safe
in hospital.
Finally, Perry showed
gratitude to all the fans who
gave him encouragement after
the fight and "I definitely will
be back in boxing," Perry said.


got together and with good
all-round fielding by tnt JenI3
- he struckout 13 of the 22
batters he faced went on to
outscore Heasties 5-2. Moss
however walked five and gave
up three hits.
Catcher Sidney Outten
getting two hits from his two
times at bat scored one and
had four stolen bases. Sidney
Wilkinson also had one hit
from two times at bat and
scored one run.
Second baseman Roosevelt
Turner who singled and stole
second took third when
shortstop Sonny Haven
grounded out, put Beck's Bees
ahead when he scored on
Phillip Huyler's ground out to
short.
Left fielder Anthony Bowe
who led off the bottom of the
second with a triple into right
centre moved Beck's two ahead
on firstbaseman Lenny
Taylor's single.
Undaunted by their early
misfortune, the Islanders
rallied for two tying runs in
the top of the third. Paul
Demeritte took four balls to
lead off that inning, with a
walk. With one down after
Dewitt Johnson's fly out to
centre, third baseman Basil
Hall singled into right as
Gomez moved to third on a
throwing error.
A two error on Beck's
rightfielder who failed to
secure Colin Thompson's line
drive deep into right saw
Gomez and Hall crossing the
plate for the tying runs.
Within the next two innings,
both teams played good
defensive ball until Taylor
spoiled it for the Islanders on
his rbi.
Don Taylor took the win
and Billy Gilbert got the loss.
Action continues at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre
tonight when Jet Set "The
Upsetters" take on Paradise
Island in the first game at 7
o'clock and Heastie Lumber
meet Bahamas Blenders in the
second game at 9 p m.
SCOTLAND WIN
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND
(AP)--Scotland celebrated its Rugby
Union centenary Saturday with a
27-16 win over an invited
international squad playing as the
'President's overseas team.'
The visitors included players
from South Africa, Australia, New
Zealand and France.
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


Reached the end of your rol...
With the high cost of commercial
photography?

Try TOOGOODS. Quick, reliable service at
a special rate to the professional customers.
-, on the waterfront at East
/: 0< C S c Bay & William Streets.
TELEPHONE 5-4641
Open daily until 6 p.m. and on Sunday afternoons from 2 5


9


Lufthansa


W'e have an opening for a

RESERVATIONS/TICKET AGENT
Thorough knowledge of Lufthansa Reservations and
Ticketing Procedures required. Also must be fluent in
German and English languages.
If qualified please send your resume to:
Lufthansa
P. O. Box N-7547
Nassau, Bahamas




sister ilackstone (Cribbean) td.





zisir


GENERATING SETS

P. O. BOX 6275-TELEPHONE 2-8488
EASTERN END NASSAU SHIPYARD.


I


LASTONE FARMS LTD.


"NASSAU'S FRESHEST CHICKEN"



WHOLESALE

ONLY I


LOCATED ON GLADSTONE ROAD
1Y4 miles south of John F. Kennedy Drive

HOURS OF BUSINESS:
MON. thru FRI.-- 8:30 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
SATURDAYS 8:30 A.M. 12 NOON

PHONE 3-4849/3-4895 -- P. 0. N4922/NASSAU


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