<%BANNER%>
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03309
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 29, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03309

Full Text
I I i I I 1 3


ENJOY FREE CHAMPAGNE
ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
- TELEPHONE 77303/77778-1


F


-NOTE TO

READERS
LAST NIGHT a Tribune
headline on the Budget had
twolwords m sig. hee mea
"Emergency tax increase of S
percent to yield $5 million
and other taxes estimated to
yield another $8.5 million."
Th last two words were
Tod y on the inside The
Tribune publishes the full
text of the Finance Minister's
Budget statement made to
the House yesterday *








AN AUTEC based U.S.
Army serviceman who
appeared before Magistrate
Emmanuel Osadebay Monday
and pleaded guilty to charges
of trespassing and causing
property damage, was given
time to make compensation or
face a conviction.
Barry Biddinger, a member
of the AUTEC station at
Andros, admitted causing wart
ot thetlamage done to fourth
floor room of the Flagler Inn
Paradi e Island at 8:30
Saturday night aefte rlha i

guests of the hotel. Biddinger

lI deni following the two
girls to th ir room pas cla nt

Cartwright. He said they had
invited him.
The interior of the room
number 416, was damaged
lights broken, rugs and
baseboards ripped up and a
cupboard broken. The damage
totalled $175, Mr. Cartwright

The Magistrate said he did
noctu itendhetoeaconvc ewou
result in him being discharged
from the Army.
oinsta herga e thfiddinge
which the accused said he had
at his base, or face a
conviction.





FIREMEN were kept busy
Tuesday answering six calls to
put out bush fires and two car
fires, one to a home in Blue
Dale and another call which
turned out to be a hoax.
The bush fires, resulting in
no property damage, took the
firemen to Lyford Cay, Clarke
Lane, Golden Gates Estate I
and Fox Hill '
Smoking in bed was the
cause given for a mattress,
valued at $200 and owned by
Mr. Rupert Rolle of Blue Dale,
off Baillou Hill Road, being
destroyed. The fire occurred at
10: 10 a.m.
A white 1972 Ford Escort,
owned by Mrs. Myrle Taylor of
Soldier Roald ca ght fi e ll


caused by a short circuit '
fie tnend reported.a Alsd
Oldsmobile owned by Mr
Henry Sears. The fire took
place at 5:10 p.m. at Rupert
pDean Lane

Gonm Gatweres astot ssh rtto
after 2 p.m. expecting to find a
fire. However, the call was a
false alarm '

SALE
UPHOLSTEiRED
RECLNER
1 ONLY


NASSAU ONLY


L_ __ __ __ -- ---------- .. ~--- - ------ -21 -"''- -- II- ` -


September, will combine the
existing schloaos ( e th ologys

departments under the ndw
e rut nt)and tre existing
religious education, with the
new departments of church
history and biblical studies,
(`Iarence (.Walton,
unive sity president, sid Fr.

accomplish the most important
task this university can do for
the world of C'atholic and all
religious thought."
~r. Colman, a Benedictine
priest and historian, is author
of several books. His most
recent, "Upon These Rocks", a
history of the C'hurch in the
Bahamias, will be published
June. F~r. C'olman is chairman
of the Education for
Ecumenism C'ommittee of the
American Bishops' ( ommission
for IEcumenical Affairs.


IP 01 ATTEMPED



WILuIA Ellen. 20. an
unemployed Washington Street
president. was charged with the

i hnrderty s
e11n. a so nrown as
Gecorge Pratt." is charged with
s noting tir. Arnett rn the left
sie >, te chest near the
s culer on Itarch ..7. A
preliminary inquiry into the
charge was set for April 24.
Allen is also charged with
possession of an unlicensed
.25-revolver and four .25
bullets.


Price: 1 5 Cents


Thursday, March 29, 1973.


By MIIKE LOTHIAN
GOVERNMENT will next week seek legislative
approval to slap massive increases, averaging nearly 120
percent, on customs duties for numerous
"non-essential" imports, and importers' costs will be
skyrocketed further by a 66 percent leap in the
emergency tax levied on most commodities brought into


By NICKI KELLY
CAR DEALERS WILL NOT BE PERMITTED to make mnort than 25 per cent profit on vehicles
or spare parts, following imposition of an Order by government yesterday imposing price colntrols



on automnobiles sold here rebate of 20 per cent.
varied fromt dealer to dealer, It follows, therefore, that if
somectimnes going as high as 40 the tariff on imported spirits is
per cent. In the case of car inlcreaSed the 4/5ths tax the
parts the markup was, in many local distiller pays will be
instances, as much as 100 per increased proportionately y.ilbruh ~fr *

cenWhat we have done is say tieA wl(us Bill a br tbef
that no car dealer can make however, reduce the 4/Sths
more than 25 per cent profit tariff' to, 50 per cent otn local
based on landed cost plus sales while the 20 per cent on ,
customs duty, cimergency tax exports will be collected
an stamp tax," The T`ribune ac ystem eliminating the
T`h e g o verr nm e nt B~EER
representative pointed out that Probably hardest hit of all
in Barbados for example, car the spirits is beer, the tariff on
dealers were allowed a markup which has been increased from FR. COLMAN BARRY
only on the landed cost of a $160 to 53 on the imperial
vehicle to which tariff charges gallon. When a brewery is
were then added, thus only established here, as is now pSW ji0st 0fo
makig aproit o th acualevident from legislation before
cost of the vehicle. Parliament, the manufacturers r om B r
al"Here the nuarkup o brn we t pay g er s tms50d er FF 05 1 B f
duties," he said. charged for imported beer.
Automobiles are only one o~f The government spokesman who sent so~ome tmn J. arr
a number of goods, including pointed o~ut, however, that Bhma aterclltn
spirits, beer and boats on while there was a 5 per cent material for a history of the
which the government has across-the-board increase in Cahlc huh in h
Cathlic ('hufh n te
introduced increased customs emergency tax to I20~ per Bahamas. has been appointed
duties in addition to a general cent, not all imports were dean of a new School of
increase of 5 per cent In the subject to this tax or, for that RlgosSuisa ahl
lImergency tax. matter, to customs duty. University of America in
CARS Hie said there were about Wsiga,10
Before yesterday's changes, 100 basic items from food to
the preferential duty on cars clothing to agricultural IFr. C'olman, who wa!
im por ted from the commodities, which were president of St. John'!
('ommonwealth was 15 per exempt from emergency tax, Univerrity, Collegeville. Minni.
cent plus 7V2i per cent and most of these were also from 96 1 197i, i!
emergency tax plus % per cent free from tariff charges, currently visiting professor ol
stamp duty, making a total tax It was made clear that church history at Yalt
of 23.25 per cent. customs duties on tourist items Divinity School. He wa!
The duty on U.S. cars was had not altered in any way. selected for his new post from
30 per cent plus 8% per cent The only change was in the candidates throughout the U.S
emergency and stamp tax, emergency tax and stamp tax. and E:urope, who wert
making a total of 38'1 per cent. Merchants were then at liberty interviewed by a special search
eUndr rcthea rew hatnf ad eoput a reasonable markup on cm itee heaard dbio newly
prefe entiali t~atif eheasntbeel sw tthe case un tamre Washiington, William Baumn.

12V2 per cent emergency tax been exampt from emergency Ascrn archbishop. r Bau wil
plus % per cent stamp duty, tax bcm h haclo ft
snaking a total of 38!1 per cent b oy Suniversity ol fKlii
versus the previous 23.25 per TeSho fRlgo
cent I Su.s due to open it


the country.


itaxniulS per gallo~n.hoe

elec1trcal andl mechanical
appliances. T`he tariff on
aircondlitoners has been
increased fromi 30 per cent to
40 percent of the value.
Mixers, slicers, extractors, hai
dr es,e shaves to othr s

25 percent to 30 percent
Lawn mowers and hedgers
have suffered a tariff increase
of from 25 to 30 Percent, and

manuall -opera e d y h*
been includedt in thle category.
The tariff on movie films has
l~cen increased from 1.5 cents
to two cents per foot.
Firearms and ammunition
have also been increased. The
tariff on air guns has risen froni
$10 each to $25 each. Pistols
and revolvers have not been
changedl; they remain at $50

Rifles and shotguns,
however, have gone uIp from 30
percent to 60 percent of the
value. The tariff on
ammunition has been increased
from 25 percent to 60 percent.
Other items affected by the
amendment include aerateel
mineral andf distilled water'
batterie s, carpet s,
microphones. loudispeakers,
amplifiers, record players, tape
recorders, tape players'
records, cassettes, tapes'
musical instruments, pool
tables and vending machines.


CHRISTIE JOINS

HIGGS & IIIINSON

FROM AP ill 2

MESSRS. Higgs & Johnson
and Messrs. William McP.
Christie & Co. have announced
the amalgamation of their legal
practices with effect from
April 2 under the name of
Iliggs & Johnson,
binl Nasau theirS nfie h':"
House, 83 Shirley Street
Jwoh orthe sir tualliggsM R
Chiristie will close his chambers
on the sixth floor of the Trade
p an se s 19vvghere he has
In Freeport the firm will be
headed by Mr. Douglas Pullel
and located in the same offices
occupied by Mr. CIhristie's firm
in the Mercantile Bank
Buildig sofheloffices onf lith^

Kipling Building, Freeport, will
close.
Tlhe firm of' Messrs. H~iggs
and Johnson was established in
1946 by Mr. G;odfrey Iliggs
and Mr. Mervin Johnson, who
retired in September, 19)67
Mr. lIiggs remains with the
firm as senior partner in
semii-retiremcnt.
Mr. Gecoffrey Johnstone
became a partner in the firm in
1952 and is now the practising
senior partner.
The practices of Senator the
lion. Leonard Knowles and Mr.
Anthony Ric ketts
amalgamated with Miligs &
Johnson in January, 1968, Mr.
Ricketts retired from practice

It na ditio to hri Kw es
are Mr. Peter Hliggs, son of the
foppider, who became a partner
las t year with his
contemporary. Mr. Craig
Roberts. and Mr. Peter
Christie, who joins on April 2.
Associates are Nick Zervos and
Mrs. Rosemary Christie
Mr. Christie established his
firmi of Messrs. William McP.
Christie & Co. in 1951. Hlis
wife joined him in practice last
year after being called to the
Bahamas Bar on July 25. Her
call made the C'hristies the
third husband and wife team
practising at the Bahamnas Bar
Mr. P'atrick Toothe, who was
practising in Mr. Christie's
chambers, left in January to
join Mr. Lennox Paton to forni
the firm of Paton. Toothe & r


Co. on l'ast Hill Street.


GIt has been made teleharsithe
to take steps to see that
importers "absorb" the
increases "as far as possible.,,
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Finance Arthur D.
Hanna tabled amendments to

(E ergec Ta Act Acn n e
House of Assembly yesterday,
and scheduled them for debate
at tHe nxethouse me tngnive
in the Budget Communication
as part of Government's bid to
abncrease5 revenue during 1973
The3.am ndn nts went into
force yesterday, subject to
subsequent legislative approval.
Provision was made that the
taox increase wodldt e eve cn

adter rts in stock as of

UP 5'if
Thei amendment to the
Emergencyy Tax Act increases
the tax from seven and a half
percent of the item's value to
twelv~e and a half percent. It
has been made: clear that the
increase effects only those
items which were already
subject to emergency tax.
Certain commodities, such as
breadbasket food items, are
not subject to either
emergency tax or tariff and
will not be affected by the
increase.
The proposed amendment to
the Tariff Act affects 20 of the
151 categories of imports
covered in the schedules to the
original Act. All of the affected
categories embrace only
non-essentia or luxur ien;;

are importers of boats and
marine engines. Boats imported
for personal use were formerly
subject to only a 1%/ per cent
preferential tariff when
Imported from a
Commonwealth country, and
two and a half p reentmgener

any other nation.

beea dis aded co piete, ahj
all such imported boats are
now subject to a 20 percent

duM rine engines, out board
motors and the parts for them
were formerly subject to a 2V2
percent general trifT; there
was no pre nms will cas'" No

importers 20 percent duty
Also hit by heavy tariff
increases are motor vehicles.
General tariff on cars was 30
percent, upped to 40 per cent
The tariff on trucks has risen
from 25 percent to 35 percent.
Parts and accessories have gone
up from 30 percent to 40
percent. Tyres and tubes
remains unchanged at 30
percent .
Motorcycles, scooters,
niotor-assisted bicycles, and
golf carts have jumped fromt 35
ere LIQUORn.

Anoher imports affected the
Tariff Act amendment is
liquor. dh f $.8
Branof hastgone frojI tariff

raet 77 9pe glon. Gi
rum from $4.80 to $6.00 and
whisky from $4.80 to 56.76.
Wines, other than the
'sparkling" brands, have risen
from 30 percent of the value to
40 percent.
The bright spots at Vodka,
down from $8.29 a gallon to
$6.00. and a drop from $6 to
$1 per gallon of ethyl alcohol
or ethanol "imported by a
daily qualified practitioner or
licensed chemist or pharmacist
for use in the preparation of
medicines."
The amendment itself has
not changed the imp~ort duty
on beer, previously set at $1.60
per gallon. However,
Government has taken
advantage of existing provision
in the Act to change the rate
from a minimum of $1.60 to a


their costs up considerably
n industry source said
a llculaalimiport rbsffwere
new taxation independentl:,
and tomorrow they are to meet
to pool the results and make
decision seon wholesale and
Peai prc
it is known that beer will
have to go up at least $3 a case.
Wholesale business ground
to a halted yeste day afternoon

ann r ned. buat today sales tare

wholesale and the retail levels.
imlow ever ntahre fanior
are presently filling only
"normal orders," the source
said, in an effort to prevent
lioa rdi ng.
The bills, introduced into
the Hourse of Assembly
yesterday and also effective
yesterday are amendments to
the TaHriff Act and the Spirits
and Beer Mianufacture Act
AMENDMENTS
Trhe 'ariff Act amendments
shot the average preferential
tariff payable on bay rum
brandy, gin, vodka, rum.

whi nku erat rd air ts" and
from $5.03 per gallon to
$ 1 It, ihilepatahee La age

fr"rn S6 to $6.94 per
The amendment increased
the preferential tariff on non.
sparklingn" wines from 26V2
percent of the value to 36V2
per~cnt. The general tariff was


doubled fromi 30 percent to 60
pere nt.

am endmrougitselftha no efaf c
on beer import duties.
Government has exercised an
existing option in the Act to
tax at either a minimum or a
maximum rate. Before
yesterday the mninimnum of
$1.30 was used. Now, the
mnaximnum of $3 a gallon is
being en o~rced.
srhe amnadme tu r e
increases the duty payable on
liquor manufactured under the
m4lfonthree shillings to $<
per ga lon
Questions also arose in the
nainds of somec importers. Trhe
Tribune understands, in
relaition to which duty, new or
old, is to be paid on liquor
removed fro~m the docks in
bond. Importers have an
arrangement with the C'ustoms
Department to remove imports
.from the docks on the basis
that the duty would be paid
within ten days.
There were reports that
liquor taken from che ocks i

ten-day period prior to
yst rdwa would bet subject to

('ustoms Dpbamnent has gi Le
assurance that the tax in those
cases would be based on the
rate applicable when the liquor
was actually taken from the
docks.


y



e



f



s
s

s
f
e





s
.


(


American cars will be

;":20. :7,t, iper cent eilrec
tax, making a total of 53'1 per
ce"! c:""nied to the previous
C'ustomns officers were
yesterday making the rounds
fak onbil rnd biat del
and boats in stock, together
with serial numbers.
The Tribune was told
officially that It is
government's intention to
co"et teno custom n duyni
any ears and boats in stock
before they are permitted to be
licensed.
"There is already precedent
for this both under the former
Si n Ited Bahamiani Party
government just prior to the
19607 general election and the
LPII government in 1969,)" the
government spokesman said. In
both casesa3tax on petroleum
was Involved-
BOAIS
tlhe preferential duty on
boats and vessels for private
use was previously 1% per cent
Ivith 20 per cent duty being
charged on vessels imported
from other than the
('ommonwealth.


Si c ( commonwealth makes and
others.
It will not, however, be
ap~plicable to boats intended
for commercial use.
Because of the large increase
In customs duties in this area,
it is anticipated it will be
po\sib~le for reasonable terms
ofr payment to be worked out
wilth the (`ontroller of customs
where an excessive amount of
stock is involved.
SPIR(ITS
In thie case of spirits
manufactured locally. as for
example Bacardi rum, the
government is entitled to
4/St~hs of the customs tax
normally paid on the imported
variety if the liquor is sold
here
If the rum is exported the


A PRE:LIMI NA Y

rg s Betrnarad 1 1lers ha
Market Street. Patr ek
Armbrister, 17. of tFarrington
Roado nd in evll Sna rsd
Wednesday afternoon before
Chief Magistrate W'ilton
Hlercules.
T'he three youths, all hotel
bus boys are accused of raping
" ej"y:"s.^da eir snctn'
and Sunday, F-ebruary '5, after
forcing her into a car while at as
church fair.
The girl was the former
girl-friend of the accused
Miller.
She was the ontly witness to
testify be fo re Magistrate
Herrc~ules adjourned the hearing
to Friday. March 30.
She was called on to Idntify
three alummniumn rods. clothing,
a pair of setissor\ and a mnanlla
envelope corntaillnin a quantity
of hair during her te~stimtony
today.

3 f00tthS e|1



anThree y/tuths wh car-stealing and arson c~harges
were granted timelc to cocnsult
an attorney by C`hief
Magistrate Wallton fliercules
Anthony Armbhrister, who
was jointly charged with
Andrew F~rane~ss. 16. and
Sterling Minnis, 19, of stealing
a 1969 C`ougar belonging to
Mr. Wesley Percentie between
February 25 and March 25,
was refused hail after an
outburst In court.
F:rancis and Minnis, both
Ridgeland Pak echanics,
were allowed bail in the sum of
$3.000.
Also charged with the three
on the second cocunt of arson
were Vincent Young, 23,
Alexander A\llen and Oliver
Hunt. They are accused of
setting fire to the stolen car


This was confirmed in a
letter by Tourism director S.
N. in usry.
In his letter Mr. C'hib sarid
that In order to consider holy
to make the hotel industry
more healthy and viable it Is
proposed to make an in-deptl
study of the economics of
hotel operation in the
Bahamnas.
"It is hoped to appoint a
quallified firm or group of
consultants to make such a
study." he said.
COOPERATION
T`he director pointed out,
however, that the study cooki
only be carried out if all the
hotels would cooperate and
provide data on expenditures.
inc~oi capital a rstricatures. bete


disc~usedd a week ago with the
menmh rs of the Baham as liltal

explained that the data wo~uki
be furnished by the hotels to
the C`onsultants and not to rthe
Ministry of Touristn
in this way the report
prepared by the C'onsultants.
a ng with their
recommendations. would not
identify any hotel or the data
furnished by it.
Mlr. C'hib said members of
the Houtel Association hiad
agreedc that a survey of this
nature should be undertaken
and had promised to let the
Ministry of Tourism know by
April I that all the data
required by the consultants
would b~e made available.


~ribuno


(Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


- I- -LI


VOL. LXX, No. 108


A LOOK AT THE NEW BUDGET MEASURES






Massive tax increases to raise


15percent tax increase on cars




and 17 percent hike on boats,




but 0 items still una fected


~~3.5m. reeu


BEER WILL GO UP AT


LEAST $b3 A CASE' *

By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE BAHAMAS LIQUOR IMPORTERS' Association is to
meet tomorrow morng o whidscs he invtheafc nPi


01[ holst SIS 00 Ioilg asS




ALTHOUGH the Bahamas has been showing record tourist
figures, hotels here are not doing as well as in some other areas of


'WO SERVICE,

BECAISE 10

PL ANES'-80 VT *

FLAMINGO Airlie h s
nt prvded ines lara"
nohedulepronviihts te> Creuked
Land since early F br ary
because the airline "doe~s not
presently have an aircraft
suitable fr operations Io at

airstrip," Tourism and Aviation
Minister C'lement T. Ma nalrd
said Wednesday.

Answering questions tableld
in the House last week by Cyril
Tynes (FNM2-Crooked Irland).
Mr Maynard said nthe se I c~


date can presently be set `
The Minister acknowl Jged c-
that he is aware the' "the
discontinuance of the seriviir is
causing serious hardship to the
residents of C'rooked Island.
A~cklins and Long C'ay." In
other answers. Finance
Minister Arthur D. Hanna told
M ic hael L ish tour ne
(FNM-Clarence Town) that
"the Ministry of Health is
landscaping the Royal Victoria
Hotel G~ardens."

Mr. Lightbourne had asked
for the name of the individual
or company employed by
government t for the
landscaping.




I


W81HIDED KIEE

TAlLKS STILL


STALLED

WOUNDED KNEE, SOUTH
DAKOTA (AP)- Nesotiations that
tooked hopeful for ending the siege
at Wounded Knee apparently fell
flat Wednesday amid a U.S.
government claim of a power
strusale amonS the occupying
American Indians and their
attorney's statement that the report
was a fabrication.

A erica 1na Moveen tA

.down a Motion Picture Academy
Award for best actor Tuesday to
protest the treatment of Indians in
motion pictures.

hmeonrsch duled, bout rat tegoiat n
in Rapid City AIM attorney Rakon
Roubideaux told newsmen th~tt it
would not be a meetings to
ngotiate, but simp y meetiq~to
occupation force's demands
There was no indication of;any
new demands.
The second negotiating session.
scheduled for just outside of
wounded Knee, was postponed for
what a civil rights leader said would

Att rey 1.erl sai se"/ler ta
he had learned that a civil rights
group within the village claimed the
leadership role, but had It taken
away at gunpoint by the militant
American Indian Movement.
MRoubideau ri tem rprt wa
from the village early Wednesday
there was no confrontation. "Therer
was no confrontation last night,"
said the attorney. "It simply is not


seso saftenoo," e si."
received a message! from Dennis
Banks that no negotiating sessions
will be held outside Wounded Knee.
ve thin rt's tle gver men'
the civil rights group and we are
insisting that the federal court
order Issued Sunday be upheld and
Wha nd de K allowed to enter





I)owNTowN MIAMI


tlle d ll
Walso goes


AIRLINES need Reservationists, Ticket Agents, Stewards,
Stewardesses, Ground Hostesses, Ramp Agents. TRAVEL
FREE plus many other benefits. Young men and women


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATORS needed to operate;
draglines, backhoes,bcranes, dozers, loaders, etc. Earn big

HOTEL MANAGEMENT offers good pay, many benefits.
Excellent ppor uniti es s. Maaers npt i raanthoMmnae e

followed by practical training in the States.
Mali coupon today for frec Information.

ALPHA TRAINING SCHOOLS, INC.
139 N.E. 54th St., Miami, Fla. 33137

SName..................... Ag


SAddress.... .....Phone.................

Bahamas
II ~11 1**


Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


LAST U.S. TROOPS LEAVE S. VIET TODAY
SAIGON (AP') The last American troops left South Vietnam today
and the U.S. C'ommland was officially deactivated. The only American
servicemen still to, depart are the 825 members of the U.S. delegation to
the Jo~int Military Commission, which now has become a two-sided instead
of f'our-side~d organization. These 825 men are to leave tomorrow and
Saturday.
So are the North Vietnamese delegates, leaving only the Viet Cong and
SaigOn government in the peace-keeping group.
The group Military Command in Saigon charges that Communist forces
still are besieging a government ranger base 50 miles north of the capital
One soldier is reported killed and 13 wounded in an 800O-round shelling
attack today. (e SILI STORY THIS P'AGE)
VIET CIVILIANS INVADE/ OTr U CdAeMPvenmscinn

invaded the departure camp for American G;IS today on the final day of
th UI.S. troorp w ~thldrawal from Vietnam and went on a looting spree while
Th civi ils hrtwkt bhro gh the chain fences around camp Alpha, at Tan
Sunt Nhut Airbuse, three hours before the last planeload of GIlS was
scheduled to, leave and cleaned out the mess hall. "T~hey tcmk anything that
wae I t i 1,"rra Mso I u rdin th ercamp had just left when the crowd
burst in. A Vietiam~ese MP' helped the looters pass tables and chairs through
the fenrce, and other Vietnamese guards stood by while the mob grabbed
bread. huga othcr ide dstuffs, ch is, t bles, cooking utensils and cabinets
~he few Amnlcji an officers left in the area called out a dozen GIs
waiting for planes home, and they drove the mob out.
TONS OF ARMS SElZED OFF IRISH COAST
~to..A 7 a ,1' wan g amb oa ldedn otc a loersy soer onBelfasB eal
troops unlcoveredl several stores of arms and ammunition in Protestant east
belfast, and in a1 (atholic district of Londonderry, British soldiers used
rubber burlicts and tear-gas to break up a crowd of about 150
sonf th cr;s wing yth Irish Republic, six Irishmen and five tons of arms
were seized aboal~rd ai 'y priOt ship owned by two West G;ermans. The arms
are believed to have been en route from the Middle Eaost to Northem
Ireland, It was the biggest seizure ever made the biggest by the Irish navy'
which co~nsists of four vessels.
U.S. TROOPS TO LEAVE COMPLETELY BY THURSDAY
WASHIINGTO'(N (AP,) The State D~eparrtment said today the
four-power Jolint Military Commission in South Vietnam is presently
expected go in ot ofthusiness prempti basascheduledienms soemn
said secret negotiations were underway to extend the life of the
commission. A UI.S. source in Saigon said later the negotiations fell

Th oram~i o esalse 2o la60ia perodmollowingthe ininlof
withdrawn otn March 30 and 31.
State Decparttment press officer Charles W. Bray announced that the
Americans who, form the U.S. segmlent of the four power commission will
ft h pult <~ u y nt < e two dates, and he said the door was not being
U.S. troops are due to leave completely by Thursday.
HOG PRICES DOWN $3 & $4 PER HUNDREDWEIGHT
decMie Sedn saymas lns for need aw sd'snatioa me boyct ga nd
momentum-
Market officials called the plummeting prices unprecedented and said it
appeared farmers had panicked and were flooding the market, propelling
rIctews for slc~ h o gs l on eh tact lower prices at the stockyards would
leald to lower prices at the meat counter, since there is a lapse of a few days
between the time the live animal is sold, slatughtered, processed and
transportedl to the supermarrket.
tIn iht on t,;1,Tenn., a gr up called houps Myesbfor lower food pie
"We wo~uldl like it known that the farmers are not the ones that will suffer
from this boyrcott," said D~onnar Honeycut, the group's leader. "The
farmers are not *he ones that are getting the money for the high prices, it's
crns midemnu, sje ditrisftortd an t mea wakr nh raising the
In lowa. where hd prcr epe mow ajand r me hn so wipk
attributed the falling prices to "punic selling and ai lack of confidence in
w the m~a Moietei bret of icoal ,as ng extiwe counterparts in Chicago
and Omttha, agreed that the threatened meat boycott wats a major factor in
faltering stockyard prices.
AGENT SAYS IT & T INITIATED ANTI-ALLENDE IDEA
WASHIlNGTON (AP~) Senator F'rank Church said today the secret
testimony of a C'.I.A. agent disclosed that 1-T- and-T initiated the idea of
U.S. intervention to try to prevent the 1970 election of resddent Allende
In Chile. Church is the chairman of the Senate CForeign Relations
Subcommittee investigating companies that do business with other
countries. T'he Idaho D~emocrart told newsmen that C.I.A. agent William
Broe testified yesterday behind closed doors that the chairman of the
board of 1-T-und-T` offered a substantial election fund in 1970 to support
another candidate in the Chile election.
-Two 1-w chaos in Chile either before or after the 1970 election.
HOPES ENOUGH VOTES TO SUSTAIN NIXON'S VETO
WASHING;TON (AP) House minority leader Gerald F~ortf expressed
optimism today that House Republicans will have the votes to sustain
sYresiden Nix~' o I icyesteerday of a enctional rehabilitationbbill. Ford
The Senate is expected to act on the veto next Tuesday. It is expected
to have the needed two-thirds votes to override.
SERIOUS CRIME DECLINED 3 PERCENT IN 1972
pe AS ING 90N entir tSerious iem ein th hnte dttsdel d 3
uniform crime reports issued Wednesday*
However, it said, suburban arena crime increased 2 per cent and forcible
rape jumped up, II per cent.
The figures, released by the IBl's acting director, L. Patrick Grtay Ill
Were reported in the preliminary yealr Bureau. The report is a collection of nationwide police statistics supplied
, voluntarily by local, county and state law enforcement aencies.
Ninety-four major cities reported decreases in the number of serious
crmes in 1972 compared with 53 cities in 1971, 22 cities in 1970 and 17

DISAGREEMENT OVER BOMBING OF CAMBODIA
WASHINGTON (AP) Defence Secretary Richardson and Senate
Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield dislgreed sharply today over the Nixon
administration's constitutional authority to bomb Cambodia. Mansfield
said that authority has stretched pretty far this time, and he predicts it will
disappear entirely when the U.S' is out of Vietnam. Richardson sold the
Authority exists and that it is not based entirely on the need to protect
U.S. troops in the field.
The two men spoke with newsmen separately on Capitol HUil. Their
comments camne after Senator William F~ulbrigfht threatened to call
Secretary o~f State Rogers before at public hearing to explain continued U.S.
hombing.


IMRLD B~A M CABAMAI CLUB
ews r
,,1. Use of our Pool and 1-3 mile of Beach tComplimentary I
2. Mats. Towels and Lounge Chairs (Comnplimentary)
3:. Four CIhampionship Tennis Courts Night Tennis

4. Hmsan miers a una Baths (Complimentary,
5. Putting Green tComplimentary)
6i Ipof Wedddings. Banqluet and Meetings held at the
7.Add lional ('cti nparte held throughout the year

9. top.c. off all special parties and group dinners
10. Managers complimentary y R(eception. Wed. 6:45pim -
7:30~pm

1 Tusam T'ampn Dane CI pm Foe N'Aft Lounge
tS I terntonal Ruffet Hiliscus D~ining Room

IS. Ftor those of you who like to play bridge, the Nassau
Baridg eCluboma ts every Tuesdayaend Pridty at8R: 0m

PHASJ;E CALL MANAGER'S OFFICI l8001
FOR FUR TH ER IN FORMATION


IM MINGMN 61ARC Eg

(AW) -A SeNaTO p~robl AR adleg d
efforts by International Telephone
& Telegraph officials to influence
action toodayh fcses reidn Ial
contacts In high places in the
federal governmenrtu.ielt

corporations Wednesday made
public CIA testimony that Harold
S. Geneen. ITT board chairman,
ofrd a "s bstat t 1" fundtlin a
Chile's Marxist President, Salvador
Allende. Allende won.
Summoned to testify today were
Carato Myeror fornwateassistasa
inter-American affairs, and Viron
Vaky, former Latin American
adviser to Henry Kissinger. Geneen
is scheduled to testify Monday. d
Gerrity to tjefled as1 aek tha ak
Neal, a former state department
official on ITT's Washington staff,
was instructed in September 1970
Vaky am offr 'p ttoosevsky rpmal,
to support any government plan for
housing and agricultural assistance
in Chile.

r"'9 ""' wr he ~ c la3e w fr
John A. McCone, an ITT director
antdeformer head of sthe Central
million was int ade by Geneen to
fund a government plan to form a
coalition in the Chilean Congress to
block Allende.
William V. Broe, a CIA agent
who headed the Asency's
clandestine operations in Latin
America in 1970, said Tuesday in
response to questions that G~eneen
told him July 16, 1970, that he was
willing to assemble an election tna
for Jorge E. Alessandrl, one of
Allende's opponents.
Broe sai IG GnNen did not
snention a specific figure but
s dlate 1f dvas considering a
The agent said Geneen wanted
te fund controlled ano channeled

ell ,I tild him we could not
absorb the funds and serve as a
funding channell" dthe testimony

qutdBrtoerh I syn.1 dalsottol
government was not supporting any
candidate in the Chilean election*
Broe said the meeting was
arranged at the direction of CIA
director Richard Helms after a
meeting between Helms and
McCone.
In late September 1970, after
Aliende had dwonce po ular election
action to choose a President, Broe
kidhtome with Gerril e inctNoen
to apply some economic pressure
on Chile."


I


Half Day Closing for Inventory



PLEASE NOTE


THAT THE




Bethel Robertson a ~o. lt.

WAR HOUSE: on trhe

E AS T-WEST H IO HWA Y

W ILL CLOSE:

NOON FRIDAY, MARCH 30TH.

& SATURDAY, M ARCH 31ST


FOR STOCKTAKING

WE RlelllET ANY INSOllVECIENICE CAS1SED


Ison,












*LADIES' DRESS SMOES from $4.00


and many many more

See yott at BOflr




Helens Shoe Stores

Madelr Shopping Centre Bay St.


7hut~ry, hllar~h 29, 1873.


CAIRO ( AP) By
proclaiming himself military
governor of Egypt, President
Anwar Sadat has acquired
power to suspend civil law,
impose censorship, and
personally sentence individuals
to life imprisonment
A review of the relevant laws


ct zes o ht enm cou t
or place their properties under
sequestration.
Other emergency law
provisions permit:
arrest, Jmoolon and house
searches.
total control of food
supplies and consumption.
Some items have been
rationed,
--a general mobilization,
placing all men between the
ages of 17 and 50 in uniform.
The late President G~amal
Abdual Nasser proclaimed
himself military governor of
Egypt in 1956 when Egypt was
invaded by Britain, France and
Israel, and again in 1967, when
Israel was invaded.
Sadat appointed military
governors of the divisions of
Egypt in 1971.
Immediately after his fifth
cabinet was sworn in Sadat
acknowledged some of Egypt's
serious internal problems,
saying thousands of persons
were hmeless nd court judges

cases a day.
He urged that Egypt's 36
million inhabitants be given all
the facts concerning shortages
of supplies, arguing they would

give willingly if they felt they
were being fully informed,
Within a 50-hour period
Sadat has proclaimed himself
Prime Minister and military
governor of Egypt, named a
new Cabinet, and given it two
months to meet the people's
complaints.
He has also made it clear
that civilians, as well as soldiers
must make sacrifices until the
Arab lands seized in 1967 are
returned~ and rights of the
"';;"""'22,". ......w.
Sadat has put dissidents on
notice that no internal
disruptions wdll be tolerated.
Observers recalled that
Prime Minister Aziz Sidkry,
appointed 14 months ago and
replaced Monday by Sadat
himself, was unable to end
disparity between life at the
front and life in the cities.





NEW YORK (AP)- Martha
Mtchell,hwife of former U.S A tye
believed someone wars trying to
make her husband "'the goat" for
the Watergarte bu~g ng scandl t
Wednesday .
The Times said Mrs. Mitchell
telephoned the newspaper Tuesday,
sa ing "I fear for my husbad. n
reas n. I c 1' tell young n topn
anything on him. I won't let them,
and I don't give a damn who gets
hurt. Ican name names...
"If you hear that I'm sick or
can't talk, please, please, get your
reporters out to find me," she said.
"Somebody might try to shut me
The newspaper account did not
say where Mrs. Mitchell was calling
Mrs. Mitchell, the story said
referred to last June when, in'
Newport Beach, Calif., she has said
she was thrown to the floor and
stuck with a hypodermic needle
during a telephone conversation
with a reporter.


Church said Broe testified
that they wanted the fund on
behalf of Jorge Alessandri to
be controlled and channelled
through the CIA. Church said
there was no reference in the
July 16 meeting of Geneen and
Broe about a constructive
purpose such as housing or
assistance to agriculture in
Chile.
BY DIRECTOR
Broe testified, according to
Church, that the meeting with
G~eneen was arranged by him at
the direction of the CIA
director Richard Helms after
an approach to Helms by Joh
A. McCone, former CIA
director and an ITT director.
Church said Broe testified
that no specific amount of the
election fund was mentioned
by Geneen but that the other
was rejected. Broe said he told
Geneen the CIA could not
absorb the fund and that "the
U.S. government is not
hupipectinganyone in the
The CIA agent also told the
subcommittee it was his
understanding that the Geneen
offer was designed to promote
ITT's own corporate purposes
and that the U.S. government
was being asked to assist in the
face of threats of expropriation
of U.S. property in Chile by an
Allende regime.
Broe testified also, according
to Church, that he presented to
ITZT vice president Edward
Gerrity on Sept. 28 a five-point
proposal for concerted action
by ITIT and other companies to
put an economic squeeze on
Chle*
Church said Broe testified
that Gerrity's attitude was

blef thahmu th pa whalt d
work.
Broe made it plain, Church
said, that all of his contacts
with ITT officials were at the
direction and with the
knowledge of his superiors in
the CIA including Helms, now
ambassa or to Iran.


As the last 2,500 Gls lew
home or to other bases in
Southeast Asia, strong
American air and naval forces
remained on the perimeters of
Indochina to keep up the war
in Cambodia and to discourage
a resumption of major fighting
in South Vietnam and Laos.
The 7th Fleet was reported
to have four carriers with a
total of 200 strike planes
within range of Vietnam, and
the Pentagon said there are 202
BS2 bombers at Guam and
Thailand and more than 400
air and marine fighter-bombers
in Thailand.
Today's departures left a
total of 1,034 uniformed
American military men in
Vietnam, including 825
members of the U.S. dele nation
to the Joint Mi itary
Commission, 159 marine
guards at the U.S. embassy and
50 military attaches at the
embssy Joint Military
Commission made up of the
United States, North and
South Vietnam and the Viet
Cong --is scheduled to be
replaced today by a
Commission made up of South
Vietnam and the Viet Cong
and the 825 members of the
U.S. delegation are scheduled
to leave the country Friday
and Saturday
The United States failed in
el seventh -ho ur secret
negotiations with Hanoi to
keep alive the four-party Joint
Military Commission and


prolong the American military
prese nce, the North
Vietnamese reported.
The U.S. sources said
Washington had promised to
press for an extension of the
Commission in return for a
guarantee that Canada would
remain as a member of the
International Commission of
Control and Supervision. Only
hours be fore the
negotiations collapsed, Canada
announced a decision to stay
on the supervisory commission
for an additional 60 days and
urged "greater cooperation"
among the four member
nations: Indonesia, Hungary,
Poland and Canada.
The Canadians had coupled
their willingness to serve on the
peacekeeping force with a
proviso that they would back
out if the ceasefire proved
impossible to enforce.
The last American troops
aer n-eavnVietnamnvirtualik
off from Saigon's Tan Son
Nhut air base from midnight
on. The last flight was due out
by dusk Thursday, ending the
role of the U.S. command that
once had half a million
American soldiers under its
orders.
Some troops simply
transferred to U.S. bases in
Thailand, where the United
States will continue to
maintain a strong air arm to
discourage any offensive in
South Vietnam by the North
Vietnames.


Single
Double
Triple
Quadruple


$9
$11
$1,)
$16


BY Robert Li
CLARK AIRf BAS E,
PHILIPPINES (AP) The lst
ous r ry fm Ha 1i Thu I ne t
join 81 others here who already are
looking orward to at trip home at
the wekend.
The remaining 67 prisoners on
the turnover list will fly in from
Hanot on two C141 Starlifter
hospital jets. They had been billed
as the last Americans in Communist
custody, but the Viet Cong
announced Wednesday in Saigon
one more U.S. prisoner will be
tur dt oerb the 588th American
war prisoner turned over by the
Naort t 2na K Vet cong anti
F~eb. 12. According to Ctimmunist
count, heisthelast.
Ohpeer iola Hme dmitp yo ni
all the regular returning prisoners to
Get their medical checks and
debriefinG sessions behind them in
time fnor fi~lgt to t United States

hMrn yn the 6 -man Group duB i
bombers downed last December
when President Nixon ordered
intensified bombing strikes in the
Hanol-Haiphong region to pressure
the North Vietnamese into a peace
settlement.
The prisoner releases and troop
shtehdd d to end Wednesoay nt
deadline set in the peace agreement
fo p wt drraturnovers and U.S.
This, however, was delayed by a
four-day impasse over the release of
nine American POWs captured in
Laos between 1965-72 and held by
the Communist-backed Pather I.alo.
Nixon threatened to keep U.S.


troops in Vietnam until the nine
were turned over.
Can nine mrnericans and a young
Oppel, 20, of British Columbia
were freed by the Pathet Lao in
Hanot on Wednesday along with 40
airmen shot down over North
Vietnam between December 1971
and July 1972.
All were reported in
comparatively good physical
condition. Many telephoned
relatives in the United States from
the Clark Base Hospital.
WILD WELCOME
Several were from the carrier
eor~a u delr th hr3r tec ca
for years from Thailand. The S2 3rd
noemb rsbj endedatcreCe kna to
oral Se n given sco ePOWs one o
returning prisoners.
Lth POWR. fo ithe Coral Sea -
liego Cdlf. dd Lt r. Jaes
were hauled across a restraining
rope by their delighted buddies
who ignored security policemen.
Molinare and Souder were
aboard an F4 phantom that was
downed over North Vietnam in
April 1972.
11se returned prisoners also
included Ene C.n Bate, t e
Indochina conflict. Brace, whose
c ne lives Inn ayb tra,' C. a
May 21, 1965, reportedly after a
charter flight for Bird and Sons
charter airline crashed,
Hes stepped out of the plane from
Hanoi with a smile, baring several
gaps where! his teeth used to be.


Q~br ~lrtbtau


ITT PROBE DISCLOSURE


$jigT ||j$


DECADE OF WAR ENDS


Last US soldiers TOlTAL POERr CIA agent testifies


ted US


OR iB Chile

Frank Church, (D-Idaho) said
of a CIA agent disclosed that
:grrrph Cr. itled the ider
he election of President Salvador


ITT initial


InterVentil

WASHINGTON (AP)- Sen.
Wednesday time secret testimony
International Telephone and Tele
of U.S. intervention to prevent tl
Allende in Chile in 1970 '


neb omittee o ult nth na
corporations, related to
ne wsme n the closed-door
testimony made Tuesday by
William V. Broe, the CIA
agent. Church said the
transcript would be made
public as soon as copies can be
prepared.
Church said Broe, who
headed the CIA's western
hemisphere clandestine
operations in 1970, testified
that Harold S. Geneen, I1TT
board chairman, offered "a
substantial election fund" on


1 = * IN EGYPT
IORVE VIet II 8 III


By Lynn C. Newland
SAIG;ON, March 19 (AP)- The last American forces pulled out
of South Vietnam today after more than a decade of military

cmmne sad the Unted Saes ha acc mlishe ins mis
ofsopping Cmui tkoe.


ast PO fl ou


from Hanoi to fr eedom


HelenS P~e


-aire


* IVINS SMOES

* LADIES' SANDALS


from $8.00

from $2.00




.-- --- ~--- --_ -- ~----_ --- -- --. T ~-:-- ----. -- -- -- ----~ --~ -C-P


NeU.Ivs ADD1CV TURAstJ IN VtERBA MAG YI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor19 72 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
GeneralOffices(IS Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, MarchI 29, 1973.


NASSAU end PRWWPORT


w~ill be closed for





FRIDAY and SATURDAY

MIARCH 30th & 31st


We regret Ony IRCOnVeRIORCe t0

our CUStomerS


relations with the E~nglish speakirin
Caribbean islands. Manley, his wife
Heverly and a large group of~
Jamaica go~vernment ofcas
advisors and newsmen arrived inl
C'aracas WVednesday otn a tour day
official visit.
CRIME RING
FOUND IN P. RICO
SAN JUIAN. PUER:TO) RICO~
(AP) A cache of fire arms. money
and narcotics was uncovered in at
plush San Juan apartment that may
have a link to organized crime on
the U~.S. mainland, police say.
(commo~nwealth and federal
government agents raided the
apartment in the Miramar section
orf the Metropolitan, and came
away with a machine gun, two
4ons ibre7 )t idolaarr if cas~h4
two, pounds of marijuana, a still
undetermined arnt nt orcocaine

reiht-thousand dollars.
HAITI CUTS PRICES
)'ORT AU-PRHINCE. HAITI`
(A') P'resident Jean ClIaude
I)uvalier has announced "phase
t we rammr for Haiti H ani-iniate
the price of milk. flour, tomato
paste. soup, and cement would he
cut up to 30 percent.


BLACK POWER APPEAL
DECISION RESERVED
P'ORTI OF SPAIN, TRINIl)Al)
(AP') After a three-day hearing an 1
appeal court Wednesday reserved its
decision on the appeal by former
London black Power leader Abdul
Malik against his conviction for
murder.
Malik was sentenced to, hang
last August for the machete mlurder
of a young Negro barber. The trial
lasted six weeks.
LEGAL PROFESSION
FUSES IN BARBADO
BRA) (AP') Iuin l
tbe ncbrriste ie lae soli ir
becomes ha Lreality ronssSuturda
1972 comes into operation h
p rocla mation, govern ment
announced to sy.pemt arses
and solicititors to, practise inl law
Iarm r *barristers will be able to
do the legal work which SOliestors
traditionally did and vice versa.
The law also provides machinery

pr", theon ano pti, neeure the le
profession operates w~ithin a
framework benezficial to the public
and the profession itself.


I, - --~a~ -- ~e ---- --~-- -- -- ~-


III~~~~BBa~llllYB~U~UB~~I


Hlousec t or a I'on~r I'eoplest

tiebtr against great odd!, and
I lrt! Iho~u\sand Pounds were
appupsatd t the
i(omlpletionl of the first phase
ofI the pro(Jectf It was dedilcated
and named Yellow lElder
(;ardtens A2gain I was ignored
and not invited to atttendl. I aww
the harlppeanngs fromir myl Iprch.
(bIstrt 1{ erc~~ tle nit lan1 h~
poo"r to, my1 then iclletague the
lalI ~p su -~te LA T d
togethelcr we ried u ltici it'
1131oley tho provate for mor
ce ~ y j. 1'i sent ilepehr work burt the results were ve~ry

grailit sgw r ) to o
,Icl1vineemnts as a membnler of
the Hocuse which are well
knowHn to thus COmmnity.njS
U'hat recognition have
rece~ived or appreciationt of the
people. None whatsoever.I
Iecoived the enormous sumr of

>cr ha ing c1 csfro i \r ltl
and hm aucce aout btter
workllng and living conditions
of Bahamiiian Farmi Workers in
te Southern States of

ne a~T vre n professional
politicians receiving fabulous
salaries with all the trimminglns..
We spent o~ur timet and molcney,
If we had1 an).. without thought~h
of remuilnerationl for the good
of the people and the co~untry.
1)espilte all the hardships.
obsta;iicls ,Ind other adlversities
we served to, the best o~f our

abiSI lke yourself, Sir l~ittnne
you have undoubtedly
e~xperie~nced mnuch hardships
andi disayppointments in life,
but these are only tests o~f your
stamina and ability to fight for
the right. Bihical history
reccrdls that Our L~ord and
Svi ur nvr committr da

carried out the work of the
salvation of mankind, suffered
anld bledl and died for us, and
those that he did mlostt good
for condemnedf Hlim before
Pilat -iando aked efor ilis death

"I find no fault in this Just
Man" and washed his hands.
Necvertheless. Chlrist died
loving those responsible for his
death and in His last words said
"Father forgive them for they
know not what they dO".
"When man has tried his
best, and failed, angels can do
no more,
Again thanks for your kind
references to me in your paper
ad mays you liv Ilong to enjoy

BERT CAMBRIDGE.


In his column recently Sir
Etienne Dupuch reminded his
readers that ten years before he
succeeded mn breaking down
racial discrimination in the
colony with a resolution he
moved mn the House of
Assembly, Mr. Bert Cambridge
failed when he made a strong
attempt to secure a committee
for this purpose.
Mr. Cambridge wrote a letter
to Sir Etienne thanking him for
having reminded the public of
the effort he had made on their
behalf.
His letter is published below
because he recalls some of the


things he accomplished and
the heartaches he endured as
a member of the House during
a period when men gave their
services free and without any
desire for personal reward.

My dear Sir Etienne:
This is to say a sincere
thanks for your kind letter of
the 20th inst. and also youth
reference in your column of
the Tribune Feb. 22nd to my
attempt to break down racial
discrimination in the Colony*
If others have forgotten the
many services I rendered to my
people and the colony as a


result of the late Sir Staffo~rd
Sanid, saying o>n t he floor~ of
the Hocu\e during debate o~n the
Issue~ that he would notl vote in

votinp h) secret hallot until
the! askedj for rt. T'he night
thalt i mmed~~ that the petitionlS
hie sentI to, d seCial~ commilltt~ee
I was the obrlC~t oft abu1Ses and C
;Iccused of laorging sigrnatures.
Howe~ver. was succetssful In
hchbalf oft our brothers and ~
sisters In the now called lands 1

Myt first assignment .rftr
taking miy seat in the Hfou~e
was membership of t1he-
Te` lephone Board whicy h
Lcontrolledl broadcastmyp.
I It iea c alpp nticestup, In 11~
nominarltal Reginld~c SaudlllllC
and Rilhardl Barrett Jr.
Regrinald Saunders today- is
undoubtedly a key mian in
BJ~lcl(o. I motved in the Hlouse
Sc~ the un~, n mrcial a lionM (,
Mousley indirectly In the
Guardian called me a
ire ill bet ust rd < 11cue a 1
ridlculously. However, 1
succeeded. and today ZNS ls
an asset to the 'Treasury
whereas it was a liability. My
pary off was relovval from the
Board and Broadcasting
Advisory ( i stllt tlsere

on during my~~ te~nure of ,f'fice
inc~ludedl thc Hlosprtal Board
I:lIe ct r i cal Board a1ny c
commnittees including, Finantce .
At allI times I attended
pr~actlically all mee~ctrings and
contributted mv hit vocally anid
o~therwise to the progress of
the Co(llon andl~ the people~.
especially those of my v
co~nstittuents
Your will reme~mber~ my fight
os nhe unoo rjit in all places in the UI.S. where
our farmi labourers were
employed. In, this respect I was
successful and at the request of
II. R. 11. The Duke of Windsor
nommnated the injirMrilSarn

Wilson who were given the
assi~nment. I later visited
the farms and brought about
certain improvements in the
living and the working
conditions of our people who
expressed their gratitude. They
too have forgotten to
remember.. At least someri of
them.
I look with a great deal of
pride from my home o~pposite
ah elo i der t;rdecns ami

an appropriation through the


whole dunng my tourteen
years as a member of the
House of Assembly it is
gratifying to know that you
have not.
I often sit and think of the
mnycn! heart aches I expe~rienced
in mly fight for a closer
relationship and mutual respect
between the races. I w~as
regarrdedt as a rebel by certain
members of~ the House. to the
extent that efforts were made
to, get ridf of me. Despite this
;rlct I fought o~n and achieved
mn1 y benefits for my
co~nstituenftS only to be told
later on by some of them that I
was no0 g()od As y'ou have said
oft dr apreit am fioer services
self is nil among some of our
people.
I look with a great deal of
satis action at the P~rincess
Margaret Hospital knowing
that my effort to improve
exi st conditions ii sp
resulted in the construction of
Princess Marglaret's I served as a
rnembeirt t tu e Flospital
chairmanship of the Hon. H. G.
Christie. meetings too
numerous to mention morning
noon antd night. I was never
absent, and contributed to the
best of my ability. At the
ddi atiotn cereronesd ratthe

whatsoever was given mie. I
stood among the crowd while
others who did nothing in
connection with the coming
into being of the institution
were provided with
comnfortao7le seats. Tears filled
my eyes and I le~ft the scene
almost heart broken.
I recall the Ways and Means
Committee of the Hlouse
instigated by mle especially

coditien iin tte C lony a
bring about a better
understandings and racial
relationship. The words at the
late Donald McKinney at one
of our meetings keep ringmng in
nis ers.theMIs wesvo ways
denomlinators". My heart bled.
I replied "One of these days
you will be forced to" Clhit
day has come andf there is
weeping and gnashing of teeth-
~'The extension of voting by
secret ballot to the out
islanders was a sore question. I
burnt the mid night oil drafting
petitions which were sent to
leading citizens in all the
islands for signatures. These

the sa dtsuo esgn turemewa.
These petitions came as a


city".
We all know, of course, what
ended the life of an Austrian


killed Inagua. The bullet that
archduke in Serbia ... which


triggered the first world war .... and which it is said was "heard
round the world" .... pierced the heart of Inagua's economy anti
wounded it mortally.
* +* ** *
One of the principal reasons why areas ... and sometimes whole
communities ... decay is because people who consider themselves

selhisens natnral at se noml chaviour for people of similar
interests and social background to get together in the smne
community. They want to be neighbours because they are friends
or possess qualities that are capable of cultivating a close
neighbourly bond.
Sometimes you see a slum area that bears all the signs of better
days. You enquire the reason for its change inl fortunes and
discover that the area lost its appeal when too miany people who
were considered undesirable moved in,
This is a pattern of human behaviour that no force on earth
can influence or control.

Recently the Minister of Tourism ma~de a speech in which he
said that it was important to get "quality" tourists coming to
Nassau. By this he meant "monied" tourists.
Until a few years ago Nassau was a great fashion centre for
world travellers. It was the "in" place ... the place where people
came to see or meet the world's "great" men and women.
Long ago we warned that Nassau was losing its appeal for
quality visitors. The reason for this loss of popularity is to be seen
on all sides in the island. And the effect is now being reflected in
the pattern of travel and in the figures of building construction.
In the same issue of The Ribune that reported a falling off in
profitable air travellers and an increase in unprofitable boat
travellers, another news story reports that private building
during the last quarter was down $4 million in Nassau, while it
had risen $3 million in the Government sector. The Government
spending has no significance because anything that Government
does today is with borrowed money. In terms of future planning
this will tea drag on the economy because one day borrowed

By contrast with Nassau, the Cayman Islands are now bulging
with investment money and a story in The Miami Hecrald s
"Around the Americas" section reports that two large hotels are
being built in Barbados with accommodations for nearly 700
guests. The story describes Barbados as the most popular tourist
spot in the Caribbean.
+* * **
Nicki Kelly wrote an interesting article under the heading
"Optimism and hope follow Cabinet Reshuffle" in which she
reflected the views of people at many levels in Nassau. The most
balanced view was expressed by a business executive.
"It is difficult to comment at the moment,' Nicki Kelly
quoted him as saying, "we just have to wait and see.
Nicki Kelly reported him as saying that there had been
indications recently in discussions that Government was
beginning to understand the problems and was making a
determined effort to improve the image of the Bahamnas in
financial circles.
"If this attitude continues," he observed, "conditions could
well improve. However, once an adverse trecnd has gainlec/
momentum, it is difficult to reverse it. "
I+* * * **
I went to the food shop near my hotel yesterday to make a few
purchases. I have most of my meals in my apartment and so I
now have to do my own shopping. This is good fun.
It was early in the morning and so very few people were
shopping. When I went to check out my purchases two people
were at the cash register ... one a tall girl, the other looked like a
small boy. This was very unusual. Only girls are used at cash
registers in the food shops.
No one else was checking out. The girl and the boy seemed to
be friendly and so I made a comment to draw them out.
"Tlraining the youngster?" I suggested to the tall girl.
"She is not a youngster," the tall girl replied. "Hiow old do you
think she is."
I immediately realized that the tiny one was n~ot a boy and that
she was older than she looked.
"Nineteen," Isaid and proved to be right.
This led to the three of us telling our ages and a chatty little
conversation.
"Where are you from?", the tall girl finally asked.
"Nassau," I told her.
"I've been to Nassau," she said, her face beaming with
p measure. ove "II d it "
"It's a dirty, dinky little place with a lot of funny people," she
said to her friend. "But still I loved it," she added, turning back
to me.
There was no doubt about it, this poor working girl was
fascinated by "a dirty, dinky little place with a lot of funny
people .
But this kind of thing doesn't appeal to "quality" tourists who
have travelled the world and who love clean dinky little places
with nice people around.
I told you recently about a New York friend of miine ... a Vice
President of a major export business in New York ... who quickly
left Freeport and then Nassau because he said he and his family
didn't feel they were getting value for their money.
These people had been frequent visitors to the Bahamlas. They
will not return.
S* * *** **
I had finished writing this article when I noticed another
interesting article in The Tribunle under the heading "Labour
Minister Wants More Social Conscience From Local
Business houses".

A o fsi epre 0ce c ople in Govermnment have been pokrng
their fingers in all kinds of places for somne time now.
For these people "social conscience" too often means "sharma
the wealth" and forcing business men to employ inefficient staff`.
Nothing is more calculated to discourage investment than t~oo
mulch Government interference, especially by inexperienced


politicians.


THE DARWINIAN thEo oNN ev uU1CoH has many apostles.
These people are convinced that man is descended from monkey.
This theory is in direct contradiction to the Christian doctrine
thtGod crea nman a dwonlmid and imbued in his soul a
knowledge of the difference between good and evil. The greatest
gift of all to man is free will ... the right to shape his own destiny
during his sojourn on earth so that he himself determines whether
his will be a reward or punishment when his spirit embarks on the
long journey across Jordan and his body returns to the dust from
whence it came.
I don't believe that anyone who has opened his soul and his
heart and his mind and tuned his whole being into the song of the
elements can doubt that there is a spirit world ... and that we
determine our own heaven or hell while on this earth,
.... as
We see men who are miserable in the midst of what the world
considers plenty, while others radiate happiness in what may be
considered poverty.
This is understandable because the measure of a man's wealth
is not in the bank but it is securely lodged in his own bosom
where no thief can enter to take it away. This is a lesson that far
too few people learn. .. ..

We are living in a purely materialistic age. Most people bow
down to the golden calf that Moses found the freed Israelites
.worshipping when he came down out of the mountains with the
Ten Commandments, engraved in tablets of stone by the hand of
-God
Most men pursue the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the
rainbow but only a few precious souls realize in time that this
image is no more than an empty, vain mirage.

There have been new discoveries, of course, that suggest there
is a close relationship between all life, both animate and
9 inanimate.
It is now being claimed that plant life responds to the human
touch or the human personality ... and that it will thrive under
the influence of music.
This suggests that people who are said to have "green" fingers
... for whom anything will grow and bring forth abundant fruit ..
::are those who love mother earth. Plant life recognizes this love
~~d rsod t it tuh
I Thi my ss nt fetched. It may indeed be far-fetched but
Ir-ly spirit experiences an emotional uplift in a rose garden or

,Oh yes, the forest lives. There is no doubt about that. I realized
this fact after a series of five major hurricanes ... three in 1926,
one in 1928 and the biggest and most disastrous of them all swept
the island in 1929, killing just about every living thing in the
.* forest.
Until the countryside was restocked with birds brought from
Jamaica by the late Robert Burnside, Public Works grdener, the
forests of Nassau took on the hushed atmosphere of an
abandoned graveyard, inhabited only by the dead and where
human foot ceases to trod. Robert Burnside was the eldest
brother of John and Basil Burnside and Lady Bancroft.

An interesting report out of Moscow reveals studies being made
of plant life by scientists who think that ordinary flowers feel
fear,joy, pain and other human emotions.
"In our experiments," psychologist V. M. Pushkin declares'
'"we used hypnosis to switch human emotions on and off and
receive definitely positive answers as to the ability of plants to get
emotionally involved."
And certainly ... since the late J. E. W)illiamson, originator of
undersea photography, opened up the world of the unldersea to
;.study, it has been discovered that fish behaviourisms follow many
:uman patterns.
SWe all know that there are plants on earth and under the sea
That shrink from the human touch ... they fold up on human
contact.

I don't know what all this means nor do I know where it may
Lead.
All I know is that when I start to write my mind's eye travels
Sfar and wide while my hand mnerely records what it sees on the
Sway.
Here I am writing about all kinds of apparently unrelated
Things merely because I read a news story in The 7>ibune that
there has been a sharp drop in air arrivals to Nassau.
.~My opening reference to the monkey clan was to point out
That, while I firmly believe that mnan is a special piece of God's
:own creation and is not evolved from monkey, there are certain
Sbehavioural patterns of man and monkey that are similar. Like
Monkey, man is a "copy cat". You know the saying monkeyy do
as monkey see". A while back there was a dance that bore that
name.
Well ... that is also true of man, especially in the world of
-fashion and in his social habits.
Nearly 70 years ago my father used to delight in telling a story
about a group of gay young blades from Nassau who went for a
~week-end fling in one of the Out Islands.
SThey had a good drunk on Saturday night. As a result one of
~them was so befuddled that he went to church the next morning
~with mismatched socks. The following Sunday all the villagers

Ltu Ts atstthog t nb th lats tfaho from Nassau!

Travelling around the world one can observe the changes that
come about in human behaviour.
You come across a town bearing all the signs of prosperity in
Former years that is run down and nearly deserted.
And one wonders the reason for the change in its fortunes.
Mathew Town, Inagua was such a place when I f'st visited it
as an election candidate a half century ago.
An American journalist, who had visited the island a short time
before my arrival there, wrote an article descr ing it as "a dead


In the future members of~ the
legall profression will be know,\n asx as
atto~rneys atla\\.
CARIFTA CHANGES
P'ORT OF SPAIN. TRIINII)AI)
(AP') The Tranadad andi Tobago
government Wednesday announced
its acceptance o~f amendments to
the Calribbean F-ree Trade
A~ssc~iation (C'ARIFTA7) agpreement
inl a mo~ve "to, sipnificantly) assist
the industrial and development
needs ofT the less developed
C`ARIFTA member states and
ensure a mo~re bala)Ced
developmntrn of thle CHII TA
group as a whole.
The instrument ofr acceptance
signed by P'rime Minister 1)r. Fric
Williams has been depo~sited with
Ant ~a yaovurnment me dmewa
which were agreed to, at the
(cmomnwnw itht (arihb)a summit

accepted unanimously at a recent
Ineeting o~f the CARIlfTA council
ofr ministers.
JAMAICAN PM ON
VISIT TO VENEZUELA

CA' RTh Aisit o~f VEaia' I (LA
Min~ister Michael Manley is viewed
ah o~ne of the mo~st important steps
in Vene/luela's e~vergrowing


**** ++1* ***
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
To see and to be seen, in heaps they run,
Somle to undo, and some to be undone.


DRYDEN


Wnhr Grtbutm


Thursday
y, March 29, 1973.


BENE FITS PEOPLE FOR GET





~U~m)lllt~D tIL*UII


Lri--... ~ ,,-~_-.- -- -- ---1 -L -L- ------- --~ --- -- -- ------ --- ----' --- --


Dodge Dart, a favourite US compact, put Chry'sler ahead in '74
S IN 1961, CHRYSLER~ CORPORATION introduced the Dodge Dart compact to the motoring pubiie. Themode~l wa ucesg
~' LZ ~ ~9 r ~soo *nr as it hit the road rad has been ever since. Because of the Dart, Chryder led the big Three in compct ales duringthe 1972 modg


year.
TIhe Dart, available at
Central Garage, didn't become
a best seller by being an

and reliability. This is obvious
by the pop laity of thedolde
ever-present on the used car
lot.
The interior of this compact
has been engineered for extra
romnes:::th plet f as ac
the six Dart models has its own
whicc is stea 8ad, hrom l:::
and vinyl to all vinyl. All
moo d raihea instaum nt:. pa
with additional trim on some
of the models. Depending on
the model, the driver has front
and rear armrests, deep pile
carpeting, duel horns, cigarette
lighter, a keyless door locking
system, front and rear ashtrays.
Available are either bench seats
or bucket seats. You can even
have a sliding metal sun roof at
the lowest price ever offered
for such an extra by Chrysler.
The sun roof is available on
the Dodge Dart Sport which is
an extremely versatile vehicle.
Optional is a folding rear seat
package which gives
six-and-a-half feet of cargo
space from trunk to the back
of the front seats. Attractive
side trim panels and trunk

placed in the upright position,
a security panel separates the
::-,:=oparment from the
The Dodge engines are
pphlriy mThne r8 tc bic inch
slant six is standard but also
available is a 225 cubic inch six
cylinder. The 318, standard in
V-8 models, is the same engine
as the polara V-8 models.
There is also a 340 V-8 engine.
Transmissions include a three
or four speed manual or
TorqueFlite automatic.
Naturally, the Dart has all
the safety factors which make
cars safer to drive than they
have ever been before the
anti-theft steering column lock,
breakaway front ashtray, dual


of unibody constriction, g
torsion-bar suspension and
great deal mrore. Over a midllica
Darts have been sold so far ar
geehe DpodlS ar mode
at Central Garage, Thompso$it
Boulevard.


on all 1973 Dart engins,
makes the car even more
reliable and more economical
to maintain
Co pact cars are known frd
maneouvrability. The Dart
afftersmore room, the strength


braking system, safety belts.
hazard warning system, outside
mirror, padded instrument
br e, sa ety i w upss kg
knobs on window cranks.
Electronic ignition, standard


DODGE DARTS offer compact size and economy plus many other advantages which have made the Dart one of the
best selling compacts on the market. Available at Central Garage.


Poor hung ry childr en in Miami
By Ann fiellmuth from anyone else. I just have to "I started giving away food brings tears to your eyes when
MIAMI, FLA. (AP)--Several keep my eyes open and buy on a regular basis when I got to you see a hungry child standinS
times a day Bob Baker loads things when they are going Miami because it is easier here in the street eating a whole loaf
his sky-blue station wagon with cheap." to reach the poor people than of bread at one go anyone
food and sets off in search of Baker who runs a restaurant in New York and I also think who does that must be pretty
hungry children to give it to. in Miami Springs with his wife they are much poorer in many hungry."
Baker, 59, has become such tfelen Marie, has been giving ways here," he added. Baker refuses to say how
a familiar sight that when away food since 1956 when he Bak er scouts h is much it costs him to be Mr.
children in poor areas of Miami moved to Florida from New neighbourhood for bargains Breadman but admits it
spot his car they run after it York. and giveaways at local stores. sometimes runs to $100 a week
shouting: "Hey, Mr. Breadman ~I was brought up to helP In one recent two-week or more.
what you got today?', others," Baker said. "When I period he got lucky a store "Because of the food he has
"I esiaeIgv wy was a kid in New York I used was selling bananas cheaply. given away, many of our
abo t 400to 50 loaves ofa to watch my father giving out Baker estimates he got 9,000 youngsters were able to have a
broad a day, but it varies,,, treats to poor neithbourhood pounds to give to the children. meal before classes for the first
Baker says. I don't get help kids when he got home from "They are the most popular time in their school life,"
L ~work, thing," he said. 'It really Miller said.


1


i

''


THE ARROWS ALL POINT TO...

"""""" "" "


'73 DODGE DART SPORT COUPE
The newest addition to the great Dart family. The Dart Sport. Three cars in one a six passenger
coupe .... with sliding sun roof, a convertible ... with fold-down rear seat, a station wagon, a family
car for fun or cargo.


'73 DODGE DART SEDAN
The compact Dodge. Roomy, strong and economical. A practical family car with electronic ignition,
front disc brakes, a host of meaningful features and engineering innovations to assure mile-after-mile
of maintenance-free driving. Great value!


CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.

Oakes Field Phone 3-4711
P. O. Box< N-1525 Nassau, Bahamas


t I WrHIMRe


Thursdy, March 29, 1918~.


BE AT T HE WATER

PROBLEM I.. Westinghouse

Water Cooler is The Answer


Mr. Biker


'the breadman'


feeds


" TH~E


DODG DAR FOR 1i973


STARTING AT 51,400 DOWN


Bnml




= -- ---- -- --- --- -- ------ f ~- --- I = L~- II-


FAMILIARIZATION TOUR

SUPERVISORS IN THE LIAISON SECTION of thre
;t Independence Secretariat are pictured during part of their
) bus tour to various historical points in Nassau Frklay
1 evening. The supervisors will be conducting twice weekly
7, seminars for liaison officers and aides in geogrpahy,
( economy, social and political history of the Bahamas.
Pictured (left to right) are: Richard Adderley, Physical

ii I ~ ~~~~~~Carieton Wright. of the Ministry of Education and Culture;Edcto ece tC .Setn eirHg col
Juliette Barnwell, Chief Liaison Officer; Vera Curtis.
1 IDeputy Headteahchr at A. F. Adderley High School:
S Sammy Dean. first Assistant Secretary to the Ministry of
-.Development; and H-arcourt Turnquest, Chief Liaison
~Officer.


, ,


_


USED USED




a BU Y

';;a ORL







FOX IR OTHERS FURllIlli lillf
DOWDESWELL STREET (Formerly BESCO Building)
Telephone 2-8012 OUT ISLAND ORDERS TO
P.O. BOXr 6104 E.S., Nassau. Bahamas.


VVAIU AL E'

ON LY I


LOCATEDONGLADSTONE ROAD
1%4 miles south of John F. Kennedy Drive

HOURS OF BUSINESS:
MON. thru FRI.-- 8:30 A.M. -5:00 P.M.
SATURDAYS -8:30 A.M. 12 NOON
PHONE 3-4849/3-4895 -- P. O. N4922/NASSAU


MRCH SHMP LM



OVERSTOCIIED~~~~~ i 0 M UBI O S


YOUR GHILD'S HEALIH IS IMPORIANITO YOU...


RIS 5X DISeOIM Wil ITHN IR ADE.


.... WELL RENOWNED, OUALITY
MANUFACTURERS OF SHOES l'W
FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY l1~

YOU SE -AGNODOD QUALF R,
REASONABLY PRICED,
FASHIONABLE SHOES FOR .&
SCHOOL, WORK OR PLAY!





COLLINS AVENUE & 6TH TERRACE -- CENTREVILLE


eICVaLAuNcl P. O. BOX N-8165i SHIRLEY STREET PHONE 2-4626/7/8


Thursday March 29 1973.


APRIL 15 DEADLINE

FMl FLBAT ENTRIES
THE INDEPENDENCE
Float Committee once again
reminds all those considering
trrthco ing fla dependence
Parade to inform the
Committee not later than April
1S.
Information submitted
should contain details of design
and colouring, dimensions,
number of attendants and
hnt n d F rinedots1 and o
April 15, will not be allowed to
participate in the parade.
"The committee reserves the
right to refuse participation of
any float that does not
measure up to the required
hg standard, rvae r em a
MOON
Rises 2:42 a.m.
P... O


Mrs. Juliette Barnwell,
Education Officers in the
Ministry of Education and
Span:s. conversaton c ----
will be conducted by Dr.
Knowles and assisted by Mr.
Wright for those teachers and
students who have a knowledge
of Spanish.
Twelve weeks before
Independence, the groups will
be divided intor teams of three
-- a teacher and two students.
Each team will be assigned to a
delegation and will undergo
further training to become
knowledgeable about the
geography, economy, social
and political history of the
country represented by the
delegation. They are also
expected to know as much as
possible about the leader of the
delegation to which they have
been assigned.


the geography, economy, sod J
and political history of the
Bahamas.

personnel: Mr. Andrew Curry,
Headmaster of Aquinas
College; Mr. Hlugh Bullard,
Dean of Students, Aquinas
College; Dr. John Knowles,
Professor of Languages, Simon
F~raser University; Mr. Basil
Chtristie, F~oreign Language
teacher of Aquinas; Mr.
Carleton Wright of the Ministry
of Education and Culture; Mr.
Samuel Dean, First Assistant
Secretary in the Ministry of
Development; Mrs. Vera Curtis,
Deputy Headteacher of A. F.
Adderley H~igh School and Mr.
Richard Adderley, Physical
Education teacher of C. C.
Sweeting Senior High School.
The chief liaison officers are
Mr. Hlarcourt Turnquest and


" NASSAU 'S


THE APPEAL of the
Independence Clean-Up
Campaign Committee for
donations from the business
community to defray the cost
of, 100 permanent litter bins
has met with immediate
success, according to Mr
Hlarold Munnings, Co-ordinator
of the Independence
Secretariat.
The Committee, headed by
Alexander McCorquodale,
Chief Health Inspector of the
Ministry of Health, consists of
representatives of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, the
three Rotary Clubs of New
Providence, the Lions Club and
the Montagu Kiwanis Club.
Pledges to pay for the
hvm be nen rciv d a~sO aie w.
Coca Col a, $S 0 0;
Bethell-Robertson & Co ,
$500; Bahamas Blenders Ltd ,
$500; Bahamas Real Estate
Association, $500; Pinewood
Gardens Ltd.; $500;
Restaurants Bahamas Ltd.,
(Kentucky Fried Chicken),
$400; Father Allen Chicken
Shacks, $400; G. M. & Sons
Agencies, $200; Audley Kemp,
$200; Burger King, $200; C. A.
Liquor Store, $200; Reef
Restaurant, $200; Golden Isles
Farms, $100; Madsen Builders
00;. 510n e AmbrosineC Lt


Bank (Overseas) Ltd. $50 and
I. A. Hughes, Bahamian
Properties Ltd., $20.
Towards the above pledges,
$3,500 in cash has already
been received.
Further pledges and
donations should be sent to the
Independence Clean- Up
Campaign Committee, P. O.
Box ES6241, Nassau. For the
Family Islands, donations
should be sent to the Island
Commissioner concerned.
The bins, attractively
painted in golden yellow, black
and red will have "LITTER"
legibly painted on the face.
They are designed to be
tip-proof and hence dog proof,
and will have heavy-duty
plastic 55-gallon disposable
The 1,000 locations chosen
and appro ved by
representatives of the local
service clubs, the Road Traffic
Department, the Ministry of
Health and the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce
provide bins at reasonable
intervals along all New
Providence major highways, in
parks and playgrounds, and at
beaches and picnic grounds.
Several of the take-out food
stores have ordered extra bins
from the Committee to place
usi ssnear their places of


*,.*
. *


Give yourself happy relief from
backache, rheumatic pains, stiff
aching muscles or the common
urinary disorders due to
acuin hT eMDoans
K &r B pills to keep
you feeling fitand
active.


STANDARD & AUTOMATIC.


rg
r


AUSTIN 1300 COUNTRYMAN
STANDARD & AUTOMATIC.


WE WILL GIVE A LIBERAL TRADE ON YOUR OLD CAR -- OR,
WITH NO TRADE....


so we are pleased to announce that
we now have the exclusive agency
for ....





SHOES OF CbANADA


FREE. UNDERSEAL
FREE. LICENCE FOR ONE YEAR
FREE. INSPECTION

FRE 00 MLEP SRVIE E

FRE 6000ML SR I
FREE. 9000 MILE SERVICE


*J


AS LAID DOWN
RNMV EUFACNTDUBROEOR


"VHhi t PIALT ISSm~l


NOTCE




Although our PARTS AND SERVICE
DEPARTMENTS are closed all this week for
inventory and will not re-open until Monday
morning, April 2nd, our Sales Department,
,Service Station and offices will observe our
normal business hours.



l8[0EQMOTORS
iCentreville 2-1031


Liaison officers will help


our guests at Independence


FRSHEST CHICKEN"


I t, JQo

Sow


Donations for 'clean up'

campaign going well


~~~~L T IvS


DOAKISHEY AND
at chemists and stores.
Distributed bl
Thompson Drug Co Ltd, Box 6021 Centreville, Nassau.


II f




I I Ilr I I I II


Iltr fo 1W It 085 0 J 1


STARTS FRIDAY
Matinee 2:30 $ 4:55, Evening 8:30--'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
Io tlleaI' &a Iwalls b


He was going to








Cahn RELEnLESurssu


JOE DON BAKER ELIZABETH HARTMAN
NO ONE UNDER 1 7 ADMfITED.
Reservations not clahned by 8:15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Last Day Friday Last Day Friday
SMatinee at rs at 2:00 Continuous Showings
"TWO LANE fo
BLACKTOP" R.
SJames Taylor "TOWER OF EVIL" R
Warren Oates Bryant Harliday
PLUS Jill Haworth

FROM HELL" R." O RD PLUSP
Steve Reeves "HANDS OF THE
SWayde Preston RIPPER" R.m
/No oneunder 7 wllr.n m bef admitted
PLUS Late Feature Kd otr g
Friday night.
'Phone 2-2534 No one under 17 wmI ase dmined.


NOW SHOWING
atnecontinuous from 1:30 Evening 8: 30-'Phone346






JMS K N ICOON *** SAMUEL2RKOF... eTRNinNC~~~Ni



-PLUS-
"ACIE HIGH "
Starring
ELI WALLACH TERANCE HILL

SSU/GGESTED FtOR MA TURE AUDIENCES.
I IPARENTAL DISCRETION )AD VIED


I- .~ ,-. ..-- --- ~~.~-----l-Y"~~~-IC -i -~---~-Y----ll-_- YL--- _111II~-I-- ~ ----- r-I --- -- _~ __ -


interrupted her regular sho
business schedule to make the
Nassau appearance. She has
just returned from Puerto Rico
an is at~rrently hea lining tthe
Hotel on Miami Beach. She has
become a favourite of Nassau
audiences through her
appearances for the Heart
Foundation and she can be
counted on to have the
audience in hysterics through
her clever repartee with various
members of the audience who
become the participants in the
comedy routine by Tommy.
TIhe audience soon learns that
the dummy is not so dumb but


a highly professional comedian
who has learned all the tricks
of the trade during the
twenty-five years the act has
bee in show business h trn
over the entire proceeds of the
evening to the Heart
Foundation, is producing the
show, along with radio
personality Mary Kelly.
WEATHER
Wind: South-easterly 10 to
16 m.p.h.
Sea: Slight
Weather: Variable clood~iness
with chance of showe; s
Temp: Min tonig.lt 65
Max tomorrow 79


INTERNATIONALLY
known ventriloquist Kay
Carole with her dummy,
Tommy, will headline the
shw to rbme heldfoat Heat
Drumbeat Club on Friday
4pril 6. The evening of
entertainment is an annual
fund raising-event for The Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation featuring
Peanuts Taylor and the regular
Drumbeat Club show, as well
as the top Bahamian
entertainers who donate their
time and talent
This will make the fourth
year that Miss Carole has


In the individual adults first
prize is S300; second prize,
$250; third prize, $200; fourth
prize, $150; fifth prize, 5100;
five consolation prizes of $50
each and five at $25 each.
First prize in the individual
juveniles is $175; second prize,
$150; third prize, $125; fourth
prize, $100; fifth prize, $75;
five consolation prizes of $40
each and five at $20 each.
Chairman of the committee
is Mr. Edwin Davis. Other
members are: John Chipman,
Eddie Minnis, Hervis Bain, Miss
Peggy Francis, Gordon Carey,
Carl Bethel, Allison Dean, Asst.
Commissioner of Police, Paul
Thompson and Basil Albury,
Asst. Director of Tourism.
TIDES


THE INDEP ENDENCE
Junkanoo parade, one of the
highlights of the Independence
celebrations will take place in
Nassau on Wednesday, July I1,
from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m. Plans are
being finalized for this parade


which promises to be the most
colourful in the history of
these island, a release from the
Bahamas Information Services
said.
The route will be along Bay
Street from East Street up
Frederick Street, along Shirley
Street and down East Street
into Bay Street. In addition,
several platforms will be
erected mn the centre of Bay
Street over which Junkanoos
will parade so that spectators
can get a better view.
There will be 50 prizes for
adult groups, juvenile groups,
individual adults and juvenile
adult groups. In the adult
groups, first prize is $1,000;
second prize, $750; third prize,
$500; fourth prize, $'250; fifth
prize, S 100; and five
consolation prizes at $75 each.
First prize in the juvenile
groups is 5500; second prize,
$400; third prize, $300; fourth
prize, $200; fifth prize, $100
an five consolation prizes of


Open 6:30 Shows Start 7 P.M.
No One Under 17 Admitted!
See 2 features late as 9 p. m.
EXCLUSIVE -
*NOW thrru TUES*
"I 10 STREET" at 7 &r 10:40
"HAMMER"art 9 p.m. Only


ri
~aisrI


High 3:25
p.m.
Low 9:41
p.m.


a.m. and 3:35
a.m. and 9:54


KAY CAROLE and TOMMY


))


frw ao tl robbery.


TH call it ielpf ul b akn king.

Nearly 65 years ago Bahamians called us 'The Bank'. Today .. they've added an
adjective . ..'Helpful'. A delights ul change. And appropriate.
From a single branch, we've grown up to branches throughout the Bahamas providing
savings. Loans. Money Transfers. Letters of Credit. And so on.
But the helpful bank is more. Smiling faces, friendly, efficient service.
Check out helpful banking in action at your local Royal Bank branch. Today.



The Royal The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BAN K
Branches throughout the Bahamas


\.


r\


j.
'i.


.4


~~~
. s
1 ~*"
ti E; ..
~
r i6
~.
'' '''
j ..
~I
~i:'~ cs~~,


L ~J


Elit mr~igg Thursday, March 29, 1973.

KA Y CAROLE TO HSEADLI~NE 'DRUMBEAT FOR HEART SHO W


frOm the people




at he Royal.


g1 s











,
.


9 Lufthansa


etESERVAtlN/ InT ETGENT
Throrough knowledge of Lufthansa Reservtions and
oir ktn nProc dures req lred. Also must be fluent in

If qualified please send your resume to:
Lufthants
P. O. Box N-7547
Nassau, Bahamas






file enti Of y0Ut I'oll...
With the high COSt Of Cctlnmercial
pfIOfography?

Try TOOGOODS. Quick, reliable service at
a speda rate to fie prefesuional Customers.


1il Wlle' S ellV GanCln2


perk up tired husband?


By Abiagel Van Buren
1n or tcnc Tremon. v. new syne, see
DEAR ABBY: I went to my minister because I hrave
been having marital problems with my husband. It had to do
with lovemaking. [He wasn't doing any.] I'm 28, and he's 29.
The minister said he really didn't know all that much
about the subject, but he suggested that I take some lessons
in belly dancing so I could entertain my husband and maybe
tha woul pe im up any 11a in Asheville, N. C., that
teaches belly dancing? WILING T 'IDEARN
DEAR WILLING: Not offrand, but look up dance studios
in your Yellow Pages, and inqalre. [P. S. Ask the minister
where HE get the idea.]

DEAR ABBY: If you have ever had this problem in
your cohann, I must have missed it. It is one that several
of a .e a dear friend who talks too much. She is bright,
attractive, and has many fine qualities, but her endless,
detailed monologs are baring and exhausting.
Her husband is intelligent and articulate, but he
doesn't get a chance to open his mouth because his wife
always has the floor. If someone else is talking, she
interrupts and proceeds to dominate the conversation.
She has always been a talker, but lately it's gotten to
the point where our husbands don't care to spend an evening
listening to her.
If you or any of your readers know how to reach a
person with this fault, please tell us. Thank you, and please
don't use my name. NAME WITHH~ELD
DEAR NAME: The only effective way to reach a non-
stop talkrer is via the direct route. DOe of her best friends
should teHl her privately, gently, but emphatically that she
really should not talk so much, and give others a chance.
And slace you're the friend who wrote the letter, perhaps
yea're the one to tell her. It would be an act of kindness.

DEAR ABBY: I am writing to you because all the
etiquette books dodge this question. Is it proper to tip the
owner of a barbershop or beauty parlor? I understand if
you do, some owners are insulted.
I go regularly to a barbershop, where I tip the em-
ploye. However, from time to time, the owner of the shop
cuts my hair himeelf. I know him personally, and know
that he makes a good living from the shop, so I never tip
him,
My wife tells me that she runs up against the same
situation in her beauty shop where the owners sometimes
do the work.
What is the correct proceduwif there is one?
PUZLE IN PHON
DEAR PUZZLED: Offer. If the owner Is iasulted, he
will let you know it, in which case don't "lasalt" him agaia.

DEAR ABBY: I trust that President Nixon reads your
Column. Just in case he does, and hasn't appointed a re-
placement for J. Edgar Hoover, I would like to recommend
my wife. She has had 46 years experience, and I can
guarantee you that if she is appointed head of the FBI,
within 90 days she will have rounded up all of the ten most
wanted criminals.
UNDER SURVEILLANCE FOR 46 YEARS IN
BATON ROUGE, LA.
DEAR UNDER: IThe acting director of the FBI has
been appointed. He is L. PaMctrc Gray. Prudent man, Mr.
Nixon, he chose neither Black nor White.

DEAR ABBY: My parents read your column faithfully,
so I hope you will publish this. It's an open letter to Par-
ents of a Single Woman:
Dear Mom and Dad: I'm 26 and single. I live my life
day to day, trying to find purpose, peace of mind, a way to
conquer loneliness. I'm frightened of being alone, never
marrying or having a child, or being labeled a spinster.
I'm filled with guilt for disappointing you, not giving you
grandchildren, not giving you a chance to say, "My daugh-
ter is getting married."
But it takes strength to make it today, and to feel that
I am a worthy person .. single, but worthy. I'm reason-
ably happy. Dating sometimes, hurting at other times. I
start to think that I am somebody event if I'm not married.
Then comes a phone call from Mother or Dad, and for "my
own good" I am reminded that I am single, getting older,
wasting time, not looking hard enough for a husband. And
there goes my self-esteem. The guilt returns and suddenly I
am more alone than before. Can't I be your daughter,
married or not? I'll never shame you. I want to marry
someday, but only if I find someone who loves me as I love
him, and not because you want grandchildren to talk about
when your friends talk about theirs.
Instead, say, "Come for dinner tomorrow night and
we'll enjoy your company." If you can't do this for me I


will have to widen the gap to protect my own peace of
mind, and that would cause me great pain and loneliness.
because I love you. YOUR SINGLE DAUGHTER


was tEIA by friend that givn werdcoung githat "la
fashioned. dShe said today they aut pass a tray around and

If money is all that important, why don't they book the
wedding at a wrestling match? A few years back, when I
was a professional wrestler, they had an occasional wed-
ding at the wrestling matches. [It was usually one of the
wrestlers who got married.] But since a wedding is usually
the beginning of a fight, they might be able to find a
promoter who would book it.
REV. LLOYD F. TEASLEY, CTROFTON, KY.


Open daily until 6 p.m. and on Sunday afternoons from 2 5


_ __


Also, we make your money safe and start it growing. As it grows, we pay you interest:

6Y/2% ON YOUR SAVINGS ACCOUNT 7%/% 8% ON YOUR FIXED DEPOSITS

If you have $1.00 or $50,000.00 which you want put away safely to grow with interest, come see
us at FinCo.'There are two street-le~vel banking offices to serve you: at Trinity Place in downtown
Nassau and at Glasgow House, Robinson Road east of East Street, where there's ample parking.









THE BAHAMAS' OLDEST AND STRONGEST SA VINGS AND LOAN INSTI TUTION


SAILEDI TODAY: Tropic
F-yr for Ies PamBa


for Ragged Island

SkARRIV Mards ;r3 fOIT )
Tihomias

SUN

Kics n'" a~r
MU DERER REPRIE E


I un~a manl who hadt been sentenced
to hang in the British Virgin
sr~nreed en Mch 26 9n72 a tr
cno ston win tor dath o
Irnox D~urante, a resident of


MEMBRrr OF THE I

PRINCIPd

THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA


PHONE 24822 6

R EST eoMuP or compults I

AL GROUP SHAREHOLDERS:

NATIONAL WESTMINSTER BANK LIMITED


ON SATURDAY, MARCH

and Cultref's Fif~to'nt "An'noo
bowed out for another year.
and all the passions and
prejudices, the loves, hates,
envies, anxieties (and in some
Cases, mercifully, the pieces of
1 music) will sink back into the
mud from which they had been
so rudely stirred. Mother,
father and musical child will
breathe a corporate sigh of
relief.
A time, then, for reflection?
Certainly; for, like any
marriage that has survived this
long, certain amount of good,
honest self-examination is a
must,
What, then, has been
achieved?
To answer you honestly, I

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


don't know. It is, of course.
easy to see the things that are
obvious: it has grown in size; it
has become more Bahamian;
standards appear to be better.
But the obvious worries me;
for it seems to have grown
rather like a tree. It has more
branches; it's easier, now, to
see what kind of a tree it is; it's
a bigger and better tree. But
it's rather as though all that
was needed for this was the
seed. Once planted (in good
soil) its growth was inevitable:
the wind, the rain, and time
did the rest
WHIAT NOW?

wh there >Pnngt dhe i et i ow
ripe for Man to intervene; a
little e althy prun s ilads

have seen a lot of change in
fifteen years; a process which
will be visibly symbolized by
the Independence celebrations


and lust won't bother to enter
nerxt time round.
the question we might ask
ourselves. then, is;, Why did
people enter this year s Mlusic
festivaP1' fo win for the third
time In succession and get a
ap?! To win for the first time
and feel good about it? To
kno~w the adjudicator's opinion
o~f them?
WHlAT 'S TH'AT?
Some, mnaybe Most, I'm
su1re. just wanted to
participate. And perhaps they
understand Perhaps
participation, rather than
evaluation, Is a more
icaning uld a wtiit) inp ti
What s that I hear, TIo give
l' 1 notittot cont the costto
thle 'testive' element of
t e stivl the joyous
Celebration at music, together
andl abandon this undignified
compl~etletie scrabble?) Timne to
rc i c t st 1he 'fiesta before

gofhIt ibth len thea fjrst thing to
which isn t such a radical idea
as It mnay sound! Many people
would argue that any kind of
formal musical adjudication
(other than that geared to
examiinations) is not only
u nnece ssa ry but can be
po~sitively harmful. TIhe young
child instilc~tively knows when
something is good or bad, and
this basic artistic awareness is
developed gradually by his
educain ac rd ngs tpoop h

do not1 need for a professional's
advi~ce; they) will not believe
himn if he disagrees with them
If they have no opinion, his
advice wVIll have little or no
Leffect~ on themn Only when
they' agree with him will they
be in a position to learn from
him. because his advice will
reinforced what they already
feel arid know.
It is possible that many
participants this year, falling to
understand the sincerity of Mr.
IFletcher s standpoint, gave him
little heed, or worse. decided
agaiinst future participation and
humiliation.
But there are some further -
issues which must be raised.
Anyone attending the adult
evening sessions (which, after
all, are the only ones that most
people are able to attend ) must
have been struck by several
regrettable facts.
WHAT HlAPPENED?
First, that very few people
had entered classes which have
usually been very popular
theree were only three entries
in the'Folk Singing' class, only
one of the three turned up).
Third, having already said
that the people who benefit
most from this type of musical
competition tend to be the
winners, it Is sad to note that,
again in the adult classes, these
tended to, be expatriates. Sad,
not because they did not merit
their high marks, but because,
in several cases, they had had
the opportunities, in terms of
experience and training, which
made the whole idea of their
competing (but not necessarily
their taking part) unjust.
All three aspects will surely
need to be given serious
consideration when the
committee comes to define the
role of the Music Festival in
19)74.


of this c~oming. July. Is the
Music F~stilval keeptng abreast
of the times'
Wecll, It has mnade~ a gesture
TIhis year, for thle first timP.
the comnurittee appointed a
blaik o~utside' aidudicatorr for
New Pro~videnie Jnd G;rand
Bahamna Now, ratherr like the
scorpion who lumnps o~n his
mate s back only to, be
devoured by one nughty
love-blow. It seemiis possible
that the committeetz bit o~f t
more)T thanl ~could he ;hewed.
Mlr. Fletcher, a ; perienced
and accomplished musician,
has mnade himself most
li ~,ulr hy y~ing what h
th Ferstival committee, he

as estcnl < thenb a ta
standard, als re~alized in the
particular ptertcrlainnce ht
witne~ssd. The Artist, then.
said what he thought


Jarn toJ wh rj< lljud i et d I r
)er' Id rii Ir~ck stival, th a
qulality w'lnch, inl last year a
Music Fecstival. hiad eldeared
somre entrants to Zr. Churchill,
typically B~ritish In lus sense of
diplom~c~y. but being tactless
was notf the` roo(t CaISe of ~Mr
Fletc~hr ~s dow~~nfclll (if I mnay
call It su~1) cht beg true to his
owi nmusical standards was.
Hlow manny of us. Wonder,
like criticismm' Iew, I believe:
and those whl, I~ke It munst he
v itt>er rlstir dsocts r rrpeople

seAtus nlaybeu this i\ why
many of Mr. F~ltcher s wo~rts
fell on stony ears. flow many 1~
entrants really wanted to be
graded, to be placed on1 a
numerical scale, to be told thtat
their hours of praCfctiC and
two-mlnute-traumla gets them
sevetnty-five (and they were '
eighty-two last yeatr!).. to be
told that Joanie (we all know
he can't play!) gets tenl miore
marks then I:lsice-Mae (who
plays, miy dear, like an angel!)
and who s right, and who's
wrong, theml or him. mne ~r
you?
And how many have be~n
Helped by being told that their
performance was worse? I
suspect that those who have
knew it in any c~ase; and those
who haven't couldn't care less


185 18858 ?F101'$11818


-.
locoGDc ("


on the waterfront at East
Bay & William Streets.
TELEPHONE 54641


lope that by then,
mud in the present
finally settled, we'll
see a little clearer
ic in the Bahamas
ached. JPB






iD TrODA Y: 'Tropic
West Palm Beach


L~et us h
when the r
pond has f
be able to
where Mus
has really re


F


FOIiIE FlRIlECTION

10? IIFFISII woIml
M0?0 OffectiVe tht&R
dachiB
Gerlaieitil Deoderant

ocan autions an prca carfied
dance in the of ectiveness of
NORFO So f minine suppositories
Poshive Protecdom against embark
maieng prgbeb dit tei highly

Sp. us.te Fmiid fnnoffte
clhe hetn icas ap 1 ing o

Sorld a al dhasl at sdral packge






Nompr~tr formng rts' v


Im mnformative booler winte to
Norwich harmadlcat neal Co., Inc.
410d Prolparkoic Ave. Neork, .Y 102


ARRIVE-
F-lyer from


CONFIDENTIAL TO "C" IN FORT COLLINS, COLO.:
, Smetimes the easlest way "areand" something is thru it.
So quit looking for angles and DO it!
Problems? You'll feel better if yes gt it off year hesrt.
For a perrsonal replyr, write to ABBY: Box No. 8970*, L. A.,
Calif. agage. Eaclse stampedl, self-oddrssed eavelope.
pleae.
For Abby's bootklt, "How to Have a levely WoddLg,"
send $1 to Abby. Box 8870, las Angles, Cal. SAM.


P.O. BOX N3038


6h Q& ttt


Thursday
y
March 29 19 3


The Baham~as Music Festival:


I, a lily festering3


BEET THEB


MON BUYN EMOOGT


N O


8 t .. 8




P ~Tr ~-1.-T1----~----I- .Ir_ ;_ II __~_ J -- I


u --- ------~~B


current year. Under the law a IYa~~g
number of goods are exempted
from the tax, particularly basic I n conjunction with Chamber of Commerce beautification
foodst itsslhs tfldoure Lardbnrce. programme for downtown area.

etc., footwear, certain goods
approved for industrial and Large Fkowering &t Foliage Baskets installed, fully
agricultural development, maintained and replanted $10.00 per month per
petrol and alcohol. Stamp basket.
Duty on land transfers is at
present charged at the rate of Wali bracket installed $12.00, if needed.
%/%. In place of this a sliding
scale will be introduced Fully responsible for damage and covered by
starting at %%9 below $6000 public liability.
and increasing to 4%%O/ on
values exceeding $100,000.00
This should yield 50.5 million
in 1973 and the necessary
legislation will be put before *IIBII LHS P O
you today. H W 14
Finally it is proposed to
introduce later this year
system of business licensing. Ex li g ah n sa

prpaed ndwn wil ebr 8g

atdasontlha are3 happening at the Faklaos
professional man in the
Baaa a is inbt hap eiged Trade Winds Ba* & Lounge
free from taxation. Moreover, *aa ieIln
he has been receiving all thePa dseIl n
benefits that our Nation has to
offer for a maximum fee of 71
cents forever. I do not,
therefore, think it is
unreasonable to ask him to pay
a modest fee for the right to
enjoy that privilege and to
demonstrate his great love for
and loyalty to his country.
Hon. Members will
a p.p r eel a to that the
Government has made every
effort to ensure that the
burden falls where it can be the
best borne, as far as our system
of taxation will allow this to
be done. There is one other *f
matter in this connection to
which I may make particular--
reference. It is the intention of
the Govemnment to amend the
meal property tax to allow for
exemption of all properties up
to $20,000. This will give relief
to small property owners. It is I
not administratively possible to
do this for the first six months
in 1973, but the necessary P
legislaion will be brought to ~ ~ r ~l
you to implement this in time .,r
for the second half of the 1973 ; 'i-
financial year, with appropriate .
creditsneer .being given where D
EDUCATION
Some brief observation of R 9 0 1
the Estimates will show that
Education still commands the
priority of this Government SHOWTIMES NUIGHTLY: 10:40 & 12:40
and the Ministry of Education
has the largest single amount Make thee~venins complete withag ounrmetdinner
allocated to it. In this year's in the Imperial DiningC Room.
Estimates, Education has Dinner from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p~m.
allocated to it almost $24
million. This is followed by the
Ministry of Health with over
S14 million which also
indicates the attention which
the Government pays to the
health of our people. The
increasing demands of the g
times and the determination of
NEXT PAGE



















AINSLIE'S SOCOTC


.j


DISTRIBUTED IN THE BAHAMAS BY


B 8~l O Od, on & o. t.
A44


' -~r~F-l.~a. r xrr n---- --. a ._r +


Thursday, M Iarch2, 93


THE HON.A. D. Hanna, newly-appointed Minister of Finance,
laid on the table of the House yesterday his Budget
communication for 1973 in the wake of Opposition criticism that
the Government had failed to provide the Estimates within 60
days of the financial year.
THE following is a full text of the*~ comlmunication, which gave
the public debt as $65 million anrd a creased taxes in many areas:


Devel p me nt for Ihe
magnificent work he did on
this and previous budgets, for
the high standards which he set
In introducing a high degree of
professtonabism for the first
time into Bahamnas' Slscal
policy, and at the same time
directing the G;overnmnent's
policies in cwo, important
Ministries, that of the Ministry
of Finance and the Ministry of
E-ducation.I think this
Country and this Parliament
owe 'a great debt to him as
indeed history will no doubt

ponturn nw tco ath einmt
Communication

Would leN t reface my
remarks on the budget for
1973 by drawing the attention
of flon. Members to certain
changes in the lay-out of the
E~stimnates. T`he Estimates of
Revenue which appear in the
first part of the volume are
now classified on an economic
basis, differentiating between
tax and non-tax revenue and
also classifying tax revenue
according to its nature rather
than by reference to the
department which collects it,
This has been done in order to
facilitate revenue planning and
management.
Similarly, changes are being
made in the expenditure
estimates so that expenditure
may eventually be charged
according to function. A first
step has been taken this year
where the expenditure
estimates for Education,
Health and Works have been
classified on a standardised
system of sub-heads, which will
be extended eventually to
enable a comprehensive system
of functional estimating,
covering all Ministries, to be
installed.
During recent months the
Government has been giving
detailed consideration to the
type of statutory financial
controls appropriate to an
independent country. In this
task it has been the benefit of
advice from experts supplied
by the International Monetary
Fund. There are a number of
changes contemplated bu t
most of them relate to the
methods of regulating
expenditure on capital works.
At present the money needed
for Government development
projects is provided from a
number of special funds
established by law and which
derive their income income
from certain specified revenues
thich ate paidito tCes ein
Fund. Hlon. Members are aware
of these special funds which
include the Crown Lands
Funds, the Roads and
Harbours Fund etc. In addition
to money from such funds the
Government has borrowed
money for development work
under various hoc laws and
has also, at times, made direct
a pp rop ria tions froml the
Consolidated Fund or General

nehd no do had cer ai
advantages under a colonial
sstern, bt iti ute uns ited


wk a anene n ao al r
smehtuthatbrecrta revienu
plntefinancing ofd ecfidaetal


hor s,weegatooess oc h t er
littel fore those mu pose o
whether ploywol n th b

thins Fu rthemr th

mg seaa fnor ame it
practically impossible to record
in simple form what have been
t son ces of thek funds ued

Member doubts this I invite
him to examine the Treasurer's

tnu cer unt a viwt


the Constitutional Conference

iti rposetd,w rhao te ann

Frn inndlelisshaill shortly th

Hboo chinwithethother s eci l
Funds. At the same time I
propose to bring for the
consideration of the House a
Financial Administration Bill
which will have the purpose of
regulating transactions on the
Consolidated Fund and will


SINCEF 1 9 67 t his
Government has taken the
o portunity In the Budget
Comncto rve th
c omuntcats a ooy re enral y
and in broad outline, and also
Io idic~ate the fiscal polic
obsenh the G;overnmen
poosed to follow as outlined
prophe ap nte est mates I
ntpoe eaptopa collowm that
opre eent o
This Is probably the last
Budget ('ommunlcatio~n of this
nature that a Minister of
uinatwe t tthe Bahamasaswill

Iolon >1 ahiamian Minise I

Parliament and if you follow
this ('mmunincat on w h ~ey

Government has met the
c~hallenge of the transition In
its fiscal policy as our country
follows the o~nly path of
freedom .
'The Prime~ Minister said
earlier this year that the
Government was geared for the
necessary step forward to meet
the challenge of Independence
that will set the pace for the
future where Bahamians will
live as free men and free
women in a free Bahamas with
all the goodness that God has
bestowed upon the Bahamas
and that we, as Bahamians,
have created for ourselves.
Many who could see no further
than the ends of their noses
used that opportunity to cast
aspersions upon and named
improper motives for that
course. But member who now
form this Government have
ridden out many a storm and it
is, therefore, very unlikely
that any attempts from the
enemnmy either from within or
without the country will be
able to undermine that solid
foundation upon which this
Government is built. This
Government is strong and
united; its policies are sound;
and its actions are dictated by
the overriding consideration of
fhe national interest.
SMr. Speaker. last week the
Leader of the Opposition made
much play of the fact that the
Estimates were not laid for the
information of the Hlouse
within 60 days of the financial
year. The fact is that the
Estimates are now laid on the
Table of this Honourable
House today and I hope that
the Appropriation Acts which I
shall introduce for the First
Reading later today will be
passed through both Houses of
Parliament well before the
Constitutional deadline of the

30For the record ne would like
to deal with the allegation that
Government is in breach of
Article I 16(1) of the
Constitution because it has
failed to "cause to be prepared
and laid before the House of
Assembly before or not later
than sixty days after the
commencement of each
financial year estimates of the
revenues and expenditure of
the Bahama Islands" for the

hls tat it i neot no brahe o
the Constitution and is acting
fully in a cord with pr; i od


y practcl rAbsos t ho


rhpr~ovides that pithe

ony finanoia rea r hes n t
inning of that financial
a, the House of Assembbly
hereMsoltion may empower
uhorise the withdrawal of

s ro m the C ns l at d

purpose of meeting
xpnditure necessary to cary
pe atpublic services until te
rmthe beginning of that
anialo raar or the comms
operation of t


Othday of november 1972;

) asts tional set exie

potumy tol say to at t e
o semmfor the wrk don o
enew procedures and
odfctosto format of the
tmtes.
M~ay I also take this
opportunity to publicly
ongratulate the frmer
nstr of Finance, the
onourable Minister of


Wht Mr%###


BUDGET

deficit. I shall therefore explain
further for the benefit of Hion.
Members. The money to meet

hase already owa eda ,erasis
nothing wrong in a government
borrowing money for such
purposes. It would have been
better if this money could have
been paid direct to a Capital
Fund and the balance on the
Consolidated Fund would then
have been shown at its true
figure: but owing to the way
the accounts had to be kept
because of the existence of the
statutory funds, this was
simply not possible.
Furthermore loans would have
been negotiated for an
appropriate term of years
rather than by borrowing on a
short term basis. Outstanding
sort-tSTS loanisoamountheto

are also medium term loani o

which mature before 1975.
Although, therefore ouraprubl c

considered modest, the amount
maturing in the next few
years in unduly high and will
put an unduly large burden on
the budget for the years
immediately ahead. The former
Minister of Finance was well
aware of this situation and of
the need to remedy it. He
therefore entered into
discussion with the
government's bankers last
summer with view to floating
a refinancing loan of some 530
million to deal with these short
and medium term liabilities
and I expect to seek the
approval of this House to such
a loan very shortly.
This, however, will not, of
itself, provide the means for
future capital financing and I
expect that from 1974
onwards, or even earlier, it will
be necessary to seek additional
loan funds for capital works,
particularly for such services as
water and sewage which are
essential infrastructure for a
service economy such as our
own. As an independent
country managing our own
fiscal and monetary affairs
through our own Central Bank
we shall have the opportunity
to develop our own local
capital market for long term
Government securities in the
same way was is now done by
the Monetary Authority with
Treasury Bills. Plans for this
are well advanced and in the
next few weeks I shall bring
before you a Bill for regulating
the dealing in local registered
stock as a first step in
implementing such plans.
In 1971, as I have started,
there was a deficit on the
recurrent account and although
there was no deficit on
recurrent account for 1972 it is
nevertheless clear that the
Government must increase its
b sially -and increase ithetm
provide the public services this
Nation needs as well as pay for
the capital development which
is essential. No Honourable
Member doubts that we are
living in an age of increasing
sophistication; the methods
and materials used by such
services as education and
health become increasingly
expensive. I do not think that
any Honourable Member

Go mrme denywhent povidng
these services for our people'
mo bl enea oruo idasthfarb a

pusibe to illnbe 11e bs
mea mdaynmf ethaes taie

he e ansonourahl ebr il no


constituents, it is inevitable
that additional revenue must


be asda to eBy athamwhWe
is called a "tax haven." That is

to sat we hve o otaxe m i

know, is deliberate policy of
long standing with a view to
enc uagn sthe estab ihmn
by non-resident capital. It is
gh o licy winh meas be at
dev il lo i o sr to r



carried on here and which has


any chag in is plc
obliged tol point to howhvere

audvnajges and,asn this lase, i
means that our indirect
taxation system is what is
called "regressive": that is, the
taxation burden is not
apportioned according to the
ability to pay. In particular
the richer classes of Bahamians
the business and professional


THE I

also establish a C'apital F~und.
Trhe C'apital Fund will obtain
its resources from such loans as
P rliament gma ap rovea u b

appropriations from the
Consolidated F~und. The effect
of' these measures will be that
all revenues will be paid to the
Consolidated Fund in the first
instance. Out of the
Consolidated Fund will be paid
the recurrent costs of the
administration and the balance
will be available for
development works or for
reserves. It will be a simple
matter to see just what is
available and it will then be for
decision whether this is to be
used as a direct contribution to
the Capital Account or as a
means of servicing new
borrwinexplained all this at

r te length b c us it as
have to present to you today.

te st i atres whch I le lof
on the Table today, Hon.
Members will observe that the
docu ment contains no
reference to the funded
revenues and also that the
substantial charges for
contributions to funds no
longer appear. The true surplus
on the budget now shows in
the summary where also is
shown the appropriation for
capital. I say "true surplus"
because under the old system
anjl surplus shown in the
estimates was artificial
reduced by the amount of the
contribution to the various
special funds. There was in fact
a double appropriation because
the amounts appropriated as
contributions to funds were
again appropriated in the
capital estimates. These
changes in the form of the
Estimates are made in
anticipation of the various
legislation changes to which I
have already referred and they
do not affect the
Appropriation Bills which the
House wil be asked to approve.
I hope Hon. Members will be
patient with me in what I
realise has been a rather
tedious discourse on the
technicalities of government
accounting but it has been
necessary to belabour these
points because they provide
the key to understanding of
the present financial position
of the government and to
future planning,
DEFICIT
Now it is true that a
slackening of the economy in
1971 resulted in a deficit on
the 1971 recurrent account
and there was a shortfall of
about $7 million on recurrent
account for that year, but in
19'2 there was no "real"
shortfall on the recurrent
account whatsoever. The 7.5

13tm tes ofoEnpen itur oe
Revenue is due to over use of
recurrent funds for capital
works. If the government had
not been fettered by the
colonial system of funded
revenues already referred to it
would have been possible
largely to avoid this situation
by the management of the
public debt
As there has been
considerable and uninformed

dl a herei on te subj ct of a e
public debt, I would like to
makeha diners on here o cle r

up ih cofso hch ha

iTreasu ryd n Bhis an eis aout
50%l of sthe annualy revenge. I
am asured bye indendnt o h

tn nrasr n il ad is rstat t


i o xesie ided, h t
for an economy such as ours it


Ihul oe tica ft mo ear
policies of the government so
require. Secondly. I state most
empha s- ono raatblit is at n

Government to borrow money

povided dt s is d ne wi hi


iae e ore icdea t

ve a control rdr policy of


inth mntr yem shn b
development of our own

exapte m boa uto dnvelo
Now I know that I have
referred to an over use of
recur re nt funds for
development works and that
this may be an over-
simplification for you cannot
pay for capital works with a


H


SPEEC

men as well as those in top
emplo yment enj oy ,
fortuitously, a tax advantage
frrotTr their less fortunate
undoubtedly the case and as
we are endeavouring to forge a
new partnership in our Nation,
I think it is not unreasonable,
under the circumstances, to ask
the business community for sts
co-operation. The overall
requirements of our taxation
policy mean that a large part of
any additional taxation must
be in the form of increases in
import duties whereas in those
countries which rely mainly on
taxes on income the increased
cost of government services
would be met mainly by
increasing taxes on income and
profits. Therefore, in view of
the taxton aadva nas en wh


j on hspoit I hn e th
night to ask that as far as
por db them burdedutf sa
absorbed by business profits
and not passed on, plus the
usual additional percentage, to
the consumer. In this
connection I would add that I
have asked the Prices Control
Commission to be particularly
vigilant in reporting to me any
i Irou avs Hent np mba s
that I shall not hesitate to
invoke my powers under the
law to impose statudo y
control oth prices should
c tcde thepic necessary to
ORDERS
You will no doubt have
noticed that I have earlier
today laid on the Table of this
honourablebrHouue tw oo er
earlier today. The first Order
imposing controls on the prices
of certain breadbasket items
namely butter, cheese, cooking
oil, tinned corned beef, eggs'
evaporated milk, flour, grits,
hambur ger, margarine'
mayonnaise, onions, potatoes'
rice, singar and tomato paste.
This Order will be reviewed
from time to time mn the light
of experience and it might
become necessary to extend
this list of items for the same
reason. The second Order
imposed controls on the prices
of motor cars so that part of
the incemase Customs duties
aodneemet iqpo tr will be
Swish to turn to to th
etiates oof recurrent
expenditure for the year is just
over $104%4 million. On the
capital side the expenditure is
estimated at nearly $130
million of which about $4%
million will be paid for out of
the loans approved by the
American Export-Import Bank,
leaving $9 million to be found
out of general revenues. The
total amount therefore needed

the recurrent and capital
expenditure estimates is $113%/
million. The revenues
estimated to be forthcoming
from existing taxation is
approximately $100'h million
so I shall be seeking the
approval of this Honourable
House for new taxes
amounting to S13'h million so
that the toati revenues would
then be SI14 million thus
le vng a surplus of some $3/4

I now come to the
proposed changes ina'axation.



ad beer. Themese ire aseare
ries timat yed to d yis i

prbe oda i nran tel


3 mllo and 5 .5 mlon
respectively in the present

Ier. I urese inexcaise dute

are also increases in the duty
on boats and on certain
consumer durable goods which
$1 million. The total yield
fom a~d ti nal iprt dut es
w th t de b b ic n e a


rte oe tan f7 hatio
changeths I propon ser inreaspes
mfgos hc uty ne bra f
buasinies s licnce fee. a
Emerogency Tax is at preseth
charged yone impots atthe rate

7hne .t pro oso ate tih rat*

12%and this is expctso tof

poduc SS. million in the rt


1973


FULL


TEXT


OFO


umWE




__ L __ II ___~ :=, ,,


-


T


Pi m gtn new patterned glass

AdA Fa n C Un n in co r


RE -OPENING SATURDAY

UNDERR NYEW MANAGEM~ENT)












NOW NASSAU'S MOST DISTINGUISHED LATE: NIGHT

RENDEZVOUS -9:00RCM. 'TIL.....

SELECTED MENU FOR LATE NIGHT DINING
+ COMPLETE LINE OF SELECTED WINES AND LIQUOR
MUSIC FOR DANCING AND LISTENING TO


Alk~ THE PAUL HANNA TRIO


I "Y OPEN TO THE PUBLIC


_ -P -L -i1173


9


ath C~vr m illito anm Thep c
aw~l' tourismm is reflectedinte
ounth allocate to besete b
t Mnistry ofTumof alorst o
$8 milon. $8 million. hasbeen

allocated to thepoce

department to upgrade and
plapintarin a proper police force
Over the last two years
financial systems around the
world have been rocked b
catastrophic developments in
international monetary
l~rngements. During this time
ap have witnessed what is
referred to as the end of the
"dollar standard", and we
good by as the Sterling Area
umbrella was unexpectedly
dissolved about us. A remedy
for the crumbling international
financially system has painfully
lddtefinancial wizardry
!of the free world
SOn 15th August, 1971 the
United States sus ended
:convertibility of its currenc
;nto gold and thus removed th
aest prpfrom u der the aI i
internal onal financial syse aeig
;This virtually ended an era Tr
Financial arrangements dating
back to the mid-1930's
The end of the dollar standard I
'long threatened had come. In
.taking this initiative the United
'States was responding to severe
pressures on its balance of
:payments and a consequent
~weakness of its currency in the
major financial centres
Along with the rest of the
world, our own moneta y
~sstem had become unhin e
~fom the international arena as
welosa orrntermd la efer nce.
aprrity is stated in terms of go d
vas by imp ication linked to
the dollar since the value of
Biold is given in United States
Dollars. In making our
;decisions we took account of
'our external economic and
financial relationships and how
best the interest of Bahamians
could be served. Our decision
Ias to retain parity with the
U.S. dollar as other major
t-urrencies, including sterling'
floated.
SLater that year, on I 8th
iDecember, an agreement on
alignment of the world's
currencies was reached at the
Simithsonian Institute in
tashington. It was clearly no
secret that this agreement was
fno panacea. At best the
:solution was temporary. The
~United States dollar was
;devalued by 7.89%/, the pound
.sterling remained unchanged'
;and the German mark and


has the best government that it
hats ever had in all its history;
the Bahamasr can be the most
beaust' country of all the
earth ...at unless her citizens
ame prepared to shoulder their
responsibilities and play their
part, we shall not be the proud
people we ought or hope to be.
Selfishness aind greed are the
enemies of progress and there
are a few who are selfish and
greedy who would take as
much as they can out of the
country and her people and
give very little or nothing in
return. There are the odd ones,
too, who would commit one of
the greatest national sins by
deserting and defanking their
own land.
Fortunately, however, the
vast majority of Bahamians -
(;overnment and Opposition
and their respective supporters
alike have felt the sweet
winds of freedom that are
blowing with a pleasant
gentleness across their new
nation-to-be and have accepted
the challenge of independence
and have geared themselves for
the inevitable push forward.
Mr. Speaker, 1973 will
indeed be a major landmark in
our Country's history. 1973
will see the end of one era and
the beginning of a new one,
with God's help, further peace
and progress, and the journey
of a people from darkness into
the light.
1973 will be the year when
the strains of the true National
Anthem will be proclaimed
throughout th lad ac d dm n

sing of the greatness of their
own country and sing the
hopes of greatness and progress
for her told in other national
songs from the hearts and
minds of citizens of Bahamas.
1973 shall be remembered as
the year when, for the first
time, Bahamas own flag will fly
and fly as proudly as any fla
will fly.
1973 will be the year when
the first instance of the 10th
day of July will find a quket
happy tear in every trure
Bahamian eye.
in the same spirit this
Government has accepted the
challenge of Nationhood and is
committed to the raising of the
standard of life for all our
people.
We have tried and are trying
through our fiscal and other
policies to achieve lasting social
and economic benefits for all
who live within these
boundaries. We shall not
attempt to lead the Bahamas
through a policy of isolation,
but we shall continue to be
part of the family of world
nations and offer to the world
whatever we are capable of
offering.
During the election
Campaign of 1972 we made a
pledge that our aim is for the
Bahalmian to get into the
economic mainstream of his
country; to reduce the distance
between the haves and the have
nots and to eradicate the
barrier between the educated
and the uneducated. This is
still our pledge and what I said
in 1972 is true now as it is
today: that our ambition is to
wipe every tear from every eye
and that so long as there are
tears and suffering, so long our
work will not be done. We
must continue to labour and,
with G~od's help, we will make


of the exchequer and about
their being the only ones in the
country with brains may not
have counted for much here at
home but they did count for a
great deal abroad. It appears
that abroad the personal
rantings and the groundless
allegations were accepted as
near gospel and not seriously
questioned until September 20,
1972. Then, people who had
been led to confidently believe
that what did in fact happen
on September 19 could not
have happened, began to
question what they had heard
andi believed and to seek logical
factual answers. In London,
Washington and New York; in
Chicago. Detroit and Los
Angeles, the questions asked
were always the same, almost
.ss if they had been copied
f'romt one master tape
recording. Since September 19,
Ministers of the Government
have taken pains to meet
opinion leaders abroad in
government, business and the
media and much, though not
all, of the damage deliberately
and callously inflicted for
mainly party political reasons
has largely been undone. As a
result and particularly after the
recent visit of the Prime
Minister to Washington and
New York, the G~overnment
has been greatly encouraged by
the renewed expressions of
confidence in the Bahamas.
TOURISM
The prospects for Tourism
in the Bahamnas remain bright.
7`a ya Is9 ? retgistereda sgi-
over 1971 but the first
quarter of 1973 is expected to
fall below the same period last
year partly because of the
unprecedented warm winter in
the North and partly because
of the desire of many people to
be in the Bahamas at or near
the time of Independence. Our
country continues to be the
most favourite island vacation
destination in the hemisphere
and it appears that no other
resort area can boast of having
so high a level of recurrent
business from so high at level of
very important people in
politics in business and in the
arts. Recent changes in the
valuation of the Bahamian
dollar will havest rich dividends
in the form of an increasing
number of visitors from both
North America and Europe. We
may expect over 1.6 million
tourists in 1973.
Our second industry, finance
and banking, has shown signs
of further growth. An
impressive number of new'
large and important
international banks have been
licensed this year to do
business in our country and
another list is currently being
processed. Discussions with a
wide cross section of the local
and international financial
community have been held
here at home and abroad and
many have indicated their
willingness to assist the
economic development of our
Nation .
As it does have a bearing on
our economic prospects, I
might also mention in this brief
review that as July approaches
there appears to be no
insurmountable problem that
will bre ach or seriously
illsffect our country's good
relations with our traditional
friends, the United Kingdom,
the United States, Canada,
Jamaica and the other


Nuow Pilkington are updating their clear
patterned glass range with some exciting
contemporary designs: Patchwork, and Orbit
Swth moeto follow
-wEve m ere important-mnany patterns will
now also be available in a range of tinted
gasses. Aka ngttheem are O iroin ambe ,r ci

and amber. Others, are Rattan and Autumn (all
colours) and Deep Flemish (5mm, amber
only). The design offering the widest choice
is Cotswold, now in all colours in both 3 and


5mm thicknesses. Pilkington patterned
clear or tinted, are practical for use
or out. They are non-inflammable, fa
and scratch-resistant unlike some sub!
So they are ideal for use with conceale
ing, as well as in window and door
and partitions.


A handsome new folder can be ge
your glass merchant or Nassau Glass Co
Ltd., Mackey Street, Nassau. Phone: 2-1


OF THE
judiciously located transmitted
steady to be fed with program
the from Nassau. The coverar
lahamas scheme comprises of thr
,ration transmitters to be located
formal Nassau, Freeport, Grar
e Hills Bahama and George Tow
plex on Exuma.
their gas It is the Corporation
red and intention to introduce F
,ned by Stereo in New Providence ear
evidence this year.
~e more The Corporation's priori
secure at this time is the tot
establishment of Radio to t1
owth of entire Commonwealth of tl
ork has Bahamas.
len the During 1972 the Baham
The 33 Telecommunicatioi
em has Corporation continued
,rk is in comprehensive developme
ng an programme throughout ti
between Bahama I stands .
on and concentration of tl
n in the Corporation 's e ffor
s sold in culminated in the success
million inauguration of tl
rease of Bahamas/United Stat
submarine cable allow
in the increased circuit capacity at
)ahamas thus a capacity to handle t
,n has future overseas traffic nee
extend between the Bahamas and t
;. A new world. This item which
mini is jointly owned by BaTelCo al
,the American Telegraph at
already Telephone represents
dor and investment of some $8
eating in million.
irth Cat in New Providencet
:future. Corporation continued
will expand its underground a
over overhead cable network
areas in enabling an additional 8~
,ut this telephone lines to

lIantcia se vce hd no pr siuslywhe
ation to available. In Granif Bahama t
t io nal Corporation ree en t
areas. inaugurated a $2 milli
joint Technical Centre at Eight M
g with Rock thereby introduce
d, the telephone facilities to t
Light surrounding area.
o make Dur in g 9 73 tl
in the Corporation plans to contain
whole its development programs
are in with particular emphasis on t
venture impro vement
private communications with t
Central Family Islands.
Recently BaTel(
ist in g purchased a submarine cal
~ahamas, from the United Sta
nportant Government. This cable whi
n uniting links Eleuthera, San Slavad
of the and Mayaguana shall
initiated activated to provide advar
provide communication facilities to t
of the area. In New Providen
telephone cables will
deration installed in many areas a
radio planning is in progress for 1
Fiber of rehabilitation of aged cables
many areas.
The Corporation is a
eSplanning the installation of
automated telex switch inN
Providence which will connl
all subscribers into
international network.
BaTelCo's gross revenues
1971 were $10,933,479 a
the unaudited revenue figu
for 1972 were $12,359,11
This increase was broul
about by increases in Overs
revenues, although at cheal
rates, due to the introduction
of Direct Distance Dialing.
During the year ended 3
December, 1972,
Corpoation invet
approximately $8 million
providing new services
upgrading telephone serv
throughout the Bahama Islal
and it is anticipated that
further $6 million will be sp
in 1973.
Mr. Speaker, I should n
like to turn to certain spec
areas of economic activities:
The execution of
SAgreement for t
construction and operation
ta oil transhiannent terminal
perhaps the most signifies
development for 1972 in t
sector of the economy. Ap
from the direct revern


S benefits to the country wkl
would accrue from
operation of the terminal,
represents a basis for
attraction of several otl
directly related industl
activities. Much time was spe
during 1972 exploring
possibility and attracting to 1
country some of thl
industries and it is anticipal
that positive results from th
efforts will be seen dur
1973.
A very limited sample
glasses, retail establishments reven
indoors that businesses experience
Ide-free mixed fortunes during 1972
stitutes. few merchants indicated t!
~d light- while their turnover figu
panels exceeded those of 1971,
vohnne of tr ding ea sshgl

Others reported substan
ot from increases both in volume ane
,mpany value, while others still sta
8165. that improved business c
1971 was very slight. From
ape:=ns generally speaking, trac
during the Christmas holi
peo dwas rehdtv ty tri r

NCI Bahama Port Authority sta


~bo ~~bUttP


: n~r~c~av. Altarctt 29 1973


I


BUDGET
Irs that 1972 saw a general
es Improvement in business in the
ge Freeport Area as well as
ee definite signs of renewed
at interest in industrial
nd developments. Wholesale and
n, retail traders reported
increased activity over 1971
I's and the major export
M manufacturers reported
ly continued success.
MANUFACTURING:
ty Output of refined petroleum
rta products by Bahamas Oil
he Ref ining Company was
he estimated at 82 million barrels
for 1972, an increase of S
as million barrels (6.5%0) over
ns 1971. Almost all of the
its products are exported and the
nt Company estimates that export
he values for the year totalled
A $250 million. Construction
he work on the expansion of the
~ts refinery continued during the
'ul year providing 540 jobs and
he the completion of this phase
es will raise the investment in the
ng facility to 5170 million.
nd Year-end employment figures
he at BORCO and its associated
ds companies reached 500-not
he including the construction
is workers -- 60%/ of whom are
nd Bahamians. There is the
nd lilelihood that the present
an expansion, when completed
1.5 in October of 1973, will create
additional jobs. Meanwhile,
he engineering work is proceeding
to for the addition of a
nd desulphurisation unit to the
ks expanded re fmery, an
41 investment estimated at 550
be million, scheduled to come "on
:re stream" by tah end of I ent

he Company produced 948 lonE
ly tons of cement in 1972.
on Exports amounted to 887,000
ile long tons, valued at $16
ng million, while sales on the local
he market reached a level of
41,500 long tons (996,000
he bags), a market value of $1.5
ue million. Local sales for the year
me averaged 4.5% of total volume-
:he This Company, too, are
of currently expanding their plant
:he to add 17% to its production
capability. The increase will
Co bring the plant's installed
ble capacity to 160,000 long tons
tes and it was undertaken
ich primarily to meet the growing
lor demand for cement in the
be Florida market. Enployment
nce figures at the plant now
the average 300 persons.
rce Bacardi and Company
be achieved a 46.4% increase over
nd 1971 in their 1972 sales
the volume, and the output of 2.3
in million imperial gallons of rum
was 45%b greater than that for
lso the prior year. Exports
an represented 98% of total sales.
ew The Company is looking
ect towards Britain entry into the
the European Economic
Community which, under
for certain circumstances, could
Ind result in an increase in exports
res to that region on the order of
01. 30%/.
ght Light manufacturing
eas Reports from manufacturers
per registered under the Industries
ion Encouragement Act, 1970,
indicate that a reasonable level
1st of production has been
the achieved and that prospects for
:ed the future could be bright.
in Some reports, however,
and indicate instances of a
~ice resistance to locally
nds manu factured goods
a demonstrated by a significant
ent number of retail outlets. It is
felt that if this problem could
low he overcome the overall
ific benief its to the country from
these industries would be


SPEEC

greatly enhanced. Already
some of the items produced
with the benefits of the Ac~t
have entered into the country's
export trade and further
developments in this direction
are projected for the
immnedia te future. Local
persons have recently shown
considerable interest in the
Industries Encouragement Act
and during the coming year the
range of goods produced
thereunder will be appreciably
expanded.
MINING:
Aragonite The completion
of the refitting of the
Aragonite Islander and of the
receiving facilities at Tamlpa,
Florida enabled the
commencement of
large-tonnage shipmecnts from
Ocean Cay. Thus, Ocean
Trading Corporation were able
to increase substantially their
exports of aragonite to 1.1
million tons during 1972. A
second receiving terminal was
opened at Perth Amboy, New
Jersey in October and although
the full effects of this were not
felt throughout the year, it is
anticipated that the export
potential of the industry will
be realized to a greater extent
in 1973. The operation now
employs a total of thirty-two
(32) persons, of whom
twenty-nine (29) are
Bahamians. The present
investment in the facilities
amounts to $15 million to
which must be added another
$15 million for the acquisition
ad refitting of the Aragonite
Salt The combined output
of salt at the Inagua and Long
Island plants exceeded one (1)
million tons in 1972 and
exports of the mineral were
very close to that figure. More
than three hundred (300) jobs
have been created in this
industry which has shown
steady growth over the years.
Capital investment during the
year was well over $900,000.
This, in the face of the
"cost-price" squeeze that the
industry faces, indicates the
confidence of the management
in the industry of overcoming
the present problems.
Favourable weather conditions
facilitated good harvests and
the ample year-end stockpiles
should lead to another record
year in 1973.
Petroleum Exploration -- An
extensive survey programme,
begun in 1971, was completed
early in 1972. This work
conducted over the Southwest
Great Bahama Bank and
reports from this, and other
surveys conducted elsewhere,
are in the process of being
analysed and evaluated. There
are signs which lead to the
conclusion that the geology of
the Bahamas makes the area a
very difficult one in which to
search for hydrocarbons and
that future wells may have to
be drilled much deeper than
the 17,800 feet penetrated in
1971. Steps have been taken
with a view to creating
conditions which would make
local oil prospecting more
attractive to the Companies
and more beneficial to the
country.
I am pleased to inform Hon.
Members that a new feeling of
confidence new prevades the
a ir: T he Opposition
propaganda about lurking
dictatorship in the country, the
dismemberment of the Nation
by secession, the bankruptcy


1973


FULL 1

Japanese yen revalued. T'he
margin within which currencies
are legally permitted to
fluctuate was widened from 2% ~
to44V2%.
Again we reviewed our own
currency to see what effect
these changes would have on
our exchange rate. We decided
that a differential of about 8%
between the Bahamian dollar
and the U.S. dollar would be
harmful, and so we devalued
our currency by 5.04%c. This
was in our best interest at that
time. By 23rd June, 1972 the
United Kingdom, responding
to internal pressures on its
economy and external
pressures on its currency,
redefined the Sterling Area to
include only the United
Kingdom, the Channel Islands,
the Isle of Man, the Republic
of Ireland and Gibraltar. In
addition, the United Kingdom
had also suspended the fixed
parity of the pound and
allowed it to float.
During this period
considerable pressure was put
on our own balance of
payments as lingering currency
fears and uncertainty about the
implications of these new
developments spread. It was
against this background that
we instituted certain exchange
control measures aimed at
restoring equilibrium in our
payments position.
We reaffirmed our gold
parity which was at the time
0.053828 grams of fine gold to
the dollar. We therefore

aainfloat inais tedollar asw
locked on to the fixed-parity
U.S. dollar at the rate
B$0.97=USSI
The situation was less
eventful during the remaining
part of the year, yet further
change was imminent as Britain
poised for entry into the
Common Market, as the
mealisation that the U.S. dollar
was not yet safe persisted, and
as the currency speculators
endured
The Bahamas Monetary
Authority, established in 1968
as an embryonic central bank,
will co mpl ete t he
metamorphisis sometime later
in the year when legislation
will be introduced to establish
the Cehtral Bank of the
Bahamas. Application is in the
process of being made to join
the International Monetary
Fund and the World Bank and
I have no reason to believe that
our application will meet with


:EXT
any difficulty.
The year 1972 saw
improvement in
performance of the B
Electricity Corpo
culminating in the
opening of the Blue
power and water coml
January 5, 1973. A fur
turbine has been orde~
when this is commission
mid 1973 the New Pro
capacity of BEC will b
than adequate to
supplies to the Island.
Parallel with the grc
generating capacity we
continued to strength
distribution system. 1
KV transmission system
been expanded and wo
progress on install
underground feeder i
Blue Hill power stati
Leisure Time substation
Cable Beach area. Unitl
1972 were nearly 275
kilowatt hours, an incl
13% over 1971.
The major change
policy of the B
Electricity Corporatio
been the decision to
into the Family Islands
power station in Bi
nearly completed,
Corporation is
operating in San Salvac
is expected to be oper
North Andros and No
Island in the immediate
The Corporation
eventually take
responsibility for other
the Family Islands b
nmogra e must nedre
capacity of the Corporr
tak e on addi
responsibility in rural at
G ov ernment 's
electricity undertakin
End O'Bay Limitec
Eleuthera Power and
Company continues tl
successful progress
electrification of the
Island. Negotiations
hand for similar joint
arrangements with
enterprise in North and
Abaco.
The Broadca
Corporation of the B
being aware of the im
part radio must play ir
all the Islands (
Commonwelilth
engineering plans to
for network coverage
Bahama Islands.
Accordingly, consi
had to be given to
network of a num


achwork White d-livj f';


BAY & DEVEAUX ST.


Phone, 5-3268
FOR RESERVATIONS
ASK FOR MR. TERRY BAIN


PILKINGTON


lead the workldin glassmaking





I


_ _~__~


__


CLSI=D AV. RN RE==T-= I


SECTION


REAL ESTAITE FOR RIENT FOR SAILE CARS FOR SALE MARINE SUPPLIES IIELP MNTW'ED TRADE SERVICES IIELP WANTED


C9056
1 CONVERTIBLE couch
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 2501b. trunk food freezer.
Call 77947.
C9277
MAHOGANY CHINA cabinet;
two end tables; child's
battery-operated power-drive
car. Phone 3-2732. Two Aqua
recliners Phone 3-1251

C9247
ELECTRIC AL APPLI AN-
CES Dishwasher, Sunbeam
Mixer, etc. and household
furnishings bunks and chest of
drawers etc. Phone 53477 after
3:30 p.m.

C9285
J. C. M. CASH Register
automatic/manual, like new.
$300. Also ceiling display
spotlights. Phone 2-1303-4
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m
C9294
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
before 20th April, 1973
SRefri erator 16 cu. ft
I Dining Room Suite
3 Bedroom Suites (one French
Provincial) d

F nd to Tleph ne 4 243
after 6 p.m
C9339
BARGAINS BARGAINS
'1) 13 ft. Tu pen's Torino
fib~er-alass boat with trailer and
25 H.P. Johnson sea-horse
enie 1,100.00
(n)gin66 Volkswagen 1500
perfect condition with trailer
hitch. $1.200.00
(3) 19 In. Motorola TV b/w
new $200.00
(4) Lawnmower 3 hp B/S
$nin 65.00
e in Pye Radio/Hi Fi
combination with records
$80.00.
(6) 4 draw Chest of Drawers.
You select finish $25.00
(7) Boy's "Chopper" bicycle
$45.00
(8) 51/2 H.P. Johnson Sea-Horse
engine $275.00
Extra bonus: purchase items
(1) and (2) for $2,000.00.
Call 3-2054 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.

C9325
RECORD PLAYER
Motorola solid state stereo
with AM, FM radio in 5ft.
console. Beautiful piece of
furniture. Excellent sound.
$250. Phone 32019.
C9327
HOME STEREO turntable
speakers, tuner amp.
Telef unken tape recorder Reg.
8 Movie Projector. Call 22836.

C9328
TYPEWRITER, record player,
sewing machine, heater, fan,
toaster. All perfect condition.
Write P. O. Box N8009,
Nassau.

CARS FOR SALE

C:9319


b~ b



TODAY'S$ ~IC i
1969 COUGAR $800.00.
Also available
1967 FORD CORTINA

d99 A LER REBEL$00



Ex deontto r $190 0
1972 DODEV IMAVEGR ..
good condition, i $2350
(1971 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN
eoo newton $i 82000
1971 SINGER VONGUE
ra.dmo, atomatic $19500
1 972 VAUXH ALLVIVAE S/W
good buViio $1950

1972 HV VAUXAL FIEDNZA
like new $220 0
1969 CHNE VY CAARO
reaniatC~eond iod $1850

recently paite $500
1973 DLVODG PLAA

oraned,atotcradio $12400

1969 CHEVY IMALB 120


1967 PLYMOUTH FURY I

FINANCING AVAILABLE
Come in and see us
Oakes Field near
Po ice Bracks

C9320
1968 COUGAR V/8,
airconditioned, Vinyl top -
excellent shape only $1250.
Day phone 35673 Nights
31909.

C9326
M.G.B. G. T. 1970. Good
condition. $1500 0.N.O. Call
22836.


C8939
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C18938
ONE EXTRA large wc:
bedroom two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large twving
and dining all baseball
furnished Victorializabeth
Apartments on d zaet
Avenue re twee Sirileyh ie

Yudry prkin T.V. antenna'
larcn it oned. Phone 5463J'
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C8959
IN TOWN furnished rooms
Efficiency a part ment, also
town prop erty for sale. Phone
2-2555-
C8942
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
a apartment, attractively
furnished. $250 per month.
Call Chester Thompson Real
Estate 2-4777-8.
C9269
I -- BEDROOM apartment -
Highland Park. $200 --water
and gas included. Phone
35729.
C9267
ATTRACTIVELY
FURNJISHED Iarge 1 bedroom
apartment out east with private
entrance and secluded patio.
Beach rights. Bachelor or
couple only. No pets. $275 per
month. Call CHESTER
THOMPSON REAL ESTATE
2-4777 or 4-2035 after hours.

C9258
YOUR WEE~t.. RENT TOO
MUCH?
$20 per week can get four
room house with good yard
space and toilet facilities in
Bain Town. Contact Mr.
Adderley at 36693 evenings
and weekends.

C9207
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom in Bamboo Town.
Phone 36959.

C9185
BASICALLY FURNISHED
bedroom, 1 bath, kitchen
living and dining area.
Montrose Avenue. Telephone
2-1722-5 and 2-3865.

C9030
1-BEDROOM APARTMENT*
furnished, on Eastern Road*
opposite Blackbeard's Tower.
Beautiful beach and gardens.
Occupancy May 1st through
December 31st. Married couple
only, wife unemployed. Low
rent for consideration of
supervision of premises. Phone
4-1476.
C9288
AoTTRASCp r Rid rnisohedd
Sans Souci 3 bedrooms (2
airconditioned) 2 baths, study
maid's room, wall to wa l
carpet throughout, all
cedar-lined closets. Available
for long lease May 15th. Phone
3-6262-3.

C9176
AVAILABLE April 1st
airconditioned, fully furnished
1 bed room apartment,
including T.V. and telephone -
Brooklyn Avenue. Phone
3-1329.
C9184




aicndiond 2-3865.


C9021 HOf t300
LARGE SO for rent 30
squnat vlfeetan6the Te races
retevleh Han iude a
store and w~all as.1731ss or d
on rance. Cl 7 o
3-1583.


FCelEbNtCY andartme~n
further particulars call 5-8679
ask for Mr. Pritchard.

C93'41
2 BEDROOM 1 bath home,
separate dining room, fully
furnished airconditioned, five
minutes walk to Montagu
Beach in quiet area. Phone
28504 day 51647 night.


C9206
HOUSE PLANS
Drawn to your specifications
Low rates. Free Estimates.
Call
Evangelos Zervos
Telephone 22633
Between 2p.m. -5:30 p.m.

C8941
PATIO AWN WINGS AND
CARPOR TS AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George &( Co. Ltd.
For free estimates and
prompt service call 2-8421.

C8947



Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
ZON IAHCT LYMlAN~ PI NDE R
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795. 2-3796.
2-3797, 2-3798
Ariroort 77434

C9282
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street, next to
Frank's Place.


C7269
JANITOR/PORTER: To wash
and scrub floors, clean rest
rooms, etc., also to assist in
loading and unloading of
trucks.
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC:
To service and maintain
delivery trucks, Bakery
equipment, etc.. At least three
years experience and good
references required.
IApply: GRAND BAHAMA
BAKERY LTD., Queen's
Highway, Freeport, G.B., P. O.
Box F-797.
C7262
ORIVE INN Body & Paint
needs (2) two MECHANICS
with experience. Must have
own tools, must be able to
work on all types of motor
vehicles. Call Freeport
3752-2002 for interview.
C7270
FREEPORT CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY LTD. requires one
mechanic foreman with five
years experience in repairing
diesel and gasoline engines,
cars, dump trucks and
ready-mix trucks.
Also needed is one mechanic
helper with previous service
station experience.
Interested persons should
contact Mr. George Stockdale
at P. O. Box F-2410, Freeport,
Grand Bahama. Phone
352-7091.
C7287
MANAGER OPERATIONS
CO-ORDINATION
REQUIRED BY GRAND
BAHAMA PE TROL EUM
COMPANY, A PARTNER OF
BAHAMAS OIL REFINING
COMPANY. ENGINEERING
DEGREE AND AT LEAST
FIVE YEARS EXPERIENCE
IN REFINERY PROCESS,
PROJECT T, AN D/O R
PLANNING FUNCTIONS
REQUIRED. MUST HAVE
PRE VIOUS EXPERIENCE
WITH CRUDE OfL
EVALUATIONS, WORKING
KNOWLEDGE OF FUEL OIL
QUA LITY, BLENDING
CHARACTERISTICS AND
UTILITY FU EL
REQUIREMENTS. ABILITY
TO ASSIST IN PREPARA-
TION OF CRUDE SUPPLY
AND PRODUCT
CONTRACTS. CO-ORDIN~-
ATE DEVELOPMENT AND
EXECUTION OF SUPPLY
AND MANUFACTURING
OPERATIONS PLAN,
PERFORM RECONCILIA-
TION STUDI ES OF
COMPANY'S OPERATIONS,
ASSIST IN THE
DE V LOPMENT OF
COMPANY PROJECTS. A
MECHANICAL ENGINEER-
ING OR CHEMICAL'
ENGIN EE RING DEGR EE
PREFERRED.
PLEASE REPLY STATING
DEP NCSOR O:PREVOU
F-2515, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.

casso
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicant should
.pl i rtin to the Staff
P raner P eng Waterhouse &
Co. P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport. Bahamas.

C7282
MAN WITH MINIMUM 10 to


suu rsin and ca bl e f

maintenance of pools which is
most essential.
Call Freeport 352-5007 for
interview.


C9336
20' BERTRAM 1969, fully
equipped, 160 Mercruiser.
$4,300 or nearest offer. Tel.
3-1020 after 6 p.m.



C9332 YTS
WILL MR S. MRMLYOF
MONCUR FORMER PLEASE

COITTACT ESO STANDARD
OI A. LIMITED AT
TELLE HONE NUMBER
28401 AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE.

C9324
NOTICE is hereby given that
FRED VALCIN of Port de
Paix, Haiti is applying to the
Governor for naturalisation
and that any persori who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts to the Deputy Governor,
Bahamas.


POSITIION WANTED
C8500
IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
Adv. C8500, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau.


WITED
C9300
(USED PAPER BACKS wanted
por Aquinas College booksale.
Please deliver donations to
school o fice.

WORK( WAWTED

c9322
LADY WITH over 20 years
experience would I~ke to be
employed as maid. Telephone
5-4420.

IIELP MN#ITED
C9293rk5
LAUNDRY maidC ta toMrs 5
days per week botc Phone
Marie Duncom e, Phn
3-4104.
C9250
BARCLAVS BAN K
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
P. O. Box F2404, Freepor
requresexpeiened female
c erk/ pls xprinchank clerk
with G.C.E. standard or
equivalent. Bahamian only
please call 352-8391.
C9212
Esso Standard Oil S. A.
Limited has a vacancy for a
Graduate Engineer to work in
the Bahamas. Applicants must
have a University Degree in

Mngin er ni prefer bly wit a
least three years practical

Bahamian citing's. maified.,
Energetic, keen men willing to
make a career with Esso should
apply in writing stating their
qualifications to the Manager*
P. O. Box N-3237, Nassau, N.
P., Bahamas. As there may be
Bahamians now working
overseas who would be
interested in returning home to
fill such a position Esso would
appreciate this being brought
`? their attention.

C9340
WANTED: Gardener wages
$40 per week. Phone Herman
Neely 3-2685.



I wldeN f htel cd k ing


2-8395
C9295
URGENTLY WANTED
Marine Biologist Aquarist as
Curator. Apply: Manager,
Seafloor Aquarium 3-6896
C9335
BEAUTICIAN TO OPERATE


Qa iict onsC Rquired. AT
least two years experience -
Capable of running beauty
salon (one Beautician

expp I nceod n botphrmeferabd
women hair cutting and
styling, but not essential for
men.


Kindly send resume to:-
"Beautician" P. O. Box
N-3229, Nassau, Bahamas. or
to phone 2-2415, 2-8730 Ext.


C90FFICE MANAGER
TECHNICAL
TeADaMbNISTRAoT Rn s
immediately open to
sohamians who ar.
experienced with Architectural
Planning and Engineering terms
and have high secretarial skills
in Shorthand. Typing,
Bookkeeping to Trial Balance
and Lease Preparation. The
applicant must also have
experience in the Property

ba mnes osile f thnedr wo d
of a small office and the
supervision of Field Staff and
would be required to recruit
and train young Bahamians.
For appointment call W. T.
LOWES & ASSOC IATES
2-174/2.


C9241
2 LARGE APARTMENTS lots
good area off West Bay Street-
Price $8,000.00 each.
Lots on Malcolm Road. Price
$4,300.00.
A good buy in Foxdale
Subdivision. Price 52,900.00.
Choice lots Seven Hills Estate.
Priced from $4,600.00.
Canal lot Seabreeze Estate.
Price $59,000.00
Choice lots South Beach
Estate. Price $4.400.00
For in format on and
appointments and to list your
property for quick sale. Call
Bill's Real Estate 23921.

C9249
DAVSON REAL ESTATE
AGENCY PRESENTS:
Smashing bargains of 3 and 4
bedroom houses in Nassau's
prestigious areas, split level
houses etc. $40,000 and up.
LOVE BEACH 4 bedrooms
with swimming pool. 3 and 4
bedrooms in the following: .
Westward Villas, Skyline
Heights, Prospect Ridge, Grove
(West Bay), Highland Park,
Village Road, Dick's Point
Brace Ridge, Glengariff
Gardens, Sans Souci, Grey
Stone, Winton, Nassau East,
Sea Breeze, imperial Park, and
Gleniston Gardens
MORTGAGE AVAILABLE
Also acreage, beach lots,
commercial and residential lots
throughout Nassau and Family
Islands.
Contact: DaVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY LTD.
Phones 21178, 35408 P. O.
Box N4648, Nassau.
C9303
FOR SALE
3 bedroom 2 bath house
Seabreeze Estates $27,500.
Mortgage available. Contact
International Management &
Investment Services at 2-2504.

C9291
LOT 50 x 100 Golden Gates
section one. $4,200 or nearest
offer. Phone 24436 or 34879.

C9264
UNUSUAL HOUSE on
waterfront Eastern Road, 40ft.
Lounge with fireplace and
minstrels gallery, dining room,
Bahama room leading to
terrace patios overlooking the
sea, 3 bedrooms including
master suite, two bathrooms,
cathedral ceiling throughout,
tastefully furnished, 2 car
garage and two cabanas. Price
$100,000. Telephone 4-1242.

C9278
OWNER LEAVING
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house
completely furnished, recently
painted Johnson Terrace.
Price: $25,000. Telephone
42462 after six

C34 FOR SALE
SEMI HILLTOP OUT EAST
2 miles from town. Has 3
bedrooms 2V2Lbaths ur ishedE
plu DN L CM ET
UNIT. 1 bedroom, 1 bath*,
kitchenette, last but not least,
ONE ACRE of grounds with
some vews of sea. Come see by

aDpIL mDnAMIANOS THE
rACT NtaREAL OR we sell
ra sae. Pone 22033.
22305, 22307 evenings 41197.

933 FOR SALE
HOUSE HaV LLAGE ROAD
AE. Haehuse -



Phdrones 2203 22305, 22307 sh


t wo-bt rsdencsrcu e sain
Viserplta Mainag Livin ar
rooaytm, epaaedii


Phneares offer. 235 3
2.nig Buyofth wekin

attractive three-bedroom*
two-bath residence in
Vsagu o areia Lvn

shorth walkti rort Qeen's
College and, Mrionthagu


4 50 O ow pricesood
includes br nnd-new
washing machine, new
Ireze ad. nw s ive.as
bargain at that price
Terms available.

3. Outstanding buy in
delightful hilltop
residence near Montagu.
Three bedrooms, two
baths, living room, dining
room, patio, kitchen,
laundry, twotar garage
etc. Favourable terms
available to suitable
prospect t. $60,000
furnished.


FOR SALE
C7263 ,
NEW 14 FT. "HOBIE CAT'
SAIL BOAT. FASTEST BOAT
OF ITS'SIZE.FR EOT

373-5382.


HELP WANTED
C7286
REFINERY ENGINEER
Must have minimum of six
years recent experience as
Project Engineer in an
operating refinery of chemical
plant; work involves the
development of a variety of
cap ita1, expense a nd
maintenance projects for
proposed and existing facilities,
providing technical advice to
operating departments and
trouble-shooting plant design




F-2435,e OFreeprt, Bahamas. O


C7285
ONE MAN TO RUN
CHICKEN FARM, GROWING'
BIRDS AND TAKING CARE
OF LA YING HEN S,
BAHAMIAN PREFERRED.
C ON TACT: BAHAMAS
POULTRY CO., LTD., PHONE
352-7897.


FOR REIT
C7249
3 BEDROOM, 2 Bath Duplex
$200.00, CATV included.
CATBedroom lu er, garbage
Freeport 352-2126.


HELP WANTED
C7283
ONE CHIEF SECURITY
OFFICER: With 10 years
Police experience and
supervisory capacity.
ONE LIFE GUARD: With
three to four years experience
in Pool and Beaches
ONE RESERVATI ON
SUPERVISOR: With four to
five years experience and to be
solely responsible for all
reservations and convention
groups.





WETRAI EE: (1)Copuer


Draughtsman and Print Room
Operator. Good mathematical
background necoawar"
(2) Chainmen with at iaast two
years experience.
Apply to: R. Warren &
Associates Ltd., P. O. Box
F-836, Freeport.


Trade-ins welcomed
Located Oakes Field

Telephone 34636-7-8


OPPORTUNITIES
C9217
PLANNING TO BUY
A LOT?
Act now! Hilltop lots'
corner lots
Easy terms
Call Frank Carey
at 27667
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
Bay & Deveaux Streets.
CALL TODAY



C9091
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 30th day of
March 1973 at 12 noon the
following property:.
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot qf land situate in the
Western District of the
island of New Providence
having the number Eight (8)
in Biock Twelve (12) in a
plan of the Subdivision
called and known as
whGc satd pian ishiitmed
in the Registered Office of

'c"mpannotimE'it"E i
City of Nassau in the said.
Island of New Providence
the said piece parcel or lot
of land being bounded on
the NORTH by land now or
formerly the property of
Tropical Land Company
Limited and running thereon
Fifty (50) feet on the EAST
by Lot number Seven (7) in
the said Block and running
thereon Two hundred and
Four faet and Sixty-thre
hundredths (204.63) of a
foot on the SOUTH by a
Road Reservation Thirty
(30) feet wide and running



1969ao 2 Athoy Alberht e2
Archer Ton F9)ina ne si

Recode iunde Volume 1447
pages 264 f to 271
poricae ad tod the rihtfr the
urc onr Tor any u nonth

price attetime of saleand
balancea on comluetion.

AThE s31s sbet DAY O Mrch rv

Publicse orAuctieoneer,



OTes ion dvifntye Dowdeswel
pi at te bakctim wit white
o stmande bnclack and ie
ose.: Rew ard offered. hoe


MARINE SUPPLINES


C9256
14 O OT GLSTO viint Dwee
xceelet conditions. Idnea fo
fieshi and slak ing. $50 igt
phone. 4-42. ayd 2-826. Phn


I- ,





I _


I


I


1


I


I


_ I


Thursday, IMarch 29, 1973.


C9329
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1970 FORD ESCORT,
Blue Std. 4 Dr. $995
1972 VENTURA,
A/C, Bucket Seats. Gold $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Radio Auto. Blue $1600
1969 VICTOR 2000 S/W
Auto. $850
1972 VIVA S/W,
Automatic White $2600
19710 PONTIAC PARISIENNE
4 Dr Sedan
Blue/White $2000
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA*
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio, Orange $3500
1969 FORD TURINO $1200
1969 FIAT 1 24 S/W.
Std. 4 Dr. $550
1971 FORD CAPRI AUTO.
Blue $1850
1 968 DODGE DART,
Green $850
1968 FORD THUNDERBIRD,
Blue A/C $2800
1971 FORD MAVERICK


C9296
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/
Administrative Assistant.
Applicant must have good
secretarial skills and at least 3
years experience in senior
.secretarial position. Financial
and legal background helpful*
as well as working knowledge
of French and German.
Interested persons should write
the Personnel Officer at P. O.
Box N-3909, Nassau.

DE ATH

C9323


Auto. Red
1969 VIVA
4 Dr. Auto-Green
1969 CHEVELLE
2 Dr. Vinyl
Auto. Gold
1971 RAMBLER
Auto. Blue
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Green
1968 FORD ESCORT
Blue
1970 VIVA
2 Dr. Auto. Black


$1950

$800


$1400

$2100

$2000

$695

$500


MR. KERMIT ROLLE of
Augusta Street South formerly
of Steventon Exuma, died at
the Princess Margaret Hospital
on March 23rd 1973.
He is survived by his wife
Mary, 2 sons Kenneth and
Roger, 4 daughters, Elaine,
Marsha, Malanie and Tammy, 3
sisters Mrs. Doris Richardson
of Freeport, Mrs. Creola
Feaguson of Miami, and Mrs.
Evelyn Roberts of Nassau and
a host of relatives.

TRADE SERVICES
C8105
TRY US FOR SAFE SURE
CLEANING! ABCO'S NEW
'SUPER STEAM' -CARPETS
UPHOLSTERY -TEL'
51071-2-3-4 *


USE THE TRIBUNE
CLASSIFIED ADS.


OeE~fficiency apartment, also
one furnished room suitable
f~orotwo reserved ladies or men.


FOR SALE

C9283
ALL ELECTRIC T.V., Record
player, Blender, Fan, Power
Saw, Power Drill, Kettle,
Percolator. Also toys, books
etc. STOKES, Woodland Road,
Skyline Heights 5 p.m
onwards.

SC9C OUR TV
1 Refrigerator
1 Stove
1 Washing Machine
Other Household Items.
Corner of Village and Waterloo
Roads. Phone 24119 from 9
2:"': 5 p rn:


25ttPBERTRAM only fourteen
months old just like new*
Call days 3-5673 -- after 6 p.m.
4-3037.

'28944
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


C9284
1970 FIAT 124, orange
$1,200.
MINI MORRIS 1970 $600.
Deposit secures, available end
April. Phone 2-1303-4 from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m.


Nassau and

Bbhtn II ad

Leading Newspaper

For Best Results Use

The Tribune Classifieds.
TO PLACE YOUR ADS.
CALL 2-1986


H. G. CHRISTIE
REAL ESTATE
309 Bay Street
P. O. Box N8164,
Nassau
Ta: -141, 2-104


Gibr Wrunmt


CLASSIFIED


~Yhnr~ .III~X;.Il II 1- '"'*'~smmu.b..~
' T 3 ~:~ L
..C :*. .tkv..hi.::
.
' :i
i ::
-:-9bp Qibund'" - :~---- ;..-::
:, ,. I
.;r ~

1 .:
:
~~ I.: :...
'' f
: ;::.: ..
..
,
i
,: ..
i, r ~: ii, j"(Hi '~~~ ~r:*; ~1
; I
I -" "
~;~:














_


~lto ~itbuno


REX MOR GAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


I


Thunchy, ~tch 29, '1979.


I K~~Ohas Feau,ree Sydiat. Inc1. 193 Wr~ld rihem
"I have to leave early. I've had as much of you em-
ployees as I can stand for one day.

Rurpert and the Mixed Magic-16


JUDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS

--1-~ FINE, BETSY! I I'D LIKE THAT! ~KATHERINE' SA HOW HAVE YOU NO WOMAN IN
BY THE WAY, THOUGHT WE'D STOP HE WAS SORT OF WONDERFUL MANAGED TO HER RIGHT
SAM... HOW IS BY TO SEE HIM A SECOND FATHER WOMAN Y WE WERE STAY SINGLE, MIND WOULD
JUDGE PARKER ? BEFORE GOING TO i TO ME! WRAT S ALL HAPPY FOR THE SAM ? HAVE ME!
YOUR HOTEL! HIS WIFE LIKE ? JUDGE AFTER ALL
sxer oneHIS YEARS AS A
IF -____ CP 9 WIDOWER! ;,, ,


as Usonano sAnosu













Tesbt youra pawn ending skHii
on thili actual play posiion
White continued 1 K9.K
K3: 2 K-BS3, K--K1 and the
playPer s ook hands on a draw.
'Ittey agreed that if White's
long sees to the queen's flank*
. then Blads ann win by queeninlg
n icing's side pawn; wittle Whit
has no other way to make pm-


Par sknes: 10 seconds, ohe-s

n~ye: 8 mltes, average; 15
SOLUTION NO 9620 -

Chess Solution
White misead a winning chance

K--J K-K2' 3 K--KU, K--B3,
K1-K2; S K xP followed by 7
KxP and wins, since White will
soon force his king' a awn
through to queen.


"Oops, sorry. Didn't snean













LNOF YI Y'~DS PUIEll


VESTERD1.4Y'S SOLUTIONS O
CLASSIFIED tagr e fita II ib I ga (,*InlC
rlns renk riot riskroom 12 resnr
ADV TS. "',","ni' ."anic i~nst rktr rokn I
*~(~r rtair srin stoon12 so tasn
lnr lt r trts trtson tr o.
IT. Depresson. (3)

21. Shipheard Stema. (4)
82. Challeases. (8))
JI. Ballors. (4)
1. Lthe some of the old tram.
2. Hrry.
3. Faond a cet ntral*

& Makes a nruhocew sead wen
f~rarltar int watenr (5)t

Aeree an larb atI
1..10812 Rass ortle (aas).(B
7. Messealer. (7) 18. Cleaal a9
D epe ~~l ln (4)a tet m easure (1 T 1
ts,~~~~~~~~0 rptia tods (4 (8 esed* *I*


SA PA RTMENT 3- G By Ales .Kofa Ic


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


:ili
~ I'M GOIIJG
70 GET c(EF~
LITTLE SILVECZ BELL
~7 fO rirJKLE ~



:j p
4~c


SCARROLL RIGHTER'S



from tim CareeW Rightr Instituste
GENERAL TENDENCIES: A wonderful day
and evening for you to get together with others,
not only to carry through with the resolutions and promises
made yesterday, but also to plan for the future concerning
career and government.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You can accomplish much
today of a personal or social nature through the good auspices
of friends, so seek them out early. Make as many new contacts
as possible and let them fit into your scheme of things.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Bringing your finest abilities
to the attention of bigwigs san get you excellent results now.
Yosr pg r eor can ieim rov by using new gadgets,
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) This is a good time to get the
data you need to pioneer in some new direction, as you have
long wanted to do. Get together with experts in such. Contact
out-of-towners and state your aims.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Confer with
government people, debtors and creditors, and arrange all your
affairs more wisely. You can make a big hit with attachment
because of your fine ideas now; p.m, can be ideal
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) If you listen to views of
associates, you can now reach a fine understanding, but be
more broad-minded. Reconcile with one who opposes you
since this person is more friendly now
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Got the new gadgets that will
help make your work easier and more smooth running Fnd
the new items of clothing that will improve your wardrobe.
Make an excellent impression on others.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) If you adopt a new attitude
now you can relate to others much better, whether in business
or personal life. Some scientific study in p.m would be fine.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) A new approach to
problems at home can solve them ideally, restoring harmony
Put that project to work in the business world that can brmg
you more success and happiness, too Avoid one who is
unfriendly.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You have some
fascinating new ideas to discuss with good friends and can get
the right results, cooperation. Keep appointments with bigwigs
or experts you need, also. Do not be late for such
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You want to add to
present income and can do so now provided you do not scatter
your forces and thus achieve very little. A clever financial
expert can give fine advice. Listen to it carefully.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Look to good friends as
well as own ability for assistance to gain your finest personal
aims. Show you will do any work required in order to progress
in your career. Get at important correspondence in p.m.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You want to reorganize your
operations so that greater success can be yours, but first
discuss this with a good and trusted adviser. Dress charmingly
and go out socially in p.m. Speak quietly.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .he or she will be
one of those charming young people whose mind literally
roams the universe, so be sure to give the finest education you
can to bring out the wonderful talents and qualities, then your
offspring can make the most of such during the lifetime
Permit to have many playmates so the social side of life can be
successful in the future, also. Any of the humanitarian
professions would be excellent here, especially.

Wmaman Chess


Who upset my room like
thi ? The Conjurer kneels
krde (kpr and fees b m
it was you, mischievous
daughter I" he exclaims, as
Tigerfify bows her head. You
Yo eave lsin xro anmd t i
ALL R)IGHTS


happen, yes ? Rupert is still
rather stunned, and whne ie
S rc rea s ze tthe tishg -rtde
" is this the wand of mixed
magic ?" he cries. I came
seeking a wonder to surpass
usto hers-and surely this
RESERVEo


Wasra imb astd ~r~




8 tr l

Wed Glat Seh
+6 O .T as
am 80 01 Pa 4 4



the Riat 0 mak a ~


to rs 6
Nlu 60 868


Ams as 08 ru


CROSSWORD
PU Z ZLE
AMIOS .26.About
28. Similar
1. Rises 29. Championship
6. Small frog 30. Sooemn
1 2. LBJ 31. Chocolate
S$3. Laundry tr88
equipment 32. Dutfac6
114. Unaccented 33. Pomrp0R
46. Of birds 35. WWII pistol
1 .7. Hitchcock 37. Texas shrine
;,thriller 39. Kind ofpin SQ
9. gS~icilian 42. White lead
voicano 44. Radio and T
:0. Thor's fathe 45. Listtend
22. Garden plant '46. Preface
214. One of the DOWN
Dwarfs
25. Jeweled crown 1. VPmonogrram


H o. ......
II A r.."""Yet
or mIore carn

":"e I rkt Ise
wo(1rd eahol
hcrt Iun

r.fy seq u asa
Icart two csset-lette~r wrcrd in the
IInt No plurals: nlo fearel n wordl,

to wonr.s uerety Go: 18 words.
exclcunt solo~ln tomorrow


2. Asian holiday
3. Strange
4. Masrsenet
opera
5. Piece
6. Japnese unit
of distace


7. Macaw
8. 9-day
devotions
9. Solidarity
10. Gaunt
11. Wild water
buffalo
15. Government


31roC~mi /3.


'llES ONE-0F-A-laND,ALL RISMCT. AND 0sO ~IlS DOS.'

Brother Juniper


SCI GCF
COT T


4/3


V)
W




IMIMMF""1 ~II I-~- ;= T--=-~ ~ ------- ~--- ;~-_i--~- -r _--;--~-- -_ -----~; _- --;


BERMUDA SQUASH TEAM ARRIVES Ewan McLay, captain of the Bermuda
squash team, exchanges team lists and order of play with Keith Parker (left), president of
the Nassau Squash Club after the visiting team arrived in Nassalu for the quadrangular
tournament starting tonight at the Blue HIII Squash courts.


GOVE NGMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL
COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM & BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


-LI~.~__.~... .- _r t'!


12


Thursday, March 29, 1973.


pract slng wit her honge oer
one of the jumps alt the
Camperdown Ranch in
preparation for 5u nday's Show.


Ill ll
The following Is the lineup for
tomorrow's races at Hobby Horse

FIRST RACE 4V2 Furlon a
It HALG DAILY DOUBL III
2. Dedi I la
3. Gone Away I20
4. Secret Agent 113
5. Echo riI
6. Restless Wind all
7. Bundio I15
8. Winged Duchess 113
9. Lollibpo I 20
Sub. Mama Brite I111
SECOND RACE 6 Furlongs
SECOND HALF DAILY DOUBLE


5. Dark Star 113

8. Golden Gunnea I1
9. Mrs. Conch Salad 116
SUB.



THMRD Ctpe -6Frog 163

3. Rega Raner illFring

4. Miss Cuda I I3
5. Lady Chester's Ill
6. Shaheen Ill
7. Queen of Hearts I 16
8. Lunarl II11
9. AUtehdrtepar 4V uln 113
L ag's mg 1
2.M >in Lmaee 11
3. Fair Lady I 12
4. Jewel's Reward 112
5. Scare Ulm 116
6. Lady Rolle I12
7. Drink en D~raw I 14
9. Mm Accunt 1
SUB.
Cigarillo I 14
Tame~tte Dial I14
Mrs. PD) I14
I:IEH RAC 9 Furiangs
CH o TY DA CUP RACI II
2.L egr I'Iueta 11
4. Deb ilt r Ill
5. Sophia 111
6. Hawley's Diana III
7. Wicked G;al Ill
8. D'Ayssnator I I3
9. Mighty Joe Youns 117
SIXTH RACE 4%~ Furlongsu
2I.lmbs Queen 11
3. Flus ing llS
4. Aquarius 11s
EET sRAC 6urons 112


3. Lady Marine 112
4. Miss GTO I12
5. Respect Toy 112
6. Tam Twist 115
EIGHT mGE 6 Fudlong~s ts
2.Fe oo Annie Ill
4. Runaway Child I15
5. Windy Eve 112
6. Desert Fox a as
7. Real News a gy
8. More Sugar I 12
MCC DRAW TEST


wars abandoned Thursday one hour
before the close after a mob
invaded the ground.
innig palth 3 un fotthe eos n
but
inninOR Aa6. kistan als inh nr
445nfor 6 declared.


GATES~ l.EN130 sn.m


POST TIME 1.15p.m.


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
"BAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT CHAMP Elisha Obed can be
assured that tonight's ten rounder w~ill definitely not be a
runover." commented his opponent, Al Cook of New Jersey.
"Obed is going to have his hands full," said "Cook, who will be
Obed's second opponent for the year. "He will be fighting a
fighter tonight ," Cook said.
A former D~elaware Vallez Golden (;love C'hamnpion, (cook peuainfrtnntshu.
skipped c~hances of going toi the 10i o elsbagn r
Olympics and entered the mkn n rdcin ny
professional field in 1',70) ;nti hth tns om iti i
over the three Years spani hre udfae eod i
has chalked up 23 wins out of appea;rances 1
25 appearances. Making his rneMa1 icr ad
b ox ing de bu t as a ()bd is ipo ig
middleweigt s e
pro. It s not that he does nct nldeegt ae ad
fi e a naeur bb ir one (geit n a i 1I dt t
more recognition," he said bcuehr asu e
Golubothe rining 1 ttirc \her (rih Naspurrn h
UnObed used tornn bef off-alaed
he 1ppoantn hm r e trit whn' he thl~rew h h s punche bu


a b ts nutyo onei n hin ,ni diievn oadi r w
vitime and he he ~in trubl Galahad. t
Cook as doppe oneto icid uently, Obed hf-as ad an
Tsommy orino. oi Jacksoville offr rm aadin
andDenisRigs idlewigt wltriw e'smight cmpr Cleayde
cu hamp of Florida bto het has Gry Witha thi se in mind Obed

Ri ggsing th eirfrt ma tch"(oo d A~ltihoug Fleischer cosierhs

really"Ithl ppe ne idoo idg, micd leevn yOd dfrwi hea


wa belterw igh t dc hiv sonfgtr on teBec
efcIne suoctin bouts this
owm ever, becantrus e o i vnig w e h s o trs

Ob Id tt hebehe" ;atnl3 l' deaardaks


9)


~~ ~


Elizabeth Sports Centre. Schlitz
loss in seven games this season,
Behind the pitching of
Henry Williams. who recorded
13 strike outs and two walks,
Schlit/ on a wild pitch scored
one in the top of the third and
paced smoothly on until the
Blenders evened up in the
bottom of the seventh when
they also got their only hit of
the game.
After disposing of the
Beermen's first six batters in
two innings, pitcher Joe
P'ennerman gave up his first
:lkm nhen rhe allow n first
Fountain stole second and

piah. Od anoothher wilodn aich
went home for Schlitz' first

richlitz then settled down and
Pate I h 00 defensive ball

birst exit tic pt h cre t

even tip th glgeamein e of .

the eighth. an error on the
Blenders' second baseman put
Williamns on first. Right fielder
A~nthony Smith followed on a
bunt and centre fielder L~loyd
Bovieg lkoud the bases after he

Third baseman G;od.

fl into ri it fi ld daTv sa it e
lead run as Williamis went
htome. Wit ithe ase ieinstiinct
Lcentre and Smith scored

I enad Two cos13e ermro ss
Bowleg andl Adler Minus
reaching home giving Schlittz


v~Ict .) N1- SI TS, unable
to get past first baseman Roy
Rodgers and second baseman
Adlai Moss fell victims to the
three hit shutout pitching of
Andre Rodgers losing 7-0 to
Big Q Marketeers during the
first game at the Queen
Illizabeth Sports C'entre.
"That the guys put out
everything they got is all I
ask commented player/
manager Ed Moxey. "If


handed the Blendlers their fifth

we put out everything we got, I
don't see any team that can
beat us."
Overcoming a shaky first
inmings start, third baseman
Ben Rolle and Randy Rodgers
on rbi's gave Big Q a 3-0 lead.
Big Q picked up three more in
the fifth and one in the
seventh, all on rbi's to take
first place in the Bahamnas
Baseball Association series.
Roy Rodgers one of the best
first basemen around chalked
upsi hl p se af ivhich Adlai
Consisting basically of the
onxee p aershaasath iyeaa
in re impro ement in the team

undD te pi ching is better.tok
advantage of a shaky Big Q
(9-1) in the first gm tilized
three pitchers e Rone Hall,
Fra kie Sweet n, takn Davy


STANDINGS


NEW JERSEY'S AL COOK (left) in fine shape and with high hopes of winning
tonight's bout with welterweight champ Elisha Obed talks with Tribune reporter.
Gladstone Thurston. "Obed is not going to have a runover tonight," he said. They meet
8.45 at the Nassau Stadium.



Big g0St IIoFs Sho Sil0 W h llli 118 f


entries to th~e SNUMB Rnu l
IEastern IEquestrian Society's
11< rse Show Aprril ishmakes it

held in the Bahamas. To0 date
there are 226 entries, in 14
events. Late entries could raise


rid show, which opens at
10 amni includes jumpiting and

chidrn teengr vi d adl
"I believe this is the biggest
show ever to be staged in the
Bahamas in terms of number of

ray wirrr uuch ll eo e

rgresdnS ietthe Eastern
"There's no doubt there will
be some excellent competition
with that number of entries "
hie figures. "F~reeport always
sends a strong team, and we
have some very experienced
young riders here too. I think

sp ccula jeumpisnonand som
good displays of all-round
horsemnanship e n ow te is

acrth sg ft heernal weeks
Ribbons and trophies will be
presented after each event and
overall trophies will be
awarded for the hunter
championship for h res


jumper,
William Whalen of the
American Horse Show
Association, an experienced
recorded judge for hunter.
jumper and hunter seat
equitation events is chief judge
for the Camperdown Horse
Show. He is the head riding
instructor at the Golden Hlills
Academy, a highly regarded
private school in Ocala,
Florida.


te number of entries even
Nearly 90 riders have
rgis ered e any ndM the rs

have been registered, including
four from Freeport. Freeport
will also be represented by 16


7 I
6 I
S4
2 3
Z &
o s


Hig V Mj..net

schlit/ Beerns
Jet Set
I icners Iahamas
Heastie Lumber


\'ar 69 and ginger
Sis a very adult drin;.


After all, isn't that what
drinking w-hisky) is for ?

Vf A'I' Of)


Wahr iFrthitttt


'N0 F000 Verfr IOr 0181




SSays Al C00k allout


SoCun... mus IEWRs, L-




Big II take lead



heating Del Jane

SCHLITZ BEER picked up four runs in the top of the eighth
innings to break a one all tie and defeat Bahamas Blenders 5-1 to
win their third game in seven played last night at the Queen


raise TEst



PORD (OPF SPsaIN
scored a close, though
well-deserved victory
Wednesday over the West
Indies in the Third Test here.
The match, which produced
tense, challenging cricket
throughout the five days, was a
personal triumph for Ian
Chappell, the Aussie skipper
who led his side splendidly,
played a fine second innings
and took a spectacular
one-hand catch to end the
game shortly after three
o'clock.
This morning, the West
Indies, 188 for 3, looked at
one time like achieving the
344-run target, but once Clive
Lloyd left and Alvin
Kallicharan was caught behind
off theufirst lull fro sWaske

swept to victory.

cha ate inmn th estolndiels

spihe Aussies leave tomorrow
eet Geougetown, whefe ure
match before engaging the
West Indies in the Fourth Test
starting April 6.

Chhpell ain dafe the matc

te lymisa aof Clive Lloyd
He said he felt his team was
ansih tof victory dw enl Max
Kall cha re{me wic ke
immediately after lunch. "We
still had some reservations
about Keith Boyce but I

lfo" "e hada bilan canc
of winning," Chappell said. It
wa a keenlhefought match,uhe

difference int the strength of'

Kallichaa np med a splen di
knock for his 91.
Australia Ist inningCs 332, 2nd
innings 281

Snd in nsn (< ern rinh gs2fo
). pMurray c Redpath b Walker I
A. Kallicharan c Walker Marsh b
Wallker 91
Kanhaib bS. Cha ell Keff

M. Foster c G;. C~happell b
O'Keeffe 34
O' efo~yce c 1. Chappell b
I. Ali b Walker 2
B. Willett b O'Keeffe: 0
L. GlIbbs not out 0
RE wes(b sent r )3, nb 7) 39
TOTAL 289


BIABY BOY TO



L I G H THl E AV Y WE IG; H T
champ Baby Boy Rolle after
months of discussion and
agreement on proper training,
has acquired Marty Goldstein
as manage rsthue dl gn l


heavyweight Johnny "Hud"
Hudgins on April 6 at the
Nassau Stadium.
Working out daily with the
full co-operation of boxers
John Williams, Cleveland
Williams, Sugar Ray, Sears and
Rennie Pinder who apply their
favourite styles against him,
Baby is said to be responding
well in order to present Hud
from making it four in a row
over Bahamian boxers.


iip "



'YO E LITLE GRL


CHARE Y






gRI go IC gg

ALL NET PROCEEDS TO

BENEFIT LOCAL CHARITIES


00 WDU
NEW YORK, MARCH 29 (AP) -
The new Mets' pitching staff
revolves around Tom Seaver and
one of the issues in their spring
training camp also resolves around
Tom Seaver.
The issue: Should Seaver pitch as
much as possible, despite the
unhappy feelings of others?
"I'm going to pitch whenever the
pitching coach and the manager put
my name in the lineup," says
Saver.
Seaver pitched six innings of
two-hit banl Wednesday as the Mets
beat the Cincinnati Reds 8-0, but
his brilliance didn't overshadow the
issue recalled and brought to the
surface by Jerry Koosman.
Koosman, the No. 4 starter on
the staff, had complained about
Sar trnt receiving preferential
"If it rains on a Monday and it
rains until Thursday ... then Tom is
going to pitch on Thursday," said
Mets'I manager Yogi Berra.
In the other exhibition games,
the Oarkland A's ripped the Chicago
C'ubs 13-3. the Chicago White Sox
slugged the Pittsburgh pirates 6-0;
the Boston Red Sox trimmed the
St. Louis Cardinals 3-0; the Los
Angeles IDodlgers topped the


R tlanad nrve d2 sthr Kan n :tra
8 2: the Milwilukee Brewers beat
thle San D~iego P'arades 9-4: the
H~ouston Astror whipped the
lDetroit Tigers 4-2: the San
F'rancisco, (;ants tripped the
Carlifornia Angels 3-2 in 11 innings
and the Baltimore Orioles defeated
diro Jo ls I lopd b tree-run
homecr for the Mets.
Vida Blue made his first start
since signingp his 1973 baseban
contlract bust Mondaly, but didn't
stick around long enough to get the
dec~ision as O)akland warlloped


innings to, give anI eas? decision to
reliever Rollie I'ingers.
blue. a stubborn holdout last
vea2 signed focr 510.000 under his
Wilbur Wood~t pitched seven
Whts S* Hini Rei hrrt k oke
in two run~s fo~r the winners.