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The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03303
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 22, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03303

Full Text
I I r I I I


ENJOY FREE CHiAivioAGN;E
ON ALL FLIGHTS fTO FI'EE.PU!T
*****TELEPHONE 77303/77778


WITHIN A WEEK'



NEW PROVIDENCE water
supplies will be back to normal
within "several days to a
week,"' Works Ministry
=dmaet ngrtayA. K.
Hei said that as with all
oilers. the dcEsalination plant,
which has been shut down
since February 26, for
contractuall maintenance,"
has to build up ste~am before it

"6wins t (1U1' prou

that Ihu' all' ho"r are

rodttui tin (,n water will begin
ifowever, constimerncs will no~t
notice any) difference in their
supp'lies until thle desalination
p'lanlt has p~rodluced enough
waiter to, replensih the various
hIgh -levelI st orage and
of timeic this "gradual" process
\\I t, 1k ul 0 1 en t the
In e~f'f'ctl the decsalin~ation
p'lanl will have to produce
water to, fill the' tanks at a rate
taisler ilhan thle waterl is leaving
the( t.Ink\ to, m1eet cotnsumerf


tol wcL. lr. Wrigeht ad.

re till ng argres is at th
slli 1 tocrvratnoe fthe waitte
notc~ut o~ff periods

Wea n the plant was shut

Miitry n I n d 2thte c
\vould be supply cuts between
2 p.mi. and 4 p.m. dauly.
()n March 9 the cut-off
period was changed to between
4 p.mi.ano 6 a~im.
While a retlrta to full
normality may take as long as a
week from today, the. hours of
pressure cuts and reductions
may be decreased if relatively
low consumer demand allows
the desarlination plant to build
uIP a head of pressure in the
storage tanks.
in a meeting with the press
on Marchi I2, Mr. Wrigat an
senior watric engineer Brian
I oreman warned that even
with desalinartion plant back to
f'ull production dover two
no soic n ga lons per day --total
water resources on New
Prtvidence are unable toomteet

dhenin placed the demand at
betlween 7.5 and 8 million
gallons a day, while supplies,
including the desalination
Plant, amocunt to only six

~The Ministry has urged
consumers to reduce wastage
of water by repairing leaks in
> pir ie ys esp Fn as possible
G;o ernmnt pipes, by re-fillin

infrequently as possible, and
by replacing ordinary toilets,
which use three to five gallons
of water a flush, with the
vacuum flushing system, which
uses only a few pints.


SORRY PAPA...
GEORGE IS EATING AT


OPEN every evenmng for
Dinner and Dancing 6 p.m. ti ....
RESERVATIONS 32077


VOL. LXX, No. 102


Thursday, March 22, 1973


Price: I 5 Cents


_C --- ~-- ~F~ --- ~- - -~ ~-~- ~ --I -~----~~~~ --~-~~ ~-~---~-~~~-~


WE ALWAYS TRAVEL FIRST CLASS

--ON EASTERN, OF COURSE!
WELL, WHEN YOU'RE MICKEY MOUSE you get top VIP treatment as this picture
by Rickey Wells can testify. Mickey, Minnie and the other members of the "Mickey
hous e vuma et"p rain toNi n syes erday as firtcas n g ges i n r astr Art l i
Fair March 24 and 25. Mickey hopes you'll be there.







A THREE-WEEK-OLD BABY. foundl dead with blood
"gushing fromi her nostrils and mouth" on the morning of
Christmas eve, 1969. died when her parents accidentally rolled on
II ~ her while the three slept in the same bed, a coroner's jury found


T`he Pnime Minister, speaking
to over 300 persons at the
monthly Chamber dinner
meeting in the Shecraton-British

brih ict li ot thpu! "go o
opportunity" within the gasp
of the Bahamas if G;ovemment
and industry can work
together*
He recognized that "you
may dismiss this as a lofty
ideal But ifwe d, we do so at

soasow pRa dr th pena e an

the waited ver the scll or in
the long run, this is the only
whay we shall blea eto ensu e

environmental whic smusitnes
and profitably, and which a
government needs to function
adequately and efficiently.
Detailing that ideal, Mr.
""din alc-
"Policy makers in the
C mmonwwealtth of the
d hamas, G eter mn private
in ustry or in Covernment, are
fcing the greatest and most
e ci ing c alnge n our

"Ou i the oprui t
develorsas sytem of euaion
gared to the needs of an
emerging people aln so hep in
shping t va ucs of an
eegOPnR .UNITY

dvr isf sth opporaurdtyoto
economic act vty and so
number oan yoever-increas n


women seeking their place in
their society.
"Ours is the opportunity,"
he continued, "to inject new
1 fe into our family islands and

movement to New Providence.
"Ours is the opportunity to
revitalise our agricultural and
fishing endeavours and so
increase our ability to feed
ourselves. Ours is the privilege
of discovehin in der n encea

holdne s of vis nh and a areful


re site ats an m ntesitms Mrta o
co-operation."
OThe Prime Minis cra id h

w9h7h manub thed s age a
partnership was forged
between industry and
Government out of the simple
relisation that in the very final
analysis the interests of both
are very much linked. And that
link is no more and indeed no
less than the gradual and
steady improvement in the
quality of life in the Bahamas.
"It is with this in miind that
my Government has geared
itself to embark on a course to
find a common ground on
which a co-operative
partnership with industry can
develop, the ultimate aimn of
which is steady improvement
in the quality of life for all
BaaC MMONSENSp
"We shall have to endeavour,

cara on er comp fbit and


with a mutual common sense
approach the problems with a
view to eliminating them. We
must reconcile the logical
requireges if eir du trns with

developing nation."
We must remove "the
remaining vestiges of social and
economic discrimiinationn in our
society," he added.
Mr. Pindling told the
Ch mber thiem ler that in

ind pender ce "we i reed have


climatur that is t enby oftha
world; our islands are filled

prente gforlacharem urc70
am hlar t munchnadon system
ranks among the best in the
hemisphere. The stability of
our political system and the
impartiality of our judicial
system are not to be surpassed
by any other country in the
world. Our population is of
managable proportions and all
of what we call problemsm' are
within the possibility of
solution."
InI addition, he said, as the
world monetary crisis nears
solution, and following the
February 15 decvaluation of the
Bahamnian dollar and tle
revaluation of European
currencies, "we are now in a
very comipetitive position on
two accounts-
CHr'AP~R
"On the one hand, tle
devaluation of the Unit~d
States dollar and the
revaluation of western
1:uropean currencies will make
i',ur o p ean va ca tion ns
appreciably miore expensive for
Americans and Bahamiln
vacations comparatively
cheaper. On the other hand,
the upward revaluation of
Eiuropean currencies will make
Bahamian vacations
appreciably less expensive for
Eurm ean travelle ste aso

county red "politically
mnotivated propaganda" which
he said has done much harm to
the country.
"Many of those whom the
big tallk made skeptical have
seen that talk evaporate into
thin air. They are now looking
andi examining for themselves.
~They are finding that some ,f
what they had been hearing
was tnru; that much of what
they ad hee hearingdwas purg ~
what was true had plausrble
explanations for their

flie added also that there hld
been much said and written
about people, business atd
Inoney leaving the Bahamias'
"but no details have ever bcn
given.
H~e re~vealed that in Janua~ry
aInd February of this ?ear
licences to operate in the
Bahamas were granted to four
banks whose parent companies
have total assets in excess of
$37 billiion,and applications an
being processed for licences
for other banks with parent
companies whose assets exceei
Sl billion.
He pointed also to the $10
mllionagr nit arro h gU.r n <

at Andros, and to the
multi-million-dlollar loan for
out island school construction.
"If there is any one else
considering leaving r
Pindlif lipd ias
hurr~y ntl Iid a

Those of us who are sta in !
have much to dlo.


1


yesterday.
f~he seven-mian iury, he~aded

r ture rn from threat willc4ses ill the
d a ol It e laren
C'olebrooke. Ma a tf!ng R re

Prncc:s M ~art lo sinal p

Arlilngton n(lolebroo~k, parents
c s le in n.
Mr and Mrs. Cotlebrooke ,
residents of F~ulford Ldne, told
Ihe court that they uent to
bed on De~cember 23 with their
infant daughter lying between
Ihcm. h ss, ...... nc s.ai.
Mr. C'olebrooke slept at the
front of the double bed and his
wife on the other side, Mrs.
C'olebrooke told the inquest
jury. "Around 2 a.mr. to 3
a.mi.," she said, "miy husband
woke me up and sent mec for
somethingg" She said shes hud
to leave the house foir It. When
shec returned their daughter was
still lying in bedf, b~ut her
hu band toldl her the hWhy was

."I screameicd." she~ sidic. "I
saww blood conning fromt her
no~se and mouth. She wais three
weeks oldl. She alppearedl to b-e
dea~d to mie "
Mr. C'olebrook atlso said he
saw "blood draining! from her
mouth" and tried to wiken
lier. 110 said he shook "her
twice, but she did not respo~nd.
Held her up ... she ;Ippeared
to be deadl."


his se dp,' hl eseklorw so li
quite close to me and my
wife." hie recalled.
After hearing the evidence
of the parents, Inspector Silas
Nixont told the court that he
did not intend to call further


evidenceil fromrl poliic` dtect~~i\es

11( Ir ~stitti~~ tt i~ rlll ~r

no( evidence ofr mayl ro'

(colchiritoke3 on te niert (


cild rlI e
hIvliden~ he yd,, sh wd
that the identh fi the ~iid
pr-oably occurred because ,t
thet p(oor circumllst)t'r wees f th
family at usel time:~ He noted
that Dr. Read, who perf'ormed f
the autopsy on December 24 at
10: 15 a.m. had said that, in her
opinion, death was due to
asphyxiation. She had said that
"overlaying" was a common
cause of infant deaths.
It was impossible for the
infant to commit suicide, he
said, but the jury were left to
decide whether, along withi anly
of the other causes, mlurder,
manslaughter, or accidecntal
death were to be considered
After returning their ver/lict
the jurors decided to donate
their jury fees to the Ranfurly
Homes for Children.
VISITOR INJURED
AN MEI cyclist, injured Wednesday
afternoon when the self-drive
scooter she was riding lost
control and crashed into a
sidewalk, has been hospitalised.
Sharon Crane, 19, a guest at
the Nassau Beach Hotel
sustained injuries at 1:30 p.n.
yesterday. Riding S.D. 303, the

sdwl k at raB yandinC arlott
Streets a Road T'raffic
Department spokesman said.
Hospital authorities Usted
Miss Crane's condition as
"satisfactory." She is being
treated for head injuries.


r


L. O. PINDLING
... "ours is the opportunity,,


P.M. THAKIS

%BRKES FOO E

WAGILE FREEZE

NOW THAT some order has
been restored in the
international monetary system
"it would be in order for
employers and workers to
resume the discussions they
might have been having with
respect to wages," even though
"it would still be very
necessary for us to watch our
prices carefully Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling said
last night
Speaking to the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce in the
Shera ton-B ritish Colon ial
Hotel, Mr. Pindling recalled
that when the international
monetary crisis began early this
year, resulting in the
devaluation of the Bahamian
dollar, Govern me nt asked
labour to refrain for a time
from de manding wage
increases, and industry was
asked to hold the line on
prices, to avoid pricing the
Bahamas out of the
international tourist market.

or er ham nh been rsor:= s
soon in the international
monetary system," Mr.
Pindling said. Because of that
restoration of order his
Government felt wage
discussions could now resume
"having due regard to the
overall economic restraints."
He thanked both employers
and workers for their
co-operation during the crisis.

HOUSE OF A



THE HOUSE of Assembly
ye ste rday adjourned to
Monday, March 26 without
dealing with any substantive
motions.
The only motions up for
Debate were for the
appointment of a select
committee and for the passing
of a bill to amend the Spirits
and Beer Manufacture Act.
Sinclair Outten (PLP-St.
Barnabas) withdrew his motion
for a select committee to
enquire into the licensing of
building contractors, with the
explanation that he had



COLOURFUL
HAITIAN

25% OFF

NASSAU ONLY


GEOFFREY PENNERMAN

*tl a hil8 118410


WASe UnitSII World


COBlege SCbol08ship
GEOFFREY PENNERMAN,
1 6, head boy of St. Anne's
High School, Fox Htill, has won
a scholarship to attend the
United World College of the
Atlantic's college, St. Donal s
in Wales in September,
Geoffrey, 16, is the son of
G. L. C. Pennerman.
Commissioner at Rock Sound,
Eleuthera. He was selected for
St. Donat's by the Scholarship
Selection Committee in
Nassau.
He will take ten 'O' level
subjects this year. He now has
11 B.J.C. subjects, whicht he
took in his third year. He also
has the Principle of Accounts
Elementary; a first class pass in
Intermediate book-keeping and
a first class pass in Advancet
book-keeping in Pitmnan

Boln deits Ho se bC pial e
Francis House, is a keen
sportsman, a leading actor in
school dramatic productions, a
member of the school choir, an
altar boy and captain of the
school's victorious quiz team.
He hopes to pursue a career
in medicine.
Four other Bahamnians
Stuart Munro, John Fowler,
Nichola Huyler and Lester
Albury are presently at the
college.

UNION SILENT

01 TEACHERS'


TEACHERS of the L. W.
Young Junior High School this
afternoon were meeting to air
"gr~ievances" of an undisclosed
nature to the executive Council
of the Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT)
BUT president C. N. Curling
told The Tribune just before
the meeting began at 1:45 p.m.
that the union would have no
statement on the matter at this
time, although a press
conference may be called at an

h metuing totkI stc i
Junior High in Marathon
E states. The same auditoriani
accommodates the L. W.
Young students. The buildings
for L. W. Young on a Bernard
Road site, originally scheduled
to open in Septemrber, have to
date reached only the
foundation level.


Of 8if 10gulatl0HS

THREE DIRECTORS OF FLAMINGO AIRLINES, including
House of Assembly M.P. Cadwell Armbris~ter, were charged in the
lower court this morning with breach of the Air Transport
Regulations.


Charged along with Mr
AIrmbrister of operating a
charter service to Abaco
without a licence were


ASSEMBLY



learned a bill covering the
subject was presently being
drafted.
Deputy Prime Minister
Arthur Hanna delayed moving
for the adoption of the
amending bill when the
Opposition FNM pointed out
they had re ceived their
agenda, with copies of the bill
attached, only on Tuesday and
had not had the chance to look
at it carefully.
Tlhe bill is believed to be
legislation connected with the
proposed establishment of a
brewery here by Gleneral
Bahamian Companies and the


Mn nday date i cedulec >
the amendment to the Spirit
and Beer Manufacture Act, aind
on amendmecnts to thle
Electricity Act andi the Out
Island E~lectricity Act.
Government may also table
the 1973 estimates of revenue
and ex enditure and the 1973
Appropriations Act.


Flamingo Airlines treasurer
Leroy Hanna and secretary
Sidney Colebrooke.
Mr. Armbrister, the House
of Ass mly repres uttive it
president of Flamingo Airlines.
guTt "three mnen pleaded "not
Armbrister, Colebrooke and
Hanna are to appear in court
on May 31, the date set for
hearings the case.
2 OTHERS
Also expected to appear
with them on that date are two
other directors of the
company. It is understood that
the summons ordering the two
men to appear in court has not
been served as yet.
The mlen are accused of
using their aircraft to transport
passengers between New
Providence and Marsh Harbour,
Ahaco, on Friday, February 2.
"without a licence or a

urne yt re Ar Tranbeing
The men have retained Mr.
Perry Christie as counsel.
Appearing for the Crown is
counsel Neville Smnith of the
Attorney G;eneral's office.
They were charged be~fore
Ma g!i s t r a te E:m mna n ncl
Osadebay *


DOMEMNSR returning froH E EurOopee touCHa Onaugred th AeM
Out island Airways BAC-l il evening service between Nassau and
Miami. The new jet now mraks four daily flights each way
between Nassau and Miami and two flights a day each way
between Nassau and Freeport. Seen boarding the inaugural flight
are: from left, defensive end Vern Don Herder, his wife Diane,
offensive tackle Norm Evans and his wife Bobble, Connie Foley
and her husband, corner linebacker Tim Foley, O.I.A. stewardess
Dorothea Russell, Brian Mackenzie, O.I.A. District Staes Manager
in Miami, Rev. Tommy Watson, organizer of the European tour,
Nancy Kolen and her husband, linebacker Mike Kolen.


~fto


~ribunp


Registerd wIth Postmaster of Bahamas for postas* concessons withln the Bahames. Nas sau and Bah ama I sl hands Lead ing News paper


PINDLING TELLS BAHAMAS CHAMBER

OF COMMERCE OF HIS 'IDEAL'


'Honest cooperative spirit






1100e 10 face cha en e






If i e enence s yP



PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING has set his sights in 1973 on the forging of "a new and vigorous
partnership" between Government and industry, to face the challenges and grasp the opportunities of today, he
told the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce last night.


R..


1

II




I


WASHINGTON (AP) L.
Patrick Gray III said Wednesday he
gav. FB, i.v...wgati ......s ..
the Watergate bugging case directly
to White House counsel John W.
Dean only a week after receiving
lesal advice that information on
FBI criminal investigations should
be routed through the attorney
anneral.
Under questioning by Sen.
Gay saidM D~ennrerqueste dtre
material and picked it up personally
in Gray's office last July 28. That
was seven days after the FBI
i n lrati n or the itte Hou
should go first to Atty. Gest
Kichard Kleindlenst ats head of the;
Justice Dte artmenthnt udcay
committee, which is considering hit;
nomination to be permanent FBI:
director, that he saw no conflict la
his own mind in taking the action:

mea Isai he bleed the tyope od
through the Attorney General was
the FBl's socralled LHM
(Letterhead Memorandum), which
is at summary written by the FBl.
The type of material given to Dean
in his onfice were the investigative
reports, or FD302s, consisting
mosedyef to nt approach was
taken because there were different
kinds of material involved," said
Gray.
Later, Kennedy told newsmen he
couldn't see the difference between
the types of information referred to
by Gray and said "they both
seemed to me to be sensitive."
Kennedy said e believed that

cray's office without notifying the
Attorney General or anyone else in
the FBI violated procedures
outline cu then 1B Bltga tcono e
director.
FBI general counsel Dwight J.
Dalbey, in answer to a request for
an o umon told Grayohnst Ivo2 1
initiative supply the White House
with information on criminal
investigations in progress.
In the memo, introduced
Wednesday, Dalbey said, however,
"since the President is the top boss
of the executive branch he can
obtain" FBI information at White
House initiative.
He added, however, FBI
information for the White House
should first go to the Attorney
General since he heads the justice
department. j c
"The Attorney G;eneral serves
the White House and can either
release to that office such
information as he see fit or as he is
memo said.
"We conclude that the F'BI has
no authority, or duty, to initiate
dissemination of infasmation to the C
white House





DOWNTOWN MIAMI


sala i11


SMALL MOTOR TRANSPORT OPERATION
REQUIRES SERVICES OF BAHAMIAN FOR
SUPERVISORY POSITION. REQUIREMENTS ARE
ABILITY TO DIRECT MOTOR TRANSPORT
OPERATIONS, KNOWLEDGE OF DIESEL ENGINES
AND BACKGROUND IN MECHANICAL SERVICE
MAINTENANCE '

REPLY TO ASSISTANT MANAGER, P.O. BOX NI216,
GIVING INFORMATION ON PREVIOUS
EXPERIENCE AND SALARY DESIRED.


_ ~L~~_


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I
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rCI
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B


VIET ONG REFS h HANIDO R l! She n or

Americanr PO'c)'s it hlad plannaI(l to, r'.lease.. S helast gro1up of AmllericanS
wa:S suppose,~d Lto haive beenI released~ thlil, wc~kendc h) thle VIetI CongI and
Northl Vietnamese,~c but thle UI.S. has1 repudiated~l the agreements l it made
yete\trday andt thle (tcommulrnists. .Ipparl-ntly fl'l that null~ifies their side lf
thle pact aIlso,. The U .S. now\\ ~ass it will noct w4ithdrlaw any mollre troops
from Sourth Vietur~nr until thle Nlorth Vietnam~ese furnish a list of
Amnericalns captured in ILans, and F(t a rclease tilne :,nd place Icor theml.

proviionsfor VH reease on ~l Nrth anld So)uth Vietnam.11 A II.S.
spokesmanli inl Saigoni claims, thle tre1~l,rrm ofl )rasoneric captured inl I.is Ham as
covered It anl "unlderstandling): Ibtween tin chic cease-rire neaotiaocrs,

so~, a / :rsu Ircr dwH1 ri 1 tll larl I)I te Agtrrlln \ at spyins
Af(terrdcov~n woit trd flounil washington the I'I.S.(on ankd thartl the rretca
Ibegin Sunda~y .rnd Ie lrllcmpte weaneslcdas~ thle last porssible dany under
true sanuary mutlitional tirne is necdedl Icr an1 orderly troo~p wvillairawal. (a SIt> S'Iouv




U.S. TRANSPORT SHOT AT BY LIBYAN PLANE
\\ \biIcllN ~ ION 01) 11shl.tLr \Iourus( reprtllr a1 Libyanl air fo)r~r plafne


i(, ; 3 c anduc .llc ~(llt o .a l l m isur cc e daidden U1~ .S. tran >n~r was cle rl

thle inrtcidet is saiidto i ha~vl been1 nea;r ther 1'iand1 of1 Mulata. I'Thre have been
Isracti earnInerICTial alTirliners to .Iaware the ll hooItingp down oft a Libyan



SUGGESTS BROAD) POWERS FOR TRADE NEGOTIATIONS




rilw\ conunllinc onelinaws a.~.ll I',rcisl Tnll trat al. 110 sarid inl a Ilouse
nui itine th 1I:1 (onermI.~ -I(Iula~ )1( consultl L regl)l arl durling~ negotf i tio) ns
:Ind~ inl some11 cses 5lloung( II;\. l )1m last1 wo7rl.
CHINESE PREMIER DRNOPS FROMl PUBLIC VIEW




addrewed.~~(, Il te 1J n nennnle wonwnsl tDay Inks the~1 twowek



SEE KS TRANSFER A AUTHOR ITIY TO COVER EXTRA COSTS.


tranlsfer manlll rit yv is nee.Lded~ (( llreside l w tJi I b~k ilj ity to meer( requir ement s
110 \;tid tlww~ iloss intentle sulch ;,s (ltw rn ellval ofr minesu ftrom North





SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMME SUGGESTED BY NIXON

says the moncley will be madlce avarilablle for emlo~~yment and recreational
oNiknuni ri1\ s Iis n~rclir hin eti staltemlentI I~toda responcding: to pleas
from mauyors across~ the1 (.ount~ry. Pres~identl Nixoni senlt (conneL~Ss ai meshalle
.Wednesdlay proposing revival o~f thle deth;tl penallt4. It callls fo~r thle death
penralty focr mosti tederal crimes of1 mutrdetlr inso~lvingr kidlnapling~ or airplane
hijalcking, klling a Ilaw etnfcrcemen~11ctt ofi~cr or p~risonc guatrd, mlurder by a
repeater inl capital crime and mnurdler f or hiifre.
U.S. BOMBING CAMBOD)IA BY WHAT AUTHORITY
wASHIN(; TO( N (A1')--A II.S. congressmtan n asked secretary of D~efense
IElliot RichardsonI Wednecsdayr fo~r info~rmationl about thle continued Ulnited
States b~omb~ing of Cambodi(,ca*
"Whait's alctual~ly happencing,"" representative I es Aspin, Dermocrat
Wisc~onsin. said "l thatt thle adInlristrattionI is condutl~cting its ow\n air war
ovg there, an1d nol on1e scenlSS to know anlythingF sho(ut it. It's way past time
thlaT we f'oun~d out who we're bocmbing.~ I), why, hw mu~tch anld with what
authority."
H~e addedl: "It' I not just the public that is becingl kept in the dalrk but
memir rsl thot I~cdrf to, a D~efensu e Departmnent spokesman, the Uf.S
has conrducted humb~ling raids o~n C'ambodJian targets every day so, far this
molcnthlanld isdal~y inlIebrulry.

SVOBODA, 78, ELECTED PRESIDENT BY CZECHS.
PRAGUEI, MARCH'l 22 (Al')-l~udvik Svcoboda. 78, was unanimously
electedl Th'ursdla! to, his secondlc five-yealr term as P'resident tf
Czeccharsinvakia. l
T'he aging: World Walr if hero,. the last leading figure of the "P~rague
SprmgK rtin In fugh1 of'i/Ce, was unICo)nteSted.. TheII eletio)n by thle F'ederal
Assemly~l was hleld inl thle historic Viadlislayv Hall of( P'reage ('astle.

BILL BEFORE CONGRESS TO PROTECT NEWSMEN
WASHINGTO'( N (AP')--Six Ho(use Replublican s introduced bills
Wednesday to protect newsmen froml being forced to reveal confidential
sources ot ultforma~tlon. I wve oft them are mlembehrs of the Judiciary
Committee whichl complletedl hearings luesdaoy on the subject~ of privilege,
They atre R~eps. WVilliaml S. (cohecn of' Maine, Tom~l Railsback of Illinois,
Henry P'. Smith III of New Yo~rk, Chlarle* W. Sandman Jr., of New Jersey,
and ~Lawre~nce (coughlinl ofT Pennsylvania. .
'Ther hill they) co,-sponlsored would provide absolute privilege for
newsmenn with, regard to invcstigatory) proceedings bcf'ore go~vernmlent
aIgencies, federal crund~ juries. o~r (convlrlwinw.1~ mm~mnitters.~ Newsmen
could nlot h~e reqluired to, disclose anry informlationl or the identity of any
news source in such cases*


WASHINGTON, MARCH 22
(AP) Official secrecy is
raising suspicion that an
unarmed U. air frce C3
transpo t-type p ae was on a
electronic intelligence mission
when attacked by Libyan jet
fighters over the Mediterranean
Wednesday.
U.S. authorities said the
four-engine plane was on an
unspecified military mission
over international waters 83
miles from Libya when it was
"jumped" by two Libyan air
force jets in daylight.
They refused to describe
the' mission. Libyan officials
said they had no notice of the
incident
C Cannon wh sh m a ed t
unharmed into a cloud and
flew back to base in Athens
Officials Said.
Secretary of State William
Rogers summoned the senior
Libyan diplomat in Washington
and protested strongly while
the top American representa-
tive in Tripoli handed the
Libyan government a similar
protest deploring what was
called an "unpardonable
Incident."
Neither the defense
department nor the state
department would discuss the
Cl30's mission, refusing even
to answer questions about the
size of the plane's crew.
Normally, there would be
nothing secret about a flight of
a Cl30 if it was engaged in the
usual chores of such a plane,
carrying cargo or passengers,
Sources here said the plane
was on neither a cargo mission
nor a routine flight.
It is known that Cl30s
equipped with electronic
"black boxes," have been used
to listen in on radio messages
and to monitor radar
fre uencies.
There was no way of telling
whether the Libyan fighters
knew what this Cl30 was
doing out over the
Mediterranean.





COLLISIGHS S

HOLBROOK, ARIZ. (AP)--The
air and ground search for two FIt1I
jet figters that collided in "a huge
ball of yellow flame" and their
two-man crews ended Wednesday
when ground crews recovered the
bodies of four air force officers.'
Killed in the collision in the sky
M jr H 1 osok lat Tuesddae "g
Colorado Springs, Colo.; Ma).
Richard L. Brehm. 37, Omaha,

b.. BrC .svie Hiam.; an H ap
David C. Blackledge, 30, Cresskin,
N.J., air force officials said.
A spokesman for Cannon air
force base near Crovis, N.M., from
which the two $15 millon
sigwng aiof ,M f dni enhe nirst
froom Cnheo andqu tactical air
AFB, Va., were at the site.
He said the cause of the collision
between the two fighters, each with
advanced electronic equipment, had
not been determined.
The crash brought to 36 the
number of Flls lost since flight
testing on them began in 1967.
Nine of the planes were lost in
combat in Indochinar, the rest were
in accidents.
NO DETAILS
The air force refused to give any
details of the collision and the crash
site was restricted.
One Holbrook resident said she
saw "an explosion .... a flash of
ligt in the air, then they fell to the
grud "
Te collision over the flat,
torth rnd Arimon ddser 1oso a

dokCiy won was ridn uds te


moving m rd to idl oha h ft to,
flew overhead then slipped out of
..When they reappeared it looked
Hike one plane," hie said. "A s I~t

eplodd. Tee was h balu o
. hundred feet long.
"When they hit it looked Ilke an
oil fire with massive flames. Little
streaks of flame were going out in
different directions."
The Jets crashed about 3Va miles
apart near the Holbrook Municipal
Airport. Search and rescue


operations were hampered by
muddy terrain, snow and reduced
visibility,


Ambassador John A. Scali
was forced to vote no, and
thereby veto, a resolution on
the Canal after a lone parade of
Latin American and Third
World diplomats had berated
Washington for its Latin
American policy.
It was perhaps one of the
most disappointing defeats
suffered by the Nation
administration in Latin
American diplomacy because
every effort to avoid the
p m onton, alof reach a
"The United States vetoed
the resolution supporting the
Panamanian cause," Foega
Minister Juan Antonio Tack of
Panama said, "but the whole
world has vetoed Washington."
From the outset the United
States opposed holding this
six-day meeting in Panama -
the first ever in Latin America
Sand all atte pts to dilute the
resolution to acceptable from
failed.
Several times Scali
threatened to use the veto right
granted to the five permanent
members of the IS-nation
Council. If the Panamanians
were worried about that
Foreign Minister Juan Antonio
Tack didn't show it when he
told newsmen that the U.S.
would have a lot of justifying
to do with Latin American
capitals if the veto fell.
Panama came off the solid
vic or in a very unusual
confrontation. It got what it
wanted and then some. Even
without the resolution and
13 bemem er nations supported
it this tiny nation has
focused worldwide attention
on the treaty negotiations,
brought U.N. delegates down'
for a first-hand look at the
Canal Zone, and gave the
appearance of an exploited
underdog standing up to a
giant in defense of its rights.
Only Great Britain of all the
Council nations stood by the
US. positi n on the resolution
Scali had not vetoed it onl


the third U.S. veto in United
Nations history the U.N.
would have been instructed to
take note of the negotiations,"
guarantee full respect for
Panama's effective sovereignty
over all of its territory" and
"keep the question under
consideration."
"The Panamanian resolution
in our view is unbalanced, and
incomplete and is therefore
su bect to seiu

rineter re ain,re Icalliono

cast inthe for of inomsweeping
generalities when we know that
the real difficulties lie in the
app location of those
gneralities."

For years the treaty
negotiations have drifted along
with what the Panamanians
have said are only minor
concessions. They want to
throw out completely the 1903
Treaty with gave the United
States sovereignty and
jurisdiction over the Canal
Zone forever and replace it
with one that gives Panama
sovereignty and would
eventually let Panama run the
Canal or atleast share in large
part of its operation. The U.S.
has offered a Treaty putting a
time limit on U.S. sovereignty
over the zone but Panama
considers that another way of
keeping control forever.
Washington has tried to keep
the negotiations as secret as
possible but twice Panama has
upset that plan. Now the
negotiations must take on a
new aspect while Panama
continues trying to use world
opinion to force major
concessions.
The government of Brig.
Gen. Omar Tortijos, who took
power in a m lary coup four
years ago, was able to avoid
any kind of street
demonstrations while the
Security Council was in
session. He is in firm control in
Panama


freed "very soon afterward."
"There is a question of
sovereignty involved," he said
of the prisoners listed as
captured by the Communist
Pathet Lao, Tin said Maj. Gen*
Le Quang Hoa, chief of the
North Vietnamese delegation,
had told the U.S. side that he
twill Pa all he can to contact
te Phet Lao and seek a
Ausck release of the prisoners*
A spokesman for the U.S.

rpnsibe fordthe Hmur m
American prisoners held in
Laos.
The Communist side has
released 439 American military
and civilian prisoners since
Feb. 12. The latest figures
pu blishe d by the U.S.
command list a total of 147
American prisoners still in
Communist hands 107
military held by the North
Vietnamese, 26 military and
five civilians held by the Viet
Cong, and seven military and
two civilians held by the Pathet
Lao.
President Nixon was
reported to have opened
channels direct to Hanoi in
efforts to forestall potential
large-scale fighting once
American troops are gone,
foreshadowed by what the
United States and South
Vietnam claim is massive North
Vietnamese infiltration of
troops and war materials
southward.
Nixon also sent U.S.
ambassador Ellsworth Bunker
and Maj. G~en. Gilbert H.
Woodward, chief of the U.S.
del egation to the Military
Commission, to confer with
the South Vietnamese.
Bunker and Woodward met
for 45 minutes Wednesda
sit South Vietamesen K i
in other developments the
S laigon m ltary command
announced several thousand oft
its troops backed by tanks and
bombers had launched a relief
operation to lift the siege of a
government outpost 30 miles
north of Saigon.
Lt. Col. Le Trn H en
chief spokesman for the
command, disclosed in a
delayed report that the
hprtinteod reo Rcah d p
advance units were within a
half-mile of the outpost. He
said the situation had improved
at the camp. Government
forces have met no major
resistance in their advance
t dtoward te outpost thus far,
ThenSld fou r- nation
International Commission of
Control and Supervision had
agreed on Monday to
investigate South Vietnamese
and U.S. cages that
Communist forces had
surrounded Rach Bap, but the
investigation has never gotten
under way.
After a meeting of the
Commission Wednesday
the chief of the Canadia
delegatio~ ~ambassador Flce
Guvin, said his delegation had
asked for an immediate
investigation "but we are not
Setting any results. o te

Commission has been
hamperedfrbqyu lysinabs 1%yti

along East-West lines with
Canada and Indonesia on one
sidethaend tlan ean Hungary
o h te. T Cmmission
operates on the principle of
unanimity*
FILM TO BE SHOr IN
BARBADOS
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
(AP).-A new film to star Juhe
Andrews and Omar Sharif will
begin shooting in Barbados on May
3, it was announced today.
Alfred Pragnell, a representative
of Jewel Pimilco Films, a British
company, said the filming of the
'Tamarind Seed' would be shot on
two island locations.


I


L


L
I


I


TIhe North Vietnamese and
Viet Cong delegations
announced Wednesday they
will release the final group of
138 American prisoners in
Hanoi on Saturday and
Sunday, and asked the United
States to withdraw its
remaining 5,300 troops by the
weekend, three days in advance
of the March 28 deadline for
completion of repatriation of
prisoners and redeployment of
U.S. o .icials indicated they
would make a major effort to
comply. The United States has
the capability to move that
inany troops in four days.
The North Vietnamese and
Viet Cong delegations
summoned a meeting of the
four-party military subcommis-
sion on prisoners for Thursday
morning to turn over the lists
of American POWs scheduled
for re case over te weeth kend
It is anticipated that the
United States, immediately
ofter receiving the lists and
tran sitting them to
Washington for notification of
next of kin, will begin the last
of' its troop redeployments.hif
Phuong Nam, c ie
spokesman for the Viet Cong
delegation, said that 31
American prisoners of war
captured in South Vietnam
would be released at Hlanoi's
G~is Lamn airport on Saturday.
Bui Tin, the chief
spokesman for the North
Vietnamese delegation, said
thalt 31 American prisoners of
war captured in South Vietnam
would be released at H no'
G;ia Lam airport on Saturday.
STILL NO WORD
Hie said he still had no word
on seven American servicemen
and two U.S. civilians listed as
captured in Laos, HIe said they
would not be among the
groups being released Saturday
and Sunday, but would be








WASHINGTON, March 22
(AP')- Latin-American specialists
Tlegrp Cr. have ecnwedge
offering assistance to political foes
of Chilean President Salvador

b in testimony Wednesday to a
special Senate foreign relations
subcommittee, they denied they
offered money to the anti-Allende
forces in Chile's 1970 presidential
campaign.
need dave pledged teur support if
fra rit y pblic relati nar nen
to top ITT executives in New York.
Hendrix said he had promised
Chilean newspaper friends that he
would try to get ITT to double
advertising purchased in l
Mercurio and other conservative
anti-Allende newspapers.
but he said, "no one ever asked
me for money," and there was
never any such pledge. He added
that ITT executives did not approve
the proposed advertising increase.
Berreller, under subcommittee
questioning, also acknowledged
offering services to Arturo Matte, a
political adviser and brother-in-law
of Jotrge Alessandria, a right-wing
presidential candidate*
B~errellez said thle offer was
"""ant d cuuts I u obau Mattee
""reller said he was instructed
to r ort Chller n ono rnic a3

the information just as he did in his
former job as a correspondent for
theS, sfo dr eP Case, (R-N.J.)
told Berreller, "You gave an
assurance on behalf of the company
that you wanted to help them (the
ant lk~ dgea tat he had.
Case added, "That usually
involves money, doesn't it?"
Former CIA director John J.
Mc(one testified that in September
1970 he informed presidential
adviser Henry A. Kissinger and
Richard Helms, then CIA director,
of an ITT offer to contribute
Marxist-Sociaist.
But, McCone said, no plan ever
was developed so "lTT' had nothing
to support."
Earlier, he said, he had informed
Helms of Allende's campaign
threats to, expropriate American
corporate propertis in Chile,
planned action to defeat Alleade.
McCone said that the CIA could


make "some minimal effort" within
its own budget.
Earlier testimony disclosed
contacts beginning in July 1970
between ITT officils and Whilliam
V. Broe, CIA chief of clandestine
services for Latin America.
Hendrix, a former
Scripps-Howard news
c respondesnt, roeot q estione
headquarters in September 1970
that U.S. ambassador Edward


" ts m c o c u i n t e ro n s b ase
"sutnut" tansd Ib an spidce n,

anunpaper asso itmselrn Ch ^*


Double
Triple
Quadruple


$9
$11
S13
$16


Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


I-,

on the waterfront at East
Bay & William Streets.
TELEPHONE 5-4641
Open daily unei c i~m. rnd o


n Sunday a ternpoons from 2 5


I^

:i
"x~' ~,
u

r`






C
7.
t
.*



Y
''
tk~
r
.



a


Thursday, March 22, 1973


Qht Tar~ibt r


U.S. C.13Q O


No WORD ON LAOS POW's


Last US POW's due


for release thais


weeke *n jita


SAIGON (AP) The United States is beginning the final mie
home from the Vietnam war with its last prisoners and troops
d ebdadroeomaue to lalre by Sun y and ts roenow one ofpeace ere.


BAD DEFEAT FOR U.S.


6Rllr AQYITS


GIVING6 REPORTI


SECRET MISSIGH US uses its third


WHEN ATTAICKED? UN veto on Panama TO WHITE HOUSE


8BRa re so utlOR

PANAMA (AP) The United States used its Security Council
veto for the third time in United Nations history Wednesday
n'ght to kill a resolution dealin with the Pana~ma Canal zone.


x~g gIHIA A ISTE17











IV
--


Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No blaster
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1 903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Pubudser/Editor 19171972
Contributta Editor l972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Pubudser/F~:ditor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas *
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, March 22, 1973


NOrSsru and Freepor







Tha srgh Bginin March 22,.,., Out ilad Airway
inaugurates super let fly ng Island service between Nassau and Freeport.
Cuts travel time to 20 m nutes with a convenient daily schedule especially
planned for Bahamians.
You II be flying the BAC 111, the world s most reliable short haul aircraft.
With wider aisles and fewer seats so you can stretch out mn comfort. Served
by beautiful Bahamian stewardesses. Aboard the Bahamos' own oarline.
It s Out Island Airways' way of expressing its confidence In the future
growth of the Bahamas. Providing the truly Bahamion service expected
of a future Independent nation.
And to Introduce you to Out island Airways' super-let Nossou/Freeport
service, OIA offers a special low cost, round-trip, one day inaugural fare-
just $33.
What are you waiting for? Call your travel agent or Out Island Airways
now for reservations. 7-8222.


Out Ilanmdirry senes the chomas sest


379


Thursday, March 22, 12

Whr P
N ~J~~A ~11


eight times that of the United

yuae: meeso .:" aces
In addition, it is a prodigious
user of energy resources,
consuming 23,000 tons of coal
per 1.000 hectares, compared
to less than 5.000 tons in the
Uie states.
On the energy side, there nas
been a dramatic reversal since
1955, when 74.3 per cent was
supplied by relatively clean
waterpower. In 1970, 76.4 per
cent came from thermal origin,
coal and oil.
Jpe ao depends t avild n
East, and this is high in

sul le are prime polluters,
Page 4, Col. 5


By JOHN RODERICK
TOK Y~octe Te lord
grasshopper, a species long
familiar to residents of Tokyo,
has gone the way of the
chestnut tree and the snowball.
Sensitive to pollution, he rarely
is seen now.
This points up Japan's
postwar industrial success and
the worsening economic
political and ecological
problems it has precipitated.
Th e newly created
g vernment envi onment

whole is paying a great price


grthitunt


for its neglect of environmental
considerations."
The agency has spelled out
sources of the problem, its
effects and what is being done
to cope with i). In thumbnail,
it is a sketch of Japan's
emergence as a modern
industrial power.
Crushed militarily and
economically in World War II,
thle country staged that until

"economic miracle." Today


the miraculous aspects of
Japan's recovery are stressed
less than the problems that too
much success has created
internal io n a1y and
domestically.
The Un~ited States. which
contributed most to that
success, now complains of the
whopping imbalance of trade
created by Japan's energetic
export die Te international

Japan's $18 billion payments
1 lus en ehe instability of
I 4apanese Industry got its big


boost in the 1960s, when It
u nde rt ook to supply the
growing world demand for
chemical products and steel in
its headlong plunge to expand
productivity, the government
lost sight of the need to plow
profits into social and
environmental improvements
As a result. Japan today is a
lopsided giant, second among
n0n-Commun st nations ban
lagging far behind in stc~ial
srices fiscal 19,70. the
environment report says. only


2 1 per cenlt o~f the count ry s
105 million people haid acess
to sewage taurlities. Lcompared
to 90 per ient In England and
68 per cent In the L united
States,
Similarly, Tfokyo has 1 2
square meters of park area per
person, compared to 228 m
London and 19.2 in New York.
Population density is I1.3
times that of the United States.
Cahooug it is only te sheco
than 1,300 automobiles per
1.000 hectares of level area.


streams in these areas are pure .... and so the food is pure.
The TV programme covered many formerly pure lakes and
streams in the U.S. to show how polluted and unhealthy they
have become as a result of the growth and spread of industry in
the nation.
The commentator stated that the gross national product of the
nation had doubled in the last few years .... the standard of living
had been raised but the standard of life had been dangerously

h over the world today p ole have become conscious of the

Considerable time and space is given to this question by

ne saes, ra nd T eaer da e dnae eareopounde

programme. When her name was announced I expected to see an
old woman come on the stage because I had been hearing her
name all my life.
Instead a spry young looking woman stepped before the
footlights.
The commentator asked her her age. She said she was 74 and
that her next birthday will be better still. She expects to live to
hae at least 100... and from her looks I believe she will make it.
Asked for an explanation of her remarkable appearance she
said that ever since she was ill as a young woman and a doctor
tae e a lecture on foods after she todhim e,.. thn r Idy oa
conscious of the importance of food to the health of a person.
As a result she watches her food carefully. For one thing, she
doesn t eat vegetables from areas that have been treated by
.insec iids.
Governments all over the world are now alarmed by the threat
to health .... and the food supply .... as a result of pollution.
It has been found that not only rivers and streams are being
polluted but also the vast oceans of the world are being poisoned.
An article in The New York Times recently revealed that
ancient and magnificent trees along great stretches of the
Mediterranean Sea are dying .... choked to death by pollution!
Everywhere today Governments are trying to prevent .... and
remedy ... the causes of this great scourge. A revealing article on
what industry has done to Japan is published in this issue. Read

Everywhere people are concerned .... except in the Bahamas
where the Govemnment is plunging into areas of pollution and
enterprises that upset the balance of nature.
**********
When I was a young man fish was plentiful in all the islands.
Any time a person wanted a meal he could catch a dish of fish
or wade along the beaches and pick up a dozen conchs.
Today there is practically no fish or conch in the harbour of
Nassau and it is not safe to eat anything caught in certain areas
because most of the water in Nassau harbour has become polluted
... and nothing is being done to correct this condition,
The wife of a friend of mine became seriously Wi with hepatitis,
believed caused by eating conch picked up in the harbour.
When I was conducting a farm at Camperdown during the
second world war I took pride in the fact that we produced all
our own food. We even caught our own fish. If we set a trap a
half dozen times a day at a shoal near our waterfront property ....
every time we pulled it up something good was in it.
This shoal has almost been completely denuded.
I recall with pleasure a trip I made through the Exuma cays as
a young man.
When we dropped anchor at Black Point we saw a girl in a
dinghy a short distance from shore. She was fishing. As fast as she
could pull in her line she was putting them in a boat. In a short
time she had a boat full of fish for the people in the settlement.
Since then the harbours in most of the islands have been so
heavily over-fished that the former Govemnment found it
necessary to make a rule forbidding the hauling of fish in
harbours of settled islands.
This was an effort to protect the food supply of the islanders.
Some years ago conch was so plentiful in the Bimini-Grand
Bahama area that shiploads were being exported to Miami ...
both for the meat and the shells.
I sounded a warning in this column. A senior official of the
Marine Products Board wrote articles to the Press and went on
ZNS to say that I didn't know what I was talking about .... he just
about said I was a fool.
But less than a year later the Marine Products Board published
an order restricting and controlling the export of conch from this
area bec~lue it was found that the food supply of the people was
being dangerously affected.
**********
Recently the Hon. Arthur Foulkes criticized the Govemnment
for now wanting to tumn the Bahamas into an oil refining centre.
He pointed out that this enterprise .... which employs very few
people .... could destroy the tourist business which employs
thousands of our people.
This is true. Even now it has reached a point where we can
hardly use our beach at Camperdown. Almost every time we go
swimming there we are likely to come out with a glob of oil on
our feet.
This is bad enough. But the real danger is to the food supply of
the islands. An oil spill kills all marine life in the area it covers.
Another thing .... the G /enmn is encouraging an extension
of aragonite mining in the islands.
A recent article in an American newspaper revealed that this
kind of operation upsets the balance of nature. It pointed out
that experience shows that anything that upsets the balance of
nature destroys life in the area.
It is feared that this activity might seriously affect the major
deep sea fishing industry at Bimini.
+*+*******
An official of the Marine ]Department in Nassau told me that
he had examined the mining area and he was satisfied that this
operation would not harm marine life.
Well .... I am not convinced because he was the same man who
said I was a fool some years earlier when I sounded a warning


against over-fishing conch in that area.
In these activities it is important not only to protect our
beaches in the interest of the tourist business but also to protect
the food supply of our people because it would be serious if our
waters were struck with a plague that affected fish and conch in
the same way that it destroyed the sponge beds some years ago.
******** '
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
The grand instructor .... Time.
BURKE


BACK in 1938 s oge fsluing H the colony's major
industry. The sntire population of Andros depended on it for a

tieiod.r Many f siie Lto G dand paaa iii p baA

Then one morning the colony woke up to find that this
important industry had been wiped out by a mysterious disease
that swept out of the eastern waters and moved on to also
destroy the sponge beds in Florida. Andros Islanders had to turn
to the soil for survival.
In Nassau the hardest hit was the small Greek colony. The
Greeks were the sponge brokers of the world. This is why they
originally came to Nassau. They found an outlet in business and

Tre Gvr ment brought scientists from England to study the
mystery. One of these men was Dr. Walton Smith, a young man
who shad come out of university .... I think it was Oxford .... with
The scientists never found the cause of the epidemic. After he
had completed his investigations in the Bahamas Dr. Smith went
to Miami where he joined the staff of the University of Miami and
established the now internationally famous Marine Department
which is doing invaluable work in teaching marine sciences.
**+~*******
The Greek merchants, in collaboration with the Marine
Products Board and some Bahamian sponge merchants, found a
way to produce sponge by artificial means.
This was done by clipping a bit from a live sponge, attaching it
to a disk, and "planting" it in a selected area not affected by the
plague .
Merchants were granted concession areas by the Marine Board.
The sponges grew well but for various reasons, mostly poaching,
it didn't work out.
Finally the Board decided that it was a lost cause. The only
thing to do was to close the beds to fishing until the disease had
run its course and the sponge beds would be restored by nature
itself.
You know .... it is difficult to completely destroy some forms
of life. When DDT first came out flies, mosquitoes and sandflies
just about completely disappeared. But they soon came back in a
stronger form.
A place .... I think it is Australia .... was plagued by rats. A
campaign was started to eliminate the rats. The rats disappeared.
but later what is now called a super-rat emerged. They are called
:super-rats because they are bigger and are more resistant to the
poisons that destroyed their antecedents.
And so the sponge did not completely disappear. After many
years the sponge beds restored themselves. All varieties came back
except velvet, the most valuable. Ihe beds were finally reopened
to fishing by the Board.
But by this time industry had produced an artificial sponge.
There was only a limited market for the natural sponge. In the
meantime wages in the colony had reached a level where it was no
longer economic to outfit expeditions to the sea beds.
At the height of this industry thousands of sloops and boats
were engaged in fishing. And so the boat building industry was
Blso hard hit.
.I became deeply involved in this problem because I served as a
inember of the Marine Board during a part of the time.
+***+*+****
: A few years ago a plague struck the fishing waters in the
Florida area. It also affected sea birds. The destruction of fish and
birds was disastrous.
SThis plague was diagnosed as Red Tide, a form of disease that
destroyed the oxygen in the water. This plague, caused by
pollution, has occurred several times since it first appeared.
**********
:A few days ago a mysterious plague struck fish in two South
()ade county canals in Miami.
:Since then the disease has spread to six more canals .... and
finally it struck 100 square miles of South Biscayne Bay.
People have been warned not to eat fish caught in these areas
and not to ski or swim in this water. Some sea birds have also
died from eating diseased fish.
A TV film of the scene shows tourists sitting on the beach in
Biscayne Bay, unable to go in swimming. This is bad for tourism
In the area.
**++*+*+***
Before they die infected fish behave in a strange~ manner. They
spnround and round in the water as though they are chasing
tertails. When they are approached by a boat they make no
effort to get away .... they seem to be confused.
A strong team of scientists are trying to discover the cause for
this plague but so far they have been baffled.
A fleet of fishing boats, whose owners and crews depended on
fishing in these canals for a living, are laid up and the men say
they don't know where to turn to earn bread for their families.
The only thing that seems sure is that the waters in these canals
have been poisoned by some form of pollution.
A TV programme discussing this plague reveals that fish will
lyve in water with a certain percentage of pollution but in many
cases they are diseased. An operation on fish caught in certain
areas revealed that they were packed with tumors.
), It is now believed that 85 percent of the steadily increasing
oases of cancer in the world are caused by pollution.
**********
SRecently people in Florida were shocked when a major
epidemic of typhoid fever broke out in a migrant labour camp.
Water in other camps was then tested and found to be
polluted.
They became really alarmed when a test showed that water in
the fashionable Miami Beach area was also dangerously infected.
********
You may recall an article I wrote a ew weeks ago on an area in
the Himalayan mountains on the borders of China and India
where people live to be 130 years of age.
Recently another area has been found in South America where


people lve to great ages.
This longevity is attributed to the fact that the air and the


~bo ~ttb~fno


Japans 810 t IITrO It


goOS SOur











4 Zait Grtiittle


~ a:f
:::: ~~1~-x
:::::
:::: Z
:::::
::::: ::::
~


Thursday, March 22, 1973


IAPIIWES ,

From Page 3
too, the report notes. Garbage :
per person increased about 30
per cent from 1964 to 1970. '
Discarded automobiles,
television sets, refrigerators and
plastic products have r
complicated the disposal
problem. Every year tourists
deposit an average of 853 tons
of garbage on Mount Fuji.
They pick rare alpine plants
and leave litter in national
parks.
allN lgi ltion to cope it
and prefectural assemblies. ""
There has been some progress.
Sulphur oxides are down a bit.
The Sumida River, in the
middle of Tokyo, has lost its
offensive odor. Fish haeBLENDED'
reappeared in some lakes and oac
streams. (UI
But the over-all picture The cu r re aw L d a~ ~ra Clom chant Ch .*.**~w
remains dark* ane~~d versp sh snwtsrhda Genih
The environment agencyrd nrr"o "OLY """"L "'"
urges coordinated research, ** ***~C
more~ regulations, preventive
measures, and a greater ~
inesmetin sewage, Distributed in the Bahamas by ethell Robertson and Co. Ltd.
Gakbsaagn tdisfildfacilities,








NEW! NEW!!NEW!


The Hornet with its two
Versions Hatchback and
Sportabout -- is an extremely
'versatile vehicle for the man
who needs cargo space one day
and people space the next.
Take the Hatchback. There
are four seats. Fold the rear
two down and the car becomes
a station wagon. Keep them up
Sand you have a Gran Tourismo.
SWith the seats down, there are
23 cubic feet of loading space
and there is even a hidden
compartment for valuables,
The Hatchback has a 100
hp. six-cylinder engine with a
three-speed transmission. Also
available is a 175 hp. V-8
engine with automatic
transmission and power disc
brakes.
There are armrests front and
rear, foam-cushion front seat.
nylon carpeting throughout,
cigarette lighter and ashtrays.
Air-conditioning is, of course
ex ra.t'
The sporty Sportabout is a
combination passenger car and
station wagon. Inside, there are
over 60 square feet of space -
plenty of travelling room for a
family of five or even six.
OPTIONAL
Standard is the 232 CID
six-cylinder 100 hp. engine.
Otsisona arepoautom ti
brakes, power steering and
air-conditioning.
You can also have the
optional roof rack, individually
reclining front seats and
woodgrain panelling.
The high-powered Javelin
has been termed "bold" by
American Motors by the
design, the engineering, right
down to the name itself. It ca
be made even more bold by the
addition of optional rally
stripes, a vinyl roof and spec a


_


MRCH SRHPM LL




OESO IID 0155O FO ll li 0 Sl FOR I


___


PS 5 IICUN M WIH Ill I AE-N


SI)N GE R...8ure we're best. We taught the world tosew.








PALMDALE _~PHONE 28421


.r~t.Abpln P. 0. BOX N-8165 SHIRLEY STREET PHONE 2-4626/7/8


AMERICAN MOTORS' line-up of cars for 1973
includes models for all drivers and pocketbooks. Three
of these are quickly becoming well-known to Bahramian
car watchers and all the models are available through
Nassau Motor Company on Shiriey Street.


wheel covers.
Power is supplied by a 195
hp. V-8 engine. The driver may
have either a manual
f ou r-spee d f loor-shif t
transmission or an automatic
transmission, and power disc
brakes,
Inside, there are slim bucket
seats for more comfort and
extra legroom.
Javelin's instrument
grouping is instantly readable
and the woodgrain finish gives
an extra touch of elegance.
American Motors' Hornets
and Javelins give more than
just value for dollar in comfort,
safety and power. See them all
at Nassau Motors on Shirley
Street.


AMERICAN MOTORS HORNET SPORTABOUT is a combination station wagon and
passenger vehicle with plenty of room for people and cargo. See the Sportabout at Nassau
Motors on Shirley Street.

ROLLS-ROYCE MOTORS UP FOR SALE!


to- build engines for America's
Lockheed Tristar airliner
T'he British government
rescued the military and
acro~space divisions fromi the
ruins by nationali/ing thern
into~ a new company called
Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd.
The automobile and diesel
engine divisions carried on
working under the managership
of an official receiver, on
whose behalf Rothschild is
staging its auction
( considerable interest is
ex1'mied in thonsale Apianr
a companyy that builds such
celebrated himousines, the
buyer stands to become richer
over the years. Last year
Rolls Royce Motors made a
profit of 3 million pounds,
about 7.5 million dollars at
current exchange rates, with an
output of some 2,800 cars and
a turnover of 50 million
pounds 125 million dollars.
Demand for diesel engines is
improving and car production
is being raised.
Rothschild is putting a
rea k geprice on its prestigious


LONDON (AP) ANY
MULTI -MILLIONAIRE who
wants to go one better than his
neighbour gets his chance next
week. Instead of buying just
another Rolls-Royce, he could
buy the entire company and
make his own. Rollys-Royce
Motors is for sale.
The prospectus of the
company which claims to build


the world's finest motor car
will be published next week by
London merchant banker N.
M. Rothschild who will then
invite hids, signe,' and sealed
from interested parties
T~he giant Rolls Royue
aerospace and automobiles
empire crashed into virtual
bankruptcy in 1971, broken by
a massive fixed price contract


HOWDA CLAIMSI ITS VEHICLES CAN

LEET ANTI-POLLITISH STANDARDS
WASHINGTON (AP) Honda, a Japanese firm, said
Monday it could produce an automobile that will meet the
top 1975 anti-pollution standards and plans to ship the
United States next year about 250,000 of the vehicles.
"We feel we know enough about it now to advise this
panel that Honda can meet the 1975 emission standards on
a production basis, and we intend to do so," said Roland
SmhotH~omd aenhicc sna oqruipe win fitrrmtafied charge
Engine, a modified version of the common piston engine in
American autos.
The Japanese firm was the first automaker to tell the
environmental protection agency that it could meet the
proposed standards.
Detroit automakers asked for a one-year extension of the
proposed exhaust requirements, contending they were
L Turewho ae thi production vehicles would be able to


ZIG-ZAG SEWING MACHINE MODEL. 257


FEATURES AND CUSTOMER BENEFITS
O ilt'~i' Wh n Ltr a o ur nw touhorh
and mend tears all without attachments.
ExIclusive Front Drap~in Babbin-Isr esry to see
an lenplac Eliminatesfumbling with.
EaLned Pressr bar Centmil-Allows you to
Generalpurpose settings for normal fabrics,
Dlu sxt ramsttng for heavyweight fabrics
S aap-en Pass er t-Savoe time when you
rlsh cho m one to another. Just snap them
G uick*Rlease Nulect Plate-Makes it reay to
change needle plates. Simply lift end remove.
SOne-Way Nee~dle Insircti-i~minates any
possibl~ity of inserting needle backwards.
SNeedle-Plate QuidelinresEye saving guides
for perfect straight stitches.
Ex Itra-wide Zig~tag Stith (Immb-Gives you
5 millimeter-w~ide (Ne) bight for rigzagl and
decortive stitschs Also increases capability
o FE-2"'. ...""" "*ntsverwindin
O Ir",",,etl~ ftde le e-H lenI~te varietyn
e ( use on-u **** i*
"""'"""""'"tflr-Hr nnnitvrit


AUSTINV IVIVIN CLUB A I ~~~
STANDARD & AUTOMATIC.


FEATURES AND
CUSTOMER BENEFITS


The muost cve~nient bobbinu loatiuton.







Lo rtyst ritch thmirt ,erabric


s~m o Lul in-A tkotouh hf oti
yo sn CItron lerritball prsingh
*otro


WE WILL GIVE A LIBERAL TRADE
WITH NO TRADE....



FREE. UNDERSEAL
FREE. LICENCE FOR ONE YEAR
FREE. INSPECTION
FREE. LICENCE PLATES.
FREE. 1000 MILE SERVICE
FREE. 3000 MILE SERVICE
FREE. 6000 MILE SERVICE
FREE. 9000 MILE SERVICE


ON YOUR OLD CAR OR,


AS LAID DOWN
IN MANUFACTURERS
SERVICE HANDBOOK


* l~ ~r lt~rtm rnw
*ic m w( h Ot~. U H f

On ~nd ,-


I I22dtt Iofo JO OFL e~d.t .
"WHERE QUALITY IS SUPRE~M~"


I


Hornets, Hatchbacks & Javelins are


gM' rd fo 173


FTrIOM SINGERtH


PR ICED AT ON LY162.00


A4USTIN 1300 nCOUNT\IRYIV4VIN
STANDARD & AUTOMATIC.


MODEL 353 SEWING MACHINE


PR ICED ATON LY . 22.


u:.
:i \










Thursday, March 22, )193


__ ~1~1_


USED USD


-I

TRADERS BANK & TRUST LIMITED

(IN COM~PULSOR Y LIQUID TION)

Will the following! persons kindly contact the Liqluidator, Second Floor,Bernard
Sunley Building, P. O. Box 1491, Telephone 2-1976, in connection with claims


DOWDESWELL STREET (Formerly BESCO Building)
Telephone 2-8012 OUT ISLAND ORDERS TO
P.O. BOX 6104 E.S., Nassau, Bahamas.


NOT IC E




Our Parts and Service Departments will be
t usdh fra in try ao IMonday, March 26th

Sales Department, Service Station and business
offices will be open usual hours.





QOIM MOTORS

Collins Avenue Tel: 2-1031


MANAGER: DONALD JOHNSON


y **5P. O. BOX NI382 PHONE 2-1322
B~~~ 0 ** *~rrr DOWDESWELL STREET BETWEEN CHRISTIE AND DEVEAUX

.."S~:"""."CN ECONOMY CARS LIM ITED OPEN 8 AM TO 5 PM, MON. THRU SAT.


LAeRfmEDi TODAY: Sea
SAILING TODAY: Sea
Lane, Sunward for Miami

ROmR Skwr, MaOd MGr
SAILING, TOMORROW:
Skyward, Mardi Gras for Miam'
WEATHER
Wind : North to
northeasterly 10 to 26 m.p.h.
Weather: Fair
Sea: Slight to moderate
.ep oin toi t 72


JU ST ARRIVED .. am~Bl~j~


5


AT~TEND CRIB






VENEZUELA

DR. HENRY Podlewski and
mebens Telzthe Ba kima
Mental Health Association, left
for South dAmerica We nesdua
executive board meeting of the
Caribbean Federation for
Mental Health (CFMH) beins
hezu .h week in Caracas,
Dr. Podlewski is attending
the three-day meeting as vice
president of the CFMH. Miss
Coakley is a delegate from the
Bahamas Mental Health

On te aelrdan r discsi n
conferencefr w ic 2ilb oh 8d
In March 1971 the Bahamas
Mental Health Association
offered to host this year's
conference. At the eighth
biennial conference einB aunan
offer was officially accepted
and the Bahamas delegation
announced that the '73
assembly would explore the
relation sd mbebt en
being. The theme, therefore,
will be "Economics and Mental

pl nig Ccoa tteeafo rt i
conference. She will report to
the delegates from the 22 other
Caribbean countries on the
plans, progress and problems of
her committee. She will also
seek the executive board's
approval of the six-day
conference programme.
to Nas"authe': BMAsol
then be able to announce
publicly more information
about keynote speakers and
other highlights," a BMHA
news release said.


Nairn, Hillary
Newbold,Cedric
Newbold, Stafford


Paul, Ma~nard
Pawlik, Jorg, or Christine
Pinder, Corrine
Pratt, David
Pratt, Prince A.


Roberts, Teresa
Roker. Juanita
Rolle, John
Rolle, lauis
Sands, Anthony R.
Saunders, Frederick
Storr, Edward H.
Strachan, Japheth
Stuart, Wendell
Sweeting ,Charles
Taylor, Idella
Taylor, Laur

TYrb est, oni ue
Turnquest, Olive
Wallace, Michael
Wallace, Sylvia
Whymns, Stanley
Williams, Stafford
Wilmore, Harold
Wilson, Dorothy
Wilson, Orbal


which they may have against the company.


Albury, Neville
Alexaqder, Marianne
Archer, Bertram
Arher, Donald


Gordon, Lydia
Griffith, Patricia E.
Griffith, Therese
Haven, Hubert
Hepburn, Gearaline
Higgs, li~fford
Humes, Opal M.
Huntes, Patrick J.
Hutchinson, Jerome
Johnson, Anthony

Joh o, Sm e
Johnson, Sybil
Jolly, Clarence Jr.
Joseph, Naomi
Ieson, Rca d

Knowles, Charles
Knowvles, Eunice
Knowles, Prince & Patricia
Knowles, Susan
Knowleks, Walter
Laing, Hermis
Lihboure,h Gerge R. Sr.

Luke, John
McDonald, Margaret E.
Mdlntosh, Addington
McKenzie, George A.
McKinney, Harry
Meicholas, Paul
Moss, Richard D.


Bastian, Thaddeus
,Bethel, Babara
Brice, Henry Alln
Brownr, Nicola B. &/lor Simeon

Blr, Mihae P.

Cartwright, Arlington
C~assr, Gilbert
Charrlton, Stanley
Claridge, W.I. &/or June
Garke, Charles & ~Lawrene
Cox, John E.


ENG AGED
MR. AND MRS. ERIC LOWE of Palmdale have
enng ine nh rneemn of noei dagtra C


Dawkrins, Norma
Dean, Vincent
Delancey, Ruth Nell
Dominique, Dunsund
Dorsett, Alfred


FeyoThh b ilus
Ford, In raham R
Foulkes, Theresa L.
Frazier, Kathleen


GRANT-MITCHELL
ENGAGEMENT
MR. and Mrs. Charles M.P.
Grant of Montagu Heights have
announced the engagement of

ad Mr.uDnl S. Mtc el
Montreal, Canada. No date for
the wedding has been set.
RED CROSS TO
RAFFLE CAR
TICKETS for the grand
raffle of the Bahamas Branch
of the Red Cross, to be drawn
at the Central Highway Inn on
Ap 17,Sar on al atp nt o
committee members. First
prize is a 1973 Dodge Polaris
car donated by Mr. Alexis
Nihon. Theraffle committee is
headed by Mrs. Graham Barry.


George, Nelson
Gibson, Charles
Gordon, James


Will anly other person (depositor, shareholder or other creditor) who considers
that he has a valid claim against the company which has not been formally admitted
by me as liquidator also contact me at the above address.
SYDNEY MOR.RIS.
Liquidaltor.


TIDES
High:
p.m.
Low:


9:52 a.m. and 10:15
3:48 a.m. and 3:48


We're very proud to represent

Fiat in the Bahamas. Fiat is the

largest-selling car in all Europe -

bigger than Volkswagen or Ford


or any one else. Why?


Because


Europeans know small-car value.

They've driven them for years.

And they don't like to waste


m oney.


European craftsmanship.


engineered. Attractively designed.
Built to last.



W~e have all these models on

hand now. Why not stop in at our


Dowdeswell


Street sales office


and see for yourself? The prices

will surprise you. You'd be doing

yourself a favour!


FIAT 1


Qt Wrtbtmt


SELL


FROM ITALY


.*r-CL-7 <+>~eEi~~.'7Ej~ -weemium

FIAT 850 FAMILIAR 7-SEAT STATION

WAGON. IDEAL FOR LARGE FAMILY.


FIAT 128 SEDAN. STANDARD

TRANSMISSION, FRONT WHEEL DRIVE.


Fiat is the ultimate in fine


Skilfully


24 SPIDER (soft top convertible), 1600cc


FIAT 128 STATION WAGON. 3 DOORS.




1 I -' I I


I


By Abigeil Van BUen
m a orcase r Mk v. mes sme, an
DEAR ABBY: I have always had a great deal of faith
in chiropractic treatment, so naturally when my 15-yearold
daughter suffwd a bad whiplash in an auto accident I
took. lar to a local chiropractle citale where I paid in
advance for a series of treatments. IShe still has six to go.]
She wa s a houtr lat getting home from her last treat.
annt and I was wrorcred sick. When she got home I asked
lar some questions and she started to cry. Then she told
me everything [I hope].
She said the chiropractor insisted on showing her his
new apartment near the ellakc. She said all the walls were
covered with plotures of noudes from Playboy magaslee. She
told me he showed her his bedrooms in which le had a huge
wraterbed, and he asked her to bounce on it a ferw times
just to get the feel of it. She said in kept touching her and
she could tell be was getting aroused, so she ran out,
saying she had to get home.
If my busband were alive he'd know what to do about
this nut. I can't let her go bsac there. What should I do? I
trus you." HATT I URD
DEAR HEARTSICK: This "auct" is accoastable to the


1. Use of our Pool and I 3 mile of Beach (Complimentary)
2. Mats, Towels and Lounge Chairs (Comnplimentary)
3. Four CIhampionship Tennis Courts Night Tennis
( Com pli mentary )
4. His and H~ers Sauna Baths (Complimentary,
5. Putting G;reen cComplimentary,
6. 10 p~c off Weddings. Banquets and Meetings held at the
Itesort
7. Additional Cocktail parties held throughout the year
8. Tennis and Swimming Climecs
9. to p~.off all special upanrties and group dinH 645m
7 30~pm
11. Jumbala Torch L~ight Steak Cook out (Wed.
12. Thursday. Champagne Iance Ilpm Fore N Aft Lounge
13. International Huffet Hib~iscus D~ining Ro~om
14. Sunday Feature Movie 9pm
15. For those of you who like to play bridge. the Nassau
Bridge ('lub meets every Tuesday and Fridayv at 8l:00pm
in the H~ird 'age.
PLEASE CALL MANAGER'S OFFICE 78001
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION


_


1Distributed in the Bahamas by

HIR W~19A WGIC IBME


-- --- --- --_ _-_~---- ~__ __ -F -II- ---I .- --- _~llr~


Thurdsdy, Marchr 22, 1973


Someone


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down on chiropractor
state Chiropracti Assoeatloat. Report him. And for good
ties, 2@ Grand At., Des Maises, la. @31. Ther are a
DEAR ABBY: Last year I was a volunteer for the
Amerlean Cancer Soelety Cwrusd. While wrorrin~g on the
campaign I learnd mmore bot the "danger signals" cand
made an appeatatent for my husband to see a doctor.
Iammediately followifng the eamlnation he was opeated on
for cancer. Thankt God they caught it in the early stages.
And thank God I volunteend. Believe me, when they cared
me again this year I said ycw! GOT MORE THAN I GAVE
DEAR AB~BY: If you had friends who usd your elx-
pensive cocktail table for a footstool, what would you say
or do? BUGGED
DEAR BUGGED: First, I would say, "Pleae don't" If
that faied. IPd "as" 'em.
Pn~emsT Yea'll ful kete If yes get it off year thest*
per a pmmalu raply, wrbs to ABBY: Bez No. 88N*, L. A,
Calif. sese. Emelese stampd, self-ddresed envelpe,
sa.
Em iiys Uc 'g bRa* r;---llrW-~*d"
send SI to Abby, Besl Wmt, las Aageles, CM. mag.


Youget an extra *

frOm the people

at he~o yal


1% call it'helpf ul banking.'
Nearly 65 years ago Bahamians called us 'The Bank'. Today .. they've added an
adjective .. .'Helpful'. A delightful change. And appropriate.
Fro asinlebrach w've ----- ~ grw pt rnhe hogotteaaa rvdn
savings. Loans. Money Transfers. Letters of Credit. And so on.
But the helpful bank is more. Smiling faces, friendly, efficient service.
Check out helpful banking in action at your local Royal Bank branch. Today.

The Royal The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BANK
Brach" ho""' utt"eB"""a


I'

rr
L


Whtr Wr~that t


should crack




I


Thursday, March 22, 1973


UPIRISING IN PENITENARY ENDS
MOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. (AP)-lRehalous imasctes ended so apdgingl a
West Vkginia Psoltatiry tody rand releasd fiv smard hostage
wAsand. One phoser ma (MalyJ rtabbd ad tw othra pirne
wounded during the 24-hour incdeat
A abort timeaft dthe6 setlemet wa nannouced by Gov. Areh A.
Moore Jr., prison offiial said fIggetin broke ot between black and white
Athorties gav no detail but said they war tying to talk the ineate
lato returning to their cells
POUCE SfEIZE OWN HEADQUARTRII
BUENOS AIRES (AP).*Povndal pollee seted ther own headqurersm
in to ajor Argentiae citie Wednsday and demanded pay raises from
Thbe protlr iols rome so,ooo officrs in sx provinces In Meaadoss,
a city 600 miles west of Buenos Aber, the goerment derred alitary
mobillsaton of po~ce peorsonnl. Not affected were th four million
resdents of the capital distrct of buenos Ahres, which 6 under ju~dediato
of the federalpolice.






(IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)
Will those persons who have not recleived a staff claim form,
kindly contact me, as soon as possible, at P. O. Box
N.4895, Nassau, Bahamas.


FOR 3 i
LA W SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


SOUTH OF BARCLAYS BANK


OPENING OUR NEW PREMISES
WITH A SALE ON


C


FOR APPLICABLE FARES PLEASE CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR CONSULT THE OFFICIAL AIRLINE GUIDE.

ALL FLIGHTS OPERATED WITH JE~T AND JET-PROP EIQUIPMENT.
ALL SCHEDULES SUBJECT TO GOVERNMENT APPROVAL


- F


as IIIWPIIr~~nu m cu
r LOWInG eAND IMPINGI"....l rr Lr






YOUNG

g NSTON t
*re. FOCRLKREMANad
RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH v


SUGGES ED FOR MA TURE AUDIENCES
PARENTAL DISCRE770NADVISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8: 15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


S Last Day Friday Last Day Frid y
Matinee Starts at 2: 15 Continuous Showings from y
SEvening 8:30

THE GIRL WHO KNEW "PUSSYCAT, PUSSYCAT
STOO MUCH" R. I LOVE YOU" PG.
SAdam West
NancyKwan an McShane
NancyKwanJohn Gavin
PLUS

S"TOWER OF EVIL" R' PLUS
Bryant Haliday "STRATEGY OF
Jill Haworth
S PLUS Late Feature TERROR" PG.
Fridaynight'Hugh O'Brian
No one under 17 will be aldmitted. Barbara Rush
'Phone 2-2534



NOW SHOWING
SMatinee continuous from 2, Evening 8: 30-'Phone 3-4666

He really y
~lives up to
his narnel




11Y



m15111111118TEUA STEVENS*RIP TORN


ps -.""'" "" "

I

I --cu'BIC IS THEMS HRI(N
FILMF 0 TRHE NCGDE."
t@P -CountDracdaSocus

I
WILLAM MARSHALL *
DENISE NICHOLAS EIlD cotn*.Almaecm mruome..
VONETA McGEE GODON PINSET THALMUS RASULALA."
NO ONE UNDER 17ADMITTED.


mShe Mlrthittr


No ene troterS 7n Adt rt oo
~1, i ~ISe~e 2 featlure~s klae as 9 p.m.
NOW thru TUES. *
"New c:enturia~ns"7 & 11:os
J. W. Coop" 9 p.m. Only
COUMBU RCTURE~Shu Rn
IOEORGOE C. SCOTT

A ROBERT CHATF-RI 8,7, CE PRW





CUCPA ISION' D


CLP ItB"tSpg


n--- urrF


STARTS FRIDAY
Matinee 1:30 & 4:25, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-100S


I
I

I

I

It

I

E


r


i


DONNA Andrea Darville
I5, (ABOVE) has entered th
Miss Queen's College beauty
contest as Miss Geranium. Mi..

333, we losm 1 Ir n
stands 5'l", has brown eyes
and brown hair. She likes
reading and meeting people.
Her sport is basketball and her
ambition is to become a speech
therapist.
The contest will be held on
March 31 at 7 p.m. in the
Polaris Room of the Holiday
Inn --- n aair


SIZES
28 -40 HALF


OUT ISLAND AIRWABYS OPERATIMG SCOEDIAE
EFFECTIVE MARCH 19 1973

ALL FLIGHTS OPERATE DAILY EXCEPT WHERE NOTED


DEPART


ARRIVE


NASSAU TO:
S0 1 5 A.M
4 50 P M
NASSAU TO:
9 30 A.M
NASSAU TO:
7:30 A.M
10:30 A.M JET
11:30 A.M
3:30 P M
6 00 P M. JET
NASSAU TO:
8:30 A M.
5:30 P. M.
NASSAU TO:
9 30 A.M
2 30 P M
5 15 P M
NASSAU TO:
7 00 A.M
3 45 P M
NASSAU TO:
8:15 A M.
I 2:30 P. M.
3:30 P M
NASSAU TO:
8 00 A.M JET
10 30 A.M JET
3 00 P M. JET
8 00 P M. JET
NASSAU TO:
8:30 AM \
11:30 A.M
1:30 P. M
2:30 P M
S:30 P M
NASSAU TO:
7:15 A.M
10 30 A.M
2 30 P M
S 4S P M

NASSAU TO:
7:00 A.M
3:45 P M
NASSAU TO:
8:15 A.M
12:30 P M
3 30 P M
MIAMI TO:
1:10 P. M. JET
MIAMI TO:
00 P. M


ANDROS TOWN (FRESH CREEK)
I 0 30 A. M 20 1
S 05 P. M. 203
CHUB CAY (BERRY ISLANDS)
9 45 A. M. 851
FREEPORT (GRAND BAHAMA)
8 10 A M. 71
11:00 A.M. 73
12:10 P. M. 743
4:10 P. M. 75
6:30 P. M. 77


ANDROS TOWN TO:
1 0 4 0 A. M
5 15 P. M.
CHUB CAY TO:
9 SO A.M.
FREEPORT TO:
8 30 A.M.
12:30 P. M. .
2 10 P. M. JET
4 30 P. M.
6 55 P. M. JET
GOVERNOR'S HBR. TO:
9:1 SA M.
6:20 P. M.
GREAT HBR. CAY TO:
10 10 A M.
3 05 P. M.
S SO P. M
MANGROVE CAY TO:
7 3S A.M.
4 20 P. M.
MARSH HBR. TO:
9 3S A.M.
1 50 P. M.
4:50 P. M.
MIAMI TO:
9:30 A.M. JET
1:10 P. M. JET
4:35 P. M. JET
9:?0 P. M. JET
NORTH ELEUTHERA TO:
9:05 A M
12:05 P.M
2:05 P M
4.05 P M
6:00 P M
SAN ANDROS TO:
7 40 A.M
10 SS A.M
2 00 P. M
2 55 P. M
6 10 P. M
SOUTH ANDROS TO:
7:55 A.M
4 35 P.M
TREASURE CAY TQ:
9: 15 AM N.
1 30 P M
4 30 P M
FREEPORT TO:
11 30 A.M. JET
SAN ANDROS TO:
10 55 A M


NASSAU
10:55 A. M.
5:30 P. M.
NASSAU
10:35 A.M.
NASSAU
9:10 A.M.
1:10 P. M.
2:40 P. M.
5:10 P. M.
7:25 P. M.
NASSAU
9:45 A. M.
6:45 P. M.
NASSAU
10:35 A.M.
3130 P. M.
6r15 P. M.
NASSAU
8:20 A.M.
S:00 P. M.
NASSAU
10:15 A.M.
2:30 P. M.
5:30 P. M.
NASSAU
10:15 A.M.
2:40 P. M.
5:20 P. M.
10:15 P. M.
NASSAU
9:30 A.M.
12:30 P. M.
2:30 P. M.
4r30 P. M.
6:45 P. M.
NASSAU
t:SS A.M.
11:10 A.M.
2115 P. M.
3:10 P. M.
6125 P. M.
NASSAU
8:20 A. M.
5:00 P. M.
NASSAU
10 15 A. M.
2:30 P. M.
5:30 P. M.
MIAMI
12:10 P. M.
MIAMI
11:45 A. M


GOVERNOR'S
9:00 A. M.
6:10 P. M.


HBRt. (ELEUTHERA)
80 1
109


GREAT HBR. CAY (BERRY IS.)
10 00 A M. 851
2 55 P. M. 853
S 40 P. M. 857
MANGROVE CAY (BERRY IS.)
7 25 A.M. 501
4 10 P. M. 503


MARSH HBR.
9 25 A.M.
1:40 P. M.
4 40. P. M.


(ABACO IS.)
401
403
405


MIAMI
8 45
12 10
3 45
8 45


A M.
P. M.
P. M.
P. M.


NORTH ELEUTHERA (HARBOUR IS.)
8 55 A M. 101
11 SS A M. 103
1 55 P. M. 10S
3 SS P. M. 107
5 50 P. M. 109


(MASTIC POINT)
301
303
305
307


SAN ANDROS
7 30 A.M.
10 4S A.M.
2 45 P. M.
6 00 P. M.


304 TU TH SA
304 MO WE FR SU
306
308

502
504

402
404
406

73

303 MO WE FR SU (ONLIY)


SOUTH ANDROS CONGOO TOWN)
7 45 A. M. 501
4:30 P. M. 503


(GREEN TURTLE CAY)
401
403
405


TREASURE CAY
9 05 AM
1:20 P M
4 20 P M


FREEPORT (GRAND BAHAMA)
1 45 P.M 65
SAN ANDROS (MASTIC POINT)
1:45 P M. 304 MO WE FR SU (ONLY)


011 G AA I





OUT ISLAND Airways
(OIA) Monday inaugurated
regular four-a-day pure jet
sr#vice to Miami when the
airline's now BAC-lll carried a
group of 73 Miami Dolphin
players, families and fans on
the first departure from Nassau
of Flight OIA 48 at 8 p.m.

the e97 ISupurow s n
reigning champions of
Aamerican professonal oot oll
accompanied by their wives
and group of their loyal fans.

Lxm ugd latN Mo dam
afternoon on the re ular
Monday International pAir

Baimta st g regulars who
helped inaugurate OlA 's
Nassau-Miami service wer
Mike Kolen, No. f7
linebacker; Tim Foley, No. 25
cornerback; Norm Evans, No.
73 tackle and Vern Denkerden,
No. 83 defensive end. Group
leader was Rev. Tommy
Watson of MiamL


19~ 1~ l~c'i~,gllc,- ag? CII i

2 millionth Omega Chronometer goes to


famous Georman soccer star

The two millionth Omega chronometer passed through
the official Swiss Government tests on August 1 last year. A
few months later the president of the Argentine Federation,
Mr. E. J. Garbarin, presented it to international soccer star
from West Germany, Mr. Gerd Muller.
Muller, known as the "international goal king", was not
able to participate in the Germany-Argentine match held
recently at the Munich Stadium: last month but his injuries
permitted him to appear and personally accept his
world-famous Omeaa chronometer.
Mr. Garbarino is shown presenting the watch to Mullei'.
Local agents for Omega are Mademoiselle Ltd.


'IOMM~I'S ~UIAOIE


PRICED ATl0


)rEN'S SillS 'll.0I & '15.01


FLIGHT
NUMBER


FLIGHT
ARRIVE NUMBER


DEPART




a~ I I I I I


CLS~FD DV.BRN RSUT-FS


SECTION


GRAN BAHAMA


CAI rrr~ I ~l~L )LI ~lC 1 1 A~~~)~NIIUYI 1 7 IIICIL YIIUICI 1


AEL rWAnTEDP


L I 1 I L I


I


7


_


2237Chevy Camaro, 6 cyl.
Immaculate condition. Asking
$700, no reasonable offer
refused. Phone 5-2104 after
six.
C9209
1972 TOYOTA 1000 in
excellent condition. Price
$2,000 or nearest offer. Call
42050 after 6:30 p.m.

C9171
1968 FIAT 600 (Mini) good
condition. Snip at $350.00
Mwe c ain colony. Call


C9ERE'S A GOOD BUY,
Owner leaving colony. 1971
FORD PI NTO in good
condition $1,800 or nearest
offer Phone 28015 from 9-5.

C9229
1 WNE4R LEAVING ISLANIDa

r97 1,oo Vuh i


C9219


- at*- -



TODAY'S ~3 j jj
1966 PLYMOUTH
FURY $400
Also available
1972 VAUXHALL


A97 LHV MALUBTH190

BARACUDA
Smart car $2350
good condition $2750
1968 CHEVY CAPRICE*

1968 FO CORTINA
6od ONTIA $300

Nre AP ,o $200,


good savin $ 1450

1970 FOOD MUSTANG'
sports car $1500

m97 VUHA L VIVA

1971 SINGER VOGUE,
1"9eciall rc~dLEMLI1500
Ilke new 52200
1989 RAMBLER, $80

Financing Available
Come in and see us
Oakes Filed near
Police Barracks
Phone 34711

FOR SLLE
C9056

2 F5ne amlfe n aker
Call 77947.
C9218
RACE HORSES for sale.
Phone 2-2660.
C9237
WE ARE the Iargest used
furniture dealers in the
Bahamas. We buy and sell
anything. We also finance. Fox
Brothers Furniture Dowdeswell
Street (formerly BESCO
Building) Telephone 28012.


S A5L REFRIGERATOR
(Frigidaire).
Boat Traller
General Electric Flat froner.
For information call 31303.

LOST
C9197
LARGE SIAMESE CAT with
wht fetClifto tPoinT r ea.

Do phn Pn sat Ci fto Pie .
$50 Reward '

BUSIE8WSS
OPPORCIrilTIES
C9217


PLANNING TO BUY
A LOT?
Act nowl Hilltop lots,
corner lots
Easy terms
Call Frank Ca y
at 27667
FRANK CAREY

CALL TODAY


C9242
Mrs. Frances H'iggs of
Chippingham would I~ke to
inform the public that due to
serious IIlness, her husband
James Higgs is not capable of
rnsacting many us nss A l

forwarded to her. Anyone
attempting to do otherwise will
be prosecuted.

THE TRIBUNEE


C9216
WANTED Pilot to train for
E18 Twin Beech aircraft. Must
have commercial, multi-engim
and instrument ratings. Ideally
400 hours total time required,
preferably with 25 hours taill
wheel. Bahamians only need
C tru to Ervin~t PP le
Bex N7m7 Narsna.

LOCAL FINANCE COMPANY
requires the services of two
young men, 20 years and over'
to learn. the credit business.
Own car essential. Also, one
female req uiied as

hao sitin ee: wd C93
FO3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

BANK LIAISON OFFICER to
assume responsibility for
analysis of loan portfolio and
Ilaise with various U.S. Banks
ue I inies ofmac eitandupd

widhothere shilard matte s
university graduate majoring in
International Banking but
wuld a so conmsie appi~can s
experience with International
Fnc Ia Organiz luon thr
senior level. Please send resume

Dle akO9g Cor or~a i
Nassau.

MUSICIANS WANTED
Pianist and Guitarist. Must be
able to sing. Interview daily
1:00 p.m. Flagler Inn.


wREQ RED CivilEMEineer t

EA inerinng Cnso t ng Fi

Sy as experine He rsl ee


design. Please send resumes to
P. O. Box N-7782 or telephone
2-4596.

TRADE SERVICES
C8947

p4r afesse

Mackey Street

N SSoA eBA MAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUT Y TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENALNG
MECHANICAL HAN LN
EQUIPMENT
ASAOCMASRGLOEAGENCE
& EIVERY
MOVIG STNORNGE
STEE BAD

SPECIAL SU NATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795. 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
C8963
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters for
ho"esin "'iv'?c"!'cnd ho Ibs
Lowe 5-8213, or 5-1772
WORLD OF MUSIC, Dewgard

C9206
HOUSE PLANS
Drawn to your specifications,
Low rates. Free Estimates.
Call
Evangelos Zervos
Telephone 22633
Between 2 p.m. 5:30 p.m.
C81049

Y OBELE IF AOUHEAPNOT
CALL ABCO FOR ALL
Y OU R C L`EAN IN G
PRO BLEMS -- TEL:
51071-2-3-4.

P TO AWN WINGS AND
CAR PO RTS AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and
prompt service call 2-8421.


BSCALLY FURNISHED 2
bedrooms (1 bedroom
airconditioned) 1 bath,
kitchen, living and dining area,
washing machine. Montrose
Avenue. Telephone 2-1722-5
and 2-3865.
C9176
AVAILABLE April 1st
airconditioned, fully furnished
1 bedroom apartment,
including T.V. and telephone -
Brooklyn Avenue. Phone
3-1329.
C9082

YAVCRRF OETBE RO
LIVING FULLY
BEAUTIFULLY
FURNISHED, BA CNY
OVERLOOKING OAN
AND POOL, LOVELY VIEW,
TOP FLOOR. CALL 4-2113

3 BEDROOM 2 bath furnished,
airc dt one 5@ Ie. Phone

C9207
FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house with airconditioned
bedroom In Bamboo Town.
Phone 36959.

FUR ISHED 3 bedroom 3
private bath house, 2nd floor -
beautiful location Cable
Beach. Phone 7-8328.

C9230
PAALMG ELE. MayOMe rEntedi a
one unit or divided into two
sones 2A~m e parking.


CTY WAREtHOUS a prx.
rental. Call Leslie Fox a
28012 31295. No lease
re uired

C9240

cFFC ENCY AP R MN

woen preferred. Phone





Beautiful beach and gardens
Occupancy May 1st through
December 31st. Married couple

s prviso rf n rem s Phn
4-1476.

CARSS FOR SAILE
C9238
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY

1970 FORD 7ESCOD.T
Blue Std. 4 Dr. $995
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
A/C Bucket Seats Gold. $4950
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Radio Auto
Blue $1600
1969 VICTOR
2000 S/W Auto $850

Gr nV4 DS. $995
Aut mtic White $2600
1970maHEVELLe
2 Dr. Auto. Green
A/C $2950
1 970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE
4 Dr. Sedan
Blue/White $2000
1 972 PONTIAC VENTU RA
4 Dr. Auto.
Radio Orange $3500
1967 HILLMAN
Std. Green $450
1970 PLYMOUTH 'CUDA
A/C Red/Black $90
1989 FIAT
124 S/W 4 Dr. 50
1970 FIAT
8900 FRD CAPRI $00
Auto Blue $1650
1968 DODGE

19l FRnD MAVERICK 80
Auto. Red $1800
1969 CHEVELLE

Au o. God $1200
191 RB BLER $10
1972 FIAT 124s
5 Speed 6000
miles Red $00
1970 HILLMAN MINX
Std. White $995
1969 Pontiac GTO
A/C Vinyl Green $2000
19681 FORD ESCORT


Blue $650
1985 DODGE
Blue $300
Trlade-ns Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Pant
Telephone 34636-7-8
C9211
1970 MORRIS MINI. Like
new. $850. Phone 54396.


= NATIONAL FIRM of
chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicant should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport. Bahamas.
C7256
QU ALIFIED MA LE
BEAUTICA ENTREQUI RED

BO LF- 90, FREEPORT OR

C7266
REQUIRED: a Superintendent
for two blocks of apartments
in Freeport, Bahamas.
Candidates should be
Bahamian and be experienced
mn the ma neance and rea




Box F-25, Freeport, Bahamas.

C7265
A SUBSIDIARY of an English
quoted company requires the
services of a GeneraloMear gr

rpproximat ly 200 aar menits
Free ort, Grand Bahama. The
candidate should have had at
least 10 years experience in an
mini trativeeposit on. Salary

commensurate with

Wr re in rst istanceF-to


C7262
DRIVE INN Body & Paint
needs (2) two MECHANICS
with experience. Must have
own tools, must be able to
work on all types of motor
3 2-20 for int rviewF epr


OIROEroD'HOTEL Megsuired
f ly gua fled d no sa e hr g


banquets. Only persons of
proven record of at least two
years experience in similar'
aost n ean apsly


Box N3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

C7237
AIR CANADA requires an

ms aveM prvi eA riec
in maintenance DC8 and DC9
aircraft, however, applicants:
with 707-727-BAC111
VC10 experience would be
con sidered. Successful.
applicant will be required to~
undergo training in Canada.
Bahamians only.
Apply in writing enclosing any




FOR MLEI
C7263
NEW 14 FT. "HOBIE CAT":
SAIL BOAT. FASTEST BOAT
OF ITS' SIZE.
PHONE FREEPORT:
373-5382.
C7264
KINGS BAY 2 bedroom
Garden Apartment, $50,000.
Dwn payment $13,000 cash.
Reply to: Adv. C-7264, c/o
The Tr bune, P. O. Box F-485,


In loving memory of our dear
mo hera ictori cCur s9h~o

One year has passed away dear
mother
Since God h s calledayou home
Around the snow white throne
God knows how much we miss

Never shall your memory fade.

oitonP Cry, thbr e uhbtoe s
Cur y, seven grandchildren, 14
relatives and friends.


MARINE SUlPPLIS
C8944
PACEMAKER 44fto Luxur ous


C 215 16ft. EVINRUDE



Wil consi tradn fo lre
at
C9224
ONE 24 FOOT Ultra Boat less

tas ,Ie yerodlk riew I

$8,000.00. Can be seen any
m. **********
aA so oe 16efoot ("la n yp e
old with 45 HP electric start
egn~e, ulaly mqipe Osn
at telephones 55521 or 52554.

POSITION WAWTED
C8500
IF YOU need a young girl to
work in your shop please write
AdvO C8B00 32 7e arbs e

C9233
LAD Y BELONGER *
experienced Hotel Manager
Nassau, Bermuda and U.K.*
qualified Accountant, requires
position. Phone 78102
mornings.

C9246
Young Lady seeks daytime
housework., Call Lorna
3-6493, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HELP rmNTED
C9174
SALES PERSON with at least
2 years In Jeweiry and gifts.
Good working conditions with
possibility of advancement. If
interested in and capable of
managing department, apply in
own handwriting giving age
education, recommendation,
experience, salary required,
reasons for leaving previous or

perti nt pl ft natiandtooMhr
Jons P. O. Box E.S. 6218,


C9204
The Board of Trustees at Fox
Hill Public Library invite
applications for the post of
Trainee Librarian. Must have
"G.C.E. 'O' levels, and b
prepared to pursue further
studies. Interested applicants
should reply in writing to: The
Chairman, P. O. Box 390 F. H.
C9212
Esso Standard Oil S A
Limited tas vcn f A.
Graduate Ega vacancy fork a
the Bahamas. Applicants must
'have a University Degree in
Mechahical or Civil
Engineering, preferably with at
least three years practical
experience, and must be
Bahamian citizens. Qualified
Energetic, keen men willing to
make a career with Esso should
apply in writing stating their
qualifications to the Manager,
P.O Baa a- 37 eNeassuu, N
Bahamians now working
overseas who would be
Interested in returning home to
fill such a position Esso would
a~pprcirat this being brought
to their attention.


FOR RENT
C7249
3 BEDROOM, 2 Bath Duplex
$200.00, CATV included.
CATBedroom, dwa er, galr5 g
Freeport 352-2126.



C7238
FURNISHED four (4}

a rcro dmtioning lated Rde
E caa lo Bahada afo e ie

3hn 1 abpoccu 32 60 or


IIELP MNTfED
C7232
JOB OPPORTUNITY
R ulme sby an Assoit ofi

oOnSIla ON: Financial
Accountant
QUALI FI CATIONS: High
School education with 3-4
sunr ad ancedc ecatio gr
JOB DESCRIPTION N:


rna es ao to eops crh s

on various financing activities.
Co-ordinates flow of funds,
administers loan agreements,
performs cost accounting and
assists in various complex

account tin o agl 2ms et n

operations c ncernunbesmaa n




aconigexperience is hconinghly

desirable.
ONLY BAHAMIANS WILL15E

Plae el statingdet its of
AnMB pesentR salP7RS NN: C
OFFECEPROP. O.BOGR F-4
BAHAMA.
C7247
TODHUNTER MITCHELL has
vacancy for a Fork-Lift
Operator/Warehouse Keeper*
Must be experienced in liquor
business.
For appointment call Freeport
352-7311 (9-5).
C7248
TOa UNTE MIVI EbLeL h

operate capping, high speed
bottling and labelling machine.
For information call Freeport
352-7311 (9-5).

C7230 d
Sorter and Washman require
with minimum of one year's
experience and full knowledge
of commercial-type washing
equipment.
Apply Bahama Uniform Rental
&e Laundry, Box F-822,
Freeport.


901 FOR SALE
EASTERN WATERFRONT.
Baycroft one bedroom
apartment, large living, balcony
overlooking pool and ocean
$25,500 firm, fully furnished.
Call 42113.
C9241
2 LARGE APARTMENTS lots
good area off West Bay Street.
Price $8,000.00 each.
Lots on Malcolm Road. Price
$4,300.00.
A good buy in Foxdale
Coc os n. 5 nH 159 E tae.

aal lot 6br ez2 Estate.

Choice lots South Beach
Estate. Price $4,400.00
For information and
appointments and to I~st your
property for quick sale. Call
BiII's Real Estate 23921.

C22 FOR SALE
1. At actird two-bedroo3

living room, separate
dining room, sun porch,
powder room, garage,
laundry, etc. Lot: 96' x
130'. $50,000 furnished.

2. Outstanding by in C b

water. Beach rights. Three
alrtonditioned bedrooms,
t wo baths, large
living dnngciopekin hon

crpp o, sptcous$55,00
Furnished. f h



living dini g, spac oundsun
utility room, etc. Lot: 95'
x 130 Attractively
landscaped. Price reduced
to $75,000 for quick sale.
RE.LCES ATE


Tel: 2-1041 u2-1042.


UO SIERE R T

Two storey, two bedroom, two
bath HOUSEBOAT w/sundeck.
Furnished March '73. Owner



Charlottprie ner By.Imed iate


Ceteil.Can be usedNasa Has o
store ahnd warehous.Hssie

enrace Ca~ll 213 r


C FIE ONE BTOEDROOM


apartent nicel furrenished.
$20 er month.e Call Cester a
eThopsne Reall Estate o
2477783.


CHREE LABOURERS: Must
be able to work on large
grounds area, or do any other
tyo of labour job.
TIrierested Rp rons ap~pl Aof
HTEL & ECOUNTRGRAN% ,

BAHAMA. Elon Martin, Jr.'
Personnel Director.

C7243
EXPERIENCED ROOFI NG
FOREMAN AND ROOFERS
NEED IMMEE EAPT YT

352-5007, G.B.C. ROOFING
CO.


_ ___


-


y:-P--r---t--


I ZI


I


I I


I I


I I


C9 9 FAMILY of the late
Prince Albert Ferguson would
like to thank their many
friends and relatives for their
expressions of sympathy and
floral contributions during
their recent bereavement. The
Family also wishes to express
thanks to The Ministry of
Home Affairs, The
Superintendent and Staff of
Her Majesty's Prisons, The
Doctors and Nurses of Princess
Margaret Hospital and Butler's
Funeral Homes,



C9244M EOIM


E 2E1RIENCED SECRETARY
required for Resort
Development Company'
knowled ltae II 2Germ1mr
pre erred Plaecl 14 a
appointment.


IIELP WANTED
C7257
( 1) INDUSTRIAL
OPE RATI ONS DI RECTOR:
S would mo rfullym cnversa t

Lauendr and DrykCleanin ea
thwe feld combined with
kno lege of recent ry
leaning M ndh tunedars
tcnques. Ms ave a es
ten years experience as*
MInge .In Laundry and Dry

S1hoMANAGER bGeOLFoSHOP:

n eandis mn 'v sa fl

and retail clothing business
Should have at least five years
experience in the retail
clothing business.
(1) CLEAN-UP-MAN: To make
cffeein kesare o eaenriand
needed.

DRIVER UNDRpicku Ra~nK
deliver to the Valet Shop and
the Ardcade Store, also o at k

table linen to Restaurants and
drvrs icene Wong hor


gofRA Eal keM in roe tdo ick
up range balls after they have
been hit on the range. Must
possess a valid driver's licence.
Must be willing to work
week-ends and holidays.

ast M SON:t fo build blodesd
cncrt la ing. Should hav a


(1 BO LERMAN:e Mitn

Handling units and pumps, at
least two years experience in
Boiler Room.
(P)A TESS T wor o

neat in appearance at all times.
Expere enced applicant

(1) BUSGIRL: To work on
shift basis, must be able to
un rstawriteMustcountneata i
appearance at all times. No
experience necessary.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 12
Noon only, to King's Inn &
Golf Club, Personnel
Department.


C8938
ONE EXTRA large two
bedroom two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartrrient. With large living
and dining all basically
fumished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shiriey and
IBu kit.Facilplies, phone,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a~m. and 5 p.m.
C9185
BASICALLY FURNISHED 1
bedroom, 1 bath, kitchen,
living and dining area.
Montrose Avenue. Telephone
2-1722-5 and 2-3865.
C90(49
OPFFCE SPACE: Roberts
Bu ding, Eas~t Street just olft

monthsq. ft. $90.00 per l
270 sq, ft. $135.00 per
month
360 sq. ft. -- $180 per month
975 sq. ft. $400.00 per
month
AI#CONDITIONING INCLUDE

OFFICE &I STORE SPACE:
Out island Traders Ltd.
Shepping Centre, opposite the
Potters Cay docks. An ideal
1a0ston is available for a
itek-out nretaurnt equipment
alredy Instled. Only
$308.33 per month. Stoet and
.office spaceavailable for as
Iltle as $277.00 per rponth. _
UNPURNISHEC
APARTMENTS OAKES
rfCigL $140.00 per month
,OFFCE SPACE OAKES
FiltLt. 8)68 sq. ft. $290.00

APARTMIIENTS OUT EAST
OFFRSE D. FULLY
FUQEAL 8 NISHED OR
Silb, FURN Ddd $3.
rggpggteely per month*
Abse~~nditinng and swimming
Stne BRT L.
RaTS LD. 23177. 8*rt
,,4,i~~r Ltd.


rle or wanted...


rental offerings...
ies. .. .

he Tribulne now


C9194
1971 MORRIS 1300 -
righthand drive. $1000. Phone
2-8802.
C9191
1968 OLD Cutlass Supe, 4
speed standard, wi e oval

~1969 FIREBIRD. 3 speed
standard, just like new
$2000.00 1971 PINTO,
yeliew, very good condition.
All must sell. Phone 2-8015,
from e arm tn a nme


reaches 33 1/3% more readers
than any other daily distributed
in the Bahamas. That's a lot of
doors. And they're opening
more every daoy.


Thre Tribune opens doors to
homes, apartments, hotels,
stonre and offices by providing
latest up-to-the-minute news
both local & oreigln...


Thursday, March 22. 1973


SWl Srthb~t


CLASSIFIED


LL FOR RENT


I I


Glllb ~BR SIILt


GCII(UI~ IIIMlliS


ntLr Illlllltl


RERII ESTATE


door I opene





a ~bargains for sa

B pu lic notices
real estate & I
4iBtri B o
Io opportune t
IWe make things happn. As a result_ TI


CEAD THE
g~rtbuar





__


--


Chess








thme pawns o IkR Powr

fu asainapsttnfo t h
wol ta lmponhp Bak




trin tto moutWitels 8am-d

Ipant piece*,~l lust offered to
swap queens. Shouki White (a)


Par ;unes: 10 second achess
master or expert; 40 seconds.
couanter standard' 3 minutes, olub
player;: 5 minue avenage; 12
minutes, novice.
Ch ati on Nio.

te) is correct. White forced a

SxKP c K -9; B -08 h
plays 1 .. B x R; then 2 B x
Gloh 8Q: i --K1 ch, K-


--a llllIIII


I


I~


I HAVEH'T PACKED OR DONE 1 I tVVE TWISTED MV >OU'M/ SEENW
4 THING In PREPARATION AZM ./ Itt SE READY TALKINGI TO
REX--- T WAS On MY WAY FOR MY TRIP--- ANJD MY IN FIVE MINUTES / MELISSA /
HELLO / HOME ANJD THOU6HT FLIGHT DEPARTS
I sHoULD TAKE )OU AT EIGHT-THIRTY/ ALLTHEI I NJICIDENTALLY,
our To OfNNER MORE I -MWIL I SE SEEING

MORNING./ OUT FOR A SMJACK
1.~~~31THIS EVNING /


AIL
I IAIPITIUI I

I
AINIDlr
I
I
L
I
r
I


JUDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS

WH NTWELL...SAM AND YKATHERINE, YOU AMAZE MEI IF IT... IT'S NOT 1 WHAT I
ALAN, YOU SHOULON T )KATHERINE ? ABBEY ARE NOT ANYONE HAS PREACHED TOTAL THAT I RALYMA
HAVE TOLD ABBEY ; FORMALLY ENGAGED HONESTY BETWEEN MAN AND OBJECT TO1 RS WHY DOE5NT
THTBTY RMN ... SUATWE ..UWALL TAKE/ WOMAN, YOU HAVE YET ABBEY'S ISWYDNTTHIS BETSY
CALLED FOR SAM! / TFR RNE NOW YOU OBJECT TO ASSEY'S KNOWING..)FREMO(T HAVE.


14. Encounter. (4)
le. Cata alt. (5)
IIt veu. (r
te. Custom. (#)
al. Halo. (4)
2t. For car rnters. (5)
as. woard ol approval (2)
~W~WW24. seriousr. (5)


n


APARTMENT 3-G By Alces Kotxky


STE VE R 0PER & MI KE NOMAD by saunders & o ver gard


BELIEVE ME,
HE S NJOT GO+JeC TO
GET AWAY WITH THA;T
CAI) ME AA
hUKEED


9


-I
r
1
1
I


cARROLL RIGHTER'S


.(sf&r GHOROSCOPE
from the Carroll itighter Institute

GENERAL TENDENCIES: A good day for
using your best judgment to gain the answers
that are vital to your welfare. Don't hesitate to get in touch
with others who have data you want. Let them know your
plans for the future. Avoid expressing prejudices.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Consider the welfare of
others today instead of just thinking of your own wants. Do
whatever improves your health. Take the time to have a
serious discussion with loved one tonight.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You have a new plan to
discuss with associates, but make sure others are not around
when you do so, or they could steal your ideas. Ask an
adviser secretly what you can do to be a happier person
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Talks over with a clever
friend how you can improve the quality of your work and
be more successful in your regular job You can get the data
you want by attending the social tonight. Dress well.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Make an
excellent impression on a bigwig and gain the backing you
want and need at this time. Much happens that can help you
to use talents you possess. Don't waste so much time.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Assume a new approach at
long-standing affairs and you can expand easily Show more
determination and increase production. Handle important
correspondence that has been accumulating.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Although you have much
work to do, take the time to please associates so that aill
goes more smoothly for all concerned Schedule your time
wisely so you can handle a new task.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Study new association
matters that are not working satisfactorily and make those
improvements that are necessary. Make the future brighter.
Handling financial affairs is very easy now
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Putting a new system in
operation will help you become a more efficient and
productive person. Avoid one who has an eye on your assets.
Use tact with everyone. Entertain friends tonight.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You have some
particular talents that you can express today, but first confer
with an expert. The evening can be particularly romantic.
Show that you have poise.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) A good day to show
family and friends devotion. You are also able to get much
help from them. Handle only important business matters. Be
sure to take health treatments.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Engage in activities that
inspire you the most and advancement can come more
quickly and easily. A higher-up is watching you so be sure to
work precisely and efficiently.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Study those new ideas you
have for true practicality before you put them in operation.
Consult with experts for their suggestions, then make the
little changes that are necessary.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who has fine ideas and
will test them frequently to make sure they are progressing
properly. There is much intelligence here, so give the right
spiritual and ethical training that keeps your progeny on the
constructive side of life. Give duties to perform early in life
to whet the appetite for work Fame is possible.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make
of your life is largely up to YOU!


"A fine son you've got. He should be home with his
mother instead of down here interrupting the office
routine,"


Rupert and the Mixed Mag c-10


Tigerily g uldes Rupert
through the house until they
reach the shuttered room.
Peering round a curtain they
o hchC jb ha s la tah
three parts of the fishing-rod.
" It Is a daring thing to mix
magic," he is saying half aloud.
ALL RIGHTS


" I am the first ever to try it.',
The chums stay well back so
as not to disturb the Conjurer
in his work, but when he
ru icets the litt ea onooAr yhe
have brought a friend," he
says to Tigerlity. That is well.
Shall need you both."
R)ESER1VEo.


Winning

Br id ge
BrVISTIOR MOLLO
81tngSuth, what contract
would tne reader lIke to be in
on this hand which came up in
the trials to choose Argentina s
tham iorm thSouth American
Dealer North : Both Val :
North
+ J1064s
oQ3
0 10 5 2
West 4 084East
4 AKQ7532 9 8
O Q4 O AJ876


VA K J 10 9 7 5 2

Left to themselves, North*


Is what happened. In one room,
the contract was 40, one down,
and in the other, 50, duly made.
Paradoxically, it is easier to
make 11 tricks than only 10.
The opening moves In both
rooms followed the same course.
Declarer ruffled the opening
sad leo d uaid done the so


sinceh coniuld affor toe lo.setwo
doiamnds In withe even, bohel
Eas reuff, d as ell an tth
could th afford.seed
In threr oth roo playing inw
50,c deca re hnadl eno oto uth
tiaons go ith the OK.t h ls


"There but for the grace of God go I."


ACROSS
1. Part of a chair
back
6. River bank
,10. Tawdry


14. nnont
amendment
18. ----- Ness
18. Shopper's
delight
19. Aricle

jM op ts point


ng




ent


23. Brew
24. Frosting
26. Young herril
27. Duffel bag
29. Inaugurate
31. Prior to

3 Russ an asset

39. Huge toad
40. Direct cell
division
43.Leaf cutter
44. Existed

4 R asenable


two easht-setter wordsw la the unl.
No parate : ate fort sa word c:

veY.r tl oa o w Zlords~. ecu


in~ I~rk hrk k baran brk hn

shark.


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S *UrZLE

.48. Abyss 4. Imbecile
DOWN 5. So
1. Wooden shoe 6. Rummage
2.Hbit 7.Concerning
9. Aoudad
5 17 )8 ( ~~ 10. Benefit
performance
12. Doctrine
15. Long teeth
17. Taxi
ag21. Smallest State:
abbr.
23. Proud
25. Statues
26. 8 namin's
ois br
27. Treadle
28. D'Artagnan's
friend
30. Himself
2.. El a o
35. Cloy
4 ~37. Sun disk
38. Breeze
41. Marsh elder
42. Prosecute
atures 3-24 46. Wife service


No. 7.078 .. by TIM McKbY
Aenrou
i. Batio nes (anas.). (8)
8. Candal appendage. (4)
7. Triamphs. (4)
9. Stubborn. (9)
it. List. (4)
13. Numaber. (4)


P)pr time 32 min.


Ap Newsfce


Thurcsdy, March 22, 1973


Qlhe Qrtilttle t


~7** "f'c/3p


REX MOR GAN, M.D.


By DAL CURTIS


Bro~h~r Juni~


CROSSWORD

PUZZ LE


on nam~e ~L





n ud once
word mus~t contain the nlarge
letter, and there must he at lead(


Dorn
1. star dormy (anas.). (6. 3)
g. Loer sm~y aspire to be.
4. olittso)Mes. (9)
5. Found In the garden. (9)
8. A ut o-
matto

10. oud eh

1t. Nnatesl.
15. .Te w el.
(5)
20. Acted as
I.P. (9) eses,.at












lo Whe QWrtbittit


fa BWDC~BISHIE BESTOFBOTH IIWRIDS!


I


I I I --I


__


e rtni me la angleaeling elelm a difibrease la ledge...dgend t.


I ~ ~ ~ T ----


P~IFI


E. GIBSON


_ _~_ __ __


Thursday, Marchr 22. 1973_


By G;LAD)STONE THURSTON
TAKING; UP WHEiRE Jet Set left o~ff. Beck's Bees stopped a three run
fifth inning rally and defeated defending league champions Del Jane Saints
5- ase nig D~el Jane, havinglostoneother to Michael Moss pitching to first
Jet Set (1-2) dropped into third baseman Anthony H(uyler, Htaven
place, one game out, as Big Q advanced to second. Hluyler lined to
Marketeers in the first game in a 6-3 right fieldler Ken Rodgers who on
" victtr ove Bhamas Bene r~s wa~ anuyeero npf rtsaven oln third and
s second place a half game out. Following F~red Taylor's pop up
Batting first. Roosevelt Turne' to catcher Sidney Outten. Rodgers
s grte aek fliunfrt nigsnanother exp nsive error wt

fourth with two dorwn cracked a scdrinuty rsecnd Knowl sthe eam
single through centre batting in second and first respectively.
Turner for the first run. Sim Humes at bat for the second
T ancingn tthee b is ng of l)(n time after he got on in the second
D~el Jane had a chance to equrlize hSydn y Wi ison seecndt anasem can
eor go ahead when they had bases to, him and this was the cause of
Icrred wt ne oout. Howevr ref Beck's 3-0 lead as Huyler crossed.
fileder Ken Rodgers the fifth and the~e Janeo f tef tid toih ore
sixth batters respectively went a double play against them.
Down swinging. Sidney Wilkinsoln Behind 4.0 going into the
started that innings with a base hit bottom of the flfth, D~e lJane
/n first before Eddle Ford, on aAdderley oin first Ford's single to
d;en saunr tollwedh wth a alk right drove him to third bringing up
Taylr'sonlyof he gme. first baseman G~len Saunders.
Nalrsonl SOR te p Saunders who walked in the first
Both teams failed to score in the dtronmutrl seid
sdr n t dho~r 1nainn right field to drive in odad
led off Beck's two run third innings a lndderlveLinokarecot etr an
with a single into left field. With Saunders crossed for the third run


808W1 DINBLYEI 1ESH'T MAKIE IT, BIT--



Al 88 Ingraffllm SGISCIS with l5 otilef





By IVAN JOHNSON
ALLEN INGRAHM, Stingrays star American Football safety end has made the "short list'
following a tryout camp with the Washington Redskins and is one of 16 selected to the Redskinl
summer camp July 10.

ch ncet kf mak nge at grat
overjoyed Ingrahm told TIhe I
Tribune today after being .S ? ll


tan


selected from 4381 others.
Nassau Jets star player,
G~odwin Blyden, failed the
selection miade last F~riday and
Saturday in Washington.
The two football stars were
Invited to attend the 'try out
camp' hy Washington Redskins
hecad coach, Gecorge Allen, after
hec had seen them perform in
the All Stars game February 23
;It the Q. E. Sports Centre.
''The weather conditions
were appalling", said Allen" we
had to practise catching the
ball and sprinting in a
rainstorm and 34 degrees, so
you can imagine how happy I
was when I was told by coach
Allen that I had been chosen in
the final 16 to report back for
summer cam e oneJullenl01dhes


before we started the trials that



he said.
Ing~rahm is a 6ft 6in safety
end for the Stingrays, weighs
205 lbs, and can cover the 40
yards dash in 4.8 sees flat
just what coach Allen was
looking for.
"Anyone who couldn't
sprint the 40 yard dash in
under 4.9 sees was
automatically eliminated," said
Ingrahm," because in the
opinion of coach Allen a player
just isn't good enough to be a
pro if he's slower than 4.9

se during the trials in




talents would be better used at
linebacker because I'm a very
aggressive playpt and I hit hard


9'


SAMUEL WILLIAMS, Mr. Grand Bahama and Mr. Eleuthera, (left) and Victor
Lockhart, Mr. Junior Grand Bahama, are among 16 others seeking top honours in the Mr.
Bahamas International Bodybuilding Contest scheduled for March 31 at the Government
High School A~uditorium.



li Will VIe 0fo titl8 10 Mr.B8118asS



1818[08110881 Boidiluilllefs CORIOSt


WASHINGTON REDSKINS head coach George Allen
explains some fine points to Allen Ingrahm, who feels he
may be on the squad next year.


SECOND) HIT
time got hi a du d ht it the tip


First baseman Huyler

nit fieohe sit of eng f

stop Haven also had three assists
and two put outs.
faiylor, the winning pitcher who
went the full length, struck out five
and walked one. Michael Moss took
te loss fork Del Jane. He walked
tree, struck out one and gave up
fou bai continues at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre on F'riday
right when Paradise Island take on
Heastie Lumber in the first game at
7:oo and Jet Set meet Schlitz Beer


and often, adi dIntgahahs he
coach also said he was looking

'f d a repl crnn ow i

linebacker, Jack Puardee, has
riow become a coach said
Ingrrahm "and since there is an
actual vacancy in the team to
which I am suited as a player I
feel that my chances of making
the grade na e chigr ltence

in Washington Ingrahm said he
had a short television interview
and signed au ograpin.va vey

excited throughout the stay"
said In rahm. "Myself and
Blyden were treated very well
by the Redskins, in fact we
\vere the only tow play rs ot

epne adtne eforteo covered

into pro football and between
now and July 10 I intend to
train extremely hard", said an
elated Ingrahm.


mictdeisjleacker atd B~st
MVP '72 G;odwin Blyden, told



b~ut he was delightedl at
Ingrahm's selection.
"The coach said that I hadl
the speed but 'unfortunately at
6 ft and 200 lbs I'm on the
small side for a pro footballer,"
sad BI d n
i"Ap rtenfrons; not being
chosen in the final 16 it was a
pleasant experience and I was
ver iprssd wth th
St r e mrnlse e ficien
organisation of the Redskins,"
added Blyden.
Blyden said he hopes to be
in contact with coach George
slen pin thed near future Ims h



with what I have learnt during
my brief excursion into pro
football should help to
improve the standard here.


TE MIS SEMI-

FINALS TOMORROW


seed fo toe oahaa Te
Championship tourney will all be in
action at the Montagu C:ourts
tomorrow when the tourney moves
itthe sern's nal. seed, the left
handed, dashing Sonesta Beach pro
and Nassau Champion F'ritz
Schunck is expected to cruise into
the final when he nieitsve -ran annd
Gecorge Catrey in his semi-final
round.
Leo Rolle, the No. I seed, has
si t l h qua tr final agai s
to play this match due to the fact
that he was selected for the
Caribbean Davis Cup team, which
lost to Colombia, mn Colombial last

AHowevr Rolle shul do b ge o
Astn aihu mc rul g
berug la tor the seifnuns ndee w

the Montagu Courts. The final of
the Men's doubles will be played on
Saturday, March 25.


El G TEEN BOD Y-
BUILDERS from Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera and Nassau,
among many others who are
undergoing constant training,
have entered the Mr. Bahamas
International Bodybuilding
contest scheduled for March 31
at the Government High
School Auditorium.
The contest is open to all


past title holders.
Exhibitions of strength feats
will be provided by Frankie
Meg Knowles, who will do a leg
press of over 2,000 pounds and
Steve Burrows, dead lift, and
standing press, shorty styles
and bench press. Other
exhibitions will be provided by
the National School of
Self-defence headed by F~rankie
Adderley. There will also be
wrestling by the Bahamnas
Wrestling Association.
Bald wi s a Iling wat


teeh an allswn i 3h0

stomach while bending over
backwards.
Contestants entered so far


are Samuel Williams, Hercules
Rolle, Dwight Palacious, Amos
Saunders, Ezra Russell,
Richard Clarke, David
Micklewight, Baldwin Darling
and Andrew Harewood in the
senior division.
In the junior division there
are Donald Pratt, Victor
Lockhart, Jeremy Knowles,
Michael Palacious, Tony
Mortimer, Thomas Cloud,
Prince Bell, Alfred DeCosta
and Roosevelt Stubbs.

Eld n, Nosrem S eting Arthu

s~e etd tjdrge Ih bvnt
master of ceremonies and full
proceeds are in aid of the
Ranfurly Homes.


A gsies 9olgei co s in

C0 enent Hg ch< ol i
annual student Tournament at the
Blue Hill Golf Club. The second
ioud f tt a N.tS.C.3 Tourna ent
Hill Golf Club.


Hhnh a pr wh isH.S. cr ma 5

on to we rsfs s op

St. Andrews College*
This squash tournament
comeludes onSB lur mong gt
finals will be played.


DODGE DART '

2*Door Coupe and 4-Door Sedan with auto transmission, disc brakes, power steering,
radio, A/C optional from $1,400 DOWN.


DODGE AVENGER

4-Door Sedan and Station Wagon. Coming soon 2-Door Coupe with &e without auto
trans; disc brakhes from $900 DOWN.


LET ONE
OF OU'R


HELP YOUI


ri ,,


BE~CK'S BEES DOWW CHAMPS

TO LEAD LEAGUE SERIES


$


~iY
r












r


~3L






i


IIPSET IW STUDEn'T SQUASII TOURWEY


C. MORRISON


CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.

Oaes Field Phone 3-4711
P. O. Box N-1525 Nassau, Bahamas


AUTOtitWID DBALUi e gT51!