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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03290
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 7, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03290

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Bank with


********M********


ENJOY FREE CHAMPAGNE
ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREEPORT
-T.ELEPHONE 77303/77778-3




DI


C -


but thJt the amo!unt woluld be:
Iincreased niaturally with the
antiiipated Increased u ragotnite

Goi~rlernment pre~sently Fret
an 3nniually incireasi~in fixedl
amount111 of roya.lties~. cent\ t or ech;ct ttn of .tcagonuel
protduired whi~chver amotiunt i:,
greater In any one yea
Thel Marrcona Corpc. Itli I'
owned by Uitah Intel national
and Cy~press Mines

CI TY MARK EI

FEELS CH ICK EN


SCAR CITY TODAY
By MIKE LOTHIAN



lat IIrda f n ow th


chic es for saalre to the publicly

m nager Gural 1 ryeirs told


shipment from Gray's Poultri
Farm in Freeltort, but "it
probably won't he more than
hal: or what w~e neecd.l
While C'ity Marketsi has no
chickens. a Quality Markets
spokesman said his store is sc,
far experiencing no shortage,


yeteeda an 1il cIlectc a
another order tomorrow.
David aSadunderso of Qualit

the store would probably be
experiencing a shortage
sometime next week, as no
other poultry farm can fill the
gap left by G;ladstone.
Government "will have to
lower the dlut!" on imported
chicken. Mr. Saunders said, as
chicken "could' be cons:idered a
staple "
"There has been a shortage,
but we have managed said
Rupert Roberts owner of
Supervalue Food Stores, the
Bahamas' second largest food
store chain.
"We have substituted frozen
chicken that was available." he
said.
G~ladstone F~arms stopped
production on Thursday,
according to, owner Niven
Nutt. jr., because the Price
Control C'ommission has not
yet answered a request made
by hun~ in January to increase
his prices. F~eed prices had
increased to the point where he
was losing 15 cents on every
pound ofT chicken he sold at his
old price. Mr. Nutt said.
This morning Mr. Nutt
explained the continuing
avadiability of chickens from
his farm.
He said that in mnid-F~ebruary
he introduced a new improved
packaging technique, and
increased the price per pound
of chicken soldf in the new
packaging.
The new price for a new
product was not touched by
price control regulations, he
said.
Ile went on to say that
anyone wishing to buy chicken
in the new packages at the new
price Is f'ree to do, so, provided
the buyer picks up his order
from the farm. No deliveries
will be made.
lie is selling only to "bona
fide wholesalers" willing to pay
the new price, and to
operations that are dependent
on chicken, such as
ke-nthe-ba _riers.


Pri


ce: 1 $ Cents


Wednesday, MIarch 7, 1973.


1-es sa~ibility'fo fo 85%
LIVINGSTONE COAKLEY SEN. ARTHUR FOULKES
... speaks at last ... warns on oil pollution




Htil 1 eSRI 1 Pne wood G dns F Sea.' slam P

.,.,,,,..,h tSr 05850iin SChma IC


announced to~day) was seen as
"a very significant vote of
confidence" in the Bahamnas
A (;overnmetnt Informnation
Services press release attributed
a brief announcement to
Development Ministe~r Carlton
F F:rancis
"Tlhe G;overnment of the
Bahamas has u nde r
consideration a proposal by
Ocean Industries, Incorporated
and the Dillingham

Marporat norpor to will letas
the operating facilities at

O T eC poosha tis needed ty
accelerate the development of

reen agonite bu n aness t

benefit to theh Bahamas

(oen en in tet sk ma o



Iduh re Mr s din tDon ld Jn
Oswald wasdinterviewed at his



lea er es m iMea miin aas i
the development of techniques
for mining from the ocean
bed."
He said Marcona is "a
natural partner to work with
Dillingham on the development
of aragonite mining in the
Bahamas. It will add
teame dous techmca a d

Marcona, headquartered in
Snl oajiiso,a haudarsales in
billion dollars, and profits for
the same year were $34
million.
It owns one of the largest
bulk shipping fleets in the
world over three million
deadweigh t tons --an
important factor in the
aragonite business where bulk
shipping is the key to making a
prof it on a low-cost
commodity, Mr. Oswald said.
He said Marcona has a
reputation of being "a good
citizen" in countries where it
has interests, including Peru.
where a city of 30,000 was
built around an iron-ore mining
project, Chile and New
Zealand.
Aragonite is a pure form of
limestone sand dredged from
the ocean floor and used in the
manufacture of glass, steel,
lime and cement, as well as in
agriculture and the chemical
industry.
LONG LEASE
Ocean Industries, a
subsidiary of Dillingharn
Corporation of Honolulu, has a
long lease from the Bahamnas
Government for four areas of
the sea bed within the
Bahamas, one in the vicinity of
Bimini, another rear F'leuthera
and two more off Andros.
The lease is good until Ihe
year 2015.
Only one of the areas hdb so
far beed under development.
At a spot some 30 miles south
of Bimini, Ocean Industries
built the 65-acre Ocean Cay as
a base of mining operations in
the area.
Full-scale mining began early
last year, and in the first eight
months a million tons of
aragonite was produced and
shipped to the U.S.
Existing facilities represent
an investment of more than
$30 million.
RECENT
Mr. Oswald said the proposal
for the Dillingham -Marcona
partnership was submitted to
Government very recently. The
Government's announcement
came "almost immediatelyy"
he said.
He also made it clear that
the reference in the
Government statement to an
increase in Government
royalties did not mean it was
prosiosed that the existing


AFTER FOUR MONTH:
counter allegations levelled
development.
Making it clear to House
members that he was "speaking
for the record," the former
Minister of Works said he was
prepared to accept "full
responsibility" for the decision
to place the utilities in the
sbdivisilcm overhead rather

"But I did this," he said,
becauser myprimarqosco nc r

the programme was geared to
thewlowdinc me br cket, I sa d

oednc erthe cost to the

"T isewa h oni waiar i


ad l stand on th t.n

postponed motion to adopt the


Noembe 1n eto iure in o


y
S OF SILENCE, Education Minister Livingstone Coakley had his chance today to
at him by Cat island representative Oscar Johnson regarding the Pinewood Gardens


and missed his chance until
today. (The Prime Minister was
absent from today's meeting)
"I am speaking for the
record and not in defence of
anybody," he told members
this morning. He said he was

perera ivetand to exp ai sho
he saw them at the time and
howh in wsr lgckl on with m
that legislation was vitally
nee nsronyares a d th

nubr ofinef rs were intha

i a bey, nume o


b ns co veritg t sne f ort
of subdivis 3ENT


sbd insion isofl ad ire en
government took over and it is
trying to implement this
policy," Mr. Coakley declared.
He said the government was
looking into the upgrading of
subdivisions. "All of us know
that subdivisions were on the
loose prior to this

bI ng mae obtri tema i
"There is a number of
sudiaisions w ere governme t
infrastructure. We are trying to
do the best with a bad
situation. In any bonding
situation this is the
responsibility of the Attorney
Geea 1 d weuehi
re omen nation astou wethes
th With is accept le or not.
Wihregard to Pinewood
Gardens I and II, Mr. Coakley
said there were certain
economic factors operating in
any society that could not be
isolated. In addition there were
certain basic procedures laid
down for any subdivision.
These procedures were
carried out and the
requirements by the Ministry
of Works met.
"When the subditvulon cme
to the attention of th Mnsr
of Works, there were cer ai
utiltiefoanim ple en atison of
the su vision.

TECHNICIANS
Mr. Coakie sad he did not
claim any technical knowledge
but he was saying that he ha
passed the matter on to the
proper technicians to advise

however, he added, he could
recall writing a memo to the
technical officers concerned
saying that "whatever we have
moask the developer let us ask
hi nw
"The only main factor for
which I as Minister take full
responsibility was whether the
utilities should go underground
or overhead. This was my
primary concern because it
would reduce cost."
The only other factor the
Minister said he took into
consideration was that the
subdivision be consistent with
the pattern of development.
"We were responsible for
utilities and I have stated
where I waived certain
implementations. I take that
responsibility and no other."
Although debate on Mr.
Johnson's motion to adopt the
report continues tomorrow.
the government has already
made it clear it does not
support certain aspects of it.
Shortly before the House
suspended at I p.m. Deputy
Prime Minister Arthur Hanna
pointed out that there were
certain recommendations made


in the report that the
government could not go alons
with.
MORATORIUM
In particular Mr. Hanna
referred to the committee's
recommendation that a

muur sbmiv s opl epdic tio
for a period of 24 months
while eenfo cingsthe c nditio s
the interest of the Bahamas

u a rnmn 'lnde said'
cannotd vee mtshand ofn th




oubd v n rn s etld hv
his application he rdd.'ta M

Coaekleys had c coa 1 stated the


rdc i e spz cto pro f r
"It is obvious the
government must have thought
it fit to approve and approved
it. However this doesn't give
government's approval to the
terms of agreement. Normally
buyers don't know what they
are getting into with these

varemn si al~esmenalusua l

Mr. Hanna said that all
thie governmenthvvas co crn d
utilities met the necessary
requirements
"Government is satisfied
that so far as the size of the
lots and utilities are concerned,
they were tryn to achieve
gov rnment's bne~ctives.',
CAN'T VOTE
Opposition member Noel
Roberts (FNM-St. John's) and a
member of the Johnson
committee, said he was unable
to attend the committee's one
meeting. He agreed, however,
that new legislation was needed
in the area of subdivision, but
his only main objection was to
a moratorium.
"ln no way could I ever vote
for this report," he declared.
"We are moving into
independence. Development is
lifeblood. This is moving
backward. Surely this House
can not accept that
development should be held
back if the developer is honest.
"Our main objective is to
improve the lot of our
citizens." Mr. Roberts said he
was asking the House not to
accept such a moratorium.
On the other hand the FNM
renegade member from Marsh
Harbour, Mr. Errington
Watkins announced that he
would support adoption of the
report
"I feel it is time this
government of ours does
something to protect the poor
man of this country. Pinewood
Gardens is only swamp. The
people are being robbed but
with the government's
permission and this is the
grassroots that the government
is so concerned about.
"Any man who would
develop in this country would
need to have his head
examined. They (Pinewood
Gardens) are using the people's
national radio. I thought that
was only to spread PLP
prop agenda," Mr. Watkins
declared.
"Who is robbing the
people now," he asked. "Not
the UBP. The UBP is dead but
the people are still being
robbed.
"This report is timely.
Legislation is badly needed. It
is time that the poor people in
this country had some
protection from these loan
sharks and pirates."


all matters pertaining to
mortgage loans, hire purchase
agreements and subdivision
land sales finance.
Mr. Johnson's original
motion for appointment of the
committee sparked a heated
Hious debate centred aroun
developer Robert Petry.

MemberC on b hh sides wer
highly critical of the business
practice o cood in dvla er

w hrc Deputy Prime Ministt


ula pae adve ting dpc i
the Pr sshma Mirny tH


indicated from the start of the

Pieod t h i ens deaet


"The Government's
open-door policy, so far as the
oil industry is concerned, is an
e e-widening pthretrt to a e

security of the Bahamian
poil oemannd their Fnatiural
said in a press release.

haveFbeen att m ti tno alerl
th G vernn nt and awak n


rh 1 nealeculable damb k wh c


refaininga anid petrochemical

a"Just e cently, the local

ehc thudhv shce 5tr
whic shuld avebrogh
forth from the people some
ou -cry of cone n. However
wt h xepto o ny a
few letters to the press and an
eiditorudl or so there was not
the Government itself is going
bull-headedly on its way

de rctiton of the B at er
heritage.

At osphNri iAnd iistcsticon o
the United States, was quoted
in these newspaper reports as
having discovered that a large
area of the Atlantic Ocean,
including the Bahamas, is
extensively polluted by oil
and other wastes from the
petro-chemical industry.
"In a survey conducted by
the NOAA, it has become
apparent that certain species of
marine life have already been
poisoned by wastes from this
industry and chemical
contamination is now a danger
to the whole chain of marine
life. The very reproduction of
some forms of marine life may
be in serious danger,
FOOD THREATENED
"If this process is continued,
or accelerated as appears to be
the intention of the PLP
Government, then the rich
fishing grounds of the Bahamas
could be wiped out in a few
short years", Mr. Foulkes
warned.
"The industry which could
be developed from those
fishing grounds will be
non-existent and a rich source
of food for the Bahamian
people will have disappeared.
Whatever survives will very
likely be poisonous to human
beings.
'Another i nd u story
threatened by oil is the tourist
industry, which has given this
country a standard of living
which is envied by the rest of
the Caribbean and other
countries as well. In a political
atmosphere which has brought
about the decline of growth on
ohter fronts, the Bahamian
people are exceptionally
fortunate that tourism is still
there to take the edge off our
suffering and to provide
income for a sizeable number
of our people. But oil and
tourists will not mix.
"Already the beaches of the
Bahamas have become polluted
by globs of tar (crude oil) and
if the present rate of pollution
continues, neither tourist nor
Bahamian will be able to find a
clean spot on our beaches
"According to The New
York Times, many of the great
beaches in the Caribbean could
become foul and unusable.
Already the pollution of
famous Pink Sands Beach at
Harbour Island, certainly one
of the most beautiful beaches


in the world, has reached
ru in o us proportio ns.
Bahamians and tourist alike

trn whc stic totesi
apparel and which are smeared
oe thisibrach anhdama y other

"It would be a tragedy and a
sn wagamnst bhumianityheir ta'

geih rhtwnshold lor s ccessi e
gnrt las ofmtohe Iianed a


gardeansisd th e lstlace on e

cn t ata rf ah hh e usr
ou pope toha thi threat its

continued wtos encouraage teo
mduhst ttho haurnastsasdsa
gadone jus t last webyPrime o
Miansismtr Pindlrfing in
Walshingttb incal fashin, r

le leod hotne ba thy b
and abole to help solve te i
enetrigy rssi thatorlaer Uantd
Sotaues At whatcost to the oi
Bahamas i h aaa a
Miitr Pindl ig a hv his
eyes igon mlin f olr f

rexlsvenu t will coe fromt ta
the encousisreagmen of in
and pe tro -el chlemical
manufayctrisi ng Hoeehe Uis
Sappaently oblivious to the

byso millions of dollars ofdage
whicue hcan bel done by one
singe acient involvingth o
monster 350,000 toan tankers
whih il beroe naigatigor
"Considetring. thoeer dae i
alpreadly donevi to the eooy
of hish country under hs o
snleadrhp acdnd cnonsdeing this
mnsew bag 00 i ton which r.
Phindn wislb dropping us" r
Foulers asaid "I vetur osy
that hde may yeto down in

plresiyding toe the most m
effethiveriaino country une i
in mdershp nd times.." in t


(FNM)n was trodayn usworn ins
tha e reprsenttiv for Long
Isl and following nElctions o
arsdndd Phe thei hmosted
Mfetierouinatain was wecome r
ightbouern (FNMClarnce

Town) and Norma on Soomn a
(te George's) tasiv well as
Hsannaad Speowgake Arlintion

"rough aeind whith somse tis
and travdials. PHoweve Sihe
wihdMr. Fountain grs eat m
success.r (FMCacc
Mrt. Bteor gve hm a specl a
welco Prme in tatthey both r
ueda tod beschoeahers arlnd
boh srve Has hoeadmtast es of
memb te rsof the tHoe and
staff would always be treadyto

Riseplig Mr. Fountain sraid
"it was ar logwaye bu at the i
wendof te road I found that
jusedtice prevailed." er a
Mosr.e Fonains helectior to
mebr fthe House no rig te
Oppostionl numysbe red tonie


~rittun~


VOL. LXX, No. 89


AFTER 4 MONTHS' SILENCE

MINISTER SPEAKS ON SUBDIVISION






Coakley accents


SEEN AS 'SIGNIFICANT VITE OF

COnFIDENCE' In THE BAHAmAS




Oneof largest development


firms in world may joii



in ar agonite = ining her e

By MIKE LOTHIAN
GOVERNMENT IS CONSIDERING; A PROPOSAL that would
make Marcona Corporation, one of the largest development


'full


50198 US oil energy crisis

IF THE OIL industry of the Bahamas is continued the rich
fishing grounds of the Bahamas could be wiped out in a few short
years, Senator Arthur Foulkes warned today.


e baR f le ap
r C MRI I ggg



de i SUP EMIE COURhT JUDGESofwillhadb Amen thi
fishermen against their conviction for poaching in Bahamian

Mr Justc aes Sct tate yester following the appellants,
Mr. Justice Samuel Graham almost two days of arguments,
deferred their judgment shortly contended that.
before 6 p.m., following a The fishermen were seen
closing arguments by attorneys fishing in and were arrested
for the appellants, James within the Bahamas exclusive
Thompson and S. A. fishing zone, and that police
Harris-Smith, and prosecuting officers are automatically
Crown Counsel Alpin Russell, fisheries inspectors under the
jr. Fisheries Act;
The fishermen are appealing r No fiat was necessary for
their November 3 conviction the transfer of the case and the
on a number of grounds, most magistrate did have jurisdiction
of them legal technicalities. as the Magistrate's Act gives
DEFENCE every stipendiary and circuit
Mr. Thompson and Mr. magistrate jurisdiction for the
Harris-Smith have claimed whole Bahamas;
that: Charging the fishermen
The arrest of the with an offence contrary to
fishermen on October 19 in the Section 8, subsections one and
Bimini-Great Isaac Light area two of the Fisheries Act did
was illegal as it took place in not constitute charging them
international waters and with two offences, as
because policemen are not subsection two does not create
fisheries inspectors, who are a separate offence;
the only persons authorised to Proof of the proclamation
make arrests in the exclusive was not needed, as the
fisheries zone; "judicial notice" of the
SThe transfer of the case magistrate is specifically drawn
for trial from Bimini to New to the document by the
Providence without a fiat Fisheries Act;
authorisationn) from the The conviction could not
Attorney General was illegal; have been based on the
The trial magistrate had no evidence of the navy officer, as
jurisdiction to hear the case; he testified to the fishermen's
SThe fishermen were location at 1:33 p.m. October
charged with two offences in 19, whereas the offence was
only one count, contrary to alleged to have occurred at
the rules for framing charges about 8:50 a.m., at which time
under the Criminal Procedure senior police officers
Code; pinpointed the fishermen's
a The prosecution failed to position;
prove the existence of the a Even though there was no
1969 proclamation establishing legal requirement for the
the fisheries zone, a document prosecution to 'prove a
the magistrate should not' have negative" in regard to the
accepted without proof; fishing boats, documentary
a The conviction was based evidence was nevertheless
on the unsubstantiated produced to prove that the
"hearsay" evidence of aRoyal boats were registered in
Navy officer; Florida;
a The prosecution failed to The magistrate accepted
prove the fishermen's five the testimony of a number of
fishing boats were not high-ranking police officers
registered in the Bahamas; who were also experienced
a The verdict was against the seamen rather than the
evidence and not consistent evidence of the fishermen, who
with it, admitted they were: not expert
Mr. Russell, in a two-hour navigators, and the verdict was
therefore consistent with the
BRASS UMBRELLA evidence.
STANDS Only three of the fishermen
have been in court during the
& MATCHING two-day appeal hearing. All
MAGAZINE RACKS had imposed on them fines
totalling S72,000, and most
paid the fines. But Froidan
118Ylf~l CIIIR% Basque, Bernardo Perez and
NASSAU FREEPORT Rafael Rodriquez were unable
to raise the $3,000 fines each.

























yrlsoner re eases

By George Esper
SAIGON (AP) The Viet Cong clraisnd on 'Ibeaday that the
United States shares reponsibility for sesolving a n ipass over
the exchange of Vietasmdhe prison rsand asked it to latervne
wth die 08ia tcrme


n)owNTowN MIAMI

Spurlal

bhilrl illtes


POWa FLOWN TO US. TODAY
CLARK AIR BASE, PHILIPPINES (AP) Operation homecomin,
officials say most of the prisoners of war rleased this week wMI be fown
to the U.S. tomorrow. They say 80 of the 106 American prisoners freed ny
No.;a z e tnam wi ::be .w o b usd a ted US a lnu d m c
Offcals at the base hospital say most of the men released are in good
condition, and they say processing and medical checks rar on schedule.
NO BREAK IN IMPASSE
SAIGON (AP) The re till is no break in an imparss between the
Communist and Saigon parties to the four-party Joint MilitaryCommission
talks in Saigon. The Viet Cong has uasd the Saigon govrnment to
immediately releaew one-fourth of the Communist prisoners it hodsr, and it
hau prdpcad that the second phase of prisoner exchanges b completed by
But there's no immediate comment from the Saigon government. Saigon
claims the Viet C:ong has not fully accounted for South Vietunmee troops
and ctyllians listed as missing.
Viet Cong and Saigon government representatives held their eighth
meeting in Paris today to discuss the procedure for political negotiations. A
Saigon spokesman said they agreed to keep their talks secret until
arrangements tor use full-fledged negotiations are completed. (e SEE
`STORY THIS PAGE)
THOUSANDS NOT ACCOUNTED FOR
SAIGON (AP) -- The second exchange of Vietnamese war ptrsoners is
expected to begin Thursday, Saigon time. This had been delayed more than
one week until the U.S. apparently intervened to settle a dispute over how
many Communist P.O.W.'s Saigon would free.
South Vietnam now has agreed to release 63-hundred Communist
military prisoners in return for some 12-hundred prisoners bdg freed by
Hanoi and the Viet Const. The Communists protersed when Salmon had
announced it would free only three-thousand men The Sovernment
cntiennded thea Comndonists hadn't fully accounted for thousands of

CANADA CONTINUES TO THREATEN WITHDRAWAL
OTTAWA (AP) Foreign Secretary Mitchell Sharp said Tuesday some
members of the Vietnam cease-fire commisson are blocking effective
operations and he indicated their actions might lead to Canada's
withdrawal.
He told the Foreign Affairs Committese of the House of Commons that
there is a "reluctance on the part of some members" to swee on
procedures for investigations and reporting by the International
Commission of Control and Supervision.
He refused to name the countries he said are at fault, but delegtes
from Hungary and Poland have recently rejected a Canadian proposal to
investigate reports of new North Vietnamese missile installations in South
Vietnam. Indonesia is the fourth member.
The minister also said the commission has had difficulty getting
permission from the combatants to visit areas where fighting has been
reap edsaid these are the disturbing developments that compel Canada to
question whether the Commission "wvill be allowed to function in a way
that would justify our continued participation;*
UNCERTAINTY PREVAIlS IN MONEY MARKETS
toONDOnNstAP) adhe dlals pdgd dwwml on Eumpen exchanges
and the new measures to reform the internardtonal monetary system.
Dollas say bank-to-bank trading in dollars was at a minimum in the general

"'8 51'.""fnane' 'iitr '.'iod th bge nn- ( nadansn h d t
price of gold declined one dollar to 83 dollars an ounce but it rose in
Zurich _bra 9d~o!ar and a half an ounce
SUDANESE PRESIDENT TO SPEAK ON GUERRILLA ATTACK
KHARTOUM (AP) The Sudanese president is scheduled to speak to
his nation on radio and television today. President Numetry's speech is
expected to be about the Arab guerrila attack on his capital at Khartoum,
Twho syan agm h aoenvm en fa te Sd md hos natr dit would no
longer be discusseI in the local press. This has left many questions
unanswred as to how the eight members of the Black September terrorist
gr up will be treated. They surrendered Sunday, after releaing two Arab
actges.
UNLIKELY SUDANESE TERRORISTS WILL BE EXECUTED
KHARTOUM (AP) The president of the Sudan has ordered a
crackdown on Palestinian guerilla operating in his country; and he says
:tb tinh BK ktSeptember terolr ca tured at the Saudi Arable
President Numelry also called on Arab countries to condemn the
murders of three diplomats.
First degree murder carries the death sentence in Sudan, but leading
SSup nes or do expet bedeve it i n tolythat any of the Black


AH NTON AP Amb~ro Do NlAnd G. Curtis Moore will



go mtt of cStatte tor ne alpe to to lea theN continpat of
ohemen 1n S tot Department ceremony. Nixon has also ordered all flags

EXPLOSIVES DISMANTLED AFTER TIP FROM FBI
elNEr tYOtrk, MA CHosw as oA>d fdis at rd ea ly td a
near the B Al srtael Akrlines carg terminal at Kennedy Airport. Bomb
squad officers turshd to the terminal after police received a tip from the
Police said the bomb ex erts to cd opnthe tu o ee gn
sedan and found three fl -galon trasdynontalrunk of prdie tI ren
lo~und botitish ofm poae ps and t plasticbb of other exdplo ivs

SIOUX INDIANS & GOVT. OFFICIALS TALK AG;AIN TODAY
WOUNDED KNEE, SOUTH DAKOTA (AP) Indians at Wounded i
onee Soth D~ako, we sed Whkd to amet again today wh gvrment
the Oglala Sloux tribal president. They also want the Interior Department
to revoke the tribe's cnstitution.
Some govenment offcisis say they doubt the Department will eliminate 1

van thpdoolCinc Th poic oubrn to por toa ulaln slf wmoor I

BANGLADESH TO THE POLLS
DACCA, BANGLADESH, MARCH 7 (AP) Benplis went to guarded :
polling places Wednesday to elect Bangladesh's firs par~ament with
victory a certainty for Prime Minister Shelk Mujibur Rahman's ruling i

Awmio votger.i

The Prime Minirstr was among the first voter, at a girl's school near his s
suburban Dhanmondi home. He refused to predict the outcome of the f
elections, but he apparently is a certain of it as everyone else. Early this a
wsem, toofflice scheduled a news conference for Thursday night* t


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P'ARIS (AP)--Most European
airlines boycotted French skies
tu. vnrb lty atm the d tour
conlision of two SpaIsbh ietuners
nyinl ander French adlitary ir
traffic control.
The 68 persons abased one of
t p anes, a dNsnanbrt wo9of
killed when the fuselage fell apart
Monday 29,000 feet over Narntes in
western France.
flee other plane, a fourengine
Coronado of the Spanish charter
company Spntax, landed sardey
with its 99 passenpts and nine
crew mesabers. Both plans were
ayndl ovr lmc vH rthe ay tr
strike.
Transport minister Robert Galleq
and the air force chiefor staff, Gen.
Claude Grisant called a oidnt news
conference rad placed major blame
on the Cronrad pilot. They cleaebd
the militay traffic control of
responslibutty.
nth n'snc trovernmeant put the
mnitary control two weeks ago in
response to the strike.
French commercial pilots at first
refused to fly under miltry
control, asserting the air force men
lacked necessary experience to
handle the 1,500 dally flights in
France's air space.
The pilots later relented, but
Ywes, Marchals, president of the
National Federation of Airline
Pilots, declared Tuesday that near
misses have been recorded every
day since the military air control
was set up.
The Interntional Fedetraton of
biln tPI ts/joined in the callb to s
so,oo0 members. American and
other non*European. cariers
ignoedovte Fchl bu pEuropean
almost toM CE It~l
British, Belgian, Dutch, Italian
Greek, Spanih and Scandinavia/

eanele lo Fre nd diveted3 to

The Belgian pilots' association
said the accident was "proof ... that
Frnthmimatry air control Is
Galley and Grigaut apparently
sought to defuse what could
gbecomecanse plos ed potitical a su
The military air traffic control
"functioned correctly and is
absolutely not to blame" for the
collision, Galley said.
prAn ofl lai Frnh in al Buis i
added preliminary lavestigations
showed the Coronado pilot failed
to tune In t the cremct trud
controllers, faled to obey orders to
slow down and attempted the
rtdht-had circling maneuver that
tok tm It he path of he DC9


without givilng hi achnc to
rep .hre pilot, pprsumabnly Spih,

dcivhinasir trafflp controllers' n s

coststoinstl ao contrit eol sysem
unfit t meet the needs of civil air
mh nust m be hen ft adre pi

wthaut Alvars had radioed the
Borideaxcntrole u stowrfrhl in ot
SAt ranmele l bt
th r tre charter lnen expresed
'surpr ise st Galley comments.

noear Coena where sothe crsh d
unddedr ntormet th edoof ciman si
thec base bertefrlrdsl


ares, a traffic checkpoint for
virtually allfinhs frmi Spal to r
Egladu cotross tofe ao shortp of


grounds eqimnt. hi n eb


"Whtte Laber









-It never varies






uWhite Label"

SCOTCH WHISILY-by .

DE WAR'S

Distributed by BUTLER A SANDS
Available throughout the Bahamas


2


ps family *IgyguagateE
*KHAtRTOUM, SUDAN, March

8 B~p p~n g (AP)- The Sdanese Pei~
c b lallv th l y n of h ee
e crjiQ ticlad unijon leaders leading Khartoum lawyer doubts
Redeafib~dlt nin Britains ~theklesI be executed if ti
reices fo consumers, bigger mp ein t Jaaner el Numairi said
k for the jobkles. in a broadcast Tuesday night
that the cSi iiembers of the Black
led for massive public September terrorist organization
nding to boost growth and would be brought to trial for the
m back unemployment, still Noe as>f U.S. c areson fa leo <;
ically high. Curtis Moore and Belgian charge
Barber programmed an 11 d'affaires G~uy Eld.
iondolardefcit bt mst The eight Palestinians
ho-ola deic b theos surrendered Sunday morning after
w~spapers c arged h failing to secure the release of a
ernment had not been number of prisoners in varitius
enturous enough in helping countries. No charges have been
lower-paid workers. broght rgains thm ye mts aia
'Kid's stuff," declared The punishment for first-degree murder.
but a leading lawyer who asked not
'he Daily Mirror said in a to be identified pointed out that
nt-page editorial: "It wasn't section 249 spells out extenuating
Circumstances, including "grave
ioak the rich budget. It provocations". Conviction under
rtainly wasn 't a this section could mean 21 years inl
bber-the-speculator budget prison, with about five years off for
it wasn't much of a good behavioutr.
,-the-poor budget." attorneys bc ud arsse thdefene
Trade union chiefs slammed guerrinlas are at war with Israel and
ber for not taxing the rich the two slain Americans were
the ig orpratins ore officials of a government supplying
the ig orpratins ore arms to their enemy.
for not making life easier If they were convicted of
the lower-income families. first-d*Sree murder, the lawyer said,
'This is a bad budget for defense attorneys likely would ask
inary people," said Jack clemency.~dnt fr cxc~v
es, general secretary of the if they were convicted of
It Transport Workers' firt-degree murder for the Belgian si
on. death, the defense attorneys
~he budet as ime at undoubtedly would ask for
he bdgetwasaime at executive clemency, the lawyer
fing up support for the continued. He said they could be
'ernment's anti-inflation expected to argue that the Black
Ipaign at a time when food Septebrn guenrilo dwh confessed
es are rising and rebellious woasassn Tltin Coranir were neer
ons are causing widespread sentenced and the United States let
ustrialttuermois ik fo th enst yer dof S artRoberuthI

ineers on commuter trains KigrlA o udnselwyr
the London area stopped already have volunteered to defend
k suddenly Wednesday, the terrorists. It is expected that
rin c nuelarti oufi nt0of h Prei t sof ahetAlgra e n

capital and putting Numaidi has supported the
sands of cars on the Palestinian cause and provided 30
ady overcrowded roads. A minutes daily on the government
onwide 24-hour rail strike radio tfor thheirbpr gam sdah
already been announced blamed not only Black September
Thursday, repeating a but also Al Fatah, the largest
men's walkout last week in PalestinianM o ganizht ndn, yo h
nize laour' capaig to connection, but Numairi said Al
Prime Minister Edward Fatah's chief representative in
th's anti-inflation freezelon Khartoum planned the operation
e creases. and then escaped to Libya a few
[ilitant miners threatened -hours before


LONDON (AP)- News~papes wer
didn't like it, but thre MI~peredmt
history i expected to bring lower p
pensions for the eldedy and more wor


Many supermarket chains
pledged immediate price cuts,
wth some tags slashed 15 to
20 pe e
One pharmacy chain
estimated the reductions would
save shoppers nearly 5 million
dollars a year. A mao goce y
group called the budget "a gift
to the housewife-
bu1xvestors also welcdaned te
budget.~ ~ '8 Sok ug n h
London market, and the
Financial Times Index jumped
nine points
The bu get was introd cd
Tuesday in the House of
Commons by the Chancellor of
the Exchequer, Anthony
Barber. It lopped 288 million
dollars off family bills and

UK 's condities for



LONDON (AP)- Britain's
Conservative government,
threatened by soaring prices and
growing industrial unrest,
proclaimed Tuesday a policy of
economic expansion and a war on
inflation.
MChancello rb the Exche a r
House of Commons the "twin
theme" of the administration's
economic strtregy Aoritthe1 fscal

e patT .n and the attack on
Barber was unveiling the annual
tax budget which governs economic
pomic Inde sa ects he tpordell of
the foreign exchanges,
This rate of growth, nearly
double that of earlier years, must
b ucc Ins ed rucal to Il trhe ntdon s
hope for steadler prices and rising
prosperity."
hEminenhav eridys enom st
such a rate of growth will suck in
impor ts at uch a pace as to roll up
a huge foreign payments deficit of
1,000 million pounds (2,500
million dollarso)ra arth eisaos
early in his peach that he would be
smable to stay on in the House for
debate hon his budge because had
international monetary crists.
The Chanedltor is slated to
attend international gatherings in
Brussel and Poi dit the sarc t



cndurrecis against tho .S dollar "sa
cmen tsrlestoi xht "sp rutog h
pr esues" ande makingre surthe g
"otEuropean enomic sytem was "
nobe r elor sad he had pos eda f
a umbreofie conditnst th oibr ma a
comuntity bfrom rem anyjoit loati
could bes lanchd .kn sr
THe shaidheelo were that moembe
conmbe a mmus ton see o ate set

hav therihta' to wthdraw fro the
commonit bfloa and devalu Bor
cupwd Ie lanh 'w us llb
preared toe gra t supot without
limits oft amount.o wthourt
Scdtonsl, and witountr obgtio
owlth rgor to guahrante fOnl the
admited oa and doesno ipoe an

thrl he sizeof rcen waks, Barber
Brmitain he saidould, be hunal
cn~dntona amnd d t ot obIgto
koleasofte suppot" should be
Inlmteretfe and thes o scheme mus
bhe srted out so hat theks foode
Britain h import wiull o be hit by
Immediat pricemo lac ftetreaebeas
o hanesn hexcanged rat "oes.a


call
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In a letter to Maj. Gen.
Gilbert H. Woodward, the
senior U.S. representative to
the four-party Joint Military
Commission, the Viet Cong
accused Saigon of failing to
carry out provisions of the
peace agreement concerning
the release of Vietnamese
civilian and military personnel.
The Viet Cong letter said
this "incorrect attitude ... has
seriously hindered not only all
projects related to the release
of military and civilian
personnel detained by the two
South Vietnamese parties, but
has also paralyzed all of the
activities of the four-party
Joint Militar Co msin"
"The Saigon government is
responsible for all these acts,"
the letter declared. "The
A merican government as a
party which led the war in
Vietnam and which signed the
Paris peace agreement, is also
res onsible for th qeto of
the release of military and
civilian personnel detained by
the dlies of the cmricans.
"We ak the Amflcan
government to respect strictly
all ihich ut has prornse i
measures so that the question







UNITED NATIONS (AP) -
Two Frenchmen freed from
Saigon's Chi Hoa Prison
charged Tuesday that the
Salgon government is
reclassifying political prisoners
as common criminals so as not
to release them.
The accusation came as the
Viet Cong and the government
of Nguyen Van Thies haggled
in Saigon over the release and
exchange of war prisoners.
Andres Menras, 27, and Jean
Pierr Debris, 29, were released

De e as said "we saw that


thy'weoe pcngn nhm o a


detainees sfter a cease-fire."

co feerenc ahkat a m
Headquarters. *
Mea said the gnd
accos to the files thr gh
other prisoners assigned to
work in the prison
administration. He said the
hingess in the files began after
~umours of a possible ceasedfire

Debris said they went to
Vrietnam five years ago to teach
n a secondary school in Da
Nang in lion of serving in the
French army.
He said they were arrested in
August 1970 and sentenced to
:our years for dbistibutinS
eaflets calling for peace and
UIS ttroopawithdrawals and for
,ionting5 88 Ve o fa
efore the National Assembly
building in Saigon. -

wee beaten nin mhe p dsn yr
n April 1971 for refusing to
salute the South Vietnamese
lag and suffered cracked ribs
lnd broken bones. They said
hey witnessed beatings of
theirr prisoners at least five

Mnras said Chi Hoa had
Iboult 8,000 male and female


Irioners weredn deportd at

whir ch theyresisted bonea
he feltiare dytinge fore lackof
ood and man ftedicin He
describe er deportaton aths




'on ahd mr da go H

ich cmon c lr shnafton


h nredh i aganes a

our tyrds and trenrw the 7


nto tnrack. Then the convoy
oes to the Saigon docks and
here s hpS n ewy ha
back takes them to- the
land."


of the release of the military
and civilian personnel detained
by the Saigon government can
be executed."
APPEAL
The Viet Cong appeal to
Washington was disclosed at
about the same time that
Secretary of State William P
Rogers told Congress he
expected the controversy over
Vietnamese prisoners to be
settled soon.
"I'm satisfied It is going to
be worked out in the very near
future he told the Senate
foreign relations committee in
Washington.
But Tin, spokesman for the
North Vietnamese delegation
had said earlier that Hanoi's Le
hec T o and U.S. presidential
adviser Henry A. Kissinger had
an understanding that the
United States would do
every ig it could to resolve
the question of civilian
prisoner.
A spokesman for the U.S
delegation in Saio sd h
would have n igomm diate
comment "until I check into
it." He added, "but the
agreement is very specific on

re cry tions abot are
understanding."
NO MENTION

make n@N metin ft ha
United States or North
Vietnam being committed to
resolving any disputes between
the two South Vietnames
parties on prisoners.
The deadline for repatriation
of all U.S. and Vietnamese
military prisoners of foreign
countries as well as American
and foreign civilian prisoners is
March 28, as set forth in the
Paris agreement.
Kissinger had this to say at a
Washington news conference
Jan. 24 when the cease-fire
agree ment was first
announced :
"We insisted throughout
tht the qluestion of American


thogo ut a dchnac n ul



"As you can see from the
agreement, the return of
American military personnel
and captured civilians is

an n ems sfhe tm rmne
from the return of Vietnamese
civilian personnel.
"The return of American
personnel and the accounting

uconm ioal iand actl otke
place within the same time
frame as the American
withdrawal,,
BOYCOTT
The Viet Cong and North
Vietnamese delegation have
vowed to boycott meetings of
the Joint Military Commission
and its subcommission on
prisoners until the dispute over
the number of prisoners to be
exchanged s nreolved.
Col. Dans van Thu, deputy

d lgatio t thetho~iur-pso y
Joint Military Commission
told Lt. Gen. Du Quoc D ng
the senior military
representative of the Saigon
government, that the Viet
Cong would release 1,200
South Vietnamese soldiers, or
one-fourth tofa whe Iit





of 26,734 military prisoners on
the lIst it submitted in Pairs.
This would be nearly 7,00
POWs.
In the finrt increment of
POW releases that began Feb.
a2 t Sion goverm zt

m ia ry dro nuel onth Ve

soh delSaigon government has
offered torelease anly a 00


lo erd teS n ber, i in




Saigon government asys its
own records show 31,8 I8
government soldiers and

t prd,c ed sherp thr t s
Viet Cong have filed to
account for them.


more of such trouble as gas
workers, teachers and hospital
aides continued slowdowns
today protesting the
government's wage controls.


THIE
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V.C. BOYCOTT CONTINUES



Vies ppeal to US


MOIST EllSPEAM UNIONS ANGERED, BUT- SIIDIL PIIESIDE I

AIRIIIES BAA $11lbillion deficitUK CALLS SLAYINGS


to end im as oe REICI FLISITS budget hell
*_,_ *M84 W,,,_ IR eP~ E m1& ae hR 18










3


, .


Qhr 4Trthunt
Nvuuna Annacwrs Jansas IN Vamas M- la
Being Bound To SwearrToTheDogmas OfroMaste
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, PubUdser/Editor 1 903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publidaer/Editor 1917-1972
ContriburkgrlEditor l972.




Th8 thiRg #8 nonle fOT&&#


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
WHEN I broke off writing this column yesterday I told you
that the time was 4 o'clock and that I was going for a swim in the
pool on the roof ... and to see the "sights" afforded by young
peos es n-i thingsat te pool-sha had my swim ... I've taken in
the sights ... and now, as Fr. Brendan recently described my new
way of life ... I'm back in my monastic cell, refreshed and
invigorated by the things I did and saw on the roof.
* ** *
I forgot to tell you that the Nigel Morrises are in Miami for a
month. My wife and I ran into Mrs. Morris on Miracle Mile in

Co. GM ri hs been ery successful in a real estate operation,
with offices in London, since he left the Bahamas. He is in Miams
on real estate business for his firm.
Mr. Morris, who was Inspector General of Colonial police
forces before he took the job as Commissioner of Police in
Nassau, was one of the finest Commissioners the force has had in
my memory.
The Morrises are charming people. Mrs. Morris was anxious to
know whether it was true we were really going to make a home in
Europe. She was delighted when we confirmed the report.
"How soon?", she wanted to know.
"Very soon," I told her because the day of decision cannot be
much longer delayed.
They are going to Nassau this weekend on a visit to Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Oakes. They will have dinner with us when my wife
comes over to Miami next weekend-
** * *
With Mrs. Morris when we met her on the street was a pretty
young American girl who had lived at Cable Beach with her

pa oas h dhos ottd u the street and hailed.
Her father, a wealthy man, has died. She told us that her
mother is married again and is living in Texas. All the family have
now left Nassau ... never to return. She is living in Boca Raton,
which is along drive from my hotel.
"We've quit Nassau," she told me. "We loved the island and the
people but we just could not take the changes any
longer.
"What about your house?", Iasked.
"Mother put it in the hands of a realtor," she said. "She told
him to sell it for anything he could get. If there are no buyers,
then just board it up and forget about it."
These are the kind of "quality" monied people the
Minister of Tourism says the colony needs today but they are
leavn nt cmn y oe
OTensday ngo youg oadyphoneld me ... gave me her number
... and told me that any time I needed transportation she would
be glad to take me anywhere I wanted to go.
Yesterday afternoon she pghoned again.
"I have talked so much about your articles to a friend of
mine that she is anxious to meet you. She is interested in history
and literature and would like the opportunity of talking with
you. We are passing by your hotel on our way to an appointment
in another town at about 6:30. Would you mind if we hailed
you?"
My son Bernard was in Miami and he came to spend the
afternoon with me. Shortly after he left the girls arrived. We had
a quick dinner together and an interesting conversation, mostly
centred around the history of nations and peoples.
I now have the telephone numbers of at least a dozen old and
new friends who want me to call them any time I need anything
to be done. And when I don't call them they often call me. My
telephone is constantly in use.

Both my wife and I are growing to like this place ... there is
something warm and friendly about it ... but still we are going on
to Europe before we really make up our minds as to whether we
should spend our summers in Europe and come south in the
winters ... or just make Florida our headquarters. This decision
will depend on what we find in Europe when we go there.
You see ... our warmest friends have always been in Europe
and so I feel that I may be able to do interesting volunteer social
work over there.
Oh no, I'm not going to sit down and rust out. Whenever I die
I'm going to my grave shining like a new silver dollar
And now let me tell you about Rotary today.
I went a little early because I had an appointment with the
Rotarian who organized the programme two weeks ago when
three young people ... two girls and a boy ranging in ages from 16
to 18 ... spoke on the dope problem in the U.S.
These young people had been hooked on dope for two to three
years. They had sunk to the depths of hell and degradation but
they had fought their way back and were now connected with
"Seed", a new organization that is dedicated to helping to save
the youth of the nation.
These youngsters revealed that at least 85 percent of the youth
of the U.S. were involved in some measure in dope addiction.


They feared that if the rot was not arrested soon America might
face the tragedy of having a lost generation.
These youngsters told the story of how they got hooked and
the terrible experiences they went through before they broke the
habit. Tlhe first girl to speak was 17 years of age. She was
absolutely brilliant. I have never heard a finer speech in all my
life. Before she got through every man at the meeting felt that he

woulurikes sh rit vsti o Nasru 1s week I told a friend of mine
about these youngsters.

n w it rstd ssn h earfo phi th te sa en orgnization

this hell in their own experience.
He asked me to try and organize a visit to Nassau by a couple
of these youngsters That's why I went to Rotary early today to
talk with the Rotarian who is in touch with this organization.
H" .'" ".omie up hep. a w uuldd realytb wonderbl if th

o igtenrn e.story these oungters have to tell. Charles Carter

As I said in yesterday's article I sat at today's Rotary luncheon
with two men who knew Nassau. One had sailed in races with

"obbbymis aetf e young man," he remarked. "A very able chap
,but he seems to play more than he works."
Bobby Symonette is one of the ablest men of his generation in
(he Bahamas. Since he has withdrawn from public life he has
Become an outstanding figure in international yacht racing circles,
sought after by the "smart set" wherever the wind fills the belly
ef a sail.


Pindling




wonder how Mr. Vesco and Mr.
Le Blanc feel about it? Is Mr
Paul Adderley back for it'
"You may win many battles
but still lose the war.
FRANKLIN G. FERGUSON
South Beach 1:state
New Providence. BAHAMIAS

V IS ITORS

GRATE FUL

FO RHE LP

EDITOR, The Tnbulle
Thank you wo~nderful
people of Nassau for every

dughe n r aire ee arC3s
of an emiergnc~y We were
"Skyward" passengers on a
cruise, but our daughter had 3
very serious Hlonda ace dent in
Dr. Poad's front ya3rd Quite
miraculously Mrs Pcoad

rsend o ud Intjed dlugtz rte
the Princess Margaretl Hospital
for very prompt surgery' by D~r
Farrington and D~r. Rudlra Tlhls
very definitely saved her from n
bleeding to death
In the meantime the nurse
and her husband rushed to the
Skyward so we, her parents,
could disembark minuO s
before sailing time. Ol

aperr 1 tely twa w eso a

me ing t ni et eopwe Ire
are constantly going the second
mile to be kind, helpful'
a cc o mm od a ting a n <1
hospitable. The doctors are
superb, and we are grateful for
all they have done. The nurses
in the Intensive ('are Roont
have all been most kind
Mr. and Mrs. Wiliamn Hart
Sweeting have visited us and
entertained us in their homie.
The managers of the Olympia
Hliotel tuive offtre dl o( id n
and gracious people continues
alWe wish we could list then
Again thank you and may
G;od Bless you ALL!
ALBERTA, JOHN
AND JANE REIMER,
740 Summit Avenue,
River Edge, N.J.
07661 U.S.A.
Feb. 28, 19)73.


~oavYlkt~F~~~~6~,:/


Hatchet Bay The Bahamian WVay


Wednesday, March 7 1973


Is pletased weth I
EDITOR, The Tribune,
The newly-reshuffles
annonumer by the Prime Ir
Minister two weeks ago, certain London in December 1972, I
individuals within the understood that the British
Government are displeased also also asked that A.D. be
supporters of the P.L.P. removed.
In the recent election "We all know there is only
campaign in the South Beach one true Black leader in the
Constituency, I assisted as an entire Western Hemisphere,
assistant campaign manager. In and that is Hon. Forbes
my opinion Hon. Carlton E. Burnham of Guyana" at
Francis was demoted in being present. Hon. Lynden O.
appointed Minister of Pindling is only a showman,
Deeorgmntth wily b oon whm mus co fess haos hhe

after Independence? any department. In my
We have had unfavourable discussion with disgruntled
balance of trade during service elements of the G~overnment
of Sir Stafford Sands and Hon. supporters, they were all in
Carlton Francis, our import agreement that come
exceed our export. I am taking Independence there would be 3
wait and see location on the decline in employment, for as
New Minister for Finance. The they put it, the investors would
nsusm e aitailcally gathered want to take a wait and see
Carlton E. Francis was the best "I would say A. D. H-anna
Minister for Finance this did a tremendous job in the.
country ever had. Under Sir Ministry of Hlome Affairs when
Stafford Sands former Minister one thinks of how the
for Finance and Tourism, Bahamian were walked on in
tourism and commerce the past in Freeport Grand
blossoms. Bahama, and New Providence .
In 1964 the revenue The thing that really hurts
B $35,513,000, expenditure most is that those who were

O20000undeor Mr. Faci makn g ithand tosnem to ae
in 1967 revenue $57,250,000 now so happy about the
expenditure $53,375,000 a current re-shuffles, are some of
surplus $3,875,000 an increase the very ones who were helped
of $1,855,000 that was the grost under A. D. Hanna
first year. 1968 revenue administration. I believe the
$65,589,000 expenditure move to have been a poor one
S6 4,7 92, 00 0 surplus and aedisgr ek to the BHtmiai

$ 97503 000 106xpe dt re Fr nis w emused. "Mr. H~anna

$3,155,000 srpu One would note very
Economist T. B. Donaldson, carefully when a story came
Chairman BMA, Minister for out on the Prime Minister and
Finance, Minister for people started talking,
Economic, most efficient Bahamas Information Service
members of the Finance would rush right away to
Department, I will like to see refute it, any other minister
more investment, portfolio you can forget it.
investment, direct investment For the Minister of Finance
and short-term investment, (Mr. Hlanna) his new post is a
more empicyment in nine promotion, but for the
months a steady growth in the Development Minister, it is
economy, and price control. obviously a demotion. If I was
I felt that I should get this in his position I would resign
matter off my chest, I was from the Cabinet, but he is a
reliably nmformedhaboutforeio ch isti ntrand a ver ofineomin

element outside the country country.
decided that the Deputy Prime It appeared to me that
Minister and the Minister for whenever the chief executive
Finance would have to felt that there was a threat to
relinquish their position, his position he got rid of the
before a certain Government opposition, e.g. Paul Adderley,
would give the Bahamas Orville Turnquest, Spurgeon
Government anymore loans or Bethel, the dissident eight and
renew aid. As an observer in now Hanna and Francis. I


This is the tragedy for the Bahamas. There are so many young
men of proven ability in the Bahamas today for whom there is no
place in public affairs.
Some of us hung on and tried to check the rot after the 196,7
election but Bobby was correct in his estimate of the situation.
Fortunately he is a successful young man in his own right ... and
so he can afford to play.
He takes the attitude that if the Bahamian people choose to
destroy themselves ... there isn't anything he can do about it. N~r
does he intend to eat his heart about it,
This is the stage I have now reached in my thinking too. I'ml
too old to play as Bobby does but still young enough to snatch
one last little breath of joy out of life.
+ .. .
A couple of days ago I wrote about inconsistencies in an article
in The Miami Herald about Governor-designate Milo Builer,
A friend of mine phoned me from Nassau to ask why I don't
write about how he got started on the upward trail in life. He told
me that Mr. Butler was backed and given credit by two Bay Street
merchants who liked and trusted him.
This is the story of just about every coloured man who has
made a success in business in Nassau. At some stage in life they
have been given a lift by their white brother.
It would be interesting to know who helped Joe Hanna to send
his son Arthur to law school in England. Everyone knows that
Joe Hanna couldn't afford to do it. And so it must have been one
of the hated Bay Street boys.
In the story in The Herald Mr. Butler talked about his bitter
experiences with the white people of Nassau, particularly that
silly little affair when he was locked in the men's room at the
House of Assembly.
In the course of a lifetime every human being has some kind of
experience that wounds his soul. By the same token, everyone has
also had gloriously bright spots in life. We should never regret our


sorrows because ... how would we understand and appreciate
happiness without the experience of sorrow? The greater the
sorrow the greater the capacity for happiness in the soul of a well
adjusted human being.


is t~ha te rebaett nta nd nouihol h dr pasae 8ul? th
lie d't think anyone will dispute the fact that I have had a

For 54 years I have been out in the middle ... shooting and
being shot at ... the target for anyone who has wanted to do
battle. Many is the time that I have been grievously hurt but I
have buried the hurts. I have allowed only the pleasant
eP inces ine ny dhakgo im no pthe lu 6ce.t As la wsla w can

just bbbling over with enthusiasm ... and it will be that way to

Mr. Butler told The Herald that he holds malice for none but
The annsf rtr e for him ... and his kind ... is that they have
forgotten the things in their lives that they should remember.
oAnd Ih sav rmemT4e m ry far dhng that embitter their


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
You will wake, and remember, and understand.
What if this friend happened to be God -BONN


1)ANBY. VTI (AP) Pearl S.
Buck, authorr o~f "'The G~ood Earth"
and score\ o~f other books on a
Chna se knee firsthand cu >n
Prize winning author was so.
Miss Buck, w~ho had been in
failing health since last summer
bldea < er tu~n did in he
Danby home less than a week after
publication of her 85th book, "All
under heavenl. The novel is about
an Arner cna hipomta >ved t(
Mac 'Tse Tung
In Washingto~n, President Nixon
j detie Mill Hukc iant um n
the East and the Wes~t He* said her
writings had enabled millions "to
se: t, beaut? rt ('hna nd it

publt ing u til lu9 us wthi
two years she had wo~n the Pulitzr r
Prize for "The GoodL larth." the
< ery cfa Chines~e peasant's rise to
In 1938 she became the first
American woman to win the Nobe~l
Prite for L~iterature on the basis of
xard made scal m~entio f, 19)36 biographies "Fighting Angel
B~orn Pearl Sydenstricker in
Hill lsborn. \.VI1u2 wm ;une h .
with hier parents aIs anl inf'ant and
learned to, speak chin~ese before she
Se reuned II Amlericaa and
Eorope for school lng but speit
mo~st of her first 43 years ii C'hina,
rn] jg on vaius vila e. bsiek war
ah rumta rge en ed n a dvolot i
1935 and Mliss Buck almost
immediately married her publisher
Richard J. Wal h. ie r led in 1960
br States virtually) full time by 194o
and she eventually settled in
hoe retard tio of3 aghe by he
husband adopted nine children.
nHe writing broenght he wealth
Buck foundation with a $1 million
contribution. Since then the
ft nation riaschel jd m re e a
fathered and abandoned by
American servicemen.
Miss B~uck continued to turn out
three books a year late in her
career momist cf them ine seesimple
child reading Chinese novels.
She maintained her interest in
conrywl r eadd fssa adshfb etrst
different from that provided by
Mao. Her last book underlines that
thema October the Chinese
embassy in Canada denied her
request for permission to visit red
Chna, en ndishtr rworkss toals an
vilification toward the people of
China and their leadership."
wI ac ordancer 11t pils uck's
A spokesman for a West virginia
foundation said the funeral would
be in Bucks County, Pa


Byj Frank N. Hawkins Jr.
CLA~RK AIR BASE, PHILIPPINIES (AP)-Most American cwa
prisoners who signed antiwar statements during captivity did so
under extreme duress or because of torture, military informants
said Tulesday.


he signed a document as the
Communists demanded. Then
he reportedly told them: "Now
you have your statement, but
you haven't won."
Despite the abuse and
hardships. the level of defiance
among the POWs is reported to
have remained high.
One prisoner said he

erlse I was th laey to hp 0i
ahive. At one point, he is
reported to have said, one
group appeared to be
wde ing bea ly. The PeW
e~xereising. Those who did
eventua ly gained tear srengt
eak One man who did not

In the early years, the North
Vietnamnesee apparently did as
much as possible to block
communication among the
POWs and prevent any strong
prison organization. The POWs
were kecpt apart, permitted to
speak only with their cell
mates.
SECRET CODE
To~( pass messages and news
from one cell or group to
another, the POWs devised a
code system never cracked by
the North Vietnamese. This
included hand signals and
tapping on the walls.
asNews also was pas ed around
though the fiv camps where

generally held.
These were the infamous
Hanoi Hilton, a former French
prison in downtown Hanoi;
Dogpatch, in the mountains
north of Hanoi, the Zoo, about
12, blocks from the Hilton; the
Bria patch on the outskirts of
flan i. also known as the
Country Club, and Plantation
Gardens, near G;ia Lam airport.
lIarlier, reports said, the
Country Club and the
Briarpatch were different
c~am s.
T~he P'OWs also have revealed
the existence of two other
camps in North Vietnam
Camp 77 and Nam-He used
primarily for Vetnamese
political prisoners and some

re rted civili in Bhe Hanoi
area.


Ihe sources said one
prisoner told them the North
Vietlnamese frequently used a
Ininor grievance as an excuse to
bear down on one man in an
attempt to break him.
In one: case, they reported,
an Ameiric~an prisoner was
forced to sit in a cell on a small
wooden stool for days at a

meepl i sthoU k iC ke PO hr rr
smnners do h
"A ter a perio o time the '
would tell someone anyt inE
Ihe i\arllyed to hear," an
T~he war prisoners returned
to Clark this week have

di< mrur isst j i; But mil twar
authorities say~te do tnot

aol be ~uset icy fearefos oh
'86 AmericaHns still in
captivity.
As a result, the scenes
described by military officers
remualn short on detail Tlhe
prisoners themselves are
forbidden to discuss their
captivity with newsmen except
in t ncam genera hte ms aue
that included beatings
cigarette burns and suspension
fromt the ceiling by the hands
the military sources said many'
men spent long periods in
solitary confinement,
TIhis included terms of 19
months tso % eas an sm

and forced to kneel on
cnretearl~oot os hepsou ce
old-fashioned stocks were freed
Inl for brief peids t g t
ohne toilet or ea eio ogoo
The sources said the POWs
generally agreed no one
Willingly gave antiwar
statements.
I HOSTIL ~
"Some of the guys were
a outallyVeenram hostile to1T ae
said.

askOd byP hs cra torrs watw h
would do if he were released,
"I'd return to the United
States, learn how to fly and
come back and bomb you
bastards," he was reported to
ha pn ec se after a man was
subjected to severe treatment


Glyr Qlribunr


U~p p orte r AuTHOR PEARL Most PO Ws sitaed antiwar


CUB 80 DI ES
tfay lnos tnemetatS ture


We'w put our flavour fresh Eggs


in New clear plaStic car tons.



Empty containers have many handy uses...

aS ice cube trays...as button holders ..

keeps fish hooks sorted ... as a jello mold

and many other uses...


~~ FT~~n~I~E3n~f H~E~C<, '~~ F~I~LC)~~

















I ~ ~ **r_;~lr~lr I'lr~#Y


bl~vlJ


~W~EIIIII~UI)
~ri~a e 1II FUVOI~
ICE CRUM


j~3 CUCI SlarltRS MCIIUI rax ~ay. ~rrra a~L~El


Wednlesday, Marchr 7, 1973.


" lac~v-i
~~PI~LmeYP1Yi
L ;~a~


~3nllc~T~


g.S. 6HSIOE
DELMYONICS STICKS




IIATURAILLY TENDER
U.S CHOICE
RicB TEALK .........e. 1.89
IIIB ROALST ...... ...1s.7l~9
CHUCK ROAS~T e.........89
PORK e ..u,8 8
W D NICIORY SWEET

DIIANKS ..............,l ,99
BOLOGNA .......... .....89


SPARE RIBS


GOL MEAL

FLOUR

6-LB.
BAG


LB*


UNCLE BEN'S
RICE


6F


QUANCITIT RIGHTS RESERVE~B PRICES
6000 TIIRU1SDArY MRCH 8, THRII
SATURDAY MAIRCH 10, 1973.
HARVEST FRESH
LETTU 0E ............. 4 8
MRYEST FRESII GREEN1
PEPPERS ............5 FOR 79
URME
LEMONS 6Fon..........8 o,9


10
LE*
.BA*


9


La


PIZZA ..... 3.39
26-OZ. MRS. SMITH PUMP CUSTARD
PIES. OR DUTCH APPLE 7Q
240 010Xit WHOLE I(ERNSEL
OORR...... ......... 6 5
1001. GREENSCIAT
BRO800LI ..............55


BEAMS ..............3 on.99
303 CAN IEB ilrs HOLE nERnEL aR CREAM StTYE
CORI........ .......3 F.99
HARPIC .............2 ron.99

12-OZ. CANS JAMAICA
00LA .............. . ToRe 99


SAWYERS
PIG FEET SOUSE


-II


SHORTENING


LB.
CAN


ORAWGIES


slSg


1/2 LB.


BUTTER


DETERGE NTbIV


2 LB. CUP SUPERBRANWD
00TTAGE CHEESE ....1.0
MLF MALLON MRAIVEST FRESH
ORAN~GE JUI0E .......1.08
12 R2. WINr f lil AMERICEll SLICED
CHEESE ................,88)


SARD(IMES


98
ggg ll
9 c


I '
AALLON


CRMOCKER JAC KS.9 StoR.99
10OZ. SrlWERS CONCII
CHOWBER .........3 roR.99
28 R 8ANID WHOLE
TOMATOES..... ....2 Fon.99
WlQI L urt ME UI


KIDNEY1 BIEANS....3 3rn.99
16Q GICAPIELLS
P)ORK AND BEANWS.4 4o,.99
18 R. IAR INSTANT MAXWELL IIOUSE
00F FEIE............... 1.99

KING6 SIZE LQIGUID DETERGENT
IVORY ..................


GUAlVA JELLY


1-LB.


A 1U a
IIOT SASE

5 a


2 ,1..80










, .


+..atea foman,
zen and women


F Ill g ggg
Cor.Okra hill
and Shirley Street


BAHAMAS


HUMANE SOCIETY



ANWBAL CHAR~~II CYI BL


SATURDAY MARCH 10th,1973

ht th



He nyo Belmoora Hotel
Cocktail Music by H(ONNY BUTLER & HIS RAMBLERS from the Nassau Beach Hotel
Dinner Dancing by BRADLEY STUART'S ORCHESTRA from South Ocean Beach Club.

SPECIAL CATERING BY URA VON ALLMEN
Food & Beverage Maestro Halcyon Balmoral

TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
Please call for tickets & table reservations :-

Mrs. Paul Poad 4-1323
Mrs. Cleophas Adderley2-8369
Mrs. Louise Campbell 7-8267
Mrs. Ron Overend 5-5561
Mrs. Rosemary Appleyard 2-2676
Miss V. L. Onderdonk 2-8381.

Black Tie FABULOUS DOOR & DANCING PRIZES 8p~m. to ta.m.


G~RAMCO I NTERKNATIONA L S.A


it il Citing1eC' it 111111() 10? toll



AT LAN TIC MIANAG EM~iENT S. A.


- --_ --- -.;- --


... IS ill iiLY WORD 10 DESCRIlE THIS SORE -WIDE SALE 1:"T"H


VISIT OUR SPECIAL BARGAIN CORIcNER -BUYS G=ALORE !


Wednesday, March 7 1973


TrH E CARIBBEAN
Association of Industry &
Commerce at its board of
directors meeting held in St.
Kltts on F;ebruary 15 and 16
unanimously adopted a
Ijesolution that a joint


industrial corporation should
be set up
The scope of' reference
would be to assist the
industrialisatioir programmeii at
the less devcloped countries
and to initial e. establish. and


operate It' necessary a
number of chosen industries in
the Ll)Cs with the view to
making them ava11lable unlder a
jo~int venturing prina~ple as
MDC -i)C` ente~rprlce It was
further agreed that the
proposal should be submitted
to the C`ARIE IA Seiretarlat
for Its urgent aittentioni and


the Commonwelt\l h Ca3ribbean
countries exucept St. V neent &


experienced any practical
advantage with regard to their
industrlahlsatlon and that It was
felt that this o~pinioin b ndered
the ec~onomlc~ progress of the

seen s a ridgng dvic


of MIx( na dUtral3Sts to enter
into ion nt ventures writhi their
LOC( partners and the nieed by
the LXs for indulstrial


Matalon, and the representative
of the Bahamaus Chamber)C of
C'onuneirce. Mr Oscar R. W
P'hill ips
At this meeting the Bahamas
C'hamInber of 'ommrie rces
succe~ssf~ully sponsored the
applications of RoyWest
Banking Corporation Ltd. and
Bacardi antd C'ompany Ltd..


RED AMBASSADOR
HIRLIIN (AP) Italy recognized
thn has \v stc ltet time in f rmanizinp
Klaus G;ysi, 61, a Communist
sic t r~u Il left hi\ post as cluall
",nll)tann hens seen nmed i
cou tr)s first Ambassad r itc, Ia
(e:!'ans 'i onishaed \ht id Wr I
in a Nazi confcntratio~n camp.


FC
,r --


SC AanySCO ryssta ea aren't


aMnrd Nesterenko; r D aneof,


NE TRERENKG, ECaiRmanE S
the SCOA Group is welcomed
to Freeport by Mr. Joseph
Delaney, Director of the
Freeport Ministry of Tourism
office. Mr. Nesterenko arrived

to Freeport's International
Bazaar. Lafayette was
officially opened at 4:30 p.m.
today. From left are: Mr.
Piere BsseuyPresident of
Pir edaasseasuyLimited, the
parent company of Lafayette;


HUMANE SOCIETY RAFF LE WINNERS


\\.r 1vl. \\llInd 1,1 us 1 unt aunt 1 1
wS ,th.( winner. 1 at t I Cril4l 10 un



Internatiolnal Air luhama,13 w\1 \ won
N 1880. Unklldnce clket 702 .
RogerdCL wa tt acket 11 II. won


Johln 11s kentii. tcker 16419
wonl .I 100( votucher donrated by
M rrirl trr' tarket to to Miami


Verer~ I su C`harles. holding ticket
1i7')1. wonri the transistor radio
Jonated~ to l aylor Industrier and
Shea~she. writh ticket 12416 wo~n the


*


Z C~
~~g~


- .


(SORRY - NO REFUNDS)


$5.00
$10.00
$5.00
From$5.00
From $1.00
From $4.00
$5.00
From $1.95
$5.00
From $3.00
$10.00 & $12.95


Cotton Shirts
Long Pants
Short Pants
Short Jeans
Pullovers


LADIES
Slacks Double Knit
Leisure Dresses
Bikini Swim Suits
Skirts
Blouses
Cu lotts
D usters
Bras
Shorts
Hand Bags
Ladies Dresses


BOYS
From $1.00
From $2.50
$1.50
$2.50
$4.95


Iiit







r




: i


BABIES
$3.00
$7.95
From $2.30
$3.00


Pullovers by St. Michael
Slacks Sets by St. Miichael
Cover Ails by Healthtex
Sleepers by Cutlers


Rugs
Rubber maid Kitchen ware
Bead-O- Fashionus
Drapes


GIRLS
Easter Hats
Sweaters
Tights
Dresses
Hand Bags
Socks
Shirts
Blouses
Jr. Miss Dre!sses
Jr. Miss Slacks

TOS SALE ON ALL TOYS -
AS LOW AS 50% OFF


4~


$2.50
From $4.00
$1.95
From $5.00
$3.00
50c
$4.95
From $2,95
From $5.00
$5.95
SOM E PR ICES


'j


Clearance on many other Household Items


Clearance on Ladies' Bedroom Slippers
Ladies' FLATS
Clearance on Infants, Boys, and Girls Shoes


$1.95
$1.95
$1.00


I


~ICI--
L r- ~--- -r--~ --._ -- r-CI
-L~~_ ~ ~_ ~ ~~ _ r -r ~ Clk C -- --~~ C


She Gr thuno


Caribbean business group to set


up Joint Industrial Corporation


At opening of Layfayette, Freeport


tl


HOUSEHOLD
1/3 OFF
25% OF F
25% OF F
25%/-1/3 OFF


SH gp


G.R.SWEETING &
ROSETTA STREET PHONE 2-3706/2-3707


SO,


LTD.




IIH


U **7--


__


P.O. Ar 1aQ7,3aseunone eu
gey suses, Nusau. beaten


INTERNATIONAL AIR BAHAMA
invites applicants for the position of
GROUND HOSTESS.
Qualifications include 2 years airline
experience and knowledge of German and

Application forms available at the office in
Beaumont House, Bay Street.

INTERNATIONAL AIR BAHAMA t
3 Bggumont House




NOTICE
IN THE MATTER OF
BAHAMAS SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION~
(NASSAU) LIMITED
INTERNATIONAL B NK AND TRUST LIMITED

Under a Court Order dated 12th January, 1973-
we were appointed the Official Liquidators ofC
Bahamas Savings and Loan Association (N~assau)
Limited and we were also appointed the Official:
Liudar of Int rational Bank and Trust
Lm ted udeoa Couet harder dated 25th January,
1973.

All persons with mortSE~es loans overdrafts and
any other debts due to the above-named:
COmpanies are advised that all current payments
and all outstanding arrears should now be paid to`:
us at the International Bank and Trust Building on^:
the corner of Charlotte Street and Bay Street,
Nassau between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m:`S
Alternatively ipyrnents may be mailed to the-:
official liquidators at P.O. Box N-7526, Nassau.

All persons with claims against the above ,
Companies are requested to submit them to us on
or before April 30, 1973. Glaims received after the
above date may not receive any benefit from any
distribution*
RONALD E. STRANGE, -
ROGER F. HENDRICKSON


DONATIONS TO HUMANE SOCIETY
THE BAHAMAS Humanre memory of Mr. Kenneth
Society has received the Knowles) $15; World Banking
following donations: Corp., $250; Mr. and Mrs.
The Bank of Nova Scotia. Dudley Witting, $100; The
$100; Mr. J. M. Donald, $75: Walkers Cay Club, $20; G. R.
Anonymous, $15; Anonymous Sweeting & Son Ltd; $50; Hon.
$100; Mrs. John Ferguson, and Mrs. Basil Burnside, $15;
$25; The Family Guardian Eleuthera Ltd., $25; Mr. and
Insurance Co., $40; Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Bethel (in
Mrs. Jim Mciees, $15; Roy memory of Mr. George Bethel )
West Banking Corp., $100; Mr. $20; Mr. and Mrs. Donald
and Mrs. Alan C. Butler, $50; d'A~lbenas, 515; Lt. Col. and
Mr. Monsen, $100; Mr. and Ms. G. O. Gamble (in memory
Mrs. Duncan McLean, $25; Mr. of Mrs. Dora McNeil), $50; and
and Mrs. John Kenning, $150; Bahamas Racco Co. Ltd.,



NCJTICE



inquiries and mail should be directed to Besco's
temporary office, phone 2.4230,and 2. 0. Box ES6208.
The Directors of Besco deeply regret any inconvenience
ta 1ryi st dd o m at nondu co t cent fire which
Payments on account will be received at the old East
Street store, where the records are held.


~" -Y~cl'~'QII


--


L1


L_


I


(IN C'OIVIPUL..SORY LK3UL.JDTION)



KIRK S. HINSEY WILL SELL THE FOLLOWING PROPERTIES:


THE ABOVE LISTED PROPERTIES ARE MORTGAGED TO


cv~u~nr~..-' I ~-r_~daa~ Yyarm~*b~c,',l-~-f'-~.~


I


I


WdnrdY Mwch7, .3,


Cl.. .. g
MA. T. V. Arnett has been
appolated executive
vice-president of the Bahamas
Employers Confederation. He
succeeds Mr. P. S. C. Power.
l' 7. Arnett's appointment
mances him the first Bahamian
to hold this position in the
confederation which was
formed in 1966. He will take
up M e o o pdgeera 2
manager of Bahamas
Telecommunications
Cordporationca positions h
held~~~~~~ sic coe 98
Arnett is responsible for
personnel and industrial
oeht en fr some tme
on assignment to the Ministry
of Transport and
Telecommunications as Liaison
O3ffl car between the
Co pcrct on and th oMm it y
High Scenool, Mr. Arnett spent
some time In the United
Kingdom with the British Post
Office, during which time he
studied at several Technical
Institutes.
In 1962 he was transferred
ardomin tie tchimha sido w
principally concerned with
training. In 1966, after the
formation of the Bahamas
Telecommunications
Consere o o thhe gen ra
manager's staff where he was
given special assignments. Soon
dfterwards he was appointed
personnel and commercial
man ger fo report and t
He is well known for his
interest in management
development, and was recently
els ed p Aasd cation f
Manoe Trang ad
n elpwment.anig


FOUR MOTORISTS, ~who appeard before Magistrate
Esmmanuel Osedebay Tuesday afternoon, had their driers'
licences suspended for twelve months and ween fined for drivinS
thert vehicles white theyv were amt insured.


St. James Road paid fines
totalling $480 when they
pleaded gulilty to the traffic
offences.
10lorton, h a owner h ca
brother to drive while he held
no insurance was fined S80 or
:.:::y, she pleaded guilty to
Gibbs pleaded guilty to
driving his car from Hyler
wihut tuo cre adH atent d
on September 19 while he held
only a provisional licence. He
had failed to transfer
ownership of the car to hi'
name He waas r$1d 120 ay

t4h0 foray rdin ra sepoter
.ihu drvrslcne
riding it while uninsured and
unlicensed. He was cautioned
for not having a valid
cert fiate of inspection
attached and discharged on a
rarli conce pl te attaha hs
For driving car 5916 while it
was unlicensed and uninsured
and while he did not have a
driver's licence, Bowe was
find S10. He vas cnauticon d
ponie..failn., to have a l8i h
which illuminated his rear
numy wrp all dis qualified
from d iving. 9
IGN C GE~G IN U.S.
reWA HNTOeN US(AP) a h
the half dolla colns will be changed
bainnia Ino 97yS mark he
Independence in 19716, Mary
Books, the Dkeetor of the U.S.


T* '. ARY


PHCIAIPIE RA en~o 's
rewrsion to a pace time economy
is proceeding nicely, thank you.
American air force men evacuating
prisoners of war are now buying
souveonks in the North Vietnamese

nm date, a., beught h silw r
butt mfy dbrooche and a necklace
"I didn't have change and I g."
them a $20 bill and they had no
trouble changing it.**

BLACK PANTHER ILL
COPENHAGEN, DENMARK
e )eusted, Ameria Blacak Pnt
l*tshrrousey P. Nseweto h
speaking tour to fly home, because
of bleeding ulcer.
He became 18l following a
to p e ha en rll Ie t T u d y
Aarhus, Denmark, before iving up.
He had been scheduled to visit
Oslo, Stockholm and Helsinki.
POKER BOASTER
NEW YORK (AP) A man
note ar e wri 's c am on
poker hlyer,Vsie he beMI man
Now he has a challenger.
'I ply Amua olo Shnm hwre, i
anywhere," announced Manhattan
Cstfelo t 8 wn Ia a sk" a
""ior" "'& :::: pm n 3,
nearly Monday with a final hand of
a sev crd (1uin whicists' bed
filled a seven high straight hush
with a facedfown three of spdes.
The other man had a full house,
with three kings showing. Said
eqt dhew I had him on that lst


CHILDR EN 80R 8100 WH 1USE
FIRE destroyed the
seven-roomed wooden house cohs d a ta
owned by Mr. and Mrs. dmg a enmd.
Alexander Forbes on Poincianahoswainue.
Avenue Monday afternoon.
Firemen, who arrived on the Two bush fires on Pe
scene at 4.15 p.m., reported Tract, West Bay Street,
that the fire was caused by aohri odad


m, i
The
rpall
and
off


I


-r I - .L


I


r


NOTICE


NOTICE


NOTICE


PUBLIC AUCTION
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at the parking lot East of
the Harbour Moon Hotel Bay Street on the 31st
March 1973 at 12 noon the following property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in
the East Central District of the said Island of New
Providence having the Number (No. 13) in Block
Number Thirty-nine (No. 39) on the plan of the
"Shiriey Heights" Subdivision laid out by New
Providence Land Company Limited such plan
being flied in the Crown Lands Office of the
Bahama lisands In the City of Nassau and having
the Number One hundred and seventeen D
(117-D) in the said Office the said lot Number
Thirteen (No. 13) in Block Number Thirty-nine
(No. 39) being bounded on the East by Mount
Royal Avenue and running thereon Fifty (50) feet
on the South by Lot Number Fourteen (14) in the
said Subdivision and running thereon One hundred
(100) feet on the West by lot Number Fifteen (No.
(15) in the said Subdivision and running thereon
Fifty (50) faet and on the North by lot Number
Twelve, (No. 12) in the said Sub-division and
running thereon One hundred (100) fuat."
Mortgage dated 5th May 1964 John Audley Munnings
to Traders Bank & Trust Ltd.
Recorded in Volume 743 pages 86 97
The sale is subject to a reserve price and to the right
for the Auctioneer or any person on his behalf to bid
up to that price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase price at time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated 2nd day of March A.D. 1973.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer


PUBLIC AUCTION
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at the parking lot east of
the Harbour Moon Hotel Bay Street on 31st March
1973 at 12 noon the following property: -
"AHl That piece or parcel or land containing by
survey Nineteen acres and Ninety-six hundredths of
an acre (19.96) acres situate approximately One
thousand six hundred (1600) feet northward of
Carmichael Road at a point approximately One (1)
mile eastward of its junction with Gladstone Road
and in the vicinity of the area known as "Johnny
Hill" in the Western District of the island of New
Providence one of the Bahama islands and
bounded Northwardly partly by a parcel of Six
acres and twelve hundredths of an acre (6.12
acres) of land granted to Ralph N. Dorsett and
recorded in the Crown Lands Department at folio
90 of Grant Book lettered and numbered A4 and
partly by a parcel of Six acres and twelve
hundredths of an acre (6.12) acres of land granted
to Walter Pratt and recorded in the Crown Lands
Department at folio 70 of said Grant Book lettered
and numbered A4 southwardly by a rervamtion for
a Road Thirty (30) fart wide Eastwardly by
another Reservation for a Road Thity (30) feat
wide and Westwardly by a Reservation for Road
Forty (40) feet wide.
Mortgage dated 28th August 1967, Leonard George
Ross to Traders Bank & Trust Ltd.
Recorded in volumne 1160 Pages 339.347.
The sale is subject to a reserve price and to the right
for the Auctioneer or any person on his behalf to bid
up to that price.
TERMS: 10% of the purchase price at the time of sale
and balance on completion.


1


(Ir1

6




:i


KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at the parking lot East of
the Harbour Moon Hote Bay Street on the 31st
March 1973 at 12 noon the following property: -
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being lot
number Three hundred and Twenty-eight (328) on
the Amended Plan of lots in the Subdivision called
and known as "West Ridgeland" in the Southern
District of the island of New Providence which said
plan has been approved by the Public Board of
Works and is filed in the Regirsterd Office ofte d
Company and which said piece parcel or lot of land
hereby assured is bounded Northwardly by the lot
number Three hundred and Twenty-two (322) of
the said plan and running thereon Seventy (70)
feet Eastwardly partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon Twennty-five (25) feet and partly
by the lot number Three hundred and
Twesnty-sven (3271) of the said plan and running
thereon One hundred (100) feet southwardly
partly by the lot number One hundred and
Fifty-three (153) of the said plan and partly by the
lot number One hundred and Fifty-four (154) of
the said plan and running thereon jointly One
hundred and Thrru and Fifty hundredths (103.50)
feet and Westward y partly by lot number One
hundred and Fift)'orne (151) of the said plan
partly by the lot number One hundred and Fifty
(150) of the said plan and partly by the lot number
One hundred and Fofty-nine (149) of the said plan
and running thereon jointly One hundred and
Twenty-sven and Forty-one hundredths (127.41)
feet."
Mortgage dated the 31st March 1967 Prcy Chariton
and Maud Edith Chariton to Traders Bank & Trust
Ltd. Recorded in Volume 1122 pages 410 418.
Thel sale is subject to a reserve price and to the right
of the Auctioneer or any person on his behalf to bid
up to that price.
Trmz :bl oofthw prhase price at the time of sale
Dated 2nd day of March A.D. 1973.


II


F


L
F;i


PUBLIC AUCTION
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at the parking lot East of
the Harbour Moon Hotel Say Street on the 31st
March 1973 at 12 noron the following property: -
"ALL THAT piece or parcel of land situate in the
Western District of the said Island of New
Providence comprising a portion of the Subdivision
of the Northwestern Section of "Oakes Airport"
and being lot Number Nilne (9) in Block Number
One (1) on the plian of the said Subdivision filed in
the Crown Lands Office of the Colony as Number
289 N.P. and which said piece or parcel of land is
bounded northeatwaurdly by a portion of Lot
Number Eleven (11) of Block Number One (1) of
the said Subdivision and running thereon One
Hundred (100) feet Southeastwardly by Lot
Number Ten (10) of Block Number One (1) of the
said Subdivision and running thereon One
Hundred and Eighty-six and Fifty-even hundredths
(186.57) fat Southwestwardly by a road in the
said Subdivision and running thereon One hundred
and Thirtn and Sixtty-twro hundredths (113.62)
fat Norrtwestwardly by Lot Number Eight (8) of
Block Number One (1) of the said Subdivision and
running t)heron Two hundred and Forty and
Thirty-thru hundredths (340.33) feet which said
piece or pacel of land has such position
brjiundries shape marks and dimensions as are
shown on the diagram on plan attached to the said
before, rcited Indunture datd the Twenty-fifth
day of Marth A.D. DrW thorusnd Nirm hundred
and Fifty-six and is defineated on that part which
is coloured Pink on the said diagram or plan."
The above property is owned by Traders Bank &
Trust Ltd. (In Compulsory Liquidation).
The sale is subjct to a aresrv price and to the right
for the Auctioneer o any person on his behalf to bid
up to that price.
Terms: 10%C of the purchase price at time of sale and
aed 2 y of Moc A.D. 1973.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer


KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer


r p18 Srtbane


* *ooit aetei:~:',,:,


Miriam Horton, East Street,
Joseph Wellington Gibbs
Ragged Island Street, John
Davis, Lily of the Valley
Corner, and Howard Bowe of
laitian filed $50
f., ...rstarts
MONESTIME Modira, the
c ptain of the Haitian stoop
Rapsurection was fined $50 or
30 days in jail for failing to
leave at a time specified by the
Immigration Department
Modira a peared before
Mag is trat e Em manuel
Osadebay Tesda akmom a g
Ima gration Vessel Restriction
Regulation. He pleaded guilty
to the charge of failing to leave
the colony after being here for
72 hours. He arrived here on
February 20 and was arrested
Monday .
Explaining that his boat
wa" """? leve odtha nlde t e
court that he would set sail
tonight for Haiti.
CLIFF OIl SAlW~lES

MR. CLIFFORD Belonia
Saunders, 48, died of a heart
attack at the Rand Memorial
Hospital at Freeport Friday.
Cre~ek n ros, MrmSaunder i
survived by his wife Edna and
four sisters, Mrs. Alice
Deveaux, Mrs. Ann Minns, Mrs.
Dtoe I unre elloamf Nma 1sa.
atFuneral serie wil be hell
2.30 p.m. Sunday.
The Rev. Charles Curry will
officiate and interment will
follow mn Wesley Cemetery.
Persons wishing to pay their
last respects may do so at
Bethel's Funeral Home, Nassau
Street until 12 noon Sunday.


NO TICE


ESTATE OF T HE LATE
OLI EV RSINCLAIR HUNTER


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claims or demands against the
above-named Estate are requested to send the
same duly certified to the undersigned on or
before the 31st March next.
epand Notice ish he ey ulogvn ht et te
assets of the deceased will be distributed among
the persons entitled thereto having regard only
to the claims of which the Executors shall then
have had notice.


By orrler of the


of Triirlers Blk imtl Trust Ltll.


NOTICE


PUBLIC AUCTION


(IN COMPULSORY LIOUFIDATION)
AND WILL BE SDLD AT PUBLKC AUCTION AT 12 NOON ON SATURDAY, MARCH 1Std AT THE LOT IMMEDIATELY EAST OF THE HARBOUR MOON HOTAL, BlcY $'~FliET.








WeonesaaV MarchI 7, 1973. ttyr Eribunt


_I

,1


II 1

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1


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,S
IC


in the International Bazaar


Perfumes Gifts and Souvenirs Clothing Beachwear -
Women's and Men's Accessories Jewellery Crystal China -
Cutlery Antiques Art.
Le Rendez-vous, a French sidewalk cafe, completes this Parisian
vision.


Lafayette, the largest and newest store in the Bahamas, is open.
Come in and visit the eleven boutiques that make up Lafayette
with the finest merchandise from Western and Eastern Europe
and the Soviet Union.


Freep~ort, Grandr Barhama











8 Star Gribunt


are excellent thanks to the
subtle flavour of thyme.
STUFFING
A rice stuffing for fowl is
quickly made. Melt four



EDDOES are coming in at
the Potter's Cay Produce
Exchange. So are potatoes,
yams and sweet potatoes. Be
careful when picking the
eddoes. They look like

kh ptto b an toe kaer
apples. You couki be in for a
surprise.
Look for thyme, paw
paws, tomatoes, lettuce,
pineapples, oranges and
pumpkins. There are also lots
of beets, cabbages, green
peppers, a few cauliflower.
tablespoons butter in a small
pot. Add a medium onion
chopped, one and a half cups
diced celery and cook until
tender. Add one and a third
cups cooked rice, a teaspoon
salt, a quarter teaspoon each
pepper, sage and thyme. Mix
the stuffing well.
If you prefer a bread
stuffing, cut day-old bread into
cubes to make six cups. Add
half a teaspoon each thyme,
one teaspoon celery seeds, a
little pepper and salt to taste.
Melt half a cup of butter and
simmer a small chopped onion
until tender. Pour over bread
cubes and add snipped parsley.
Toss well.
Chicken goes well with
thyme. Coat three pounds
chicken pieces in flour and
saute in butter until golden.
Combine one can cream of
mushroom soup and half a cup
milk and pour over the
chicken. Top with sliced
onions and sprinkle with
thyme. Simmer covered for 3(}
minutes.
In this recipe, thyme is


k
1
*rl


If you grow your own
Thyme and want to preserve it*
rhere are the simple steps. Pick
C ~~the leaves at their best and
Swash them carefully to remove


all dirt Spread the leaves on

rhl- ecn tiestretclhaed on
process can be hurried along by
put ting the frame and leaves in
the oven at very low heat
leaving the door open.
When the leaves are well
dried and crumbly, roll them
with a rolling pin and pour the
bits into an air-tight jar.
Thyme is extremely pungent
and armoatic and can
definitely be too much of a
good thing if used badly in a
recipe. It takes a gentle hand
or the dish will be merely a
plate of thyme dressed up to
look like a stew.
Thyme, if used subtly, can
enhance the flavour of most
meats pork, veal, lamb, beef
by mixing it with a little
salt and pepper and rubbinS
'the mixture into the surface of
the roast. Added to melted
butter, it can be used with shell
fish, carrots, onions,
mushrooms. Even potatoes get
a lift by the addition of melted
butter and thyme.
Grill tomatoes with a
topping of cheese and a light
sprinkling of thyme. It can be
used in stuffings for meat,
poultry and fish but here
especially, a light touch is
required. Thyme also goes with
eggplant, beets and peas.
Try it with chowders, onion
or potato soup, or celery soup.
It can even be used in chicken
or seafood salads.
Here are a few recipes which


4Ff.i a :,


Miss Quebec visits
MISS BAHAMAS, Cyprianna Munnings, and Miss
Qiuebec, Genieve Mercier, enjoyed some of Nassau sunshine
Friday afternoon and chatted briefly at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Alexis Nihon, hosts for Miss Quebec. The
charming queen won the title over some 1,000 Canadians
last June. Sponsored by CBC and Canadian newspapers, the
c jnts dat prim rilyuwis uaet Misss Merca' 5 ni
cash and prizes. Prior to winning her title she was a school
teacher and holds a Master's degree in Comparative
Education Why did she enter? "I wanted to do something
new," she said. During the months she has done
commercials for radio and television and appeared at
various sporting, political, charitable and social events. Her
plans for the future ... "I hope to go Into public reblatons,
she said.


I
*


RED CROSS FAIR
RAISES $30,000
TIhe annual Red C:ross Fair
held Saturday at ;overnment
Hos gruds rad mr
tilans 30 00. The a al fi r
has not yet beecn counted it
was disclosed by Mrs. Clement
Maynard, chairman of the fair
committee.
Mrs. Maynard said that she
and her committee were
pleased with the outcome or
the fair and wished to thank
the Out Islands for their


support and everyone who
helped to make the fair a
success.

STATIONS OF THE
CROSS AT MARY STAR
EVERY Friday evening
during the season of Lent, the
Stations of the Cross will be
made at 6 p.m. at Mary, Star of
the Sea Church, Freeport.
The regular evening mass
will be offered at 5:30.
Confessions are heard daily a
half hour before mass.


By EMMANUEL ALEXIOU
THE BAHAMAS MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION recently held its first public meeting of the
was Swami Vishnu Devananda and his subject was "Yoga and Mental Health".


year. The speaker of the evening


Thw Swalrni, whose yoga
seminar served as the catalyst
in 1966 in bringing the
ahoaria ioniNenta eigtfealth
even further in his talk in
proposing that yoga be
considered as a possible way of
attempting to solve some of
our m ntalhhealthk po of s

the physical world has
expanded tremendously with
our technological advances, our
knowledge of' the mind is still
in its infancy, the Swami
maintained
The West has tackled the
mental health problem in a
very limited way, basically, by
using various methods of
psychoanalysis in conjunction
with various drugs in an
iliemt to bring peace an
Swami said that Yoga on the
other hand, looks at a full and
complete picture of man and
attempts to analyze man in
both his physical and mental
aspects.
To take man in his physical
aspect d rst, T'roga lo kssaiad

that diet affects the mind and
reminded the audience "Even
stodern ps cho ogi flu ee s

the mind". He further pointed
out that a study of the world's
eating habits shows that
whenever meat eating
predominates as a basis of the
diet, mental problems are
mecreasing
The Swami pointed out that
it is the wrong diet which is
causing the present high blood
dnrssure experienced by many
~9amians today. The Swami
stated that he was a forty-five
year old life-long vegetarian
and did not suffer from such
Ailments of the west as high
blood pressure caused by


cholesterol-
The second aspect of man
which Yoga studies is man's
breathing. Ninety-five percent
of humanity does not know
how to breathe, the Swami
claimed. Without proper
breathing the body is dead, it
becomes filled with toxins and
the prana (vital energy and life


avail especially to the
untrained mind.
The second level is the
conscious level. At this level
the intellect predominates and
it isat this level that most of us
function throughout our lives.
However, this is very much tied
to the first level of the
sub-conscious and very often is
influenced by its emotional
energy, he said.
INTUITIVE
The third level is th'e
superconscious level and at
this level man functions on an
intuitive plane and is
ultimately able to free himself
and become immortal. Jesus,
Buddha and Mohammed all
functioned at this intuitive
level, he said-
ath g Swami said that
man's physical needs are bein8
fulfilled there still remains a
great spiritual vacuum. It was
this vacuum that was helping
to cause the ever increasinS
mental problems arising in the
world today. The lack of
spiritual Inner peace caused our
many anxieties and our
constant restlessness and
discontent, he said.
The Swami maintained that
we should forget our 'sense'
world and turn inward. The
mind has been confused, he
said, with many external
stimulants of today. He
claimed that the West
continues to excite the senses,
but that such excitement is
only of a temporary nature and
not ultimately fulfilling. The
goal of man should be to calm
the senses and silence the mind
which would bring manner peace,
and it is peace which is man's
final goal.
FIVE-FOLD
To obtain this inner peace,
the Swami said that one has to
conceive the body as a vehicle.


The soul as the boss who sits in
the car, and the mind the
driver of the vehicle. Fully to
realise our potential, all aspects
of man have to be harnessed
and developed. The Swami
described the five-fold method;
(1) Asanes or exercises
which are necessary as the
various postures create positive
moods.
(2) Diet, as improper food
may adversely affect the mind
therefore, one must eat foods
which elevate and liberate man.
(3) Breathing, for without
proper breathing, the body is
sure to die. If done properly
good deep breathing increases
the oxygen in the system and
expels the lethal toxins while
allowing the prana to enter our
sysem. Relaxation, for by
relaxring we are able to allow
the vital prana taken in by
breathing to feely circulate
throughout our system and
rejuvenate us.
(5) Meditation and Positive
Thinking, for by meditation we
are able to maximise the
benefits derived from the other
four methods and concentrate
on our ultimate objective of
attaining peace and harmony
with ourselves and the world.
The Swami in closing, called
upon doctors and psychiatrists
to learn to control their own
minds by Yoga practices and
by doing so would be in a
position really to help their
patients. He said he was
pleased with the interest
expressed by the Bahamas
Mental Health Association in
Yoga and its way of life and
hoped that now such interest
would be extended into the
Mental Hospitals in an effort to
alleviate many of the mental
health problems of today.
In conclusion he invited all
Page 10O, Col. 4


SWAMI DEVANANDA
giving air) is unable to circulate
freely and oxygenate the body.
Improper shallow breathing
was the cause of many of our
mental problems, namely our
anxieties and negative moods.
MENTAL
The final three aspects of
man which concern Yoga are
the mental aspects. The mind
functions on three levels.The
first is the sub-conscious level,
which is also the lowest level
and which includes the seven
instincts, lust, anger, jealousy,
greed, fear, envy and hate. And
of all the instincts, the Swami
claimed that abnormal fear the
basis of anxiety was probably
the most detrimental. The
Swami maintained that many
of our actions are done while
in these highly charged
emotional states without
recourse to reason. When there
is fear the intellect is of no


(1 --Slr4~


r~NO.1Rice in the Bahamas Ma hatmaiIP Ii


.g'" LONG GRAIN RCI

v ~~ALWAYS COOKS UP LIGHT AND FLUFFY .

I mam eseai meemnse n u m smamamam m u ws mei smam uemmemes mmm am m sm mmeam m mma am mam aesu emmmmmae ee m amam mmm ae mam aemmemm mn m am m ae u


entle with


Be g
FOR SEVERAL MONTHS,
the popular herb, Thyme, has
been available at the Potter's
Cay Produce Exchange. Thyme
adds its own special touch to
many dishes and it is a boon to
the cook since the herb can be
preserved and kept for many
months without losing its
flavour.
Thyme belongs to the family
Labiatae which contains such
tongue-pleasing members as
mint, rosemary, savoury and
marjoram. The word is said to
come from the ancient Greek,
"thyein" which means to bum
perfume. The herb, known for
thousands of years, was once
burned as an incense.


9

. ..


Yog a &Menta


Health discussed le~s. cHOoCE PRTEmouIss sun








Wectdnedy, Marchr 7, 1973.


ahr Wetibuto


r7 Ililr ~


If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Valuel


SPECIALS
END UGGH
1973.


FOR THE
MARRCHH


WEEK
11H


Mahatma"~ Ihannai
Lone ename RIce OII R


r~l)




~ I~ I~ I





;


U.S. CHOICE
Per Ib .179 SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
Per Ib 1.99 ROUND ROAST
BAHAMIAN GROWN
Per Ib 1.99 PORK ALL CUITS

Per Ib 1.69 DAISY CHEESE


Z1*


r


rl ~ II )) t


T


I


U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN STE AK


Per Ib 1. 9


r


BIRDSEYE
SLACKEYE PEAS
SARA LEE
CHOCOLATE CAKES
SARA LEE
POUND CAKES


U.S. CHOICE
10ooz 2X89 PORTERHOUSE STEAK


Per Ib 1.59 CARROTS


(


2/40)


1 lb Pak


U.S. CHOICE
.99 T.80NE STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
.99 TOP ROUND STE AK


.89 CELERY
FLORIDA
.99 SWEET ORANGES


.39


Per Ib

Per Ib


13-oz

12-oz


10for.99


OSCAR MAYER
COTTO SALAMI
OSCAR MAYER
HAM STEAK
OSCAR MAYER
BRAUNSCHWEIGER
OSCAR MAYER
BOLOGNA ALL MEAT


.66)


ser


Gallons


1 Ib 2.29


SFAMIVIY FARE
ORANGE ZIlICE
KRAFT SLICED
CHEESE SINGLES


1.39

1.,09


3X99


%-Gall.


2X99


e-oz

8-oz


12 oz.


. 59

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OSCAR MAYER
BOLOGNA


NEW ZEALAND
BUTTER


PURE BEEF 8-oz


HUNTS
FRUIT


PLEDGE BONUS TIN
2/794 FU RN ITURE PO LISH1 9%-oz$~1.09

694 F RE NCH S MU STAR D9-oz 3 / 894


COCKTAIL


1s-oz

2 Roll


GALA DECORATED
PAPER TOWELS


SMEDLEY'S SLICED
99e GREEN BEANS


TYIP-BOL


20-oz 2/794


12-oz


HARP IC
(FREE Look Cooking Film) No. 12


HEFTY TRASH CAN
LINERS 20's
S/UN COUNTRY
AIR FRESHENERS


$1.79


59e


POST ALPHA BITS
9-oz 794 CEREAL


2/994


s-o,


BORDENS

~MILK


$3@9













-~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ---------~


WrOTH





PICTURESSY. ..



b~y WImur Str~
TELEPHONE S 461
Open daily until 6 p.m.(esediwlr~y for those family groupr,


PLANS are well underway
for the Independence Float
Parade, which will be one of
the many attractions staged
during the week of Ju'y 4 to

It metn f the fl t
par ea co mite last week it
was decided that floats should
be eoedi highestandar n t
dimensions. :
(A) An overall length of 24
feet.


JUSt slip thern in the Philips cassette recorder, push a button and Ilsten. Great!
Over 10.000 titles. More than 130 labels. Musicassettes can't srcratch, can't
collect dust. I~~


ERIC Y. REYNAL, general
manager of the First National
City Bank, this week
announced the appointments
Mr. Keith Smith to the
position of pro-manager and
Miss Alexandine Cumberbatch
to authorize signer.autof

Central State University, Ohio,

here aHea jin Citiban ce
Decmeber, 1971. Since that
time a spokesman said he has
proven an ability to assume
management responsibilities.
In announcing the
appointment, Mr. Reynal
remarked: "We are confident
that this promotion will serve
;Is an incentive and a challenge
to Mr. Smith towards paying a
long and productive career in
the organization."
A\lexandine Cumberbatch
has been with the bank since
July 1970. She has. spent a
considerable amount of time in
the sundries department, as a



From Page 8
to visit the Paradise Island
Yoga Retreat and share a
vegetarian meal and
participate in the exercises and
Ineditations of t he
Retreat- free!


senior clerk. Before assuming
her new responsibilities she was
assigned to the centralized
reconcitement unit.
Speaking of her new
appointment Mr. Reynal said,
"Management has been very
dtanse lith Aletxand n'
prformance "


(B) A width of 10 feet.
(C) A height of I2 feet.
All work should reflect the
work, business or purpose of
the participant or sponsor. It
should sk, convey as far as
ndsibenthe orthameeaof
theme.
Dadlmne for entry of floats


KEITH SMITH ALEXANDINYECUMBERBATCH


ONE GOOD TURN
DESERVES ANOTHER
TULSA, OKLA, (AP) Like
most grownups, President Nixon
apparently has experienced the


childhood agony of losing a beloved
Ilyear-l Idind M Ivintoparalsd
below the walst from spinal cord
damage:
"Mrs Nixon and I were saddened
to learn of the tragic accident you
recently suffered. Our hopes and
prayers are with you for a full
recovery.
"We also want to tell you how
much we admire the unselinsh spirit
which led you to offer your
beloved pony, Jacob, for sale to
help your parents with the medical
expenses. We share your happiness
in knowing of the good will and
concern which prompted so many
people to buy Jacob."
Jacob was auctioned for $1,137.
Then the buyers gave the pony
back to Linda. "I guess he read
about it in the papers," said the
little girl.

MAXICAKE FOR POWS
CLARK AIR BASE,
PHILIPPINES (AP) T. Sgt. John
F. Clayson of New Bedford, Mass.,
spcil birtddy tcwke 3o fetm ag Z
feet wide and 4 inches thick, in the
shape of the United States.
Mrs. Clayton, a native of
Germany, used two dozen eggs, 12
boxes of cake mix and 10 boxes of
pwrd sua.thAn mo cdid th
but it wasn't for them. It was for
four returned American prisoners
of wlar whhobse birt days happened
"It was our way of saying
welcome home to the returnees,"
tMrs e j n explained. "I hope

U.S. WOMAN C.O.
HEIDELBERG, GERMANY
(AP) Capt. Reba Tyler looks
forward to never a dull moment in
her new U.S. army role. She has
taken over a postal detachment of
34 men, the first woman officer to
command an all-male unit*
The 32-year-old former
schoolteacher from Neosha, Mo.,
declared "I think my new
assignment is the ultimate. It will
be a very interestinS experience for


all concerned."
44 DAYS ADRIFT
SUVA, FIII (AP) As the
raindrops kept falling on their
heads, fishermen Nabuti Tabutos
and Tarala Teketaba yearned for a
little sunshine. Out of gas, their
boat was stranded at sea in a driving
storm. So?
"When the storm cleared and the
sun came out with a relentless heat,
we found warmth," Nabuti said.
"What we had longed for was not as
welcome as we thought. The heat
pealed off our skins and we felt as
if we were boiled. As remedy, we
took turns having a dip in the sea
while the other looked out for
sharks."
Living on coconuts, see turtles
they speared and rainwater they
hoarded, the pair drifted for 44
days across 1,000 miles of ocean,
before they were picked up. They
came home to a hero's w trome
Tuesday on Tarawa.
A BIT GHOOLISH
CAMBRIDGE, ONT (AP) As
coincidences go, it was a little far
Robert Barthel recently bought a
new car, and when he picked it up
he noticed the license plate bore
the initials D)OA. In police parlance,
the letters stand for "dead on
arrival" at at hospital cienbu t
doesn't worry me," said Barthel, a
local undertaker.

WOMEN'S LIB FOR
ISLE OF MAN
has Lh~osentheAisle ofW Mn sor ith
fientt world fsival, scheduled for
The Isle of Man was the
birthplace of the founder of the
British suffragette movement,
Emmeline Patnkhurst, and the first
European territory to introduce
women's suffrage.
It is midway between England
and Ireland. Hitherto, its
population has been divided into
Manxmen and Manxwomen.
Now, Manxpersons, perhaps?


POLICE AIDED BY MAP
RECOVER STOLEN MONEY
MOENCHE:NGLAD)BA CH,
(;IRMANY (AP)--Police using a
map drawn by the: key suspect in an
armoured van theft, dug up Money
tth eevesacks containing whant ll
marks (1.17 million dollars) in
missing toot. The money, still in the
original money sacks reinforced by
asrt cof whais In 8stra cItyanea th
D~utch border.
The map was drawn by Guenter
ofth m ,ey vean2 wh atpae
fl Ireb mr 35ete wilhnearily 3.81
he was to transport toa
Duesseldorf bank.
Heinemann and a second man
were arrested by D~utch police near
I)en Hlelder last Thursday night and
have been questioned by German
police. The second man has been
identified by police as Heinrich
Linen Von Den Berg, a 39-year-old
salesman from Monenchenglaldbach.
The two are being held, pending
extradition.


Como usd lIrte t


@ )15 Wribunt


Wednesday March(1973.


IndependenceFloatParade?



deadline is April 15


2 more Bahamians get



Citibank promotions


MIMP


IIAYOR IDUSRIES1I*


P O. BOX N-4806


PHONE 2-8941




I


-- I ___ ___ __ r_ __ ___ ~


L


WE WI LL CUT (k PACKAGE ALL MEAT TO YOUR SPECIFICATION


I


BUY AUs. cuOlcE
WHOLE BEEF LOIN ANWD GET

LI WHOLE

BIRDSEYEl


Wdnesday, March 7 1973.


8rit, ~BTfhtntP


~llt~W~~WtRI


ll~t~l~ls331


3/.99


L.. SS$


..1.09
,, 1.29
,.. 1.38


or Haives
PECHP r h?


LB. UQy
LB. $1.09


AT NO ADDITIONAL COST


T-BONE STEAK
SIR LOIN STEAK
EaRLTOERHOSE STEAK


650


C


WE WILL CUT & PACKAGE ALL MEAT TO YOUR SPECIFICATION AT NO


;3l A~PPlTQ)AL COST


TOP ROUND STEAK
BOTTOM ROUND ROAST
RUMP ROAST
EYE ROUND ROAST
CRIBE STEAKS
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
CHOICE GROUND BEEF
CHOICE GROUND ROUND


.99
.55
.55
.59,


FaIalUE


COrn on Cob
BIRDSEYE
Blackeye Peas
BIRDSEYE
WOle Okra
BIRDSEYE "AWAKE"


~SC%;:


4 EARS
1o-oz.

10om.


FILLET MIGNON


Orange


9 0z.


GIANT SIZE .89 i KRAFT
.,,jOR ANG JUICE
KRAFT
s ee. .59 GRAPE FRUIT JUICE
QTs. 1.89 DANISH LURPAK
BUTTER s s.
STRAINED 7/.99
BEEF OR CHEESE 1.29
AS5TD. 4/.88 ENGTES
)NS 2/.79 NATIVE
BANANA Ls.
,KINS 2/.79
IVMB 2/9 CARROTS LB. BAG
LEMONS
2 ACK .69 __ __ __ __ __


MR. CLAN
TRIPLE J
CORN BEEF
GOLD MEDAL
FLOUR

HEINZ
BABY FOOD
GAINES
BURGErRS 36-t.
KLEENEX FAMILY
NAPKINS
KLEENEX
DINWRt NAPKI


.7 5


OTS.


% GAL. 1.69


so


10/99
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3/.89


KLEENEX
COCKTAIL
KLEENEX
TOWELS
KLEENEX
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NAP


10/.99
_ _ _


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FACIAL TISSUE
K EC L TISSUE


1/.59
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1.2L I
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2/.89


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INSECT KILLER
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DEL5EY
BATHROOM TISSUE 2 PACK eg g .
KLEENEX
BATHROOM TISSUE 2 PACK 2/.8 8
Lsesv~s SPAGHETTI & MElrCBALLS


SAVE .30e


sA Ax
CLEANSER


3/.79


14 o.


No., 1
14o.
20 oz.
12 oz.
u r.
20oz.


MANAGERS


SALE!!!


GIANT MEAT FREEZER SALE!!

Stock up these values & save


* C


CHUICK ROAST


CHICK STEAK
SHOULDER ROAST
SHOULDER STE AK


GRU.S. CHOCE
DAISYgg CES


for $1!9 ,,


BOLOGNA SAUSAIGE,..


LB. *12


S BUV A II P pU. Ull IUL
WHOLE BEEF ROUND
AW 88 T.


*o .19 ,


,,. $3.68


COFFEE


OMO


W amm




I I I


-~~ ------~-


BACK BY POPULAR DEEMAND

TONY SEYMOUR



THE NITEBEATERS


I
g


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DEAR NAMELESS: Flad a piggy bank la the shape of
no lasenandbdecorate it with the followlag message, "'m
piano, but don't play, "The best things in Ilfe are free."

DEAR READERS: I thlak this is worth noting:
"Every gun that is made, every warship launched.
every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from
those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and
are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money
alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius et
its scientists, the hopes of its children. .. This is not a
way of life at all la any true sense. Under the cloud of war,
It is humanity hanging on a cross of iren."
Do you know who said that? No, not George MHcGoverB*
It was Dwight D. Elsenhower, on April 16, 1953, before the
American Soelety of Newspaper Editors. And it's as true

wDEa wABten:I have read that the quality of one's
voice changes withr age, and I'm sure it's true. And that is
my problem because my husband said to me the other day:
"I can't help it, but your voice just grates on my nerves!"
I have always been considered a good conversationalist
and my personality has been described as "bu~bling." But
now I am so self-conscious about my voice I don't talk any
more than I absolutely have to. And when I do talk to my
husband, I try to use different tones and pitches so as not
to irritate him.
I would be very grateful to you or to any of your
readers if this condition of mine could be improved. Thank
you. UNHAPPY
DEAR UNHAPPY: Onr the chance that your problem is
medical, first you should see a throat specialist for a com-
plete examination of your vocal chords. If yea are healthy,
a speech therapist or a voice coach might be very helpful.
Your local college [speech or drama department] can
make recommendations. And good luck!








GRE AT SHCNV ',':0 ." I:0 A.:

CHICKIE MORNE
RENOWNEDl IMPERSONATOR

..:'::rionii :"'eah Hoel Isrdi 1 island

h NONSE DINING from 7p.m.


LAST DAY THURSDAY
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
If you steal $300,000
from the mob, it's not robbery.
It's suicide.








ANTHONY QUINN YAPHET KOTTO
"ACROSS 110'"STREET
R~ Unied Artsths


Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first come first served basis.


Thursday & Friday
Matinee continuous
Eo g2 00
"TWINS OF EVIL" R.
Peter Cushing
Dennis Price
PLUS
"HANDS OF THE
RIPPER" R.
Eric Porter
Keith Bell
No one unlder 17 will be admitted.
'Phone 2-2534


Now thru Friday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"MURDERS IN THE RUE
MORGUE" PG.
Jason Robards
Christine Kaufmann
PLUS

"THE AMBUSHERS" PG.


Wedrasdlay, March 7,l 1973.


NOW SHOWING
Matinee 2 & 4:45, Evening 8:30-'Phonre 2-1004, 2-1005


-PUS-


ary handbook".
skull was gently and gradually
flattened by placing the
newborn infant in a
cradleboard with a slanted
frontpiece fitting over the
child's forehead".
BEAUTIFUL
The results were far from
gruesome as one might expect
since the Lucayan women were
considered so beautiful that
"numerous inhabitants of the
n eigh bou ri ng countries,
charmed by their beauty,
abandon their homes and, for
the love of them, settle in their
country", according to a 16th
(century writer.
Today 's "permissive
society would have seemed
child's play to the Lucayans.
The samne writer described the
young woman who gave freely
to one and all as "the most
generous and honourable of
all "
They smoked tobacco as an
mntoxicant during ceremonies,
TIhey painted their bodies.
They worshipped the spirits of

scre idsnme me kind oejgi 1 l
When C:olumbus first came
et tce Bhms ue testimiat d
region of 20,000 to 40,000
Iwnentde Len a rred, wo l
one old Lucayan woman could
be found. The reason for the
devastation was the granting of
a request made to the
Governor of Hlispaniola to
recruit labour from the
Bahamnas.
It didn't take too long to
whittle down the numbers
until all that remains today are
a few cranially deformerd skulls
in the Nassau Public Library.
FI:ATURES SE(.TION
The Features Sectioni also
delves into the mysteries of the
Tongue of the Ocean, the
srang ecreiatrels to be found


Bahamas Handbook as "no ordin;
The fact that the Bahamas
Handbook has never been
ordinary is the main reason
why this 528-page fountain of
knowledge continues as
practically the bible of
Bahamian information
throughout the world It will
remain so, thanks to this latest
volume which is now on the
bookstands.
Dr. Julian Granberry, an
American archeologist, has
contributed a fascinating
article in the Features Section
on the Bahamas' first
inhabitants the Lucayan
indians, the beautiful, gentle
people who perished in slavery
in the hands of the Spaniards.
lie describes their practice
o~f cranial deformation "in
which the front part of the


Bahamian sand is so soft and
pure, and an article on Bliss
Carman, the Canadian poet
who immortalized the Bahamas
in verse at the turn of the
century, plus his famous poem
"In Bay Street".
The section on leisure and
vacation is mainly for the
tourist but it offers an
excellent refresher course for
those dulled to the beauties of'
the Bahamas because of
familiarity.
The Out islands section gives
alphabetical listings from
Acklins to Turks and Caicos
including history, size,
accommodation, points o~f
interest and sporting facilities
of 18 of the more well-known
islands.
Hlow high or low is the
Bahamian cost of living? What
is a Central Bank and how does
it work? Who are the people
who promote the Bahamas and
tourism? How can U.S. and
Clanadian investors receive the
best tax benefits? Where can
slnd ada ho m ch willi
are answered in the Bahamas
liandf ce sec in eonisbu nne
directory of where to buy
gos and services in the
The section on Bahamas
information is a vast collection
of facts including everything
from how to bring an elephant
into the country to the price of
a one-pound frying chicken in
August 1972 (72c to $1).
Who is the dentist at North
Andros? How do you get a
divorce in the Bahamas? How
much does electricity cost and
what are the best months to
fish for amberjacks.
Freeport/lucaya has its own
section consisting of general
in form nation, industries,
aoun is and sports, real estate


~J~FI
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*:


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1


By Abigail Van Buren
a I3 by Chicrae Tribune N. Y. News Synd., lac.
DEAR ABBY: I have a boss who is more than ready
for retirement. Nobody knows how old he is, but he's been
with this company for nearly 40 years.
About four months ago he announced that he would
retire on a certain date. He kept saying, "Well, 120 days
before I leave, 110 days, 90 days, etc."
We co-workers planned a farewell dinner for him, and I
collected the money for his retirement gift.
The morning of the farewell dinner he told us he
changed his mind. He is not leaving!
We decided to go thru with the dinner and give him the
gift anyway. Nobody knows how much longer he will be
here.
Have you ever heard of anything so crazy? And what
can we do about it? SPEAMED


east 8 to


ThlS WarhrBOSO CaDt




chanDn RhisS Aid7F en ea rtl es, cus say, "odbme "

emDiaR pABbY serd ae ear omy hbad some soerri u
wife left me. Then I did something right for a change. I
",nt to elpe'dho oist. She sw me three ties a rwee ,
OncO 8 Week. My psychologist is a single woman, about 40
years old. She is a very understanding person. My problem
now is that I am stuck on her!
I would like to see her outside her office. Don't get me
wrong. She never did anything to encourage my feelings for
her. Should I tell her how I feel about her? I want to. but
what if she gets mad at me? Then she wouldn't even see
me in her office, and I couldn't stand that. Please tell me
what to do. UNDECIDED
DEAR UNDECID)ED: Tell your psychologist how you
feel. She'll know how to handle it, and she'll help you deal
with your feelings. That's what you're paying her for.

DEAR ABBY: I play piano in a piano bar club. Many
customers request special songs, and to show their appreci-
ation t ey loffe ato ouymeha rdink. I don't drin ond t jb
working ." Thte smile a tat' h dind of ithedin
I would be very, very happy, but how does one convey this
idea to the customers without coming across as a "money-
hungry" musician? If they are willing to buy me a drink,
g shouldn't they be just as willing to part with the price of
the drink? NAMELESS, PLEASE


ARRIVE: I) T I:
Sunward from Miamni Ire <1
from Freeport
SAILED) TODAY: Freeport
foA T(IN~lG TOMORROW
Topc E~er fro mWest I as
Beach
SAILING; TOMORROW:
Emerald Seas, Bahama Star,
Flavia for Miami


WEATHER
WIND) Southr


S.


in p.h.
SWI: ATlif R Fir
to EMP: Min. tonight 70 Ma!


TIDES
HIGHl 9:13 a.mi. and 9:37
P.m.
LOW: 3:0 l a~m and 3 14
p~m.
SUN
RISES: 6:28 a.m
SlTS: 6:10 p.m.
MOON
R[SE~S: 7:5 a'in


Dean Martin
Senta Berger


5AM


NOW SHOWING
AT 7:00 & 10:40


'1D


AT 8:55


tl ,


fr fE Gributtp


Bahamas Handbook features new


sections in its 1973 publication

DUPUCH PUBLICATIfONS' BAHAMAS HANDBOOK for 1973 brings its gigantic trek through
every facet of Bahamian life with a brief resume of what the reader may expect from the book. It
describes the flamingo as "no ordinary bird", the Bahamas as "no ordinary countryy, and the


Monday Sunday

Off Tuesdays

7:30p.m. la~m.


Heart raf fle car dra w tomor row
THE HEART RAFFLE DRAWING takes place tomorrow night at 11:30 p.m. at the
Drumbeat Club. Tickets will be on sale at the club from 5 p.m. Looking over the grand
prize of the 1973 Pontiac Le Mans Sport Coupe are committee chairmen (left to right),
Mrs. R. Ernest Barnes, Mrs. Cleophas Adderley and Mrs. Alton T. Davis.


1 """


Dean ~a66~-


Op s 6: n Ehw atlr FR m
See 2 features late as 9:25
I~:Nr~ STARTS TONITE *
"SWORD IN THE STONE"
"SILVER FO/ 8:40 & 11 p.m.
.8 EEI~RffO 0fo magiC81mirtti and rntsicI
'' A 197 -... LL 0


THE WORLD FAMOUS


LANCIME

BEAUTY PRODUCTs


HIIlas


THIE MANY
tW"Err 4
00$$1887 I
EI-I


THE PERFUME SHOF

Cor. Frecdrick& bay Struets


LEE VA C~EER

~RETUO aS......




Eg Ill


__ f __ _ _


- ,4


'd feel a lot healthier if yon had mykind of a ob
lere you're out in the fresh air."

A d"~


t's those little personal touches that I'll miss if I
place them with machines."


".. But what he settles down to office business, he
callsr in THIS old workhorse."


I rl ___.__ __~______ r 1 -


__


T


from 9a.m. to 5p~m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


STRADE SERVICES


~~~------------~ _-- r IL ~RY





I


I


C9032
DO YOU HAVE AN idea for
making money. We have the
money send full details to
"IDE ", Box 6104, Nassau
Bahamas '


FOR SALE
C7196
1968 Chris Craft 32' Sea

Skif twn 32 u n hvs


Phone 352-2000 or 373-2446.
Box F-737, Freeport.

C7197
1968 17' 6" Ski boat, all


aa.,Fod teco r ecetr

off r
Ph ne 352-2000 or 373-2446.
Box F-737, Freeport.

REAL1 ESTATE
C7209
DUPLEX FOR SALE!!!
2 bedroom 2 bathrooms,
furnished, rented, Price
$12,500 cash, no mortgage.
Phone 352-8868, after five
352-9293.


FOR RENT
C7207
ONE BEDROOM ,

B UV WATER AGRATRMANGTE
NC2L5UDED. UNFURNISHED
$ 15 00 .00. FREE PO RT
352-2126, 373-3780.

IIELP VMN TED

C9069
HOUSEMAN required. Will be
responsible for transporting
clean and soiled linen to and
from all guests rooms and carry
out all duties as requested by
supervisor.
K KITCHEN C LE ANE Rs
required. WiII be responsible
for the removal of all garbage,
scrubbing and mopping kitchen
floors, and carry out all duties
as requested by the Chef or
Sous Chef.
KITCHEN PORTERS required.
Will be responsible for the
collection of supplies from the
store room and suopupt dall fod



Al neeste per onsorshol
epl noMs M maamAdderiey



INTERNATIONAL FI RM of
chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
ei Certifinee ccountant sicn
Successful candidates will be
uside cellen lsalariesh ad
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport. Bahamas.
C7210
THREE (3) LABOURERS,
GARBAGE COLLECTION.
APPLY TO: RUSSELL'S
SANITATION SERVICE, P. O.
BOX F-557, FREEPORT.


SCS720
FOR SALE OR CHARTER
125ft. x 23ft. 4ft. draft, steel
hull, 290 tons, powered by
new Cat .343 diesel. 15 ton
crane. Up to date load line
with 2 cargo hatches, one 14ft.
x 24ft and the other 14ft. x
42ft. double bottom, in
excellent shape.
Contact: Sands Construction &
Shipping, Marsh Harbour, box
489, Treasure Cay, Abaco.
Phone 159.

IN MEMORIAM |
C9067














a r~ ....e Np+ C
in loving memory of our dear
sister dell Evans who passed
aways 7h Marchsil967.yo ae

sIl sgnan hear your cheerful

W firing words of cmot

dlepo dea ob% e5ste anM ta

Rolland Evans, Nephews -
Chris and Wilton Finlayson*
relatives and friends.


EL WrArNTED I
C8995
BLUE VISTA HEALTH
BAUTY SLONSS asue

Manicurists & Pedicurist. Also '
aprent ces males ooi fm nets

Telephone 77048ap .

C9006
SMALL DOWNTOWN hotel
has position available for
resident Manager/Manageress.
Requires ability to deal with
public and supervise staff.
Good references required
Apply in writing to: Adv.
C9006, c/o The Tribune, P. O.
Box N-3207, Nassau.


"You
-- wh



















"II
rel







,, - *


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meby Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5i 'n Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeor


1


3RA ESA 8938FO RET
OTFOR SALE IN HIGH ONE EXTRA large two
ISTA. $7,000.00. 50%down. bedroom two bath, and one

NNTIERET Poem t13( ap me r. With large lvn
furnished Victoria Court
918 Apartments on Elizabeth
ONT LOSE YOUR LOT OR Avenue between Shiriey and
OMbecause you can't meet Bay Street. Facilities, phone.
payments Call FOX & laundry, parking, T.V. antenna.
SREAL ESTATE Tel. airconditioned. Phone 54631
012 31295 evenings between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
x6104, Nassau.
C9041
9054 1 LARGE SHOP and 1-2
AKFRONT LOTS AT bedroom apartment on Soldier
AMACA W L#"AC Road opposite Technical
SATES. Price from $7500. TraEnfirin Colga art ets o
It apsit x13mlonth.T No W f Roa opep4 9e Bhasmi
-3027 or 24148 Morley &, Lubr hn -9
'Brien Real Estate 900
LARGE SHOP and warehouse
SALE ORRENAL~ on Wulff Road below Mackey
EST SLES R RETALSStreet. Suitable for furniture
nORealS Esae e tru~gh, store -olaundrDma Go BnC _
1295, Box 6104, Nassau. 21031 -' 52483 ask for
Douglas Carey.


9 74 cE s noef and in Blue LA GEill OP for rent 3 0

9081 store and warehouse. Has side
ASENOW5 RRN enra~nce. Call 2-1731 or

aycroft one bedroom C8943
ptment, large living, balcony BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
v Io kfirmpo tlya frnoshd adn rtmns Ra abl o na

9083 5-4926.
FOR SALE C9005
CALE BEACH imagine APARTMENTS located at
bing bd romt, 3 at corner of Colin Ave an


fom waters edge, for only per month. For further
$69,000.00. Good sea-ba thing. information call Mr. Clonaris -
Financeeed $2 00FO do.00 Day 24264 Night 31143-

payment, to live like King on C97
the Gold Coast. C02
HARBOUR MEWS 2 FUDI!
bedrom 2 athsonly Large new unfurnished 2 or
$42oo,000 seabathng pool, R bedroom house on Charlotte
furnished0 saahn po Rdge West of Boyd
CHERTShEY 4hFlo Subdivision. Phone 21170.
PENT HOUSE best views vnns418
tastefully furnished from
Harrods of London. Ideal C9058
tropo tm living. Come see by 1. 2BLI bESTATES bath
OL NGARIFF off JohnsoS rmn unse btn
ARCHIECTUALLY UILTapartment furnished. Phone:
from $50,00.0 toNight 32589. Day 22580.
$115,000.00
NsC n5 inrnoo F9UOR ISH ED dl2 ibe ro

;uper-liner. Patio facing Sea telephone, utility room with
7tagnificent views, good new automatic washer. Phone
swimming also has pool 5-8201.
privileges and tennis court.
Yours for only $75,000.00. C8959
Finance already established. IN TOWN furnished rooms
250 FEET ON WATERS Efficiency apartment, also
EDGE -OUT EAST With town property for sale. Phone
house. It only needs decorating 2-2555.
and minor repairs. Priced at
$75,000.00. C9085
HOUSE GOLD COAST 2 BEDROOM house in
CABLE BEACH. Has SANDY Sunshine Park with separate
BEACH ma nificent views. dining room, enclosed yard.
No pollution. Contains 4 $180 per month. Available
bedrooms, two showers for March 15th. Call 5-6901.
bathers enclosed rear patio

idle ,000r0 ntertan fina ce. 90 IIENCIES by the week

AT ON2 7ELOSPho~nes ol Ne o Cub 2Eastae

4119 CEI LR E 2 bedroom 1 bath
FOR RENTdownstairs apartment could
C8939 be used as office or classrooms
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE - spacious grounds. Phone
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate 2-8086.
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017. TATERFOT EAST.
C8942 BAYCROFT ONE BEDROOM
LpARt nt ONEel BEDRiOOM APARTMENT, FALRLGE
$250 per month. Call Chester B EA UTIF U LL Y
Thompson Reat Estate FURNISH ED, BALCONY
2-4777-8. OVERLOOKING OCEAN
AND POOL, LOVELY VIEW'
C9049 TOP FLOOR. CALL 4-2113
OFFICE SPACE: Roberts
BIlding, East Street just off FO AE 1

120 s ft. $90.00 per I
mont 5. P 6
270 sq, ft. $135.00 per 1 C NVE RTIBLE couch
month 1 Fender amplifier and speaker
360 sq. ft. $180 per month 1 2501b. trunk food freezer.
975 sq. ft. $400.00 per Call 77947.

AIRCODITIONING INCLuD CARS FOR SALE

OFFICE &I STORE SPACE: C9080
Out Island Traders Ltd. 1969 Toyota. Call 51628 ask
Shopping Centre, opposite the for Janette Carrol.
Potter Cay docks. An ideal


Mtaeut nr taurn eui mena C896
already installed. Only 9
$308.33 per month. Store and
office space available for as FOR YOUR FURNITURE
little as $277.00 per month. AND OTHER EFFECTS
UN FURNISHED
APARTMENTS OAKES HX ~RS
FIELD $140.00 per month AW *
OFFICE SPACE OAKEs pgAIlTURE OUTFIT
FIELD: 868 sq. ft. $290.00
per month DOWDESWELL STREET
APARTMENTS OUT EAST (4DOSETOF

O UFRNR SDH EDF LOR DEVEAUX ST.)
BASICALLY FURNISHED: P.O. BOX 6104E.S.
$265.00 and $230.00 i)NASSAU, BAHAMAS
respectively per month. TEL: 0012
Airconditioningpol and swimming wa )ak
Telephone: BERT L.
ROBERTS LTD., 23177. Bert [@
L. Roberts Ltd. ~ OP( U'I YM IH


I i


I I


TRADE1 SERVICES
C8104
YOU'RE IN A HEAP-O*


OAL MCO FR AL

51071-2-3-4 -
C8958
TROUBLES .... small or large
call The Plumber on Wheels:-
ROBE RT M. BAI LEY
P. O. Box N56*
Nassau
Telephone: 3-5870.


PUBLIC AUCTION1
C7205
WANTED with minimum 10

eersexpe 9ece bya Top

estimating work both from
bl ueprint s, build ings
interior/exterior, knowledge of
spraying, installing of
wallpaper, all other phases in
connection with painting and
decorating.
Reply to: Adv. C-7205, C/O
The Tribune. P. O. Box F-485,
Freebort .
'C7198
EX PERI NC Ew F pino


nequimr d. Ase, fulquaif ed
cocktail t ou nge waitress
wanted. Please apply in person
to the Personnel Department,
International Hotel. Freeport.


Req ired by Bahamas Oil
Refining Company.
POS ITION: Marine Pilot


EXPE INE: S lasct tur

berthing and unberthing of

Ko ledge pass r our t sag

Please reply stating details of
qualifications and experience


FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.



POSITIONS WANTED

POULTRY PLANT Manager
with 25 years experience in
shell eggs, broilers, further
processing, Excellent resume.
Call Freeport 373-5779 or Box
F-707.


c89
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.

hlu ot va $r1100
2 Dr. Radio
Auto. Blue $1895
1970 Viva Auto Green $1200
1970 Ford LTD A/C
Belge Vinyl $2995
1973 Pontiac Hatchback
A/C 2400 miles Blue $4950
1972 Viva S/W
Automatic White $2600
1972 Pontiac Ventura
Vinyl Top 6cyl. $3950
1970 Morris 1100 Series
White Auto. 4 Dr. $995
A 70 ChreveileA2 Dr. $40
1971 Ford Escort 4 Dr.
Automlitic Belge $1695
1971 Vauxhall Victor 4 Dr.
S/W Auto. Green $1895
1972 Pontiac Ventura
4 Dr. Auto. Radio $90

1969 Camaro, Orange.
Auitomatic 81500

A/C utomtic $2400



1969 Chryster Imperial

168A Cuar A/C $50
14,000 miles only $1600
Trade-Ins welcomed
OL cat Oh ke Fid



MIARIE SUPPLIES


u CEAKaER 4ft. Luxur ous


HELP WANTED
POSITION AVAILABLE
FOR MASTER M o NE


Nassau, Bahamas, is seeking a
qualified Bahamian for Master
of the M/V "Island Cement" a
1500 DWT Beikc Ocean Vessel.
Applicant must be at least 30
years of age, fully qualified as
to education and professional
experience, possessing a British
Foreign Going Master
Mariner Certificate or
recognized equivalent.
Applicants to please apply in
writing to the above address

edctio eper sume anod
technical certification.

C9029
REQUIRED one landscape
architect for resort
devel pment ar andscapin al

construct nursery for further
landscaping designs, consultant

hit Gl or Genkpr


C9028
GEeQUskReEpDr ep xp renc3
years experience to live on
family island. Please submit
reuewth q~ual faion t



UL" A Modern Dental Clinic
requires:.

E ce l nt paar ida working

conditions. Experience
considered but not essential.
Apply in writing to "Dental
Clinic," P. O. Box N3750,
Nyassau.
C9062
WAREHOUSE MANAGER
Successful applicant should
have knowledge of groceries,
meats and liquor. He will be
responsible for the receipt.
shipment and complete control
of all merchandise entering and
parting the warehouse.folw

ca"''.i s'nte of c nt .l.o*C
subordinate workers employed
in the warehouse. Only
Bahamians with experience in

this er c need e ely Sa ar

Apply in own handwriting to
Adv. C9062, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.
C9063
POSITION OPEN for
'Work ing F or eman
Electrician" at Diamond
Crystal Salt Company, Solar
Salt Operation at Long Island,
Bahamas. Applicant must be
Bahamian, having the following
qualifications:
MUST:.
1. Be capable of installing and
maintaining aerial and
underground transmission lines
include ng igh vlage.n isl

powe ed genertatormequp3e t


Alopwer distribnutionmotnod


3. Have a minimum of ten
years experience in installing,
maintaining and operating the
electrical section of a large
industrial plant.

rnstaHla ionN nd npwrto ge
electrically operated conveyor
adrlpumping systems and
5. Be capable of installing,
overhauling and operating
electrically powered pumps,
one two and three deck
vibrating screens and slingers.
6. Have full knowledge and be
capable of operating and
maintaining an electrically
powered and controlled water
treatment plant and water still.
7. Be capable of operating and
maintaining a Sonoray audio
gauge test equipment.
8. Be able to service and

ema nmnt of fleet oe tr cs
road building equipment.
9. Have enough plumbing and
pipefitting experience to
maintain 5 houses, shop and
plant area.
o0 rBee aleintor eant and
telephone and radio system.


11. Be able to maintain walk-in
deep freezer and cooler and to
maintain central
air-conditioning units in 5
building and 7 room
air-conditioning units.
12. Maintain Mercury Vapor
Lamps used in outdoor lighting
of industrial area. Also
maintain lights in channel and
choarag consurate with
quali locations. Air mail
applications to Diamond
Crystal Salt Company.
Clarence Town, Long Island*
Bahamas, in time for
preliminary interviews in
Nassau 14th and 15th March
1973.


C8978
WANTED MEN OR WOMEN
Re re etative to sl appro e



Fitzgibbons School of
U holstr a Itro
Deign,ter1363anBird Intorior
Miami, Florida, U.S.A '
C90944
HARD' WORKING SALES
MANAGER WANTED. Hours
1 p.m. until 9 p.m. Good salary
plus commission. Apply -
Owner, Fox Bro th ers
Furniture, Dowdeswell Street.
C9064
CHARTERsEDarandsougtifi d

positions with the Nassau and
Freeport off ices of Price
Waterhouse & Co. Handwritten
applications in the first
instance, please to P. O. Box
N-3910, Nassau.

AQUINAS COLLEGE
P. O. Box N-7S40




Bahamians who are interested,
pleased IIl thorabove telepho e

appointment with Mr. Andrew
R. Curry, Principal, at Aquinas


racn is diena de fo lwi~
de artment :
Sp nish .
Religion
Mtematics


Home Economics
Commercial ( Ty pi ng'
Bookkeeping, Shorthand)
C9010
1 HAIRSTYLIST Male or
Female.
1 Manicurist
Must have 3 to 5 years
experience in all phases ce
beauty culture.
Apply in person at Carmita,
Beauty Salon, Charlotte Street.
Phone 24222 or write P. O.
Box 5166, Nassau.

oeHEAD BUTCHER
Duties would include the
complete supervision of the
meat department in the

unoweg l Mn ual ae~cts o
must have knowledge of all
types of meats, fish and
poultry. Must be able to trim
carcasses of all kinds to
produce the desired cuts of
meat as required. Will be
responsible for all meats, etc.
in the butcher shop. .
Only Bahamians with
experience in this field need
app y Salar y will
be commensurate with
experience.
Apply in own handwriting to
Adv. C9061, c/o The Tribune'
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

UR ENTLY required young

mae bitwent ce fg tf2 to





POSITION WANTED
C9079
ENGLISH WOMAN with
tahamia status rquiees2 4 r
day.
C9084
BOOKKEEPER up to balance
sheet seeks job at night 6.30
p.m. to 12.00 midnight, 6
nights a week. Call 8.30 a.m. to
5 p.m. 2-3706 or 7.

TRADEI SERVICES
C8963
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-8213, or 5-1772
WORLD OF MUSIC, Dewgard
Plaza.


C8941
PATIO AWN WINGS AND
CAPR S Aa INS,


to fe eials 2-842
prompt service cal 2 1.


HELP VWANTED
C8952
HELP WANTED


Isad Oeen Cop

qualified Bahamian for Master

DMlin VutBe t lenaset 3
years of pge, funly qualified as
to educa ion and professional

e rrneir C riiate o
recognized equivalent
Applicants to please apply in
writing to the above address

cai'o\, epei 0" anod

C7200
DRESSMAKER Must be
able to work without
supervision, cut with or
without pattern, also complete
finishing. Bahamian only,
references required.
Write Box F-406, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.


nO~ rr..... s,.e... I... 1(on. w..U~ .@* ****


C9009
OUT ISLAND RESORT has
opening for the post of
Resident. Engineer. Successful
candidate will be responsible
fr th aoln tareas:- uiiy
company.
2. Construction and
maintenance of sewage plant.
3. Supervise garage and heavy
equipment maintenance.
4. Supervise maintenance of
Resort and Development
feacltie,
5. Preparing all engineering and
designs f or new installations
etc.
ar Coordinating ac jvisi o
departments.
Candidate should have
Technical and Engineering
training and should have at
least 5 years experience.
Attractive salary and benefits
offered. Send resume to:- P. O.
Box N3229, Nassau, Bahamas.


C8947


Markey S om&

M o eveet rve ue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELl VERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEESLHB DGNG
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMVAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434


E LASR OFS RAC


WTIP WIIYTFD


MTED Y tn


i8 Set for

a Pant Ad'.


That's a question The
Tribune Classif ied
Department hear often. And
fortunately, there is no "best
day".
Each day therre ar people
with new wants and need.
Each day brings new nreaer,
as well as old ones to the
Classifid pages.
So stat year ad when year
"want" a~rse, rad cance it
when it brings ntrelt.
Stop-by The Tribune offce
to place yours. Every day k
the best day to advetis with
The Tribane Classified Ads.


"Actually, I'm st afraid to ask for a raise... It's just
that F'm araild I migt get fired I f Ido."










Wednesday, IMarch 7, 1973.


14 Stb Orthbunt


I I


r


~i~Z~U ~EL~%L


Chess
By ORONAAD BAltDEN












Blsac to move what should
be the result ? 'IILtdcaame is
~itrickrth itc lookc~s fn ooled
Rbbn Qlt wde ai
lhes gandngs. As usual, the
~hite povns are moving up the
boast, Ima bottom 40 top at
Pa tdmes: 10 seconds chess
arneser; 20 seconds, chess
1Jnasd 2 mhL & u
gl~a; I ~Lutes. averasre; 7



Chess Solution
It's a drarw after I .. P--R8
rQ ; 2 Rx Q, R--R31 and snow
2 AxJE is a drawu by stdateate
and so is 3 R--91. Ex P ch; 4
K xR.





81t r Qthunr

c awaurwr



leman


SHIRLEY STREET
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

gm19018 AdutrtiSIg
Taaha 2-192


REX MORG AN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


--1


I


L
FIL161W15 IE~W IOINIUI~
L.
U

I
T




r


aew
4, 4,
tain aWelm (S
( ,







fl1(. ALmd

at.as
(8'l u etedes toia


1 **.I r*l*-- S>*. **** .* i,*M V*** .lh* --~r I

"Of course I heard you yell for help. That's why I sent
my secretary in to see what was wrong."

Rupert and thre Nmnky T oys-39


. - -


APA RTMENTL 3- G By Al~er K o ts is


ISTE V. ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


CI A TE NC pl ncnao




areENRA toDR~fg make ao sucs ofyor at


ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Your ideas ar fin but you
have to as1 your enegle wisely if they ar to become
successful in your life. Anything of importance should be
thought out in advance before proceeding.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Confkle only in trusted
advisers concerning acret aims you have. Forget fun until you
have problems well handled. Make this a day of great
accomplishment. Take it easy tonight.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You are not feeling up to par
and may want to ignore good friends, which isa wrong thing
to do at this time. Group affairs are fine but do little talking
for best results.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Hadle vocational
matters in a most efficient way. Don't irritate a higher-up.
Make surs you pay an important bill you've been putting off.
Don't takel chances with your credit.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You thinkt you have some fine
ideas but it's best you study them further before you put them
in operation. Take no risks with money. A plan of a newcomer
is not for you, so turn it down.
VIRG;O (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Further analysis of your
obligations makes it possible for you to dischprp them with
efficiency. Find a better way of pleasing mate. Avoid
arguments and add to present haratony.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) If you don't impose on
associates, you can come to a far better understanding, and be
more cooperative than in the past. One who opposes you is in
an irate mood, so avoid this person.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Plan your time wisely so
that you can handle thoen important duties ahead with
efficiency. Use a new method to improve your health. Do
something of a philanthropic nature tonight.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Taking time off for
fun is fine, but don't be extravagant in any way. Plan to use
your talents more so that you get better results. Think along
constructive lines. Relax tonight.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Don't caus friction at
home by bringing up old arguments. Strive for more harmony
instead. Try to eliminate the cause of any trouble and gain the
respect of all. Keep calm.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) This is not the right day
to do whatever you feel will be helpful to associates so wait
for a better time. Don't take any chances in travel or in dealing
with those in trouble.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Instead of getting deeper in
debt, be sure to pay whatever bills you have. Obtain the advice
of experts for your problematical affairs. A small investment
could be successful.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .. he or she will be
one of those young people who will want to jump into almost
anything without proper preparedness. Teach to plan and to
be patisat, although it may be a difficult lesson to lean. Give
as fine an eduestion as you can affoul. Also, teach the
importance of the value of the dollar. Spiritual training is a
must. Fame is possible here.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life islately upto YOU!


The driver Is .n too much of
a hurry to ask questions. He
bundles Rupert and the sack
into his van. the doors are
locked, and very soon the little
bear finds himself carried away
at speed Ooo. I didn t
expect this he says. gasping
At length he Is lifted out of
the van, together with his sack


t~~~:~s J.,
and carried up his own garden
path. Merr y Christmas,
ma am." says the driver when
Mrs. Bear answers his knock.
" I see you ve had a Wgigt
shower of snow here. Two
parcels for you And
Rupert s bewildered Mummy
has to sign a book before sre
can take the deliveries !


AJO92l


a Q J S 4 2 9 7 8 5 4

O 8632 J lb


SQ, 4aplae


*_ g gasasn

amai be o lakan

QA an HAAA M*



Searl
mt Wbels.b o a
eQRMb 'll~~1 1 (rldao


"Don't worry, chief--it's not a real aple.n


CROSSWORD
PU ZLE
1. Bonnet 29. Copperfield's
5. Urial wife
8. Young fish 31. Corpulent
11. Ditto 33. Coral islet
12. Successful 34. Pineapple
play 36. Vigor
13 elre 38 r pant
15. Contestant Psalms
17 Pnidetermnine m50~lrY SQL
20. Heli oter 47. 8ulif ight ciner
blade 48. Continent
23. Globe 49. Leucothea
26. In error 50. Radiation unit
28. Whitewall 51. Let it stand


TARGET

M r four states
~rom thel
as a i Ins
8 B E us *& *

r.tv tr rcs a

SBr aerhklr ed s. sood
IIe Se tIrar ut ltm1normr
1ESERDY' 8 O UTON

5eart It gas no
bAnatl.L one free mt seer
tes kt ten oter lor onle ree
mte rt 4ntl role rose tell


1. Molety
2. Not the
real spread
3. Glacial ridges


4. Recipient
5. Lawrnan
6. Stag's malte
7. Rose oil
8. Distraught
9. Try for office
10. However
16. Upraor
18. God in Spain
21. Mekdieval
22. King


25414earwter
294.8agArhe's

32. Frtch
shootirgng atch
35. Thespan



42. Card aum
43. 9reek letter
*1 Ht


No. T.*as


by tas ageMAIY


I)


~7XI Com;/3~


r4~-` Iinning

'wNwtur oaucf Millib

SOME~TWING....* tnpsMln~~ *s~r

uniperr we***r


I ~\\\~


Brother J\


... A GLASSINE BACr, ... EMPTY YOUR
-, CO)NTENXS UNKNOWN, POCKETS... THEN
FALLS FROM THE FGSES YOU D0 THE
*, OF A PAMPHLET. N(OWV SMnE, MR. YERKES.
Y013, MR. VINCENT...
IF YOU PLEASE!


tf~~t~~.~~ t~~."~l~ n ('
17. 1981 p00 TOt. (3)




1 3


15 nominations(4 girls for Bahamnas Sports Awrards


FIFTEEN NWO GATIDSWN THRSOm 1 fthe 26 member
f.organizations of the Bahamas Federation of Amateur Sports haer
been received by the Federation for their 1973 Sportsman and
Sportswoman of the Yea r awrd. Of these fifteen, four are


In that game Blyden passed of the entire season amassing
for 171 yards and three an incredible 453 total
touchdowns as the Jets put on yardage, 282 on the ground
their biggest offensive display..-and 17 I through the air.

1'











rfTreShes






Natural Menthol is why.
Salem uses only natural menthol,
not the artificial kind. That s why
Salem never tastes harsh or hot.


Pierre Siegenthaler N~~ATHANI:~ EL NOWLE~~S


II~~~~~~ill~~~R Ill~ il(lill)11 4.90, $4.00; Chi Chi (1) J.
Swet 8 $6 O,2$nd.60;u Sae n (4)
4TH1 RACE 5 FURLONGS _
Miss Sharon () M. Lewis $12.70,
5.25 52 ; LuF~ck irl ) J. n
Brown $2.95 3rd Quinella (26-7)
343.30
DaST RADE 4%GFURLONGS -
$3.7s, stoo0; G Go Gil 9) M.
Pzve 3.35 ma2d55; Moon Walk
Quinella (8-9) $7.55r .04h
6TH1 IZACE 9 FURLONGS -
Stilletto (7) A. Saunders $2.35,
Ban32.20 S.o.0 sth quinella (I -0 .s 8l
On Po n r E~ie (F5U A.
$si 5.1s oth Quinella (1-5) $3.63.s
8TH1 RACE 6 FURLONGS _

EIASTRN EN NASA S IPYARD Ferguso $7.95, $4.00; Anal le s
84) $30Br8own $2.65 7th Quinella



(IN30 COMPLSOR LIQUID TIN)w ( R







Will the following persons kmndly contact the Liquidator, Second Floor,Bernard
Sunley Building, P. O. Box 1491, Telephone 2-1976, in connection with claims
which they may have against the company.


Will any other person (depositor, shareholder or other creditor) who considers
that he has a valid claim against the company which has not been formally admitted
byme as li uidator also contact me at the above address.
SYDNEY MOR.RIS:
~Liquidaltor.


- I ~~;'Yg


GODW IN BLYDEN
TIIE BAHAMAS FEDERATION of Amateur Sports announced today that the Bahamas
American Football Association has nominated, Godwin Blyden, middle linebracket of the BAFLA
undefeated Champions, the Nassau Jets, for the Sportsman of the Year Award 1973.


Wednesday, March 7, 1973.


women.
The nominees are: GOLF -
Beryl Higgs and Bob Slatter;
SWIMMING Andy Knowles
and Tracy Jagr; YACHTING -
Pierre Siegenthaler;
BAMERICAN FOOTBALL -
GdwinE Blyen; CSRI ET -
Wille Eiiot; ASEALL-
Eddie Ford; SQUASH -
Robr D MNo nNEomern and
Florence Rolle; VOLLEY.
BALL Leroy Fawkes and
FI rence Rol1e; BAS ETBA L




Thebl'r ewaknitster' Cu:


Instead of a one shot deal,
"the trophies will be floating
and each year, the B.F.A.S.
will make the awards," added
the BFAS.
Previous winners of the
Sportsman of the Year award
include Wenty Ford for
baseball, Boston Blackie as an
all-round athlete and Durward
Knowles for yachting.


GODWIN BLYDEN
... top American Footbaff star


PIERRE SIEGENTHALER NATHANIEL KNOWLES
... outstanding yachtsnma ... best boxer of yerr


outstanding Sportsman and
Sportswoman of 1972 duri g
the B.F.A.S. dinner dan e
scheduled for March 17 at the
Grand Ball Room of the
Sonesta Beach Hotel. This
function will be under the
Patronage of the Prime
Minister, the Hon. Lynden
Pindling and Mrs. Pindling.
SPresenting the trophies will be
Miss Bahamas and Bahamian
movie star Sidney Poitier.
Radio Bahamas' sportscaster
Kirk Smith will emcee the


moThe s AF Ls f thO awards
dinner depends entirely upon
ar:e the the support of the amateur
LNS at letes the Bahamas," says the
ai~n $3.2 BFAS, and as a gesture of
rHI o j oranatti s aed slin ra 8
ULNS tickets at designated locations.
iRLn $13.3lj5. Top prize, donated by
e eaJ.~ International Air Bahama, is
$3.35 Ist two round trip tickets to
Luxem bou rg.


representation in boxing action at the Munich Olympics has been
nominated for the top sportsman award by the Bahamas Amateur
Boxing Association.


fle has proven tough in
competition and can be
counted on by the Amateur
Boxing Association of the
Bahamas to come out on top
despite the advantages he
usually gives away to his
opponents
Knowles made history last
year when he won his first
bout in the competition at the

mh aisb Baain bxr t
win a bout in Olympic action.
Giving away weight. reach
and experience to his
Venezu elan op po ne nt
Knowles moved in and forced
re pet rdirht pwerfsl ohoks
victory came via the
disqualification route, but all
the judges had him ahead at


VETERAN *YACHTSMAN Pierre Siegenthaler has been
nominated by the Bahamas Yachting Association for the Bahamas
Federation of Amateur Sports "Sprsa t Y r 17


was unable to attend.
Mr. Siegenthaler will be a
hot favourite to win the 1973
World Sunfish Championship
being held April in Mlartinique
when he leads a Bahamian
team of eight or ten entries.
During I972, Mr
Siegenthaler also won the the

Bhaampimns ip in Nta t io al
Class, in which class he is
always a very strong contender
for top honours.
All in all, Mr. Siegenthaler
has sailed under the Bahamas
fla in local and for sgn waters

particularly in the Sunfish
Class in which he is
outstanding.


that point.
Knowles lost his second
bout, but his victory was a
sigruficant step for the fledgling
Amateur Boxing Association
which was taking part in its
first big-name competition.
To date, Knowles has
compiled a 10-2 record while
competing in three classes -
wedterweight, middleweight,

aHis m~ost rcn triumph wa
Freeport. Knowles carried the
fight to the heavier and taller
Green, pounding away with
v ic ious blows to the
midsection. The result was a
una ious win forhKn tled

tough Mike Doyle of Canada.
His 12 fights make him the
most experienced boxer in the
A.B.A.B;


award.
The Prime Minister's Cup
will be awarded to the
outstanding Sportsman and
Sportswoman of the Year at
the B.F.A.S. dinner dance on
March 17 at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel.
Mr. Siegenthaler, who is
Swiss, first came to the

epamye ef Dielt B nki g
and has since then proved
himself to be one of the
keenest yachtsmen around.
Presently manager of the
Cisalpine Overseas Bank Ltd.
Mwitz egentha or represent d
Olympics in the Flying
Dutchman Class and placed
ninth.
Since coming to the
Bachaamas, the 34-ybear-olod sailed
Nassau Snipe Fleet at tl e
Royal Nassau rSailitnh l a d

Yacht Squadron at the N.Y.C.
He distinguished himself is
both classes.
UNBEATABLE
The N.Y.C. said that it is for
Shis efforts in establishing the
; Sunfish Class as a strong racing
class in Nassau and for his
becoming an almost unbeatable
skipper in that Class that they
are putting him forward for the
Sportsman of the Year award.
Mr. Siegenthaler was
ins""2snntal in int oda mg the
1971 he attended the Sunfish
W.::r!. ve; aios .. i
tirst encountered the potential

ceditt le clash oat mf9 oata
in a very heavy wind regatta.
Sunfish was introduced to
the Bahamas in July I97 1 and
in February 1972, Mr.
Siegenthaler won the Bahamas
Championship Regatta. In
November of the same year, he
went on to win the Caribbean
Sunfish Championship at St
Croix in the Virgin Islands
where he won all five races in
an international fleet of 38
boats from eight countries in
the Caribbean and North

Amlthe gh Mr. Siegenthaler
attended the Sunfish World
Championship in Bermuda in
March 1972, he became ill and


BG A of ficers f or 1973
THE NEW BGA OFFICERS FOR 1973, elected at the
BGA annual general meeting held to elect officers and the
President Februalry 23 at the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel. Standing from left to right; Charles Saunders, David
Lunn, Dr. Cleve Eneas (President), Freddie Higgs
pitr e-resMidnkeaTaylDr ad Bi Smith wh e aso
elected as officers to the BGA at the meeting.
0HT: Rickey Well.


THE FOLLOWING
results of yesterday's racil
IST RACE 6 FUR

Slb 5265, s285 L
2ND RACE 4% FI
- Screw Ball (3) J. Bai
58.9 son.90 Rncy 2
Girl S R. Ferguson
Quine la (3-4) $217.7s


Although in previous years
Sportsman of the Year awards
werega held by i 1 gi othee
Tribune, "this year marks a
milestone because it is the first
time that the newly formed
B.F.A.S. has undertaken such a
prodigious task," a BFAS
statement says.
A committee under the
chairmanship of Dr. Grahame
Barry and members of various
sporting sections of the new
media and other individuals in
the sporting world will select
the Sportsman a nd
Sportswoman of the Year.




CRICKET



THE BAHAMAS Cricket
Association's annual general
meeting for the election of
officers and Board of Control
of the BCA will be held on
Wednesday, March 14 at 8 p.m.
at Our Lady's Schoolroom,
Young St.
Three members from each
team in the Association are
requested to attend the
meeting-
The current President of the
Asociatiwn oMrbes He 8

for re-election this year. He has
been president for the past
four years. ,


Last month the 5ft. 200 lb.
middlelinebacker was voted by
the BAFLA as the best
defensive player and Most
Valuable Player for 1972.
Shortly after being voted
as the MVP for '72, Blyden was
invited by Washington
Redskins head coach, George
Allen, for further trials with
t Rdknst s Wa hnton at
Ingraham of the Stingrays was
also invited to Washington
along with Blyden.
Having seen Blyden and
Igraha pay inte sAHl nE


thought that "judging from
preliminary examinations these
two players had the makings of
pro footballers", but he added,
"I would like to see them
against superior opposition
before committing myself to
saying anything definite.,,
FINE ATHLETE
.Speaking about Blyden Allen
teid Illy enalt on sperb

motba 1 rif he i r parad t
put in some hard work he
might well make the grade.'
In recommending Blyden to
mtheBaha ortsFetd at on of
stated that "the key to any
football teali-'s success lies in
their ability to stiffle their
opponents' running game and
force them to pass. The man
responsible for forcing plays is
the middle linebacker. Godwin
Illyden in 1972 made it
impossible for any team to run
effectively against the Jets. Iin
the 12 games played against
the Stingrays, Marlins, Sharks,
Rockcrutshers and New
Providence All Stars, the Jets
allowed them to score only
103 points for an average of
8.6 points per game."
In further praise of Blyden
the BAFLA also tells of
Blyden's versatility as a player
when on October 29, with Jets

Ferg on offthte ibla d, BIye
stepped in at quarterback to
lead the Jets to a crushing
52-13 victory over the Marlins.

ST. KITTS TO PLAY
IN TENNIS HERE
ST. KITTS (AP) The St.
Kitts lawn tennis association
has accepted an invitation from
the Bahamas affiliate to
airstc ti i t e B ando ad
Phillips Tournament.
Macnish Jeffers (mens
singles champion) and Lionel
Berridge (mens doubles
champion) will represent St.
Kitts.
The tournament is to be
hqid at Montagu ~Beach Hotel
in Nassau.


Gaitor, G~arfield L.
Gardiner, Wellington V.
Gibson, Herman
Gordon, Hubert
Gnreeslade, Earl

Hall, Peter A.
Hanna B.V.
Haven, Richard A.
Hickel, Hans
Higls Alfred &/lor Dorothy

Johnson, Eula Mae
Johnson, Jack, W.
Johnson, Leonard
Jones, Maud

Kelly, Robert S.
Kemp, Judy
Knowles, Carolyn
Knowles, Susan

Lewis, Esrum
Lightbourne, Gerald
Lightbourne, 11albot
Lightbourne, Walter
Lunn, Arthur
McBride, Vernall
McClure, Kingsley J.
Mendez, L. A. Avis
Miaoulls, Emmanuel
Miller, Katherine

Neely, Buster
Newbold, Eugene
Newbold, Laurie
Newbold, Simeon
Nicholas, Henry W.


Adderley, Esther
Adderley, Israel
Adderley, Mervin &/or Merline
Anderson, Jennie Marie
Andersop, Sarah

Bowe, Garnet P.
Bowe, Henry A.
Bowe, Muriel
Brooks, Ethel
Bullard, Darlington

Carey, Suzanna Marie
Cartwright, Norris
Coorbell, Nello
Clarke, E. J. &/or A.V. Clarke
Clarke, Paul

Dahl, George
Davis, Raleigh
Daleveaux, Conville B.
Deroscar, Charley
Dun~wcanson, Porter

SEdgecombe, Leon
Edgescombe, Pearline
~Eldon, Henry A.P.
Elliott, Sandra
SEighth Bahamas Senior Troop
~Evan, Bartella
.Edwards, Carl

Farwkes, Jennifer
Ferguson, Julie
Forbes, James
Fowler, Samuel
Fox, Ulrick


Palmer, Daniel
Patton, Sidney
Puld, Edward E.
Payne, Maxine R.
Pinder, James

Ramsey, Venrna
Roker, George
PRoer, Nathaniel
Rolle, Bursell
Rolle, Hastings

Seymour, Idell
Seymour, Sa nel
Simpson, Elsworth
Smith, Lewis
Spence, Ralph W.


Taylor, Charles
Thompson, Ethel
Thompson, Roland L
Turnquest, Olive '
Tynes, Bnrue

Wallarce, Rupert & Mena
Ward, Jame
Watson, Rhendella
White, Edward &/or Arnna
Whyms, James
Whyms, Samuel
Willkinso, Vernon R.
Williams, Cynthia L.
Williams, George Chin
Wilmott, Betty
Wilson, Daniel
Wilson, Howard
Wivell, Dorothy


''


4.


* *


on.*"- ....


011st 9rtbune


FAut LEG i. No.8 horse in the fourth race is followed by Chanda (8) ridden by
meeti at the Ho (fr rght) and Sib (2) mounted by G. Soearhwell during Saturday's 18th
Sib ~ ir seondplby Horse Race T rack. Chmnds was the eventual winner of the race with
to iis in third plc n st ncl he Sic urd in f urth alc* above, coming from behind


R dodgers lose to Coug ars
MIRZA SELVER, the big forward for Rodgers Sport
Shop shoots over a Cougar. With an injured lg against him,
Salver ended with a mere four rebounds and 10 points as
the Cougars beat them 119-73. (SEE STORY BACK PAGE)
PHOTO: Rickey Wells













Wednesday March 7, 1973.







WITH PAKIISTAN

.b RA aIA) The ilR
Wednesday.
England set Pakistan the $
impal ntask of scodhfac2 nm
home side who were never in the
hut ,riaed W with 124 for theto loss '
England resumed this morning at
134 for three and with skipper
hey se re adrill n ot of the
woods.
Pakistaln had an reary success
pt Egat dh fur on fnor 5 bu
Lewis and the tall all-rounder G~reig
saw England through and when the
visitors declared at 306 for seven a

ari hdtoan ostanind match
innings he made 41 in the first
innings.
He also claimed four wickets in
tae ss and innings adtoi
With little interest left in the
match, Pakistan at the close were!
124 for three, still needing 117 runs
for victory.
Majid Joshangir -- 43, and Talat
All 57 batted well..
The visitors will play their next

beginning March 10.
SCOREBOARD: England (first
innings) 355 and 306 for 7 Pakistan
(first innings) 422 and 124 for 3.
AUSSIES 189 FOR 3
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
(AP)--The touring Australlan
cricket team placed themselves in a
commanding position on the first
Wes tondie yoot heme 1 Babdo
Tuesday after bowling the young
West Indians out for a meager 174.
The Australians hurried toa
co et f play total of 169 for 3
Stars for the tourists were Max
Walker, the big Victorian fast
bowr who finished with four
Opening batsman Keith
Stackpole acting as captain in the
absence of lan Chappell punched
thd al nto aH parts ofthe around
making 63 in an hour and 20
minutes with 13 fours.
The young West Indians regained
nnup pr sSIg thobyh ue bri~llan
the capture of two wickets with
successive balls late in the day by
off-spinner Martial F'rancis.
ot thny face aninueedl struggle
ROSE SIGNS FOR
REDS AT $117 500
jT)A-~e Ro. eL ell AhroHt0 th7
10,000 he wanted toRpa
bllssye r, but eo by incinat eds .
Rose -negotiate by telephone
'" esa Cn n t adodnre Cahlef"
player personnel, and agreed to
terms.
offered I ,SO, 10d0Roe an d
we negotiated and reached a figure
Rwe are ndt ter hppt with.tei
his first spring workout w th the
Reds here today.


IInll Hillel 1st b tII IIllt


GOVE NGMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL

COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM & BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


PROS WIN TIES P.L. SEMI-FINAL PLAYOFFS



Classic PrOS SeRSational Stoff filOS



basket to pip Colonels in final seconds


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
SHARON STORR, the sensation of the sensationlu Classic Pros, dropped in last night and
contributed a game high of 23 points, seven assists and took nine from the boards to pace the Pros
to a crucial 70-68 victory over the Kentucky Colonels and tie the semi-final playoffs.
With the Paradise League game for the Colonels as they assists. Newbold added 28 and
se mi-final playoffs now went ahead 68-67* took I 4 re bound s.
notched at one game each, the Slowing the ball down Player/coach Papa Smith,
Pros visit the Coloncls tonight considerably, the Pros picked contributed 18 points, 15
at 9 o'clock at the A. F'. lip a toul of~f T`urner and Storr rebounds and seven assists-
Adderley Gym for the final of going one for one from the line G;odfrey Bumnside topped
the P. L.. best of three playoffs. tied the game 68 all with 32 Rodgers with 15 with Selver,
in the second game last seconds remaining. G;eorge Farrington and Perry
night, Rod er Saote Shop n btalnh glo esio t tthe Stubbs scoring 10 each.

fowad ira eve ad uadout had it stolen by Bain. is rb f tp
Frankie Bnice to injuries were Wenty F~ord in an attempt to Johnson o 2
eliminated 119-73 by recover the ball was charged Ingraham 2 9 3 4
defending champions Beck's with a travelling violation.
Cougars. 2-SECOND VICTORY
Storr, a student at St. John's b
Univrsit Minesot is Storr on an in bound pass
remember forhis inedribbled around the top of the
perfrmane dring thekey to the left side where he
with two seconds remaining
Novemer 2 Pro/Colncisgave the Pros a 70-68 victory.
p de when he with 10 assists "I would have to put
emphasis on the fact that Storr
humiliating defeat. Although was an asset to the win, but all
the Pros lost in competition, the guys played well said
they won via a protest. player/coach Cleve Rodgers. i

) ~The first time, Iwasn't Rodgers said that they slowed
ready, but this time, I was in down the ball so that the
fine shape," said Storr after the Colonels may play their game.
game. "It's just we are smaller "We~ are ready for them no
and quicker ... it's just that we
play together more." Storr will
be the man to look out for
during tonight's game.
TIME OUT
The Pros took an early lead Lr


THE CLASSIC PROS from left (standing): Cloeve
Rodgers (coach), Goison Bain, Hallie Moultrie, Clement
Longly, Gary Symonette, Minky Isaacs, Pat Ingraham,
(kneeling) Greg Ramsey, Wilfred Johnson, Jeff Rodgers,
Joe Jones, Sidney Saunders. Not pictured are Sharon Storr
and Benny Adderley (assistant coach).
PHOTO: Rickey Wells









CO me18C k if Sil Mar il li

FORMER HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP of the Bahamas Bert
Perry after stopping Floridian heavyweight Gene Idlette in a
fourth round technical knockout late last year continues on his
comeback trail March 16 when he takes on American Johnny


Perry is gunning for Boston's
crown and by the way,
Boston is not worrying at all -
"We hope to retire Boston this
year," continued Wright.
"We're going to beat him so
bad ... and then hire him as a
sparring partner*
"I have every confidence in
the world that Perry is going to
win. There is no question in
my mind. I believe that Perry is
the best heavy weight in
Nassau."
Perry during the latter part
of last year went through a
series of exhibition bouts and,
according to Wright, all this
helped put him in great shape.
Speaking with Hudgins
manager Pat Curry, Wright said
that Curry predicted a fifth
round knockout. However,
although he did not predict the
round, "we are going for the
knockout too," said Wright.
Supporting this card will be
a bout between lightweights
Otis Clay and Al Moss.


Hudgins at the Nassau Stadium.
"This is a fight Perry must
win," said his trainer/manager
Garth Wright, who is also
promoting the fight. "I am
going to have Perry in the best
shape of his life."
Hudgins twice defeated
Bahamas heavyweight champ
Boston Blackie first by
knockout and the second by a
unanimous ten round decision.
Since then, Hudgins has
created quite a sensation in the
Bahamas and heavyweight
contenders conclude that once
they beat Hudgins, they can
beat Boston.
"Once we get by Mr.
Hudgins, we have a score to
settle with Levi Forte,"
continued Wright. Forte in
1969 stopped Perry in the
ninth round of a ten rounder.
Wright explained that Perry is
punching harder and has more
stamina than before. "I feel
that Perry can hit as hard as
any heavyweight in the world,"
Wright said.


which they held by one point
until Wenty Ford on a jumper
from deep in the left corner
moved the Colonels in the lead.
Sterling Quant followed on a
pushup moving them 20-17
and the Pros called a time out.
With Hialilie Moultrie
controlling the rebounds for
the Pros, Storr handled one of
them to move the Pros one
behind. From the line, Storr
went two for two but Keith
Smith replied from the corner
and tied the game 22 all.
Both sides swopped baskets
evenly until Pat Ingraham on
an interception sent one of his
four assists to Golson Bain who
saw the Pros 30-28 at 2:55
when they called another time
cout.
Returning to the court,
Storr on a stolen ball had Bain
scoring another basket.
Another Colonels turnover and
Cleve Rodgers made good a
jumper from the left post.
Quant, however, on a
technical foul free throw and a
jumper, kept the Colonels
three behind.


b hin 38-31l has Str scored
Hanour hm u of the fv.


After a Colonels time out
Bain gave the Pros a basket and
Tony Bostwick added one for
th~e Colonels, who were 40-33
F-shind at half time.
COLONELS RALLY
I'he Pros in the second half
held on to their seven point
lead until with 12 minutes
remaining the Colonels rallied
to within three points of the
lead 53-50. However, Storr,
who was accurate from the free
throw line, again went two for
two and followed on a jumper
to reopen the seven point lead
59-2*
With Quant on the bench for
the first time in the game, the
Colonels again moved to within
one pitTo te~o lea m d

gave them the lead.
However, the Pros regained
the lead by one point 67-66
with 1:28 in the game.
Bostwick missed an easy layuP
that might have sealed the


Symonette 4 4 I 9
Mo ersi 8 1
Bain 6 7 2 12
Storr s 9 2 23
KENTUCKY COLONELS
Smith 4 II 4
Ha Ford 5 .4 3 10
W. Ford 5 7 4 10
Turner a o 2
A. hostwick 7 7 0 0
Quant a la 3 a8

BECK'S COUGARS


matter who they bring," added
Rodgers when asked whether
the addition of 6ft 6ins Charlie
Robbins to the Colonels' side
would mean any difference to
their upsetting the Colonels.
Storr, formerly with Pinder's
Sport Shop, has been picked
on the all-college team in
Minnesota. "It's a good chance
I'll make all-American," he
told me.
* ** ** +* **
COUGARS EASY WIN
BEC K 'S CO UGAR S,
displaying form that can
possibly beat either the
Kentucky Colonels or the
Classic Pros, outscored Rodgers
Sport Shop 27-16 in field goals
in the first half to hold a 57-34
half time lead.

Newbl e une on th d e
Cougars with 21 and 14
respectively to await the
opponent from tonight's
Pros/Colonels game.
Brown topped the Cougars
with 35 points and seven


28
1 4
I 14
I 35
0 6
2 4
3 o


Newbold 14 14
smith a is
Ferguson 2 s
rearr 7 7
Ingraham 4 6
Huylor 3 1
Bosfield 2 2
Rolle' o 1


1 RODGERS SPORT SHOP


oncu


R. Johnson
Srice
* urn ii


a 6
s a
5 6

I 3
j o


ACNff HIS VALUABLE ASSISTANCE for the Classic Pros 70-68 victory over the
Kentuacky Colon*rIs as night, Sharon Storr is cngratulated by a host of fans, after the
second smnbfinal playoff at the A. F. Adderlecy Gym. PHOTO: Rickey Wellsr.


4br Wlr tune


FRIWI~ RACING