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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03288
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 5, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03288

Full Text










1.L TO HA
FAVOURITE MALT
OF THE BAHAMAS
Bi AVAILA;ILE FROM
~LF -LUDEN LTD.
Dowdeswell St. Nassu Ph. 22 I17


ENJOY FREE CHAMP~tAGJE
ON ALL FLIGHTS TO FREE~PORT
- TELEPHONE 77303/77778- 1


C~ r


__


INTERN AT ION AL AIR BAHA MAS TAKES

COURT ACTION AGAINST CHARTER AIRLINE





Bahamas court or der s







T rIIS OR aIl AIr waVs











By NICKI KELLY
TRANS OCEANIC AIRWAYS LTD., which plans to operate charters between the Bahamas and Europe, the
Middle East and North Africa, has been ordered by the courts to stop "misrepresenting" itself as a scheduled
international carrier contrary to the terms of its licence from the Bahamas Air Transport Licensing Authority.


SAN SAL VADO R
A DC -3 aircraft with 20
Ftudlents and three crew
inem ers aboard aovers~hat a

Saturday and landed in five
feet of water
The only injury was
sustained by the pilot who
1"',"'fcrcJ broken keg. Reports
but it is urnderss~tood the plane
wn-wattempting to land
T'he IX '-- reportedly belongs
to a fliorida-based charter
company. A spokesman for the
Civil Aviation Department said
this morning that a1 report was
expected to be mladee later
The extent o~f the damage to
the aircraft is not known.
No further information is
kn own concerning the
students' visit to San Salvador.



BARC'LA Y 'S Ba n
International has filed a writ
with the registrar of the
Supreme C'ourt claiming the
sum of $6.250 49 as monies
owing thernarby M1r. Lawrence

TIhee sum. listed In a
statement of claim dated
March 1, states that the money
represents an overdraft
account.

BARBADOS TO EXPAND
SCHOOL OF NURSING


frdm was considering au
nureng: toJc~ce rndate J school of
(addice \aid he asn ~concrne~d
Jtbout the larrg n~umbrrl of
unqualified public health inspecctos


i P -d(s


Price: i 5 nts


Monday, March 5, 1973.





VOL. LXX, No. 87


4 CRUISE SHIPS

BI-PASS WISSII







THE BAHAMAS lost 2,450
cruise passengrs over the
weekend as four cruise ships
by-passed Nassau because of

( he Inte t ino n n I

against the Bahamas on
Wednesday morning.
ee It.AZ ;re demranding the
ty release of three Cuban
as' :jilhermen, whose appeal
Irt ,openedt todJ\ before the courts
se- ;Illcr eilng adjourned on
nd I rlday at the request of the
is11ncr'l ;:ttorness. T'he three

me I he\! haive been chlarged with
nd l"'latio~n ofr the Bahamas~
he 1'ml ihn m t
he OverT the wcke~nd eight
m. wii wo ,2n Tl a Laro
Sonrl o~f No~r was, Sun Vic~king
and Suward b-passe~d
Nowa~, u andit substltuted other


-


APPEAL SENTENCE The thr
Cuban*Americans who were found guil
of poaching within the Baham;
exclusive 12-mile fishing zone leave cou
after the first day of their appeal ca!
Left (with handcuffs) Froidin Basque ar
behind him Bernardo Perez. Above
Rafael Rodriguez. Sixteen others pa
fines totalling $63,000, and returned
their Florida homes pending the outcon
of the appeal Basque, Perez ar
Rodriguez were unable to raise tl
$3,000 each and are serving tl
alentHOTOS PHo hP S nONE TT


The order was made this
morning by Mr. Justice Samuel
Graham following issue of a
March 2 writ by international
Air Bahama claiming that
Trans Oceanic's advertisements
an ciclr "ha e cued an


substantial proportion of the
moneys paid TOA to book
flights would h~ave otherwise
gone to IAB's scheduled flights
between Luxembourg and the
Bahamas.
In h iA af fidavit
accompanying the writ'
International Air Bahama

pesaid ta un es rstr Oaie b

would continue to advertise
itself as a scheduled airline "to
the increasing loss and
damage" of IAB.
The: writ was issuled by the
law firl~u Cf Seligme' Maynard
& Clo., acting on behalf of IAB,


and served on TOA at its
registered office in the
chambers of Darrell Rolle and
Company, Berwin blouse.
The IAB claim is that Trans
Oceanic was issued a licence by
th Air Trar o rt Li es


freight services between points
in the Bahamas and between
the Bahamas and elsewhere,
and is therefore not entitled to
operate a scheduled
international air service
between points in the Bahamnas
and between the Bahamas and
elsewhere

forddyso Ocor iju etion
advertising or televising any
statements misrepresenting the
terms of its licences, suggesting
that it j licensed to operate a
scheduled) international air
se-vice with ir tables or that
it is "duly licensed to operate


international air flights with
flights so regular or frequent
that they constitute a
recognizable systematic series."
SCHEIDULED
Mr. Maillis said in his

s fidavit t at Inentioa A

service between the Bahamas
and Luxembourg since July
1967.
Trans Oceanic was
incorporated in the Bahamas
and was issued a licence by the
ATLA "on or about October
27. 1971" for the operation of



between the Bahamas and
elsewhere-
Early inl9Y72,he continued,
TOA published advertisements
announcing scheduled flights
to G;ermany, Belgium,
Switzerland and North Africa


commencing with an inaugural
flight on April 15. 19)72.
Mr. Maillis said he made
"vigorous re'presentations" to
the Bahamas government in
March anid A~pril 19)72 and the
advert smenits din questill


place pursuant to those terms.
flowever FOA had recently
r ec om me n de d a ne w
advertising campaign directed
to travel agents in Florida,
Georgia, North Carolina and
Texas which indicated
extensive television advertising
by TOA in those States.

evdec r erpm on a irt l
used in this campaign and the
travel section of the March I
1973 edition of "The Miami
News" containing an
advertisement by TOA offering
scheduled flights to Brussels
every Tuesday, to Tangier,
Morocco every Saturday and to
Nicosia, Cyprus every Sunday.
LANDING RIGHTS
"Quite apart from the fact
that the foregoi ng
advertisements contravene the
terms of the defendant's
lieoncedas described, I la n
Brussels and verily believe that
the defendant company has
reeige eno authorisationu froni
land its aircraft in that country
whether on scheduled or
non-scheduled flights."


A r riv Ing withi 1,818
PassengersCT were' the Freceport,
I lnerald Seasr. Bahamnas Star



!,n Saturdfay, but not her usual
consiginment o~f freight.
t he Fr eepotrt ma~kesr twice
weekly vi';its to Nassau and on
each o~ne brings 12 containers.
She arrihed again today, again
with pdasengers. but no freight.
U'nit:d Shipping, agents for
the Sunwatrd. were informed
tot~ l at the S inwar w 11


instead to Pocrt-au-P'rince, lia ti.
Tlhe Sk~wardl by-passedl Nassru
F~riday. It is not known
whether she will st~p at Nassau
this F:riday.
In Mliami one cruise
passenger was quoted as saying
that the only inconvenience he
experienced from the strike
vats "car yin dnq own bags,
hut idon'tmind.


8 p881IISal 00se I' epealed law, but






ONE TH GRUND S onre w ich 20Cu anmrcnfihemna peaing thser


The appellants, represented
by attorneys James fhomnpson
anldS. A. larris-Smiith. claimed
that the magistrate who tried
the case Irid no jurisdiction to
entertain evidence concerning
an offence committed outside
his own district. The fishermen
were arrested o~n October 19 in
a.e Bimini-Great Isaacs Cay
The claim was based on the
Magistrate's Act, which the
appellants said limited a
stipendary m agist ra te's
jur sdicto
who is hearing the appeal with
Mr. Justice Samnuel G;rahant .
pointed out, however, thiat the
chigin jtonpo eof the Act be j
October, 19)66."


CARLTON FRANCIS'

HOT HER DIES
MRS. DIANA E~litabetti
Francis, 80. mother of
Development Minister C'arlton
Francis, died at the Rassin
Hospital at 12:55 p.mn. Sunday.
Mrs. Francis of Mason's
Addition, was from Himini
She is survived by husbaund,
Elisha F~rancis, two sons. the
ifon. Carlton Francis and the
Rev. E'arle F~rancis. two
daughters. Miss Miriam F~rancis

si er M rs. Niliea KRn s a
Maoi eailn to bro hers a u.
and Mr. Colonel Wilkincon ,f
Bimnini, twelve great-grand
children and twenty-five
grandchildren. .
SFuneral se tics will h~ Is
Taylor Street. The Rev. I neel h
Backford will officiated
Interment will follow in the
Western Cemetery.
Persons wishing to pay their
last I ietds aymtao no nois
at Bethel s Funeral Hlome,
Nassau Street






BRIDGFITOWN, Barbados
(AP)--Angllcan Bishop D~rexel
G;omez. of Barbados. has called


euisn ni e r oin 1

see that our identities are
preserved and that we develop
a West Indian approach to It,
the bishop decitumd. teews

heno talk va ou f reat n
little was being done. Bishop

Iit n- irasoeatre sk and swi [ tc<
mnany women wore their
dresses too short.


the case
Mr. Thompson also began
dealing with a third ground,
"that the verdict Is against the
evidence and not consistent
with it.
Mr. Thompson went through
the trial magistrate s wnitien
judgment, and specified I 2

weeconnttralyt t he vde d
heard during the frve-day
hearing.
lie has not as yetl started to
go through the transcript of
the testimony to, baick those

FOUR GROUIND)S
T'he Cuban-Amrerlc~ans are
also appealing onl fou~r other
rounTht the mnaglstrate "erred
in law by taking Judicral
notice" of the Feblruary 26,
1969) proclamiatio~n by the
Governor of the Bahama~s' I 2
Inie exclsive fr hne l";:
or pleaded;
*"That the learned
rnagistrae ederred It accee a g

witnesses for the prosecution
without requiring that the
same be corroborated In
accordance with the provisions
of the Evide~nce Act, thereby
making such evidence hearsay
evidence which should not
have been admit ted:
"That the learned
magistrates msietemd etcohimself

oe r ecentcorwernen teretain
which should have been proven
strictly ;
*And that the charges In
the Information against the
fishermen failed to comply
worth the rules for framning
charges
()nily three oft thle convic~ted
fishermenn were In court today
I roidin basque. Bernar~o
n be arnt Raa cl K womlan, was cautioned Sixteen
others paid fines totalling
$63,000. and returned to their
Fl orrd hies ptendn! the
ou comle a, we atpPea .
ruhe thee, In canr today
have been unable to raise the
$3.000 fines levied against each
of them, and~ are serving the
alternative seven-mnonth prison




the M~arine DIrvision of the
Royal Bahamlas Police F~orce
and Royal Marines from the
Poyl n Navy frrgate H1MS

exp~e ed ap e com ltr early
Tuesday afternoon. Crown

proscus edl in the Ma itrawhos
Court, is appearing for the
iesponde~nt in the appeal.


When the amelnded version
of the Act was produced, the
relevant section stated that
every stipendlary and circuit
magistrate "shall ex officio be
a magistrate for the whole of
the colony."
Mr. Thomrpson, who
addressed the court first thi(
mornmng,a said he woulh sd f

ground of appeal until he had
ha~d the opportunity to study
the amended Act
GROUNS
dee went aon, cowe er. t
"that the learned magistrates
Ierred by rejec ti ng the
submiission of Lcounsel for the
rappllaa b tghat the yoreav
Court since the respondent
((Commissioner of P'olice) In
bringing the charges und~r
appeal failed to comlply with
"': prns sons of ten Ivisheries
Mr. ~Thompson argued that
under that law ol ya "fksheries

arepetewithine te fistirag Itone
Ile claimed, therefore. thaut the
police who made the arrests ,n
October 19 had no jurlsdlctlon
to make a lawful arrest in the
fishing irone.
Ithe Act defined aI fisheries
inspect or as "every
commissioned of'ficer of Hier
Majesty's Royal Navy, every
pa officer< r ini evr\ crf 0 < V

:gricultijre a~grnw isiher c
appointed fo~r thle purpose by
the' Minister (o~fAg~riculture) by ?
Insitrumentt In writing.
lr. Thomnpusn onltend~d
that noc one can mnake an arrest
in the fishing tone unless he is
appointed a fishierie~s Inspetor
by the Minister I 1
tnlie gxdinte ett car jsthat
inspec e tjkirgert parres n

nast ares morasmistus n\ nit

place in the Bahama islands
and there "deliver them1 into
the c~ustocf y of tile 1now4 Fonl()
police officer "
mli fsheries inspector mlum
also, miake a complaint It the
Iloc)'t senior police office'
RI:LI ASI
T~he Act adds, Mr
I'ciipo onte al hti



forthwith release such person,
Mr. Thomnpson claimed that
although the fishermezn were
rkr dtco Bimini thte 1<}v n t

po aic ofice i thneae an n
fisheries inspector. Therefore.
he saidjr they tshouki not i
magistrate should on that
ground have refused to, hear


Al


ALTHOUG;H all foreign exchange departments are officially
closed in the Bahamas today because of the close down of major
world exchanges, local banks are accommodating their customers
and tourists in lirnited trans cions.


It w anuc i rssl
today that the nmne Common
Market countries are keeping
their foreign currency
changes clot ed nllthis we k

American dollar. The market's

Bus es Ihrd as wo a tth
crack at solving the crisis.
Common Market officials
are also inviting the United
States, Japan and other major
trading nations to talks in Paris
Friday. American Treasury
officials indicate a willingness
to cooperate, but stopped
short of promising to attend.
Meantime bankers in Nassau
have been forced into a wait
and see position.

exch nges to thl Iordtr co
thr ar no ratpo itrut \r o
banker said today. "There will
he small huying and selling for
the sake of tourists. But we are
not in a po~siton to trade,

The monetary crisis is
expected to be discussed at a
bank managers' meeting this
afternoon.
If the local foreign
exchanges continued to trade,
said the banke it be tadk ma

position that when the world
changes openesdh could fn

current y.b This wvoudidtmean

loss
",We are not speculators," he
commented. "We trade when
there is a market, but we don't
trade when there isn't one.
And so we will not trade until




comment on reports that
Britain is under pressure to
stop floating the pound on its
own and join a projected fl a

currency s. Ones authoritat v

Common Market countries are
pra iall Eagre an iflo tn
against the dollar. However,
France has reportedly called on


the "group of ten" leading
industrial countries to work
out ways of defending the ten
per cent devaluation of the
d llar announced February

DEVALUATION

all creenxts adv ca 'd by t
Common Market countries, as
in effect another devaluation
of the dollar. The dollar has
been devalued twice in the past
two months.
The dollar was devalued 8% o
iln December,thl972, and again
I' lst mon h.
"I can't see what the
solution is," he commented.
"o country is wi ling to pay
the price of a solution.
cThoTe situaiome hahsa bse o

ohethirte beb e the Breton
It was at the Breton Woods
conference in New IHumpshire
in 1944 that the price of gold
was s at $3 per etoune st n

August, 1971 when America
came off the gold standard.
The official price of goldl is
now $4 2.22.
"oaP tthe other turehnci s
na," te source said,"hyl

2 er center va shtonmorntsh
dollaerrihicitrwall give the U.S.

with he strong econom c
pstio '
pos I ugh in some quarters it
is thought that the dollar will
devalue again, President Nixon
who announced the 10 per
cent devaluation on February
12, has declared that there will
be no further devaluation.


Roa ak d f Caaas

to y
"We are open to our own
clients at rates f xed by
subelt e o apvan. nea

to cr an to accommodate
The position of Barclays
Bard was v ntal nter gs me

small trading to acconmmodate
their tourists and customers.


$155m. C' WEALTH




CHIEF JUSTICE Sir Gordon
Bryce today agreed to an
application by attorney
Kendal Isaacs asking that the
four fndsme tI m t in th
Luxembourg S.A. and Bahamas
J nmmoanweoa-t fen tase t
suit being brought against BCB.
The parties concerned raised
no objections to Mr. Isaacs'
application, The Tribune
understands.
Mr. Isaacs is acting on behalf
of Fund of funds, Venture
Fund Internatl on al,
International Investment Trust
and Transglobal Fund, all IOS
sFunds whic deposited dal e
Comm nealt n rough the

Overseas Development is
seeking repatriation of the
funds on grounds that it runs
the risk of losing its licence
frotnrn whi Lxmbourg

demanded return of the
money .
Both ODB and BCB are
subsidiaries of International
Bancorp Ltd., the holding
compSn isintouxwehdbh IOS put
Bahamian banks when the
mutual fund complex began
experiencing difficulties with
Swiss authorities in late 1971.
The four Funds are claiming
that they are entitled to not

of thteh to SUSl31 42 milo
said to be IOS money laced
s th Bahas Co Inwath
wThe amasth mmfonwe ki







NEW SHIPMENT





NASSAU FREEPORT


An advertisement presently
being placed locally by Trans
Ocecani promotes direct jetot;
Europe.
The ad says that on March
10 TOA's first jet flight will
arrive at Freeport International
Airport. "Thereafter each wteek
will see Trans Oceanic jets
transporting Bahamas-bound
visitors from Europe, North
Africa and the Middle East."
The office for Trans-Oceanic
in Nassau is given as in the
Nassau Beach Hotel and in
Fre port in the International

JAuapress ann un mete ronn9
Oceanic would inaugurate its
charter jet service on March 3.
ONE1 SOLUTION
ATLA chairman Bruce
Braynen was reported as
hailing the new jet service as
one solution to "our claim to
build on our tourist trade by
mo ing into new, viruno ae as "

sae bethat tn them past "w
t uists eframnohexpenitt

to last forever.."
lie commented that this new
market was needed "more than
anything to expand the
horizons of the tourist influx.'
Trans Oceanic was said to be
planning to operate a Boeing
707 jet three times weekly
bet ween Nassau a nd


oe siaton i Euroe No


The airline s president is an
American, Mrs. Irene Bowen

m erai nal nAircBhaBama
martkedtinta operations in the

It is understood Mir
Se ignan ilaf his after oenr t

about enforcement of the
Order in the United States


abO


~ribu*


(Resistredrn with Postmastr of Bahamasfor postage conce~astns within the ashames.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


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4 L .oS. FunoS W0 Of Seig R tr ailing IIut b an ks


at8 ac commollatlng t08 ISts


JOINED IN


063 GRASHES















2 Vf,~~rr


__ __ ____ I


Iquirid aOTI Oai 02l d23 dir ctdB E 2ec'
tmp ray ofc phn 243,and .O o E60.

The Directors of Besco deeply regret any inconvenience
in service and operation due to the recent fire which
totally destroyed the premises and stock.

payments On aCCount will be received at the old East
Street store, where the records are held.


544MORE POWS FREED TODAY
CLARK AiK BASE., PHILIPPINElS (AP') The Viet (`ong freed 34 more
prisoners of war in Hanoi today, and the men landed at C'lark Air base for
ate atn Icrliand Marcu\ headed the welcomners because two Vitipino
employees of the Voice ofr America were among those freed. With them
wetre 27 Amecrican servicemen, three Ammerican civilians and two West
G~erman mnediial workers.
cine of fire west IGermans was 30-year-o~ld Moinika Schwinn, the only
foreign woman known to beL held by the (communst\.
it was the second prisoner release by the C:ommlunists in two days, the
dcrhVietnanrnee having handed o~ver los II.S. airmen and two Thais
The North Vietnamese. and Viet (cong nowu have freed 299 Americans
since the January 28th ceaseftire. Today was the first time the Viet C'ons
have released any prisoner st t lannci. Their previo~us release of 20
Americans o~n I chruary 12th occurred north of Saigotn.
'Thc C'ommunists still ho~ld 286 Amelricans, all ofT who~m are to h
released by March 28. (* StEE STOR) Y THIllS P'A;I )

DISAGREEMENT OVER PRISONER EXCHANGE
SAION(A) he future oft the Viretnam trace l; haseets thlreaten~d

Vi nnams an ie '( ac s h Sa ~ni Icverndmeija of welstin o t
three-thoutsand I'.c.W.'s in, the current secotnd phase, but thle ('lmmunists
csay the number shouldd hec cevenr-tho~uwand.

prisoners mlay no~t be freed by March 281 as called for under the cease fire
agavemecnt.

inld th al)!cd rt silr biehit the anld a (commnunist demand fo~r more freedom ofC movement for North
Vietnamese andi Viet (congR truce teatm*. Thle third po~stponedl itemr is the
11.S. draft tro lan fo~r ailtc appeal to, hallt the bloodlcshed that ha'
continued dspit ic cease-fr 57 ys ago1.

GUERRILLAS GIVE REASONS FOR MURDER OF ENVOYS
UIIHUT (AP') I~I~Kck September guerrlllas mnurderedl three western
diplomiath in Khlarto~urn mainly becauue of what thery called "Nixonr's
. a';rrogan eF and chtie y.i guerrilla states 'cn cai Sulau so Irdy
the Uniited States would nort 'give in to, blackmail demands' \uchi as those
issued b~y the guerrillas for thle retcase of Sirhan Sirhan who, murdered U1.S.
Senator Robert Kennecdy in 1968.The hostile attitude of the Jo~rdanian
government ailso prompllted thle executiorn of the three diplomats, the
Itate amen d that (;c~~ (. Mor. 11.S. 1)ept C'hief of Mir~i~ i
Kihurtom ewho was mur cred avour ,is AmbhaaJss < lel, A. Noel, r 'tn "
CIA aenlt ... who participated in prlanning the mas~sacre of P'alestinians in

"Uak at t m en t viluticmani c t cuted bhreandfu t ~s vv o

PLEA ON BEHALF OF GUERRILLA LEADER
13EIRU (AP) alestinian guerrilla leader Yasser Arafat appealed to
I If king mu an lrds edf' state M n lday mght for 19deedy intervention on
sentenced to death in Amma~n.
Ammun radio anootuntcd earlier that King H~ousein ofT Jordan had
endOrsedd death sentences on Mohammed D~aoud alias Abu Daoud and
the other guerrillas.
Abu D~anud was o~ne of the men Blarck Septembher commclandos sought to
free by holding five folreign diplomats, including thle U.S. Amnbassador-
hostage at thle Saudi Atrabian E-mbassy in Kharto~um.
"NOTHING HAS REALLY CHANGED" SAYS GOLDA MEIR
WASHING;TON (AP) Prime Minister G;olda Meir ofI Israel said in an
interview broadcast Sunday that she has seen no recent progress toward
negotiations with Arab countries to end the stalemated Mideast situation,
"Tot the best of my knowledge to my sorrolw -- nothing has realiv
changed," Mrs. Meir said on CB)S-T`V's programme, "F'ace the Natiol"
"We haven't even reached a moment where the Arab countries. E~gypt
especially,e itl even discuss boundd r) line,"t sh ksag o Lbyn
commercial airliner a "terrible tragedy" and also urged the nations of the
world to take any measures necessary to stop terrorist activities by thle
II~nck September gro~up.
STALE MATE IN WOUNDED KNEE
WOUND)ED KNEE, SOUTH DAKOTA (AP) The indians occupying
the hamlet of Wounded Knee in South D~akota show no Ilking fo~r federal
olfficals' latest offer to end the armed stalemate, but both sides plan a
noon meeting to try for a solution.
When the Indians go~t a copy of the now government offer, their tenders
burned it. The Justice Dlepartment said Indians would he allowed to leave
without mass arrests, but stipulated the militants surrender their wouponrs
and thatI all men identify themselves to, federal agents.
reset h lets'otn y i ueulprovide hor them to re nain in the

ALLENDE RETAINS CONTROL IN OdlLE
SANTIAGOC (HILEMARC'H S(AP) Thc Moderate C'onervative
Opp stion t 'esPR nt ISalvndork Alde hai net inad Lotrl >~ l at

With 50 per cent of the voter in Sunday's eletcton co~unted, the
Oppposition head collected 56 per cent of the H~ouse of D~eputies votes to 4 I
ra cnt Te th Left st la vernment coal rio. aThde dvso aft 567-1


The Christian D~em~crats and its righlt-wing allies in the Opposition had
hoped to get a two-thirds mlajority in thle Senate as a lever to force Allende
to moderate his socialist programme of' natit~onlziztion. A two,-thirdls vote
is required to impeach the P'resident.

U.S. PLANES STRIKE AGAIN IN CAMBODIA
HONOLULU (AP') U.S. war planes carried out operations over
Cambodla Sunday at the request of the! Cambodian government, the U.S.
acilfi Militar Comnmand reporter The activity wats light. involving
There was no word on where in C'ambod~ia thle strikes were made ono
Sunday, but Saturday's operations were reported tol be in an aIren southleast
of Phlnoml P'enh.

MYSTERIOUS EXPLOSION ROCKS GREEK SHIP
TELI AVIV (AP) -- Thle first group of 104 passengers froni the G;reek
liner 'Sounion.' which was rocked by an explosion in Beirut harbhour
Saturday, arrived at israel's Lod Airport SUnday nigh, in their pajamas and
other assorted clothes picked up in ('yprum. They were flown here from
Cyprus by the Israeli Natiaonl Airline, El1 AI.


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SUE*NAN


ag o a p S. Nxtt Cies ilag ic oue
P.O.Ic Box~ ~ N 41BySgsNssu aaa h -19~ I~


I


Romang of Cardinals today in a
Cossollege le cpd into one day

Th: dy's chele .cluded the
pivate consistory at which the
Ppr notified the college of its new
openbr Alo. the onblic
membestrs at which the new princes.
cof he ourch pledged loyalty and
obedience to the Pontiff and
received their rdchat eo y am
and a mass at whCardinale ws
to present the new Cria teir
sap hihe p~a t, each of these has
been held on a separate day. But
Pope? Paul, having already
eliminated such consistory
trapigs s wod beaes
getrean ein awais ng and spca
robes, reduced the pomp of the
o cs on Amcr by concentrating

new Cardinals Archbishops
50-year old Luis Aponte Martines,
an ing luan; 6 -earutelTimothd

SB s croldHumhberto Medeiro st
first Puerto Rican Cardinal.
Itn s ath d rth c nitor ain dh
it brought younger men and more
nations into the church's senate.
whhicthelects its Pohpes p tals oai
College to 144 Cardinals, its largest
ine hi oalian contingent still is the
largest with 41 members, followed
by France with 13 and the United
States with 12. The consistcory gave
Pakis Zaie te Q first Cardinals, as
well as Puerto Rico.
The average age of the new
Cardinals is 60: it was 68 in the last
consistory four years ago.
biAft r tehe Poe be twe ath
received a titular church in Rome.

Altouh 6 he 30 ne rnces

to the centre of Roman
Catholicism .

Adrian V who rte gd bieefly i
the 16th century.


forig asch ne mark of th
nine world's richest countries
prepare for more talks later this
week. se::ing a solution to th.
The Common Market's finance
ministers met Sunday at their
headquarters in Brussels and
decided to extend the market
closing they had ordered last
Thursday night. But they failed to
ar>e cothea cu rt cperogramme to
The ministers said they would
meet again Thursday in Brussels.
They announced another
conference for P'aris on Friday to
which the United States, Japan and
other major trading nations would
be invited. And the nine said they
would meet again in Brussels next
Sunday.

whe UStr. Tesu s tha r

monetary crisis. But it stopped
short of promising, to participate in
the conerenc sri i "rope

exchange market for the week. The
halt to official trading takes the

lspa ieksets bins rn kep t

floor
The dollar was devalued 10 per
cent on Feb. 1. Clnsing the
changes means there fxl dnsut f
exchange rates during the week's
trading on private money markets
DISTRUST
minier aodmoe 1arkett fina c
dollar "was due! to a distrust of
speculative origin" and was not
justified by the offical exchange

rat lery G~iscalrd D'Estaing, the
F~rench finance minister, told
newsmen the European
governments were "eager to defend

th e p re tctse t o f p a rr i e s w e

Other informants said there had
been sentiment among the mi sisters

>gra whether their currencies
seueld float individually or be fixed
against each other and float against
the dollar.
Anthony Barber, the British
Chancellor of the Exchequer, said
Britain\ would agree to a joint float
only if the other members promised
unlimited support for the! pound
ster n.n Aparently this was not
Both Britain and Italy have been
letting their currencies float and
both wanted to make sure that, if
the pound and tira return to a fixed
value. their exports would not be
priced out of some foreign markets.
TYPHOID OUTBREAK -
SEWAGE SYSTEM BLAMED


wa r, healthy, happy

By Frank N. Hwins J.

CLARK AIR BASE, PHILIPPINES (AP) Another 106
American prisoners of war, apparently healthy and obviously
happy. returned to freedom Sunday from years of captivity in
North Vietnam.


d plomats leave


Kha rtoum a xrpor t

By Holger Jensen
KHARTOUM (AP) The bodies of U.S. ambassador Clero A. Noel Jr.
alnd deputy chief of mission G. Curtis Moolre, left for the United States
Monday in frla-drapped coffins to the strains orf Auld Lang Sne.


Diplomats. Sudanese government
officials and even hardened foreign
correspondents wept openly on the
tarmac of Khartoum's airport as the
families o~f the slain diplomat said
goodbye to a long receiving line of
we~ll-wishers.
The coffins were loaded aboard a
special Bo~eing jet sent by president
Nixo~n shortly after dawn. Iach


< hewse the nre ba n cmom .
A forklift horisted the coffins,
wrapped in the stars and stripes'

o tk ofgen and great eSudante

Only after the remains were
aboard did the Sudanerse army

Nex >a od ah ln wan
terrier, which was carried up the
ramp in a wooden boK with
breathing holes by an embassy aide.

dip they' joined the reception line long
before the bereaved relatives
arrived

dra eed n dbimcek ,lth, itdruc U
Auld Lang Syner, upon the arrival of
Mrs. Noel. her 21-year-old son
John, Mrs. Moore, and her two
duhens 2Lucy Anne, 22, and
The two widows were dryuyed
although Mrs. Noel was obviously'
greeted each person in the


ter th s and c afis b
The widows and their children
entered the door of the Presidential
jet without looking back.
theog sann apparentaioversi ht
not at full staff but it was clear that
Noel and Moore left the Sudan fotr
the last time not as diplomats but
as friends.
GRIEF-STRICKEN
Behind the Presidential jet, a
smaller group of grief-stricken
call agues supe bie dthe loading <

air force jet.
It wats the body of Belgian charge
d'af~rfires G;uy Eid which was
being flown to C'airo aboard the
U.S. Cl41 jet that brought States
Department personnel to Khartoum
Saturday.
Amore hepy left, rel tivemb o h
the Belgian's brother FEid, and the
deceased s fiance, D~ominiquue la
Croix.

thrM gheu th ro artur ce e o
and was so overcome that she had
to teuve the American receiving
line.
The highest-ranking Sudanese
official who saw the bodies off was
Mrs. Naffsa Ahmed al Amin, a
member of the political committee
of the Socialist Union. A Sudanese
sokeshrana sain sem hnata higher
Also present for the departure
was Robert F~it7. the new American
charge, who arrived after hris

aoisto Wahnto was Suacse
minister for public service Abdel
Rahman Abdullah1 and Sudanese ~
am fscor th th a S. A dul A t l


Belgian was ambassador Sainth
Hushim, who represents Suldan in
France and Belgium.
8 HELD)

theT inc eptuembeis mati i (,
the Palestine Liberation Movement
were held at a Khartoum army
hadquarters for the slaying of the
President Numairl cabled
President Niron that he would deal
firmly with them. "We find the
killhingof these men outrageous,"

A highl-ranking member of the
Sudunese government told
diplomats privately: "The gluerrillus
are already dead men."
Mlore .than too paratroo~pers
surrounded the embalssy Sunday as
thle eight Pa;lestinians. described as
between 19 und 25 years < l.
emerged from the building f~lahingy


victory signs,
In a statement issued in Beirut,
Black September said the guerrillas
surrendered "because of the high
esteem we hold" for Numairi.
"We leave them in trust in his
hands," the statement said. "We are
confident they will be treated as
true revolutionary fighters...
Armed with machine gunls,
genadess land drevolysers, t e

und rinmra deed the release of a
number of palestinianrs held In

r presntc n evr, tha t ei chi

coa er Mohn e moioud Obe a
19 other members of the
Palesti ian mo ement under death

None of the terrorists' demands
were met, and King Hussein of
Jrdans en Scu Iy confirmed the
his associates.
First reportsteindi aterd thhatt the
guerri but riaday night, the en
Americans and the Belgian were
taken to the basement and
exe ued. why those there were
killed, Mathouk told newsmen:
"Because the Fedayeen considered
them enemies of the Palestinian
cause." An anonymous guerrilla
sta emert itssubedc snBeirut sai x e

arrogance and obstinacy" in his


Te oies nV sh meia
diplomats were taken Sunday to a
local morgue, where autopsies were
performed. U.S. consul Carol Rochi
ludilatted by todet wunds and
almostt unrecognilable."


Along with them down the
red carpet came two
mysterious Thais branded by
flanoi as mercenaries and spies.
The Amnericans, dressed in
grey shirts and jackets

itd ptrtrous rmaprovi ed t%
the American flag and waiting
11 S. officials as they stepped

h spi le jets tat b 4ught flying
here
Tlher jo~y at being free after

cpoiit adom ntedyr theiin
release, An information officer
said many were "grinning from
car to ear" after getting on the
plane at lIanoi's G;ia Lam
airport .
"My face is going to bust,
he quoted one as saying. "I
haven't smiled so much in a
long time "
Most oif the men had lost
weight and some had missing
teeth. But they appeared
vigorous, in good spirits and
showed healthy appetites.
There were no litter cases
among t hm a


hospital's cafeteria. There they
wolfed down 60 dozen eggs,
240 tenderloin steaks, corn on
the cob, fried chicken, cornish
game hen and ice cream
sund~es with nuts, bananas and
cherries.
"Beautiful!" exclaimed
o~ne freed POW watching a
cook fry eggs-
"l ,s great everything
tasted delicious to me," said
another,
CIGARS, TOO
After dinner some lit up
cigars handed out on the plane
trip from Hanoi. Reporters
were allowed to observe part of
the meal and were escorted by
military officers but couldn't
ask questions.
T~he returned prisoners,
having shed the clothes
supplied by Hlanoi, wore light
blue hospital pyjamas. They sat
at square, four-man tables
lighted by candles and
decorated with flowers. Their
placemats were crayon-
coloured posters made by base
school children.
"Forget war, welcome
peace!" proclaimed one.
bay ou'v dam tear.ong way,
The two Thais released with
the Americans ate in their
has ital rooms. There was no

join the Americans. A
spokesman said they had
chicken curry, coconut milk
and rice.
The commander of the Clark
Hospital, Clol. John W. Ord of
San Antonio, Tex., said the
Americans were "in generally
good shape.
Their release brought to 269
the number of American
prisoners freed by the North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
under terms of the Jan. 27
Paris cease-fire agreement.
Another 30 Americans '
along with two West German
medical workers and two
Filipino employees of the
Voice of America, are to be
released by the Viet Cong in
Hanoi Monday.


Co mnistwsiade Ha oi 28 -
pledged all will be released by
March 28.
IMPAssE
But AP reports from Saigon
that an impasse in the
Vietnamnese prisoner exchange
Monday threatened to delay
the peacekeeping! efforts of the
four-party Joint Military
Commission before it expires
in less than a month
The commission, in its first
30 days, had served more as a
forum for rhetoric than as a
body for keeping the peace.
Constant dispute among the





to fulfill a number of


obligations spelled out in the
Vietnam peace agreement
signed in Paris last Jan. 27.
It had been hoped that the
Commission might get moving
in the last 30 days of its 60-day
term establ hed t tge spe c

to the two-party Joint MilitarV
Commission maode up of
representatives tet eSaigon


C'ommnunist delegations walked
out of a meeting of the chiefs
of delegations to the four-party
Commission, and threatened to
boycott future meetings until
the Saigon government

prisnr it t 11 r ntbse int e
second phase increment,
already a week behind
scheue international

peacekeeping mission, known
as the International

Com si oon (f C onto we d
reported unanimous agreement
for the first time since it came
to South Vietnam, but
remained split on a complaint
by the U.S.-South Vietnamese
side that the Commumists had
set up a missile site at Khe
Sanh, just below the
demilitarized zone, after the
Jan. 28 cease-fire.
UNANIMOUS
The ICCs, made up of
Indonesia, Canada, Poland, and
tiungary, sent unanimous
reports to the Joint Military



rock-throwing incident at Hue
in which six North Vietnamese
representatives were reported
injured, according to
ambassador Michel Gauvin of
Canada
But the discord on the
prisoner issue seemed to
overshadow this first report of
progress by the international
cease-fire watchdogs.
Under terms of the
agreement, the Joint Military
Commission is supposed to
operate on the principle of
consultations and unanimity. It
will end its activities on March
28 after the completion of the


L~oNAoNThu S, ASN rshA arlin rs
collided in fight near here Monday
and one crashed, killing at least 53
perso~ns. The other made an
emergency landingt at the military
air base at Cognauc. 125 miles away.
air ies twi jen D C9 ws fon
spread over a wide area of
apicultural land. Itnhad heen filiht
island, to Lo~ndon yja P'alma
Thle other planet was a C'oronado
Saits cltuar r It had beetn due in Lo~ndon half an
Ilour after te accidet ie eed
how many people ~.cre hourdd the
p~lanes. They can carry a total tf
about 265 passcenges.
The accident occurred while the
air routes over I rance: were in the
control of the military, who took
fvr< Imt civila technician safer

T'he canlision apparently
happened at gih alt tude a 7
triis slnnokeand theLpassenpers

unsccr ati a watct anlan fon
the log boo~k of thle I)C'9 12
kiltsmret ri a rsml tre scene ofr >
thle main wreckage reported finding


clthii nd hits oft isted tt al
The accident was certain to
rekindle the controversy over
military control of civilian flights
during the air controllers strike.
The F~rench pilots hard I~~Crotested
tht t Csuslibenrti sm wih fet.
The French air line pilots
associ tisn said hey .S d ren 1 is
association describinlt military
control as "a very high risk
sat rational airlines, including
U.S. carriers, have continued flying
inko setm osinrc ntromititary
A stewardess aboard the Spantax
plane, reached by telephone at
Coganc, said all the passengers were
safe. She declined to give her name
or any details, saying it was up to
the capltain of the aircraft to give
such mf e al iht," she said. She
ref sed to, give details of how the
cSh mwoua perly say the jetliner
came from Madrid on u'normal'

hefiials at thhr I)9 cr sh sit
coldision.t Hecuer sfoundhtthe nose
engines, but were still looking for
the middle section.


withdrawal of U.S. troops and tlOMESTEAD). F:LORIDA (AP)
those of other foreign Seventy persons, most of them
countries from Vietnam and young children, have been
the completion of the return of ho~spitalized following an outbreak
captured military personnel of typhoid fever at a migrant labour
and foreign civilians of the camemgency clinics have been set
partles. up at the camp, 25 miles south of
The walkout by the North Miami, and health officials
Vietnamese and Viet Cong Saturday described the epidemic as
delegations pushed back on the "the biggest in the area for years."
d osal b )r. Milton Saslaw, Public Health
ten Unitad States for a had be' adnfil0 cases oal o hv
renewed joint appeal to field 12 probable cases and the other
commanders to stop the patients all have the symptoms but
shooinganddiscssio of we are waiting for laboratory

euface 0o-air mi silanbat tere lse a thlahi hed na d cl
Vietnamese havre charged the the county-owned camp's walter
Nor th Vietnamese with aySt ay itsswrkndr
installing after the cease-fire. caAbout 2,000 p >ple live at th

meagre living picking vegetables on
nearby farms







WOUNDED.I KNEE:. S yI) Ri1)c- hardmiccitant Indians who seized
Wo~unded Knee and federal lawyers discussed peace propondls Sunday in a
tee~pee erected between the village and the encampment of armed federal


inwmen rinuinw the community.
There has been no, shooting
reported at Wounded Knee since
early Saturday. Among other
th ks wther idian g 200T of w
were demanding the withdrawal of
federal lawmen.
But the President of the! Oylata
mm b~ersmajve onthe Pne 10d r
Reservation where Wounded Knee
is located, said he had been told by
justice de artment officials that
such a wit drawal was impossible.
The leader, Richard Wilson, has
threatened to, lead a force of his
s epear rejns o1 Iustmth e Woundes

There was no report on the
progress of the talks between
leaders of the American Indian
Movement (AIM), their lawyers and
the U.s. aissries attorneys from
NothE Iinkt asnpdc SusisDakottao
the U.S. attorney geenera~l nd senior
federal official at the Pine Ridge
Resrrateln nbut tin ir1 Woun e
in discussion of the proposals
offer d late Saturday by the
The proposals were drawn up
by the! Indians. Incal clergymen and
thueehdostapls t < I rdans held from

withdenseino lwe and moor s
and the restitution by the Indians
of damages suffered by the trading
Pou rn Wunded Knee vhen th


ineoe additin, th Ioc~ndian ha said
taIn nurnt nos ms mantsd d aer
reut from000 fhede prosand jury
ce roimina charg oand theatre thos
k tgesv sh ~houd uno inclde

In;r~iicksnh aid early Sud ay h

threyant to lead armedt n orce o

O al ndtan hret ern twas thos
whentats dstrued ro rneade


neda oe Kf Mery 00 idnanns
Asked what his followers were
doing white waitingl to learn the
SIt oe' If nge pere "akWilson
There were sporadic gunfire
excharnges Wednesday, Thursday,
Friday and early Saturday between
inins Thre hmv s tesn no idiju e s
reported in the six days of the
conflict.


Dowdeswell & Anrmtrong Sts. Nassau P. O. Box N-1388


.. r.


i


Monday, March 5, 1973.


5 5 b
t ft latt


03S LLATSAI[ )gp


trr~ rr


GIE HT GUERRILLAS HELD


REDS THREATEN BOYCOTT COMM8HW MAllET


t


I


106 more American CLsISE ITS Filrles Bodies of three slain IEW CllillAlSt
EXCIIAWGESFOR WEEK 11 C~IAISTQIA


PO W s return from


OVER FRANCE, 53 KLLED




I I r rr


on ay ar ;...


NvLnr Anrns sJvr ~ IN a~A MAG_ I~
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1 903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.LItt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 911917.97
Contributriy Editor 197 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Pubtlsher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
.TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (IS Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Monday, March 5, 1973.


done by deliberate design because he had a question on the
Agenda that night asking why a coloured man was not pointedd
to the Executive Council. I often sat next to Mr. Butler - or very
near him in the House but I don't remember this question
being on the Agenda. This is all nonsense, of course, because, if
by being locked in the toilet that one night he missed Question
Time at that meeting, surely he would have been able to put the
question at any subsequent meetinR.
He may have ha fact put this questions to the chair but I don't
remember it. This means that he could not have pushed the issue
very hard because it seems thiat I remember most of the
important things that have happened in the colony during the last
60 years.
For instance, I distinctly remember the effort made by Bert
Cambridge, who then represented the South in the House, to
break down racial barriers several years before I succeeded in
bringing the barriers down. But, alas, coloured people don't
remember the effort Bert Cambridge made in their interests while
he was a member of the House.

Most people would have taken the toilet incident as a joke. I
certainly would have, and then waited my chance to lock the
pranksterts in. But Mr. Butler must have been furious when he
found himself locked in. He must be a very powerful man
physically because I am told that he actually bent the heavy steel
bar that was placed across the outside steel window of that room
in the building!

As I understand the story, a couple of members of the House
arrived late. They entered the House as Mr. Butler went into the
toilet. The large iron key that locked this door was prominently
exposed on the outside of the door. Basil McKinney, a fine fellow
who was always ready for a joke, saw the key, thought he would
have a lark with Mr. Butler, turned the key and went upstairs to
his seat.
It seemed an amusing thing at the time but it is unfortunate
that it ever happened since it seems to have wounded Mr. Butler's
prd s d 1 ly
pri eso ep y. *+****2***

Funny thing, Mr. Butler claims that God has been on his side. I
also feel that God has been on my side.
I remember in the trenches, back in the first world war .. .
when a Christmas truce was called .... the men in our trenches and
th mniacross No IMan's La aisne th Grman tr nc Is ..t. bi h
was a great favourite.
God must have a busy time sorting us all out. But I have long
ago learned that God gives to each of us what he knows we
deserve .... and what is, at the same time, best for the overall plan
in which He embraces all His children.
And so we can both be right. You see .... it depends on what a
man wants out of life.


EST ATE E FTHE LA TE

OLIVER SIN CLA IR HUNTER




NOTICE3 is hereby given that all persons
having any claims or demands against the
above-named Estate are requested to send the
same duly certitled to the undersigned on or
before the 31st March next.
And Notice is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time above-mentioned the
assets of the deceased will be distributed among
the persons entitled thereto having regard only
to the claims of which the Executors shall then
have had notice.



HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executors


Comments on the

Cabinet reshu ffle


Ilyatt Intef lati0H81 hopef ul


for fHIH fA of th e Raha as


Thursday.
Mr. Michael McCann, in
Nassau for the signing of a
long-term management
agreement covering the
Emerald Beach Hotel, said that
Hyatt had great faith in the
future of the Bahamas once it
"begins to simmer down
politically "
SHe told a press conference
that Hyatt's example was likely
to have considerable influence
on investors who might be
hesitant about coming to the
Bahamas.
"We are not politically
oriented. We cannot afford to
be. We are strictly hotel
operators. Our personnel are
told to keep out of politics "
An official announcement

CorgnCo dany thatNassta
owners of the Emerald Beach,
had signed a management

Itere amieoal u 1th whicHyta"
worldwide spte s aiiyhn w n

operation of the Nassau hotel.
Asked about the labour

btemisot l, Mr.M~n sc
that if it could be kept at 75
per cent occupancy through
Hyatt's convention and sales
programme the labour
situation would take care of
itself.
Low occupancy was a
pr blem all over the world. he

Mr. Leslie Moore of the
Corrigan Hotel Company said
that the effect of the
agreement would be to enter
the Emerald Beach into the
international sales organization
of the Hyatt people.
Mr. McCann said that with
25,000 rooms, Hyatt was the
fastest growing chain in the
world, with 128 salesmen and
17 national offices.
Haymsg sounded the staff out
he felt that morale had gone "a
few degrees higher because
the basically feel they will


"Tourism to the Bahamas is
practically more important
than in any other country in
the world. I feel the staff
understands that the burden is
to be shared by all not just
management.
"If you have a good staff
and mutual respect between
employer and employee,
problems will be minimal."
Mr. Moore said that there
were three recent happenings
in the Bahamas which he
considered important. First
was the number of recent
things done by the Prime
Minister. Second was the
equalization of the dollar,, and
third the reaction to the entry
of Hyatt Inwu the Bahamas.


Mr. Moore also praised
Tourism Minister Clement
Maynard for the "superb job"
he was doing for the Bahamas
on the exterior.
Emerald Beach Hotel
manager William Stowell
remarked that the one thing he
was very optimistic about was
the new immigration policy.
The hotel, he said, had 300
staff five of which were
expatriate.
"We feel that with
liberalization we will be able to
have a few more for training
Bahamians."
Mr. McCann added that it
was Hyatt's policy to train
local staff to assume top
position ns.


AN INTERESTIBGEaTIcENN DUPUCH Hon. Milo Butler,
Governor-designate of the Bahamas, appeared idi the Miami
Herald of February 14th.
Ban las p blished under the trap heading "Fro Bo ,v t
The Door of The Promised Land, ,,
Mr. Butler is very pleased with his achievement and so he is due
congratulations which we h artil extend to him.

But there are things about his story, as revealed in The Hemald,
that are inconsistent,
"He was born julst after the turn of the century (1906), in
Nassau," Al Burt records in his article, "and went to public
schools there at the age of 17. He gave up the Bahamas {'I
couldn't live under those conditions') and worked for
approximately two years in the United States. Most of that time
was spent in the farming community of Hastings, Florida
although he also lived for a while in Miami and New York." *
This was back in l923, exactly a half century ago.

The article doesn't say what "conditions" he could not live
under in the Bahamas in those days but, since the entire emphasis
of the article was on the way he expects Ethiopia to spread her
wings, one can only conclude that his reference was to racial
conditions in the islands at that time.

Back in 1923 coloured people in the Bahamas had the vote,
they sat on juries and were Magistrates in the Out Islands.
For many years prior to this coloured men were members of
the House of Assembly and they held important positions in the
Public Service. For example, the Hon. C. O. Anderson was then
Postmaster General of the Bahamas. At the turn of the century
James Carmichael Smith, who later held similar position in
Sierra Leone, Africa, was also Postmaster General. I mention
these two men at random but there were many more.
The Bahamian people had a free press which was instrumental
in 1956 in helping to break down the barriers of racial
discrimination in the colony. Mr. Butler's Government is now
well on the way to destroying a free press in tha colony by unfair
administration of the Immigra~ion Act.
Coloured people were among the largest land owners in the
colony. Since then they have sold sitost of their lands. They can
blame only themselves for this when the time comes that they
find that they are land-less. The only coloured people whose
lands are protected today are the Rolles of Exuma. They have to
thank the generosity of the owner of their tdrebears Lord Rolle
for his generosity and for his foresight in providing that the
land should continue in perpetuity in the ownership of the
descendants of his slaves.
Coloured people were also protected under the law. British
justice was still supreme in the land. This too now seems to be in
the process of being watered down. There is no telling what will
happen after independence when our people will lose their right
of apeal to Britain for ratiection
o peral coloulred men held valuable property and conducted
big businesses on Bay Street-
There wasn't a great deal of social intercourse among the races
at that time, but still some did exist and so it was possible. And
the relationship was growing.
***+*******
Now then, Mr. Butler went to the U.S., presumably in search
of more palatable living conditions.
The article states that he spent two periods in Florida.
Back in 1923, the Negroes were an oppressed people
throughout the U.S., and in the South they were a persecuted
people,
There they were deprived of the vote. It was unthinkable that
they shoulld sit on juries. Th~ey held no public office. They were
struggling to find a place in business in their own communities,
And this wasn't easy because their own people wouldn't support
them.
Some of my readers may remember the visit Mrs. Bethune'
founder of the Bethune-Cookman College in Daytona Beach,
Florida, paid to Nassau.
Mrs. Bethune was the female counterpart of Booker T.
Washington, founder of Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee. Alabama.
She was an old friend of mine. The late Hon. T. A. Toote and I
visited her at her college some years earlier and had a picture

mahie nh Nssau she gave a tremendous talk in one of the
hool budildcin ss to ee o l dghte with th Ct rie rh iod. Sh
recalled that when she was a child mn the South coloured people
preferred to buy ice from a white man because they believed that
"the white man's ice was colder".
Throughout the U.S. coloured people were herded together in
ghettos. In the North they had practically no protection under
the law. In the South the law afforded them no protection.
The Ku Klux Klan was then in full swing. For the slightest
offence a coloured man would be hustled out of town, tarred and
feathered, hanged or burned at a stake. There was no chance of a
coloured man winning even a hearing against a white man's
brutality.
All this has changed now, of course, but these are a few of the
terrible conditions that existed in the U.S. in 1923 by contrast
with the far more advanced social structure in the Bahamas at
that time under a British administration.
Still Mr. Butler says he went to live in the U.S. because he
wouldn'tt stand conditions that then existed in the Bahamas .... all
of which is so much poppycock.
***~*+*+***
it is extraordinary how Mr. Butler has allowed the incident of
bein locked in the toilet at the House of Assembly one night to
embitter his whole life.t tehas never forgotten it. He mentions

Th i me teralpdP ticle reports that he feels that this was


I ,d -

PM gets commemorative tea towel

pre e ted to Prhime Min so r nen O. Pn li featurns.theelen haatsria (riht),ofnro n
Bahama Hand Prints. Looking on is the company's head printer, Miss Rosemary McPhee.
The tea towels are now available in local shops.


many Bahamians in their
present position sgo othn

short way back in order to
remember that prior to his
takeover of that portfolio,
most of the Permanent
Secretaries were expatriate and
in fact even the Secretary to
the Bahamnian C.abinet was in

mntio the any jbs ted b
them in both the private and
the public sector. I speak of
jobs that Bahamnians are
CAPABLE of performing,
There have, of course, been
cases where lack of foresight
placed Bahamnians in jobs for
which they were not qualified
and that is regrettable.
We must not, however, lose
sight of the fact that there are
many Bahamians, especially in
the Public Service, holding jobs
for which they are not
qualified and other Ministers,
neot IletMrforWanna, wehris
constituent had to have a job
and the other and so on.
Whether they could function in
those jobs was immaterial.
They had to have a job. Of
Course, this has presented and
will continue to present many
problems unless it is nipped
now.
If you want a sample of
what I speak visit some
government aagenci es fdisee

and clerks go about their daily
routines. They don't care, and
we thes Public must grin and
bear it or leave.
We now come to the
demotion of Mr. Francis. I call
it a demotion because whereas
he once handled Development
as a secondary matter, it is now
his "main squeeze". To say
that the Finance Ministry did
not do its function seems to be
putting it mildly. The fact that
Treasury Bills have to be sold
each month in order for the
Government to meet its
obligations does not speak well
for our financial stability. Nor

cinea hge dfi ta budget pseati
well for the Ministry of
F~inance.
Its main aim being to collect
taxes with which to run the
country's affairs, everyone will
agree that the various increases
in all forms of taxes should
have netted the country more
than its fair share.
JAMES E. BROWN

Wh y De vCo

inV OSting in

Ca 0 8 9 S?
EDITOR, The Tribune,
if it is true that the Bahamas
governmentmaon ta pso tin, if

Grand Bahama Development
C o., why then is this conce rn
investing in the Canary Islands
when they (the government)
are constantly espousing the
need for more investment
locally and criticizing the
foreign investor for placing his
fumds a outside the Bahamas te

following news item that
appeared in the Caribbean
Business News of February.
Trhe (; rand Bahama
Development Company has
announced ad massive

dvlop ent inanthe Craensao
Islands. They are Spanish
dep end encies off the
No~rthwest Coast of Africa.
TIhe development, on a
500-acre tract of land on the
island o Fu Oevntua o to

NO NAME


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Pleasevapuerbmit me spa e tin

comment on the present
political controversy.
Like a bolt out of the blue
L.O.P. has done it again, in
relieving Messrs. Hanna and
Francis of their prestigious
portfolios of H~ome Affairs and
Finance resp cti elyt ut e

particularly painful since he
must do a job of rebuilding the
Commonwealth's purse string
to meet the needs and
challenges that independence
will bring. After all, it has been
said that it was his handling of
the Immigration policy that
contributed in large measure to
the rapid decline of the
economy. This is, of course, a
debateable matter and A.D.H.
will long be remembered if for
nothing else, for the fact that
his fervent passion for things
nationalistic helped to put


THE INDEPENDENCE
Essay Committee has
announced a full slate of
national competitions relating
to Independence July 10.

commit ee adm tat t ere hve
now been implemented a
national essay competition,
and a national poetry
competition.
Unlike t he drama
competition, which is an open
class event, the two new
competitions are sub-divided
into contests for schools and
contests for the general public.
Outlining details of the essay
competition, the spokesman
said that in schools, a number
of age groupings has been
established in order to arrive at

aub itteudgmTentare ages 7a
10-11, 12-14; 15-18. He said
that entrants should be within
their specified age groups at
the deadline of May 15, by
which time, it is required that
all entries be received.
All students up to and
including age fourteen will be
writing on the topic "What I
Can Do To Help Build My
Nation," and those up to and
incl dinrg eigtee year will b

Piriileges and Responsibilities
O3f a Citizen In An
Independent Bahamas."
AGES
Word limits have been set
for the various age
sub-divisions, the spokesman
said. Those students 7-9 years
of age are not required to write
more than 150 words; those in
the 10-11 category, not more
than 200 words. Those in the
12-14 age groups should write
essays 300-500 words in length
and the 15-18 group should
not write less than 500 words.
The subject of the essay

BAHAMIANS

TAKE NOTE!
KINGSTOWN, St. Vincent
(AP) Civil servants in St
Lluciadhave had stringent rult
9 klac on tem for co ing t
An announcement from the
premier's office has warned
them that a red line on the
attendance register will be
drawn at five minutes past
eight o'clock in the morning
and at five minutes past one
o'clock in the afternoon and
deductions from their salaries
will be made for coming to
work late.
FMTtoh leek v i Psremer sa
sharp warning about their late
at tenda nce at of fice.
He told them: "Cabinet has
noted that it appears
impossible for civil servants to
arrive at work at 8 a.m. and if
the situation continues it will

t status nec i an eefr t
give the public the hours of
service expected."
A five-day working week was

dne r mncts oartlygotjnun y
with working hours. Monday
to Friday, 8 a.m to noon and
1:15 to 4:30 p.m.
The Minister of Finance, E.
T. Joshua, referrng recently to
the public service as top heavy,
drew attention that more than
75 per cent of the revenue
collected paid salaries to the

Puust hat ivi s rvda s wrk o
the wages which they receive.


competition for the general
public is "The Tools Required
For Building A Nation", and
there is no limit to the number
of words in this category. ie

amoeon theedagthf 18 at ea 15
fitted into this category.
Likewise were those individuals
under 18, but not in school.
The spokesman then
outlined details of the national
poetry competition, and said
that this, too, had been
sub-divided into contests for
schools, and for the general
public. In the schools, the
groupings are thle same as for
the essay competition with the
addition that a group for those
u;nder seven years has been
created.
le1 0p iific hopicstof o d
poetry competition, the
spokesman commented, but
the committees: hoped that
entrants wi!! endeavour to
explore the theme of
nationhood for t he
Commonwealth of the


Bahamias.
Insofar as the essay and
poetry contests for the general
public are concernedly entries
should be forwarded to the

nut re aotentio nuctio Su dn
Wallace. Deadline is May 15.
The Ministry of Education and
Culture will be informing
schools of how their respective
comp etitions should be
administered.
The spokesman reminded
those who intended to
participate in the recently
an nounced playwriting
competition that deadline for
this is May 1, and entries
should be forwarded to Mr.
Clement Bethel, Ministry of
Education and Culture.

comenitte noe df rard t
large-scale participation by all
age groupings mn dw
community. Winning entries
will eventually be published in
a special Independence
publication. Prizes will be
announced later.


victims of the earthquake in
Nicaragua.
Drugs, plasma, camp-beds,
tents and food were
despatched immediately after
the disaster and we are now
arranging to purchase more
tents from Japan, prefabricated
buildings from South America
to replace the Headquarters of:
the Nicaraguan Red Cross in
Managua which was completely
destroyed and ambulances for
the Red Cross ambulance
service in Managua. We have
also arranged the local
purchase of stationery for
school children through the
Jouniobede oity, together
with that of so many of our
supporters, has enabled prompt
and effective aid to be given,
We are most grateful to the-
people of the Bahamas and to~
the Bahamas Red Cross for
organising the collection.
DEREK BARSONg
Secretary
Feb. 19, 1973.


EDITOR, The Tribune
I enclose herewith a copy of
letter received from the
British Red Cross Society,
thanking the people of the
Bahamas for their generous
donation to the Nicaraguan
Relief Fund. I would be
grateful if you would publish
the contents of this letter so
that those persons who have so
kindly given to the Fund
would know that their
donation has been appreciated
and put to good use.
LOTTIE V. TYNES

Feb. 27, 1973 co.
Mrs. L. V. I'ynes,
Director, Bahamas Branch'
'The British Red C'ross Society'
P. O. Box N-1' l
Nassau.
Dear Mrs. Tynes
I am writing through you to
say how grateful we are to the
people of the Bahamas for
their magnificent contribution
oif 1,499.52 pounds for the


THOUGHTS FOR TODAY


G~od works in a mysterious way
His wonders to perform;
He plants his footsteps in the sea,
And rides upon the storm. HENRY LYTE


Judge not the Lord by feeble sense'
But trust Him for His grace;
BHin frow nig povidence


-COWPER


Sheb Glribunp


M d M h 5 1973


Fu 1111 e 81o~f co mpet it zons


relaiaflg to In dependence


8 8IT ISH RED CR 0SS THAN KS

B~AMI A O A 9 8 ll A R













--r


CENTRAL GARAGE HOLDS CAR SHOW

'"ENTRAL GOES DODGE was th themea of Friday's Car ShoBw CatCntrl Garag
Sl-,......llu,.ird. Over three hundred Inrited guests turned out to catch a firtd
.had viewin of the new Ilit of Dodge cars now atalabl at Centra l Garag. P rtod
from left are ot of town guests Dr. Al lilverpoolr Dr. Emrni Marhal; Lottle fTatul,
executive vice president of Intenrational Supply Co.; Mrs. Pat Mrrshal; Mr. ErrolCLach,
Bat*Io's Publc Relations Director; Mr. A. H. kowles Sr., managing director a atr
Garage and Dr. Desmond Braithwaite. Seatd in the Dodge Dart Sports Coupe is Mrs.
Elaine Liverpool, who alon with her husbnd and other doctors pictrure reside In
Toronto.
PHOTO: P. Symonette





THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA







Our John F. Kennedy Drive

Br80Ch WiII be temporarily

closed for renovation and

SX pa ns ion of fa cil ities as of
the close of business

Tuesday, March 6th.



AII J. F. K. Branch accounts

WIII be serv iced at our Ca ble

Bea ch Br an ch ef fect ave with

the opening of business

Wed nesday, Ma rch 7th.



It is a nt ic ipa ted that

renOVat ions w IIl be com-

pleted by approximately
JUne 1St, 1973,





The Royal M The H~elPful Bank


NTIE
SMALL MOTOR TRANSPORT OPERATION
RE UIRESSOSERVICES OFRE BHAA FR


AOPERAIONTSO KN WL DGEMOFORIESEL EN IO S
AND BACKGROUND IN MECHANICAL SERVICE
MAINTENANCE.

REPLY TO ASSISTANT MANAGER, P.O. BOX NI216,
GIVING INFORMATION ON PREVIOUS
EXPERIENCE AND SALARY DESIRED.


IN THE SUPREME COURT 1972
OF THE BAHAMA ISLANDS No. 45
Equity Side

NOTICE

THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1969.

The Petition of Caroline Fernander of the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Bahama Islands in respect of:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situate
on the Western Side of St. James Road in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
which said piece parcel or tract of land is
bounded on the NORTH by land the property of
Carl Nottage and running thereon One Hundred
and Sixty-eight and Sixty-nine Hundredths
(168.69) feet on the WEST by land the property
of Thomas Knowles and running thereon
Eighty-two and Fifty-five Hundredths (82.55)
feet on the SOUTH by land the property of the
Honourable Milo Butler, M.P.4 and the property
of Joseph Thompson and running thereon One
Hundred and Fifty-five and Forty-five
Hundredths (155.45) feet and on the EAST by
St. James Road and running thereon
Seventy-one and fifteen Hundredths (71.15)
feet which said piece parcel or tract of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and
dimensions as are shown on a diagram or plan
filed in this matter and is delineated on that part
of the said diagram or plan which is coloured
Pink.
CAROLINE FERNANDER claims to be the
owner of the unincumbered fee simple estate in
possession of the said land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Bahama
Islands under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act,
1959 to have her title to the said land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by
the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
said Act.
Coppies of the plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
tb) The Chambers of S.' A. HARRIS-SMITH at
Market Street, in the said City of Nassau,
Attorney for the Petitioner.
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the Ist day of March, 1973 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the Ist
day of March, 1973 will operate as a bar to such
claim.
S. A. HARRIS-SMITTH,
Chambers,
3rd Floor,
Golden Dragon Building,
Market Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner


__


IHo~dsy_,a~L~h~


y outle groulp
a national youth organization
which would have the consent
of all youth groups to be their
national spokesman."
The release said that
literature would be prepared
and distributed "as soon as
possible" so that young people
would fully understand the
purpose of the conference.
The second conference is to
begi b p~m. March 10Sat hdj
auditorium, R~obinsron Road.
Members of the steering
committee are Kermit Ford of
the Ministry of Education, St.
Augustine's teacher Vincent
Smiles, St. Augustine's student
Rence Smith and C. R. Walker
Technical student Stephen
Plakaris.


A FOUR-member volunteer
steering committee has planned
Second national metin Of
youth to establish a national
youth organization and to
formulate a national youth
Policy, following the failure of
an earlier attempt to
accomplish those aims.
A press release referred to
the conference held at Holy
Famiy '"s, Highbury Prk,
"Although that confere:fe
was not completely successful,
it was not by any means a
complete failure. It awakened
many to the need for young
people to work together for
greater understanding among
themselves, in order to advance
the well being of young people
throughout the Bahamas."
The press release said that at
the February 17 meeting a

was se p tocneneoam sc
conference on Saturday, March

scIf this cnference as o ly a

nre say tharepresenztaattives
come along to contribute their
views towards the formation of


ARRIVED TODAY: Joma
from Jacpks~onville; Freeport

aSkAILE TODAY: oma fo

Fr RItVING TOMORROW:
Rhienland from Hamburg;
Trop c Flyer from West Palm


By CURTIS COOK
Bah~aEW wIl diefy it:

comesbut win epgh hd o
keep its tourist appeal
competitive with the rest of
the Caribbean and Europe,"
Bahamian Tourism Minister
Clement Maynard said
Wednesday.
Maynard cited better
inter-island air service, a
currency revaluation to equal
the U.S. dollar exactly, a
taqia racial stain n adent
schedueo beida nk ity0, ta
make the Bahamas an
even-better vacation spot.
Maynard said the Bahamas
government would form a
national flag airline with an eye
toward improving air service
with the Bahamas Out Islands
as well as other nations.
The Bahamian dollar was
recently devalued to equal the
U.S. dollar on a one-to-one
basis, while in many other


tourist areas currencies were
recently revalued upward
thereby becoming more costly
to American travellers.
The Bahamas are associated
with time Caribbean Free Trade
Association (CARIFTA) on an
informal basis, and Maynard
expects, "the Bahamas will
have an even closer relationship
with CARIFTA in areas where
he can do thig sfo them and
WeDIVERSIFYo an
agriculture-based nation and do
not have quite the same
problems as they do," he
added, noting that the
Bahamas must diversify its
industry and maintain its
attract iveness as an
international banking centre in
addition to improving its
tourist industry.
In his additional capacity a
Bahamas Civil Aviatio


Minister, Maynard said that
present air routes, especially
with the United States, "will
be maintained for at last a year
after independence begins."
"Naturally, we will try to
renegotiate the air fare
structure with the United
States before independence in
order to make travel to the
Bahamas the most attractive
vacation spot for Americans,"

in Ne Ma nardt as sphakint
government announced in
Nassau that Prime Minister
Lynden O. Pindling will soon
travel to Washington for talks
with State Department officials
linked with Bahamian
independence,
On race relations, which has
caused strife mn other
Caribbean nations, Maynard
said, "We've made the
transition, stage-by-stage
without disruption or hostility
and have every prospect of
continuing to do so. After all,
Steates'closnect nei hbour snd
weenwantorthet Baas tv lbe a
visit after independence."


IN THE SUPREME COURT
OF THE BAHAMA ISLANDS
Equi ty Side


1972
No. 29/72


NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1969


The Petition of Lionel Johnson of the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the
:.Bahrama Islands in respect of:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing Six Acres (6) and situate Two
Thousand Seven Hundred Twenty-four and
Sixty-six Hundredths (2724.66) feet West of
Fox Hill Road in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence which said piece
parcel or tract of land is bounded NORTH by
Pine Yard Road and running there-on Four
Hundred and Fifty-seven and Ninety
Hundredths (457.90) feet on the SOUTH by
Yamacraw or Joe Farrington Road and running
thereon Four Hundred and Fifty-seven and
Forty Hundredths (457.40) feet on the EAST
by Lot No. 31 otherwise known to be the
property of D. A. McMillen and running: thereon
Six Hundred and Four and Sixty Hundredths
(604.60) feet and on the WEST by Lot No. 29
otherwise known as land formerly owned by
Edward Corlett and running thereon Six
Hundred and Three and Sixty Hundredths
(603.60) feet which sraid piece parcel or tract of
land has such position shape boundaries marks
and dimensions as are shown on a diagram or
plan filed in this matter and is delineated on that
part of the said diagram or plan which is
coloured Pink.
LIONEL JOHNSON claims to be the owner of
the unincumbered fee simple estate in possession
of the said land and has made application to the
Supreme ('utof the Bahama Islands under
Section 3 WTeQuieting Titles Act, 1959 to have
his title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and dectated in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
(b) The Chambers of S. A. HARRIS-SMITH at
Market Street, in the said City of Nassau,
Attorney for the Petitioner.


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NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not secognised in the Petition shall on or
before the 14th day of March, 1973 file in the
Suipseme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
..prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the
14th day of March, 1973 will operate as a bar to
such claim.


S. A. HARRIS-SMITH
Chambers,
3rd Floor,
Golden Dragon Building,
Market Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner.


. v


~lhp (liribunr


- YOltlis 10 ify aain to


for OfAation al


'BailmasS Will fight 10 keep its tourist


8pp681 Competitive -Maynard





I


I II


Yr~rr. rrr u, ~


nS DEPARTMENT
POLYESTER PANTS
POLYESTER PANTS
MEN SUITS
MEN SPORT COAT
MEN DRESS SHIRT
MEN POLYESTER SHIRT
BERMUDA SHORTS
MN' SOES


IMAY TAG HOME LAUNDRY CENTRE


A $uITNGu MATERIALS


) LADIES DEPARTMENT
FRENCH DRESSES $7 I
LADIES SHIFTS $6 & $7.00 -
LADIES NIGHT GOWN (15 $6-$7
LADIES BABY DOLL $5
LADI ES DUSTER $10
LADIES DRESSES $16
LDESUPANT SUITS $14-$ 6
PANTIES, BRASSIERES HALF SLIPS,
WAIST SNIPPERS HAL F PR ICE.
LADE HE $8 $10 $1
LADIES GLOVES SHORT & LONG $3
LADIES RAIN COAT$1
IDIE'S MP, Sl
4~ ~ HLSL ... nocn vaano. sErA rs


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LTD.
P. O. BOX N4806 TE L. 28941-5


CENTRAL HAS GONE DODGE


L


Monda March 5 1973


MIAMI, Fla. The
Southeast-G~ulf Coast sales staff
of the Bahama Islands Tourist
Office will move from their
present location In the First
National Banke Building here to
TIDES
LOW: 1.34 a.m. and 1.54
WIND: Southeasterly 10 to
16 me h.


new quarters as of March 1.
The new address will be 3510
Biscayne Boulevard, Miami
33137.
Involved in the move will be
WEATHER
WEATHER: Fair and chance
oha: Sooth to slight
Temp: Min, tonight 65
Max tomorrow 80


Jack Norris, B.I.T.O.'s regional
manager; sales representatives
Mike Alvarez recentlyy
transferred to Miami from
Atlanta), Van Isaac~s and
Russell Raether; and office
iTffr Patricia Ryals and
There Guene l Cfi


of the ....wl
Its present location a
Piai Ctrr.. us....,


Whill at WOI'k hiS

Wom ag r a W WHw WW


from work on Wednesday he
broken into and transcked.


found that his house had been


still in their boxes, had been
stolen.
"I had one of those suits
specially for a wedding that I
was to attend this week," he
said. From the bathroom of his
house, he could see that his
back door was "wide open."
Mr. Brown said the police
arrived and found one of his
suitcases under the floor of his
house. The police, he said, are
investigating.
DEANS LIHOWARD S.
Greenlee of Windham College,
Putney, vennont, has
announced that Mr. Patrick D.
Lowe of Nassau, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Rae M. Lowe, has
been named to the Dean's List
for the first semester of the
1972-73 academic year.


He said his next door
t 0 ..neighbour and her children
told him that they had seen a
young man sitting on his porch
around 2 p.m. that day. She
then saw the youth at the back
of the house playing with Mr.
Brown's dog.
Later in the day it was
found that four panes of glass
had been removed from a
window to his home.


Mr. Brown said when he
enerd ri sshno ephe oudno
something to eat in his kitchen
"But when I went into my
bedroom," he said, "it was
there that I got the biggest
shock. My bureau and chest of
drawers had been ransacked
and things were all over the
flo~or. The bottom drawer of
the chest of drawers was
smashed. A set of my clothing
was folded neatly and placed
her to fm electric heat r
He said that two $210 suits,
which he had bought a few
days before and which were

ABBE Y


FUND






...:2.1 ce
March 2n 1973


H now NO
$16 $10.00 28 to 36 WAIST


FOUR PANES OF GLASS were removed from this window of Noel Brown's home, on
May Street and a thief entered and ransacked his home during the day. Mr. Brown was at
work. Police are investigating.


$22 $16.00 28
$65 $30-$25
$45 $15-$25
$4 $5 $6 $7
$10-$15
$3
21.0S ZE 6-20A


MOHAIR & TERYLENE $5.
POLYESTER DOUBLE KNIT


PER YARD.P
$6 PER YARD


AUTOMATIC WASHERS &; DRYERS
PORTABLE WASHERS &: DRYERS
WR/NGE~RS WASHERS
D/SHWASHE~RS & FOOD DISPOSALS .
BUY WASHER DE~PEND4BIL/TY


~1
CII-r"".~srpis~.


'73 DODGE DART SEDAN
The compact Dodge. Roomy, strong and economical. A practical family car with
electronic ignition, front disc brakes, a host of meaningful features and engineering
innovations to assure mile-after-mile of maintenance-free driving. Great value


'73 DODGE DART SPORT COUPE
The newest addition to the great Dart family. The Dart Sport. Three cars in one a
six passenger coupe .. with sliding surn roof, a convertible . .with fold down rear
seat, a station wagon, a family car for fun or cargo.


5be Qlribunt


BAHAMAS MIAMI TOURIST OFFICE MOVES


.L GOING ON UNTIL MARCH14lth.


TO 36 WAIST


M ill FU [


h 8vI


b 0 dii S


We


with t he Best of Ever thing for


'73


~~izi:~ ~~


CENTRAL GARA\GELT D.
Oaes Field Phone 3-4711
P. O. Box< N-1525 Nassu, Bahamas


"d "''"" "'" m1~~1 rr


"












" urt v ruir


Her travelling salesman


husband doesn't roam


a tws as Qcmss tewae Y. Wnews swa, e.
DEAR AIBBY:. My husband la a travelinrg salesman, but
I never worry about him cheating on me wlan le's on tm
road. I solved that problem years ago. Know how?
I tire him out so good when he's home, he's lucky If b
has enough energy to carry his sample cases to the ear.-
SECURE IN SYRACUSE
DEAR SECURE: I hate to burst your babble, lady, but
a man can have the flaest banquoet la the world, and six
hears later he's hungry agaa.

DEAR ABBY: While my parents and I were p tia
away the Nativity Scene and wrapping the pieces in old
newspapers, I found a picture of you from 19812. You were
very pretty then. DENA BERNARD
DEAR DENA: Thanks, dear. It's letters tle years that
keep me humble.

DEAR ABBY: Could you please give me somne advice
on howK either to marry a rich man or get in the movies?
I would love to marry a movie sitar, but I lve in
Wisconsin and don't have the money to get to California
Pad mingle with the stars. If I did manage to scrape up the
bus fare, do you thiink it would help if I got myself a job as
a waitress in one of the movie studios?
I will graduate from high school in June and don't have
the money, or grades, to go to college. People keep telling
me I am very pretty, and I'm built nice. I am not lasy rand
have nothing special keeping me here, so what advice can
you give me? DAIRYLAND GDIRI,
DEAR DAIRYLAND) GIRL: Before you leave the Daiy-
land, you'd better face a few facts. It all the pretty, weB-
built girls who went to California la seach of rich hns
bands or movie careers were laid end to end, they'd reseh
Keaosha. Unless yea have a job waiting for yen or salth
elent money on which to bfe antil yea flad one, ptlu at
least one good friend to golde yea, stay home.

DEAR ABBY: I aum a registered nurse, age 40, never
married. I've worked hard alll my lie taking care of my
patients, aging parents, and doing church and communrity
work. I'm sure many people assumed that's all I mar

I e enl emrienced something that I had given up
all hope for. I nursed a young man witth a seriousr Illness
back to health. We have fallen gloriously in love with each
other and want to marry. This is the most beautiful, wbat
Itevable feeling I have ever known.
My friends thinkr bat I: have lost my mind because the
young man is only as. He is very mature for his age, and
bas a salable job skill, and i semployed dstdily.
Four years ago, a United States senator married a
woman 43 years hs junior and now they have timid r mood
child. I live aloe rand have no relatives. Before I fell in
love, the most excitement in my lie was going home to
talk to any canary. My heart has already told me what to
do, but will you pleasre confirm it?
IN L~OVE IN TI!!NNESmSC
DEAR IN LOVE: Yes a1~re an dut, and need aelther
the approval of year frieads aer a coalirmation from me to
do as yeal please. Many May-December marriages have
succeeded. Yours aan le one of them*

DEAR ABBY: Three weeks ago, Jimmy3 and I met on a
blind date neither one of us wanted to go on, but we went
to get our friends off our backs. I am 2 land Jimmy is 4.
We hit it oRY perfctly. He tookr me to dinner. We
danced ad laughed and jobed ~ad found whaEd a lot in
common. When he brought me home neithsFerr on of a


only ones rad that's the truth. Ilet him aslep on my mcuch
and the next morning we went to chu~rch together as it we
Sunday. This may sound crasy, but I'm tellng it like it is*
Jimmy is so wswet and clean and wonderful. X'v aevr
felt this way about anybody in my Ime and aelther has
Jimmy. We've pspnt every poselble moment together since
we met and tie's never laki a hand on mse and neither has
raybody esei. [This took a lot of self-ontrol as we aN
very much in low)!l Jimmy wants to marry amas oo mas m
poassble, but Abby, this all happsend a fast, I can't ballev

our friends say Jimmy and I shouki Itve together first
to find out if wem aresexualy compatible, but Abby, I haW
always wanted to sawe myaslf until atter marriage. Jamy 3
says it's up to me. Should I o rshouldn't If Pb.. *
honest. ~IN LOVE IN TAMPA
DEAR IN LVE: Compartbigaty is based ea leving,


earla14g,1 sharinasseihmes, and ma41tea consideraties
pan resperci se ia fromyar lenr, rd #sa fes sea Jammy
have M. Pee~lla as yee k-r w~b leh sare to in eem a
acaYLded4b gditn yes we@ uperleserc hem prearsl
sear weald damae yer seM~eespct. She yeaP'w wakd
this k~leg wat to eateh that goldes rlag. God1 blss you.


F OSHIEI'S 8 AY SOBOllT7

IS CELEBRATED HERE


a a so as~b I i

** 17
18
19

23
24






41


I




*YAPHET KATTO I

trhdadktrhls
17~ADMITTED. C
d by 8:15 will be sold~b~b' I




Last Day Tuesday I
5 Conti~nuou Sown s I

"CREATURES THE WORL I



Tony Bonnr I


"NOON SUNDAY" PG.

Mark Leonard
Linda Avery



TUESDAY I
Evening 8: 30-'Phone 3-4666 1


FRANC0 NERO
TONY MUISANTE M







US -




rring a
PAMELA JONES

A TURE A UDIENCES. g
RETIONADVISED.


barrels a day and supplied to
the mainland," he said.
i't is also within the realm
of probability that storage
facilities for crude oil could be
established in our Bahamas and
and the oil transshiipped to
pcocro odvhicher cannot

SIIS ESTS W nIII S

BE A1SSSCIATED

WITH THE E.E.C.
BRIDGETOWN, Barbados
(AP) Senior research advisor
to Barclays Bank International
Ltd. of London, Thomas
Soper said toda y
Commonwealth Caribbean
countries should seek some
type of association with .the
European Economic
Community.
His support for the idea was
stressed during a meeting with
the Chamber of Commerce and
the Manufacturers Association.
Soper said even if at the
start, the terms of association
were not suitable to all the
territories, there was the hope
and great possibility that once
involved in such an association

in lenceouo bring exeout the
desired changes
He pointed out the terms of
association came up for review
ever five yal sso tha th

c ircu mstances to be
considered.
Soper discussed the various
options facing Commonwealth
Caribbean territories, and said
it was desirable they present a
united or regional approach
since this was more likely to
impress the EEC commissions
in Bruseal that are highly
organize .

A M PT PRY


AIP TA
A RI



ILI ILIA
LI H IN

AN ERE
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOUWN


L __*. Y~S(1G


_ I


_ I I _


The Petition of JAMES O. HOLTON Junior and
'MARY ELLEN HOLTON both of St. Louis in the
State of Missouri one of the United States of
America in respect of.-
ALL that piece parcel or lot of land situate to
the West of Little Point on the Island of Little
Guan~a Cay one of the Abaco Cays in the
Bahama Islands said to com rise 0.726 acres
bounded NORTHWARDLY by land the
property of Mary Ellen Holton and running
thereon 421.60 feet more or less
EASTWARDLY and SOUTHEASTWARDLY
partly by the eastern edge of Nigh Creek partly
by land the property of the said Mary Ellen
Holton and partly by a Public Road and running
thereon jointly 163.30 feet more or less
SOUTHWARDLY by land formerly the
property of Lujim Limited and Judpete Limited
but now the property of the said James O.
Holton Junior and Mary Ellen Holton and
running thereon 346.50 feet and
WESTWARDLY by a Mangrove and Button
Wood Swamp and running thereon 44.85 feet
and which said piece parcel or lot of land is
coloured Pink on the plan thereof filed in this
matter in the Registry of the Supreme Court in
the City of Nassau in the Island of New
Providence.
JAMES O. HOLTON Junior and MARY ELLEN
HOLTON, the Petitioners in this matter, claim to
be the owners of the unincumbered fee simple
estate in possession of the said piece parcel or lot
of land and have made application to the Supreme
Court of the Bahama Islands under Section 3 of
The Quieting Titles Act to have their title to the
said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
COPIES of the said plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:
(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court in the
City of Nassau aforesaid'

(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Higgs & Kelly, 324
BayStretin h~eCit no Nassau aforesaid,
(c) The office of the Commissioner at Marsh
Harbour Abaco.
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before Tuesday the 3rd day of April, I973 file in
the Supreme Court in the City of Naossau aforesaid
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file' and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 3rd day of
April, 1973 will operate as a bar to such claim.

HIGGS & KELLY
Chabrs
Narssau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioners


aondry, Mras rs, im7.


those of island groups and (4)
fishery conservation and
pollution control.


WASHING;TON, March 2
(AP)- Prime Minister Lynden
O. Pindling said Friday that
development of the Bahamas as
a major oil refining and
trans-shipment point could
play an important part in
solving the U.S. energy
shortage problem.
"In the interests of
international cooperation and
understanding," Pindling said
in a speech at Htoward
University, "a free and
independent Bahamas would
be ready, willing and able to
help solve it, satisfying the
ecolo gis ts and the
environmentalists at the same
time."
Pindling, who received an
honorary doctor of laws degree
from Howard, said present
refinery capacity is 250,000
barrels a day in the Bahamas
and pln call for an expansion
He said that in recent
months the Bahamas has
reached agreement in principle
for the establishment of a deep
water oil transshipment
terman al intended to
accommodate ships of up to
300,000 tons and to serve the
North American market.
"Several oil companies have
made proposals to our
go vernm ent f or similar
facilities and it appears from
preliminary investigations
carried out that our Bahamas
might well become a major
centre for oil transshipment."
Pindling said.
He said a terminal could be
located within 100 miles from
the Atlantic seaboard.
Ilt is in the realm of
probability that Bahamian
refining capacity could be
expanded to over a million


tankers."
Pindling also suggested that
the possible emergence of two
new superpowers. China and
the enlarged European
economic community, might
make relocation of the United
Nations headquarters to a
non-super power country
advisable "in the interests of
peace and understanding."
"It is not my wish to start a
stampede," he said, "but it
does seem that one of the 700
islands of our Bahamas would
be an ideal location for any
future headquarters of the
United Nations organization
since it is blessed with


equitable climatic conditions
...pollution free national
beauty ... and a calm, stable
political atmosphere within
which to settle the world's
major problems."
He also said the Bahamas
will take special interest in the
law of the sea corifierpace to be
convened by the United
Nations this year and he named
four key questions to which he
said the Bahamas 14tould seek
to make a contribution: (1)
The extent of national
jurisdiction in the sea and on
the seabed; (2) the legal
requirement to govern the
seabed beyond national


jurisdiction (3) the right of
passage through straits and
other sea lanes, particularly


:- I

PHILIP J. MORTIMER








LOS ANGELES Philip L
aMbrir of Ifasseau is thillI
be achieved by the Bahamas on
July 10.
"There will be room," he
said, "for all Bahamians to join
in the exciting days of growth
in the years ahetid. And who
can appreciate our pride in our
forthcoming Independence
more than Americans who,
almost exactly two centuries
ago, fought for and won their
own Independence?"
Mortimer, 24, joined the
Ministry of Tourism in August,
1971, and was assigned to
Detroit, Michigan, to attend
the Bahamas Tourist Office


,Ar ,

.ti
tr a


training school conducted by
B.I.T.O. Regionald Manager
Adel Fahmy. He completed the
course in December of that
year and the following month
he moved to Los Angeles to
join the Los Angeles B.I.T.O.
sales force.
Richard Foreman, Regional
Manager, says, "With his
intelligence, his eagerness and
his drive, there's simply no
limit to Philip's future in
serving his people."
Mortimer is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ulric J. Mortimer, of
East Street, Nassau near Fort
Fincastle.kHis fa there is we retred

Winifred, is a house wife. There
ar sae ranrot erageliving i

Lester UIrhceyJr. Weso rnedd
Lowell. Of four sisters, three
live in Nassau (Ayres, Esther
and Joan). Sister Ann lives in
Daytona Beach, Florida.
Upon graduation from
Eastern Senior School, Nassau,
Philip went on to Government
High School, graduating in
1967. There he excelled in
volleyball at 1 soccer and as a
member of the gymnastics
team. In September of that
year, he went on to Dillard
University, New Orleans, where
he was graduated in 1971 with
a bachelor's degree in English
It was there that he met
Patricia Barrett, of Huntsville
Alabama. They were married in
April, 1972.
Mortimer's sales territory
includes all of San Fernando
V all Omage BeCo n '
Riverside and most of the
beach cities in Los Angeles
c h ndy bwee m hanhattan
In his daily duties Mr.
Mortimer calls on travel agents,
as well as those airlines and
steamship officials who serve
the Bahama Islands. And
"frequently he says, "I
participate in a filmed
presentation or seminar to
promote tourism to the
Bahamas.


CROSSWORD
PUfZ~LE
ACROtSS
27. Attractive
i.Hair intent 28. Earthen pot
sorceress 32 Cilr n's
12. White kite game
13. Strain -33. Pennsylvania's
14. Apartment nickname
dweller 35. Greek letter
15. English 36. Flirtatious
theologian 37.0triental porly
'""' "act Orchid meal
13 rt cle t5 Wrnns
-'E'" ',';',""g 46 lent


IN THE SUPREME COURT
OF THE BAHAMC~A ISLANDS
EQUITY SIDE.


1973
No. 2


NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT.


NOW SHOWING T
Matinee 3 &r 5, Evening 8:

I If yOU Steag

I frm the mob, i
g ~It'S SIL









ANTHONY QUIWNN

I i~"ACROSS 1

I NO ONE UNDER

Re"servatios no clame


IW o~n=igu firtcome fir
g "AITUO




Eveing 8:30 oo


JLS ames Coburn



Tuesday night.
'Phone 2-2534



I LAST DAY
M altinee continuous from 2,











I PL





lYAPHET KOTTO

SSUGGESTED FOR M
I~PARENVTAL DISC~


1. fencing

2. e iioado's


3


7


2 4
r


with skill

fec eason
Red wine
Foreign
Sou mdg group
Goddess of

Stole
Robust
Cl pigeon
Mormon State
Utah lily
el to th
consumers

gmoup
Candlenut tree
Preceded
Small
Eket*"


MEMBERS of the Eta Psi
Omir9 Psoro ity celebrated
Salturday, February 17 at the
home of Marylyn W. Grager.
The club is a branch of the
mother chapter of Alpha
.Kappa AIphadsorority,Hwhich

University, Washington, D.C.*
in 1908.
The members sorors Paula
Bain, Thelma McMillan, Shirley

:Gwe doy G ~dt, ind

SPlewi, Ltils~ c Cnod
Mllatny Zonicle also hosted
ea,guesrts Mrs. Beverly Taylor,
Vebronica Brown, Florence
Delany, laurel Tuckrsand
Celestine Cooper.


The celebrations included a
scat h ur as well ast a spec a

which guests were told about
th~e sorority which s
instrumental in the promotion
of ais ter hood and
congeniality" among its

The persons responsible for
establishing the society here
after chatrtering a chapter from
the university are Muriel

D ores SS it dade Dana
Donaldson,
A charter has also been
granted to the men of Kappa
Alpha Psi to form a fraternity
of the society here, it is
. andesntood.


, .
ie


3-7 144 Shrew


For see 34 do.


ACP Masteauwres


1$ Wrtb nt.


PM Believes Bahamas could help solve US energy problem




I '


itc, nassau Beach captain


promoted Isst. Maitre d'


_ _


and the United States.
Kennedy arrived on Sunday.
Th %ilninews apers speclase that
propose a new quota on textile
exports to America.
MEXICAN ARTIST DIES
MEXICO CITY (AP) Mexican
Artist Horacio Renteria O)chlu...Dst
known for his patinting~s of Mexican
girls in 18th century dress, died
Saturday at the age of 63.

oytr s ro ndd 'ha 1e
Identity.
Renteria Ochos s death was
attributed to a kidney deficiency.
He is survived by 12 cAilren.


NO LONELY THOUGHTS
PALERMO, SICILY (AP) -
Unis (rtG (fthrbo Allfredo SAnello
75 year old widower from Palermo,
Sicily plans to marry again. Italian
newspapers reported Sunday that
Anello's intended is 15-year-old
Maria Murotta. "I don't want to live
alone," Anrello was quoted as
saying.
DIRECTORS' AWARDS
H~rcotrs3 0 P~ido Aeni a son
7rni ( >du b ppol ,p ffr h
the G~uild's award for best direction
of 1972.
Hie received the award Saturday
night at the G~uld s 25th annual
banquet. Lamont Johnson won the
guild's award for best television
direction Soum teryear for "That
G~riffith Award for outstanding
direction went to Wililam Wellman.
director of "Wings." "A Star is
sorn,ao "Nothn Saci e, t d
"Battleground."'
GOOD LUCK SIGN
KAMPALA, UGANDA (AP) -
"A spectacular object, covered with
smething liket rma, Sd roped
then took off agah1 sevrarl minutes
' 'dr, Radio ft(gand msaids son
minutes, the object was seen lifting
off like a rocket being fired but

lein d3 arin" the rdio s id
the tall of a big snake."
Among those who saw the
object, the! radio said, was President
Idi Amin. He told Ugandans it we
"a sign of good luck" and urged
anyone who had seen It to go and
pray .
SOME CYCLE CLIMB
NAIROBI (AP) New Zealander
Bill G;arls left here Monday for


INTERNATIONAL AIR BAHAMA
invites applicants for the position of
GROUND HOSTESS.

Qualifications include 2 years airline:
experience and knowledge of German and
French.

Application forms available at the office in
Beaumont House, Bay Street.


INTERNATIONAL AIR BAHAMA
3 Beaumont House
Ba Street


I - -~ ~L_51


Monday, March 5, 1973.


i~ r










CAPTAIN AT NASSAU BEACH PROMOTED Rudolph Farrington (centre)
recently promoted to assistant mitre d' hotel at the Nassu Beach Hotel, is congratulat d
on his promotion by the Food & Beverage Director Guisappe Marcon (right) and Bill
Butler, Maitre d'*


RUDO LPH Fa rrington,
captain in the Lamplighter
Dining Room at the Nassau
Beach Hotel, has recently been
promoted to assistant maitre d'
hotel at the hotel and is to
supervise the popular
indoor-outdoor dining area.
"Pineapple Place."
Entering the hotel industry
as soon as he left the Eastern
Senior School in Nassau,
Rudolph F~arrington
commented that he had no
doubts in his mind, even at this
early age, that the service
world was the career he wanted
to follow. He started work at
the former Bahamas Country
Club at sixteen as a bus boy
and soon acquired enough
knowledge and training to look
out for a better position. ie
found this at the Nassau Beach,
where he has worked ever
since.
Enthusiastic about his
career, he spent as much of his
time as possible attending
on-the-job-training courses and
studying the technical side of
hotel operations. This enabled


him to gain promotions and to
accept the responsibility of a
more demanding position.
Rudolph Farrington is also
closely involved with the hotel
cuisine and takes great pleasure
in preparing special recipes
from a chafing-dish for guests
at their table. These include
such flamnbe delights as crepe
suzettes. cherries jubilee, and
also individually prepared
dishes such as Caesar salad and
Irish coffee.
MZarried to the former Rosile
G;reetnslade,. and father of five
childlren. C'hristine. 13, George
F~arrington. I1. Chance, 9,
C'larise., 7, and Felony, S.
Rudolph Farrington and his
family reside in Yellow Elder
Ga3rd~ns.
P rseted with the challrenenge
of organizing Pineapple Place,
Mr. F~arrington said he looks
forward to these duties and
hoped that as well as having a
reputation ap an attractive spot
for luncheon this area would
soon be even better known for
prompt efficient service.


4.aa~~~~~~aaaaaa~~~~~ "';-r.-"~~~r ~:.;q ~ _r;~AL~~~R C~~

Management seminar for Star Insurance
DISTRICT AND STAFF MANAGERS attended a three-day seminar recently at the
company's Star Plaza headquarters, conducted by Shervin W. Thompson, assistant general
manager. Subjets covered included budgeting, manpower, accounting, underwriting and
data processing. Lecturers were the department heads of Star's supporting services. Mr.
Thompson is shown opening the seminar. Also shown are (front row, 1. to. r.) J. A.
Carey, R. C. Barnett, J. M. Pinder and J. E. Culmer; (second row) L. L. Westherford, J. R.
Weech, U. J. Cartwright, S. O. Evans and R. L. Bartlett; (third row) A. L. Cartwright,
Millard Bethel, A. R. Pratt, Edward Hanschell, P. T. Sweeting and T. W. Davis; (back row)
n H nrrvinea


Tanzania where he hopes to cJimb
Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest
moun ain, on motor bicycle. te
19.340-foot Uhuru Peak riding aill
the way.
Three years ago, he reached 18,
000 feet in a similar attempt. He
claims if he reaches the summit he
winl set a arw world record.al hs
climbed to nearly 13,000 feet on
his Czechoslovak made machine.
TAIPEI TRADE TALKS s.

ambassador -at-Isrge David M.
Kennedy is in Talpel for talks with
government officials and business
leaders on trade between Talwan


captain.
Messrrs. Hamilton, Carter and
Hope joined the hotel in March
1972, as waiters, and Mr.
Cooper started in November
1971, also as a waiter. He was
later promoted to captain and
to his most recent position of


head captain.

Mr. Rudol h Cl eare, mitre
d' hotel, is pictured centre.
Seen from left to right are Mr.
Hamilton, Mr. Cooper, Mr.
Clearre, Mr. Carter and Mr.
Bop


LOEWS PARADISE Island
Hotel and Villas have
appointed Mr. Eddie Hamilton,
Mr. Benson Carter and Mr.
Walter Hope captains in the
Imperial Dining Room and
Terrace. Mr. Reuben Cooper
has been prpmotedt to head


Ne w or gan at St. Joh n's
ST JOHN'S BAPTIST CHURCH, Meeting Street, Friday
nih uce brae dIt 138t hanni ersaary wthi secial se vc
Educational Convention-
A number of other denominations took part in the
selv ice,
St. John's recently acquired a $26,000 organ, one of the
few on the island.
The pastor of the church is the Rev. O. A. Pratt, B.D.
Photo shows the new organ. Seated from left are: Rev.
Theadore Darling, Mount Mariah Baptist Church; The Rev.
Harriet McDonald, Transfiguration Baptist Church and the
Rev. Dr. H. W. Brown, Bethel Baptist Church.

R L8 US 8LI WI nW & RILLU In H 8 ULI
1951 and was naturalized in 1957,
LA PAZ, BOLIVIA (AP)--Klaus "may be Biarbie."
Altmann, the German-born Bohytian Barbie was tried In absentia and
citizen sought by France for war sentenced to death by a French
enimes, remained in the La Paz military court following the war on
aptnt pos ibiit of imdhnte i h c rat h tf hre ah rsnistanc hr
release. Jean Moulin and for sending Jewish
Altmann, accused by France of children to concentration camps.
being Klaus Barbie, World War II Altmann has admitted serymg a
Csapo chief in L on, wasd ijied an 'SS' captain in charge of a
Fiay o re o itc special anti-guerrilla command mn
proeuo aGMtdon codemm bs Lyon during the war, but has
question ng, cehad5 rason to Lies he tT h ss adited us
Altmnann, who came to Bolivia in wartime pseudonyms.


JAMAICAN PM'S WIFE
IN TRINIDAD CARNIVAL
PORT OF; SPAIN, TRINIDAD -
(AP)--Beverley Mantey wfe of
Jamaica's Pnime Mini ter w ichael
Mianley, will play an active part
Monday when the annual two day
Trinidad Carnival explodes in a riot
of colour and steelband music.
Sporting a multicoloured bikini
featuring a halter top and matching
sarong skirt, Mrs. Manley had her
own preliminaries Saturday on
scenic Maracas Beach I5 miles
northeast of Port of Spain. As she
jumped to the calypso hit tune
'Soul Chic', Beverley told newsmen
she will jump carnival Monday in
the "Constellation of the Stars"
section of Wayne Berkeleys
presentation "Secrets of the Sky".
Playing in same band will be
Erica Williams, vivacious daughter
of Trinidad and Tobargo Prime
Minister Doctor Eric Williams.
Mrs. Manley, who is the guest of
WIr cams adidhils daugtr o d


Trinidad for the carnilval I knew I
could not be a spectator. I simple
had to play."
AIR CANADA MAN
RAPPED IN BARBADOS
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOs
(AP)-Barbados Hotel Association
president, Shephen Edwards, has
reacted with complete disapproval
,o F'riday's statement by Air
Callada's new manager here,
Kenneth Esselmont, that unless
local hotels lowered their rates they
would price themselves out of
competition within five years.
Defending the rates charged by
local hotels, Edwards said Air
Canada's official publication "Sun
living Vacation Planner" had
approved 47 local hotels as "places
where you get your money's
worth".
Edwards said Saturday his
association had for years been
pressing Air Canada for lower fars,
Ch bih ncos of air travels t h


intorduction of tours and charters
which prospered mainly became
the scheduled fares exceeded the
charter rates by $100.
ARI AND JACKIE AT
PALM BEACH PORT
PALM BEACH, FLA. (AP)-The
yacht basin in this millionaires'
playground was a Ilttle bit more
crowded on Sunday. Art and Jackie
Onassis have arrived aboard the
Christina for a stay of several days,
a spokesman for the Greek shipping
tycoon said*
Onassis and his wife, widow of
President John F. Kennedy, arrived
Saturday night from Haiti for a visit
with Mrs. Rose Kennedy who has a
winter home here*
Onassis' spokesman, said the
couple will fly to New York after
the visit with the late President's
mother. Official, said tha arrival of
the Christina caused a huge traffic
jam at the port of Palm Beach a
oorit be o latch a glimpse of


9nADERS BAIY asa TRUS L 11 M TE


(IN COMPULSOR Y LlIQUIDA TION)


Will the following persons kindly contact the Liquidator, Second Floor,Bernard
Sunley Building, P. O. Box 1491, Telephone 2-1976, in connection with claims
which they may have against the company.


Ganito, Garfield L.
Gardiner, Wellington V.
Gibson, Herman
Gordon, Hubert
Gmreeslade, Earl

Hall, Peter A.
Hanna B.V.
Haven, Richard A.
Hickel, Han~s
Higgs Alfred &/or Dorothy

Johnson, Eula Mae
Johnson, Jack, W.
Johnson, Leonrd
Joes, Maud

Kelly, Robert S.
Kemp, Judty
Knowles, Carolyn
Knowl~es, Susan

Lewis, Esrum
Lighthourne, Gerald
Lightbourne, Thalbot
Lightbourne, Waliter
Lunn, Arthur
McBride, Venrna
McClure, Kingsley J.
Mendez, L. A. Avis
Miaoulisr, Emmanuel
Mllier, Katherine

Neely, Buster
Newbold, Eugen
Newbold, ~Laurie
Newbold,Simeon
Nicholas, Henry W.


Palmer, Daniel
Patton, Sidney
Paul, Edward E.
Payne, Maxine R.
Pinder, James

Ramsrey, Verna
Roker, Georgee
Roker, Nalthaniel
Rolle, Bursell
Rolle. Hastings

Seymour, Idell
Seymour, Samuel
Simpson, Elsworth
Smith, Lewis
Spence, Ralph W.


Taylor, Charles
Thompson, Ethel
Thbomponr, Roland L.
Turnquest, Olive
Tynes, Bruce

Wallce, Rupert &r Mena
Ward, James
Watson, Rhendella
White, Edward &r/or Anna
Whyms, James
Whyms, Saueld
Wilkinson, Vemron Rt.
W~ilams, Cynthia L.
Williuam, George Chin
Wilmott, Betty
Wilson, Danriel
Wilson, Howard
Wkvell, Dorothy


Adderley, Esther
Adderley, Israel
Adderley, Mervin &/or Merline
Anderson, Jennie Marie
Anderson, Sarah

Bow~e, Garet P.
BoWe, Henry A.
Bowe, Muriel
Brooks, Ethel
Bullard, Darlington

Carey, Suzanna Marie
Cartwright, Norris
Coerbell, Nello
Clarke, E. J. &/or A.V. Clarke
Clarke, Paul

D~ahl, George
Davis, Raleigh
Deleveaux, Conville B.
Deroscar, Charley
Duncanson, Porter

Edgecombe, Leon
IEdgecombe, Pearline
Eldon, Henry A.P.
Elliott, Sandra
Eighth Bahamas Senior Troop
Evans, Bartella
Edwards, Carl

Fawkes, Jennifer
Ferguson, Julie
Forbes, James
Fowler, Samuel
Fox, Urick


Will any other person (depositor, shareholder or other c
that he has a valid claim against the company which has not
by me as liquidator also contact me at the above address.


editor) who consider~ 6


I


I i


SDhe Gr thute


ii't i~dwm~
P.O. Box 4887, 3 Beaumont House
Bay Street, Nasauu Bahams


Promotions at Loe ws Hote I


been formally admqti~


SYDNEY Mbl ,





elmlie aAs h ob, de~c



Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p~m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


_


---~--- I


'


'


I


1 ~a c


C9036
SPANISH GRANGE,
BERMUDA


C9048
URGENTLY REQUIRED
Bookkeeper with four years
experience up to trial balance
and balance sheets, to work for
Iarge insurance firm. Only
persons meeting above
requirements need apply-
Contact: Mr. J. Knowles*
telephone 2-2465 for
appointment.
C9010
I HAIRSTYLIST -- Male o
Fema le or
1Manst ar 3 to 5 ye r

tueiec .nall phaseya o

Beau y Sato Chaatott SrSee2
Phone 24222 or write P. O
Box 5166, Nassau.
C9061
HEAD BUTCH-ER
Dut es would include the
complete supervision of the
meat department in the
warehouse. Must be
knowledgeable in all aspects of
running a butcher shop and
must have knowledge of all
types of meats, fish and
poultry. Must be able to trim

preoad the dsrdkic s bo
responsible for all meats, etc.
in the butcher shop.
Only Bahamians with
experience in this field need
apply. Salary will
be commensurate with

Axppl einn own handwritina to
Adv. C9061, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.



C8963
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-8213, or 5-1772
WORLD OF MUSIC, Dewgard
Plaza.


C9058
BLAIR ESTATES
1. 2 bedroom, bath
apartment furnishe bth

apartment furnished. Phone.
Night 32589. Day 22580.
C9072
FOUND IT!
Large new unfurnished 2 or
3 bedroom house on Charlotte
Ridge West of Boyd
Subdivision. Phone 21170.
Evenings 42148

FOR SAILE
C9031
TOTALLY reconditioned
B.S.A. 650 lightning twin carb.
S$800. Telephone 27692 ask
for John.

C9056
1 CONVERTIBLE couch
1 Fender amplifier and speaker
1 2501b. trunk food freezer.
Call 77947.
C9007
2 WILLOW bar stools
1 Georgian Tole Lamp
1 pai Geodgian Tol acm mic

1 nest of three teak wood
tables
3 large Nassau paintings framed
6 medium Nassau Paintings
framed
4 small Nassau paintings

framoead pictures framed
Telephone 22278 for
appointment to view.



C8999
MGB, new July 1971, white
with black hard top,
convertible hood and radio.
Immaculate condition, only
12,000 miles. Phone 2-1023


f CNeEhRousEAVING. 1968
Austin 1100. Inspection
passed Ex cellent

4246 water 6 o e ken one


C9009
OUT ISLAND RESORT has

R sdet. Eorgin ee. S ccssfog
candidate will be responsible
for the following areas:.
1. Management of utility
company

maintenonsto ese ange pl ntd
3 upevs ga~raeneand heavy

Resorutperd maiel pme t
facilities
5. Preparing all engineering and
designs for new installations
etc.
6. Coordinating activities of
Warehouse and purchasing
departments.
Candidate, should have
Technical and Engineering
training yard espheu ceave at

Attractive salary and benefits
offered. Send resume to:- P. O
Box N3229, Nassau, Bahamas.

R0dl RED one experienced
Greenskeeper preferably 3-5
years experience to live on
family island. Please submit
resume with qualifications to
P. O. Box N-7782, Nassau or
telephone 24596.
C9029
REQUIRED one landscape
architect for resort
development landscaping all
surrounding areas of hotel,
construct nursery for further
landscaping designs, consultant
with Golf Course Greenskeeper
on landscape improvements
and assist in training. Send
resume to P. O. Box N7782'
Nassau, Bahamas.


JO s TSEt: r xpeld t

High school graduate or
equivalent
MINIMUM Experience: 2-3

QUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Reviews stores requisition for
correctness; posts requisitions
to Kardex cards; calculate
value; posts charges to spread
sheet by cost center and work
costs and expensee code; pulls
order card when quantity on
hand is equal to or below
re-order point.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
DeOaNrTmAnC Da Pe r on n l
Com an, P. O. Box F-100
Fre p rt Grand Bahama *


C9018
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
wanted. Island leading
publishing house looking for
best secretaries in Bahamas.
Publishing is challenging and
exciting. Please apply only if
you are seasoned person,
ETIENNE DUPUCH JR.
PUBLICATIONS Telephone
CT-5666, 3-5667 or 3-5668.

UeqTiReA Modern Dental Clinic
(1) Receptionist Typist
(1) Dental Assistant
Excellent salary. ideal working
conditions. Experience
considered but not essential.
Apply in writing to "'Dental
Clinic," P. O. Box N3750,
Nassau.

INTERNATIONAL CREDIT
BANK seek accounts officer
for their Freeport branch. Must
be up to RSA intermediate

uxeinc ing hdandplin
knowledge of general office
routine and procedure. Typing
essential. Reply own
handwriting: Box N4802,
Nassau.
C9064
CHARTERED and certified
accountants are sought for
positions with the Nassau and
Freeport offices of Price
Waterhouse & Co. Handwritten
applications in the first
instance, please to P. O. Box
N-3910, Nassau.
C9062
WAREHOUSE MANAGER
Successful applicant should
have knowledge of groceries,
meats and liquor. He will be

ornn el merndirn entrre?. a
part ngbthe wareehouse.folw

carded system of control. Must

s bor inae ok rs ea thyee;
In the warehouse. Only
Bahamians with experience in
this field need apply. Salary
will be commensurate with

exppl reeprown handwriting t
Adv. C9062, c/o The Trib neo
P. O. Box N-3207, N au
C9063
POSITION OPEN for
'Wtork ing F or eman
Elcrician" at lamon
Crystal Salt Company, Solar
Salt Operation at Long Island,
Bahamas. Applicant must be
Bahamian, having the following
qualifications:
MUST:.
1. Be capable of installing and
maintain ing aerial and
underground transmission lines
including high voltage.
2. Be qualified in diesel
powered generator equipment,
electrical control panels, its
installation and maintenance.
Alo power di tr ution and

winding. ngmor
3.Haye a minimum of ten
ya eprienc in install ng
mai ta 1n an eo eratin itnge
electrical section pof a lar e
idustrial plant ge
4.Have full knowledge of
installation and operation of
electrically operated conveyor
and pumping systems and
mnterlocks. .
5. Be capable of instalf ing,
overhauling and operating
electrically powered pumps,
one two and three deck
vibrating screens and slingers.
6. Have full knowledge and be
cn alan enof operaeltricg I
powered and controlled water

mainain a Soay ad o
gauge test equipment.


pipBefitting exerviece to
maintain houes shop riand


plant area.
10. Be able to maintain and
operate an, Inter-departmental
telephone eand radio system.

mai a n cn ra
air-conditioning units in 5
building and 7 room
air-conditioning units.


12. Maintain Mercury Vapor
Lam~s used i: outdoornikah i g

anchorage buoys*
Salary commensurate with
app icatisons to AiDiamm d


Carene ToS t Long s ad
preliminary interviews int
Nssau 14th and 15th March


C8947

asI CJ&I

Macke Street
& Roseve t Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING,
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHAN ICAL HAN DLI NG
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING



CONTACTRLYMAMCNCPA ER

POE -795, 2-3796,
P203N7 7, -33798
Airport 77434
C8104
YOU'RE IN A HEAP-O-
TROUBLE IF YOU DON'T
CALL ABCO FOR ALL
YOUR CLEANING
PROBLEMS - TEL:
51071-2-3-4.
C8941
PATIO AWN WINGS AND

T GR OTS A AWSPNGS,

For free estimates and
prompt service call 2-8421.

C9043
YOU CAN HAVE your
swimming poot vacuumed,
ties cleaned, he micals and
fiter system chce properly
for as little as $8 or have done
monthly for a very low price.
Please call 23110 or write to P.
O. Box N8830 ask for Luther
Cartwright. You will get
immediate service.


C8943



Day call 2-2152. Evenin s
5-4926
C8942
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
o2rn pesr ronth.eCall Che ter
2-777-8.

C8939
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

LR SHOP for ret, 3000

Ceun evilifeetCant ~e Tse ac
stor d carhou Ha sde
entrence. ward ou2 173al sor


EXTRA LARGE
UNFURNISHED 2 BEDROOM

DOWDAESATLMLENSTREET.
$175 PER MONTH*
CONTACT ROSS BINDER
TELEPHONE 2-4492 3
AND 4.
C8985
? BEDROOM 2 bath house
completely furnished -
Baraboo Town. Phone 34181.
C9041
1 LARGE SHOP and 1-2
bedroom apartment on Soldier
Road opposite Technical
Training College.
2 Efficiency apartments on
Wulff Road opposite Bahamian
Lumber. Phone 4-2981.
C9040
LARGE SHOP and warehouse
on Wulff Road below Mackey
Street. Suitnadblemfor furniture
Food store or Dry Goods. Call
21031 -- 52483 ask for
Douglas Carey.


B


I


C8965
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1970 Ford Escort
Blue Std. 4 Dr. $1100
1971 Vauxhall Viva
2 Dr. Radio185
Auto. Ble $ 89
1970 Viva Auto Green $1200
1970 Ford LTD A/C
Beige Vinyl $2995
1973 Pontiac Hatchback
A/C 2400 miles Blue $4950
1972 Viva S/W
Automatic White $2600
1972 Pontiac Ventura
Vinyl Top 6 cyl. $3950
1970 Morris 1100 Series
White Auto. 4 Dr. $995
1970 Chevelle 2 Dr.
Auto. Green A/C $3400
1971 Ford Escort 4 Dr.
Automatic Beige $1695
1971 Vauxhall Victor 4 Dr.
S/W Auto. Green $1895
1972 Pontiac Ventura
4 Dr. Auto. Radio
Orange $3950
1969 Camaro, Orange.
Automatic $1500
170AR verWhite $40
1969 Humber Sceptre
Automatic $1200
1970 Plymouth 'Cuda
A/C Red/Black Vinyl $3200
1969 Chrysler Imperial
A/C Auto. $3500
1968 Cougar A/C
14,000 miles only $1600
Trade-ins welcomed
Opocate Oes Fil
Telephone 34636-7-8

C5 ROLLS ROYCE $8000
or nearest offer. Phone 7-4295.





m e2 betwoon s ad 5cor
54516 antime


MARINE SUPPLIES

4AEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


CL A


FOR SAILE
C7196
1968 Chris Craft 32' Sea
Skiff, twin 327 cu. in. Chevys'
marine head, sleeps 4, very well
kept and fully maintained, fly
bridge, fitted, $9,500 or
nearest offer.
Phone 352-2000 or 373-2446.
Box F-737, Freeport.

C 97 17' 6" Ski boat, all
fiber Ilss correct craft, 210
hp. For V8 interceptor
fresh water cooked, com0 e e
with road trailer, $2,10 or
offer.
Phone 352-2000 or 373-2446.
Box F-737, Freeport.

IIELP WANTED
C7194
MANAGER To manage and
operate Photographic and
Electronic Studio and Store.
Must have minimum four years
in commercial and studio
photography and darkroom
work. Knowledge of buying
and selling photographic and
electronic equipment.
Apply in writing by 8th March
to LUNDOR LTD., Box F-156.
C7202
(1) FOREMAN PAINTER/
WALLPAPER HANGER: Must
be able to supervise own crew.
should have knowledge of
mixing paint colours, able to
hang vinyl paintings.
knowledge of decorating hotel
and back-up facilities, 5-10
years experience in painting

()d MID po sevcnd clean
guest rooms, must be willing to

1onn or ee80ng gs ft, or a
and set tables, bring in dishes




Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a~m. and 12
Noon only, to King's inn &
Golf Club: Personnel
Department, Freeport.


ER1ETAEY: Must be able tE
handle all legal and insurance
correspondence as well as
acc ou nts receivable
correspondence Will be

requiredb o taesotr an a

correspondence on her own.
(1) COCKTAIL WAITRESS:
Mr s. ha so knowle ae o


aAepl r nda through Frid y
Noon only, to King's Inn &

G partme ,ubFreepo rsone


C7203
JOB TITLE: Burnerman
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good educational background
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPON IBILI ESS

clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT : Pe rsonnel
Department, Bahamna Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand RarhamaT


C8978
WANTED MEN OR WOMEN
Representative to sell approved
for Foreign Student courses in
Upholstery. Send resume for
details to:
Fitzgibbons School of
Upholstery and Interior
Design, 11363 Bird Road,
Miami, Florida, U.S.A.
C9016
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND
AD VERTISING S AL ES
STAFF wanted by leading
publishing house.
ETIENNE DUPUCH JR.
PUBLICATIONS Telephone
, 3-5666, 3-5667 or 3-5668.

H RD WORKING SALES
MANAGER WANTED. Hours
1 p.m. until 9 p.m. Good salary
plus commission. Apply -
Owner, Fox Brothers
Furniture, Dowdeswell Street.
C7203
JOB TITLE: Burnerman
MINIMUM EDUCATION*
Good educational background*
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5

DUTIES/RESPONSIBI LITIES*

cik bngK cnstinuoous produe
INTERESTED APPLICANT


COmay A O. B F10


In loving memory of our dear
mother Edith Maude Minns
Lovell, who passed on March
4th 1969.
The golden evening brightens
in the nest.
Soon, soon, to faithful warrior
took her rest.
Sweet was her calm of Paradise
the blest.
Left to mourn: Daughter Mrs.
Dorothy Ann Wilson, son John
Lovell, six grandchildren and
many relatives and friends.


S CHOOL )
C9004
''K NO W -WE LL '
COMMERCIAL INSTITUTE -
Vacancies exist R.S.A.
Typewriting 1, 2 and 3
Tuesday and Thursdays 6:30
a-8*00 plm.3Co~m ecing 1th
Supermarket, 1st. Street
Coconut Grove. Telephone
55240.

POSITION WANTED
C9025
YOUNG COUPLE seeks
position as caretaker with
accommodations in arb enc o

supplied. Phone 3-4169 after 6


.mHELP WA NYTED


tLU VSA u LH

apprentices males or females
Call for an appointment.
Telephone 77048.
C8952
HELP WANTED


isln SIM en CAompny
Limited, P. O. Box 5140*
Nassau, Bahamas, is seeking a
qualified Bahamian for Master
of the M/V islandd Cement" a
100 DW Bulk Ocea Ves


to education and professional
expe ience, possessing a British

rMeacrizedCert i fctealstr

Appliat n o pleae apple ent
giving a full resume of


360 sq. ft. -- $180 per month
o75nts. ft. $ 400.00 per
AIRCONDITIONING INCLUDE
ED.
OFFICE & STORE SPACE:
Out Island Traders Ltd.
Shopping Centre, opposite the
Potters Cay docks. An ideal
Location is available for a
take-out restaurant equipment
already installed. Only
83833 pe ronoh Stor rand

little as $277.00 per month.

A OTRN~ SO ED

OFFICE SPACE OAKES




BASICALLY FURNISHED*
$ 265.00 and $2 30.00
respectively per month.
Airconditioning and swimming
pool.

eOBET LTD.,B2E 7. Br

C8960
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE
World-famous postal

Scott C etandS)
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examina-
tins lim d etisof oi

CARFEEER toTh RapiR
Results Coliege Dept. TNI


I I


I _


I


I


Monday, March 5, 1973.


SREAL ESTATE


I I


I I


f I


I I


SC9003
MUST SELL. Make an offer;
Lot approximately 92' x 110
Blair Estates, zoned f or private
dwelling or duplex. Phone
4-3026.

C8917
BEST SALES OR RENTALS
in Real Estate are through,
FOX5& SON6S1 Tel. 28012 -
319, B 60, Nassau.

FOR RENT
C8938
ONE EXTRA large two
bedroom two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living

ntsihe V ctoria rh' t

Aenuebe twe lhi hleyhoannd
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 5463)
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C9005
APA RTM ENTS located at
corner of Collins Avenue and
6th Terrace. Airconditioned
and furnished. Rental: $175
pnerormant al Ferlfu other
Day 24264 --Night 31143


C8959
IN TOWN furnished
Efficiency apartment,
town property f or sale.
2-2555.


rooms,
also
Phone


C9039
2 0 FT SEACRAFT
OVERNIGHTER WITH 140
H.P. MERCRUISER MOTOR
SSLEEPS 2. FULLY
EQUIPPED SHIP-TO-SHORE
RADIO, SINK, STOVE, HEAD
EXTRAS. 2V2 YEARS OLD.
COST $8,500. A BARGAIN
FOR $3,700. TELEPHONE
3-1 554.



C9020
NOTICE is hereby given that
Dimerci Louis, alias Adley
Veus, of Coconut Grove
Avenue, is hereby applying to
the Go vern or f or

natrlzatin, and oha a

wittgr ana s ould st emena
of the facts to the Deputy
Governor, Government House,
Nassau, Bahamas.

LOST
C9051
REWARD OFFERED for
reuco ery one blue, an cdne
Removed Thursday evening,
Stapiedon Gardens. Phone
36650.

FOUND
C9068
WRIST WATCH -- at Catholic
Diocesan Bazaar held on
February 24, 1973. Owner
please call 2-8919.

ANNROUNCEMENTS
C9050
GRAND OPENING
MOTHER MARION FRIED
CHICKEN
Servearound Buildings
Blue Hill Road
For all your early or late
snacks we're open 6 to 10.
Sunday from 2 to 10.
Buck Archer, Manager.



C9065I EOIM


C9006
SMALL DOWNTOWN hotes
has position available for
resident Manager/Manageress
Requires ability to deal with
public and supervise staff.
Good references required
Apply in writing to: Adv.
C9006, c/o The Tribune, P. O.
Box N-3207, Nassau.


C9060
ACCOUNTANT required for
Cayman Trust Company
Applicant must have
experience of Trust Company
accounting systems. Reply in
writing, giving telephone
number to: Adv. C-9060, /o
The Tribune, P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau.


C9045
HANDYMAN to weed. Phone
S-3928 or 5-4258.


IOne of Bermuda s most
s, ati e red substanti l

cut ad with fudnta r eanod
over-looking a bird sanctuary
and the island's beautiful
South Sheore.hSitfuateadron five

landscaped gardens with a
citrudedorcha an and Enatural
thoedpar ln. Entrance
hal wit winding cedar
staircase. Seven bedrooms. Six
b throomj. i geb nirgD nom

room, breakfast, recreation and
utility rooms. Maid's quarters.
Central heating and

a eonitooig frBrerraces.

P. O. Box 934, Hamilton'
Bermuda Telephone: 2-0846.
C9037
LOT FOR SALE IN HIGH I
VISTA. $7,000.00. 50% down.
Bala eTES2000 ~pe emo 3hl
day --Night 41584.
C8918
DON'T LOSE YOUR LOT OR
HOME, because you can't meet
the payments Call FOX &
SONS REAL ESTATE Tel.
28012 31295 evenings
Box 6104, Nassau.

C8930
2 LARGE LOTS 20.000 sa. ft

eaa iro t los abr ez

$5000.00.
Well situated Hilltop Lot

M10 00.0 A c~hoc corn re l
Highvista Estate Price,
$6000.00
Choice lots Dannotage
Subdivision Soldier Rd. from
$6250.00 Choice elevation
with excellent view.
For information call Bills Real
Estate 23921

C9054
LAKEFRONT LOTS AT
YAMACRA W 8 EACH
ESTATES. Price from $7500.
5100 deposit. $103 month. No
interest. From 70 x 100. Tel:
2-3027 or 2-4148 Morley &
O'Brien Real Estate

C9035
FOR SALE
SPLIT LEVEL hos Sila
Big enough for tw fS liea.
Furnished-only $37,500.00
2 UNIT HOUSE ha icm
that isetabli asdMincome
Heigh es Neatsh cleanoantau
.sat ous.. Reuced to

HAVE HOUSE
approximately 4000 sq. ft.
priced way below reproduction
costs. 2-car garage - enclosed
SWIMMING POOL. Bar-b-que
pit under cover. Ideal for
extremely large family for
good livingdinchhe tropics. Near

Price wanl sur rise you.c Pea e
inquire
OUT WEST 2 Storey in
elegant taste. Facing Sea-r ghts
to Sandy Beach. Ideal for
yachtmans family-golfing
swimming, shopping nearby.
No problems. Priced below
reproduction costs. By
VSoitmM RINA houses
enclosed with well cultivated
r Hnd A- a ee anytimefrm

NASSAU EAST houses from


ainshstebs. Ou

22305, 22307 Nite 41197
C8937

S HI

AONRDOORERUERFNFEIE E

FOX( MOS.

FURIlTURIE OUTLIET

( WRSLELAS O
DEVEAUX ST.)
P.O. BOX 8104E.S.

TEL 200


OF


IHMSIFIED

HIELP WANTED
C719
ASSISTANT FRONT/OFFICE
MANAGER: To train and
supervise Front Desk Staff.
Fully conversant with
reservations and Front Desk
procedures Must be able to
operate N.C.R. 4200 and type.
At least two years Front Desk
experience required, also Police
Certificate.
HEAD WASHMAN: Receiving
and sorting soiled linen.
Supervise loading operations of
washing and drying machines.
Must be able to adjust and
make minor repairs to
machines when necessary.
References from previous
employer required.
INS PE CTRESSES-L INEN
ROOM ATTENDANT &
MAIDS: At least three years
previous experience necessary.
APPLY: Oceanus H~otels Ltd.,
Personnel Dept. Royal Palm
Way, or P. O. Box F-531,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C9023
$9125.00
Minor. Phone
p.m.


1960 Morris
41066 after 5


C9049
OFFICE
Building,
Bay.
120 sq.
month.
270 sq.
month


SPACE: Roberts
East Street just of f

ft. -- $90.00 per

ft. -- $135.00 per


C7204

A pi cdnt isE NGirt yE nRcharge
of an operating crew and


sp ounnso t el atr c poo3r
Individual must be fully



povressureit power plantfo

several yeas or n stem shriog s


of comparable operating
conditions. Individual reports
directly to Superintendent or
Assa Sup rnte dentpo

experience in Purchasing and
Accounting, with the ability to
supervise clerical staff
employed in the preparation of


eucorhds a file petinn
thereto. Individual will be
required to supervise the
pearatro rets statistical

ADepartment,toGranderschnn
PotAu hoi orLimited if O

Buhiding, Freeport, Grand


C9052
AQUINAS COLLEGE
P. O. Box N*7540
Telephone: 2*8934
There are vacancies in the
flowingg departments for the


please call the above telephone
number or make an
appointment with Mr. Andrew
R. Curry, Principal, at Aquinas

Cef reethe deaadlie o Aptri 1

Vacancies in the following
departments:
S nisohn
M thmatics


Home Economics
mBolkei g ping, nd


C8720
FOR SALE OR CHARTER
12ft. x 02 Lt 4ft. d aeft s*3 l


crane. Up to date load line
with 2 cargo hatches, one 14ft.
42f24ft andb te obthetrol4ft.n x

Contc: Sands Construction &
Shipping, Marsh Harbour, Box


r _~_:=;~;~-T~~~ir~i*?_rr_:-*.~-~;i~"" -.~Y1_L"_.-.' I.l-~(i~i43htilll~**~i*lfC~~-il Ift__CfiLl~_~gd*I~c~P~Tit*k~~;:*
ruhny^i--ra


Gkh Grthittit


MAILYRINE SUPPLIES


H ELP WANTED


REAIL ESTATE


FOR RENT


HIIEP WANTED


HELP WANTED


TRADE SERVICES


S












__


~


_ __ I


_ _


a


~LI-~ir


e7~ e0)U:1



REX MOR GAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

an5 (3o A MU3LacE MM i tl KNOW, MR.JASPER MAUYBE M WE'RE PlANNING oN 00we ALL
CRMP---AND WEj ---sm 71C~ rCW( ER- m lHRARE TS BAK AT Tme BTPK/ tF
REALEING THAT SHOULD SE ABLE TO3 CI ALS MJCANGT RATHER /LH $NOTS TNERE'S ANIY CHANCE THAT
KEN SARON IS WODRK IT OUT IN A HALF EX UPENSIVE /ER )ol? PDWC'f M ROM h0oNY SE ABLE 10 N O---
HAVING DIFFICULTY, HOUR / liAVE '10 6HOW DD TNESE OUT~OoR SHOrS HE'Lt
TAFE J7 smR o Av icE WAtKIe / Rma WLU& ON IMCK bE ALTL
STALL TWE 1DN~na..P6T



, 1








SUDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS
I'M SORRY MR. SILVESTElt...~ DO YOU THINK WE HAVE TIME TOABBEY, WHAT S I'M NOT SURE!
BUT YOUVR WIFE REFUSES TO RUN INTO THE HOUSE FOR A GOING ON ? WE LL DO EXACTLY
cAS ROCKY AND LEAVE UNTIL SHE'S TALKED Aj COUPLE OF MINUTES JERRY? ? AS SAM SAYS...WAIT
HI CAPTOR 0 OYou! p -rt EE FU0RT HE
TH SPENCER

BY SAMI;


c:~ \c' OKAY WE'LL CO
IN...BUT REMIND

PLANE TO CATCH!




A PA RTMENT 3- G By Alex K ofaky

I'~ ~1LT/ SPOILED THIS YOUNG MAN WAS TAKING I CAN T REMEMBER HOW LONG IT'S
EVENING NE AND IU COMTM TE STO BEEN SINEQIWENT TOA
I'MSORRY WERE ACALCUILATEP *1 IcSOUNDS LIKE FUrJ i /X YE449
YOUR E 6IN, W NT EC 7N


19. Walt.b9 (5 Old sailor. (4),
St.d Glolt drivl ns round. (3)
St. Automobile drive (5. 4)
Down
1. Blze waoratla. (4, 5)
S. Way outl (4)
Strenuous exertion. (6)
6. Soand return. (4)
7. niversty appointment. (0)
13. Young hawk. (4)
IS. FItting.


11. 041) ten.
18. ak


20. Domestle
B( ial Yressrdaysr solation


PSITIO A IBLE
FOR MASTER MARINER

Ilnd Ceae C man

qalified Bahamian for Master
ofthe M/V "Island Cement" a
t5cens00 DWT Bulk Oca V sset
Applicant must be at least 30
atrs of age, fully qualified as
foeduca ion and professional
Ixperience, possessing a British
Foreign -- Going Master

'eac ng7zed ert talent
Applicants to please apply in
writing to the above address
giving a full resume of
education, experience and
technical certification. -

C9069
HOUSEMAN required. Will be
responsible for transporting
cean and s ied l euaed aar


supervisor.
K KITCHEN C LE ANE RS
required. Will be responsible
for the removal of all garbage,
o rbsin dncdrmoo i kit hen
as requested by the Chef or

KICH PORTERS required.

cl ect on rof spIe f m te
store room and supply all food
areas, and carry out duties as
requested by Chef or Sous
Chef.
AHl interested persons should
apply to Miss Miriam Adderley,
Personnel IHManager at
in erna ional He.


EELP Nm `TDm o

tingsexpeoie ce by m p

t iabe work servising.
t>lu eprint s, build ings
interior/exterior, knowledge of
spraying, installing of
wallpaper, all other phases in
connection with painting and
de orti g
Recpla .o Adv. C-7205, C/O
The Tribune, P. O. Box F-485,
Freeport.

C7198
EX PERIENCED dining
room waiters for Freeport's
number one dining room
required. Also, fully qualified
cocktail lounge waitress
wanted. Please apply in person
ttet PersonneotDeparreerneo2


DRESSMAKER Must be
able to work without
supervision, cut with of
without pattern, also complete
finishing. Bahamian only,
refetreencesxreq 1 %d.,Feor
Grand Bahama.

POSITION VWATED
C7206
POULTRY PLANT Manager
with 25 years experience in
shell eggs, broilers, further
processing, Excellent resume.
Canl Freeport 373-5779 or Box
F-707.


"Yes, it's office business. I'm writing Dr. Joyce
Brothers for advice on how to handle a romantic



Rupert and the Ninky Toys--37


go~- B bf


ISTE VE


R 0PER & MI KE NOMAD


RIGHT! HE HAD
M/KE ANID STEVE YOU VE BUSTED\ A NEAT LITTLE
OVERHEAR AN OUR 000. FRIEND~ S~UD/O" 5ETL/P
EXCITED CALL hPERCY THE /L NA TRA/LER./
FROM THE PENMAN' ?
POLICE -


HEw WAkVT PR/HT/HN6 CdLAVTERFE/
1OT TEY T~/CKE TS. ^ 81/T HE WAS
$ REV5/NO' THEM ~-- BY HAND "./


By LBOMNARD BA~RIDEN


,,


from the CarroP RIghter Forecast

GENERAL TENDE CIES: Yo uthavetimor
constructively by engaging in various interests that are
waiting your attention. Look at both sides of any situation
facing you so thla' *ou can take full advantage of ti
opportunity. Maintain your cool.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) A confidential talk with an
influential person can bring about the support and advice you
need. Show some interest in a civic matter and you get
excellent results. Progress then comes easily.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Making tasw *ontacts via the
auspices of tried and true friends is wise. This will help you to
Samn some of your fond est hopes. Listen to the fine advice
they give you. Make good use of it.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You have a chance to talk to
a higher-up. Keep cheerful so that you can put your points
across and improve the state of affairs. Go out with mate to a
fine restaurant tonight and erajoy yourselves.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) After you get the
right perspective where an association matter is concerned,
tal nto a ex nhitu asoca tnand get nih rsults. Avoid
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You can improve anything of an
occupational nature now by coming to a true understanding
with co-workers. An idea you have for increasing your vitality
should be put in operation without delay.
oun GOw tug.h22 to Seept. 22) Talk wit esocante wd fn
ideas. A good day to become reconciled with one who has
been uren~del T~hinkok nly,2ac fiM le r ouudrsd

fundamental obligations and can handle them efficiently.
Show that you are a fine worker. Put your artistic talent to
work with neat touch and fine benefits will result.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Get together with a good
friend at places where you can have a good time and come to a
better understanding. Contact one who can help you with
your fine talent. Think logically. Relax tonight.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Us practical methods
and organize home life much better for the future. You have
many duties to perform, but you are more energetic now and
can get thm done quickl22 ad OPll on ca dscssan

important matter with a friend and see both sides of anr
important matter before coming to a decision. Good day to
shop and do errands. Show that you are very much alive.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Get together with a
monetary expert and obtain the advice you want. Do not
confide in others or you could be sorry. Spend the evening
studying important matters concerning the future.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You can do whatever you
please today but contacting older persons could be most
helpful to you. Make yourself very charming and you will
delight those you come in contact with.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. .he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who will be able to
understand both sides of a situation. But a tendency to feel
sorry for self could ruin the fine potential in this chart.
Encourage the fine compassionate nature here from earliest
days. The field of medicine, nursing and social service could be
fine. The ministry is also very good.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


AAJ 10 a
( 43

West6 Neeth East South
Pas le ~ 30
West6 leads the d3 to geat's
+. The +K 40aQws. How
Sou~Bt~h ptay ?
ANALY~SS: South refts anal
his firt impulse is to paey the
UK. It he does, a second apade
wlSdrve out dasry' OQ and
t2#e wlbltheube trromore
deaatroe Att Un-

Ssare rouhsy 241ag~ala ae 34
csthat2 It the ta gave 341- l
a n~d ifa~ thy re not thneres
hop or~Theya ods tt b r
te lub willaa t Jte hnth one b

Iwith the third heart,. It so, the
canr only asuff with a whales.
6~r3983 6AKpQ100
0104 iAJ)
0654 0873
It East had sxsdea
fourth epzade, when he is "ien wirth
tale OA would allow West0 to
overtui BoothJ1, k~iling dranmly a


Orivert by ital little ru wror
the chair moves along Ithe
overhead cable, taking Rupert
away from Santa s castle. He
Iooks back, waving goodbye
to the friendly storekeeper
until everything behind him is
hidden in cloud. I seem to
be going faster this time," he
ALL R~ll!70


thinks as he travels high above
ground. That's good, I'll
soon be in Nutchester." And
his journey ends back in the
post office, right beside a
surp icad sorting-man who
stares at the little bear a
arrival. Hullo, where have
you come from ? he demands.
RCSCAVED.


White mates in ~two moves,
against any cdeence (by H.
Hermanson). A quickie ict
eee ced solverrs, an asier
Par Uine6: 1 minute, problem



n~vja.

Chess Solution
1 P--KS ftoa~ting). If I ..
Kt-Qd4; 2 B--KtS, or if Kt else-
tuhere; 2 B--Kd. or if K-Q94 or
B--Kt2: 2 Q-Qfd.


"How do you want your egg,
Sonny?"


"Medium rare."


No. 7,081 . .by TIM~ McKAY
Aerose
I. Ounfire (8~d hrt (
g I n t hnn~ p o l e ( 3 -)

t~~Tlhhey assult yJou to your


Monday, March 5, 1973.


016< Srir un


70 otr asumiper


TA R GET



o m~ he ( R Er names. TODAY 8

word. a~ch YESTERDAY SOLUTION :
M E N 1'':' uwm "g rrkisand ae Ir~m
word must contain the larse r"mcn Ilr rMA kK3 n" ksink


'SaB~u~Nwrrc ~lcE
~J~ (I~u ~VAEIT TO,




'I I i


#be #ribunt


ROLLE SELECTED CISSSIC ROS SlimilatG

.. ..... FOR DAVIS CUP .


s elaEr eslewduB 8 7 7 8


II)I P t 0 A888 I HS


MA IR I C CH 0 pH 8 ll






By IVAN JOHNSON
IN FRONT of a huge crowd at Clifford Park yesterday, Red
Lions dashed McAlpine's chances of regaining~ the imgae u
Championship title by defeating them 3-2 in the last league game ,vW


RODGEL~:s' SP'ORI' I SHOP)
fg: rb F tI

R.Johnson ,o I 3
R. Johnson 0 I 3
I)upuch 3 0 0
irr ton 12 18 3 2
Burnside 10 5 3 2
Flei urn 0 0 0

SUPERHWASH- ARAWAKS
D~elaney 0 0
Suta han 0 0
D~eveaux 4 I
Armbrister 7 16 I I~
W side 14 I4 3 3
Rolle 3 6 2
Sawyer 2 11 3



aelbte

wsth Deans
Give ourself happy

aching muscles or the
common urinary
dsisuordr hs t
action. Take Doans
K d is to keep
active.






DOAN'PS
KIDNtrYAND BLADDER


Distributed by:
Thompson Drug Co Ltd,
Box 6027, Centreville, Nassau.


Monday, March 5, 1973.


LHAHIAMAS LAWN TENNIS
Association \ec~retar\ D~r Malcolm
Hale coninire~d thisarnocrnin~ thah
tennis pro and present ho~lderr of tle
Bahama\ Tennis C'hampiornhipi title
has been selected tol represent thle
Claribbean in the D~avis ('up to, be
played in Bogota. coilo~mbia this
Speaking of Rolle s w~lection 1)r
ben aeictrdhat lt~ho b :re ehza
teamn he would notl kniw un Irit next

match against either (`olcomb~ia tr
Canada. ab one player o~n ther team
wioll nt lu eicicn o the matchi Cu
treim, the anrtals at the Hahame ~
Ten~rnis. chamlplr~ions, Ltuc tor be
played at the Montag~cu Iiourt\ the ~
week rcl~\ ill~ be ckitf owelusit >
March 18
Italkc is the firct Ha:hamniant ever
tri wa \lrcted t<, 1lree~r ('"

during trial\ in Jama~ir: fromt ttp


Hlonduras.
In the men' \in~les at rthe
Hahamas Tennis ('hampn~ ionshl~i,

jlua ter finas Iin tue n1~ 0 st j c~
art due to, mrct )Ierriram iskl ~\~r
and Anithon) Munnawps~ in, thei tenal
Irit/ Schunlck, the merits No .

( ~rey tin la tVr R titr a l i ;I t

tu~ quarterr i /Ir~tram
KnowlesI~. the No. 3 ~Crl (rlaim tle
wilcr us the Rolle ~~list n luarter

Antho~n! Munniiiing. the Nor 4
seed lo~st by deflaul t to, l'cter Isa~cs
whel~n he failedt to turn, up foir hi
niiatc~h on, Saturdlay

Richmnd 6 ViL Iic\~ls in thruit 1

ith trh 0No tieed






SEIO A3 0PENS



1)AVID) "JACK'EIIf Bullard
thrilg c~to acl~eckrste Pl
Juine take~s on Big Q
Supermarket in the opening
gained of the Bahiamar, Baseball
Association's 1973 series at the
Queen I'ilabeth Sports (centre
On hand during toniight s


Baseball, New Yorki and Larry

Naitnal Baral ( o ?ress i
Wichita. Kancs.s
T`he Rocya~l Bhamals
Police Force Band will b~e oil
hand -


vuuririLU1V UgI
By G~LADST`ONE THlRKSTON
-THI: SENSATIONAL CLASSIC PROS, the surprise rookie team of the
league, challenged defending Paradise League champions Kentucky
Coltonets Saturday when with five players In double figures they eliminated
Budweiser CFagls 87-79 and advanced to the semifinals of the Bahamas
Amaiteur Hasketball Association's playoffs.


The addition of 6ft 4ins forward
Mlirra Selver to Rocdger\ Sport Shop
l-ctr wtilr > hlver too 18 fom
thte borardsr and scored 24 of 38
fru~n 6the 6 ied to pace Rodgecs t
Arawatks in the second game at the
A. I Adderlel G~m.
lb defeating Supzrwu~sh for the
wrLct d tim cain the best ofo tree
.rd v ncrd to the semi
finials.
ilefending chtamplionsl fleck s
t'ouga~r\ host Rocdgers ~tonight at
7j1. B. .st tol semi hia out m go
8 30att the A. I. Adderleyv Gym, .
ther (`lassic P~ros play K~entuck)

S~in g otn 31 of' their 71 from
the field and 25 auf 43 from the
free throw line, the P'rus paced in
rtice frst hal b? their cndidatehfor
w~ith 15 an~d G;ot e Bain rat 1 un
ranl to a 43 36 half time lead.
The Eaglese camer on strong in the
second half with Mlichael Johnson
etd ir "14 gl- c~y iving them 10
FOU LE~)ouT
Itowever. continually finding
themselves in foul trouble, the big
uetb~c~k came for the IEagles when
the) ulost their ke ycuentre and gual"
inl the first half.
t~his gave the P'ros thle monopoly
Ioth ie game and aidthough they were
thle se nrd half, the as rld 144 on
their 24 free throws while the
Fagyles scored only nine of their 18
Ingriahtam topped the Pros with
20pt> ntshutd Il rebmaids, WH re
assists.
it was just one of those nights
forF the Arawa~ks. Their super
Ihooter Van D~elaney ,s paced
ankle eatrl) in the first half and had
to sit out most of the game. On


rorokie of the league Roscoe D~avis
tooktC the weight o~ff the team and
\fcored 17 of his game hligh of 31 (0
tnhl hafto get reasonable
backingp. Rodgerr with Selver's 18
alongp with Godtfrey Burnside and
iKiith Mullings seorngo 500eachal e
wheln the half time horn blew.
1)avis continued his pace in the
secan hArfri trh a big el from
nine assists.
This, however, made no
rll cr nc 20 S, Burnsi ru a del

o~f 22 to see Rodgers ahead by eight
to w s took I 3 rebounds and
Armbrister handled 16. Burnside
gav itisagerb 20 points.gms$2
tickets for thle 13.A.B.A.'s finals will


be on sale. Lucky ticket holde~rs cant
win many valuable prices.

CLASSIC PROS
0g rb 0 0
Ingrahaml 8 11 3 20
J. Rodgers 0
Symonette 3 4 O 12
Sa 55rrs 0 0 2 0
Moultrie 3 2 I It
C.Rodgers 3 4 2 10
Bain 8 7 4 17



Iermna~ridn ISE EAGL 2
M.Johnson 6 8 3 12
ob ohlnson 5 12 3 13
McKay 8 3 5 18
Bussenl 5 7
Lundy 2 0 0 5
Clarke 0 I I 0


of the season-
The Lions' victory means
that Tropigas emerge as this
year's League Champions with
17 points from 10 games.
McAlpine are the runners-up
with 15 points from 10 games
and Red Lions finish in third
place with 13 points. Tropigas
skipper, Randy Rodgers,
described McAlpine'sdefeat as
"unlucky" this morning but
added that he was overjoyed
by the fact that Tropigas are
the new League C'hampions.
"E.verybody on the team is
very happy," said Rodgers,
"but we must now set our
sights on the knockout cup. We
,would I~ke very much to do the
double.
INJURY 'JINX*
Yesterday, McAlpine's
injury 'jinx' continued to take
its toll. In the 20th minute of
the first half striker Tony
Hlodgson had to leave the field
following a clash with Lions'
goalkeeper Paul Johnson which
produced a nasty gash above
Hiodgson's right eye. Hodgson
returned 10 minutes later but
never looked like scoring and
he was finally replaced in the
70th minute by 15 year old St.
Andrew's schoolboy player,

Brfe dT reman Peter Stanham
was taken off in the SSth
minute when he collided with

Hnter pSot am am eaed t
have suffered a recurrence of
the back injury which put him
out of action three weeks ago.
Besides sustaining these two
injuries during the course of
the game McAlpine fielded
mike Haywood, who has also
been out in recent weeks with
a leg injury and defender John
Williams played with his right
arm in plaster.
SHAKY START

to Red L s wh af ern ta sh


linesman's flag and the Lions'
escaped the penalty. At thiS
point the Clan were well in
control of the game, and the
penalty that should have been
awarded would probably have
changed the whole course of
the game.
Simpson, Goodger and
Hodgson all had chances of
scoring in the next few minutes
but it was the Lions who
opened the scoring with a
penalty, when Richard Baptiste
was penalised for handball, and
Colin Knight made no mistake
from the penalty spot.

F ve Nmsn es laAerGteALions
took a 2-0 lead with a
sensational 38 minute goal by
the bustling Jimmy McKay.
McKay, running onto a cross
from the left hit a first time
shot out of the blue from some
30 yards out which curled over
Dimbleby, in the McAlpine
goal and dipped down into the
top of t he net .
Trh is goal changed
the whole game McAlpine
appeared to be stunned by the
fact that in spite of their
territorial advantage, the Lions
had moved 2 0 ahea I tme

another fine cross from
Stanham seemed to be destined

m ranked Sam on in frot t
an open goal but centre-half
Dave Allen diving full length
headed the ball up and over the
bar and the score remained 2-0
to the Lions at half time.
In the opening minutes of
the second half Archibald
forced a good save out of
Johnson but shortly after this
disaster struck again for
McAlpine when Stanham was
taken off after a collision with
Hutr.1-ear dd scho loy
Rihe 17-li na n


t~e

















one


RED LIONS goalkeeper, Paul Johnson (left) shown as he
clashes with McAlpine striker Tony Hodgson while in the
process of punching away a dangerous cross from Peter
Stanham, during yesterday's New Providence Soccer League
game at Clifford Park. Following the clash Hodgson was
forced to leave the field with a nasty gash above the right
eye. Red Lion won the match 3-2 and Tropigas emerge as
the League Champions for 1973.


THI: followanl S istre lineup for
t anorrow's racing at Hobby Horse
FIRIST RA( E 6 furlongs
Ist. HALF DAILY DOUBLE
i to lfey 11
3. Last Hope Ill
4.Sn O e 11
6. GoI Mary G;o 1Its
7. Aires Moon I111

SUB. Black Ma ic Ill
SE-COND) RACI 4'/ furion?
2nd6 HALF DAILYDOXUBLl:II

16 Idpe ndene
4. I'ancy I~re s 5
1. )rta ni irl 1I

8 itatl Hvr 1I
SUB.
Mrs. Conch Salad IIS
Great Su arise 111
Dak Sdar n 5
THIRD RACE S furiogs
i.Add ISugr 11
3.wonern Mt I 2
s. Mama Brite 112
6. Lady Lynn 115
a. Lad tella 1 2
9. Wicked GalI 112
SUBatis.?

FORTH ABCEk- 5 furlongs
2. Lucky iri I1

4. olen ulnea 11
6. Miss Sharon Ill
8. rdy Ma 1 1
FIFTH RACE 4% furlongs
1. R. U. Sure 12o
2. Mo n woerk(Spot) I 5
4. GoSugar I12
5.outen late II
7. Miss Adsantage 124
G.Deat Like Dat 1 I
SIXTH RACE 9 furionRs
i. Doe Doe I 13
10. eigril 1 a
4. Skeeter 113
6. Ktlep iine 1
7. Hang em High I111
s. Miss GTo all
'E EtH RACE 6 furlongsI8
1. Restless Wind
2BL confusion) 1
3. Kismet Ill
4 na Con devvino 1
6. MarkL I l
7. Penr si Hart 1 a
9. Bundlo
(Marry Me Darling) Ias
U di Ill
Golden Whistle Ill
Mame Joan tI
Wine gedA uches
(Redl Rose) IIS
EIGHTH RACE --9 furionls
2 Tr a el ht t
3. Annic Biell a12
4. Runw y Child I1
6. Go Bfily Go 112
7. Thrice 11


start played good soccer. Les Stanham.
HI tr pan Jid mwel Moc y for~t Ticontne to 6 n
Lions in midfield, giving Colin minute, a shot from McKay
Knight and Don Maples good was deflected off John
support throughout the game, Williams into the Clan goal,
while Dave Allen controlled leaving Dimbleby with no
the defence in masterly fashion chance.
catching the McAlpine LIONS IN CONTROL
forwards offside on several From this point onwards
occasions. McAlpine never really looked
For the first 30 minutes of like winning and for most of
the first half McAlpine could the second half the Lions
well have gone 2-0 ahead but, controlled the game.
as in last week's game against McKay had the ball in the
Dynamos, the ball refused to net again after 62 minutes but
find its way into their the goal was disallowed.
opponent's net. Meanwhile at the other end
Stanham, playing well in John Williams hit the post for
midfield, sent over a beautiful the Glan from five yards, and
cross from the left wing, Lions' Hunter cleared off the line for
Goalkeeper Johnson and Clan the Lions. Maples immediately
striker, Hodgson rose together replied by hitting the post for
and from the rebound the Lions with Dimbleby out
Archibald, who always looked of hisground.
dangerous when he moved into With the clock running out
the front line, headed wide of the Qan threw everything into
the post the attack in a last desperate
LIONS BLUNDE RS attempt to win. In the 79th
Minutes later, right back minute G~oodger scored from a
Richard Baptiste blasted just penalty and with seven minutes
over the top of the Lions goal remaining Crozier scored the
following a corner. Clan's second goal when his
In the 26th minute a free-kick rocketed off a Lions
blunder by a Lions defender defender into the goal.
allowed Arc~hibald to break However the Lions had
through but with Dave Allen little trouble in holding out in
clinging on to him in front of spite of a certain amount of
,an open goal he was unable to pressure from the McAlipne
complete the nan by scoring. attackers, who fought to the
The referee ignored the end.



Musequita wins SORC series
by GORD LOMER
A VETERAN CREW and a brand new boat combined to outclass a
filed of 124 ocean racing sealing craft as Munequits won the 1973 edition
of the six-race Southern Ocean Racing Conference.
The 37ft. Gary Mult designed stoop owned by Allen Bernl of
Ranger one-ton owned by Jack Buffalo, N.Y.., and third place In
Valley of New Orlean and sailed class went to D~r. Blake I~litman's
by sailmaker Okck Scureck won 37ft Ranger one-ton sloop Ranrod.
every race in Class 'D' cad placed out of Key Wacaryne.
high enough in the oeral fleet to Class "C" was wron by Jestin and
edget Ted Turner's Lighnin, ra Cas Alan Wasley of Bristol Conn. with
"E" 38ft sloo. their yellow 39tt. Cassian and

Buddy F~riedrichs to win the 1968 sloop Windquest. Bandit, a 41ft
Olystple od mtedal in theDreaon Sparkman and Stephens stoop.
class, had former North owned by A. M. Kennedy of
American sotln champion John Sewickley. Pa., took second place
Dane and veteran Vinn and SORC in "C".~ and another Canadian
sellor O. J. Young aboard as crew. stoop, Mirage, arC & C 40-footer
Musequits faished the fnl re of owned by Ga~rhard Moor of
the) s~rie, the Nases Cup Race In Taorot and saild by Bruce Kirby
sixth pisc, nd placed first in Clan edito of Yacht Racinr Mulrr r
"D" for the sjxt~h sraight rae. stood third.
Meanwhite two~time SORC Alethen, another Caona-
winner Ted 11arnr of Atlantr boat a 43ft fibrealasssoop owned
uinrded his 38tt. Spa~rknn and by Mel and John Horlsten of Lotg
Stephens designed one-tornnr, Meadow, Mas. topped class "B".
Lightnin to second place overall Second plac wnt toAunrap. a4 t
and first in Cleg "E". Eanerwon S & S Palawr Johnson stop
t 127 AOGtd wit ai haerd s o ownechi o t
Eagle, and alo wee with Vamtp X Searamouche, a Soft. 8 AS st oop
in the 1940'r* skippered by Chuck Kirsch of
He was folwred ineless "e" by Studrg, Mich., fnisrhed third In
Roble, a36 ft Hood custon t cass"8**
designed cenerboruder owned and Amont the big boats oft class
sailed by 'Ted Hood of arbklehed, "A" ther veteran Charrima. winner
Massr., sa by No beo V. a 34 ft. of her class in the Miami-Nassu
Peter Holen stoop owned by a Race, topped the Hield. Owned by
grap free Chicago headed by Jesse Ph~lips ofDayton, O hio.the
Eliot Stepl* 56t."e alaminum ha medium
MYesquits, in clas "D" was displacennnt S & S sloop was first
talled by Aquilo, a 39 ft. trieikson In her class


THE F~OLLOWING are the
results of Saturday's racing:
Ist. RACE 4YI furionls
gR4.nay 2'ild (7) Ren $9).00
Searcfhwell $5.90. $2.95; Liberty
Bell (3) M. Borow $2.90.
2nd1 RACE 4%1 furlongs Point
Taker (4) A. Saundrrs $6.90,
SS.1S, $3.10: Troule Taker (2MG.
Ctanrc 3) G. Ran S .6 Drl
Double (7 ) $38.65 fit. Quinella
(2-4) 541.40.
3rd RACE 9 furlongs Damond
(4) D. Carey $10.50, SS.60, $4.15:
Sun Tiger (8) G.. Searchwellf $7.40.
$5.15; G Lenlbs Kharn (6) A.
Sun ars 54.20. 2nd ZJuinella (4-81)
4th1 RACE 9 furlong~s Chanda
8)A. Saundrrs $5.05. $2.80.
62]. IS Sib (2) G;. Searchwell $2.90.
$2.20; Uncle Lou (9) (;
Sheeting 52.50. 3rd1. Quinella (2-8)
55.30.
511 R)TE Bro f ong sG e
$3.00: meorrranp (8) C. Munnin~
SS.40, $3.35: Anonymous (6)n(
S*earchwH $4.S 4th1 Quinells (2-8)
S10.40.
6th1 RACE -6 furlongs My
Account (S9 M. Brown $3.40,
ha lmapi. $2$. t .19; Uack eI ()Ms
61 8 .Mat $4.75 Sth Quinells1 (6.9)
7th RACE 6 fterlng Ring Of
Fire (5) G. Sertchwell $7.50,
$5.35,~ $3.00: Arle Moon ( M.
Brown $3.95. 52.85; Str ~ () A.
Saunders S3.IS 6th Quimlr 5-9)
$11 RACE 9 furlongs Forest
Fire II (2) A. Saunders $8.20,
$5.15, $2.90: Doe Dos (3) G. Bain
$7.30, $6.20: Miss GTO (9) M.
Brown $3.00. 7th1 Quinells (2-3)
*45


Lest-, r,. ..g


BRIDGE~TOWN, BARBA)OS
SA)- hue West lndie made tihrree
the Second test against Australia
starting here Friday.
all~cketkerep m~edrryc 10urra )

are ratouss t In Wcetm err Mi
Findlay, fast bowler Uton D~owe
and leftairm wrist spinner Inshaln Ali
are dropped from the team which
drew the first Testhlast m nth.l I
wilb cho enu are R hsan Katnh si
Fredericks, Lance G;ibbs, Gerofres
Greenidgle, Vanburn Hldr

I nadc Jun. Ilv n Klli ranal

Neither Julien no~r Willett ha\ \l
played in a Test
la ray I ang agas ~

spine iet from the idal is Tand c
Nevis. He will be the first Leewalrd
islander to play In a Test for the
ces rnvls His atT ofet tare his
Already this season W ilett has
aganst the Aukts lianns, ven i h
anadchigitforfothe Lew rd Islaendn
Jullen, a le. .rm. fast medium
howler an hard hitting
ris ht- dn bidatsman wnefouerth r at
of the Test on March 13. He plays
for Kent in the English County
rhmpont i alnddihas benot~

In making the announcement,


recuperating from a knee operation
atc tea id dshas played only o~ne


: -