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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03279
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: February 22, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03279

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VOL LXX, No78 Thursday, February 22, 1973. Price 1 Cents


IT'S A DAY OF RESIGNATIONS: FIRST, ~MISS BAHAMAS; THEN 2 SHOCKS IN GOVERNMENT *aaa rhplb

Baaa arhielt


at e istered with Postmaste per


1R


DEBORAH TAYLOR CYPRIANA MUNNINGS
... leaving the country .,..new Miss Bahamas



801Ili8 Ta800f 18sign aS S








ATiHE ANN ALe Mis Bahanuss C ntes usually cel arot d
Bahamas Beauty Pageant Committee, sponsors of the event


T'he shock disclosure came

satement erslae d I w r

Bahamas Information Services.
The release said that Mr.
Hanna, who is also Minister of
Home Affairs, "has requested
that he be relieved of
responsibility for the subject of
Immigration with immediate
effect.
"The Prime Minister has
acceded to the request of the
aD py Pr sm~e Mnste anas ias
for the subject of Immigration

Govern ent Ifor tion 2ad.
REQUEST ACCEPTED
Continued the official
statement: "The Hon. Carlton
Francis, Minister of Finance
and Development has also
n diltedthat he be believed of
"The Prime Minister has
accede to t is re ust and e s

Ministry of Finance for the
time being."
Although Mr. Hanna and Mr.
Francis have resigned their
respective responsibilities for
immigration and Finance, they
still continue as members of
Prime Minister Pindling's
13-member Cabinet.
Mr. Hanna will continue to
have responsibility for the
public service, local
government administration'
parliamentary registration,
gaming and lotteries and
cinemas and films.
Mr. Francis, who assumed
the portfolio of Development
following the September 18'
1972 general election, will
continue in that capacity.
PORTFOLIOS
The Ministry of
Development is responsible for
promotion and development of
business, trade and industry'
econ omic development
planning, co-ordination of
applications for technical
assistance, petroleum, mining'
relations with the Bahamas
Development Corporation'
regional planning, town
planning. Crown lands and
the acquisition and disposition
of lands.
Mr. Han na assumed
responsibility for Immigration
in the January 10, 1969
Cabinet re-shuffle. He
succeeded former Development
Minister Jeffrey Thompson
who was the country's first
Immigration Minister under the
PLP government.
Mr. Francis has held the
Finance portfolio since the
present administration took
office January 10, 1967.
Mr. Francis, accompanied
by two of his children, left for
Canada this afternoon.

RM*s BIRTHR Ag
BAi I BIR I 2lltI

TH1E PRIME Minister's
birthday ball for 1973 is
scheduled for Friday, March
23, at the Paradise Island Hotel
and Villas.
This night of entertainment,
which is expected to be the
most enjoyable of all so far
held, begins with cocktails
and hot d'oeuvres on the pool
deck of the LaC~uana Terrace
at 7:30 p.m.
At 9 p.m. the guests will
move to the Crown Ball Room
for "Best Wishes to the Prime
Minister and the
ent rtainOen ofMTaony McKay

programme supported by local
stars and actor Sidney Poitier,
as master of ceremony.
At II p.m. there will be
dancing.


For the past ten years,
beauty queens were sent to the
Miss Universe Pageant after
being crowned Miss Bahamas.
The Committee now feels
that it would be an advantage
for the queen to have a year's
experience and exposure
before competing in the Miss
Uwerse on thisdirection have
been under way for sometime
go andC nem tatemas oBe u
the the Miss Universe Pageant
Committee with whom the
Bahamas Pageant is franchised
agreed to the new decision.
In conjunction with the Miss
Uni""",'"o'"'""'hCommi teen
lowered to 17. However, young
ladies 11o vvll e egbi befo e

1973 Miss Bahamas Contest.
4euirements for entry are
that young ladies be Bahamian,
single and between 17 and 28
years.
RUNNER-UP
For this interim year Miss
Cypriana Munnings, first
runner-up in the 1972 Miss
Bahamas Pageant, will


represent the Bahamlas at this
year's Miss Ulnive~rse Page~ant
from Ju~ly 11 to 21.
The present Miss Bahamnas'
Dehorah Taylor, has resigned
her crown effective Mtrchi 1,as
she plans tot leave the Bahamas.
in pre para tion fr
participating in the Miss

M n igs will tae mp rt in th
World Peace International

H rtuford, Conctic t, whi h
is being co-sponsored by the
International Cultural
Exchange Organization (India).
The Bahamas Beauty
Pageant Committee is aimed

at rcive,thetelh gnutm B mi n
young women both her and

abBoanmas Beauty Pageant
Committee members are: Mrs.
Hazel Thompson, president;
Mrs. Cypriana Fleischer,
secretary; Mrs. Vernice Cooper'
treasurer; Mrs. Cherry Bethel'
publicity director; Mrs. Joan
Neeley, Mrs. Shirley
Vanderpool, Mrs. Catrisse
Thompson and Mrs. Vera
Cartwright.


..PRIME MINISTEeR 11 DI ton


D dTU~ PRM M~N HNA


A..no lontIn I lne


said today.
The new company, Nassau
Brewery, Limited, may start
production by m~id-1974.
Enabling legislation is
expected to be introduced m
the House of Assembly "in the
not too distant future,
according to the source, and a
shop licence is expected to be
granted shortly after.
It was earlier said that the
company would start
production of beer about 12
months after the licence was
granted.
The G~overnment source said


SHARP DROP IN

AIR ARA ( gAL g
A SHARP drop in air arrivals
brought the overall visitor
count for January, 1973 down
3.58 percent to 109,995
compared with the I14,083
recorded for January last year,
Ministry of Tourism statistics
show.
All Bahamas air arrivals for
last month were 73,842, a 8.68
percent decline from the
80,861 arrivals counted in
January last year.
Sea arrivals were the bright
spot in the monthly report.
The figure climbed from
34,973 in January last year to
37,3061last month, an increase
of 6.67 percent.
Nassau air arrivals dropped
I1.88 percent from 44,578 to
39,279, while sea arrivals went
up 1.11 percent from 28,890
to 29,210, for a total visitor
decline of 6.77 percent from
73,468 in January, 1972 to
68,489 last month.
Freeport also suffered a
decline in air arrivals, falling
2.42 percent from 25,081 to
24,473, but sea arrivals jumped
more than 60 percent from
4,311 to 6,901 for an overall
visitor count for January, 1973
of 31,374, up 6.74 percent
over 1972's 29,392.
Declines tin bohar a sa
arrivals in t O Iln as
month led to an overall drop in
the Out Islands of 9.72
percent, from 11,223 in
January last year to 10,132 last
month.



BEDSPREADS



NASSAU FREEPORT


Cabinet gave its approval in
principle to the agreement "a
couple of weeks ago." The
terms of the agreement are not
known.
The move comes almost
three years after the then
Development Minister Jeffrey
Thompson announced that the
Heineken-GBC proposal was
the "most attractive" of several
offers to establish a local
brewery, on the basis of cost
considerations, technical
competence, marketing
know-how and the degree of
local consumer acceptance of
Heineken products.
NEGOTIATIONS
Since that announcement,
made on April 4, 1970, the
Government, Heineken and
GBC have been involved in
wide-ranging negotiations over
the provisions of enabling
legislation, and over ownership,
tariff incentives and other
matters.
GBC said Nassau Brewery
would be 20 percent owned by
Heieken, with the balance split
between GBC and Bahamian
public ownership. GBC itself is
publicly owned.
There were unconfirmed
reports that the Government
also wanted a share of the
ownership.
Heineken-GtBC, on the
other hand, wanted
preferential tariff treatment for
the importation of machinery
and raw materials in order to
meet a Government stipulation
that the price of the local
production when it enters the
market be lower than imported
beers.
The joint Heineken-GBC
investment in the venture was
placed at almost $1.8 million.
Nassau Brewery's plans call
for the purchase of the former
premises of Gold Star beer -
an earlier, unsuccessful bid to
place a local product in
competition with imported
beers on John F. Kennedy
Drive .
The premises would be
renovated and new machinery
installed for an initial
production csyacity of
360,000 cases of beer annually,
increasing to 480,000 cases and
eventually to double the initial
figure if demand warrants it.
GBC president David
Johnson told The Tribune this
morn ng that th Goki bStar

purchased, "although there
have been several meeting,
because the whole operation is
contingent on final
Government approval.


jobs.
Although the Convention
has said that the
"memorandum was not
intended as a dismissal of
staff the PWHS
Student/Parents Petition says
that the "petitioners are of the
general opinion that the issue
of the Jan. 10 memorandum
by the Board of Governors is
the chief cause of disturbance
and uncertainty at the school.
"Therefore the petitioners
call upon the Board to
withdraw the memorandum
and to assure all teachers of
com plete certainty and
protection up to the time of
dismissal or resignation."
The controversy erupted
after a "memorandum of
understanding" was circulated
among the PWHS staff giving
them three months' notice of
termination of services.
The school board is to meet
with the parents tonight to
discuss the position.
At a meeting of the school
board on January 10 board
chairman Artemus Cox told
the staff that the three months
notice, beginning January 10,
was to be considered a
moratorium. During that
period the teachers could
advise the Board whether they
were willing to enter ;nto a
new contractual agreement.
Mr. Carlton Martin, a
mermber of the petition


committee, told The T'ribune
today that two copies of the
three-page petition had been
given to the headboy one for
the headmaster and the other
for the Board of Governors and
the Bahamas Baptist and
Educational Convention.
The petition said that the
parents of students of Prmnee
William Iligh School are deeply
c once rned about t he
educational welfare oft the
students."
It says that for some time
"there had been discontent
among the staff and students
of the school."
The Board of G~overnors, the
petition coctn t inues. is
"responsible to the parents and
students for the general
conduct of the affairs of the
school."
It said that the present
disturbance at the school
would only "hamper the
success of the students and
endanger the future of the
entire school."
Prince William students are
no w preparing for
examinations and the "success
in these examinations depends
to a great extent upon the
degree of stah;lity and
harmony existing at the
school "
Students have complained
about "the student systems.
especially the shortage of
staff."
Students and parents have
vowed to "stand united at all
times in an effort to bring
about better conditions at the
school."


navigation of cruise ships and
commeresal airlines operating
in this area, and to the welfare


he
id

re
is
in
io

!e
e,
is


TEMPLETON FOUNDATIONand protection of thousands of
HEADTO SEAKAmericans who visit here every
HEADTO SEAKyear and of a large number of
wiB t HNesM. nmp eto Baham arts who visit and live in

In h~asau otar Helub Mr. Spear said the U.S. also
Shad an interest in the Bahamas'
talk on he Tmplton entry into such bodies as the
Foundation Prizes for Progress Uie ain n t
in Religion.


i~bP


~ritrun~


Cabinet shock:


theory raises problems



for US Consul General

THE BAHAMAS GOVERNMENT'S MOVE to define its,
territorial limits o~n the archipelago theory may raise potential
problems in its relations with the United States. U S. Consul
General Moncrieff Spear told members of the Chamber of
Commerce last night.

naval powr iF itin \ijse~p ad i1 tee at dal agenolL
security commnritmnent;. the intiuton ad the
United States. along with other O)rgan~ization of Ame rricani

has onssct~ IIP.c anyn",: s... also referred toi the
international practice which concern being expreusced by
would tend to res~trict the free' some Latin member over the
movement of our shipp and "*ininistate problems within
aircraft on andi over the high that organization. and the
seas." Mr. Spear said prospect of a large number of
Speaking at the Sherraton small1, new. non Latin memrberse
Bndtsh C'olonial Hote~l on what joining the OAS as they
changes can be expec-ted be- became in~dependent.

e ent raat s ft .. position could also make more influence of Its older mem-bers.
difficult U S.. efforts to, reach Mr, Spear o~bserved that the
agreement oIn the fisheries recent diplomatic recognition
problem. "W'e recognilte and of Cuba by four of the
understand the Bahamas'P desire C'ormmon wealth Caribbeanl
to control the economic countries, in disregard of the
resources of the seas common position of the OAS
surrounding these islands. but on this question had added to,
feel that there are international this concern.
conventions and other means "F'or Its own part, the
tl achievi e these m it ttics l~itt r St test asprt h

pne en i atkhnow 3c~h la o anticipa 5s no early "haH. l

cm on ecohjmdsc inbteresttI o1tt arcnti lon the urgenit

Bahamnas and U~nited States and OA~S
noted that the Bahamnas had ;As fr as the Bahamuns
sought since 19)69 to reserve its entry into the OAS is
wa ers thor itsh wn nishermnit n oncerned. we believe that this

years prior to that time, o runhtert hip a the ertntr
Apm seta fish rmn had bntilt which are f usually applied in
these fisheries. judging sue1 ma to drs
INTI RESTS sec~uiring.MrtoSpea e id te
"The problem as we see it." Bahamas would cease to be
he said, "is how tc minimize covered by NATO( guarantees
the economic damage to the once it becomes indepe~ndentr
Fl orida fishing industry liowever the Bahamas~
brought about by this change government had Indicated rt
and ensure the rights of would seek new inte~rnationial
Amierican fishermen under guaranteeLs under the collective
international law, while taking security provisions of the OAZS.
due account of the Bahamnian Tfhe question of seccuity
interests involved. guaranltees as well as other
Mlr. Spear said the UI.S. had de~fence matters will probably~
been seeking a settlement to be explored in tripartite talks
this problem through which the Bahamian. British
notiation for some thrce ;Ino sl~lce...n pOVCernmenfS
years, but so far had been agreed to last December in
unable to work out a solution. London. Mr. Spear said.
"But we feel agreement is It was envisioned. he added,
important to both sides to that these would be held in
avoid armed clashes between Nassau in the spring.
our fishermen and to institute "In these talks we shall
necessary conserv at ion want to review a whole series
measures. of activities which the U.S.
In his address the Americani Coast G;uard undertakes in the
Consul G;eneratl referred to the Bahamnas area: the operation of
changes to be expected in the the "Loran" station at San
diplomatic status of his office: Salvador and other aids to
in treaties and agreements navigation, the air-sca rescue
betwen te Baamasand patrols which are conducted in
Amierican governments and in cooperation with BASRA and
defence arrangements. the local police, and other
1 oilowing Independence, he operations which contribute to
said, one of the first changes stability and safety in this
would be the elevation of the rgo
U.S. consul G;eneral's office to Aohrae fmta
Embasy satus and the Interest involves U.S. military
establishment of a Bahamnian bss r pa ad
Emnbassyy In Washington. MILITARY
In the succeeding months, 11e explained that the U.S
the U!.S. Embassy and the I
Ministry of Eixternal Affairs urnyInanans re
would be engagIed in a review th aamaa itrFinst otaios hm
of a large number of treaties bee deamasivaed o rersn
and agreements formerly cenrs Tetiae sur precentl
concltuded between the U.S. yeliart rese wrh rmarid
and G;reat Britain which apply dieveloap ent f iartecs and nnot
to the Bahamas. defence bases in the sense that
Thlss was necessary to combat forces were stationed
determilne which the two, int them "but their presence
coulntrleF wanted to continue here does contribute to the
and which should be U.S. interest in the defence of
terminated or renegotiated. the Bahamas "
AIR ROUJTE:S According to the American
These agreements. Mr. Spear Consul General, the Bahamian
said, tou bh on such matters as government had stated that it
etvil air routes, pilots' licences, wanted to renegotiate the
consular relations. extradition, agreements which provide for
postal arrangement ts, these bases, so presumably this
telecommunications.. weather too, will be taken up during
stations and aids to navigation. the tripartite talks.
preclearance at Nassau Airport, "The outcome of these


etc. negotiations will determine the
He pointed out that these future of these bases
agreements were of very real whether the cotn ad
Interest to flyers and ud er t ey continue an
yac~htsmnen who come to the whe her tey condition,
Bahamas, to the safety and eoad. r pr i.
reoae."M.Sea ad


Fina& Fr1 i


By NICKI KELLY .
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER Arthur Hanna and Finance and Development Minister Cariton Francis have
resigned their Immigration and Finance portfolios repectively. Both these portfolios are being taken over by Prime
M~~ildnir etsriniM


r~~llrllr~~ag luII


PH TO OPER

POLICE TRlIllIG

CO LLES E TGORO10W
PRIME MINISTER L. O
Pindling will officially open the
new $900,000 Police Training
College at Oakes Field Poli
Training College at Oakehe iel
at 3 p.m. tomorrow w en he
will unveil a plaqdue.arste
ofcaltouge rnda tak 11e eh
ofica op nng,t the colg
b en mn operation sincewth e
then gtf and ree uit mov d
from the East Street training
facility. A sergeants' refresher
course is also underway.
The college, referred to as
among the finest in the
Caribbean area, is located on
an 11V2i-acre tract of land at
Oakes Field aThe complex
includes the existing Mobile
Division building s but this unit
is quite separate from the
training facilities
At the time of the
announcement of the proposed
school in January 1971 by
Joseph Godber, Britain's
Minister of State, the cost wa,
estimated at $600,000, all of
which would be borne by the
British Government. However
by January 1971 when the
contract was signed between
the Ministry of Works and the
contractor, Sir Robert
McAlpine and Sons (Bahamas)
Ltd., the cost of the complex
had risen by almost $300,000.
It was understood that the bid
of $893,000 by McAlpine was
the lowest received by the
Ministry '
The college was designed by
the architectural and
engineering staff of the
Ministry of Works and
construction began in
mid-January last year.
The first phase consists of a
dormitory for 108 men, a
classroom and registration
block with four classrooms,
lecture theatre, library>
armoury, staff room and
of fices. The third block
contains the canteen, kitchen,
lounges, medical inspection
room and sick bay.
Later, another dormitory
bl oc k and a drill
hall/gymnasium will be added
to the college. The school,
when complete, will have a
capacity of 100 recruits to be
trained in squads of 25.


By MIKE LOTHIAN .
GOVERNMENT HAS AG~itEED "in principle" to the terms of
an spopmenst lunder which the I~ntalva Beer company of Ho~tlad
and General Bahamian C~ompanies are to establish and operate a
company for the local production of beer, a Government source


IIStit10 0 0e ft 8 8CIIFS
A PETITION supported by about 400 Prince Williams High
School students, has called on the Board of Governors of the
Baptist Missionary Convention to withdraw its Memorandum of
January 10 and assure Prince Williams teachers protection in their


SE AR CH C 1T INES SOR L OS TSEAMEg
THE SEARCH continued Cay where some of tl
today by BASRA and the U.S. wreckage from the boat is sai
Coast Guard for the remaining to have drifted.
T etle wen owonS t he three dead crew wet
'a .oHrt flown from Norman's Cay th
wayto ait a 5:30 a.m. morning to Nassau for a
ye n lad i th serchare autopsy. The bodies carried n

Curdhellaonpets, ontek a ploaas t ideti hoe ied that the there
and one private plane. men could have swum ashore
They are searching in the o~ut it was said today that th
Exulmas an also around Shroud chance was slim.





WILDLIFE FILM SHOW
Sat/Uday -Feb. 24th 8pam.
TSBCher9 7ialith~g CcJ/Ope Auditorrium
OA KES FIELD
Featuring

1ISIAL'E SAT~ E#IE~IIUI
Audibon Lecturer ROMAN ROBER TPA VLO WSKI
ADMISSION:


(Children who are Bahamas National
Trust Members Admission 50c J


CEASE-FIRE BEGINS IN LAOS TODAY
two NTcde Nf mfr Lo eAn at xmontody an .S b 1:: n
support of the Vientiane government's forces stopped several hours before.
The effectiveness of the cease-fire was not expected to tx known for
some hours, or even days, since communications in much of the
mountainous, Jungled kingdom are primitive or nonexistent. But
government troops were reported engaged with North Vietnamese units
around the southwest rim of the Plain of Jars up to the time of the
cease-fire. It was not known whether the figting continued after midday.
Co m nis7Pt te a a d b thui tN rth V etn mets all ese fo ast p th
drives they have been making in the Laotian panhandle, through which the
supply route from North Vietnam to Communist forces in South Vietnam
The cease-fire began 25 hours after the signing In Vientiane of a peace
accord between the Vientiane government and the Pathet Lao.
The Vientiane regime and the Pathet Lao are to form a new coalition
wovrnnuntne is up Bt etua Iu r drocmtinch yetudn and tw
factions would get down to forming the government. Nor was anything
being done about setting up the machinery for supervision of the cease-fire.
The agreement delegates this to the International Control Commission
made up of India, Canada and Poland which, since the 1954 Geneva
Aag esmenm on ndoc ina, has been prevented by Communist blocking
tci fo ong any hng.
"STATE OF UNION" MESSAGE TO CONGRESS TODAY
WASHlINGTON (AP) President Nixon was to send his economic
"Sato vhe1 PNation" mevg t~o teCongress today.x Yesterdaadr stheSnia
budget-cutters. The measure directs the Agriculture Department to spend
the full amount of loan funds appropriated by Congress for rural
electrification and telephones.
ree mme dat in tonxend stoadoaptend ng (Ar foeg 17and rne t E
and Labour D~epartments for four months. But Senate Foreign Relations
Committee chairman J. W. F'ulbright has asked that the emergency funding
of the foreign aid programme be limited to one month. The Senate
Aphieo t Nx nm tc etso d uds foord lou an HE.W. last year on
the ground that too much had been appropriated for them. The foreign aid
funding became blocked on a Senate provision that executive agreements
o math tie ntions be submitted for approval to the Senate, as well as
PARLIAMENT APPROVES NEW IMMIGRATION RULES
LO)NDON (AP) The House of Commons has approved new rules on
immigration intended to ease the way into Britain for citizens of the 'old
commonwealth' Australia, Canada and New Zealand.
The rules wfill gve an unquestioned right of entry to any commonwealth
citizen who can prove he has one British-born grandparent. They allow for
'worldng holidays' of at least a1 year and probable ex tension to five or seven
The vote wtas 283 to 240, a government majority of 43.
A previous set of immigration rules was defeated last year because
members claimed it gave preference to Europeans from Common Market
countries over commonwealth citizens with traditional British ties.
VIET PEACE AGREEMENT WILL HAVE "POSITIVE EFFECT"
WASHINGTON (AP) Soviet Communist leader Leonid Brezhnev has
told President Nixon the peace agreement in Vietnam will haen a
fupot ve enct on ture s.neSovicetdrelat ons and open the way for their
The White House confirmed that B~rezhnev had sent a letter to Nixon
after the cearse-fre was signed expressing the sati~sfction of Soviet leaders
at the end of the war.
enFo fmhie Hou he rs im halse la edmtea nhn s o wrote that th
tewasroma mlome non oody by the Vietnamese and American peoples
"While eliminating one of the most dangerous hotbeds of international
tension," Brezhnev was reported to have said the end of the war in
Vetnam 'wwill in many ways facilitate the healthening of the whole world
And he told Nixon that it "will have positive effect on the relations
between our two countries as well." He said it would open "new
p esbilities for their future development and deepening and we stand for
The White House had no Immediate comment on the contents of the
Russian leader's better*
PUBLISHER SES TO FORCE OPENING PUBLIC RECORDS
-CHRIlsTIANSI~, nSf ChoiX Feb. 2i (AP) L A ne pajrper publisher
today flied a suit in federal court in attempt to force the Virgin Islands
Senate Prealdent to make records available to the public.
Sam Ballard of the St. Croix Free Pres, a weekly newspaper, said in the
maandammr pedt tn thatdcitizens of the U.S. tenrrory were refused the right
The petition said that the Senate action was "in violation of the Virgin
Islands code." The suit named Senate President Clarude Molloy as the only
defent d mid that he attempted to view records, and that he was told by
Stch csodian eof the legislat r's financial records on Feb. 7 that Molloy
In reaction, Molloy claimed that Ballard had not requested the
information and that he had proposed the current law to provide for
freedom of public information in the legislature last year.
Vir SnlMe Persalen m ersid the suitdwas an apparent attempt to divide

RELIEF FROM SOARING FOOD PRICES

and a ce todaT the AA rican oormr c enxpetolrealef for r ern o
prices in the second half of the year. And Nixon said his effort to halt the
food price spiral will not mean cutting farm income.
Nixon defended his cuts in the federal budget saying they will protect
the family budget. He said the country could be wrecked on the rocks or
loose fiscal policy if the federal budget gets out of control. Nixon's
economic state of the union report goes to Congress tomorrow, and he said
he wanted to tell Americans how the economy affects their family budgets.
YOUG VIET MHT RP HE EI o AeWARo rperwo


Huynh Cong 'Nick' Ut, 22, of the Associated Press took the honours for
the Ibest pares phottoe r the h-m- I tiig pcre of Viames am f

a Napalm attack. Later, newspapers across the world followed up the story
of the girl's recovery.
The Vietnam picture topped entries of 612 photographers from 48
countries on the verdict of a nine-member multi-national jury. The
competition is the 16th to be organized from Holland.
The young AP man was three times wounded in the Vietnam war, most
rcently on Oct. 26. He joined the International News~ Cooperative soon
^lter his elder brother Huyn Thanh My was killed on active duty for the
AP in 1965. Nick helps to support a family of seveit brothers and a sister in
whe delta village where his mother lIves.

WANT TO BUY OR SELL PROPERTY?
Call or see FRED KANITSCH
NELSON FERGUSON
ANZLO STRACHAN with

MGR HMP OERTY
LIMCEID
Serving the Bahamas since 1947
in Property Sales and Manalgement


S107 SHIRLEY ST. next to Sassoon I
SHouse Phone 27662 or 28966 1





N IE


BAHAMAS INIXJSTRIAL

GSES LD a


wit be closed for their annual stock -taking

on TIhursdayr IMarch lst.1973 and until


1p.m.on Friday IMarch 2nd.


DURINGi THIS PERIOD WE WILL BE UNABLE

TO MAKE ANY SALES OR DELIVERIES.


WE REGRET THE INCONVENIENCE.


The development was
announced in a joint
communique issued in
Washington and Peking.
Presidential aide Henry A.
Kissinger said the offices will
serve as the principal contact
points on the expansion of
trade "as well as all other
matters except the strictly
formal diplomatic aspects" of
ties between the countries.
Kissinger said the liaison
offices will have full diplomatic
privileges but will in no way
imply establishment of formal
diplomatic relations.
Kissinger, who returned
Tuesday from four days of
extensive talks mn Peking with
Communist Party Chairman
Mao Tse-Tung and Premier
Chou en-Las also disclosed
that.
*Two American airmen
held prisoner by China since
being shot down over Chinese
territory, will be released in the
next few weeks. They are Air
Force Maj. Philip E. Smith, a
prisoner since Sept. 20, 1969,
and Navy Lt. Cmdr. Robert J.
Flynn, held since Aug. 21,
1967.
aThe life sentence of John
Thomas Downey, a Central
Intelligence Agency employee
held since the Korean War, will
be reviewed in the last half of
the year. Kissinger said he had
been told Downey's sentence
could be shortened for good
bha iur an esot uc w

a prisoner had been exemplary.
*The united states has no
immediate plans to withdraw
its remaining military forces
from the Chinese Nationalist
island of Taiwan but the
subject will be reviewed
periodically, with decisions
based principally on
Washington's assessment of the
danger of war in the area.
*Secretary of State William
P. Rogers and Chinese foreign
minister Chi Peng-Fei will
begin discussions in Paris next
week on settlement of private
American claims against China,

1olas and mom2508 m lio
dollars of blocked Chinese
assets in the United States. The
aim will be to resolve the issues
quickly through negotiations.
MOST SIGNIFICANT
The agreement to establish
liaison offices in each other's
capitals apparently was the
most signlificant development
to come out of Kissinger's
Peking talks. He said the two
governments felt the existing
formal channel for contract
through their tParis embassies

Wiea the heads of the two

diloe ati cities tKisne sagun
they will enjoy full diplomatic
privileges, including the right
to communicate with their
home governments by code.
The communique said
Kissinger and the Chinese
"agreed that the time was
appropriate for accelerating the
normal zation of
relations."
"To this end, they
undertook to broaden their
contacts in all fields. They
agreed on a concrete
programme of expanding trade
as well as scientific, cultural
and other exchanges.
"To facilitate this process'
tndo it improve cdomhmu i-
the near future each side will
establish a liaison office in the
cptal of the oher Details
wil be workedotout through
existing channels."
Kissinger reported that, as
part of the exchange effort,
China will send to the United
States next year its priceless
exhibit of archeological
artifacts h usd in Pek n's
forbidden city. In additiorl
three scnt Sic/ 1 is an





noIwNTowN MIAMI


Sbrle S 9
Double $11
Tripe $13
Quadruple $16'

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


WASHINGTON (AP)-
Secretary or state winliam P
Rogers Wednesday pledged the
United States would not
commit itself to an Indochina
reconstruction programme
without the full support of
Congress, but he refused to rule
out the diversion of funds from
other programmes for the
assistance.
Rogers' statement was in
response to a question by
Senate foreign relations
committee chairman J. William
Fulbright, who sought
assurances that Congress will
be consulted fully on the aid
question.
Rogers repeated earlier
statements that getting
Congressional approvals will be
no easy task but he said he
expects Congresrs "will act
responsibly" in achieving this
important element to
stabilizing Indochina.
The question of diversion of
funds from other programmes
to pay for Vietnam
reconstruction was raised by
Fulbright and was disregarded
by the Secretary as unworthy
of comment.
However, Senator Clifford
Case, Republican-New Jersey,
brought the matter up and
asked for a flat denial that such
a tactic is under consideration
or will be used.
HEDGES
Rogers at no point would
deny the possibility of
diverting funds, but he said the
administration is not "doing
anything surreptitiously He
added that aid prog amme
would not be carried out "in a
way that would surprise
Co ges"
Whnpressed by Case, who
threatened to propose
legislation to prohibit the
diversion of funds to the
Vietnam aid programme,
Rogers said, "I am not now
prepared to say that if money
were available and it was
apropriate to do it after full
Congressional consultation we
wouldn't use" that money.
But he insisted again and
again that Congress and the
committee would be consulted
fully and in advance before any
aid programme is proposed or
any attempt is made to
implement it.
Rogers did deny that a
strategy is now being carried
out to use defense department
money that would result from
an overinflated budget
proposal for an Indochina aid
programme.
Senator George Aiken,
Republican-Vermont, joined
Case in expressing the thought
that legislation may be needed
to prevent the administration
from diverting funds to the
reconstruction area
In spite of the exchange over
fundtdiversion, the early going
'before toe n ple gh
committee was generally
pleasant.
Fulbright greeted Rogers'
statement, which covered
many other areas of the world
in addition to Vietnam, with
enthusiasm and he pledged his
committee's cooperation in
carrying out American foreign
policy
SUPPORT
Senator Mike Mansfield, the
Democratic leader and a
member of the committee,
ex ressed his gneral su port
for the administration plan to
aid Indochina. Fulbright said
he was pleased no commitment
on aid has been made and he
indicated he would take an
open view and would wait until
the proposals are actually in,
Aiken and Case both
indicated agreement on the
principle of Indochinal aid in
spite of their reservations on
diverting funds for the
purpose.
Mansfeld made a lengthy
statement concerning his pet
poject 0f puI lin Amri a


troos ou of urp H
repeated his arguments that
four U.S. divisions are not
needed 25 years after the end
of world war II and present an
unacceptable expense at a time
when the American economy is
in trouble.
He suggested that the talrs
on balanced troop reductions
with the Soviet Union and its
allies could drag on for years
and the U.S. should move to

unortal a getper share a~o
the burden of its own defense.


United States this year.
The United States, he said,
will send the Philadelphia
Symphony, groups of doctors,
scientists and elementary
school teachers, Congress
members and athletic teams to
China duringl1973.
Asked if the talks envisioned
exchanges of journalists'
Kissinger said he felt there was
"an understanding in
principle" on the subject but
that details would have to be
worked out. .
He said the Chinese
expressed a willingness to send
journalists to the United States
and that American news
organizations are eager to
provide more extensive
coverage of Chinese affairs.
Responding to another
question, Kissinger said there
was no discussion of possible
American visits by Mao, Chou
or other Chinese leaders.
Asked to give details on his
talk with Mao, Kissinger said
he could not do so, but added:
"The atmosphere was
cordial. Chairman Mao was
apparently in good health and
spoke animatedly for nearly
two hours."
The exact status of the
liaison offices was not spelled
out in the joint statement.
Ne either country has
maintained an official presence
in the capital of the other since
the Communists took control
4fthe Chinese government in
Heretofore, the Chinese
and American embassies in
Paris had been the designated
point of contact between the
two countries, supplemented
.by periodic Kissinger mission
to Peking. There also have been
informal contacts through the
Chinese mission at the United
Na 1 -K
whith Missinger was meting
minister Chi Peng-Fei and
others, the communique said
State IDearkt nt Asilan a le t

ta ks on technical subjects with
h estnt fo engn mamister
The importance Nixon
attached to Kissinger's Peking
conservation was underscored
by a breakfast meeting today
at which Kissinger briefed
Democratic and Republican
leaders of Congress on the
outcome.


appeared to mean that Prince
Souvanna, 72, a declared
neutralist, would be retained
SUPERVISION
The accord provides for
supervision by the same
three-nation International
Control Commission that was
unable to enforce the 1962
Geneva Agreement. It includes
Canada, India and Poland.
Vientiane, the administrative
capital, and Luang Prabang, the
royal capital, were declared
neutra itetnam has never
admitted it has troops in Laos,
which is criss-crossed by the
Ho Chi Minh Trail network
used by Hanoi to supply
Communist forces in Vietnam.
Assisted by North Vietnam,
the Pathet Lao claim to control
about three-fourths of the
territory of Laos, which is
about the size of Oregon, and
half the population of 2.6
million.
Phoumi said he thought the
titular Pathet Lao chief, Prince
Souphanouvong, would like to
come to Vientiane, "because
he has many friends and
relat ves here Price

brother o uvan a Pahoumaz
Phoumi said during the
signing ceremony he thanked
U.S. Ambassador C. McMurtrie
Godley for his efforts to bring
peace and Godley in turn had
congratulated him.
Godley's role in authorizing
U.S. air strikes against Pathet
Lao-held territory the past four
years was unmentioned.


national unity to be set uP
within 30 days.
Secretary of State William P.
Rogers in Washington hailed
the cease-fire as an important
step toward general peace in
Indochina. He confirmed that
U.S. air attacks were halting.
The accord should help in
getting complete accounting
and return of U.S. prisoners
held in Laos, Rogers said.
The United States about 300
of its airmen missing after
beinth s etndmwnhaT or La

Ame amensery cemonlynd t o
civilians held in Laos.

The P Oh tS Ea f icial who
signed the Vientiane agreement
talked with newsmen afterward
but declined to discuss prisoner
release.
"You will know their names
when they are liberated," said
Phoumi Vongvichit, th~e Pathet
Lao political branch branch
Chief
The cehase-firea was geitd

indifference that has prevailed
through most of the decade of
war in this capital city of
200h,000. Noidsttreet crowds
of P emie tSouvanna Poenm
fo r the ceremony, attended
smeyby diplomats and

exci ed?" ad Ilidem vr askgelt
"This is the third time in 20
years we have signed a peace
agreement."
When Laos radio broadcast


At a meeting of chief delegates
of the United States, North and
South Vietnam, and the Viet Cong
to the joint militarry comnmission,
the United States expressed
concern that the Communist side is
not moving its terms into the field.
The United States and South
Vietnam teams are at 24 of the 26
sites, North Vietnam at five and the
Viet Cong at none.
Despite this, teams of the
Iaterntnonal commsiron of
Control and Supervision began their
move to 14 of the subregiaonl sites
Wednesday .
The deadline for these sites tobhe
operattinal, as specified in the

While parties to the Vietnam
Agreement worked to clean up
flplting there, the warrlngl factions
i~cnt o shtooe a fc eotsinanoon
Tuesday local time, which is
midnight E:ST W dnesday night.
Vient ane a Id end sipoedr o
conflict following btreak wn of
the 1962 G;enevo Accord designed
in its time to bring peacC to 2Vs
million Laotlans.
In Washington Scretakry of State
William P. Rogers healed the

Indochina.
In testimony before the Senate
foreign relations committee he sso
pledged that the on
administration will not c mit L~
itself to an Indo hina
reconstruction programme without
support from Cong~ress.
In testimony before! the Senate
foreign reladions commrinte he also
pledged that the Nixon
admoinistration wlI not commit
Itself to an Indochina
reconstruction prurogrmme without
support from Congress.
Roger said the cease-fire in Laos
urcintnce o i oin .S. prisonfu
hedthere and atrrangng for their

U.S. REQUEST
rue ommliun onm copurod pers n
in Saigo~n the United States
proposed that the second incrment


of about 140 U.S. prisoners of war
be released in North and South
Vietnam before next Tuesday's
deadline.
But Tin, the chief spokesman for
the North Vietnameser delegations
said the subcommission would meet
again Tfhursday and there could bc
word from the Communist side
then.
The South Vietnamese side had
proposed earlier that the second
Ph*** of vietnam... Pow releases
begin Thursday. Instead of
answering the Saigon proposal, U.S.
officials said, the Communist side
raised the question of detained
civilian personnel.
hre ngyn dtie CSmuit nalelt me"
S,000 civilians it holds whereas
Communists figures put the number
at 300,000*
of A.S upgrhw rsthtd qu rto of
civilian detainees, Includins
thousands of political prisoners
hol mbyniSaison, could dcaun a e
freeing of American carptives until
the last minute.
Viet Cong and Saigon delegates
araed to form a separate two-party
Commission to settle the problem
of civilian detainees.
N "rthedVI tam rndathe i
and ci Iltan personnel Feb. 12 in
the first of four scheduled released.
Another 20 Amercans were
released Feb. 18 in North Vietnam
in advance of the second scheduled
batch as a goodwill sesture after the
visit of Henry A. Kissinger to Hanot
F~eb. 10-14.
The Communist side now holds
422 U.S. miliary and civills
personnel in North and South
Vietnam and Laos.
Seven thousand Communist
POWs and 1,000 Sailon troops re
scheduled to be released in the
second phase of Vietnamnes
*E assachtahe same num wte tnha
incrementomwhich took more than a


U.S. & NORTH VIET INVITE POLAND TO CONFERENCE
on SA VM P PoA m knawUI prlitrd go the htm tional con nn
said Wednesday night.
Polad was invited to the talks by the United States and North Vietnam.


e hS Wributte


Thunrsdy, February 22, 1973.


KISSINGER ON CHINA VISIT LIA$$ $17 ~II


CAMBODIA STILL AT WAR


Laos ceasefire


ends decade of



8 DOrai 8ICWar

By Peter O'Loughlin
VIENTIANE, LAOS (AP)- The divided Laotians signed on
Wednesday a cease-fire designed to end a decade of sporadic
warfare fought with U.S. and North Vietnamese help along the
fringes of the Vietnam conflict next door.
The cease-fire called for first news of the cease-fire
fighting to end at noon pact, most people appeared to
Thursday, which is Wednesday be listening to rock music over
midnight EST. It gave a the Thai radio station across
strengthened political hand to the Mekong River.
the Communist-led Pathet Lao The agreement gives the
rebels who have fought for Pathet Lao equal status with
years to take over the small the present government in the
Indochinese kingdom. national unity regime to be set
Its signing meant that in up. In effect, it reduces from
principle Cambodia remains three to two the number of
the only country still fighting official government factions.
on the Indochinese Peninsula The 1 96 2 Geneva
which has known off-and-on Agreement on Laos created a
conflict since World War II. three-party government of
The agreement provided for rightists, neutrals and Pathet
withdrawal of all foreign Lao. The Vientiane accord says
troops, release of war prisoners a new provisional government
within 90 days and an end to shall have two factions with
U.S. bombing against the equal representation, plus two
Pathet Lao and their estimated additional persons it describes
65,000 North Vietnamese allies as fa vouri ng peace,
in the country. independence, neutrality and
It barsintroduction of other democracy .
foreign troops and arms and The Prei s k pt sprt
calls for government offrom the two factions. This


agg~gg ptggggg


isslsirect ce so

BIEIRUT (AP) The Arab world

of a Libyan airliner by Israe'i jets
and Israell commando raids on
camp in Noh 8n Le anon m.l
The west was lashed for what
mtwas n as a muted reaction to the
laraeli attacks. U.S. President
Nixon, who sent condolences to
Libyan leader Muammar Kaddafi,
wet crged with 'hypocrisy.thto
a murderer who attends thre funeral
of his victim," declared one
Lebanese nesunpaper.cmetor
described the incidents that claimed
some 105 Arab lives as "barbaric
afodto lett ao un 4 "cannot
*Israel commits air and sea
piracy," "Twin air and sea
massacre," "The day of Israeli
crms, 1%sre ty ical ofrnmwpaper
"Israel has gone beyond anl
reason and this time the Arabs must
retaliate at all cost," declared leftist
IraS'slofficisimaaghdad Rdi dth
attacks were a "brutal reminder to
all Arab countries that they must
pool all their resources for
confrontation wsth Isr in a

striking mannersthat it has onlymooe
objective to torpedo peace
efforts now underway especially
thesidenial adviser) Hafez(Egyai tlia
tes United States," said Beirut'
Lorient-le Jour newspaper.
In Rawalpindi, a Pakistan foreign
office spokesman declared ?he
plane's shooting down as
"regretable and uncalled for."
He said Israeli air force action
was against all international
conventions and law for flights of
cIvn Aim2 r, the semi-official
government newspaper El
Moudjahid, said, "the Munich
tragedy is far from equalling the
horror oounse tragreddy which was
sinal."
The newspaper said Israel s
action again posed the question of
security in c ivi a iation.baeth
United States "the origin of all
the world's unhappiness" as
being at the root of the attack.

rnc h~at an ds vgeary ask onl
the newspaper said. yn
Israel said its fighters fired on the
Boeing 727 Wednesday because the
hdo ers teolahnd af r ni ovte
Israeli military installations along!
the suez Canal.
stThde death Stoll toods appar ntly
said there were 112 persons aboard
the plane, including nine crewv
members and Israeld said nine

a ckg. B two survive som both
worrief died during the night.
The Israell military command
said 90 bodies had been recovered.
oThe arlineriwst do mnedlo
raided Arab guerrilla bases at the
northern end of Lebanon. Israel
sad t raidr kite 0 guerrillas,
death toll between 15 and 26.
Whe nesLibyan g vrnent dsa d
Tripoli; overshot Carlo airport, its
destination; and, because of bad
weather, strayed across the Suez
Cn ito Israell-held territory.
The plane whas downed about 12


nz enfes/!ssl China & US will


FAu senseyl have hiaison offices


WASHING;TON (AP) The United States and China
uanounced Thunrsdy they will establish official governmental
lirason offices in Washington and Peking to speed up
normalization of relations between the two countries.


more POlsa &id in peacekecepial

SAIGON (AP)--11se United States asked the Communists Wednesday to
free the next group of American prisoners as oon as possible and to move
Its field teams to subregional truce sites "to dampean major hostllities."




___ ___ ____ __ __ L I---r


NWP Anor bun'

Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas1 Of A Master


A46taker/lEditor 1917 1972
Contributty Editor 1972 .
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
AtbusheriEltror1972-
Published Dally Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
GeneralOffics(15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertisng 2-1986, 2-2768
Thursday, Feb~ruary 22, 1973.




Whatr is enrsesg8 ?


C


I yOU fe IOOKin fOr a deposit haven

Whefe tne O f-SDOf9 DenetRS
are~~~ *tl iil


I


Thursday, February 22, 1973.


s


The heavy decline was
lubstantially offast, however,
by a $2,908,900 increase in the
estimated value of permits
approved for government
construction. .
There was also an Increase in
construction at Freeport where
the estimated value of permits
for the fourth quarter of 1972
was $315,592 compared with
$34,100 for the same period of
1971.
The value of building
permits approved for the
fourth quarter of I972 was
$10,069,883 in New
Providence compared with
$11,192,726 for the
corresponding period of 1971-
The cost of buildings
approved in the private sector
was $6,134,883 of which
$4,896,605 was for housing,
$1,238,278 for commercial
and industrial and a further
$3,935,000 was in the public
sector.
This compares with an
est im ate d value of
$10,166,626 approved for the
a resondin ad riodinf 19 1
Of this, $6,924,575 was for
housing, $3,242,051 for
commercial and industrial and
$1,026,100 in the public
sector.
NEW PROVIDENCE
appiceatiotot ppr rsumbj Ne
Providence in the fourth
quarter of 1972 was 301
compared with 376 for the
same period in I971.
Building approved for the
private sector totalled 294 of


which 243 were for housing,
51 for commercial and
industrial and seven for the
public sector.
Construction was started on
109 buildings compared with
178 for the corresponding
period inl971. se private
sector accounted for 104
building starts with 86 for
housing, 18 commercial and
industrial and five in the public
sector.
The estimated value of
starts for the fourth quarter of
1972 was $3,222,244
compared with 56,252,515 for
the corresponding period in
1971. Of this 52,323,244 was
in the private sector. Housing
represented $2,010,204 of this
amount, commercial and
industrial $313,040 and a
further $899,000 was
accounted for in the public
sector.
This compares with
34,137,007 for housing,
$1,843,028 for commercial
and industrial and $272,480 in
the public sector for the
co eso ttin w co pl ete
on 49 buildings compared with
73 for the corresponding
period of 1971. There were 39
buildings in housing, eight
commercial and industrial and
two in the public sector.
TeCOMPLETIONSu f
completions for the fourth
quarter of 1972 was
33,849,342 compared with
S7,9 I8, 52 3 f or the
corresponding period of 1971.
Housing represented


$1
inc
pu
$1
$5
an
thr
co
ap
fo~
co
co
Tt
co
co
pe
19
wi
co
co
co
co

fo



to
at
1:


st
w
$c
vs
in
c,


,339,822; commercial and
dustrial $2,435,520 and the
Iblic sector $74,000.
This compares with
,892,603 for housing,
;,581,860 for commercial
d industrial and $444,060 in
e public sector for the
Irresponding period in 1971.
At Freeport the number of
applications approved for the
urth quarter of 1972 was 16
,mpared with I 2 for the
respondingg period of 1971.
he number of starts was 16
,mpared with 12 for the
rresponding period of 1971.
The estimated value of
rmits for the last quarter of
)72 was $315,592 compared
ith $34, 100 for the
Nrresponding period of 1971.
The number of buildings
,mpleted for the fourth
carter of 1972 was nine
,mpared with three for the
respondingg period in 1971.
The estimated value of
buildings completed for the
,urth quarter of 1972 was
1,031,827 compared with
4r98 3od ng period rin IY197l
OUT ISLANDS
In the other islands. the
,tal number of applications
approved up to December was
21 with an estimated value of
7,042,457 including 24
lluur q t $501,290 in the
Total number of buildings
arted up to December was 42
ith an estimated value of
616,037. Twelve buildings
valued at $78,590 were started
Sthe fourth quarter.
Total number of buildings
competed up to December
are OP$1w6t 3at estimated
Three buildings value at
1,390,000 were completed in
re fourth quarter.
TIDES
TIDES: High I 1:02 a.m. and
11:35 p.m. Low 4:59 a.m. and
i:05 p.m.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the third article in a series I am writing on the
all-important question: What is Enough? Where lies wealth?
Where is happiness to be found? They tell about life with my
mother and are a continuation of three stories I wrote on this
subject last September.)
I don't have before me the stories I wrote about my mother in
September but I remember saying that life for me up to the night
of her death was like that of a bird flitting from limb to limb of a
tree in warm sunshine and singing praises to the beauty of all
creation.
I also said it was as though a light had been turned off in my
heart that night. Other lights had come into my life ... some of
them equal ... but none of them the same.
********
My mother had everything that made happiness for herself and
anyone who came into contact with her.
She had the ability to communicate and radiate love to her
surroundings ... art ... music ... and a silent and unswerving
devotion to the needs of her husband and children.
She seemed to have everything ... at least all the things I prize
most in my storehouse of memories.
I'm sure there were times when my father and mother had
misunderstandings but I cannot remember any occasion on which
either raised a voice in anger.
Just once I remember what seemed to be a sudden flare-up at
our dinner table. My father and mother were talking quietly when
suddenly my mother grabbed a loaf of bread and threw it at his
head. My father dodged. My mother hung her head in remorse.
My father went to her side and took her in his arms. She cried on
his shoulder. I had no idea of what this was all about but it was a
beautiful scene, reminding us that, never matter how
well-adjusted a person might appear to be, there is always a bit of
temper lurking in the background that might easily be triggered.
The important thing is that man and wife should never allow
anger to be more than a momentary flash ... to be controlled and
buried again as soon as it ap ears.,
Am I my brother's keeper?
This is a question raised in the Bible.
My mother certainly felt that she was a sister or mother to all
living things.
When anyone in the neighbourhood was sick, she would help in
the nursing. There were no trained nurses in the island in those
days. She had soothing hands. She could rub ... or should I say
caress? ... a pain away.
If an animal was sick .. she cared for it.
Plants knew and loved her. Anything grew for her. People are
said to have "green fingers". It is now being demonstrated that
there is communication between plant life and human beings. It is
now claimed that plants grow well and they seem happy for some
people because they know the people who genuinely love them.
****++*5+****
Now you may understand what I meant when I wrote that a
light had gone out in my life the night my mother died.
My father could not live in the house after that and so we
move to the big house on Bay Street that had been built by my
great-grandfather. It was then owned by Sir Walter Moore. My
father rented it from him.
There we had no garden ... no art ... no music ... my father
never sang again after my mother died. .. and there were no more
nightly gatherings of story-telling friends. My mother seemed to
have been the magnet that drew people to our house.
*********
During the early years of The Tribune the children in our
family didn't have time to go to school. We all had to work in the
office to keep The ;ibune alive-
Before she got married my mother had been a Board of
1Education school teacher at the Victoria School on East Bay
S street which until recently was used as the offices of the Ministry
lbf Education.
She conducted a school at night for us. But she also tootk in ...
free of charge ... all the boys in The RI~bune office as well as any
boys in the neighbourhood who wanted to attend her classes.
********
My father always said that the boys and girls on his staff were
like his own family. We have tried to keep this relationship alive
with our staff.
In the offlee we were all treated alike ... no favouritism for his
;;own children. And so, they all accepted discipline when they Rot
Iout of line and he laid the strap on their bottoms.
When anything went really wrong among the young people in
the office he would tell my brother Gilbert to fetch the stool and
the strap. We knew what that meant. We were all going to get it.
Always his own children headed the line.
As each of us camne up in the line he said three words: "Turn it
up". That meant lay across the stool and turn your bottom up to
:the skies.
There was never any resentment at these sessions because he
t~was like a father to his boys ... they loved and respected him.
This is the false idea about child rearing today. I am satisfied
That a child respects and loves a parent who administers just
;:punishment without any show of vindictiveness. What is called
Sthe generation gap today is nothing more than a breakdown of
parental discipline.

I have told you that my mother was the essence of kindness.
Ilut she was also a no-nonsense person who didn't hesitate to
Administer the strap whenever it was considered necessary. I was a
rambunctious boy ... I got it every day, sometimes several thpes a
day. I needed it and it was good for me. This is the only kind of
language some children understand.
My mother regarded the boys at The Tribune as her special
care. Every Saturday she walked from our house on Shirley Street
to the office in Frederick Street with a large basket over her arm
filled with Johnnywcake, hot homemade bread, coconut cnrams


and chocolate fudge for the boys.
On my father's birthday and on The Tribune s birthday she
always gave a big picnic for the staff. On one occasion she
chartered a vessel ... made my father shut down The 'Iibune for a $6
week ... and she took the family and staff on a visit to Governor's th;
Harbour, Eleuthera.
It was on this trip that my father met the girl who years later T
was to become his second wife. It was then that she met my
mother for the first time.
We spent a day at her parents' house and when we sailed that 5
night my mother brought this young girl and a sister to Nassau
for a vacation. The girl was struck down with typhoid fever and
almost died. My mother nursed her back to health.
My father never saw these people again until after my mother's
death. They heard how distressed he was and so they asked him
to come to Governor's Harbour for a vacation. This girl provided
just the thing my father needed at that time ... a quality of
gentleness that was soothing. He was old enough to be her father
and up to the time of her death she always spoke of him as
"Papa".
The relationship between this young girl and my father was
)... but it was just what he needed ... gentle love that offered no
resistance and treated him with the respect due to a father.
It's an extraordinary thing but years earlier, when this girl was
'wearing pig-tails in a classroom at the public school at Governor's
Harbour, my father visited the settlement and addressed the
school. Afterwards he singled out this little girl for a moment of
special attention. At the time he didn't know this family.
was uns evraence of a natural attinity?'
I don't know what it might have been but I can say that both
my father's marriages were made in heaven.
*********
But to get back to my mother.
As I told you, she regarded all the boys at The Ribune as her
own children.
Back in those days there were only a couple of doctors in the
island. There was only one doctor at the hospital and no trained
nurses ... only midwives and practical nurses.
And so most people learned the use of bush medicines. My
mother knew a great deal about these medicines.
She had a medicine for each season of the year. At one season
she claimed the blood needed cooling. At another it needed
warming. At another a good clean-out was necessary. There was
another time to be wormed.
When the time came to "physic" us she would make her usual
Saturday trip to the office with her basket of goodies on her
arm but the boys knew what it meant when they saw a long
leather strap hanging from her belt. That was her "persuader" and
she didn't hesitate to use it on some of the big boys if they
balked.
Most of the time everything went easily. Even bitter senna was
taken without much resistance. It was the castor oil at which all
of us balked. This oil was the best thing ever for cleaning out the
bowels but it made me sick at my stomach ... just the thought of
it ... for a week afterwards.
Today castor oil is so doctored that you hardly taste it. But
back in those days the drug stores carried a very limited range
of medicines. This meant people had to make their own
medicines from bushes that grew wild in the backyard.
Castor oil was homemade from a bean that grew on a fairly
large shrub. All a person did was to crush the bean to extract the
oil and it was administered in that raw state.
The castor oil tree used to grow wild in Nassau at that time.
It's been years since I have seen a castor oil tree. It is possible that
they have all been destroyed because ... like so many other things
people made for themselves in "the good old days" ... it is now
easier to go Into a shop and buy a product that was manufactured
thousands of miles away. This is as true of furniture and clothing
as it is of the humble caster oil bean.
I described this period in my life...when almost everyone in the
island was poor ...as "the good old days". They were good days
Ifr e. noe sare rich in memories that today help me to know

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Enough, if something from our hands has power
To live, and act, and serve the future hours
And if, as toward the silent tomb we go,
Through love, through hope, and faith's transcendent dower,
Wefe ht we are greater thnwe know.
-WORDSWORTH


Fortunately, the Channel Islands remain one of the
areas where the financial climate is extremely favourable to
off-shore investment. The standard rate of tax is 20p in the
; there is no surtax, capital gains tax, withholding tax,
profits tax or Estate duty.
With the backing of the multi-million pound Triumph
Investment Trust Group, and the accompaniment of a very
good growth record, we are able to o fer an incomparable
service in all these categories:-

Ji Deposit Accounts
&c Current Accounts &c Loans and Advances

i Corporate Finance $ Company and Investment Management
&1 Trustee and Nominee Companly Facilities
We shall welcome your enquiries at our Head Office:
General Manager, Mr. A. G. R. Willis,
3, Mulcaster Street, St. Helier, Jersey, C.I.
Telephone: Jersey Central 35361/2. Telex: 41654
Audited accounts are available on request.

Whyte, Gasc & Company (Channel Islands) Limited


22t40 4ribune


Private bulilding tl0WR $4 millioR


18 W85588, g0Vt. SeCIOr up $3 milli0R


Providenc fell $4,031,743 in the east quartrattlf_972 compared to the same period in 1971.


At a proximately 8:15 p.m. on Thursday the 15th F:ebruary,.
1973, two masked gunmen entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. R.
F. Spenlcer situate at Albacore Drive, Lucaya, Freeport. and
forcibly took away their daughter Andrea. aged 4V2 years. Mr.
and Mrs. Spencer were subsequently informed by telephone
that they would have to pay the sum of $250,0.8 for the
return of their daughter.
After a number of telephone calls from an unidentified male
voice or voices, Mr. Spencer was instructed to deposit the sum
of $250,000.00 at a location near Freeport City.

The District Manager, The Royal Bank of Canada, Nassau.
Bahamas. offers a reward of 510,000.00 for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of any or all persons involved in the
kidnapping described above.

Anyone having such information should contact The Royail
Bahamlas Police Force at Freeport (Telephone Nos. 2-9774/5.
2-8 333 (or Nassau
Telephone Nos. 2-2561/2,
( 2-3049, 2-231 1 and
2-3335.)


In the event that information~ leading to the arrest and
conviction of any such person or persons as above is provided
by more than one person, the Bank reserves the right to share
the reward in such proportions as it thinks fit.

Dated the 21st February, 1973.
THE ROY AL BANK OF: CANADA


1for the Channel Islands














She r a


ir Pursuant to the provisions of Section 33 of the
,-- Companies Act, notice is hereby given that the
Registered Offices of E. F. G. Ltd. and of
BALMORAL HOTELS Ltd. have been
transferred to Suite 701 Balmoral Manor, West
Bay St. Nassau.
Dated 15th. day of February 1973
G. E. SIMMONDS
Secretary of the
above Companies.


1971 AMC MATADOR 2-door hardtop $3250
Black vinyl roof, p/steering, radio, w/w tyres, low mileage 232 6cyl.. engine. A/C, vinyl
upholstery, clean body.


QUALITY antd SER VICE'
PHONE 2-4626-7-8 SHIRLEY STREET P.O. BOX N-8165i


Vauxhall's new pacesetters b ied as Transconti

VAUXHALL'S LATEST LINE OF VEHICLES, available at Island Motors, Oakes Field, are
being billed as the Transcontinentals, a tag which has firmly taken hold since these cars are ready
to go anywhere on any continent. They are already on active service in the demanding conditions
of Sweden, Switzerland, Canada and the U.S.


The vauxhalls are all
pace-setters the two Victor
saloons and three estate cars,
the Ventors and the VX 4/90
They are smooth, have clean
lines with spacious interiors
Combined with the new
"European" look are new
safety standards, lots of power'

otae egieerin ad-hdo e ga
luxury.
They are all strong and rigid
dit long life bilt into the

aTheel ceit n refwn mnt
Vivas has been maintained but

wih r ttyri emphasis in ttely

Europa wt esmoolch saf ty

undatable. T~he lines bring back
the famous flutes to the
Vaxibal bobrt tn r the first
The cars have a long

broad tires whic g ick a lnd
low look. Each has a low glass
line and curved body sides
Interior space in the new
mo e s is igreaterd ihn th
fact that the overall exterior
dimensions are virtually the
same. The comfort of extra
shoulder and leg room Is
augmented by very
wide-opening doors and
luxurious seating which is
designed for the human body
que eVauxh Il cars are very
put on this not obvious
quality. The silence has been
built in by the smooth*
projection-free body shape, the
soft-rubber seals on the doors.
and the tight-clinging glass in
the doors. All of these cut
down on wind resistance and
hence, the annoying whistle.
High performance 2279 ce
and 1759 cc engines have been
developed from the overhead
cam engines of the preceding
models. The smooth 3.3 litre
six cylinder continues to give
the Ventora top performance
place in the range.
teVauxhall' af nghprov
armund Milltrank. in Ennland.


Tneadoor frames annd the c nr
and the windscreen frame is
also one piece, giving strength
in both areas. The shape of the
body sides allows a very strong
erxsecdion along the on" "
heavily reinforced,
'The cars are stable in
boad-holdig aandu handling
advances ogrtet precdn

and track, redesigned front

suspension < wihvelarge bal

power steering standard on the

imrvdverlsone of Vu hala'
multi-link rear suspension and
rear roll bars on most models.
The ride too benefits from
these and other engineering
improvements. It is flat and
w llbala ced front to rear,

Safety has certainly nit
been overlooked in the new
V uxhall aime. thust en n

abobn sstreberi ga c mn, t
front seat backs. and
scatterproof rear view mirror
A new design on the door
lock combines the anti-burst
characteristics with an
impressive but quiet "clunk"
s und on cilosakng. A posit ve

been ruilt into t rea door .

hy raulichbabkes w teh cena m
master cylinder and disc brakes
at the front. All have improved
dipped beams and big, wholly
illuminated warning light areas
at the rear.
The steering column lock
has a new twist. It is a
two-handed operation to
remove the ignition key. Not
only is it easier than past locks
to withdraw the key but it
eliminates the possibility of
inadvertently locking the
starring while the car is In

moe onnew Vauxhalls are all
extremely serviceable vehicles


US sxentsts report 'massive'



p)Oll RilOROf sea sround Baha ma s
By Stan Benjamin
WASHINGTON (AP)- Government scientists Tuesday reported finding globs of oil and bits of
plastic "in massive proportions" in the A tlantic Ocean from Cape Cod to the Caribbean Sea.


$1250


$2175


1970 VAUXHALL VIVA Station Wagon
A/transmission, low mileage, good tyres, newly painted.

1972 MORRIS WOLSELEY 1300 4-door
A/transmission, radio, low mileage, good tyres, clean body.


The National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(N than had previously been
suspected."
Analyzing samples of the
microscopic organisms that
form the basis of the ocean's
food chain, NOAA reported
that "more than half the
plankton samples (young fish
and thiri food)acollected from

oil-contaminated."
The oil pollution was so
thick, NOAA reported, that
the three research ships which
cruised the Atlantic last
summer had trouble collecting
samples at all.
"One of the survey ships,
Albatros IV, reported that 75
per cent of the time its nets
were befouled by oil clumps so
thick they extruded through
the mesh 'like spaghetti'," the
agency said.
It said the oil took the form
of grain-to fish-sized balls of
tar which "appeared to have
]bee fnonrdmerd srohmsunker oil


NOAA said its researchers
were surprised to find bits of
patic in the openmsea, as well

balls of polystyrene, the
crumbly plastic foam widely
used as a packing and
insulating material:
NOAA said other
researchers, at the Woods Hole'
Mass., Oceanographic
Institution, found bits of the
ind gestible plastic in the larvae

The Woods liole scientists
feared the plastic might
threaten the survival of the fish
larvae that swallow it.
Ocean explorer Thor
Heyerdahl, who sailed a
modern reconstruction of an
ancient Egyptian ship cross
the Atlantic in 1970, had
reported seeing tar balls and
plastic debris all the way from
Africa to the Americas.
NOAA'S ships found the
pollution covering almost
700,000 square miles of the
U.S. Atlantic continental
waters, the Sargasso Sea and
the Gulf iof Mei tmae te


contamination covered about
50 per cent of the survey area

Massa husetes to c ordafrom
purlfc t in ('e aa bea and
cent in an area surrounding the
Bahamas and the West Indies.
Plastics wer Ies wd srd
but appeared ess wil essprve
areas; the heaviest
concentrations were from Cape
liatteras to Cape Cod.
toThe aena ym sa tehaet'the

thestehwidespreadecrnotainmant
evaluated "
For the past several years
oil pollution of the oceans has
been recognized as a serious
problem, and has led to federal
actions, int erna tional
agreements and successful U.S
legislation, all aimed at curbing

Oil reaches the sea in many
ways
Tankers may pump
oil-contaminated water out of
their bilges, and oil sometimes
nis ie odpuei t loading and


'$1460
the small


1971 FORD Y/2 TON PICK-UP TRUCK
Radio, low mileage, newly painted, excellent condition. Just right for
businessman,

1970 VAUXHALL VIVA B-door
A/transmission, good tyres, good upholstery, Iow mileage.


$1450i


1971 TRIUMPH 2000 ESTATE 4-door $3150
A/transmission, radio, p/steering, clean body, new tyres a much sought after car.

....BARGAIN CORNIER (as iS) ..


WE OFFER
A 30 DAY
WAR RAN TY
ON THE
ABOVE
VEHICLES!


1969 TOYOTA 4-DOOR SEDAN-new paint
1969 FORD ESCORT 2-DOOR
1967 VOLKSWAGON (1600)
1969 FIAT (600) very good condition
1970 FIAT VAN
1969 MOR RIS 1 000 VAN
1969 MORRIS 1 000 ESTATE


$860
$950
$450
$695
$825
$800
$375


1973 DODGE POLARA S/IVAGON


$6500. 00


1972 PONVTIAC VENTUIRA II


$3550 00


i
''
~, e*
b'Sp


1970 FORD ESCORT AUTOMATIC
1970 PLYMOUTH BARRACUDA
1971 VEGA SEDAN
1972 CHEVELLE MAUIBU
1971 DODGE AVENGER
1970 CHEVROLET IMPALA
1969 VOLKSWAGON
1968 CHEVROLET IMPALA


$1250.00
$2350.00
$2950.00
$4750.00
$1700.00
$2950.00
$1250.00
$1200.00


1971 FORD CAPRI
1970 FORD ESCORT
1972 PON~TIAC VENTURA II
1964 DODGE DART
1969 HILLMAN IMP
1969 CHEV. CAMAPO
1970 TRIUMPH SPITFI RE
1972 FORD PINTO


$1800.00
$850.00
$;3550.00
$250.00
$250.00
$1950.00
$1000.00
$3350.00


SALES TEAM


D.Mtta


E GBLasN


C. MORRISON


Thunrsdy, February 22, 1973.


W th nt


BELOW IS A LOST OF $@ME OF QUR 900.11 USED CABS.


f~ll :'


'131


c~ ---rS

P\lh~


~C'"' C~lrr ,:~hl


Oakes Field Phone 3-4711
CLNTAL C RACELTe P. O. Box N-1525 Nassau, Bahamas


I J. ALLEYNE I


NK- Sh













































a A2vailable ill
your
favourite
food stores





TRADE IN YOUR PRESENT STOVE AND REFRIGERATOR
FOR OUR BRAND NEW ONES
Apartment size Gas Stove and Refrigerator, including
installing and Gas _

For Only *950. DOWN PAYM~IENJT

"Trade In Accepted Towards
Down Payments"

OPEN EVERY NIGHT UNTIL 9:00 P.M.


IROF BOL FRIU OI1
D~oweleswell Stree Tl 2802
P'.O. Box 6104 E~.S., Nassau, Bahiamas.
FORMALLY BESCO BUtLDING
OPPOSITE GENERAL EQUIPMENT
"We Pay Cash For Usred Furniture & Appliances


IT'S HERE



the all new Vauxhall



V IC T(R EE.

re-designed by Genleral Motors


NOPPOI'TTS.




Informatrive booklet, write lto
Norwich Pharmacal Co., Inc.
410 ParkAve., New York, N.Y. 10022


BAH AMAS BUS & TRUCK

MONTROSE AVENUE --- TELEPHONE 2-1722-3-4-5.


SMEARED


Ministry of Tlourism; A.
DiScala, Bahamas Hotel
SEmployers Association; George

Nasu Pa dis Isln

Knowles represents the Hotel
& Catering Workers Union.


Once such a scheme comes Into
-ffect. the Training Council
will be phased out and the

e g a i za n which it will h v

The chairman of the council
is Mr. Hugh Sands, Permanent
Secretary Ministry of


Eduiatlon and Culture; Mr.
Irevelyan ( oopler. extecu've
director. Bahamas H~tel
E mp r c n i m em b r a t ,

Secretary, Mlinistry of Labour
and National Insurance: John
Deleveaux. assistant director,


THE BAHAMAS (Interim) Hotel Training Council. charged
with the responsibility for introducing a comprehensive training
programme for the hotel industry. has been estualished


renamled the Bahlimas Hotel costs of the school and of the
Training College. development programme will
Once the new school stars, .be borne equally by the
it Iri mankhe firistht memin2 Gover ment000nd EhAR hotel

oJperative In the Bahamlas. The The total cost of operation
las~t occatslon was the formation' obff tib cicool is estimated at
of. the Dundas Civic Centre in $140,000 per year. The
1940 by former Governor of Bahamas Government is
the Bahamas Sir Charles committed to pay $70,000 of
D~uneas. this. Of the remainder,
The-curriculu m of the neiw~ 50,000 will be paid-by the
colleges will provide practical Nassau/Paradise Island
training in all categories ,of Promotion Board and the
holtel work, and through remaining $20,000 by the
special career development, Bahantas Hotel ~Association,
will prepare pupils for all types Each side has agreed to pay
of Job opportunities. It will be these amounts each year for
design ne d to meet the the next three years or until
immediate reqluirem~ents of thie .the Industrial Training Act
industry, and structured o comes into force, whichever is
f~ulfil future mlanpowler needs. sooner.
With existing personnel in It is expected that the
the industry trained to teach Ministry of Labour and
others, the programme willfie 'National Insurance will soon
implemented with on-the-job present a Bill in Parliament,
instruction. S',vin effect o, te training
Further, the curriculum Q9411. scheide. 5 h 3 'Bill wiill apply
empharsi/e part-time vocational' toa all branches of economic
alnd supervisory (raimningCand ,a~ctis i ie Crimmbnwealth.
will seek tor meet accreditatidn
req ui re ments for those
student'; who display a dpfinite .. .L .~
potential for advanced tr~ininic8.
at recognited universities
overseas otf ring full of
associate deg~ree~s in Hotel~~a.T .~
Admi nist rat ion. ;
T'he whole emphasis of the
prograiimme however, will be

fu rather development of i
existing and potential
emiployees to, all levels of
responnibiiity.
nImpe n d in g is an
a nn ouncemen t of the
appointment of a hotel training (i
director who, as executive
officer of the council, will be la liamica course
responsible for the overall
programmres. Officer at the Bahamnas Red
Although the college will be Cross left recently for the

pcramrnieito ssadeelope J~a a c, to folo e Westioa
will embrace the whole hotel four-month course in the
industry, and the needs of Principle and Practice ofSocial
Grand Bahama and the* other Work at the Social Welfare
I family islands will be fully Training Centre.
covered in the programme. Mrs. Coleby, a Registered
While the college buildings Bahamian Nurse, received a
will remain the property of the scholarship from UNICF.F. On
Bahamnas Government and will her return she will continue to
be maintained by the Ministry work with Mrs. Rodgers in the
of Education, the operating Red Cross Welfare Department


I ~ lnal rl etit] n (';cut ner
7t h deem~un to tuirn the
coune~i i a the result a, t a surves
made in 1972' at the
instigation oft the hotel
mndt.st ry br Prfe ssor
Brother. Director of Re~search
andL Deovelopmentn of the
S c ho o f( H ote ~
Admilnlstration at C'ornell
U-niv'ersity, New York
('ornell is internationally
tamolcus fo~r Its spec~ialised
mstructiorn Int hotel w~ork, and
mta ny aam hotel
I1Xecutives. C have.t Stuie~d there
Itc he university' agreed to
contInue11' f its enPerdftion inl the
capacity of ~consultants to the
itllcunil
Ithep oe training
programmers whubi~ hars already
been aceptedl In puinciple, is
based on the u~pdating and
re equ ppirng~ of the o~ld Nassau
Technicail (Colleg tacilities in
Oakes tield. This will be


Id ctio an C'utur tryes
Ministry of' To~urisml and the
Ministry of Labour atnd
Na t i otnal I nsu ran ce
Representing the Hlotel
Industry are the Bahamuas
Hotel luinployers Assoc~iatlcon
the Nassau laradise Island
Promotion Board. the Bahamlas


II IITIVE II WOIR81

M0?8 GROeCtive than
donching
Germicidal -Deodorant
Tne cautious and practical married
woman of today, places her conl-
dence an the ef ectiveness of
NORFORMS ferrunine suppositories
because they offer
Positive Protection against embar-
easncg pr brlem dit h highly
Positive Protection in avoiding of-

temperature, forming a protective
film, more effective than internal
smchn he ar e Ieaisy tapl and
Sold at all pharmacies in packages
of 6, 12 and 24


.


Herre'sa
Norforms...small
and so easOY to use


\li


'Thursday, February 22, 1973. _b rirnP 5

I. .',",$ fn nnnr AW trttC 'b ew hotel training school,a .result of 3-way,effortsr


r-
s ._


BEFORE PRICES INCREASE (due to devaluation)


(OUR NEW SHIPMENT WILL BE HIGHER)


1973
MoRRIS


r r r c
-r


1~




i


ISL AND MOTOR CO'.

11970 LIMITED


:; D ES FI ElikroP.00BSK N-640-4::~




















yeariDo da Mhr wh hssto brn o a tb>? S sy
that we gave birth to her for reasons of our owKn, so we can
keep her for the rest of her life.
Eating, sleeping, reading, listening to the radio and
doing volunteer work at the local animal shelter, and urg.
ing her little brother to hang himself, 1 all she has done
since graduating from high school 2%1 years ago.
Her skllU with animals has brought her many good job
offers from veterinarians, but she says she refuse to work
for money as long as her brother is alive, as she fiercely
resnts not being an only child.
The police say they cannot help as because she is


_ _


E ALTH M INISTE R
BAC K FR OM WINDIES
HEAL.TI Minister Lnoftus
oksr returned to, Nassau last
hursday at ter attendting the
fth rratl cf the (;rba




NOW SHOWING! 7 & 10:25



'"AND 8:45







iVO ONE UIND)ER 17 ADMITIl.l EI)


nor a lunatic. ITwo doctors have told us
us because they can't find anything
. So where do we go from here? We
, and we're fed up with .
FEEDING AN EIMrPHANT
NG: Go to another doctors This time And
latrist. You cersalaly have enough clues
he gir has serios emotional peeblems.
eeds help to gettlag her head together.
be "peanlls" compared with feeding as


I


~ ~m*r~i~~9Fc~ 5j~ --


1




I





I
I 1

I
I




ii
I


UNTIL NEXT THURSDAYI'~"r~
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 8: 30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
She's got to cut it...or cut out.





Directed by
Ossie Davis
Screenplay by
Ms. J. E. Frankhln


iPStarring Brock Peters and Leslie Uggams as Netta
~Special guest Ruby Dee Also starnlng Peggy Pettitt
SUGGESTED FOR MIATURHE AUIDIENCEiS. g
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISE'D
Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold on
first come, first served basis.
I
rnwam~RIE B
Last Day Friday Last Day Friday
Matinee continuous from 2 Continuous showings from
Evening 8: 30 "PLAY MISTY FOR ME" RI
'CREATURES THE WORLD
FORG;OT" PG. Clint Eastwood
Julie Ege Jessica Walter
Tony Bonner
PLUS PLUS
"THE LAST REBEL" PG.
Joe Nmath"FRENZY" R.
Woody Strode
PLUS Late FeatureJoFnc
'Poe223Friday night. Alec Mc~owen I
'Phoe 2-534No one under i 7 will be ad~mitted


NOW SHOWING
Matinee continuous from 2, Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4666




.45 clb claws! -1 e







FrRIED EILUAMSON * Lvm erodynon am...unru rNems .. i?




TOWER OF EVIL"

NO ONE UNDER 1 7 ADMfITED.


Thurday, February 22, 1973.


DEAR ABBY: I am in the Mbarine Corps, stationed in
Nam Phoug, Th~llad. There is no fearle penrsonnl o this
base at night. It i very hot and we live in huts. I prefr to
remain in the aude when we return from showerag be-
cause It is much cooler. This seems to annoy one guy in the
hut. Do I have a problem? Or has he?
NUDE hi NAM PE10NG
DEAR NUDE: If HE has one, why are YOU writing?
DEAR ABBY: CanL you get VD from11 kissing somebody?
If you can,marybe I've had it for a year and have altorea
grven it to three peopl.
I didn't even hour about this disease until six months
agoe, and the kid I think might have given it to me moved
out of town a year ago.
I am so worried. I am only 15, and I'm not a slut or
anything lke that. Please don't tell me to talk to my
parents. They would never undrstand. Also our family
doctor is a good friend of theirs, so I can't go to him.
I have to knw right away, Abby, as my grades are
falling off because I'm worried instead of studying. Thank
you, and burry your answer, please. WORRIuED SICK
DEAR WORRIED: The hnces of coantrctlag VD trom
kissing are very very slim, but if yee bsve gone ln a l
beavy petting, yes could be la trouble.
Call year Despartmet of Publle Healh. Tell them I
suggesrted that yee eaB, sad ask for a physica sl eaminatio
to ease your mlad. Yee do set need year parents' eemsat
and if yea seed treatmeat, yea'll recelve it ea a coudea"
tlal [and free] basis. Please do this today, sad good lack.


DEAR ABBIY: fow luea should a couple wait to get
married followrlag a diverwt I have ban divorced for
three years, but the man I am golog to marry has tmen
divorced only a ferwmohs.r We have knownm each other for
a very long time rad are both ove forty. I am not talking
about the amoun of time h Is ardd& eal" to ge
married again, I mean how long should we wait to awitd

DAR FLORIDIAN: Go ahead sad arury the a d
don't worry about gaselp. After all, a diveree Isa't te same
as a death. 'ller is as "mearalag" period when eae loses
a mate la the diveree curt.

DEAR ABBY: Maybe this is kind of childish, but I still
hke to be surprised on Chrsmas mosralog.
I've been marrid for three years, and every year my
lashand rad I have the same argument. He asks me what
I want for Christmas, and I alwyas sa, "Surprise me!"
Then he says he would rtathr get mne something he is sure
I want, rad we have this smam hasse all over` again.
I do a lot of "hinting" during the year, but he never
seems to catch on. If you tell me I'm wrong, I'll come right
out and tell him arht I wan, Mu if you say he's wrong, IT1
pin your answe to his nose next yer.

DEAR LIEESC: Bew's yer husband's battlag average?
1l yes ae leseud with his gifts, continue to let him surprise
ean. But If his tast Ins flam ager, either throw heoader
hints, or tell himr what yes wnt.


from February 5 to 9.
Also, at tending tle
conference were Ministry lf
healthh Officials, Dr. G,. F.
13avis, Chief Medical Officer
and Mrs. M. Mcnonald, Deputy

PcHoe Sth Mnset' < ner n e,
the Ministe- accompaniedd by
Mr R ser tndt the Derputy
Pnrmal nt Secretary visited
Sar ba dos end T rin id ad whe re
he discuse d~c with the Ministers
of Health anid senior heald'
personnel, various aspects of
thre health services and visited
thle principal h ospt s la d
health centres in bohilns.
RECOGNIZES


BARBADOS COMMISSIONER neither a criminal
The Govemnor has accorded they cannot help
Mr. Robert Clifford Chapman "wrong" with her
recognition as Commissioner of aren't millionaires,
B rbdos to theta Baamas with
F~lorida. DEAR FEEDII
WE ATH ER a competent psych
WE AT IIER : Wind: to conclude that t
North-westerly 10 to 17 She desperately n
In.p.h. Weather: Partly cloudy And the cost will
Sea: Modlerate Tem: Min eehat


HELD OVER BY POPUL D


"Yobu'l Snd me at any branch



Of the Ideal Bank"







The RoYal 4 The Helpf ul Bank


Itt*~. '


Ghr Wethat


~'" ~a~
.~ ~*~;~;;,rsm~,~go-iaq:
i
1

_Idi~_ if t *: i
_-_~1. ..-. .'


How to get rid of a lazy 'elephant'


"Happy to meet o~u..




fm the Helpf al Banker "

































































































































MEMBER OF THE SOAET aoROU OF COMPArNIES

PRINCIPAL GROUP SHAREHOLDERS:
BANK OF CA~NADA NATIONAL WESTMINSTER BANK LIMITED


I - ---~


1~ - -
-


BaTello invites building contractors to submit tenders for the
construction of a single storey Central Office Bulilding (Approximately
1,500 sq.ft.) at G;overnor's Hiarbour, Eleuthera.

Copies of contract documents including drawings and specifications
may be collected from the Eingineering and Planning Office, Chase
Mianhattan Building, Oakes Field, Nassau, or Station Manager,
Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera.

Sealed te~nders or written inability~ to tender should be sent to the
General Manager, BaTelCo, P. O. Box N-3Q48, Nassau, so as to arrive no
later than March 7, 1973.


Thursday, February 22, 1973.


f


Society's
p.m. to I a.m., there will be
dinner and dancing.
Thanks to the generosity of
Murray Delahay, manager of
the South Ocean Beach Hotel,
Bradley Stuart will be front
and centre for the dance music-
Bradley and the band play
every night out at South Ocean
but on March 10, they plan a
busman's holiday at the
Balmoral.
Lorraine Onderdonk,
chairman of the ball
committee, said that this year's
ball would be very special with
lots of surprises for the guests.
"We plan on about 300 people


THE CRYSTAL Ball.
highlight of the social calendar
for both the Bahamas Humane
Society and Nassau, is coming
up on Saturday, March 10,
with a splash of music by
Bradley Stuart, beef
Wellington, door prizes, a room
raffle and crystal from one end
of the evening to the other,
This year, the ball will be
held at the H~alcyon Balmoral
Hotel in La Chandelle, the
main ballroom which adds its
own tremendous crystal
chandelier to the decor.
Cocktails will be served from 8
p~m. to 9 p.m., and from 9


.vice-president of the society, is
'in charge of getting the prizes
and so far, such shops as
General Hardware, Francis
Peek, House and Garden,
Ambrosine and Treasure
Traders have donated exquisite
prizes.
Talented designer Mel Doty
is in charge of decorating La
Chandelle and the room will be
"as crystal as possible".
according to Miss Onderdonk.
Mr. Doty has been responsible
for the decoration of previous
Humane Society balls. Those
who have attended in past
years will know what


spectacular decor they can
expect on March 10.
The Halcyon Balmoral chefs
have spend a great deal of time
and imagination on the menu
for the ball. Guests will enjoy
smoked Scottish salmon, beef
Wellingtdn, a very special hotel
salad, and a surprise dessert.
The Crystal Ball is the
culmination of the Humane
Society's busiest season which
started on February I with the
beginning of the street raffle.
Tickets are on sale all over New
Providence and the first prize is
the small, economical car, the
Datsun. Datsun offers more
than just transportation. It's
licensing and insurance costs
are way, way down in these
days when such items are way'
wThe raffle will be drawn on
Monday, March 5, at the C'at
and Fiddle and it will be
broadcast over ZNS at 9:30
p.m. Tickets will be on sale
during the evening at the Cat
and Fiddle right up to drawing
time .


at the ball," she said. "We are
going to have surprise favours
for every man and woman at
their table places. Every year,
we do this sort of thing and I
have a lot of other things up
my sleeve for the guests."
One of the surprises will be
the personality who will
provide the music during the
cocktail hour.
PRIZES
Drawing cards for the ball
are the door prizes and the
room raffle in which only
those attending the ball can
participate. Mrs. Douglas
Apple yard sec ond


MONEY BUG TOO





at .. INC

Also, we make your money safe and start it growing. As it grows, we pay you interest:


6Y21% ON YOUR SAVINGS ACCOUNT 7%% %


- 8% ON YOUR FIXED DEPOSITS


If you have $1.00 or $50,000.00 which you want put away safely to grow with interest, come see
us at FinCo. There are two street-level bankingl offices to serve you: at Trinity Place in downtown
Nassau and at Glasgow House, Robinson Road east of East Street, where there's ample parking.


i FINuANCE :OR PORA'TION
OPF BAHAMA~I~ S
LIMIn T ED


THE BAHAMAS' OL DEST AND S TRONG;'. i SA VINGS AND LOAN INST/ TUTION


PHONE 24822 6


P.O. BOX N3038


Y~~CIV1 ~u~


TlE ROYAL


r )8 Grthant


Humane


Crystal Ball on March l0


GBYER~HIR'S HARBOUR



CMTRAL OFFICE BUUIING


BEAT THE














,


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 'rs Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from Qa.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri.. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.ni.

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR RENT FOR SALE MMINE SUPPLIES WLP WANTED RELP MATED IIELP MNTED


08649 C8876


I


I


I


I


I


C;8895
EXPERIENCED Gardener and
.andyman. Phone 5-052

C8868 '
LIVE-IN MAID. Experienced
Bahamtan over thirty. Two
school children. References
essential. Phone 41204.
C8904
SALESMeAN tondsell Cherni as

Supplies. Must have own
transportation. Basic pay. Call
51074 for appointment.

C801NG MAN between the
ages of 18 and 28 wanted by
Mademoiselle for general
cleaning duties. Please
telephone Mr. Revington at
2-1404 for appointment
C8908
WANTED MAI1D 6 days week.
Salary $40.00, must have
references. Call 22460.
C8920
WANTED One farmer to live
on farm at Cowpen Road.
Phone 3-6852.

C8914
MALE MANAGEMENT
TRAINEES
Young men over 21 required to
learn credits and collections
leading to management. A
background of dealing with the
public is preferable. Car is
essential. Starting salary
$4,800 per year and car
allowance. Reply in own
handwriting to: Adv. C8914,
c/o The Tribune, P. O. Box
N3207, Nassau.

C8902
SERVICE MANAGER
required to control mechanical
section of large automobile
dealership. Must be able to
control staff, fully conversant
with warranty procedure,
oversee body shop and
maintain extensive workshop
equipment. Write Box N-3741
for interview.
C8934
URGENTLY REQUIRED
Bookkeeper with four years
experience up to trial balance
and balance sheets, to work for
large insurance firm. Only
persons meeting above
requirements need apply.
Contact: Mr. J. Knowles
telephone 2-2465 for
appointment.


HOLIDAY INN has immediate
opening for experienced night
auditor. Must know NCR
4200. Apply in person with
references to Mr. Moraan -

C8874
ONE REAL ESTATE
SALESMAN should have
previous experience in land
saes Mands haveon pro/as
experience with Resort
Development Iland sales. Please
apipy 40: OBox N-7782, or

C8864
THE DELTEC BANKING
CORPORATION LIMITED
require two Chartered
Accountants or Certified
Public Accountants. Applicants
should have approximately five
years professional experience
with a public accounting firm
or an international financial
institution. Must be willing to
travel primarily to Latin
America and Europe. Please
reply to Personnel Department,
The Deltec Banking
Corporation Limited, P. O.
Box N-3229, Nassau.

C8759
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LIMITED re ui e
automotive mechanic with ores
tools. Experience with a warn
or fleet owner prefgarge .
Previous experience with e.M*
vehicles and/or engines an asset*
but not essential. Successful
applicant would be exetdt
fila vacant position with
ctleroo for advancement.
Contct M. J.Smit, Service
Manager for appointment"

cOI'TION AVAILABLE

MASTER MARINER
Island Cement Company
Limited, P. O. Box 5140,

suai ed Bahamma nfor astea
of the M/V "Island Cement", a
1500 DWT Bulk Ocean Vessel.
Applicant must be at least 30
years of age, fully qualified as
to education and professional
experience, possessing a British
Foreign-Going Master Mariner
Certificate or recognized
equivalent. Applicants to
please apply in writing to the
above address giving a full
resume of education,
experience and technical
certification.

C8897
Expanding Travel Agency
requires Office Manager/
Manageress, who ~must have
had at least 5 years experience
with airline ortravef agency
and be capable of completely
managing office and training
and supervising new staff.
Salary commensurate with
qualify ic nations. Interested
persons should write to The
Personnel Officer, P. O. Box
N-3909, Nassau.

C8898
Security Guard/Chauffeurs
required for shift work 8 hours
per day. Applicant should have
at least 3 years experience as a
Chauffeur/Driver and 5 years
experience as Security Guard.
Home telephone essential.
References and Pol ice
C htti ate required.ffPlease


C8887

Pre-i dpednc seN iaILELots
in Winton two on ridge and
two near sea. AII with excellent
view and aacccessat rxad ataeT

13 acre.h Reduce dby at lea t
consider terms. To view call
32110.

C8662
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furnished apartm ent
overlooking Montagu Bay (very
desirable area). New complete
rugs, stove, refrigerator, heater,
wall mirrors, sliding doors, etc.,
Good rental no problem.
$27,500.00 Will consider
exchange in Florida. Call Mr.
Kay collect 5-2598 or 2-4223
anytime. P. O. Box M-4635,
Nassau.

C8865
1-2 storey building on Soldier
Road opposite Technical
Training Centre.
2-2 storey buildings on Wulff
Road opposite Bahamian
Lumber. For further
information Phone 42981.

C8907
GOLDEN GATE No. 2
2 Corner Lots at $4,800.00.
$480.00 down $107.00 month.
PLOT REALTY CO. LTD. Tel.
22460, Box N1492, Nassau.

trl 2R16 A o xC1 8
C8930
2 LARGE LOTS 20,000 so. ft
Blair Estate. A good Buy
Canal front lots Seabreeze
Estate price $9,000.00. Inland
lot Seabreeze Estate Price

Wl iuated Hilitop Lot
Monta ue Terrace Price
$10,00 .00 A choice corner lot
Highvista Estate Price
$6000.00
Ch ie lots D nnt g
Sut ivisio Sosdi anrm age m
$6250.00o Cholc erlevariom
wit excelln vew.
Fr nf~or~maltion call Bills Real


FOR SALE OR RENT
C8715
ON PINK SAND BEACH -
unique 5 room designer's
home, quest cottage. fireo~lace
2V2 baths, patio, marvellous
view, swimming, fishing. H. H.
Larkin, c/o Box 101, Harbour
Island.

FOR SAILE OR LEASE
C8928
FOR SALE OR LONG LEASE
Attractive 3 bedroom 2 bath
hours fully furnished and
airconditioned with walled in
garden, garage, laundry room
Westward Villas near shops and
beach. Call 22211 or 77938.

FOR RENT


h tICeORaST RE SPmACE --

rcua y2017ample parking.

C8648
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152. Evenings
5-4928.

C8784



5-8679 ask for Mr. Pritcr~ard.

C8815
BAYCROFT beautiful ocean
view, 1 bedroom apartment,
I rge i ing ts eul '


C8643
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.

C8647
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.
C8841
FURNISHED 2 1-bedroom
apartments for rent. Phone
3-1403.
C8854
UNFURNISHED 2 tedroom


a lrm~ o~rhead r
Symonette's office (dentist) -
Minniel Street. Apply on
premies.
C7166
NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroo /2
bath, situated Domim o
)*Iepts, East St., South. no
Contract Nassau 5-6234.


PACEMAKER 44 ft. luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

08720
(OR SALE OR CHARTER
125ft. x 23ft., 4ft. draft, s~eel
hull, 290 tons, powered by
new Cat .343 diesel. 15 ton
crane. Up to date load tne
with 2 cargo hatches, one 14ft.
22f24ft adnod the obhe f4t. x
excellent shape*
Contact: Sands Construction &

ShppenT Marsh Ha bour,b Bo



31' CHRIS CRAFT,excellent
condition, bargain at $18,500.
Phone 54011 days.
C83 84
BAHAMAS YAGHT SALES
JAMES W ALRIJAY
p Osa. emana SC
TEL aeove


TH`OJANYAGHT E
A DIVISION or



C8925
BERTRAM 31 seat express
cruiser, twin G. M. diesel,
excellent condition. To see call
Mario 3-6645 from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. or 3-6649 after 5 p.m.
C8921
14 FOOT GLASTRON -
Good condition. Ideal for
fishing and skiing $400. Night
phone 41429. Day 28262 -

CAIRD OF THANKS
C8933
THE FAMILY of the late
Sylvia Louise Wallace extend
sincere thanks and appreciation
ro Mr. &MMrs. Spu con oBetheel,
Mr. & Mrs. Wilford Coakley'
Mr. William Eneas, Mr. Willie
Bethel, Mr. Stephen Coakley,
Dr. H. W. Brown, Lean and
Missie, Valeria Pinder, Mr.
Victor Bain, Joycelyn Allen,
Rosetta Taylor, Cecil Taylor,
Portia Taylor, Mr. Elkanah
Johnson, Mrs. Dorie Ferguson,
Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Rutherford,
Dorothy Finlayson, Mrs. Dolly
Foster, Mrs. Alma Cartwright,
Olive Maycock, Marguerite
Jackson, Dorothy Coakley
Sylvia Todd, Bertha Mae
Ferguson, Mr. Buster Hall, Mr.
Rosco WYallace and others
whose names are not listed, for
having come to the States to
extend their sympathy to the
family in their hour of
bereavement. We will forever
be grateful and oiur prayers will
always be with you.
Mr. B. Wallace (Husband)
Mrs. Eunice Phillips (Niece)
Mr. Will Hanna (Brother)



C8935


C8912
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT/
CHIE F ACCOUNTANT
Substantial International
Company is seeking 'a
professional accountant with
supervisory experience and
some knowledge of investmerit
company actIv it leq.
Responsible and capable

Io m a aeal p sitino i
Nassau. Applications, including
idar rquirmemnt, should he
aO. Box N4399, Nassaursgr

TRADE SERVICES
C8634
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 58213, or
5-1772 WORLD OF MUSIC,
Dewgard Plaza.

C8639




Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING'
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
&e PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH.
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
C8103
YOU WON'T BELIEVE IT
UNTIL YOU SEE IT! ABCO'S
NEW 'S UPE R STEAM'
CLEANING METHOD. TEL:
51071-2-3-4.

C8642
PATlO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.


IN FREEPORT tEL 352-8808


HIIEL MNTED

OFFICE MACHINE SERVICE
MANAGER R REQUIRED.
MUST BE EXPERIENCED IN
MECHANICAL CALCULA-
TORS AND ADLER
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITERS.
PHONE FREEPO RT
352-6167.
C7171
DIRECTOR OVERSEAS
SALES Must have 5 years
exeinhe o Reaste and


worihS aish, orw u uese
Goe nsland French. Straight
SECRETARY part time,
with typewriter at home, use
dictaphone.
J. Stuart Robertson (Bahamas)
Limited, P. O. Box F-93,
Freeport.


EG NEERM ESCPECIAALIZING
INAHEAVY D TY BOILER
AIR-CONDITIONING WORK.
Apply: L. & A. Industries Ltd.,
P. O. Box F-2580, Telephone:
3 2-5422.

Bi-lingual secretary needed to
work with French Co., must be
fluent with French and
Engl ish.
Please reply in writing to:
Lafayette, P. O. Box F-2588,
Freeport, Grand Bahama


c8866
1-1956 Dodge Dump truck
1 Michigan Pay loader
Office equipment. Phone
42981. .
C8813
20 h.p. LONG SHAFT
Mercury engine control. Both
$375 call 3-2095.

CAIRS FOR SALE
C8892
1966 FORD MUSTANG, big
tires, mags,5 cmewc.eGloing fo

island. Phone 5-1606.
C8857
ISLAND MOTO R COMPANY
1970 LTD
1970 Chevrolet Impala $2600
1969 Hillman
Automatic Green $875
1971 Vauxhall
Viva 2 Dr. Radio
Auto. Blue $1895
1970 Vauxhall Viva
Automatic Green $1200
1970 Ford LTD
A/C Belge; Vinyl $2995
1967 Cougar Yellow $800
1973 PontiaCe Hatchback
A/C, 2400 miles. Blue $4950
1972 Vauxhall Viva
S/W Automatic White $26600
1972 Pontiac Ventura
Vinyl Top 6 Cyl. $3950
1970 Morris 1100 Series
White Automatic 4 Dr. $995
1970 Chevelle 2 Dr. Auto.
Green A/C $3400
1970 Pontiac Parisienne
4 Dr. Sedan Blue/White $2500
1971 Vauxhall Victor
4 Dr. S/W Auto. Red. $1800
1973 Le Mans 4 Dr. Vinyl,
2000 miles only,
Blue, A/C $5850
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice House
Telephone 34636-7-8

C8919
1967 FIAT Sports Coupe.
$300. R. King Telephone
2-8907 from 8:30 a.m. to 5.00
p.m.
C8932
Nlew Providence Leasing
Limited have the following list
of used cars for sale. On the
spot financing and generous
trade allowance given. Our lot
is located on Gibbs Corner
Opposite the Laundromat.
Telephone 24801 or 24802 for
further details:-
1972 Dodge Avenger
Automatic Transmission -
Price $2,850 Down $650.
1971 Ford Ltd. 9f-Passenger
Wagon Price $4,850 Down
$1,500. This vehicle is in
tip-top shape.
1971 Toyota Corona PrT e
$2,100 Down $700.
1970 Ford Capri Automatic
Transmission Price $1,850 -
Down $500
1971 Austin 1300 G.T. Price
$1,750. Down $550.
x s;1 Vau wall Victor
Automatic Transmission -
Price $1,650. Down $450.
1970 Vauxhall Victor Standard
- Price $1,500 Down $400.
1971 Mercury Cougar -- Price
$4,500 Down$81,200.
1971 Ford Pinto - Price
$2,400. Down $600.
1972 Volkswagen 1300 -- Price
$2,400. Down $700.
We also have additional buys
for cash up to $1,000 so please
call and see us and we will be
hpy o sow you around our


Da~uvil9-ase eerds Ca *
mechanical and body attention
we will accept $1,550 Cash as

C8927

E Ielent cOntion.a niaxe Ic.
'73. $900. Telephone 3-1973

e ing .U S I NE S S

OPPORTUNITIES
C8558
WANT TO BUY A LOT?
Phone 2-7667 P. O. Box

eAC ESTFAR8tNKTD. L~ l
complimentary tour of any
subdivision of your choice with
.no obligation to buy.
CALL US TODAY


C8879
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house -
completely furnished -
Bamboo Town. Phone 3-4181.

C8852
2 BEDROOM 2 bath residence
situate on waterfront in
western district. Fully
furnished, airconditioned, and
read y for immedia te
e cu inng. t4 tsper month --
Call: Dorothy L. Atwood Ltd.
2-8763-4-56.

U FURNISHED 2 bedroom 1
bath apartment --Soldier
Road. Call John H. Rolle
3-4265.
C8899
BEAUTIFUL 2 bedroom
furnished house with carport
having all utilities. Phone
58201

C8915
TWO-BEDROOM apartment
near Montagu Beach. Please
call 3-1330.
C8931
ONE EXTRA Large two
bedroom two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartment on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shidley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

IFOR SALE
C8831
55 CASH PAID
For used furniture and
appliances. Fox Brothers
Furniture Outlet, Dowdeswell
Street (Formeriv BESC O
Building). Sorry telephone
2801t2 is out of order-

C8889
WAREHOUSE SALE
dt sthwaE ts eoe BBErSCOs
Foodland
NEW STOCK IN CASES:
Phitco Product *
O 14 scf No Frost
refrigerator
One -- 14 cf Automatic
Defrost refrigerator
Six Eight Ib. wringer washers
Thirty Air conditioners from
7,000 to 23,000 btu 115 and
208 volt
Eight refrigerators 9 and
12 cf .
Prices are well below current
selling prices but no warranty
will be given. CASH ONLY. b
We also have a certain num er
ofante ain andr mts atwell

C8894
"CHOICE GLEANINGS"
Scripture Calendars
for 1973
$1.55
Christian Supply Centre
Montrose Ave.
Phone 5-8052
C8871
2 ---8' x10' new tents (sleepy
3-4)
1 10' x 16' tent (sleeps 6-8)
1 -- 2 damper camping gas
stove.aiso cots, etc. Priced very
reasonable. Walter Higgs;
Winchester St., Phone 5-8742
or 2-4391

896PATIO SALE
Saura 24tst Februwn .

laI ng Island. Fans, eior s
doos, etc. Pg, toyS7 ectia
29od et. one 5060 and

C8825
STELLA MARIS MARINA at
Long Island, has for sale the


rn ulic ge1ar inbox dies


condition; 15 KW KOEHLER
marine generator, powered by
Waukesha diesel, Model: 180
DLCK- in excellent condhi in

goene oDE ha mt new -
perfect condition. Call or write
Stella hnaris Inn, Long Island *


tOR SAILE

C7156
1969 '26' Stamas twin 160
horsepower 1/o, fiberglass. Cost
nsew $13,000.00. Duty Paid,
a kng $7,900.00. Telephone:
Freeport 373-2616.

IIELP MNWTE8
C7160
POSITION AVAILABLE
FOR
MAST MtARINR


sulafe dB ham an fo Mse
of the M/V "Island Cement", a
1500 DWT Bulk Ocean Vessel.
Applicant must be at least 30
years of age, fully qualified as
to education and professional
Fx einc~e, onM tsngr aMBr tseh
Certificate or recognized

oea al apdbpl i ri nts to th

resmenc ofan edu ahion
certification.

C7162
BTN~ blATiOSNALfo CIT
Mortgage and Real Estate
Group in Freeport a Mortgage
Loan Administration Assistant.
Successful applicant should
have good educiational
background and preferably
exnpe encenan emortg g
and accounting. Full training
programme available for young
career-minded applicant.
Interested parties should send
resume to Mortgage and Real
Estate Group, P. O. Box
F-2681, Freeport or telephone
Misseibrook 352-6741 for an
appointment.


WORK FOR THE AIRLINES I


C8924 ALPHA TRAINING SCHOOLS, INC.
MAKE BIG MONEY as a HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR. MEN Learn to operate Dozers, Draglines.
Backhoes, Loaders, etc. Call or see Mr. Richard Mooney,

A hONIA a OTELquipT y Str oI N sau hFEBB@ R
25t an 26h.Phone 322-3301-


~


)___


I


I


r


1


I_-.. -


L


I


II


I


t


_~_ ~_~___


I__I__L~I__ IY_ __I_ __


C8918
DON'T LOSE YOUR LOT OR
HOME, because you can't meet
the payments -- Call FOX &
SONS REAL ESTATE Tel.
28012 31295 evenings -
Box 6104, Nassau.
C8903
PLOT REALTY CO. LTD.
Tel. 22460 Boxt N 1482
OyWESTu AReD ILbLArSoo
2 bath, completely furnished,
enclosed landscaped yard.


THE MAN FM PLOT
NEVILLE HANNA
Choose a lot from:
Nassau East
Nassau East North
Eastwood Estates
Monastery Park
Eastern Estates
Winton Meadows
Winton Heights
Yamacraw Beach Estate
Bel Air Estates
Colony Village East
Golden Gates Estates
Stapiedon Gardens
Garden Hill Estates
Pinewood Gardens
Sea Breeze Estates


C8663
CORNER building lot, mair.4
road, very near The Current
Club, Eleuthera. 81750.00 or
make a sound offer. Contact
Mr. Kelly, Nassau Florist Ltd.,
P. O. Box N-4635, Nassau. or
call collect 5-2598 or 2-4223
anytime.


C8870
FOR SALE
3 Bedroom house, completely
furnished in excellent taste.
Carporte, basement, rear patio
AII this for only $30,000.00.
We can arrange terms. Palmdale
residential area.

SPLIT LEVEL BLAIR. 3
bedrooms plus den
unfurnished b'L 31 Spacious good L house.
Asking only $64,000.00.

H-ILLTOP SKYLINE -- Has
P0OOL & TWO PATIOS. 4
bedrooms, 3 baths separate
dining two sitting rooms -
big enough for large family and
high class entertaining. To see
is to appreciate.

WES TWA R VI LLAS
BEACH RIGHTS 6 bedrooms,
5 baths spacious outdoor
PATIO kingsize SWIMMING
POOL. Spacious grounds idea
'for targe family.

CABLE BEACH THE GOLD
COAST. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths
only 150ft. from SANDY
BEACH tastefully furnished
and decorated. Selling at a low
'low price of $68,000.00.
EIGHTY FEET OF SANDY
BEACH. At Cable Beach. Has 4
bedrooms plus shower rooms
maids quarters Gorgeous views
excellent swimming. Need
no pool - best location
available. Only$5105,000.00
Wf STWARD VILLAS rights
to Sandy Beach. 3 bedrooms
plus extra large screened-in
PATIO 2 car garage -
complete bedroom and bath
for maid enclosed grounds. -
fruited trees. With Air and
Ceiling fans. Immaculate Was
$85,000.00 reduced to
5~75,000.00.
Come to us we give red
'carpet treatment.
DAMIANOS we sell real
estate. Dial 22033, 22305,
22307 Nite 41197.

C8917
BEST SALES OR RENTALS


325 Box 614, a sau
C8926

1. AttracFiv R Sr -bedroom
two-bath residence in Vista
Marina. Living room, separate
dining room, Bahama room
porch, patio, carport, etc.
Large lot, fruit orchard.
~$85,000 furnished or nearest




r lcous laying dinina, dporpchd
grounds, fruit trees. Only six
years old. Financing available.
$54,000 unfurnished.
3.Two streh Ge rgi n

~two bedrooms, two aba hs
living room, dining room,
powder room, laundry
carport, two porches, maid's
room, etc. Lot: 80' x 168*
Dual water supply. $54,0 0
semi-furnished,
,4. Charming three-bedroom'
t~wo~bath nrsidence in quiet
lcut-deisac off VIIage Road
LFonveniently close to Queen's
oidleg and new shopping
centre. Spacious living room,
s separate dining room, modern
',kitchen, study, maid's
bedroom and bath, laundry,
urportxAir< nditiond nc

Iavailable to suitable prospect.

etc, Prc of $4 ,00 flumrnghd
.includes brand new stove, new
'freezer and new automatic
I~rrng machine.
H. G. CHRISTIE
REAL ESTATE
309 Bay Street,
P. O. Box N8164* sa

Tels 2-1041, 2-1042


C8873
REQUIRED licensed Land
Surveyor or equivalent with at
least four (4) years experience
to work on Family Islands.
Please apply to: P. O. Box
N-7782, or telephone 2-4596.
C8893


Rs osil o RxeuAive Chef
and Erxecutive Assistant Chefa

graduate of an accredited hotel
school or three years
experience in a major resort
aoe rr s mlar o~perat on.

ability and qualifications of the
applicant.
Responsibilities: Prepares,
seasons, and cooks soups,
meats, vegetables and other
food stuff for consumption.
r juu etheermott res tro e to
broilers, steam kettles and
roasters.
Carve meats, portions foods on
serving plate. Add gravies
sauce and garnishes serv ngs to
full orders.
Must be prepared to take over
responsibility from the Chef
Grilliairdian, and Chef
Rottiseur during their days off.
forI make own preparat o

irteemrento be served. Good
ieernt ed are requ he an
inereste applicant s would
a ppl in ow~n handwriting
letifg caout deal sri.
qua iiains and expe ience
to: Mr. William Hawkins,
Office of Human Resources,
Nassau6 Beach Hotel, P.O.Box
N7-7174, Nassau. Telephone


In sad memory of our dear
mother Francine Tinker who
parted this life February

,'re bu ooro b Han a

Bain, 5 daughters and three



SCHOOLS

C8782 ,
NIGHT AUDITING CLASSES
COmmencine week of February
12, 1973. Call Nassau
Academy of Business 24993
or pay us a visit at Shirley
Street opposite Collins Avenue.

C"M



FOR VOUR FURNITURE
AND OTHER EFFECTS

Fox #rM *

FURNIITURI OUTLIT
DOWDESWELL STREET
(4 DOORS EAST OF
DEVEAUX( ST.)
P.O. BOX810tB.S.
NASSAU,BAHAMAS
TEL: 30tts

we kb

OP n( UNIL9 ..Nr il


8922


In Reserrvations, Ticketing, stewardess, Ramp Agent,
Passenger Service. Travel free plus many other employee
benefits. Call or see Mr. Richard Mooney, Alpha Airlines
School at the BRITISH COLONIAL HOTEL on Bay Street
Nassau, FEBRUARY 25th and 26th. Phone: 322.3301-


C


C7177
FRONT OFFICE CASHIER:
Must be able to operate the
NCR 4 200 machine.
Experienced in Travel Agent
Guest Coupon, 2-3 years
experience. Reference from
previous employer, Pol ice
Certificate and neat in

apRONancOFFICE CLERK*
WMust have experience with
ya go Cony ntionn Gr upe e 3
from previous employer, Police
Certificate and neat in
appearance.
interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, BETWEEN THE
HOURS OF 9 A.M. and 3 P.M.


EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
required: High school graduate
or equivalent education: 3-5
years experience desirable.
Applicant must be able to take
dictation and type at a
reasonable speed: filing
experience will be helpful.
Apply in person to Personnal
Department, .Bahama Cement
Compn P O. Box F 100


C8923 ALPHA TRAINING SCHOOLS, INC. .
HOTEL MANAGEMENT. CAREERS ARE AVAILABLE
FOR Managers, Assistant Managers, Housekeepers, Desk
Clerks, Maintenance, Clerical. MEN WOMEN -
COUPLES. ALL AGES. Call or see Mr. William Albert
Alpha Resort Career Institute at the British Colonial Hotel
on Bay Street, Nassau, FEBRUARY 25th and 26th. Phone


Sher #rtiltitt


Thursday, February 22 1973.













I -


5)tr Qltrtbnn


_ 1 1111 1


HOW manyI the alst. No palora; no forern
w of sw~PCords:o~ ar mes. TO.
fearlrs DAY'S A 16 words,
yor mo~ a~ od'~ w rl8.

heret la Dep dsee dere ae 4dl f
mak lar a elder arld here hg
T 1 E A "**... htlni~ed hltd PERIISHED


cll4 one e t-letter word~l spred.


I I I -


I


REjX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


^ ^* APL


, I7r31 L us z


APARTMENT 3-(; By xc Kork


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saundes &ovrgr


YOU Callot Beat The Prices

AT






OUT ISLAND TRADERS BUILDING;
Just East of Inwe's Pharmacy

14CU. 2 DOOR COLOUR REFRIGERATOR $469.00
V.M. CONSOLE STEREO AM-FM
RADIO &t RECORD CHANGER $350.00
PORTABLE 8 TRACK PLAYERS $130.00
TOSHIBA 19" T.V. $265.00
TOSHIBA 16" T.V. S209.00
ELECTRIC CHORD ORGANS SI10.00
V.M. MULTIPLEX 8 TRACK PLAYER
RECORD CHARGER & AM-FM RADIOS S3SS.00
Complete TV Antenna Installation $200.00
Wall Furniture & many otner app~lanres at
Competitive Prices.


SMLES & StERVICES
Open 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m. Saturday until 8 p.m.

PHOM~ 32255
or Come And See F~or Yourself


ASSIFED

HELP MNTED HELP WANTED
C7176 C7154
. ASSISTANT MANAGER: FIRST NATIONAL CITY
Mainly rsosbefrte BAN K requires for its
ove r-a I o e epn Mortgage and Real Estate
Meugmrtment ofk500-room hotel. ouIeice g
all phawes inno egable of h educational background,
houseke psng oea tioof e- typing and shorthand skills.
years experierTe, ref fences Knowledge of mortgage loans,
and Police Certificate. .real estate, conveyancing and
COST ONTRLLER:Musttitle research would be an
be knowledgeable of all phases advantage-
In accounting, be able to Apply Misselbrook, Mortgage
Analyze daily payroll costs for Dept., P. O. Box F-2681,
500-room hotel with as many Telephone 352-6741 for an
c~as 750 employees. Must be abf eaponmt.
Sto analyze all daily purchases. 830
leferenc as andexper e INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Certificate. Chartered Accountants have
PHYS CO THERAPIST several vacancies for Chartered
REQUIRED: Member of the or Certified Accountants in
Chartered Society of their Freeport office.
Physiotherapy, London, Successful candidates will be
Eiglgand. Registered member of paid excellent salaries and
the profession supplementary bonuses wAplpicantstshes d
to medicine. 2-3 years Partnern Pricen t Wtehoe & af
preiu Tee foerenefo Co., P. O. Box F2415
Interested Persons, Apply: Freeport, Bahamas.
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL
AND COUNTRY CLUB* AT ER TAILOR Must be
WEST ND, RAND able to cut, direct and manage
BAHAA, BTWEE THE gent's clothing production
HOURS OF 9 A.M. to 3 P.M. must have experience ir'
C7174 custom and ready-to-wear
( 1) AUTOMOTIVE clothing.
MECHANIC: Must be able to YON LA ES fr
repair cars and trucks including stitching and garment finishing,
major engine overhauls and specializing in shirts and pants.
transmission overhauls. Must Apply in person to: Mr. Man,
have knowledge of electrical Friendship Shopping Centre,
and ignition systems and be a Eight Mile Rock, between 7-8
competent Gas and Electrical .P.M.
2 LF ECHAICS:MustC7181
have previous experience in INSPECTOR -o Cavcndideatleis
trouble-shooting and repairing expected t ae consxeiderabe o
electrical circuits and knwedean x erienc of
mechanical failures in electrical te mtos aeil'
recreational vehicles. Must be a ates id e n
competent Gas and El'ectrical cntuto;iset ulc
Welder. also be experienced in wrs osrcinpromd
vehicle maintaining and repairs. undrks constractwith throre
(1) MDNIGT BELMAN:Company such as street paying,
Thoeki ~uetiu dothi sidewalks, curb adgte,
theckn Hotel thi In o t sanitary or storm sewers,
personality mu a d ep easan building, docks, electrical
apearsoance.ndb nat system and any other related
(1) LAUNDRY WORKER: To cortuin.patcs and
press pants, coats, shirts and tcnqe as related to
coveralls. Experienced female tecngineer in osruto
applicant preferred. niern osrcin
ECHASMCALL MuNGhNE nividra mntloexee inoo
comlee kowedg o smllconstruction work on or
poeures an largm an tdean ad acenabt to right-of- aye and
equipment. Experienced male d
..plcnt preferred. engineering plans an
Apply Monday through Friday specifications and to apply
betwen 900 am an 12 sound engineering principles
Noononl, toKin's In & and practices in inspection
Gof Club, Personnel wokesu cadat is
Deparment Freeort.expected to have a High School
C8653 education or equivalent and
INTERNATIONAL F1RM of considerable experience in
Chartered Accountants have nngilneerrn aton trcio wo
several rv ancies for Cthartere oan surte uiand damhiance with


idcssu cnI lteasrwiel reAp o e vcoG personnel*

apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse & C7179
Co., P. O. Box F-2415, ONE EX PERIENCED
Freeport, Bahamas. GARDENER /DRIVER ,
EIG H TMI LE ARE A.
C7173 APPLY: WILLIAM JOHNSON,
ONE DISHWASHER AND P. O. BOX, F-1997,
ONE CHEF SAUCIER COOK FREEPORT
Appi J IM WH ITE *
FREEPORT 373-3033,
DCEAN ONE RESTAURANT.


trom timCerrellRi Ishg

\GENERAL TENDENCIES: The decisions you
made mn joint conversations with others can
now be put in effect, at least so far as your part of any such
arrangements are involved. Become more active and show that
you have the capacity to produce fine results.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Take time in the morning to go
over your important paprsn, accounts, taxes and see to it that
all is well. You can have a delightful time with mate tonight by
attending a civic affair.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) See what changes should be
made in contracts you have made with others, and be willing
to compromise. Forget that resntment you feel toward
another. Avoid a troublesome situation.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) If you pay an associate a
compliment, you can get fine cooperation for all that work
that faces you. Use a new system for best results. Forget the
social this evening and get a good rest.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) A find day for
recreation and conviviality, but be sure you are with
congenials and avoid arguments. Don't forget to take a good
friend along with you. Help one in distress.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) If you keep promises you have
made to kin, this can prove to be a most enjoyable day for
you. Take steps to eliminate whatever is causing friction in the
home. Show loyalty to mate.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) There are routine affairs that
need to be handled in a clever way for best results. You are
capable of analyzing things very well now and can easily
impress others. Relax tonight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Forget all that jumping around
socially and pay more attention to important financial affairs
that need handling right now. Find a new outlet that can add
to income. Show your true ability.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 Nov. 21) Use that magnetism being
generated by the planets so that you gain your finest personal
aims. It is wise to attend group affairs. Bigwigs can now be
most helpful to your interests.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Arrange a meeting
with advisers in the morning and get the ideas you need.
Forget anything of a lighter vein. The evening is particularly
fine for the romantic side of life.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Look to a dynamic
friend for the support you need to have greater success and
happiness in the future. You can benefit by joining a group
affair. Handle correspondence wisely.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Get the backing you need
from an outsider and align yourself with higher-ups for a new
project that appeals to you. A civic matter can be extremely
helpful. Show that you have expertise.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Before you start on a new
project, be sure you study every factor concerning it carefully.
Make yourself easily available to others. Taking a trip will
make everything easier for you.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .. .he or she will be
one of those young people with great determination and
willpower that can be felt early in life. Be sure to provide for a
good education along right lines so that this life will be a
successful and meaningful one. Anything in the field of
investigative work and laboratory research is fine here. Give
spiritual training at an early age.


I


Bridge
By VICTOR MOC'LO
He eiCI~on hay n to me,"
''Oh, I don't k~now. Someone
e're might hare misplayed the
hand, too." consoled the senior
Kibitzer.
Dealer Sooh Both Vtto

10 8
K QB 7 6 3 :
7%0th
8~~AK
A 5K40g
Snot KJ 5 10 9North



nf the OA were held up twice*
he would switch to d~icts. So at
~trick two, he led his 04 to
c'Tron's OK.E
4 8 7 6 510 9 4 3 2
8 J 6 53 9 4 2
O sa- O A 10 0 85
East won and returned the 09.
TIwo diamond tIdek weren't
enough for the constrat, and
with only one heart stopper left.
there was no tdrne to swritdh to
cl~ubs.
You should have realised."
said sKt sevtrely "tlhat a 4--
diamond break was the only
danger, so instead of leading a
low diamond. auitomaideally, you
should have started with the OJ.
Now, if Best wins, you duck the
next diamond, ensurring four
daood trlits I BEst ho~ds p
tricks-before West can get his
hearts going."


Chess
By LRONARD BAItDEN







Wh tt me







3~s~a minutes, cnty phave; ion-
Futesf club ngthd inot nthes

Chrtkess Solutionds hs
whiter wi t~ne, byea 1 -5nd f
3 ldfue...aq)R 2ort Bxavr, ; 3 i
Q--B8e~tta ch, te &-9; xRme.

If ...Kt )x RfQ 2 BxR R mate.
In the game, Blc tried (1
&-95)s I -KBS hoping for 2
xx xR; 3 Pxktt?~ xxP
ch; J -Kt2z Q-K7 ~ and
wifns but White continued (1
R-Qj. R--KBI) 2 Q--K7! and
Black restoned because it 2..
R--RI; 3Ax R, QxR; Q x Kt
or 4 P X Kt and W ite toins easfly
wf hr fa de m in the diar-
amis f P xKt? R-Kt7 ch:
~rK-gi. Ex P ch; 3 K--Kt]
(3- Kt? mate.


CROSSWORD

P~UZZLE
1.Canadinnfliers 27. Tycoon
4. Palm seaf 29Heulssa
7. Advantae~i 30. Achierve

i 13. Calm 35. Cheat
14. Type of 36. Animas '
16. makers 37.uck
S17. Relieve 40. Army masot
_;18. Reflection 41. Timnetable
19. Scoop abbreviation
2. King t opr h2 B ivr
23. item for 44. French marsl
discussion 45. Scottish rive


SSOLUTION OF
DOWN
1. Baton
hal 2. Past
,r 3. Andiron


ve


RETSEY DA Y
'
S *UZZ E


4b.Porti
5. italian money
6. King
7. Worldwide
8. Copperf leid's
wife
1d Oter
15. Shirker
18."Diamonds"
19. Escape
20. Chalice
21. Antiquity
23. Od Siamese
24.Sleeping
25. Rubber tree



34 Filthy
37. Satoldirsin

38. Turmrct
39. Pasha


Thunrsdy, February 22, 1973.


3i.. e.-; I 3,













Iu yey y rw


FOR SECOnS TEAR In ROW ;arE:



SAC win high school



dia mjioRSh ill r om St.



ohn' 90 t0Ht S 8mA I

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
CONTINUING THEIR DOMINATION which won them the
Eastern Division Senior Boys Championship St. Augustine's
College chalked up their tenth consecutive victory and their -
sercond consecutive championship yesterday when, behind the
coaching of deputy headmaster Vince Ferguson, they demolished ta ~Yr ~~i
St. John's College 51-48 to take the second in the best of three
play offs and the 1973 High School Basketball Championship. )


IN THE SUPREME COURT 1972
OF THE BAHAMA ISLANDS No. 29/72
Equity Side

NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

The Petition of Lionel Johnson of the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Bahama Islands in respect of:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or tract. of land
containing Six Acres (6) and situate Two
Thousand Seven Hundred Twenty-four and
Sixty-six Hundredths (2724.66) feet West of
Fox Hill Road in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence which said piece
parcel or tract of land is bounded NORTH by
Pine Yard Road and running there-on Four
Hundred and Fifty-seven and Ninety
Hundredths (457.90) feet on the SOUTH by
Yamacraw or Joe Farrington Road and running
thereon Four Hundred and Fifty-seven and
Forty Hundredths (457.40) feet on the EAST
by Lot No. 31 otherwise known to be the
property of D. A. McMillen and running thereon
Six Hundred and Four and Sixty Hundredths
(604.60) feet and on the WEST by Lot No. 29
otherwise known as land formerly owned by
Edward Corlett and running thereon Six
Hundred and Three and Sixty Hundredths
(603.60) feet which said piece parcel or tract of
land has such position shape boundaries marks
and dimensions as are shown on a diagram or
plan filed in this matter and is delineated on that
part of the said diagram or plan which is
coloured Pink.
LIONEL JOHNSON claims to be the owner of *

tet uin umberednfeehsimple este lin tossessio

Supreme Court of the Bahama Islands under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have
his title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
(b) The Chambers of S. A. HARRIS-SMITH at
Market Street, in the said City of Nassau,
Attorney for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the 14th day of March, 1973 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the
14th day of March, 1973 will operate as a bar to
such claim.
S. A. HARRIS-SMITH
Chambers,
3rd Floor,
Golden Dragon Building,
Market Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner.


TRADERS BANK & TRUST LIMITED

(IN COMIPULSOR Y LIQUID TIO~N)

Wil hefoloin prsnskndy onac te iqidtoS cd Floo ,B rrd
Su'lly t ilfoloing, O erons kin9dTllyont th2-1i6 sid rconne cion wt claimS
which they may have against the company.


IN THE SUPREME COURT 1972
OF THE BAHAMA ISLANDS No. 45
Equity Side

NOTICE

THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1969.

The Petition of Caroline Fernander of the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Bahama Islands in respect of:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situate
on the Western Side of St. James Road in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
which said piece parcel or tract of land is
bounded on the NORTH by land the property of
Carl Nottage and running thereon One Hundred
and Sixty-eight and Sixty-nine Hundredths
(168.69) feet on the WEST by land the property
of Thomas Knowles and running thereon
Eighty-two and Fifty-five Hundredths (82.55)
feet on the SOUTH by land the property of the
Honourable Milo Butler, M.P., and the property
Of JOseph Thompson and running thereon One
Hundred and Fifty-five and Forty-five
Hundredths (155.45) feet and on the EASTby
St. James Road and running thereon
Seventy-one and Fifteen Hundredths (71.15)
feet which said piece parcel or tract of land has
such position shape boundaries marks and
dimensions as are shown on a diagram or plan
filed in this matter and is delineated on that part
of the said diagram or plan which is coloured
Pink.
OCArROLItNeE t EnRNANDERfeel pistoes thet

pOSsession of the said land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Bahama
Islands under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act,
1959 to have her title to the said land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by
the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
sid Act
Coppies of the plan of the said land may be
inSpected during normal office hours in the
following places:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
(b) The Chambers of S. A. HARRIS-SMITH at
Market Street, in the said City of Nassau,
Attorney for the Petitioner.
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
Claim nOt recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the Ist day of March, 1973 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the Ist
day of March, 1973 will operate as a bar to such
claim.
S. A. HARRIS-SMITTH,
Chambers,
3rd F~loor,
Golden Dragon Building,
Market Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner


Will any other person (depositor, shareholder or other creditor) who considers
'that he has a varid claim against the company which has not been formally admitted
Iby me as liquida~tor also contact me at the above address.
SYDNEY MOR.RIS.
Liquidaltor.


a convincing 33-6 victory apinst the All-Stars in the Bahuamas
pame at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre last night.


American Football Association

their 10 yard line but Jets
defenders Max Jenoure, Minky
Isaacs, Colin Blyden and Paul
Johnson miraculously stopped
the All-Stars from scoring, in
spite of their continuous
territorial advantage.
Both teams fumbled passes
throughout the first half as
they found it difficult to pick-

uloodih ts. Qarteubc Jetshse
Ferguson of the Jets fired two

speeb ong range p tses aly

seemingly groping in the dark!
Ferguson's fortunes changed
three minutes before the end
of the second quarter when he
found Philip Allens with a 15
yard touchdown to open the
scoring and put the Jets 6-0
In dthe second half the
BAFLA unbeaten Champions
really came into their own.

pas ero mPrkDo set wh
quarterback for the All- tars

second touchdown of the

Going into the final quarter
running backs Basil 'Barr' Davis
and Earl Bostwick revealed the
form that they had shown last
season for the Jets.
Bostwick scored twice,
receiving 30-yard and 12-yard.
touchdown passes from
Ferguson and Don Huyler
rounded the scoring for the
ssama srovvit~heru 28 yard
Andy Key scored the only
touchdown for the All-Stars
late mn the final quarter.


Watching the game with
keen interest were four top
football celebrities from the
States George Allen, head
coach for the Washington
Redskins; Mark Witkin, a scout
for the New England Patriots,
Herman Weiskopf. Associate
Editor for Sports Illustrated
and WGBS's sports
doml"entator Eddie
Allen, Witkin, Weiskopf and

a dlmayn taslageed that th

better coaching to bring out
their full potential.
"You can see that the
players possess a lot of natural
taet" sadNwEngland
Par ts co dh and scout, Mark
Witkin, "but proper coaching is
needed. A fotbl tam s o

each coah ecacn tdnic tthe
aspect tof the game,"a cone u

ply ossi coach andcoit s
everythtinR." sad Win.

Washi gon Iedskins he d
coach, Gorge Ain, said h
was very impressed with the
players' speed and agility but
added, "the talent is
undoubtedly there but needs
to be developed by first class
coachinE*
hFollowing the game, Allen
s owed par iulr in eres in

oe ,tngas a Coi B yd
of the Jets.
"These players certainy

hr efo tbpah(',ski Alen 'bur
whether they have the speed
for it is another matter."
Allen then said he would te


giving Blyden and Ingrahm
trials within the next day or so
to determine if they had the
speed and acceleration required
to play pro football.
The result of the game was
certainly a surprise to football
fans, many of whom turned
out to watch the game in spite
of the cold, blustery
cnitiwa thought that a
combined Stingrays-Marlins
1l-Sta tm wol r bb


However, the Jets not only
extended their wins to 13
straight but at the same time
trounced the All-Stars.

qu rtrbact Andym eyAid th
felt the Jets thoroughly
druerod ts en e"Ourplan t

Sunp 1ngn tbhaecks R l,

Ban ono ady tromg wnhec d t
defence," exclaimed Kel fwe

switched tacticsbto divert th

flank, Ryan Cl are, nthe
opposite side, but this also
failed," said Key.
"In fact it wasn't until well
into the last quarter when I
started to alternate my passes
to the appropriate flank that
we began to find paths through
the Jets defence, but by then it
was too late," said Key.

undoubtedly es ed the cayie
the first two quarters. For
almost the entire half the
All-Stars drove the Jets back to


"l(y, I'm so, proud of my

I<. jIr roakies "

i'ros in these last two games,
e ad d e d, sayouring
ii n!rat ulations coming in from
1ll s~ides. "We will probably go
dlownl to f~reeport and beat up
Ireeport Hligh and Catholic
Hig~h and show the people that
(1an ir sialy hte dlli School
St. Augustine's holds the
Ifgh School basketball record


68in69 shets 196(7 '68 and
Tied at 32 all at the end of

eepbutrh, dwhip td baldrd
Monday, came on and sparked
St. John's with two assists to
Tyrone Sawyer and Andrew
Albury as they moved 36-32 in
the lead and S.A.C:. called time
out.


second enance in the fourth
q artereafte hee was houed eo~uts


counted five fouls on Albur
but the scorers recorded only
four. Turner and Robert Scott,
both of whom were fouled out,
scored II and eight
respectively.
COMPLAINTS

twotgame btte Iro pltai e
about poor officiating. "We are
supposed to win that game,"
sad Albury,hcaptai ao St

how weC lose it yeat. ainte

first quarter to get warm, were

quatr deficit as neal160 0far
crammed the A. F. Adderle
G~ym to cheer on thei
favourite team.
With Noel Munroe
controlling the boards for St
Augustine's, G~eorge Mills used
his only two field goals of the
game to help to a 16-14 lead
until Hepburn entered the
game oto work wth Rolle on

John's to 19 all t e
JulianoaRussell,iefouled by
Albury, went two for two from
the line with Munroe following
on a three point play which
gave S.A.C. a 24-21 lead as
Albury in the closing seconds
clip d the lead by one on a
A fairly even third quarter
s St.3John's jumping t~o an
rebounded two behind at
32-30 and evened out 32 all by
the end of that quarter.
"It's like I told you from the
beginning said coach
Ferguson, 'St. Augustine's is
going to hold their own.' "
ST. AUG;USTINE:'S COLLEGE
Cooper 3 23 2 t8
Barbes 6 6 7 2 18
Murt 4 5- 10
a ls 00 0 4
smith I 0 3 1 I
HuneH 04 0 &
* ** *
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE E


St. Augustine's v St. John's
College High School Basketball
Championship playoffs. S.A.C.
won 51-48 to take their second
game and the Senior Boys
Championship. Photo: Rickey
Wells.



TOURWIE SCHEDULE
FRIDAY F B. 23v .Pyec,

B. Fnwe v n.Lnn BethelA v
Avrbrok a ,ie~Knowe v Felix

str~ac av J. Gen AO. Smt nv .
5 p.m. V. Miller v J. Marshall, E.
Webt v B. Delancy, i. Bethel v J.
RS TURDAY, FEB. 24
2 p.m. B. Demeritte v R. Stokes,
R. Preston v B. Knowles, J.
Thompo v t.Heo Hae
All matches not completed on
Sdy' sch dul wIl e pstdd a
the Montagu Clubh~ouse on
s YR 'DOING FINE'
PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA
(AP r- South Afdican glife Gare'
Monday after surgery on a blockage
between kidney dand oradere at
Tuesday for removal of a cyst from
his left leg and a bladder
examination


Returning to the court,
Albury added one of two free
throws followed by Phillip
Turner rep daf firu before

inthe qate ad ed ed to 34.
SnA.C .quahe 5:5 in the game
lost their second man on foulls
when George Mills, trying to
stop Dexter Rolle, picked up
his fifth.
FOUL TROUBLE

br C hton Fi ne Jnervish an
G~reg Cooper to strengthen the
of ece as S ohnea wo~o

trouble, saw Robert Scott and
Phillip Turner make their exit,
and Sawyer and Albury
struggling with four fouls each.
Livingstone Barbes added
two free throws and a jumper,
with Cooper following on
another basket, gave S.A.C. a
47-43mlead with 2:24

Turner on a three play
brought St. John's to life
moving them one behind with
1:58 remaining. Retaliating,
Barbs controlled a lau poer

S.Auq, anrkedr ait io Cooper
who on another layup gave
them a 51-46 lead with 33
seconds remaining.
Both Rodney Farquharson
and Turner missed chances of
scoring free throws and a late
jumper by Turner moved St.
John's to 48.
Barbes topped St.
tAuut' dit fo8 six from
the free throw. Noel Munroe,
before being fouled out,
contributed 10.
Alb~ury. who was given a


CONTROLLING ONE OF THE MANY he took from the
boards, Noel Munroe of St. Augustine's College finds very
Little room to move while closely guarded by Robert Scott
and Phillip Turner. S.A.C. won 51-48 Photo: Rickey Wells.


Agg [@gy ARE Carters keep their

JUNIIOR CH AMPS BABA hopes alive


CAR IER's HITACHI kept their
hopes for the playoffs alive when,
p ced by prince n" una wthE if
dewith 22 points and 24
rebounds, they de eated Ramsey's
8Blazerst A3 Adddurin sy astmnight's
With Bodle and Hepburn scoring
12anda t3 espbutive yl in the llrs
lead wiywtoh ione ahoe pacing
Sidney Frarncis came on strong In
th hselcund iaf t~o hae nms y'
andHL onvl rlar ad ed sixS mons
picking up the! range of the basket'
soem dlme i 2 epblurnC rdt d
opene~b2 119inltyeprto win. me
Sturdy when they meet Pinder's
brown's ra aks boring 39
parcn fl o tec til bu chdich
game high of 27, trampled St.
Agnes Crusaders 72-33 Inst night at
A. F:. Adderley G;ym.
uSrctrisg Edt o b theh tF rebounds helped the Arawaks to a
29-6 second qarter.it ern
Sleith wh sco dd nine ot hispacl
frmo nh ied, omnvedo the rael 1
on to victory.
Harry Woodside! topped the
Crusaders with 12 points. Clatude
Hoaonk1 ad n other eight anld
S 81Wigg Igg

IITH AUSSIES

(AK)1NAutSaTIOIII rou ht a nickel oA
sexeen nero the d ing m nues o
as tuilndies here Wednesdlaynisy
wickets cheaply. But by then th
rna h was beeyont res rectson and
for 1niti sres we dAu to lia 42
declared: West Indies 428 and 67
for three.WetId
chan e of batting sescse/ dtinta
after Australia had declared earlier
in the day at 260 fo~r two in their
second innings, knwt their three
wickets in the space of seven runs,
but were n verm In eal drno r of
Au tanon cptoain ean hd/ l"'g
second over and similarly d missed
lr~hond dt opner hRoco 1rdr i
seven rutnsI ltor <;eas acin" t
at gu ty to dism as Lawrence Rowe
o rst bowler Jeff Hammond for

and awt r Fo te thKn hrar t
hom toa fthhero h uttil the ind
a rehni to bahdon playaywp'ithg a

setdne day the anu a 3 in
St n hoe, I '2, ad tan d ath,
60. kt was the highest Australian
sa f te nt to sice e agi
grud a dc tre nes IoA tralia
hetack j t tehe vul bu lt aig

minutes at the crease. Otherwise he
was In command on an easy paced
pitch, and hit two sixes and 22


WHILE STILL battling for a
Adere Hoigh'sjuno bo ps, pce~d
by D~eric Vost with a saime high of
24 points, stopped C. I. G;ibson
Gunio rbenysA d13 restetrday at te
Junior Boys Basketball
chiponh .og scoring four in the
firsteqartyd AdderhlefoHigh took
High paced by Jeffery Stubbs
bt iedt hc t daqiu4r rltie at the
a she Joh on temng uhe d h
Adderley to a 29-23 third quarter
lead. However Gibson Higth thoungh
w~~te its urt whenortheirga r
Thompson entered foul trouble,
Vgot u der another eigr yin F
ch p onshi in teir ronk yetare
it was not all loss for G;ibson
though, their junior girls defeated
Bailey High Junior gir s to win that
championship.


Turner
Sawyer

Albury
Scott
I arrquharson


I'ASTERN DIVISION (Junior boys)

St. A ~lsubi e? 2 2
Dounald Davis 0 4
Note: C. 1. Giibson defeuatd R. M.
Batiley High for the E. D). junior
boys championship,


WE:STIERNDIIVISION
A ; dee~rley High 4 0
Mc ersNo High 3
St. John's College I 3
Government High 0 2
Note: Government High withdrew
after two games.


Adderley, Ellis
Anders~on, Gloverbell
Blain, MaVIS
Bain Sidney
Bain, Warren
Bowe, illian
Br Eemen, Stanley
Brice, Susan Mae
Brown, Granville
B~row, Kirkwood
Brown, Simeon L.
B5rowb Sind

Burows, Ithaman
Burorow, Lillian
Burrows, Maoudlene
Burrows Maudlean
C~aspbeU, Agnes P.
Colon, Charles
Clerk, Dorothy
kCle, Nipal

Chke, Wedlb
Colebrook, Georp
nooper Spence


CurtisJ, Delores
Darling, Claranell
Ferguson, Beatrice
Ferguson, Lllian
Ferguson, Robert
Ferguson, Vernice
Ferguon, Villamae
Forbes, Evelyn
Forbes, Judy
Forbes, Kirk
Forbes, Roin
Frnmcis, Zach &/or Curry V.

Geotc John
G~ibson, Charles
Green, Albulrn
Hall, Carolyn W.

Heastl, Arnold
Jack, Mitchel
Johnson, LW


'Kig, Arenetta
Cha ~Brles


K~neeshaw, Rex
Lightbourne, George/Wilfred
Multree, Merline

Page,Blddk
Pople, Edward
Pratt, Joel
Rahming, Edward
Rahming, Theo

Saints Burial Society


Smith, Harry
Smith,Jennie
Smith, Milton
Smith, Naomi
Thompson, Earl
(Earl's Texaco Service).
Theman Muriel
mpnsDn
Webb, SheV8
Wi~llams, Eul Mae
WIlisms, Terry & Deveaux, Olivcr


hurdsdy, F~uary 22, 1973.


Eb Gribunt


FfeguSOR Stafs sS lets win 33-8,



2 to be trials by Redskins

QUARTERBACK JESSE FERGUSON; threw four touchdown pssess to lead the Nassau Jets to


STANDINGS