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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03268
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: February 9, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03268

Full Text
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3


SU EMAR ET
If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Value!


P3-~-i~BgE~a~i%


I


VOL. LXX, No. 67. Friday, February 9, 1973. Price: 15 Cents


(I


1972.







2 W g g a
011~ HlAITIIAN national was
shot to, death and two o~thers
were wounded~ in an alleged

<(a she toh ateer tn u' >c
Iast ni ht. gxlice saidheve

aInd other dr as s were not
immredlately available. The
injured were treated at ho)spital
and disc~harged.
A police cpokesquann said an
"int az che investigation has
It was the second time
with n ten dayS that a mlan has
died from gunshot wounds in

Thi ariro vidtim. also a
Iatea ieth bn ranatappa ene
Hlill Road service station on the
night of January 31. A
Jamaican. 1 7-year old I rrotl
liayden. has been charged with
the murder of Emllile P'ierre.
A hospital spokesman this
afternoon refused to, disclose
the conditions of the two men
wounded last nighrft, as fIhe
Tribhune did notl know their
names.
Late this atternconr police
confirmed another shooting on
Miami Street.




POLICE In AR mED

URnR R UUULR

AT FRE EP ORT
TWO MEN are "assisting"
Freeport police in connection
with the Tuesday morning
armed robbery of the Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce on
Queen's Highway. The three
firearms thought to have been
used in the hold-up have been
fund ad poie ha


ank police spokesman told


Magistrate s C'ourt in
conetio wth the robbery

T~he spokesman saiid ~ne o~f
the men being held was picked
up on Wednesday evening. and
the third later the same night.
TIhree maskedl me~n. arrmd
with a double barre~l shotgun
adktwo r voavers beld up the
about S52 000 in cash ind

C`henrolet ar.nvertrode:

F~reeport doctor on Saiturday,
was found an hour after the
robbery parked with the engneii
still running outside the
Bachelor Apartments on
Hludson Avenue.

thPolice havee saihdothey bliev




about $800 in cash.
Also under investigation Is
the robbery early Saturday of
the Pancake Hlouse restaurant
on East Sunrise Hfighway. A
lone, masked gunman accosted
the restaurant manager and his
wife, took about $240 and
made his getaway onl foot.


Irl~lU ~UUI~III


a POWERFUL JET-PROP ENGINES
ARE MORE RELIABLE: THAN 2.
-T.ELEPHONE 77303/77778


the rise in the cost of living during
The demanrld is for a pay. rise
over aInd abo~ve' the watge
structure built into a two-year
work contract signed by the


in a1 letter declivered this
afternoon to Asstciation
'presiident A~ntonrio DiScalla.

Glinton wrote
"The Bahama~s Hlotel ald
C:atetringua Wort rs aldr i
for 5.8 percent increase
across he t, doubt aware of
the tremendous rise in the cost
of Living in the Bahamas over
the last 12 months, and could
imagine the increased burden it
hasm slce .workers in the
"Government figures show a
5.8 percent increase over the
past 12 months. This in itself


beiU EINT MEiETING
"An urgent meeting with the
Association would he greatly
appreciated to further discuss
i. this very imnportant matter."
al Mr. Glinton told The
y Tribune that while the cost of
living has been rising, "roughly
" 70 to 80 percent" of hotel
,e workers in Ne~w Providence ant
Paradise Islands have not
ec recently been working fuU
of weeks. Hle said rotation
ts systems have been instituted.
He said copies of the letter
were sent to Labour Minister
e, Clifford Darling and to Mr.
dirr t rnoftthe A sci ce n

Id signed at the Labour Ministry
e.in January last year provided
asfor increases in minimum
"1 salaries payable in the various
al categories of workers rangring
s, as high as 25 percent.
rActual salary increases for
persons already on the job
averaged about 54.15 for all
categories. Salaries being paiti
at the time were as low as $26
,f per week, and rarely over
,f $100.
d iUenddr teuanel s cortra t

minikua wage tayable s $29

rotated.


PRIME MINISTER Lynden O. Pindling (left) returned
Gomrnoro Gera. neig at MloaB. Butter, See ting om
international Airport. The Prime Minister met with Lord
Bainiel and other officials of the Foreign and
Commonwealth Office to discuss details of the transfer of
oer as t~he Bahamas moves closer towards independence











By SIDNEY DORSETT
A NASSAU SHOPPER, claiming she was "wrongfully arrested
falsely imprisoned and defamed" during a visit to her loc
foodstore has filed suit in the Supreme Court against the East Ba


P.M. SAYS NEW YORK PREMISES

FOR U.N. MISSION 'TOO EXPENSIVE'






Bahamas asks Prince















I dpnd~ec batim



THE ADDED COST OF INDEPENDENCE for the Bahamas is already making itself felt.


Con stit ut ion and the
Independence B el tort h

Pariarnentl were "in hand adnd
no rbstaclesh are antic pateli
wide-ranging nt I a withatLord
Balniel, Minister of State
included such protocol
qu"stins :sto whno m be
designed to represent Queen
Elizabeth at the Independence
celebrations next July.

A forma' ",::I.Tent ..o w
ie Iadei solier Mialestyndthe
subsequent announcement of
the Royal visitor's Identity will
come from the Palace.
The Tribune has been
authoritatively informed that
the Bahas goe et
.vould like Prnee gernmen o
serve as his country's
representative at the Jubilee
celebrations.
Production of the new flag
and scoring of the national
anthem are also on schedule
Mr. Pindling disclosed
There has, however, been no
public announcement as yet
conce ning eit ern thea oous


T~he Tribune understands
from official sources that this
information is to be revealed at
a later date.
The national anthem was
composed and the words
written by former Ministry of
Education music officer
Timothy Gibson, and has
already been played publicly.
ANTHEM
The anthem is being scored
by a team of Ministry of

i~nd te Bhama a mu ofinal
n o~andon by music ansnof te

lihe will beopmblished in an
international journal,
While in London the Prime
M nisterM aso ieddiscussins


Co oweat eheaSec etar at
Mr. Smith told the Prime
M in ist er that other
independent states in the
Commonwealth already have
been approached for their
views on accepting the

Bawsm wilabeacomemu ica heso

noun ement wl e made in

M korf seing stop ed in NeN
flyn to London. In both
ci nes he instructed officials
who are searching for premises
to house the Bahamas,
diplomatic missions.
The Prime Minister said he
h rcivee r por fro tw

i o d r ce n l at e n g a


dfAgr culturee a Fsh res
Assistant Secretary, Ministry of
External Affairs.
Such subjects as territorial
Emits, the continental shelf
and exploitation of the seabed
were dealt with at the
conference, Mr. Pindling said,
all of them matters of
importance to the Bahamas in
ved ofare el Covernmentl's
which was ex o ndedprin bop
the Green and White Paints
pThe of iscials'i rport, the

encouragedt msi our p st on"
proposes to advance at the
.IntemnationaldLawoof th eSe s


Prime Minister Lynden
Pinhdlings disclosero d asitadio
night that available quarters for
a Bahamas consulate and
United Nations Mission in New


York are "too expensive and

too thohrght we should look
for something less expensive
and smaller quarters, he told a
Radio Bahamas interviewer.


The Prime Minister returned
olmwinLono nigWednesd y
Foreign and Commonwealth
Office and reported that drafts
of the new Bahamias


MIRISIGF SasS BahaMSS 10 eHSill8



VinrSIOFS 1188 8HOugh trife SIIStaff

THE BAHAMAS GOVERNMENT has placed a high priority on the training of Bathamians to
ensure investors in an independent Bahamas "that we have the trained personnel needed to sustain
whatever kind of business that is established here," Imbour Minister Clifford Darling said
Thursday.


Addressing the Freeport
convention of the Colorado
Contractors Association, Mr
Darling pointed to this and his
Ministry's various pieces of
labour and welfare legislation
asri dicative of eh 'health
aii te rsli~~rr atn l
visitors" which the Bahamas
government had created.
Mr. Darling gave his own
i n t e p re la alnao

first.
Ilt means giving the
Bahamians an equal chance to


compete with the other man. It
means giving to Bahamians the
opportunity to branch out into
areas that were formerly closed
to them.
Bahamianization, said the
Ministlle.-ees opening the
door so that Bahamians may,
for the first timle, enter the
mainstream of their society.
"Perhaps then, the primary

a proc cne edne sol
Bahamians to take over the
lead in sailing this ship of state
in short, training Bahamians


to fill responsible positions in
the nation at every level.
IMPROVEMENT
Earlier in this speech Mr-
Darling dealt with his
government's effects to
improve the lot of the working
man throulghh the Industrial
Relations Act of 1970 which
opened up a new phase for
trade unions.

wPrio tothtl ine said, there
legislation.
Through this Act, Mr.
Darling continued, trade
unions were assured freedom
of association and the
fundamental rights of workers
to bargain collectively through
freely chosen representatives.
"While there is no doubt
that this was of great
importance to the workers of
the country, it was as equally
important to employers who
hineablept iduti tehe Ithe

tolraa n ovpeamesfulf isnolts

The Industrial Relations Act
was followed by the Fair
Labour Standards Act the same
yn relThis Act established aad

wokesof ou Pyoun naiotnhe
the Minister said.
The Act, he said, established
standard hours of work and
vacations with pay for certain
categories of workers. It
further provided machinery for
setti g mirniusmnwages laws in

nblihd emt doctrine of


Mr. DarURANghe rAe ered to
his Ministry's most recent
achievement -- passage of the
National Insurance Act which
provides for the payment of
benefits and grants of
assistance to persons who are
sik,s the invalid and maternity



c lo m oese thn t c s iose
tor the Bahairedanh pee, much


along the line of the social
security measures of the
U.S.A."
The Minister maintained
that no one could fault the
government's record along
these lines.
F rst it as su med
respo sibilit obforectramning
ensured that the conditions of
their employment was

prvddben fids foh i uri s

andWetremen tken measures,,,
heasaid, "ht ptle tohn e

le ulity f allt Baar anssoil


Street branch of City Markets.
Although listing no specific
amount for damages, Mrs.
Freda Pinder Thompson,
believed to be of Town Court
Apartments, claims that she
"has been gravely injured in
her character, credit and
reputation," by the incident.
The suit arose out of an

mni en la s fe ast Ba~y Str e

She claims further that she
has been brought into "public
scandal, odium and contempt,"
as a result of a forced search of
her hand-bag at the store.
Filed by attorney Cecil
Wallace Whitfield on behalf of
Mrs. Pinder Thompson, the
writ states that she had paid a
visit to the foodstore on
November 4 and after paying
for purchases, left at about 2
p.m.
saUpo aleavingtem ltose she

Ed lica arding, "lwthgfl f

forcefully detamnedeher" at th

handbag tc aimingot t she had

SALLEGn(D REMARK
h"You uotbsomething in Paour
your hdag . am
instructed by my company to
arrest and search anybody
whom I suspect of stealing
rdmrsthe store. These arew'':


METHODISTS PLEDGE

SUPPORT FOR MORE

ROAD SAFETY HERE

THE BAHAMAS District of
the Methodist Church on
Tuesday pledged its "full
support" to programmes aimed
at promoting road safety in the

ahahm Methodists' call to all



mTuisda igts roeepresentratve
sessionsblt of thein Bahemas
Distict's, 161sto Syod moeeig
at Termt Methodis Church*y t
Fredesricks Street intef
The Syo resolution aot drn


Flight persons hae dsetaivedn
resoad aciensi the Bahamas
st Tince y th r e nn ding of het er l


cube at elgous ad civia
resun ca n fos th nesfet ijr

Meoad cisets andt Bahamians


suspect and I searched you
Hoarding is alleged to hav
remarked.
Mr. Harding, The Tribun
understands, is the manager (
the East Bay City Marker
branch.
He is accused of havin
made the remark to th

"o snPal( 1n e rnd d iv
been identified as a l5-year-ol
packing boy at the foodstore
Claiming further that she hr
suffered "a nervous condition
and had to seek medic;
treatment after the accusation:
were made, Mrs. Pinde
Thompson said that he
"handbag did not contain an
articles or thing from M
Harding's foodstore."
Acknowledging service o
the writ, the law firm o
attorneys Issacs, Johnson an

Tho pson t is m ring fil
Limited.


Includes is Ih ex s uds n

co ies of prints on th sa e y

, ocurnents such ana dai l
back to the 1820's, a slave

rmoaumissio oret1rSofa lsl~aw

will be shown
S Ira books gvn
accoeui a of slave sales an
conditions of slaves in the
Bahamas are to be included,
Also photographs of ruins of
frmer plantations will be


in the seac hr ea t the fn
rftshes arvscl sal ding sa
through the repository to see
how records are stored in the
air-condiltioned, humidity
ceositrod ire-proof
r At the back of the build ng,

tee md iln be on dis layb o



eandiutreh1 adqbuart by t
ffichialex st onf we trhie oee e

Miite the H ducayon Euatind
aN. Cutr H1 on Ivaptone
The eibitiopnm aty. b
th e i c ro :31 opene oy t


p.m. aily dur ng the m. to
NOT SAME
FRANK CAREY
MR. FRANK C. Carey of
Frank Carey's Real Estate Ltd..
sid itcodwi tei e inoino awa

whon hvobeen cahrged wit
home on White Lane January

ofroay 's iare ils president


THE BOARD of G;overnors
of Prince Williams Baptist Hligh
is to meet January 22 with the
Parent-Teachers AssciL~ation to
explain its decision to
hermin te thie car trahets aft e

coaop chl n~ nne^ n tm

Idase niorhtt during the ruan
monthly meeting of the Board
of Governors.
The date coincides; with the
PTA's regular monthly
meeting. The PT1A. chaired by
Customs Officer Ariangton
aylemoee ch ontthe last


se o bg at pni a h


Mr.inCox said Bth at 3te
"outline to the parents exactly
what gave rise to what
appeared to be a problem but
which was not a problem." The
parents would be assured, he
said, that students will, have
"proper education" and that
the school will not be closed
down.
in a meeting with the Prince
Williams teachers on January
10 Mr. Cox served notice on

t umd at terry i atred contAapci

erluring he stttntervening
could re-apply to the Board to

beohr m u dewh a j onntract


~ttP


~ritruno


Regiere wihPsmse fBhmsfo otg oesinihin the Bahamas). Nassau and Bahamna Islands Leading Newspaper


TO MATCH RISE OF COST

OF LIVING HERE IN 1972









/ ~By MIKE LOTH1IAN
THE BAHAMAS HOTEL AND) CATERING WORKERS'
UNION ttxlay registered a demand with thle Bahamas Hotel
i'Employers Association for a 5.8 percent wage increase to match


tt tSli 8eod OpCS8 IV 5


THE MINISTRY of Education and Culture's Archives Section
will hold an Exhibition of Historical Documents "Aspects of
Slavery" --for the week beginning Monday, February 12.


EISCli0H case 0 T



IIISIofy, SO its sa ill
TH~E CYRIL Fountain-Philip

Sim incBaBhamn aNOsto th t
the wrong candidate has taken
a seat in the House and been
subsequently removed and
replaced by court order, as
rep rted in last night's
Tiune.

a byoultec ponin teran Baha n

eevatilon6 f Clo o. Bhell t

rh ueiltv Coucl Hrl

petition filed in the Election
Court showed that Warren
Levarity had in fact polled a
majority of votes. Mr.
deGregory had to vacate the
seat, to be replaced by Mr.
Lhevatonly major difference
b tween he twod oae ist



Reetum ig Officer to be tie i
general election, and in a fresh
poll held October 6 Mr. Smith
won the seat when Mr.
Foun toin 's supporters
boycotted the poll.
However, on scrutiny by the
Election Court it was found
that Mr. Fountain had in fact
won the September 19 poll,
and should have taken the seat.

CRSAL

BEDROOM
LAMPS


NASSAU REPORT


10 me8 81 A 00 FO hilary 22


SOFT DRINK FIlg

WORKERS STILL OUT

tod GEEN tr e nl our


Shirly Sntre tet prodcond d

retunedoitin to ther jobs. t
The dsu work-sopaed wonas
sparked byrto alwlegedly harsh

hrules intre roducd yanew





Cay, Andkros harvest ben
re-unmed to he Clrence .Bin
Aipor inhoour -of the late
spark b liamentaria who
representeoucd b tha osttency
many ymears temwiht

Cabinethe oeato Bahwekama
InformaotiaonSrvcs arelmeae i
aid tn e taou aiisrmen Jof he



Tem~ aIPR at obe epae
thi w eek rts da t e

Arot as Iseorvef ir s t





(A)Team odyrn ih
tanks to the perimeter of the closed

wpraho s cf A ra madg Id
to tthe Dominica Re ub ic s captlW
Authorite also checked vehicles
entering or haiMA Santo Domingo,
a smlliurrpn a ce landd ery
Sunday.
oAt least two adiers were placed
station la Santo Domingo. Nine
were shut down by government or
manesement orders earlier in the
week. They are now back on the


Rrr et lrun seagerl dIn
address Wednesday night,
a nun ed thet te governmental

public order."
He said he feared that a broader
"subsrasive action" could pill over
ino the capital and other unnamed
Government admitted for the
first time three soldiers had been
killed in combat.
ThrsAy mWha oes aot man tad
martial law hasbeen declared."
Reaction to the Prealdent's
speech came swiftly.
whb Amiceman oi, ont of t me
assasination of former dictator
Rafael Trulillo on May so, 19611
and one of two who are still alive,
said:
st Despite the Presidentbs speech I
Invasion ever occurred. I don't have
sufficient data. The issue is still
cent jguer talked of coincidences,
not fact. He gave no proof."
Two days ago, the military
surrounded Amlama Tio's home

A la a To' hm,n bu Fkeerps a
squad of guards at his plush
residence on the western edge of
Bthed guer publically accused
Bosch, although he was not
mentioned by name, of being
He icaed3 i h andinn a laugue

became aware of the landlP g at
Caracoles Bay," in Azua Province.
Balaguer also sid the former
s ceh ng sarid otm uspee
proportions would happen in
1973."


LEADER OF IRE "RED HAND" ARRESTED
BELFAST (AP)- British troops have rfade another search-and-arrest
sweep through Prot sant asit Belfast It's fearedxthe pre dawn raids mag
John McKeague, the reputed leader of a small but militant Protestant
rouecdalled thisR 1Hele the largest ever mounted against Protestants in
Northern Ireland. Those rounded up can be detained for up to three days
without charges.
The Catholic ex Servicemen's Association of Belfast says it will send a
dele aiaon to the Itish Repubi tod eek arms h group clam a

south.
U.K RECOGNIZE eCOMUra NSTecEomGEReMANYf h BgTre,
western powers to recognize Communist East Gjermany. A joint
communique says full diplomatic relations are to take effect immediately.
But British sources in West Berlin say a British ambassador will not go to
East Berlin until East and West G~ermany ratify their historic friendship
This will mean West G;ermany will send its ambassador to East Berlin
before the British. The U.S. has indicated it eventually will recognize East
Germany asor.
POLICE PATROL FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUSES
BOCA RATON, Fliorida (AP)- Police patrolled seven Florida school
campuses Thursday following disputes between black and white pupils.
One high school was closed and tense situations were reported at eight
offficcl sai many of the incidents across the state were triggered by
the painting of white power slogans on school walls and the wearing of
Confederate armbands by white pupils.
Authorities said several pupils w~ere arrested after racial troubles which
started last week at Boca Clega High School near St. Petersburgh on
Florida's west coast spilled over to four nearby campuses Thursday.
HUGHES CONFINED TO WHEEL CHAIR HEART ATTACK
LONDON (AP)- Billionaire American recluse Howard Hughes, said to
tohide isn thn gnthoush laha r ondn oem ehu had a serious heart
Tse London Evening News said two heart specialists arrived from the
United States and sped in a chauffeur driven car to the Inn on the Park
Hotel, where Hughes is staying. Hughes, whose hideaway is a closely
to rdd pnt ouse n th nin Bor of te hot l, arivd anLodon two


REPUBLICANS FOR WATERGATE COMMITTEE NAMED
Gu 11(TOiN (A) L we91 Howard H.r I ker o Te noneee, ~dward 1
Thursday as the Republican members of the Senate s special committee to
investigate the Watergate bugging case and related political espionage.

O HI(TON AP) SNT U rge Oml 6P fildn a anst retuning war
prisoners for making propagaenda statements over North Vietnamese radio,
the Defense Department said Thursday, but Pentagon spokesman Jerry w.
F'riedhelm did not rule out disciplinary action against PO)Ws for "ratting on
cmt 5 o" cy rtan qoudest nmanelo prisnrs w~in t restated
Former Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird had taken a similar stand
about six months ago, and Friedheim made it clear that the policy remains
in effect under Elliot L. Richardson, Larird's successor.
When a young questioner asked if the government contemplates filing
*charges against any U.S. war prisoners for making statements over Hanos
:r delm oMid Ib dnow w y som othnir sta edents w~e machres,,

rLL BUILD THIRD MAJOR AIRPORT TO SERVE LONDON
LONDON (AP)- Britain's Conservative government Thursday won
approval for a third international airport to be built at cost of 1,ooo
million pounds 2.400 million dollars.
The airport' is scheduled to be built at Maplln on the coast about 4s
mhUn~aP a seBr~viced by Heartrow in the northweste rnuburbs and
by Gatwick la the south but British air authorities believe these two
airports will not be adequate to cope with future air traffic.
U.S. AMBASSADORS NAMED TO WORLDWIDE POSTS
WASHINGTON (AP)- The Senate Thursday confirmed the nomination
of James Keogh to be Director of the U.S. Information Agency.
Keogh, newsman and author, was chief of the White House research and
writin rtoln It969 and 170. He succeeds Frank J.Shakes p 1 ments:
Daniel P. Moynihan to India, Richard Helms to Iran, Richard T. Davies to
Poland, Cleo A. Neol Jr. to the Democratic Republic of the Sudan, and
Melvn L. Manful to Liberia.
MAKARIOS PRESIDENT FOR THIRD S-YEAR TERM
NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) Archbishop Makarios was procliamed
rediected Thursday to a third five-year term as president of Cyprus.
In a speech to roaring thousands of his supporters, the black-robed
Arabbishop denounced the forces of his rival Gen. George Grivas, for their
termrori tactics and chided them for not contesting the election.
The throng immming0 the square, streets, rooftops and balconi s
surrounding Makrluros' palace was estimated at 150,000 to 200,000, which
is 30 to 40 per cent of the Greek Cypriot population. About a fifth of
CV bly mvd by th massv ulr out, Markarios declarred: "The people
spak today. They condemn violence and terror'~m. They condemn
unlawful armed men, bomb throwers, those unconsciously working for a

a n badda tf3bio ceT proclaimed prees dentdautodmaticcall par hne
for Enosis the union of Cyprus with Greece at any price -- refused a
dichaller by Makarios to contest the election and seek popular support.
BANK ABANDONS FLOATING PRIME RATE
NEW YORK (AP) First National City Bank, the nation's second-largest
commercial bank, said it was abandoning its floating prime interest rate
Thursdy "as a direct result of government pressure."
A spokesman for the bank said Citibank believed the step could "hurt*
rather than help ... the fight against irnfltion." But it said it would leave its
prime rate at 6 per cent, at least for the time being.
la the pat, the bank had set its rate according to prevailing conditions
in money markets. There had been widespread expectation that the
ban Prom ntr akthelsulderesomae r bsn torp gstsmost creditworthy
customers. As an indicator of the availability of credit, it influences
business expansion, employment, prices and the general economy.


The Chinese Village

he Hou~swe

pl SASETPHONE 2-2164


toda as *es-fr n t tiansA bew e th a Lo n pvrm nt en::
Communist Pathet Lao rebels appear to be nearing agreement.
Amrcan sources ai oK ssier's eralim sa ven oute to Hro was

oCcl lin Bangkok ttodesy hat t utewill be la ce o-fre Ch 1::: a
Choonhavan, told newsmen.
c~ic~ Vi dtKissinger planned to discuss details of the proposed
Western diplomats In the Laotian capital expect a truce within days.


By Edmond 14 Breton
Washington (AP)-Presdent
Nixon'sd administration b


tax on imports to prod

erl gno 1l neo i tins o
trade as well 8a monetary
problems.
This assessment was made
Th rs t by msouricebutuho
close to the adm nstration,
economic thinking. W s
They su gsted that the
threat of an import surcharge'

eosblt Tesa ny He br
Pres m nt's eounci o


of negotiations the United
States wants. But if not, they
sa do it ca tdtbe ass med that
actually imposing the
surcharge, which would not
requin0 Congresinl nahea n.

imposed briefly in 1971 when
Nixon launched his new
economic pro ramemee t lo'

enough to have much im act
on the flow of foreign goods
into the country but it was
cr dited a omtnh mi afa tor in

A re ents that headed omfan
trade-emonetr crisis.ontee

agreements, however, has been
disappointing to many both in

Cngr ss. sscu sos dav no

hoddped and uropean trading

sesid ering rsdetar
questions first, postponing the
trade issues that urgently
conmarn thm Uie tes o
imports over exports.
The United States wats t
eal chu gthe whole comp d
capital movements at once.
Th t o new men ion ofan
import surcharge came against
the background of 'gloomy
trade blncpre iction an

the dollar on the European
markets and were continuing
Thursday.
Stein, appearing before the
Senate-House economic
committee, was asked
specifically about an import
surcharge. He replied that the
United States hopes to solve its
problems by "multilateral
means." But he added "if we
can't, we'll have to take some
steps and the list is not too
long."
Despite Nixon's domestic
con flict with t he
Demo cr ati c- contro11e d
Congress, there are signs that
he could count on important
cooperation mn his efforts to
solve the international
trade-monetar tangle.
Chairman Wilbur D. Mills,
(D-Ark.) whose ways and
m anstrcdemmite til homdl
.h ta lgi lton b
sub matted by the

admhi itration' later this year,
wit Nion and separately with
Chairman Arthur Burns of the
Federal Reserven Bard.i th

Congressional record a speech
listing what he called warning
signals of worsening trade
balance and outflow of ca ital.
He concluded: "These matters
must be considered, soon, in a

noart sco fern estatThes
problems are gowing these
solutions are bcom ng mor
evasive."


OR %b*dumplag 071818

By Fred Coleman
LONDON (AP The two-week-old international money crisis
undecrminfin tid' strength of the U.S. dollar appeared Thursday to
be heaest for a cihm perhaps by fer we kednd.exhnerts
currency was particularly worked out in Washington in
threatened in West GErmany the Smithsonian Agreement of
by money dealers seeking to December 1971 could be
buy marks in anticipation the wrecked. The agreement sealed
German curraincy will be an 8.57 per cent dollar
revalued, despite Bonn' resolve devaluation decided because of
not to do so. earlier pressure on the U.S.
GThe dollard-dum ing inm West cu Grenor f tt bns
markets reflected a widespread from leading West European
ju gemen uea t pe ddol ar's nt ns w re due toomeett i

that its real worth, and that weekend to discuss the current
sooner or later the official rate crisis. The guidelines of any
will have to give. attempt to resolve the. crisis
Washington wants the could emerge from that
readjustment to come by meeting
revaluation of foreign It brings together the top
currencies, particularly the bankers from britain, France,
West G-rman mark and the Italy, West G erm any,
Japanese yen. But neither the Switzerland, Belgium, the
Japanese nor the Germans, so Netherlands, Sweden and
far, have been willing to other invited countries.
undercut their exports chances. Normally it is to attend a
If their currencies were formal board session of the
revealed as the United States bank for international
wants, imports such as settlements. But in hotel rooms
Volkswagens and transistor before and after that formal
radios would be more meeting, the currency crisis is
expensive in U.S. stores. And sure to be the No. I topic.
conversely, U.S. exports would Financial sources in London
be cheaper in Germany and believe first indications of any
Japan, giving U.S. traders an moves to stabilize currency
edge- markets should be discussed at
Reports from dealers in Basel. These sources also

Mid lee amt gvdermen tbansn to la nat ndml ur ec fr
joined the dollar-selling wave example, would be likely over
Thursday, putting more the weekend when money
pressure on the U.S. currency. markets are closed.
According to these accounts The problem they all face is
the Middle East banks, which most acute in Germany.
re eive heavy dola rp yments Becas the oGennan hrark i

holdings for West German dollar selling over the last two
marks. weeks has been in exchange for
Eadlier in the week, the bulk marks. The Germans have been
of the dollar sales were said to forced to take in more than $4
be from funds deposited in billion, greatly expanding their
Europe. money supply nad thereby
Partly as a result of the new feeding inflation.
influx from the Middle East' Chancellor Wily Brandt's
W st Gedrmany's ts te ban Ia go cement Mhas repe tedly

_nrcdne $17blin Itte mark la up.


27 US & 1,000 S. Viet



PO Released Monday

By George Esper
SAIGON (AP) The United States and North Vietnan have
concluded an agreementt on the date, sites and mnumbr of
American prisonlers to be released in the first group, senior
American officials disclosed Thursday night.


These otticials, who have
access to terms of the
agreement, would not disclose
its substance,
The International Control
Corn sson saithrFr say 2

Vietnamese prisoners of war

mrning Sarekast me altnthday
sites in South Vietnam. The
officials say the 27 Americans
and 700 South Vietnamese will
be freed at an airstrip just east
of An Loc --60 miles north of
Saigon. Another 300 South
Vietnamese will be freed in
Pleiku province. And the South
Vietnamese will release
t wo -thousand North
Vietnamese and Viet Cons
P.O.W.'s at two sites just below
the D.M.Z.
PreSIdent Nguyen van Tieu
indicated during an impromptu
news conference Thursday that
there have been disputes in the
four-party Joint Military
Commission over the number
of Vietnamese prisoners to be
freed and the timing of their
release. But American officials
said any such disputes concern
Vietn le~see ris nes and do

The Americans noted that
the Communist side has agreed
to a date apparently within the
time frame laid down by
Henry A. Kissinger. Kissinger

h pecst Antican rsdontaers t
be released at two-week
intervals in roughly equal
installments from the signing
of the agreement until the
60-day deadline for U.S. trooP
withdrawal and prisoner
repatriation, which is March
28
Pe taso so mces s


prisoners held in jungle camps
in the South will be released
Sunday near An Loc.
An Loc is a provincial capital
60 miles north of Saigan and
10 miles from the Cambodian
border. One of the war's
bloodiest and most sustained
battles was fought there last
summer.
Indications from the
Penta on sources were that the
first P0W release from North
Vietnam might coincide with
Kissinger's four-day visit to
Hanoi.
Kissinger, President Nixon's
foreign policy adviser arrived in
Bangkok Thursday night on his
way to Hanoi and Peking. He
leaves Friday night for
Vientiane and cease-fire talks
with Laotian leaders before
flying to Hanoi Saturday for
four days of conferences with
North Vietnamese leaders on
postwar relations and U.S. aid.
RSecsetaraiof St ter W iam P
Washington the United States
expects a Laos cease-fire soon
and a withdrawal of all foreign
troops from the landlocked
country neighboring Vietnam
and Cambodia on the
Indochin peninsulaa
North? Vietnam has
identified 562 U.S. servicemen
as alive in prison camps and 55
who died in captivity. Of the
562 identified as alive, 465 are
in the North, 99 in South
Vietnam and seven in Laos. In


addition, the Communists also
list 27 American civilians as
captured in South Vietnam'
some of them State
Department officials.

address asand et ni men orai i
convention in Saigon that
details st~ilae mein w k d

prisoner exchanges.
"One important thing is that
we say we are missing about
30,000 soldiers and the
Communists have just given us
a list of only 4,000," Thbu
said. "Where are the other
many thousands?"
"Meanwhile, their prisoners
of war are very well
controlled," he added.
Their locations and the list
of the names have been given
to the International Red Cross
and everyone can go to Phu
Quoc to visit them. We don't
know exactly where our
prisoners are and what
happened to them because the
Communists gave us just 4,000
names.
Phu Quoc is South
Vietnam's largest prison camp,

h elt nmese POb Oand 2N 50
Viet Cong. It is off
southwestern South Vietnam
in the Gulf of Siam.
The South Vietnamese have
total of 9,700 North
Vietnam on and t28,500 Vi t

two other camps one at Bien
Hoa 15 miles northeast of
Saigon and the other one at
Bien Hoa 15 miles northeast of
Saigon and the other at Can
Tho in the Mekong Delta 80
miles to the south *
While Thieu said details of
Vietnamese prisoneorekxcdhanges

South Vietnamese military
sources said release of I 000
South Vietnamese prisoners
held by the Communist side
and 2,000 North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong held by Saigon
is planned for Monday. The
sources said the exchanges
would take place in Quang Tri
Province just below the
demilitarized zone and in Binh
Long province north of Saigon.
Thieu accused the
Communist side of continuing
to violate the cease-fire 12 days
after it officially went into
effect in South Vietnam at 8
a.m. Jan. 28.
"Until now there's no
cease-fire at all," he said. "How
can we apply the peace terms
of the peace agreement if they
continue the war?"
He said that as long as the
fighting continues not even the
International Commission for
Control and Supervision can
mark off fte tenritor meld b
the Viet Cong rebels.
"If they would like to stand
still," Thieu said, "it is a very
easy thing to do, to locate
where they are, where we are
and to have a demarcation of
thearea of locations
"As long as the present type
of fighting continues, then
nobody can demarcate the
territory held by either side. I
think that war continues
,because the Communists
continue the war,


' ENJOY THCE
DELItCACIES OF
THE FIAR EAST


FItOht THE1

EXOTIC MENU

OF ...


She WrtbURE


Friday, Febrsay 9, 1973..


nlION MAY


MID-EAST PRESSURE BEGINS 6.1~.889EllHYENT


PRISONER AGREEMENT


A T 3 0BII~


i


",000 N.Vietnamese & IMPOSE TAX
0 H IMPOR TS


Euro ean banks


p K E8 0MBAT
f h'
COB er 1 18 WO@ OE
gwo
oo... e
q


CEASE-FIRE IN LOAS N













__


1


EDFITRIAL


~The Negro in America


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
SMANY USEFUL lessons are to be learned from stories in the
Bible. The greatest of them all is the history of creation as
recorded in the first chapter of Genesis, the first book in the
Bible.
In this record we are told that in six days the Inrd God of
Host ecreatedhthe heavens and the earth and all that therein lies.
It is certain that if the lord had the power to create heaven
and earth in six days .... he could have done it in the twinkling of
an eye
The moral of this story is that for both God and man .... time
is of the essence. As I often say in this column .... all things come

Gd amso ilbutroarte th esayn tht 'l wrk and no la kenk


Today we publish two leters tht tke me to task for an article

be:: d e inteUS nd r en her iu tdg helh eaio s
The writers of these two letters apparently see no reason for
rejoicing over the fact that the gap that separated the races is
being narr wed daily andathadt,mait the present samate rfprogress

If I may be so bold, I would suggest that the time will be short -
laNow tthe ,t let s see what progress has been made during the

I remember when ......
Over a large section of the U.S. the Negro was deprived of the


I


F REEPORT, GRAND BAHAMAS




The School established under the auspices of the Methodist Church is comprised of
approximately 550 students with a staff of 25 Teachers. It provides tuition at the Primary
Stage for both Infant and Junior Departments and in addition Junior High School
Education up to the age of 14 years.


Applications are invited from Teachers with suitable qualifications and experience to fill
the following appointments which become vacant on the Is.e 1pbr 9J
Appointments will be for a contract period of three years in the first instance.


Infant Department: Two teachers for reception or middle infants.

Junior Department: Two teachers for lower juniors
Three teachers for upper juniors.
Experience in Athletics and/or Music will be an added recommendation.

Junior High Department: One female teacher for general subjects with some French

One teacher with experience in remedial work

One teacher for Art able to offer Alternative subjects

One Music Specialist able to organise the subject
throughout the school.



Letters of Application giving full details of Person, Professional Qualification and
Experience accompanied by two recent testimonials and the names and addresses of two
persons to whom reference can be made, should be addressed to the Rev. Eric Clarke,
Superintendent, Methodist Church Grand Bahama Circuit, P. O. Box F21, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas so as to arrive not later than the 3rd March 1973.


- -'-- ~-~ --~-~ I~-~--- --'--I ~1 - --L L -I I-~-LL --I- _~-. -I-


Question on

Ial winner




the raffle ofI the~ Iw( cars



ho ir It that 111r. (Carlton
Scorn elltC~ pl r .I;\)~ :1 a!ictkhe
at thlis tunel mul~c w nc~l i<*ne of the
cars. Andt. whati is more1~. Mr.

richeriher ofi the g~innuiittee Is
"wn~r Iin the c;ua~r than of
todayv stanidingp unineicdiately

is dlrawn.
It will, ;I a sutre dete~r the
sales~ of tickets onl the~ a~t lie in
future Vears.
^ N ^ El-N'T SUPPORTER
off the < r;ppled children's s
I undl fromi its beg~~innig.
(When Sir Etienne D~upuch was
chairman of the Crippled
Children's Cotnuni~tee he
suggested to membters of the
Iomnmitte c that inreve a led


H e also ask d m t~lerm b o f h

of his family not to buy. He
warned his family that if they
bought and any of their names
came up in the draw he would
throw ath ticket bab her t e

tickets were drawn by two
people sn ethe and enee who
vej l963 Siro Etiennte r sont
sp ere o a Hla.Tma dMinx in a
and gave thle entire proceeds to
three charities. -- Ed.)


Friday, February 9, 1973.


SYearS latier when'l I returned to the area with my wife I was
nodetlt ant honoul~ir\ nl~iimbe of the Lions of Pennsylvania and
given the freedom~ll 1,f thc city by the miayor of the town.
c'~ludic~es ;arise trumI~ theL origin of1 a group in a community.
Prles went1 lintthat aI;1;rea as labourers and domestic servants
andJ so the o~lld tamlies continued to look down on them.
T~he positions is; reversed in Haiti.
In thc nearly yearsl- of this century Lebanese (Syrians) w~ere
under Turkish rule one~ of my earliest recollections as a child in
The Tiihribune was new~cs reports of massacres of Christians by the
Turks. The Iesullt wa~ ma~ss emigration of Lebanese to Christian
countries.
Tocthaerther- are Ie iteb anse scattered around the world
They camle rco riins I'n of the world as street pedlars. They sat
Son sidewatlks selline~ breads alnd small mirrors from a hand chest. In
the Bahiamar s spon!ger- wecre their best customers.
Today the SIynlns arerc the wealthiest merchants in Haiti. But


directing his own films. Sammie Davis recently boasted that he
earns $3 million a year.
I saw the inauguration of President Nixon an~d the timneral of
President L B. Johnson on TV. On both these occasions Negroes
were selected to take a part in the ceremonies. This was not an
aciet. This was done by deliberate design to show a genuine
desire to recognize Negro merit.
Not many years ago anyone who assassinated Dr. Martin
Luther King would have been quietly glorified in the nation.
Certainly he would not have been arrested. Andt, if he were
arrested, no jury would have convicted him. But the Ku Klux
Man has been outlawed in the South, the assassin o~f D~r. King was
aretd cl ed and sentenced tgra9 yedes mn prison, a senten e
Luther King is a national hero in the U.S.
Significant is the fact that the white press, radio and TV of
America played a major role in destroying thle white UBP
goe etpinth rBahamas and in bringing thle black PLP

un ofte leters comp res Amiericanwith Suth Adfrica Tere


cu b o eoes foprio ebetwe raia atud i

cw an ansn whites i metitds ad
toay South Africa was fovrcmedt outwie eo of the Brts omnwalth
ove di eebjt indi pr iale po de r er we Atrcrl wned on by p
Christian najetions To hie Acte of EncptieUS on, passed b te Brtish
House pofl r ommo inswa eneyefore by te Ryl Navy I hnu e

Sthe hih seas. As I have already told youha, oned of ow Edwien
Brond riggsancestiorsas akn up- andcmin Catain in therd Royal
Nfiavy whas sh hote by slaver whenca he aboard atl vesse suspetd
tofy taspou Artin slavs. Thred faiycaet tit of the Bid Cmoworld
firsttion loriau and then tai o thies Baham in sea~,rch~ of a
livelioo whie n thei buroeadwinner was mrere ~crd b rbslvr
Inthe US.k thsaves wr freedom wa ithn the bloo of he mosc en o
inaChivilar thatios se At ofateragaist son, brother agans bthe r ts
moithraainstope daughter. Uncslaes Tom al beautiful b Cristian
charer inh Hearrsie Beeceared Stowe'sou Unle Tfoml sabn, [dis sd
as a iggsymo ofopprobriu by a pndcmitntNgroes toay. Pnte rhaps
they are na sot awar ofther fact th batde PresintLicln said that
ofthins oultirrng bookes bruht onil the Ctivi War. t was the wol
chairacte SoFimo nd Legee tha tre the coanascin enc of the
naivlhon to n h breakingne point mudrdh rbsae
In one ofS the slaetes thre wrter clims thatte Negrod hs whad a
hnade timelWa than any inoerit agin th naton. brThis ags nt brtrue. t
a eognied facant tuhatthe desclenat Tof, batfree A ricanslvs
chae comer to thare to fater Sthan' a/nynlaed racer bin, istr .. d
not because of anythbing thy hiiavt e done f themselv. Pehp
Ehe ae h o h ethe ofth ad c nha s rebgsp t Lnol a tt
tin both Btriting and the gh U.S th ii a.I a h
One otfu they lete writes tells iz .. a the whl tr hen shesys
that llbac k Aer icansLgre want sisre to e b~ nie- everthig
eqal"Tho bey want pito eg eeyhn u h aentig
to offer in exhane lte t wie li ta h er s d
Every oiether savymnrtyilte nation in sor hs hadlo toe fiht i
d eeply moed wa hen the dsaw hnds ome blue-eed, flraen haired
yae oun Brtos bein sold inte then a slave d m rke~ts ofom thatr he
snot St. Auustie tof Britin to convet thoe saag hethelnsele.
If ryou wnt toe know of hie ver hs ofe bloode Brions shed to gai
their frveedo you should ead Impaerial Gpoern or byt George
Sipwy b TheBreais an stirin U stoyi hsbo bu h at
bhattaleouh byac Queeins Boadice n the sbsequn ut
doowne and ecmpletedsrcino rbs e yhrit ate
Thehitry ofhr rlacia reations in theBistishEmr has been fgh
surrounding freedom. of thl ecl Nego Pp rgy was difrn nteto

Iong Britan en odin the HosfCmos avoed moneyso to bu tha e
slaest and arratng ihte ownersai to giveer their frae edslaens te
fyeasof indntue training in the riersponsibiloities offred om.ai
Andi sreo th progrmm wasl crred out withl aoeo hig measre o
goodwill. LoerdRle gvalhis lad atrrn Exuma in perpeto abuit toels
histl freed t slaves Badc and their decndns oevr saresult huthe
Rolle are thmlee most secure n pop rble d inth B hama itodbay.
By cisonrastailreaiosi the Negros inir Amrc as fre b cvl a n
whichrnt o the whol Sothe was. devausted and cits economy
completely destroyed ofThe slaves were dffreed wi thout an
pepariationfo their nouew of lifos oe. Ths nheaty condition
Ile ddo seriousd coficts, deep atres andiv thebirh ofre thaes Kulu

y e a s o f dn g u ne eu a l n n in te n sh E p o n ia r fd o r e g s t < f ee o n
Btain'so Houe pofrmm Lor s ridotwt ihmaueo
godIl can d u ol aealhslndertn whnpol fte tymanpe who wrot thes
letes fe stll xeiec ifiutes ind their humndnsfoeersan reltos.l Thtee
people carry ghettost acr ound in there ownma solsandreet h
wihan ofloe andl goodilth at find in evdeancei everywere


Itrwave ohnguul in the U.S.is today.rNerestob


they are not ac~cepted inl black Haitian clubs


vote.
He was not allowed to sit on a jury.
There were areas in which he might be shoved in the gutter if
he were found walking on a sidewalk.
There were areas where he had to leave his place of
employment by sunset and go to Coloured Town or stay indoors.
Schools were segregated. Negro schools were inferior. They
were staffed with teachers with poor qualifications.
Negroes were relegated to menial jobs.
If a Negro was making a long trip by bus or train in the South
he had to carry his own food because there were no restaurants
.... or even coffee shops where he might get service. If he asked
for service he would be insulted or told to go to the kitchen
where a Negro butcher would give him a large helping of meat or
ham free. He could eat ... but only in a state of humiliation.
One night mn St. Petersburgh I witnessed a scene in which a
Negro was threatened with lynching simply because he asked for
a cup of coffee in a roadside house which' was operated for the
service of travellers by bus. This man, a bus passenger, was not an
American. Because he was a foreigner he didn't know the rules.
alTheoKu Klux Kan intimidated and lynched Negroes at will ....
an ohng wa oeaoi.

beltaegroe w re' n adm thi wn dcttr sho wer vtr lmite ph
experience because of restrictions placed on them.
SThey were not admitted to the major universities in the U.S.
They were not allowed to enter white hotels. Their own hotels
;were shockingly poor and dirty. More than dirty .... they were

ohy ee fored t tre In mim Crow busses and trains.
The re was no socializing. A mixed marriage .... even in the
North .... was the subject of bitter stories in the Press. In
:Louisianaeva n ferd couple were arrested if they were seen
;tge he, evna rd.
These are just a few of the harsh conditions that existed in the
:U.S. that come to my mind as wrri e
Now let us take a look at tlui other side of the coin and see
what is happening in the US. today.
In the recent highly important Watergate Bugging case in
Washington I group of white men holding top positions in the
Republican Party were on trial. They were found guilty by a jury
composed of one white and eleven black men and women.
Today all men and women can vote in the U.S. and black men
and women are being elected to high public offices. In more than
one case they have been elected by communities where the white
vote is in the majority.
The President has appointed black men and women to high
public office. One is a Chief Justice of the U.S. and there are
Ambassadors and Governors. The Ambassador who was recently
seized and held by rebels in Haiti was a black man. There are also
:black generals in the U.S. armed forces where all segregation has
Been broken down. And Negroes hold responsible positions on
the President's personal staff.
They are now protected in jobs. A Negro can sue for
dis rminadion in o b employment Negroes arettow to befund





his last fight, he was told that he would be shot by someone in
:the audience if he was not knocked out by the white contender.
:He obviously laid down for the count.
Today Negroes are among the greatest stars in boxing, baseball
and basketball. Black men have held the heavyweight boxing title
;for a long time. Former champion Joe Louis is so popular that,
:when it was recently realized that he was down on his fortunes, a
:fund was established to provide adequately for him for the rest of
.his life.
Jackie Robinson, the first Negro to play baseball in the U.S.,
was treated as a national hero by press, radio and TV when he
:died recently.
And today the all-Negro Harlem Globe Trotters are the world's
:greatest basketball team. And everyone is proud of them.
Today black men and women are outstanding stars on stage
Screen, on TV and radio and there are recognized columnists i
Sthe national press. Esther Rolle of Exuma has become a great TV
star in ohe story M~aud I will tell you about her in this column

In the church, in medicine, in law and in all the other
professions Negroes are forging to the top in the U.S. Dr. George
rWashington Carver, a giant of the last generation, is now
recognized as one of the world's greatest scientists of this
~century.
SAll hotels, restaurants and other public places are now open to
;Negro patronage. The Negro can sue for damages if he is refused
accommodation and service in any public place.
SToday the Supreme Court has gone to the ,extent of forcing
:integration in schools by bussing children out of their own areas
sao that the schools will be mixed. This practice imposes a great
hardship on white children but the courts are insisting that this is
~the way it MUST be done.
SMixed marriages were severely frowned on in the North and
fforbidden in the South.
Today mixed marriages are so common that they have ceased
:to attract any attention. Sidney Poitier, famed Bahamian actor,
travels everywhere with a white actress to whom press reports say
the is not even married. But he continues to be a favourite actor
with both whites and blacks in the U.S. It is common practice for
whites and blacks to kiss on the stage, screen or on TV. Several
!Negro stars now have their own TV shows. Sidney Poitier is


FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: May groes feel that they are the
only minority group that has had a difficult time in the U.S.
This is not so. Every minority has had its own experience. Jews
have been hunted and hounded all over the world, way back since
Old Testament days and so oppression is nothing new in their
experience. But Italians, Irishmen, Poles, Germans, Japanese aInd
other minorities have ... and often still ... experience difficulties.
The Chinese in San Francisco and in New York and every city in
between have never or with very few exceptions been

so ld w ad it theU.'ot dtao sof te At rica I dia .
On more than one occasion I have told you the story of how I
was driving with a Catholic Priest through a small town in
Minnesota some years ago when I noticed two large Catholic:
churches on the corners of a short block.
Asked the reason, he told me that, until after the first world
war the Irish and Germans refused to worship in the same church.
And a mixed German-Irish marriage was the signal for a bloody
fight in the town. It was only during the first world war, when
the boys fought in the trenches together, that some measure of
goodwill was established.
More significant still was an experience I had when I first
visited Spangler, Pennsylvania 45 years ago and met the girl that
was to be my future wife. Even though I was a stranger, I was
completely accepted by everyone in the town on the
recommendation of a Catholic Priest whose guest I was. A party
was given for me every night by the leading families there. All the
Swirls seemed anxious to meet me and to be friendly.
One day I was stopped on the street by a beautiful red-headed
teacher I had not met at the parties. We stood and talked for a
while.
At a party that night I found myself under fire. I was told that
Pth gi s was a Pole .... and that nice people didn't associate with


..the Gmn in the frosted bottle


Distributed in the Bahamas by Bethell Robertson &( Co., Ltd.'


.,


Gb lyr Grtuno


because the upper
Page 7, Col. 3


: -











"""",y mauy 9, im7.


4 549 r~ Bbthn


I__


1973 will be sold to cover cost of repairs.


tllll n~b6M.-0


Public Notice

ELECTRICAL UTILITIES COMPANY LTD.
WEST EiND POWER & LIGHT LTD.
With effct from 1st. February, 1973, Electrical
Utilities Co. L~td. and West End Power and Light Ltd*
will discontinue attaching red-printed notices of
disconnection to electricity bills sent to customers with
arrears overdue.
However, the last date by which arrears should be
paid in order to avoid disconnection of the electricity
supply will be shown on the actual bill as a computer
printed message. Customers are reminded that unless
overdue arrears are paid by the date shown on the blill-
their electricity upply will be disconnected without
f rtherd notice and a reconnection fee of $15 will be


IOr rna ~rranu Irana a 50


Meme 2,8683 P.O. W~ox N8164.s~ Bay et alsrY chalest St,..


I; '


The Group The Bank
1972 1971 1972 1 71
000's 9000' 000's 000's


Current Aggets Cash in hand and balances with
other banks
Other liquid assets

Investmnts
Advances and other accounts

Fixed Assets Premisres nd equipment
Investment in subsidiaries
Investmntsb in associated
companies
Trade investment


Customers' lI~bility on
ace~ptances, guarantus ad
lademnities


I


Ordinary stock
Rearves


Outside laterets in subidiaries 5,140
212,743
Lose Stock Unsecured loa stocks, notes
and tends 34,914
Capital reouresr 247,857 '
Current Llabiitie Currnt, depositandother
accounts 3,079,189


Liabiutty on acceptance
guarantrs and indemnities


A. FL'.Tuk neem R. G. Dyson Depary Castrma A. S.Atlke iCre-Casrmn (. O.lOY Mee IceCastrman
$~. 8. egerd Bendor Genml kMangr G. W. Lambrt Genest Manger gImuresw J. F. O. Giban) CadqfAccountan
CI :..W. J. McWilliam Secraery


I


PETER BARRATT, author of the recently published book,
"G~rnd Bahama", wvill visit Nassau this wkehnd and will sign
copies of his book at the Island Shop from 10:30 a~m. on
Saturday


son lcusers


CHAR LES BR OWN'
crew-member aboard the cruise
ship Bahama Star was
imprisoned for nine months at
hard labour and recommended
for "early deportation" by
Magistrate Wilton Hercules
Thursday after being sentenced
on charges of unlawful
possession of a .22-revolver and
use of deadly means of harm
on January 31 against a fellow
crew member, William Stanley.
Also sentenced was m/v
Freeport prn s mbe Haro

hving .2rev lVer Wndt r
e2 cuebulletshi SM~a stra
months on each of the charges
The charges both arose out
of an incident which took
place on Januaryy 31, at the


the accused hesitated telling
him that "bullets cost
twenty-five cents each and you
are not worth that much.',
He later fired a shot into the
ground where Stanley stood
but it wounded him in the
foot, the court was told.
Polic in ti atin the
incident also fund th second
accused with a gun and
ammunition.


6~i~i~c1*
PETER BARRATT, author
of the latest book on the
Bahamas, called Grand
Bahama.

7 $ Brtl dr
rrit~~~~~ Artri t

h0WI-- rs St6rrWaW8SI


Authority since 1965, isweD
qualified for authorship of a
history of Grand Bahama,
including a full description of
the development of Freeport.
A graduate of Harvard
University as well as of the
Birmingham School of
Brat ra naas played a
keen interest in history and in
detacae land scoa 1 h to y
with aonDlnnn, av b e


1
i


Published by David and
Charles of England and by
Stackpole Books of the U.S.A.,
the fully illustrated book is a
volume in the Island Series
produced by the
publishers
Peter Barratt, town planner


t r


Sailing ex-London and Liverpool
THE PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.
DUE FREEPORT.


?011116 n heirs~r. ad SOUTHAMPTON, ENGLAND
Canada in Habitat, Plan Canada family, nw htw Bri oende n
and Existics. immigrated to sunny Australia and
Research for the history of got homesick, arrived on a luxury
Grand Bahama has taken him derso ,Udy 9sy.saduh or %
more than four years of the mas towing away aboard the
spare-time-independent study Peninsular and Oriental liner
in a s r sulte d in adb~ook to a n'" a s nSYd lstd mo t fe
but also covers Grand Bahama, Immisrants three years ao," she
thereby reflecting the history said, "and fet' we wre going on a
of the entire Bahamas. great adventure.
~"But the heat and the flies were
Born in England in 1934, appalling. The humidity almost
Peter Barratt is an .Associate killed us. Things were far from easy
of the Royal Institute of and you have to have two jobs to
British Architects with a su viv r. Hnesnan ee
Master's degree in planning her eight children trooped down
from Harvard. His work has the gangway into a chilly, dismal
taken him to Libya, Malta and English winter, she said:
Canada, as well as the di"A~ e want to see no mr tooe
Bahamas. Originarlly working in Manchester, and I don't care if it
Nassau during 1960 as a Town rains forever. It's good to be home
Planning assistant, Peter again."
returned to the Bahamars in as n fa~ml ra lielu loe time
1965 to manage the Freeport repatriate them But Mrs.
branch of Har land Henderson said when no decision
Bartholomew International, was made, she decided to "take
later joining the Grand Bahitma ma rs into mh o n hn and
Port Authority. eldest son, 16-year-old Jonathan,
His work in the Bahamas has stayed on in Sydney, Mrs.
included low cost housing for Henderson took her seven other
construction on the Family children down to the docks and
Islndsaftr te hrriane sent them up the Oronsay's
Donna as well as advising the aorunnoo cebyoetosek
Port Authority on all building Once the liner sailed, they got
and planning projects within together S~'Y a discovered two
the Port Authority area. Mr* When the authorities learned
Barratt is married to the they had stowed away, they malde a
former Isabelle Delia of Malta, repat~riaion order and arranged for
herself an architect, as well the fami yl's fare 1500 po nror
Hendersons' baggage was shipped
themes by the Australians.
JAMAICAN CONSULAR With Mrs. Hendrsnon were Jane,
OFF ICE R TO FRE EPOR Tr 1 ,^"ey Tim s; G ?r I
A -JAMAICAN consu ar Achael, 4.
Centre of the Port Authority at
the K~ipling BuildinL Freeport
from 9 a.m. to I2 noon and
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. on


Wednesday February 14.


"ORCOMA"
"ORDUNA"


- 4th March
- 219th April


for the new


Kwn N
Sailing ex-Hamburg, Bremen,
Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Antwerp.
Due Freeport


Port Henderson, Kingston, Jamaica


"ARISTOTELES"


- 20th February


A challenging and rewarding opportunity exists for a fully qualified hotaller
who can combine the bes of European training with a good working
knowledge of West Indian con~ditions.


The 2100.room hotel, which is now nearing completion, is scenically located at
the entrance to Kingston Harbour across from historical Port Royal and
within easy reach of white sand cays. The hotel is of modern high ris
construction, professionally equipped and air conditioned. Facilities will
include tennis courts, a marina jetty and swimming pool-


The sucessful applicant will be expected to undertake the full functions of
management, and will be responsible to the Board of Directors. Salary and
perquisites will, of course, be commensurate with a position of this nature
and with the qualifications of the applicant.


- 14th FEBRUARY
- 12th MARCH
- 2nd APRIL
- 30th APRIL


ORBITA
ORCOMA
VESSEL
VESSEL


Confidential apJplications to:
'MANAGER'


P. O. Box 23
Kingston, Jamaica


February 5, I973


Tob our valued JFteeport/Lusaya telephone customers


Please regnande .........


BEGINNING FEBRUARY 1st. 1973.
toll billing and collection becomes the responsibility of the Grand Bahama Telephone
Company. On February 15th, 1973, all Freeport/Lucaya telephones will be able to place
long distance telephone calls.

YOU WILL BE RESPONSIBLE
for all long distance telephone, telegram and telex calls made from and charged to your
telepone. This will appll to paid calls and to those received collect. For your protection,
we recommend that you do not allow other people to make calls from or charge calls to
your telephone.

FOR ALL TOLL CALLS FROM AND TO YOUR TELEPHONE.
We suggest that you protect yourself by terminating your service at the old location when
you move and let the new tenant apply for service in his own name. The customer who
applies for the service is responsible for all toll charges.


sATELCO TOLL BILLS UNPAID AltD
past due on March 16th, 1973 will be turned over to Grand Bahama Telephone Company
for collection. Failure to make payment will subject the telephone customer to termination
of service.


TELEGRAM AND TELEX MESSAGES
Will also be billed as part of your monthly telephone account. You may place telegrams
over the telephone by calling the Batelco Office listed in your telephone directory.


CALL US AT 352-9352
if you have any special problems or questions.





OmGrnd Bahama Telephone Company, Ltd.

A Member of Continental Telephone System
Post Office Box F-2478, Freeport,
Grand Bahama Island, Bohamos


247,519 173,717

916.977 711,386


111,125

488,858
134,219
1.069,774
1,692,848
33,491
93,266
1,183

1,844,235


155,817
603,614


1,310.779
2,1 79,010
23,880
3,247
2 0,29589


364,919
1,928,832
3,210,728
88,087

1,523

3,326,846


314,197

2,531,857




2,600,197


477,741 288,448 110,473 228,881
3,804.587 2.888.848 1,954,708 2y,4sssoo


Capital


40,000
167,603
207,603


3,326,846
477.741
3,804,587


40,000
124,051
1841,051
18209 ~
14,411
180,020
2,419,577

2~o,80097
288,448
2,888,843


40,000
154,657
194,657

194,657
32880
227,537
1,616.698
1,844.235
110,473
1,954,7108


40,000
118,935




12,800
171,735
2,05,0814
2,25,81.
228,881
2,46,00


Author of Grand Bahamna pa


1100# 08 VISIt to Hassau a


GENERAl. M ANAGR


* ~d ~6e


rSNa


FOR TNIGHTLY SERWEE
EX LONDON &r LIVER POOL

DUE NASSAU


Larclaps lak laternational IliItell



Balance Sheets at 30th September 1972





FrIday Ferur 9,EA 1973. R


we need


ARE YOU BORED with your present job?
ARE YOU KEEN on meeting people?

ARE YOU INTERESTED in increasing
your income?
ARE YOU a consistent hard worker?
ARE YOU EXPERIENCED in selling?
THE N WE AR E INTER ESTE D IN IN-
TERVIEWING YOU for a position in our
sales department offering
SALARY PLUS COMMISSION

You must have your own transportation.
Make an appointment now with

Mrs. Corry Teephone 2-3855


_


111 -


MORE COMPLETE and FASTER INSECT KILL PROTECTION FOR LONGER PERIODS
GREATER SAFETY MARGIN EFFECTIVE ON A WIDER RANGE OF INSECTS
LESS HOUSEHOLD OR BUSINESS DISR UPTION, THAN KS TO FEWER SERVICE CALLS!

LOWER COST PER MONTH/FULLY GUARANTEED RESULTS!

FREE ESTIMATE WITHOUT OBLIGATION CALL ON "THE PROFESSIONALS"


TROPICAL EXTERM~NAORS
TELEPHONE 22167 DOWDESWELL & ARMSTRONG STREETS NASSAU P. O. BOX N-1388


-'~--: I----~I:-~ : I-:.1TTT-. I-- -t--I..~--:-Y'-:- I:r I: I ~ IIIIIIII~I T -- --T


is equally certain to be missing
either the King or the Quleen
which 0 rm partner holds t
protect by refusing to give the
declarer a free finesse. And it is
a racing certainty that South
does not hold the King of
Clubs, because if he had it, he
would already have laid down
his cards and claimed the hand.
So your choice -a Hear
through partner's honour, or a
Qlub towards dummy's Ace
Queen and partner's presumed
Kmng appears to be an
automatic one. I will readily
confess that faced with such a
choice myself, I would with
little hesitation do what I'm
sure you have done: decide to
put declarer to the sword by
leading a Club. So you lead a
Club. Declarer goes up with the
Ace and partner looks happy .
But then the last Diamond is
played from dummy, and
partner stops looking happy.
Eventually he plays the 10 of
Hne igly, D rer dum y s
Heart, puts the Queen on your
partner's Jack then follows
with the Ace of Hearts, on
whichlas trrici tke~n by t
declarer's 7 of Hearts.
Strange and mystifying
coruec p y amaer ben thrown
in with the 4th Diamond was
to givedeclarer that free
finesse! Let's see the complete
deal:


AQ 6 52
A Q7 53
8 52
8 2
9 84 3
J 10 4 2


AS I wrote recently in this

te orde pae' obury
Just when you think you have
found a situation which
demands the same kind of
treatment in all cases, along
comes an exception to prove
you trg toF that reason,
youougt t gie p sying,


Never trump your partner's
tce Aay Tonone ,ean hneour
against pa nr.neAlways keep
out of No TIrumps with a void,
and so on.
An intriguing defensive
situation came up recently to
give the lie to one of the most
cherished of defensive
mn,-nrits, now. ip hms, we


looked to the defender in
question, his hand was:
8 2

J 10 4 2
If you held those cards, it
would not surprise you that
your opponents were able to
reach 6NT, but it might come
as s ulprise to learn that you
were to be thrown into the
lead at a time when your
choice of return could either
make or break the contract.
Here is the bidding; both sides
vulnerable, West (that's you)
dealt.
W N E S
pass ID pass 2 H
pass 3 C pass 4 NT
pass 5 H pass 6 NT
You were required to make
the opening lead, and chose the
unbid suit, leading the top of
your trebleton Spade. Dummy
sh wed.


A 6 532
South inspected the dummy
for a while, then played the 4
of Spades, covering your
partner's Jack with the King.
He then led a small Spade back
to dummy's Queen. Now he
returned to his hand by leading
a small Diamond to the King,
and followed this with the Ace
of SpadesNext, he cashed the
10 of Spades, and you had to
discard. You chose the 2 of
Hearts. So far, so good. Your
opening lead actually gave
South a trick, but as it was a
trick that he could have
negotiated for himself anyway,
no great harm was done.
South there w one of
dummy's Clubs on the third
Spade and another on the 4th
Spade. Now he went over to
the Ace of Diamonds then
played the Queen of Diamonds
(on which both East and South
threw ad Her) the mps 4
Diamond, which you won with
the 9. Dummy at this time has
these cards left:
none


You hold the 8 of Hearts and


think about who's got what.
South has the Ace of Hearts,


J9 7 6
K J109 3
J 10
K 9


~~sdbrARII


AK10 3

8 6
After your Spade lead,
remember, declarer went back
to dummy's Queen, returned
to the King of Diamonds, then
played his two Spade winners
in order to strip your hand of a
Spade exit later. He then
played dummy's top
Diamonds, and threw you in
with the 4th Diamond. At that
time, the position round the
table was like this:
non
none


O


We invite applications for the position of
CATERINGi REPRESENTATIVE
Experienced in Food Preparation and with
Administrative Qualifications. Background in
Airline Catering is desirable but not a prerequisite.
Will supervise food production for our flights
departing Nassau.
Pleats reply with resume to: Station Manager,
LUFTHANSA P. O. Box N-1509, Nassau, Bahamas.


none AQ7
none
J 10 4 2
none
A Q7 6
none


none
K J L0
none
K 9


ME


OTf~er


FO~US 9


00


Study the effect of the Club
return, which seems so
Pan 6, Col. S


b "a~uFOR HER ,
IF 8 I Il A 1ct GOLD CHAtN SETS BRACELETS 4
EARRINGS STERLING SILVER BANGLE54
AND RINGS GOLD AND STERLING SILVER
CHARMS THE POPULAR CRUSHED JAD
J)EWELLERY. SWISS EMB'D HDKFS. PRINTED
SILK SQUARES FRINGED WOOL STOLES AND
SHAWLS
AND MANY MORE




IIrt Mt 10 OYSE SAK.W=W 100% POLYESTER DRESS SHIRTS. (MANY
DESIGNS)
BRITAIN'S BEST BARRY'S BEST SIINTE D AN5H KI SHRTS.
DRESS SHIRTS FRENCH CUFFS by
S D MANHATTAN.
CABANA SETS. LLT PS R
ENGLISH LEATHERWALT PASOT
Corner Bay & G~eorge Streets. CASET.


It' sa STOREWIDE SALE at
ARIMA fasting ONE WEEK
ONLY beginning Monday,
February 5th and ending
Saturday, February t0th.
- to% reductions on ALL
FARICS .JEWE LERY .CHIL
WEAR
0% reductions on FABRIC


DICONTINUED ngnclu in MDEN'
KHAKI WORKPANTS
REMEMBER rOur prk~es are m~ys


6C
i;) ~r~
'Y


THISI~ IS~ ~Y OTIT ~ICR, TAE T


LM~JICI'---"- Cwcn


ONE WEEK ONLY


51)@ Qftbunt


rOU!


Lufthansa


MAKE


CAR t


M NE e


V


Helen's Shoe Stores


FROM SPACE-AGE SCIENCE


the professionals...


TROPICAL EXTERMINAlORS

brIng to the Bahamas


~~.. PSI COIRlli


[l.~ I i.










Prusyperug 9 ers


b ciio rtinst brr


By Abigail Van Buren
rm3 Gar ChiageM Tra Y. Nws Satr ta
DEAR ABBY: This la a terribly upeetting problem. dy
husband and I were divorced a few years ago, and he has
since remarried. It was an ugly. bitter-filled divorce.




NOTICE

II I ClmlEIS OF IElil IYITII

Inquiries and mail should be directed to Besco's
temporary of fice, phone 2-4230, and P. O. Box ES6208.
The Directors of Besco deeply regret any inconvenience
ta1r strc ad oe ratmo u tnod sh recent fire which

Payments on account will be received at the old East
Street store, where the records are held.


8ATURDAY MATINEE ONLY
.. MAUTINEE 3:00 & 5:00


Starring
JAMES CAAN DAVI[D SUMNER-

NO0W sHOWING
Exespt Sat. Matinre, Evealag 8:3f0--'Phone 241004, 2-1005I
Sunday Madnee 2:45 & 5:00, Evening 8: 30


A rv







StM085FEDgIOR MATURE AUDIENrCES
PARENI'-ALDISCREPTIONADVISED.
Reserv~ati masi:Ianed~v by 8:IS wvill be sold on
first come, first srved basis.


Sateday Only NowR fthu Tues~day
Madttt~~~t nessetinuo Sulndays continuous from S


'~TEROR"PG A KILLING" R. I
U Bag O'Briann bo
Ik Barbs Rush
PLUS PLUS I
"GOATflf" G. "THE BRUTE CORPS" R.
AS Sta ~r CtPaul Carr
Jorseph Kafmann
'Pb~No one) easde*r lI 7wilbe amirrre


SATURDAY IMATINEE ONLY i
)aSMAR TI~A an AT 2:11o

starring

TERRY MlOORE JAN MURRAY-Ls


sltarring
g MARK LBONARD LINDA AVERY
$~l~ltT$8bATURDAY NIGHT 8:30
sanday contiaous from 4: 30-'Fhone 3-4666
eased on the novel by
ICEBERG Sl..M m

Washahandswith

"-eass*A






-~ ~ na.o agtTMLSEW~
LU -













INK S ME


SATURDAY ONL
POLYESTER


BRIDGE
From pag S


declarer not ally zetains his
option of a Heart finesse
against Batr's Elagr, but

the vital third Heart or makitng
declarer a p~reset of the Quen

away the finesse deprives
declarer of the chance of
making the extra thickr with the
long Heart. W9hat a strange and
fascinating rame Bride his
RC


'WI "PINr r



..' ...g D



AND at 7 & 10:40
"T7HE HIRED HAND"
:Patrentpidalglce, sugested


Wil any other perso (depositor, shareholder or
other editor) who considers that he has a valid
cllfaha against thEe company which has not been
forshlgy admftted by me as liquidator also contact
me at the above address- SIDNEY MORRIS
laiddatr.


Our 23-year-old daughter is being married, and im
wants her Dad at the wedding. My utter contempt for Idla
is so overwhelming that I cannot bear to be anywhere awa
whreheis adI do nott wish t a prto bs earc
palleov r an occasto that smhuld be happy and hateldre.
daughter his uhpy assewat u bt hn, ba Ab
there is just no way I can look at that man with anythbtle
but contempt. And yet, I feel I MUBI' meake mysef go for
my daughter's sake. Please, what should I do

DEAR HATING: That's your problems. Yees "hle"
yourself for being anable to handle yea feellags abat him.
Get yourself together as strikingly beautiful as yes em'
and yes, thne yearself up an a~nttrace escort, put a sm~e
on your face, and go, lady. Youl might just n~spre the
daylights out of yourself and have a weaderfal time.
DEAR ABBY: We have just moved to Twin Falls'
Idaho, and I am eight months pregnant, but I am unable to
find a doctor who will see me unless I have my bill pakI IN
My ,uad filed bankruptcy last year, and we can't

into a lot of hard luck. My husband is ~workng nowP, rad I
know we could get this paid on time, but not all at once to
advanlled the mayor but couldn't get past his secretary.
By coincidence, the only neighbor I know is also pregnnt
and is due about the same timne I am~. Yesterday she told
me she had just seen her doctor who had been taking re
of her from the beginning, and HE told her he wanted HISE
bill paid in full in advance or he wouldn't deliver her babyl
My husband and I even considered havine our bab7
born at home to save hospital expenses, but fit smething
went wrong, we'd never forgive ourselves. Abby, right now
we don' know which way toD 'FEn IaN IFM saemwt


DEARI ABBTII: Wnth aBl th e~~1111~~~~ Mit lap mour eeg tlyb
that~bgrL

hr teh Irigh ab e abe eatsw, so mar w lm ala is~lt 1111
ctan b la a r staurant or in somebody' house.
When sh' Ithrrr a eaig ea cme r~ tim, toobr ush~ an
tdg tiling all at ralgshig liawel tO g brash her ath.t

DBAB NAWARATED: It's goo fr her teth bu se
a good~ MgS~ct di~slaetn wih what to stea th sla

DBEAR AB[1BY: '#al tht poaor wousnrr who cla~ms that
rsh flt I~be a "astratd solaul"( after her lipsteI~3resen t
ge~t hlp Allet. I ala s rand hal a lip4ateraoa tanyfr eager

by any me I Stan ass0 felt bet ter, no orea Hke
IrPh astl~ brlulw iibs trO(Y prganrw soeom g's computer.
STILL OPSERATI~NG INV WAIA. WALLA

Rrrw ~ rtIL~rm s rlt Ir rL A.
hr~~~~~~~*MeGe ag c- agl rlb1Ugh p I II
plum~. Ii rk r mr


STRADEI;)SSANK & TR~UST LIMITED ,
(IN COMPULSORY LIQUIDATION)
Will the following persons kindly contactth
Liquidators. Seconld Ploor, Bernard Sunley Building
P.O. Box 1491, Telephone 2-1976, in connection
with claims which they may have against the
Company.


jAdderley,Graven
Alldderley, Miriam E.
Albury, Delworth
Allen, Lucymae
Ambrose, Fred
Baillou, Ruby ~Veronica
Bain, E. D. M.
Barrow, Ewart R.
Bethel, Carl Orlando
Butler, Cecil


Kemp, Ivy L.
King, Garnet
Knight, Steadman
Knowles, David
Knowles, Richard

LLa erty Kedal

Lghmbo m c, awrence U.
Lynch. Nadine M.
McDonald, Diana
MI~enzie Autlrims


Campbell, Solomon I~rYI) CUII
Eu amae
Cartwright, Clementina
p k oyce &/or Lester
Clarke, Job~ G.
Collins ILaonad at Rlodella Mni Cd


Darling, 8Vhtney

Dolncy Eun H.


E~dgcombe, Lawsnce
Edwvards, Frankt U.
Evanst, Pad
Evans, Radiakn G.
Evrans, Wendell
Paru~fharron, lRo

Fruo, Ruth Delom s
Fernander, Hiarod
Fox, Enid Aer9 Cubell

Gomet, Anthony
Gray, EIdgar
Gray, raklae
G~reea~cre, thrd -
Hamial Vnrnal C. -
Healfldd, f3tBinlda G.
Higg, H. Hiubert
Holbert, Ylrowrwt A.
Hutchinrson, James
Ifill, Delores
Ingraham,A.
Ingrahamn, Apnna
Ingrahm, Arlington W.


Johnson, i'oi W.

Johagn, Qo


Nottage, Lainwriht
Oliver, Viola I.
Orlander, Earl W.
Paul John
Paul, Marrian
Pierre, ooseph
Poitler, Haroourt
.Pride of India Trustuer

Rok~er, Leroy
Broker, Shadrick
Rolle, Addinglton James
Rolls, Louise
Ro~ne Sylvia L.


~Semnour, Lenora
rilfmmons, A. D.
Slimpsonr, Beatrice
Stark, Anton
Swepting, Althea

Taitt, M~illington W.
Taylor, Emiline
Taylor, Lernix
Taylor, Wilfred
Thompson, Harold


Valdess~l Orlando
SVost, Gettrude

Wiliams, Alonzo
WRilams, Catherine
Wilson, Bernrd
Woodside, BasB~ M.
W~oobdide, Mary Jane


,f


Dean -/a66(k


Daughter's wedding plans upset mother











nation would not have shed their blood to free their black
brother.
Over 30 years ago the late Hon. T. A. Toote and I represented
the Bahamas at an anniversary being celebrated by Tuskegee
Institute, the Negro college in Tuskegee, Alabama. founded by
Booker T. Washington and made world famous by the genius of
Dr. G~eorge Washington Carver. Mr. Toote represented the Board
of education. I represented the Agricultural and Marine Products
Bo r
SOn the platform at this celebration were white representatives
of old Southern families that had suffered terribly in the C'ivil
War. These men were on the Board of Directors of thle college. it
was this remarkable kind of American who had financed andJ
helped to guide this institution to a position of greatness in the
nation.
I imagine that by now these men have bowed out and Ileft
Tuskegee in full control of Negro men and women. But the sto~ry
of such Negro institutions in the nation is that they were financed
and fathered by white men and women of goodwill until they
were well and truly established.
All this has been made possible by the fact that the'
descendants of freed slaves have been embraced in thle armsl. oft a
highly developed Christian society.
The problem for many Negroes today is that they wantt to,
build their own structure within the fabric of the white sctciett
that has reared them to full manhood as a people.
This is impossible unless they are able to completely defstroy
American society and start all over again. This would men c3
wallowing in darkness for centuries. Such has been the experience
of Haiti!
To all of which I say .... God forbid!
*+****+*****
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Love thy neighbour as thyself
BlHLE_
The Government took two jolting steps last week to eliminlate
discriminatory hiring and promotion practices in business.
In one case American Telephone and Telegraph C'o agreed to
pay $38 million in back pay and raises to thousands of women,
blacks and other employees who were discriminated against.
The Labour Department also ordered Bethlehem Steel C'orp. to
improve its job opportunities for blacks by revising its seniority
system, an area usually regarded as a key preserve of management
and unions.
The moves, the farthest-reaching the Government has yet takeni
to root out bias in business, sent a chill of concern through
managements across the U.S.
TIME Magazine,
January 29, 1973
British Amesrican trant

Ilisedical scholrship
THE BRITISH American
lasurance Compan y has
earmarked a scholarship for a *
Bahamian who gains entry to
the Faculty of Medicine,
University of the West Indies,
for thle academic year
beginning in October, 1973.
Applicants for this
Sthe Uiv rity 1coasi
Examination in March and
s p~uld therefore contact the
Bg ie tel Tutor's act a
arrangements.
This offer is open to persons
sitting "A" Level Examinations
irk June 1973 who expect to be
qualified for direct entry to the
Faculty.


D11KS 8 LACKS LU EACH



BAY STREET NASSAU
TE L. 2-8405, 2 8406







ME N'S C OC ONUT STRA HATS
MEN'S POLY ESTE R KN ITr SLACK KS

g10 and up.

POLYESTER DRESS FABRICS
ini Beautiful assortment o~f roloturs.



BarrV's Limited
Corner of George and Bay Street
PHONE 2-3118


___


SLufthansa
We hrav an opening for a

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and administrative skills required. Previous airline
experience as well as knowledge of German and
. panish preferred.
Pioase apply to:
Sttoun earar, LUFTHANSA P 0. Box N-1509*




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for F'REEI: inspcctirm --- phone
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FREE PO RT --- 2-55 21
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E gI If.ITIAI
The Negro in America

From Page 3
social crust in the black Republic still think of them as pedlars.
lbey have their own clubs!
And so you see .... prejudice is not a one-sided affast
But it is unfair to suggest that the American people are not
trying honestly to overcome their racial problems with love ....
and not hate.
There is just one more point I ele should make before closing
this discusson.
The reason that the Negro in this part of thle world has
developed faster than any freed slave race in history is that, from
the outset, there has been a large body of British and American
people who felt a special responsibility for the development of
the slaves and their descendants.
This fact was shown by Britain when she bought their freedom
and then arranged a ten-year period of indentureship to their
former masters. This started them off on the right foot.
Through the years she has led her people on the upward path
.... and now she is launching them on the high road to
Independence. I don't think many of them are quite ready yet ....
this is particularly true of small nations like the Bahamas .... but,
whereas other races in past history have been obliged to shed
their own blood to gain independence, Britain has not only given
her former colonies independence freely, she has also given them
money and institutions such as the West Indies University to help
them get a good launching. She has also endeavoured to keep
them in the British family of Nations.
If this were not true in the case of America white men in the


"GRAND BAHAMA" is the first
comprehensive book about a
strategically placed island which is
r. -m nagg unique in having only very recently
achieved prominence after its sparse
-4 I population had enjoyed a quiet,
Suntramelled existence for hundreds


~oc~ ~t~


2


- --- --- -L


FEARED


__y


r


Friday, Febnrury 9, 1973.


EXCEPTIONAL CAREER OPPORTUNITY

THE ROYAL BANK HAS SEVERAL OPENINGS FOR AMBITIOUS YOUNG
BAHAMIANS PREPARED TO ACCEPT WELL DEFINED ACCELERATED
TRAINING IN PREPARATION FOR EARLY ENTRY INTO THE
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F
r
P P;e 1


of years.
P. J. H. ~,rJtt, a town planner in
charge of the development of
Freeport, writes with first-hand
knowledge of the island in all its
aspects.


ELEUTHERA

R1ED


We've put ess* queliycentelled Milk

In New easy to spot 2-COlour eartone




H atchet Bay The Bahamian Wai


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Qfht Qttbunr


CAN YOU AFFORD TO MISS AN


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GREEN


~OWElt
au"urr c&nrara,
MU(
'Qeauut
~ourav
EGOS


- rlrrr

1


E J. H. Barratt

will be at the Island Book Shop
from10astm~on Saturday,

February 10th, to autograph copies
of his new book.


BAIY STREET




_ ___rr __ I~__ __ ___ _______ ___ ___ __ __


I _


1111115 1111111 ill I

WILDLIFE FILM SHOW
Saturday -Ferb.Hoth 8:p.m.
Teacher8r Trainting Caflege Auditorium
OAKES FIELD
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Audibon Lecturer RO YE. CO Y
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Ahduts '2!o Children*P~o
(Children who are Barhamars National
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COX AUTO SALES



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1972 VOLKSWAGEN very celen
1971 FORD CAPRI cream puff,
1971 DODGE AVENG;ER excellent buy.
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OFFERED PRICE $1.44
BID PRICE $1.37
YIELDING 1.19%


I~IILIU~~UI~MII _


Friday, February 9, 197bI~


EDITOR, Thre Tribune,
To be very honest, I doubt
that my letter will appear in
print as you are so apt at
presenting biased views in your
paper. At any rate I shall still
satisfy myself in that I shall
know that I did express my

vielw oonot surprised to
disc ove r that you have
established yourself now as an
expert on race relations in the
U.S.A.. after only a few
months' "exile" there.
Your statement to the effect
that there is no longer evidence
of segregation anywhere is
truly naive. My dear man,
schools are still segregated,
churches are segregated,
sororities and fraternities are
segregated, labour unions are
segregated and just try to
purchase a house in some
"lily-white" community, and
voo n.egte' too s,"siser : d
her family recently moved into
a white neighbourhood. They
were "welcomed" by shot gun
blasts into the windows during
the early morning hours. Had
any harm befallen my sister,
her two small daughters or my
sister's husband, there would
have been another race riot in
the national headlines. Elven
you must admit that whites
have been infamous for this
type of cowardly behaviour.
It is true that blacks are
being elected to city hall and
the Congress, but that is not


due chiefly to white supporters
as you would like us to believe,
but rather this is the result of
blacks having finally learned to
vote together to give black
candidates a solid foundation.
This foundation when coupled
with votes from liberal white'
issuflficierR t let rak bla ~l
political success. Irish, P'oidi :
and other ethnic groups
employed this form of bloc
voting, and blacks mnust
continue to do so too. .
You were most insultjin :
degrading and totally irrelevanrt
in stating "lower classes at
coloured people are not able to
forget and forgive". You are
less than intelligent if you
think that only lower classeso (,
blacks were mistreated and clrn
not now forgive. Black peo~pli
from all levels of society
continue to suffer injustices

hri t:g boudrithg cha whto
never permit us to forget. The
great Dr. Martin Luther King
was reminded of his heritage
by being beaten, spat upon,
jailed and finally murdered. Hie
was a man that forgave and
preached love yet he was
destroyed by whites.
My parents did not have to,
tell me of "terrible conditions"
of only 15 years ago, for I have
seen with my own eyes terrible
conditions that occur each day.
Given some 300 years of
enslavemvement, lynching,
beating, raping and other
injustices, and I believe it is
very easy to understand why
blacks are reluctant to accept
the white hand they now see
extended to them in
"brotherhood". We have
learned that this hand often
conceals a dagger instead of the
laurel of peace.

WALKATHON
TOMORROW
THE FOX IllLL Welfare
Federation will sponsor a
walkathon on Saturday starting
at 9a.m.
Starting place will be the
Fox Hill Parade, proceeding
south to Prince Charles Drivel
north on Soldier Road, east to
Bernard Road and back again
to the Fox Hlill parade grounds.
Mr. Lionel Davis, M.P. will
lead the walk.


If being resentful and bitter
about past and present
mistreatment m....es me a "low
class coloured person", then I
gladly accept my place with
fellow black Americans who
feel as I do.
We are proud of our African
oeritabe Wk seek notrato frget
choose to flount it. The shame,
the guiilt, they are not ours, but
belong to the white oppressors.
T~hic may come as a great shock
to you and others like you Mr.
D~upuc~h, but we black
Americans don't want white
people to love us, marry us or
be brothers to us. All we want
is to be respected as fellow
hua beig n ie qa
vematnhin! Isaandd whneuhal
ever ~comes to pass, perhaps in
a!nother 300 years from then,
we black folks can begin to
thinkh about forgiving and
fogtn. 'AN AMERICAN
IN THE BAHAMAS,
Nalssau
January 29, 1973.
(a F:OR C'OMM:NT`: See
EDITOR`<> IAL ON PAGEi3
today.)


LADY THURLOW, wifo of
the ex-Governor of the
Commonwealth of the
rahama, ih as t pove one o
be auctioned on tSaturday
Govbe me~nt House. This
event will be the third Annual
Auction in aid of the
institute for the Mentally
Retarded and will commence


at 9:30 a.m.
Holding the painting is
Mrs. Si J. Amoury, an
AuctionmCommittee Member.

from the Institute is that the

pn house apanrttment hava
been donated for this
auction. The public is
cordially invited to take
advantage of the wonderful


bar ains at this event.
Refrashments will be served.
An advanced showing of
eey hig obe r ad wil
Friday, February 22 and 23
at Government House
between the hours of 10-12,
2-4 and 7-9. A printed
catalogue will be availal
listing all items donate .


KATH1RYN Adrienne Hall,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Clifford liall of F~owler Street,
on January 20 became the
bride of Mr. Paul Ambrose
Simms of Village Road in a
ceremony conducted by the
Rev. Paul Roberts at the G;lad
T'iding Tabernacle, Kemnp
Road.
The bride was given in
marriage by her brother
William Hlall.
She wore a satin full-length
A-line gown with a low neck


and covered with lace.
She was attended by the
matron of honour, Mrs.
Dorothy Campbell, and
bridesmaids Alice Simms and
Frances Pearce. Robert Pinder
was best mlan and Terrance
Simms and Elmon H~all were
the ushers.
Following the wedding a
reception was held at the Lions
Clubhouse on John I .

Kenheedcori have taken up
residence on Montrose Avenue


ED:LITIOR TIhe TIribune,
W'ith interest I read a recent
e d it oi ial dated Monday
January 29, 1973, "On The
March", by your illustrious
contributing editor, Sir tltienne
flopuch. It seems to mne that
luis assessment of historical and
contemporary race relations in
the Ulnited States as reflected
in the election of Mary
Singleton to the Florida Hlouse
of Representatives is at best
short-sighted, yea, naive and
probably racist.
Such statements as: ...
"'There is no evidence of
segregation anywhere....", and
"white people in the United
States now go to the other
extreme and show excessive
goodwill and a desire to
co-operate in their contacts
with coloured people", is, in
my opinion absurd and
fallacious,
I am wondering if Mr.
Dupuch knows that in terms of
relative political and economic
gains, blacks in America are
further behind than they were
100 years ago! Since the post


World War two periods of 1946
to 1948, the gap between black
and white workers' annual
earnings has gotten wider.
Today, the average black
family of four or five earns
about $6,400; whereas the
same size white family earns
about $10,600. In education
the picture is somewhat more
encouraging but certainly there
are still marked differences in
quality and facility as a direct
result of historical racism,
victimization and outright
oppression of blacks by white
Americans.
Concerning the "backlash"
or "pockets of resentments":
Well, Sir, the record shows that
"coloured people" did not
provoke the backlashes by
refusing to accept the
outstretched hands of white
brotherhood. Even if they did,
they had every good reason to
do so. Thy record shows that
white hands have been
murderously unkind in the not
too distant past. I think the
late Dr. Martin Luther King
anticipated your opinions
when he wrote, "White
America is seeking to keep the
walls of segregation
substantially intact while the
evolution of society and the




complaiing th acet ithre were

nochao ch ngeu oould comh e

American and the world needs
to know and understand that
white America, like white
South Africa, is poisoned to its
soul with racism. Too many
Americans, and would-be


Amencans, are horritied with
the product of a set of
conditions, and not with the
conditions that produce the
product the American
NEGRO himself.
Victor Hugo once said, "If a
soul is left in darkness, sins will
be committed. The guilty one
is not he who commits the sin,
but he who causes the
darkness". Editorials like "On
the March" causes gross
darkness is my humble
opinion.
I submit to you and your
readers that the policy makers
of the white American society
have caused darkness; they
were the ones who created
discrimination; they structured
the slums; and they are the
ones perpetuating
unemployment, disease, crime,
poverty and ignorance among
the underprivileged. Mind you,
I am not saying that blacks
have not committed crimes,
This is incontestable and
deplorable; but to me they are
derivative crimes. Black crimes
for the most part are born of
the greater crimes of the white
society. The hidden, smooth
and often smiling decisions of
white American leaders that tie
a white noose of suburbia



short: the failure of bAmrcan

opportnitiesfor blacks wgis ho
arethean vitmso het relsidu
ueffct o lavr this is the
real proem, Mr. Dupuch, and i
nodesto blcse tereua tow ado
anythin.(Please read h e


Can 't Wait, by M. L. King).
Of all the minorities in
America, Afro-Americans have
worked harder to receive less.
They have waited longer to lie
told no, or wait a little longer.
They have been less violent yet
the most violently treated.~
From the inception of
America, blacks have been
paying with their very liie
blood for a realization of the
American ideas. Yet, equitable
gains have always been
minimal. Unfortunately, power
concedes nothing. It can't be'
asked for or given, it must be
taken. During the violent,
sixties, Black Americans cami'
to realize this and demanded
their right to participate in the
midstream of American li~fe.
Again real gains have been atf
best short-termed andi
insufficient.
Consequently, I questign
your thesis that .'goodwill is ofr',
the March". Marching where' I
finally submit that if goodwill
is marching in America at ail!l
the band players are dressed in
White Racism.
THOUGHTS FOR ETERNITY
"The definition of blacks as
violent, inferior, promiscuoq:
and irresponsible have given
rise to certain institutions that;

se n li io de uedu aa vi 1 nt,
lice practie sar encouraged=

reac uon a~m gtblack people .~


are on ak clar roadhto seu ces
have to wake up!" =
VERNON E. JORDEN, JR.:
PHILLIP CAREY:
Social Psychologist.;
Nassau,
February 1, 1973


M IN IST ER N


TOURISM TOUR

e.MINSERmeOn TRIn ,

start foeir nt boards a
which tok hmct Dail a

annual tour of the Bahama
Islands Tourist Offices.
The Minister is
accompanied by Felix Bowe
representative of the Tourist
Advisory Committee and E.
John Deleveaux, Assistant
Director of Tourism.
,, he M nister on paty M
Maynard's alnnuaL schedule
also includes visits to several
other selected American cities
on ri I, C aToronto and
Each week the Minister
wi"' 'r""-:o"haratherdeeg of
March 22.
While abroad the Minister
will meet with top people in
thedetravel iral tr,r civic
travel trade and the press. Mr.
Maynard returns to Nassau on
Friday from Texas.


S3,400.
$2,200.
s2,000
$1300
$1,t100.


- f)


~


C

all


-


1


1,


~ -,.. n -r .. -,..; ....... F- ~I.-- - -r


Whotr Or btht


Black American resents


comment ts of: Editor


Lady Thurlow painting for Mllentally retarded


SIM MS-H ALL WE DDING


PSYCHOLOGIST WRITES ON RACE RELATIONS


~-




STEVEDORES SIGN WORK CONTRACT
LABOUR MINISTER CLIFFORD DARLING, second from right, on Monday
Union and Cothegning of amwoark cntract the first between the East Side Stevedores
friom left, CoiESS Texec ivebal irdc o~aer ts of ohin Alfred Wharf. Signing were,
Mackey, Ministry permanent secretary C.A.P. Smith and Crig),e SUT presidntal oeathlel
manager Herbert alinton.r mnaseatos


~ '~
i, ~4\ Z






P ~:p:


.liil ~1


ILO expert completes insurance scheme
MINISTER OF LABOUR AND NATIONAL INSURANCE, the Hon. Clifford Darling,
right, shown presenting Mr. V. R. Nat~san, expert actuary with the Intemrational Labour
Organization with a going~away present Thunrsdy as a token of appreciation for a job well
done. Mr. Natesan has been in the Bahamas since last July and has recently completed the
last phase of the national Insurance Programme.

































































































































ENJOY FABULOUS CANTONESE DINING FROM 7 p.m.


BRIDGE TOLL REDEEMABLE FOR ONE DRINK AT THE COYABA ROOM


I


S'WTe must work together to make successful nation' Johnstone


overnight. The time for such '
recklessness has passed. If the
government wants to mnake a
nation it must build a nation.
And you can only build a
nation with its people. All Its
people. Now having said that
let me pass on to the
Opposition. It is an almost
unbearable cliche to s~ay that
it is the duty of the Opposition
to oppose. That is ac~ceptedl as
their day to day function. But
primarily they exist as a vital
organ of democracy. In the
lives of most people there are
occasions when they must arise
from their pedestrian pursuits
and assume a role of overriding
importance. It is on such
occas ions t ha t t he
commonplace is not good
enough. A great deal miore is
demanded.
The Opposition party fought
the last election with
determination and great skill.
They forced the issue of
independence to be placed
squarely before the people. 1,
for one. knew full well that if
we lost the election that would
be the end of the matter, and
the Bahamas would have
independence. And I might add
that, although I did not contest


I


_II ___ _____ _~ _ ~_ L ~ dl ___~ ----~C-~I-UIIC -~--


knew how much was at stake.
and I knew the inevitable
result. It seems that there were
thousands who didn't
I .'e not relish the thought
of f la country ending its
colonial ties with Britain. I
make no bones about it. I
would prefer to see that
continue the rest of my days,
and I am not ashamed to admit
it. If there is a tear in my eye
on the 10th of July 1973 it
will be there because the Union
Jack is lowered forever.
But Mr. President, I have
already told you that I am
intensely practical about
politics and that I am a
Bahamian. I was not born in
Britain, I was born in the
Bahamas. and, although I have
great affection and admiration
for Britain, it is these islands in
the sun which make my heart
burn when homeward my
footsteps are turned. In the
final analysis this is my home,
my country, and I love it. I am
resolved to make it my home
as long as I am able, and I fully
expect that to be the rest of
my days. And because it is my
country I must do my best to
make it succeed.
Now I am perfectly well
aware that many people will
leave the Bahamas as a result of
independence and I can
understand why. In a few
notable cases I have great
sympathy for them and
thoroughly approve what they
are doing. I have told them so
many times. But the fact is
that for the vast majority of
the Bahamian people there is
no alternative but to remain,
and for those of us who remain
there is only one thing to do,
and that is to face up to the
truth and labour to make our
country a happy and successful
nation. That is not easy in the
atmosphere which has been
created, but then not much
credit is allocated for
accomplishing easy tasks.
I do not wish to be
misunderstood. I do not want
you to think that we should all
adopt a compliant attitude and
bend to the government's will.
Quite the contrary. I believe
that people should actively
speak out against the
government. I believe that the
Opposition party should
Page 12, Col. 6


was a decision for the people
to be made at a general
election.
e As I have already said the
British people are more than
anxious to \he~d their colonial
responstibilities
a The INM'r made it plain
beyond any polssible shadow of
doubt that if the P.L P. won
the elections the Bahamas
would becomer an independent
countryy.
I The P.LP.F won the
election. They won by a
ma~rgin which in any country
Itoday would he regarded as
o~verwhe~lming,
Now Mr President. you put
that all together and you can
onlv come up with one answer.
I he issue ol Iindependenlce was
decided o the 19th
Septemiber. 1972 and that was
a total and incomplete end to the
mnatt~r
But yet rthere 1\ a school )f
thought which h:Iieves that the
Opposition should have gone
on fi gh t ing against
independencer even at the
constitutional conference. Mr.
P'resident.I have attended two
constitutional conferences in
London. I have over the years
spoken with many British
politicians. c~inI servants and
former colonial servants and
for some years I have tried to
judge the moo~d of the British
government and the British
people on the subject of
independence for colonial
peoples. I sat at Government
Hlouse in 196h8 and heard Lord
Shepherd who presided over
the 1%68 constitutional
conference say that he had
nothing but contempt for a
man who did not want to
become independent.
And you may think Mr.
President and gentlemen that
over a period of years I have
given the matter some thought.
Ican only tell you that I
have not the slightest doubt
that the matter was settled on
the 19th Septembher 1972 and
that any further debate was
totally futile.
Ican only tell you that from
that point onwards the first
duty of the opposition was to
secure the best constitution
they could for the Bahamian
people.
Found it a bitterly
depressing experience to lose
the last election, because I


to the truth and labour to make
sful nation" after independence,
mbers of the Nrasau Rotary Club
Ig Tuesday.
our history, but I am not
foolish enough to be one of
those who says "independence
never .
*I have strong ties to the
British nation and my chief
emotional experience in
respect of independence will be
th oss of ose ties.
a 1 am intensely practical
about politics. In 1956 I first
ran for the House of Assembly.
After a couple of weeks
campaigning I was convinced
by what appeared to be an
overwhelmingly favourable
electorate that I couldn't
possibly lose. I was told to stop
wasting my time and to "go get
measured for my soot". I
believed them. I was soundly
beaten. In 1960 I was assured
by a close friend and renowned
political prophet that I would
win by 83 -- not 82 or 84
but 83 votes. I lost again. In
1962 I scraped in by a margin
of 58 votes. I have never
indulged in wishful thinking
since that day.
*It is worth repeating, I am
a Bahamian. May I now turn
to an examination of our
present position as a colonial
territory. As I have mentioned,
I have strong ties with the
British nation by ancestry and
by sheer admiration for that
country. I have more than once
publicly proclaimed my pride
in being a British subject. But I
am quite overwhelmed by the
total lack of a sense of reality
which distinguishes the
approach of many thousands
of Bahamians to the facts of
life. It is as though they were
some drowning soul clutching
at any straw. There are
Bahamians who actually shout
"independence never" and
who actually believe it. Let us
look at it for a moment,
LITTLE PRIDE
Here is a nation, Great
Britain, which has enjoyed a
glorious imperial march upon
the stage of history, but which
has now irrvocably turned its
back upon its imperial past-
Sadly enough it has little sense
of pride in what it has done for
the world, but rather it has
been talked into the belief that
it should have some sort of
g uilt c om plex ab ou t
colonialism. Its days of power,
and wealth and domination are
over. It spends vast sums in
caring for and maintaining the


BAHAMIANS must "face up (
our country a happy and success
Mr. Geoffrey Johnstone told mer
at their weekly luncheon-meetin
Many Bahamians will leave
the Bahamas because of
independence, but the vast
mrgrity of Bahamians have no
alternative but to remain, he
s followingg is the complete
tye~tof Mr. Johnstone's talked:

MBr. President and members
of he Nassau Rotary Club.
IYou will not find it
surprising that I should choose
tol speak to you on
"Independence for the
Bahamas", a subject which is
on everyone's lips. You may be
quite tired of hearing about it.
An Englishman, whose
friendship I much value, and
who is married to a Bahamian,
is'fond of telling me that only
a Bahamian can suck his teeth
like Bahamians do. I believe
your club is a fair mixture of
Bahamians and expatriates and
so, prepared for the worst as I
always am when I speak in
public, I can expect to receive
at the worst a large number of
genuine expressions of
disapproval delivered in the
time honoured and
incomparable Bahamian
manner, and perhaps an equal
number of expatriate tries,
lacking in the true resonance
and perfection I know so well.
It cannot be as bad as sticks
and stones and these I have
braved on many occasions on
the ~public platform.
Perhaps I should start with a
feiv words about myself since I
intend to approach the subject
with as much candour as
possible.
BAHAMIAN
a In the first place I am a
Bahamian. I was born in these
islarids on this island of New
Providence. I am not a
Nassauvian, a Long Islander, an
Ele'utheran or an Abaconian. I
am' a Bahamian. If the
significance of that is lost on
anyone who hears me I hope to
repair the loss before I have
done.
el am opposed to the P.L.P.
government. I have been ever
sin~ el have been in politics. I
do 'not admire people who
"c rry favour" for their own
good and I openly admit my
opposition. I am a staunch
F.R.M
,eI am against
independence at this stage in


last shreds of its colonial
empire. Its people actually
shell out of their pockets a
good deal of money because
the Bahamas and some 25 or so
other territories are colonies. It
still patrols the high seas to
dispense the last fading
remnants of the pax Britannica
while it turns its eyes to
Europe, where it knows that its
destiny lies. It is aware,
painfully aware, that in its
colonial territories the
Englishman has no privileges
whatsoever and that its own
country must accept thousands
of former colonials as
residents, in the name of its
past obligations.
And here in the Bahamas the
Englishman is just as much a
foreigner as the American or
the Chinaman, and the average
Bahamian will cheerfully tell
you that he doesn't like
Englishmen. And yet there are
Bahamians who actually think
that the Englishman will
continue to see to the defence
of our shores and guarantee
our liberties forever. As a
departed friend of mine used
to say pass me the opium
pipe, I'd like to have a puff
too".
ONE-WAY
Can anyone who seriously
thinks about it believe for a
moment that this is the sort of
stuff on which an enduring
relationship can be founded? It
is a one-way street. It is like a
marriage from which love has
departed and been replaced by
sadness. It cannot last, and it
must come to an end. It is my
firm belief that Britain will
have no colonial territories at
the end of this decade. What I
am saying to you is that the
whole system of colonialism is
in its death throes and it will
be as dead as a dodo by 1980.
Mr. President, the truth is
that for a long time now it has
been evident that we must
prepare ourselves for a
different role in the world. I
fear that too many people have
been walking around with
blindfolds.
In 1963 I attended the first
Bahamian Constitutional
Conference in London. I was
awakened to a realization of
the future. Three years later I
addressed this club on the
subject of "The Role of the
Bahamas in International
Affairs". I had this to say on
the subject of independence:
"In the Bahamas we have
not yet been attacked by this
fever. We have been more
concerned with improving our
internal conditions, and raising
the standards of the country.
But we cannot forever ignore
the fact that the world is
moving at a breathless pace. We
have been wise not to jump on
the band-wagon but sooner or
later, we must take our place in
international affairs. If I may
paraphrase an old saying:
Some nations are born
independent, others achieve it,
and others have it thrust upon
them. The old order of world
affairs has broken up, and the
former colonial powers, in
changed circumstances, and
under the incessant, rasping
voice of the United Nations,
are as anxious to shed their
overseas responsibilities as,
once, they were eager to
acquire them. And so we must
look to the day when we take
Our place in the family of
nations. It is not, I think, yet
at hand, or even perhaps, near
at hand. But it behooves us to
prepare for our future. We


"~ w
.'" ".~. C .
TALKS ON INDEP~ENDENiCE Geoffrey A. D. Johnstone addressed the Rotary Club
of Nassau Tuesday at its weekly luncheon-meeting at the Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel.
He spoke on "Independence." Left to right Rotarian William McP. (Peter) Christie,
Rotary President John it. Monday, Mr. Johnstone, Charles Hall.


must think positively, and act
positively, but we must not act
rashly and intemperately. And,
above all, we must have a sense
of reality".
My warnings about acting
rashly and intemiperately have
been ignored, but then,
nothing else that I said was
paid the slightest attention.
I believe that the
government has rushed into
independence too quickly, and
the worst tragedy is the
inevitable one in such
circumstances they have not
taken the people with them.
The government has been fond
of saying that independence
should not be an issue in an
election. If the proper time had
been taken and the right
approach pursued, it may well
have been so.
But by the same token the
opposition has really not done
enough to awaken the people
to the truth, and for this I
must accept my full share of
the blame, despite my early
warnings.
LEADERSHIP
So let me turn now to the
present. Of all the functions
which a government must
perform the primary function
is to lead the people.
Independence is an issue of
transcending importance in the
life of a dependent people. It
is equivalent to the turning
points in the history of great
nations and peoples. I can only
say that the government has
badly bungled the issue of
independence for the Bahamas.
For a long time they blew hot
and cold about it. The Prime
Minister himself was quite
contradictory in his own
statements. And in the end
they suddenly rushed it upon
the people and forced it to
become a political issue. I well
recall my last days in the house
when a government minister
called upon me to do my duty
by informing my people of the
glories of independence. I
could not possibly find it in
my heart to do any such thing
when I knew how badly the
government had mishandled
the whole matter. And nothing
that I saw or heard from the
government was calculated to
induce me to do such a thing.
In fact they have done much to
put anxiety and fear in my
own heart to say nothing of
those who have less insight into
the complexities of our
position. Much is said about
the duty of loyalty to the
state, but not enough is said
about the obligation of the
state to deal wisely and fairly
with its people as though they
were one people. Too much
has been said and done to
demonstrate that their
government looks upon the
people as black and white, or,
at best, as P.L.P. and F.N.M.
And you don't build a nation
or command loyalty that way.
It is only fair to say that the
Prime Minister is, in my
opinion, very much alive to the
need for leading the people as
one people into nationhood. I
believe that he has an honest
and sincere intention of doing
this. But if he is to succeed he
must he prepared to prevent
some of his ministers from
uttering the drivelling nonsense
which emanates from their
mouths with the spontaniety
and abandon of water driven
over Niagara Falls. He cannot
expect loyalty from the people
who have every reason to
believe that they will be set
upon and persecuted because
they happen to differ in their
political thinking from his
government. And he cannot
expect any sense of national
pride from those people if they
are assured that the
constitutional instrument
which guarantees their liberties

posses inrs osntbe cion e


a seat for the~ Houtse of
Assembly I fought Iin the~ front
lines of that ba~ttle~, and I
fought a good deal harder than
some of those who now
complain most loudly
It seemns that there are
thousands of Bahamnians who
did not understand that. Why
they didn't is totally beyond
me. It could not hlave been
made plainer. I am o~blige~d to
state my irrevocable belief that
from that point onwards the
supreme duty of the
Opposition party' was to play
its part in buiildling the
Bahamian nation. This is what
1 meantt a momencrt ago whlen I
said that there are occasions
when the commonplace is not
good enough and thiat a great
deal more is demanded. I shall
return to this point later in my
address
So many people believe
Otherwise that I wonder
sometimes if Ihave lost my
head. But while I think Istill
have it let me examine the
facts again,
PEOPLI:'S CHOICE
For some years now the
British government has
indicated that the matter of
independence for the Bahamas


J


yadirF February 9, 1973.


e hS Wrtbany


IYI~j L;. ~~C:IL YCI~II ------- E~~- -- ""















0 $jit Crthage


ES


I


2-storey house, HAWKINS
HILL HILLTOP approx. 150
by 150 -- three bedrooms two
bahss wtnh sme fur itin
repairs. Only $27,000.00. See
any ime.
TWYNAMV AVENUE -
HOUSE AND CONTENTS.
Only $25,000.00, has
furniture, enclosed grounds,
car port, with 2 bedrooms one
and one-half baths. Income
established being $3,000 year .
NASSA U EAST -well
developed area. 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, furnished, only
$35,000.00 Good rental unit.
HIGHLAND PARK AREA -
house, furnished, with 3
bedrooms, 21/2 baths. spacious
,s s les- inco e $4nOO
$42b0e00.00. Financing
BUENO RETIRO -3
bedrooms, 2 baths, f urnished,
grounds enclosed with fruit
trees street to street 2
i ra ith.O yfin$42 000.00.
MONTAGU HEIGHTS 2
bedrooms, 2 baths, plus maids
quarters, plus adjoining
apart ment. Income $450
month. Sales price only
$45,000.00.
2.5TOREY HOUSE Old
Balipmin. 3to bedrooms -
im\rn~ished, spacious grounds
-- tig~ate Montagu Heights -
asklg$60,00Q0.O.
GET THE BEST deal with
realtors with the best.
DAMIANOS we well real
estate. Dial 22033, 22305,
22307. Nite 41197.

873 FOR SALE
HAR BOUR MEWS 2
bedrooms, 2 bath sales price
$42,000.00. income 14% -
fully FURNISHED.
OUT EAST Extremely high &
dry -- Kingsize SWIMMING
POOL 2 storey affair Extra
spacious dining -- with Air-
Approx. an acre of grounds
Well kept and immaculate
:condition.
EIGHTY FEET OF SANDY
BEACH AND I MEAN SANDY
~-- House has four bedrooms 3
baths, maids quarters, showers*
etc
FURNISHED. It is only listed
*as $100,000.00 Enclosed rear
PATIO Ideal for entertaining
during high winds. Ideal dog
en closure See by
Appointment.
CABLE BEACH PROPERTY
Just 100 Ft. away from
BEACH Contains 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, tastefully furnished in
excellent taste. With Air
Ceiling fan and SUNKEN
BEDROOM imagine the low*
low price of $68,000.00 can
Finance
CONCHREST 2 bedrooms, 2
baths largt living area like
magic When in living room it's
like I~ving on board a super
liner. PATIO facing SEA,
gorgeous views SWIMMING
POOL, PRIVATE BEACH,
TENNIS COURTS and
parking. Only $75,000.00. Can
offer mortgage.
Imagine buying 250 ft. ON
THE WATER'S EDGE with 3
bedroom house that needs
repair for as low as
$75,000.00. Ideal for
investment and expansion. See
anytime.
3 STOREY HIGH & DRY
horue spacious with four
bedrooms, four baths carpeted
i god taste fully
kFURNI~ISHEDO AND Air
Conditioned. Gorgeous views
and rights to` the BEACH.
POOL, PATIO eclosed garage.
Ideal for Politician Banker or
Executive who royally
en rt ins.Se byt
D AMIANOS REALTV
COMPANY LTD. we sel real
2807t NA 42 033, 22305,



A IR< OPPORTUNITY

-Tlgge laoo two
house054 shee ea M
e~adld~ga gado wi-
Ashlag $0,B000.00.


lifer a p~m.


_


I


- ---' _r


caves
2 BEDROOMS 2 baths.
waterfront cottage --Western
District. $425 per month. Call
Doroth y L. At wood
2-8763-4 5-6.
C8750
TWO BEDROOM unf urnished
duplex apartment, McKinney
Avenue, Stalpedon Gardens.
$180/month. See proprietor on
prem ises.
C8724
3 BEDROOM 2 baths house-
Situated Anson Road,
Stapiedon Gardens. For
information call 5-4258
C8647
2 BEDROOM un furnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.
C8784
2 BEDROOM apartment in
Centreville District, fully
fumi ed kFo rparticultr hr

C7106
NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroom/2
bath, situated Domingo
Heights, East St., South-
Contact: Nassau 5-6234.
C8762
COMPLETELY FURNISHED
two bedrooms apartments Blue
Hill Road south, one block
south of Soldier Road. Washing
machine and dryer on
premises. Telephone 23287.
C8651
PRIME OFF ICE space
avtlable ia r Mdil-1 with
ample parking. For further
in ormation call 3-2351/4.

CAIRS FOR SALE
C8 I PONTIAC Ventura II.
automatic aircondition t
power s eerin, 0. F ncin
condition.T h430 5-7766 n
available. Tep one 576.
C8740
MINI COOPER 'S' 1275 c.c
twin carbs, spreader rims
radials. New Radio, clutch
battery, radiator and wate
pump recently installed, body
work needs attention, sacrifice
for $600. Call 28618 da s
51398 evening s
C8612
FIAT 124 Sports Coupe, 4,000
miles. $2,000.
MORRIS Traveller, automatic.
Like new. $1500. Phone 51147
evenings.
C8756
1959 ROLLS ROYCE $8000
-- or nearest offer. Phone
7-4295.
C8736
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
SUBSTANTIAL END
OF SEASON REDUCTIONS
1970 Chevrolet Impala $2600
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic, Beige 4 Dr. $1695
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic $1600
1967 Ford Fairlane
Brown $800
1970 Mustang
Red A/C $2400
1969 Plymouth Fury
I II White A/C $1 795
1971 Viva 4 Dr.
Auto. Red $1895
1970 Chryster
S/W A/C $2995
1969 Oldsmobile
Cutlass Blue, A/C $2400
1968 Vauxhall Viva
Automatic Red $850
1973 Pontiac Hatchback
A/C 2400 Miles) Blue $4950
1972 Pontiac Ventura
Vinyl Top, 6 Cyl. $3950
Trade-ins welcomed
.Located Oakes Fiel I
Opposite the ice Plant
Telephone -34636-7-8
C8763
1970 RED TRI UMPH
SPITFIRE convertible. Good
condition. Telephone 2-8711
office hours or 5-3091 after 6
p.m.

1 C 2M1ORRIS 1300 Station
Wagon in excellent running
condition. Radio. $1,000 cash.
Phone 4-2986 evenings.

FOR SALE
C8758
A BUILT in oven and grin
(white). $50 Tel: 4-1543*


C8769
1 973 WOR LD BOOK
ENCYCLOPEDIAS are now

~ na r rses. Call 2-39 1. Sns

GOO SECOND hand 50cc
Yamcaha sIcooters $130.00 to
$150.00. Cati 22183 between
8.30 aln.m 5.0)0 p.m

1 eodpaver almost new

Ladies dresses size 16 plus
various household goods.
5- Auolpatic Hoover. Phone

Classified Ads.


T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 58213, or
5-1772 WORLD OF MUSIC,
Dewgard Plaza.
C8739
WANT TO BUY OR SELL
PROPERTY CALL OR SEE
GROSHAM PROPERTY LTD.
Serving the Bahamas since
1947 In Property Sales &
Management
1071 SHIRLEY STREET
PHONE 27662 or 28966.


87 THAT we may serve yoL
better, effective February 9tt
1973, our new working hour,
are as Ool ows:-THRDY9E
p.m*
FRIDAY 9-4 p.m.
SATURDAY 9-1 p.m.
HISE EERG


c877
6 WEEKS old Bassetts mixed
with Beagle Hound, all shots,
the cutest dogs you ever saw.
3 lef t. $70 each. Phone Mrs.
Kemp 42862 evenings



C8649
PACEMAKER 44 ft. luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.
C8704
40' DRIFT-R-CRUZ houseboat
twin Chryster 210 H.P. 6-5 kw
generator. Airconditioned,
freezer and complete galley
and head, ship to shalrer ...
many extras. Call it-2836.
C 8749
BERTRAM 31 seat express
cruiser, twin G. M. diesel,
excellent condition. To see call
Mario 3-6645 from 9 a~m. to 5
p.m. or 3-6649 after 5 p.m.
28720
FOR SALE OR CHARTER
125ft. x 23ft., 4ft. draft, sfeel
hull, 290 tons, powered by
new Cat .343 diesel. 15 ton
crane. Up to date load line
with 2 cargo hatches, one 14ft.
x 24ft and the other 14ft. x
42ft.. double bottom, in
excellent shape. '
Contact: Sands Construction &
Shipping, Marsh Harbour, Box
489, Treasure Cay, Abaco.
Phone 159 *

C8717
YACHTS AND BOATS LTD.
DISTRIBUTORS FOR
CHRIS-CRAFT

CONCORDE

I RWIN SAIL YAC HTS

MAGNUM MARINE

AVON INFLATABLES

P. O. Box N16858
Telephone 24869


OPPORTA1IITIES
C558
WANT TO BUY A LOT?
Phone 2-7667 P. O. Box
N4764, FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE LTD. Let us
take you on a FREE
complimentary tour of any
subdivision of your choice with
no obligation to buy.
CALL US TODAY

IN MrMORIAM
C8765


C8782
NIGHT AUDITING CLASSES
Commencina week of February
12, 1973. Call Nassau
Academy of Business 249

Street opposite Collins Avenue.



C8761
THE BANK OF NOVA
SCOTIA requires anr
accountant for Its Wulff Road
and East Street Branch.
Applicant should possess
G.C.E. 'O' level certificate or
its equivalent and have at least
5 years banking experience.
Only Bahamians need apply.
,Please apply in person at the
ren ofNn yS otia, Rawson

C8657
IP RACTI CAL NURSE
'WANTED $18 per day. Cable
Beach area, furnish own
transportation. Write P. O. Box
4e9 honN fhct. and give

C8759
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LIMITED requires
automotive mechanic with own
tools. Experience with garage
or fleet owner preferred.
Previous experience withQ. M.
vehicles and/or engines n asset
but not essential. Successful
applicant would be expected to
fill a vacant position with
ample room for advancement.
Contact Mr. J. Smith, Service
'Manager for appointment.

C8760
E. D. SASSOON BANK & 1
TRUST INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED require an
Administrator to assume
control of securities and
mutual fund department.
Applicants must have a
knowledge of world major
security centres and stock
exchange procedures.
Experience is also essential in
the~ investment analysis field. It
would also be of value if the
applicant had experience in
data processing and its
application to security records
and mutual fund valuations.
Candidates will require to show
that they have held a similar
position for a minimum of five
years.
Applications in writing only to
The Manager, E. D. Sassoon
Bank & Trust international
Ltd., P. O. Box N3045, Nassau,
Bahamas.
C8776
EXPERIENCED CREDIT
ANALYST INTERNATION.
AL LOANS required by
multinational bank. Candidate
should haw minimum an
years international banking
experience, with emphasis on
statement analysis, loan
negotiations, documentation
and credit extension.
Educational requirements
include, GCE "O" level in
minimum of three subjects
including English and
Mathematics, and institute of
Bankers Diploma Part I
Knowledpe of one or maor
foreign languages and previous
ovenrse experience desirable
but not required. Successful
candidates triust be willing to
tranl and fin overseas if
Flrnewmry. QuaIlifia persons
.invited to, submit writer
resumes to Manager, Work
Banking Corporation Ltd., P
e. B.. N1oo, N.....

QNE TRUCK DRIVER and
oe erxperincedl Back Hoe
rec ContrC rdactLtd; Pho a
24996 - 5~87125-




03 WON'T BELit #IT
UNTIL YOU SEE ITi ASIJCO'S
NEW SUPER STEAM'
CLEANING METHOD. TEL:
51071-2*8-4


IN FREEP#T

TEL.352-88M


_ _


HELP WANTED
.C70~6
Accountant. reuired with at
least three year experience in
general Accounting. Applicnt
must be capable of preparing
Branch Accounts and be able
to work with minimum of
supeirvion. Please reply In
own ~handwriting with copies
of references, giving full detallS
af education, qualificationS
and expe~ience to date.
Bahramians Mny will be
:ominsdrd.
Sun' Allance & London
Insurance Group, Post Office
Box F-26. Freeortt. Bahamma.
C8628
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
required: High school graduate
or equivalent education: 3-5
years experience desirable.
Applicant must be able to take
dictation and type at a
reasonable speed: filing
experience will be helpful.
Apply In person to Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport.


IIELP WANTED :

WINEC73 STEWARD: To sell aid
serve wines to dinner guests.
Must have knowledge abofit
wine storage e, wine
characteristics, presentation
and wine service.
Apply to Oceanus Hotels Ltd.,
Personnel Department, P. b.
Box F-531, Freeport, GraQd
Bahama.*
C8653
INTERNATIONAL FI RM (f
C)hartered Accountants have
settral vacancies for Charteral
or Certified Accountants is
their Freerport office
Succasful candidae wHIl ~ie
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicant should
apply in writing to the Stat
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
To., P. O. Box F-2415,
Fleeort, Bahama.


IEAL ESTATE
C7124
FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL
FOURPLEX LOCATED AT
1257 S. MALL, FREEPORT.
EXCEPTIONAL PRICEI FOR
INFORMATION WRITE TO:
JAMES S. JORDAN, 2001 N.
W. 7 STREET, SUITE 101,
MIAMI, FLA. 33125, or CALL
COLLECT: (305)642-4835.


IIELP rMNTED
C8300 1
INTERNATIONAL FIRM or
Chartered Accquntants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in

Sh cessful rc didates wii leg
paid- excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. ~oxi ~F"2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.
~C7121
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
needs an attractive young lady
with secretarial skills to work
in its Freeport office. In
addition, the applicant must
have some, knowledge of
book keeping and be
experienced in filing. Five day
week, salary depending on
experience, paid vacation and
other fringe benefits.
: Interested persons should
contact either Mr. James Rea
or Mr. Alvin Swann at Freeport
Construction Co., Ltd., P. O.
Box F-2410, telephone
352-7091. Only Bahamians
need apply.
C7091
FULLY EX PER IENCED.
BODY MAN required, must be'
able to repair all types of`
vehicles and install replacement
parts and complete up to
re-finishing stage. Minimum 3
years experience, full Company~
benefits. Bahamians only need
apply.
Fivet Wheels of Grand Bahama
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.

C7090
FULLY EXPERIENCED
MECHANIC required for our
service department. Must have,
minimum of 3 years with
knowledge of General Motors
products. Full Company
benqfits with factory training.
Bahamians only need apply.
Five Wheeis of Grand Bahama
.Ltd., Telephotm 352-7001.

C7130
RESIDENT MANAGER: To
take complete charge of
Con ecial Bakery. Must haw
Apply in yearg~t e e and
Bahama Balary Ltd.. P. O. Boi
F-97 Pruport, Grand


C7134
Real Estate Salesmen wanted.
Must have at leist 3 to 5 years
experience in Realty business.
Must be top closers and have
substantial knowledge of all
sales techniques*
For interview appointments:
Tel:- Mr. Jacques Smith.
Intercontinental Realty Ltd.,
Freeport 373-1255.

C7132
GARDENER/LABOURER -
capable of helping welders,
cleaning premises, offices, etc..
Apply L &AA Industries Ltd.,
Telephone 352-5422, P. O.


I ~ ~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -LiL IL~ -.-


ROSET'TA ST REET

TPWO DOORS WEIST OF

MONTROSE AVE


g


SG$$$I I


Friday, February 9, 1973.


I I


I I


FOR RENT )


c874
LARGE LOT in Sans Souci
area. Sacrifice for cash sale.
Call 42828 after 6:30 p.m.
C8770
LARGE LOTS
FOR SALE
SANDS ADDITION
BERNARD ROAD
Deposit $200.00. Monthly
payments $100.00. Cash
discount 20%/. Call today Bill's
Real Estate 2-3921.
C8714 ~ABACO PROPERTY
North of Cherokee Sound. Half
acre tracts (20,000 sq. ft.).
Close to ocean beach. Only 16
tracts available from $2,000.00
per tract. Undeveloped
property. Call Philip Brown
Realty, Box N.104, Nassau.
Phones 31273 77681 after 6
m.

C8780
44 ACRES of land just south
tuaLittlen Flaebor ,eAba o
1200' beach waterfront. Phone
4-1240 6 p.m. 9 p.m.
C8786
OUTSTANDI NG BUY
Western District, large 3
bedroom 2 bath residence with
2 apartments attached.
Excellent income producing
property. Call Dorothy L.
Atwood 2-8763-4-5-6.
C8663
CORNER building lot, main
road, very near The Current
Club, Eleuthera. $1750.00 or
mkeK a sonds loffr ctonttadc

P.Oc oB N-4263958 Nassau2 o
anytime.


ENROLL NOW
Typing
Shorthand
Borkkeeping
Commrcnial Mathemnatics
Office Practice
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier (NCR
4200)
Dictaphonel Typist
Filing
Telex Operator
BJ.C. and G.C.E. Classes:-
English
Mathermatics
Literature
History
Spanish
NASSAU ACADEMY OF
BUSINESS, Shririey Street,
Opposite Collins Avenue.
Phone 24993*


C8641
LAR GE HI LL TOP and
waterfront lots at East end.
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.

C8662
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furni sh ed apartment
overlooking Montagu Bay (very
desirable area). New complete
rugs, stove, refrigerator, heater,
wall mirrors, sliding doors, etc.,
Good rental' no problem.
$27,500.00 Will consider
exchange in Florida. Call Mr.
Kay collect 5-2598 or 2-4223
anytime. P. O. Box N-4635,
Nassau.


WILDCAT STRIKE BY NON-
WHITE S. AFRICAN WORKERS


DURBAN, South Africa (AP)-
A wildcat strike by 16,000
non-white municipal employees was
declared ended Friday, hut
tih usands of la ourers in private
Andstry remainesp smansai
non-white city employees who were
threatened with dismissal if they
failed to report F~riday had
compiled with the ultimatum.
They are receive a 15 per cent
hike with a minimum increase of
two rands (2.56 U.S. dollars) p~er
oek cide ania warned that
The city employees stalled refuse
collections, the produce market,
the municipal slaughterhouse! and
other services when they walked
out wednesday. Sewage, water,
electricity and health facilities were
not curtailed.
Elsewhere in the Durban area
Friday was fire and rhirer
dica dngm tei antir b fi
new work force --with many of the
dismissed employees taken back.
This appeared to be an attempt ts>
ween our miiirants.


Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenle
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
O AK CASH
PHOONRE: A3795, 2-3796,

Ai -34 48 43


C8773


FOR SALE


HUSSEIN SAYS HE'S
AflSQUOTED BY MEDIA
AMMAN (AP)- King Hussein tf
Jordan, who is currently visiting
Washington, denied Thursday niglbt
he is willing to hold direct talks
Th eing spoke to his people ina'
tel.iio progr..., ared frot

'""...:'nf his two-day talks in
He had been quoted Wednesday
'in an interview with the Washington
Evening Star-News as saying he is
ready for separate talks with Israel
.."Je m..""", pr"":'ds tof u
que dpomta possibly through
Answering a question on the
report, the King said Thursday:
'This is misunderstanding, or
mis-expression by the media. Our
position is clear and unchanging.
'Wehiwante anra ee kl settlement
Security Council Resolution Ng
242 (0 Nov. 22. 1967) ar~
welcome any positive action in t ais
respect. 'We refuse partial
settlements because we! have
responsibilities toward our brethrenl
and because our problem is onle..
pr pnosal fr an isntealnm a reet
between Egypt and Israel fotr the
reopening of the Suez C'anal, which
has been closed since the 1967
vieat tsor,o asa first step for )n


C8789
LONG ISLAND
SALT POND HeARB UR 4
bedrooms, 4'r baths, suitable
large family or entertaining.
Lwmig/dining room, large
kitchen and porches
overlooking harbour. Utility
building with well equipped
workshop, complete laundry'
generator room with 41/AKW
Lister. Fusaggrg,- appliances'
kitchen equipment, linens, etc.'
included. House completed
1971. Asking less than cost, at
$65,000. Write R. J.
Henderson, Deadmans Cay,
Long Island.
C8775
FOR SALE
1. Attractive three-bedroom
two-bath residence Blair
Family room, patio, carport
etc. $63,000 furnished.
2. Desirable three-bedroom
one-bath residence with
living/dining, carport etc. in
Blair. $40,000 furnished
(reduced price).
3. Excellent buy in
three-bedroom, two-bath Blair
residence, with living/dining
patio, carport, etc. $42,000
furnished
H. G. CHRISTIE
Real Estate
309 Blay Street
P. O. Box N8164
Nassau
Telephone 2-1041, 2-1042.

FOR SALE~ OR RENT
C8715
ON PINK SAND BEACH -
unique 5 room designer's
home, guest cottage. fireo~lace
292 baths, patio, marvellous
view, swimming, fishing. H. H
Larkin, c/o Box 101, Harbour
Island.

WANITS TO RENT
C8735
2 BEDROOM furnished house
with fenced in yard in quiet
neighbourhood for young
couple with dog. Approximate
price $250. Phone 27548 days.
58964 after 6 n.m

FOR RENT
C8640
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
inquire 4-2017.
C8643
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C8648
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
aircnditioned one bedrooms'
epartments. Res abr~ rental.
54926.

FLYV FURNISHED
apartment -2 bedrooms'
arcronditioned, phone, T.V.
cnnectronns, large private patio
.and barbeaue pit. Phone


BASICALLY furnished 2
bedrooms (1 bedroom

kidn ,hn Iv nd dining ara,
wrashIng machine Montrose
Avenue. telephoder 21722-5
and 2-38e68*


IN Loving memory of a dear
father, husband and brother
James C. Sands of Rock
Sound, Eleuthera, who passed
away three sad years ago today
9th February.
He is survived by his wife
Rowena Sands, two sons, five
daughters, five sisters, three
brothers and a host of relatives,
Sand friends.
Gone but not forgotten
May he rest in peace.
THE FAMILY,



C8751


... IT ALL ADDS UP i




Your nrurabinr but tanwanted

items of

clothing tools,

appijances, clock,

fans, etc. .. Clear out

your closetsr, garagJe, storeroom .. .

all can be of help


THE FAMILY of the late
merns E. Butler, who died
thanuk s8t 1973, wish to
friends, associafa and nrela a
for djral wrsth, crds an

Spci tank to Rev. Miohael
Symonette, Superintendent of
le. John's Nastive Barptist
.S ity, Pastor, officers and
members of St. John's Baotist
Cathedral and Deme lrta's

POSITION H m NFE

C8733IM rnE


to Someone else.

Donate them to


TCH CHA St TRED
Accountant Firm of Tasists
Ross & Co., P. O. Box F2450,
Fpreport, Grand hotme,

-~Mtep ai hmg ho
our yrs experience. Good
com mand of typing,
a orha ~d,a gnd "G'

business language esm~ntial.
Reply in writing to the ab~ove
addore.


Do you
weekly


need a part' time .Cf
m~aid? Call Roney


e% ~l siI e hejbdn




Corne by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6008 in Freeport from 8am. to 5p~m.Monr. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to lp.m.


I I ~esnu _I I mi~PE #rvreEs~ I


EAL ESTATE


REAL ESTAITIE


PETS FOR SALE


TRClbL ~EIIVICI


C8642
PATIO AWNIINGS AND
CARPORTS
AHFQNS, SK.U'TTRS,
J~h $. Georg 2 Co. Ltd'.,
Per fra estimates and prompt
gervice call 2-841.













_


si..e.- P.,.


Chess














I aut (Alte EveoalsM
Str~Randant possles as I seat



gnmdn ster mvu U Anderwon
(Wl~te to move) ta le dhan to
got pawnP by 2 Q xP or 2
abrould Anderago take either
Per rtbmes: 10 seconds cheeis



at50tnrarO No Ot579 -

Chess Solution
Acth kedo ino be t 9cn
wc3IM 2 Qx 7 -8S Jd K and
B aate or SeN;B2 for K-
Ktl) Q- 8( aste.

SK B--B o chan b
oAuntlral by 4 Q-Kta.


I


-


r\ ur r rr r II I -"


SOLUTION OF SATURDAY'$ PUZZLE


C. .J~


THlE Make You Ver CROSS~wordl. mh e wk~h ao amkm,
rad $pt form tbsIn la KAh : T ao is~ krt tue dlul~
help yes t rs Solution on Monday.


APARTMENT 3-G By A ^ 1* K os aw



COME ALONG, you MAY WELL HAV~E IMMEDIATELY YIOU WILL ASK, 'WHY THAT'S THE FIRST QUESTION E WOULD
FiOtZEN TO PEATH BEFORE ANOTHER PIp ROMHAPK LUPPINO STOP FOR WANT AttSWERED! DO 70U THINK ITS
CAB STOPPED FOR YIOU? ME?'! RIGHTt THE UNIFORM THAT TURitS Me ON?


9 KNJOW--
WXCT~HAT I
SWAS ABOUTWA r
TO ASK(! r j






STE VE R 0PER & MI KE NOMAD by saunders & o ver gard
Ylrr Irrlr .t R 1, WA ubT THE MAN;


'ILl@. WItsQJW ilow 'eour us assa'oco Hpae~So...
'TIL THIN6S SIAll GIWFING~ AGAIN? "


I --


I SUPPOSE IT'S
SILLY AND SUSPICIOUS

L KE TP VINCHEE..
ALL RIGHT, NOTH NSB
SLOsT.

3

ai


202- q1 7 m1-2 11


ao ~~3


Clclue Aerous
anuwaysnern workt to It. to>
Wt anr emot te truth. (n)
Barc fr. one t
Heer espert. (6)
Hc1r neo isc ()


- -- -r


Frkley, Fbnruary 9, 1973.


CARROCLL IHW





GENERAL TENDENCIES: This is your day
not to expand, but to reduce your ideas rad
desires to a workable plan that is practical. Make certain the
financial aspects are on a solid and secure structure. Look
about your house and see that all s right. Stick within your
budget. Your mind is working well.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) G~o ahead with plans to pay
bills, get reports out of the way and come to good terms with
those you deal with in business. Use your good hunches. Show
mate you have a sense of humor.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Take the health treatments
that will have you at your best for social affairs this evening.
Make the acquaintance of fascinating people. Others will now
respect and appreciate you more.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Take the time to work out
the details of a fine plan you have that is important. Later rse
what it is that close ties expect of you. Do your utmost to
please them. Show that you have wisdom.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Analyze thoer
friends you want to cultivate more in the future for your
greater happiness and success. State your aims to those who
will understand them and give you a helping hand.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) It is wise to get busy and handle
all those responsibilities that are yours. Show you are a fine
citizen. Stop procrastinating or you get into trouble. Assist
thoen who need your help.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) You have the chance now to
obtain the data you need, get out of the rut you have been in
and make something out of yourself. Ally yourself with those
whose experience has been wider than yours.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You are wide awake to the
most intelligent means through which to get your obligations
behind you. Don't delay any longer. Show more affection to
mate and put your existence or an even keel.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Study the contracts you
have made and be sure you keep your end of the bargain.
Strive for more harmony with everyone, whether in business
or personal life. Think logically.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) With all the duties
ahead of you, it is well you persevere in a most intelligentt
fashion today. Make thoem changes to wardrobe that will make
you looke more attractive. Be wise.
oCA RIC 6RN (Decr 22 toh Jnbie20)inToakd die tne to et
full speed ahead in the near future. Don't neglect your routine
works. More affection for mate is wise.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Every detail connected
with your home is important now so give as much attention to
this as possible. Bring friends into your home tonight and have
a good time. Show that you have poise.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) A good day to make
notations, lists and reports, so that you can function more
efficiently next week at work. Do your shopping early so that
you have more free time for a happy weekend.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. .he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who can converse
intelligently but is likely to shy away from making definite
decisions. Teach to take the initiative. Give discipline kindly
and start your youngster on a course of action that will last
throughout life and bring considerable success. A good
entertainer here. Give spiritual training early in life.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Wol se m d


"I have good and bad news. Ourr new item has broken
all gaes records, bM$ QAb to a1 Cost-accotmting error,
we've lost fifty cents on each item."


K~upert and thre Ninky To-a--17
IV// e din I


Wlhen Rupert has boarded soon he is explaining matters
the Nutchester bus he settles to the counter clerk. A
down for the journy. BiII parcel for Santa Claus, sh ?"
was kind to lend me Ninky," he says the man. That's very
murmurs, hugging his parcee. unusual. Mostly we get letters
hI N isro Snad 'n exactly fr him. Vuda u it.r le
takes Rupert right to the post bear." And he I~fts the
olise in the busy town, and flop to allow Rlupert through.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


"f/6HT/ANDHESAwPOS/8 /T/E5FOPPROFIT YE, WELL
L LITSI *-- N
ATOMCE/ HE HAD BEEN AM #Af peyHOLEdu 000 T $EE WHY YOU RE I HOPE TO MARRY
TLt E OR


Winning



Ln a'nY1,a s op mea yonus
is taking mc~essasmgl .o amage.
Athe annual University Obam*
puonnatp, restricted to rene uneru

grpat and nmpo stillo agre xcted
Irats yeaa. ~Ni~coas Brlot, ourganer
of one event, sat BJoutax on tas
noarm :
Dealer West : sloth Val.
North
+KQ6

yAKJ100

WAKJ85 4 1078

SA3J 76 Bo6 807o5 3 2
8 A 10 8 5 43

West N~omK 9Eat Boath

WNest Leads Stim 95 Hlow

neepoulb Esast. pa
abs nera Se or playto to ae +
Museg ound~ps a imnd s
out danesem. It1 West wins, all

as t ond a I nonles ;doesn't
nuous, nus Nicates BrMOo made taLe

ane tar, th discarded a di~amo.
14aw Y a~ll wa ain ealling. 'Ithe
runi, eand ind Wens not, caaea
his 6A at, trick OWlo, toe ~wolral n
tave madek it ait aM.


gr
4


"It loses a little after dark."


ACROSS

GBeard of wheat

!!: 8"meight
14. Outright
15. World-weary
16. Generation
1l. Early auto
18.Sesame
20. Proximity

K6 indergartner
:27. Mucilage


41rathe tareter thee ther thrclr
cwclar tre rer tyrend~


28. In case

3 Pro f time
33 ub de

36. Husband
37. Brew
39 Conform
42. Vindicate
45. California
white oak

47 euf @ct
48 Expunges


1. - -bamas,
2. Twilled cloth


C



C
2-1:


3. Visionary
4. Vocalize
5. Accomplish-

7 eius
8 Rectangular
9. Yarn measure
10 Onager
11. Formerly called
17. Proportion
18. Narrative
19. Holly
21. Rose-red dye
22. Components
23. Trustworthy
24. Membership
29. Synagogue
31. M ore
courageous
34. Herey badges
.38. Russian river
39. Awkward boat
40. Oxfordtutor
41. Boy's nickname
42. Tennis score
43. Teamster's
command
S44. Vetch plant


DOWN


otird. 4 (3

larct ntcc. ( )
whiskr drink. (.i)
Clues Unews
('wnsu feature. (U)
>rdetterranean Irstand. to)
Oa pra is an h .~ (0I)
too animalsr. t4)
rhelter. (8)
Thinks deeply. (0))
Cha rmed.

Return of
iou nd
(4)

(8)
nt s take. rsrs* e~o


1


er **6 aIn.


Bbe Qrtib~nne


By DAL CUrTIS)l


REX MORGAN M.D


I


2*} 9 Khir :


HOLY TOLEDO.
"~EMK~ I SAW POU UO TL



--A REAL
GU$HER ININESE'o


Brother duniper


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE


A '6 s~~h e ha
makinsr a

used onee
wordn must cllontlentr go I
letter, andt therre must atre a


y

Y6


AP Newsfatures















_


ST.10OHN'S GIRLS


WALK OFF COURT,

PROTEST REFEREE


Friday, February 9, 1973.


MIIIlli ist11 11 54ll IItll


GOVERNMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL
BETTING.
COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM &l BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


-t~sL~~--~-~c~ ~--


Reverse for the "vyios"


GATES OPEN1i.SOa...

POST TIME 1.15p.m.

HVIl IIElll~llw ~111 11118111


WITH A. F. Adderley High
Senior Girls leading 21-10

dure n boh team tryi
to get the better part of a five
and one win-loss tie, St. John's
College Senior Girls, reportedly
due to poor officiating, left the
couurt.
The referee made a call
against St. John's and they
disagreed. A technical foul
followed and St. John's team
was called off the court,
explained A~dderley High's
coach. A report from St.
John's College said that
protest will be filed.
In other games yesterday,
St. Annes senior girls won their
fourth game in six yesterday
when Queen's College failed to
show up for their game and
lost by default.
The Queen's College/L. W.
Young game which was

sc e ue fo r sa a 2p aand
toaylA aQEen' Cleg
(senior boys) W L
St. Austn' College o O

L.W. Young High I 4
Note: All schools with the
exeto fSA .) hav postponed
Aquinas Coll ge Aces 7 I
>~veohmnt tHige School 3 &
C.C. sweeting ~ih 3 9


Prince Will High have a postponed
game to play.


NICKLAUS KEEPS


2-STROKE LEAD


IN HOPE CLASSIC

PALM DESERT, Calif.
(iP-Jack70Ni klus m ge
two-stroke lead Thursday as
golf's great names shouldered
their way to the fore in the
second round of the $160,000
Hubh Htope Desert Classic.
The 33-year-old Golden Bear
hiad a1t wo-round total of 134,
10 under par after playing two
of the four desert courses used
in this unique event.
Two strokes behind at 136
were Billy Casper, Doug
Sanders and former Masters
title holder G;ay .Brewer
Sanders had a 66, Clasper
aInother 68 and Brewer a 70 in
the sunny, 80-degree
t I t~empra tulre.
Alrnold Palmer, a four-time
H~oPe champion who is seeking
a~n end to the longest victory
dlrought of his fabled career,
ws ho dr at 137 nwithM I u
PalmeIr notched a 66 and
Miller, seeking his first
professional ictaor, shtea 6

Tlamlarisk and will shift to L
Quinta for Friday's third
round. All played their opening

rouhe frit Por tels 90-hole,
five-day event calls for the pros
to play one round on each of
the four courses before the
field is cut at the end of 72
hioles for the final round
Sunday at Bermuda Dunes.
Indicative of the fashion in
which the great players moved
into the top spots is their
career re co rds. Nicklaus,
Palmer, Clasper, Brewer and
oar rht es ao omor ethan
niore than the rest of the field
combined.
John Schlee, surprise winner
uM astwe ka u H ian OpnO
four strokes off the pace at
In38 aOhmll thoodst, runne u
events, had a 68 at Tamarisk
for a 139 total. Defending
chayn otL Tamrs, i pro e
to a 70 for 144, but was a
distant 10 strokes back of the
streaking Nicklaus.


If0 ligsS 800 MCAlpiRO



0fAr d0Hill8110800 St



Clifford Park on Sunday

by Ivan Johnson
PRESENT` SUNDAY SOCCER LEAGUE LEADERS Tropigas,
;tnd de~fending League Champions, McAlpinle. will make up the
doubiheader aIt Clifford Park on Sundaly when they play Red
Unn,, and St. G;eorge's respectively.


iMcAlp'ine will no, doubt find
that St. Geo~rge s are a force to
he reckonedt with h~ut with the
to~rm they have shown in
recc~nt wee~ks. they shou~ldc win
(,n Sundlay.

Ho~we~ver. the1 Ieal test and
decider will comrle when the

Red Laucn wrho aIre resting in
third plaLce In thle tabIle, nest
week. Redi Lion are
undoubhtedly in the class of
T~ropigas andt Mc~lpine and a
late hurs ilof v oto~riet ts b thtel <

League (`ahmpionship.
Last week 1`ropiglls beat

scra d es6 nt il1w te tae.t I
T`ropigus play against Red Li~n
as they did ,Igain~st Pa;radise
then Ried L o~n will win,

tinfes fr<~i gsdefehr awa
unIIfort ul;laely' for P'aradise they
dlid niot have the strikers to
exploit the TroPcligns defefnce
mnd Red Lionl d,.
Players suilh as flyncs,
Maples, Kinighit. Seville and
Sygraves will plaiy havoc with
the ~I ropigns~ defence onI
Sunday if thiey adopt the same ~
pattern o~f defensive play oil
Sunday, namely playing too
square.
Admitte~dly Tro~pigas were
without their captain Randy
Rodgers last week who was
recuperating from a serious
ill es.n Kogs~ aisec w

week.
Rodgers sa d this morning
that he was still not sure
whether he would play on
Sunday or not.
BIT SHAKY
"1 gave myself a workout
yesterday and I felt a bit shaky
afterwards, if I feel alright on
Sunday, 1I'l play and if I don't
feel fit then I won't play,"
Rodgers said this morning.

peduodangce without Kders
last week the odds must be on
a Red Lion victory if he
decides not to play.
Mc/\lpine, following their
extremely efficient annihilation
of Paradise in their last game
are favourites to win when
they meet St. George's on
Sunday.
St. George's always play a
tough game and they are a
difficult side to beat
convincingly. No doubt Paco
Nunez and Luis Renoso in
midfield with Larry Minns
Steve Nicholls and Pat Luison
up front will give McAlpine
one or two scares during the
course of the match.
McAlpine, on the other
hand, are a very well balanced
side. The frontline, comprising
Hodgson and Lever as strikers
and Gtoodger and Simpson on
the wings make up a
formidable attack while
Archibald and Crozier are the
mainstay of a very solid
def ne
T opgas V. Red Lion
Kic~kof tme 1:370t ( *rge
Kickoff time 3:30 p.m.


Wrthl T~ropigas at the top of
!lhi I
ai secundI1~ position with 11
renantsl fromr 7 gamelcs and Red
Lime! In thirdt place~ with 9

leagpue ('hamrlplinship, title is

If Iropilias win on Sunday
,vier Red I lon,. then they will
inal linch the
hanpsonshlll~lip. They will then
a Iv hav to beat
hlotclom-cat-the-table D~ynamo s
ar thirir last match of the

.ZrBAW R HMB I

AFTER PAKISTAN'S

507 FOR 6 DECLD *


bow\.llKK g br ItlCkhab Alamn wrecLked
Nu~ ew haundl' first innings and~ tad
brhie t r13 iwd 1I1 vie~~n t so agini
In /ea un\ .est Carisbroo rond ~
twokJI i rest perfor fcm nce
r~erk <1 kri 7 ~an f rsfr >nmin21s
rnll pu't '\ew\ Zelan13d ast runs ~
hehlrnd Pskistan 5' first innings 507
I ia\ wl c2e dal rdemainiunif N
/ralanld wrre s for 123 in their
Irl n unin cleared before play
Iladu andJ New Zealand started
ilowly lonsin opener Terry Jarvis at
15 eg< sit Intskhus ha a t leir seeid through the rest of the
At onie stage he had taken 6 for
26 and inl 28 balls. Surrounding the
Iiic b ts sx tikhab took five
Turn~rr and captain Bevan
(`ongdon scored solid 30s and at
the end wicketkeeper Ken
Wa;dsworth hit out bravely fo~r 45.







(Al O TFGeAustral an ar reAet ng
their test certainties G;re Chappett,
Det'frmst natc a ainsta te an t
Indies cricket Board of Control
tPresident's 11 starting at Jarrett
1/>rm nbtsma v r g, brother of
ski pr ln, hd anwo credit le
Jamasco in the four-day first class
opener which the Aussies won by
five wickets. Walker's six wickets
fo~r 94 in the second innings must
make him the first choice to share
thel nb si attc wi h Lill sttwo
matches due to a virus infection in
the stomach, which had him in
hospital for five days, will make his
first Jamaican appearance in this
mla cah.his third straight match
will byi an edpath, whose form
has been lousy so far. The
Australians must be looking for a
goo innings from him with the
frttest just seven days away.
Chpee Austral up team is e@
St ackp le, Dlan RW pth, J~ohn
ndauds, R 8ney Morsh, Keon
O 'Keeffe, Terry Jenner. Bob
Masens J 2 aHammond. John
Giuyana's Clive Lloyd, who will
be playing in Montego Bay for the
fis .01e aed amyoung es idnt s
of playing fo~r the West Indies.
The team, in likely batting order,
reeoclkharti Se as ,ien,

Ali. and Michae~l H~oldins.


TE RRY HAYWARDi


Cr8d81 ISH cte GI10III gill


Obd Mih I o hi Ug IV lllU
BAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT CHAMP Elisha Obed continues
diligent practice at the Miami Fifth Street Gym under trainer Moe
Fleischer in preparation for what could be the toughest fight of
h career when he tkes on Canad an jurdoarumit leeight champ

Twenty-two-year-old, 5ft- middleweight title.
10ins., 152 pound Hayward "Terry will give your boy a
has fo gt 25 fights one less fight for hismamoney,"R sad

majority of them, including Larivee in correspondence to
victory over noted boxers as Bahamian promoter Wilfred
Marc Gervais, Jack Clements oke w an it hs

amddleweih tmhamp of Cunad s opm t
David Hilton. Hayward lost a
decision to Irish Pat Murphy Both fighters are expected
anld a ninth round technical back in N~assau on February 21
knockout to Canadian and a report on Obed's
middleweight champ Donato progress is expected by
Paduano in his nuest for the Monday.


reDENNIS oMARHSaHALC of St. John'sGCol ege coentrolsoa
Adderley High Wednesday when St. John's turned loose in
the second half to defeat Adderley High 72-57.






18Ck 5050e g0011 181001

AN EIGHT MEMBER Canadian Amateur Boxing team headed
by the president of the Canadian Amateur Boxmng Association,
Mr. Jerry Shears, and coach Lucien Herbert, arrived in Nassau this
afternoon for the Bahamas Amateur Boxing Tournament
scheduled for tomorrow night at the Nassau Stadium beginning at


Comprising the Canadian
team are 200 pound
heavyweight of Thunder Bay,
Ontario Rick Petch, 173
p~oundS oaghhe ytleghtfrlom
pound light middleweight Jean
Paul Segium, of Quebec
welterweight Sestino Ricci and
Oa8 pund John Bremer of
These boxers will be
amra cd ba hns five lo I
trained by the Baham s
national coach Bert Pe "y*
it'They allf eelstha the ha
about the condition of his
boxers. "I rate those bo s i
good condition y n
Among the Canadians is


'south paw' Doyle who is
presently undefeated in six
fights. "South paws usually
make more trouble for
otahrcuox boxers," commented
Segium is the most
experienced of the lot. He was
voted best boxer in the westem
hemisphere Carng las

year. Segium, however, lost a
hplt dein ao Jssen Vad

champion and member of the
U.S.A. Olympic team.

boxeora hmulfbha had oen' 4
years of boxing experience.
Besides being the coach of this
team, he is also the coach of
Eastern Canada senior boxers.
Herbert fought during the


title of Canada
Shares, a former lightweight
champ, is also the president of
the Canadian Boxing
Association and director of the
Canadian Olympic Association.


From Page


continued to go to an almost
empty church each Sunday for
months on end. One day my
mother was assaulted by a
dissident member and
upbraided for taking the side
of the minister by going to
churcah.shMytmoth r's repty ws
She said that the other lady
could do as she wished but that
no minister was going to drive
her out of the house of God. I
was profoundly impressed. I
have never forgotten it. I have
already told you that I am a
Bahamian, and I can only add
that I am not easily driven off
my home ground.
The other answer is this. I
believe in God, but no one has

b isnence t mtoin any lgal o
scientific way. The atheist or
agnostic will tell you that I
have come all this way by dead
reckoning. I prefer to call it
faith. And by faith I shall go
on.


behaving like Bahamians, by
helping others to think like
Bahamians, by opposing the
government in the democratic
process, and by helping them
in everything that can go to
make this commonwealth a

sucni ly Mr. President, let me
say this. Every day I hear dire
predictions of doom; I am
assured that all my possessions
will be taken from me; that I
will be pushed out or clapped
in jail. I recognize that I may
have to eat my own words but
I do not believe this will be so.
I am also asked how I can
guarantee anyone liberty and
peace after independence. 1
have two answers only to this,

dhrch Whebno was a i Ine bm
there was a terrible row in my
church. It was a case of
everyone against the minister,
Most people left the church.
My mother and father and a
handful of others remained. We


indulge in sustained, active
spirited and, above all, united
opposition to the government
on the dozens of issues which
yesterday were burning but
now seem to have been
froten nThey sho dr assault
instead of assaulting one
another.
In fact one of my greatest
worries is that the Opposition
may remain divided and weak,
because what is needed in an
independent Bahamas is a
united opposition and a strong
one. Without it the democratic
system cannot survive. It is
time now to cease quarrelling
over the issue of independence.
Itis deie d. No mry cl ot
will descend from the skies. It
will occur on the 10th of July.
Let us all try now to build a
Bahamian n nation. The
Opposition can do that by
accepting the truth, by


B6A PRESIDENT'S JUNIOR CIP SUNDAY

The Bahamas Golf Association's Junior golf programme will continue
,Sunday when the juniors will compete for the first annual President's
Junior' Cup at the Blue HUilGolf Club.


The tournament will have a
thorun sart. II gisnto say htf al
tees, at the same time, in this way
all the players should finish at the
same time so that they may take
part in a question and answer
session on rules and etiquette on
completion of the tournament.
As is customary In BGA Junior
tournaments the three junior
players will play along with a senior
player who ensures that they
observe the proper rules of golf and
their golfing etiquette.
Immediately after the start of
the tourney a clinic will be held for
those juniors who are not good
enough to take part in the
turnament and wish to improve
The President's Cup is the second
junior tourney of a new BGA junior
programme which is designed to
expose Bahamians to the game of
gof as early es psilet rdde
Hig said he felt that the
de slopment of Junior Golf in the
Bahamas was of vital importance
because the game is increasing in
pplarity in leaps and bounds in

thag 8 also pointed out he fc
months of the year in the Bahamas'


whereas the majority of other
cun tries were limited to anywhere
All those participating in the
tournament should be there at 9:30
a.m. The competition will
commence promptly at 10 a.m.
The starting foursomes are as
follows:-
10 a~m. No. 1 Tee Vernon
Lockhart, Don Butler, Valdo Proza,
Audnel Clarke.
No. 2 Keith Lunn, Roosevelt
Adderley, Mike Rolle, Mike Taylor
No. 3 Tee Dwayne Hepburn,
Therone Hepburn, Rory Higgs,
Basil Smith,

TerN 4Bet ele Chris Lunn,R Zr
Stubbs.
Ph lip Hil o, An y Mcwee yob
SIatr
temse taking part in the clinic
should be on time: Lynden
Russel, Barry Russell, Janis
HKgs le thL Hlon, R ertS nil era
Oswald Isaacs, William Butler,
Byr ardPalmer ,mlaern Minnis.

pr phie mdd Awardsk wI ibe
the Tournament &r Clinic.


it.14


1or Gr~ibunt


IOHNSTONL ON INDliPENDEWCE


'
pt


TUESDY.FfB13*h