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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03267
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: February 8, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03267

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MAAged with Postmaster of Bahamas sor postage concessions within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


E. ,. . 6W

CONTRACT WITH

CO MAIWER FRM
THE EAST Side Stevedores
Union on Monday signed a
one-year worl ract with
Container Terminals, Limited,
operators of John Alfred
Wharf.
plTheatsitgmng,abwhichi t o
on John F, Kennedy Drive,

ESSm cme ino exia e ces t
challenge the United
Brotherhood of Longshore-
men's 20-year domination of
the waterfront labour scene.
The details of the contract's
provisions were not
immediately available, but it is
understood it provides for pay
increases for the John Alfred
Wharf dockmen retroactive to
November 11 last year.
Signing for the union were
president Salathiel Mackey and
executive board chairman Jack
Rahming. Operations manager
Herbert Glinton signed for
Container Terminals. The
contract was witnessed by
Labour Minister Clifford
Darling and his permanent
secretary, C.A.P. Smith.
The ESSU, made up mainly
of former UBL members who
were dissatisfied with the UBL
leadership, was registered by
the Ministry on April 11 last
year despite protests from the
UBL.
The new union immediately
applied to Container Terminals
for recognition as bargaining
agent for the company's
employees. The firm, however,
already had a recognition
agreement with the UITL,
although no contract was in
force, and Mr. Darling decided
to let the workers themselves
decide who would represent
them at negotiations.
A poll was held at the
Ministry on June 16 in which
47 votes were cast. Two ballots
were spoiled and 45 votes
favoured the ESSU.
The ESSU finalised a
recognition agreement with
Container Terminals in
September last year, and the
first meeting to begin
negotiations for a work
contract was held in
mid-October. It is understood
most of teeecontracitn poio

by mid-November,
COSMETIC DISPLAY
THE CANADIAN Womens'
Club wBl meet on February 14
at 12:30 p.m. at the South
Ocean Hotel.
The meeting will consist of a
Charles of the Ritz cosmetic
demonstration by Mrs. Lynn
Holowesko of the Carib Shop.


HANGING LAMPS
AND

CHANDELIERS



NASSAU FREEPORT


ERNST BROCKMEIER
...in hotel deal


BROCKMEIR IN



II LL L g It LLO




MR. ERNST Brockmeier,
owner of the Ocean Spray
Hotel, West Bay Street,
confirmed today that he is
negotiating for the purchase of
the Gleneagles Hotel, located
on east Shirley Street.
Mr. Brockmeier said,
however, that final closing of
the deal is contingent on c
number of conditions being
met by certain parties involved.
The hotel went into
receivership last month when a
previous buyer failed to meet
certain financial commritments.
The 71-roo~m hotel was
repossesed by the accounting
firm of Touche Ross &
Company as receivers folr the
mortgagee, Mrs. Papandi
Alexiou, who is also the owner
of the hotel.
Purchased originally by the
Alexion family, and extended
in 1967, the Gleneagles was
leased to Mr. Jamnes Herrington
of Kingston, Ontario.
AGREEIMENT
In July 1971 Mr.
Herrington's com pany
Shearwater Ltd. agreed to
purchase the hotel in a $1
million-dollar deal.
The Tribune was told that
Mr. Harrington fell behind in
his payments about five
ntonths ago. Although Mrs.
A~lexion does not wish to
return to the hotel business she
is anxious to claim the monies
owed her.
A family member said there
was still a very large sum
outstanding. Mrs. Alexion
recently flew to C'anada to
consult with her lawyers there
cont:"ernn futre. action on
The hotel has been closed
for the past month and staff
was given one week's severance
pay.
it is understood that the
purchase price now under
discussion with Mr. Brockmcier
is under $1 million.
Mr. Brockmeler owns several
poerties in New Providence.


Thursday, February 8, 1973.


Price: 15 Cents


PHILIPsSMIT ( LP)


CYRIL FOUNTAIN FNM)


external Affairs permanent
secretary Arthur Bamrntt said
today that the matter was
under active consideration but
his Ministry had niot yet come
up with a firm procedure.
"There are 810,000 valid
passports out at the moment.
and it would be a mammoth
task to try and change all of
thicse at one time," Mr. Bamertt
He anticipated that the task
wu tkeB asiatwas yarls
experience no difficulty
taas pr th their exi tng
any problems in this direction
based on the experience o~f
ot er counties which haye
Brnme7 sim epen ent," r.
The Permanent Secretary
advised that those Bahamians
whose passports expired within
a month or two prior to
independence should obtain
what is nyown as "ee ifcate

valid for one year and accepted
anywhere in the world.
.hi Avwould then give the
in Ecaualt re to ma e proper
safptpr Ju alfor a new passport
FINAL PROOFS
According to Mr. Barnett
the Minis ry of External
Affairs ish waiting fororthn::

he was not prepared to disclose
its colour or design at the

"They will, however, be in
and available well before
independence," he said.
A spokesman for the U.S.


Consul Ge~neral'F office saidl
today that visas already issued
to Bahamriians will continue to
be valid for the prescribed time
named o~r unitl such time as the
passport holder obtains a new
documents.
T-he Ame~rican ('onsulate
General s Office presently
issuers three types of vlsats a1
n ult ple and finite, good for

wh~ic~h limiits the number of
tir esbapplication fod adn vision

multiple entry visa good for
four years.


TO PROTECT SECRECY OF BALLOT ELECTION COURT'S

DECISION ON SPECIFIC BALLOTS WILL NOT BE GIVEN





Fountain was elected in








Ie t.l e ec lon 1 It4votes

;~ ByMIKE LOTHIAN
THE ELECTION COURT ON WEDNESDAY came to the history-making conclusion that for four months the
wrong man has represented a constituency in the House of Assembly, and that decision raises at least one'
unprecedented administrative problem: who was entitled to the M.P.'s salary.
The Election Court ruled Returning Officer Livingston by law to call for a fresh poll, rejection of Mr. Dean's
yesterday that FNM candidate Smith found that Mr. Fountain which was held on October 6 nomination had resulted in the
Cyril Fountain won the and PLP candidate Philip and from which the PLP unopposed return of the UBP's
September 19 North End Long Smith were tied at 473 votes. candidate emerged the winner, Basil Kelly.
island election by a four-vote In those circumstances, the as the FNM boycotted the The Election Court ruled
margin, but at the time Returning Officer was bound polls. that the Returning Officer had


no power to reject Mr. Dean's


n ecio ao unad cled 1 o
fresh poll.

Dea di nto enienonfe a
candidate, and Mr. Kelly
defeated the PLP's Wilbert
Moss.
Yesterday's ruling by the
Election Court b ought no
visilbe reaction from either Mr.
Smith or Mr. Fountain, both of
whom were present in the
courtroom when the ruling was
del y redrat 3 30h pm.col e

contacted today for comment.
MOTION
A secondary effect of the
ruling is expected to be the
legislative death of a motion
tabled by Mr. Smith, but never
never proceeded with, calling
for the appointment of a select
committee to consider the age

However, some other PLP

beaintk) b en te rotionmiin is
own name.
During the six days of public
hearings leading up to the
Court's ruling, attorneys for
Mr. Fountain Eugene
Dupuch, Q.C., and Bradley
Callendar called numerous
witnesses to support Mr.
Fountain's claim that three
persons who cast ballots in the
September 19 poll were not
entitled to vote.
Attorneys for Mr. Smith -
Jamaicans Vivien Blake, Q.C.,
and Dr. Lloyd Barnett, and
Bahamian Mrs. Ruby Nottage
.-called no witnesses to
counter Mr. Fountain's claims,
concentrating instead on
arguing legal points.
During three and a half days
of closed-door sessions, the
court scrutinized three other
ballots. Two of them Mr.
Fountain claimed were
wrongly rejected by Returning
Officer Livingston Smith, and
the third Mr. Fountain said was
wrongly accepted.
It was during the
closed-door sessions that the
attorneys for the PLP called
their sole witness, an American
handwriting expert, to support
the contention that a vote for
Mr. Fountain was properly
rejected for having the words
"Cyril Fountain" written on it,
because the handwriting could
allegedly identify the voter
concerned,
The court's decisions in
relation to the specific ballots
is not known and will never be
made public, in order to
protect the secrecy of the
ballot.
Only the final result of the
scrutiny is known: on
September 19 Mr. Fountain
actually polled 475 valid votes
to Mr. Smith's 471.


Fia Febur I6 a am.
Meantime the order freezing
Bh Btransfern of th lfundns by
court order issued by Chief
Justice Sir Gordon Bryce on
February I at the request of
ODB.
aBothhOverseaso m elpmae
and subsidiary ies of
International Bancorp Ltd.,
holding company for the Swiss.
Luxembourg and Bahamian

blasguerdintOS mua If the
enlpire placed them after
running into difficulties with
Swriss authorities.
The SI 55.42 million
represent balances outstanding
on five IOS mutual funds which
were originally deposited with
the Luxembourg bank and

tB amas Commn Iath, ih
Overseas Development Bank,



its licence unless it can
repatriate the funds deposited


"LC "C


with BCB between October 4
and November 27, le97by he

Luxembourg Commissioner on
November 27 has demanded
the liquid assets of five IOS
off-shoot Funds be blocked'
hd ehat os monmies whc
and been deposited with BCB
be recalled.
To date U.S. $21.5 million
have been returned by BCB
leaving a balan e of $155.4 ,

affidavit of the managing
director of the Luxembourg
Bank has refused to return.
Of particular concern to
Overseas Development Bank is
that $10 million of that
amount are still with BCB'
which it does not consider "of
similar sadn" to th ot

funds have been deposited by

CIt is understood that both
the Bahamas government and
the Luxembourg government
are taking an active interest in
the outcome of the
proceedings.


Septembecrr el
votes and sho
returned as
representative.


ection by four
,uld have been
the elected


ABOUT FIFTY WORKERS at the Nassau Bottling Company's
Shirley Street production plant remained off the job in the fourth
day of a wild-cat strike, but management and labour today began
neg tiations toward a settlement at the Ministry of Labour on
JonF enne y Drive.


However, while the court
action was pending, Mr. Smith
was sworn in as a member of
the House on October 18, and
has sat in five House meetings
sinc \"'", sd M. omNo t
and San Salvador.
During that period he has
been paid slightly less than
$3,000.
The Tribune learned today
that Mr. Smith will probably
keep the money he has so far
been paid, and Mr. Fountain
will receive his salary from the

probably February 14, when
the Houfe next meets.N

Speaker of the House
Arlington Butler explained to
The Tribune this morning that
under the law a representative
is paid from the date of his
swearing in.
He pointed out that at the
time of his swearing in, Mr.
Smith was accepted as "the
bona fide duly elected and
returned representative for
North Long Island."
As for Mr. Fountain, "a
member is entitled to his salary
from the time he gegins serving
in the House. He is paid for the
service he does. Mr. Fountain
might have. been prevented
from serving, but still, he did
not in fact serve."
Yesterday's ruling was the
first of its kind in the history
of the Bahamas. There have
been election cases dealt with
before by the Elections
Committee of the House and,
since the enactment of the
House of Assembly Elections
Act and its successor the
Representation of the People
Act, by the Election Court.
But never before has one
person been replaced as a
representative in the House as
the result of proceedings
before either the Election
Committee or the Election
Court.
in 1949 the H-on. Eugene
Dupuch Q.C. filed a petition
against the election return of
Mr. Artemus Pritchard as the
representative for Crooked
Island, but Mr. Pritchard
resigned the seat, forcing a
by-election before the Election
Committee could deal with the
matter.
DIED
Also in 1949, Fred Pinder
petitioned against the return in
Cat Island of William
Cartwright. but Mr. Pinder died
iefoneth mns teegot to the
In 1967 PLP candidate
Loftus Roker (now Minister of
Health) petitioned in the
Election Court against the
return of UBP member Peter
Christie in the Nichol's Town
constituency on Andros. But
Mr. Roker was out of the
country when the case came
up, and the Election Court
dismissed the petition.
The only occasion before
the Fountain-Smith case, on
which an election hearing
resulted in any decision by
either an Election Commitrtee
or an Election Court to~k
place in 1967, when ND;
candidate F. A. Dean protested
the rejection by the Returning
Officer of his nomination for
election in Crooked Island. The


lie ading the l abour
delegation at today's
negotiating session, which
began at 10 a.m., were Mr
u x we Ta y so
Bahamas Transpor t,
Agricultural, Distributive and
Allied Workers Union, and
union shop steward Mr.
Symonette.
On the other side of the
conference table were Mr.
Philip Pinder, president of the
BaruasSoft Drink B ttliers
secretary J!erome McSweeney,a

Nseco rDoi Sealy aand Mng
Ray .Saunders, assistant
manager and president of
Nassau Bottling.
The firm, bottlers of
Schweppes and Suncrest
products, is owned by Mr.
Michael Taylor, Mr. Winston
Al bury, Mr. Donald Pritchard
and the estate of the late Mr.
Brian Rootes.
The union secretary told
The Tribune early this
afternoon that he could not
yet give any indication of when
a settlement might be reached.
The dispute centres around
charges by the workers that
Mr. Sealy, among other things,
threatened to fire and replace
the entire staff, ordered truck
drivers to stop taking lunch
breaks, ordered two supervisors
to work six days a week
instead of five and a half for
the same salaries, and notified
all staff they would have to
start punching into and out of
the work site on a time clock.
Management has declined to
comment on the accusations.



rrfa rre i WI *





raffle has made over $30,000
Mrs. Robert Orr, vice chairman
of the Cr pled Children's
Committee apnd chairman of
the raffle, said toda .
Mrs. Orr said th t she was
certain that the final fi ure
would be over $30,000 as the
proceeds from tickets sold at
the Cat &t Fiddle Club on the
night of the draw are still to be
counted
Mrs. L. O. Pindling, wife of
the Prime `Minister, drew the
two i nmnng tcet at te Ca
the two cars donated annually
by Mr. Alexis Nihon.
At the draw Mrs. Shirle
Oakes Butler, chairman of th?
committee, announced that the
;;;;al clinics conducted for
.nvnu 20 years h an American
t an of doctors, wo de now b
t ken over by te dcors o
the Princess Margaret Hospital.
The money raised by the
committee will be used to pay
for these clinics*

PRESSURE ON S PUSHES UP
PRICE OF SILVER
NI W YORK (AP') 'Pressure on
the dollar in I :urope pushed
sot-h lerstpl cs ciNel96or nt
sources sid today of 2.122 dollars.


,tr~"
a


FAIRFIELD, New Jersey
(AP)- International Controls
Corp. announced Wednesday
the resignation of Robert L.
Vesco as a director and of
Laurence B. Richardson as
president and acting chief
executive officer.
The company and both men
are defendants in a civil suit in
which the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission alleges
investors in Four L.O.S. mutual
funds were defrauded of 224
million dollars.
The funds are Venture
Foreign International N.V-,
Fund of Funds Ltd.,
T`ransglobal Growth Fund and
International Investment Trust.
According to L.O.S. more than
half the investors are residents
of Gtermany-
Richardson, who remains as
a member of the board of
International Controls, asked a
federal court in New York
Tuesday to appoint a receiver
to take over the company. He
alleged the board is
"dominated and run by Robert
Vesco, who is clearly
motivated only by his own
personal interest.
Wednesday the company
announced that Richardson
will be succeeded as acting
chief executive officer by
Frank G. Beatty, presently
executive vice president.


A FORMER CIVIL SERVANT charged with two counts of
fraud declined to inform his senior officer about a "bogus"
driver's licence which he "knew something about" when asked
because "he was not the only person involved with the issuing of
the licence" a Supreme Court jury was told this morning.


Mr. Ralph Valdo Emerson
Wood, Controller of the Road
Traffic Department, told the
court in the trial of Wilton
Thomas, 26, a former Road
Traffic Department supervisor
charged with uttering a forged
document and attempted fraud
by false pretences, that he
could not get an explanation
from the accused about a
driver's licence that had been
fraudulently issued.
Thomas, represented by
attorney Terence Gape,
pleaded not guilty to the
charges. He is accused of
uttering driver's licence
number 27360 to police
constable William Cartwright
and attempting to defraud
Mr. Cartwrightt of $20 by
pretending that the lincece was
"properly and validly issued by
the Road Traffic Department."
The offences are reported to
have taken place "sometime
during the month of February,
last year" after Mr. Cartwright
had applied to the Traffic
Department for a driver's
licence.
Mr. Wood said he
approached the accused about
the "bogus" licence after a


Supervisor of Road Traffic, on
April, 181ast year.
NOT TELLING
"I told him it was a bous
heence and asked him if he
wasn't going to tell me
anything about it as he wasn't
the only person involved in the
issuing of the licence."
Mr. Wood said he decided to
postpone his inquiry into the
matter until the following day
at the request of the accused
who did not return to work
after april 18. After checking
with his Permanent Secretary,
he reported the matter to the
Police, Mr. Wood said.
He told the court that the
accused had been responsible
for regulating the use of public
service vehicles and was never


entrusted with issuing drivers'
licences or conducting drivers'
exams except on one occasion
at Freeport.
Mr. Wood said he was able
to detect the falseness of the
licence as the "validation
sticker was an old one which
had been issued to somebody
else on April 21, 1970." It was,
however, dated February 10,
1972, he said.
He said under
cross-examination that the
accused's work performance
was up to standard during his
first year at the department,
but his demeanor soon became
unsatisfactory and his work
was inefficient.
QUESTIONED
He said his honesty was also
questioned prior to the
incident with the driver's
licence, of which he was now
charged.
Hfe also said that the $4.29
licence fee had not been paid
into the department's funds as
it should have been upon the
initial issuing of the validation
sticker.
Chief Supervisor, Mr.
Bullard testified this morning
that he spoke to Thomas in
"ea'If ^.p"r'il last y';""' e
him certain information and a
driver's licence that he
examined and found to be
bogus.
He said he spoke with the
accused who declined to tell
him anything about the
licence. "I then handed the
Licence to Mr. Ralph Wood
the accused walked off his job
that same evening."
He said the accused worked
along with him and they had
nothing to do with issuing
drivers' licences. He later saw
Thomas "about two months
afterwards at the police
station," he said.
Heard before Mr. Justice
Samuel Graham, Mrs. Janet
Bostwick is appearing for the
Crown.


THE G;ETAWAY car used
by three masked gunmen on
Tuesday in the robbery of the
Queen's Highway branch of the
Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce in Freeport of over
$21,000 was stolen from a
Freeport doctor on Saturday,
police sources say.
The car, a beige 1965
Chevrolet convertible. is
owned by Dr. Humertick of
the Antoni Clinic.
After the three robbers,
armed with a double-barrel
shotgun and two-revolvers,
escaped from the bank shortly
after 9:15 a.m. Tuesday, they
abandoned the vehicle in the
parking lot of the Bachelor


Apartments on Hudson
Avenue. Police found the car
there, with the engine still
running, shortly after 10 a.m.
The same three men, who
are believed to be Bahamians,
are thought by police to have
also robbed the Britannia Pub
on Kings Road of about 5800
in the first few minutes of
Sunday morning. The same car
may have been used as the
getaway vehicle in both
robberies.
Police are also investigating
the robbery early Saturday
morning of the manager of the
Pancake House, who lost $240
when he and his wife were
accosted by a masked gunman
in the restaurant's parking lot.


i


~bP


~ribun~


VOL. LXX, No. 66


WHAT TO DO IF YOUR PASSPORT

RUNS OUT BEFORE IILY 10




Passport changeover Riely



to take 'ahout two years'


THE MINISTRY working on a method to ease the transition from the present
British colonial passports held by Bahamians to the new ones to
be issued after independence on July 10.


0fieaieg set for nel Frda

A HEARING INTO THE CHARGES brought against Bahama

OvrsasDeelpmntBank Lembor S.A. hes bee st fw


Following a scrutiny of the


M 8gotiations star t to end ba9st c ,Si terdn uh ce an
.Mr. Justice James Smith

W ssSS5 B0ttling fifA'S StrilkP p L'esdingrled hatwon fc


CH IEF RE SISW N1m er trafi CSullevit150 F 01


F105 COMPAnY 'boeg3' drivgy's licennc cismegg


G8trrW8l Car Sttlil ifra Fr88plfI ioctor














(L ~yr y~iun,


^ '' SAIGON DECISION MADE


assesA IIIeA as mnmesmaSI


NAVY PLANE CRASHES INTO APARTMENT HOUSE
ALAMEDA, CALIFORNIA (AP) Emergency workers searched
Thunrsdy for additional victims believed buried in debris after a navy
n# tre thae dnhd owo an armbn ahou eand a plded, touching off
Three were known dead, at least 17 were injured.
Authorities said that in all, more than 200 persons were believed
living in the buildings affected by the crash and fire in the San Francisco
Bay area community. 'There's no question they're going to be pulling
bodies out of there. There' no knowing how many are dead," said city
councilman Malcolm Loopaker,
PENN CENTRAL GRINDS TO HALT
PHILADELPHIA (AP) All passenger and freight service on the Peonn
Central Railroad is at a halt today. Twentyright-thousand striking
conductors and brakemen are trying to stop the nation's largest rail line
.m-ho ad othe opeat ng8 epoymees hre hnou stgpicolet pears e
Ihere i no indication whether the Nixon administration, which had
delayed the walkout for 30 days, will make new efforts to end it.

AMIN SAYS BRITONS MAY TAKE OUT ALL THElR SAVINGS
KAMPALA, UGANDA (AP) Preident Idi Amin said Thursday Britons
who wanted to leave Uganda would be allowed to take out all their savings,
Rnan oU erylew bo odcast by the radio, he said any Briton who wished
to leave would "be given all the money he has saved". Previously the
emigration allowance for departing residents was 50 pounds sterling 12o
dollars a family.
Amin said the 2,500 Britons still living here could stay or leave as they
chose, but if they made propaganda against Uganda they would be expelled
at short notice.
Asked to comment on the exodus of Kenyan railway workers and others
who have fled the country in the past few days, Amin disclaimed
responsibility. "This is caused by the guerrillas", he said, "what can I do?"
He said if the Uganda section of the East African railways system ground
to a halt as a result, he would obtain replacements from "other friendly
countries". Which these were he would not say, claiming that Britain was
trying to prevent other nations giving assistance to Uganda.
Amin also announced that another 70 antigovernment guerrillas had
"surrendered" to the Uganda security forces last nilht, but gave no details
of where or how they gvae themselves up.
GUNMAN KILLS ONE WOUNDS THREE
PARSIPPANY, N.J. (AP) A gunman killed a teen-age boy and
wounded three other persons, including his brother, before escaping on
Wednesday from a house surrounded by police, authorities said.
Police put out an all points bulletin for the arrest of John Hoover, 19.
They said he may have fled in a car, but had no immediate details on the
escape which apparently came in the midst of a tear gas attack by police
that touched off a fire in the house.
"We don't know how he got out of there," the police spokesman said.
"We believe he may have escaped in a car and there are roadblocks set up
throughout the area. We presume he is still armed but do not know what
kind of gun he ha."
Police said one of the wounded, Hoover's brother, Kenneth, IS, was
undergoing surgery. The shooting occurred at the Hoover residence. One of
the wounded was found in the house when police entered after the
gunman's escape. The victim who died escaped by jumping from a window,
and it was not known how the other two got out. All of the wounded were
taken to St. Clare's Hospital.
A police spokesman said police used tear gas to try to force the man to
surrnder and the tear gas touched off a fire in the house. The spokesman
said police had been reluctant to rush the house because the fourth victim
apparently was at the mercy of the gunman. He said the gunman had not
fired any shots at the police.
CANADA RECOGNIZES BOTH N.AND S. VIETNAM
OTTAWA (AP) Canadian Extemrnl Affairs Minister Mitchell Sharp said
Wednesday that Canada has formally recognized the government of North
Vk .p told the Canadian House of Commons the move means that
Canada now accords equal diplomatic status to the governments of North
and South Vietnam.
He said there are no plans to exchange ambassadors with either
government although Canada has representatives in Saigon and Hanoi
serving on the International Control Commission set up In 1954 and with
the new International Commission of Control and Supervision.


FRANKFURT (AP)-The West German central bank bought up more
than one billion U.S.
dollars Thursday after finance minister Helmut Schmidt served notice his country's reserves were
strong enough to outlast the wave of monetary speculation.


-Five more

au b tt sr
d ~n r~d


BELFAST (AP)

bo- -nchrlo ing M
rro th rl
Ireland.
The victims inctlu
otrdebyd be In ar
and three Proteste
killed in a shootout wk
Army. The confrmce
three and a half yea
wrfoi er usw 7der
time every available
Belfast was at work,
was udeh fire from b

nbumbe I d bum
apokesman said durin
Roman Catholic
Imrned in at least three
Protestant hoodtur
packs called "Ta
desecrated a Rom
Church in Belfast a
smash up the home
priest, but the army (
with a barrage of rubi
Other Tartans set
Catholic church an
convent schoolf
handicapped children
children were getting
when a hall of rock
smashed the dormit
One of the nuns let
downstairs and led th
of songs to takte their
rioting. But the bar
the stained glass wi
tiny chapel.
Again the army d
off with rubber bullet
Dozens of others
during the day, inclu
treated for sword wol
reported. No details
available.
24-HOUR ST
The bloodshed coi
24-hour strike called
Protestants to protest
of two suspected ter
demand the retu
suspended provincial
The strike shut do~
much of the rest of
The few stores that
told to close or be
gasoline bombs. In se~
the it t lae II
former provincial h
who helped organic
charged the rioting
ca nacke done t
army said it uttere
attempts to blame t1
the troops.

'BLOODY CL

DOMINICAN

SANTO D(
DOMINICAN
(AP)-President Joaq
said Wednesday nigh
are trying to return t1
"l96S conditions" thr
civil war and led to in
U.S. marines.
He said :n a spe
Government will te
measures" to meet tl
he did not give details
The presidents
without elaborating
had been "a bloody c
between troops and I
landed on a Dominic
the weekend.


can only go down so far. The
state bank is obligated to enter
the market at floor levels and
buy dollars. This artificial
demand helps push the rate of
the dollar back up.
The West German bank,
however, leaves the foreign
exchange market at 1500
GMT, an hour before the
market actually closes.


o-of rh ~ ~ With the Bonn Government
denying plans to revalue or
ded a fireman float the mark, its central bank
asyosunls or lent massive support to
ant gue rits keep the dollar at its floor level
ilth the British of 3.1500 marks. It gobbled uP
d death toll in 600 million dollars during a
rs of religious morning selling frenzy, picked
ipead, at one up another 160 million at the
fre engine in midday fixing of 3J500 and
and the army an additional 300 million by
ot sdest" the mid afternoon, according to

d,'nd sops bankingrsources. prhss
Igthe evening. brought to more than 3.5
homes were billion dollars the total the
ee the tons central bank has absorbed
ms roaming in during a week of renewed crisis
rtan Gangs" on the international monetary
ran Catholic mre
nd started to Scmdtodh a
of the parish Scmd odte nation ly
drove them off circulated newspaper, Bild,
ber bullets. that the Bonn government
fire to another cudspotteprt fte
d besieged a Cldola "fpor teai o
Tor mentally dolr"or considerably long
en. The 25 period."
ready for bed As of Jan. 31, West
sr and bottles em s oe *
ory windows. Bemay' frign currency
d the children reserves totalled 51.4 billion
em in around marks or 16.3 billion dollars.
r minds off the The flood of dollars has
rag~~e sate continued into West Germa
despite government action to
Irove the mob stem the flow. Last Friday, the
ts. government of Chancellor
were injured Willy Brandt virtually banned
d~:ing to me forego purchs of W s
on that were German stocks, required
special permission before
'RIKE Germans could borrow abroad
incided with aanreuedoei
d by militant an aeurdfrin companies
tthe detention to obtain permission before
rrorists and to investing foreign currency in
rn of the German subsidiaries.
Parliament.JA NBUS
wn Belfast and
the province. The Bank of Japan was
opened were reported to have bought
blown up by another 105 million dollars
veral cases, the Thursday .
liam Craig, the And pressure to devalue the
tome minister U.S. dollar eased slightly in
ze the strike, Europe Wednesday even
erupted only though the American currency
,ooamou dh closed below its permitted
erly rejected" floor inWest Germany.
he violence on But money markets
throughout the continent
1IS#' IWremained nervous. Dealers
ASH' 11cited fears that unilateral

REPLICAomedican a Hion toprotec tteh
international monetary crisis
OMINGO, and perhaps a trade war as
REPUB LIC well.
uin Balaguer Parallels were being drawn
t that rebels with the situation just before
he country to
at exploded in August 1971 when President
~tervention by Nixon shocked his allies by
suddenly letting the dollar
!ech that the float and by imposing import
ake "drastic
he threat, but controls that risked retaliation
from Europe and Japan.
aid also The crisis set off then was
lah uss- that there finally resolved in December
guerrlltas who 1971 when the dollar was
an beach over devalued, the U.S. import
controls scrubbed, and new


international exchange rates set
up by the Smit sonian
Agreement,
Financial sources across
Europe believe the heavy
pressure on the dollar over the
past 10 days has now thrown
the Smithsonian Agreement
into serious question, raising a
new threat of economic
confrontation between the
United States on one side, and
throrpe and Japan on the
Under the Smithsonian
Aree the dollar is
allgreeme move in a narrow
range, between a floor rate and
a ceiling rate. If it slips below
the floor rate, another
devaluation is in order. For
most of the past 10 days the
dla as been at or near its
floor rate in most major
European centres.
The dollar closed Wednesday
at its permitted floor in
Amsterdam, and near it in
Paris. The U.S. currency was
weaker in London. But in
Zurich, Milan, Vienna, Brussels
and Oslo the dollar gained
slightly on the day.
Perhaps more encouraging,
trading volume Wednesday was
substantially reduced from the
panic levels earlier in the week.
Taing in WetGrmany,
however, remained a major
worry. Speculators and
international corporations with
large amounts of money to
move around have been selling
dollars to buy German marks,
on the theory that in any
exchange rate realignment the
relatively strong mark is likely
to go up against the dollar.
When there are more sellers
of dollars in the market than
buyers, the dollar's exchange
rate -- in effect its price goes
down. Under the Smithsonian
Agreement. however, the rate


Ove VB7s 18Weekend

By George Esper
SAIGON (AP)- The four parties to the Vietnam cease-fre
agreement held a series of meetings today, making arrangements
for the release of the first group of American prisoners from
South Vietnam this weekend, U.S. officials sand.


A senior American official in
Saigon said Wednesday that the
first group would be freed
Saturday, but later reports

meures in Wsingtdoen si T21
prisoners of war would be
handed over on Sunday.
U. S. officials said
representatives of the United
States, North and South
Vietnam and the Viet Cong
were ironing out the final
details today. They would not
elaborate. Pentagon sources
said the Viet Cong plan the
first transfer near An Loc, 60
mif fS.es nort o Sagon.
North Vietnam has reported
562 American servicemen in
captivity in North and South
Vietnam and Laos, leavi g
another 1,328 missing,
according to Pentagon records.
Roger E. Shields, the
defense d apartment's POW
specialist, told newsmen at
Clark air base in the Philippines
that the United States soon
will take up the matter of the
mlSSlag men With North
Vietnam and the Viet Cong in
the Joint Military Commission.
Shields added that efforts
would also be made to get
information about civilians
missing in Cambodia, including
19 newsmen.
The Viet Conlg accused the
Saigon government today of
violating the Vietnam peace
agreement. The Saigon
government announced
yesterday it turned loose some
ten-thousand prisoners of war
who changed their political
allegiance after indoctrination.
But the peace accord says all
prisoners should be turned over
to the command under which
they served.
g overnment s kesamn in


North Vietnamese harbours
and rivers in about three
weeks. A task force
commander for the operation

hel c pbte ce menalready" a
training for the task at Subic
Bay in the Philippines. And
U.S. officials add that
minesweeping ships may begin
operations soon as well.
The Saigon command
reported that over-all 443
North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong soldiers were killed in the
24 hours ended at 6 a~m.
Wednesday, adding that 424
government soldiers were killed
and 232 were wounded in the
same period.
In Paris, representatives of
the Saigon government and the
Viet Cong met for the second
time this week to work out
detail s on starting substantive
talks to determine the political
future of South Vietnam.
Both sides said further
procedural issues were resolved
during the three-hour meeting.
But they gave no details and
announced plans to meet again
Saturday .
Dinh Ba Thi, representative
of the Pro visional
Revolutionary Government
said he wanted assurances that
Viet Cong delegates could
move about freely once the
substantive talks begin in
Saigon. He said Viet Con
delegates to the Milita 8
Commission have been
restricted.
CAMBODIA FIGHTING
In Cambodia, Communist
Vietnamese and Cambodian
guerrillas attacked several
government posi ions in
Southern Cambodia and along
the Mekong River's east bank,


IowNTowN MIAMI






Single $ 9
Double $1 2
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Hme of te
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


7-MAN COMMITTrEE FOR WATERGATE CASE CREATED Salln atlattiLmo l
nillik gay atsin least I, I Cambodians
A;WSMINGTON (AP) The Senate voted Wednesday to create a special ordered the pr nrs rle sd and w roundin 12. ck a
sej ven-mrah committee to investigate the Watergate bugging case andprons eae Te rudatck ad
related dhirr of .mrialn olitical espionage. three days before the artillery and mortar
Its De Im ratil majorit l, however, rejected Repub~lican efforts to cease-fire.
broader the panel's mandate and revise its memrberhip so that it could Pentagon sources say harbdassemen throuhoqualt
look into alleged past Democratic political misdeeds as well a salleged Ameia heli oter Iod Camodi werel aboutltie requalto
Republican ones in the 1972 campaign. mrcn cpescu telvlo otlte eotd
Democnrats aeed to give Republicans control of one-third of the begin sweeping mines from daily before both sides
committee's staff after Republican leader Hugh Scott threatened "to leave R0El A t VE none hywr utn
the whole thing to the majority." Then, Scott said, the entire country anucdte eecti8
could as that the probe was "a partisan political effort to extract the last back military activities in the
bit of juice from an already squeezed lemon anrd lemon it Is." P t Le O IWam oi' he-arl wrhope of winding down
The investlption stems from the bugging and break-in at the DemocraticP A E CT O KIG amoastheyarldWr
Party's Watergate building offices last June.
WA~SHINGTON (AP) -U.S. Radio Peking, quoting the
26 AFRICANS KILLED IN GOLDMINE FIRE FUMES Secretary of State William P. Khaosan Pathet Lao press
JGHANNESBURG. SOUTH AFRIC1A ~(AP) East Driefontein gold Rogers told Congress Thursday that agency, reported that the
manang company said Wednesday 26 African mineworkers were killed by developments in Vietnam since the Pathet Lao will set free SI
fumes from an underground fire. Most of the victims were from Malawl. peace agreement was signed
"certainly support our expectations prisoners of war captured in
SCHOOL FOR MENTALLY RETARDED BESEIGED BY MOB that the agreement will work." the Laotian War.
BELF~AST (AP) Roman Catholic nuns cowered under a bombardment Roger told the House foreign The radio said the prisoners,
of bricks and bottles Wednesday as Protestant mobs ragd through Belfast affairs committee that "over the including I8 officers, were all
amid the paralysis of a 24-hour general strike. More than 100 protestant past two weeks we can already see La
youths :?besepd a Catholic school for handicapped children, hurling that the Vietnamese parties as well tins
Smislles through the windows. 'The children and the nuns were terrified,* a others involved are working It said the prisoners will be
said anoffcal o f th e Immaculate School at White Abbey in the northern together to carry out the released to mark the 17th
part of Northern Ireland's capital. agreement." anniversary of the Pathet Lao's
Only 25 of the school's I12 mentally retarded children were on the However, Rogers in his prepared roi r dte h
premises The nons ducked the milssue crashing through windows and led remarks .said that the positive patrol font and h 20t
the children to a basement playroom. 'We had a nice I~ttle sing-song until developments since the Jan. 27 anniversary of its people's
the solae stopped,' one of the nuns said. signing "constitute only the liberation army fighting with
The noise was stopped by British troops who moved in on the rioters firtsteps toward building peace in North Vietnamese help to take
firing rubber bullets until they dispersed. Indochina.
CHIEF OF U.K 's O.S. ESPIONAGE SYSTEM IDENTIFIED? He added that massive and over the Laotian government,
LONDON (AP) The spy chief who heads Britain's overseas espionage cope cnmc nd oltal Tebacstid otay
network was identified Wednesday through a minor item in a West German problems still must be resolved in when, where or how the
Tap ecetay tth e n n59n facial istd a a epuy etnut and the acn Mle ge tat prisoners would be released.
His job as bass of the organization known as MI6 links him with the have not been settled. Kissinger, President Nixon's
fictional 'M' who figures in the James Bond stories. According to the scretary, the top foreign policy aide, is to
Off~ldals In Whitehall, hub of the British Government, were unperturbed key to lasting peace involves the stop in the Laotian capital of
by U myrlbe's disclosure whch came in a moundabout manner. aint th nVetnamart opartHe and Vientiane Friday to discuss
The magesn*, Stern, reported that Charles Rennie and his wife principal allies and suppliers.* prospects for bringing the
Christine, were the couple referred to but not named in the British pren eldctdta h oit Vita es-iet h et
after being chrdwith posessing Chinese heroin at their London home. Union and China's participation in of Indochina.
an international conference later Kissinger left Washington on
this month to underwrite a
Vietnam slettlemecnt constitutes "a Wednesday for Thailand on his
M~il I significant firt step to help make it way to Hanoi for four days of
endure, and to promote the talks with North Vietnamese
tran lI c tr sutn m t to th leaders on postwar relations.
committee was basically aHe will visit China later on the
restatement of the broad terms of tour.


The guerrillas, who the
government said moved into the
mountains, were alleged to, have
come from Cuba in a yacht.
Barlauer sid the group was made
up of eight men in uniform and two
in civilian clothes.
He said the guerrilla action is "a
divisionary tactic" to pull military
forces out of the capital and other
stratesic areas.
"I know the measures that will
be taken will be bothersome, but
we are taking these measures not to
hold one man in power to continue
the peace and tranqulity of our
country," Balaguwr sid.
Pre ideant Jan Brh inpriesti nm
.elections after the 1965 conflict
and is expected to seek re election
to a third term next year.
souRh Iso rnect im tth pre is 7c
for Bosch, who was overthrown by
the military. Bosch, who still is
Balaguer's chief political foe, has
been accused by authorities of
Instigating the guerrilla landing
Sunday
The former President denied
from hiding that he had anything to
dothe Iminican Republil has
suffered many such military or
guerrilla assults.


Thursday, February 8. 1973


@e Wrib nt


5 MORE KIILLED W. Ge8fa8S buy more thanlbilli0Rt Il!


Virst US prisoners of In IRISH IH 118H1 f8p rveHt II8va108ti08 Of IIS dollar
,,,, +, hLa 0~~r I OF V10 LENCE












, ,


All items left for repairs before January 31st,
1973 and not claimed by Febnrary 28th,
1973 will be sold to cover cost of repairs.


Current Assets Cash in hand and balances with
Other banks
Other liquid assets
Total I~quid assets
investments
Advances and other accounts

Fixed Assets Premises and equipment
Investments in subsidiaries
Investments in associated
companies
Trade investments

Customers' liability on
acceptance, guarantees and
indemnities


11161~~971RU~1


Ordinary stock
Reserves


Outside Interests in subsidiaries 5, 140

212,743
Loan Stocks Unsecured loan stocks, notes
ad b ds 34.914

Capital resources 247,657
Current Liabilities Current, deposit and other
accounts 3,079,189


Liability on acceptances,
guarantees and indemnities


A. F. Tuke Chairmaln R. G. Dyson Deputy Chairman A. 5. Aiken Vice-Chairmatn G. G. Money Vice-Chairman
S. G. Mogford Senior Genra~cl Manalger G. W. Lambert Generacl Manager (Treasurerl J. F. O. Gibson Chief Accountant
W. J. McWilliam secrtary


Thursday February 8 1 3


I asked him. "They may not be able to do anything for your case
but it might be worth a try."
"Man," he said, "I am desperate. I will try anythiing."
"Right," I told him, "contact me as soon as you know I am
back in Nassau and I will give you a letter to Dr. Burbacher or to
Dr. Walter Jones Ill.
Soon after this he went to Miamli and o~n his return he phoned

"W entoIr arit ed rethe doctor's office the place was filled with
patients who had an appointment writh him.
'ththe dertr soo sou l ste sn himi. She returned to say
"I didn't have to wait long. I had never met the doctor on his
trips to Nassau but he proved to be otne of the nicest persons I
have ever met.
"He took X-Rays and then talked with me for about 20
minutes. Suddenly his face lit up. He satid, 'I know what's wrong
with you'."
This man came back to Nassau in a short time .... cured!
The thing that surprised him was that the doctor chlarged him
very little for his services.

The Princess Margaret Hospital has always been limited in its
facilities. This is understandable in a small country like the
Bahamas, but from all accounts conditions have grown steadily
worse in recent years.
A group of local doctors .... conscious of this fact .... planned
to build a private hospital which would be free from all political
overtones and could be run efficiently.
They abandoned the plan when they found that they would be
cramped and their purpose defeated by the Iimmigraion policy of
the Government.
**********
Just how poorly equipped is the Princess Margaret Hlospital?
There are numerous cases on record but I will tell you of' three
cases mn my own experience.
At the last Crippled Children's Clinic the doctors required a
certain type of bandage for a patient. The hospital didn't have it
in stock. We had to send to a drug sto)re in town to buy one!
Worse still, one of my grandsons fell and injured a finger. A
delicate operation was urgently needed. The hospital didn't have
the kind of instrument that was needed for this operation. And so
the doctor was obliged tol use whatever he couldc get.
When it was over the doctor was frank with my son. He told
him that he hoped it would be all right but hie doubted it. You
see, if it wasn't right the child would have a stiff finger for the
rest of his life
The operation was not successful. Uster mny sonl was obliged to
take the child to Dr. Burhacher in Miamii to dlo the operation aill
over again.
This state of affairs is unfair to the doctors in Nassau.
A friend of mine* who is always taken care of' by a doctor in
Nassau went to Miami for an operation some m1-onthls ago. I asked
him the reason for going to Miami*
He told me that he feared his condition miight be malignant. He
wanted to know without delay. He said that if he had the
operation done in Nassau it would be necessary f'or thle doctor to
cut out several feet of his gut and send it to Miami for analysis. It
would then take weeks to get a reply. In the hospital in Miami the
doctor snipped off a small piece of gut, sent it downstairs to, the
laboratory, and he had an answer within an hocur. By thre time he
came out of the ether after the operation the doctorT was able to
tell him that there was no malignancy.
**********


opposition politely .... but clearly. What he says is that anyone from
the Bahamas who may need his services in future will have to
comell to, him as a private paying patient. Hie will have nothing
further to do with Mrs. Butler s comnnuitee.
+**"******
My o~nl~ comment~l is that, in the Governme~nt s desire to give
everything in the colony a Bahamiian image, many things of great
imnportance to the Bahamian people are being destroyed.
+**********
F OOTNOTE TO HIlSTORY: I can't resist the temptation to recall
an c utstandiing Nassau ball player that he would have to lose his
right arm.
The brother of this young mnan went to see Rita Toote, the
senior member of my committee, and begged her to give his
brother a chance. If he lost his arm, he said, his brother would
hever play ball again.
The committee sent him to Miami where the three principal
mecn on the Burbacher team .... Dr. Burbacher, Dr. John
Kiilp~atrick and Dr. Walter Jones III .... gave him a thorough

ex@1 t~lt~i found was that he had an unusually large cyst in his
stomachl that was upsetting his nervous system.
Dr. Kilpatrick, a1 general surgeon, removed the cyst .... and,
believe it or not, thle arm was saved!
e See page 5 for correspondence over Crippled Children's
doctors.
*+*********
TH1OUGHTS FOR TODAY
Fathecr, forgive themr; for they know not what they do.
CHRIST'S lament on the cross.
ST. LUKE 23. 34.

ITre operations was successful but the patient died.


Neusers Anexcros JURARE IN VERBA MACISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor l903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt.. LL.D.
Pubitsher/Editor 1917 1972
ContributirlllEditor 1972-
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRONMS. r.. L. .


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
TODAY WE publish an exchange of correspondence between
Dr. Charles R. Burbacher, OBE., and Mrs. Shirley Oakes Butler.
Dr. Burbacher headed the team of Miami specialists who, for
20 years, gave their services free to crippled children and also to
many adults in the Bahamas who needed specialist medical
attention.
Mrs. Butler is the chairman of the new Crippled Children's
Committee, organized after the committee that I had headed
since the inception of this work was dissolved when I left the
colony on September 19th last year and withdrew from all public
activities in the islands.
This correspondence reveals the fact that Dr. Burbacher and his
team feel that they cannot accept the terms and conditions laid
down by Mrs. Butler's committee for continuing their work in the
islands.
This is sad. No one, except those of us who were involved in
this work, can fully understand what the colony has lost by this
piece of political folly. 4,,4
*******.
I have written so much about these doctors that readers of this
column know how this work was started and how it grew into
one of the most important activities in the colony, completely
free from politics and without Government aid or control.
The terrible thing is that so many children will suffer because
of this latest exhibition by Government of a desire to give
everything in the colony a Bahamian image, however inefficient
or lacking in equipment the Bahamian image might be.
In this affair they strike at the health, happiness and even the
lives of poor and helpless children!
**********
The Miami specialists were dedicated men.
On more than one occasion Dr. Burbacher told me that when
he retires he might go to Hawaii to live, but that wherever he
went he would come to the Bahamas to take care of the children
because he felt they needed his help and also because their
mothers seemed grateful for their services.
Unlike the U.S., where the people had the finest hospitals and
some of the most outstanding specialists in the world, the
Bahamas had some serious limitations which could be overcome
for Bahamians and residents in the islands by association with the
high standard of medical services in Florida.
**********
What the public may not fully understand is that this work was
not confined to crippled children. It covered any kind of
specialist treatment required by anyone in the BahamnaS.
When anyone came to me wanting to make a medical contact
in Florida I sent him or her -- to Dr. Burbacher with a letter.
Dr. Burbacher determined the kind of treatment the person
needed and then secured an early appointment with the top man
inghe area. It is not easy to get an appointment with some of
these men
The well-known story of Ursula Darling illustrates how far
these doctors went in obtaining the services of the finest medical
men in the state for our people.
Ursula had a liver condition that doctors in Nassau said would
kill her in six months. When I spoke with Dr. Burbacher about
this case he agreed that nothing was known in medical science to
help her case. He said nothing could be done for her,
But I asked him to take her to Miami and try. He called in liver
specialists from all over the State. At first these men despaired
but they accepted this case as a challenge and they finally came
up with a treatment that saved her life.
She lived for a good many years .... had a baby .... and would
probably still be alive today had she not neglected her treatments
after the baby came.
This case helped to advance the knowledge of medical science
in the world!
*********
The children from the Bahamas received special treatment and
extraordinary consideration at the Variety Children's Hospital in
Miami.
On one occasion my wife and I took a group to the hospital.
We were unknown there at the time but as soon as we arrived
news spread through the hospital like wildfire that another lot of
"Dr. Burbacher's children" had arrived.
Members of the staff came from all directions to welcome
them and to see that they were taken care of without delay.
"Dr. Burbacher's children" were not only treated for their
main ailments. Before they were returned to Nassau their eyes
and teeth were examined and anything necessary was done.

On one occasion some of the children were in hospital for
Christmas. Floridians, who knew of this work from the doctors,
came from all directions with gifts for them.
By Christmas morning their room was full of toys and other
gifts. These poor children had a Christmas unlike anything they
had ever experienced in their lives, so much so that one of them
didn't want to come home when the time came for him to be
discharged.
It was really amazing ... absolutely fantastic .... what the
doctors and their friends did for children from the Bahamas.
*+********
I have written about some of the many almost miraculous
cures made by these doctors and so I won't go over this ground
today.
But Cyril Tynes, member of the House for the district of
Crooked Island and Acklins, can tell his own story about how his
life was saved and he was restored from a polio cripple to the
robust health he enjoys today, thanks to the Florida team and the
efficient facilities provided by the hospital in Miami. Any delay in
handling this case would have meant total invalidism or death for
Mr. T ns
In thsand many other cases Mr. Arthur Finnieston, M.B.E.,
brace maker and one of the pioneers in this work, helped in
gttin Mr. T nes to hospital and stayed at the hospital half the
night so as to be able to phone a report to me on his condition
for his family.

I will tell you just one other story that has never been


pooblished before. I will not call any names because it concerns a
senior public official. One never knows how an official might be
prsecuted for any association with me.
Some time early last year my wife and I were in the airport in
Nassau waiting to board a flight to Florida.
This public official was also there. He didn't look well and so I
e~Mnquiredftr his health,
"Mn"he told me, "I am ill. I will soon have to retire for
health reasons."
"What have you done about it?", I asked.
"I have spent a lot of money on doctors," he told me. "They
all tell me something different but none of them have been able
to help me."
"Why don't you try one of our Crippled Children's doctors?",


by The Associated Press
T`OD)AY is TH1IRSl)AY,
193.'leRer are 326 2ys r it t t
year.
datilGHLIGHT1S in history on this
1972 C'ommunist forces fire
mterictnan i2ba ri et into big
south vietnam.
pu 97 to /liietameh troops
C'oni unist supply tric etr
Robert F. Kennedy of Newr York
denounces Vietnam war and says
the u.s cannot win it. d
CI6t Poil icon ressman Yor~
r un\ ecq s on cosiuinlgonund t
considering his qualifications to
se 6 m onesbels in Baghdad
assassinate Premier Abdul Karim
Kassearn fho is replaced by Abdul

t I he U.S. m li ay c uncil is
Anti-OAS riots in paris. Arg ntia
bracaks cf d~ipmoematic relat o~ns with
less soviet premier G;eorgi
hlalenkov resigns, is succeeded by
Nikt9 ai)A dcares it is unable
to participate in NATO while
Ireland remains divided.
1945 C (anadian forces launch
offense te s> theas verf Ni~megen
1943 R ussian fotrce~s retake
Kur0 frmKurnans forces retake
Kurks from Germans.
1940 Nazis shoot every tenth
pesoa in two I'oish vill ges neaer
two7 rnSop nis rebels take
Mlalaga with Italian aid.
not4 I una Ifuner ue forms
to avert civil war.


Shop early for your











JUSt in.. a lovely line of

LINGERIE by Barbizon.

For your Valentine's Day

Party we have a lovely line of

CASUAL WEAR.

MARLBOROUGH STREET
PHONE 2-8800


PARKING INQUEEN'S ST.


One of the things that really disturbed mre when I decided (O
leave the colony was the fact that I would hlave to leave these
children who I felt needed me.
Iwas sure that no one else would carry on this work
satisfactorily because I knew that for a long time somle of the
local doctors and politicians wanted to get conttrol of it .... but
they were afraid of an exposure in The Tribune They knew that
this work was too important for them- to trific around .... and
that I wouldn't let them.
And so, when I fully decided to leave the colony I felt that mly
committee should be dissolved and the way left open for anyone
else to take over the responsibility independently of any
association with me.
I was also concerned because Iknew how devoted Dr.
Burbacher, Dr. John Kilpatrick, Dr. Walter Jones Ill and the
Finniestons, father and son, were to this work.
You will recall the story of how a grand-daughter of a member
of the Burbacher firm was so badly treated at the Hospital soon
after the PLP came to power when she lost her baby at the
Princess Margaret Hospital. When her grandfather came to Nassau
to report this outrageous affair to the Prime Minister he was
ridiculed on the floor of the House by the Hon. Milo Butler, who
is soon to be the Governor of an independent Bahamas! Mr.
Butler was Minister of Health at the time.
I thought the American doctors would be so annoyed by this
incident that they would quit. But no. They took the attitude
that the children should not be allowed to suffer for the inhuman
behaviour of politicians-
And so the doctors reacted exactly as I expected when I told
them that the work had to be suspended .... at least temporarily
.... because the committee had been dissolved. They said they
were not concerned with the politics of the colony. They hoped
that a new committee would be formed for the sake of the
children.

The doctors and I were very pleased when Mrs. Shirley Oakes
Butler formed a new committees. Mrs. Butler wrote to me
informing me of what was taking place and asking me for my
cooperation .
Iwite to Mr. Clyde Minard, Treasurer of my committee'
authorizing him to transfer to Mrs. Butler s committee funds held
in the bank by miy committee. This was a tidy sum of money'
enough to give them a good start.
I also virote to Mrs. Butler telling her to contact miy daughter,
Mrs. Roger Carron, at The Tribunle for wheel chairs and other
equipment stored there. At the same time Mrs. Butler wrote to
Dr. Burbacher who assured her that he would be delighted to
carry on. Hie gave her a date for a clinic to be held in Nassau in
March.
Everything seemed to be going all right until it was later
announced in The 7>ibune that Minister of Health Imftus Roker
had placed control of the operation in thle hands of the hospital.
This meant that Mrs. Butler's Committee was nothing more than
an agency to collect money to support the hospital.
I wrote an article in which I predicted that this plan would not
work.
I discussed the proposal with the doctors. They said that they
didn't understand what the Governmlent was trying to do but
they would go to Nassau for the clinic in March and then decide
whether they could carry on. ,
Now you will see by Mrs. Butler s letter to Dr. Burbacher that
the commiittee has cancelled the March clinic for the Miami
specialists!
And in the doctor's reply to Mrs. Butler you see the sad, sad
conclusion of a great work.
"I'm sorry for the children," was the only commlent Dr.
Burbacher made to me when he gave me copies of his
correspondence with Mrs. Butler. "But I am glad the decision wvas
made by then and not by ys. It is now their responsibility."
*+*********
In Mrs. Butler's letter she informs Dr. Burbacher that "there
are no urgent cases requiring hospitalisation at present among the
crippled children seen at the August clinic".
The August clinic was the last one for which my committees
was responsible.
Dr. Burbacher knows better. At that clinic at least five children
were set aside for surgery at the Variety Children's Hospital in
Miami.
In his reply to Mrs. Butler, Dr. Burbacher has stated his


The Group


The Bank
1972 1971
000's 000's


1972
000's


247.519
669,458
916,977

364,919
1,928,832
3,210,728
88,087


1,523
26,508

3,326,846


1971
000's


173,717
537,669
711,386

314,197
1,506,074
2,531,657
53,678


4,060
10.802

2,600,197


111,125
377,730
488,855

134,219
1.069,774
1,692,848
33,491
93,266

1,183
23,447

1,844.235


155,817
447,797
603,614

264,617
1 ,31t0.779
2,1 79,010
40,617
23,660

3,247
10,285

2,256,819


477,741 288,446 110.473 228,681
3,804,587 2,888,643 1,954,708 2,485,500


40,000
167,603

207,603


3,326,846

477,741
3,804,587


40,000
124,051

164,051
2,1i58
166,209

14,411
180,620

2,419,577

2,600,197

288,446
2,888,643


40,000
154.657

194,657

194,657

32,880
227,537

1.616.698

1,844,235

110.473
1,954,708


40,000
118,935

158,935

158,935

12,800
171,735

2,085,084

2,256,819

228,681
2,485,500


Capital


Qlo be Ar tune


'
I I' I
B u'l It:illirlIr I


n.!II
,i II II


I tl 8 Mil WW NW WilM igal



Balance Sheets at 30th September 1972













T --r- -~IC,


COX AUTO SALES



.Iffers a week of Values:

!972 MlAVERICK in excellent condition. $3,400.
1972 VOLKSWAGEN very clean S,0.
1971 FORD CAPRI cream puff, 52,000
1971 DODGE AVENGER excellent buy. $1,300
1971 FORD ESCORT Bargain. $1,100.



FINANCING AVAILABLE. Phrone 5-7367


imnproved by wide leaf springs
and a longer wheelbase.
Fourd and ABC` Motors also
offer light-duty conventional
trucks in the F-100, F 250 and
F-350 series. '
The F-senes 4x4 s are
designed with the ground
c lea rance and st rong
components needed to take the
worst terrain in str~ide


Thursday, Februalry 8, 1973.


MANY NASSAU
businessmen in the pick-up and
delivery fields depend for their
livelihoods on the vehicle that
does the pick-up and delivery.
If this vehicle is out of action,
th~e business grinds to shaslt. If
the vehicle is old and bumpy
cargo is damaged and money is
lost. More and more of these
men are turning to ABC
Motors for the new Ford
pick-ups which deliver comfort
not only for the cargo but for
the driver and passengers as
well. These pick-ups deliver
even more in sturdiness and
reliability .
ABC Motors on Collins
Avenue has the Custom, the
Ranger and the Ranger X LT in
and assortment of colours.
Ford has dubbed the
pick-ups as the "new
generation" in trucks. The cabs
are roomier, more comfortable
and more car-like than any
conventional pick-up Ford has
ever built. The three models
are handsomely styled.
Deep-foam seating comfort it
standard on the Custom while
even more quiet and luxury
have been built into the new
Ranger and Ranger XLT. Both
are heavily insulated and
beautifully finished in six
interior trim colours.
The cabs are far more
spacious than last year's model


withl lots of elbowtroom. TIhe
high seat positions give
comfortable body support and
generous legroom and still
provide ample headroom.
Good seat height and increased
Slass area to the rear and sides
allow great all-round visibility .
The two speed windsrcrn
wipe rs easily deal with
anything from a mild drizzle to
a downpour.
STORAGE
The new Ford pick-ups have
a large storage spot behind the
front seats. Ford moved the gas
tank to the outside on most of
the models leaving this handy
space five-and-a-half feet in
width which can accommodate
golf clubs, fishing tackle, small
suitcases with ease. The seat
back unlatches and tilts
forward for easy access to this
big, in-cab storage area.
The roomy cab allows the
front seat back to be tilted
which provides a more
comfortable driving position
for long trips. And the seat
adjusts five inches fore and aft
to please both short and tall
drivers.
The bright grille and front
bumper are standard on all
models as is the twin I-beamn
independent front suspension
which contributes to the
vehicle's comfort and
ruggedness. The ride is further


1~ l yanwantIn arag
(1) A car that parks easily, yet will accommodate 5 people
(2) Reasonable in price, but equipped with automatic transmission.
(3) Superb riding qualities and pleasing styling
(4) Good performance, but economical to operate



AObTIOU V On



With automatic transmission














This incredible roominess, within a car that's small enough to make town parking a
pleasure, is one reason why the 1300 range has grown into the biggest success story in the
history of British motoring.
Bar none.
.TranSverse engines, front-wheel drive and Hydrolastic suspension. Time and over two
million motorists have proved us right.

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easy on the cargo and easy on the driver.


",AR EMOSA IN AE S
BRIDG~ETOWN, BARBADOS
(AP) G;overnment employees
here are getting pay increases
ranging from 22 per cent for the
higher paid members of the public
service to 39 per cent for the lower
paid workers.
The wage lift follows the recent
conclusion of salary and wage
revision talks between the
gver~nmn Iandrthe National Unit
agreement, which spreads over
three years, workers will get Curther
increases of five per cent in 1974
ane eu on claimed that since the
last revision in 1969 the cost of
an wou Ir ach 4 er cent by t
dtom tee new saae re pApril
received an interim pay hike
ranging from nine dollars a week to
120 dollars a month.


i)I TOIT Al') American
Motors C`orp. I\ recalling 270,815
of its 1972 and 1973 cars because
of a possible brake failure problem,
a spokesman said Satulrday.
inh evspokesmanlisaid the recal
Javelins. Mdtadors and
Ambassadors built aIt tle
company's Kenosha, Wis.. plant
ovteen Nov. 1, 1971, andl Nrv.
The spokesman said the brake
pedals o~f an estimated 3t preentre

attrache cih Ih come~nI "This could permit separation ~f
the linage from the brake pedal
resulting in complete loss of
hdraulic but er aclborie wtlt rt n
AhM e us~itnso s11 mar nete stc b
o~f the recall.


T'he brake difficulty. AMC said,
hac occurred nine times, causing
five minor accidents involving
property damage. In any case, use
of the parking, or emergency, brake
is n~ot involved. adtecckp
would take less than an hour and
would be free of cost.
AMC' gave no explanation for not
rnakirl as public a nouncement b
the other carmakers to speed
notific in. nit didN- as myuie w

ais ton. Administration in
Clhe: company has based its
recent sales campaign on quality
"uc Ppr tsec < n lnad wtart coer
praut ualy
when igrs are kept for repair


War WrtbRNE


FORD pick-up trucks-- rugged& dependable


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, ___


TRADERS BAhlK& aTRUSTIlullITED
(tN COMPULSORfY LIOUIDATION)
Will' the following persons kindly contact the
Lieuidator. Second Floor, Bernard Sunley Building
P.0 3$x 1491, Telephone 2-1976, in connection


I. Ise of our P-ool and I 3 mile of Beac~h~e (omplimentarry >
2 Mats. Towerls and L~ounge Chairs r('omphlmentary)
:1 F~our C'hamptonshlp T'ennis Cosurts Night Tennis
< Com pli ment ary I
4 His and Hers Sauna Haths I(Compismentary >
5 Putting G;reen
6 10 p c off We~ddlngs. Banquets and Meetings held at the
Resort
7. Additional (cKkual parties held throughout the ye~ar
8. Tennis and Swimming C:linics
9 to p c off all special parties and group dinners
II, Slanaers ('ompllementary- Hoteption. Wcd. 6i 45pml
11. Jumbala Torch Light Steak ('ook out cHWed
12. Thursdayv. Champagne D~anc` I Ipmn Fore N' Allt Lounge
It, international o ftu ~litiba us Inining~ Rowm

1rird~c e'uh m ts evry Tu da \Tnd nirdaf aet Ha~pm
In Ih BIlrd C.age

PLEASE CALL MANAGER'S OFFICE 18001
FOR FURTHER IN FORMAT IO N


__


Will any other person (depositor, shareholder or
other creditor) whd considers that he has a valid
claim against the company which has not been
formally admitted by me as liquidator also contact
mec at the above address. SIDNEY MORRIS
Liquidafor.


~;1~~~3~d~3~7~~~8oe~ic3~-~~~3~7~7C?


~7



C~ cl


Thursday, February 8 1978.


whDc hdincludeM Mrs. Bf B
Coakley, Mrs. L. B. Johnson,
Mrs. Margaret McDonald, Miss
Vernita Mott, Mrs. R. S.
Owers, Mrs. Loftus Roker, Ms.
Maxwell Thompson and Mr.
Carleton Williams.
Despite his recent ilk.css,
Mr. Clyde Minard has agreed to
remain on the Committee and
to act as our Treasurer. In
addition, we are most deeply
grateful that Drs. Burbacher,
Kilpatrick, Jones and Mr.
Finnieston have indicated that
they will attend and contribute
their professional services to
the March clinic for which
plans are underway on their
MreplMinr dus reported that
he is holding funds on behalf
of the Crippled Children's
Committee which will cover
any outstanding costs of the
August clinic and its ongoing
expenses. Five children are still
scheduled for trips to Miami
resulting from the August
programme. We would ask that
Mr. Minard be authorised by
yourself to release the balance
of these funds, if any, to the
nbw omm t: :te hc we : ho
does not anticipate that there
will be any very substantial
balance trema g A after

acunt butaas ao know rm

incurs considerable expenses in
te printiug and distriba ion o
duty on the cars, etc. and we
are anxious to minimise any


Dwar Clydeased to receive a
letter from Mrs. Shirley Oakes
Butler informing me that she
has formed a committee to
carry on the work of the
Crippled Children 's
Committee.
She seems to have organized
a strong committee with whom
you could feel justified to be
identified. I am glad of this.
Mrs. Butler has asked me to
authorize you to hand over to
her committee any funds you
may have left over after paying
the bills of the last clinic. I
don't know whether I have this
authority but if you think it is
all right I certainly approve.

that am wr ttitnegto you tlo sy
that I approve. I have also told
her to collect any wheel chairs
crutches, etc. that may be at
The Tribune office.
ic~e ey


resaultantexoverdnf tssib
Minard has further agreed to be
the signatory on the
Committee's account and will
await your authorisation so to
act if you will be so krind as to
confirm this to him at your
convenience.
Both the old and new
members of the Committee are
cognizant and appreciative of
your many contributions to
the rehabilitation of our
crippled children in the past,
and we would be grateful for
your help and moral support in
continuing this work in the
future
Sincerely yours,
On bealf ofe 'C nmpip
SHIRLEY OAKES BUTLER
Chairman
,,,.
Flotida,
November 19th, 1972
Mr. Clyde Minard,
Treasurer,
The Crippled Children's Comm


IN his editorial today Sir
EU ene qpuc S ite sof te
for over 20 years, have
conducted clinics in Nassau for
the Clrippled Children's
Committee. This committee,
under the chairmanship of Sir
Etienne, was dissolved last year
and a new committee was
formed by Mrs. Shirley Oakes
Butler -
Under Mrs. Butler's

dcdminpht te osctor of t

in fuue cn~du tHh se cln 11
In her letter of Jaur S
informing Dr. Charles R.

Brolhe tor th ec 3bnMr .
made it c itrthat e view, of

arrangements if patients are
referred to him they will be
treated as private patients,
which means that unlike the
arrangements with the former
committee they will have to
pay private patient's fees.
Following is the complete
correspondence between Mrs.
Butler, Sir Etienne and Dr.
Burbacher.

CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S
COMMITTEE
P.O. Box N981
Si teneDbassau, Bahamas
O.B.E., K.C.S.G.'
D.Litt., Ll.D.
'C/o The Tribune
DaSrEtNovember I5, I972.
Many of us here believe that
the work of the Crippled
Children's Committee over the
years under your dedicated
chairmanship has been of
inestimable value and
importance to the
Commonwealth. We hope,
therefore, that you will be
happy to learn that the
Committee was recently
reconstituted and will continue
along the same lines of service
to the physically handicapped
children of the Bahamas that
you inspired by your initial
leadership in this important
endne nw Committee held its
first meeting yesterday and we
feel sure that you will be
gratified to know that many of
your original co-workers are
donating their tiine and efforts
to the children as before. Mr.
Alexis Nihon, the Honorary
Chairman, has once again given
us two splendid automobiles
for the January raffle. Mrs.

Rxopbeeence isinval l et u
has graciously consented to act
as Vice-Chairman of the
Committee and overall
Chairman of the Raffle. She
will be assisted by Mrs. Wenzel
Nichols, Mrs. Lionel Chapman,
Mrs. Clyde Minard, Mrs. Hugh
Wright, Mrs. Rudolph
Sweetnam and all other
members of' the Committee


witch claims which they
company .


A'ddt cley, Graven
Adderley, Miriam E.
Albuy Delw rth
Allen, Lucymae
Ambrose, Fred

Baillou, Ruby Veronica
Bain, E. D. M '
Barrow, Ewart R.
B te, Iar Orlando


Campbell, Solomon
Cartwright, Clementina
Charlton, Percy or Maud E
Clarke, John G
Collins, Leonard or Rodella


may have against the



Kemp, Ivy L.
King, Gamnet
Knight, Steadman
Knowles, David
Knowles, Richard
Larverity, Edlnaal
Laverity, Kend l
Lewis, Cedric
Lightbourme, Lawrence L.


McKenzie, Autrim &
Euamae


Maycock,
Joyce &/~or Lester
Mainnis, Cecil
Moxey, Baltrum

Nairn, Charles
Neita, Larry
Newbold, John
Newiy, Harold
Nottag~e. Lainwright
Oliver, Viola 1.
Orlander, Earl W.

Pal Marrian
Pierre, Joseph
Poitier, Harcourt -
Pride of India Trustees,
Fund
Broker. Leroy
Broker, Shadrick
Rolle, Addington James
Rolle, I ouise
Rolle 5 Ivia L.


Page 7, Col. I


Darling, Whitney
Dean, Jennie
Delancey, Eugene H.
1Duncombe, Mlario
Duncombe, Wendall

Edgecombe, Lawrence
Edwards, Frank U.

Eas eudben G.
Evans, Wendell

Farquharson, Leo
Ferguson, Alfred
Ferguson, Ruth Delores
Fernander, Harold
Fox, Enid &or Cubell

G~ibson, Marlin
Gomer, Anthony
Gray, Edgar
Gray, Erskine
Greenacre, David

Ha-nna, Vernal C.
Henfield, Emalda G.
Hi gs, H. Hubert
Holbert, Harcourt A.
Hutchinson, James
Hfill, Delores
Ingraham, A.
Ingraham, Anna
Ingraham, Arlington W.
In raham, Doris
SInraham James H.
Ji0nnson~eresrwi S.
Johnson, George W.
Johnson, Joseph S.
Johnson, Julia
Jones, Sam


9


We invite applications for the position of


Eparinr in 0 sod ictrnParatio nk/ond wi h
Airline Catering is desirable but not a prerequisite.
WiII supervise food production for our flights
departing Nassau.

LU TH A P. O. Box -109, Nlu, a .E: a


Seymour, Lenora
Simmons, A. D.
Simpson, Beatrice
Stark, Anton
Sweeting, Althea

Taitt, lillington W.
Taylor, Emiline
Taylor, Lemix
Taylor, Wilfred
Thompson, Harold

Valdes, Orlando
Vogt, G~ertrude

Williams, Alonzo
Williams, Catherine
Wilson, Bernard
Woodside, Basil M.
Woodside, Mary Jane


t (than


Carrespondence over Crippled Children's doctors


Lufthansa


scotch Whis~zy





NOTICE




Inquiries and mail should be directed to Besco'c
temporary office, phone 2-4230,and P. O. Box & S6208.
The Directors of Besco deeply regret any inconvenience
in service and operation due to the recent fire which
totally destroyed the premises and stock.
Payments on account will be received at the old East
Street store, where the records are held.


DEAR ABBY: I
having given birth
beautiful baby boy


>uthwedI froml Virgin Islands;
~res~i D y; from West Palm
C;All I I, 'IODIAY: Sunward,
Seas for Miami;
Sta, F-lavia for
;liVIN; 'IOMORRO W:
-; u~,il tfroml St. Thomas
' D ES
I i S Migh IOs am n










OW;(\ SHOWING at 8:50
*ruEraxim






ii retlgiace suggested l


Thunrsdy, Februry 8, 1973.


"n gt hi.". ":"""~ tbe drov td tbs nes dCle
that he had been loked up by a poicoeman for "drnkehn-
aess."
That reminded me of a similar laddent whih or tared
near Corning, N. Y., where I was raisd. A local w itman
on his wa~y home from woark bed Msr horse and waegon at
the watering trough and wtent into a bar for a drinkt. Later
that eventagl the local constble found hi ami g ru
a tree and lockted him up for drunkennsse. The next mornt-
ingl the horse was stilB at the trough, but its owner was
dead-in jail. He had been sict, not drunk~.


My husband and I decided to name our son - - .
Please don't mention the name if you use this letter. It's an
unusual name, but my burrband and I both like it. Well, last
evening his mother called and begged me to please change
the baby's name. She said that nobody in the fnamy liked
the name we seleted and she thought out of respect to my
father in law, we should h~ave named the baby atter HIM.
[My father In law is still lving.]
I didn't know what lshe to say, so I just sai, "I will
talk to my husband about it."
to me AY ney w Ih ,mothe .spoidon' wat hisf
against me, but I don't want to change the baby's name.
Can you help me? NEW MOTHIER
DEAR MOTHER: Tel year harbad that yea does
want the responsibility of makilg that deesies alonre. Dis-
ass it--nd let It be knownrl that the decision was jointly
made. And since you wrote to me, F'm all for naming the
boy cxactly what you prefer!
DEAR ABBY: I am 83 and live alone; my principal
activities since my retirement from the teaching staff at
Purdue University are "relative hunting" and working
crossword puzzles. I take thne out every morning to read
the headlines, editorials, and Dear Abby.
I am moved to comment about the Dad who took his 14-
year-old son to a football game, left at halftme to take
some pills for his asthma, and had not returned by the time
the game had ended. The frightened lad wakted by his
Dad's parked car until the stadium lights were turned off,
then made his way to a phone and called his sister to come


EDISON SWEETING, a
Rupert Dean Lane motorist
charged with driving without
due care and attention and
falling to report an accident
was efan ed MS75 tWed nesda It
Hei rules
sheeting, an ex-policeman

"aks no powarles
constructed," said he had no
alternative but to swing his car
in theadirectiodr rft e wl
immediately In front of him
The accident took place on
November 15 last year, he told
the court, adding that he had
promised the owner to repair
the wall "as soon as possible"
if he did not inform
authorities
For the first charge, he was
fined $50 or 30 days and $25
or 30 days on the second.
Asking for leniency and time
to pay the fine, he was given
three days by the magistrate
WEATHER
WIND: Variable 5 m.p.h.
tonight; Sou th east to
south-southeast 12 m.p.h.
tomorrow .
WEATHER: Fair and cool
tonight; sunny tomorrow
SEA: Smooth tonight, slight
tomorrow
tollMP: Min. tonight 59 Max


5~ NOW SHOWING
Mat~in~ee 2:45 & 5:00, E~veYnin~g 8:30- 'hon 2-1004, 2-1005mm

g scoovri \

in" THE i

1 8
SAli MacGraw g
E~l SU(GGESTE:D FOR MATURE AUDIENCES.
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISED.
SReservations not claimed by 8:15 will be solda on
Sfirst come, first servd basis.

I gl~I~l~m~ l~~~r~
I LasDay Friday Starts Friday
Matinee continuous from 2 Continuous showings from
C) Evening 8:30 "CANDIDATE FOR
"MURDERS IN THE RUE A KILLING" R.
S MORGUE" PG. I
Jason Robards Fernando Rey
Christine Kaufmann Anita Ekberg
PLUS PU
"THE LOST MAN" PG.
Si ~dnYey oiie "THE8 BRUTE CORPS" R.1

S PLUSLate Feature Paul Carr
Friday night. Joseph Kaufmann
Phone 2-2534 No one unerI wl~l b eadmitted



Matinee continuousfromn 1:30 Evening 8: 30
-'Phone 3-4666 5



ph E Un ut n teEbs rsF EkZnad i

I "th ar~frsitr(eLg ~tpli~kase an


18 oae nearras aru
lorrb E nlnrmd ku Eaur) wnl n se I1asts~ hl


DEAR ABBY: I teach a course here in Dalton Junior
College in consumer seN protection, so I was especially
wneetdife that letter mxpe "Boteb an igse
dughrter even the they weein hock up to their ears. May
Throw away your credit cardsp, and don't buy ANY-
THING you don't have the cash for. If you can't keep up
with the Joneses, stay away from them. When it comes to
buying groceries, check the newspaper ads carefully and
compare prices. You can save a small fortune and eat a lot
better if you buy house brands. Develop some self control!
Don't buy anything on impulse. Go to two or three other
stores and see what's available there, then wait a day or
two and think it over. You'll be surprised how much you
DON'T want what you thought you couldn't live without
yesterday. RAYMOND L. CHAMBERS, DALTON, GA.
DEAR PROFESSOR: Gee, I wish I were h tla DIz. d
signI up for year course. You make a lot of sense.


am writing this from the hospital after
to our first child. Hie is a healthy,
and we are so thrilled because Imy


The Roval The Helpful Bank


5 9 Wrtbunt


'~ FINED $75 ON
ARRV FD TDAY:0RIVIN 8 CHAR 8E


If you can't afford --don't buy


"Hapy tO met 8...




I'm the lielpf al Banker "


"You'll Snd me at any branch



Of the Rec~al Bank"




---- -- --- -- --- -- ---- -- -.-1


Y0U'1EEL S0 000D


YOU WON7 WANT10O STOCK!


ALL THE WAY TO CHICAGO.


I~ ~- ~' I - '


Fro PSn

P 9t~h Novembl2 1%7 .

Mrs. Shirey Oakes Butler'
Chairman,
Crippled Children's
Committee,
P.O. Box N981,
Nassau, Bahamas
Dear Mrs. Butler,
I was very pleased to receive
your letter informing me that
you have formed a committee
to carry on the work for
crippled children which I was


assste and "" ---'"thes
Dr. Walter Jones. Ill and Dr.
John Kilpatrick join me in
wishing you good luck and
G;odspend in your assumption
of these responsibilities.
You have stated that you
wish tL retain our services in a
consultant capacity and to
refer patients to Variety
Children's Hospital in Coral
Gables under our auspices I
believe it is obvious that
because of your new
arrangement, that any
c consultation and
hospitalization, which of
couurse we would be glad to
assist with, would have to be
on a case-to~-case basis and
treated as private cases insofar
as hospitalization at Variety
Children's Hlospital is
concerned.
Again. we wish you every
success in this venture.
Sincerely,
CHARLESR BU RBACHER.MD.

SEIGNORET TRINIDAD'S
FIRST AMBASSADOR
TO CIBA
POR1-Of ~ SAN rinidald
(AP) TFrinidad and ~lobago's
riniane nati~,s 1~sl c Sei actet
4s, has been appointed this
country's first Ambas~lsador to

T app~nteP Mni cs iannounr
Wednesday night atI a reception
following thle inaupurat~ion of new
govet >r-lrclncil Isir I nlis agreed latst year to, thle exchange of
non-resident ambassadolrs.


patients to Variety Hospital in
Mliamni under y'our auspices. Dr
D~uffy~ will be writing to you on
this in greater detail
It. in consequence of the
abv.Ido not have the
pleas\ure of1 meeting you in
Ma~rch. do hope the
opportunity? will so~on present
Iitcelf the~reafte~r. Dr. Duffy and
L. the Mlinistry ofi Health and
the~ (rippled C'hildren's

very cog~nitant of your
ece~illent wor)k and important
iontrlbutions to the Bahamlas
anid wish to see our mutual
relaltonship gpro~w as well as

Wit1h best personal regards,
Sincerely
SHIRLE~Y OAKES BUTLER

January 1, 1973


1' 0 Bo~x 1981


1)ear Mre Butler
r~~ihan you,; fr your letter of
Janruar\ 5. 19)73 It was nice to
le~arn that your facilities and
pe~rsonne~l have developed to
the point where you can now
assume the responsibility and

c eldren In te ortoei f il
of the C'hildren's Committee
these files have been
developed over a period of
aipproximnately twenty years
during which time it was with


li ead he gemuost shp itlually
rewarding work I had ever
done and it caused me deep
concern when I found it
necessary to give it up. I'm sure
it will bring you great
satisfaction.
You have a strong
committee and I am sure you
will do well. Mrs. Orr was one
of the most active members of
my committee. She is a fine
woman and a great worker, so
also is Mrs. Wright. Please give


them my warm regards and say
that I am happy to know that
they are carrying on.
I certainly approve of your
committee having any funds
that may be left in the bank. I
will write Mr. Minard and tell
him so.
I don't know how far you
plan to carry your work. My
committee was primarily
concerned with the care of


children but we also helped
many adults who needed
specialist attention.
We provided artificial limbs-
we gave wheel chairs and
other facilities to needy
people.
I believe there is a wheel
chair, maybe two ... crutches,
...walkers, etc., at The
Tribune office.
If Mrs. Orr or Mrs. Wright
will contact my daughter, Mrs.
Roger Carron, at The Tribune
she will be pleased to hand
over to you anything that you
might consider helpful in your
work.
My warm regards to your
wonderful mother.
Sincerely,
ETIENNE DUPUCH
P.S. You ask for my "help and
moral support" in carrying on
this work. I shall be happy to
do anything that is possible but
by the time you really get
going I exp n'ttokbe liv st in

can do from that distance. But
if there is anything you think I
can do please let me know. I
will try


this point.
I am glad you reminded me
about the assistance given to
adults who needed specialist
attention. We shall certainly
endeavour to continue this
service .
Frankly, thank you for the
offer of any remaining wheel
chairs, walkers, etc. about
which I will contact Eileen as
soon as possible
With best personal regards,
Sincerely.
SHIRLEY OAKES BUTLER


6th December, 1972
Mrs. Shirley Oakes Butler
Crippled Children's
Committee
N assau
Dear Mrs. Butler,
I want to thank you for
your letter of December 5th in
which you ask for suggestions
as to way atdm n or tra sn

com mittee
I do feel that it is urgent
that you should send out an
appeal letter at the time you
hold your raffle in January
I don't have a list of
addresses of my own. I usually

Cows n amsre thoam thhee wl
be happy to cooperate.
Sincerely'
ETIENNE DIJPUCH

December 7, 1972
Mrs. Shirley Oakes Butler
Chairman, Crippled





Dasar Mrs. ulea::
Se eraa clippings ha e be n




continue with their work as in
the past. I was pleased to see
quite a few familiar names on
the list of your Committee
members.
You may or may not have
been advised that following our
last clinic there in August, for
obvious reasons it was
necessary for us to temporarily
give up any commitments for
hospitalization of surgical cases
at the Variety Children's
l~ospital or to manufactate andi
deliver braces, shoes and
similar items which we found
to be necessary at that clinic. If
Mr. Minard could give you or
us information as to whether
or not any funds are
immediately available, some of
this work could be resumed to
th!e irndnded the available
It is the plan of our group to
have a regular clinic at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
probably on the last Thursday
in March at which time we will
proceed in our usual fashion as
far as examining and
recommending is concerned,
following which the availability
of funds will determine how
much indicated treatment can
be planned and carried out
after that clinic.
Please feel free to call us for
any assistance that we can give
in organizing your Committee
or giving assistance or making
a nunmendataions. IG nu of be

gets a copy of this letter.
Yours very truly,~
CHARLES R.BURBACHER.MDI

December 15, 1972.

Charles R. Burbacher, M.D.,
Coral Gables
Orthopaedic Associates,
2801 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
-Suite 222,
Cora Cbe,4
U.S.A.

Dear Dr. Burbacher:
Many thanks for your letter
of December 7, 1972 which I
received only this morning due
to its being forwarded from the

no apreciat yurlos al ol


assistance.
I was not aware that
hospitalisation and
manufacture of braces, etc. was
suspended immediately after
dae Au t Isinihc Mr. Manard is
used for the expenses following
the August clinic and these

aaldasble. De to th mmsag eof
time, it may be that you would
wish to defer certain cases until
the March clinic and I can only
be guided by your professional
opinion on this. If you would
communicate with Dr. Duffy
on the pending cases, we can
certainly arrange payment for
any work that should be done
prior to March.
The entire Committee is
very gratified that you and
your colleagues will conduct
the March clinic as usual and
we have taken note of the
dates. The new members of the
Committee are very much


looking forward to mneetlng
you at that time .
Sinerely ,
SHIRLEY OAKES BUTLER
t I *
JaniUar\ 5 1')73
Dear Dr. Burhacher
Further to mi eterof
Decemberc~ 15. 19721. I am
pleased to report tha~t thrre~ are
no urgent icases rcqumng ii
hospitalisation at prese~nt
among the enppled ithiildren
seen at the August \clinii Sister
Phillips has prepared .I report
on the spending Cases4 whiih I
discussed tod~ay writh1 I)r
Duffy. the Meltdical Chwtii of
Staff. As yotu will recall. Sister
Phillips ,rlso visits the ial;1nds
other than New\ P'rovlalenice to
process patlcents In neecd of
orthopaedii arttenrtion i
in that clr litonnecio we deem i
it advisable that~ our tirst iclinue
in 1973 scheduledc for Ma~rcit
should h e co n d uct ed
exc~lusively~ by the existing

the Prncs @lrac Icital
Facilities have b~een exupanded l
at the PMXl~f 11 urtng the past
year and it is aniticipated
that certain surgic~~al cases
are capable at being hlandl~d

Iht ltyhe lonrthe azi pcdacrpl n
here in Nassau should assulle
complete responslbiltyy fo~r the
record-keeping andi \tatlstical
files on all the~se cases anid the
follow-up procedfures. We are


February 5, I 973



To our aluesd Freeport/Luatya telephone customer*



alru remrenrbe ..........


BEGINNING FEBRUARY 1st. 1973.
toll billing and collection becomes the
Company. On February 15th, 1973, all
long distance telephone calls.


responsibility of the Grand Bahama TIelephone
Freeport/Lucaya telephones will be able to place


YOU WILL BE RESPONSIBLE
for all long distance telephone, telegram and telex calls made from and charged to your
telephone. This will apply to paid calls and to those received collect. For your protection,
we recommend that you do not allow other people to make calls from or charge calls to
your telephone.


FOR ALL TOLL CALLS FROM AND TO YOUR TELEPHONE.
We suggest that you protect yourself by terminating your service at the old location when
you move and let the new tenant apply for service in lus own name. The customer who
applies for the service is responsible for all toll charges.



BATELCO TOLL BILLS UNPAID AND
past due on March 16th, 1973 will be turned over to Grand Bahama Telephone Company
for collection. Failure to make payment will subject; the telephone customer to termination
of service.



TELEGRAM AND TELEX MESSAGES
Will also be billed as part of your monthly telephone account. You may place telegrams
over the telephone by calling the Baltelco Office listed in your telephone directory.




CALL US AT 352-9352
if you have any special problems or questions.









A7 Mme Cniet Tlpo SrmGrand Baham a Telephone Com pany, Ltd.

PotOffic Box F-2478, Free ort,

Grand Bahama island, Bahoamos


On Air Jamaica. we make you feel so good Beautiful things like a show of island fash-
youI won t want us to stop. And we don't un- ions, modelled by our sun-warmed Rare
tli you reach O Hare. Because Air Jamaica Tropical Birds.
has the only non -stop thights fromT Nassau to Lulling and lifting and rollicking jamaican
Chicago, leaving every evening at 5:50 and music, recorded right at the source.
arriving in Chlcago at 8:00 P.M. And we have all kinds of other good-feeling
From the miomenit you step on board things designed to keep you nice and
good-feeling things begin to happen. loose until you get to where you re go-
Delicious things hike dining on Lob- ing. So even if you didn't fly down
ster Port Royal and River Janga with us, call us at 2-1538 in Nassau,
Salad, papaya, p!antains and Blue or 2-7028 in Freeport.
Mountain coffee. We'll make time fly.




WE MCU(EVOU FEEL8000DSM.OVER


t pl$ EdilUnt


Thursdy, Feburury 8, 1973.


Cor respondence over Crippled Childr en's doctor s





Thui dU,, february 8, 1973.


.CS639




Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
ST EPLH BD NG

S C LLENUOSEA OC
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN PINJDER

PHOONRE: AC3K95 SH796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
cavas
WANT TO BUY OR SELL
PROPERTY CALL OR SEE
GROSHAM PROPERTY LTD
Serving the Bahamas since
1947 in Property Sales &
Management
107 SHJRLEY STREET

8PHONE 27662 or 28966.

YOU WON'T BELIEVE IT
UNTIL YOU SEE IT! ABCO'S
NEW 'SUPER STEAM,
CLEANING METHOD. TEL:
51071-2-3-4.


C8647
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.
C8690
FURNISHED APARTMENT,
airconditioned. Located at the
corner of Centreville and
Mnadeira Street. $175 per
month For fur their
information phone day 2-4264
night 3 1143.
C8648
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Da call 2-2152. Evenings


C8B DROOM 2 baths house.
Situated Anson Road,
Stapledon Gardens. I or
information call 5-4258


II


---L ~1


ARP ItmntED


'


'


I


'


'


C87UI
1972 PONTIAC Ventura II,
automatic, airconditioned.
power steering excellent
condition. $4,3 b. Financing
available. Telephone 5-7766.
C8756
1959 ROLLS ROYCE $8000
--or nearest offer. Phone
7- 4295.
C877
169clWHITEndiRIUMPH r 00

levn coly 91t00. O.N.O*


PETS FOR SALE

C8W7EEKS old Bassetts mixed
with Beagle Hound, all shots,
the cutest doqs you ever saw.
3 left. $70 each. Phone Mrs.
Kemp 42862 eveninan:

BUSINESS ~
OPPORTUNITIES
C8558
WANT TO BUY A LOT?
Phone 2-766ANK. O.A Bo


pike aAR tour Fo
subdivision of your choice with
no obligation to b y
CALL US TuO AY


MARINE SUIPPLIES
C8649
PACEMAKER 44 ft. luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C8749
BE TrRAM n31. .ea edipr
exac ilent6 cdition.9Tom te cl
p.m. or 3-6649 after 5 p.m.
C8384
BAHAMAS YACHT SALES
JAMES W. ALeuRY
Po sox seo
^NIau.epanas
TEL. aeove

~I ROJANYACH~ E
A DIVISION OF

W W-*MIf

08720
FOR SALE OR CHARTER
125ft. x 23ft., 4ft. draft, sfeet
hull, 290 tons, powered by
new Cat .343 diesel. 15 ton
crane. Up to date load line
with 2 cargo hatches, one 14ft.
x 24ft and the other 14ft. x
42ft.. double bottom, in
excellent shape.
Contact: Sands Construction &
Shipping, Marsh Harbour, Box
489, Treasure Cay, Abaco.
Phone 159.
C8704
40' DRIFT-R-CRUZ houseboat
twin Chryster 210 H.P. 6-5 kw
generator. Airconditioned,
freezer and complete galley
and head, shiD to shore
many extras. Call 2-2836.

IN MEMORIAL L

C8772
In loving memory of our dear
mother Cecenia Taylor who
departed this life February 7th
Is9a%.at Grand Turk, Turks
We shall meet beyond the river
Where the sods cease to roll
d dl cm r edby ch idrent
grandchildren and other
relatives,

C8781
IN LOVING memory of our
dear mother, Mary Susan
Moncur who de arted this life

She cannot hear when the great
bell is ringing over head,
She cannot rise and come to
curch with us for she is

But we believe a day will come
when all the dead will arise
And they who sleep down in
their graves will open again
their eyes '
Sadly missed by: Sons, G.
Gilbert Moncur, (Rtd.)
Inspector of Police, Dwight A.
Moncur, Inspector of Police'
David and Cannis; daughters:
Mrs. Leonard Davis, Joyce'
gDoreen and other relatives and
fre s


C8777
MISS ENID BETHEL and the
Misses Emma and Flora Bethel
wish to thank and express their
gratitude to all those who cmam
from far and near to attend the
funeral' of their father and
brother Mr. George J. Bethl,
and for their many rts
kindness and expressions o
symPath .


C8761
THE BANK OF NOVA
SC OTIA requires an~
accountant for its Wulf Road
and East Street Branch.
Applicant should possess
G.C.E. 'O' level certificate or
its equivralnt and have at least
5 years banking experience.
Only Bahamians need apply.
Please apply in person at the
Bank of Nova Scotia, Rawson
Square and Bay Street.

TRADE SERVICES
C8634
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters

h tes, Sae and se vcs. Cl

5 1772r WRLD OF MUSIC,


CA864 AWN WINGS AND

AWN NRGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
servie ...o 2-8421.

C8774
SO THAT we may serve froL
better, effective February 9tt
1973, our new working hours
are as follows:.
MONDAY THURSDAY 9-5

mp~m.
DIESEL ENERGY
(BAHAMAS) LTD.


Which day

is best for

a 881tAd?

That's a question The
Tribune Classified
Department hears often. And.
fortunately, there is no "best
day".
.ac sy tere are people
wsth new wants and needs.
Each day brings new readers,
as well as old ones to the
Classified pages.
So start your ad when your
"want" arises, and cancel it

St pnby The Tr sunereo ties

te bsteda ut ades with
The Tribune Classified Ads.












IIELP WANTED



bD MAeN rqi Id mustE
vhicie ad install re lacement
parts and complete up to
re-finishing stage. Minimum 3
years experience, full Company
benefits. Bahamians only need
apply.
Five Wheels of Grand Bahama
Ltd., Telr, hone 352-7001.
C7128
BAHAMIAN live-in maid
required. Must be prepared to
stay alone for periods of six to

tbsnce weeRfer ens reoqw re
reply n writing to P. O. Box

C7129
THE CHARTERED
Accountant Firm of Touche
Ross & Co., P. O. Box F-2450,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
requires a secretary/
bookkeeper with high school
graduation and minimum of
four years experience. Good
com mand of typing,
shorthand general
bookkeeping and English
business language essential.
Reply in writing to the above
address.
C7130
RESIDENT MANAGER: To
take complete charge of
Commercial Bakery. Must have
at least 15 years experience.
Apply in writing to Grand
Bahama Bakery Ltd., P. O. Box
F-797, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7132
GARDENER/LABOURER -
capable of helping welders,
cleaning premises, offices, etc..
Apply L &c A Industries Ltd.,
Telephone 352-5422, P. O.
Box F-2580, Freeport.
C7134
Real Estate Salesmen wanted.
Must have at least 3 to 5 years
experience in Realty business.
Must be top losers and have
substantial knowledge of all
sales techniques.
For interview appointments:
Tel:- Mr. Jacques Smith,
intercontinental Realty Ltd.,
Freeport 373-1255.

C7131
WINE STEWARD: To sell and
serve wines to dinner guests.
Msto haves tnweg ebu
characteristics, presentation

aAnpdpwi so Ous Hotels Ltd.,
Personnel Department, P. O.
Box F-531, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.



C8703
The Spiritual Knights would
lie tortinformr te pui min

that because of lack of
communication and
confirmation concerning the
programme which was to be
held in Free ort on the 26th of
January, between the Spiritual
Knights and the Redemption


Singers, we have no knowledge
of the arrangements, nor the
financial arrangements with the
organizers. So we cannot be
held red PDRO McFALL
Pres. Spiritual Knights


CTRGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C8640
OFFICE OR STOREl mAed ate

r 4 2017yample parking.

C8746

r-Vne Rod 2 ag waldi
2-2682 and 2-2683.
C8624
DOWNTOWN OFFICES
Second floor office suite at IPS
House, Shirley Street
furnished, airconditioned
$250.00 per month, including
utilities call 21980-1-2-3 t
view.

FOR SALE

GO D SECOND hand 50cc
Vaaasc te2T 133.0 e

8.30 a.m. 5.00 p.m.

C8700
1 record player almost new
1 Car Radio
Ladies dresses size 16 plus
various household goods.
1 Automatic Hoover. Phone
5-7766.
C8758
A BUILT in oven and grill
(white). $50 Tel: 4-1543.
C8753
ONE LARGE airconditioner, 1
year old, $275
Three arm chairs $10-522
Double Bookcase Cabinet with
drawers, TV stand, etc. $135
Small baby crib $22
Used playpen and baby swing
(both for $15)
Coffee Table & Lamp (both
$25)
Two pairs floor length beige
drapes (double) $18
Wine and Champagne Glasses
Large Coffee Table with glass
topp $18
Phone 5-4988. Infant View
Road, 1st corner to left after
passing Marcus Bethel Way -
pink house, same side as Brice
Garage.

C8769
1973 WO RLD BOOK
ENCYCLOPEDIAS ar o
available at C are Sanndw
Enterprises. Call 2-3921.

CARS FOR SALE

C7 2MORRIS 1300 Station
cWagnd io Rxeln Ounnis
Phone 4-2986 evn gs
C8 n eenng.
MINI COOPER 'S' 1275 c.c.
tai calsrbs, s~peaderclut ,
battery, radiator and water
pump recently installed, body
work needs attention, sacrifice
fr398eeninCall 28618 days

C8736
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY

SUBStT NTIAL END
OF SEASON REDUCTIONS
1970 Chevrolet Impala $2600
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic, Seige 4 Dr. $1695
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic $1600
1967 Ford Fairlane
Brown $800
1970 Mustang
Red A/C $2400
1969 Plymouth Fury
III White A/C $1795
1971 Viva 4 Dr.
Auto. Red $1895
1970 Chrysler
S/W A/C $2995
1969 Oldsmobile
Cutlass Blue, A/C $2400
1968 Vauxhall Viva
Automatic Red $850
1973 Pontiac Hatchback
A/C 2400 Miles) Blue $4950
1972 Pontiac Ventura,
Vinyl Top, 6 Cyl. $3950
Trade-ins welcomed.
.Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7.8


IILP WAN~TED
c8748
cHAUFFEUR/HOUSEMANto
live on premises. Must have
references. Phone 4.1078.

C8594
2 rBAAMIAN Han yeto a

per week.
Apply: Deal's, P. O. Box 1548,
Nassau or telephone 2-4656
C8657
IP PRACTICAL NU RSE
'WANTED $18 per day. Cable
Beach area, furnish own
transportation. Write P. O. Box
4903, Nassau and give
telephone contact.

ggpy ~
STELLA MARIS INN AND
*AIN LMs MD on Lope
Isa d as thas f lo i p

preferred) kindly contact
immediately in writing or bV
phones
BOOK*KEEPER preferably
single: Couple Interested in
leaskag Sienla Maris Martna
Restaurant & Bar facllties -
reasonable temrm; Certified
Tutor/Teacher for small
number of 5-8 year old
ChildftW3 Chef de Cuisine -
must have ful'l professional
training and a few years of
practical experiences Licensed
commercial aircraft pilot with
Iinstrorment rating, airplane
single and multiengine land*
total time 3,000 hours, total
multiengine time 2,000 hours
instructors licence desirable.

C8760
E. D. SASSOON BANK &
TRUST INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED require an
Administrator to assume
control of securities and
mutual fund department.
Applicants must' have a
knowledge of world major
security centres and stock
e change procedures.
Experience is also essential in
the investment analysis field. It
would also be of value if the
applicant had experience in
data processing and its
application to security records
and mutual fund valuations.
Candidates will require to show
that they have held a similar
position for a minimum of five
years*
Applications in writing only to
The Manager, A D. Sassoon
Bak & Trust N31 rntison l

Bahamas.
C8759
11 AND MMT~ORD COM ANre
automotive mechanic with own
toos. E periencerwith aga ag

Previous experience with G. M.
vehicles and/or engines an asset
but not essential. Successful
applicant would be expected to
fill a vacant position with
ample room for advancement.
Contact ARt. J. Smith, Service
Manapar for appointment.


IIELP WANTEfD
C7133
MECHANIC WANTED FOR
SMALL ENGINE REPAIRS.
CALL FREEPORT 352-8741.

C8653
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
saveral vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful cndidates will be
paid extcllnt salaries and
bonuses. Alpplicant should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Prdce Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Frmport, has.

C7116
JOB TITLE: Superintendent of
Production
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Graduate engineer degree or
equivalent.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 10
years experience at various
management levels of cement
plant operations.
DUTI'ES/RESPONSI ABILITIES:
Coordinate and direct all the
producing facilities of the
Quarry and the cement plant
to process various raw
materials into finished cement.
INOTNR CED rLCnAnNT
Department. B ham~axCemient
Company, P.O o -0*
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


IIELP rMNTED
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accquntants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
,Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. BolC F-2415
Freeport, Bahamas. '
C7121
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
needs an attractive young lady
with secretarial skills to work
in its Freeport office. In
addition, the applicant must
have some knowledge of
bookkeeping and be
experienced in filing. Five day
week, salary depending on
experience, paid vacation and
other fringe benefits.
Interested persons should
contact either Mr. James Rea
or Mr. Alvin Swann at Freeport
Construction Co., Ltd., P. O.
Box F-2410, telephone
362-7091. Only Bahamians
need IpplY.
C8628

CeqUid: High Ecolgr a ut
arequival tieeducat on:r 3-
Applicant must be able to take
raoanble anspeed: fiing
experience will be helpful*
Apl mn person hamaPerseonne
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport.

CU 0Y EXPERIENCED
MECHANIC required for our
service department. Must have
minimum of 3 years with
kwetdge of Genral Mo o
benefits with factory training*
Bahamians only need apply.
Five Wheels of Grand Bahar
SL~td., Telephone 352-7001.
C7111
RESIDENT MANAGER: To
take complete charge of
administration of Oceanus
Hotels Ltd., Must be capable of
supervising and directing all
departments, also handle sales
and promotion. At least 10
years previous experience in
various areas of hotel fild
necessary - prood o
qualifications necessary.
ASSISTANT MANAGER: to
assist. in ttw management of
Oceans Hotels Ltd., must be
capable of taking over full
responsibility during resde~nt
manager's absence. At least 10
years experience.
Apply to Oceanus Hotels Ltd.,
Personnel Department, P. O.
Box F*351, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C8663
CORNER building lot, main
thdveynear Th 5 ur~rent
Cu, Eeuhra. $1500 or
make a sound offer. Contact

calclet 5-58 or 24
anytime
C8714 ABACO PROPERTY
North of Cherokee Sound. Half
acre tracts (20,000 sq. ft.).
Cros to ocenbah. 0l 1

pr perty.rCal Uniip roo d
Realty, Box N.104, Nassau
Phones 31273 77681 after 6
m
C8641
LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East end.
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027


B8ERNARD ROAD
LARGE 6400 sq. ft. lot price
$5,000.00 cash. Discount 20%-
Term deposit $200.00 Monthly
payments $100.00 5 years.
Contact Bills Real Estate
3-3921.
C8712
ONE LARGE corner lot
Gleniston Gardens, Soldier
Road, $5,200.00
One main Road lot Seven Hills
Estate Blue Hill Road,
$n 6cal lot Seabreeze Estate.

OalBil s Real Estate Ltd.
23921.

C8770
LARGE LOTS
FOR SALE
SANDS ADDITION
BERNARD ROAD
Deposit $200.00. Monthly
payments $100.00. Cash
discount 20%. Call today Bill's
Real Estate 2-3921.
C8775
FOR SALE
1. Attractive three-bedroom
two-bath residence Blair
Family room, patio, carport
etc. $63,000 furnished
2. Desirable three-bedroom
one-bath residence with
living/dining, carport etc. in
Blair. $40,000 furnished
(reduced price)
3. Ex cellent buy in
three-bedroom, two-bath Blair
residence, with 'living/dinin ,
patio, car ort, etc. $42,00
urihe.G. CHRISTIE
Real Est t
309 Bay Street,
P. O. Box N8164,
Nassau.
Telephone 2-1041, 21042.
C8745
SACRIFICE gor geous
bahfr nt. Noeosie Gen

American homes. $5,000
trs. sOwner phone 5-7224
4 nig.
C8773
FOR SALE


running thereon Three
Hundred and Fifty (350)
feet on the NORTHEAST
by a Public Road and
run ning thereon One
Hundred and Seventy-five

r rTHEAS tPR lado t
and running thereon One
Hundred and Twenty-five
(125) feet and on the
SOUTH by the Sea and
run ning thereon
approximately Five Hundred
(500) feet and on the WEST
by land the property of the
Estate of the late Francis
Smith and running thereon
One Hundred (100) feet.
WMortgage dated the 1st day of
Fbusay,toA IDal971 James
Re rded in Vol. 1722 at pages


pri ealedstso te ritghta fr te
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price
Terms: 10%C of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Deatd the 16th day of January
A.D. 1973*
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer

FOR SALE OR RENT
C871S
ON PINK SAND BEACH --
unique S room designer's
home, guest cottage, fireplace.
21% baths, patio, marvellous
view, swimming, fishing. H. H.
Larkin, c/o Box 101, Harbour
Island.

WANTS TO RENT
C8735 .
2 BEDROOM furnished house
with fenced in yard in quiet
neighbourhood for young
couple with dog. Approximate
price $250. Phone 27548 days.
58964 after 6 n.m

FOR RENT

CTPL Y FURNISHED
apartment 2 bedrooms,
cone tios lrge p ite pat
and barbecue pit. Phone
3-1329 -
C8768
hTOooBEDIROOMoohoa e
dining room, on Hospital Lane
opposite Bias Street. $35 per
wak incldngovvater Cntact


C RISHED spacious hilltop
two-bathroom stone colonial'
overlooking Stapledon
Gardens, acres flowers, near
becI's, lundrprivmachriens
water supply, maid's room.
$300. Phone owner 5-7224
evenings.

C8742
BASICALLY furnished 2
bedrooms (1 bedroom
a i rconditioned), 1 bath,
kitchen, living and dining area,
washing machine Montrose
Avenue. Telephone 2-1722-5
and 2-3865.
C8651
PRIME OFF ICE space
available in IBM HOUSE, with
central airconditioning and
ample parking. For further
information call 3-2351/4-
C8750
TWO BEDROOM unfurnished
duplex apartment, McKinney
Avenue, Stalpedon Gardens.
$180/month. See proprietor on
prem ises.

C8708
BAYCROFT one bedroom
apart ment, beaut if u ly
furnished, oceanview, pool*
telephone. $300 monthly. Call
mornings 4-2113.


_ I _I


HIL ILLhP ap~prox 1NS
by 150 three bedrooms two
baths with some furniture.

rN a rs. Opay ti7,000.00minS
anytime.
H USNAMANDVCENNTEENTS
Only $25,000.00, has
furniture, enclosed grounds,
car port, with 2 bedrooms one
esablosnh in 00nyea
NASSAU EA well
developed area. 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, f urnished, only
HG LAD PRK AEA
house, furnished, with 3
bedrooms, 2H baths, spacious
grounds income $400
month, sales price only
$42,000.00. Financing
available.
BUENO RETIRO -3
bedrooms, 2 baths, furnished,
grounds enclosed with fruit
trees street to street 2
entrances. Only $42,000.00.
With or without finance.
MONTAGU HEIGHTS 2
bedrooms, 2 baths, plus maids
quarter, plus adjoining
apartment. Income $450
month. Sales price only
$45,000.00.
2*STOREY HOUSE Old
Bahamian. 3 to 4 bedrooms -
unfumished, specious grounds
- situate Montagu Heights -
asking $60,000.00.
GIET THE BEST deal with
tealtors with the best.
DAIMIANOSC we well ral
estate. Dial 22033, 22305,
22307. Nita 41197.


_ 1


__


I_ ___ _1


--- ----~------ -------- r .1


I I


I I


I I


C866f
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furni sh ed apartment
overlooking Montagur Bay (very
desirable area). New complete
rugs, stove, ref rigerator, heater.
wall mirrors, sliding doors, etc.,
Good rental no problem.
$27,500.00 Will consider
exchange in Florida. Call Mr.
Kay collect 5-2598 or 2-4223
anytime. P. O. Box N-4635'
Nassau.


C8743
LARGE LOT in Sans Souci
area. Sacrifice for cash sale.
Call 42828 after 6:30 p.m.

PUBLIC A UCHON
C8492
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
situate Five (5) doors from
Shirley Street, South on the
right side on Friday the 9th
day of February A.D. 1973 at
12 o'clock noon the following
poperty:-
prALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate at Hatchet
Creek on the Island of

frn parw f Sixf(6 mer%

granted to Ltdwis or gdalsy
deceased as delineated on
the plan thereof recorded in
r cods of Crwn Gr tst i
te Crown Landas Office f r

Bahama Islands and which
said piece parcel or lot of
Iand is bounded on the
NORTH by Crown land
which adjoins the sea and


08763
1970 RED TRIUMPH
SPITFIRE convertible. Good
condition. Telephone 2-8711
office hours or 5-3091 after 6
p.m.


C8705
ENROLL NOW
Typing
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Commercial Mathematics
Office Practice
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier (NCR
4200)
Dictaphone -- Typist
Filing
Telex Operator
B.J.C. and G.C.E. Classes:-
English
Mathematics
Literature
History
Spanish
BSN SS, Shirey Strn t
Phone 24993.

POSITION WNTfED


7o ou need a part'time or
Meky maid? Call Roney


JOB TITLE: Electrician
MNIMa Meu CEoUCATION:
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 5
years experience, preferably in
cement plant or similar

DTfl /RESPONtSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repair, install and
wire all electrical apparatus,
devices and circuits, of any
volitag in cement plant or
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTAC T: Pe rson nel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C7117
JOB TITLE: Machinist
MINIMUM EDUCATION-
Good basic education *
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE*
5-10 years *
DUTIES/RESPONSI BILITIES:
'Lay out work, set up and
oaperaft machine tools,
mechines parts to pedision
'tolme~rae and specified
finished, Use precision
measrlng Instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONT AC T: Pe rsonnel
Department, Bahama Cament
SCompany, P. O. Box F*100*
Report, Grand Bahama.


C8776
E XPE AIENCED CREDIT
ANALYST INTERNATION-
AL LO1NS required by
multinational bank. Candidate
should have minimum ten
years intemational banking
elxperience, with emphasis on
statement analysis, loan
negotiations, documentation
and credit extension,
Educational requiremenrts
include, GCE ."O" level in
ryittimum of thru subjsects
including tr iallijh and
Mathematcs, and Institute of
Bankers Dtioma, Part II
Knowledge of one or more
focignr ladqag and previous
ovsrsds eixperince desirble
but not required. Successful
candidate must be willing to
travl and live overseas if
necessary. Qualified persons
invited to submit written
.resum49 to Manager, World
Banking Corporation Ltd., P.
O. go N400, Nassau.


REAL ESTAlTE
C7124
FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL~
FOURPLEX LOCATED AT
'257 S. MALL, FREEPORT.
EXCEPTIONAL PRICE!) FOR
INFORMATION WRITE TO:
JAMES 5. JORDAN, 2001 N.
W. 7 STREET, SUITE 101,
MIAMI, FLA. 33125, or CALL
COL~LECT: (305) 642-4835.


(f


(aht -Qt'tblitit


e~lm i Ms get me) d


1Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p~m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


REAIL ESTATE


REAL ESTAITE


S tgg0llLS


TRADbE SVICElS I


FOR RENT


CAlRS FOR SALE





















































































































































Jusrl IT, (sarouro~so

~FON vout
1 W~iSW Rae


R BX MO G AN, M.D. By DAL CURLTIS

vE@/ W WENJT REX, ISN'T THERE AI.S. IS A AFLrZIR6S IZt TAKE THE PNOWE AT MY VWS,
)OU SAY TNAT KEN M SN -- A)1 WE TWA CA K EP WO1 OWT )DU FRT PfET
WAS HAVING SO~ME WAS AWARE OF BE DONE r TOMORROW WILL SKING HERE / SHALL I
DIFFICULT WITH THE FACT THAYH HE \ L A Slt~IEEAKTNADU@ / W $5#M Iw r

WIM /




L






SUDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS

AREYO AL PCKE YES,! GOOD! GET A DRINK AND I ROCKY $ WIFE IS STAYING WITH AN
TO LEAVE, JERRY ?h ~ jA AND WE LL_ TALK! YES, SPENCER FARMS! IT 5 MY
c9 SIR! UNDERSTANDING THAT
i4CnoCP ,ECUP TY Me ROUND
THE PLACE..


ir~ I CAN
I. HANDLE
I ifIT, MR.T !







APARTMENT 3-G By Alaes Kotsisy


^401".(


from the COrrell MIghInter .***
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Despite a tendency
to think you can get more done than is actually
possible, make sure you move forward to desirable goals in
such a manner that others are not inclined to think your as
too pushy Use your present cleverness to forge ahead.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) Work on personal aims now
and make great progress, but keep out of the way of irate
higher-ups. Engage in activities that improve relations with
friends who are helpful and mean much to you,
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Find the right means that
will gain you the favor of higher-ups that you desire very
much. An adviser can give you suggestions that are most
valuable. Don't take anything for granted, though.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Know what your true
personal aims are and go after them in a clever fashion and you
get the right results. A fine evening for a party and bringing
good friends together. This can bring much goodwWl.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) It is best to see a
higher-u alon eksteaoduof with asbc ates andigt tha i ackin'

need to make the future brighter.
LED) (July 22 to Aug- 21) A day for much activity, such as
making changes, planning a trip and getting routines out of the
way. A new contact can be most helpful to you in the future.
Show that you appreciate the assistance.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Aspects are excellent for
getting much of that important work ahead of you out of the
way quickly, so get busy early. Wise individuals can be most
helpful to you. Contact them without delay.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) You can accomplish more in
the business world today than you can at home, so get an early
start. Discuss policy matters with associates and iron out all
problems nicely. Relax at home tonight.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Handle all that work ahead
Of you and be sure to cooperate with fellow workers more
than you have in the past. Invest in new appliances that make
your work easier and more efficient.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You have an
opportunity to have a delightful time today, but be certain
you don't spoil it by being too extravagant. Try to please
friends who accompany you. Show you have poise.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) It's better to listen to
what kin have to suggest today since your judgment is not as
good as usual, and the planets are in their favor. Seek those
who can be helpful. Avoid one who bickers.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Contacting those persons
who are able to assist you to gain your aims more quickly is
wise. You are able to obtain the information you need for
advancement. Perseverance wins for you.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You can make advances along
financial lines now and should pursue such a course instead of
wasting time with friends who want to have fun. Make sure
you invest wisely and add to what you possess.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .. he or she may
appear to have a big ego, but since there is much ability in this
nature, it would be well to give the finest education possible.
Fine success is possible during lifetime and there will be the
desire to help others climb the latter of success. Give the right
spiritual training early as well as some discipline for best
results. Sports are a natural and a must here.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


"A sandwich and coffee? I wish I md w ar s
I couldn't afford to stuff myself na ldeyur slarso


Rarpert anod the Niaky Toys-16


looks doubtful. I handle lots
of letters to Santa," he grunts.
m ttr faor ch Ntche t~ osa
office." So Stupert has to
wait for the next bus. I wish
I could come," says Bill, but
Smuatnhep with the Christmas


The padres containing Ninky
and Rupet's letter is soon

mrade his collection. This is
for Sants" says Rupert. I
know it won't o0 into the
..wlu bg? yeo ootmake


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Winning



Bad bid ~maM 0 meet


mise deal in H~ungayry a Idivi*
dual 8ealer asi /W Yul

WestrWet EastVu

Beath


West Not ast Sah


oths oveca ws



as a r woldhae
esoth' openedl the #K nd
abast, whon altao have droped
the 4J. led letroaW.~ Fearing rand
Ithe roverbt~tal Bahoup, Waest
swiched ato te94 heQ
WeK and ne tAmae up th tic.
Ah dJ.iamond folowe. Overinlthaki
Welaest' QJ iha tAs8 QQ, Et an
the I10, clear e the s3uiet
swthdto theiW::**C"I
OK tsdonAm ed u his QA on
oWes OJ shbha entry O an d
Obere 16 tha~igt had East pa
Whits thJ corectyatrick one,

spd on~~rt in uationtr woud

presented Soutlh with his con-
tract and injustice would have
triumphedb once more. WitShout
the hread switch the defnce
would only co~eb to tear spade
tricks and two diamonds. Nowr
had South won the bkst trickr....


"~Try not to block the scenery as you go by.


CDORSSRO W

ACROSS
1. Civilian ciathes 29. Snarl

13. Calm 32. Missile shelter
14. Bull's-etye 33. Rose's love
16. Diminish 35. Shackles
17. Uproar 37. Ladart
IS. Acidity 39.0Oral
P2Go rimrerlw a lThubr
24. Staff 45. Sleek
25. Scarf 46. Spanish title
26. Exist DOWN
28. Biblical
pronoun 1. Doily


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUEtIL
2. Grape 6. Half in
prersenptions
3. involuntary 7. Social
4. Closedfisted 8. Courteous
5. Thought 9. Tranquility
10. To a place
a within
11. Gmam animal
15. ice cram
18. 0rizles
I i II20. Crooked
21. Cultivator
23. Sickly
a 25. Lobby sign
3 26. French dance
27. Conceit
29. Stums
o30. Finch
31. Baby grand
32. Night sound
33. Weapons

38. River island
40. World War II
area
6 41. Saul's
grandfather
a ...... .lo 43. Hush


"You might at least stop and say hello to other dogs."


Chess
g B LIONARD BARDEN













Two masters had a dkn view of
today' a iagraaaa~~~~~aaaaam from a tourna-
ment in1 IsabNn, Poland. Black
(to move) wanted to p~ay the
sacrithlee l. .. E., xKP bu
noticed that it allowed White a
meate In two by 2 Qx P c K x Q;
3 R--R3 mate. So he pbe 1 .
P--KR3, White dh~eeruy pushed
his pawn with 2 ,-48 Black
ssa~itced 2 .. t x P; aend
White nad to resign because it
3 P x Kt, QxP ch; 4 R(3)-KCt2,
P-a 8a the hug hole in a~
this which both pla ors missed?
Par times: 10 seconds.. ohess
master; 30 seconds, cheess eloped;t
3 minutes, county~Y~ ~~ er;
minutes, cu te :1
minutes, atvenge; 20 minutes.
novice.
Solution Sa:; Jan 20 9)578l

Chess Solution
After Black;'s 1 ... P--KR3
SPi P R 3 hQ eh Kt-R2;
4 Q x Kt ch, Ku 9 ; S R--83 mate.


Brother Juniper


Brother duniper












- I---- ;--~s~ --.1..-1


Prince Will shock Aquinas '"'~~i~



Aces iR d0CIilie 57-55 win r I6---


who ead paidt his fine




SLufthansa
We have an opening for a

GROUWD HOSTESS/SECRETARY
Personable, with public contact background; typing
and administrative skills required. Previous airline
experience as well as knowledge of German and
Spanish pre erred.


.~E -_-.~-.~. -I'


NAntfAs Ave Op.oe's ipe& CSteelI


1 htt WW c

C. W. Sands, Manager and proprietor of Bill's
Reial Estate Agency Ltd. and C. W. Sands
Enterprises Ltd. wishes to advise the public that
Mr. Pat Rutherford and Mr. Hubert Benaby are
no longer associated with his two companies and
no negotiations on behalf of the Company
should be transacted through them. However
those who were in the orocess of negotiating any
transaction With either of the two above named
gentlemen may still complete their transaction
with either of the above Companies by visiting
Mr. C. W. Swand at his office in the Dupuch and
Turnquest Building on Shiriey Street or calling
him at telephone 23921.



PLsi Notice


ELECTRICAL UTILITIES COMPANY LTD.
WEST END POWER & LIGHT LTD.

With effect from 1st. February, 1973, Electrical
Utilities Co. Ltd. and West End Power and Light Ltd.
will discontinue attaching red-printed notices of
disconnection to electricity bills sent to customers with
arrears overdue.
However, the last date by which arrears should be
paid in order to avoid disconnection of the electricity
supply wift be shown on the actual bill as a computer
printed messages. Customers are reminded that unless
overdue arrears are paid by the date shown on the bill*
their elctricity upply will be disconnected without
toft noice and a reconnection fee of $15 will be


RECORD PARTNERSHIP
BY ENGLAND PAIR

..a4srsA rcd ithA aik
Tony Greig took England's first
innings score to na3 for five at the
end of the third day of the fifth
and final test a ainst India, in reply
to dii s 4k would have it,
Keith Fletcher fell leg before in the
nth di f h ast over of the da3
Tony G~rei was 126. The
partnership score an ten adge
against any side so far. Also their
individual scores were the highest
sore byM tem on teh cike Itfr
runs to a nal india's first innings,
with fiveplackets Itadlinactreue
Saturday, Friday being the rest day.
PAKISTAN KNOCKS UP
RECORD 507 FOR 6
DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND
Mstaq Moh m fl entho2 fi bu
in a record breaking fourth Hiket
htadd ofP 10 wth Irelf I bal(17th),
formidable score of 507 for six by
econ dteof theinss New Zealan dt
Carisbrook Gr und Thursday.
This stand was the best fourth
slcet a rtbnerhhiu aorPakin ini
set personal records.
ta 0a6q bbai edn h t 20 f ur.
Asif, the faster scorer, hit 18) fours
ad inet xi intehi 2the-min~ut
partnership.
NICKLAUS, 64, LEADS
IN BOB HOPE CLASSIC
PALM DESERT, CALIF. (AP)-
lck Nwdkla forntaking his m st
to rnment, fas noedn as
eight-under-par 64 Wednesday for
the fi streo d lesd i h 160,000
Nicklaus had seven birdies and an
650-y rd idiaro pellsovCountr
Club course as he established a
two stroke margin in the first of
five roundstin this 90- oe eventpe
champion Gay Brewer, and a pair
hnstour an nwnnerslr oeo~rsge
shared second place at 66. Brewer,
I is Nick aso Bla to a Ind dn
Johnson were at Tamarisk.


BAIFLplayers against ilecision te allow



Stingrays players to play All Star game


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
AQUINAS COLLEG;E ACES, undefeated in seven games.
succumbed to the shooting of Ray Rose and the rebounding of
David Morley last night as defending Western D~ivision champions
Prince Williams High won a decisive 57-55 victory over the Aces.


both players and officials in the Association.
The Stingrays were given a because the
deadline of Tuesday, February~ exactly the
6 to pay their fines, imposed they were n
on them for walking of the Indeed,
field of play in the Crawfish obvious to
Bowl Game December 31 at that the A
the Sports Centre while playing having con
the Nassau Jets. problems,"
Acc or ding to the backwards
Association only four members in their e
of the Association have paid American
their fines, but in site of this Bahamas ii
it was decided by the not punish
Association at a meeting last behaviour.
Tuesday evening that the Many pe
Stingrays would be eligible for question
selection to play in the All Star Stingrays j
Games on February 21. and allow
This All Star Game will be continue
watched by the New England develop t
Patriots scouts, and the officers Bahamas, i
of the Association felt that destroy the
each player in the BAFL The ans
should be given a chance to The Sting
display his talents to the by three pl
scouts. Bernard '1
DISAGREEMENT Tony Rahr
However, one member of Accordil
the Association who was in Marlins ar
disagreement with his fellow majority
officials, Geoff Stuart, would like
immediately resigned his but the
position as secretary of the previously
BAFL following the decision allow this.
by the Association to allow the NOT
Stingrays players to participate Nassau
in the All Star Games. back, Basi
In a statement made to The today thal
Tribune yesterday, Mr. Stuart undoubted
said that he had resigned his future of 1
position as secretary to the the Baham
BAFL because he felt he pay their f
could not associate himself "Howev
with the BAFLA if it did not Associatioi
uphold its ruling namely that ruling. Onl
the Stingratys would not be paid should
allowed to play in Association in the All
sanctioned games until they Davis.
had paid their fines. "We ca
"This decision by the undisciplir
Association can only be League,"
harmful to the future of that the
football in this country. In will be pr
giving in to the Stingrays they totally irre
are allowing them to run the Davis. "TT
Association," Mr. Stuart said their chan
yesterday. the scout!
Mr. Stuart added that there off the fie
was absolutely no point in Marlins
having an Association that Fountain
could not discipline its players Stinrwys


e players would do
same thing again if
lot penalized,
it would seem
all those concerned
association, which is
Isiderable "teething
would be going
instead of forwards
effortss to establish
Football in the
f the Stingrays are
hed for their poor

~ople have asked the
"Why don't the
just pay their fines
the Association to
in its efforts to
:he game in the
instead of trying to
:Association?'
wer is quite simple,
rays are influenced
layers Bil Wallace,
Porky' Dorsett and
ming.
ng to players mn the
nd Jets teams the
of the Stingrays
Sto pay their fines
three gentlemen
mentioned refuse to

RELEVANT
Jets star running
il 'Barr' Davis said
t the Stingrays were
Ily destroying the
American Football in
ras by their refusal to
ines.
ler, I feel that the
n must uphold its
ly the four who have
d be allowed to play
Star Game," said Mr.

nnot afford to have
ned players in the
he said. "The fact
New England scouts
~esent at the game is
levantt" stressed Mr.
he Stingrays forfeited
Ices of being seen by
s when they walked
lId."
corner back Vincent
also felt that the
should not b


allowed to play in the All Star
Game on the grounds that it
would be harmful to the future
of American Football in the
Bahamas.
FOOLISHNESS
"The whole thing is just a
bunch of foolishness,"
exclaimed Fountain, "I can't
understand why the Stingrays
don't pay up and stop behaving
like a group of spoilt kids.
Margins quarterback Andy
Key, however, said this
morning that he felt that due
to the fact that scouts would
be percent at the All Star Game
the Stingrays should be
allowed play.
"The All Star Game cannot'
in my opinion, be defined as an
Association sanctioned game,"
said Key, "therefore I think
that the Association is right in
its decision to make the
Stingrays eligible for selection,
to play in the All Star Game.
Former Stingrays captain,
Minky Isaacs, who at the time
of the 'walk off' incident said
he felt that his teamn was not
justified in leaving the field,
said today that the Stingrays
should not be allowed to play
mn the All Star Game until they
had paid their fines.
"If the Association back
down on their original ruling
then it will be harmful to the
game", Isaacs said.
isaacs then added that he
was one of the four players


"I wasn't concentrating on
St. John's," said coach John
Todd. "When we went out to
practice, we practiced for
Aquinas A4lthough his win
against Aquinas Ac~es was not
really a dream come true, "this
is the first timne i ever beat
Jerry Harper. Now that's a
dream comer true, said Todd
who took over Prince Will
again this season while skipping
last season. "We could have
.done it last time. said TIodd
referring to the first game this
season when Aquinas in
eaera n kelm b ti tor t n
"We gt sl py'
Prince Wil last night jumped
to an early four point lead
before Ben D)avis on two
layups came through to tie.
Rose, potent from the corners,
gave Prince Will the lead once
more and getting help froni
Leonard Stuart and Lynburst
Johnson offest the Aces to
take a 12-11 first quarter edge.
Alphius F~orbes, who worked
the rebounds with Morley,
swopped opening baskets with
Ben Davis before P'rince Will
again ran to a five points lead
with 5:57 in the second
quarter and Aquinas called a
time out. Returning to the
court, Aquinas moved to
within one point of the lead
21-20.
David Bullard then came in
for Forbes and Sherwan
Coakley for Rose and, teaming
up with the others, gave Prince
Will a 29-22 second quarter
lead.
"Defence is the game,"
stressed Todd. "I think this is
our best game because the guys
caught on to the defence."
Returning for the third
quarter, Ben Davis added two
quick jumpers but Prince Will
replied and opened a nine
point gap (35-26) at 6:06 of
the quarter. Bernard Davis,
Clifford Rahming and
Edgecombe later started a rally
that again moved the Aces two
behind.
"Ray Rose was the big
factor,"' commented Todd.
Looking over at Morley,
"Morley is the best centre in
this league. You can do
nothing with Morley .. him
and Ray, there is a
com nations there. efurh

.q artersvvith a45 le both sides

Aquinas again moved to within
two points of the lead at 51-49
with 3:32 in the game when
Prince Will called a time out.
Returning to the court, Rose
started thi gs off from the
corner and Stuart and John in
control with Morley on the
rebounds opened a 57-49 lead.
With 1:52 in the gme
Prince Will began to freeze the

runn rn c lshl ef ue
baskets moving them two
behind as the final horn blew.
Bennett Davis scored a game
high of 21 points for the Aces.
Edgecomb scored ne Wll
with 14 while Johnson and
Stuare sep ndh t2omnts ea h


Aces) drunk for you all," said
Todd to Prince Herpburn, of St.
John s. T'he Aces and St.
John s C'ollege clash next week
Wednesday in what could
possibly be a Western~ Division
championship playoff.

A. I. Adderley f igh ran out
of' stream in the last half and
fell victims to St. John's
College who, again playing
without Ronald Johnson and
Leymond Russell, downed
Adderley Hligh 72,-57,
yesterday at the Adderley
G;ym t
St. John's behind the
shooting of Robert Scott,
opened a 20-13 first quarter
lead
Subjected to the rebounding
of Hlarvey Roker and Mark
Bethel with Cyprian Newrey
and Derick Vogt playing great
hall control, St. John's who
opened a 32-22 lead late in the
second quarter, were unable to
stop Adderley Hligh who came
to within two points of the
lead at 32-30
Continuing their attack in
the third quarter, A. i'
Adderley Htigh mooved on to tic
the gamne at 36 all.
Dexter Rolle and Prince
Hlepburn working the ball with
Robert Scott set the pace that
saw St. John s reopen their
ten-point lead at 46-36 with a
little over three minutes
remaining in the third quarter.
Prince scored nine and Scott
added six points in that
quarter,
Although Adderley H~igh
again broke the ten point lead
and came to within five points
of the lead, St. John's going
into the fourth quarter leading
49-44 pressed on and opened a
61-48 gap which they
controlled 72-57 at the end of
the game.
Hepburn scored a game high
of 22 points and Scott added
another 16. Newrey popped in
19 points for Adderley High
and Roker and Bethel teamed
up for 26 points.
* * *
David Cleare pumped in 30
points and Levant Carey scored
20 to lead Government High
Senior Boys to a 72-58 victory
over C. C. Sweeting High at
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.
haMovn feo ma 3n stl n r

themsecond ar f," said coach
"That was when my
rebounders started coming
through. '
Peter Mitchell started the
rally for G.H.S. and they
scored near 20 consecutive
baskets before Sweeting High
replied. Also working an
effective fast break, G.H.S.
continued their devastation to
win their third game in eight

SIe inn R ehescored 2Hafr
Woodside scored I11

in other games played
yesterday: St. Augustine's

cosee utilvonanth St. sne
handed Queen's College their
thr~d9l of thehseesson in a


A WRONG DECISION finds Prince Hepburn (31) of
Carter's Hitachi having his hook shot cleanly knocked away
by forward Stancel Ferguson of Beck's Cougars during last
night's game. Cougars won 107-81. PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


6 00gartrs 81 I FSH [IfSlu7on


SAMMY "BOOKIE"
Johnson who has lately made a
remarkable recovery from a leg
injury, shot a cool 11 for 20
from the field and six for eight
from the free throw taking 15
rebounds in pacing Beck's
Cougars to a 107-81 victory
over C'arter's Hlitachi. at the
Adderley H-igh G~ym last night.
Moving through a sluggish
first half which saw the
Cougatrs led by only ten points,
offensive guard Peter Brown
came on in the second half to
set the ball rolling with 14
points and five assists.
Prince Hepburn, the
offensive guard for Carter's,
topped them with a game high
of 22 points and eight assists.
Ellis Bodie took 12 rebounds
and added 15 points.
In the junior game, Carter's
Collegians behind the shooting
of Mark Bethel with 27 and


David Cleare with 18, among
five men in double figures,
defeated St. Agnes Crusaders
94-50.
For the Crusaders it was
Jeremiah Rolle with 13 points
and Samuel Thompson with
I I.


BECK S COUGAKS
4 II
,n 4 6
17 3s
n 11 1


o


smith
IFergus

Cle ns
Bosfiel
Ne oa


Bodie

Balfou
Simmor
Hebpbu
Clalrkre
Bullare


am 3
Id 7
lId 5

CARTER'S I


r 3
,ns 2
rn II

5 f


7 I
3 3
10 1
*
HITACHI
12 1
7 s
o I
3 o
2 3
7 2
0 o


Please apply to:
Station Manager, LUFTHANSA P
Nrssau, Bahamas.


"g-SA gLYR Wi g5, 5 gH
THE FOLLOWING a playr pked fo the Bah ma
Amateur Basketball Ass ciation e 1-star Classi scheduled fo
tomorrow night at the A.F. Adderley Gym at 7:30 :-


O. Box N1509,


PARADISE BASKETBALL
LEAGUE
SENIORS IST TEAM
Guard: Wilfred Johnson
Classic Pros; Guard: Cleve! Rodgers
qu assic Pr nt Centre:Csters ng
Forward: Kermit Rolle -- Fox Hil
Saints: Forward: Lionel Evans -
I ox Hill Saints.

Polunrd: A nthoy Wood sie -
t~dweiser Eag es Centre: lromae

Inge ith Classic tPws; l orwar :
JUNIORS IST. TEAM
Rueben Knowles Fox Hill
Saints; Roger Brown --Fox Hill
Saints; David Morley the
Warriors; Ronald Humes -- FOK Hill
Saints; Noel Munroe Jammers.
2ND. TERM
Mathew Leckey Nassau
Schlitz; Glen Wright Jammers;
Kenneth Whitfield Warriors
Livingstone Bain Jammers




ESSO HAS maintained a one
game lead as they took two
games from Albury's in high
scoring matches this past week.
City Market has moved into
aa to g re tleead at th Pas
Mecry. BeM rni teS g

246(672) and Ronnie
Turnquest 224(610) City
Market were able to win three
games easily from Finco. Percy
Knowles 180(508) was high
scorer for Finco.

fraMe s rge drm Swyar's a
they won two games from the
tough food producers. Cedric
Saunders 226(587) and Lary
d'Albenas 207(567) set the
pace for the mariners as
Dnni Elo k200(SI3 an

rolled-in good sets for
Sawyer's.
O.I.A. just won three games
from Home Purmiture, they

swcond ty2and th~e chrdt b
thirty. Herb~ert Roberts and
Dana Johnson rolled high for
Home Furniture and O.I.A.

"'"Ii'A'RE LEAGUE
Amoury's seem determined
to win the second half as they
won two games from the tough
Home Furniture team. They
still maintain a game and a half
lead over Thompson's. Rosie
Saunders 206(532) and Pallas
Roberts 165(445) again led
Amoury's to the victories. Joan
H~ayling 177(4S9) was high for
the furniture ladies,
Titompson's kept pace as
they won two games from New
Oriental. Ivy French 182(495)
gave Thompson's the punch
they needed for the two
victories. Patricia SweetinS
IS9(462) lent a helping hand


Patrick Dean Schlitz.


NASSAU BASKETBALL
LEAGUE
SENIORS IST. TEAM
Guard: Peter Brown Beck's
Geunatr: dyn DeLaner t- Ara eks;
Forward: Roscoe Davis Arawaks;
Forward Samuel Johnson Beck's.

Gu~uard: V DI B Mc~aMI air's

Frt rd:GaGeo ge F rringtec's
RHodgers; Forward : Julian
Edgecob b-RRamsey'sTEA
Ciflford Rahming Beck's,
Harvey Roker Hawks; Tyrone
Sawyer: Michael Delancy Hawks;
Danny Edgecombe Arawaks.
2ND TERM
Robert Scott Carter's;
Kenneth Fox Beck's; David
Cleare Carter's; Reginald Forbes
- Beck's; Basil Burns Arawaks;
Ray Rose- Arawaks.




in the cause. Joyce Waugh
170(437) was high scorer for
the laundry ladies.
Maura's sent Super Value for
a tumble as they shocked them

bent Sp Vau oac btm th ee
gmesbou 8of first place ns ead
Schippmann 175(494) led
Maura's as Annie Russell
mustered-up the top scores for
Super Value.
MADEIRA LEAGUE
After suffering a great loss in
te frtG game,hEssothbruned
scoring night for the season,
and they also won two games
from ~Albury's. Sydney French
243(632) and Terry Chea
234(571) had excellent set for

betnigt theR se onhad s h
shot a 195(552). The brother
combination of Billy 222(557)
and Mike Albury 223(S98) had
good set as they were top for

AP ich rd's kept pace as they
won two games from the tough
K. C. Auto team. Having his
best night of the season Albert
Rdtd's t2o2 c6 ) AIM
was helped out by Barry Kemp
201(572). Ken Sands 235(621)
and Tom Stubbs 206(573) had
good sets in a losing cause.
Ellswortn Weech 238(642),
Bradley Friesen 214(578) and
Robert Pinder 2041(572 le
Claridges in three crushing
victories over the lowly
Tinker's team. Ron Wells was
top scorer for the paint men.
Guinness also had an easy
*night as they won three games
from Heinekens. Roy Parks
221(599) and Lou Parker
213(S64) were high for
Guinness and Heinekens
respectively.


*BASSETTll8 HI~S *S0OHOYA RISSIAN


RILAeRI(MIA LRRILR 'IRiell 951I LW

*FOR TER~E AllE1*GDEn -RETRIEV El




*MALAIYITE COCKERII SPAWIELS


eggg gagg gg *1llM

FUUL% e RIRBT *WIML UlIWWWHAA~ET


I


5159 Qlribut


Thursday. February 8, 1973.


tTt


..th Oue' Pt


Now i stoa


WELCHH CORGI


*TOY POODLE


i~T. BERW~RD


A// Dogsr A.K.C. Repr'stered.


OII~SB~e~S tP~fI'l7 I


DPEII~~~~ FI IM'llM