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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03260
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 31, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03260

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AUDLEY C. K(E MP
I J*t St. South ISclrn 2-4796


POWERFUL JET*PROP ENGINES
ARE MORE RELIABLE THAN 2.
-TELEPHONE 77303/'77778--


VOL. LXX, No. 59 Wednesday, January 31, 1973. Price: 1 5 Cnts


MORE POLITICAL

VICTIMIZAION





reports of victimization in the
Out Islands by certain
government officials.
According to an FNM press
release the latest reports



thought to be sympathetic to
the FNM even though most of
them were not qualified to
vote in the last election.
some of these reports. said
the relea3Se. "haver been taken
toi the floocr ofi Parliamencnt and
further Parliamnentary action
\vill be taken. The l:NM will
also consider what turthe~r
action is to be taken."
The FNM "regards political
victimization as intolerable int
total con tradition of
Government's official call for
unity on the eve of
nationhood," the release said.
In a letter of complaint to
the FNM headquarters in
Nassau a party supporter at
Inagua claims. "What is
happening here now is a
disgrace before G;od and man."
The letter writer says that
threats have been made and
"are being carried out in a
most cruel and un-C'hristian
manner "

of th Tuhrek I lau peole
a big vcosy uproe

hae bnliount oher eforo mat
years. They know no other
home. Most of their children
haeb ey aor ie the Bhmas
inside ation and shown no

PERMITS REFUSED
"What is happening is that
work permits are being refused
to the husbands and fathers to
iiork for the salt company and
so they have to take their
families to Turks Island or Itfey
have to leave themselves and
break up the families. It is

thurtribi this he population ie
being decimated. Those who
have not yet had their work
permits refused are living in
fear. Even those who have
formal Bahamian status are
fearful that they, too, will be
uprooted after Independence "
The FNM release gives

Acc:din ito nma release
Donald Harris and his Turks
Island wife have five
Bahamian-born children. Hie
had lived in the Bahamas for
about 20 years, mostly at
Inagua, and was a sub-foreman
with Morton Salt Company.
Hisi wienis a civic wo kerhbehig
and also an officer of the
newly-formed G~irls Brigade.
Although unable to vote he
was thought to be a supporter
of the FNM candidate in the
past election. Hiis work permit
was not renewed and he had to
return to Turks Island.
Claude Lightbourn is
married to a Bahamian wife.
He had been living in the
Bahamas about 15 years. Hie
knows no other home having
come to the Bahamas as a boy.
A mechanic and truck driver,
his work permit was not
renewed.
Hubert Williams and
his Bahamian wife have 10
children. She had four before
they were married. The wife is
a PLP supporter. according to
the FNM release. Williams, a
truck driver, had been I~vmng in
t Bahoamas lormver 20 years
renewed and he has gone to
T~urks Island without his

Henry Henfield and his

Tu k sa n ieu fa so hav e 10
chilrea l0e fwhmwr


yer.Atruc driv r, hi ork
permit was not re ewed.
~uks Isin wife hav dw




watfrte ae to shlbt et


Mr. Roger M. Jones, largest refineries in the world
presidentof Jones, Bardelmeier was that right now
&t Co., Ltd., Ocean Bulk 250,000DWT tankers over
Shipping Consultants, traced three times bigger than tankers
the growth of thesupertankers delivering crude oil to the
since World War II and the United States --are able to
problems they have created for regularly deliver crude oil to
U.S. importers. this facility at Freeport.
He said that during the Mr. Jones then went on to
second World War, the big describe the mechanics of the
tankers of that era were 16,000 new terminal to be built at
DWT T2's. Commencing in the Riding Rock 30 miles east of
late 1940s, the size of tankers Freeport, Grand Bahama as a
started to climb rapidly. joint venture operation with
In 1950 the largest tanker the Bahamas government
was 30,000DWT; in 1955 owning Sl per cent of the
44,000DWT: in 1960 shares, Seabulk International
100,000DWT; in 1965 Corporation owning 49 per
150,000DWT. cent and Burmah Oil Company
As recently as 1966, there of London contracting to
was only one ship in the world utilize the terminal to

o e a 20,0D t, trans-ship their crudeM
tons.Press reports indicated that
ton~hn he asiv buldup an oil storage tank farm would
began," Mr. Jones said. be constructed at Riding Point
Hunred ofshis wrewith an initial capacity to
ordered Ik tl makes atut handle 1001 million barrels per

OD 00000 apAox dee wa erO berth
entr ad brthat ny .S offshore will be built to handle
port fully loaded, up to 400,000 Deadweight ton
Very Large Crude Carriers -- or
TOO LARGE VLCC's as they are known in
By January 1, 1972, there the shipping world, and several
alreadyy 463 rmrer s nd fmller berths to load out th.
Ikcarriers in service too 80,000 ton shuttle tankers.
large for any U.S. East Coast or The procedure then was that
Gulf port, the big tanker, the VLCC,
Observed Mr. Jones: "We which was too large to go to
estimate that with ships known any existing U.S. port, would
to be building or contracted deliver oil from some
for, that by January 1976, producing source such as the
there will be close to 1,050 Persian Gulf to the Riding
ships of over 100,000DWT in Point Terminal where the cargo
service 752 tankers and 285 would be pumped ashore for
dry bulk or combination temporary storage, then later
carriers (OBOs) that will not be reloaded into the relatively
able to go to any existing port shallow draft shuttle tankers
on the United States East or~ for delivery to refineries at
Gulf Const.th aiu et conventional U.S.rpc repots

at U.S. East Coast and Gulf in the marine press indicated
ports is presently 45 feet, that six VLCCs are being
which effectively limits the size considered for the long haul
ships that can berth fully run from the Persian Gulf to
loaded to approximately Grand Bahama of
70,000DWT. 380,000DWT each over five
Furthermore it was times bigger than tankers that
considered practically cana itielie oI ad teg US
mporssiblehe 90 eotade these ton shuttle carriers for the run
dpo s necessary to tandeot between Riding Point and U.S.
la gst of the rsn a ports,
tankers epeen a Altogether, he explained '
Paradoxically, at the same there have been well over 20
time the size vessels in the schemes proposed for solving
uor t on Sprt n en have udedildemimeari howhteo perm t
outgron U.S.portsan enrgy crd eieist h ..i
crisis is overtaking the United VLCCs without the ships
States which will require that actually docking at U.S. ports.
six times more oil than is now Several projects proposed
being imported will have to be by major oil companies, call
delivered in tankers to the for the locating of Single Point
United States by I 85. Moorin n Buoyast Cftohae U. .

So, Mr. Jones explained, the dee ater in tehopen sea five
United States is caught in a tod2 mi es o fsore with an
two-way crnch ports which un ersea pipe ine bringing the
cannot take the mammoth ol orea storage terminal on
tankers of the 1970s and a ISLANDS
need to import greatly Th US t al
increased quantities of oil. ThsuderS co sedernmt nt as
This, he said, is where the constudructon of oe tor more
B mras amem continental artificial islands in deepwater
shelf of most of the U.S. East on the Continental Shelf to
ad Gulf Coast puts the 17 permitthethbundlinig of VLCCs

fiv to m ils f ordte within U.S. waters.
Bham s i b irned w ifo tso ne sadtat so

quarter to talf ahmileloff shore Srartificiad island terminals in

ae welrprotecteesefrocati e In addition to the offshore
ai. woes a i e wB rn e d of e a e u b en a go d do



x ac s s u in d ow s ob e in E a s e r n C ea ma d sa ea n a tH


GRECIAN $1ATUES Turk r hCa ~os, Puerto Rico,
AND the Netherlands Antillona eos a
P~IWSiALSRica, New Brunswick, Nova
Scotia and Newfoundland
Of all the: poects
IM IIII~~llillilW a ndond at nteoatrhy iT ig
NASSAU -FREEPO RT locations the only project
that is actually going ahead at


this moment is the terminal in
the Bahamas at Riding Point-
Incidentally, he said, "of aill
the potential terminal sites
mentioned outside the United
States, we consider the
Bahamas to be the ideal
location as it not only is closest
to the U.S. but a terminal at
Grand Bahama can serve
equally well both the U.S. G;ulf
and the U.S. East Coast."
POLICY
Which of the proposed
terminals will be proceeded
with or whether
redistribution terminals and
refineries outside the U.S. will
be encourage~. would be
greatly dependent on an
expected comprehensive new

enex epolifr the project at
Grand Bahama, all the other
announced projects hang on
U.S. Federal government
policy guidelines on the energy
enisis expected uon be ist ed t


nexo30 da sthe subjects it is
anticipated will be covered by
the new U.S. energy policy are
revision of the oil import quota
system, imports of liunified
natural gas (LNG), the
quest son of off-shore
deepwater facilities for V LCCs,
the advisabilityr of some
percentage of imported crude
or refined product to be moved
in U.S. flag ships and the U.S.
position as it relates to new
foreign refinmng capacity
intended for U. S .
consumption.
Mr. Jones said that as soon
as some policy statement on
some or all these matters was
forthcoming from the U.S.
government, action could be
f actde opna nany u i ts t:
low cost VLCCs for the import
of crude oil to the U.S.
He predicted that in
addition to the VLCC
redistribution terminal at
Riding Point there would be,
within three to seven years,
Uou as fiventermilnals of sthe
including at nearby foreign
locations -- capable of taking
VLCCs of from 250,000
to 400,000 deadweight tons.
PASSING
Mr. Jones pointed out that
some of the most heavily
travelled commercial shipping
lanes in the world passed
through and just off the
Bahamas.
In addition to the Gulf
Stream. there was the much
less known but major shipping
track known as Crooked Island
passage and Mira Por Vos
Passage in the southern
Bahamas.
This, he said, was a heavily
travelled commercial shipping
route followed by ships going
to or from the Panama Canal
and ports in the Caribbean and
Central America on the one
hand, and ports of the U.S.
East Coast and Canada on the
otersurvey conducted some
years ago for several major oil
u nm k r o e m{ m snt e l t n

commercial shaipast art le

passg o rno f dthereBa a as
oe cam ies, pseger ships


as being regma osrn numete alt


Bhaipping route thhrog hetahe
Providence Channel between
North Eleuthera and Abaco
which at the southern tip of
Abaco, known as Hole in the
M/aHvidebne eamhane 1edn o2
the G~ulf Streamn between
Grand Bahama and Great Isauc


Clay.
Mr. Jones said that
practically all of the
commercial traffic between the
Gulf of Mexico and Europe
either passed through the Old
Bahamna Channel which runs
between the Bahamas and
Cuba or went through the
Northwest and Northeast
Providence Channels.
Which of the two, routes
ships took depended upon
their European port of
destination or origin
it was evident, therefore
that the Bahamas sat astride
and immediately adjacent to
some of the most heavily
travelled shipping routes in the
world.
poConcern ng te dnesgert o
certainly whenever oil was
transported, loaded or
discharged anywhere this did
represent a remote but
pot ntial danger.taalhuh


b nkeofng tt mi als and Intajr a
major refinery had been
established at Freeport, he did
not remember hearing of any
severe problems there with oil
pollution and that was right
adjacent to tourist facilities
and beaches.
Secondly he felt sure that
any new facility constructed in
the Bahamas would have the
latest anti-pollution measures
and containment features built
into the design to prevent
inadvertent pollution.
Th irdly a number of
devices, methods, techniques
Page 16, Col. 1




FN1 p


dede aIL MA toMeP wa dra mbu Ilas ndght when fire
auto parts and paints at McCartney Auto Company on
tMount Royal Avenue. Police are investigating the cause of
t fre. PHOTO Philip Symonette


0 if 8Ct dialling 10 0 888118


as 105m 0 moff W


DIRECT Distance Dialling
from the Bahamas will be
extended tomorrow to Canada,
the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Corporation has
announced.
A BaTelCo spokesman told
The Tribune that by using
DDD local subscribers can save
as much as 45 percent on calls
to Canada compared to
operator-assisted person to
person calls.
The spokesman said
Negotiations are continuing
with the Bell Company of


Canada towards mutually
acceptable rates for DDD calls
from Canada to the Bahamas.
He said it is hoped that DDD
from Canada to the Bahaaes
would be a reality "soon."
DSHARGED FRO M

OTIS F'erguson, 5, of
Palmetto Avenue who was
knocked down by a car at the
intersection of Palmetto
Avenue and Ragged Island
Street Coconut Grove,
Sunday has been discharged
from hospital.


s hoo t ng attempt on his hife

By SIDNEY DORSE'TT
JURORS IN THE SUPREME COURT TRIAL of Bahamas Electricity Corporation boiler supervisor Leonard Jervis, 25, were this
morning advised by Crown Counsel Fred Waterman of Barbados, that their verdict "should be unaffected by any political or other
persuasion whatsoever" as the case opened before Chief Justice Sir Gordon Bryce.


Charged with attempting to
murder Free National
Movement party supporter and
part-time worker Ernest Barry
Thompson of High Vista on
September 5, Jarvis also faces
two lesser counts of possession
of a .20-gauge shotgun with
intent to put Mr. Thompson
and his former girl-friend Judy
Miller, 25, in fear, and using a
deadly means of harm.
The trial was adjourned to
this morning when Mr.
Thompson and Miss Miller
failed to appear in court on
January 23.
This morning, Mr.
Thomnpson, the first
prosecution witness to be
called, said that the incident
took place after he had
dropped two F.N.M. campaign
wor ersM at their homes on

He said tha hisacar was first
trailed by a "big gold-coloured

smtim ale thaat nilgt,

HavinABdOfffd A.Veronica
Rolle sandh Fatsy dFinrs atM thit


we rM diek-i teatre and


Ch Monal u Hotl esaidsh a te
beinge feolowe.We her bak
turned Minton Infan Viw eRoa

fhle sawin "a Mutang and a


Cougar parked between
Ho spitalaat he stopped in
front of iss Miller's home and
was trying to open the door for


her when he saw a car stop at a
distance "about 50 to 100
yards away" and turn off its
lights.
SHe "put the bright lights
on" from his car and
recognised the driver of the
other car to be Sherwin Taylor.
T~he two other cars had driven
behind him, he said.
SHOTGUN FIRED
Jarvis got out of the car
holding the shotgun in one
hand and aimed it in his
direction and fired it shattering
the windshield on the driver's
side, Mr. Thompson siad.
He told Miss Miller to lie
down and a while later, she was
ordered from the car by one of
the men who also told him to
get out.
He said that a scuffle took
place when he came out and

Jris w st ndimg adiswa c
away with the gun and ordered

adin that Miss Milr wa

wit te gu anna grante ei
f ee js the man, anrdia shot twa




his ca as he had Jreviwerstedit
foroof the street. He w fre

Attonhey Perry Criste is

representfingd Jarvois wth
uinsheld bubec d ne t a


behaofrf the usamsey


Wearing a wine-coloured
bush jacket with an ascot and
white trousers, Mr. Thompson
denied that he was a chauffeur
and body-guard employed by
the F~.N.M. party.
"A chauffeur. yes, I
chauffeur myself." he told
counsel adding, "like I said, I
was not working at the time"
to complete the answer as to
whether he also acted as
body-guard.
Although unemployed, he
revealed that he presently
retains an apartment at High
Vista and also had another at
the Royal Victoria Hotel a
short distance from the
Supreme Court. Hie has since
owned another car, a 1968
Valiant, after the incident Mr
Thompson stated
Hie also told Mr. Christie
cill e didtnot le n ovegto
compartment for a gun when

Io n e iug sed brat he w a

It wa filRD SHder cross
e minisao nhatt he revealed




Ida a ht g sk bewheaire ta
repeate riflge or any oter. wle

rifle, hte he would beale to how
tdnour what atheccsewas don
wThompsogn haid husreaso hi
for o belinge pewresent ing cout
on Jauay 23 asbecus he tl r


had not been notified. Asked
whether he did not hear
broadcast notices he said that
he had been in Freeport that
evening after having left Nassau
that Monday.


METHODIST

SYNOD OPENS

TH-E: ANNUAL Synod of
the Methodist Church's
Bahamas District opened this
morning with a pastoral session
at Trinity Methodist Church on
F~rederick Street. It will
continue through Fecbruary 7.
The Synod will be opened
officially at an 8 p.m. service
tonight at Trinity Methodist
( hurch on Frederick Street,
whn District LChairnon t e

review the past and project the


toe hig li ts houchte
nicetmg ofn Methodis miitrt

Bahamiscoasd 181 1h Turk


rothrall t h wo th Ia

inire ty ee beginning 8 p.m.
P~rerachn at the official yo

president of henee Methodist
Churhe ieat Ghrey Sta
relgiousn leaders aeure exece
toattnd the lsn service .


i~ritruno


agisterd with Postmaster of Bahamasr for postage concessions within the Bahamas.) A B UR dB h m SR A edn e sae


U.S. NEEDS MORE OIL AND

PRESENTLY FACES ENERGY CRISIs


Bahamas


ideal y


sited


fo01 101'1111 bSO

By NICKI KELLY
THE EXISTENCE IN THE BAHAMAS of numerous well-protected deep water locations close to shore make
this country ideal for the establishment of oil redistribution terminals, the Rotary Club of Nassau was told
yesterday by one of the leading shipping consultants in this part of the hemisphere.


ARSON IS






ARSON IS SUSPECTED in
a fire which last night
destroyed the White's Lane
home (SHOWN ABOVE) of
Mr. Frank Careyand his
family, and police are
investigating the cause of
another fire last night which
destroyed a large assortment of
auto parts and paints in a
Mount Royal Avenue building
owned by the McCartney Auto

Coo ce are h Iding a nian i
p.m. fir which dstr xed the

wooden building was valued at
S10,000. It was not insured.

De atenit fongh for tvel i;;
hour to can ro te ulazein the

Mount Royal Avenue, and to
prevent it spreading to a small
gas station just yards away.
The single-storey stone
building was already well
ablaze when the firemen
arrived on the scene shortly
before 8 p.m.
No official estimate of the
damla e, bas immediately
be several thousand dollars.
The building and its
con ten ts were insured
McCartney Auto Company is
owned by Mr. Albert
MlcClartney.


ar tV work er tells court of











2 She Oirthant


WeNdneshy, .hsnury 31, 197H.


He said it is conceivable that U.S.
air lines may eventually decide to
lease the planes.
Pan American, whose decision
may have a large influence on other
possible buyers such as Brnmiff, has
been plagued by financial
difficulties lately. Altogether, six
U.S. lines have options expiring in
coming months to buy a total of 32
Concordes. However Trans World
Airlines has practically excluded
the possibility of exercising its
option to six planes by Feb. 28, the
deadline.
The New York Times said "Pan
American appeared intent on
dropping its options and recovering
some t.8 million dollars in down
payments.





DOWNTOWN MIAMI


I$rsll lte

single $ 9
Double SI
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


C. R. SWEATING &SOM LTD.

Will 130

C losed for STOCKTAKNmG
on Friday 2nd February. '1973.

P.O. Box N3009 Tel. 2-3706


L~~ L


ST. PAULlS MElillll Sillil


F REEPOR T GRAND BAHAMAS


PRESIDENTS NIXON & THIEU TO MEET IN HONOLULU?

Vfretllname officials reported here today. H~onolulu is the most likely site
for the1 meeting, the officials said.
Vice Plresident Spiro T1. Aglnew, who, arrived Tuesday for a twot-day visit,
nrlt wto aTshrepthis afternoocn to, map plans for the Nixo~n-Thieu meeting,

STENNIS REPORTED IN SERIOUS CONDITION
chIIN;O cA' Th at a John n swt W ltr red uop ta says the
7 I-year o~ld Stennis was shot twice during a hold-up attempt outside his
Washingbto~n ho~me last night. T'he htospital sporkesrman said he was conscious
rdged tetngcmrfh v afe sie and a-al Itcurs >f eme gencyabfornin l
listedr in "very seriouss' condition.
Stennis is chairman of the Senate Armed Services C:ommittee and hts
neenr aIs much a frc~ of civil rights as he has been a friend of the pentagon.
arlice say Stennis offered no resistance when two black te~en-agers
altlc hih /allet and wrist watch.tl'he pcli e say thertwo then said re
owe~tve~r, itf the ass~ilants knew wh~o Stennis was.
NIUXON SUBMITS ECONOMIC REPORT
c.rrconmic report to r ~ness. Tresidetnternis otne se as i is hisal alnl74
budget message earlier this week. Namely, Congress must watch its
aIrdinig t, ;tvorit innation
aFh Irereidtlntissidayesterday that his propte >wdc onr teerspenpd n
ex*plosionr anld hasten an end to wage-price controls.
thel economic report coincide~s with at Commerce D~epatrtment report.
""f ,ernurnens a ie in r
NEG;OTIATED PEACE FOR CAMBODIA RULED OUT
FO(KYO) (Al') D~eposedl (atmbodian Chief of State prince Norodom
'rhenrouk hats ruled olut negotiated peace in Caimbodia and reaffirmed his
;Irlcocstruggle (1W re indpo~wer in the IndJochina kingdom, a Peking
Sihanouk appraised the restoration of peace in Vietnam with the
Vietnumn peace agreement signed in Paris last Saturday but as to Cambodia
h ritl the acp tcn o setMln tht Cambodian problemacan he found
Tfhe Sihanlouk s five point P'eking declaration called for among others the
cre~arion of a nationall liberation army' to overthrow the Cambodian
;e *dt ship headed by president Lon Nol and his followers.
i'ie orffcial Ifsinhuat News Agency, in a broadcast monitored in Tokyo,
saidt Slhanouk, who has been in exile in Peking since he was ousted in
Malrch 1970, issued the statement with his P'rime Minister Samdech P'enn
Mouth and IDefense Minister Khieu Samphan.
LURED BY PROMISE TO HAND OVER STOLEN PICTURE
SANTA IIARBARA\, Callifornial (AP') A 77-year-old Armenian
immoigrant pleaded innocent T'uesday to charges that he shot to death two
Turrkibh diplomats after luring them here from Los Angeles with the
promise o~f turningl over at painting stolen from a Turkish Sultan 100 years
(;ourgen M. Yunikian, a land developer and author of several books,
entleredl the plea before municipal court judge F~rank P. Kearney, who set a
Inslil hearing for Thursdaiy and as v. limninairy hearing for Feb. 1s.
Yanikil has been held without bail since his arrest following the
shoo,~ting at the Hiltmore Hottel here Saturday.
Stain in the incident were the Turkish Consul Geeneral in Los Angeles'
Mehmet Buydar. 47, and his Vice Consul, Ba2hadir Demir, 3o.
Authorities said Yanikiatn did not know the two men personally but was
kno~wnl tor hold a grudge against the T~urks for what he said was their
respo~nsibility for the massacre otf 26 members of his family more than so
Newrs ;ago. 110 did not have the painting the two diplomats thought they
wire getting, officers said.
A\MERICAN CREW FOR SPACE FLIGHT NAMED
SPAICE CEINTRE, Hlouston Jan. 31 (AP)- The American crew of the
r'irst joint Soviet-Amfricaln space flight will be commanded by veteran
ihtan 1t It will be the fourth space flight for Stafford, an air force brigadier
GeneralI( and the first for Slayton, the 48-year-old chief of the space
;Igency's flight crew operations. The third American crewman will he
Valnfc I). IBrand, 41, a civilian astronaut who has never flown in space.
~The Space Agency also announced Tuesday that thle American crew and
their Soviet counterparts, ats yet unnamed will have their first joint crew
trvining~ session this summer in the United States. Starfford and his crew
will go to the Soviet Union in the fall for more training.
PROTESTANT ASSASSINS GIVEN GREEN LIGHT
BEltFAlrST, Jun 31. (AP)-- Northern Ireland's biggest private protestant
;,nny) ga~ve the g7ren lighlt Wednesday to P'rotestatnt assassins, saying it could
no( longer control them and would no longer try.
Ass1l i(Mrsrron Avsice cairmen nbo bin 50,000-man bUlst e Dcefsen
(`athorlics of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) hasL provoked the
I'rce s ants, and "P'rotestant extremists cannot keep turning the other

"Wef can d nl ghop ta t k tn e ikil afce io not reach the proportion of
I'toiw c nlenimwhile, disclosed the fourth killing since Monday. The
Stone~c~ Cirled ~ suah men fht th heewa fn int na car at a prehistoric
yet whether hie was at Protestant or Catholic. 5 wsntkon
EARTHQUAKE ROCKS MEXICO

frol t~he cenla Tja infi c30as t this capa 8cit Teusday erkiln at leso
10 persons and injuring about 100 others.
The qluake registered 7.5 degrees of intensity on the Richter scale at
s s:o2 (IST~) Its epicnter was in a relatively unpopulated area Joo
kr ilom L'rsin w stco state of Colima the quake coincided with increased
;Itviybea no~no nt u t gOkl trf rort o h it y n r oi u a
the gunke in the village of Tonile, on the slopes of the volcano. Six of the


President I uis Icheverria ordered aid sent to the affected areeas

FIFTH sRM R I AAU IC E MB 2
reported.
The first tre~mor struck at 0500G;MT and a second occurred an hour

10.000 dead.
Lauck of seismographic equipment in the country has prevented
measuring the intensity of the tremors..
HUjNGARIAN RAIL-BUS COLLISION KILLS 34
D)UD)APEST, Jan. 31 (AP)- One of the worst rail-hus accidents in
Hfungarian history has taken a toll of 34 lives, gravely injuring six and
hospitalizing another 15 persons. A bus crashed into a passenger train
Tuesday night at an unguarded level crossing in central Hungary.
charic t rested lent or tshl re sdre ohe italong distance bus'
wr he u h t edo he tth p singer train and reduced to a tangled


"Wbit~e Lcbl










-It fl9Vef Var8S






'Whie ** ~

SCOTCH WHISKY- by

DEWJAR'S

Dittributed by BUTLE~R& SANDS
Available throughout the Bahamas


The School established under the auspices of the Methodist Church is comprised of
approximately SSO0 students with a staff of 25 Teachers. It provides tuition at the Primary
Stage for both Infant and Junior Departments and in addition Junior High School
Education up to the age of 14 years.


Applications are invited from Teachers with suitable qualifications and experience to fill
the following appointments which become vacant on the Ist December 1973.
Appointments will be for a contract period of three years in the first instance.



infant Department: Two teachers for reception or middle infants.


Junior Department: Two teachers for lower juniors
Three teachers for upper juniors.
Expe rience in Athletics and/or Music will be an added recommendation,

Junior High Department: One female teacher for general subjects with some French

One teacher with experience in remedial work

One teacher for Art able to offer Alternative subjects

One Music Specialist able to organise the subject
throughout the school.




Letters of Application giving full details of Person, Professional Qualification and
Experience accompanied by two recent testimonials and the names and addresses of two
persons to whom reference can be made, should be addressed to the Rev. Eric Clarke,
Superintendent, Methodist Church Grand Bahama Circuit, P. O. Box F21, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas so as to arrive not later than the 3rd March 1973.


WASHING TON
(AP)--Presidential assistant
"::r Ab Kis gnero wisvisil
post-walr relationships between
the United States and North
Vietnam, the White House
announced Wednesday.
The brief announcement was
s ngtosimultaneol ni a
came four days after the two
countries joined in signing an
agreement to end the long and
costly Vietnam war.
The announcement, read to
newsmen by White House press
secretary Ronald L. Ziegler,
said:
"The United States and the
Democratic Republic of
Vietnam have agreed that Dr.
Henry A. Kissinger, assistant to
the President of the United
States, wil visi 31anoid from
Fb 01, 17, to discuss
with the government of the
Democratic Repu blic of
Vietnam the post-war
relationship between the two
countries and other matters of
mutual concern.

North Vitaesei capia 1 d
been rumoured since he and
Hanoi politburo member Le
Due Tho initialed eight days
ago the Vietnam peace
a reement. But officials had
adopted a nocomment stance'
apparently while working out
details for the journey.
AID ITEM
A major item on Kissinger's
agenda is certain to be
reparations for war damage
suffered by North Vietnam
aid vaguely promised in the
peace agreement.
Kissinger will be the first
top-level U.S. official to visit
Hanoi during the past decade
while the United States was
involved in the war.
Already in Hanoi are
medical evacuation teams
prepared to receive the first
American POWs to be released.
Although there was no official
indication that he would do so,
it appeared possible Kissinger
himself would be the first
sterican o official to get th
prisoners upon their release.
The President's Assistant for
National Security Affairs said
at a news conference a week
ago that he expected the first
of the prisoners to be released
virthin 15 days after signing of
the peace accord -- or before
Feb. 11-
fe e HanoiK grpdds another
Nixon's chief foreign policy
operative. The G~erman-born
former Harvard professor made
a secret trip to Chmna in 1971
to arrange for the President's
subsequent visit there.
m tssinger also conduce d 30
with the North Vietnamese
before his Paris talks became
p blic about a year ago.


field.
A spokesman for the
Canadian delegation to the
Commission sad the th r
members of t interenat ona
supervisory body had asked
('anada to meet with the
United States and South
Vietnam to re quest
transportation, communication
and security for its seven
regional teams.
Under terms of the cease-fire
agreement, the ICCS field
teams should have been
operational and in place at 8
a.m. Tuesday, 48 hours after
the agreement went into affect.
But members of thelICCS have
said that the security of the
teams cannot be assured
without full support from the
North Vietnamese and the Viet
Gng
A second group of the
four-party joint military
comrmission, met for the third
sllccessive day wth n
indication of progress. It is
made up of the United States,
North and South Vietnam and
the Viet Co "
Canadian members of the
International Commission
expressed hope that the
four-nation go would so
be able to get its teams to
cease-fire observers into the
field. But the absence of the
chief Viet Cong member of
ano her 1eace-keeping group
was delaying things, and there
was no indication when he
would arrive,
VIOLATIONS
The Saigon command said
there were 209 violations
during the 24 hours ending at 6
a.m. today, compared with 311
in the previous 24 hours and
426 in the first 22 hours after









WASHINGTON A federal
jury on Tuesday found two
frer Nixon ofc mag

into and bugging the Watergate
offices of the Democratic
National Committee last
summer.
Convincted were G. Gordon
Liddy and James W. McCord.
emeuny tofkeight mn and wo
to reach guilty verdicts and
listened for 15 days to the
testimonydof 51 witnesses.

feony COU ts f co000 ght
burglary, attempted bugging
and8 iretappn pos absn of
devices and actual wiretapping,
fc a p te tial maximum d i


Ldy, wo was not charged
with the possession counts'

fae p to 3Dis tars and
Chie U.. Ditrit Jdge
John J. Sirica ordered the two
held without bail pending
sentencing.
Defence attorneys said they
planned to appeal
Even before the trial
opened, five others charged
with McCord and Liddy E.
Howard Hunt, Bernard L.
Parker, F~rank Sturgis, Eugenio
Ron lartinez panad Virgi io R
the charges.
AUTOPSY ON2000-YEAR.
OLD MUMMY
DETROIT (AP)- An autopsy -
delayed some 2,000 years will be
adrornwd hersday oniy wayne
Undergoing the talated surgery
will be the mummified remains of
aninmE rtint wot ied about the

provd I lu c eo thte di euosewh c
affect modern man.
The scheduled surgery is part of
a symposium on "death and disease

',"st: 'GRE TO SEND
TOP O LD


NW ) LHI () - Luotlan
Premier S~uvanna Phouma sIPd
Monday night India has1 agreed to
send ~toops to supenrvs an
expected cease-fir in Lau*.
Th one m condithm~ st by In 1''
Communist-led faction in the
""""an Civil Wr,. the Path*t Lao.


of which India is hairman,
Souvannau, addnresing an
setd*uled tnhev c forence, w
rulnks slo boulder the present ICC staff, which
Iort primarily ofi handful of


agreement-
At the White House.
p re side ntial press secretary
Ronald L. Ziegler said the
initial post-cease fire state of
fighting was expected, and
added:
"The momentum of 10
years of fighting is coming
rapidly to a halt, and we
expect the agreement to work
out as signed.
Before the Senate foreign
relations co mmitte e, U.S.
negotiator William J. Porter
testified "I think peace is a
probability," although "it
won't happen overnight."
"1 think that after an initial
period of adjustment the
parties will become used to
working with each other," he
said.
Porter, who headed the U.S.
delegation at the semi-pubic
Paris peace talks, went before
the Senators on his nomination
to become Undersecretary of
State fo Polit 1a Aff ~rs
Nixon conferred with Saigon
minister Tran Van Lam for 45
minutes. Ziegler said the topic
was U.S.-South Vietnamese
relationships in the post war
period.
Ziegler gve no details on
the session, which waS
attended also by Presidential
adviser Henry Kissinger.
GOOD FAITH
Porter said "the government
of (South) Vietnam is fully
aware of the concern in the
United States that we consider
it absolu te ly necessary for
them to demonstrate good
faith in observing the
provisions of the accord."
He said Washington believes
Saigon will observe the
agreement, including working
toward fair elections.
Ziegler denied that Kissinger
split with Nixon at any point
in the long negotiations leading
to the peace deal.
The White House spokesman
said that not at any time was
there a "wide difference of
vew, aosranous differences of

difference" of view between
Kissinger and his boss.
The question came up when
reporters asked about an
article by Charles W. Colson in
Tuesday's New York Times.


the cease-fire went into effect
at 8 a.m. Sunday
The S io's comn he
spokesman Lt. comm ndrct
Hien, said total casualties since
the cease-fire hour were 2,434
enemy tro ps ~killed or
c ap tured, o434 Soutoh
Vietnamese troops and 15
civilians killed, 1,633
government troops and 90
civilians wounded and 129
government soldiers missing,
Heavy fighting continues
today in some sections of
South Vietnam. And U.S.
sources describe the situation
along the Demilitarized Zone
as "grim." South Vietnamese
marines are reported trapped
and taking heavy casualties for
a third straight day on a river
peninsula.
Also on the northern front .
government artillery was firinS
on both sides of Highway One,
near Quang Tri City. South
Vietnamese officers claim it is
response to North
Vietnamese truce violations.
LAOS BOMBING
Meanwhile U.S. bombers
Waging 8 COntinuing air War in
Laos, despite the Vietnam
cease-fire, have slashed at
Communist positions including
SkitheHey poin on theH Chi
Minh aupply-trail network.
The Pentagon has declined
all comment on the bombing 8
except for the vague
statement: "At the request of
the Royal La tian government,
U.. aircra t, inldng B52s...
continued operations over
Laos.
However, it was learned that
air force, navy and marine
fighter-bombers and air force
B52s have attacked the trail
near Tehepone, an important
supply transsrhipment point .
.The bombing Rear Tchopose
indicated thraiis atuombto the

the advertised support for
Royal Lao forces "in resisting
whatever Communist
movements are taking place
prior toaoian cease fre'

bo ber als hase been acU v
near Saravane, a town astride
rod esan uthe LBolovens
U.S. air force and marine
fighter-bombers also have been
attacking North Vietnamese
iti Com uns nPa entL o
strategic Plain of Jars region,
which has been fought over
again and again for a decade.


Colson, special counsel to th
President, disputed reports of a
rift bet ween Nixon and
Kissinger.
Ziegler also said the last time
Nixon personally spoke to the
late Lyndon B. Johnson about
the Vietnam negotiating
situation was Jan. 2.
He said aides were in touch
with the former President
subsequently.
Ziegler gave this response
when asked about a story
saying Johnson knew before he
died that peace had come. He
died Jan. 22, just before
Kissinger's initialing of the pact
in Paris the following day.


NEW YORK (AP)--"All
indications yesterday were that Pan
American was ready to drop its
options for eight Concorde
supersonic airliners" the New York
Times said Tuesday.
However, the Journal of
Commerce reported the U.S. airline
"may decide to extend its purchase
option beyond the Jan. 31 decision
date."
A spokesman for the British
Aircraft Corporation, which is
negotiating the sale of the plane to
a number of American air lines, said
Tuesday no decision has been
reached yet in the negotiations with
Pan American. He said an
announcement is expected
Wednesday or Thursday.
Pan American itself had made no
formal announcement of its
intentions Tuesday.
Th BAC spokesman wase
Lononnetdhata theSaci p7 3en rae
of France has agreed to cooperate
with Wm. Brandts Sons and Co. of
London in a plan to finance
Concorde aircraft through leasing.

TIE
BEA fTY BOX
THELMAA CANCING
BEN ABRANOFF
Beauty Specslatests
Speciasifzing in Facials
PHONE 2-6i305
FREEPORT ARCADE
PIONEER WAY
DOWNTOWN. FREEPORT.


self-defense."


sae ent ised ? ::E Hao
Vietnam news agency that
immediately after the standstill
cease-firemob I ts Sounth

and launched air and ground
operations in efforts to regain
control of population centres
held by the Viet Cong.
The violence that has
shattered the truce thus far was
reported to have subsided in
some areas of South Vietnam.
icui t C nolrt ern qarB"
the fighting has resulted in
major redeployments of troops
ad movmn in hydlatiaou i

chaos in territorial control. The
Communist side apparently has
made more gains than the
South Vietnamese in the
political land grab that
preceded the truce with such
momentum that it never
stopped when the cease-fire

can ( uth taing sides, the
ICCS peace-keeping body said
it 'deplored' cease-fire
violations and asked its
Caaia members to try and
Ambassador Michel Gauvin
of Canada, temporary
chairman of the ICCS, told a
news conference after the
second meeting of supervisory
body Tuesday that he had been
asked by the other countries to
seek logistical support from the
four- srsy joint military

"Then we should be able to
move within a matter of
ioussioC~auvinadsaid. Te
Canada, Poland. Hungary and
Indonesia, scheduled another
conference for Wednesday


SAIGON (AP) Vice

cPresiudent Spito um oA i w

President Nguyen van Thieu on
post-war relations between the
a me States andt South
obstacles to a real peace can be
overcome.
Both the North Vietnamese
and their southern Viet Cong
allies, and the Sai on
government, accused each
other of violating the peace
agreement signed in Paris last
art dh Vietnam also charged
that the United States and
South Vietnam violated the

ar eme t b idr n
Communist delegates arriving
in Saigon to work on
peace-keeping arrangements.
The Internat ion al
Commission of Control and
Supervision (ICCS), stalled by
lack of security and
transportation, failed to meet

getting Rts sv regoa taos
operational and in place.
The Saigon command
accused the Communist side of
z737fcaefi en vilteon fe t
8 a.m. Sunday.
As a result, the command
said, 1,761 North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong and 296 South
Vietnamese troops have died in
the first 48 hours.of the truce.
Another 1,070 South
Vietnamese soldiers have been
* undedmad11al5hand mi sn
said.
"None of these violations

tr ops." decinitilat 1o. L
Trung Hien, chief spokesman
for the Saigon command. "We
are fighting back as a right of


I


Anll RESCHS


2 RIIMAWAY

HORSES IN u.K.
U)NDON ( P)-rnces A nn
galloped to the rescue of two(
runaway horses cowboy-style
during a fox hunt in the English
Ouee,4*, Eiabt II's 22-year old
daughter was out with the Cheshire
Hunt when the horses threw their
reenen the first hunter fell at a
bush fence, witnesses said Anne
called out: "Leave the horse tor
me e overtook the runaway on her
own bay gelding and swinging low~
in the saddle grabbed Its reins and
brought it to a halt.
The other rider to come to grief
was breweird executive RossmPi o.
l expect It was my fault.
"The princess jumped over me
and went straight after him. She did
vey well toouich him. Later sh~e
nearly landed on you." r
Charles Tomkinson, a former
master of the hunt said: "It is a
very chancy business catching a
faladoneo avelling t abot
miles per holu."
Joint master Mrs. Naomi Kae
addekd:a "rnct Anne was very
Anne took part in the hunt
without her constant companion
Lt. Mark Phillips, the 24-year old
sDrea onb (uards offie with wom


NYO DETAILS GZr'leN, BUT-


Nixon meets with



Sa ago x envoy on


pO81 war p08111011

By Lewis Gulick
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Nixon met with South
Vietnam's foreign minister Tuesday as the administration again
stressed that it expects all parties to live up to the peace


SUPERVISORS STALLED



Heavy fighting still


KISSINGER TO

IISIT HWIIol


* ET MONTH
n a Vsetnam and US


4~~~~~ ~ ~ V

still bombing Laos

By George Esper
SAIGON, JAN. 31 (AP) Heavy fighting continued in parts of
South Vietnam today as the International Commission of Control
and Supervision formally asked the United States and South
Vietnam for logistic sup-ort toget its cease-fire observers into the


PallAM m8) IIFop COACOrIGS


Agnew holds important

consultations with Thieu





Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Malster
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publtder/Fditor 1 903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Ltlt., LL.D.
PubI~er/Editsp 191 7-1972
Contrbutin Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publt3tr/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monda to Saturda

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday, January 31, 1973





Chan-e arnd decay


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
ONE DAY this week I went with friends over a hundred miles
from my Miami home base. We stopped at a roadside restaurant
for lunch.
"I knew you were in Florida but I didn't realize you were in
this neck of the woods," a familiar voice said behind me.
I turned round to face a well-known Bahamian businessman
and his sister
He and his entire family had decided to leave the Bahamas -
One brother has settled with his family in Australia, another
brother is in Fort lauderdale, Florida with his family.
A middle-aged member of the family is a bachelor. When he
decided to find a new home outside the Bahamas he went on a
world tour to locate a place that would suit him. Now he finds
himself back in this part of the world and he has decided to put
down his roots in Naples, Florida.
During the course of his travels he made another discovery.
This discovery has robbed him of the right to make any tirture
decisions alone.
in New Zealand he fell in love with a girl. He left it for her to
decide whether they should settle in New Zealand or Florida
when they get married. His fiancee and other friends from distant
places were with him when we met.
"I like Florida," she told me in a distinct New Zealand accent.
The Australians and New Zealanders have a strong Cockney
accent. You can't miss them any more than you could fail to
identify a Barbadian as soon as he o ens his mouth
I recall during my visit to New Zealand in 1955 ... I went to a
hotel Jdesk way up in the interior to register. A girl was at the
desk.
"How in the devil did you get here?" I asked her as soon as she
handed me a registration form and asked me to fill it out.
"My sister and I decided that we wanted to see New Zealand
and so we worked our way ... and now we are here," she told me.
I got the impression that she liked New Zealand and had decided
to stay there. This girl was a Barbadian with an unmistakable
'Badian accent,
Now we have a situation in reverse ... a New Zealand lass is
seeing this part of the world and she finds that she likes it better
Than her birthplace.
I wonder ... is it Florida or the man that pleases her fancy?

I will repeat a story I told years ago in this column.
When I got married in New York in June 1928 I was hurrying
back to Nassau for an election at Inagua. I was then the member

I a at dt Moh' Uniest H Mi e osa wn Sir Charles
Orr, Governor of the Bahamas, had a quarrel with the House of
Assembly because Mr. Speaker Malcolm withheld a Bill for his
signature that had already passed both the House and the
Legislative Council.
After the Bill had passed both Houses of the Legislature the
Speaker and his cronies in the House decided that they were not
satisfied with it. And so they decided to let it die until the next
session when they would do it over again in a form more to their
liking.
In those days the Governor came down to the Legislative
Council (now Senate) chamber from time to time during a session
for a public ceremony of signing Bills and approving other
legislation passed by the legislature. In this way he functioned as
a third branch of the Legislature.
At that time he had certain "reserve powers". Not infrequently
he "reserved" a Bill "for the signification of His Majesty's
pleasure". King George V was then on the throne. This would
mean that the Bill contained some questionable clauses and so it
would be sent to the Law Offices of the Crown in London for
review before it received royal assent.
If I may digress for a minute, I might mention here that this
was what I liked about the old constitution, prior to the 1964
change when Cabinet Government was introduced to the colony.
The old system was full of safeguards. For example, the Bill
passed by the PLP G~ovemment in which no provision has been
made for an appeal after a conviction in the Supreme Court
would not have been approved by the Law Officers of the Crown
in England. This was contrary to the high standards of British
Justice. They would have protected one of the most important
rights of a British citizen ... the right of a convicted person to
appeal to a higher court.
Nor would the colony have been allowed to plunge so deeply
into debt that it is a question whether it will ever be able to dig


itself out again. The Govemnor, always a man of wide
administrative colonial experience, exercised some control over
the expenditure of money. The Legislature could pass any
financial measure it wished but no money could be drawn out of
the Public Treasury without the warrant of the Govemor.
We are told that we are free in the liahamas under the present
system ... and we are soon to go deeper into independence. Yes,
we are free all right ... free to destroy ourselves under the
guidance of inexperienced and, in some cases, complete
ignorant men.
** ** ** **
But now let me get back to my story.
After we were married we went direct from New York to
I aua in sae euhsh th tu lwas sopping off ateMathew Toonu t

American ports.
No one came from Nassau to oppose me in this election and so
I was returned by acclamation.
My bride and I then had to travel to Nassau by the mail boat
Alisada, an auxiliary vessel with none of the home comforts to
offer
The deck was crowded with donkeys, sheep, goats and
chickens for the market in Nassau. This type of cargo was
increased as the vessel stopped at various islands on the
homeward journey.
TIhe second class passengers slept in the bow of the vessel and
on deck with the animals. The first class passengers slept in the
stern. Captain Fred Bain placed his cabin at our disposal but we
nlever used it. We slept on deck with the other passengers.
For the purposes of this rough travelling we both wore riding


breeches and top boots with shirts open at the collar. My wife
then wore her hair in a short Dutch bob.
Today it is fashionable for boys to wear their hair in long curls
like a girl. L. Last Sunday we sat in church behind a family. The
young man's hair was longer and more beautiful than that of his
sister.
Back in 1928. when I got married, it was fashionable for

Mpun yl to werthi y s itf le v was known as a "boyish
My wife spent most of the day among the animals in the bow
of the boat. She was a horsewoman. Her life before meeting me
was absorbed by her horse. She missed her horse. The donkey was
the nearest substitute for a horse and so she made friends with
the donkeys. on the deck.
This was the first time she was seeing donkeys.
** * ** ** * **
Around daylight on her first morning in Inagua she startled me
when she suddenly sat bolt upright in bed,
"Etienne," she asked in a startled voice, "what was that
noise?"
I hadn't heard anything unusual. Her forehead wrinkled in a
look of grave concern when I told her so.
"That's it" she exclaimed excitedly, when she heard the noise
again. This time I heard it too.
It was only a donkey braying!
At Inagua, where donkeys run wild on the Savannah, she had
grown to know this animal and now she was making friends with
them on the deck of the Alisada. In her riding outfit she looked
like a boy.
* * ** ** *
"Who dat pretty li'1 boy always wid you?", an old Cat Island
mlan asked me one day when she was up in the bow of the vessel
with the donkeys.
"That isn't a boy," I told him. "That's my wife."
His eyes bulged out of his head.
"Yer mean ter say dat's a 'ooman?", he asked in a subdued
tone of voice.
"Yes," I assured him, "that's a 'ooman all right. HeI wife."
"Ware yer fine dat pretty gal?", he asked in a low voice.
I told him.
"An yer mean ter say she goin' ter live wid you in Nassau?",
he asked, his face becoming more and more filled with wonder at
every question.
The reader should remember that back in those days Nassau
was a poor town with a fishing village economy ... not the
flourishing city it is today.
I assured him that that was exactly her intention.
"Lawd-me-God, suh!", he exclaimed almost under his breath,
with his head turned heavenwards and his hand partly covering
his mouth, "'ooman duz fowler man all 'round de earth, hey?"
And so this New Zealand girl is carrying through the old-age
story of a woman in love following her man wherever his
footsteps may take him.
In the "good old days", whlen mnan roamed the forests armed
with a club and clad only in the skin of an animal, he made all the

deiiejlneto Wed he r rt? beos girl nt hei iush at he llike h
her unconscious body by her hair to his cave.
This is one of the rights that civilization has rcitbed ~from the
male beast. And now they talk about independence!
Where is it?
As time goes on Women's Lib will probably take over ... and
then it will be the mlan who will follow his woman all round the
world.
A woman may never be armed with a club to capture and
control her man. Nature has given her a far more potent weapon
... h tnge.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Change and decay in all around I see;
O Thou, who changes not, abide with me.
HENRY LYTE


a


drafted by the UBP and agreed
to by the PLP and the
Independents (of whom I was
one) in I963
The most Important section
of the Constitution deals with
fundamental human rights.
These rights include
protection from inhuman
treatment, slavery, arbitrary
arrest d Ise r im a na t ion,
deprivation of property and
protection of privacy of the
home, conscience, expression,
assembly and movement
These fundamental rights
and many other provisions in
the Constrtttion were
proposed by the UBgP in 19h3
and proposed by the PLP in
1972 and supported by
everyone on both occasions.
If there are people in this
country who feel that we
should have fought the PLP on
this point, it would be
interesting to know who they
are. They should be locked up.
In 19.3. the Bahamas
obtained iomnple te
independence, except In three
main areas
1 External affairs.
2.Internal security
3. The right to change the
Constitution.
In 1969, the Bahamas
G vrnet Ia gv lmtd
coontr onm r ct g isn u nide .
under the new C'onstitutio ,
our Government will have
complete control over
categories I and 2. This is the
inalienable right of a sovereign
government. External affairs
and internal security were not
even discussed at the
Conference. They did not arise.
The only category left for
discussion was the fight to
change the Constitution,
The PLP Government
proposed that the "entrenched
pro visions of the
Constitution should be
subject to change by a vote of
two-thirds or three-quarters of
the members of each House of
the Legislature.
We pointed out to the
British Government that if
they accepted this proposal
they need not waste their time
drafting a Constitution
b ec cause the Op posit ion
strength at the present time
was less than one-quarter and
the Government could write a
nw Constitution the day after
It was suggested at one stage
that a change in the
Constitution should be made
an issue in a General E~lection.
This, of course, was a reversion
to the theory of the Good

ef Inepe n e Io t~h7 F

culd not and did not buy
this bill of goods. We insisted
on a referendum and we got
it in spite of the consensus
of opinion in London which in
effect was that if Prime
Minister Heath would not give
peoreferendum t ihnso or
Common Market he would not
give it to the monkey on his
back
This brings me to a question
which I have been asked a
hundred times:
"We lost the General
Election badly. Why are you
beating your brains out trying
to win North End, Long Island

Tin is good question
Why?
The answer is: We now have
eight seats in the House less
than a quarter. If we lose the
Long Island seat we can forget
the whole thing. If we win the
Long Island seat we shall still
have less than a quarter but
it will make Cooper's Town,
Abacso the most mphort nt sea
Island and Cooper's Town, the
FNM can block any change in
the Constitution unless, of
course, they agree to the
change. If we find that any
provision of the Constitution is
unworkable which is possible
chabn h paris mta agree to a
Government. of a country is


run by reasonable people. It is
the duty of the Opposition to
oppose but it is also the duty
of the Opposition not to
oppose anything that is good
for the country.
If we lose Long Island and
Abaco or either of them, we

will nba kr n thde reerte opla

question which is not
associated with the election of
a party. This makes it possible
to get a true answer to the
wishes of the electorate.
Going back to the
constitutional Conference, the
PLP proposed that we should
reitainthour anesenanasstomatio
present system of honours
should be retained.
We agreed.
Were we wrong?
I need not go into the points
we fought and won, because if


members of the public do not
know about them by now they
will never know and it serves
them right if they sink into the
mire of ignorance with my
friend in the super-market with
his cart full of groceries.
I do not claim any credit for
the success of the FNM in
L~ondon. I did not even have a
right of audience. I merely sat
behind the Opposition and
wrote rude notes from time to
time.
The credit goes to the
members of the FNM
delegation. I repeat their names
in the hope that they may have
a place in posterity in the
country of their birth: Mr.
Kendal Isaacs, Leader of the
Opposition in the House, the
Honourable Orville Turnquest,
Leader of the Opposition in
the Senate. Mr. Norman
Solomon. E-NM member of the
House for St. G~eorge's and the
Honourable A4rthur Foulkes,
FNM member of the Senate.
For the special attention of
Iny friend in the super-market,
who has given his last penny to
the FNM, I must mention the
names of Mr. Noel Roberts,
I NM member for St. John s.
and the Honourable Henry
Bostwick, FNM member of the
Senate, who went to London
at their own expense to assist
me in my onerous task as Legal
Adviser.
On my last night in England
Iwas In bed with the London
flu but these men were on
deck until four a clock in the
morning two days before
Christmas. They came back to
spend the holiday season with
their families and to face the
biting criticism of my friend in
the super-market and his ilk.
When you have friends like
that, who needs enemies?
I have even heard it
suggested that we would have
defeated Independence by
walking out of the Conference.
No one ever won a battle in
retreat. If we had done this the
Government would have had
an open field to write their
own Constitution -and many
of our compatriots would not
have liked the look of it.
Fear that a lot of people in
this country are "'way out in
left field .
cot nterybud under tuhae
medium Is the language of my
people. However, since I use a
baseball expression perhaps the
language of the streets of New
York would be more
app oerate. Damon Run an is
my favourite author besides

Sa ki aie mew e might tell
it if this matter had come to
the attention of "Hiarry the
florse and other prominent
citizens from around and
about" gathered at Mindy's
ranching cheesethblintzes at
tree owcould inprobaniorning.

something like this:
"Way out in left field is a
vrry superfluous place to be,
especially if Alec the Home (so
called because after a trot
around the bags home plate is
his usual place of abode) is
patting the tile with his stick,
as it is well known to one and
all in and around Broadway
and also to sundry p~e snlitie

Alec is a straight gee at times
but likewise a low Joe at others
who has a somewhat unpopular
habit of belting the old skin
into the bottom drawer of
right field where nobody
always is sometimes."
Last Saturday night, for thle
first time in history, the loyal
toast (normally confined to the
tmo w dssubj tQueen ") was
According to the Press, PLP
stalwart George Mackey said,
"We tend to forget those who
have assisted us in our
attainment of nationhood. We
owe an awful lot to the Mother
Country."
You can play that again,
Georgie Boy and this time
pull out all the stops.


Do not censure or commend
the PLP or the FNM for
Independence. Give credit
where credit is due exactly
where Mr. Mackey placed it in
his paean of thanksgiving.
you can't fight iisy Heare a

cWe all av to io ed t this
now that we are saddled with it
- to try to make Independence
work.
Sabotage is not the answer -
because no one ever saved his
life by scuttling his own ship.
I expect to spend the rest of

mFro ha on the Lord is
my shepherd and I don't
mean His Lordship the Good
Shepherd who put us where we
are way back in 1968.
EUGENE DUPUCH
Nassau,
Jan. 30, 1973


Independence in a General
Election. If the Independence
party won, Independence
would be granted
automatically, if the
anti-Independence party won,
Independence would not be
granted yet.
I pointed out to him with
some reason, I thought that
Britain would be making a fatal
mistake if it combined the
choice of a party (which is
decided largely in the Bahamas
by political, social, racial and
economic emotion and
prejudice) with the choice of a
future way of life (which
should be decided on the basis
of social philosophy and
political practicability and,
above all, on sober and prudent
reason). I told him that I
doubted that this clumsy and
crude political device would
produce a true answer in
England and I knew it would
not produce a true answer in
the Bahamas.
He told me this was
"Ldamned nonsense". It seemed
so elementary to me that I
frankly did not understand
why he could not see the virtue
of my argument. However,
when the Great White Father
tells me that I am talking
damned nonsense there is no
doubt about it I am talking
damned nonsense.
So the position as early as
1968 five years ago was
this: The British Government
not our Government but the
British Government in its
wisdom decided (1) that
Independence would not be
granted before a General
Election ( 2) that
Independence should be an
issue in the next General
Election and (3) that if the
Progressive Liberal Party won
the election the Bahamas
would be forced to accept
Independence whether or not
the people wanted it.
Nothing could have been
more definite.
In 1972 the position was the
same, with one big difference.
In 1972 exactly what I told
Lord Shepherd would happen
in fact did happen. The PLP
published their Green Paper,
put their propaganda machine


Editor, Thne Tibune.
After wading through
dozens of columns of
appallingly uninformed and
hysterical comment over the
last few months, perhaps you
would be interested to know
the facts leading up to
Independence as I see them.
I am afraid that it is
impossible for me to be brief
and I trust that you may find
space for this lengthy
discourse. It might possibly
save you dozens of columns of
irate seething in the future.
On the other hand, I know that
there are people who refuse to
accept facts and I may be
only precipitating another
spate of hysteria.
Let the chips fall where they
may.
Shall we start at the
beginning? It might be a good
idea, because according to
Genesis that is where the light
was.
In 1968 the Commonwealth
Office, as it then was, sent
Lord Shepherd to tell us,
among other things, that we
could have Independence for
the asking.
I was then leader of the
Opposition in the Senate. At a
not too pleasant meeting at
Government House I told His
Lordship that the question of
Independence should be
decided by the people on a
referendum. He told me that
the question should be decided
not by the people but by the
Government of the day. He
said that the recent referendum
in Gibraltar had shown that it
was an unsatisfactory mode of
resolving an issue. Up to that
time, I had thought that the
Gibraltar referendum had been
successful exercise. He,
apparently, did not think so -
but never explained how the
worth or worthlessness of a
referendum in Gibraltar had
any bearing on the Bahamas.
He did concede that the
people should decide who the
Government of the day should
be, but insisted that after they
elected the Government the
people should bow out. His
unalterable position was that
the political parties should go
to the people on the issue of


into high gear and spent tens
(perhaps hundreds) of
thousands of dollars of the
taxpayers' money flogging the
Cause of the Crab under the
guise of educating the people
in the virtues of Independence.
The FNM spent the few
thousand dollars in their war
chest telling the people that
they were being led to
perdition and they had all
the hell they wanted keeping
the Torch alight with the
paltry donations of people who
expect their interests to be
protected for nothing and
bitch the loudest when they
lose the toss.
The General Election was
not fought on the issue of
Independence it was fought
on the issue of PLP and FNM
with all the sordid political
racial and economic overtones
Indeed it was even narrower
than that. Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling himself said:
'There are no issues in this
election. There is only one
issue. I am that issue."
As usual, with his incisive
capacity for astute political
assessment, he was as right as
rain
Mr. Pindling offered for the
constituency of Kemp's Bay in
the island of Andros but
every PLP vehicle in New
Providence carried a poster
with his beaming face, mutely
exuding all the exhilarating and
intoxicating magic of the Pied
Piper's reed.
Let's face it. The General
Election was not won or lost
on the issue of Independence.
It was won on the electrifying
personality of Lynden Pindling
the spell-binder the Man
of the Word. So much for the
woolly pastoral fields in which
His Lordship the Good
Shepherd spends his halycon
days!
Now look back at the British
Government's position in
1968.
No one needs to be an
expert in political science to
realize that the watchword of
the FNM "We do not want
Independence!" was uttered
with meaning for the last time
from a political platform
rnmewih re in the Bahamas1 o
1972. '
On the bright and sunny
morrow it lost the last vestige
of its meaning and anyone
naive enough to mouth that
tasty phrase today is talking a
lt of d ivl b(More a prop iate

vn able Tetonic four-leter

refrain from using only because
the Oxford Dictionary
whispers to me with a gasp of
horror that it is "no longer in
decent use"). Oh shucks!
On September 19, 1972, the
Bahamas became irretrievably
and immutably enveloped in
the net of Independence cast in
such a devious way by dear
Mother Britain.
Britain wanted to get a
monkey off her back and a
referendum would have
defSeatembde m 1972 she
aot the clinn ad
burdensome scm iangoff ah r
back and she intends to keep
it off.
If asked to justify it, she wiu
do so by quoting two Latin
cliches which the English use
to justify everything they do or
do not do, even though they
are ashamed to use them in
ter pownl I gex Dei (The
voice of the people is the voice
of God).
Fiat justitia et ront coeli
(Let justice be done though
the heavens fall).
Translated into Bahamian,
all this Latin and English
double-talk means: "Yinna
done had it an' day's dat!"

let7 1 ekp tehns in sequence,
On November 2 the
Bahamas Government, with
tongue in cheek, introduced a
Resolution on Independence


which was debated vigorously
in the Legislature but was
passed without a dissenting
vote.
This, on the face of it,
a hearts t r to n t 1o be t i i


those who are unfamiliar with
Parliamentary practice.
In order to vote against a
measure in the House it is
necessary for the Opposition to
rise.
Time after time, when the
terswe at inweopp stin
debated were passed without a
single member rising to vote
against them.
Time after time, when the
UBP were in opposition, the
same thing happened.
The reason? With party


government it serves no useful
purpose to rise when you know
you have lost.
In the days before party
government when any
member might vote with
members of Executive Council
one one measure and against
them on the next we had a
tricky political ploy which is
no longer used. A measure
could be won or lost by a
single vote. If a member
wanted to have something to
throw up in another member's
face at the next election, he
would "call for the yeas and
nays". Members voting with
him would take up the cry
"yeas and nays". The clerk
would then go to each member
and ask whether he voted for
or against. The names would be
recorded in the Minutes of the
House. At election time the
wily member could wave the
minutes on the platform and
bellow. "This hateful creature
who is asking you to elect him
is one of the traitors who voted
against a techniical training
school for your children. See
his name right here where
my finger is."
It is obvious that this device
is useless today, because all
members of the majority party
vote together and all members
of the minority party vote
together
The hearty days of
individual politics have been
lost forever in the
sophistication of party politics.
But all this aside, the only
real object of the Resolution
was to ask the British
Government to fix a date for
the inevitable constitutional
Conference.
This would be laughable, if
it were not for the fact that
this meaningless episode
appears to have alienated some
FNM supporters.
I hope that they now feel
differently after knowing all
the facts.
The war of Independence
was won by the British
Governemnt and the PLP on
September 19, 1972 and
nothing that happened on
November 2 or later could have
reversed the result.

thp. w stp t ItoC telwith
at Marlborough House, seat of
the Commonwealth Division of
the British Foreign Office -
but before doing so I should
like to recount an incident
which took place on one of my
ra e vits fo t e spmn c t


A man pushing a cart full of
groceries advanced on me in a
menacing manner.
"The FNM has had its last
penny ~out of me," he said.
"Oh? Why?" I queried.
"Because according to the
aed n youndfell ee ventw t
everything Pindling said."
"We agreed with a great deal
Pindling said," I admitted,
"because he talked a lot of
sense. Most of the time he was
right up our alley and we
went along for the ride."
Apparently I said something
wrong.
My assailant almost lost his
dentures in thendeep freezefiht

him?" he spluttered
"On what?" I asked
(knowing that the FNM had
fought the PLP to a standstill
when they reached areas of
disagreement).
Perhaps you can guess his
reply. I could not and I was
left speechless when it came.
expOdn everythingn" he
I have been steadfastly
opposed to Independence
because I felt that our people
the rank and file of our
people -- were not ready for it.
At that moment - in the
inhospitable solitude of this

gsv ono y Ickne hw Sa l
of Tarsus felt on the road to
Damascus. I was struck by the
poignant realization that the
people of this country --not


only the unlettered people, but
the successful businessmen
who stride through a
super-market with bulging carts
Share not ready for

I thou etdis onsolately,orI
on fire with his business
acumen does not know the
facts of life, what about the
cheerful young man who packs
the bags at the counter and
holds his hand out for a
quarter?"
It was a frightening thought
lhar t paenodplem ste ted in
the highest echelons were being
herded into nationhood, which
they do not understand.
Now let us look at the
Independence Cosntitution.
The greater part of it was


Wednesday, January 31, 1973


Whe Grtbune


FNM legal adviser states case on Independence


III 'I I I










__


I

N TCEl




Inquiries and mail should be directed to Besco's
temporary office, phone 2-4230, and P. O. Box ES6208.
The Directors of Besco deeply regret any mnconvensence
in service and operation due to the recent fire which
totally destroyed the premises and stock.
Payments on account will be received at the old East
Street store, where the records are held.


NASSAU BICYCLE CO.
PHONE 2-8511


TRADERS BANK & TRUST LIMITED
(IN COMPULSORY LIQUIDATION)

Will the following persons kindly contact the
Lispidator, Second Floor, Bernard Sunley
Building, P. O. Box 14t91, Telephone 2-1976, in
connection with claims which, they may have
against the company.

A. B. C. Island Sales
Bahamas Investors Circle
Bain, Sheba
Basti'an, William C
Bonaby, Jocelyn
Brice, Sylvanis
Brown, Alfred
Brown, Alfred (In trust for Melvin Doty)
Brown, Mary A
Bullard, E. and/or Charles Smith
Carglill, Marcus
Carter, Clifford
Carter, Esther
Charlton, Marina
Clarke, Edith

aCur:y DAeel and/or Lottie Curry
Darling, Edgar and/or Dorene Darling
Darville, Basil Benson
Deveaux, Albert A.
Dorsett, Donald W.
Duncanson, Winston
Evans, Bernard
usdssle, Hugo
Henderson, Alfred T.
Henfleld, Doris
Higgs, Elamuel Caleb
Higgs, Paul S.
Knowles, Edmund Cyril
McDonald, Benson
McKenny, Evelyn
McPhee, Marilyn
McPhee, Oscar
Mackey, Hermon & Dorothy
Marshall, Moses
Miller, Gltadstone
Minns, Erskine and/or Lula Mae
Nairn, Leonard S.
aey evenc eand/or Alfred
Rolle, Livingston
Russell, Helen
Seymour, Monica
Taylor, George Dudley
Valsavie, Euriarice
Van e, Fr

Whitfield, Fred
Wilson, Beatrice
Woodside, Mary Jane
Zumburg, Remy

'Will any other person (depositor, shareholderor
other creditor) who considers that he has a valid

f natlly a itte by m li uidtor lso on seen
me at the above address.
SYDNEY MORRIS,
Liquidator'


SApplications are invited for the position of Local Ma~nager
Sof well-known Engineering Firm in Nassau. Appilcants must
be Bahamian, with minimum educational standard)
SEquivlalnt to Five "O" Levels or preferably ordinary
I national certificate in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering.
At least five year's engineering experience is essntial, and
( applicants must have sufficint commecrdal knowledge to
( anablethem to tlak charge of a sale & service organization
servingl the whole of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
I The successful applicant would be required to undergo a
) comprehensive training programme at the companies'
factories overseas in order to become fully conversant wuith
Sthe companies' products.
( Applicants without the full nenineering background a
g necessary, but with the potential and personality to enable
=them to successfully train for the position, will be(
1 considered.
SApply in own hand-writing to: Box No. DA3962 c/o The
STr~ibune, Nassau.


~BAHAMAS TELE COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION~


For DDD calls subscribers are rmrinded to dial 1 ~tollowed by areac code and seven digit ntanber.


Wednady, January 31, 1973.


Ubt: RE


the Foundation. On February
17 the annual Heart Ball will
be hdld in the Crown Ballroom
of the Paradise Island Hotel.
Drawing of the Heart Raffle
prizes will be held at the
Drumboat Club on March 8.
C-chairmen of the Heart
Raffle are Mrs. Alton Davis and
Mrs. Ernest Barnes.


Hanna Contract Cleaning Co.
A.I.U. Bahamas Limited are
donating a comprehensive
insurance policy on the car for
one year.
The Hearrt Raffle, which will
have ticket adlers all over town
during the month of February*
Heart Month, is one of the
major fund raising efforts by


A 1973 PONTIAC LeMANS
Sport Coope will be top prize
in the Heart Foundation's
raffle during the month of
February. The car was deonted
by Mr and Mrs. C.A.B. St
George and presented to Lady
Sassoon, chairman of The Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation, and Mrs.
Cleophus Adderley, chainman


of the Raffle Committee, on
Monday.
Second prize in the raffle
will be a Honda Motor Scooter
donated by Honda Sales and
Rentals. Third prize will be a
pair of round-trip tickets to
LuxemburL courtesy of
International Air Bahama and
fourth prize is a Vacuum
Cleaner deonted by Frank


LADY SASSOON, left, chairman of The Sir Victor
Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation and Mrs. Cleophas
Adderley launch Heart Month with thseannouncement of
the donation of a 1973 Pontiac LeMans Sport Coupe by
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. B. St. George as the top prize in the
Heart Raffle. Other prizesl include a Honda Motor Scooter,
a trip for 2 to Luxembourg and a Vacuum Cleaner.


THE JUNIOR Red Cross
Link at the Palmetto Point
Sc hool, Palmetto Point,
Eleuthera, has collected $105
for the Nicaraguan Relief.
Fund.
The children went around to
theb vious homes and paep
of residents.


Some of the children in the
Link who helped with the
collection were: Gayla Cooper,
Iva Johnson, Debbie Sands and
Gwendolyn Knowles.
Headteacher of the Palmetto
Point School is Mrs. Francis. J.
Da, who is also patron of the


The Corporation Li pleased to announce the introduction of Direct Distance Dialing facilities northbound
to Canada effective let February, 1973.

The.rates for this service of fer substantial savingeover rates for person to person traffic via BarTelCo
overseas operators.

For your information the following lisrt sets out the area codes, provinces, principal cities and rates to
Canada.


Prince ipal
City


Person to Person
neekday Su.


Area
Code


7.50
6.00
4.95
4.95
4.95


403
604
204
506
'709
403

902
416
5i19
613
705
807
902
418
514
819
306
403


Albebrta
British Colu~mbia
Manitoba
New Brunoswick
Nevioundland
North West Territories


Calgary
Vancouver
Winnitpeg
Maoncton
St. John's
District of
Mackenstie
Halifax
Toronto
St. Joseph-
Ottawa ~
Sudbury
Port Alrthur
Char lot tetown
Quebec City
Montreral
Sherbrooke ~
Saskatoon
Whiterhorse


$6.00

6.00





5.25
5.25

5.25


5.,25
5.25


6.00


$7.20
9.00
7.20
6.00
6.00
6.00

6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
7.20
9.60


$4.80
6.00
4.80

3.90
3.90

3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90


7.20


$ 9.00
11.25
9.00
7.50
7.150
7.150

7.i0
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.5i0
7.50
7.50
7.50
9.00
12.00


Nova Scotia
Ontario


6.95



4.95

4.95
4.95
4,9
6,0
8.40


Prinrce Edward Island
Quebec


Saskatchewan
Yukon


Pontiae LeManitaps Heart raffle prizes


DON'T WALK(!


Junior Red Cross aid quake


NOTICE


Provinces





IS A PLEASU5


U 50 ASi h ULB s Aa IURR O S ~01 W 0 HICKtORY SWEET
HINqUATES t .3 $ARE RIBS ,, .49 BACON le .99
DELTA 16 01. W 0. U 5 CHOICE 80HQOM U S CHOICE TOP
BATHROOM TISSUE uFR KS .89 ROUND ROAST re 1.79 ROUND STEAK to~ 1.69
SIRLOIN STE..AK 1.79 GROUND BEEF to.59 ROUND STEAK to 1.69
:~ 10IPCK O s rU.S CHOICE T 80NE 01 PORTERHOUSE U.S CHOICE SIRLOIN TIP WD 5 9 Ib AVG.



-- qUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED PRICES
* M----' IIORTONS GOODD FEDBRURY 1, THRU FEIBRUARY 3, 1973.
CHICKEN AND TURKEY
rv oln~r~s180Z SARA LEE
CHEESE CAKE 1.09
20 01 MORTON
QUAKER PE ,.8
GiRITS 24 01 tl ME
VEGEfTABrLES .69
4A BI IDE \
10 01. GREEN GIANT CREAMED
5L.PKGS. SPINAICH~~~~~~~~~~~2o 2,.99

08 MLR UT 0 BCCGAIIES
THE BA\H~mF\s LARGEST
BAHAMIAN9 GROWN AlnD mTost esmouBLsH ED
TOMATOES6 P~OOD STORES,P~IRST WITH
BA~H~miFnns since 1934.
T I~B~E~~B~JEWEL
~~~~M~SHORTEmING CARROTS .1 Ib. 4OR .9
GREEN
3 ~ ~~~~~~CABBAGIE to~~~~~~~~~~~~ .19
GRALPES to~~~~~~~~ .~~~~~s 68
LB,
AAII LB. NOS.3I.


e------.B & B 46 oz. CAN
TO MATO JUICE 2/99e
SUPERB RANWD mmemn
MALRGARINE SAWYER'S
8 LACK EYE EPcEA C


DINLh ROLLS~~~~2o 2..T
12-02 EID SMERIC0ll SLICED
1-LB. IN
!1 -GALLON (AggYESI 06g
quARTERS ORANGE JUIClE 1.19
PKGS.


14 01. MILK MAID 12 OZ. GRfHN GIANT NIBL;T 152 OZ. SAWYERS
MILK 3 On .79 CORN 3ro,,gg CUT OKRAI 210R .79
20 02. SAWIERS COLORED
1 LB, CA MAxw~tt HOUSE REGULAR OR GRINO 303 CANS GREEN GIANI TI S30 9
COFFEE 1.09 PEAS 310R .99 BAS3o.9
10-oz. SAWY ER CONCH 6 01. MANHATTAIN IUNIB0 303 CAINS SAIWYERS
CHOWDER 21an.75 PEANUTS 2tan.7g KIDNEY BEANHS 3,,,.99
61nT~1 01 BOU ArOu .
"g" (RGENT .99 ,0setclnno ,ng OAOSUE 2aT
STOKELEY Y.C. HALF or SLICE 100 8Z ANO B
JELL.IR AYER CU.55 PEACHES 303 CAN 2/76 feIT UIE 2o 7
12 02. tXETER 16 OMASWYfRS IC fUtf
J B AM .AYR UV~ai""" "' 65 CORNED BEEF ,69 SAUCE 2ron.188


Wednesday, January 31, 1973. Sb a~he r~thmr


LOWsO enAnt PRICE YL QLW1Eaam


RICE


0a1 s6


W.D. SMOKED
PI(ZNIC HAMS

itEFFECTIVE MON. FEB. 5th ALL CITY MARKET
iiSTORES EXCEPT LYFORD CAY WILL REMAIN
WEDNESDAY


~(;~
.,'` t'T~~i


OUR CITY MARKET STORE IN OAKES FIELD WILL
BE OPEN FOR BUSINESS EACH SUNDAY
MORNING FROM 7 a.mn. to 10 a.m. STARTING THIS
SUNDAY FEB. 4th.


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7"1~EL i


69LB









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_ ________ I__ ___


and show at Le Cabaret
Theatre, donated by Eugene
Barrett, Vice-President,
Paradise Island Ltd. Won by
ticket No 1195 Agnes
Dillett, Jerome Ave., Tel.
54616, P. O. Box 5701.
10th Prize Stone China
Tea Service for 8, donated by
GnetralN Hardware Mr Won bbt
tA. McMillan, 8 Tedder Close.
Ilth Prize Dinner for two
at Le Cafe Martinique, donated
y Eugene a rrett,
Vice-President, Paradise Island
Ltd. Won by ticket No 2401
St.,HP. O Blos N 165.24By
12th Prize Sunbeam
Electric Frypan with Lid,
donated by Maura Lumber
Won by ticket No 3511 -
Capt. Tyrone Bass, Rolle
Town, Exuma.
13th Prize --Extra Special
Prize A tour package to Walt
Disney World for 2 persons,
courtesy of Eastern Airlines -
Won by ticket No .1546
Phillippa Hilton (six years old)
Highbury Park.
14th Prize --2 Spanish
ensdona odn ty case Ni
3778 - Anthony White.
15th Prize - Terrestial
Sad rd o ,ming Wn b
ticket No 3676 Mrs. Paul
Cdol


---- -f .~


announces its
DAILY CHARTER FLIGHT SCHEDULE
to the Out Islands starting Feb.1Ist
FLIGHT SCHEDULE DEPART ARRIVE FREQUENCY

WIIfA t RI~II C~Y9:00 a.m. 9:25 a.m. DAI LY
5:45 p.m. 6: 10 p.m. DAI LY
$30 round trip fare (.xe.,r Fri.a Sun.)
9:40 a.m. 10:25 a.m. DAILY
Il~ll~fE UI to MSISI 6:20 p.m. 7:20 p.m. DAl LY
(except Fri. & Sun.)

MilEII l Y~to l IIIll 9:00 a.m. 9:50 a.m. DAI LY
$30roud tip are 5:45 p.m. 6:40 p.m. DAILY
$30 oundtri f ae cxc.,< Fr. a sun.)

guanual tom use0 ps" 1 DAIL
"Contact Alice Smith Phone 2644 -- Marsh Harbour,, (except Fri. & Sun.)
I1~1II t IIII ~l10.00 a.m. 10:25 a.m. DAl LY
~ir o~d rifae4.00 p.m. 4:25 p.m. eceD IL& u.

Irr lMMIMMs~ 10:0 a.m. 1 13 a.m. DA .Y
"Contact Ted (Kinky) Allen in Tarpum Bay., (except Fri. & Sun.)
IIMI t II ELrmfll10:00 a.m. 10:55 a.m. DAILY
$21roud tip are 4:00 p.m. 4:55 p~m. DAl LY
$21 oundtripfare(except Fri. & Sun.)


"Contact N*Ille Albury in Lower Bogue,,' (except Fri. & Sun.)
FOR RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION CALL: 77872 POINCIANA TOURS


.~ 1I t1C
SHOES WE RE $21.95-NOW $13.99
ENGLISH SUITING MATERIAL -- PRICE





EAST ST. OFF BAY ST. PHONE 248g39


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Wednealey, January 31, 1973.


AT RED CROSS BALL
SHIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR of the Bahamas,
SSir John Paul (2nd from right) and Lady Paul (far right)
enjoy a chat with the Hon. Milo Butler (left) and Mrs.
SButert and Sen. Gerald Cash, President of the Senate,
Sduring cocktals, prior to dining in Le Chandelle Ballroom
Sat the Halcyon Balmoral Hotel during the Red Cross Bail
Held at the hotel on Saturday.
) MENTfAL HEALTH AGM TOMORROW
STHE BAHAMAS Mental at 8 p.m. tomorrow at
fHealth Association will hold its Teac~hers Training College.
.annual general meeting Reports of the committee
(which is open to the public will be read and election
t officers will take slarce.


*. I


the
ees
of


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~ Irsi
aLY


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LADY PAUL, w~ife of the
Governor, drew the prize
winning tickets for the raffle in
aid of the Bahamas Red Cross
at the annual ball held this year
at the Halcyon Balmoral Hotel.
Winner of a special prize
courtesy of Eastern Airlines
was six-year old Phillippa
Hilton of Highbury Park. The
pr i snaey Worlpd, a won wih
ticket number 1546.
The First prize, two return
tickets, Nassau/Mexico City on
Pan Am, with accommodations
at a first class hotel, donated
1s'th tiken:= =e 00 4,w b
Miss Mizpah Johnson of the
Halcyon Balmoral Hiotel.
Following are the remaining
prize winning ticket numbers
and names. Prizes can be
claimed by calling Lady
Prescott at 77826.
2nd Prize Two Return


Tickets Nassau/Luxembourg,
donated by International Air
Bahama Won by Ticket No
3564 Wm. F. Burton.
3rd Prize --T. V. Set
20-inch screen, donated by
Taylor Industries Won by
ticket No 2290 Mr. G;. Hart,
Nassau Beach Hotel.
4th Prize Gift Voucher,
Wonny t cket o oql76 Mrs.
Della Davis, Ranfurly Home,
Box NI413.
5th Prize Two Return
Tickets to Treasure Cay with


Minimax is a trading name of
Chubb Fire Security Llinited


20" 0



IllSW ~R
BULKY KNIT and REGULAR
LADIES', MEN'S, BOYS & GIRLS!

BUY( & SAVE


A fileL S 1. Good Store
228 Bay St. -- Phone 2-2943


DC 2.2 DRY CHEMICAL


two days hotel accommodate.
ion, donated bo[ Obt sakned
2735 H. Hepburn, c/o Mrs.
Dana. Lyford Cay. .
6th Prize A week for two
at Honeymoon Cottage, Cutlas
Bay Club, Cat Island, donated
by Brig. Gen. James Frew -
Won by ticket No 2109 Sean
Gaitor, Tel. 34422, Box 1585.
7th Prize Two return
tickets to Marsh Harbour with
two days hotel accommoda-
tion, donated by Out island
Airways Won by ticket No
0533 Darnell Johnson
Iprial Park, Tel. 42705 or
8th Prize --Two Return
tickets to Freeport, donated by
Fak ngo oAirwy Wo a
Burrows.
9th rize- Diner or wo.


fire extinguisher
FOR HOUSE CAR BOAT
ALSO FROM STOCK FOR
IMMEDIA TE DELIVER Y
CO2 Extinguishers 2-LB up
Dry Chemical 7 10 25 LB.
Water 2 Gallon


Worms in the body can make children and
adults weakr, thin and irritable. De Witt s
Wr yru ink 5 out woms so
they pass right out of the body.
alsy-to-follow instructions with every
,bottle. Get some today. I


LTD.
TEL. 3-6441/2


P.O. Box N-4688 Narssu, Bahamas.


i j


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e siW We thus


List of Red Cross raffle prize winners


B AHAMYAS


GASES
CABLE: 'BIG' NASSAU.


THE ESQUQIRE SHOP'S BARGAIN BASEMENT


POINCIANA


TOUR S










Wedndesy, Janluary 31, 1973.


Cabbag es plentif ul


-- and inexpensive


BWI, Qrthant t




II ~i IroE)


CABBAGE is coming in
nicely at the Potter's Cay
aeu om ca ante ,Orang s
good supply.
pumprs imooco nutspapse
thyme. There are green
peppers, lettuce and
cucumbers.
Grapefruit and potatoes
are in abundance.

cook in boiling, salted water
until just tender. Drain well. In
a saucepan, melt six
tablespoons of butter and mix
in a tablespoon each of vinegar
and sugar. Add salt and pepper
to taste. Add the cabbage and
cook over lo~w heat for 10
minutes.
This recipe for cabbage rolls
is excellent as an
accompaniment for ham. Make
a crepe batter by combining
one-and a-half cups sifted flour
with two-and-three-quarters
milk, four eggs, three
tablespoons each of rum and
heavy cream. Add half a
teaspoon salt. Beat the batter
until smooth, strain it, and
chill overnight.
Heat a 10-inch skillet and
butter it. Pour in three
tablespoons of the crepe batter
and tilt the pan to let the
batter form a thin film over the
bottom. Cook until brown,
turn it and cook the other side.
Lift out gently. Keep warm in
a low oven and cook the rest of
the crepes. The batter should
make about 18.
Make a cabbage filling.
Quarter a cabbage and steam it
in four tablespoons water for
15 minutes until tender. Drain
the cabbage well and chop


BACK B)Y POPULAR DEMAND


DEAR LONELY: Girls are not fish and yea're no fish-
erman, so forget the body chemistry theoryt. Quit thinklag
about what yea lackr and start making small1 talk with anyr
girl yea dig wpho's handy. If she doesn't dig yea, maybe she
can dig up a friend who does. You sound like a bright
young man. Now get going.




WANTED
1 wo Cashiers to work in the Cashiers Cage of'
the Casino
Minimum educational requirement -High
School Graduate
Some banking or accounting experience
preferred but not absolutely essential
SHours six shifts (8 hours each) per week.
8.00 p.m. - 4.00 a.m.
Interesting opportunity for persons with
initiative and ambition.
-- Salary to be commensurate with expenence
-Applicants are requested to submit by
February 15, 1973, in
Applicants are requested to submit by
February 15, 1973, in their own handwriting, all
pertinent background information on themselves
including two personal references, all previous
employers and business experience
Eligible applicants will be contacted for personal
interviews.

Letters of application are to be forwarded to the
Director of Security, Paradise Island Casino,
P. O. Box N.3707, Nassau, Bahamas.


Ir~ur~)rrluCInr i~~lr~rl1/ I


ONE OF THE MOST VALUABLE W'INIR .egetables in the
Bahames and worldwide is the cabbage. n the United States
alone, over 140,000 acres of agricultural land are devoted to
satisfying the nation's "cabbage" tooth. In- the Bahamas,
l~audreds of cabbages come into the Produce aechnge each
winter and now Ji the time to enjoy this inexpenrsive, de~cion
and verstile vegetabe.
Cabbage belongs to the nasturitum and candytuft in
mustr dais y rn ta long the earden flower r naed n
Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, Europe, probably Greece, and
r 1 sh, arustk rabibr cc e esoamies om Ta d Iusthaerd-like
vegetable line, alyssum, hundreds of verities grown


finely. In a saucepan, melt two
tablespoons butter. Add two
tablespoons flour and cook
stirring for two minutes. Add a
cup of chicken stock and cook
until theesacuc has ttu ke eda

pepper.
one read some 11th ai n
place in a baking dish. Pour a
cup of sour cream over the
crepes and bake them at 325
degrees for 20 minutes.
Try this creamy cabbage
casserole. Cut small cabbage
into quarters and cook in salt
water for 15 minutes. Drain
and cut into thin strips.
Arrange a layer of cabbage in
an oven-proof dish. Pour over
the layer some white sauce
and a half a cup of grated
Gruyere cheese. Season with
salt and pepper. Continue the
layering of cabbage, sauce and
cheese ending with the cheese.
Top with a cup of buttered
bread crumbs and a quarter
cup Parmesan cheese. Bake at
375 for 20 minutes until the
top has browned.
When making a stuffed
cabbage, care must be taken
that the cabbage does not lose
its shape. Cut the centre
portion from a large cabbage.
Tie strings around the cabbage
and cook it in salted water to
cover for 40 minutes. Drain the
cabbage and remove the
strings. Keep it warm
For the filling, mash six
medium potatoes. Add salt and
pepper, a little nutmeg, four
tablespoons butter, half a cup
of sour cream and enough milk
to make the potatoes light and
fluffy. Stir in a quarter cup of
minced green onions.
Fill the cabbage cavity with
the potato filling and transfer
the cabbage to a serving
dish.
Our final cabbage recipe is a
simple but excellent one. Cook
four strips of bacon until crisp.
Drain and reserve both the
bacon and the bacon fat.
Coarsely chop one cabbage and
cook for 10 minutes. Drain
well and return to the pan,
Add a coarsely chopped onion,
a third of a cup sugar, and salt
and pepper. Cook over low
heat tightly covered* for a few
minutes. Reheat the bacon fat
and add two-thirds of a cup of
vinegar. Bring to a boil, stir in
the cabbage and let it stand for
dish rm ble th aso rvi
sprinkle the bits on top of the
cabbage.



APPOINT ME TS
MR. DONALD Mervin Pratt
former senior out island
Commissioner, has been
appointed to the post of acting
oepuy rmndirectr dquocal
effective January 1.
His appointment was
announced by the Minister of
Home Affairs, who also said
that Mr. Wellington Ferguson,
deputy director Immigration,
Freeport, has been temporarily
appointed to the post of acting
deputy director Local
Government, Freeport,
effective February 5.
Mr. Pratt was appointed an
Out Island teacher in 1949 and
served in that capacity until
1959 when he was appointed
an Out Island Commissioner.
He was posted to various
districts in the Out Islands
including Cat Island, San
Salvador, Crooked Island and
EMm. ratt attended courses in
public administration held
locally for senior' public
officers from 1967 to 1968.
In September 1969 he was
promoted to the post of senior
Out Island Commissioner,
As the post of director Local
government Headquarters is
vacant, Mr. Pratt will be in
tmeallcharge ofof Lohe
Government and will be
responsible to the permanent


secretary of Home Affairs for
the administration of the
department of Local
Government.
Mr. Ferguson will be acting
temporarily as deputy director
un adsueh tme sa su rteaenT
replacement can be found for
Mr. Stafford Gomez, the
present holder of the post, who
is being transferred to the
Ministry of Works.
Mr. Virginius A. Knowles,
wvho held the post of Chief out
Island Commissioner, has been
retired from the public service
by virtue of an abolition of
tat ostrby a recent act of the


worke w le.
Thire are only 40 calories in
one :up of cooked cabbage and
as well as being good for the

cabge frdeentt ies ias ber
given credit as a cure for
drunke nte andr Irangove s

Egyptians made it a habit to
eat some cabbage before going
to a feast. Even today, many
people still gulp cabbage the
morning after to get rid of the
night before.
Cabbage is a very versatile
vegetable and can be used to
make many excellent dishes.
WITH BACON
Bacon bits add a special
taste to this cabbage dish.
Shred one head of cabbage
finely. Melt three tablespoons


Pregnant girl doesn t

know where to turn

By Abigail Van Buren
o sm m cassae rnmIIJ. v. unew swee, er.
DEAR ABBY: I am 19, rad am pregnant nearly five
months. I am not trying to make excuses for myself be-
cause I know I was foolish, tmt I rally thought I was ta
love.
I dropped out of coiege because I was so worried I
wasn't eating or sleeping, and I couldn't make my gades.
I can't tell my parents what's wrong with me because i
would kill my mother. My father thinks I am lawy, andl he
beat me twice last week with a belt. My legs are all black
and blue.
I have been living on tea and coffee and know I. should
be seeing a doctor, but I can't go to our family doctor
because he would tell my parents.
I don't have a penny to my name and don't know where
to turn. Please tell me if there is a home for unwed moth
ers near here. I'll walk there ifI have to.
IN TERRIBLE TROUBLE
DEAR IN: Please sed me your name sad address sat
eace. I am sure I can help yea.

DEAR ABBY: I have an aunt who always edled me
her "favorite niece," and she is getting on in yars. She
tokI me many times she wanted me to have her diamond
ring, which is valued at $10,000. She said she wanted me to
have it while she is still living and cia see me enjoy
wearing it. [I am 33 and married.]
Well, a few weeks ago she got this ring out of her
safety deposit box sad asked me to come to her hous so
she could give! it to mp.
I came, and she told me how much abe loved me and
she gave it to me. We both cried, and I klased her and she
put it on my finger.
The next day she called my mother raving and cream-
ing that her ring ~was "missing" sad she said I had visite
her the day before and she "showed me" the ring, and rsh
is sure I took it!
My mother called her lawyer and asked him wrhat to
do, and he said that he would have to "study" the case
because he had never had anything lke this in his practice
before.
In the meantime, I'm afraid I'll~ bearsted if I keep
the ring, and can't prove she gave it to me. It's my word
against my aunt's. Please tell me what to do. I 118* the
rla -bt not that much. BEWILDERED DIN 'lEAS
DEAR BEWILDERED: If I wer yea 1 wokld reters
the ring at eace. Yeas mat is obvisualy distrbed. ShauM
she have a change of heart and waat to give yes te riag,
don't accept it lnless she provides yes with wrrities pre
that she has GIVEN It to yes

DEAiR ABBY: ITbL is cncen the lasrand who ds-
turbed the entire neighborhood by booking his born early
every morning as a fareweHl signal to his wife.
My husband and I have a little farewerll Foutlae wrhe
he lseves for work every morning at 3:31 a. m.
I flip the porth lights off and on a few times, and he in
turn flashes his headlights off Pad on. That way we don't
bother anybody. W. SI'H ST., SIOUX CITY, IA.
DEAR W. RTH: Thabt's alce. I hope you do't have any
assy slgbhbors who figur it's a signl that year hushead
just left rad the coast is learr.

DEAR ABBY: I am a 19-year-old male and in college. I
have yet to discover the formula for finding a girl friend. I
ask girls out to sports events, movies, walks, or anything,
and have a refusal rate of about 99.71. The other 0.3 per
cent agree so they won't hurt my feellpgs.
I know I amn not very good-looking, and I have Ilitle
money, but I see other guys who aren't good-looking with
little mone and they ave gIr frie ds, so it must be me.
divorced and there were five children and I lacked affee-
tion, which I am sure has something to do with my eager-
ness to make up for it now. I find extraordinary pleasure at
any chance physical contact with another person, which is
rare and only by accident.
Maybe it has something to do with my body chemistry,
something in line with my inability to catch a fish. I've
heard that a fish will not touch bait which has been pre-
pared by a person with a certain characteristic body chem-
isrtry.


butter in a saucepan. Add the
shredded cabbage and a little
water. Cook covered over low
heat for about five minutes
until the cabbage is tender,
Dice five strips of bacon and
cook until brown. Remove the
bits with a slotted spoon and
drain. In the same pan, saute
one bunch of chopped green
onions until just tender. Stir in
the cabbage, mix well, then
add the bacon bits. Season
with pepper.
Cabbage does well at a
barbecue. Cut a cabbage into
wedges and place on a large
square of aluminum foil. Bring
the foil up around the sides
and dot the cabbage with
butter and a few tablespoons
cream. Complete the covering


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TONY SEYMOUR



THE NITEBEATERS




BRITANNIA BAR

Monday Sund y


Off TuesdayB

7.30p~m. l~a.an.


of the wedges with the foil and
secure the edges tightly. Place
the packages about four inches
over the coals and gril; them
for an hour.
Here is a simple one with an
interesting flavour. Cut a head
of cabbage into qats n


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Kellogg's C
Dettol (No
Glade Air F
Cold Power
Emery Cor
Jew*I Shorr
Maxwell He
Libby's Sp
Wesson Oil
Hatuey Mal


Imily Napkins 3 for
sardines 5 for
Ir 5 lbs.
st Whole Corn 3 for
;ue (double) 2 pks.
orn Flakes 12 ozs. 2 for
.16)
Freshener (all flavours)
SDetergent (king)
ned Beef (12 ozs.)
tening (3Ibs.)
house Instant Coffee 12 ozs.
aghetti & Meat Balls (15 ozs.)
24 ozs.
lt Tonic (6 pks)


69c
89c
59
86ic
85c
89c
$1.19
69c
$1.65
89c
09c
1.99
2 for 89c
89c
$1.29


LB .85e 111
11511
FRESH CUI UP CHICK(ENS riggg

LB 750 111

CeOMISII 8 A E HEHS

-A C . .. .

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LOINELY GUY


Any suggestions?


BABI SPARE RIBS Kleenex Fa
Silver Sea S


IANISH8) PORK LOIN ROAST mn Delsey Tiss


VALLEY DALE PICNIC IIAMS LII 658















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BA HAMTIAHN
SUPERMARKETS
If it s value you really want,
you really want Super Valuel


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK ENDING FEBRUARY 1ST.
THROUGH FEBRUARY 4TH, 1973.


scoon Paper Towels
C IHill, n R HR ORANGE -GRAPE
* ~FRISKIES DOS FOOD CHICKEN-

LIBBY'S MIXED VEGETABLES

., MT COCKTAIL


.00

.95

.80


8-o,


Per Ib

Per Ib

Per Ib


8-o


1.

1.2

1.1

.8

1.1


Per lb

Per lb


.9


Per Ib


1.20


.7


4 Roll Pack


Per lb


WIZAR-BOUGUET- LILAC LEMON MIST- BATHROOM
WIZID- AMERICAN BEAUTY -LILY OF VALLEY 9 oz Save 20c .Q


.15


Per Ib


20-oz


ss...


160's


.SS


Big Roll


s-o.


* *a

4.8S


46-oz


MEAT LIVER 15-oz Save 39c


MAXI CUPS 1-Ib Pak


16-oz

16-m


2.9

3.9


V2-lb


1.00


ni-o=


3-lb Bags


10o. .70 FLORIDA LIMES


10/.00


.1


6-oz


EACH


1.48


.85


24-oz


I )
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SLICED BACON
CHOPPED HAM

BEAASILAMI


U.S. CHOICE

U.S CHOICE

U.S. CHOICE



U.S. CHOICE
$1EW IEEF
U.S. CHOICE
1101 MII CH~
ENGLISH


NORTHERN
BATHROOM TISSUE


S~LTBEEF


HUNTS TOMATIO KE TCHUP

Spaghetti & Meat Balls
NORTHERN PIE AWN


50s Mi 9


I"


Say. 1o .


2.8


AIMERICAN CHEESE

CINNAMON ROLLS


,,,,2 9


9-oz .


FERN LEAF
BUTTER


Save 27c 3/ Q


*gg 9


BEEF BINNERS


RED DELICIOUS
.70 APPLES


CHOCOLATE ECLAIRS


RED PUNCH

8881EB SIRIMP

LIMA BEANS


2. 9


ICEBERG LETC





rurrrt- 3'~CL~C~S~
c-.R.3'


ween..any. annuary as_ 19on a


1~


-1:


"SPECIALS GOOD AT ALL STORES"


'"r****..


Wessonl
OIL


Gallons


5.49


rr
~t
:9:


ADDITIONAL PRODUCT LINES
... WITH SPACIOUS ISLES.


r OF FAMOUS BRAND NAMES.


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EXPANDED PRODUCE SECTION.


AiCKEt) SHELVES.


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II'
2:;


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L. "
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ENLARGED MEAT DISPLAY.


ADDITIONAL CHECK-OUT COUNTERS.


Four Roses

EVAR MLK



5/99


ri a ;L'
'
'' 1:i


COME IN... AND MEET THE MANAGERS OF OUR NEWLY REMODELLED STORE:
WESLEY PERCENT Assistant Store Manager. DEXTER THOMPSON~


$ty 9r thun


Wlcomne t the 1%wly Renw~




BLU HILLS UP ER


GQlobe &
Brunswick
SAR DIN ES


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--~~~~ -* --~


1





NOTICE OF SITTING OF THE PORT AUTHORITY
TO CONSIDER APPLICATIONS FOR LICENCES
UNDER

THE BOAT REGISTRATION ACT (CHAPTER 289)
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of the Port Authority for the Island of New
Providence will be held at the Port Office on Thursday Ist February, 1973 at 3:00
p.m. for the purpose of granting licences under The Boat Registration Act.
Chapter 289.

Any person entitled and wishing to object to any application should do so at least
six (6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his objection in writing to
the Board of the Port Authority, Nassau and by forwarding a copy of the objection
to the applicant.

The undermentioned persons have applied for a grant of the licence specified
bd ow.

Name and Address Name and Class of Licence
of Applicant Description of Vessel Applied for


"Staniel Cay E~xpress ~ A
76' Motor Vessel


MORE ON PAGE 11.


L_


anda nday January]


Robert H. Symonette,
P. O. Box N-1216,
Nassau. Bahamas.
George R. Pearce,
P. O. Box N-595
Nassau, Bahamas.
Robert W. Bolderson,
P. O. Box 5749,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Gerald W. Hefty,
P. O. Box 5536,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Cyril D. Joffre,
Nepco Towing Co.,
Freeport, G~rand Bahama,
Bahamas.
Elridge Maycock,
Talbot St. West
Nassau, Bahamas.
Charles Sweeting,
P. O. Box 72,
Spanish Wells,
Bahamas
Theodore Knowles,
P. O. Box 5693
Nassau. Bahamas.
William L. Albury,
P. O. Box N-3711i,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Preston Sands,
Spanish Wells,
Bahamas.
John A. Peterson,
P. O. Box 458,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Eu tae N.Ithmcanson,
Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Frank D.1 Ioss,
P. O. Box 865,
Nassau, Bahamas.

U.O Bo n5417,
Nassau, Bahamas

eardh H rbor
Abaco, Bahamas.

mTnkinW. Pickstock,
Andros. Bahamas.

Spans Wel ide,
Bahamas.
Roy O. Lockhart,
P. O. Box N-7094,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Reubin S. Knowles,
P. O. Box 'SO44, i-
Nassau, Bahamas.
Eugene Kelly,
P. O. Box 5230,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Charles Gardiner,
Blue Hill,
Turks Island.
Hershall R. Albury,
P. O. Box N-756,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Patrick W. Turnquest,
P. O. Box 5438,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Cecil Smith,
P. O. Box 5457
Nassau, Bahamas.
Chester L. A. Turnquest,
c/o P. O. Box 2128 G.T",
Nassau, Bahamas.
Garth B. Albury,
P. O. Box 35,
Spanish Wells,
Bahamas.

Alfred Roberts,
General Delivery,Nassau, Bahamas.

George Saunders,
Johnson Road,
Nassau, Bahamas
David Moss,
P. O. Box N-865,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Bramwell E. Roberts,
Spanish Wells,
Bahamas .

Sam Parker,
General Delivery,Nassau, Bahamas.

David W. Lowe,
Green Turtle Cay,
Abaco, Bahamas.
Frank Clarke,
P. O. Box 5693,
Nassau, Bahamas

Eugene S. Wells,
Nassau Yacht Haven,
P. O. Box 5963,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Jerry Lweless,
P. O. Box 5693,
Nassau. Bahamas.
Henry William Smith,
P. O. Box N-3709
Nassau, Bahamas.


"No Name"
7' Paddle Boat
"No Name"
10' G~lasshopper

1' Dry
"No Name"
13'6" Boston Whaler
"Untamed"
17' Boston Whaler
"Carmen"
53W 'Tug



Barge "AS I5"
195' Barge/Lighter

I5 eBar / ~ghter
Barge "BL254"
195' Barge/Lighter
"Free ort I"
441' Passenger Vessel


Derek W. Clare,
P. O. Box 5210,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NP: 1354 Diamond Crystal
Salt Company
Long Island,
Bahamas.








NP: 1352 Freeport Cruise Lines,
Nassau, N. P.,
Bahamas .


NP: 1295 Rolly Grey,
P. O. Box N-4209,
Nassau, N. P.,
Bahamas.
NP:2196 Alfred Johnson,
Nassau, N. P.,
Bahamnas.
NP: 1322 Franklyn Clarke
GeneralNDe~livery,

Bahamas.
NP:1t227 Theophilus Knowles,
P. O. Box 8562,
Nassau, Bahamnas
NIP:4194 Edward Johnson.
Nassau, N. P.Bahamas
SNP:2199 George C. Pratt,
Nassau, N.P,
Bahamas.
NP: 1126 Jerry Hefty,
P. O. Box 5536
Nassau. Bahamas
NP: 1236 Spanish Wells Shipping C
Spanish Wells
Bahamas.
NP. 1191 Gary Roberts Limited,
a.O. Box N-371 i ,
Nssau. Baamas.
NP: 1217 Noel Roberts, Ltd.,
P. O. Box N-3711,
Nassau~, Bahamas.
NNP: 1308 A. C. L.Limited,
P. O. Box N-865,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP: 1309 Joel Moss,
Golden Gates Estate,
P. O. Box 5044,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP:2115 Cecil Smith,
P. O. Box 5457,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP: 1315 Michael Cartwright,
Nassau, N.P.,
Bahamnas.
NP: 1345 C. N. Williams,
P. O. Box N-1059,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP:2148 Reubin S. Knowles,
P. O. Box 5044
Nassau. Bahamas
NP: 1161 Eleuthera Limited,
Nassau, N.P.,
Bahamas.
NP: 1189 Church Bay Ltd.,
P. O. Box 1505,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP: 1243 Neptune Lane Ltd.,
Nassau. N.P.,
Bahamas.
NP: 1338 Venture Navigation Co.,
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
Bahamas .
NP: 1254

NP: 1328 Genelois Ltd.,
L. E. Sawyer,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP:2145 Eugene Kelly,
P. O. Box 5230,
Nassau, N.P.,
Bahamas .
NP:2129

NP:2138 James Strachan,
P. O. Box 3133,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP: 1362 Colony Sport-Fishing
& C~ha ter merie,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP:4114 Bayshore Marina Ltd.,
P. O. Box 5453.
Nassau, Bahamas.
NP: 1263 Bahamtas Towing Co.,
P. O. Box N-4669,
Nassatu, Bahamas.


NP~: 1250 Robert V. Bolderson,
P. O. Box 5749,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NP:45 17 DereK W. Cleare
P. O. Box 5210,
Nassau, Bahamas


"Sea Angel"
23' Boat

"Maria Tia"
45' Boat


"Sea View"
23' Boat


RENEWALS GREAT HARBOUR CAY
BERRY ISLAND BAHAMAS
AD:6046 Great Harbour Cay, "Miss Doc
Service Limited '22' Boat
Great Harbour Cay,
Berry Island.


littlee.


o.


"Tamboo 1
Open Out Board
"Tamboo 2',
15' Open Out Board
"Tamboo 3"
15' Open Out Board
"Tamboo 4"
15' Open Out Board


NEW APPLICA'
Universal Alco Ltd.
1001 North American Way
Dodge Island
Miami, Florida.
Freedomn Shipping Co.,
P. O. Box 1146,
Nassau, Bahamas.
John A. McKinney,
P. O. Box 6339,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Geographic Shipping
Company Limited,
clo Higgs & Johnson
Attorney-At-Law,
P. O. Box N-3247,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Ship's School Association
of Canada Inc.,
c/o Higgs & Johnson
Attorney-At-Law'
P. O. Box N-3247'
Nassau, Bahamas.
Patrick Maycock, .
Mackey Street,
General D~elivery,
Nassau. Bahamas.
Arnold Fowler,
Mastic Point,
Andros. Bahamas.
John Newton,
Lowe Sound,
Andros, Bahamas.
Anthony C. Farrington,
P. O. Box N-1028,
Nassau, Bahamas.
RENEWA

Roger W. Carrol,
P. O. Box 5674,
Mackey Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
William R. Sweeting,
Man-O-War Cay,
Abaco, Bahamas


"No Name"
4-14' Fibreglass
TIONS NEW PROVIDENCE
"Irwin I l"
203' Motor Less Barge


BAHAMAS


"New Day"
164 Motor Vessel

"Skylarking"
35' Sportsfisherman

"Canada Goose 1"
125' Schooner


"Canada Goose l"
125' Schooner


"Bahamian Gal"
18' Boat


"Tejana 11l"
I 12' Motor Vessel

"Madam Elizabeth"
70' Motor Vessel


"Sea Spray"
28' Motor Sailer

~LS MASTERS LICENCES
NEW PROVIDENCE


Willi G. Letters'
35 Wynford Crescent,
Don Mills.
Ontario. Canada.
Jeremiah Gibson,
P. O. Box 7859'
Nassau, Bahamas.
Alphonsa Bowe,
P. O. Box N-3711i,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Kelvin A. Wilson
P. O. Bo xl 374 '
Nassau, Bahamas.

Clifo Box N- 005
Nassau, Bahamas.
Theophilus A. Knowles.
P. O. Box N-8562,
Natssau, Bahamas.
Ralph Gray,
Staniel Cay.
Exuma, Bahamas
John S. Pintard,
P. O. Biox N-37 I1,
Nassau. Bahamas.
Livinlgstone Taylor,
Simms Long Island,
Long Island,
Bahamas.
Lasardo E. Moxey,
P. O. Box 1974,
Nassau, Bahamnas.
Herbert A. Smith,
P. O. Box 2260,
Nassau, Bahamas.


"I Purchase"
17' Boat
"Morning Glory II"
50' Glass Bottom Boat

"Leilani"
52' Cruising Boat

"Nassau Moon Glow"
72' Shrimper Hull

"Gary Roberts"
1 12' Sub-Chaser

"Noel Roberts"
120' Native Built Boat

"Bahama Trader"
90' Local Built Boat

"Eastern Charriot"
14' Boat



"White Wing"
36' Boat

"Pilgram"
42' Boat

"San Salvador Express"
11 l' Steel

"lowna"
18' Boat

"Offshore"
76' Twin Screw

"Church Bay"
87' Boat

"Sandcraft"
152 Barge

"Holly"
I 18' Motor Vessel



Sealane"
175' Motor Vessel
"Genelois"
38' CIris-Craft


"Captain Kid"
20' Sailing Sloop


"Cutie K 1,,
21' Sloop
"Mona A"
28' Glass Bottom Boat


Sarah Lee"
45' Sportfisherman


No Name


"Mako i"
52' Steel Hull-Tug


"Mako 1l"
65' Steel Hull-Tug
"Nymph Errant I1"
55' Cutter


"No Name"
2-13' Sail Boat

"No Namne"
2-8' Paddle Boat
"No Name"
8' Paddle Boat


Whr WrtbHMt











Wednesdy January 31, 1973.


NOW V


FOR RESERVATIONS:
Call Your Travel Agent or
In Freeport Canl 352-2376
In Miami Call 871-3331
Anywhere in the State of Florida Call Toll Free 1-800-432-1238

Rodney A. Hanna, Al
P. O. Box F-2580,
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.
Deweese Pi~nder, A
P. O. Box N-3217,
Nassau, Bahamas.
NEW APPLICATIONS MASTER LICENCES
NEW PROVIDENCE

Wendal A. Nesbitt, A
Bluff Eleuthera,
Eleuthera, Bahamas.
Whitney H. Clarke, A
Sandy Point,
Abaco. Bahamas.
Anthony C. Farrington. A
P. O. Box N-1028,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Sidney Sau he B


Arnold Fowler.
Mastic Point, A
Andros Bahamas.
Sidney Smith, B
P. O. Box 5230,
Nassau, Bahamas

Brent Curry, A
P. O. Box N-8164,
Nassau, Bahamnas.

Billy S. Thompson. A
Marsh Harbour,


Aab A. Shtr achalan, A
P. O. Box 3133,
Nassau, Bahamas
Signed: L. H. FLOWERS.
Acting Port Director.

DATED I Ith. January, 1973.


I


t'


*

* *

. .




a


. .

gI 1I g *


~


~ew marina opens in Exumi
STANIEL CAY, Exuma Prime Minifstr Lynden O.
Pindling predicted the building of 20 to 25 new wsmll
marina sas he officially opened the new Happy People
Marina on this small island in the mid-Exumas. Attending
the opening ceremonies at the weekend from the right sar;
Capt. Freddle Brown, former member of the Hours of
Assembly for the area, Mrs. PIndling, Mrs. Vernice Cooper.
Immediately behind the Prime Minister is Kenneth Rolle,
one of the ownesn and operators of the marina. Standing
are George Smith, member of the House of Assembly for
the area, alnd Out island Commissioner Patrick Dorsett.
PHOTO: Howard Glass

HAITIAN SLOOP RESCOED


AN UNIDENTIFIED
Haitian sloop with several
passengers on board was towed
into Black Point, Exuma
Tuesday afternoon by the
motor vessel Black Point
Queen, which went to its
rescue after learning that the
sloop was adrift.
Bahamas Air Sea Rescue
Association officials today said


that the Haitian sloop became
disabled after its mast was
broken about five miles
southwest of Black Point,
Exuma .
The discovery was made by
police flying over the area in a
plane. All persons aboard the
vessel are safe at Black Point.
BASRA said.


SOUT..WAST

AIRLINES

FREEPORT ADS FRTE LDERDALE
DIRECT NON STOP SERVICE


Freeport to Ft.
DEPART
11:00 A.M.
4:30 P. M.


Lauderdale
ARRIVE
11:40 A.M.
5:10 P. M.


Ft. Lauderdale to Freeport
DEPART ARRIVE
9:25 A.M. 10:05 A.M.
1:35 P.M. 2:15 P. M.


ONE WAY FARE $20.00












~ ar ~r r--------


EARN FULL PAY WHILE
LE WARNING A SPECIALITY
It pays to specialize! And IBM will pay you while you train
to become a Customer Engineer. It's your chance to get
started in one of today's fastest growing areas of
Electronics.
As a Customer Engineer, you'II install and maintain the
Latest IBM Data Processing Equipment. It's a demanding
job. One requiring intelligence and skill. You'ti receive
continuous training to update your knowledge.
If you have what it takes, you can be promoted to a
position or even greater responsibil ty in this challenging
field of information handling and control.
What do you need to get started? Mechanical aptitude.*
knowledge of Electronics, and two years of technical school
or equivalent experience.Bahamians only need apply.
Why not begin your specialization today? For more
information Call 3-2351/4
and ask for THE MANAGER


r~r-ja ga ~


l~z-~~-~;ea h~. l


:fa













JAME~lS W ALBURY TAEL 80
See ~ ~ ~ ~ 194 th ToanYch isly a




the Miam Intern action BoplyatShw

FEBRUARY 23RD 28TH


BINDER S FOOD MARKET


_ __


LARGEST




SHOE SA LE

IN AH AMIA HI TR

"OUR PRICES ARE LOWER THAN
MIAMI SHOE PRICES"

SALE ENDS IN 10 DAYS!
BUY NOW FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
WHILE THESE LOW LOW PRICES LAST!
w nsn 2n Lorfas0


r--r --__-~I-_ __,~ ---------- ---


FOX'S SH(E ST(3RE
COINS AV~ERU~ & St~H TERRACE OPE~N: MON. THURS. TIL 6 P.M.
(NXTm DOOR~ TO DDR9ALD'S FURNlTUR ) PRI. & $At. CtLt 81310 P.M.


The Ministry of Devrelopment staff are prepared to offer you
adice anrd assistanceonr:
PROJECT SELECTION FINANCIAL NEGOTIATIONS
MARKET SURVEYS AND OTHER RELEVANT
STATISTICS -PREPARATION OF FEASIBILlI STUDIES
-PREPARATION OF APPLICATION FOR
REGISTRATION UNDER THE INDUSTRIES
ENCOURAGEMENT ACT AND GUIDANCE ON THE
EXPANSION OF YOUR EXISTING FACILITIES


assesses-u semsoY ap~tMIe


We~dnesdy, Janurtry 31, 1973.


CHINA HOPEFUL FOR
WIDER SETTLEMENT
TOKYO (AP) China's four top'
leaders including chairman Mao
Tse Tung Monday told the
Vietnamese Communists that the

,f No. p.qade nd ran ence,ouni e
wholeso etnamssase, the Chinese
leaders said "we sincerely wish that
the people in North Vietnam, under
Works pa rt yan thte govr rmanm
of the Democratic Republic of
Vietnamo wll lachiav liw sucs
Socialist North.
"We sincerely wish that the
people mn South Vietnam under
the banner of the South Vietnam
National Front for Liberation and
teverProvisinat toRevolutlion r
sedil oa Ntico at C un it o
National Reconciliation and
Conord and councils at lower
levels and, through consultations,
hold general elections and decide
the political future of the South
and make a continuous advance
lon cthe soad o ndu endenche*
message said.


By The Associated P~res
TODAY is WEDNESDAY.
JANUARY 31ST., the 31st day of
1973 Then are 334 days left in the
da GHLIG;HTS in history on this
wit97em tilc erupts, could
Ireland to protest killing of 13
civilians by British troops.
ast onuts t ke ofU o voygo
Moon.
Pres 8n N South Vietnam's
declares martguye la n face u
mounting guerrilla attacks
throughout country.
1g67 Flash fire, similar to one
which killed three Apollo
rtronuses, tensulfr sppacemc abn
school, kiling two.
tr1963 Britain accuses Frace of
Frec h too iedomaT vo rih tto kee
the British out of Eu oean
Common Market ro
1962 Foreign ministers of the
Organization of American States
(OAS) vote to exclude Cuba from
part cipating in the Inter-American
1958 First earth satellite,
Explorer I, launched at Cape
Canaveral, Florida.
1957 Trans-Iranian pipeline,
Abadan-Tehran, completed.
1950 U.S. President Truman
instructs Atomic Energy
Commission to proceed with


for industry begin ur Dldir
becomes Premier of France.
1929 Leon Trotsky is expelled
from Russia.
1927 Inter-allied military
control of Germany ends.
01 iy fu~ntersm ctedu naa afr
-89 Cit:1'"'ar bgins n Cie
Amir of Afghanistan.
to7 r a Suktan Ab dull AzOa tao ""
Empire; Cortes adopts new
c n s hi u o b ner a i rp ro ~An " "

granted in WR ssa, uti, kn
and Pruasisa demand abolition or
S reshconstitution of 1812 but
1790 Prussia withdraws
int rvetOn int Rumo-8Turrkhh r,
Fawkes Is executed.
end w of th~e Ct olof Lo buy
Protul ,dins lar ng fIH ncljings f
do a 8 utD n Johr lo Ausria
Battle of Gembloux. am t
1531 Holy Roman Emperor
1Charles V appoints his sister, Mary
of Hungry, as regnt of the
Netherlands.
15041 By Treaty of? Lyon,
Louis XII of Fruranc fnally cedes
Naples to Ferdinand of Aragon.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS: Frans
,Schubert, German musi- u
((1797-1828)); Nomrmn Mailr, U.S.
author (1923 -); Carol Channing,
it.S. comedienne (1921 -): Ann.
paviova, Russian dancer
K1885-1931)*
THOUGHT FOR TODAY: "You
must scale the mountains If you
would view the plain" Chinese
philosopher.

TIDES
TCIDES: High 5:38 a.m. and
5:58 p.m. Low I1:59 a.m. and
I 1:49 p.m.
SUN


MONTROSB AVENUB 88HU.BYI HE~IGIFS
FREE DUBY ANDPIAR~IENG -
O~N.-WED. 8-7 FRI. A (IAT. 8-9
TIAsUM s*8 stsAY MYORNING 840


Libby's Vienne Sausages 3 tins for .99c
Libby's Tomato Catchup 20 oz 56c
ivory Liquid Giant .76c
Bake Rite Shortening 3 ib. tin .86c
Graves Apple Juice 48 oz. .69c
Green Giant Sweet Peas 17 oz. .38c
Tang Breakfast Drink 27 oz. $1.75
UlUuiol~om 6 oz.
PUtity FlOur 5 Ib. .60c
French's Mustard 9 oz. .29c I


TUI(E llEYWINS 486 It

FRESH GROUND HAMBURGER

tet I

tlI. BUT TEII Si I 2 f or 700


US


US. CHOICE CIBE STEAK


3e A 5



WZ. PRIME T-BOnf STEAK



US. CHOICE TOP ROUND STEAK

$1.50


6:53 a.m. Sets


SUJN: Rises
5:54 p.m.


Men's H/H Loafe
was $23.75 now $20


Ladies' Suede So dal
was $14.50 now $1C


to participate in the Industrial Development of the
Commonwealth by establishing enterprises for the
manufacture, processing and/or assembling of a diversity of
products or for the expansion of their existing businesses.


II hltln[l trrillr Bil [I 09
offers very attractive incentives including:
DUTY-FREE IMPORTATION OF
FACTORY BUILDINGS, MACHINERY,
EQUIPMENT AND ALL RAW MATERIALS

Modern and attractive factory buildings can be obtained at
low RENTALS at the

blllr hIrl atria lisa
These buildiings are designed with maximum flexibility and
will be constructed to meet your specific requirements on
generously-sized lots.


Boys' Desert Boot
Ladies' Suede Sport Shoe Boys' Alligator Loafer was $9.50 now $5.50
was $14.75 Now $9.99 was $8.95 now $5 ~rr


hoe


Ladies' Suede "Dresy'' S
was $18.75 now $15


20%OF~F MARKED RCE
IN OUR ENTIRE STORE -
CHILDREN'S CLOTHING,
TOYS, SHOES EVERY ITEM REDUCED


b


Ladies' Flats
Spedial $5.95


@p (ir that


" THE PHOTOGRAPHERS "
MADEIRA STREEiT PALMDALE
aHN 5A~fn


EF ROAST $1.


S... 17

































dS~il~t~dt~


SCOTS CELEBRATE~'r~s


BURMS NIGHT
NOW SHOWYING at 7 &j 10:40 THE CALE DONI AN
SOCIETY of Nassacu observed
its 14th annual Robert Burns
Night on Friday in a banquet
held at the Sheraton-British
Colonial Hotel. The Scottish
; delicacy haggis, the high point
of the evening meal, was
specially flown in from
London and presented to the
SiS~ Society by BOAC. Pictured at
the Friday night celebration
are 1., th oieysofiesfo
~left, General Committee
1, Treasurer Ken Thomson, GCM
uure Mrs. Tom Kennedy, Vice
DEAN NANCY YAR KEENAN GEORGE President Mrs. Francis Millar,
JONES*0LSONOIIIWN *InSVl: rMORGAIn* WYnn* UNDoSEY GCM Mrs. Hellen Suddell,
DON( TAIT AND JIM PA E & ARNOLD MARGOLIN ""~~U'."~'".".2" President lan Taylor, GCM
*Ous, RON MIILLER D".'If NORMAN( TOKAR TLIIICLm [d u~~ Mrs. Alf Moss, Secretary Mrs.
Michael Taylor and GCMW W.
PLUS at 8:50 Peddy-Rice.
"20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA', PHOTO: Andrew Toogood.
MOON
3MOON: Rises 4:50 a.m. Sets


Y0Ul.L EL SO 000D

YOU WON WANT10O SIOC!

ALLTE WAIYID CHICAGO.


The 2 000year old


PURITY BAKERY LIMITED


S~SSOON PROPBY DEYELOPMtNI U1IIUI


NO-ONE H-AS OUR AUTHORITY TO COLLECT MONTHLY
PAYMENTS FOR THE PURCHASE OF ANY LOTS IN THESE
SUBDIVISIONS.

ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE MADE AT OUR OFFICE: IN
SASSOON HOUSE, SHIRLEY STREET, AND OUR OFFICIAL
RECElYT ISSUED.

IF YOU HAVE' EVER MADE ANY MONTHLY PAYMENTS TO
ANYONE OTHER THAN AT OUR OFFICE, PLEASE CALL ON
US IM MFDI A'ITELY AND BRING ALL YOUR RECElPTS WITH
Y OU'


CROSS AND THOMAS
CIOLLECTlON AGENTS FOR
SASSOON PROPERTY DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED


L~1~~ I~r~


AUIECE.

ADVIE. g




;willbe sold on 1
is.


st Day Thursday
Itinuous2 sOwings


IAY THE HOT LINE I


Charles Boyer
PLUS
ARQUERO" PG.
Lee Van Cleef I
warren Oates I


YI


frightening customers and staff
who were present at the time.
In court, Bain, also charged
with possession of
ammunition, denied the gun
was his. Prosecui~ron witnesses
who testified did nlot tell the
truth as the gun went otff by
itse sa wh n 0=

next to his friend K~enneth


LAST DAY THURSDAY
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005


g 7 HE HAS MORE THIZE W~ST

g ANID HEY ALL WE

SSUGG;ESTED FOR
PARENTAL DISe

Reservations not clain
first come, frsl


Now thru Friday
Ma.ne cniuus from ;
"PLAY MISTY FOR ME"
Clint Eastwood
Jessica Walter
PLUS
"ST. VALENTINE'S
DAY MASSACRE" R.


No one under a7 wm ~ is

S'Phone 2-2534


ther g n ued thet hR omacr.n raonLte, otheon ngred
toentn r ael nhe *h rutmypinwekt
Toedco wno owr n obcdrbedo
~O hr c sayun 2hl 000 n years wo pl r


2 ov domla~ co on ah prnodu k nd ao m e
hna '"d"' hbr nT rr th Ihuad nlrofr un o




MA TURE
CREATION ,
ned by 8:15
t served basic


aL


Con


2


"THE D
GO


"B


LOTS IN GOLDEN GATES II, II ADDITION,
WINTON MEADOWS, WINTON HEIGHTS,
COLONY VILLAGE EAST, BEL AIR ESTATES.


I
I
I;

I
I

IC
I
I


NOW SHOWING
Matinee continuous from 2: 30, Evening 8: 30
-'Phone 3-4666




,h a~I a ne? ea s rw n o
pp ena nd w a .......,,. CE5
a lMonrmnctmoeesv / 1


Beautiful things like a show of island fash-
ions, modelled by our sun-warmed Hare
Tropical Birds.
Lulling and lifting and rollicking Jamaican
music, recorded right at the source.
And we have all kinds of other good-feelin9
things designed to keep you nice and
loose until you get to where you re go-
ing. So even if you didn't fly down
with us, call us at 2-1538 in Nassau,
or 2-7028 in Freeport.
We'll make time fly.


On Air Jamaica, we make you feel so good
you won't want us to stop. And we don't un-
til you reach O'Hare. Because Air Jamaica
has the only non-stop flights from Nassau to
Chicago, leaving every evening at 5:50 and
arriving in Chicago at 8:00 P.M.
From toe moment you step on board
good-feeling things begin to happen.
Delicious things like dining on' Lob-
ster Port Royal and River Janga
Salad, papaya, plantains and Blue
Mountain coffee. d


'I,


5lbe Ilribunt


REMINDER


asr:Jamalcc
WE MKE YOU FEEL 900 #L OVI











Wedfnesday, January 31, 1973


~


REAL ESTATE FOR RIENT CARS FOR SALE FOUND HELP IWANED TRAIIBE SERVYICES TRAD)E SERVICES MlLP WHCLTED


I


L


C8102
AFTER CHRISTMAS MESS?
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCO TEL:51071-2-3-4
C8280
PATIOORAWNINGS AND
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS '
John S. George &~ Co. Ltd *
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.
C827S
TROUBLES ......small or large
canl The Plu~mberB LnWheels:-

P. O. Box N56,
Nassau
Telephone: 3-5870.


C8515
HOUSE PLANS..
...alterations, additions, walls.
etc., drawn to suit you. Low
rates. Free Estimates-

Evangelos Zervos
Telephone 2-2633

C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters

hotels. o es aapdrstemvc C l
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
or 21662. WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.


PI ANIST: Five years

Rf ernices must beeuruniisheed.
Interested Persons Apply:
G AND BEANHAMA HOTEL,

BAHAMA, PERSONNEL
OFFICE, MONDAY
FRIDAY, 9 A.M. UNTIL 3.00
P.M.

H7E7D STOREKEEPER:
should be able to supervise
staff, purchase all food items

rspon ile fohr st rage odf food
items, also issuing of same to
kitchen. 2-3 years experience,
male applicant preferred.
FLAT WORKER: to sort out
soiled linen, feed them into
machine and folding away of
saem nao epere necessary,
LAUNDRY WORKER: to
press pants, coats, shirts and
tS' als eprenced female
CREDIT RECEPTIONIST:

Hnweg ca nt io redngei
machines especially the NCR
4200 possess ability to discus
individuals as well as groups,
female applicant preferred.
s EIT MA AER: Msts

relations, accounting, law and

maowie inclu ing NCR 4n20
must be able to handle
continuous accounting, hotel
policy and administrative
dscussioms with individuals aand

preferred.
pApply Monday through Friday
betwe 9 am n 2No
only"tno K gsa In & NGon
Club, Personnel Department.


C8602
EX ECUTIVE LEGAL
secretary required by law firm.
SL~ary commensurate with
Lexper n 5. Telephone


CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
required by international
Group of Companies with
diverse interests, including

cAop l can so would have at least
two years post qualification
experience. Apply in writing
givingoresume of career do daS

Robert McAlpine &
Sons (Bahamas) Ltd., P. O.
Box N. 3919, Nassau N. P.,
Bahamas.

C8657
PRACTICAL NURSE WANTED
Cable Beach area, furnish own
transportation. Write P. O. Box
4e03 one oCt and give



sXEUadVEoteSECRETARY
to handle reservations'
c~ou spoandence k-k pichaar s
accounting experience; a desire
and ability to handle people is

LODE, SBMALNL11HOPNa ssAu


C86H~andyman $30 per week
Phone 42469
C8673
CLEAR'S ELECTRIC needs
2 electricians. Call Willard
Cleare for interview 3-6465.

C8677
COOK general, February to
June. Good wages. Cable Beach
amin. Call 7-7827, 8 a.m. to

C8682

PA TS C UTEMEN. Dus
h verhnade atn least t3 ya s
business Salaries
commensurate with
experience. Attractive fringe
benefits. Call Mr. Godwin
Wright at 2-1031 for
appointment.

C8665
DIVE MASTER REQUIRED:
Must have NAUI certification
or equivalent; must have
knowledge of boats, motors'
their maintenance and repair;
must have knowledge of
regulators, tanks, compressors'
their maintenance and repair;
must have good ability to
handle people and willingness
to assume complete
responsibility for diving
programme. Phone 77472 or
write P. O. Box N1131, Small
Hope Bay Lodge on Andros.

C8680
SHIPPING FIRM seeks
applications from qualified
individuals for position as Vice
President to direct and
administer operational and
commercial activities of the
company which is engaged in
wor ldwide ocean
transportation of bulk
commodities. gra atover Oh
minimum 10 years experience
in bulk handling and ocean
shipping. Please submit
applications to: Office of the
Pesiet Navios Corp rtin



C8681
AUTO MECHANIC WANTED

,Au nMcOai Sexpeqiueined i
all phases of automobile work,
but in particular the electric
system. Must have own hand
tools. Must be sober, reliable
and winlng to workanGoodr p

benefits. Call Mr. Stunce
Williams at 2-1031.

TRADE SERVICES
C8279





Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue


NASSAU, BAHAMAS
'P. O. Rox N3714

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
CASAOCMSRGLOEAGEN E
& DE L /E RY
MOV NGCSTORAGE

STEeL BANDING
& SHIPPING

REASONABLE RATES


C8303
IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique S

cotmget ires}@ ceo2me, b ehst
patio, marvellous view,
swimming, fishing. H.H. Larkin
tClo Box 101, Harbour island.

C8566
FOR SALE Oe Vw o
East End. 100 ea 2V ew TL
blocks from beach. Call 5-2370
after 6 p.m.

LA 2GE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East End

840000. Wtrrong starOiNL a
ONLY $0000. Pone 2iS02a7
or 2-2680.

C8591
CORNER building lot, main
road, very near The Current
Club, Ele thera $1750.00 or





C8995 FOSAE

2-STOREY BUILDING 3-2
bedroom apartments upstairs

dooben s Part o epo o n

rpsiteh -ec2nc 81ra ni g
Box 5387, Nassau.

C8592
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furnished apartment
overlooking Montagu Bay (very
desirable area). New complete
rugs, stove, refrigerator, heater,
wall mirrors, sliding doors, etc..
Good rental no problem.

echag 0 FI rida. c s Mer
ay collect 5-25988 orN2 6232
Nassau.

C87BERNARD ROAD
LARGE 6400 sq. ft. lot price
$5,000.00 cash. Discount 20%.
Term deposit $200.00 Monthly
payments $100.00 5 years.
C tBills Real Estate

2- 921$
2 HOUSES for sale -- 2 doors
west of Barclay's Bank on
Madeira:-
I. 2-storey building 3
bedrooms, 192e bath, drive-in
garage,
2. 2-bedroom 1 bath, living
room, dining and kitchen -
Both $45,000. Phone 5-4684.


F~OR REJT

C8597
ATTRACTIVE fully equipped
'3 bedroom 2 bath house
exclusive Buen Retiro Avenue.
just redecorated, large garden,
airconditioning, excellent T.V.
antenna, washing machine etc.
$350. Phone 53177.
C8392
PRIME OFF ICE space
available in IBM FIOUSE, with
central airconditibning and
ample parking. For further
inf imation call 32351/4.
C8410
BACHELOR ROOM in
res ctablee home in Palmdale
private entrance. For
information call 5-1044.

BEA TIFULLY FURNISHED,
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
'Day call 2-2152.

826B7EDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.

C8264
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
raceRRESs TOWnEr i(T~hird

E edat ftll furnished baa
apartments, airconditioned*
Lwimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842,
*14116, 2-8224 q~2-8248.

r WO SHOPS available in the
IEast Bay Shopping Centre'
East Bay Street. For further
information call 2-4782.
2. Office, warehouse, open


yhrd storage area at the corner
gf~ Virginia & Heathfield
$treerts. For further
~Information call 2-4782.

LRE unfurnished 2 or 3
bedroom house Boyd
oubdi sron. Phone 2-1170


OFFICE OR STORE SPACE.
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
r 43017yample parking,


C8539
1971 FORD ESCORT. Phone:
7-7231.

MARINE SUPPLIES
C8283
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C8576
BE TrRAMwi 31M E ere s
excetient condition. To ses
call Mario 3-6645 from 9 to E
or 3-6649 after 5 p.m.

C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleeps
six; private bathroom with
vanity, shower and head;
stove refrigerator, sin *
.tre nI to-i s st w n 23
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. nsseng $22,000 or
nearest offer PhoneM n2d67 9

Friday.


20' O0UTBOARD CRUISER -
120 hAp. engine 25 watt radio

op etne with anch and gas
tanks -- Call 36542 or 55811.


BC8H MAS YAGHT SALES
JAME A.AU Y




'1 HOJANYACFT E
A DIVISION OF

Wti~nes.

C8666
1 F BREGLoAS boat -61 f.

Phone 42503.

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

5 14lthriving business for sale
Good income For details cal
telephone 2-2633 between 6
p.m. 8 p.m.
C8558
PhVANT TO BUY A OOT?Bx
N4764, FRANK CAREY
REAI, ESTATE LTD. Let us
take you on a FREE
complimentary tour of any
subdivision of your choice with
no obligation to buy.
CALL US TODAY

PETS FOR SALE
C8668
STS LL MORE German
Shepherd Pups left. Prices
reduced. See Alexander Virgil*
Durham Street off Mount
Royal Avenue-

IN MAEMORIAM


C u


IN FREEPORT TEL 352-6808


C8364
LBEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furnished duplex apartment.
Air-conditioned, laundry, large
privnatte yard.aVillage Road noeae
5-2370.
C8589
EXECUTIVE TYPE two storey
dwelling house on long term
lease. Four bedrooms, three
adina half baths. mbvingoond
kitchen, double car garage with
recreation. facilities. Large
s~wirnminrespoolwatennissuour .
Attractively furnished. Located
in Sans Souci near St.
Andrew's School. Caff 41563.
C86 5
FURNISHED 1 large bedroom
apartmS rt vvith tteleephoone -
58196.
C8624
SeDOnoTOWf cO tC IS
House, Shirle Stet
frni hed 11 odiio

view.
C8661
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath house
Farrington Road. Partly


Phone 77414 after 6 0.m.
C8614
LAR GE ONEr bedroom
apartment, out east with beach
r ghsh ad Cpoi'at patio. Fully
children. Telephone 2-47e77 -
Evenings 4-2035.

C8521
WINTON HIGHWAY
Sectud, spacious,bedfulmV

apartment overlooki d Neil
Exc optional Fstorarge = ce

2-2239, or evenings 77861.
C7106
NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroom/?
bath, situated Domingo
Heights, East St., South.
Contact: Nassau 5-6234.

fIc OWN fra te rooms
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.
C8676
FULLY FURNISHED one and
two bedroom apa rt ments,
Centreville. For further
information, phone 5-8679,
ask for Mr. Pritchard.
C8678
2 and 3 bedroom house for
rent on McKinney Drive off
Carmichael Road. Phone
3-6565.

FOR1 SILE

C85ISCHOTE QUE SET
2 turntables, 2-15" speakers -
twaters nd woofer e A300

$700.00 -- O.N.O. Phone
5-7541 Mr. Dean
C8674
ONE BARBER'S chair, 1
shampoo be stin,240
aircon iioning unit 24
BTUs. Terms crash. Telephone
3-2079.
C8686
SAUGARAGIE SALE.,By
Street, 2nd driveway west of
Eastern Police Station.

CARS FOR SALE
c867
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
SUBSTANTIAL END OF
SEASON REDUCTIONS


C8687 l
Very friendly half43rown cat
black with orange and white
markings. Phone 3-1180.


SCHaOOL I
C8658
EDUCATION SPECIAL
DID YOU EVER WISHED you
could tye do bookk eig
write shorthand, keep a pro r
file; Do fractions, decimals'
percentages etc? Understand

wihns Cal 2m42 7- 6 op m
to8p.m. or write P. O. Box
6216. IN JUST THREE
MONTHS WE WILL TEACH
YOU ALL THESE THINGS.



C8684
VAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES
Further to the advertisement

asof the 8h Fbcru 1 :
Lot Number Name
46 Basit & Clarabelle Williams
86 Prince & Patricia Knowles
215 Elizabeth Adderley

231 ucits dra eie Green

398 Pa rick Nee y

426 Edgar Ferguson
430 William Cancino

C8667
L.T.D. SURVEYING office has
been moved from Shiriey
Street to 1st. Terrace
Centreville. Telephone: 24596
has not been changed.


POSITION WANTED
C8608
sEXtECUTIV h gto rtehmlloner

Bah rames ntown aenks
administrative capacity
regardless of type of business,
Please write to P. O. Box
N7511 if interested, or phone
Nassau 41115.




R G IRED two chainmen
bush-cutters for work in No
Providence and Family Islands,
previous experience not
required. Telephone 58825 or
24596 or write to P. O. Bost
N-7782, Nassau '
C8619
REF RIGE RATI ON AND
AIRCONDITIONING
MECHANIC to manage Service
Department and handle repairs.
Must have own tools Apply
in person to Fox Brothers
Furniture, Dowdeswlell Street.

C8438
NASSAU PUBLIC

Qualified librarian required;
F.L.A., A.L.A. or equivalent
degree in Library Science
essential. Applicants must have
axpetrie ce in catalog ngd and
able to type. Bahamians only.
Applications should be
addressed to:-
The Chairman, Board of

Lirsy P. Oa Boux N- 2b ,

1C8671 1


P10 ASHER: Male, able to
lft heavy duty articles cleaning
ofall pots and pans used ir dhe

EeXECU IVE CHEF: Malesable
to supervise dishing up of all
banqluets, be responsible for
the orti of the food
prepaora lon, est food in ail
departments also chedi

mxpenrie ced pre ervedntoris
VEGETABLE COOK: Male,
must be able to prepare
vegetables according to daily
menu for the day's business,
follow daily routine and dish
out vegetables during the meal
hours. Experienced applicant
preferred.
PASTRY COOK: M~ale, must
be able to take charge of the
pastry shop, oversee all the
preparation of French pastries,
prepare all dessert items on the
day's menu. Experienced
applicant preferred.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 12
Noon only, to King's Inn &
Golf Club, Personnel
Department.
C7110
CATALYTIC WEST INDIES
LIMITED, POST OFFICE
BOX F-2544, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA has job
opportunities for Bahamians in
thF Idndu tiaor Mainotrena ce
Fild Fepot o Cath
following positions, orf Ime
ust havesRaef ner ym Process
Industrial experience.
'INSfnRUMaEN cTECHl tC c
Instrumentation experience in
Installation, Trouble-Shooting
and Maintenance of Pneumatic
Equipment, Automatic Tank
Guig, Servo SM han smtse
Electronics, Telepulse I and II
Telemetering and other
Electronic and Pneumatic
Instrumentation pertaining to
Ae iery opera to s.relto
The Deputy Chief Industrial
Offcr Ministry orf Labour --

C7070
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
required: Migh School graduate
or equivalent education: 3 5
years experience desirable.
Applicant must be able to take

raoanble anspteyed fling
experience will be helpful.
Apply mn person to Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
_reeport.
C7109
MASTER MECHANIC
Appl icant must possess
extensive experience in
mel earn oflre airs ada
equipment and large airport
cras /fire rescue vehicles.

documents certifying past
experience with all airport

eqLueAE /JANITOR OnIy
Iplcnswhoiar i prepared to
cleaning bathrooms and toilets
should apply.
Apply to: Devco Personnel,
18C Kipling Bidg., P. O. Box
F-2666, Freeport, GBL.


Partly furnished 3
bedroom apartment for
rent on Winton Highway.
$275 per month. Call
2-2511 days. 4-206i3
evenings.




eaan '-- -









NA.50 W\tRi


He was the sunshine of our

mnsa but loving memory of
our dear son and brother,
Andrew lan Morris. Born June
13th 1967 passed away
suddenly January 31st 1970*
To some you may be forgotten
But to us, who love and lost

Yoour memories will always

Pa ets, Mr. Rupert and Mrs.
Edna Morris, brother, Wilitam,
sisters, Ruby Ann, Dorothy
and Shirtey. Grand Parents,
Sergeant and Mrs. William G.
Mackey.
C8679
in loving memory of our dear
husband, father and grand
father the late Alfred Percival
Hall who departed this life
January 31st 1958.
Your Ilfe was full of kindly
deeds
A helping hand to all in need
A pleasant smile, a heart of

A cederful mind and peaceful


Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone -34636-7-8
C8058
O NmER LHEe NIG COLOo
condition. 5500 or best offer
Can be seen at Teddar Street
2nd house from Madeira after


L "--...


I


__


I


I


I


I~ --


I





t


14


Brig YOUr Partner




Beginning Thursday, Feb. 1st, and every
Thursday thereafter, at 8.00 p.m., there will be a
Whist Tournament at Gambier House
Fr ing onM Rd. Pi ss wII be awarded the


IIELP WANTED
C7099
DSn WASd Rs~: General
POT WASHERS: This job
requires long peri ods of
standing.
LAUNDRY WORKERS: Must
have previous knowledge of
operating the pressing machine.

eM eriehnaje In aunr doneW
PORTERS: Must have prev ou
t p riene of meaning lag
MASON: To do general
maintenance work, experience
required in heavy building
maintenance. Must have 2-3
years experience.
TELEPHONE MAN: Minimum
of 8 years experience. Must
have knowledge of telephone
installation, 1A key equipment
and central office repair and
maintenance
FRONT DESK CLERKS: Four
to five years experience is
required. High school
education is a must. This
person must be courteous, neat
in appearance and able to deal
with the general public
GARDENER: This person
must be able to work on large
grounds area and also must be
able to make flower
arrangements.
BUTCHER: must have at
leastl- d5 arcs exper enee Hg

References are required
AI R-CONDITION HELPE R:
Must have knowledge of
installing and repairing

di -co letnoners. tRef~esnces a e


HEL1P WANTED
run large golf shop, give
Itenonsme snd Mdeal with
member of the Bahamas
P.G.A .
CIVIL ENGINEER: Must have
experience in field supervision
and cost analysis. References
GeFqICeE MA4NA ER* Ms
have knowledge of account ig

office. eust no cs cntr id
References required.
CONSTRUCTION FORE.
MAN: Must have knowledge of
heavy steel erection. Know
how to work all types of heavy
eg ui pment. References
required.
PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR:
Will be in complete charge of
panelling insulation and
co-ordinator with other crafts,
will make all decisions
involving project. Five to seven
years experience is required.
References needed.
WELDERS : Must have
knowledge of blueprint
reading, qualified burner, know
metals and heavy metal.
Knndoedne ael weddi g, baing
iedin rods. License certified
wit pers andU sTENece .

DENT: Must know all phases

ar- oniti niwork hti g
refrigeration, sheet metal
plumbing installation and be
able to cut and thread, sweat,
wedge, annealing and brazing.

heacy pi s. si kwe gne o
A/C, refrigeration and broilers.
Certified license and
references.
PLUMBING SUPERINTEN.
DENsT: i I allatphas as o
correctly for health and
sanitation reasons. Know cost
of both labour~ material from
price list, know gas and water,
elec rical fpaneith conitnol,

Knowledge of swimming pool
ewxorhk bmoioer wwork ysheat
includingousbalancing.anMus

water circulation pumps
material take-off. Must be able
to get along with people
Certified License master. *
PLUMBING FOREMAN: Must
pbe able to areaed tao iph es o
phases correctly for health and
sanitation reasons. Must know
solder, braze welding and
cutting, threading and be able
to get along with people
Certified L ic ence and
references are required.
INSULATORS: Must be able
to read blueprints, read and
undersr od opcfp lac i n

on hot water lines, chill water
aingF~reon Klines an he
systems in duct work and
exhaust hold insulators. Must
havaiowm tools. References are

MHE t EA a OcRKtERe .
Know pin distribution, be able
to do take-offs and layouts, be
able to galvo weld, read
blueprints, know alloys.
References are required.


required.
POOL MANAGER: Must be a
pool mechanic and able to take
care of all the pool needs and

of 4-0 ad t las 4ya rs
ex p ience. Re erences
KITCHEN HELPERS:This
position requires a lot of
standing. Must be able to work
in large kitchen and to clean
large kitchen area.
SOCIAL1 20 reSS pMr haea

boa Hos ess oera our Ed rt
Must be neatly dressed, have
pleasing personality. Must be
able to work with large sums of
money. Typing experience is
preferred. References are
rt f ted with Pol ice
ACCOUNTANT: Five years
experience is required. Must be
able to process P &r L. Must be
able to control A/R.
References are required along
with recent Police Certificate.
PLUMBERS: Must have
certified plumbers' licence
Know all phases of welding*
Mous oe obto ssilver ider
types of burning. Know all

buprints. Musol ie le toe l
out own plans.
PIPEFITTERS: Must know all
pi dni oang M chan ca
to use steam toocu band thread

make various fittings of
different sizes for piping,

to fiv yEarsexperien e asGo f
Pro re red. Must be able t


..r


, -,,....


1970 Chevrolet
Impala
C91Fr Escort
Automatic Belge
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic
1968 Javelin A/C
1971 Vauxhall Victor
2000 Auto Grey

r90tltn Re /C
1969 Dodge Monaco
A/C Vinyl
1971 Viva 4 Dr
Auto Red
1967 Chevy lI A/C
Automatic Yellow


$2800
$700


$1895

$1600
$1600

$2300

$ 40

$1795

$1895

$900


soul.
Dee in our hearts your life is
To love, to cherish and never
forget,
Timreftakes away the edge of

Buternemories turn back every
Fondly remembered by, Wife
- Ethel Pauline Hall, Daughter
and Son-in-law Rose and
Ossie King and eight
grandchildren*


C8670
MUST SELL THIIS WEEK
1967 Triumph 1300 with 1971
engine, new paint job. Very
good condition. $850 or best
offer. Phone 24450.


CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PH~ONE: 2-3795, 2-3796'
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434


C86556
2STOREY HOUSE for rent on
ggy Streelt near Armstrong
;Stnret. $185 per month. Phone
2* 352,


(ahr Wrfthatt


el ads getthejo done



Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p~m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.mn. to 1p.m.


FORl RENT


COLONY ROON
M01 TAGIIBEAfHilOTEL
TII ,~ i0VA6t
ONLYATTHE poon
fa a utsATRS











VII _VIIYHII~


II~ II- I -


g EIl I


GENERAL TENDENCIES: Today Is especcialy
good fo r o orgeaking your practical and basic
affairs that you can add new ides and methods to long
accepted ways of achieving good results. Wise and a~stae
businerssmn give you some excellent suggestions for success if
you use them. Kep plodding SW y
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You asre ble to make bl8
headway in both civic and caree work today provided you use
the positive and direct approach with others. Use wisdom in
handling credit matters. Evening ran be ideal with mate.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Use thoen fine ideas you
have rad it will be easy to expand in the avenues that mean
the most to you. Meet those interesting perronallities who can
become an integral part of your life in the future. Forget

Q @Maloid y 21 to June 21) Get regular routines done in a
more satisfactory and lever way and use more modern
methods as well. Get insurances, taxes, etc., paid. Find right
method to have more rpport with mate.
MOON CHILDREN (Juner 22 to July 21) Learn what is
expected of you by associates either in personal or busine..
life, or both. Many situations come up that give you the
So-shead sign for expansivsenes. Use good, constructive
methods
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Plan your activities well in the
early morning and then go ahead with them in a positive and
effective manner. Take the right treatments that will make you
feel and look better. A more politer and optimistic outlook on
lfe is wise now.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Join with good friends during
spare time rad discuss wnhatever is uppermost in your mind,
come to a far better understanding. Buy a nice gift for mate
lad show you really care. Use more tact, too.

d ffRsns yuma YOv with kirl aeds ortw eeerelse i
important in your life. Invite some person to your home who
can be helpful to you in the future. Impresrs this individual
favorably.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Makting the appointments
that are helpful to your scheme of things is wii; he sure to
keep them on time. You can esilly double your productivity.
Take it easy tonight and do some studying that appeals to you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Keep rooted to
whatever is of a most practical nature today and add much to
present monetary security. Look to an expert mn business for
suggestions that will help you solve your problems. Engloy
mate in p.m. Show more courtesy to this person
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) A perfect day for the
social on this last day of the month when you can plan next
month's activities better, also. Join with persons who like the
same amursments you do. Forget all that worry and fretting.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Not a good day to be your
sociable self, but do closect yourself with experts and work out
financial and other problems well. Lend a helping hand to
those who are not asr well off as you. Stay within your budget.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Getting out to group affairs
with kin who can add much to your public image and give you
added knowledge is fine now. A good friend can help you
achieve some vital personal aim. Do not be extravagant,
though.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY...he or she will be
one of those practical and serious young people who will do
well in business of all kinds and the education should be
slanted along such lines. Teach early to use that fine smile he
or she has more to get faster and better results, otherwise the
pressure of merchandizing could make a sourpuss of your
offspring. Give good grounding in relgious tenets early and be
sure the diet is right. Musical appreciation here, too.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel"' What you make of
your life is largely up to YOUI


- _~~_~__ ~-I
.~...~r


I warf cour LIKE 7AnrSWoutoN'T ASA vOU TO LIE, PLASE--DOMY TED~ DONr stRRY
TNie IEA OF MISS GALE /I' fWSORRY/ IT WYAsN T KEN I CAME -r t40MT r
)DW KNOW FErres mHAN wLINe To Wme,' A VER;Y GOOD IDIEA I MAYSE IT 1 TO 988 IS/
I EDO---fMERiE'S 4 QUESTON MR. JA4SPER; i WOULD SE BEST FOR kEN IF TUE
ASOUT KENNJY' R FTURE As Two OF YOU JUsT GO ouIT aND
mi nMEESIWL tLE MA~~ A G0 TME
TOI 6TETM O I~i MAKE SOME MONIEY--




LAi






J UDGE PARK ER By PAUL NICHOLS
~~~IT 6 GOOD TO SEE YOU. JRRY LEAVE ROC E ELM, I' IK ODTUOE
HELLO, MR. T( ROCKY f TAKE A SEAT AND ME ALONE FO SrRf ROCKYY,, HOW TRE PHONE, MR.Tf SME'S
Y uRE LOOK NG A LITTLE WHILE! Is YOUR WIFE ? F NTE EXETtAA 9E
~RETG?,. I THING THA;T HAPPENED
S BEFORE THE ACIET












APARTMENT 3-G By Ale~r Ktotsisy

,H DNT ` HELS IN INTIENSIVE CARE,TOZ#MtEI HERE S THE POLICE DEIT~ETIE I
STAY AND THERE S NOT MUCH A PRIVATE WONDER WHAT INFORMATXION HE
WH DM' )U LLGOHOE PECIALBRA DUiTY NURSE CAN DO! GOTfROQM BRYAN!
AND GETSOME REST? I'LL BRYAN?
CALL IF THERE'S ANY 1'
CHANGE! .











STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOM AD by saunders & overgard


Otnolr sue an
A fro s the
R m Ihory #4

IV. a L ch
least ne eigt-ltter word in
th fsh nolraiino foreign 6X

TESTRMAd BOLUTION :bnlr ~o n
Uedel ben ed le le
blead bleae biloneboeho
tbsmer brone demlr dason done a
ebo embedr EMBLDE emend of
leonl a lob loed lodeloe
olden om n. l bol


Ces











(nl:.71)
bhite rates rin two moves.
aanot any defesnce (by H.
i~nes). In this puzalle, White
is as usual moving up the
board, and ~the b~a~ck pawns are
moving doawn---rmm top to
ber toma8 el minute, problems
meater; 2 minutes, problem
expert; 6 minutes, good; 12
arinutes. average; 25 minute,.

euiL~1IN O No. 9571 (Jan 12

Chess Solution
1 B--KIS (threat 2 B xP
mate). If 1 . P x B; 2 Q-Kt7.
or if~ P-K8C; 2 Q--B4, or if
R-87;2 B--K3, or if Q-K ;
2 xB.Traps for solvers are
1 B--4 ? P--K61 or 1 B--Kt7l?
B--R71













No. 7.034 .. by TIM McKAY

1. Pata melon in ran anatram.
1 r e (4)



11. Wnmeth wrliia smi. (84)
14. Blroad. (B)
19. Ill tr diir ()


1. Secret peri fi entry. (9)
2. SYithout Insthod of arrant
ment. (9)) 8. Wonder. (2)
5I. Tokes ofdr stlage.
0. Muslelan t. (S)7 1tm 4


so eket.
fl)
Stl. Slor~f.

St. rIakstc
oater. rW1


Kucpert and the Ninky Toys-9


rd


GRAND BAHAMA




IFREPRT IFEr D 1~1


EL.352-8808 LY EXPERIENCED
BODY MAN required, must be
able to repair all types of
MELP MAITED vehicles and install replacement
parts and complete up to
~6 re-finishing stage. Minimum 3
ountnt rquird wih at years experience, full Company
;t three years experience in anefit. Bhmasol ed
etral Acc uting App iat Fie Wheels of Grand Bahama
nch Accounts and be able Lt.Teeoe3270.
work with minimum of C7090
enrision. Please reply in FULLY EX PERIEN CED
n handwriting with copies MECHANIC required for our
erferences, giving full details service department. Must have
education, qualifications minimum of 3 years with
experience to date, knowledge of General Motors
lamialns only wUi be products. Full Company
sidered.anc ~ Londn fits with fa toe ta.inm.
trance Group, Post Office Five Wheets of Grand Bahama
SF-26, Freeport. Bahamaslz Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.


T







leas

to t

supe
owr
of r
and
Bah
,on
Sn
Ins
Box


C7108
IMPORTANT U .S .
Manufacturing Company has a
career position available in
N GEor for witGENERAL
e coutng ifakgroiund.icde
the general management of
local manufacturing operations
.and supervision of export
activity. Prime emphasis will be
on supervision of al
accounting and financial
functions. Marketing is not
Inovd cetnfeaste 5- rs of
management is called for, with
initiative and ability to work
independently important.
Salary will be based on
qualifications.
Please send resume in full
confidence to: P. O. Box F-25,
Freeport, Bahamas.


C7093
BILINGUAL SECRETARY ,
MUST SPEAK AND READ
FRENCH ,GOOD
SHOORTHAENED A~ND TYPANG
ACCOUNTING EX ERIE N
CORRESPONDENCE .
APPLY: Al R CANADA, P. O.
gOX F-391, FREEPORT.
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accquntants have
several v cacie for Ch rere
their Freenort office.
,Successful candidates will be
paid- excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamnas.


t- ~




Next morning, after break-
fast, Rupert wanders restlessly
'In the garden, keeping wftch
for Margot. The little girl is
true to her promise and soon
arrives with a Ninky toy in ,h~er
arms. I've madeit"he
beams as she returns the
pattern to Rupert. Don't you
think It's nice ?" Ooo,
ALL RIGHTS


thank you- begins Rupert,
: only to hesitate and look
againl at the toy. aut-;but
the ears, Mar gotta he
exclaims. "You've put them,
on its back, ilke wings I"
" I know II tt ou h t it
looked nicer tH~e that." replies
his chum. I've made it a
flying donkey."
RESERVED


Vienesday, Janulary 31, 1973.


Gk Grthu e


.7~PCO~C'"~


By DAL CUlR~T IS


REX MOR GAN, M.D.


SW VICTOR MOLLO
WOULD you back declarer to
make 49 or defenders to break
the contract?
North
E6 K 10 6 4

g4 q651
West East
S97152 4Q83
J 9 9752
0 JS 950 K l08 42
South

O 7 3
& J 87 2
Declarer wras Walter Avarelll,
twelve times world champion.
W~est, who had doubled Avarelli s
reid tf~I Son way tb ~O
trumps, Wethrw two
spdsand a club, a f~~st
aicsrd. Then came the 4A h
mm a Avre now ha
nine tricks. ah diamond finesse
11ied, howvr and he wen
Avarelli, d ssng e hand
with Preach laterniational Joad
Le D~ents Ever card was
marked. With four C~ubs only,
West wouldn't have thrown one
since I had old clubs, and if he
had iAK, he would have led
clubs. I abould have plyda
low club to East's a SKfeoi II,
fbsting him to lead a auod.
An e comments Le Dentue
'"Aococine Cioup. ra 8Oth can
West NWhe ad clab b ule

leads the 0 J. South is hie ~eas.
crcdim s xue h a.auth' turte
up, after all with the lKT such
accidents happen, even to
crocodiles.


'l Ba'T NEE~D 10 MISW UP 101 UINCH 81004 M00.
Au TWE. eas ONl ME ARE F~R13I swL /*


Brother Juniper












~~' '---~--~ --


O~Q


tu OLLO TnG are the results of

s *AC r E furlnt b hl
$2.65. Doe Doe (2) G. Searchhwel
321n~d RACE 5 furtong Yellow
Elder (6) N. Sweeting $16.35,
$7.20. $4.30. Golden Guinea (9) S.
zMcN st $6.22 s345 Alysu wists (
S19.45 First Quinella (6-9) $41.15.
Dane drRA G. Ren S.0, s 75
$2.SS. La y Beth (2) Ni. Sweeting
Mj 5.5 C2nd ourin I e
4th RACE -- 9 furlongs
mo40 old GaH3l()nOSSei 5.
ss.os Miss Cle (9) C. Marjor $3.oo.
3rd Qul I aE (3-5)dl k ng. Sr D
(5) S. McNeHI $25.85, $29.35,
58.10. Mi hty Joe: Young (8) R.
F* guonai6.0 8SOS8. 4tWncuhes e
3)J.-I) 562.30.Bi 550. 4h Q icl
6th RACE 6 furlongs Stilletto
.540K.Regohns Midrn~3.00,. Gdi
$2.05, $26.50. The 17(8) .
Saunders $4.05 Sth Quinella 3-)
ftho RACE 6 fur4 ass Bardoo
any (8) S. McNeil S .es, S2.so,
52.95. Ugly (5) A. Saunders $3.70,
S4.10. Uncle aoc (4) K. Johnson
$8.70. 6th Quinella (5-8)
8 RACE 6 furlonp
Sent Paii (3) K. Johnson 57.70*
ss.75 oSs.5 Ju e'skJoG 6J Aen
Gtibbs $5.20. 7th Quinella )

PRO BASKETBALL
Baltimore 104 Golden State 86
Buffalo 105, Italldelphis 104
Ihaluasn3k, Vi4) I I ,I oertime
Indiana 126, San Diego 120


'- O ENIr U VE

EIl l II
BgolrlLvaN I


SElisha Olbed will he pllling Ifo



IRIeflatl0881 f8COg~ltl0H VOff 5000

BY GLADSTONE THURSTON
AFTER TWO IMPRESSIVE VICTORIES in the middleweight division, the question that arises
is whether Bahamian welterweight champ Elisha Obed is ready to relinquish his welterweight title
and go fully into the middleweight divisions.
It was a big test for the
Bahamian champ last Friday
against Puerto Rican
middleweight Sandy Torres,
but Obed came out on top
after one minute and forty two
seconds of the eighth round to
capture his 26th consecutive
win and move his knockout
score up one to 16.
'After that bout Friday
night. Accomplished a lot," C j
said Obed. "That was the most
blows I ever took in my life." ak
Obed made his debut in the
middleweight division on ~ ';
November 18 when he stopped i L
middleweight Joe Hooks of
Philadelphia in the sixth round ?I
of their scheduled ten-rounder.
"I don't think I'll go full force
in the middleweight right .
now," explained Obed, "I'll
fight in both classes."


SSt. lohn's girlS 8V8Rg8



11075' dBIoat,IISat AI|HiRas

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE Senior Girls after a slow start
yesterday avenged their senior boys loss to the Aquinas Aces in a
30-22 victory over Aquinas College Senior Girls at the Garfunkel
Auditorium.


Aquinas, using a full press
defence, held St. John's but
inaccurate shooting by Aquinas
kept them scoreless for the
first four minutes of the first
quarter.
Janet Bethel started a rally
for St. John'. which saw them
drive to a 8-1 lead before
Sandra C ..eeting in the closing
minutes added a basket for
Aquinas placing them five
behind (9-3) by the first
quarter-
Paced by Joyce T'hompson
and Alice Wells in the second
quarter, Aquinas moved one
behind at 8-7 but St. John's
held them o~f to take an I 1-8
second quarter lead.
St. John's in the third
quarter got all the help they
might have needed from
Winsome Davidson and Mavis
Sullaord to outscore Aquinas by
1S-5 to take a third quarter
command of 26-13.

Sw etin sod PaulahGomnt kpt
up a hot offensive pace, and
out:cored St. John's by 9-4'
they were not enough to offset
the ;omrmand placed on them
in the third quarter and
Aquinas dropped their second
to level off with two wins and
two losses.
Davidson top-scored for St.
John's with 12 and Bullard
added ei ht. Thompson and

respectively for Aquinas.
In other senior girls action:
Prince Williams High 27, C.
SC. Sweeting High 16. Agnes
Minns, Nora Albury and
Yvonne Brown all added six
points to give C. C. Sweeting
their fourth loss of the season.
L. W. Young High 18, Queen
College 16.
A 12 point performance by
Della-Reese Symonette was not
enough to break Queen's
College losing streak as they
lost their fourth in a row. Judy
Young and Christine Saunders
scored nine and six points
respectively for L. W. Young,

R. M. Bailey High 18, St
Annes Colleg 14 '
Moving fo ma four all first

Reta NirnB lia ed ac nhei
third win in four games


SA HAMAS



From Page 1
and additives had been
developed in the last few year
to attack, contain and clean up
inadvertent oil spills if they
should occur.
SMr Jones pointed out that it
was aircady evident that big
tankers were going through and
right past the Bahamas
anyway,
It would be ironic, he added,
if the Bahamas were to ban or
discourage VLCC terminals
here for fear of oil pollution
only to have a VLCC going
though or past the Bahamas to
Snew competing location have
r: serious casualty which
ok ctdh in tthenie pollution


yesterday. Patsy Adams scored
10 for St. Annes.
*r*+****
After their victorious win
against St. John's College on
Monday. Aquinas College Aces
begin the second round of
competition in t he
Inter School Senior Boys
Basketball series today when
they meet Adderley Hligh at
the A. F. Adderley G~ym.
Aquinas swamped Adderley
liigh 71-23 when they met a
week ago.
In other games in the
Western Division this
afternoon, Government Hligh
visits Prince William High and
St. John's are at C. C. Sweeting
fligh.
In the Eastern Division
defending champions St.
Augustine's College meet L. W.
Young at L. W. Young's and
Queen's College are at R. M.
Bailey High.
IU --


MARGARET KNOWLES of St. John's College eyes the
basket for a field goal attempt while being closely guarded
-2 Dbbie Rahming of Aquinas College. St. John's won
PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


MAKING OF A CHAMP
The undefeated champ is
presently under the watchful
eye of trainer Moe Fleischer
Brho healo er withthD ne
Fifth Street Gym. "He has the
making of a middleweight
chiamp," said Fleischer after
the fight, "but he has a lot to
,er.
leOnbed echoed his trainer's
comment in that. "Like my
trainer said '! have a lot to
learn' and in boxing, you never

sitoplea b mreA rushinene u ,a

Ob t ogh he was not in the
very best of shape for his bout
against Torres, Obed, who said
that he started training for the
fight only two weeks ago, still
retained his confidence. "Any
time I go in the ring I am
confident," he said. "In a way,
I was a little bit scared because
Sdd not knw anything about
SObed who started boxing
about six years ago when he
was 15-years-old, had about
two amateur fights, both of
which he won before going
into the professional division as

"'".'A'Eghtwith a second
round knockout of Buddy
Taylor, Obed worked his way
up into the junior welterweight
division where in 1969 he
attained the unclaimed junior
. we teweight title.ithjnor
welterweight division where he

y 0 ign ad B nhain fia tinst


SANDY TORRES tasts another of those tantalizing lefts
thrown from Bahamas welterweight champ Elisha Obed last
Friday night when he gained an eighth round knockout
victory over Torres. Photo: Rickey Wells


Obed worked himself into the
welterweight division to
become the number one
contender, and on June 5,
1971, he out pointed former
ieterweightS cham ioann Ra

reigned as champ since then.
EASIEST FIGHT
"That was one of the easiest
fights I had in my life," said
Obed, explaining that one of
his hands was injured. "Ray
did not present any problem."
Minus had a few more fights
and went into pre-retirement-
As he moved up in the
boxing world, fights got stiffer,
explained Obed, but he was
always able to hold his own.
His toughest fight in the
welterweight division was his
first match against Don Frazier
of Jamaica. However, in the
,eodsamda dh "he was very

Obed then continued his
winning streak defeating all in
his class that had the courage
to fight him or give him the
Idpeof competition the peop e
finally decided to go into the
middleweis tc i like I

"I wa cofdntlk


always be," declared Obed
concerning his match with
Hooks. "I was a little bit
stronger and was in one of the
best shapes I wanted to be.
"I was hitting Hooks the

O ed, ayb bdbtue sI ws
a better shape."
Obed who is the third child
of ten children born to Mrs.
Ceta Ferguson of Nassau is
only waiting until he reaches
the legal age of 21 --which he
will be next month before he
sets forth for international
recognition.
"Elisha has proven that he
can fight in the middleweight
division," commented his
trainer Moe Fleischer. "I will
polish him up as he goes
along," Fleischer added.
"He (Fleischer) showed me a

boetforoe," cmentende bedkne
Following in the footsteps
of his older brother is Obed's
10-year-old kid brother Van
Ferguson who already is
r kin x tdte aragoo sHoe r

quicker than the older boxers,"
somk tde h bed concerning



his kd brther


TYRONE SAWYER (left)
fibB ck' Ca C eg a:1 Cr
battle for a rebound which
eventually ended in a jump
ball. Carter's won the game
83-63.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells




OPEN 0 A Y
N saSUNDA, sE~brunr b th
co-ordination with the B~lue Hill
Golf Club will hold an open day of
squash at the Blue Hill G;olf Club
q5ussh Club counts.hepnda s
to give all sporting fans in Nassau
an opportunity to see exhibition
ga satof quashwan ito tr their
Growing participatory sport in the
world today.
All members and friends are
dqime t wll e aty laopen do us
at no cost and instruction will be
siven for a nominal fee.
Listed below are! the events for
sun ctm. prqp m both Courts;
Round Robin-American scoring
(first to IS points with scoring on
eer gerally) a ll sde cdap e tand
Those wishing to enter are
requested to put their names on the
a ty f rm on the notice bear a
February 2.
COURT I -- 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
EXHIBITION GAM6S
I.00 p.m. Tony Lancaster V.
Mo1 pm. ernda Zeese V. E~nid

L2.J p.m. Ivern Davis V. David
15i p.m. Keith Parker V. Roy
COURT 2 I p.m. to 4 p.m.
colrro action to the turne on
coaching for 'B' and 'C' Indder
players.


Bucner wi C8 WI if St f 0 R II


Of H ar ry K~nowles Tr ophy

By IVAN JOHNSON
THE BUCCANEERS RUGBY Club defeated the Baillou R.C
13-12, scoring three penalty goals and one try to the Baillou'
'"o t "ie """""",;. tw o.,sin i he eis ru ofd the Harr

With the score standing at for the first time this season.
12-9 to Baillou and ten Baillou struck first whet
minutes of the game remaining after ten minutes scrum-hal
the Buccaneers second row Geoff Hallam, who had flowl
forward, John Smith, burst in specially from Bermuda fo
through the Baillou defence the game, broke through or
from a loose scrum to score the the blind side following
winning try for the Buccaneers. set-scrum, passed to Phil Davi
Minutes later Baillou came who in turn passed to Bol


Beese who ran twenty yards to
place the ball between the
Buccaneers' post. Phil Davis
made no mistake with the
conversion to put Baillou 6-0
in the lead.
Minutes later Tony Broome
kicked the first of three
penalty goals for the
Buccaneers when they were
awarded a penalty for feet up
in the scrum.
Some five minutes later the
Buccaneers enwere awarded
aoh p nly folwinE
another scrum infringement by
the Baillou forwards this
time Broome did well tb find
omespacov betwenr the p st

mati e. the score 6-6 at

MEMORABLE TRY
In spite of the fact that the
Buccaneers were continuing to
get most of the possession it
was Baillou who scored first in
the second half. With the
Buccaneers deep into Baillou
territory, Baillou centre, Allen
Gee intercepted a pass and
p ssd to Barrettr who gal80%d

opposition out of the way with
all the subtlety and
discrimination of a snow
plough, to score a memorable
try between the BuccaneerS
posts which Davis again
converted.
However, shortly after
Barrett's try the Baillou
scrum-half, Geoff Hallam Was
penalised for not putting the
ball in straight in a set scrum
and Broome stepped forward
once more to kick his third
penalty goal of the match.
With ten minutes of the
game remaining and the score
standing at 12-9 in their
favour it looked odds on a
Baillou victory when John
Smith burst through from a
loose scrum to score the final
try of the match and clinch th
game for the Buccaneers e


desperately close to clinching
the match when John Bird ran
fifty yards with the ball but
Barrett failed to hold onto his
pass with nothing but open
territory between him and the
Buccaneers' posts.
With the Baillou scrum being
so mew hat depleted the
Buccaneers forwards
dominated the sthse ns an

match and if they had had the

thei s8 Mter ossae sio a the
ball the Buccaneers would
un obdy have emerged as
easy Victors.
Ji ain kthedBuccaneer ho

ur denfor ard wh el h

perkormoyctes r eepmng tmhse
while the Baillou star backs,
Barrett, Reid and Gee waited
with itching fingers for a ball
which rarely came their way


1 *
SCARE-UM, the No. 5 horse ridden by Stan McNeil, shown crossing the finishing liner
in first place ahead of Dacvid Peatl on Miss Brite (6) and Complete image (9) with Alfred
Gibbs up, in second and third place respectively, during the third race (4Va furlongs) at
the Hobby Horse Race Track Saturday.


BABA NIGHT GAMES
SUPERWASHI ARAWAKS after
a pdian to Ceunt tenheiri chirdpla r

Rde Spo S op intesc
ejm at 8:30 at the A. F. Adderley

'In the first p~es :0
undefeated Brogam arAra a s
defend their lead aainst Fort
Flacastle Hawks.


.ACROSS
5. Cardigan
10.Comprehend
II.Broker
12. Sport coat
13. Christmas
visitor


is dbl semsaeed

20. Hairless
21. Near
22. Jump up
and down


23. Mountain P N E P E T

24. Sign of the AR13CIA DIAI I IAIL
zodiac LIE T RT
25. Timid P ER R O IN A
26. Exist 1
28. Concoction UL LIT R l.,I
30. Luau dish P R E N E

33. Balsam SO1LUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUfZLE

3 Cek market 4 Fsph g boat molishi
place 4Sao
37. Water ouzel 0W
39. Discourage 6. Moslem titIe
40. Clumsy 1. Desire 7. Intellectual
5 7 8 to18. Up to
9. Night table
at 1 110. Admiration
12. Lump
I 16. Mine
S19. C081
271 I 0. Youth
4 a 22. Mandible
23. Greek letter
24.0Out-of-the-way
'25. Wretched
26. Cap
27. Pitcher
28. Glazier's tacks
29. "Thesaurus"
COmpiler
30. Mixed type
31. Pet
q 33.Cultivate
34. Meatt
4 ~36. urmeric
38. Cadmus'
AP Newsfootwes 2.2 daughter


MIDF~IELD MAN Kenny Love of Golden Isles is shown
above just before bing sandwiched by two converging
McAlpine defenders during last Satutrdy's Soccr League
match. Golden Isles emerged from the match as easy victors
soring five goals. Centnforward Larry Minns sored a
hat-trick -- striker Tony Walker and outside left Andy
Reece were the other goalacorers for the Isles.


5be Grtbnatt


Wednesday, January 31, 1973.


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE


~fu \~


SANDWICH ED?