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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03259
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 30, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03259

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ORANGE JUICE
available at your
SUPERMARKET'


4 POWERFUL JET-PROP ENGINEs
ARE MORE RELIABLE THAN 2*
-TELEPHONE 77303/77778- ,


VOL. LXX, No. 58 Tuesday, January 30, 1973. Price: 1 5 Cents


be sent to the U.S. and Puerto
Rico for training, and Motor
Centre hopes to open with an
all -Bahamian service
department.
The first attempt to bring
the Datsun to the Bahiamian
motorist was made between
1964 and 1966 by Leonard
Roberts, who then operated a
GM sales and service dealership
on Bay Street near the Nassau
Bicycle company.
deThe effortclended when Mhre
Roberts' death in 1966.


EMI1S TOMORROW UI
STREET SALES for the
Crippled Children Committee's
annual raffle of two cars is
slow this year "due to the
inclement weather," Mrs.
Shirley Oakes Butler, chairman
of the committee said .today.
However, with one more day
to go chom m pto u i teob r w


$1 ticket to help the Bahamas'
crippled children and win one
oftMT attr etwve cars donated

The two cars being raffled
this year are a 1973 Dodge
Polara station wagon and a
1973 Chrysler Newport sedan
The retail value of each car is
B$6,000.

thaTo wiktselilse hwilliabed o
Bay S reetivvith raffle ticke s

tickets will be held on the
night of Tuesday, February 6
at the Cat & Fiddle when Mrs.
L. O. Pindling will draw the
two winning tickets at 10 p.m.
Our n tma igttick ts can be
p~m.
Mr. Nihon, who personally
assists with the sale of the
tickets each year, has arranged
atr four sliersa ro rrto th
night for the last drive. Selling
at the casino will be Mrs.
Butler, Mrs. Vernice Cooper,
Miss Vernitta Mott and Miss
Deborah Taylor, Miss Bahamas
1972.

theT biom eeade apeal t
this final opportunity to help a
child and win a car.
Although the street sales
were slow, Mrs. Butler hoped
that private sales would be
much better. Allrseellers' books

Thursday-




FloRANTINE

WALL PLAQUE


AII YII lliB


By MIKE LOTHIAN


A FORTHCOMING EXPLANATION by
Williams/Baptist High will "clear up all the
Artemus Cox assured ITse Tribune today.
Mr. Cox confirmed this
morning that the Board will
meet, possibly this Tw k,hwith

Association of Prince Williams, I
but he did not disclose the
nature of the explanation that *'L
would be given to the parents.
However, he said "we will
ex lai ee ntl wha id e adi
why it was in the best interests
of the children."


the Board of Governors of recent events at Prince
uncertainties that appear to exist." Board chairman


ROGER JONES
. president of Jones,
Bardelmeier & Co., Ltd.,


WITH Independence imminent government will have to "decide and let it be known to the world shipping
fraternity whether or not they want to encourage or discourage the registration of international shipping under the
new Bahamilm flag," Mr. Roger Jones, president of Jones, Bardelmeier & Co., Ltd., told members of the Nassau
Rotary Club today.


TRINIDADIAN

MR. JUSTICE SAMUEL
Horatio Graham,. C.M.G..
O.B.E.. Puisne Judge of the
British Honduras Courts of
Justice, Belize. has been
appointed a Justice with the
Bahamas Supreme Court, The
Tribune has been informed.
Sources also disclosed today
that, although no official
notice confirming the judge's
appointment has yet been
made, Mr. Justice G~raham will
arrive here sometime tonight or
tomorrow from Grenada
The new judge will bring to
four the number of Justices
acting in the Supreme Court.
H'ork ha al ead b Idinon the

Rawson Square which wiln
soon be used by members of
the Registry and Records
Department
The space used by that
department at the eastern
section of the Supreme Court,
is to be converted into a
courtroom to be presided over
by the new judge.
Although the disclosure of
the new judge's appointment
had been first gven at the
opening of the la ary Assizes,
for some reason, the judge's
name was never revealed to the
press.
Speculation at the time was
that he would arrive here from
Bnitain.
Government House today
stated that "he will arrive
soon" and declined to say
when, adding however, that "it
will come out in the official
Gazzette."
Mr. Justice Graham, a Puisne

llnud a I urts o utc
to hear civil cases sources
revealed.
FORMER JOURNALIST
A former journalist and
teacher, he was called to the
Bar, Gray's Inn, London in
1949 and engaged in private
practice in Grenada as a
barrister-at-law from 1949 to
1953 when he was appointed
Magistrate of St. Lucia where
he served on the Bench for

foAp oi ed Crown Attorney
of St. Kitts, he also attained
the position of Attorney
General there in 1960 until
becoming Administrator of St.
Vincent in 1962.
Mr. Justice G~raham was also
the chair an ofoaICommisson

Reliefs, the Coconut Industry
on the island of St. Lucia in
1955, and acted as
Administrator of St. Lucia, St.
Kittassand Dominica on various
l-Ie also acted as Chief
Justice of British Honduras in
1968 for the four month
period from February to May.
Fond of cricket, bridge and
swimming, he is the only son
of the late Rev. Benjamin
Graham of Trinidad and is the
husband of the former Oris
Gloria Teka and father of four
daughters and two sons.
He was educated in
Bardbeadosoand was an externa(
stdnd o h university o
Heonas made an Officer of
the Order of the British Empire

nompaln n2 of Sat Mich el a
St. George in 1965.

OA B O AS Information
Srvi es rlaa n stateedm to

the Advisory Council to the
Ideepenodence Seckretearsiat these

inadvertently left out.


headquartered here but
probably few of you realize
that the Bahamas also is the
corporate and/or operating
headquarters of some very
large international shipping
companies," he said.
"Navios Corporation, for
instance, which I was formerly
associated with, established
their world headquarters
an Nassau in 1954 and from
here operates one of the largest
fleets of iron and carriers
operating anywhere in the
world. I doubt if there has
been any corporate resident of
the Bahamas that has been
more of an asset to the
Bahamas in the 19 years they
have been here than Naytos, as
they pioneered the hiring and
training of Bahamians for very
speci ali ze d, technical
management positions. You
can now hardly go in any bank,
trust or insurance company
or government office in Nassau
without finding some senior


Bahamian member of the staff
who started his or her business
career and received his or her
early training at Navios.
SCH1OLA RSHIPS
"At the present time, I
understand, Navios employs
approximately 40 Bahamnians
at their headquarters building
on Village Road and one of the
Bahamians, Clyde Bethel, is
directly responsible for
scheduling the ships and
instructing the captains in the
worldwide fleet. Iwas pleased
to see in the newspapers last
year that Navios granted two
four-year scholarships to
Bahamian boys so they could
attend a University in the U.S.
specializing in all phases of ship
operation and management.
There are a number of other
international shipping
companies with headquarters
here, however, none with quite
the substance or size staff that
Navios employs.
"It has been estimated that


Bermuda, which has gone out
of its way to attract shipping
companies, has almost ten
times as many shipping entities
headquartered there than there
are in the Bahamnas," he said.
"We know, however, thereis
not one single tangible
advantage that Bermuda has
over the Bahamnas for this type
of truly international activity
and, as a matter of fact, from a
banking and communications
standpoint which are most
important when conducting
worldwide shipping operations,
the Bahamas is far superior to
Bermuda. If the Bahamas want
to attract more of this type of
activity, I'm sure it can,
"Our own firm, Jones,
Bardelmeier and Co. Ltd., is
unique in the shipping world.
Our specialized services can be
defined as covering any
commodity that can or does
move in shipload lots in world
trade iron ore, coal, grain,
oil, sugar, salt, bauxite, forest
products cargoes that
ordinarily move in tankers or
bulk carriers that range from
3,000 up to 350,000 tons. As
far as we know, we are still the
only company any where in the
world providing this type of
objective shipping consulting
service. Most of our work
involves projects diat are going
on in far corners of the world
and in recent weeks our
partners have visited and
worked on bulk shipping
projects in such diverse
locations as the Cana lan
A cticLa~ibe dth sAmieric n

nateernorkedcfop ov 90

i anc, Nor~we ican, Ca~nha i
German and, of course, U.S.
and British. We are also
consultants on bulk shippinS
matters to the U.S. Maritime
Administration and a Canadian
Government entity.
INTERNATIONAL
"Shipping is truly the most
international of business. When
one of the shippers of bulk
commodities in the Bahamas
such asmthe companies ship ing
or Owens Illinois when they
were shipping sugar from
Abaco needed a ship --the
word would go out to a
brokerage network around the
world to New York*
Lonm n. anambu~rg,2 hO o,

offers for ships would start
coming in for ships of
Norwegian, Swedish, German,
Liberian, Greek, Hong Kong,
UaK.N Dtch S anh biltalan
most international o
businesses but it also is
probably the most competitive
of all international businesses

cmetei g wit the ernpgs o
perhaps a dozen ot er
countris dOnly co ntre nl a
with extremely high labour
costs don't compete unless it's
uncontrolled trade where a
goen a t subsid i pad
governmeMarch, ye paPrime
Minister, Mr. Pindling, in a
speech to the Chamber of
Commerce here stated that the

i prtnt couaditibecomatioann
she Bahamast ast yu can se
direction and if the

t cormge the t pe ofs ppi g
te r gistratio of de psas
shaipsmunder thhe new B h ma

maritime nation."


Speaking on "The Bahamas
as a Maritime Nation," Mr.
Jones said that some of "the
most heavily travelled
commercial shipping lanes in
the world pass through and just
off the Bahamas." And as a
maritime nation the Bahamas
already had a good start in this
direction,
If the Bahamas wants to
encourage the registration of
international shipping, he said
"then the Bahamas will have to
become signatories to a
number of international
conventions on shipping, set up
a system of inspection for the
ships, arrange to license ships
officers, arrange for world-wide
consular representation at
major ports and otherwise take
steps to facilitate the
registration of ships here.
"All of you are familiar with
the banking, trust company,
insurance, mutual fund and
other such activities


Mr. Cox's statements this
morning were the first made by
him or any other member of
the Board on the controversy
which has developed at the
school since January 10, when
the entire teaching staff were
served with three months'
notice of the termination of
their contracts.
While not saying what the
Board's explanation will be,
Mr. Cox stressed that what has
been done is in the best
interest of the students, and he
said he is considering suing the
Nassau Guardian in connection
with published reports on the
controversy. Also, he said that
even if the Board does not
permit the press to attend the
coming PTA-Board meeting,
the press will be subsequently
informed of the Board's
position.
CONSIDERING
Referring to the proposed
meeting, Mr. Cox said "I am
considering all the things which
have happened and I am going
ahead with every bit of energy
in doing what is necessary to
set the record straight."
He stressed that while the
Board has not explained its
actions to the parents
collectively, individuals who
have called Board members
have been assured that what
was done was in the best
interest of their children and
they have been satisfied.
He acknowledged that he
has been informed by PTA
chairman Arlington Miller of

meeting isth reqe BardforButa
meadei, "e Board realized
Thursday 's PTA meeting, that
we would have to meet wi h
the aren said the meeting
with the PTA will be held
"when it is mutually
convenient for both the Board
and the parents.
"We (the Board) haven't said
our bit yet, and as soon as
convenient and possible we will
make a statement and that
statement will clear up all the
uncertainties that appear to

Mr. Cox said the meeting
"could very well be this week.
I cannot say definitely it will
be this week, or it will be next
week, but it could very well be
this week. It will be as soon as
twe could conveniently arrange
PRESS RELEASE
On the question of whether
the press would be allowed to


CENTRAL FIG URES IN THE PRINCE
WILLIAM/BAPTIST HIGH controversy are from left Rev.
Dr. R. E. Cooper, president of the Bahamas Baptist
Missionary and Educational Convention, Mr. Artemus Cox,
chairman of the school Board of Governors, and Mr.
Selwyn Smith, headmaster.


attend the meeting, Mr. Cox
said:
"I have not even discussed it
with the Board. But there is
every possibility that I will say
to the Board. 'let the press
attend.' But whatever the
Board decides, the press will be
given a statement.
"If the press is allowed into
the meeting they will get the
statement then. If they are not
allowed in, I will give the press
the Board's statement."
Mr. Cox went on to say that
he has copies of every report
published on the controversy
by the G~uardian since January
10.
"I am seriously considering
all these things and making up
my mind on what to do," Mr.
Cox said.
NOT BAN KRUPT
He took particular exception
to "the Guardian article on
Friday in which the newspaper
said 'it is felt that the school is
being faced with possible
bankruptcy ...'
"We have been banking with
the Bank of Nova Scotia for
years," Mr. Cox said, "and
anyone could go and check our
solvency. Our books are
audited by F. R. Wilson and
Company and anyone can go
and looknat ourbbooks. We a

ban kplw, our bank knows

aid nu all tos v ntow we are
When Prince Williams'
teaching staff, including
headmaster Selwyn Smith,
were notified that their
contracts would be terminated
on April 10, the teachers were
told that they were free at any
time during the three-month
period to apply to be rehired
under a new con tract.
Most of the teachers and
many parent have etaenk mthe

that the entire teaching staff
was being fired without
explanation and with no
promise that they would be
replaced.
In a joint press release a
number of dreteacerust saurgeed

most as a result of the
upheavel, and parents have
expressed a similar sentiment.


StAFE Al tilEC it




FOUND'CRACKED'

PO LICE are today
investigating the Monday
morning fire which completely
destroyed Besco Limiited on
Shirley Street following the
discovery in the wrecked
building of a safe which had
been broken into.
Besco manager Charles F.
Smith told The Tribune this
morning that one side of the
safe had been cut open and
about SSO in petty cash was
missing from it.
A spokesman for the Fire
Department told The Tribune
this morning that there were
no signs of forced entry into
the building. "That's what is
being investigated," he said.
Investigating the cause of
the fire is hampered, the
spokesman said, by the fact
that when authorities arrived
on the scene shortly after 6
a.m. Monday the building was
already well ablaze and the
roof, a possible point of entry,
had already started to collapse.
mo. mSmi h aId that mhi

sae, ithna quantity ompcanh

accu ni tcreceivable, were

of the c pnt toyr ter reoai
outlets on East Street is to be
used as temporary offices for
the purposes of accounts
handling and other business.
However, he pointed out
that all the tools and parts
stock had been destroyed in
the fire, which caused and
estimated $230,000 worth of
dmageSmith added that most
of his 17 employees are still
fully employed "doing
different jobs" and will remain
employed at least "until we
decide what we're going to do.
I may have to have some of
tbhenstaff wi draw for the time
look for work elsewhere. But
the majority are fully
employed."


I if0 pr-hillS 50 V8588
THE DECISION BY A NUMBER OF CARIBBEAN
COUNTRIES to establish full relations with Cuba is believed to
be one of the reasons the United States is concerned about the
economic stability of the Bahamas after independence.


The United States and
Bahamas governments recently

center int ta ouonretm e t

development of agriculture and
livestock production from the
Ag Icpm for International

Bank er, the xport-Imdort
an $11 million loan for the

faii i ,n after turnn due ionan
down four months previously.
In the interim Jamaica,

Duymn ai nounced thy woau

diplmaticr a tade 1 vel witi
Cuba. All four countries are
heavy contributors to the
British market in terms of rum,
cigars, bananas and grapefruit.
The Bahamas also exports
considerable qiu tithesdof rum

same preferential trade quotas
which have given Caribbean
Ur ducts and adnvan age over
This country, however, has

nt itud towd Cuba will as
after independence, and it
would appear the United States
is concerned to ensure that it
doer not follow the example of
its CE, ibbean neighbours.
MEETING
President Nixon and British
Prime Minister Heath are to
meet in Washington this week
and among the matters likely
to cause the greatest friction is
the question of British trade
quotas.
The U.S. has complained
about this trad preference to

organization which ne va e
international trade disputes.

troT seal po uts1 trm th U. .
ando ruertohRico to Bntaon and

'c'nonbeanr cooin as crs
fruits, bananas aind rum.
lik salir d Sates wulids

interpreted as a U.S. response


to the action of the former
colonies in recognizing

s~ou csu hve,Chuobvemde ie

Mr. Heath's job will be to
explain why the quotes are
being continued andotry tlo g
the~~~~ GT opan
withdrawn.POIY

Mr. Nixon, meantime, is
to ing tha er.uadliatth willhbe

leaders of the Common Market
to adopt a more benevolent

other n nw dmbe ec tr (1

citrus f dollarth oatrasest, it i
1,150,000 pounds per year -
were established just after the
second world war to save
dollars, since they limit the
amount of goods Britain can

bHfowvr dolly also guarantee
the British market for
Jamaican rum, cigars and
ba a asd for Dominica an

ruml from Guyana and the
B ghams O'Shaughnessy
writing in the Financial Times
London, said that the U.S.
complaint may be "the first
shot in the tough negotiations
among the enlarged
community (Common Market),
t he U.S. a nd the
Commonwealth Caribbean.,,
Washington, he said, "is
known to be very exercised
over the possibility of U.S.
trade being whittled away by
the EEC in an area which the
Americans have tended to
think of as their own

aMkyarO'Shaughnessy also said
observers feel that "the U.S.

tht the U.Su Itl is ih o ven
eafr mrhe GoA plaint for

gani onhernember of that
The belief among foreign

f ibl me as otlat tdie dol a

Nixon-Heath agenda to settle.


THE JAPANESE-MADE
DATSUN vehicles are coming
to New Providence in March,
when the first construction
phase of a $500,000
investment is scheduled for
completion at a site on John F.
Kennedy Drive.
It will be the second time
Datsun has attempted to get
into the Bahamian market.
The new Datsun dealership,
called Motor Centre, Limited
is owned half-and-half by
G ra nd Bahama Leasing

Ldmpaa nw cmpan o rgsmee d
mno ths ahamas about three

It is understood that the
personsmbeehindethe half r pin

Slated to manage Motor
Centre is Mr. Bill Black, f orm


The Stran-Steel Company is


the principal contractor for the
first phase of construction,
when about $200,000 is to be
spent on building a showroom,
offices, a parts department and
a service depart ment.
Mr. Black said they are
expected to be completed in
March, and the premises will
open for business soon after.
There are proposals to
develop the 4.6 acre site
further, at a cost of $300,000
more, Mr. Black said. The
propoasalsui cude ta used-car lo

built and then leased to a bank.

thThe property, jus vves t
owned by Motorambar.

Mr. BlacSEV si otor Centre
00,l 18and service 01200,

Diku and the atsun 2

spBra aan mechanics are to


~brD


~ribunp


Reitrdwt ouatro eaa o psaecncsoswti h eae)Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


LO Ao^'@ PPPING CHIEF POSES INTERESTING


,i sr~F-S INDEPENDENCE NEARS




Ibes Bahamas want to





encozlrgewolh. ppn


II AFTE 3-WlEEK( SILENCE ON BAPTIST III6i






SSchool Board to meet with parents



I this week'to clear up all uncertainties'


under~T ou


calPPLED clutelEN WashilgtSH COncrCedlG1St

2;CRR,,L, L Athma joAC neihbu


NEW $500,000 HOME FOR DATSUN




---- "--- -------- ----- ---- ------------- --1 ------ --- -- ----- --- --- 1~~___ ____ _~~_,__,-------- Etl


cls .e7so.












UItBELEVABLE i
)UR BEAUTIFUL COLOUR
PORTRAIT







Eson the Wate aon
yat s St. & William St.
Phone 5-4641
y Special to keep our
fter-Christmas Lull


HEALTH AND NIXON TO MEET IN WASHINGTON
LONDON (AP) Britain's Prime Minister Heath leaves for Washington
today with a proposal for President Nixon on a new peaele approach in the
Middle East. British sources say Heath wants the Pre~sident to pressure
Israel to come to tenrm quickly, while European governments do the same
with the Arabs.
Heath and Nixon begin their two-day conference Thursday at the White
House. They'll continue Friday at the presidential retreat at Camp D~avid,
Maryland. While they discuss policy, Secretary of State Rogetrs will be
meeting with Britain's Foreign Secretary, Sir Alec IDouglas H~ome. Their
talks will include Soviet and Chinese intentions, internartiotnal trade and
monetary reform.
U.S. NOT ABANDONING FRIENDS
SA GON, JA 30h (t)-ie) Remsidenn Spir Tnt 2 dws frie I

Saigon is Agnew's first stop on a seven nation Asian tour that includes
also Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Singapore, indonesia and Malaysia

pH asre hs cutist tw e brae abadnn oeurfrirnds. He sadt
Scan to see that those countries enjoy freedom and self de termination "
THIRTYSEVEN KILLED IN EGYPTIAN PLANE CRASH
NICOSIA, CYPRHUS, JAN. 30 (AP) -Thirty seven people aboard an
Egyptian jetliner from Cairo were killed Monday night when the plane :
struck a mountain ridge while approaching Nicosia Airport.
The crash occurred in the Kyrenia mountains 12 miles from the airport.
Use four-engine jet of Egypt's Misrair Airline was approaching from the
north and flying at an average altitude of 2,000 feet over the: mountains
when the airport lost contact with it.
NARCOTICS TRAFFICKER GIVEN TWENTY YEARS
NE:W YORK (AP') Argentine national Auguste Joseph Ricord, kingpin
of a $600 million a year international heroin ring, was sentenced to a
mxismkueme 0 bers ugn f deral piso UM nday ,t M~"the biggest narcotics
The description came from Asst. U S. Atty. Walter Phillips, who told the
court: "Ricard's organization has been responsible for bringing into the
United Sttes 2,000 pounds a year. The destruction he has wreaked upon
By government standards, aI ton of heroin translates into enough to
supply 49,000 addicts for an entire year a figure which sentencing judge
John Cannella compared to the American casualty list in Vietnam. The
street value of the dope in New York would total $634.2 million.
SENATE APPROVES RICHARDSON'S NOMINATION
WASHINGTON (AP) T~he Senate Monday confirmed president Nixon a
nomination of E~lioth s. ecehssna rto b e Scar ua aefnd Wlfr
succeeds Melvin R. Laird in the pentagon cabinet post. '
Earlier the Senate labour committee approved without a dissenting vote
th nomination of P'eter J. Brennaln, New York Labour leader, to be


Abusuo L o rR i Clnon S Kno andI p ioes rlase fU.
Haitian jails as part of the diplomat s ransom were to be questioned
Tuesdayl~a M xicdan roevelrnmentdspo esman said.aHtancropnend
n h r 5 aried h eb e ls e n s a ard i t (ata Bag CI ) la n .and
One of the IS, a woman, had been ill, he added.
There was no indication what the government s decision would be
The ue t i t waie listen ont thts mh wol see t b sent to other
countries while a few might ask for political asylum
Temporary asylum was granted by the Mexican government an order to
gain the safe release of Ambassador Knox and U.S. Consul General Ward

sper ano mn h snce be tun o ai y th exican

PEmLIEVE BLACK MAGIC USED TO KILL VILLAGERS
JAKARTA, JAN. 30 (AP)-Seventy persons in West Java were under
arrest Tuesday, accused mf strangling, chopping and burying alive seven
men whom they believed used black magic to kill several villagers, police
RTh killings occurred in the Rancakalong district of the regency of
Sumedans six months ago, but details became known only recently when
one of the arrested men confessed to the murders, police said.
arreo em ordh pc ed up th a9 stthiers n information fro te
Pid prelmiplery Information suggests the killings resulted from rivalries
Pndeves*,
US, SPEEDING WORK ON LASER BOMB
WASHINGTON, JAN. 30 (AP)--Dahe United States is speeding up work
on a pro~posd "laser bomb" that will be as powerful as the hydrogen
bomb.
The Nixron administration's proposed budget for fiscal 1974 provides
$34 million for laser bomb research by the Atomic Energy Commission.
The amount includes $20 million for a high-energy Inser facility at the AISCC
Ishoratory at Livermore, Calif.
Research Into a laser bomb has been upder way at least five years, but
the expenditures proposed for 1974 are the greatest yet. The appropriation
for the current fiscal year was $22 million.
The! bomb would use the intense heat of a laser beum to ignite hydrogen
explosives. Existing hydrogen bombs employ an atomic bomb as the trigger

sim Idutuc I f o ~sbeuel lus trigger is that it peumably w~oudid b
an-tiles I c t edns deIce m be used as a bomb or in the warhead
The Nixon administration also proposes to allocate S44 million to the


JAILED FOR FIVE YEARS FOR RAPE
Y ORTSMOUTH, England (AP')- A 22-yealr-old African-horn soldier was
Inited for fiv years at Potrtmouth Crown Court Tuesday for raping two
American girl hitchhickers at gunpoint after giving them a lift across
u S lbw born Zandibar and serving with Britain's Royal Artillery,
~asr found guilty at Winchester Crown Court Jan. II. The sentence
oldlowed a psychiatric report ordered by the judge at the Winchester trial.
SSelf pleaded innocent ti the charges of aping um;! !ahun ~herg, 20, o
st~wthorne, N. J.
rIBefore passing sentence, the judge, Norman Broderick, said "this is a
erry serious and very bad case of rape because it was done! at gunpoint. I
anrv hen able to red ce sightlon cha thought was the right sebntetce.d




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- -- -~- IY. -.-~ I


Tuesday, January 30, 1973.


PARIS TO BE PEACE
SUPERVISORS SITIE
e PARIS (AP) The newspaper Le
SMonde said today "there are
reasons to believe" that the
12-nation ministerial conference.
which is to supervise the Vietnam
SPeace settlement will open in Paris
on Feb. 26, despite initial American
objections.
The conference, established
uide daileI vo the thgraement

voatli ns. idennored rarc saie
the United States and the Sasgon
'rose vtinmo about the hirced o
Rit.,n c a urs would almos
conference chairman. uan e
The United States reportedly
would prefer Vienna as the
conference site, raising the
possibility that U.N. Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim might be
chosen as Chairman,
Under the peace agreement the
conference participants are the four
pnjtte St tthe settlement So t
Vietnam and the Viet Cong's
provisional revolutionary
government, the four members of
Commission -Cn Ind~ontnia
Poland and Hungary, and the fou
remaining permanent members of
the U.N. Security Council
bian teW doie mU (alsChi a
part.
Diplomatic informants said the
American arguments against Paris
was based on the view that the
conference should notp Iee tth
government. Under old-established
diplomatic custom, the delegate of
thechost country s generally chosen


VE INAM' E OWSER
I~WASHINGTON (AP) President
oface meetsn ruesa m tte So
Van Lam to discuss the United
States relations with the Saigon
government during the postwar
pere two leaders were smiling
during a photo session at the White
House.
Nixon's top peace negotiator and
Kisnnjr t 8e'i th mee n
ambassador Tran Kim Phnons-
SAIGON CLAIMS
VIOLATIONS
SAIGON, JAN. 30 (AP) The
North Vietnamese foreign ministry
luteodn govermn ofa cousin th
cease-fire. It also charged South
Vietnam and the United States with
iaas ings tote oCommunist
commlissin.
Foreign ministers Nguyen Dus
Trinh of North Vietnam and
Nguyen Thl Binh of the Viet
Cong told a reception in Paris that
their forces have observed the
cease-fire strictly and will continue
to do so.
But the South Vietnamese
command in a communique
claimed that Communist forces
violated the cease-fire 31 I times
during the 24 hours ending at 6
a.m. today.
'Thus e ince 8 ahm Jn 28'

efec 6 Communist units ioej t d
co muniqsue said.omadcamd
that 666 North Vietnamese and

rh nsth2a askt ur end n i
dead and 468 wounded in fighting
all scroess te ennj s, hn t he
peace agreement was firt
announced, 3,988 North
Vetnamese and Vit hoens tromp
command claimed. The command
said South Vietnamese looses for
the same period were 703 dead and
2,704 wounded.
U.S. MINESWEEPERS
TO CLEAR MINEFIELDS

Un ted S Nte nNv (mi~nesweep s
have left the Philippines to join a
tm ne fro theapprace sc s temon
North Vietnamese ports, the U.S.
department of defense said
Aot 20 to 2S U.S. navalsrhips
xnldn to helicopter carriermi p

Gue otas force is forming in the
There was no indication when
ah oeratkmn would begn The

commission now being orgnized in
Saison.
Th omio r to in 1 d


rorepett e on ty fhe Unit Soe
and North Vietnam as well as the
South Vietnamese and the Viet
cons.
56 U.S. POWS STILL
NOYT ACCOUNTED FOR
WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S.
defense department said Monday
56 American servicemen previously
carried by the United States as
pr"awnun~ offoar remain
vietnam.
Pentagon spokesman Jerry W.
Friedheim said their names "are not
on the two lists we havel received so
These lists, handed to U.S.
offiial in Paris Saturday by the
North Vi t omese, dentiht d 5)
C'ommun t prionmamps inNo t
names or ss PoWe the Communists
said died inn aptivityths tte
Communists also failed to furnish
information on Americans taken
prisoner in Laos or provide clues to
tAmercrl a ill m rin itha aelct::n
throughout Southeast Asia,
Sen. Charles H. Percy, (R-Ill.)


would create "massive mrsstance"
enConrcu sto prioposals to ri i
Vietnam .


TOKYO (AP)--The foreilpn ministries of North Vietnam and
Viet Cong's provisional revolutionary government in South
Vietnam Monday charged that the United States and the Saigon
governments have violated a peace agreement signed in Paris by

the twu patlemost identical Both Trinh and Mrs. Binh
statements claimed that Saigon claimed they had no detailed
troops launched "nibbling information on the continued
operain I nd violent attacks" f ghins rsinc the casefire bt t
areas last Sunday night right their forces will carry out all
after the cease-fire. the terms of the agreem jto
"The United States and the the letter.
Saigon administration must "We hope that the other
bear the full re ponsibility fo parties to the agreement will
all the consequences" of their also strictly respect it and thus
alleged violation of the peace create conditions for national
agreement, the statement said. reconciliation and the
The statements were consolidation of peace," Trinh
broadcast by Hanoi's official said.
Vietnam news agency (VNA) Trinh and Mrs. Binh seemed
and monitored in Tokyo. in a happy mood as they
The North Vietnamese chatted with wellwishers and
foreign ministry statement said newsmen at the party attended
the Saigon government by more than 1,000 guests,
"mobilized big armed forces in including former French Pnime
coordination with aircraft, Minister Maurice Couve de
tanks and artillery" to launch Murville, deputy foreign
attacks on the Viet Cong minister Andre Bettencourt,
controlled areas "south of the and other high French officials.
Viet rivermouth in Trieu Phong Mrs. Binh avoided pinning
District, Quang Tri Province, in blame directly on South
Tay Ninh Province, northeast Vietnam for the continued
of Due Co., Pleiku Province, fighting but she said:
southwest of An Lo, Thua "In the light of what
en vun ,ga Pm jnce, ad hah be sayig s he vilati u

"The Saigon administration Asked about the dispute
da uls cndu ted air, naval over tH diplomatic privileo*;;
who were celebrating the members of the Joint Military
restoration of peace in Binh Commission in Saigon, Trinh
Son district, Quang Ngai and Mrs. Binh both said this
province, Tam Quan and Bong matter had to be decided by
Son districts, Binh Dinh the four parties to the
Province, etc.," it said. agreement.
The Hanoi statement also But Mrs. Binh said under

p maetdons, th ntedm Saae P eeennt exlctl ny ted a
and Sai on administration have com mission members full
violated arrangements made in diplomatic immunity and she
Paris by openly causing trouble said this included the right to
to representatives of the use the Viet Cong flag on PRG
DRVN (North Vietnam and buildings and vehicles and the
the RSVN (Viet Cong) to the right to refuse to submit to
four-party joint military liaison customs formalities.
commission at their arrival in Asked about the American
Saigon to perform their task as bombing of the Ho Chi Minh
preparatory meeting of the said trail in Laos, Trinh said "the
commission could not be held United States has continued its,
in the afternoon of Jan. 28 as policy of bombardment in
scheduled. Laos to back its agents in that
'These facts prove that the country "
Uie states and Saigon 'Our attitude is that the
administration have overly parties to the Laos conflict
violated the agreement on should determine their own
ending the war and restoring future. The (Comm nit)
peace in Vietnam right after Pathet Lao has always
conclusion," it said. demanded cessation of the
The statement said the bombardments and the
NOrth Vietnamese foreign withdrawal of all foreign forces
m nstry tronglyhdenouncees ...waedsupport this legitimate

Sa mes tfo ese god fu He said the question of the
ct d dmen ded thas hasle fture 12-nation conference
a ts nan i dela tha nt enp ws at easter tto be & cidd by

out of the areas under the
control of the RSVNPRG.
(Viet Cong) without delay, and
put an immediate end to allY
acts that may obstruct the i
normal activities" of the North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
delegations to the four-party
joint military commission.
The foreign ministers of
North Vietnam and the Viet

ReonlutionaryP ro ermnt
said Monday night their forces i
have strictly observed the e
Vietnam ceasefire agreement sour sensational Januar
and wil continue to do so. staff busy through the Al
Hanoi's Nguyen Dui Trinh

andtheVit r nh ses Mrs New Kind of NA

Communist parties Saturday T k sO l
gave a lavish reception in a tk sO l
P rs hotel to celebrate the endo hewr Can Even Pull 1

Trinh told newsmen Hanoi
objected to the continued WIthout Breaki
American aerial bom ardrnent

answer questions implying that
this bombardment violated the
Vietnam agreement.


inod nt ubulence Monday,
A week-long land grabbing
effort and diplomatic bickering

Vena ese ad Com Sgn
g over nment left the
countryside in chaos from the
Demilitarized Zone to the
Mekong Delta on the eve of the
arrival of U.S. Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew.
Agnew was due in Saigon
Tuesday afternoon on the first
leg of a seven-nation Asian tour
that will also take him to
Cambodia, Thailand, Laos,
Singapore, Indonesia and
Malaysia.
Agnew's press secretary, J.
Marsh Thompson, said the trip
is intended partly to assure the
Asian countries "we're not
abandoning our friends*
Fast-moving, swirling fights,
attacks and counter-attacks for
political control threw the
positions of the armed forces
of the Saigon government and
the dissident Viet Cong into
disorder and added to the

aled ofsd rpatttei on

Commission of Control and
Su eviimn n(ICCS), s ill in t e
organization, stalled by the
diplomatic haggling between
the two Vietnamese sides over
formalities, and lacking
enforcement authority, faced a
monumental task in restoring
some semblance of order.
Bu. ambassador Ellsworth
meanwhile, to have intervened
for the second sruccessive day
in trying to solve a second
diplomatic snag that could
prove embarrassing to A new.
SNearlye 50dadd tional North
from Hanoi to Saigon aboard
tro sU.tS. Air Forc Cl
fouitar-party m ltry peace
commission followed their Viet
Cong allies and staged a second
all-night plane sit-in at Tan Son
Nhut Air Base
The dele ates were parked in
front of U.S. base operations,
in the same area where
Agnew's jet was scheduled to
land
One air force man said, "the
big man (Agnew) is coming and
if they ain't gohneemby then r e're

the a ARANTEES
Thieu apparently was
conding on A newb t mre e
United States and South
Vietnam.
In an address to the nation
at the official start of the
cease-fire Sunday, Thieu
declared that one of the
guarantees needed for an
effective peace agreement is
'the unity of our allies and
their people, who pledge that if
the Communists violate the
ces-Irandupenacencondiltio s
with sufficient military and
economic means to cope with
the Communists." He
apparently wats referring to the
United States, but his meaning


reapot nha snhe first twe
meetings of the four-party
joint military commission

ar moniou sd slpue oe

of the two Com munist
delegations to present
credentials.
The U.S. and South
Vietnalmese demanded that
they offer such documents and
Sthe Viet Cong claimed they did
:not need them because they
had been invited to the
meeting, it wase learned.
There were conflicting
reports as to whether the
North Vietnamese also refused
to offer credentials.
The protocol on the joint
military commission makes no
:reference to credentials. In


article 15, it says: "The central
four-party military commission
thaH beh n operating 24 hours
o;ftr .th cease-fire goes into
WALKED OUT
The Americans and South
:Vietnamese walked out of the
first meeting about noon
shortly after the Viet Cong
delegates arrived from Tan Son
Nhut Airbase where they had
stayed for 20 hours aboard a
lane that hd br lg~ht them
Their overnight soloum
aboard the South Vietnamese
air force plane was yet another


bringing swift U.S. diplomatic

dispute over documents, that
was originally characterized by
U.S. s msmesas a r fum y w h

South Vietnamese immigration
procedures.
However, it was learned
Monday (fast the dispute
actually centred primarily on
their refusal or inability to
produce valicI passports.

rep~o edlyo comn eed tohap
because they were invited to
Saign they did nt ed
p spots n r should therebe
required to fill out immigration
and customs forms as
demanded by the South
Vietnarmese,
Bunker intervened in the
impasse, sources reported, he
met with Prime Minister Tran
Thien Khierm at mid-morning
and shortly the efte Thi u
gave the order to leterhe Vieu
Cong off the plane, sources
sad
si. E)CPECTED ,

ohe dNix n admin ration

in South Vietnam th t
followed time signing of the

ceS cesmaxi focused on
effor ts to make the
complicated peace agreements
"We're not su prised "
,Preiet press secretary

Ro n l orZ iegler sadi e

rnta So as namviolations
Ziegler said he expects "the
peace deal to be scrupulously
adh tere State Department
spokesman Charles W. Bra
sad' "Eveyhn isn
Solutions to pr blems sif an ,
will have to be worked out on
the ground."
"For otar pr the U.S
government is and will be
focusing its efforts on
stabilizing the situation on
the (1un and making the
agreement which was signed in
Paris on Satuarday work."
Both spokesmen noted too
th at the Vietnam and
international groups assigned
to supervises the cease-fire are

sairivatel ,a hish tiS iofficiah
along that the 7 p.m. EST
Saturda ca un ie swoul ng

all weapons in the scattered
battlefronts throughout South
Vietnam*
But they said initial reports
indicate that only small
fighting actions are taking
place. They said they have no
word of any large-scale
offensives thy main force North
Vietnamese troops.
The officials indicated too
tat te Bexpect it nil ae
or two days mentioned by
William II. Sullivan for the
post-truce violence to subside.
NOT SPECULATING
Sullivan, topl Southeast Asias
rpcilalt hor helped neg tia e


day or tw my that ceta nl
know how seriously these
problems 1 Itthedcease-firet

speculate on what Nixon
would do if the peace
arngemerats threaten to break
do*
At the same time, they did
voice concem over the
possibility of offensives bems
waged by North Vietnamese
forces in neighboring
Cambodla and Laos, now that
they are freed from combat in
South Vietmam.
Efforts are under way for
cease-fires in both the
adjoining Indochina countries.
A North Vietnamese push
there nowr presumably would
be to increase the Communist
hold in advance! of local truce

dedos IPremier Souvanna


Phouma has indicated he hopes
for a cease-fire there within
about two weeks after the
Vietnam signing Saturday. U.S*
official samid they look for a
similar swgotiating pattern
between opposing forces to
develop ha Cambodia, although
the situation there is more

Ziee cr dfused to talk a out

officials will be going t o
to talk atiout postal ai to at
North Vietnam.


The inventors of NAILT' FLyr
'Ll Touhee guarrate you'll have no
mo~se eraced or broken .. aslno
rmatter wat .. or return Nanette to
store for money bankI Your long blon
de may head a Uttle under stnre but
they'll be too tough to breakl. So r
Nallette Flragerad Toughenaer today.



Avairlabl at better cosmestic
*O~31


Wise Wrtbunt


WATERGATE


VIETNAM PEACE

couxISSION STYMIED


I undr ed a of ceasefire


VIO R'ioR 8 1re w eacc


truce IBt O IrE Wence
By George Esper
SAIGON (AP) Hundreds more reported cease-fire violations
and casualties by the thousands threw a Vietnama peace truce into


LAOS BOMBING SCORED


Hanoi charges US U6W RI


.ago .wh peac

81ltin OR .WlB 880


NE ARS ITS END
WASHINGTON (AP)- The U.S.
government rested it case in the
Watergate political espionage triae
The gov. ment rested after
calling SI witnesses including seven
members afRriet Nixon's
White H acia nd campaign staffs
prty. mcai
The case grew out of the break-in
adtlee e et anc devesdopn

June IT.
The defense was expected to


both sides in thle afternoon.
The jury was expected to get the
case Tuesday after receiving its
instructions from Sirica.
The government would up with
only two witnesses Monday
White House lawyer Fred Fielding
and Democratic official R. Spencer
Oliver.
salollr itesfeod only briefly, bu
National Committee offices In the
Watergate complex was tapped.
of thr whss ir lecutive dir ctor
Democratic Chairmen, was asked
on cross examination by defense
attorney Peter Maroulls if he had
beea mlbeen the object of
Although Oliver atnswered the
questions with a "No," Sirica
ordered the jury to disregard the
question and answer. IAndoOliver
government witnesses.e
Fielding, an associate counsel to
President Nixon, testified about the
opening of a safe in the executive
office building used iyE. H ward


Te ti et red i north wee


US $ IISClilOS
LONDON (AP) The U.S. dollar
declined steadily in Europe's
foreign exchanges Monday and
r aced new lows in Paris and
Dealers said trading was active
and selling persikstnt. The selling
wave appeared to have been
r enked e b lat weicka
at weekend denial by West German
thna toe ektcrm Ikm wII aghi
upvalued.
"The minute you start denying
things," one dealer in F~rankfurt
beievin ta whear th rehir sok
there is fire."
The dollar closed in Frankfurt at
so17marardown from Friday's
The dollar was not alone in
a:t pioS jhe furich market. The
fluing issfranc jumped in
relation toanl major currencies. The
franc was set free to float a week
ago to halt an influx of unwanted
dollars.
The dollar closed in Zurich at
3.64 francs down from Frriday's


LIL TOUGHENER

lays .Then You

Tasks...


ng aI Fingernalil.




L _I J I -I __ __ _-__ Ir ,___


-r


NULotus Aruc J2naaIN VtRBA hIA_ s
Being Bourat To Swear To Thre Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH.Putbushr/cEditor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCHO.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publsher/lEditorl917-1972
ContrbuttylEditor 1972-
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.*
Pusesserisditor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-1768

Tuesday, January 30, 1973.


EDFITORIAL


66Old timer" lives


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
I HAVE a friend who has been teasing me for years.
On every birthday and at Christmas I receive a special card
from him signed simply "Old Timer". He refuses to reveal his
name.
About two years ago I felt that he must have been very ill
because he indicated that his end might be near.
And so twice a year on my birthday and at Christmas -- my
wife and I watch anxiously for the card to see whether "Old
Timer" is still alive

ri thavei rked myeboair! tolueqland find ot whto Iy mter ou
must have been an association I forged when I was a small boy
delivering The Ttibune Over-the-Hill or when I was a student at
the Boys Central School.
The reason I say this is because some time ago I wrote an
article about a fine family at the far southern end of East Street
that I knew when I was a paper boy. I was fond of a boy of about
my age the family had adopted. He was frail and died young. I
said I couldn't remember his name. Ihe next day "Old Timer"
sent me his name. This revealed that he was familiar with the
Over-the-Hill area and probably grew up there.
I made many friends Over-the-Hill and in Fox Hill when I was a
child. These are among my happiest memories. The old folks are
dead, of course, and .... except for the boy who died .... and Bill
Richardson who lives near the Woodcock School, I cannot recall
any close associations among the children of that period.
Somehow, I didn't have many friends of my own age. My friends
were all old people .... and I learned a great deal from these
contacts
I look back with gratitude to the old men and women of that
period who were prepared to take time out to sit down and talk
shop with an inquisitive little boy.
And, of course, I am pleased that a spark of these associations
still lives in a child of one of these people, now grown old with
me.
But I do wish he would reveal his identity, especially now that
:I lamn leaving.the BdPlnud. It would be a pleasure for me to sit
down at lunch with him and reminisce about a period when
pto in uthe Bahamas were por in material things but rich in


The Bahamas has changed almost beyond recognition for us
old timers. But this change has swept all over the Caribbean and
now the reaction is beginning to set in.
We feel it here but our economy was so strong that it will take
time for the full impact to hit our people. I fear that the process
of decay will be speeded up after Independence .... and the
possibility is that it will be bad for our people.
Jamaica has already been seriously affected. I will not write the
Jamaican story myself. I will take it wholesale out of the
September issue of The IWest lndies Chronicle.
Here is the article. It was published under the caption:
"Jamaica moves to avert impending tourist crisis".
The Jamaican G~overnment is to take swift and tough action to
solve the imminent crisis in the island's tourist industry. This
announcement came seven days after Jamaica's Director of
Tourism, Mr. E. A. Abrahams, had, in an uncompromising speech,
attacked the lack of Government action to solve the problems of
crime, racism, and low hotel occupancy rates, which, according to
Mr. Abrahams, threatened to destroy the island's tourist indust y
and result in large-scale unemployment.
Announcing the new Government measures, Mr. P. J.
Patterson, the Minister of Industry and Tourism, said, "the time
has passed for fooling around and for piecemeal action. Perhaps
some of the measures to be introduced may seem stern. Perhaps
we will make mistakes but .... we will act now in order to save an
industry that is needed, if we are to succeed in the bigger task of
sava Jawmaiaasures announced by the Government are as
follows:
1. To combat crime and violence: increased police patrols in
resorts, particularly in the Montego Bay area; and the expectation
that magistrates should deal severely with guilty persons.
2. Education: A large-scale public education programme by the
Tourist Board to increase public awareness of the importance ~f
the tourist industry to the island's economy; and the designation


of October as 'tourism month'.
3. Improvements: At the airports, the completion of air
Conditioning, the provision of piped music and the improvement
of landscaping and decoration; the prohibition of all touting by
'U-drive' car companies; a new ni~tered taxi fare structure to
ZZenable drivers to earnl a decent living while at the same timle
q protecting the tourists; the allocation of most of the 3 per cent
hotel room tax to provide parks, civic centres, creches, etc., in
Montego Bay, Ochos Rios, Port Antonio and Kingston; a bureau
to deal with tourist problems and complaints; and various
G;overnment-sponsored developments in Montego Bay.
4. Prices and conditions: The re-introduction of a revised value
go ide for the hotel industry; a full-time hotel inspector; the
revocation of the licences of those hotels failing to reach the
required standard; and the requesting of all hotels. restaurants,
and night clubs to eliminate exorbitant prices.
5. Hotels: The development of more rounded programmes of
social activities and publicity for them among both tourists and
local -residents; the submission of proposals by all hotels of
programmes of in-service staff training; and the establishment of
ex angpec bucau ine te lier, Mr. Abrahams haid said, that if
immediate action was not taken to halt the slowing down of
Jamaica's tourist growth rate, as much as 30 per cent of th:
industry's work force could find themselves unemployed a
quantity which, he said, the island had not the capacity to bear.
Mr. Abrahams also pointed to the problem of escalating air fares
at a time when fares to Europe were being reduced; the shabby
condition of tourist facilities; and attacks upon tourists.
**+********
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
It is important to introduce into society a greater change and a


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(NEXT DOOR TO DONALD'S FURNITURE) FRI. & SAT. TIL 81:30 P.M.


MECHANISATION OF CANE-CUTTING


greater evil than this: the conversion of law into an instrument of
plunder.
No society can exist unless the laws are respected to a certain
degree. The safest way to make laws respected is to make them
respectable. When law and morality contradict each other, the
citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or
Losing his respect for the law.
FRED~F.1C DASTIAT


- I I r'' ---- I r I


Tuesday, January 30
1973.


By RICHARD CRAWFORD

YOU NOTICE IT EVERYWHERE. In the sleazy streets of
down-town Kingston, in the campy suburbs, in the country
towns, in the markets, even high in the hills. It sweeps over you as
a buoyant wave of optimism, a surging feeling of hope. At the
airport, the normally tight-lipped and serious immigration and
customs officers are trying out their new smiles; the cab drivers
sing as they drive; the stoens and hotels and crowded streets brim
over with exuberance. And tracing these bulbbling rivers of joyous
expectation back to their source, you are led invariably to a man*
O man. The man who at the moment epitomises the Jamaican


addressed me, when I could get
near to him. in tones of sauve
and patient respect. As we
were talking, a toothless but
very vocal old woman, clad in a
wretched torn gown, tugged
imtperiously at his sleeve and
Iareunteanslata ee oses i

Io rhds t ne nor in hmannea
fraction as he turned to her.
"May I be of service. madam?"
he entquired in the best E'tonian

No-one In Jamaica pretends
that prosperity and social
justice will come overnight.
But most people seem to
believe that they are on their

wraepared do mos their rh ild er
to the national wheel. Even the
bLP parliamentarians wim have
to some of whom I talked, are
glad about he) way ea tisngs

caucus of vocal dissent at the

ca efeurl wawchh and ter
are some har d-c ore
scaremongers who have tried to
disrupt Manley s efforts;
politically-motivatedf rumours
which led to an almost
disastrous run on the banks
stemmed from a small band 'of
disappointed fanaticsa rt im

P amlp ewhomudw singing to the
it was a stimulating and
invigorating experience to liye
for a while among people who
feel that they have left the
shadows behind and are
climbing towards the sunlit
uplands. But. just the same, it's
good to be home again.


present a depressing picture of directed to the nearest of the
unifo~rmity o~n a vast scale. they newly established family
are Intlrnitelv better than the
sordid shanty-to~wn districts lnngCnrs .
near the Kingston waterfront. Despit al the l iannoation'
Mlost ot this area is scheduled nans touldda
tor re development anyway cutywmnsilcryter

h bee m da rmsn tr family wash to the river and
Wage ar nluh lwer hanspread it on boulders to dry;
in uarn a n You still have to take very
so re rics. ylva ad Ihad seriously the road-sign which
lunch in aypclwsdeinforms you that part of the
country r(1stpaljant iporAn ae urareapnihig
and corn, plus the ever-present tarna than allwae compn a
Red Stripe beer. The bill for nwee nareunl os
two 1.90 Buteverthin weNot too far outside Kingston, a
had was pro~duced locally. and 3001b woman, grinning
thereis ashar conrastcheerfully, sits astride a 2001b

tp l dmd s d hoe ful andnr ds pst likeless
can cost less than $4, but a pairemrsButsosogrut

ui ka an ise w time da yonr nhtl bcuse
autrthi isonerasonm why the in Jamaica, making a song and
rity p gr ue ha ha dancecaboutn t as siply doing

~he poi~ of the JNP ON THEIR WAY
governinipo scyecos teo be: There are plenty of expatriates
identify the problems, state the around in Jamaica, especially
remnedies, lay down targets, in Kingston. and they appear
then pitci In. One problem to have adapted smoothly
which has been rdentified is enough to what must still be to
that of population growth. In many of them a bewildering
such a. delicate area, which environment. I have a vivid
amrounts to an intimate human mental picture of the manager
na
opacpgandaucis paying the way Kmngstwoh s asnpemedsrs rad

controversial doctrine. manner would have fitted in
Wherever you go, a nicely in a solicitor's office in
good-looking woman smiles Chancery Lane. Instead, he
down at you from huge stands in the centre of a milling
posters, and the words: "You vortex, surrounded by a shrill
don't have to get pregnant" babel of tongues, trying to
force some kind of reaction restore order out of a
from you. You are then multitudinous chaos. He


e cnMichael Manle as

sne last I was in Jamaica, and
during the intervening time the
country has had its ups and
downs. The analysts insist that
at hai been mostly downs, and
austhv gon don al n
to potential travellers to
hrnaica al
word: "Don't". I was warned

ntso longuagdo that tl go to

whre a hail of bullets could
swep any street at any time'
where the people were angry'
frsrated and bitter, where
poerty and neglect were
b e ding revolutionary
vi ence.
elet there hasthbeen a gene a

din en e h v LP w

swpt out of office by the JNP,
hedd by Michael Manley, son
of the famous Norman Manley,
hohelped to found the JNP-
It is impossible for a stranger,
on a brief visit. to aet any real
nsht into the political
undertones which carry men
ad parties along in the way
tha ee hidden objaent cu ent
race. This much, however, is
clear: Shearer's JLP and all its
works are discredited on a wide
sae, and Michael Manley is
the new Jamaican hero,
outshining even the legendary
Bustamante. Busta, still alive,
but very old and feeble and

gea orce u tnioes in Irmoto
complete seclusion.

:IMPRESSIVE UPSURGE'
Manley does not have the
mystical charisma once
exrcised by Busta, but by his
direct approach, by his ability
to conduct a meaningful

tlig othov etohe to a d
generated a most impressive
upsurge of confidence,
goodwill and cooperation. He
has the country with him.
Manley, whatever he may be
as a private individual, in
public life enterges as a strong
mean, da tet i e clear soghte ,
has embarked on two main
lines of action which may seem
at first to run in opposite
directions, but which under
firm yet delicate guidance are
made to run parallel:dhe is busy
restoring the democratic
process where it had been
epflia ds 68yn tyranny sa
time he is imposing his
personal strength to get things
done where they most badly
need to be done.
Law and order have come
back to the urban districts. The
roving bands of "rootless
onsrecentlyl ge scourgr ri
the inhabitants. Perhaps the
most remarkable difference

Kinsteonn a e Nahoau se th t
those in Kingston are
universally fitted with 'burglar
bars'; with very few

Kigtn of a size is teatr
up all the way round. Bolts,
chains and padlocks are further
eloquent reminders of a grim
dra not yet completely over
when law-abiding people
were forced to pult themselves
and their property into


fortresses.
Mlanley mobilised the police
and the army on a national
emergency basis, and a harsh
but necessary purge of the
worst elements took place. The

cr wdd but wheastr ets nlre
lot safer. Somec tension
remain the ep he aare rnidu

their guns at any moment. But
thhi areonap ceterrernt orfoce,
lingering nervousness
rAgr series hf cr
instituted to reduce the wildly
escalating u employment
figures. Despite many
difficulties, burdens are heing
eased, money is circulating
more freely, and jobs are being
created

in Agr i utensive st on inng
anid efforts are being
made to mnechanise and
Industralise as much as
possible. Jamnaic~a's balance of
trade was disastrously
top-heavy, with the value of
imports far exceeding that of
exports, and austerity mneasures
have been proclaimed which
afec htnsumer goods being
from being howled down or
derided, these measures have
actually been welcomed on all
sides, such is the grip which
Manley has achieved on the
popular mind. In his radio
addresses he minces to
words,exudes no soft talk or
tok ifluili aris eul ys ta o
doubt of his intentions. But his
Iagae lin ad blun
tanguagh t is i also laced w t
the kind of colloquialisms
which Jamaicans know and
love, and his identity with
them is complete.
An assault is also being made



national scale. It would seem
that Manley has been wisely
advised here: you cannot
achieve a breakthrough by
herding large numbers of
illiterate adults into a
mass-teaching system, and the
only real hope of lasting
progress as I know so well
m tolf-- lies in r tblshipg
between teacher and learner. It
appears that Manley has
listened to this advice, because
an imaginative crash
programme has been launched
whereby educated Jamaicans
saeblen lnite o e oleT
to commit themselves to be
responsible for the literacy of
at least one of their less
favoured compatriots. The
slogan "Each One Teach One'
has caught on, andJ thle
programme is going ahead.
NATIONAL PROJECT

Tourism, for so long
c nfinel ttioouMo teo OBah'

Rios and a few spots along the
north coast, is now becoming a
nation-w de pro ect, and s je

compared with heavy industry,
and since the returns are
comparatively rapid, a lot of
energentic planning is going
into making the whole island
tourist-conscious. As far as 1
could tell, visitor-satisfaction
seems to be high and for this


MICHAEL MANLEY
... new Jamaican hero


the atverage Jummlcann miust take
mosretr y(f the cdthe bease
thi '~ril fier ndly ptol te ~
helpfurl .
Dlialcct Is the greatest
barrler separating class from n
c~lass" Thus wvro~te Geotrge
Bernilrd Shaw mal~ny years ago
1 s certainlyy' (tue~ i the

Jamatesiatun of 1r td There are


rcn~i < < nldi c, it 'eir th
There Is what you mnigl t icall
'Jamaican I nglish which is
indistinguishable from any
other kind of E~nglish except
for the characteristic lilt in
intonation whicLh Is peculiarly
Jamiaican. Then there is what
you might call 'colloquial
tJamicnaw< k which tice bulk ad
understand, but which is a
little tough on people fromn
outside. Then there is the
patois. totally unintelligible to
the outsider. having no
ascertainable structure and no
written equivalent, and which
operates most effectively to
se rate the ha e-nhotssifrom the

simplification, it does induce in

Jamatie nre k gs down f this
particular barrier may prove a
long and troublesome business.
The Rastafarians. who have
created a whole myttrol'ogytut
of social rejection, today

ap esar on artg e di rnt

shiftless troublemakers, they
have become the focal point of
a new cult: an attempt has
been made to sanctify them as
grass-roots primitives, and to
retain what is valuable about
their way of life, while gently
trying to absorb them into the
mainstream of Jamaican
sof uty tonother long and
The housing estates
proliferate, huge developments
based on prelabbricated
components and labour-saving
techniques, and although they


ROSETTA STONE ON LOAN TO FRANCE RETURNED TO U.K.
LONDON (AP)- The famous million pounds or 2.36 million the way to Le Havre
h land hsoiandondec che mnat so cam ack to the Britor Lndmon ist to IeledS
hieroglyphics was back in London Museum, which is its present home, like any piece of glo
Sunday after being returned on a hired private truck.
.err lyo from Paris where uthyd sta i apF ie, at aletn aplThis week it w
Museum, of police outriders and mobile antiquities at the B
The stone, insured for one police armed with machineguns ail


i. But on its latt
,uthampton to
unescorted just

tergo sn hv
Iritish Museurr


Mr Gribune


A NE W HIGH WIND IN J AM AIC A




L I


rm


)~C;~~e~BB '

ARRIVED TODA Y
Bahama Star. F~lavia from
Miami; At anti oderchant rm
West Palm Beach; Sun ward
from Freeport.
o:AILEI) TDAa3 Tr i
Ocearnc fo ew Yr.
A R IVING; TO MORRO W
F~reeport from Freeport
TIDES
Hiigh 4 51 amrn and 5 09
Low II 14 a~m and 11 03


LINES LIMITED D U.K. TO NASSAU NAVIGATION CO.
For htformvation contact the agents
R.H. CURRY & CO., Ltd.
PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


WIYl~lli~L~LI~YI


FINAL NITE *





Pc- Plus at 8:50
"Ibamn uU rm


STAR'TS WEDNESDAY
Martinee continuous from42: 30, Evening 8: 3


- II~ --~ ~ ~ ----'~-' ------- --- ------- ,--- ------ __ _._.- c ~_ _ ~_~_


I

1


I ii li e n1tools of his trad


I


SReservtions notcaim
Sfirst mcm, frst





l"PLAY MISTY FOR ME""
I Jssica Walter
PLUS
"ST. VA LENTINE'S
DAY MASSACRE" R.
Jason Robards
Getorge Segal
No osarunder 7 w tII
be ardmitted


~WI~.

I




I



led by 8:15 will be sold on
sered basis.


Wednesday &Thursday
Continuous showings
from 2:30 i
"T~HE DAY THE HOT LINE I

CharlesBoyer
PLUS
"BARQUERO" PG.
Lee VanCleef
Warren Otate


Tr~drv. JI~Hc~v ao. 1973.


_


ae. NQo music or demotalog Not own~ a small recption.~00~~99~ She
has informed me thu Me SH s olog to wear a lrOn d~re.
Wlhat I waM ntoQ know I this: Do I have to weaur ba lo
dress And does my hobusbad hae nto re a tn I hte to
put outt all that moeyrr just to st down ald eat a msr.
DIEAR WgST': Wear whatever yes waM,r atI teyr
tor~a de1 the ur.P. 8. SHC~r IE'S wea~qrla
lea dres to eeacel the homer sh am fr treaprts.

Mar a perseml rely, wrYe to AARYV: bes No. WIM LA,
C4i.I~.gg, PeagY r ddressellJ d evlpe
*bl
mei C wr~e WQ MS i 6 *t C *Lr,~ ~w
Angeles, Cal sage, lr Athy's Imelet, "Howr a Write
Letterser IwAl Geeseless,


My father in law fl call him "Coach"] beg me to 1(.
and just to please him, I do. I always asd up with SM
winning team, but I lose money because he come up with
all kinds of funny "house rules" sch as pres bets, skle
bets, etc. Meanwhile, he sits there with a Cleveland Blrwns
coaching hat on his fat head rad laughs his head off.
What should I do? KEN IN WOO8'I'ER
DEAR KEIN: Reep the bets smaBl ad let the eld gaer
have fea. Mesawhihe when yea've hulene his game, raise
the ante rad then YOU have fam, test
DEAR ABBY: Paul and I have been marrid for 2't
years. We have three children.'h Two tar college. Psal
has worked hard ah his lfe and we have done weB than-
clally because I worked, too, and we saved our money.
Paul came from a large family [10 children] et which
he was the oldest. His father died shortly after we were
married, so Paul helped support his mother and tim young-
er children. I never objected, the it was qtite a strain on
us for many year.
When Psa~s mother married two years ago, I
breathed a sigh of relief. Well, the other day when I wamt
thru Paul's pockets before sending his suit to the cleanes,
I came across two letters from his mother, addr..."* t
Since no o was around, I decided to see what was up.
I fon wt ash had asd himr for some mloney and he had
baiing n Ir cn't ake kw a M M.W**
I amn fed up with this whole mess, especially this busi-
ness of writing to Paul at work to ask him for money.


How do I handle this situation? I am not a snooQp, but....
SEAUDD IJPS
DEAR SEALED: Yee say yes are set a "samp" yet
yee ag leteon that were s het s a r yo eyes. To
m methr e yoer gn ealcd and Iwb Bkwb rL
hing or coaless that yes read the letters and ask Psal for
as secoasting. I think yea'd feel better if yee confessed
an d elead th e ar.
DEAR ABBY: Myb son is getting married soon. The
bride's mother does not Ulke my son because he has lonS
hair and a beasi rand he refuses to cut it for the wedding.
In orde to punish any son, she has planned the followm-
lag type of wedding: Jusrt the paetnts of the bride rand
groomn and the brother rsnd sistesn on both sides. No other
relatives and absokstely no outside friends.
After the weddlag there is going to be a sit~bwn din*


By Abigarl Van Buren
eam rn Ccanese Tree. v. saw syne, eac
DEAR ABBY: My father in law is basically a pretty
nice guy, but he is a real football freak
My wife likes to spend Sunday with her parents, so we
go, and of coure the TV isr always going full blast with
some football game because her father is crazy about foot-


0


ea~ltU I


.


Branches throughout the Bahamas.


Qlbr Qliibunr


3 ~


The rules change after the game ends


"Happy to meet you..




I'm the Helpf al Banker "


"hill Sind me at any branch


The Royal The HelPful Bank


ROYAL BAN K
















Please leave our government officials and teachers alone


industrial scholarships, and les dresand up. And on the other
academic and degree hand, you try to get a good
scholarships, for the time painter, carpenter. man~n
would come when everybody even a machinist. And you'll
would be looking for white have a bigger job on your hand
collar jobs, and there would be than to start building a Sputnik
none for them. On the other to go to the Moon.
hand there was a shortage of As for our teaching staff,
highly trained technical men right now we have a shortage
and women, and also among of highly trained an
the trades and industries. Now experienced teachers and need
that time has arrived, and few many, many, more to complete
if any of our young people the staffing of our present
wish to work unless they can Schools, to say nothing of the
sit behind a desk all day fact, when the three new


~I


SHOP

WILL BE

CLOSED
FOR

STOCKTAK;ING
WEDNESDAY 31ST. JANUARY, 1973


ROSETTA ST REET

TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTR~OSE AVE


tuwbv. Jmuwv 30, 18t3.


schools now planned re
completed. Where then is the
logic and common sense in
retiring all who are 55 years
and over? Can we put a
number of inexperienced new
novices in our junior high and
high schools to teach where the
majority of our students shall
be completing their acadenuc
work and on accou, : of a lack
of finance not able to obtain
scholarships to go abroad even
if they are qualified for further
training?
In our Civil side of the
service, can we put young and
inexperienced young men and


Bahamas as a whole, and not of
any particular group of citizens
old or young. And are satisfied
within their minds that every
single act d Law passed, would
be for dae good and .in the
interest of the Bahamas in
Seneral, if we are to progress
and be a su access
governmentally and otherwise.
And it is to be hoped that such
a Bill as mentioned in the
Tribune be cast into the trash
tia. and buried there for ever,
EXPERIENCED
BUSINESSMAN.
Nassau,
January 19, 1973.


service all of our young women
and young men who are either
returning from schools abroad
and all those who are now
coming out of local schools
and are in search of work
ragardless of whether they are
qualified or not to teach or to
work in our various
departments of government?
Even with our present staff of
teachers, and those in other
departments of Government
and after many years of service
we find so very much
inefficiency. What then will
happen if we duplicate them


young women in offices like
the audit office, the treasury,
the post office, and the
customs? Just what use would
they be there? Not any at all
for the first two to three years,
All of these things our
government should first
examine and enquire into
before typing out Bills to have
passed through our law-making
louse of Assembly. And just
to try to satisfy certain job
seekers. It is the one duty of
each and every member of our
Assembly and Senate, to think
first, last, and all the time of
the Commonwealth of the


EDITOR The Tribune,
Reading in the columns of
The Tribune an article with big
ihead lines: "G~overnment
Froposal to makte 55 New Civil
Service retiring age", I had to
read the article ovrer and over
agin, for it sounds like
nonsense to int, and a number
of well thinking residents alike.
Mr. Editor, what is
Government now trying to do?
To do something which in the
mind of every saen-minded
tidnking citizen~ would be
highly impossible? And that is,
to absorb into the government


with new-comers, and without
hardly a day experience? It
would only mean for
frustration and far more chaos.
The very thought of such a thinB
is ridiculous, and can only be
what is described by many
citizens as a payoff for having
voted for So and So. Over five
years ago, the matter of what's
going to happen to hundreds of
our students coming out of our
schools was debated on the
"Let's Talk Programme," and
one of the speakers pointed
out to two other speakers that
it was time thiat our government.
give far more technical and


Judge Mlaxwell Thompson

says warm 'thank you'


EDITOR, The Tribune,
I know that this is an
unusual request but during my
recent illness of practically a
month's duration which I spent
in the Princess Margaret
Hospital I was practically
swamped with get well cards,
telephone calls, flowers and
personal bedside visits from my
friends and well wishers. In the
circumstances I find it
impractical to say an individual
thank you to so many friends
and well wishers. Will you
therefore permit me to use
your column to thank my
many friends and well wishers
and to let them know how
grateful I am to them for the
interest displayed at a time
when it really meant something
- this being the very first time
That I have been hospitalized.
SMy doctors and nurses waer
simply superb. I cannot find
Swords adequate to convey my
gratitude to them for the


tenderness and compassion
shown me when I was really
painful. I say it simply from
the bottom of my heart thank
you Dr. Earl Farrington, Dr.
Cecil Bethel Jr., Nurse Merlene
Hanna, Nurse Elaine Cooper
and Nurse Brendel Cox. You
were all marvellous.
I also owe a debt of
gratitude to the cleaning staff
of the hospital. My! room
was immaculately kept at all
times and their attitude and
demeanour were simply grand.
In my view, the only snag
about the Princess Margaret
Hospital is that the obvious
success of the institution has
overtaken its resources.
Having been a patient of
over three weeks duration I say
with a great measure of pride
that I am proud of our hospital
and its staff.
M. J. THOMPSON
Nassau,
January 29, 1973.


THE 100-foot schooner
Westward, a unique vessel
designed for oceanographic
research and to teach young
people the ,art of living
together, will be in Bahamian
waters for most of March and
early April.
On February 26 the
Westward is due to arrive in
Miami, Florida from its home
port of Boston to pick up the
board of directors of Outward
Bound, an organization
operating a survival school.
On the trip from Miami to
Nassau, where arrival is
scheduled for March 6, the
'Wetward will be, the scene of
Outward Bound's annual
meeting of directors. They will
disembark< at Nassau on March
8, and going on board for the
trip back to Miami will be the
board of directors of the
Sailing Education Association
(SEA) of America, the


organization that operates the
Westward.
The SEA directors will hold
their annual meeting during the
voyage back to Miami, where
arrival is scheduled for March
19.
On March 25 Westward will
leave Miami again, carrying as
crew and as oceanographic
students 18 young Americans.
The schooner is scheduled to
sail to San Salvador, where
until April 5 the studentcrew
and ship-board scientists will
conduct oceanographic studies.
The main purpose of all the
Westward's several cruises each
year, however, is to "develop
within each apprentice an
unparalleled understanding of
the ways of the sea and an
increased confidence in his
own capacities as a person."
SUN
Rises 6:55 a.m.
Sets 5:51 p.m.


.. I ALL ADDS UP


your rousabin but unwanted


items of


clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc. .. clear out


your closets, garage, storeroom ...

all can be of help


to someone else.

Donate them to


ZHhr ~l~tbuno


Unique research vessel

due here March 6












.6


REIAL ESTATE FOlR RNT ragit E IIEL amnTEo TIRADE SERVICES TrRAD~E S~ERT-PV~ICES SEP ANEDML MI


I


T


L


C8303 C8518 C86 3


__


a


EXPERIENCED BACK HOE
Operator wanted. Please apply
to Cavalier Construction
Comp any, Oakes Field.
Telephone number 3-5171-2.
c8594
2 BAHAMIAN Handymen and
garden workers. References
and experience.
Apply: Deal's, P. O. Box 1548,
Nassau or telephone 2-4656.

C8565
A YOUNG MAN to train under
the butler in a private home.
Other staff kept. Must have
references. Please write P. O.
Box N4861, Nassau.
C8675
1 Handyman $30 per week
Phone 42469
C8669
EXECUTIVE .SECRETARY 1
Out island hotel. Must be able
to handle reservations.
correspondence, and charts.
Must have book-keeping and
accounting experience; a desire
and ability to handle people is
LO ,ut SBMALNL1HOPE BAY
LODGE BoxN113, Nassau-
C8665
IVtE hMASERI Rc UIc t
or equivalent; ~must have
knowledge of boats, motors*
their maintenance and repair;

me uatohs, eanks cmrssors
their maintenance anbd rpait

handle people and willingness
to assume complete
responsibility for diving
programme. Phone 77472 or
write P. O. Box N1131, Small
Hope Bay Lodge on Andros.


PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS.
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.*
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.

C8515
HOUSE PLANS..
. c., drations,t additions, walls'
rates. Free Estimsauesyo. Lw
call
Evan elos Ze vo
Telep one 2-23

C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza


C7070
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
required: High School graduate
or equivalent education: 1-5
years experience desirable.
~Applicant must be able to thike
dictation and type at a
Reasonable speed: filing
experience will be helpful.
Apply in person to Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport.

C7093
BILINGUAL SECRETARY,
MUST SPEAK AND READ
FRENCH GOOD
SHORTHAND A4ND TYPING,
BOOK K EEPIN AN4
ACCOUNTING EXPERIENCE
AND MUST HANDLE OwN4
CORRESPONDENT C E
BPLp-3 1IR CFNDA ED il

C7090
FULLY EXPERIENCED
M CAdNI rtequ red ofor hi
minimum of 3 years wtp
knowledge of General Mof4)
products.' Full Corryptipi
benefits with factory trainladj.
Bahamians only need apply.
Five Wheels of Grand Bahain
Ltd.,Telephone 352-7001.


L.T.D. SURVEYING office has
been moved from Shiriey
Street to Ist. Terrace
Centrevinlg. Telephone: 24596
has not been changed.


OPPORTUNITIES
C8514
Small thriving business for sale.
Good income. For details carll
telephone 2-2633 between 6
p.m. 8 p.m.
C8558
WANT TO BUY A LOT?
Phone 2-7667 P. O. Box
N4764, FRANK CAf.Y
REAL ESTATE LTD. Let is
take you on a FREE
complimentary tour of any
subdivision of your choice with
no obligation to buy
CALL US TODAY

POSITION WANTED
C8489
YOUNG LADY seeks job as
part-time maid or weekly.
Please call Ilene 3-6031.

C8608
EXECUTIVE with belonger
status wishing to oewmain ite
emplo yment in a ny
admini st rative cap ac ity
regardless of type of business.
Pl51 sle wi er sted, or phB e
Nassau 41115.


IILP WANTED
C8602
EX ECUTIVE LEGAL
secretary required by law firm.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Telephone
2-2511-2-3-4-5

C8600
REQUIRED two chainmen,
bush-cutlers for work in New
Providence and Family islands,
previous experience not
required. Telephone 58825 or
24596 or write to P. O. Box
N-7782, Nassau.

C8615
WANTE6': O-ffice Mainager
Front Desk Supervisor. Must
have general knowledge of the
functions and the operations of
all departments and a thorough
knowledge of night auditing.
Applicant must hilve at least 4
years experience. Apply:
NASSAU HARBOUR CLUB.
C8619
RE FRIGERATI ON AND
AIRCONDITIONING
MECHANIC to manage Service
Department and handle repairs.
Must have own tools -- Apply
in person to Fox Brothers
Furniture, Dowdeswell Street.

C8580
STENOGRAPHER
THE ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA, FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama requires the services of
an experienced stenographer.
Applicants should have at least
G.C.E. in English Language and

Sh r mnt n yi sed tre
80 words per minute.
Bahamians only. Apply ir
writing to- The Assistant
Manager/Administration, P. O.
Box F61, Freeport, Grand
Bahan'ta, or call for an
appointment at telephone
352-6631.

C08613J
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
requ ired by International
Group of Companies with
diverse interests, including
construction.
Applicants should have at least
two years post ,qualification
experience. Apply mn writing
giving resume of career to date
to Commercial Manager, Sir
Robert Mc AIDine &I
S ns N.Ba a s) Ltd., O
Bahamas.
C8605
WANT ED : BAK ER Y
ENGINEER to assume full
responsibility in the
maintenance and mechanical
operation of fully automated
bakery. Must have at least 10
years experience in Bakery
Engineering and possess own
tools. Excelled salary and
opp or tunity available.
Bahamians only need apply to:
PURITY' BAKERY, P. O. Box


N7778, Nassau. Telephone
2.2668 -- 2-2669 ask for Mr.
Albury or Mr. Holland.


SCS671


IN FREEPORT TEL. 352-8860


1. TWO SHOPS available in the
East Bay Shopping Centre,
East Bay Street. For further
information call 2-4782.
2. Of fice, warehouse, open
yard storage area at the corner
of Virginia & Heathfield
Streets. For further
information call 2-4782.

C8624
DOWNTOWN OFFICES
Second floor of f ce suite? at IPS
House, Shiriey Street*
f urnished, airconditioned
$250.00 per month, including
utilities call 21980-1-2-3 to
view-

C8664
UNFURNISHED HOUSE -
Tedder Street, Palmdale. Ring
3-5900.

C8661 ..
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath house -
Farrington Road. Partly
furnished. Suitable for large
family or couples sharing-
Telephone and airconditioninq.
Phone 77414 after 6 p.m.

C8656
2 STOREY HOUSE for rent on
Bay Street near Armstrong
Sret. $185 per month. Phone

C8625
FURNISHED 1 large bedroom
aatm ri withS e epho o
58196.
C8614
LARGE ONE bedroom
apartment, out cast with beach
rights, and private patio. Fully
furnished. Couple. No pets or
children. Telephone 2-4777 -
Evenings 4-2035.

FAR SI1E
C899
85DISCHOTEQUE SET
2 turntables, 2-15" speakers --
tweaters and woofers -- 300
Watt Amp. and pre Amp.
$700.00 -- O.N.O. Phone
5-7541 Mr. Dean.

CARS FO6R SAILIE
C86i2i
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
SUBSTANTIAL END OF
SEASON REDUCTIONS


Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
TO p ite the IePhan

C8539
1971 FORD ESCORT. Phone:
7-7231.

C8670
MUST SELL THIIS WEEK
1967 Triumph 1300 with 1971
engine, new paint job. Very
good condition. $850 or best
offer. Phone 24450.
C8666
1 FIBREGLASS boat 15 ft
good condition. $600.00
Phone 42503 .
C8058
OWNER LEAVING COLONY
Triumph Herald 1968. Good *
condition. $500 or best offer.
Can be seen at Teddar Street
S2nd house from Madeira after
,. p.m.
:C8674
ONE BARKERS chair, 1
shampoo ba stn, 1
airconditioning unit 2400
BTUs. Terms cash. Telephone
-32079.


MIARINE SUPPLIES
C8516
BERTRAM 31' Express
Cruiser, twin, GM Diesel*
excellent condition. Tol see
call Macio 3-6645 from 9 to f
or 3-6649 after 5 p.m.

CS902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan1 sleps
six; private bathrohjim with
vanity, shower and head;

ste shi sat~orr,twin 2n3
h.p. engines with les than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 -9
a.m. to 5 p~m. Monday to
Friday.


IC8282
LA RGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East End
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.

C8591
CORNER building lot, main
road, very near The Current
Club, Eleuthera. $1750.00 or
make a sound offer.
Contact Mr. Kelly, Nassau
Florist Ltd., P. O. Box N-4635,
Na2 4 2 or call collect 5-2598
or 2-23any ime.

C8592
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furnished apart me nt
over okig Mnagu By (very
desirable area) Nw o teetre

wall mirrors, sliding doors, etc..
Good rental no problem.
$2 7,500.00. Will consider
e chacn e 5n Frda. Cal Mr3

anatime., P. O. Box N-4635'


SPNISH WE LLS, qit
frame cottage with guestquain
and bath In separate mason y
building, airconditioned and
mostly furnished. Fenced and
walled landscaped yard and
patio. Contact Owner, P. O.
Box 26. Spanish Wells.

C8566
FOR SALE Ocean View Lot
East End. 100' x 200'. Two
blocks from beach. Call S-2370
after 6 p.m.

C8595
FOR SALE
I2-STOREY BUILDING 3-2
bearoom apartments upstairs
and open shop known as
Robertr,* Pa~rs Department
downstairs '- Solir Road
qpposit TdchnldP'sYiis91 ning
Box 5387, Nassau.
C8672
BERNARD ROAD
LARGE 6400 sq. ft. lot price
$5,000.00 cash. Discount 206.
Term deposit $200.00 Monthly
payments $100.00 5 years.
Contact Bills Real Estate
2-3921.

F ag IE '
C8264
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
HILLCREST TOWERS (Third
Terrace West Centreville) --
Elegarit, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
apartments, airconditioned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842.
7-4116, 2-8224 o 2-8248,


B ATIFULLY FURNISHED.
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152.

C8265
LARGE 1 BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4'777-8.

C8520
LARGE unfurnished 2 or 3
bedroom house Boyd
Subdivision. Phone 2-1170
from 9*5.

C8289
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parrki ~
.Inquire 4-2017.

C8410
BAC HELOR ROOM In
respectable home rid Palmdle
with private entrance. For
Information call $1044.

C81267
O BEDROOM unfurnished
rmnBoyd Subdivisiorn
off Foster 'Street. Ior
information call 3-6644.

BEfAIthIFUL two bedroom
furnished duplex apartment.
A ditioned, laundry, large
prlvJ yard. Village Road near
5-238@. Q"~ a kn
CMa92


PRIME OFF ICE space
availble in IBM FKOUSE, with
cnt'ral rindlitbo1n frta
8n mation c 32351/4.


~ar-~---- ------- -- I-


I


Tuesday, Januarry 30, 1993.


Mackey Strert
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
.P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
AF~CHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELtVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STECL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACKCASH.
PH~ONE: 2-3795, 2.3796,
2.3~937,2-3798
Airport 77434


knowledge of precip era~
general plant equipment and
knowledge of principle
methods and problems
associated with the operations
of 'maintenance shop and
chemical plant equipment. Six
years diversified industrial
experience required.
chemical plant equipment. Si
years diversified industries
experience required
ELECTRICIAN: R qulk for
the installation, maintenancer,
repairs and tests of electrical
and instrumentation systems
associated with power
distribution, lighting,
Communications, machine
tools, motor controls, heating
ventilation, air conditioning,
refrigeration, steam generation
anf various ch'emical plant
eqIpment arid utilities. Must
uae at least 6 years experience
In industrial, electrical and
instrumentation work.
PRODUCTION FOREMEN:
Responsible for the direction
and supervision of chemical
operators, helpers and trainees
in the manufacture of steroids
and organic chemicals. 2*5
years in the fine organic
chemical industry essential.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT:

ac"ou"ingand rook epn
activities. Must be proficient ir
the use of the Frider
Computyper, ability to typt

Api'""I"nts should apply ir
aeso to ynte Co ra on
P. O. Box F-2430, Freeport *

C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accquntants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freenort office.
successful candidates will be
6aid excellent' salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply In writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.


C7091
FULLY EXPERIENCED)
BODY MAN required, must iel
able to repair all types of
vehicles and install replacement
parts and complete up to
re-finishing stage. Minimumr 3
years experiencer full Company
tienefits. Bahamians only need
apply. r
Five Wheels of Grand Baha a
Ltd., Telenhdne 352-7061.:;


IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's home, pest
cottage, f replace, 292 baths,
patio. marvellous view,
swimming, fishing. H.H. Larkin
Clo Box 101, Harbour Island.


IEmLP WANTED
PIPEFITTER/WE~LDER: Must
have sound knowledge of
piping systems, fabrication and
welding techniquers. Must be
able to install, maintain and
repair structural steel,
platforms, supports, piping and
related accessories associated
with chemical plant
construction, equipment
installation, plumbing, heating,
airconditioning, refrigeration
and water distribution systems
Must have at least six years of
industrial welding and
pipefitting. Certificate
preferred. *


IIEP WANWTED

C8623
SYNTEX CORPORATION
HAS VACANCIES FOR THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS:-
CHEMICAL MANUFACTUR-
ING OPERATORS: 2-S years
experience in batch chemical
processing producing fine
organic chemicals.
CHEMICAL TECHNICIAN:
Applicant must have previous
experience in Chemical
Laboratory work and be able
to carry out routine analysis
and calculate analytical results
and physical constants,
Previous experience in acid and
base titrations, thin layer paper
and gas chromatography
""""'ial


1970 Chevrolet
Impala
1968 Chevy II
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic Beige
4 Dr.
19'71 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic
1968 Javelin A/C
'1971 Vauxhall Victor
2000 Auto Grey
1969 Flat 124 Green
1970 Mulstang Red A/C
1969 Dodge Monaco
A/C Vinyl
1971 Viva 4 Dr.
Auto Red
1967 Chevy II A/C
Automatic Yellow


$2800
$700


$1895

$1600
$1600

$2300
$700
$2400

$1795

$1895

$900


rPrtly furnished 3
bedroom apartment for
rent on Winton Highway.
5275 per month. Call
2-2511 days. 4-2063
eeningsr.


PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxuriou
. Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


C


Who~ttr rthant


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 'rNassau,352 -0608 in Freeport from 9a~m. to 5plm. Mon. to Fri. Sat. Fam to~ 1p.di


FOR RfWT


A RACTIVE fully equipped
'3 bedroom 2 both house
eplus uen Retiro Avnue,
escallet T.V.
I~tsch~ne ec.



















j


SREX MOR GAN, M.D.


* ByDALCURTIIS


cAISH H(AIL
csk E E VIEIR

A WE ARE




ALE VEAI 8 OP


"If her wedding is three weeks away why CAN'T you
loan me what you've collected until next payday?,,

Ku~pert and the Ninky Toys-8&

em$ ,


HOW man
Hou wcerc 'f
oro more cne
a om the
g 1ttnr show n
making a


word must contalo nthe la ~
letter, and there must be at
least one elsrht-letter word in the
itst. No plurals: no forget awords;
no proper names. ~TODAY'S
gl4ROMEdT : P3 rvrds. go &
excellent. Blt on tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
E:pos stop less lest loess lose
lose lost pest PLOTLESS pose
posse posset post sell ser a set
blept rtoe slop slope alt sole
spell spelt spet st*D st a srtoD
toss.


No. 7.0683 A TIag MeNAT
I. Newsoneerr weter. (Ls>
a. Tr otd nra certaintr. cs)
101. KIne's deputy. (0)
It. Colonel. (8)
1a. Net matter (anas.). (s))
I.T. Toothed wheel. (3,
Ii. Serene. 44)
18. .tt a @stance. (4))
Iii. Portion of better. (3)
?O. Meia~lc snooes. (6)

I. HI mankerat briere, (.1, I
:I. Elstae eat aae. (3, 4)

6. For the most part. (2, 3. 4)

8I. G a rdea
mIe n 4.
(3)
12. Stem e.
I 5. rand
meaC *
sUre s.
(5I)
1o. N o a
fres h.
(3) tesseedes's slukeer


APARTMENT 3-G By A les K otsisy


ChessNADBRE

ll IsRD IR I






I i-u


r k90EWaKa Sespon #Z~ftr sofW S1
S gEasAU biCR ly 0


\(Y ) GENERAL TENDENCIES: You are eager to
get your life on a more solid and secure basis
and it's all right to plan it thusly so long as you do not
approach others to go along with your conclusions, as
arguments and varied points of view could quickly follow. Use
tact and diplomacy.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Taking any risks where your
reputation is concerned is not wise now, for others could be
very critical, and pose big problems for you. Quickly get the
credit matter taken care of. Avoid further expense.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You have fine ideas that you
want to put in operation too quickly, so take it easy and plan
them better for good results. Those ideas which an overly
glamorous individual has are not for you. Social fun in p.m.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You think you can run aws)
from some promise, be it of a'personal or business nature, but
you would do better to keep it now, scrupulously. Then you
make big headway. Avoid the social or recreational tonight.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Although you
want to make a change where some associate is concerned, you
arte required to change your methods mastead. Steer clear of the
public and handle those personal matters wisely, too. Your
attitude has not been right.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Get busy at that work you have
to do although you would rather make radical changes that
could be very bad for you. Take the time to improve your
health through exercise. Do this intelligently.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) You want to have fun and
relieve worry you now feel, but make sure you stick to the
tried and true, otherwise you compound your worries. Get
creative plans worked out better. Take the bugs out of them.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Don't go off half-cocked and
get into trouble in the outside world because conditions at
home do not suit you. Calm down and right them carefully,
wisely Then you can make big headway in business.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Much care should be
exercised in motion, otherwise thoughtlessness on your part or
that of others could result in big trouble. Shop wisely and
don't buy anything you are not sure of. Show that you have

goA ITRIU (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Don't think you can
buy your way into what more ethical means could get you
easily and properly. Learn to be more thrifty, wise. Got busy
and improve surroundings.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You are all fired up to
achieve some personal aim that is absolutely no good for you,
so forget it and start something worthwhile. Improve your
appearance. Show you are loyal to mate.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Don't feel sorry for
yourself because you have work to do get it done and then
you have time for pleasure you want, also. Use good judgment
and forget that intuitive idea that is incorrect. Make this a
constructive, happy day, p.m.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Don't foist your worries upon
others now since they have enough of their own. Got busy
solving own problems objectively. Avoid group meetings that
could lead to arguments. Fine evening for reading, writing.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . .he or she will be
one of those practical and businesslike young people who will
also be most alert to whatever is of the New Age. So send to
the right schools that will help to retain the best of the prat,
while teaching the best of the present and future, then there
can be a most successful life here. Inventiveness is also a good
part of the chart. Banking, property management, sound
producing, are particularly fine.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make bf
your lIfe islargely up to YOU!


Ire.......s ....... I


w., riw,


SJ UDGR PARK ER


"It looks an easy pattern,"
remarks rMargot. May I see
It ?" ;When Flupert has laid
o thgirsheeb of papercotut
make a Ninky toy for you,"
she says. I'm good at that
sort of thing. I'd have it
bol theRupmr Is oerjo codu
ALL RIGHTS


" Then I need not wait for Bill
to come home." The pattern
is left in Margot s care and
Ruopoedt goes hoe n whh ie
is painting the fir-cones, he
tells the full story of the
cowboy's visit. i must be
Nr ytoo onrdothe pattern sand
RESERIVEo


Bridge
At t~!~~Vosre club this

Society In the onLY tournament
which combines the mechanics
of duplicate with rubber bridge
scoring. Played in an atmo-
sphere which is alwa es and
rdlaxed, with rI~edy~e on
the side tables, t Dvonshire


cate. Among them is Dr Jose h
Automob i rlb.Lis Mr wa.1
Dealer East: Love All
North
Q AK Q 2
Q 65 43 2


th(ne hfe q ickesd winnsd of
Open was the 14)-mover between
8. Th -ws: (White, to move, and
L. Marden. White is already a
pawn lup and his next two
poeflmoves decided Black
to resign. Wha1t w~ere the
moves, and why did Black
g v ut mes: 10 seconds rche~s
master; 30 seconds. chess
expert: 1 minute, county
standard: 3 minutes club
strength 5 minutes, ave: age:
10 minutes, novice.

-80OLUTINO No. 9)570 (Jan 111-

Ches Sol t'
1 P1qT4! Ox KtP; 29-q
Resigrs~ Whirte wins a piece --94
KiP B 3--92.b: 3 1B~
and B x R. Pc


West East
ccK8J33 909
O~ O
9e~ 8 AQJ 10 7 5
AA 10 4 2
W sA K1Q J3108 7
West NoM East South
- 36 40
West l6Qds the +K. Can the
contract be marde?
Not at trick one, but maybe
at trick two i West can be per.
sueden t ead n eond sL der
dropped the iHconcealing the
+2, and West obh;gingly led the
Lister won and areled on his
diamonds, leaving four cards
outstanding. West had to keep
the cc, since South retained
the .LO East had to hold on to
the ; so neither could keep

trick.


"Your forgot the music? Well, play something off the
top of year head."


28. German song
29. Moon goddess
31.0Outdoor
staircae e
33. Monastery
34. Peacock
butterfly
35. Norway's
capital
36. Spirit
39. Matr of fact
42. Knitting stitch
43. Brave
44. Born
45. English


L 1 Rocky hill
4.Arkm of the sea
7. Bigwigs
II. Form of
Esperanto
12. Compass point
13. Part of the eye
14. King Arthur's
dmain l
16. Fur
17. Continent
18. rticle
19. British noney
21. 8kirt feature
25Paradise
27. Isanin cola


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
46. Odin's son 2. Harem room
47. Superlative 3 Poet
ending 4. Misrepresented
5. Wild ox
DOWN 6. However
1.Twichin .Defenseless
1.Tw~~~8. Vine
a 19 1o 9. Corral
10. Roofer s tool
IS 15. Squadron of
6 ~planes
18. Man's nickname
19. Feele r
) ~20. Lake
21. Dance step
22. Flying
%1 ~23. London art
Gallery
o ~24. Weaving reed
26. Form of John
30. Tea sampler
32 Buckshot
35.Uncou0s
4o4 36. Marienbad
37. Personal
4 ~pronoun
38. Vase
39. Destiny
2-3 Roman bronze
denour" 4. Hindrance


By PAUL NEICHOISS~


CROSSWORD

ELUZP E
ACAOSS










a Elitr Gtisantr




_AlllllnsS ACOS CilinCII 10


$|10, kROCK Out St Jolin's Ii


SCARTERS 61M1


ItSonlyn~h~al


BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION


Mir~ DDD~ c11* subscribers are reoinded to d~il 1 followed by area code and seven digit number.


LATE SURGE by
Superwash Arawaks in the
second half together wlt thLe

brought tham from a 39-27
half time deficit to an 81-78
victory over Carter's Hitachi at
the A.F. Adderley Gym last
ni sk th lBahamas Amatesur
1972-"l3 seriesnresumedwihot

competition sure showed on
the Arawaks as Carter's took
hold of the situation with a
39-27 half time lead.
Carter's behind the shooting
and rebounding of Ellis Bodie,
who scored 23 points and took
25 rebounds, held the lead
55-40 with 12 minutes in the
game when Delaney came on
after resting for the first part
of the second half. Going five
for seven from the field,
Delaney saw the Arawaks to
six points behind at 61-55.
Roscoe Davis, who
controlled the rebounds for the
Arawaks taking 21, took an
assist and moved Superwash to
57. Calvin Balfour who came
through with a layup for
Carter's was followed by
Clement Strachan and
Anthony Butler on baskets to
move Superwash tied ait 63 all.
Both sides swopped shots as
the lead changed hands for the
following two minutes until
with 22 seconds in the game,
Carter's control led 78-77.
Superwash returning from a
tim ot held Carter's to 78
meie ouelaney moved them to
79 and Butler on a late goal
sealed the game for the
Arawaks.
ofDelapne soredthaey hs h
while Davis added 21 points.
Carter's Collegians won their
tididn as rw IB kst Cohwhen
Junior 83-63 in the junior
game played at the A.F
ASdeafrd yGmKnowles and
Charles Albury scored 18 and
13 points respectively for
'art r's. Cl ffordoRlfmn 8 d
Cougars with 20 points each.
GIRL VOLLEYBALL TEAIV
PLACE 2ND IN MIIAMI
THE BAHAMAS Ladies
Volleyball Team. over the
weekend captured second place
in the 1973 St. Petersburg
Invitational Tournament in
Florida, with 11 wins and five
losses. Favourites Miami dulds
oeu71 fistwith 12 wins and
'The kids were in great
shape," commented coach Dr.
Norman Gay. "It did my heart
good to watch them."


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE'S aspiration of winning and upsetting
Aquinas College Aces for the first time in three years was met
with an iron defence last night when Clifford Rahming's 20
points complemented by Bennett Davis's 20 points and 14
rebounds dashed their hopes in a 78-57 victory
f qive na, now uethen hin Aquinasm with two cm ues i
Se ior Boysa 17 bs30ebtbl sowkedd o he bse down and

of first place in the western Swinging to the cheers of
school's division after their fans "we got the whole
demolishing St. John's who game in our hands," Aquinas
prior to yesterday's game were rested their starting five and
tied with four wins. brought on a new set that saw
Playing at the Garfunkel them to a78-55win.
Auditorium Aquinas' home TEAM BALL
court St. John's playing a Prince Hepburn playing his
full court press took an early second game with St. John's
6-2 lead until Ben D~avis and and his first against former
Danny Edgecombe got through team mate Aquinas Aces noted
on layups to tic the game. that Aquinas play more team
The Acfs clave a formation ball. "St. John's don't play
that can e fciey counter te defence," he said. "If we get a
full court press, explained coach and play together, no
coach Gerry H~arper. And the team could beat us."
Aces showed it as they held St. Captain Andrew Albury was
John's to eight points and pleased with Hepburn's
D~avis and Rahming opened a performance. "He (H~epburn)
17-8 lead with a little less than blended in with the fast break-
one minute remaining in the Prince is catching nt u


tiBO S LATTER .... re an
Splay t.





GOLeF TILE
BOB SLATTER successfully
.defended his McAlpine Classic
tTitle on Sunday when he
defeated Mike Taylor on the
second hole of a sudden death
playoff at the Coral Harbour
Golf Qlub course.
Both men carde d
four-over-par 74. Slatter
looked certain to win when he
came off the front nine with
36 while Taylor managed only
a 40 over the front nine.
However, moving onto the
back nine Taylor produced
several excellent shots to
return a superlative 34 down
the back nine to qualify for the
playoff as Slatter had posted a
38 down the back nine.
This was Slatter's second
consecutive victory in the
McAlpine Classic. Last year he
shot a one-under-par 71 at the
South Ocean Golf Course to
win the tourney 5 strokes over
Audnel Clarke.
Sunday's tourney was the
first BGA tourney for
Hoerman Cup points and all of
las yeat's H ce t onCuop t a
Duncombe emerged from the
tournament with Hoerman Cup

potb Slatter and Mike Taylor
both captured 11V/2 points
each. Basil Smith who finished
tid with a 79took 9Cph r s
Saunders received 6V/2 points
each having shot scores of 82.
doluncombe ofmishewitwell
disappointing 85.
Finishing mn second place
was Zorro Stubbs who showed
fine form in carding 75 this
puts Stubbs in second place for
Hoerman Cup points with 10
points.
Vernon Lockhart, 16'
continued to dominate in the
jumiors division by winning his
sec ndheconse utiv t ua e

Sunday Lockhart carded a

Junior Golf Championship.
The net winner was Senator
Gerald Cash who posted a~ 67.
.The next BGA tourney for
tora G f pro nt will e
this will be played at Great
Harbour Cay on March 10 and
r '


plays."
"Prince is a help to any
team," commented coach
Harper, who coached Hepburn
last season. "He is a good
hustler and a great shooter."
Coach John Todd who
caught the latter part of the
game sees St. John's as being
good material to work with.
With St. John's, they do not
have any body to sit on the
bench wliatch their ito r

them explained coach Todd
Todd dect nd to cmet o
whete rh fsou d limetoonta

A. F". ADDERLEY HIG;H
after leading 30-21 by the first
half, fell apart in the second
half scoring only 11 points
while Government High paced
by David Cleare's 28 points
drove on to a 59-41 victory.
G.H-.S. after taking a 17-14

frstb qu er slea orel on y
take a 30-21 lead.
Mark Bethel, the only man
in double figures for Adderley
High scored 16. He along with
Cyprian Newrey worked the
fast break well until the final
half when they fell apart.
Coach Martin Von Jena
thinks that his team needs a lot
of practice. "A few solid hours
of practice," he said.**
in other action scheduled
yesterday, Western Division's
Senior High/Prince Williams
game was cancelled due to
inclement weather. In the
Eastern Division, defending

am. Agsinae' Cogee Ite a
rest while the Queen's
College/L. W. Young and the
R. M. Bailey game was
postponed.


Wins Battling
TWENTYSIX-YEAR-old,
140 pounds lightweight Sugar
Ray Sears (left) on Friday
night was awarded the Battling
Douglas Trophy for his fighting
potential and ring courage
during 1972.
Trained by John Skinner,
who also trains Bahamas
middleweight champ Rennic
Pinder, Sears recorded six rinse
appearances in 1972 beginning
with a four round decision over
Otis Clay and ended with a
fourth round knockout of
Harold Moss of Jacksonville.
On October 20, Sears scored,
an upset victory over .


Douglas trophy
lightweight champ G~ypsy Mike
Whymns in ten rounds.
However, the title was not at
stake .
Sears is one of the
outstanding prospects and
followers of the standard of
fighting potential and ring
courage laid down by former
boxer Battling Douglas,
commented Wilfred Coakley,
Bahamas boxing authority.
In his six appearances, Sears
scored two ,knockouts, three
decisions and one no decision.
Our picture shows Sears
receiving his trophy from
Coakley.


~~P1~711). 41~ 7 ,.
CHARLIE GREEN of the Aquinas Aces gets a hand in
this rebound which is being controlled by Tyrone Sawyer
and Phillip Turner of St. John's. Aquinas won 78-57.

4n~l~PHOT



*Str In ll y "s l "


first quarter
Ronald Johnson, coming on
late in the first quarter and
Prince Hepburn, drove in two
baskets moving them 5 behind
(17-12) by the end of the first
quarter
Aquinas returning their
starting five Ben Davis, Bern
Davis, Charlie Green, Rahming
and Edgecombe in the
second quarter took control of
pith ea da 26ol6 wth a itt e
over three minutes remaining
in that quarter.
AtIMPENETRABLliad
Tyrone Sawyer rebounded well
with Johnson, L~e rmond
Russell and Prince Hepburn
shooting with fair accuracy,
the unity of Green, Davis and
Edgecombe controlling the
centre/forward area began to
prove impenetrable as Aquinas
controlled their lead 33-23 late


4TH. TEST DRAW CERTAIN
KANPUR, INDIA, JAN. 30
fors a6rs teor leunqh k t ls
day of the fourth Test here
Tuesday after the England tourists
had taken a first innings lead of 40
En tendwershall out for 397, witih
hitting a defiant 125.
Wiping out the 40-run deficit
shortly after lunch, Indla had made
I frhnoe lt tfea, p nuina cead <#
play. A draw was certain.
AUSSIES OPEN TOUR
KINGSTON, JAMAICA .(AP)--


the touring Australlan team will get
its first net practice Monday at
mil ayt uamp goune is aisonean.
40-over match against the
University of the West Indies on
Thursday.
NICKLAUS WINS PLAVOFF
PEBBLE BEAGH, CALIF.
(AP)-Jack Nicklaus given a second
chne wh n eril Mo

Moody and Ray Flyd for his
second consecutive title in Bing


Crosby's national Pro-Am golf
tournament.
bkicklaus ramhmeldstn haleZ
Pebble Beach golf links to score his
first victory of the season and 42nd
of his remarkable career.
BUCHANAN REGAINS
U.K. TITLE
G LA SGOW, SCOTLAND
a sp rm Ken ducanal Mnia
u poi re gained nthe Bridish title by
over 15 rounds.
Buchanan was a clear winner of


Watt fought grimly but
Brssre a ladn good pimnhs .y
the last round Watt was wilting.
Buchanan weighed mn at 133-3-4
pounds and Watt at 135.
ENGLISH CUP RESULTS
LONDON (AP)--Results in
En lih soccer games M akday:run


rot a om,e Wes Bromwich 3
Rochdale 1, Bournemouth 0
Swansea 1, York 3.


THE WEEKS OF BEING
TIED for first place in all three
leagues seem to have come to
an end as City Market,
Amoury's and Esso have taken
over sole possession of first
place for their respective
league.
PLAZA
The two first place teams

mf air as he sronge d am
City Market, won all three
from the weaker O.I.A. team.
Ronnie um n est 2364
lead the pace for the foodmen
as Miguel Obregon 197(513)
mustered-up the best segre for
the flyers-
Mercury kept within one.
game of City Market as they
won their three games from
Home Furniture. Murcury were
cnfident of victory right .frhom
t arts s mh~ wnt e

be back in shape after a few
bad weeks for Mercury. Larry
was helped out by Tommy
Russell 189(534) and George
Friesen 189(530). Tony
Zervous and Hubert Roberts
turned in the best lines for the
Furnituremen.
Sawyer's are also keeping
pace as they are only two
Lom o~ hfo dSa yer'lseade i
seems they always enjoy
victory over the stronger
teams. Charles Cooke led
Sawyer's as they won two
games from Finco. Brian Harris
was high for the financiers

Amoury' E YeR into sole
possession of first place as they
won two evenly contested
games from second place Super
Value. Rose Saunders


181(482) and Pallas Roberts
167(455) led Amoury's as
Jeanette Higgs 156(426)
turned-in the best score for the
Super ladies.
First half winner'
Thompson's, moved into
second phase as they won all
three games from the lowly
Maura's team. Ivy French

20( )ha dmosL rspe t be
scores for Thompson's. Tootsie
Thompson and Virgina
Shi pmann were top.scores

Well, Home Furniture did it
again as they tied another
game. This time they split right
down the middle with New
Oriental Laundry as both
teams won one and one half
games each. Joan Graham
167(475) set the pace for the
furniture ladies as Donna
Fryers Ie 11l of N O L'pl te

they won two games from the
team they were tied with,
Pritchard's. Led by rookie
Terry Chea 214(615) and
veteran Sydney French
246(575) Esso were too stronS
for Pritchard's. Manny
Kastrenakes 191(547) and
Barry Kemp 196(543) did
most of the bowling for
Alu' Suphpy reai ny
one half game behind Esso as
they w~on two games frmB t

Mlbury 246(606) and Mike
Sawyer 240(591) set the pace
for Albury's while Ken Sands
214(585) and Tom Stubbs
201(Si43 bowledawell for K.C.

they upset the highly favoured
Claridge's winning two games.
Tinker's Paint won two
games trom Heinekens.


in t cnd qart ,M an

"The guys were not coming
through on the press,"
commented St. John's captain
Andrew Albury. "Man for
man,, we have a better team."
But it did not show on
Aquinas' home court as
Rahming and E~dgecombe on
early baskets moved the Aces
43-30 in the lead.

ca e to l n'swhrno t~eba y
Johnson and Rolle attempted
to break the ten point lead.
But Aquinas picking up the
pace when St. John's relaxed
the press and moved their lead
58-41 at the end of the third

qu knson, Albury, Russell
and Rolle kept up a creditable
offensive attack in order to
bring St. John's to a
respectable position but


The Corporation is pleased to announce the introduction of Direct Distance DialiLng facilities northbound
to Canada effective let February, 1973.

The.rates for this service offer substantial savingsover rates for pexron to person traffic via BaTelCo
overseas operators.


F
Canada .

Area


403
604
204
5)06
709


902
416
519

705
807
902
418
514
819
306
403


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$6.0 o
7.50
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4.95
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4.,95
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6.95
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4.95
4.95
4. 695
4.95
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6.(00
8.40


$4.80
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4.80
3.90
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3.90

3.90
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4. 80
7.20


7.,50
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5.25
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5.215
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5.25


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12.00


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