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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03258
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 29, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03258

Full Text












nrtbuttr


i I I" ~ I
(Registerd with Postmatr of ahamas for postage conceslons within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading

VOL. LXX, No. 57 Monday, January 29, 1973.

DESPITE FRICTION BETWEEN P.M. & HIS

DEPUTY, & CONTRARY TO RUMOURS----





I Hanna not likelytobe


1 _


0 moved trom immn


By NICKI KELLY
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER ARTHUR HANNA, rumours to the contrary, is not
Immigration, The Tribune has been informed.
Reports concerning a rift replacement for Mr. Hanna at
I Lnr LaaPaP between Prime Minister Immigration was Transport
IND rPnUDN L Lynden Pindling and his Minister Darrel Rolle.
SDeputy began circulating Although still a freshman in
DAY REGATTA IN before both men left in politics, Mr. Rolle, in the four
December to attend the months he has been at
MOnTAIG BAY London constitutional talks Transport has established an
and have gained momentum impressive record for
MONTAGU B......AY :. L


THE ANNUAL Family
Island regatta, which is held in
Elizabeth Harbour
each year, will not be held
there this year.
Plans are being made to sail
the regatta in Ft. Montagu Bay,
Nassau during the
independence day celebrations.
Organizers of other regattas
scheduled to be held in some
of the Family Islands are
invited to reschedule these
races to coincide with the
independence celebrations in
the Family Islands and to
contact the Independence
Secretariat.

INDEPENDENCE

ADVISORY

COUNCIL NAMED

THE APPOINTMENT of the
advisory council to the
Independence Secretariat was
announced today by Mr.
George A. Smith parliamentary,
secretary to the Prime Minister
and chairman of the
Independence Secretariat.
Following are the members
of the committee: Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling,
honorary chairman; Tourism
Minister Clement Maynard;
Education Minister Livingston
Coakley; Senate president
Gerald C. Cash; House Speaker
Arlington Butler; the Rev. R.
E. Cooper, chairman of the
Bahamas Christian Council;
Mr. Edmund S. Moxey,
parliamentary secretary
Ministry of Education and
Culture and Mr. A. R. Braynen,
former House Speaker. Mr.
Smith will head the advisory
council and Mr. Harold
Munnings, permanent secretary
and coordinator of the
Independence Secretariat, will
serve as executive secretary to
the Council.
Mr. Kendal G. L. Isaacs,
Opposition Leader, declined an
invitation to serve on the
advisory council.

ELDERLY TRAFFIC

VICTIM IDENTIFIED
THE ELDERLY woman who
died in a traffic accident on
January 21 has been identified
by neighbours as Albertha
Major of St. James Road,
police reported today.
She is believed to be either
59 or 60 years old.
She was a pedestrian walking
on West Bay Street in the
vicinity of Arawak Cay at
about 10 p.m. when she was
involved in an accident with a
car driven by Hynah B. Major.
Police initially identified her
as 50-year-old Ida Mae
Ferguson of Tyler Street.
Subsequent investigation
proved the identification
incorrect, and a public appeal
for help in identifying the
woman was made.
Following the publishing of
photographs, Mrs. Mary Gibson
and Mrs. Pauline Gray, both of
St. James Road, came forward
to identify the woman as their
neighbour, Albertha Major.
No details as to survivors
were available, as investigations
were not complete.


ELEPHANT

PLANTERS


NLA ON ULY i lilE
NASSAU ONLY


since their return.
There is no question that
there has been disagreement
between the government's two
leaders, but while the
Opposition Free National
Movement has been publicly
airing its differences in print,
the PLP administration appears
to have quietly settled its own
quarrels behind closed doors.
It is understood that the
Prime Minister went so far as
to advise Mr. Hanna that he
was to be relieved of his
responsibility for immigration,
which has been the area on
which the government has been
most frequently attacked.
The Deputy Prime Minister
has reportedly refused to back
down and has mustered
sufficient support within the
government parliamentary
group to hold his ground.
FINANCE?
At one stage it was said that
Mr. Hanna had been offered as
an alternative the portfolio of
Minister of Finance, leaving the
present Minister, thd lion.
Carlton Francis, to deal solel-
with an expanded Ministry of
Development.
Repeatedly mentioned as a


impartiality in tne
administration of his duties.
There are many who would
have liked to see Mr. Rolle at
Immigration, but just as many
who fear that Mr. Hanna's
influence on Finance would be
far more wide-ranging than it
presently is at Immigration.
Perhaps the Prime Minister's
dilemma was best-expressed at
the PLP's January 10
anniversary banquet. He spoke
only three sentences, and these
concerned the need for party
and national unity.
UNITY
Mr. Hanna also spoke of
unity, and making indirect
reference to the reports in
circulation, commented that
"selefishness, rumour-monger-
ing and suspicion are the
enemies of unity."
The most recent report in
circulation was that the Prime
Minister, unable to resolve the
differences within his party,
had gone to the governor and
sought dissolution of the
House and another general
election.
The governor is said to have
turned down the request. But
one finds it difficult to put


Haitian tailor bound over for


3 years for assault on wife
FRANCIS BOUBERT, 51, a Haitian tailor resident of Abaco,
was bound over by Chief Justice Sir Gordon Bryce for three years
"to be of good behaviour" when he appeared in the Supreme
Court charged with causing previous harm to his wife Cecile on


October I.
Boubert, accused of stabbing
his wife in the "right lower
abdomen" and cutting her
across the right part of her
forehead, pleaded guilty to the
offence.
"Yes I am guilty," he told
the court after court clerk Fred
Seymour read the charge which
was interpreted for Boubert in
Creole by court interpreter,
Mrs. Vera Cartwright.
Boubert said he was sorry
about the incident, which was
caused by his wife whom he
discovered was being unfaithful
to him. He told the court that
he and his wife, married for 17
years, had five children who
"would die" if he was to leave
them. He still loves his wife, he
said and was determined to live
ij-


with her for the sake of their
children.
Mrs. Bostwick, prosecuting,
told Sir Gordon that evidence
recorded by the police spoke
of Boubert as being "well
liked, very courteous and well
mannered.
This morning, Mrs. Boubert,
appearing in court wearing a
blue Aran knit sweater and
brown dress, testified to her
husband's good character. She
blamed herself for the incident.
She told the court that she
and her husband never had
reason to be angry with each
other prior to the incident.
She said she still lives with
him, "loves him and caused
him to do what he did". She
said she was also sorry about it.





V.


FOX'S
Collins Avenue
6th Terrace

"SHOES FOR THE

m NTIRE FAME "


Newspaper


Price: 15 Cents


ONLY CRACKED WALLS and blackened steel supports remained standing at the
two-storey Besco Limited building on Shirley Street this morning after fire raged through
it causing damage estimated at $200,000. Two firemen, centre, are pictured inspecting
the still-smoking ruins. PHOTO: Philip Symonette.

CATHOLIC PRIEST TELLS NASSAU IAYCEES


Christian church must be 'a source



of unity in an independent Bahamas'

By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH must be a "source of unity" in an independent Bahamas, Roman
Catholic priest Fr. Preston Moss declared Saturday night.


much credence in such t
it seems highly unlikely
Pindling would consider
position so desperate
chance the public ridic
another election so s
after the constitu
conference.
What, however, has be
most disconcerting asp
the whole affair is the s
suspension into which
country has been plunge
time when it should be
full ahead towards the
independence.
It has been said tha
are investors waiting
their money into the Ba
providing Mr. Hann
removed. Again one d(
know how much weight
on such reports.
From what has been
of the conduct
representatives at the I
talks, the Deputy
Minister proved the
difficult person to deal
the negotiations.
OIPOSEII)
It is known that he o
a recommendation that
be allowed to leave the c
freely, and strongly fa
the government being gi
authority to confine a
movements to a "sl
area" should it choose.
Mr. Hanna was out
but not before clashing
on with the Prime Minis
Whatever their differ
however, Mr. Pindling
choicee but to accept t
that Mr. Ha
Bahamianization poli
whateverr the conseque
reflects the wishes
majority of Bah
including doubtless som
Opposition.
While it may n
compatible with the w
the investor, it is a fact
with which any on
wishes to do business
Bahamas must live.
More Bahamians, h
are becoming incre
disenchanted as the fal
jobs and income beg
affect them personally
lower level, where tt
draws the majority
support.
Ecouragingly, their
evidence of some relay
within the area of Immig
and greater depart
efficiency.
If such is to continue
the case, then Mr. I
presence at Immigration
not continue to b
bug-a-boo it has been
past.


alk, as
y Mr.
er his
as to
ule of
shortly
utional

een the
)ect of
tate of
h the
ed at a
moving
day of

t there
to put
ahamas
na is
oes not
t to put

learned
hv


I:


"Unity is a priority without
which the Bahamas cannot
become a nation," Mr. Moss
told members and guests at the
annual installation banquet of
the Nassau Jaycees, held at the
Sonesta Beach Hotel.
"Religion in the past has
tended to divide. It must for
the future be a source of unity;
co-operation, rather than
competition, is our goal."
Discussing "the role of the
Church in an independent
Bahamas," Fr. Moss prefaced
his remarks by defining the
Church not as buildings but as
"the whole people who believe
in Christ. When we speak of
the Church's role in an
independent Bahamas we are
talking about the new
responsibility of our Christian
peoples."
Among those responsibilities
are the development of unity,
faithfulness, self-confidence, a
true ordering of values, and of
a responsible people.
UNITY
Dealing first with unity, Fr.
Moss, pastor of St. Bede's
parish, told his audience:
"We are the Church. What
part, then, do we ourselves
play in our developing
country? Firstly, source and
example of unity.
"Unity is one of man's most
necessary conditions in order
to live, but the most difficult
to achieve.
"It is only in Christ alone
that all men can really find
their differences coming into
unity. The Church will,
therefore, in the preaching of
the Gospel of Christ and the
services to the people, try to
bridge the gap that exists
between the various religious
groups on the social, political,
economic and racial levels."
Fr. Moss said the Church
must inspire self-confidence
and must be concerned with
faithfulness on four levels.
He said that as the family is
the basis of both individual
security and the foundation of
a country's life "it is necessary
that the Church better prepare
our people for their
commitments, by marriage
instructions."
CALLING
People must be inspired with
faith to seek and accept their
calling in life whether it be to
sweep the street or to be a
doctor because each "has its
own nobility."
Thirdly, the Church must
inspire that kind of faith
"which is the same in a room
alone, on the job with others,
or at worship."
Finally, it must inspire "that
faithfulness which will bring
about continual development."
Fr. Moss went on to say that
"the Church must help our
people come to a true ordering
of values: people above things
and people above buildings.
Money is not the first priority.
Special values such as honesty,
understanding, tolerance,
dedication, attitudes of
respect, gratitude, forgiveness,
humility and integrity must be
seen as more valuable."
He added that "the Church
itself must be a clear, objective


.. za ..-",., .. -


HIGH WINDS BRING DOWN BIG TREE
HIGH WINDS reached near
gale force in New Providence winds gusting up to 35 spokesman said the
early this morning, knocking miles per hour and even velocity would fa
over this tree on higher in exposed areas and tonight, although
the Eastern Parade. along the shores -- and the gusts" would c
Fortunately, the tree did not heavy rain were the result of through the night. T
fall across Dowdeswell Street a cold front which passed should have ended, ex
to block traffic. The through the Bahamas scattered showers
Meteorological Office told between 3 and 4 a.m. today, morning, he said.
The Tribune that both the The Meteorological Office PHOTO: Philip Syn


voice in the community in its
official direction of the people,
It must not be afraid to discern
and to speak for the good of
every individual and the good
of the whole community.
"It must be above party
politics. It must look to the
real interest of the Bahamian
people and the will of God and
try to put the two together. It
must be a voice that is just.
NOT AFRAID
"It must not be afraid to
caution or to offer correction
when the actions of anyone or
any group are detrimental to
themselves or to the good of
the people, the real good of the
country, or contrary to
Christian belief."
Cautioning against
arrogance, Fr. Moss said
"without the true guidance of
the Church and without the
Church performing its role in
the community, the people will
be saying before long:
'Hallowed be my name, my
kingdom come, my will be
done.' Without the Church's
role in the community," he
said, "there will be a betrayal
of our forefathers, betrayal of
ourselves, a betrayal of our
future and a betrayal of the yet
unborn."
Summing up, Fr. Moss said
"the Church's responsibility, in
other words, is to develop a
responsible people, a people
who respond to each other, to
the world around them and to
God."
6 FIRE CALLS
THE FIRE Department
answered six calls over the
weekend, only one of which --
this morning's Besco fire on
Shirley Street caused major
damage.
At 5 p.m. Friday firemen
put out a rubbish fire at the
City Dump on Blue Hill Road
before any damage was done to
property.


London EMPLOYERS GROUP
Prime
most CHIEF BACKS 60VT.
with in

INSURANCE SCHEME
opposed BAHAMAS EMPLOYERS
citizens Confederation president
country Vernon G. Collie has thrown
avoured his full support behind the
ivtenthe government's National
citizen's Insurance Scheme.
specified Accompanying Labour
Minister Clifford Darling to
voted, Abaco Friday to support the
ig head Minister's comments, Mr.
ter. Collie described the scheme as
erences, a "definite step in the right
has no direction.
he fact "As a Bahamian I am proud
n na 's of this milestone in the
cy development of our nation; but
;nces more importantly, as a helpful
of the measure in relations with
amians, workers," he said.
e in the Those on the business side
of things had often been
iot be accused of not being sensitive
ishes of to the needs of their workers.
t of life "We have often been accused
e who of looking out only for our
in the own selfish interests," Mr.
Collie declared.
however, While this might be so in
easingly certain quarters, he said he
11-off in thought it had always been an
gins to accepted trade mark of most
at the businesses that there was a
he PLP "genuine and abiding" concern
of its for their employees.
"This concern has been
e is demonstrated by the work of
taxation the employers in cooperation
ration, with workers and government
mental to help the National Insurance
Scheme get off the ground."
e to be REMARKABLE
anna's The Confederation president
should remarked that the partnership
e the of government, workers and
in the employers was the most
remarkable feature of the
National Insurance Programme.
"No one group can claim to
have been excluded in the
formation of this scheme.
Representatives of every
employers group were
consulted as a means of
ensuring that the viewpoint of
all employers were
entertained."
Now having given its stamp
of approval to the scheme, Mr.
Collie continued, it now
became the Confederation's
responsibility to make sure
that it was successful.
This was of vital importance,
he said. "Each Bahamian must
prepare himself to assist in
whatever ways possible. We
must view this scheme as being
something of which we ,re a
part and as something which
belongs to all Bahamians."
Mr. Collie the employers'
representative on the Joint
Advisory Committee for
S National Insurance, said that as
president of the Employers'
Confederation he would
attempt to do his best to help
in carrying through this
wind programme of National
II off Insurance.
"cool lie urged every employer to
continue give his full co-operation and
he rain pledged the assistance of the
:ept for Bahamas Employers'
S by Confederation to any employer
who felt the need to discuss
onette. the programme with them.


TWO MORE children were
hospitalized over the weekend
as a result of traffic accidents.
Carl Brice, 7, of Market Street,
is in "fair" condition, and
Darin Taylor, 2, of Englerston,
is "satisfactory".
Both were pedestrians.
Brice was involved in an
accident with car 9393 being
driven by Vera King of
Bamboo Town, on Market
Street at 8:10 p.m. Saturday.
Taylor was injured when he
was involved in an accident
with car NPHI 258 being driven
by Willard Miller of Cordeaux
Avenue. The accident occurred
at 4:30 p.m. Saturday on Key
West Street.
The two accidents were
among 34 recorded over the
weekend by the Traffic
Department.
So far this year ten children,
all pedestrians, have been
hospitalized for varying lengths
of time as a result of traffic


accidents.
A spokesman for the
Princess Margaret Hospital
reported this morning that
both Alexander Symonette, 4,
of Rose Avenue and Clinton
Strachan, 7, of Comfort Street
are still "very ill" and still
unconscious.
Symonette was injured on
January 21 when he was
involved in an accident with
NPC 521 driven by Ronald
Newman of Glinton Street.
Strachan was hurt on Jan.
17 when he was involved in an
accident with car 9709 driven
by Ka Kerr of Centreville.


'" i ..... .i ines
----m--


4 POWERFUL JET-PROP ENGINES
ARE MORE RELIABLE THAN 2.
TELEPHONE 773t13/77778-


rration



likely to be removed from


FIRE DESTROYS

BESCO STORE;

$200,000

IN DAMAGE
By MIKE LOTHIAN
AN ESTIMATED $200,000
worth of damage was done this
morning when wind-whipped
flames completely destroyed
Besco Limited on Shirley
Street.
The fire struck only a month
after Besco closed its
Dowdeswell Street outlet and
concentrated all its stock and
business in the two-storey
Shirley Street building.
The cause of the fire was not
immediately known The
building and stock were
insured, according to a
company spokesman.
The Fire D)partment was
alerted at 6 13 ain but the
building was already engulfed
in flames when the first
fire-fighting units arrived on
the scene.
Mr. Charles Smith, a
shareholder in the company
and the manager, told The
Tribune when he was called to
the scene at about 6.30. "it
was already well ablaze; the
roof was gone."
It is thought the fire raged
inside the building for some
time before it was discovered.
NO SPREAD
High winds threatened to
send flying sparks to ignite
other buildings in the area, but
a light rainfall and the fact that
the closest building is about 50
feet away across Shirley Street
prevented any spread of the
fire.
Motorists on their way to
work along last Bay Street
became involved in a traffic
jam when firemen began
pumping water out of the sea
through hoses across Bay and
south over Okra Hill to Shirley
to augment the supply taken to
the fire scene by tankers.
Fire-fighters, who at one
point had five fire appliances
on the scene, brought the blaze
under control shortly before 8
o'clock, but water was poured
into the still-smoking building
until after 9 a.m.
The top of the building's
southern wall had collapsed
outward, and the rest of that
wall and the east wall were
severely cracked and sagging
slightly outwards.
Except for a small area near
the front of the building, the
entire second storey, weakened
by the flames, collapsed under
the weight of stored home
appliances and furniture.
Firemen rooting through
what was left of the upper
floor recovered nine radios
which were undamaged by fire
and, as they were still in their
plastic wrappings, possibly
undamaged by water.
The crowd of spectators
who lined Shirley Street
thinned considerably at 9
o'clock when teachers from the
nearby primary school came to
the school's Shirley Street
entrance and rang the bell to
get children to their classes.
Besco closed its Dowdeswell
Street outlet at the end of
December.
Another outlet on last
Street had been closed down
about three months before.


2 more children in PMH


after traffic accidents


~8~-~i9


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II


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AIRPORT DIPLOMATIC HASSL


'NEW ERA OF PEACE'


Ma ny, uary U2, 1973.


S'ILIIIT HIIAT'


PRESIDENT NIXON VIITS GRAND CAY, BAHAMAS
GRAND CAY, BAHAMAS (AP)-Preidmnt Nixon is relaxing on this
privately owned bland with two friends after disclosing that he wll break
tradition and sand Congress his State of the Union report as a series of
detailed messages.
Usually, President deliver their State of the Union addre in person.
Earlier this month, Nixon decided to send It to Capitol Hll in written
form, and he added on Sunday that it won't be a single report "covering a
laundry lit of programmes." Alde said the first of the messages is
expected to be completed this week.
Nixon flew by helicopter Sunday morning to Grand Cay, the small
island owned by New York industrialist Robert Abplanalp. With him was
Florida friend C. G. "Babe" Rebozo.
Nixon, Abplnalp and Rebozo went swimming for two hours Sunday
afternoon, had an early dinner, watched filmed highlights of the super
bowl game and then watched an unidentified movie.
Indications were that Nixon would return to Washington late today or
Tuesday.
CANADA WILL WITHDRAW IF FIGHTING BREAKS OUT
MONTREAL (AP)-Prime Minister Perre Trudeau says that Canada's
representatives on the Vietnam cease-fire commission are not being sent to
observe a war, and if fighting breaks out they will be quickly withdrawn.
Trudeau told a new conference Saturday: "We don't want to get
involved in any major war.
"If there's a few shots that go off, I don't suppose well pull out," he
said. "There is no question we will leave ourselves to be caught in a
crosfire."
NO U.S. MILITARY ACTION IF CEASE-FIRE BREAKS DOWN
WASHINGTON (AP)-Carl Albert, speaker of the U.S. House of
Representatives, said Sunday he cant foresee the United States returning
to action in Vietnam even if the cease-fire there breaks down.
"The treaty signed in Paris ends U.S. participation in that war," the
Oklahoma Democrat said in an interview Sunday on the CBS broadcast
"Face the Nation." "We're out of it, and I think we should stay out of it,
and we will stay out of It."
Albert said he expects Congres to approve funds for the rehabilitation
of Indochina, including North Vietnam, "but you'll find a lot of reaction
against that on Capitol Hill."
Although noting tt the United States helped rebuild both Germany
and Japan, as well as its European allies, after World War I1, Albert said he
believes there is a real danger now that Liberals and Conservatives will unit
behind a policy of noninvolvement in international affairs.
"There's a danger we may isolate ourselves from the world," Albert said,
"and that would be a real tragedy."
"BELLE OF DA NANG" DIED PRISONER OF WAR
NEW YORK (AP)-African-born Betty Olsen, a missionary nurse from
New York who became known as the "Belle of Da Nang" where she served
as the only woman among 10,000 American soldiers, died as a prisoner of
the Vietnamese Communists.
This was revealed Sunday in prisoner and dead list revealed by Hanoi
following the Vietnamese ceasefire.
Miss Olsen vanished Jan. 30, 1968. when Viet Cong troops overran Ban
Me Thuot, killing six missionaries there. Mis Olsen was the daughter of the
Rev. Walter Olsen, field chairman for the Christian and Missionary Alliance
in Africa's Ivory Coast. After graduating from the missionary college in
Nyack, New York, she went to Vietnam where she eventually joined other
missionaries at a leprosarium in Ban Me Thuot. The Vietcong reportedly
besieged the mission station 36 hours and captured Miss Olsen after she
had fled into a jungle.
N. A. COUNCIL MEETING SCHEDULED FOR TODAY
BRUSSELS (AP)- The United States and its western allies scheduled a
meeting of the North Atlantic Council for Monday amid the expectation
that they would accept a Soviet bid to start force reductions talks in
Vienna on Wednesday.
Authoritative sources said the Soviets delivered notes in Moscow
,Saturday night saying that they want Rumania and Bulgaria to come along.
These two East European Communist governments would bring to 19 the
'number of countries participating in the first contacts. The Soviet proposal
had been expected among western diplomats.
MEET TO PLAN STRATEGY AGAINST ISRAEL
SCAIRO (AP)- Defense and Foreign Ministers of the 18-Arab League
me mber states resumed their closed meetings Sunday to work out a
strategy plan against Israel, while President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
continued his efforts to iron out Iatr-Arab differences.
Sadat received Jordan's Foreign Minister Salah Abu Zeid, but it was not
immediately known if the meeting has cleared the way for the reported
desire of Jordan's King Hussein to visit Egypt.
Egypt broke diplomatic relations with Jordan last April after Hussein
announced his plan to set up a Palestinian state on the west bank of Jordan
under his throne.
Sadat also received Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Omar Sakkaf who
.lnied as a meame from King Feial.
Me ~.hrtM Middle East Nei Agency reported thertl Arab Legu
mainm Sundy morning was to dimu s a report by Egypt's War Minister
General Ahmed Ismal In dealing with the requirements for battle against
Israel.
The meeting also was said to deal with another report by the Syrian
Foreign Minister Abdel Hallm Khaddam on the latest sraeli attacks against
Syria, the agency aid.
GREEKCYPRIOTS STAGE ANTI-ZIONIST PROTEST
NICOSIA (AP)- Greek Cyrpriot demonstrators waved anti-Zionist
placards outside the Israel Embassy here Sunday in protest over the death
of the Cyprus representative of the Al Fatah Palestinian guerrilla
organisation in Nicolia last Thursday.
The placards in Greek and English sad: 'Murderers gt out of here,'
Zionism means Nazism, 'killers go to hell,' and 'Zionist murderers get out
of Cyprus.'
Earlier about 300 people, mostly Greek Cypriots, marched behind the
hearse taking the dead Palestinian's body from a Nicoia clinic to the
premises of the Cyprus Arab Friendship Association, where memorial
service was held. Later the mourners escorted the body to Nicosla airpoort
from where it was flown to Beirut.
The Fatah man, Bashir Abu Khair, was blown to pieces by an explosion
in his Nicosia hotel room early Thursday.
The Al Faah office In Beirut claimed the same day that Abu Khair was
Its representative In Cyprus, that he was murdered by Zionist agents and
vowed revenge.
GAZA-TEL AVIV R. R. LINE BLOWN UP
GAZA (AP)-Arab saboteurs below up a section of the Gaza tel Aviv
railway line nar Khan YunIs In the occupied Gaza strip early Sunday, a
military spokesman said.
Army engineers had repaired the damage, he said. No casiuaties were
reported.
The spokesman aid 400 Gaza Arabs use the railvsy daily to travel to
their Jobs Inde Irarl.
THREE AFRICAN PRESIDENTS MEET FOR DISCUSSION
DAR ES SALAAM (AP)- A three day meeting is to take place in
Arusha, Northern Tanzania, between President Nyerere of Tanzania,
President Mobutu of Zaire, and President Kaunda of Zambia.
The meeting I to be held Frebuary S to 7.
It Is expected that the three will discuss the liberation struggle in
southern Africa and Zambia's communaletios to the ase through Zaire
and Tanzania followings blockade impond by Rhodesia.

M A


HI News highlightsli
-- -- --^^


Fighting has flared in
numerous hamlets as the
International Commission of
Control and Supervision and
Vietnamese Communist
delegates to the peace
agreement's joint military
commission are gathering in
Saigon. They are to set up
machinery aimed at
strengthening the shaky
cease-fire. The Vietnamese
Communist delegates are
scheduled to meet the U.S. and
South Vietnam tomorrow for
the initial meeting of the
four-party joint military
commission.
This last-minute effort to
grab land left details of
positions to be straightened
out in the spotted pattern of
disputed holdings that already
marks the map of South
Vietnam.
The four-nation group that
is supposed to supervise the
peace and pave the way for
final agreements was in only
preliminary stages of
organization, and that too
posed uncertainties. It is in fact
uncertain whether the 1,160
observers from Canada,
Indonesia, Hungary and Poland
will be effective even after the
commission has set up it
observation posts.
Vietnamese blood was shed
in Tay Ninh and the Mekong
Delta right up to the final
hours. Three Americans died
and more than a score were
wounded in the last two days.
The arrival of the first North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
delegates in South Vietnam
after more than a decade of
war immediately turned sour
Sunday. The 10 Viet Cong
peacekeeping representatives
refused to get off their plane at
Saigon's Tan Son Nhut airport,
apparently objecting to
ustoms,ppocedures.
They arrived at 3:45 p.m.
and remained in the plane late
into the night.
The Viet Cong delegates
were reported to have objected
to filling out customs and
immigration forms after
arriving from Bangkok,.
Thailand, where CoL Dan Van.
Thu, the delegation leader,
praised the cease-finm
agreement as a "great step of
reunification of the two
Vietnams."
The delegation's refusal to
budge from the South
Vietnamese air force DC3
touched off a storm of
diplomatic activity which at
one pointinvolved from North
Vietnamese officer-deleptes
who had arrived on an earlier
flight from Hanoi.
URGENT CONSULTING
Informants reported that
U.S. ambassador Ellsworth
Bunker had "urgent
consultations" with the South
Vietnamese foreign ministry.
At one point, two U.S. air
force planes were brought for
some unknown reason
alongside the DC3 but they
were hauled away about 15
minutes later.
It wasn't clear why the Viet
Cong delegates were refusing to
sign the forms, but apparently
they objected to doing
anything which would imply
recognition of the legitimacy
or sovereignty of the Saigon
government.
The standoff overshadowed
other airport firsts: The arrival
of Hungarian and Polish
peacekeeping members on a
Soviet-built ILl8 airliner and
of Indonesian delegates on two
U.S. Cl30s. It also raised


doubts about Monday's first
meeting of the four-party
international Commission of
Control and Supervision.
Airport security on the
military side of Tan Son Hnut
Airport was so heavy that few
newsmen were aware of the
incident.
The South Vietnamese,
determined to avoid a public
meeting with men who until 8
a.m. Sunday were considered
their enemies, put the base
operations area of limits to
newsmen, restricting them to
the civilian terminal.
he first peacekeeping
members to arrive were 85
Indonesians who disembarked
at the civilian terminal. The
delegation is headed by Gen.
Dharsono, former Indonesian
ambassador to Cambodia.
The next plane to arrive was
the International Control
Commission plane which flies
weekly runs between Saigon
and Hanoi through Vientiane,
Laos. This week, it had some
very special passengers: 19
North Vietnamese
peacekeeping delegates and one
Viet Cong.
BALKED AT FLAGS
The ICC plane arrived about
3 p.m. and taxied to base
operations where four South
Vietnamese policemen and an
ICO military liaison officer
went on board. They
submitted to immigration and
customs processing but refused
to ride to their quarters in
eight limousines provided by
the United States.
The North Vietnamese
objected to having the ICC
flash on the fenders, claiming
the white flags with blue
lettering resembled "flap of
surrender." An American
sergeant ran along the line of
cars ripping off the flags.
In the meantime, through,
the Communist delegates
climbed into buses and drove
off. Most of the delegates and
members of the four-party
j6inr military commission will
live in barracks that once
housed U.S. air force men. But
soniL "VIPs" have been given
the option of living in down
town hotels or officers'
quarters.
After the ICC plane dropped
off its North Vietnamese and
Viet Cong passengers, it taxied
to the civilian terminal where
several Canadian and Polish
members of the old ICC got
off.
John Hammill, Canadia's
permanent representative to
the old ICC in Vientiane who
was aboard the plane, aid the
military liaison officer who
boarded the plane shook hands
with the North Vietnamese
delegate. He said the South
Vietnamese were "polite and
businesslike."
'The North Vietnamese
were very quiet on the whole
flight Hammill said. "They
were curious. They were
looking out the windows when
they got nearer the ground,
Just like I was-..." ,
M about the time the ICC
plane arrived at the civilian
terminal, the DC3 with the 10
Viet Cong aboard pulled up
neat base operations.
Hammill said the 19 North
Vietnamese and one VC
delte on the ICC plane
"filed out cards and customs."
With the 10 VC on the second
plane refusing to do likewise,
the VC delepte on the ICC
plane remained at the time the
onll VC legally in South
Vietam.


Ceasefire shattered


by all-day


fighting in Vietnam

SAIGON (AP)- The Vienm cea -e habeen shattered by
all-day fhtilif from the Demllitared Zone to the Melong
Delta. And U.S. offices my they aticipat re hard fl8htin
ahead.


I U~i l Hours 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mon. Fri.
IWitff M. ftarM ektet 8:30 .Sm. to 8 p.m. Sat.

i. r


Nixon budget to slash REMEIEIEa sIT
WITIUOT VIOLENCE


several popular



federal programmes

By Gaylord Shaw
KEY BISCAYNE, FLA. (AP) Declaring it It "time to get bg
government off your back and out of your pocket," President
Nixon told the nation Sunday he is sending Congres a peacetime
budget hold the line on taxes and dashing veal popular


FATE OF 1,347 MISSING
IN ACTION IS UNKNOWN
WASHINGTON (AP) Noe
Vietnam has told the United S
that 555 American military men ar
alive in Communist prison camps in
North and South Vietnam, the
Pentagon said Sunday night.
Stl in doubt was the fate of
1,347 other Americans missing In
action, many of whom may
eventually be presumed dead.
The North Vietnamese sill had
not released the names of
Americana held prisoner in Laos,
the Pentagon said. But a spokesman
said such a list was expected.
Before the cease-fre Saturday,
the Pentagon had said it knew of
591 prisoners in Communist
camps in Vietman but expected
that some were deed. In Laos, 317
were considered either captured or
missing.
All American prisoners of war
are to be released within the next
60 days. Hanoi gave the United
States the POW list in connection
with the signing of the cease-fire
agreement Saturday.
NO POW LIST OF
THOSE IN LAOS
WASHINGTON (AP) The
North Vietnamese have failed to
furnish the United States with a list
of American fighting men taken
prisoner In Laos, defense
department officials and an
organization of POW families said
Sunday.
This leaves anxious relatives
without any knowledge of the fate
of 317 U.S. servicemen carried on
the defense department's books as
either captured or missing.
Some military officers suggested
the North Vietnamese might be
holding back on this information to
deter further U.S. bombing of the
North Vietnamese supply trails
through Laos. More than 120
American bombers hit Laos and
Cambodia after the Vietnam
cease-fie.
NOT OPTIMISTIC
WASHINGTON (AP) A
member of the House armed
services committee, Mississippi
Democratic representative R. V.
Montgomery, says he doesn't
expect any pleasant surprises to
come out of the lisltng of American
prisoners of war. He said he thinks
we're going to have to face the
blunt truth only a small number of
the 1334 American listed as missing
will show up as captured.
Montgomery spoke to newsmen
at the Pentagon after he had met
with defense officials handling the
prisoner of war lists supplied by the
Viet Cong and North Vietamese
in Paris. Montgomery says he has
not been able to get a firm figure
on the number of names on the list.
He said he believes the total
number of prisoners will be higher
than the $91 the Pentagon has
listed as captured In North
Vietnam, South Vietnam and Laos.
U.S. AIR COVER FOR
LAOS TIL CEASEFIRE
NEW YORK (AP) William H.
Sullivan, the state department's top
specialist on Southeast Aian
affairs, said Sunday the United
States will continue "to provide sir
support in Laos" until a cease-fire
agreement is declared there.
"From our reports, there appears
to be a significant Communist
offensive going on in parts of Laos,
but we have reason to believe that
there will be a cese- ir there in
the not too distant future," mid'
Sullivan, the deputy assistant
secretary of state for East Asian
and Pacific affairs.
He said the continuation of U.S.
air support in Lae, during the
interim until a ceserfire b
permitted under the Vietnam
cease-fir agreement that took
effect at 2400 GMT Saturday.
Sullivan, In Paris whe he helped
negotiate the cease-fir, commented
on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press" in a
tli broadcast transmitted from
Paris to New York via satellite.
He did not elaborate on U.S.
activities over Laos, but it was
learned in Washington that more
than 120 U.S. war planes bombed
North Vietnamese supply tral in
Laos and military targets in
Cambodia after the Vietnam
ceas-fire went. into effect.
Sullivan, on another matter, sid
he had received a report of 138
cease-fire violations in Vietnam
since the Paris-negotiated
agreement took effect, and he
described the violations ar "small
sporadic attacks."
LAST AMERICAN TO
DIE BEFORE CEASEFIRE
SAIGON (AP) The lht
American killed before the Vietnam
cease-inre was the father of five
children, an army offlcer who had
Moved through the dege of An Loe
and was psslonateiy dedicated to
rebuilding the devastated dty.
Ironically, Lt. Col. William Nolde
was killed in An Lot by a direct
artillery round hit just as he
finished conferring with his
Vietnamese counterpart on how to
gt the economy rolling aga in. The
official end of the war was only
hour away.
"He was a fine gentleman," said
SSouth Vtname officer who
knew him wen.


NEW WAR CNIEF

NAMES BY ARABS
CAIRO (AP) Egyptian defense
minister Lt. Gen. Ahmed Ismall was
appointed Commander in Chief of
the "confrontation countries" -
Egypt, Syria and Jordan directly
involved in conflict with Israel, it
was announced Sunday,
The decision was taken by the
Arab defense ministers' conference
In a closed season Sunday evening,
the Middle East news agency said.
After a brief recess, an enlarged
meeting including foreign ministers
and chiefs of staff of the 18-nation
Arab League resumed their closed
meeting which started in the
morning.
The inclusion of Jordan's armed
forces under Ismall's command was
seen here as a success for Arab
efforts to reactivate the so-called
eastern front. Ismail s also
commander of the Egyptian, Syrian
and Libyan armies.
The move could also mean that
Egypt, Libya and Syria will resume
diplomatic relations with Jordan,
ruptured since hat April after King
Hussein announced his plan to set
up a semi-autonomous Palestine
state on the west bank of Jordan.
The agency said the defense
council has approved the report
introduced by lsmail on the
military requirements for the battle
against Israel.
"Arab delegations have informed
Ismail that they will place all their
military potential in the service of
the battle against Israel" the
agency mid.
It sid Syria was offered 20
million dollars by Abu Dhabi and
another 12 million by Saudi
Arible as contributions to her war
efforts.


The first of the messages will
reach Capitol Hill this week
and altogether, Nixon said,
"will chart a new course for
America a course that will
bring more progress by putting
more responsibility and money
in more places."
Aides said the chief
executive worked on the
messages Sunday after flying
by helicopter from his Key
Biscayne home to an island in
the Bahamas owned by a
friend.
Nixon's slashes in
programmes popular with
Congress, coupled with his vow
to keep current fiscal year
spending to 250 billion dollars
by withholding congressionally
approved funds, already has
touched off major controversy
on Capitol Hill.
Nixon declared that "if we
are going to keep taxes and
prices down, the Congress must
keep spending down."
"What is at stake is not just
a big, impersonal federal
budget," he said. "What is at
stake is your job, your taxes,
the prices you pay ..."
In his only direct reference
to the Vietnam conflict, Nixon
said: "We can be thankful that
with the war in Vietnam now
ended, this is a true peacetime
budget in every sense of the
word."


NLONONDERRY (AP)- "Come
on out you lB.gh buns come out
and fight w ot your auns,"
they sang he Sunday on the
first anversary of 'Bloody
Sunday,' the day British
paratroope shot dead 13 Irish
Catholics.
But ths time British forces
sted discreetly in the backround
and the commemorative rallies
passed off virtually without
incident. Al sides clearly
recognized that since Bloody
Sunday, Jan. 30, 1972, Northern
Ireland has never been the same.
The shooting that day in a
melee following an illegal parade,
began the wont year of violence In
Northern Ireand's troubled history.
They eventually led the British to
scrap the protestantbased
government in the province and
assume direct rule from London
last March.
An inquiry by Britan's top
Judge, Lord Widgery, discounted
the army's claim that all 13 victims
were gunman and found some of
the paratroopers' shooting bordered
on the reckless. The Judgment has
long troubled the British
conscience.
The day remains an important
one for Irish Catholics who want to
drive the British out of this
province and reunite the North
with the overwhelmingly Catholic
Irish Republic to the South.
More than 3,000 people crowded
into St. Mary's Church in the
Roman Catholic Creggan area here
Sunday to commemorate the first
anniversary of the Shootings. Black
flap fluttered from hundreds of
houses. Adults and children, many
wearing black armbands, wept.
Father Michael Mcivor appealed
in his sermon for the
commemoration to be treated
peacefully. It was.
Only a few hundred people,
mostly relatives of the 13 victims,
participated in the wreathlaying
ceremonies that followed at
gravesides marked "murdered by
British paratroopers."
The thousands were back for
separate afternoon rallies in the
Catholic Boside areas that
included song like "The ballad of
Bloody Sunday" beginning
"England's name was black with
shame ..." acts Vanessa Redgrave
and other prominent activists
participated. Miss Redgrave read
poem.
The rallies dispersed peacefully.


REMOVAL NOTICE



NIXON UPIIEI1R SE8VlE

WILL MOV]TO

BERNARD ROAD
FEBRUARY 1st, 1973
PHONE 4-1298 P.O. BOX 5238
---- ------






NOTICE




BAHAMAS BLENDERS LTD.

Warehouse, Kenndey Drive


will be closed for





on Wednesday,

January 31 from noon.

. . . . . . . .- - - a- -


LADIES JR. DRESSES 3's-15's-H PRICE
ONLY LADIES LONG SLEEVE
BLOUSES LESS THAN % PRICE *
LADIES LONG SLEEVE SWEATER
BLOUSES LESS THAN I PRICE 4
GIRLS SLEEP ROBES W PRICE *
GIRLS SWEATERS V PRICE INFANT
BOYS SHOES (2-5) PRICE BOY OR
GIRL'S SANDALS (4-8) W PRICES


AND MANY, MANY MORE
ITEMS ON SALE AT...




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PALMDALE SHOPPING PLAZA

SALE THRU. JANUARY 1ST.


INK-


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PA Bo N 1411- Iby Siret Nassm, Bahanm- Ph. 2-1179

~ ~ .... .,.,- .. o. . .-.; -


SME


federal pogrammes.
A day after the formal end
of American fighting in
Vietnam the nation's longest
war the President said in a
nationwide radio address that
his 269-billion dollar budget
"will give us the chance ... to
make our nw era of peace a
new era of progress."
Nixon's budget went to
Congress at Noon (1700GMT)
Monday, but he set the stage
for his battle of the budget
with Congress by unveiling
some of its key provisions in
the Radio address taped before
he flew to Florida on Friday.
He said:
He has searched for
waste in "every nook and
cranny of the bureaucracy."
His own executive office
payroll will be cut 60 per cent,
while deep cuts were made in
projected defense and
agricultural budgets.
e He is seeking to shift
more spending to such
programmes as pollution
control, crime and drug abuse,
energy needs and cancer and
heart disease research.
SERIES OF MESSAGES
Nixon disclosed, too, that
his State of the Union report
this year will be "a series of
detailed messages on specific
subjects," rather than a single
report "covering a laundry list
of programmes."


L LAOIES'


IEUSS TIAN -1/2 PREl~


714











Monday, January 29, 1983.

jbt grtbunr
Nuuusa AmmICrus JtuaAms ma VRBA MACWl
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DdPUCH. PHbltger/EIrdor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E.. K.C.S.G., D.Ltt., LL.D.
Publlhaer/Editor 1917.1972
Contributed Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRONM.Sc.. B.A., LL.B.,
PubiMelr/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (IS Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2.2768

Monday, January 29,1973.
i i -


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
A FEW DAYS ago I read a UPI news story in The Miami
Herald about a coloured woman who had defeated a
segregationist in Jacksonville for a seat in the City Council and in
the Florida House of Representatives. She is Mary Singleton.
I put this story aside for future reference because it interested
me personally but I have now decided that I should write an
article about her views on certain public questions in the hope
that it might make some impression on racist Bahamian readers.
C** C4C* C CC
The news despatch from Jacksonville reported that, as the first
black state legislator from North Florida since Reconstnuction.
Mary Singleton believes voters are beginning to forget race in
choosing their representatives.
"I think people are getting away from racial attitudes and
trying to elect candidates who have the public interest at heart,"
explained the newcomer to parliament.
"You can't do a job if you are filled with prejudice and hate,"
she continued. "I always look at things as what's best for the
public black or white."
The news report revealed the fact that, with her basic
philosophy, Mrs. Singleton has consistently polled more, votes
than any other candidate in Jacksonville a staunchly
conservative city in three contests for the City Council and one
for the Florida House.
Mrs. Singleton, the report continued, was one of two black
women elected to the City Council in 1967 the first women to
serve on the council and the first blacks in modem times.
Her husband, Isadore, had twice sought election to the council
without success before his death so Mrs. Singleton was familiar
with politics.
"We had such poor representation, I tried to get some men to
run," she recalled. "I never really thought about running myself
until a group came to me and said, 'Why don't you run?'"
Here are a few more interesting points in the story:
Mrs. Singleton, mother of two grown children and two
grandchildren, was managing a family barbecue business when she
4lecided to enter politic;. She has turned tfe,management of this
business over to a.son-in-ltw.
In the priimay tun-off frr the nomination as the Democratic
candidate Mrs. Singleton was opposed by alleged segregationist
Warren Folks, and another Democrat. She easily defeated both of
Them. In the general election Folks qualified as a write-in
candidate but received only 22 votes to Mrs. Singleton's 54,598.
Mrs. Singleton plans to concentrate in the Legislature on the
subject of child care.
Many black people in the U.S. are opposed to the death
penalty but Mrs. Singleton voted' for it. She agrees that capital
punishment was unfairly imposed on blacks and poor whites in
the past, but she feels the threat of the death penalty can be a
-deterrent even if it is never used.
*C***C*****
SIn the last few years there has been a remarkable change in
.racial attitudes in the U.S. This is particularly true among white
-people who are leaning over backwards in an effort to convince
-coloured people that they have "arrived" at the point of
acceptance and that the day of segregation and racial animosity
has passed and gone forever.
I travelled through the South in the days when conditions were
bad. I witnessed an incident on a bus in St. Petersburg, Florida at
about 3 o'clock one morning when a coloured man might have
been lynched when he went into a wayside restaurant at a bus
stop provided for people doing long journeys by bus.
This man was travelling from New York to Miami. He was tired
,and hungry. He went into this place with the other passengers and
-asked for a cup of coffee. The waiter behind the counter told him
-to go to the kitchen at the rear if he wanted service.
S"No thank you," he said quietly and returned to the bus.
SA white man in the restaurant took this as an insult and
Followed him to the bus. Fortunately the coloured man kept cool
and refused to be baited into an argument. The white man was
trying to provoke a fight so that he could say he was attacked.
This would have been a sure signal for a lynching.
; Now this is all changed. There is no evidence of segregation
anywhere. On the contrary, white people in the U.S. now go to
the other extreme and show excessive goodwill and a desire to
-cooperate in their contacts with coloured people.
Coloured people in the U.S. are now actively participating in
'everything., They are being appointed to executive positions by
the President, they are being elected to the Legislature in areas
"where a majority of the voters are white, they are active in
'business and in the professions, they are to be seen on the screen
and certainly they are fully integrated in sports in the U.S.
I Some very good actors and actresses are to be seen daily on the
TV screen. A buxom woman who plays the part of a house
*servant in the TV serial "Maud" is most amusing. She is really
First class.
More and more TV is being used in stories of racial
communication to convey the fact that there is a widespread
desire in the nation to end racial conflict and to build a new
*society on a firm foundation of goodwill and human
: understanding.
I am sure that there still exists in some parts of the nation
pockets of prejudice but this is to be expected. It is too much to
Hope that this cancer could be completely erased in such a short
me but, sulea something goes seriously wrong and there is a
widespreadd backlash throughout the nation against integration,
by the nast generation the white-black issue in the U.S. wll be an
t, academic question.
.- There has been some evidence from time to time of the danger
of a backldish. These pockets of resentment, unfortunately, are
provoked by coloured people who refuse to accept the hand of
brotherhood that Is being extended to them.
I suppose it is too much to expect the lower classes of coloured
people to. forget and forgive so soon. Their forbeats have been
badly used and many of the younger generation continue to be
suspicious because of stories told them by their parents and
Grandparents of the terrible conditions that existed in the U.S. as
recently as 1/ years ago,
I The important thing today is that goodwill is on the march and
i so we can look to the future with confidence that, in time. this


3lob WrtbunP 3


v P


-II


DR. JAMES R. JUDE, left, examining Jllle Jones of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, the day
before her heart surgery. At right is Dr. Earl Farrington, chief of surgery at the Princess
Margaret Hospital, who assisted Dr. Jude. The operation at PMH was sponsored by The
Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation and was the first planned and performed
here under their auspices. PHOTO: Andrew Toogood



Little lulie given new lease on



life by PMH heart operation
By MARY A. KELLY


THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TH
took place on Friday morning
Bahamian involvement.
For years now The Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation has been
underwriting heart operations
in Miami for Bahamians, but
this was the first one to be
planned and performed "at
home" so to speak, in a locale
and atmosphere that gave it
more dramatic impact than it
normally would if the child
had been operated on at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Initially the stage was set
by Dr. James Jude at the last
children's heart clinic. Having
investigated the facilities at
PMH and discussing it with the
medical staff he saw no reason
why certain corrective heart
procedures could not be done
at the hospital. He felt that
professionally and medically it
would be a morale booster for
the dedicated staff at PMH.
How right he was as I observed
the operation in the operating
theatre and noted immediately
a feeling that this operation
could be a success in which
they all could share.
For three and a half years
Julie Jones had been living.
with a heart murmur, but on
Friday morning she was
transformed into a normal
child following the PDA
(Patent Ductus Arteriosus)
operation. Even the discovery
of her heart murmur was
surrounded by other emotional
and physical factors. Little
Julie was in an accident in
Marsh Harbour a year and two
months ago and had to be
flown by emergency flight to
the Princess Margaret Hospital.
She was suffering from a
concussion and head injuries
and in the course of the
examination it was discovered
that she had a heart defect. She
recovered from her injuries and
returned to Nassau for the last
heart clinic where Dr.
Francisco Hernandez and Dr.
James Jude confirmed Dr.
Maude Stevenson's diagnosis of
the heart murmur and the need
for surgery.
The decision was made that
this would be the type of
operation that could be
performed at PMH and,
following one postponement
from last fall, the operation
took place on Friday morning
with everyone concerned
feeling the importance of the
event and the hope of success.
SPECIAL MEANING
I have witnessed and written
about many of the heart
operations which have taken
place at Jackson Memorial
Hospital, underwritten by the
Heart Foundation, but this one
had special meaning for me,
too. It was the first time I had
been suited up and masked so I
could watch the operation in
the operating theatre and not


E HEART OPERATION, both emotionally and physically, which
at the Princess Margaret Hospital is measured primarily by its


from an observation room with
closed-circuit television as I.
have done in Miami. It's a
different experience, believe
me.
It was 9:45 a.m. when Dr.
Jude and Dr. Earl Farrington;
chief of the surgical staff at
PMH who would be assisting
him, went into the room
adjoining the theatre for their
scrubbing. Already Dr. Alistair
Graham, the anaesthetist, and
his assistant, Dr. A. Ziauddin,
had put Julie to sleep.
At 10 a.m., after putting the
child into the correct position.
on her left side with her left
arm tied over her head, Dr.
Jude started the operation by
scrubbing with disinfectant
that part of the body where
the incision would be made.'
After assurance from Dr. S.
Rudra;:', assistant to Dr.
Farrington, that the child was
indeed Julie Jones, the incision
was made of about 4 to 5
inches. The area to be opened
up was between the third and
fourth ribs under the left
breast. The team also considted
of two scrub nurses, Mrs.
Marina Thompson and Mrs.
Lydia Rahming, circulating
nurse Mrs. Remilda Sweeting
and the assistant to the
anaesthetist was Mrs. Miller.
They were not the only ones
in the operating theatre as
other doctors and nurses from
the surgical staff also.were on
hand fcr the historic operation.
Dr. Jude explained
everything as he worked, such
as he does at the University of
Miami School of Medicine
where he is a Professor of
Surgery. This particular defect
was to repair the connection
between the aorta and
pulmonary artery as it was
pumping too much blood into
the lungs. It is repaired by
dividing it and suturing each
side, the pulmonary artery first
and then the aorta. The size of
the ductus varies in each child
and Julie's was small in size
making it a little more
difficult, explained Dr. Jude.
Once the defect was repaired
Dr. Jude let everyone
individually look at the area of
the heart showing the Patent
Ductus before proceeding with
closing up process of the
operation. A thin, tiny scar
below the left breast will be
the only evidence of this
operation as Julie grows older.
It was at this stage of the
operation, as he was preparing
to suture the ribs together that
he let me go out of the
operating theatre to find Julie's
mother to tell her everything
had gone all right. When I
found Mrs. Frances Jones in
the waiting room, she hugged
me so hard I thought my ribs
would crack. Tears flowing


cancer will be removed from the bloodstream of the American
people.
This situation today recalls to mind one of John Greenleaf
Whittier's most inspiring poems. Written over a century ago, he
envisioned the time when all men would be free.
In anticipation of that event he could hear in his imagination
the peal of church bells joyfully announcing the great event.
Today we can also look joyously to a time in the future when
men will not only be free .... but when they will be brothers in
the true Christian spirit.
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
I know not where His islands lift
Their fronded palms in air;
I only know I cannot drift
Beyond His love and care.
WHITTIER in Eternal Guvdincss

O brother man! fold to thy heart thy brother.
WHITTIER in Worship


FEARED ,


down her cheeks she kept
saying "bless you, bless you".
The time was then 11:10 a.m.,
the first moment that Mrs.
Jones had allowed herself to
relax with relief.
Returning to the operating
theatre Dr. Jude was finishing
the closing procedure which
ended at 11:40. All in all the
whole operation took less than
two hours. Dr. Jude then left
the operating theatre to talk
with Mrs. Jones, who was still
reacting with disbelief that it
was all over.
Julie was taken to the
intensive care unit for special
post-operative treatment for
about 48 hours. Dr. Jude
checked her on Friday evening
and again on Saturday morning
and indicated she was
Page 4, Cl. 4
I I


U ___


Minimax s a trading name of
Chubb Fire Security Linited


DC 2.2 DRY CHEMICAL


fire extinguisher

FOR HOUSE CAR BOAT

A LSO FROM STOCK FOR
IMMEDIA TE DELI VER Y
C02 Extinguishers 2-LB up
Dry Chemical 7 10 25 LB.
Water 2 Gallon


BAHAMAS

I NDUSTRIAL

GASES LTD.
CABLE: 'BIG' NASSAU. TEL. 3-6441/2


P.O. Box N-4688 Nassau, Bahama


MEN!.. STARTING FRIDAY 26


AT THESE PRICES


...THEY WON'T LAST!


MIKE'SSHOEI

MY STRIT, INASSAU.


i r

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Is.












TELEGRAPH SOCIAL CLUB
AID THE DEAF CENTRE
THE TELEGRAPH SOCIAL CLUB of Bahamas
Telecommunications Corp. donated $75 dollars Thursday
to the Centre for Deaf Children. At centre, Deaf Centre
superintendent Miss Hazel Buggs displays the cheque she
had just accepted from club ways and means committee
chairman Mrs. Monica Moss. Also present were (left) club
secretary/treaurer Maston A. Evans, club member Barbara
Clarke and, right, Deaf Centre teacher Ruth Turnquest and
club president Richard A. Curtis; in front are three of the
Centre's children.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette

U' Fast relief
from tiredness
.NOW RHtWInO * and discomfort


0I a
rin h tn Mcondl e |Us



- Plus at 8:50
h- hfk lib IK mpi"
hBimllM
d1hl


If you often feel tired and
find yourself getting irritable,
it could be caused by inade-
quate flushing of impurities
from the body. This condition
may be relieved with Dodd's
Pills. Dodd's contain an effec-
---- flow of urine and
speed the re-
moval of impu.
rities to help you
feel better.
Dodd's Pills
For relief from
tiredness and
discomfort.


Liquor Association gives to charities
MR. STANTON CHEA, president of the Bahamas Liquor Importers Association, on
Friday presented cheques of $400 and $200 respectively to Mrs. Sybil Blyden, left, of the
Stapledon School for Retarded Children and to Mrs. Jennie Mackey and Mrs. Edwin
Woodruff of the Ranfurly Homes for Children.


SUGGESTED FOR MA T
PARENTAL DISCRE
Reservations not claimed b
first come, first sen
La I


-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005











I




TURE AUDIENCES.
TION ADVISED.
y 8:15 will be sold on
ed basis. I


Last Day Tuesday
Sunday continuous from S
Monday continuous from 3
"TODAY WE KILL,
TOMORROW
WE DIE" PG.
Montgomery Ford
Bud Spencer
PLUS

"SUBMARINE X I" PG.
James Caan
David Sumner


esemtI


MOON
Rises 3:12 a.m.
Sets 1:49 p.m.



ABBEY

INTBNATIOA


FUND


$12.31
Offered Price
As of
January 26th, 1973


PHOTO: Philip Symonette

HEART OPERATION AT PMH


From Page 3
responding and recovering very
well.
Julie will have to stay in the
hospital from five to seven
more days and then she will be
well enough to be discharged
and probably be able to return
to her home in Marsh Harbour
in about three weeks. Life will
be a lot different fra her now
as she will be normal and
healthy and be able to be much
more active than she could
before the operation.
Dr. Jude had nothing but
praise for the operating team
and the nursing staff at PMH as
he prepared to return to Miami
on Saturday. He expressed his
willingness to come over at any
time to perform those heart
operations that can be
scheduled to be done at PMH.
Although most of the cases
underwritten by the Heart
Foundation are 'open-heart'
cases and cannot be done here.

UNBELIEVABLE
YOUR BEAUTIFUL COLOUR
PORTRAIT I


l^ oocyo,:2:,. s
on the Waterfront
East Bay St. & William St.
SPhone 5-4641
*our sensational January Special to keep our
staff busy through the After-Christmas Lull


it is encouraging for all
concerned to know that those
operations that can be done
here will in the future be
scheduled for PMH.
In evaluating the effects of
the success of this heart
operation one can readily see
not only the economical
advantages for such cases but
more importantly the
psychological advantages of
patients and parents being in
their own environment at such
a crucial time.


Monday, January 2, 1973.


'Togetherness & unity' sown in


opening new fire station at Freeport
GRAND BAHAMA society must foster a Bahamian image and respect Bahamian conventions if
the island is to make a "meaningful contribution" to nationhood, Grand Baham M.P. Kendal
Nottage declared Thursday at the opening of the new Freeport fire


Noting that those present at
the ceremonies reflected a
cross-section of all the
elements of Grand Bahama
society, Mr. Nottage took the
opportunity to invite them to
"attain that spirit of
togetherness and unity in
Grand Bahama that is symbolic
in the opening of this
building."
The fire station was built
jointly by Government and the
Grand Bahama Port Authority.
Mr. Nottage pointed out
that "our whole daily life
seems to be ordered by the
peculiar lines of politics,
nationality and station, and
while all these principles have
their place, it is not necessary
to flaunt them on our shirt
sleeve every single day of our
lives.
"This is now a time for
building together, for sharing
together, for helping one
another, a time for a unified'
Grand Bahama.
"If we in Grand Bahama are
to make a meaningful
contribution toward
nationhood," Mr. Nottage said,
"then there are some
fundamental principles which
we must adhere to.
"We must foster a Bahamian
image and have respect for the
conventions of Bahamian life.
"Local businesses should
become concerned about any
unemployment conditions in
Grand Bahama and go the
extra mile to maintain full
employment.
"Investment firms must do
all they can to envourage more
and bigger investments and
developments in Grand
Bahama.
"Those involved in the
tourist industry must strive to
give the best possible service in
order to ensure repeat and new
tourist business.
OPPORTUNITIES
"Financial houses must
bring their lending principles in
line with the philosophy that
economic opportunities should
be available to all and not just
to a chosen few..
"Local industries should not
always look outside the
Bahamas when there is a
contract to be performed.


Industry must be committed to
the industrial training and
development of our people at
home.
"All workers and employees
must recognize that they owe a
loyalty to their employers to
give an honest day's work in a
cheerful and friendly manner
for an honest day's pay.
"We in the Government
must extend the open arms of
welcome to well-intentioned
investors, we must protect our
established business
community, we must preserve
the rights of our people and we
must be dedicated to the total
development of Grand
Bahama," Mr. Nottage
declared.
Mr. Nottage saw the opening
of the new fire station as a
symbol that "Freeport and
Grand Bahama are not dead,
that this island is still young
and strong and vibrant, that we,
in Grand Bahama still maintain
faith in the total and orderly
development of this island
which enjoys acres and acres


expansion." I ,, ,e', , ,, ,-




EARN FULL PAY WHILE
LEARNING A SPECIALITY
It pays to specialize. And IBM will pay you while you train
to become a Customer Engineer. It's your chance to get
started in one of today's fastest-growing areas of
Electronics.
As a Customer Engineer, you'll install and maintain the
latest IBM Data Processing Equipment. It's a demanding
job. One requiring intelligence and skill. You'll receive
continuous training to update your knowledge.
If you have what it takes, you can be promoted to a
position or even greater responsible ty in this challenging
field of information handling and control.
What do you need to get started? Mechanical aptitude.,
knowledge of Electronics, and two years of technical school
or equivalent experience.Bahamians only need apply.
Why not begin your specialization today? For more
information Call 3-2351/4
and ask for THE MANAGE .


... IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusahln hut unwanted


items of


clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc... clear out


your closets, garage, storeroom .


all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to


ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


aMILI PLASE


I LOVE YOU

"THE PHOTOGRAPHERS"
MADEIRA STREET PALMDALE
E s1771


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L lMatione I, EIVmuIni. In
SMatinee 3 & 5, Evening 8:30


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Monday, January 29,1973.


3obt Irtbunt


Humane Society raffle starts Thursday


NEXT THURSDAY, raffle
tables will sprout up all along
Bay Street, in supermarkets
and even at the race track
With the single purpose of
raising large sums of money for
'the Bahamas Humane Society.
;Ticket sales will continue
'-throughout February.
First prize in this 19th
annual raffle by the society is a
relatively new import to the
Bahamas a Datsun Deluxe
car donated by Dr. and Mrs.


Men's H/H Loafer
was $23.75 now $20


Ladies' Suede Sandal
was $14.50 now $10


Victor Horan. Mrs. Horan is a
past-president of the Humane
Society.
Other prizes are round-trip
tickets for two to Luxembourg
donated by International Air
Bahama, round trip tickets for
two to Chicago donated by Air
Jamaica, a $100 food voucher
donated by Bahamas Quality
Market, round-trip tickets for
two to Miami donated by Out
Island Airways, a transistor
radio donated by Taylor


Industries and an electric
toaster donated by General
hardware. A chance on these
worthwhile prizes can be
purchased for $1.
Last year's raffle brought in
$23,000 from Nassau and some
of the Out Islands. This year,
for the first time, tickets will
be sold in Freeport and the
proceeds from those ticket
sales will be divided between
the Nassau society and the
Grand Bahama society.
"In this way, the raffle will


Arrived today: Oceanic from
New York; Freeport from
Freeport
Arriving Tomorrow: Bahama
Star, Flavia, from Miami
Sailing tomorrow: Oceanic
for New York
Wind: Northwesterly 10 to
20 miles per hour
WEATHER
Weather: Cloudy with
chance of few showers.
Sea: Slight to moderate


I


help both societies." said Mrs.
John Kenning, president of the
Bahamas society and raffle
chairman.
SELLERS
"Of course, we always need
people who will give a few
hours of their time to sell the
tickets," said Mrs. Kenning,
"and anyone who would like
to help may call me at 7-7229,
Lady Bryce at 3-4057, Mrs.
Kendal Isaacs at 4-1193 or Mrs.
David Knowles at 5-3944."
Mrs. Kenning said that the



TEMPERATURE: Min.
tonight 58
Max. tomorrow 78
TIDES
High 4:00 and 4:15 p.m.
Low 10:17 a.m. and 10:10
p.m.
SUN
Rises 6:55 a.m.
Sets 5:51 p.m.


LARGEST



SHOE SALE

IN BAHAMIAN HISTORY

"OUR PRICES ARE LOWER THAN
MIAMI SHOE PRICES"

SALE ENDS IN 10 DAYS!
BUY NOW FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
WHILE THESE LOW LOW PRICES LAST!
Men's H/H Loafers
k L tis_ was $25 now $20


N


Ladies' Suede "Dressy" Shoe
was 1 a 75 now r15


Ladies' ,$ede S$prtoe
was $14.75 Now $9.99


Boys' Alligator Loafer
was $8.95 now $5


PLUS EXTRA SPECIAL

SOAOF MARKED
0 U% PRICES
IN OUR ENTIRE STORE -
CHILDREN'S CLOTHING,
Lades' Italian Sandal TOYS, SHOES EVERY ITEM REDUCED
Ladies $8.95Italian Sandal $5.95
was $8.95 now $5.95 -- ... ...


Boys' Desert Boot
was $9.50 now $5.50


Ladies' Flats
Special $5.95


FOX'S SHOE STORE
COLUNS AVENUE & 6TH TERRACE OPEN: MON. THURS. TIL 6 P.M.
(NEXT DOOR TO DONALD'S FURNITURE) FRI. & SAT. TIL 8:30 P.M.


society needed to raise as much
money as possible from the
February raffle.
"The more money we get,
the more we can expand," she
said. "If the proceeds are low,
our 1973 programme will be
seriously curtailed."
Heading the list of priorities
on the programme are a horse
box and a set of slides to be
shown in conjunction with
lecture- and demonstrators to
school children on care of
animals.
"But we'd like to do more,"
said Mrs. Kenning. "We would
like to build more kennels for
dogs for adoption. We would
like to expand our training
programme and of course,
there is always equipment
needed for the clinic.
"The everyday running of
the clinic, just the feeding of
the animals, costs so much
money. Sometimes it is weeks
before a dog or cat is adopted
and they all must be fed in the
meantime."
RESIDENTS
The society's yard at
Chippingham has quite a few
permanent residents. Right
now, there are six old surry
horses, pigs, goats, a parrot. On
Saturday, January 20,
members and their friends were
the animals' guests at the
annual Open House at the


yard.
The


Bahamas Humane


Society has approximately 400
members.
"We are always anxious for
new members," said Mrs.
Kenning. "Membership is $5
for adults and $1 for juniors
and the members can be active
or not, as they wish, but every
$5 helps."
The February raffle will be
drawn on March 5 over ZNS.
The time will be announced
later.
Highlight of the March
calendar for the Bahamas
Humane Society will be the
Crystal Ball to be held at the
Halcyon Balmoral Hotel on
Saturday, March 10 cocktails
at 7:30 p.m., dinner and
dancing from 9 p.m.
Miss Lorraine Onderdonk is
the chairman for the ball and
once again, talented designer
Mel Doty is in charge of the
decorations and the crystal
motif.
Mrs. Douglas Appleyard, the
society's second vice-president,
is presently collecting the
prizes which will be offered at
a room raffle and as dopr
prizes.
The Humane Society has
been helping animals in the
Bahamas for 24 years.
February is the society's
month for hard work through
the raffle. March is the month
for kicking up the heels at the
Crystal Ball. Help the society
by supporting both.


HUMANE SOCIETY DONATIONS


THE BAHAMAS Humane
Society acknowledges the
following donations:
Mrs. Leonard Astely Bell,
'$200; Dr. and Mrs. D.
Appleyard (in memory of Mr.
Barney Black), $25; Mr. & Mrs.
Harry Cruickshank (in memory
of B. Black), $25; Mr. & Mrs.
Harry Oakes (in memory of B.
Black), $25; Anonymous,
$100; Miss Beverly Brice (in
memory of Mr. Jimmy Castle)
$20; Miss Alice Wilkins (in
memory of J. Castle) $10; Mrs.
Patricia McCarthy, $10; Mrs. J.
Castle (representing donations


received from persons here and
relatives abroad) $50.
Mr. P. J. Chiltern-Hunt, $50;
Bahamas International Trust,
$75; Mr. George Elcock, $10;
Major Martineau, $100; Mr &
Mrs. Herbert Deal (in memory
of Mr. Jimmy Castle) $15;
Emerald Beach Hotel, 512.50
Miss Paul, $10; Bishop
Markham, $1.
Mr. George B. Storer $100;
Mr. Roy Solomon, $350; Mr. &
Mrs. John Kenning, (in
memory of Mr. George Bethel)
$10.


ARTIST EDDIE MINNIS and Verneitta Mott, public
relations chairman for the Crippled Children's Committee,
display one of the posters he designed to advertise the
Committee's annual raffle of two cars one of which is
also pictured donated by Alexis Nihon. Mrs. L. O.
Pindling, wife of the Prime Minister, will draw the winning
tickets at 10 p.m. February 6 at the Cat & Fiddle Nassau
Street.


BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION


NOTICE


The Corporation is pleased to announce the introduction of Direct Distance Dialing facilities northbound
to Canada effective 1st February, 1973.

The.rates for this service offer substantial savingsover rates for person to person traffic via BaTelCo


overseas operators.

For your info
Canada.

Area
Code Pro

403 Alberta
604 British Cc
204 Manitoba
506 New Brunse
709 Newfoundla
403 North West

902 Nova Scoti
416 Ontario
519
613
705
807 "
902 Prince Edw
418 Quebec
514
819
306 Saskatchev
403 Yukon


*rmation the following list sets out the area codes, provinces, principal cities and rates to


wvince


Dlumbia

rick
mnd
: Territories

La





ward Island



fan


Principal
City

Calgary
Vancouver
Winnipeg
Moncton
St. John's
District of
Mackenzie
Halifax
Toronto
St. Joseph.
Ottawa
Sudbury
Port Arthur
Charlottetown
Quebec City
Montreal
Sherbrooke
Saskatoon
Whitehorse


Person to Person
Weekday Sun.


$ 9.00
11.25
9.00
7.50
7.50
7.50

7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
9.00
12.00


$6.00
7.50
6.00
5.25
5.25
5.25

5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25
5.25
6.00
9.00


Day

$7.20
9.00
7.20
6.00
6.00
6.00

6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
7.20
9.60


DDD
Night

$6.00
7.50
6.00
4.95
4.95
4.95

4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
6.00
8.40


Sun.

$4.80
6.00
4.80
3.90
3.90
3.90

3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
3.90
4.80
7.20


For DDD calls subscribers are reminded to dial 1 followed by area code and seven digit number.


1973 TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY CORRECTION

The THOMPSON BOULEVARD BRANCH of
BARCLAYS BANK INTERNATIONAL LTD. in
the OAKES FIELD SHOPPING CENTRE advises
its customers & friends that its correct telephone
number Is:

36065


FROM ALL OPERATIONS

1972 sales of both individual and group
insurance were the highest in Crown Life
history, according to 1972 sales results released
today.The figures show new sales of more than
$2.24 billion, an increase of $231 million over
1971.
A year ago Crown Life recorded the largest
increase in insurance in force ever achieved by a
Canadian life insurance company in a single year
- $1.45 billion for 1971. In 1972 the increase in
insurance in force was $1.74 billion, 20% more
than last year's increase.
This bring the total insurance in force figure to
more than $11.5 billion.


No hand holding until


a doctor's at hand

By Abigail Van Buren
DEAR ABBY: I have never m a problem like mine
In your column. I am a 15-year-old girl and I never let a
boy hold my hand because I have ugly warts on my fingers
and I am so ahamed of thm. My family cant afford to
send me to a doctor to have them removed ad I have
tried every kind of compound and even rubbing potato on
them, but they don't go away.
Please help me. LOVE FROM FT. MYERS, FLA.
DEAR LOVE: Ask your schol aue If there is a free
cdinc I yewr area. Be deoetn delate their services. and
perhaps oneewo ag to remove yew warts ad solve
yew problem. [P. Write to tel me If you have any
lack.]

DEAR ABBY: I am a blind and partially paralysed vet-
eran who has been home from Viet Nam since 1968, and
one of my biggest pleasures was listening to you on CBS
radio. It was only about five minutes a day, but I never
missed it, and it sure cheered me up. Lately I can't find it
Did they take you off or what? DISAPPOINTED IN N.Y.
DEAR DISAPPOINTED: Not I am still o CBS radlo
six days a week, but they changed the time of my program
all over the U. 8. Telephone yew leeal CBS radoe station
aud ask them what time Dear Abby Is onw ea. And God
bleat

DEAR ABBY: Years ago when one received an
R. S. V. P. lrCrtation to a wedding, no rnneme was taken
to mean the answer was negative. Who changed all that?
About a month ago, I received a wedding invitation
from out of state. The groom is my cousin, and I never met
the bride. Well, I didn't respond one way or the other
because I had no intentions of going.
Yesterday, I received a very fornal-type letter from
the bride asking to please let her know at my "earliest
convenience" whether I am coming or not!
Several other members of my family received the iden-
tical letter. We all think this s very peculiar to get such a
letter from a total stranger. Have things changed?
ANONYMOUS
DEAR ANONYMOUS: NetMag has changed. AN
R. 8. V. P. iavitat es shea be acknowledged promptly
with either an acceptaae er a declie. [Wherever did
yeo get the Idea that to Igore an ivtatis was to deeiae
It?]

DEAR ABBY: I never thought I'd be writing a letter to
Dear Abby, but maybe if I put this down on paper it wi
strengthen my resolve.
A Wr6ma we objected t yd dirty j*oket wrt v Iflaked
you what to do whan someone told one in her preenme, and
I think your amwer to her was so good, I am cutting it out
and taping it up on my mirror where I will se it often.
You said:
"Don't permit ANYTHING which ofends you to be said
i you presence without challenging it. Silence implies
tacit approval. Respectable people will respect you, and
don't worry about what the others think."
Never again, I hope, will I sit in my white, suburban
living room politely acquiescing to statements like these:
"I'd like to sell my house to a Negro family, but I'm
afraid of what the neighbors will say."
"What else can you expect of him? Look at the family
be comes from!"
"All Jews are alike."
"All the Irish are big drinkers."
"Don't ever trust an Italian."
The list could go on and on. If you don't mind my
taking your answer out of context in this instance, sig
me. ... ABBY FAN IN ROCHESTER, N.Y.
DEAR FAN: Be my guest. The principle i the same.
PreMems Tiea' lstd bower you ge t Rf year heset.
Fer a eimril relp, wile ta TAMY: eist No. OW. L. A.,



BUS REAL ESTATE LTD.
OFFERS
THE FOLLOWING

I. A choice lot on Collins Avenue in a good
location suitable for business purposes.
reasonably priced.
2. 8 acres on a Main Road with a substantial
residence priced $80,000.
3. A wide selection of attractive homes in
various subdivisions of New Providence
reasonably priced.
For information on any of the above call 2392 I
or visit us at our office, in the Dupuch &
Turnquest Building, Shirley Street.

CROWN LIFE SALE

REACH RECORD

$124 BILLION


I


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I











9.B Wrt iGrtbamu


Monday, January 29.1973.


*IafS(B~CI 331 get thlejob.done I

Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 h Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to5p. Mon. to Sat. a.m. to p.m.
I r- ---- I.I... - i -- .... ., o.- a am


I UFIE FITITF I I FSi RET I I RMnS tJIIPPDIIF I I M I IMi wIMYTa IM I Iw .a I I I


I ,,1,, 160wnM91


I I


IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's home, guest
cottage, fireplace, 24 baths,
patio, marvellous view,
swimming, fishing. H.H. Larkin
c/o Box 101, Harbour Island.
C8282
LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East End.
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.
C8566
FOR SALE Ocean View Lot
East End. 100' x 200'. Two
blocks from beach. Call 5-2370
after 6 p.m.
c8553
SPANISH WELLS, quaint
frame cottage with guest room
and bath in separate masonry
building, airconditloned and
mostly furnished. Fenced and
walled landscaped yard and
patio. Contact Owner, P. O.
Box 26. Spanish Wells.

C8591
CORNER building lot, main
road, very near The Current
Club, Eleuthera. $1750.00 or
make a sound offer.
Contact Mr. Kelly, Nassau
Florist Ltd., P. O. Box N-4635,
Nassau, or call collect 5-2598
or 2-4223 anytime.
C8595
FOR SALE
12-STOREY BUILDING 3-2
bedroom apartments upstairs
and open shop known as
Roberts Parts Department
downstairs Soldier Road
opposite Technical Training
Centre. Phone 4-2981, P. O.
Box 5387, Nassau.

C8592
BEAUTIFUL tip bedroom
;furnished apartment
overlooking Montagu Bay (very
desirable area).. New complete
rugs, stove, refrigerator, heater,
wall mirrors, sliding doors, etc..
Good rental no problem.
527,500.00. Will consider
exc~ n'Flortdall Mr.
Kactec* fr25 24223
any ., P. 0. B r4635,


FO RENT
C8597
ATTRACTIVE fully equipped
'3 bedroom 2 bath house
exclusive Buen Retiro Avenue,
just redecorated, large garden,
airconditioning, excellent T.V.
antenna, washing machine etc.
q350. Phone 53177.
C8392
PRIME OFFICE space
available in IBM HOUSE, with
central airconditioning and,
ample parking. For further
information call 32351/4.

C8410
BACHELOAt ROOM in-
respectable home In Palmdale
with private entrance. For
Information call 5-1044.
C8286
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED.
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental..
Day call 2-2152.
C8267
2 BEDROOM unfurnished'
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.

C8264
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU.
HILLCREST TOWERS (Third
Terrace West Centreville) -
Elegant, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
apartments, airconditloned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842,
74116, 2-8224 t' 2-8248.

C8604
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment for rent Cooper's
Terrace. Phone 32688.

CM518 S
-1. TWO SHOPS available in the
east Bay Shopping Centre,
East Bay Street. For further
Information call 2-4782.
2. Office, warehouse, open
yard storage area at the corner
of Virginia & Heathfeld
Streets. For further
Information call 2-4782.


1A9MTIPUL two bedroom
:fimilWd duplex apartment.
Air.cidltlUoned. laundry, large
:io yard. Village Road near
ontage. Call after 6, phone
6-2370*.
C8610
1 44bedroom 3 bath house
icoripletely furnished.
A;aliagl February 10th.
1 2.edro 2 bath apartment
4 1 404roimn apartment
" or Efficiencies In
prte entrance.
o:. n. CMll 3.1706
%"lP 10 a*m.


Uw I-kIm I I inninl we i LILbV I


I I nLr IiinIru I I ImmI I ETM n


Iin -.-- I--I--- -----v-- I I uww Wm E EW I


C8520
LARGE unfurnished 2 or 3
bedroom house Boyd
Subdivision. Phone 2-1170
from 9-5.
C8522
ONE UNFURNISHED 2
bedroom apartment Hawkins
Hill. $160. Telephone 51835
before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m.
C852i
WINTON HIGHWAY
Secluded, spacious, fully
furnished one bedroom
apartment overlooking well
landscaped gardens and sea.
Exceptional storage space.
Available February. Phone
2-2239, or evenings 7-7861.


C8614
LARGE ONE bedroom
apartment, out east with beach
rights, and private patio. Fully
furnished. Couple. No pets or
children. Telephone 24777 -
Evenings 4-2035.

C8589
EXECUTIVE TYPE two storey
dwelling house on long term
lease. Four bedrooms, three
and a half baths. Living and
dining rooms, family room,
kitchen, double car garage with
recreation facilities. Large
swimming pool, tennis court.
Own fresh water supply.
Attractively furnished. Located
in Sans Souci near St.
Andrew's School. Call 41563.

C8625
FURNISHED 1 large bedroom
apartment with telephone -
East Shirley Street. Phone
58196.
C8624
DOWNTOWN OFFICES
Second floor office suite at IPS
House, Shirley Street,
furnished, airconditioned
$250.00 per month, including
utilities call 21980-1-2-3 to
view.

WINTS TO BUY
C8601
USED UPRIGHT freezer in
.god a-4 gtion -: preferably
frost free. Phone 34579.

FOR SALE
C8609
HOUSEHOLD FURNISH-
INGS, dressers, chairs, 7 piece
living room set, double kitchen
sink new and lamps. Call
31705.
C8599
DISCHOTEQUE SET
2 turntables, 2-15" speakers -
tweaters and woofers 300
Watt Amp. and pre Amp.
$700.00 O.N.O. Phone
5-7541 Mr. Dean.
C8058
OWNER LEAVING COLONY
Triumph Herald 1968. Good
condition. $500 or best offer.
Can be seen at Teddar Street,
2nd house from Madeira after
6 p.m.

PETS
C8583
BAHAMAS OBEDIENCE
TRAINING SCHOOL new.
session. Registration at 6 p.m.,
January 30th Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre. For
information call 31409 after 6
p.m.

CARS FOR SALE
C8627
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
SUBSTANTIAL END OF
SEASON REDUCTIONS


1970 Chevrolet
Impala
1968 Chevy II
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic Beige
4 Dr.
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic
1968 Javelin A/C
1,971 Vauxhall Victor
2000 Auto Grey
1969 Fiat 124 Green
1970 Mustang Red A/C
1969 Dodge Monaco
A/C Vinyl
1971 Viva 4 Dr.
Auto Red
1967 Chevy II A/C
Automatic Yellow


$2800
$700

$1895
$1600
$1600
$2300
$700
$2400
$1795
$1895
$900


Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8


C8404
1965 AMPI CAR Triumph
Herald 1200 cc Engine. Owner
must leave colony. Phone
2-2441.
C8539
1971 FORD ESCORT. Phone:
7-7231.

M E SUPPLIES

' PACEMAKER 44ft. LuxurlOft-
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371..


C8576
3E RTRAM 31' Express
Cruiser, twin GM Diesel,
excellent condition. To see
call Mario 3-6645 from 9 to E
or 3-6649 after 5 p.m.


C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleeps
six; private bathroom with
vanity, shower and head;
stove refrigerator, sink.
stereo ship-to-shore, twin 230
h.p. engines with less than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 -9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.

C8384
BAHAMAS YACHT SALES
JAMES W ALBURY
P o BOX 5soo
NASSAU.BAHAMAS
TEL 28079
'DISTRIBUTOR FOR
TROJANYACHT
A DIVISION OF
W sHITAKER

S BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C8558
WANT TO BUY A LOT?
Phone 2-7667 P. O. Box
N4764, FRANK CAREY'
REAL ESTATE LTD. Let us
take you on a FREE
complimentary tour of any
subdivision of your choice with
no obligation to buy.
CALL US TODAY
C8514
Small thriving business for sale.
Good income. For details call
telephone 2-2633 between 6
p.m. 8 p.m.

LOST
C8645
LOST in Cable Beach Area
Blond Male Cocker Spaniel
with Red Collar and Tag
bearing name "Trompel".
Children's pet. REWARD
OFFERED. Phone 77868.

IC MEMORIAL
C8626


In loving memory of my dear
brother William T. Moss who
departed this life Jan. 22nd,
1965; my sister Emily Moss
McKinney who departed this
life Jan. 22nd. 1968.
Today you are remembered,
To others you are the past,
But to me who lost and loved
Willie and Emmie
Their memories will always last
in my heart.
Sadly missed by their only
sister, Elsie Moss Alburv.

C8622


In memory of Clair Gay
Newbold, who was called away
on 29th Jan. 1970.
If thou shoulds't call me to
resign
What most I prize it ne'er was
mine,
I have but yielded what was
thine,
Thy will be done.
Remembered with love by
husband, Paul Newbold,
parents Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Bay
and the family.


C8590
NOTICE IS HEREBY given
that Sidoles Toussaint (alia-
Bill Francis) of McQuay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Governor for naturalization
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of facts
to the Deputy Governor,
Government House, Nassau,
Bahamas. -


SPOSITION WmNTED
C8489
YOUNG LADY seeks job as
part-time maid or weekly.
Please call Ilene 3-6031.
C8608
EXECUTIVE with belonger
status wishing to remain in the
Bahamas now seeks
employment in any
administrative capacity
regardless of type of business.
Please write to P. O, Box
N7511 if interested, or phone
Nassau 41115.

HELP WANTED
C8438
NASSAU PUBLIC
LIBRARY
Qualified librarian required;
F.L.A., A.LA. or equivalent
degree in Library Science
essential. Applicants must have
experience in cataloguing and
classification and should be
able to type. Bahamians only.
Applications should be
addressed to:-
The Chairman, Board of
Trustees, Nassau Public
Library, P. O. Box N-3210,
Nassau.


C8580
STENOGRAPHER
THE ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA, FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama requires the services of
an experienced stenographer.
Applicants should have at least
G.C.E. in English Language and
be high school graduates.
Shorthand speed of 100 words,
per-mniut-andl typing speed of
80 words per minute.'
Bahamians only. Apply in
writing to The Assistant
Manager/Administration, P. O.
Box F61, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, or call .for an
appointment at telephone
352-6631.
C8585
EXPERIENCED BACK HOE.
Operator wanted. Pleaseapply
to Cavalier Construction
Company, Oakes Field.
,Telephone number 3-5171-2.

C8605
WANTED: BAKERY
ENGINEER to assume full
responsibility In the
maintenance and mechanical
operation of fully automated
bakery. Must have at least 16
years experience In Bakery
Engineering and possess own
tools. Excellent salary and
opportunity available.
Bahamians only need apply to:
PURITY BAKERY, P. 0. Box
N7778, Nassau. Telephone
2-2668 2-2669 ask for Mr.
Albury or Mr. Holland.

C8600
REQUIRED two chainmen,
bush-cutters for work in New
Providence and Family Islands,
previous experience not
required. Telephone 58825 or
24596 or write to P. O. BoA
N-7782, Nassau.
,C8613
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT.
required by International
Group of Companies with
diverse interests, including
construction.
Applicants should have at least
two years post qualification
experience. Apply in writing
giving resume of career to date
to Commercial Manager, Sir
Robert McAlpine &
Sons (Bahamas) Ltd., P. O.
Box N. 3919, Nassau N. P.,
Bahamas.

C8615
WANTED: Office Manager
Front Desk Supervisor. Must
have general knowledge of the
functions and the operations of
all departments and a thorough
knowledge of night auditing.
Applicant must have at least 4
years experience. Apply:
NASSAU HARBOUR CLUB.


C8373
TUITION
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE. World.famous
postal tuition for the G;C,
School Cert and
Accountancy, Banking,
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinat-
lons. For details of our
upecialised courses write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Reault Collee Dept. VNI
Tuition Housem: LodI
SW19 4DS


oI i i


C8602
EXECUTIVE LEGAL
secretary required by law firm.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Telephone
2-2511-2-3-4-5.
C8619
REFRIGERATION AND
Al CONDITIONING
MECHANIC to manage Service
Department and handle repairs.
Must have own tools Apply
In person to Fox Brothers
Furniture, Dowdesweil Street.

C8594
2 BAHAMIAN Handymen and
garden workers. References
and experience.
Apply: Deal's, P. O. Box 1548,
Nassau or telephone 2-4656.


TRADE SERVICES

C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300'
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.
C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS;
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.


C8102
AFTER CHRISTMAS MESS'
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCO TEL:51071-2-3-4.
C8279

Ifldif'i lfe01e


Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
'P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH-
PHONE: 2.3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2.3798
Airport 77434
C8515
HOUSE PLANS..

etc., drawn to suit you. Low
rates. Free Estimates.
call
Evangelos Zervos
Telephone 2-2633


UGRAM BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT


TEL. 352-608


HELP HINTED
C7094
CHAINMAN Individual
should have past experience as
a chairman performing task
under the direction of the
party chief, contributory to
execution of surveys.
Experienced In making
accurate linear measurements
over long distances and cut
reference lines. Individual will
also be responsible for
maintaining survey
equipment.
YARDMAN Applicant to
assist in the cleaning of yard
and at times clean and take
care of Gold Carts.
HANDY MAN Applicant to
assist where needed and is
expected to do general cleaning
around the Golf and Country
Club.
TRACTOR DRIVER -
Individual should have
experience operating road
mowing tractors and farm type
tractors which are used for
beautifying the highways.
Individual is required to
produce good references.
GARDENER Applicant
should have some background
in gardening and be
experiOnced in knowing the
various plants. Individual
should also be prepared to
work each work day.
Apply to: Devco Personnel,
18C Kipling Bldg., P. O. Box
F-2666, Freeport, GBI.

C7093
BILINGUAL SECRETARY,
MUST SPEAK AND READ
FRENCH, GOOD
SHORTHAND AND TYPING,
BOOKKEEPING AND
ACCOUNTING EXPERIENCE
AND MUST HANDLE OWN
CORRESPONDENCE.
APPLY: AIR CANADA, P. 0.
BOX F-391, FREEPORT.

C7096
Accountant required with at
least three years experience in
general Accounting. Applicant
must be capable of preparing
Branch Accounts and be able
to work with minimum of
supervision. Please reply In
own handwriting with copies
af references, giving full details
3f education, qualifications
and experience to date.
Baharmans only will be
considered .
Sun Alliance & London
Insurance Group, Post Office
Box F-26, Freeport. Bahamas

C7089
WELDING and Machine Shop
Foreman, familiar with all
phases of shop repair Including
MIG and TIG. Good basic
education required and 7-10
years experience.
Freelance Enterprises Ltd.,
Box 297, Phone 352-7972.


HELP WANTED
C7091
FULLY EXPERIENCED
BODY MAN required, must be
able to repair all types of
vehicles and install replacement
parts and complete up to
re-finishing stage. Minimum 3
years experience, full Company
benefits. Bahamians only need
apply.
Five Wheels of Grand Bahama
Ltd.. Telephone 352-7001.
C7092
2 FLAT WORKERS: Female,
to separate linen, feed them
into machine and fold same
way, no experience necessary.
DISHWASHER: Male, must
keep all plates, cups, etc.,
clean, keep working tables-
clean at all times, washing of
floors and walls, also seeing
that trolley for dishes is always
clean, should have some
experience in running
dishwashing machine.
WASH ROOM HELPER: MaleC
begin work at 5 a.m. sorting #f
soiled linen, loading them ifl
washers and pulling clean liners
from same.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to King's Inn & Golt
Club, Personnel Department;

LITTLE
THINGS
ARE
IMPORTANT
Small in size, but
performing an important,
function when needed,..t
what would we do without
paper clips, pins, needles,
etc.?
Classified Ads are like that
too! In fact, they do more
'things for more people at
lower cost than any other %
form of advertising!
Place your ad now in The
Tribune Classified section.

Which day

is best for

a Want Ad?
That's a question The'
Tribune Classified
Department hear often. And
fortunately, there is no "bet
day".
Each day there are people
with new wants and needs,
Each day brings new readers,
a well a old ones to the
Clssified pages.
So start your ad when your
"want" arim, and cancel It
when it brings results.- .
Stop-by The Tribune office
to place yours. Every day is
the best day to advertise with
The Tribune Clasfied Ads.


I ELWANTED
C8623
SYNTEX CORPORATION
HAS VACANCIES FOR THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS:-
CHEMICAL MANUFACTUR-
ING OPERATORS: 2-5 years
experience in batch chemical
processing producing fine
organic chemicals.
CHEMICAL TECHNICIAN:
Applcant-must have previous
experience in Chemical
Laboratory work and be able
to carry out routine analysis
and calculate analytical results
and physical constants.
Previous experience In acid and
base titratlons, thin layer paper
and gas chromatography
essential.
PIPEFITTER/WELDER: Must
have sound knowledge of
piping systems, fabrication and
welding techniques. Must be
able to install, maintain and
repair structural steel,
platforms, supports, piping and
related accessories associated
with chemical plant
construction, equipment
Installation, plumbing, heating,
airconditioning, refrigeration
and water distribution systems.
Must have at least six years of
industrial welding and
pipefitting. Certificate
:preferred.
MECHANIC/M ILLWRIGHT
Capable of trouble shooting
platft equipment and
knowledge of principle
.general plant equipment and
knowledge of principle
methods and problems
associated with the operations
of maintenance shop and
chemical plant equipment. Six
years diversified industrial
experience required.
cnemTcal plant equipment. Six
years diversified industrial
experience required.
ELECTRICIANs Required for
the Installation, maintenance,
repairs and tests of electrical
and instrumentation systems
associated with power
distribution, lighting,
communications, machine
tools, motor controls, heating,
ventilation, air conditioning,
refrigeration, steam generation
anf various chemical plant
equipment arid utilities. Must
have at least 6 years experience
In Industrial, electrical and
instrumentation work.
PRODUCTION FOREMEN:
Responsible for the direction
and supervision of chemical
operators, helpers and trainees
in the manufacture of steroids
and organic chemicals. 2-5
years in the fine organic
chemical industry essential.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT:
Responsible for routine
accounting and book-keepinc
activities. Must be proficient Ir
the use of the Frider
Computyper, ability to type
essential.
Applicants should apply Ir
person to Syntax Corporation
West Sunrise Highway, or write
P. O. Box F-2430, Freeport.


C7090
FULLY EXPERIENCED
MECHANIC required for our
service department. Must have
minimum of 3 years with
knowledge of General Motors
products. Full Company
benefits with factory training.
ahamins only need happy.
ive Wheels of Grand
Ltd.. Telephone 352-7001.


IELP MNTED
C7070
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
required: High School graduate
or equivalent education: 3-5
years experience desirable.
Applicant must be able to take
dictation and type at a
reasonable speed: filing
experience will be helpful.
Apply in person to Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport.

C8572
CURRENT ACCOUNTS
OFFICER-IN-CHARGE
THE ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA, Freeport, Grand
Bahama requires an
Officer-in-charge of Current
Accounts Department.
Applicants must be familiar
with the operation of a current
accounts department and have
considerable experience.
Bahamians only.
Apply in writing to the
Assistant Manager/Adminis-
tration. The Royal Bank of
Canada, P. O. Box F61,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, or
call for an appointment at
telephone 352-6631.

C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accquntants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeoort office.
Successful candidates will be
paid- excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply In writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.


ET ARE HAPPENING
THIS WEEK AT




SHOES SHOES SHOES
THOUSANDS OF PAIRS ON SALE


Z~LC~L~a~b: F ~Ir


Ladies leather sandals
were $16 NOW $8 .,
^S dr-


andal- $5


HE





WI


Men's all-leather high heels
were $28 -- NOW $18


Men's Thom McAn casuals
were $26 NOW $12


-I-


. AND 3BAHAMA
iN FREEPORT TEL 352-6602


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"... A slight disagreement over the contract I signed.
Luckily, I got the part with my signature on it."

Rupert and the Ninky Toys-7
IF~ -- i -1 SI


On his way to Bill's home Mummy this morning and he
Rupert meets Margot, who told me they won't be home
has an animal balloon on a until tomorrow evening."
string. "Can't stop." puffs Rupert sighs at this new set-
Rupert as they draw level. back. I was hoping to send
" simply must see Bill Bill's Ninky to Santa with this
Badger.' "You won't find pattern." he says. "It would
him in." smiles Margot. "He be so much better if he had
went on a visit with his them both."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


1 k ftm**Colownd RIVI uIi
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Many upsets ae
apt to occur today ad tonight and you am all
too apt, as well as everyone else, to feel you have been taken
advantage of and to spout off and really get yourself in an
obnoxious position. Quiet study of all factors of difficult
conditions in your life show silence momentarily the best.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You are tempted to get rid of
present set-up and go after the new and untried and this could
cost you a good deal, get you into big trouble. Keep busy
improving routines instead. Study something worthwhile in
p.m.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You want to go off on some
tangent that could really get you into trouble, so refrain from
Joing so and stick to the conservative. Try to understand how
Sclose tie is thinking. Do not force your own will.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Be content with some
associate who does not think as you do, since it is this very
difference in ideas that makes the partnership work. One who
opposes you is not telling the truth. Keep silent and all is well.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Get busy on that
work as you had planned and don't make radical changes now
that could spoil it for you. Don't overtax your nerves. Once
your work is done, get a fine rest in p.m. Forget the social for
now.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Ydu want to have fun now, but
don't take chances with the unknown and unfamiliar, or you
could get into real big trouble. Your mate's ideas may not be
good for you at all. Be like Caesar's wife above reproach.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. '22) Don't criticize kin so
mercilessly, or you start a big battle at home that is uncalled
for. Use diplomatic means and increase the harmony there
instead. Evening is then fine for entertaining at l.hme.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Make sure you use care in
motion of all kinds and don't do anything that can harm
others in any way. Shop carefully also and don't lose your
wallet, purse. Think before you speak or you can get into
trouble.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Not the right day to take a
chance on some new venture you don't know enough about,
or it could prove to be very costly. Get into something sure
that will add to present security instead of taking away from
it. Think logically, constructively.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Important you are
wise as the owl but calm as the lamb today if you are to win
over others now. Take some time to make yourself more
attractive and charming. Don't just jump into your clothing,
dress carefully.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Others around you can
seem quite a drawback to you, but this is only to test your
mettle and help you advance despite opposition, or because of
it. Delve into that important work with a vengeance. Drive
with care.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. .9) Ideal day to forget
dashing around here and there and to get into the work that
awaits your personal attention. The social should be put aside
if you feel nervous. Await a better day for such.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Get busy at routines with
more efficiency instead of jumping into the new and untried
which could get you into some kind of trouble. Investigate
whatever interests you for the future. Avoid one who is a
drawback to your progress.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY... he or she will be
one of those fascinating young people whose mind is always
buzzing with all kinds of thoughts, who literally has to be
made to shut up early in life so that there can be more
harmony with others, until religious training and ethical
methods teach to speak with care and wisdom. The habit of
criticizing others mercilessly should be curbed early, also. A
fine problemsolver here, so give a good education. Sports a
must.


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

TATs AULL RieT, AS vOU KNOW, I'M KENNY/6 'sTHE TRUTH THAT Tn o THE
MR. TASPER BUSINESS MANAGEg--AND FIRST YEAR THAT KENNY's AOTED
I'M SORRY Tr WAKE )vU COME IN WHEN HE MAKES MONEY/ TO MAKE ANY REAL MONEY = AD,
SO (ALY, MISS GALE--- SO DO 1 AND MANY PEOPLE IF HE CAN orrmTINU PLAYT
ESPECIALLY SINCE KENNY WtULDNT BELIEVE THIS-- UT CNAMPIONSWHP OOLF
HAD )VU OUT SO LATE I'M MORE INTERESTED IN HIS E'L M FINANCIAMY Tl T IE
ST NIGHT WELFARE THAN I AM INPIP NPDNT IN A l*MIl lALE-
IN HIS MONEY FEW .ARS/ CANHE PIAY










JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS

S":<.' ' HOW'S YOUR WIFE, SHELL MEANWHILE... YES, AND, JERRY... I MlI1T
MR. SILVESTER E ALL HE SAID HE'D BE MR.T! WANT YOU TO 60 ON A
FOLLOWING A RIGHT, ARRIVING IN AN A LITTLE BUSINESS TRIP
PHONE CALL, ROCKY 0 08 LARRY! HOUR! GO PICK TONIGHT...60 PACK
SILVESTER TELLS HIM UP AT THE A BA6!
HIS PILOT THAT 0 o o AIRPORT!
THEY'LL BE FLYING
TO NEW JERSEY!

/-2g





m| 1
Rt 7 T
EM


APARTMENT 8-G


By Alex Kotskl


Brother Juniper


"Here's how the procession will proceed . .
fingers can hold onto his candle."


if butter-


Winning

Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO

497642
V KQ
04
SAQ 10 3
South
A J. 3
A

Contoa't 60 : Lead 46.
How should declarer pla ?
ANALYSIM: The asaumpton
mmeit be that trumpe break 2-2,
for otherwise there's no hoq,,
but the problem remains to s-
poseof two loedna spades. With-
out idat lethal ckib lead killing
dummy's oly entrr, e would
be platn- rin. Dealer would
cash the ;VA, cross to dummy
with a club and throw two
spade on the V K Q.
.Now dummy is as good as
dead, for its vital entry has been
knocked out prematurely, while
htheearts are blocked. there,
then, no hope?
Things aren't as bleak at they
look All depends on the club
po in. If Wentas led away
from the 4K, the club 9ineaee
will bring home ,he contract. On
the 4t k outh jettisons his A.
unblocking. Now he can throw
his two spades 9 the Q K Q.
West Bast
4K Q5 i 10 8 2
S J 9 7 4 4 108 ,
0 Q J OK 10
aK 6 e >976 42


Chess
By L.ONARD ,W#tOsN












White mates in three moves,
against uny defence (by
0. TIt nks). The Black dOs is
ipped on the edge and ahls
miniature puzde loo s easy.
but the solution is crafty and
provides an exercise n chess
r times: 1 minute, problem
master; 2 minutes, problem
expert; 6 minutes good; 15
minutes, average 30 minutes,
novice.
"SONLUION No. 9589 (Jan 10)
Chess Solution
Since I Q-Kt27 fails to
I . K-R5 when the Black
king escapes. White first blocks
the flight route by 1 Q-Kt71
threateningg --Kt 3 or Q-Kt4
mate), R-Kt4i (ao that if
2 QxR? it is a draw by stale-
mte); 2 Q-KKt2 K--RS (or
2 R..-Kt7. 3 Q-R8 mate);


S1 AL rhs Quiz Is based on a hand 3 Q-QR2 mate.
CROSSWORD aII E AL featured in Australtn Bridge.

PUZZLE K M
1. Skirmish 26. The extreme H-OW an No lrM: O oretB wor4
6. Nimbus pointA o P 0 ; eow0 tsTA no er p T:14 Is 0a
10. Pure 28. Tricks or more ca n 25 or d& was
SPueu make ezoel28Tp.ouAAon seerow.
11. Turn inside 32. Dusk FLm th ST A T 11OJNt '
out 35. Goal boret In A-r uall1D
11. Ship's cable 37. Street sign 1amakrla
I High nest 38. Violet M L L itaM m haay ir a l
15. English 41. Expert I E be sed once r
cathuranl city 42. Wide sakm only. e .
16 Coead 43. Cross SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLEw ord mr uti coi n 1 the on l rat e
letter ond taere intut be i t
18. Origin 45. Hospital least one e"tater word In te
20. Buese knife worker DOWN
21. High explosive 46. Rub with oil 3. Fool
22. Oinsmntle 47.Watched 1. Small house 4. Phase i---1 J. ..atherserious. (4)
24. Sddrs arlor 48. Memorial 2. Counselor 5. Biblical king I P tt to t he Emnerald


& Erica
7. Declare
8. Dormouse
9. "The Hunter"
10. Fischer's game
12. Mrquee
17. Enactment
19. Gaming cube
23. In the ground
25. Jitney
27. Assist
29. Former Russian
leader
30. Geological
epoch
31. Exhausted
32. Ardor
33. Worth
34. Each
36. Western hills
39. Gaelic
40. Small animal
44. Card g me


a2. FIsh. (3)
13. No more than. (4)
24. Quarterdeek. (5)
Md. Mesh. (3)


Down
I. Measres. (44)
In between times. (U)
a. More unussua. (5)
S4.A .harml broadaster-
To do with tbe moon's pull.
7 -1 1 ( a)
S- - el. (3)
t o. ___C s I ) cooker. .)
No. 7.032 .. by TIM McKAsY I. e g
Across t y
A rm mint anass. <> I .). (4) i
a. Reuire. (4)f I
7. c lle. (4)
= as r oul 4 a sea level or s t anee.
v.ao 4 ) o. 4 ) 0
11. Seareb. (4) o u r
15. Wartime entertaining group. ashlo
) bfhioned
1. Its probably close to the V r -r
be&M. ,4) sto n.
15. Pause 4 (3) reuswE.s'. um
17. Humour. (8)


ICEMitlimR~


!


--I H ffl












Q'Jbt Urribunt


Rolle's recovery has



Schunk flustered in



Montagu Pro-Am tourney |

By IVAN JOHNSON
LEO ROLLE, the No. 2 seed, made a fine recovery to lead by
two sets to one over Fritz Schunk, the No. I seed, after losing the
first set 5-7 when play ended due to bad light with Schunk
leading 5-2 in the fourth set in the final of the Montagu Pro-Am
Championship at the Montagu Beach Hotel Courts yesterday.


Throughout the afternoon
Bradley Demeritte, organizer
of the tournament, ensured
that the champagne flowed in
great abundance as did
numerous shots from the
rackets of the contestants.
Schunk broke Rolle's serve
in the third game of the first
set and for a time Rolle could
not make himself other than a
sounding board against which
Schunk made the rich virtuoso
tones of his game reverberate.
Rolle's volleying at the net
was not good and Schunk kept
up the pressure putting away
anything loose. In an attempt
to drive Schunk back from the
net Rolle tried to lob but this
had next to no effect as
Schunk showed that his
,'overhead gear' is superb as he
'disposed of Rolle's lobs with
several devastating smashes.
Schunk displayed all aspects
of his game-backhand passing
shots, several glorious forehand
drives down the sideline and
one or two delicate drop shots
which had Rolle scurrying up
to the net.
SLOWED PACE
However, with Schunk
serving at 5-2 Rolle began to
come into his own. Sensing
that Schunk preferred the
faster game Rolle changed his
tactics to stroking the ball
firmly but gently to the
baseline. The change in pace
unsettled Schunk and by the
time he realized that Rolle had
slowed down the pace of the
game Rolle had recovered to
5-5.
Rolle took the 10th game
with some fine serving but
Schunk held on with some
difficulty to take the first set
7-5.
Going into the second set
Rolle began to show signs of
dominating as he broke
Schunk's serve In the first
game. But in the second game
Rolle had to return to Paradise
Island to have his racket
restrung and play was
interrupted for half an hour.
Pros usually carry four or
five rackets to tournaments but
apparently Rolle's racket and
grip is the only one of its type
on the Islands.
One would have thought
that the intermission would
have been to Schunk's
advantage as at the time of the
incident he was beginning to
look tired and flustered.
However, it did not and


Role continued where he had
left off on his return and easily
took the second set 6-1 to
make it one set all.
In the third set Rolle broke
serve in the second game and
with the crowd cheering him
on began to control the match.
Schunk stuck with it but Rolle
chased everything like a
madman and disposed of
anything of poor length with
splendid efficiency.
With the score standing at
5-1 Schunk took two games
before succumbing 6-3 and
Rolle moved 2-1 into the lead.
FOUND RHYTtHM
In the fourth set both
players continued to maintain
a high standard of play and in
the third game with the score
in games at 1-1 Schunk began
to find the rhythm which he
had shown in the opening set.
Schunk broke serve in the
fifth game and romped to a 4-1
lead winning the fourth game
with some fine forceful serving.
Rolle showed signs of
recovering as he had done in
the first set when he also broke
serve in the sixth game but
Schunk replied by breaking
serve again in the seventh game
to lead 5-2 in the fourth set.
At this point play was
stopped because of bad light.
The match will be resumed at
4:45 p.m. on Wednesday when
the final set will be played,
assuming that Schunk holds his
serve at 5-2.
Other results of Montagu
Pro-Am Championship;
QTR. FINALS L. Rolle
bt. B. Demeritte 6-1, 7-5 B.
Knowles bt W. Lightbourne
6-3, 5-7, 7-5.
SEMI-FINALS L. Rolle
bt. R. Isaacs 6-1, 7-5 F. Schunk
bt. B. Knowles 6-1, 6-3.

School cage clash
IFAVOURITES St. John's
College and the unpredictable
Aquinas College Aces, both
unbeaten in four games, poise for
combat this afternoon when they
clash for the first time this season
in the Western Division of the
Inter-School Senior Boys Basketball
Series.
Scheduled for Aquinas' home
court the Garfunkel Auditorium
St. John's will be striving to
equalize a two game loss they
dropped to the Aces by two
points on their home court and by
more at Aquinas last season.
These two games, and two
dropped to Prince Will, placed St.
John s in third place, and Aquinas.
having lost two playoffs rested
second to Prince Will at the close of
the 1972 series.


DAILY BU


BABA SERIES

RESUMES

TONIGHT
AFTER 26 DAYS of
negotiations, which resulted in 29
games having to be cancelled, the
Bahamas Amateur Basketball
Association finally reacquired the
A. F. Adderley Gymnasium where
".* they will continue the 1972-'73
series tonight at 7:30.
S/Third place Superwash Arawaks
and fourth place Carter's Hitachi
will vie to improve their standings
when they meet in the second game
at 8:30. The first game will be
played between Beck's Cougars
Junior and Carter's Collegians.
Scheduled to resume on January
3 after the Christmas break, the
B.A.B.A. were unable to acquire a
,.. gymnasium as the A. F. Adderley
Gym which was used in 1972 was
being used by students taking the
a General Certificate of Education
exam.
It was hoped that two gyms
...... shown might become available to the
z Schunk in Association so that the scheduled
sal Montagu games might be played within the
which is to be period of time set out in the
Wednesday at Bahamas Federation of Amateur
Sports' seasonalization programme.
However, with only one gym
available, "those (unplayed games)
will just simply have to be wiped
out," said Mr. Ferguson. President


The following is the lineup for
tomorrow's Hobby Horse Race
Track meet:
FIRST RACE 5 furlongs
Ist. half daily double
i. Stephanotis 113
2. Doe Doe 116
3. Screw Ball 113
4. Concha Bay Ill
5. Jubils 116
6. independence (Milk Face) 113
7. Magic Prince 116
8. YOung Bahamian 113
9. (;o Marry (;o 111
SUB.
Easter Bunny 113
Quisiera IIl
Little Tiger 111
Dark Star 111
The Hustler 116
SECOND RACE 5 furlongs
2nd. half daily double
I. Sweet Music 115
2. Avatheon 115
3. Scorpio 112
4. Mrs. Conch Salad 115
5. Jenny Fanny 112
6. Yellow Elder 112
7. Ton 0 Money 112
8. Aries Moon 1 I15
9. Golden Guinea 112
SUB.
Black Magis 115
Mr. P. D. 115
Sugar 112
Soul Brother 115
Al's Twist 115
THIRD RACE 4'/ furlongs
1. Royal Prince 117
2. Lady Beth 113
3. Sun Tiger 113
4. Bird's Baby 113
5. Wall Eye 117
6. Crow Dancer 115
7. Royal Star 117
8. Duke's Girl 113
9. Coloured Girl 113
FOURTH RACE 9 furlongs
1. Una Copa De Vino 115
2. Sophia 115
3. Gold Gail 115
4. Hawley's Diana 115
5. Fantasma 115
6.Dedi 117
7 Kismet IIt
8. Lady Lynn 117
9.MissGlo 115
SUB.
Added Sugar 117
FIFTH RACE 10 furlongs
1. Leaping Lena 114
2. Tam Twist 116
3. Winchester (Royal Dream) 114
4. El Spyrow 114
5.SirD 116
6. Cigarillo 111
7. Mis Constance 111
8. Mighty Joe Young 116
9. Trouble Maker 1I1
SUB.
Pete 116
Village Queen 114
SIXTH RACE 6 furlongs
. Spanish John 116
2. Five By Five 116
3. Regal's Maiden 116
4. Little River 111
5.Stilletto 116
6. Magic Woman Ill
7. Big Deal 111
8. The Kid 113
9. Hot Rod 111
SUB.
Ring 0 Fire (Zipporah) ll
Star Marie 113
Miss Shirlene 116
Banquero 113
SEVENTH RACE 6 furlongs
1. Roman Dancer 116
2. Mrs. A. D. Ill
3. Empire 111
4. Uncle Mac 111
5. Ugly 11
6. Sir Francis 116
7. Dream Girl 113
8. Bardoo Boy 116
9. Troy 11
SUB.
Flying Jo 113
Gunsmoke 113
Be Wonderful 113
County 113
Great Surprise 116
Miss Sharon 116
Catherina 116
continued next column.


IFFET LUNCH


Announcing a great new eating idea. Now enjoy
a delicious Buffet Lunch Daily at the Halcyon
Balmoral Beach Hotel. The Buffet features
exotic International Dishes daily at the
reasonable price of $6.00 per person, plus
gratuties. Enjoy a sumptuous meal, in a
beautiful quiet setting, tomorrow, perfect
businessmen, working girls and couples who
want to relax, gracefully. Make your way to the
Balmoral on Cable Beach for a really great
dining experience. Lunch served from 12:30 to
2:30 p.m. daily.


I im BoIHod I

umw u,,,o m tho BHdl9 To


I



a,
*I''
*Il


of the B.A.B.A. Teams will then be
graded "by virtue of their records
at the end of the season," added
Mr. Ferguson.



THE following are the results of
Saturday's racing:
Ist RACE 41/1 furlongs
Carmichael Queen (8) A. Saunders
$4.50, $3.75 $3.20 Miss Millie (5)
J. Horton $16.15, $2.15. Gone
Away (2)M. Brown $3.50.
2ND RACE 6 furlongs Secret
Agent (4) M. Brown $18.15, $9.25,
$6.25. Queen Hearts (9) N. Walcott
$6.55, $4.25. Jewel's Reward (2)
D. Patel $6.55. Daily Double (8-4)
$72.60; First Quinella (4-9) $47.45.
3RD RACE 41'/ furlongs
Scare-Um (5) S. McNeil $24.70,
$7.30, $7.00, Miss Brite (6) D.
Patel $11.20, $6.25. Complete
Image (9) A. Gibbs $3.75. Second
Quinella (5-6) $284.10
4TH RACE 41/ furlongs Go
Sugar (3) E. Stirrup 22.80, $6.30,
$3.90. Golden Eagle (9) G. Bain,
$3.70, $3.30. Shaheen (1) J. Bain
$7.60. 3rd Quinella (3-9) $27.25.
5TH RACE 9 furlongs Count
Zorich (2) S. McNeil $3.85, $2.80,
2.45, Dat Like Dat (4) G. Bain
2.80, $2.25, Regal Ranger (5) J.
Horton $2.25. 4th Quinella (2-4)
$4.10.
6TH RACE 5 furlongs Miss
Constance (1) G. Bain $4.80,
$4.55, $2.70 Neysa's Joy (5) J.
Bain $4.40 $3.05 Thricie (4) D.
Smith $2.35 5th quinella (1-5)
$9.20
7TH RACE 6 furlongs Spanish
Dancer (7) G. Baln $2.30, $2.35.
$2.40. Sib (6) S. McNeil $4,25,
$2.35. 6th Quinella (6-7) $10.40.
8TH RACE 5 furlongs Bundio
() N. Sweeting $4.85, $3.80,
$2.75. Connie (5) D. Patel $7.90,
$4.50.Liberty Bell (8) A. Saunders
3.20 7th quinella (5-9) $3..45.
EIGHTH RACE 4V furlongs
1. Dora's Hope 113
2. Baby Twist 113
3. Seni Paul 116
4.Casper's Child 113
5. Dark Gold 116
6. June's Joy 11 113
7. Shannedoah 116
8. Sweetness 116
9. Sling Shot 116


I



41 .

.. ,- -, 4... ,













IN THE NET Paradise goalkeeper, Mike Halkitis, dives in vain as Norman Archibald's
shot finds the back of the net to put McAlpine 4-0 ahead in yesterday's Sunday league
match at Clifford Park. McAlpine won 5-0 with Tony Hodgson scoring a hat-trick placing
them back at the top of the League table along with Tropigas, with 11 points from seven
games. Photo: RICKEY WELLS


impson and Hodgson shine
r






















as Clan rout Paradise 5-O

By IVAN JOHNSON
MCALPINE RETURNED TO THE TOP of the League table in grand style at Clifford Park
yesterday as they demolished Paradise 5-0 with striker Tony Hodgson scoring a hat-trick and Ray
Simpson being the main architect behind the Clan's roasting of Paradise.
Simpson playing at outside Simpson and Goodger began to scoring again when seconds
ight was continually in the revel in the freedom given to after half-time Hodgson ran
game bursting through on the them as a result of Paradise's onto a through ball and shot
ight and sending over endless poor marking. past the 'lonesome' Halkitis.
rosses and shooting with In the 30th minute Simpson Minutes later Simpson nearly
deadly accuracy and power. again burst through on the made it 4-0 when Goodger
One might describe Simpson right and released a shot from a found him unmarked on the
is the perfect player. His ball narrow angle which Eusebio right and with Barrett, who
control is superb, once past a would have been proud of had been caught on the wrong
ull-back his speed is blinding Halkitis seemingly amazed by side of his man, in full pursuit
nd his right foot is pure the power of the shot parried Simpson again struck the ball
dynamite. the ball upwards into the cross with tremendous power at
McAlpine went into the bar and Hodgson completed Halkitis who produced an
ead after 15 minutes when the job when the ball excellent dive to tip the shot
Simpson broke through on the rebounded off the round the post.
right and Halkitis failed to hold bar. Shortly after this Five minutes later following
onto his shot. For some ten Hodgson sent over a good cross a Paradise corner the Clan
minutes after this the play was from the left and Goodger scored again through Norman
concentrated around the centre again came very close to Archibald on the left and from
of the field with both attacks scoring. Minutes later with the this point on it was all over for
being unable to impress. Clan being allowed more than Paradise.
However, with Goodger and enough 'roaming' space, McAlpine brought on Rick
Simpson playing like maestros Goodger found Simpson Philips and Mark Turner (two
aep front the Clan soon began unmarked on the right and he schoolboy players) for
:o dominate, again fired a blistering drive at Stanham and Goodger and
POOR MARKING Halkitis who did well to gather with 15 minutes of the game
Paradise's attack lacked the ball cleanly and when the remaining Hodgson completed
penetration, while their half-time whistle sounded the his hat-trick and the Clan
lefence seemed to be oblivious Clan were 2-0 ahead cruised to victory and to the
af the fact ht theymust POWER SHOTS top of the League table with
Mark their man. After a time McAlpine wasted no time in 11 points from seven games.
mark their man. After a time McAlpine wasted no time in 1 1 points from seven games.


V


LEO ROLLE
serving to Frit
yesterday's fir
Pro-Am tourney
completed on
4:45 p.m.

DBBHD


-W--'y.




El


REMOVAL NOTICE



IlXON'S UPHOLSTERY SERVICE

WILL MOVE TO

BERNARD ROAD
FEBRUARY 1st, 1973
PHONE 4-1298 P.O. BOX 5238


wI E9I


GATES OPENii.30a.m.

POST TIME 1.15p.m.
M IE S 1RO11l l IINTITRA11


1111 11110E 1st 21 2ll lES
ALSI IIIHUIN1AS
GOVERNMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL
BETTING.
COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM & BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


I ~-


-1111


- ~.-'" ~I -----c-c~ii~-" tr;u~~ru-d~Y"~*~*-*~I:


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