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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03255
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 25, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03255

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esitfrtmd wwith Portmatt of Bahamas for po tage conceatons within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX, No. 54 Thursday, January 25. 1973. Price: 15 Cents
|tl 1


P.M. CLAIMED RECENTLY IT WOULD

BE 'A THING OF THE PAST' BUT--


Load shedding again after






trouble at Blue Hill plant


By MIKE LOTHIAN
EVER SINCE PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING declared 20 days ago that load-shedding was "a thing of
the past," the Bahamas Electricity Corporation has been doing just that -- load-shedding at irregular intervals and
in widely separated areas.


'PHONE LINKS

TO G. BAHAMA

'ALMOST BACK

TO NORMAL'
TELEPHONE communica-
tions between Grand Bahama
and the rest of the world were
"almost back to normal this
morning" and direct distance
dialing had been restored.
\-Mi/ Errol Leach, public
relai director for the
BahamaiTeiecommunications
Corporation, told The
Tribune this morning that
replacement parts for faulty
equipment at the Eight Mile
Rock technical centre arrived
from the manufacturer
yesterday and the fault has
been repaired.
He said the number of
operating lines available for
overseas calls into and out of
Freeport was slowly increasing,
as the repaired computerised
switching equipment is
gradually taking on the load.
V.-'dnd Bahaa .. was
completely cut off from
Overseas telephone communi-
cations early Monday
Monday evening when the fault
in the equipment developed.
Communications were
partially restored on Tuesday
afternoon, when the faulty
equipment was taken
completely out of the system
and replaced by manual
switchboards.
SIX LINES
On Tuesday afternoon
BaTelCo engineers had opened
six lines for out-going calls
from Freeport, and that
night further work opened the
six lines to both in-coming and
out-going calls.
All calls had to go through
operators at Eight Mile Rock.
With the replacement
parts installed on the
automatic equipment, the
manual switchboards have been
taken out of the system and
switching duties have been
returned to the automatic gear.
The process of opening all
100 lines into and out of
Grand Bahama is being carried
out slowly to avoid the
possibility of an overload, Mr.
Leach said.

.V. MALONE DIES
MR. JAPHETH VERNON
Malone, 86, died at his home
on Charlotte Street yesterday
evening following a long illness.
A public servant for 40
years, Mr. Malone started out
as a schoolteacher at Exuma iin
1906 and was then transferred
to Long Island where he met
his late wife.
He stayed at Long Island for
many years, rising to the
position of Commissioner. In
1936 he was transferred to
Inagua, following which he was
brought to Nassau and put in
charge of the Produce
Exchange where he remained
until his retirement in 1946.
S His guest house on Charlotte
Street, started in the 1940s,
became a well-known place to
visitors to Nassau.
Mr. Malone is survived by
three daughters, Mrs. Robert L.
Knight Jr., Mrs. John D. Wilson
and Mrs. Oris S. Russell, all of
Nassau, and three
grandchildren.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced later.


15 Haitians win asylum



in Mexico, plus $70,000



after kidnap ransom

By VINCENTE MORALES
MEXICO CITY, Jan. 24 (AP) The kidnapping of U.S.
ambassador to Haiti Clinton E. Knox was a means to an end, but


there is no reason to discuss it
asylum in Mexico as part of the
ten men and tive women
the three kidnappers and 12
political prisoners freed in
exchange for Knox and his
consul general arrived here at
8:23 p.m. Wednesday.
In a news conference at the
airport the exiles, most of
them students, said Knox was
chosen for the kidnapping
because he was an important
person who fulfilled their
purpose, not because they had
anything against him.
Raymond Napoleon,
apparently the leader of the
g-oup, denied that the
- p.son- released from Haitian
jails and the kidnappers were
part of any group.
He said the group brought
enough money to live in
Mexico, but apparently, the
70,000 U.S. dollars in ransom
was turned over to Mexican
authorities.
NO COMPROMISE
"We don't want to discuss
political things that could
compromise us," Napoleon
said.
Napoleon said, however,
that Haitian youth have
problems with the government
of Jean Claude Duvalier.
The group was evasive in
answering many questions.
One member of the group,
who declined to give his name,
said he feared what might
happen to his family in Haiti as
a result of his release to
Mexico.
Napoleon said most of the
12 released had been in prison
for four years.
The group arrived aboard a
DC-6 cargo plane of Air Haiti
after a seven-hour flight from
Port au Prince.
GUNPOINT
Knox was kidnapped at
gunpoint on his way home
Tuesday and a short time later
arrived at his home with the
kidnappers who held him
hostage there. During the night
he phoned Consul General
Ward Christianson who went to
the residence.
In Washington the State


now, his abductors, who received
ransom, said today.
Department said at one point
the kidnappers demanded half
a million dollars in ransom,
which Secretary of State
William P. Rogers refused. The
$70,000 came from the Haitian
government.
Also included in the original
demand, Napoleon said, was
the freedom of 31 prisoners,
Which the Haitian government
refused.
I The Mexican Government
cepted the exiles after
consultations with the Haitian
d U.S. Governments, Foreign
minister Emilio O. Rabasa said.
-itir immigration status will
be determined Thursday after
all are questioned, he said.
The group, dressed in
clothing for Haiti's tropical
climate, appeared cold and
tired.
They were taken to two
hotels in downtown Mexico
City.
The exiles were identified
as: Elizabeth Philibert,
Adrunne Gilbert, Sainte Rose
Guy, Antonio Joseph, Emile
Almonor, Daniel Josue
Bernard, Napoleon Victoric,
Raymond Napoleon, Anna
Napoleon, Armand Napoleon,
Jack Mage, Ulrick Julliet,
Therese Madiou, Francoise
Lenoir and Robert Lenoir.
Francoise Lenoir was
identified as one of the
kidnappers, but the identity of
the other two was not revealed.
HUMANITARIAN
The Mexican Government
said asylum was granted "for
humanitarian reasons" and
added their status in Mexico
would be decided Thursday.
On at least five other
occasions Mexico has accepted
political exiles in exchange for
the release of diplomats
kidnapped in other countries.
In September, 1969, a group
of 15 prisoners arrived from
Brazil as part of the ransom for
U.S. Ambassador C. Burke
Elbrick.
In March, 1970. exiles
arrived in connection with four
different kidnapping.
sK a "k- t').


And the source of most of
the trouble, The Tribune
learned today, has been one of
the brand new gas turbine
generators at the new Blue
Hills Power/Desalination plant.
A senior BEC official told
The Tribune that "we have
been having some trouble with
one of the new gas turbines at
Blue Hills."
He explained that when a
problem developed in the
defective generator it
automatically shut off to
prevent further damage,
over-loading the other
generators.
SHORT PERIODS
As a result BC(' has been
"shedding load" for as long as
it takes to get the defective
machine back in operation. iHe
said repair times range from
five to 15 minutes.
The end result of the
problem is power-cuts. Known
to have been hit by brief cuts
in recent weeks have been the
eastern district of New
Providence, Village Road and
Palmdale.
Most of the areas have
suffered load-shedding at least
twice, and Palmdale has
reportedly been hit several
times, last night being the most
recent.
The Blue Hills Power plant
has three John Brown
Engineering generators and
one Brown-Boveri engine.
Which of the four is causing
the current problems is not
known.
Recently there was also a
power cut in the Cable Beach
area, but The Tribune
understands it was the result of
damage to cables done during
trenching operations by the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Corporation.
The Blue Hills
Power/Desalination plant was
officially commissioned on
January 5.
At the commissioning the
Prime Minister said: "Now
we're up to scratch and
load-shedding is a thing of the
past."
Mr. Pindling and other
speakers at the commissioning
treated the extensive
load-shedding of 1967-70 as a
problem that was solved by the
coming on-line of the new Blue
Hills plant.
GUEST SPEAKER AT
NASSAU ROTARY
On February 6 Mr. Geoffrey
Johnstone will talk to the club
on "Independence." It is'
understood that the theme of'
the talk will be the need for all,
Bahamians to close ranks to"
make independence an all-out
success.


Bacardi workers win more wages
T H E B A H A M AS contract is due to expire in of the Commonwealth of the
BREWERY Dairies Distillers 1975. Provision was made in Bahamas Trade Union
Bottlers and Allied Workers it. however, for a review of Congress; Richard Gardner,
Union yesterday signed a salaries after the first two Bacardi plant superintendent.
renegotiated wage agreement years. Standing from left are:
with the Bacardi Company Shown seated from left Clifton Adderley, union shop
which gives workers a 17 are: Charles Rodgers, steward; Francisco
percent across-the-board wag! president of the Carrera-Justiz, assistant
increase over the next two BBDDBAWU; Manuel S. treasurer of Bacardi and
years. Cutillas, vice-president Evangelist McPhee, shop
The original four-year Bacardi; Reg Grant, president steward.


AWARD FOR SERVICE seen after receiving a 20-year-service award from Bishop
Paul Leonard Hagarty last night is Mrs. Helen Major of King Street with her co-workers at
the Catholic Clinics. Shown from left to right are: Sister Marie Smith, Dr. Marie Bachem,
Mrs. Major, Bishop Leonard, Sister Mary Pius and Mrs. Lorraine Moss.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette


4 GAMBIER MEN Bishop's award to Bahamian

MISSING AT SEA for 20 years 'devoted

52HOURS,FOUND service' to Catholic clinics


AFTER missing at sea for
almost 52 hours in a small
dinghy with only one oar, four
Gambler residents were found
in the Berry Islands Wednesday
afternoon and are now safely
back in their homes.
Returned to Nassau at 9
o'clock this morning were
Leslie Scars, Martin Allen,
David Fox and a fourth man
identified only as "Slim".
Now the attention of
Bahamas Air Sea Rescue
Association is focused on
locating three other men who
left Nassau on Friday for
conching off southeast Andros
and have not been seen since.
A BASRA aircraft started
the search 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday for the 16-foot
boat with a grey-and-red hull
and black-and-white cabin,
powered by a 25-horsepower
motor.
Aboard the missing craft are
Lewis Johnson, 26, Sidney
Pinder, 19 and Daniel Joseph,
34.


The two-and-a-half day
ordeal for Sears, Allen, Fox
and Slim began at noon on
Monday. They were found
3:30 p.m. Wednesday off Little
Whale Cay in the Berry Islands
by a foreign vessel the Seven
Suns, captained by Lawrence
Neely.
The Seven Suns took
the four men to Chub Cay,
where they arrived at 7:15
p.m. They were subsequently
taken by air to the Crown
Colony Club, and flown to
Nassau this morning.
They were examined at the
Princess Margaret Hospital for
exposure and dehydration, and
released this morning.

2 accident children

in'serious condition'
FOUR Nassau children who
were injured in recent traffic
accidents remain at the
Princess Margaret Hospital, two
of them in "serious" condition.
On the serious list are
Clinton Strachan, seven, of
Comfort Street and Alexander
Symonette, four, of Rose
Avenue. In satisfactory
condition are Portia Moree,
four, of Exuma St. and Edwin
Knowles, also four, of Brown
Alley.
Strachan was involved in an
accident on January 17 at the
corner of Comfort and Hay
Streets with car 9709 driven by
Kay Kerr of Centreville.
Symonette was injured on
Sunday when he was involved
in an accident with car
NP-C521 driven by Ronald
Newman of Glinton Street.
Moree was hurt Sunday on
the corner of Exuma Street
and Palmetto Avenue in an
accident with car NP 394 being
driven by Lamarr Cambridge
Knowles was injured on
Tuesday at Kemp Road in an
accident with car 8667 being
driven by Ervin Strachan
HEART OPERATION
TOMORROW
JULIE Jones, 3'i years, of
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, will
undergo heart surgery
tomorrow morning at the
Princess Margaret Hospital. The
heart operation is the first
being done here in Nassau by
The Sir Victor Sassoon
(Bahamas) Heart Foundation.


A 20-YEAR SERVICE AWARD was presented last night to
Mrs. Helen Major of King Street by Bishop Paul Leonard Hagarty,


O.S.B., for her devoted service
Bahamas.
The award, a silver pin, was
presented at the 6 p.m. mass
concelebrated at St. Francis
Xavier's Cathedral by the
Bishop and the Rev. Johnr
Finger, Chancellor of the
Catholic Diocese.
Mrs. Major joined the staff
of the Madonna Day Nursery
in the Priory Grounds on
leaving St. Francis School at
the age of 19. The year was
1952.
In 1958 when the Nursery
closed Mrs. Major joined Dr.
Maria Bachem and Sr. Mary
Angelus, S.C. on the staff of
the Catholic Clinics. The
clinics, located in Fox Hill,
Young Street and the Priory
grounds, are the responsibility
of the Nursing Sisters of the
Sick Poor.
The Bishop thanked Mrs.
Major for her faithful and
cheerful service over the past
20 years. Basing his sermon on
the life of St. Francis de Salles,
whose feastday it was, he said
it was appropriate that she


to the Catholic Clinics in the

should receive her award on
that day. St. Francis, he said,
had done so much for the poor
and the sick and Mrs. Major
was following in his footsteps,
doing the things that he would
have done. He gave a history of
the clinics, telling how they
were the outgrowth of a day
nursery for little ones.
After his sermon he blessed
the pin and presented it to Mrs.
Major.
Attending the ceremony
were Mrs. Major's husband,
Joseph, and her 18-year-old
son, Philip. Also present were
her mother, Mrs. Ethlyn
Butterfield, two sisters, Mrs.
Alicia Rahming with four of
her ten children, and Mrs.
Florita Green with her four
children; co-workers at the
clinic and friends.
After Mass a small reception
was held at the convent of the
Nursing Sisters on West Street
when refreshments were
served.


GM recalling 3.7m. cars


for steering coupling defect

GENERAL MOTORS announced the recall Monday of 3.7
million 1971 and 1972 cars for installation of a shield over the
steering coupling to prevent flying stones lodging between the


coupling and the car frame.
A stone lodged between the
coupling and the frame could
interfere with steering when a
left turn is made, GM said.
The Tribune was today
unable to find out if there were
any cars in the Bahamas that
might be affected by the recall.
A spokesman for Island
Motor Company, local GM
dealer, said he could give no
figures until he had received
the chassis numbers of the
vehicles involved.
In making the
announcement, GM said it had
received reports of 96 incidents
where stones lodged at the
critical point in the steering
system, had resulted in 23
accidents and 12 injuries.
According to an Associated
Press dispatch from Detroit,
involved in the recall are
"full-size 1971 and 1972
models of Chevrolets, Buicks,
Oldsmobiles and Pontiacs,
totalling 3.7 million vehicles."
NOT INFORMED
Is land Motors
owner-manager J. W. Blackman
told The Tribune this morning
that he had not yet been
informed of the recall by GM,
and he could not say how
many vehicles in the Bahamas
might be involved until more
specific information was
received from GM.
lie said for competitive
reasons he could not reveal the
total number of 1971 and
1972 GM products sold by his
company.
He added that a number of
his cars are imported from
Canada because of the
Commonwealth Preferential
Tariff, and it may be that only
U.S.-made GM products need
to be modified.
In Detroit. GM said owners
of affected cars would be


informed of the recall through
local dealerships "in about two
weeks."
The shields over the steering
coupling would be installed at
no cost to owners.
GM said if one of the cars is
driven over loose gravel at
speeds which cause the car to
pitch excessively, the front
frame crossmember may scoop
up loose stones or gravel from
the road.
Some of the stones could
lodge between the coupling
and frame, causing steering
interference in a left turn. The
stone is dislodged when the
wheel is turned to the right.
GM said.
The recall follows
investigations by GM and the
National Hilghway Traffic
Safety Administration.
Following G M's
announcement, the Centre for
Auto Safety in Washington, a
Consumers Union organization
which had urged the recall,
termed G(; s recall
"irresponsibly belated."
The GM announcement
"seriously downplays the
gravity of the steering lock-up
defect," the Centre said.


T INTERNATIONAL

BANK & TRUST


ORDERED TO

. f BE WOUND UP


MR. JUSTICE James
Smith, acting on a petition by
one of the creditors of
International Bank and Trust
Ltd., today ordered that the
bank be wound up on behalf of
the court and that Ronald Eric
Strange of Roger Frederick
Hendrickson of Messrs.
Touche, Ross and Company,
be appointed liquidators.
In its brief sitting this
morning, the court heard the
petition of Haitian national
Noroy A. Theodore, who was
represented by Mr. Keith
Duncombe of the firm of
Dupuch and Turnquest.
Two other creditors Mr.
Murray Carrol and Mrs. Zoilaf
F. Chavez de Segura were
represented by Mr. Dana Wells
of Graham Thompson and
Company, who supported the
petition presented by Mr.
Duncombe.
Before making his order Mr.
Justice Smith asked if there
were creditors present in court.
One man stepped forward
and was asked by Justice Smith
if he supported or opposed the
application.
The man, speaking in a
heavily accented voice, said he
concurred.
Mr. Theodore petitioned for
liquidation of International
Bank and Trust on grounds
that a cheque for U.S.
$195,106.76 made out in his
favour and drawn on Nassau
Bank and Trust Company Ltd.
was dishonouredd."
His petition added that the
bank's licence had been
revoked and it was therefore
unable to pay its debts.


Civil Service

meet Deputy PM


to seek review

of salaries

THE PUBLIC Service Union
has made representations to
Deputy Prime Minister and
Home Affairs Minister Arthur
Hanna for a review of salaries
of public officers.
This was confirmed today in
a Bahamas Information
Services release which said that
a delegation from the union,
led by its president, Mr. T. L.
Darling, called on Mr. anna to
discuss their proposals.
It was anticipated there
would be further discussions,
the release said.
The last salaries review
became effective in January
1970 after a complete revision
of scales in 1967. There was an
interim increase between 1967
and 1970, but no change since
then.
The Public Service, which
has close to 8,000 members,
announced in March 1972 it
intended to press for salary and
pension increases due to rising
living costs since the 1970 pay
increase.
GENERAL INCREASE
Mr. Darling said at the time
that the union would request a
general increase in salary for all
civil servants in schedules A-M.
Pay increases given in 1970
amounted to 30 per cent at the
lower level to five and seven
per cent at the top.
Mr. Darling said there was
"less than $2 million involved'
in the case."
The union head could not be
contacted today as he is on
leave and off the island.
Home Affairs Minister
Arthur Ilanna has
responsibility for the public
service.


ROSA CAREY DIES
MRS. ROSA Maude Carey, grandchildren.
72, of Harley Street, died at Funeral services were held
her home January 19, Sunday at Ebenezer Methodist
following a short illness. Church with interment in the
She is survived by her church cemetery.
husband Anthony; one son
Bill; six daughters, Mrs. Easbon
Roberts. Mrs. Joseph Lleida
and Mrs. Walter Higgs, all of
Nassau; Mrs. Gwenyth
Chapman of England; Mrs.
Jack Roberts of Spanish Wells
and Mrs. Ken Daigle of
Edmonton, Alberta; one
brother Lester Bethel; 19
grandchildren and seven great


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US. TRADE DEFICIT REACHES ALL-TIME HIGH
WASHINGTON (AP) The Nixon administration apparently has failed
in one of Its chief economic goals a reversal of the balance of payments'
deficit. The Commerce Department announced yesterday that the U.S.
trade deficit had reached an all-time high of nearly six times greater than
the two billion dollar imbalance of 1971.
Administration officials stated last year that a reversal of the trade
deficit was one of the government's prime aims. The Increase is attributed
to the steady improvement of the economy and devaluation of the dollar.
A trade deficit occurs when the value of foreign imports exceeds the
value of exports.
ONASSIS SAYS SON WAS NOT PILOTING ILLFATED PLANE
ATHENS (AP) Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis has taken
issue with an official account of the plane crash which led to the death of
his only son. Onassis says his son was not piloting the private amphibious
plane when it crashed at Athens Airport. He claims the plane was being
flown by an American Donald MacCusker of Columbus. Ohio.
The multi-millionaire also says he told doctors not to keep his
critically injured son alive. The doctors had said Alexandroa was beyond
recovery, but that they could keep his heart beating for another few days.
The 24-year-old executive died in a hospital.
176 KILLED IN NIGERIAN CRASH SAYS GOVT.
LAGOS, NIGERIA (AP) The Nigerian government announced
Wednesday night that 176 persona were killed and 33 survived the crash
landing of a Royal Jordanian Airlines Boeing 707 at Kano Airport on
Monday.
The death toll equals the worst air disaster to date the Oct. 13, 1972
crash of a Soviet airliner near Moscow in which 176 were also killed.
The government statement, broadcast over Radio Nigeria, said all the
victims Nigerian pilgrims to Mecca were buried with Moslem funeral
rites.
The government statement denied reports from Jordan that the airport's
runway collapsed at the time of landing. It said the runway was 'in very
good condition' when the big plane landed.
The announcement said 26 of the survivors are in Kano hospital. It said
four members of the crew, including the American pilot. John Waterman,
survived the crash.
Waterman, according to U.S. Embassy officials here, is staying at the
Central Hotel in Kano. The plane crahned Monday morning when it came
in to land after crossing the Sahara from Jeddah in Saudi Arabia.
NEW ADDITIONS TO ARSENAL
BELFAST (AP)- A bomb exploded in a car parked outside a tavern in
Portadown, Northern Ireland, early today. At least three people were
injured as they slept in nearby homes. The incident occurred in a Catholic
section of the mainly Protestant industrial town.
The British army has disclosed some new additions to its arsenal in
Northern Ireland. One Item is an American loud-peaker that emits a
piercing whistle to help in crowd control. Another new weapon is a
four-barrelled gun that can spread tear-gas over an area of 100 square
ards..
WATERGATE AND PENTAGON PAPERS TRIALS RECESSED.
WASHINGTON (AP)- Both the Watergate trial In Washington and the
Pentagon Papers trial in Los Angeles are recessed today because of the
national day of mourning for former President Johnson. In Los Angeles
federal court yesterday, the government showed the jurors slides of the
Pentagon Papers, which most of the panel had not read. A brigadier-general
testified that some of the data could have been helpful to the other side at
the Paris negotiations.
This was an account of a former U.S. Ambassador to Saigon's dealings
with C.I.A. agents and Vietnamese military officers who planned the
overthrow of President Diem in 1963. The general, Paul German, noted
that the Ambassador was Henry Cabot Lodge, who later became the chief
U.S. negotiator in Paris.
BLOWN TO PIECES HANDLING BOMBS
NICOSIA (AP)- A Paleatinian Arba reportedly was blown to pieces in a
hotel room in Nicosia, Cyprus today. Police sources say the explosion
apparently came as the Palestinian was handling a number of bombs.
The police statement said the man had arrived from Beirut, Lebanon,
last Monday.
In separate incidents, gunmen believed to be advocates of union with
Greece struck In four places in Cypros during the night. And in Arab East
Jerusalem, a bomb exploded in a car that had been left at a garage for
repairs. Three Arabs were Injured.
WOMAN MURDERED ON TOBACCO FARM
SALISBURY, Rhodesia (AP)- A middle-aged woman was murdered and
her husband wounded Wednesday night in an African Nationalist attack on
their tobacco farm in the remote Centenary area about 90 miles north east
of Salisbury, It was reported Thursday.
SNo official confirmation was Immediately available, but it was believed
Mn. Ida Kleynhanm, a white South African, was killed by a grenade
Ithffidl* iviepv y wa 0Iht 'hotifltsfld i blldwry. Hia condildAo
not known. The coupe's two teenage children were not at home when
attack took place.
The farm is In the area where terrorist activity has been concentrated for
the past few weeks.
Mrs. Kleynha is the first civilian killed in the current fighting..
"ROOTTCT UNBORN CHILDREN" BISHOPS URGE
WASHINGTON (AP)- A Catholic bishops group has charged the
Supreme Court with "bad morality, bad medicine and bad public policy'
in its decision barring state officials from interfering with medical
abortions through the firt six months of pregnancy. "As religious leaden
we cannot accept the court's judgment and we urge people not to follow
its reasoning or.conclusons," said the National Conference of Catholki
bishops' committee for pro-life affairs.
The statement said "the Court has written a charter for abortion or
request, and has thereby deprived the unborn child of his or her humans
righLt."
The committee urged state legislatures to protect "unborn children" to
the fullest extent possible and said Catholic hospitals and health car
facilities should refuse to provide "abortion on request."
"During the first six months of the child's life, the Court has made th
doctor the final judog as to who will live and who will die," the statement
aid. "This seems to reverse the history of American jurisprudence tha
prohibits the deprivation of the right to life without due process of law.
AID TO CARIBAIR MAY END IN JANUARY
NEW YORK (AP)- Eastern Ablrnes may end Its asiltance to Caribair a
the end of January, an Easternm executive reportedly said. But executive
vice president Charles J. Simmons added in a story carried Wednesday b
the Wall Street Journal, that Eastern would continue to seek to acquire th
Puerto Rican carrier "even if it ceased operationss.
Eastern has advanced $815,000 to Caribair In the past three months t
keep it operating, the executive said according to 'he Journal story. Thi
has been done, Mr. Simmons pointed out, despite "the long delay i
obtaining a final Civil Aeronautics Board decision on the purchase."
WARNING TO PARENTS TRIGGERED STUDENTS REVOLT
MANSFIELD, England (AP)- Senior girls at a Nottinghamshire higl
school staged a revolt Thursday after their headmistress wrote to 6!
parents claiming their daughters were taking the contraceptive pill.
Sixth-formers at Sherwood Hall Technical and Grammar School it
Masrld held playpoundmeeting protesting the "interference" of thl
headnitea, Misa Mary Timaon.
Mmy dialed the legatons. -
The girls, lad between 16 and 18,said theirparents had searched thel
bedrooms, clothing and satchels oh receiving the warning letter
Wednesday. Many said they had been forbidden to see their boyfriend
alone.
"My father went mad when he got the letter," said one. "I am not o
the pl. but the letter has made things very awkward at home." Anothe
aid: "When the letter arrived my father was sitting at the breakfast table
He read It, slapped down his knife and fork and said: 'What have you bee
up tot' "I didn't know what he meant, and when he told me about th
letter I was very upset."


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I < Kfl INFORMATION

;*:lu,^W^ ^^e


'FRAGILE SETTLEMENT'


Thursday, Janury 25, 1973.


KISSINGER WON FLAT PROHIBITION' CLAUSE LAST RITES


Kissinger's big gain: 'SUBSTANTIAL' Kissinger comments on

.:al'i : .. #A:,o ,CHANGES.HESAYS N. Vietnamese troops


OUXKUH B -LgUL LOV ILB


own political future

By Kenneth J. Freed
WASHINGTON (AP) The United States and Hanoi
Wednesday outlined a fragile settlement that Henry A. Kisinger
said could bring "a peace that heals," first to Vietnam, then to all


Indochina.
In simultaneous news
conferences, presidential aide
Kissinger in Washington, North
Vietnamese special adviser Le
Duc Tho in Paris, both sides
disclosed details of the
agreement first announced
Tuesday night.
Kissinger provided no
surprises, although he did say
the return of American
prisoners from North Vietnam
would begin by mid-February,
and his hour and a half
presentation was full of
caution.
"Whether this agreement
brings a lasting peace or not,"
he said, "depends not only
upon its provisions but also on
the spirit in which it is
implemented."
The U.S. govern.-:ent
determination to keep its
emotions from soaring into
euphoria was also evident in
President Nixon's first
statement since he announced
the agreement.
"We've got our prisoners
coming back," he told
Congressional leaders, and "a
peace, however fragile, which
we have hopes will endure."
According to the full
12-page agreement and the
four accompanying
explanatory and technical
documents, the settlement will
be signed in three different
ceremonies this Saturday in
Paris.
Within 15 days of the
signing the first American POW
will be picked up in Hanoi by
American personnel in
American planes, with the
captives 473 in North
Vietnam, 108 in the South and
6 in Laos to be released at
about two week intervals for
two months.
The withdrawal of the last
24,000 American troops
Remaining in South Vietnam
will begin and continue at a
similar rate.
The cease-fire initially will
be limited to Vietnam, because
of the complexities in the
other two Indochina nations.
But Kissinger added that "it
is our firm expectation that
within a short period of time
there will be a formal cease-fire
in Laos.
As to Cambodia, the
presidential adviser said "it is
our expectation that a de facto
cease-fire will come into being
over a period of time relevant
t to the execution of this
t agreement."
GAINS MADE
Kissinger told a national
Broadcast and television
Audience watching his news
conference that "no one side
got all it wanted," but he
D claimed the United States
n obtained most of its essential
demands, particularly
concerning the right of
political self-determination for
the South.
Le Duc Tho saw great gains
for his side, as well, even to the
point of claiming the
agreement was a "great victory
r for the Vietnamese people."
S In addition, the settlement
Contained these basic
n provisions:
r A cease-fire takes effect in
SVietnam at 2400 GMT
Saturday.
e All infiltration of
troops and war supplies into
South Vietnam is prohibited
without qualification.
South Vietnam retains the
right to unlimited military aic
on a strict replacement basis
Both sides are banned
from violating tht
demilitarized zone at the 7tl
parallel.
While no provision i
made directly for th,
withdrawal of the estimated
145,000 North Vietnames.
troops now in the South, thea
units are prohibited from an.
military activity and all parties
agreed to reduction anm
demobilization of all forces.


TROOERWITH1iDRAWAL
There can be no use o
Cambodia and Laos t(
encroach on South Vietnar
and all foreign troops in those
two states must be withdrawn
The political future ,
South Vietnam will b
determined only by the Sout
Vietnamese and the current
Saigon government remains i
existence, at least until a
election is held.
Any move toward
reunification of the tw
Vietnams must be peaceful an
come by negotiation.
A National Council c


National Reconciliation and
Concord will organize elections
for South Vietnam but will not
in any way be a coalition
government although
containing Communist and
neutralist representatives as
well as members of the current
Saigon regime.
-- Poland, Indonesia, Canada
and Hungary will provide
1,160 men to supervise the
cease-fire and elections, while
other commissions representing
the various parties will operate
as well.
An international
conference including the
Vietnamese elements, the
United States, Soviet Union
and mainland China will be
held before the end of
February to guarantee the
agreement.
NO PROBLEMS
Tho said there are "no
remaining problems to be
settled." He denied, as did
Kissinger, that there are any
secret understandings or
protocols.
As to the issue of the North
Vietnamese troops in the
South, Tho said "we have
completely rejected the
allegation concerning the
so-called North Vietnamese
forces in South Vietnam ..
furthermore, the American side
completely dropped" a
demand for their withdrawal.
The immediate reaction
from world leaders combined
expressions of welcome and
caution. The Soviet Union
echoed Tho's claim for a great
victory and France expressed
"profound satisfaction."
China was quoted by
Japanese news agencies as
being relieved and pleased.
However, Peking was said to
feel there will be further
political struggles between
President Nguyen van Thieu
and the Viet Cong. I
Kissinger was asked what
was accomplished in the
agreement that couldn't have
been obtained four years ago
and he took the opportunity to
outline the U.S. gains.
For the entire period since
the first negotiating session in
P.ris four years ago Thursday,
Kissinger said, any chance for a
settlement "foundered on the
insistence of the North
Vietnamese that a political
victory be handed to them" by
demanding acceptance of a
coalition government as a
precondition to negotiation on
other issues.
"It was not until Oct. 8 of
this year that the North
Vietnamese ever agreed to
separate" the political and
military issues, he said, and
from then on the negotiations
moved relatively 'ast.
What this led to, Kissinger
stated, is a guarantee that no
coalition government will be
imposed on the South, that the
South Vietnamese will
determine their own political
future.


CAMBODIA WILL ALSO
CEASEFIRE SATURDAY
PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA
(AP)--Premier Hang Thun Hak says
Cambodia's armed forces will ceae
all offensive operations against
North Vietnamese, Viet Cong and
rebel Cambodian guerrillas after the
cease-fire begins in South Vietnam.
"We will open a new era of
detente with the other side and
construct new ideas, "he said in an
interview Wednesday.
President Lon Not told the
nation In a radio broadcast that the
latest diplomatic moves "augred
that- peace-may -soon return not
only to that country (South
Vietnam) but also to tthe Khmer
Republic," (Cambodia's official
name).

US. MEETS CONTROL
COMMISSION MEMBERS
Washington (AP)-Secretary of
State William P. Rogers met
Wednesday with the ambassadors of
Poland, Hungary, Indonesia and
Canada and handed them the
e-omplete -texts of the agreements
for a Vietnam cease fire which the
four nations will supervise.
He also scheduled a meeting
Friday with Canada's minister of
external affairs Mitchell Sharp and
Indonesia's -foreign minister Adam
Malik .who will be here to attend
the funeral services for President
Lyndon B. Johnson.
Canada has indicated willingness
to serve as a member of the
International Control Commission
to supervise the truce in Vietnam
for at least the first 10 days.
Sharp also stipulated, a did the
other countries, that all four parties
to the agreement must approve
their services and that they be given
freedom of access and a higher
authority to whom they may
report.


WASHINGTON (AP)- Henry A.
Kissinger says he won substantial
changes in his final peace seeking
negotiations. But both rides wound
up short on some of thier demands.
Notably absent from the peace
terms disclosed Wednesday was any
specific provision for withdrawal of
North Vietnamese troops from
South Vietnam. President Nguyen
van Thieu had been calling for
ouster of northern forces from the
South.
In the three months since
Kissinger first proclaimed "Peace is
at hand" on the basis of a
nine-point draft accord, however,
the presidential adviser had not
pushed this demand In his secret
sessions with Hanoi's Le Duc Tho.
The U.S. view was that a settlement
had to reflect battlefield realities.
But Kissinger did contend at his
news conference that the lon-term
results of the cease-fire-in-place
agreement would be a withering
away of the northern troops now
below the border.
He noted the agreement bars
further infiltration or replacement
from the North.
FARED BETTER
The allies fared better on a series
of alterations in the nine-point
draft dealing with such items as
cease-fire policing and sovereignty
for South Vietnam.
Kissinger listed about a
half-dozen modifications which, in
the U.S. view, boosts prospects that
the peace deal will be a lasting one.
He said that he had succeeded in:
Making sure that the cease-fire
supervisory machinery would be in
place on the scene in time to police
the truce at the time it gets under
way.
Shortening the time between
the start of the cease-fire in South
Vietnam and companion cease-fires
in Cambodia and Laos.
Clearing up "linguistic
ambiguities," in particular knocking
out a Vietnamese language term
that implied governmental power to
a three segment National Council of
National Reconciliation and
Concord. This unit of Saigon
government, neutralist and
Communist parts is supposed to
organize elections and promote
conciliation and the carrying out of
the agreement in South Vietnam.
OBJECTION
Thieu had objected to any
scheme which would impose a
coalition government on South
Vietnam. The objectionable term,,
'"administrative structure"
describing the Council no longer
exists in the agreement's
Vietnamese language version,
Kissinger said.
Resolving difficulties over how
an agreement would be signed. This
had been a stumbling block with
the Saigon government not
recognizing the Viet Cons as an
equal.
-- Language was put into the
agreement which, in Kissinger's
view, explicitly provides that
neither side will seek to impose its
will on the other by force.
The accord stipulates that
Vietnam's reunification shall be
carried out in time by North-South
negotiations "without coercion or
annexation by either party, and
without foreign interference."
What Kissinger termed "specific
references to the sovereignty of
South Vietnam," were included in
the pact.
Thieu did not get, however, a
proviso giving his regime full
writ over all of South Vietnam. The
cease-fire-in-place leaves
Communist forces in control of
areas they now hold.
The 17th parallel demacration
between North and South Vietnam
is named as a temporary boundary,
not a permanent political division.
Saigon stresses that all of
Vietnam should be regarded a one
nation.
But the accord also says both
sides shall respect the demilitarized
zone along the 17th parallel.
Kissinger said the deal rules out
North Vietnamese military
infiltration across the strip.
Kissinger aid that for an
agreement to be lasting, it could
not be fully accommodating to the
demands of either side. If one
Sadversary got all it wanted, he said,
the other would be too dissatisfied
with it to allow a lasting accord.


GI's STOPPED
WASHINGTON (AP)-The U.S.
army Wednesday sent out orders
halting shipment of officers and
men to South Vietnam.
The army sent mesages to bases
and stations around the country
giving instructions on what is to be
done with men ticketed for flight
to Vietnam before the came-fire is
signed.
Army officials estimated about
2,000 army men *re affected.
There was no immediate word on
similar actions.by the other armed
services, but they were expected to
follow suit.
The army has more than 13,300
men in Vietnam, roughly two-thirds
of the 23,700 American servieamen
remaining there.
Under the terms of the cease-fire
agreement, all American are due to
be out of South Vietnam within 60
days after the cease-fire is signed.
Men on order .when the
cease-fire was announced were
intended as replacements for some
of those already there.
READY TO SIGN
';OKYO (AP)-North Vietnam's
foreign minister Nguyen Duy TriAh
reportedly has left for Paris to ign
the Vietnam seee-fire agrement
on Saturday. U.S. secretary of state
Rogers is to leave for Paris
tomorrow, The foreign minsters of
outhi Vietnam and the Viet Cong
already are in the French capital.
The cease-fire s to go into effect at
7 p.m. Saturday.
Henry Kissinger yesterday
outlined what he called a
"convoluted" system for sining
the accord. Then are to be two
ceremonies .In one the four
partners wil sign an agreement
which does not name the parties.
The other so that the United
Statte and North Vietnam can sign
an almost identical agreement. '


FOR FORMER

PRESIDENT LBJ


By Lee Byrd
still WASHINGTON (AP)- America's
still present inS.Vietnam cpitl id farewell Thursday to
Lyndon B. Johnson in the Congress
By Fred S. Hoffman he served for 23 years and the
church he attended as the 36th
WASHINGTON (AP)-The United States expects some 145,000 President.
North Vietnamese troops now in South Vietnam to gradually "The years will be lonely
dwindle in number after the cease-fire takes effect, Dr. Henry without him," eulogised a close
ger said Wednesday. friend, Marvin Watson, minutes
Kiringer aid Wednesday. before the coffin was carried off
Kissinger, chief U.S. the international supervisory to burial in the Texas hill country.
architect of the war-ending force, and members of a But intrst in radiant sunshine, it
agreement that is to be signed temporary joint military was borne from the hall of his
in Paris Saturday, made his commission representing all of beloved Congress to four bunts of
ruffles and flourishes and 'Hail to
comment when asked about the warring parties, will meet the Chief" from a Coast Guard
the lack of a requirement that within 24 hours after the band as some 2,000 people stood
North Vietnam withdraw its cease-fire agreement is formally in total silence on the Capitol
grounds.
troops from South Vietnam, as signed Saturday. Then, t the National City
the United States must do The agreement requires the Christian Church, came a final
within 60 days. United States, the South tribute from Watson, the late
'That problem will be taken Vietnamese, the South Koreans President's appointments secretary,
and the rector, Dr. George Davis.
care of by the evolution of and Communist forces to The bulky, black-suited Watson
events in South Vietnam," remain in place as soon as the spoke of Johnson's "devotion to his
Kissinger told a news cease-fire goes into effect. country" and his "restraint in the
conference. "In order to ensure a stable uses of power while Davis said "for
He said the number of North cease-fire," the documents him,Lady Bird Johnson t infe."
Lady Bird Johnson sat in a
Vietnamese forces in South said, "there shall be no major front-row seat, touching her eye
Vietnam would decline because redeployments or movements once with a hankerchlef. Alongside
of a "flat prohibition" on the that would extend each party's were the Johnson daughters, Luci
infiltration of new men, on area of control or would result and Lynda, their husbands. Patrick
Nugent and Charlea Robb, and
military movements across the in contact between opposing grandson Patrick Lyndon Nugent.
demilitarized zone, and on armed forces and clashes which The S-year-old boy fidgeted.
"foreign forces" in Laos and might take place." President Nixon and his wife Pat
Cambodia the traditional The agreement also rules out sat on an aisle.
Through the lons night the
springboards for infiltration of "armed attacks against any coffin had lain in the Capitol
South Vietnam. person, either military or rotunda, between the House, where
The agreement to be civilian, by any means Johnson served a Texas district
signed Saturday specifies that whatsoever," and outlaws acts from 1937 to 1949, and theSenate,
where he sat from 1949 to 1960
the 23,700 U.S. troops now in of "terrorism or reprisals and over which he presided as Vice
South Vietnam be withdrawn In a separate document, the President until 1963.
in four phases of about 1-5 days AGE 64
in four phases of about 15 days United States agreed to "clear Johnson died Monday at his
each. This would coincide all the mines it has placed in Texas ranch at the age of 64.
approximately with the the territorial waters, ports, Thousands of ordinary
indicated pace of the return of harbours, and waterways" of Americans, many of them dressed
Amrican war prisoners fromcasually, drifted past the coffin to
American war prisoners from North Vietnam. say goodbye. When it was carried
North Vietnam. in-clearing off by eight servicemen, two
Kissinger said the pact s mine-ctrampled carnations, one yellow
severely limits the resupply of operation shall be and the other white, remained.
North Vietnamese forces in the accomplished by rendering the They had fallen from one of the
South. It permits under mines harmless through wreaths and were crumpled in the
international supervision the removal, per nt procession.
'a Ms. Johnson, smiling serenely
replacement of worn out and deactivation or destruction," and her hedheld high, walked IS
damaged weapons and the agreement said. paces behind, followed by the rest
of the former President's family.
equipment only on a MINE CLEARING Little Patrick Lyndon Nugent
one-for-one basis. The mine-clearing is to begin raised his hand to his forehead in
The United States obviously at the time the cease-fire salute, blinking his eyes in the sun.
is anxious to get the agreement is signed, the Nine years ago another small boy,
John-John, offered a similar salute
international supervisory documents indicated. The U.S. at the funeral of fil father,
machinery in place quickly to navy moved mine-clearing President John F. Kennedy.
prevent either side from vessels into Southeast Asian the military pallbeare eased
gaining advantages which might waters months ago. the coffin through the rear of a
upset the cease-fire balance. North Vietnam's seven church.
Kissinger predicted the orts including There, huge wreaths lined the
armies of both North and biggest ports, including front of the building, one from
South Vietnm evntual Haiphong, have been sealed by Gov. George C. Wallace of
South Vietnam eventual U.S. minefields since last May, Alabama. Yellow rose, the late
would be scaled .down. Tie# cutting off seaborne supplies '*" .5"5t'* 7 "5 *-
Saigon government has an from Russia and other a predominated.
armyof about 1.1 million men. from Russ and other es. Moments later, the motorcade
DEMOBILIZATION However, the North began a final passage through
DEMOBILIZATION Vietnamese have managed to Washington streets and on to
"Among the questions to be material, soline and other Andrews Air Force Base in
discussed by the two get matels gasoline and other suburban Maryland where an air
Vietnamese parties aresteps to vital supplies by and from force jet would carry the coffin and
Vietnamese parties are steps Communist China. the family home to Texas for the
reduce their military afternoon burial.


effectiveness and to
demobilizatze the troops being
reduced," Kissinger said.
Presumably any North
Vietnamese soldiers discharged
from military service_would
return to North Vietnam.
Kissinger said members of


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Thundav. January 1973.


bht tribune


rbt rtibunt
NuLuus ADDcrUs JoUaUR IN VmERA MAGWmI
Being Bound To Swer To The Dogma Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, PubMlWerlEditor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.itt., LL.D.
PubWWerlEditor 1917-1972
Contrtbuttul Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PublUber/Edltor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 22768

EDITORuIA

Quality attracts quality


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
YESTERDAY 1 quoted briefly from a speech made to the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce by the Minister of Tourism in
which he declared that they must try to attract quality travellers
to the Bahamas.
For the past six years his Government seems to have done
everything possible to create conditions that would drive quality
tourists out of the colony and to attract the dregs of the travel
business to the islands. Now the Minister declares that they must
have quality tourists!
That's easier said than done, mister. The tourist business is a
fickle affair.Quality people will patronize a resort as long as it
offers quality conditions. People of quality can pay the price and
they want value for their money. Quality tourists go where they
get what they consider value for their money.
A lesson the Government has to learn is that tourism is a
business ... not a culture.
Even the Minister realizes that with the cheap rates of air
transportation today it is possible for a tourist to go great
distances for little money .... and that the world is full of
interesting places to attract the traveller.

An indisputable fact of life is that nothing is free. There's a
price for everything. You get out of life what you put into it.
Every person .... every community .... has the right of free
choice. You choose what you want and you get what you pay for
in your own behaviour and public attitudes.
**i*+*****4i>
I will illustrate this fact with two simple but true stories of life.
During the bootleg "industry" in the Bahamas a poor family
became wealthy. They built a great house and lived in fine style.
Their sons, who had helped them make the fortune,
understood the meaning of money and how they came by their
fortune.
But the grandchildren were different. They thought money was
made to "blow". And so they set out to have a glorious time with
their grandfather's wealth.
QnMeof the boys became drunkard.
The time came when the grandmother sent for the boy and
upbraided him for his loose ways ofliving.
."But granny," he protested, "what are you complaining about?
What's wrong with drinking liquor? After all, grand-dad made his
money selling rum."
"You little damn fool," the grandmother scolded, "rum is
made to be sold."

Thirty years ago Bermuda was way ahead of her island rivals in
#tis hemisphere in the tourist business.
SI visited Bermuda during this period. Motor vehicles were still
prohibited in the island. Horse-drawn carriages dominated the
qene. This was a lovely spot.
., Bermuda was the place for fun. The business of tourism for the
island was developed by a group of hard-headed business men.
SThe time came when their sons were attracted to the fun spots
provided for the tourists. They were spending the money earned
iy their parents.
Bermuda youth were "blowing" money so fast their parents
felt they had to have a show-down with their straying youth.
SThey gave the story to the young people in a few words.
"Tourism is a business," they told their sons. "This is the way
we make a living. You defeat the purpose of our trade if you
ipend the money in tourist frivolity."
0*0**0**0
SThe promotion for Nassau was so good that even I believed
that the Islands themselves had something special to offer.
Since I have been living in Florida I have discovered that this
part of the U.S. has as much tropical charm as the Bahamas to
offer .... and a great many other things by way of recreation.
Quality Americans are now discovering this fact for themselves.
This explains why Florida is now experiencing a building boom
because more and more quality tourists are finding here the kind
pf life they had formerly enjoyed in the romantic Caribbean
islands.
as 4i********0*
What made the Bahamas attractive to monied people who
made their homes in the islands?
Don't fool yourself about Americans. They have a weakness
for English culture.
They liked the British atmosphere of the islands. They had a
great respect for British justice which gave them a feeling of
!icurity, both for their persons and for their property.
0*00*00**0
The English culture had an attraction even for Bahamian
Fople.
SI was surprised when a wealthy Bahamian woman .... member
tf an old family .... who was a liberal supporter of the Crippled
children's Fund and other charities .... told me that she had never
ftld an invitation to Government House.
: She felt she had missed something.

3 When people who had houses in the Bahamas arrived at the
port they were welcomed by friendly and understanding
officials.
'Some of these families employed a large Bahamian staff the
ar round but they probably brought a few personal staff who
avelled everywhere with them.
Now these people are asked at the airport how long they plan
0 stay. They had always felt that they could stay as long as they
I led. Now they were being told how long they could stay in the
island. And they were also told that they could not have any
personal staff .... they must employ Bahamians.
***0****0*
: There was a time when people with houses in the Bahamas
fbund it easy to find pleasant Bahamian staff for their
households. Now this is no longer easy. Satisfactory staff is hard
to find because many of our people no longer have the kind and
living qualities for which the Bahamian people had been famous
ab over the world.
**000*0*


:Just one other thing. When Labour Unionism first started to
..


Pindling and Hanna are
Princes of Black Bahamians


EDITOR, The Tribune,
The tumult and the shouting
dies; kings and princes
disappear. So has it been in the
political life of the Bahamas -
soon it shall be in the
economic spectrum.
I say this to remind those
who now hope to create
tumult that there is an
infallable dictum written by a
man I have always admired it
is as true today as it was in
1527 when he died Nicolo
Machiavelli:
"And one of the most
efficacious remedies that a
Prince can have against
conspiracies is not to be hated
and despised by the People, for
he who conspires against a
Prince always expects to please
them by his removal; but when
the conspirator can only look
forward to offending them, he
will not have the courage to
take such a course, for the
difficulties that confront a
conspirator are infinite.
"And as experience shows,
many have been the
conspiracies, but few have been
successful; because he who
conspires cannot act alone, nor
can he take a companion
except from those whom he
believes to be malcontents, and
as soon as you have opened
your mind to a malcontent you
have given him the material
with which to content himself,
for by denouncing you he can
look for every advantage; so
that, seeing the gain from this
source to be assured, and
seeing the other to be doubtful
and full of dangers, he must be
a very rare friend, or a
thoroughly obstinate enemy of
the Prince, to keep faith with
you.
"And to reduce the matter
into a small compass, I say
that, on the side of the
conspirator, there is nothing
but fear, jealousy, prospect of
punishment to terrify him; but
on the side of the Prince there
is the majesty of the
principality, the laws, the

FAREWELL 1
NANAIMO, B.C. (CP) T.
C. Douglas and his wife Irma
think they'll steer clear of
Jamaica on their next vacation
after a Christmas holiday that
included robberies, a punchout
an attempted break-in and a
reprimand from the Jamaican
police.
Mr. Douglas, MP for
Nanaimo-Cowichan-The
Islands, went to Jamaica
looking for sun and relaxation,
but all he found was
trouble.
A member of Mr. Douglas's
Ottawa staff said in a
telephone interview yesterday
that the former national leader
of the New Democratic Party
and his wife were strolling
along a beach on the second
day of their vacation when two
young men approached.
The men grabbed Mrs.
Douglas and held a knife at her
husband's throat. Mr. Douglas,
one-time Manitoba amateur
bantamweight boxing
champion, let fly with a punch
and hit one of their assailants
in the face. Both men fled.
Later, the 68-year-old MP was
given a stern lecture by
Jamaican police for being so
pugnacious.


get organized in the Bahamas, the late Hon. George Murphy, the
man who turned the Fort Montagu Beach Hotel from a dismal
failute into a great success and who was also responsible for other
major developments in the colony, predicted that when the time
came that labour unions got control of the hotel business.... that
would be the end of the industry.
Well .... when you realize what happened recently in the King's
Inn in Freeport .... what can anyone expect for the future for the
Bahamas?
*0**00***0
Now don't misunderstand me. I am not suggesting that there is
anything wrong with Labour Unionism .... nor am I suggesting
that the employees of King's Inn didn't have a legitimate
grievance.
But whatever the facts of the case .... this is not the business of
the tourist, who has paid his money to go to a resort in the hope
of "escaping from it all".
A fact the Minister must understand is that tourism is a way of
life. A resort gets the kind of people it deserves. Quality people
patronize resorts with a quality atmosphere.
ii****4^***
FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: Today we publish a news story from
'The Toronto Globe and Mail of January 5th reporting the
experiences of a Canadian member of Parliament and his wife
during a visit to Jamaica over the Christmas holidays.
This extract from The Globe was sent me by a friend in
Toronto who told me in a covering letter that this news was
broadcast on the Toronto radio every hour on the hour for
several days.
You can read this kind of story and weep for the future of
island resorts in this part of the world.
Quality people will look for more secure places to spend their
vacations.
*0*******
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Knowledge advances by steps, and not by leaps.
MACAULAY
*0****0*0*
Nothing can be created out of nothing.
-. LUCRETIUS (99-55 B.C.)


Privy Council upholds local court injunction


protection of friends and the
State to defend him so that,
adding to all these things the
popular goodwill, it is
impossible that any one should
be so rash as to conspire. For
whereas in general the
conspirator has to fear before
the execution of his plot, in
this case he has also to fear the
sequel to the crime; because on
account of it he has the People
for an enemy, and thus cannot
hope for any escape."
Machiavelli is quoted here
only to expand the mind of
those who conspire to destroy
or separate whom I know to be
the Princes of the Black
Bahamian be they FNM or
PLP, subconsciously Pindling
and Hanna are the Princes of
the Black Bahamian.
I have never totally agreed
with many of their policies
but where does one expect
total agreement' I believe that
"over the hill" should be
cleaned up and given priority
in development in New
Providence; I believe that P.M.
Hospital can be more
efficiently operated and more
protection given to consumers
by this Government and I shall
always believe and say this
until there is reason for me to
change that opinion. I believe
now as I stated at South Beach
some years ago, that with
consultation and co-operation
the political leadership of this
country will solve their
problems as they arise.
I also believe as the actor
Ossie Davis eulogized at the
graveside of Malcolm X: "He
was our own Black Prince and
we love him so". I believe this
about Pindling and Hanna,
internal or external
conspirators will do well to
take a hands off attitude as was
recently decided about
Vietnam.
OSCAR N. JOHNSON,
CAT ISLAND M.P.
Nassau,
Jan. 24, 1973

0O JAMAICA
But that was only the
beginning .
On Dec. 24, the couple's
hotel room was broken into
and burgled. Then, on
Christmas Day, they were
sitting in their room when Mrs.
Douglas began to scream. A
man was on the balcony trying
to force his way inside. He left
empty-handed.
A member of his staff said
Mr. Douglas, now back in
Ottawa for the new
parliamentary session, is able
to laugh off his Jamaican
adventures. And what delights
him most is that Mrs. Douglas
had never before given any
indication that she could
scream so loudly and keep it
and keep it up for so long.
From Toronto Globe &
Mail, Jan. 5.
(* See today's editorial.)
HUMANE SOCIETY'S
JUMBLE SALE
THE BAHAMAS Humane
Society will hold its annual
jumble sale Saturday at the
Kirk Hall beginning at 10 a.m.
A large selection of
children's clothing and
household goods will be on
sale.


IN A judgment delivered .
January 15 by the lords ol the
Judicial Committee ot the
Privy council their Lordships
dismissed with costs an appeal
brought by Texaco Antilles
Limited agamst an injunction
restraining the erection of a
"public garage" or gas
stati o" on six lots of land on
the south side of West Bay
Street, west of the Cable Beach
Shopping Centre in the
Westward Villas Subdivision
The injunction was sought
by Captain and Mrs. Clifford
Kernochan, the owners of a
residence adioining the
proposed site of the garage or
gas station on the ground that
such a user would be a breach
of the restrictive covenants
imposed in 1925 on all lots in
the Westward Villas
Subdivision by the W. I
Brown Land Company,
developer of the subdicision.
The injunction prayed tor
was granted on May 20. l% x
by Mr. Justice Iledworth
Cunningham Smith sitting on
the Fquity Side of the
Supreme Court. lexaco
Antilles Limited appealed
against that decision to the
Bahamas Court of Appeal and
after a four-day hearing the
Court of Appeal in a judgment
dated July 3, 196) by a
majority (the President. Sir
Ronald Sinclair and Sir Paget
Bourke, Justice of Appeals. Sir
Clyde Archer. Justice of
Appeals dissenting) affirmed
the judgment dated May 20
1968 of the Supreme Court
Texaco Antilles Limited
appealed to the Privy councill
against the granting of the
injunction and after a
five-and-a-half day hearing
their Lordships rejected the
contention of Texaco Antilles
limited that the building,
which they wished to elect. it
used for the purpose that they
had in mind, namely a gas
station or filling station, would
not be a "public garage" within
the meaning of the restrictive
covenant. They also rejected
the contention on behalf of
Texaco Antilles Limited that in
any case the restriction was not
binding on them. It was argued
on behalf of Texaco Antilles
Limited that Texaco Antilles
U


Limited was not bound by the
restrictive covenants because
their predecessor in title. Ihe
Ocean and Lake View
companyy Limited, when in
1935 that company purchased
some 350 lots from The W. E
Brown Land Company
Limited, being all the
remaining lots in the
subdivision, there was no
reference to restrictive
covenants in the body of the
deed. Their Lordships ruled
tha: Texaco Antilles Limited's
predecessor in title. The Ocean
and Lake View Company
limitedd, had constructive
notice since certain notations
on the lotted plan of the
subdivision would have put the
purchaser of all the remaining
lots in the subdivision on
enquiry of the vendor for
restrictive covenants, and had
lhie Ocean and L.ake View
'Conpany Limited so enquired
the\ would have learnt of the
restrictions.
It was further argued on
behalf of Texaco Antilles
Li.nited that because all the
lots of both the Kernochans
and Texaco Antilles Linited
were once in the common


.1_I __


ownership of Chapmans
Limited, the restrictive
covenants were extinguished
because during such common
ownership Chapmans Limited
could not sue itself. They
found that in a case of a
building scheme or scheme of
development, which they
found the Westward Villas
Subdivision to be, there was "a
local law" binding all lot
owners in the subdivision to
observe the restrictions and
while Chapmans Limited could
not sue Chapmans Limited in
respect of one lot held by them
against another lot held by
them, after they conveyed out
their lots to different
purchasers "the local law'
relating to the restrictive
covenants operated as before
A further point was taken
by counsel for Texaco Antilles
Limited before the Privy
Council, which was not taken
in either court below, namely
that by a Conveyance dated
November 12, 1951 of all the
lots now owned by Texaco
Antilles Limited and by the
Kernochans the parties agreed
that the lots should be released
from the restrictions. This


ST. ANNE'S SCHOOL
NEW PROVIDENCE, BAHAMAS


The School wishes to extend their most grateful thanks to all who assisted in
any way to make their Walkathon a success.
Special thanks must be given to the Pioneer Drum and Bugle Corps, the
Royal Bahamas Police Force Coco-Cola, Pepsi Cola and Borden's.


MEN .. STARTING FRIDAY 26




AT THESE PRICES


IURR ...THEY WON'T LAST!


MIKES SHOE!
MY STIIT, NASSAU.


restricting erection of garage


-------- ---_---I -- --- --


1


I


I


j


argument was also rejected by
their Lordships.
Subject to a minor
amendment to the wording of
the injunction their Lordships
advised Her Majesty that the
appeal, should be dismissed and
that the appellants, Texaco
Antilles Limited, pay to the
respondents, the Kernochans,
their costs of it.
In the Supreme Court and
the Court of Appeal the
Kernochans were represented
by Mr. Paul H. Bethel of
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes
and Texaco Antilles Limited in
the Supreme Court was
represented by Mr. Patrick
Toothe of William McPherson
Christie & Co. and in the Court
of Appeal by Mr. George H.
Newsom, Q.C. who was
brought from England
especially for the case, assisted
by Mr. Toothe. Mr. Newsom
also conducted the case on
behalf of Texaco Antilles
Limited before the Pirvy
Council. In the Privy Council
the Kernochans were
represented by Mr. Jeremiah
Harman, Q. C. assisted by Mr.
Nigel Hague










- -1 S-.. -Thrsdy.-anury 5--973


There's another side


to hitchhiking problem
DEAR ABBY: Please warn girls against hitchhiking
rides with men. Girls who get into a car with a strange
man are just begging for trouble, but there is another side
to it which few people consider.
My husband has a problem he has been trying to over-
come for six years. It's a compulsion to expose himself to
young women. He is not a rapist, he only does this to get a
thrill from their reaction. He has never touched a girl, the
many have encouraged him to go further. One of these
girls reported him to the police and he is now facing the
possibility of having to leave me and our three small chil-
dren for a jail term on a charge of indecent exposure.
I am not condoning his actions, but he has finally faced
his problem and is getting psychiatric treatment. He is a
.& good husband and provider, and the children adore him and
SAso do I. I plan to help him thru this crisis, but I need help
S from everyone else of my sex.
Abby, please ask girls not to hitchhike with strange
S men. They may be giving someone who is trying to go
straight an opportunity to stray again, and the price is paid
S by his family. WORRIED FOR MY HUSBAND
S DEAR WORRIED: I agree, hitchhiking is a risky busi-
m* ess for all concerned. While I appreciate your understand-
S ag attitude and your empathy to your husband, he cannot
shift the responsibility for his compulsion to the girls who
are foolish enough to hitchhike with him. He is doing the
right thing in facing up to his problem and getting psychi-
atric treatment. But public sympathy is more on the side of
the hitchhikers than the man with such a problem.
S DEAR ABBY: My husband sleeps all over the bed. He
rolls on top of me or pushes me off the bed in his sleep. He
sleeps so soundly it's impossible to wake him up. If I ask
S him to please roll over, he does-on me!
The next morning he doesn't remember a thing. All his
life he's had a full-sized bed to himself, and he's accus-
tomed to sleeping that way without giving anybody else a
thought. We have been married for two years and I haven't
S had a good night's sleep yet.
We are buying new bedroom furniture and I want twin
beds. He says he isn't ready for that yet, and he wants a
ki g-sized bed. What is your advice?
SLEEPYTIME GAL
S DEAR GAL: Compromise. Get the twin beds with a
single headboard. That way you'll each have your own
mattress. And if you can get the kind that "swing" apart,
by all means do. I have an idea you may need them.
DEAR ABBY: Another miserable holiday season has
passed and I made a New Year's resolution that rather
than be in the middle of another power struggle between
-,.y pitMts and iay laws, my husband and I are going to -
take a trip somewhere and not spend Thanksgiving and
Christmas with either.
We started to "alternate," spending one Thanksgiving
with one set of parents and Christmas with the other. The
biggest problem was my mother. She felt that if she
couldn't have all her children with her every holiday, she
was neglected. My inlaws were willing to accept the every-
other-year decision.
Last Thanksgiving was the last straw. After driving 300
miles to spend Thanksgiving with my mother, she said, "I
wish you'd come for Christmas, too. Next year I may be
dead, and then you'll be sorry you didn't."
Now, how could I go to my inlaws for Christmas and
enjoy myself with that kind of goodby?
HAD IT IN IOWA
DEAR HAD IT: I don't know. But why punish your
laws because your mother is selfish?
DEAR ABBY: I sure hope that lady who said she and
her husband didn't have any sex relations for more than 12
years doesn't find out [like I did] that SHE was going
without, but her husband wasn't. My husband was being
"served" by a waitress for six years, and all the time I felt
so sorry for him. I thought he lost his manhood because he
had had a prostate operation. We're divorced now, so it
doesn't matter anymore, but some wives can be too trust-
itn. DUMMY IN DETROIT
DEAR ABBY: Last year my brother went into a new
venture and he's doing a terrific business. It is a massage
parlor. He has girls do the massaging, and the customers
re all men. I think you get the idea.
Well, my brother asked my husband to manage the
place. I was against it from the start. My brother takes in
about $4,000 to $5,000 a month. My husband is a salesman,
and if he clears $150 a week he is lucky.
My brother told my husband if he would manage the
massage parlor he would pay him $1,000 a month, plus at
the end o the year my husband could buy the business
from him, and my brother would open another parlor.
My husband wants to accept. All that is holding him
back is me. I don't want my husband in a business like
this.


Do I have a right to come between him and the money?
Also, my husband being around those willing young girls all
day is something else to consider.
We have three children. Would they be proud of their
dad in this kind of a business?
Everybody says I am wrong. What do you say?
HOLDING TIGHT
DEAR HOLDING: I say you're right. [But don't rb it


Canine distemper here


kills at least 6 dogs


THE ANNUAL outbreak of
canine distemper in New
Providence has come about six
weeks ahead of schedule,
prompting the Bahamas
mane Society to publish its
ming to dog owners earlier
the year than in the past.
"Dog-owners will be
l-advised to consult their
terinarians regarding booster
It against this disease," a
cet press release said. "All
puppies over seven weeks
should be done as soon as


possible."
A spokesman for the Society
told The Tribune Monday
that the annual outbreak
usually begins during the
second half of February each
year and continuing through
March and April.
But this year the Society's
clinic south of Fort Charlotte
has dealt with "at least a
dozen" cases of distemper
since the first week of January.
Half of the animals died.


Bahamas Medical Conference 'a success'


THE FIRST annual
conference of the Medical
Association of the Bahamas,
was held Friday and Saturday
at the Halcyon Balmoral Beach
Hotel and proved very
successful, an Association
spokesman said.
At the annual general
meeting on Friday evening, the
following were elected to the
executive council: Dr. Kirkland
Culmer, president, Dr. John A.
Lunn, vice president; Dr. Mary
Ritchie Ramsingh, secretary;
Dr. Andrew lEsfakis, treasurer;


ARRIVED TODAY: Tropic
Day from West Palm Beach;
Sea Lane from Port Laudania.
SAILS TODAY: Tropic Day
for West Palm Beach; Sea Lane
for Rock Sound; Noel Roberts
for Grand Bahama
WEATHER
WIND: Northeasterly 12 to
18 m.p.h.
WEATHER: Cloudy with
showers


Dr. Cecil Bethel, past
president; Dr. Wavell
Thompson, member at large;
Dr. Ada Thompson Hepburn,
member at large.
The scientific sessions were
opened by Health Minister.
Loftus Roker.
The academic papers were
attended by a large number of
doctors and para-medical
personnel. Dr. Marvin Moser,
who is Assistant Professor of
Clinical Medicine at the Albert
Einstein College of Medicine,


SEA: Slight to moderate
TEMPERATURE: Min
tonight 68 Max. tomorrow 76



-rpia


New York City, Chief of
Cardiology, White Plains
Hospital, White Plains, New
York, pioneered the
epidemiological studies of high
blood pressures in the
Bahamas. He gave two papers
on this subject.
Professor James Jude, who is
well known for his work with
the Sir Victor Sassoon
(Bahamas) Heart Foundation,
talked on the subject of cardiac
surgery.
Dr. Graham Duffy, Medical


Chief of Staff of the Princess
Margaret Hospital, gave a paper
on u barachnold
Haemmorrhage, and Dr.
George Sherman, former
secretary of the Association,
gave a paper on modern ideas
on oral contraception.
The annual ball was held
Saturday evening and was well
attended by a majority of the
profession, representatives of
other professional associations,
para-medical personnel and a
number of friends.


"Happy tomeet you...





Im the Helpful Banker"


"Yotll find me at any branch



of the Royal Bank"


The Royal U The Helpful Bank

ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas.


Doeu.. eei


BAHAMIAN WANTED

ADVERTISINGG SALES PERSON)

Male or Female,

experience preferred.


Interested persons please
contact :

MR. H.R BETHEL

Phone 2-2768 The Tribune,

between 9a.m. & 12noon

Monday through Saturday.

Salary open.


UNBELIEVABLE!
y YOUR BEAUTIFUL COLOUR
PORTRAIT
97"



on the Waterfront
East Bay St. & William St.
S Phone 5-4641
sour sensational January Special to keep our
staff busy through the After--Christmas Lull


Thursday, January 25, 1973.


Wl&#r4W swu, s*




















































I


lhbr Irtbunr


IAITIAN BOAT CAPTAIN
JAILED FOR 3 MONTHS


LUXURY HOTEL
in Nassau
is offering the position of
RESTAURANT MANAGE
to best qualified young applicant. The
candidate must be a Bahamian with excellent
organizing Talent and Leadership qualities
based on experience in the Bahamas and
possibly abroad.
We are offering secure employment with good
salary and possible Career Development in
Food and Beverage Management.
Applicants are to write to: Adv. DA 5185, c/o
The Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau,
Bahameas, with Curriculum Vitae, Photogaph
and copies of References.


the Haitian sloop Victory
Express, a sailboat under 100
tons, was also sentenced to a
month in prison for travelling
without proper documents.
This was to run concurrently
with his three-month sentence.
Also sent to prison for a
month for travelling without
proper immigration documents
were his passengers and crew
Jeanne Cadeley, Mrs. Nicolas
Galixte, Anna Rose Joseph,
Dulmas Mader, Bernadin
Joseph and Leriny Tony.
After serving their sentences
they are to be deported to
Haiti.
The boat was boarded by
officers from the police launch
Andros on Sunday and brought
to Nassau. The 71 passengers
were taken into police custody.
Like the Dieu Sauveur,
another Haitian sloop picked
up near the Exumas on
January 6 by the police launch
Acklins, the Victory Express
was confiscated by a Court
order.


A HAITIAN boat captain
was sent to prison for three
months Tuesday for
attempting to land 71 Haitians
withoutt proper travel
documents and his boat was
order confiscated by the
magistrate.
Clerviu Zephir, captain of
Fat relief
from tirednes
and discomfort
yu yo ohn W tired and
nd yourh orgettiag irritable,
It could be oaued by Inade-
tiSo Nfludal of tanpurities
the botT. oTh ndition
May be relied with Dodd's
Pii. Dodd's contain n effec-
Sflow-of urine and
speed the re.
moval of lmpu.
rtles to help you
feel better.
Dodd's Pills
For relief from
tiredness and
dloomfort.


I 5


MENTAL HEALTH
ASSOCIATION'S
AGi ON FEB. 1
THE BAHAMAS Mental
Health Association will hold its
annual general meeting on
Thursday, February 1, at the
Teachers Training College at 8
p.m.
Reports of the Association's
various committees will be read
outlining the past year's work
in each field. These include the
Family Life, Drugs and
Alcohol, Child Development,
Mental Health Week, Public
Relations, Broadcasting and, of
particular interest this year, the
Conference Committee. This
committee, under the
chairmanship of Miss Telzena
Coakley, is preparing for the
biennial conference of the
Caribbean Federation for
Mental Health, which is to be
hosted by the B.M.H.A. and
held in Nassau from July 22 to
28 this year.
Among the year's
achievements of the association
have been a nation-wide
broadcast by the Prime
Minister and the president of
the Association, Dr. Timothy
McCartney, a special survey
into child care centres on New
Providence and the
establishment of a bulletin
newspaper of the association,
sponsored by Finco.
During the meeting next
Thursday, election of officers
will take place. Nominations
have been requested from
members of the association.
PM ON INDEPENDENCE
PANEL DISCUSSION
THE INTER-denominational
Christian Youth Association
has scheduled a panel
discussion on "attitudes to be
developed in an independent
Bahamas" for 8 p.m. Friday at
the Teachers Training College
in Oakes Field.
On the panel are Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling,
Opposition Leader Kendal
Isaacs, Lionel Carey of the
Vanguard Nationalist Socialist
Party, attorney Jeanne
Thompson, and Mary Ellen
Nairn and Leslie Pinder of the
Association.
SUN


12:28 p.m. Low 6:27 a.m. and SUN: Rises 6:56 a.m. Sets
6:35 p.m. 5:47 p.m.


h their Be s list
A 1 9-YEAR-OLD
BAHAMIAN student at
Eastern Michigan University in
Ypsilanti has been placed on
the Dean's Honour List for
academic achievement during
the past year.
Honoured was Clare P.
Symonette, above, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
Symonette of George Town,
Exuma, who is studying for a
B. A. degree in speech and
dramatic arts for children.
A 1970 graduate of St
Augustine's College in Nassau,
Miss Symonette is expected to
be graduated from university in
August next year,
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
LECTURE TONIGHT
"TODAY'S Search for
Survival" is the subject of a
lecture to be given at 8 o'clock
tonight at the Bahamas
Teachers' College Auditorium
by Mrs. Florence C. Southwell
of Coral Gables, Fla.
Mrs. Southwell is a member
of the Christian Science Board
of Lectureship of the First
Church of Christ, Scientist in
Boston, Massachusetts. She was
a former trustee of the
Christian Science Publishing
Society and is presently
actively engaged in the healing
work of Christian Science both
as a practitioner and a teacher.
The lecture, which lasts an
hour, is free and no collection
will be taken.
TIDES
TIDES: High 12:19 a.m. and


Your very own homesite...


FOR ONLY $3900 CASH!


Or on easy terms: $75 DOWN and $18.40 A WEEKI
Pinewood Gardens is a government-approved sub-division. It is the first com-
munity designed to place good homesites within the reach of every Bahamian.
That's why so many Bahamlans have bought landin Pinewood Gardens. They know
a good land buy when they see it. And they know that the price of land is always going
up. They know, too, that In ho other sub-division in Nassau but Pinewood Gardens
can they get a 100 X SO' lot for the low price of $3,900 cash, or on terms of $75 down and
$18.40 a week. This is why Bahamians have bought and continue to buy 'homesites in
Pinewood Gardens. Paved roads will be installed, electric power lines will be
overhead and waterlines underground just like it is where you may be living now !


WE INVITE YOU TO SEE THE LAND.
WE PROVIDE TRANSPORT.
WE KNOW YOU'LL BUY.
IT IS A GOOD DEAL!


If you can get a better 100 X 50' lot for $3,900 buy it!
But, first, look at Pinewood Gardens homesites.


piN


qApdENS


-


CONTACT: plIN Od qdENS LIMITED
CHARLOTTE HOUSE (MAIN FLOOR) PHONE 23861(sus).23893.23894-2385
OR VrT YOUR rwTOCURTE REAL ESWE AGENT
Imm----------


X OUNCE ENGA ENT
THE ENGAGEMENT has been announced of Mss Audrey
Annette Sands of Nassau, youngest daughter of Mr. Mertland
Sands of Great Guana Cay, Abaco, to Mr. Paul Franklin Sattem,
oun of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sattem of Fairborn, Ohio.
Miss Sands is a secretary at World Banking Corporation and Mr.
Sattem is currently employed at Lords Ltd.
The wedding will take place Saturday, April 14, at Calvary
Bible Church, Collins Avenue with pastor the Rev. David T. Cole
officiating.
The couple will make their home in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.




at te.



CLOTHES




onB ST.
MAXIS- PANTSUITS -BIOUSES -
SLACKS -BELTS AND SANDALS

ON WEEK ONLY I


Thu4wdey, January 25, 1973.


I I


q W4 Wv .


-- ----- ;--- ;-- -L


I











ebr frtbunt


Thrsay Janar 26173


[LSAVL


MASSIVE SEARCH FOR W.W II
JAPANESE IN HIDING
MANILA (AP) A large group
of Japanese, led by officials of
Japan's Welfare Ministry, will
launch a new 'massive search
operation' next month for a former
Japanese World War II soldier
believed hiding on Lubang Island.
Consul Takehisa Nogami of the
Japanese Embasy told a newsman
Tuesday that 'about SO Japanese
will be coming here by the middle
of February to continue the search
operation for Lt. Hiroo Onods.'






NOW SHOWING *
AT 7 & 10:50
BILL ROBERT
0SS CULP






AND at 9:05
"GOLDFINGER" pg.
Paren tal guidance suggested.


RED CROSS APPEAL DONATIONS


I CA I-aSMr I 41


BAHAMAS Red ('ross has
received the following donations in
response to Mrs. Rowena Eldon's
appeal of January Ist:
Red Cross Group Mangrove Cay
Andros, $60; Red Cross Group
Arthur's Town Cat Island, $54; Red
Cross Group Betsy Bay Mayaguana,
$30; Mr. Franklyn Ferguson, $5;
Mr. & Mrs. Gerald C. Cash, $SO;
Mrs. Margaret Johnson, $40; ABCO
(Bahamas) Ltd, $10; Mr. & Mrs. C.
W. Pemberton, $10; Mr. & Mrs. A.
N. Kimble, $10; International
Credit Bank, $52; Harry B. Sands,
Esq., $10; Maura Lumber Company
Ltd, $25; Mr. & Mrs. John Howard
Bamforth, $10; The Bank of Nova
Scotia Trust Company (Bahamas)
Ltd., $250; Mr. & Mrs. George H.
Kluge, $30; Mrs. Selina Lakin,
$100; Mr. & Mrs. J. S. Johnson,
$40; Republic National Bank of
New York (International) Ltd.,
$ 100; Gulfstream Insurance
(Bahamas) Ltd. $50; Fred L. Myers
& Son (1879) Ltd, $50; W. A.
Russell $15; Bishop Paul Leonard
Hagarty, $25; Mr. & Mrs. J. C.
Bates, $15; Lady Sassoon
Charitable Trust, $100; Mr. & Mrs.
R. E. Barnes, $10; Dr. Henry
Podlewski, $10; Helen D. Lindsay,
$20; Dr. & Mrs. M. Maxwell Joyner,
$30; Mr. & Mrs. Jack Sheohard.
$10; Preston Albury Esq, $19.30;
The Deltec Banking Corporation,
$500; T. Gorman, $25; Staff -
Hemisphere Agencies (1972) Ltd,
$48; Mr. & Mrs. F. C. Rubbra,
$100; Anonymous, $15; Mr. & Mrs.
Donald d'Albenas, $30; Sir Roland
& Lady Symonette $25; Eunice
Lady Oakes, $300; Staff Swiss
Bank Corp (Overseas) Ltd., $63;
Swiss Bank Corp. (Overseas) Ltd.,
$200; Mrs. K. Gonsalves, $50;
Henry W. Downs $5; Mr. & Mrs.
Allan C. Butler, $200; The Hon. H.
A. McKinney, $SO; Barclays Bank
Intl. Ltd., $100; Staff Barclays
Bank Intl. Ltd. Local Head Office,
$17; Credit Swiss (Bahamas) Ltd,
$100; The d'Albenas Agency Ltd.,
$30; Staff d'Albenas Agnecy
Ltd., $41; The Hon. & Mrs. Carlton
E. Francis, $20; The Family
Guardian Insurance Company, $50;
Nyhaco Credit Corporation
International, $10; Mr. & Mrs.
Ronald G. Lightbourn, $200;
Michael Clonairs, $25; Ballou Hill
Estate Ltd, $100; Modernistic
Garden & Pet Supply Limited, $25;
Mr. Peter Schellens, $25; Red Cross
Group The Bluff Cat Island, $29;
Julia 0. E. Crawford, $15; Royal
Bank of Canada Freeport Grand
Bahama Branch, $10; Tamarind
Development Grand Bahama Ltd.,
$25; Stanley V. S. Albury & Son
Ltd. & Staff, $100; Red Cross
Centre Acklins, $87; Bahama




(*****Iiiiiiiil8iiiiiiiiiiii


Cement Company, $300; Crystal
Seas Enterprises Ltd., $25;
Maintenance Installation &
Renewals Industries Ltd. $5; Mr. &
Mrs. E. A. Boyce, $2S; Olga
Esfakis, $30; Mrs. Arthur Sands
M.B.E. $25; First National City
Bank, $100; Clark Hulland &
Company, $15; Staff Bahamas
International Trust Company Ltd.
$38.18.


'Project Biknhs'

at Grand Bahaa

gets off ground

"Project: Bahamas", a
stewardship programme of the
Catholic Diocese of Nassau,
held its third general meeting
on Wednesday, in the meeting
room of Mary Star of the Sea
Church at 8 p.m. Volunteers
from the five Catholic parishes
on Grand Bahama were
present.
Co-chairman for Mary Star
of the Sea parish are Charles
Coakley and Philip Hillier, with
Beverly Russell and Ronetta
Batson as secretaries.
Father Paul Keohane, O.S.B.
of St. Vincent de Paul, Hunter,
Father Orlando Molina of St.
Agnes Church of Sea Grape,
Father F. Klinger of St.
Michael's Church, West End,
and Father Cornelius Osendorf
of St. Leonard's, High Rock,
will announce their chairmen
soon.
"The Project: Bahamas
stewardship programme
opened in Nassau in November,
has been amazingly
successful," a spokesman said.
During January and
February the project will be
extended to the Family
Islands.
"Project: Bahamas" was
conceived at the first General
Assembly in the history of the
Diocese, which was held last
June. Lay and clerical delegates
agreed that with the new era in
the history of the Bahamas, a
programme of stewardship
should be instituted.


Four youths to stand


trial for robbery


FOUR Over-the-Hill youths
who were taken into custody by
police officers on January 17
as suspects in two reported
incidents of robbery were


committed for
Supreme Court
Emmanuel
Wednesday.
The men -
Curtis Neely
Green, both 21


trial in the
by Magistrate
Osdebay

horse groom
and Bernard
of "no fixed


address", are charged with a
15-year-old St. Augustine's
College student of King Street
and a 16-year-old ReasCorner,,
resident of robbing Ulrick'
Armbrister of a watch and $30
cash.
The men are also charged
with receiving the money and
the wrist-watch, a gentleman's
Seiko automatic, valued at
$58. Committed to the
Supreme Court they are to be
tried for robbery with violence.
Asked if they wished to
make a statement prior to
Wednesday's preliminary
inquiry, they reserved their
defence.
Police witnesses, who
testified during the preliminary
inquiry, produced three
statements, purportedly taken
from the accused, which they
entered as exhibits to be used
in their Supreme Court trial.
The wrist-watch, also
produced by the police as that
belonging to Armbrister, has
been entered as an exhibit.
No bail was allowed the
youths who were ordered
remanded in custody until
February 22, the trial date of a
third charge brought against
them.
They pleaded not guilty to
breaking into the Province


Avenue Texaco Station on
January 16 and stealing two
acetylene gas tanks. They
elected trial in the magistrate's
courts.


F.O.B. CAMERA CLUB OFFICERS FOR 1973


THE F.O.B. CAMERA
CLUB recently elected its
new list of officers for 1973
at the annual general meeting.
Standing from left are: David
Andrews, committee
member; James Redmon,
vice-president; J. E.
Tertullian, treasurer; David R.
Curl, president; Fred Mauran,
librarian. Front row from left
are: Mrs. Melvern Johnson,
committee member; Miss
Linda Huber, secretary; Miss
Margaret R. Gullaume,
public relations; Mr. Rickey
Wells, past president. Not
pictured are Mr. Edgar Hall,
Mr. Gino Henry and Mr.
Urban Bostwick.

CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S
COMMITTEE DONATIONS
THE Crippled Children's
Committee has received the
following donations:
Bahamas Association of
Land Surveyors $25. Bahamas
Raceco Limited $1,300;
Bahamas Racing Commission
S1,024; Chase Manhattan Bank
$150; Mr. F. G. Stubbs,
Harbour Island $5; Mr. E. P.
Taylor S1,000.


NUMBER PUBLICLY EXECUTED NOW TOTALS SEVEN
KAMPALA (AP) A military tribunal sentenced two more Ugandans
Wednesday to be executed publicly by firing squads. Five others received
similar sentences Tieaday.
The condemned menm a all alleged to be guerrilla supporters of former
Ugandan President Dr. Milton Obote. President General Id Amia said
Wednesday anyone suspected to engaging in guerrilla activities would in
future be brought before the tribunal.


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE


1. Impact
5. Offspring
8,. Chop
11. Lima bean
12. Greek letter
13. Anger
14. Holly
15. Diamond
necklace
17. Of government
19. Chinese leader
20. Bast of
burden
24. Bright
27. Coach


29. Rabbit tail
30. Shoal
32. Health resort
34. Scottish uncle
35. Regale
37. Personality
39. Atom smasher
44. Middle
47. Present
48. Hawk parrot
49. Poem
50. Annexes
51. Some
52. Mister
53. Kinds of
bread


Per time 30 min. AP Newj


Do MBED




S NODHE
:, r.c ,m vE
omu MHdm



AM W I RE uiE


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 3. Biblical
character
4. Axiom
1. Vessel 5. Sober
2. French 6. Auditory
composer 7. Maritime
8. Hurry
S 9 to 9. Blunder
I 10. Small
16. Misfortunes
I 18. Accounting
21. Expert
-- 22. Quiet
23. Consumed
S24. Knack
S- 25. Through
9 i 26. Pipe joint
28. School book
31. Truth
33 Past
S 36. Neophytes
v rI SI 5 38. Else
S_ 40. Moslem judge
97 41. Depend on
42. Heraldic
o Wreath
43. Cape
S44. Rolled tea
45. One in Bonn
features 1-27 46. Negative vote


II I








thwayu spak and write


Are you content with the way
you speak and write? Are you
sure that you are not making
mistakes that ause people to
underrate you? You are udged
by sh.
an handicapped
because they make em a
erron rn peech and writing
annot apn thmselves efec-
Dyou want to be a master of
dclr,eespresle glihDoyou
want to become a ond conver-
otioalintandlttr-wr I ? Im-
pmove U BnUlh oquiely amd
any b ew theR. I. way.
enables you to mae noticeable
progress in a fewhours. You learn
Rsm the lateretingly wraiteon
easy-to-undertandlessonshowto


avoid errors and how to press
your ideas fluently.
The study requires only a little
time, and the moderate fee off a
may be paid in convenient
monthly inalments, which puts
it within the reach ofeveryoe.

SEND FOR BOOKLET
b sendo wfror
thintf antdtib sa s
ord Matne".
It wilnbe sent
without
obligationm.


it mm mm
PAWN end me wmhout e6petiton, a copy of Word fM ery"
I wth defs of yourpecl arrangements and helped l ms f
ov* reawv udenM. 352C
N a m e.................................................................................................. ......
I A dd r- ...................................................... ..................................................... I
I Address


THE REGENT INSTITUTE
^ep.Nep~y~tytlwwon 4W


BOAC AID CHILDREN'S HOSTEL

PRESENTATION OF A CHEQUE for $235.50 was recently made to Canon William Granger,
chairman of the executive committee, Children's Emergency Hostel. The money was raised by the
staff of BOAC and the airline also made a handsome contribution. Pictured making the
presentation to Canon Granger are (left) Mr. Wendell Seymour, senior station officer BOAC, and
Mr. Sammy Sands, accountant, BOAC at the airline's Bay Street Office.


INK-


SM


rr I -rr


Thursday, January 26, 1973.


WULFF RD.llr^^wwm^H^


I

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Thursday, January 25, 1973.
m -,- "- -


gihbe rtbunr 7



Exhibition of work by Max Taylor and


Edmund Moxey plans national dance and




drama troupe --plus a symphony orchestra!


THE DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL DRAMA TROUPE, a national dance troupe and a community symphony orchestra are
some of the plans envisioned by the Ministry of Education's Community Youth and Cultural Development Division.


The division is now the
responsibility of Coconut
Grove representative Edmund
Moxey, according to an
announcement made Monday
by Education Minister
Livinaston Coakley.
The public is being invited
to submit any suggestions
which, Mr. Coakley said, would
be given careful consideration
for possible inclusion in the
Division's programme.
In outlining the functions of
the new Division, the Minister
said it would be responsible for
formulating the following
programmes:
CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMME
The Cultural Programme has
been divided into two sections:
(a) The Performing Arts ,
The Performing Arts Section -
will be responsible for:
(1) annual festivals;
(2) the development of a EDMUND MOXEY, M
national drama troupe; ... now in charge of y
(3) the development of a cultural development.
national dance troupe;
(4) the development of a carving, han
community symphony designing, mak
orchestra; musical instrument
(5) the establishment of live work, etc.;
theatres particularly in (4) the establishment
densely populated areas near future of a rr
with emphasis on play centre for E
writing and directing; handicraft produce
(6) the establishment of voice COMMUNITY CENTR
culture workshops In addition t
(7) the establishment of community centre
workshops to be completion in the
developed into a national Grove area, construct
school of music for vocal another centre is a
and instrumental begin in Ann's Tow
advancement in music. hoped in the near fi
(b) Visual Arts Programme construct community
The objectives of the visual arts in the following areas:
programme are: Fox Hill, Bain's Ti
(1)The provision of training Michael's and Fort F
in arts and crafts McCullough Corner Ar
techniques; A health clinic is al
r(2) t ove ion f M etfen- m- th
nthe preparation of Grove Community Ce
materials for the arts anri centres will
crafts programme; accommodation for c
(3) the coordination of be administered I
workshops at craft centres Ministry of Health,
in plaiting, basketry, Centres, auditorium


IP
south and


community use for training in
the cultural arts, performing
and visual arts as previously
outlined and adult education
programmes. With respect to
adult education, reference is
particularly made to that
section of the White Paper on
Independence which states:
"Greater opportunity will
also be given, through Adult
Education Courses for older
people, to further develop their
knowledge and potential."
YOUTH PROGRAMME
"In view of the fact that the
country is now about to enter
into full nationhood, the whole
youth programme should be
geared to a national level," Mr.
Coakley said.
With this aim in view, the
Community Youth and
Development Division's
objectives are:
(a) the establishment
throughout the Common-
wealth of Youth Corps, similar
to the Four "ll" Clubs, which
aims are for the develop-
ment and the training of the
future adult citizens of this
Country to:
gain new knowledge, skills
and attitudes through real life
experiences.
Realize the satisfaction and
dignity of work.
a develop leadership talents
and abilities
a recognize the values of
research and learn the process
of making decisions.
understanding how
agriculture and 'home
economics contribute to the
economy and human welfare
explore career opportunities
and continue needed
education.
appreciate nature and apply
_, L ... Lm lel 1" .. _


constructive use of leisure time
* strengthen personal standards
and citizenship ideals
* cultivate desires and ability
to co-operate with others
* perform national services,


whenever the opportunity
arises, with pride in their
performances.
(b) the coordination and
continuous training of the
youth of the Commonwealth
in all phases of sports. The
schools are the nurseries for
future athletes of this country
- athletes who will in future
be representing the Bahamas in
International Competition. In
order to ensure the continuous
chain of development for these
athletes, the training
programme will be
coordinated on a continuous
basis throughout school and
post-school years.
DEVELOPMENT OF
JUMBEYVILLAGE
The prime objective for the
development of the Jumbey
Village site, in addition to the
elimination of an unsightly and
un-healthy area located in the
centre of a residential area, is
to provide accommodation and
facilities for the events
sponsored by the cultural
development of Bahamians in
the Arts, performing and
visual.
With this aim in view and in
keeping with the Bahamian
theme, construction of the
buildings are planned as
replicas of early Bahamian
structures. Buildings now
completed will provide
accommodation for the sale of
local handicrafts and gifts; the
museum which is to be
constructed will depict scenes,
paintings, furniture, etc., of
early Bahamian life. The
auditorium will provide
accommodation for the
presentation of the performing
arts.


on March 24.
As 1973 is the Bahamas
Independence year and "all
energies will be focused on this
historic event," the organising
committee has "restructered"
the festival to lend it a more
Bahamian flavour.
New classes of entries are
being offered.
In the out islands, new
categories include Gospel and
Anthem singing, Ring Play,
quadrille dancing, jumpin'
dance, rake and scrape bands
and choral speaking.
In New Providence and
Grand Bahama, pageant classes
are being introduced to
combine all the performing arts
- music, drama, dance and
mime into simple
presentations poportraying
some historical or social aspect
of Bahamian life.


I- A LOK AT THE ARTS A


A release from the Ministry
of Education and Culture
added that "all choral classes
will be required to sing the
national anthem, 'March on
Bahamaland.' "
Acting as adjudicator in the
out islands will be Mr. John
Churchill from the music
department of Carleton
University, Ottawa, Canada,
who had adjudicated in New
Providence and Grand Bahama
for the past three years.
Mr. John Fletcher, a native
of Scotland now resident in
Barbados, will be the
adjudicator in New Providence
and Grand Bahama this year.
Mr. Fletcher, born in
Edinburgh and raised in
Granada received his musical
education at the University of
Edinburgh, and Moray House
College of Education.
lHe was appointed director
of music at the University of
the West Indies in 1968, but
subsequently moved to
Barbados.
He is a Fellow of the Royal
College of Organists, and is
presently working for a
doctorate at the School of
Sacred Music of Union
Theological Seminary, New
York.

NEW IWI REGISTRAR

IN LEGAL EDUCATION
THE Director of Legal
Education has announced the
appointment of Dr. C. A.
Goodridge as Registrar,
Council of Legal Education at
the University of the West
Indies with effect from
December 15, 1972.
Dr. Goodridge was educated
at the Combermere Boys'
School and Harrison College,
Barbados.
He holds a Master of Arts
Degree with Honours in
History and Law from the
University of Edinburgh and a
Teaching Diploma. He was
awarded the Degree of Doctor
of Philosophy from the
University of Cambridge where
he was a Commonwealth
Scholar.
He was an overseas Fellow
under the British Technical
Assistance Scheme


By SONIA HILL
LAST MONTH NASSAU
ARTIST, Maxwell Taylor
opened his Bahamas
Printmaking Workshop and
Gallery on Bradley Street just
off Madeira. It must be the
first of its kind here. I was very
impressed and took along a
camera to get a picture of the
gallery.
"No, don't photograph
that," said Max. "Can't you
take a picture of my press
instead?"
I was led through the gallery
into the p. nting room. There
it stood in splendour a brand
new etching press.
"It's the only one of its kind
in the Bahamas." said Max
Taylor.
I must say I was very
impressed with this too. I think
it is pretty good going that
someone who has spent the last
five years as a student, (and has
had to take odd jobs as barman
and night watchman to
subsidise his studies), is able to
set himself up with a gallery
and workshop equipped with
new tools.
Good going but typical of
Max. Although he has been
helped in his career by winning
three scholarships, it is largely
his own drive and single
mindedness that have got him
where he is. But I mustn't start
on the story of Max Taylor's
life. He is too well-known to
need an introduction here, as
are the woodcuts he used to
exhibit at the Loft Art Gallery
before he left for Europe and
the U.S.A.
INTERESTING
What is not so well known is
the work he has been doing as
a student in New York, for
apart from an exhibition here
last year, the public has had
little chance to see what has
been happening during these
hidden years. What has been
going on is a lot of interesting
experimental work.
"Printing involves a great
variety of techniques," said
Max, "And a good printmaker
should be conversant with all
of these."
The walls of the gallery bear


to give a collage-like effect of
contrasting textures.
However it is not the skilful
use of techniques that
recommends these pictures to
me. but the fact that this artist


local artists at the Bahamas



Printmaking Workshop & Gallery


has something very definite to
say Max Taylor is often put
forward as a black artist,
mainly concerned with the
plight of the underprivileged
Negro in society but he himself
points out that his view is
wider than this.
'I am primarily an artist,
secondly a black artist," he
says. "We as artists should
make it our duty to bring
awareness to the people or
nation; to eliminate suppression
and prejudice. I consider my
work an expression of people
with problems and suffering
mental and physical."
Max Taylor is also giving
other artists a chance to have
their say at his gallery. Friday
night sees the opening of an
exhibition of work by local
artists including Brent Malone,
Eddie Minnis. Bob Brome,
Michael Vincent. Denis Knight,
Eddie Yanowitz and James
Rolle. There is a continuous
showing at the gallery daily
between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m

Why all the fuss at the
beginning about the printing
press? Well, this is not just for
Max alone but is to be used in
imparting his skill to others.
('lasses in print making,
etching, painting and drawing
start at the workshop this week.
Children's classes will be held
on Saturday.


It

U
S




I

i


IF


5



ii

I


MAX TAYLOR AT HIS PRINTING PRESS


SMuticfestivaLthis year


to include many new


Bahamian categories

THE 1973 BAHAMAS MUSIC FESTIVAL has been slated for
February 20-28 in the out islands and March 1-14 in New
Providence and Grand Bahama, with the final concert coming up


ARIMA


HAS A WIDE

ASSORTMENT OF:-

BEDSPREADS... SHEETS
... PILLOWCASES ... TOWELS
.. BLANKETS
VERY REASONABLY PRICED.

CLEARANCE SALE CONTINUES ON
ALL WOOLLEN READY-TO-WEAR
UPTO 33 1/3 OFF


WULFF ROAD NEAR MACKEY STREET.
8 A.M. TO 7 P.M. MON. FRI. 8 P.M. SAT.


FEARED


Thursday, January 215, 1973.


-;chn*u4'- -- --- Wnil-l^--lx


k-.


-


-Icvm -muv


proof that he follows his own
dictums. On display arc a
variety of lino cuts, silk screen
prints and wood cuts which
open one's eyes to the new and
interesting ways in which these
processes can be used.
For instance, etching has
always been associated with
fine line engraving but Max
also uses an uninked etching
plate to make an embossed
texture on the paper. Op art
effects are obtained by printing
fine lines directly on to silver
foil and, in some of the screen
prints, photography has been
combined with free line work
MOON
MOON: Sets 1 1:00 a.m.

EARTHQUAKE NEAR NEW
HEBRIDES ISLANDS
BOULDER, COLO. (AP) The
National Earthquake Information
Centre Tuesday reported a
moderately strong earthquake in
the area of the New Herbrides
Islands in the South Pacific.
The tremor was recorded at 6.5
on the open-ended Richter scale at
04:49 GMT. The University of
(alifornia seismographic laboratory
at Berkeley, ('alif., reported the
same quake at 6.3 on the Richter
scale at 05:02 (MT.
A spokesman here said the area is
sparsely populated and seldom
results in heavy damage. lie said
there were no reports of injury or
damage from the quake.
The Centre uses an open-ended
Richter scale with the highest level
ever recorded on the scale being an
8.9 in a 1906 quake off the coast of
South America and a 1933 quake at
Saniku, Japan.


''
.~





be irtibUtt


Thuralay, January 25,1973.


U1M U hmIUa ige 'se Oi (O flMe

Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from ga.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.

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C8282
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COMMERCIAL 12 units.
Income $32,000.00 Sales price
only $250,000.00. Come see-
we can convince you.
CITY LIMITS- 11 units. Only
$150,000.00. Income
$25,000.00. We have
Condominiums, Apts., and
Hotels for sale. Come see us.
We have the listings.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
22305 Nite 41197.
C8526
NEED $10,000.00 MINIMUM.
Have house with 3 bedrooms
2 baths fully furnished,,
NASSAU EAST neat, clean
and well kept. Was $60,000.00
reduced to $47,500.00.
Financing available. Come see
anytime and let's do a deal.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033.
Nite 41197.
C8527
FOR SALE
HILLTOP RIDGEWAY -
POOL -- PATIO. Gorgeous
views has 4 bedrooms 3
baths -- plus maids room.
Furnished. Substantially built
now vacant. Can be seen at
anytime. Spacious patio for
high-class entertaining. Only
$160,000.00. DAMIANOS &
ASSOCIATE S.- DIl 22033,
22305, 22307 anytime. Nite
141197.
C8591
CORNER building lot, main
road, very near The Current
Club, Eleuthera. $1750.00 or
make a sound offer.
Contact Mr. Kelly, Nassau
Florist Ltd., P. 0. Box N-4635,
Nassau, or call collect 5-2598
or 2-4223 anytime.
c8553
SPANISH WELLS, quaint
frame cottage with guest room
and bath in separate masonry
building, airconditioned and
mostly furnished. Fenced and
walled landscaped yard and
patio. Contact Owner, P. 0.
Box 26. Spanish Wells.
C8541
FOR SALE
WATERFRONT OUT
EAST. Approx. 250 on water
with house. Ideal for
expansion, or development.
Places on water always in
demand ripe for
development. Amazing low
figure of $75,000.00.
SHADOWS Out East.
Approx. 147 on waterfront.
Gorgeous views protected
from storms & inclement
weather. Has 2-storey house,
garage etc. Priced. at
$90,000.00.
OTHER HOUSES ON
appreciate.
BUEN RETI RO City Limits.
3 bedrooms 2 bathS, furnished
homes. See anytime. From
$40,000 and up
SHIRLEY PARK AVE. -
HILLTOP. 3 bedrooms 2
baths, plus adjoining
apartment. Furnished. Good
rental units. Only $55,000.
MONTAGU HEIGHTS 2
RENTAL UNITS.
Immaculately kept spacious
grounds. Live in one and have
income from other. Was asking
$60,000.00 come make offer
$4(7,500.00. We might surprise
y i.
C BL.E BEACH the Gold
Coest. Have 147ft. on water by
615 ft. depth. Was
$4p0,000.00. Owner says sell
fo4 the elow low figure of


$2 0,000.00.
INVESTQR WANTED- Cable
Bech Property. 200 by the
$.1 and 870 depth. Approx.
17 i00. sq. ft. Income
pr duclng loads of grounds
for expansion good for
Cottage Colony,. Apartments,
or mall hotel. Good size pool,
patio and five cottages. See
anytime. Amazing low low
price.
SIX BEDROOMS 4% Baths -
furnished, pool and patio -
Out West with rights to Sandy
Beah. Price upon inquiry.
HILLTOP HOUSES Out
Ealt._With pool, patio, views
and rights to beach.
DIAL THE ACTION
N BCRS 22033. 213059
2237 Nite 41197
oDIANOS & ASOCIATES.


FOR SALE Ocean View Lot
East End. 100' x 200'. Two
blocks from beach. Call 5-2370
after 6 p.m.
C8561
SACRIFICE beachfront acre
tract $10,000. Fashionable
out-island resort. Convenient
everything. Phone 5-7224
evenings.
C8595
FOR SALE
2-STOREY BUILDING 3-2
bedroom apartments upstairs
and open shop known as
Roberts Parts Department
downstairs Soldier Road
opposite Technical Training
Centre. Phone 4-2981, P. 0.
Box 5387, Nassau.
C8592
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furnished apartment
overlooking Montagu Bay (very
desirable area). New complete
rugs, stove, refrigerator, heater,
wall mirrors, sliding doors, etc..
Good rental no problem.
$27,500.00. Will consider
exchange in Florida. Call Mr.
Kay collect 5-2598 or 2-4223
anytime., P. 0. Box N-4635,
Nassau.
C8579
FOR SALE
1. Large attractive Shirley
Park Avenue residence for
only $40,000 furnished.
Three bedrooms, two
baths, living-dining room,
porch, laundry, carport,
etc. Lot: 75' x 136'.
2. Outstanding buy
intwo-storey hilltop
residence Montagu area.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
living room, separate
dining room, carport, etc.
$27,000 furnished.
3. Beautifully situated
four-bedroom, three-bath
residence Breezy Hill.
Unusually large living
room with open beam
ceiling, separate dining
room, porch, patio, maid's
room, laundry, two-car
garage etc. Lot: 120' x
200'. Grounds fully
landscaped with fruit
orchard. $85,000
furnished or nearest offer.
4. Attractive, well-furnished,
co-operative apartment
Baycroft Ocean View,
East Bay Street. Two
double bedrooms, one
bath, living-dining,
kitchen and small
balcony, pool privileges
and parking facilities.
$25,000 furnished for
quick sale.
H. G. CHRISTIE
Real Estate,
309, Bay Street,
P. 0. Box N8164,
Nassau.
Telephone 2-1041, 2-1042.



C8492
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
situate Five (5) doors from
Shirley Street, South on the
right side on Friday the 9th
day of February A.D. 1973 at
12 o'clock noon the following
property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate at Hatchet
Creek on the Island of
Andros which formerly
formed part of a Six (6) acre
tract of land originally
granted to Loewils Forbes,
deceased as delineated on
the plan thereof recorded in
Book F3 page 86 of the
records of Crown Grants in
the Crown Lands Office for
the Commonwealth of the
Bahama Islands and which
said piece parcel or lot of
land is bounded on the
NORTH by Crown land
which adjoins the sea and
running thereon Three
Hundred and Fifty (350)
feet on the NORTHEAST
by a Public Road and
running thereon One
Hundred and Seventy-five
(175) feet on the
SOUTHEAST by land the
property of Fit: Roy Forbes
and running thereon One
Hundred and Twenty-five
(125) feet and on the
SOUTH by the Sea and
running thereon
approximately Five Hundred
(500) feet and on the WEST
by land the property of the


I.


Estate of the late Francis
Smith and running thereon
One Hundred (100) feet.
Mortgage dated the 1st day of
February, A.D. 1971 James
Johnson to William P. Hunt.
Recorded in Vol. 1722 at pages
459 to 469.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for tlhe
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.


Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time. of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated the 16th day of January
A.D. 1973.
HARRY 0. MALONE
* Public AutIomeer


C8267
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.
C8286
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED.
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152.

C 7066
Newly built 3 bedroom/2 bath,
situated Domingo Heights, East
St., South. Contact: Nassau
5-6234.
C8289
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C8530
3 BEDROOM 2 bath burnished
house Sans Souci. Phone
5-2398.

C8410
BACHELOR ROOM in
respectable home in Palmdale
with private entrance. For
information call 5-1044.
C8264
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
HILLCREST TOWERS (Third
Terrace West Centreville) -
Elegant, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
apartments, airconditioned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842
7-4116, 2-8224 or 2-8248.

C8520
LARGE unfurnished 2 or 3
bedroom house Boyd
Subdivision. Phone 2-1170
from 9-5.
C8265
LARGE 1 BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C8589
EXECUTIVE TYPE two storey
dwelling house on long term
lease. Four bedrooms, three
and a half baths. Living and
dining rooms, family room,
kitchen, double car garage with
recreation facilities. Large
swimming pool, tennis court.
Own fresh water supply.
Attractively furnished. Located
in Sans Souci near St.
Andrew's School. Call 41563.
C8529
2 BEDROOM HOUSE on
spacious enclosed grounds.
Phone 2-3709 .3-4881.
C8518
1. TWO SHOPS available in the
East Bay Shopping Centre,
East Bay Street. For further
information call 2-4782.
2. Office, warehouse, open
yard storage area at the corner
of Virginia & Heathfield
Streets. For further
information call 2-4782.
C8564
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
furnished duplex apartment.
Air-conditioned, laundry, large
private yard. Village Road near
Montagu. Call after 6. phone
5-2370.
C8560
FURNISHED two bathroom
spacious hilltop colonial. Oakes
Field area. Convenient beaches,
golf, airport. $300. Telephone,
television, laundry, pool. Acre
trees, flowers. Children and
dogs acceptable. Everything
necessary. Phone 5-7224
evenings.
C8523
1. OFFICE SPACE: Roberts
Building, East Street.
120 sq. ft. $90.00 per month
270 sq. ft. 135.00 per month
360 sq. ft. 180.00 per month
975 sq. ft. -400.00 per month

2. OFFICE & STORE: space
Out Island Traders Shopping
Centre, opposite Potters Cay.
Ideal location available for
takeout restaurant $308.33
per month. Store and office
space available from as little as
$277.00 per month.
3. OAKES FIELD AREA: one
bedroom apartments,
unfurnished $140.00 per
month.
4. OFFICE SPACE OAKES
FIELD AREA: 868 sq. ft.
$290.00 per month.


5. APARTMENTS --- out East
- I & 2 bedrooms, fully
furnished, aircondltionina.
swimming pool, $255.00 &
$265.00 per month.
6. EFFICIENCY APART-
MENTS: close to town,
-fully furnished, airconditloned
- $150.00 per month.
7. LOVELY EXECUTIVE 2
bedroom apartment, in the
east, redecorated and
refurbished $375.00 per
month.


All enquiries on the above
should be directed to Bert L.
Roberts Limited tqephone
NRS. 2-3177/2-3178


I I


I


C8547
2 2 BEDROOM Apartments,
Foxdale Subdivision. $150.00
per month. For information
call 28640 Monday to Friday 8
a.m. to 5 p.m.
C8392
PRIME OFFICE space
available in IBM HOUSE, with
central airconditioning and
ample parking. For further
information call 32351/4.

C8562
UNFURNISHED 2 storey
house. Bay near Armstrong.
$175. Call 2-2152.
C8522
ONE UNFURNISHED 2
bedroom apartment -- Hawkins
Hill. $160. Telephone 51835
before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m.
C8584
2 BEDROOM furnished
apartment, East Bay Street
opposite Bayshore Marina.
$275 per month. Phone
2-1631-2.
C8597
ATTRACTIVE fully equipped
3 bedroom 2 bath house
exclusive Buen Retiro Avenue,
just redecorated, large garden,
airconditioning, excellent T.V.
antenna, washing machine etc.
$350. Phone 53177.

WINTS To- li
C8487
CASH for your furniture and
other effects. Fox Bros.
Furniture Outlet, Dowdeswell
Street (4 doors east of Devoaux
St.), P. 0. Box 6104 ES,
Nassau, Bahamas. Telephone
2-8012. We Buy, Sell and Rent.

FOR SALE
C8556
3 PIECE LIVING room set, 7
piece Dining room set, Fridge,
3 piece Bedroom set,
Children's bed, T.V. Antenna.
Phone 35472.
C8488
FOR SALE
1970 Triumph car, excellent
condition $1100 or best offer.
2 Washing machines $275 each
1 Dryer $250
8 mm Projector, reg. & super
$85
Swing Set $50
1 Automatic Coffeemaker
$110
1 Large reclining chair $95
Call 2-4173
C8555
FOR SALE
FLEETWOOD T. V. -- slightly
used, 24" screen in excellent
condition. Including antenna
Only $500.00 CASH. Phone
36362.

CARS FOR SALE !
C8539
1971 FORD ESCORT. Phone:
7-7231.
C8569
FIAT 500 L 1970. Good nick.
Telephone 4-2026.
C8404
1965 AMPI CAR Triumph
Herald 1200 cc Engine. Owner
must leave colony. Phone
2-2441.
C8416
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
SUBSTANTIAL END OF
SEASON REDUCTIONS
1970 Victor
Automatic $1500
1970 Chevrolet
Impala $2800
1970 Rover 2000
A/C Automatic $2400
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic Beige
4 Dr. $1895
1969 Vauxhall
Viva4Dr.Std. $825
1968 Javelin A/C $1600
1971 Vauxhall
Victor 2000
Automatic Grey $2300
1968 Ford
Escort Std. 2 Dr.
White $650
1971 Vauxhall Viva
2 Dr. Auto. Green $1895
1971 Mercury
Comet Auto. Green $2800
1970 Mustang
Red. A/C $2400
1969 Dodge Monaco
A/C Vinyl $1795
1963 S/Wagon
Ford Auto $450


Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8.


C8551
1970 FORD LTD. nine
passenger station wagon, V.8
Automatic, Power steering,
Power brakes, Radio. Very nice
condition must sell $3,395 or
O.N.O. Please call Mr.
Hendrickson or Mr. Parnell, at
2-1784 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
C8516
1970 LEMANS Sport Sedan,
19,000 miles.
Excellent condition.
$2,500.00. Call 2-2992 days
4-2571 evenings.


C8575
1966 WHITE convertible
Mustang P/S, radio. $850.
1969 Triumph 13/60, 12,000
miles only. $1000. Telephone
52448.
C8557
1968 MERCURY MONTEGO
MX excellent condition, low
mileage. $2000.
1968 Cadillac, beautiful
condition $3200 O.N.O. Phone
RICH 58404.
SC OLS |

C8485
GUITAR LESSONS .... taught
by Derek. For Information call
5-2354.

POSITION WANTED
C8489
YOUNG LADY seeks job as
part-time maid or weekly.
Please call Ilene 3-6031.

E BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES-- I
C8514
Small thriving business for sale.
Good income. For details call
telephone 2-2633 between 6
p.m. -8 o.m.
C8558
WANT TO BUY A LOT?
Phone 2-7667 P. 0. Box
N4764, FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE LTD. Let us
take you on a FREE
complimentary tour of any
subdivision of your choice with
no obligation to buy.
CALL US TODAY

S LOST

C8586
SIAMESE CAT with bent tail
in Soldier Road named Amber.
Tel. Mrs. Leigh. 58567 day.
31837 night. REWARD.

PETS
C8583
BAHAMAS OBEDIENCE
TRAINING SCHOOL new
session. Registration at 6 p.m.,
January 30th Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre. For
information call 31409 after 6
p.m.



C8590
NOTICE IS HEREBY given
that Sidoles Toussaint (alias
Bill Francis) of McQuay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Governor for naturalisation
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of facts
to the Deputy Governor,
Government House, Nassau,
Bahamas.
C8593
APPLICATIONS for the
entrance examination to St.
Anne's High School are now
available and may be obtained
from the school during normal
'school hours Monday -
Thursday 9.00-3.15, Friday
9.00-1.30. Forms and fees
must be returned by Feb. 9th.
The examination will be held
on Feb. 16th at 9.00 a.m.
Upper age limit 13 years Sept.
1973.
C8598
THE PUBLIC is hereby
notified that the roadway
running North and South
between the main Government
roadway situate North of
Arthur's Town Cat Island, and
the privately owned airstrip at
Arthur's Town will be closed
to the Public from 5 p.m. on
Sunday, 28th January, 1973
until 5 p.m. on Monday, 29th
January, 1973 in order to
retain its ownership.
E RVIN KNOWLES
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
LIMITED.

I EiIE SIWLIS
C828.3
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxuriou:,
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleeps
six; private bathroom with


vanity, shower and head;
stove refrigerator, sink.
stereo ship-to-shore, twin 230
h.p. engines with less than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
C838A
BAHAMAS YACHT SALBS
JAMES w. ALBURY
P 0 Box bees
NASAUW BAHAMAoS
S osTnIuroR roft


TROJANYAOrHT t
DA OlVISOn OF
W***


C8576
BERTRAM 31' Express
Cruiser, twin GM Diesel,
excellent condition. To see
call Mario 3-6645 from 9 to c
or 3-6649 after 5 p.m.
C8568
JOHNSON MARINE Engine
33 HP 1966. Working
condition.
Orlando Clipper fibre glass
hull. Telephone 4-2026.

IIELPWANTED I
C8585
EXPERIENCED BACK HOE
Operator wanted. Please apply
to Cavalier Construction
Company, Oakes Field.
Telephone number 3-5171-2.
C8565
A YOUNG MAN to train under
the butler in a private home.
Other staff kept. Must have
references. Please write P. 0.
Box N4861, Nassau.
C8536
(1) One On-Site Inte International
Sales Director for growing
resort. Applicant should have
previous experience in Land
Sales, and should live on the
development site.
(2) One Real Estate Salesman.
Should have previous
experience in land sales and
live on site.
Applicants should apply to P.
0. Box N-7782 or Phone
2-4596.
C8503
EXECUTIVE FOR CAYMAN
ISLANDS BANK AND TRUST
COMPANY
An expanding bank and trust
company in the Cayman
Islands owned by a consortium
of leading international banks
requires young executive to
assist In the operation of the
company's trust and banking
business and in the control of
accounts.
The successful applicant will
have had experience in banking
or trust work in a tax haven
and in particular with the
preparation of accounts
preferably for trusts and
managed companies. Ji3 will
have qualifications appropriate
to this experience.
The company offers an
attractive salary with non
contributory pension, medical
and insurance benefits.
Applications in writing with
full particulars of education,
experience, present salary and
terms of employment to The
Manager, P. 0. Box 661, Grand
Cayman, B.W.I.
C8550
CHARTERED OR
CERTIFIED accountant
required by established Nassau
professional office. Please reply
in writing with full details of
experience to date to Clark,
Hulland and Co., P. 0. Box
N-4107, Nassau.
C8545
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
required for local firm. Please
furnish all necessary
information to Maldwyn G.
Evans, P. 0. Box N3720,
Nassau Bahamas.
C8506
AUTO MECHANIC WANTED
ABC MOTORS requirequires an
auto mechanic experienced in
all phases of automobile work,
but in particular the electric
system. Must have own hand
tools. Must be sober, reliable
and willing to work. Good pay
to right man. Many fringe
benefits. Call Mr. Stunce
Williams at 2-1031.
C8549
BAHAMIAN CONTRACT
MANAGER
I nte rn a tional construction
company requires the services
of a construction contract
manager with surveyor
experience to oversee parent
company's contractual
obligations in Florida and the
Bahamas. Applicant should
have a minimum of 10 years
experience in the building
trades, both in the Bahamas
and Florida, and expect to
divide his time between both
areas. Submit written resume
to Metric Contracting Limited,
P. 0. Box N-1372, Nassau,
Bahamas.
C8577


SECRETARY with experience
in general office practice and in
operating Telex, Reply In own
handwriting stating experience
to Adv. C8577, c/o The
Tribute, P. 0. Box N-3207,
.Nassau.
C8502

BAHAMAS
LARGEST


PRINT

SHOP


MONUMENT

VI I .


C8582
COMPUTER SYSTEMS
ANALYST/TRAINING
INSTRUCTOR
Burroughs Bahamas Limited is
seeking a qualified System
Analyst/Training Instructor.
The position involves
programming, systems design
and training of other
personnel.
Applicants should possess the
following qualifications:
1. University education
2. Teaching certificate or
training experience
3. Programming experience
4. Knowledge of COBOL and
other languages
5. Experience on Burroughs
equipment useful
Salary commensurate with
experience and background.
Interested applicants reply in
confidence to: Burroughs
Bahamas Limited, P. 0. Box
ES 6266, Nassau, Bahamas.

C8581
BURROUGHS BAHAMAS
LIMITED is looking for a
person who has previously held
the position of Accounting
Manager within the Burroughs
Corporation.
The successful applicant will
work with the Bahamian
company with a view to
training the Chief Accountant,
who will be selected locally.
This position requires a
thorough knowledge of the
policies and procedures of
Burroughs Corporation
including the techniques and
principles of accounting for
marketing and manufacturing
operations.
This knowledge is usually
acquired through a college
education in Business
Adm inistration and
Accounting with several years
experience in the accounting
field, of which at least three
years will have been in the
Burroughs Corporation.
Apply to: Accounting
Manager, P. 0. Box ES 6266,
Nassau, Bahamas.
C8580
STENOGRAPHER
THE ROYAL BANK OF
IANADA, FREEPORT, Grena
hama requires the services of
an experienced stenographer.
Applicants should have at least
G.C.E. in English Language and
be high school graduates.
Shorthand speed of 100 words
per minute and typing speed of
80 words per minute.
Bahamians only. Apply in
writing to The Assistant
Manager/Administration, P. 0.
Box F61, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, or call for an
appointment at telephone
352-6631.


C8588
BLACKSMITH
hooves and clip
3-1313.


to attend
pony. Call


C8587
DAILY MAID WANTED -- 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 3-1313.
C8594
2 BAHAMIAN Handymen and
garden workers. References
and experience.
Apply: Deal's, P. 0. Box 1548,
Nassau or telephone 2-4656.

TRADE SERVICES
C8515
HOUSE PLANS..
...alterations, additions, walls,
etc., drawn to suit you. Low'
rates. Free Estimates.
call
Evangelos Zervos
Telephone 2-2633
C8102
AFTER CHRISTMAS MESS?
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCO TEL:51071-2-3-4.
C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.
C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300'
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.
C8279

Plader's Custolems

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGQAENTS
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEFL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES

CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2.3797, 2.3798
Airport 77434


ELP WANTED
C7076
HOSTESSES
Large and expanding real estate.
company needs three hostesses
to co-ordinate between
adm inistrative staff and
prospective clients Only
attractive young women of
pleasant personality plus a
sound knowledge of Freeport
and the Bahamas need apply.
Good salaries and
opportunities for suitable
applicants who will undergo a
two week training course.
For interviews telephone
FIRST ATLANTIC REALTY
LIMITED AT 352-7411,
extension 125.
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accquntants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid- excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. 0. BoN F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.'

C7082
TIRE REPAIRMAN, MUST
BE ABLE TO WORK ON OWN
INITIATIVE. CALL 352-5267.


C8572
CURRENT ACCOUNTS
OFFICER-IN-CHARGE
THE ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA, Freeport, Grand
Bahama requires an
Officer-in-charge of Current
Accounts Department.
Applicants must be familiar
with the operation of a current
accounts department and have
considerable experience.
Bahamians ohly.
Apply in writing to the
Assistant Manager/Adminis-
tration. The Royal Bank of
Canada, P. 0. Box FP61,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, or
call for an appointment at
telephone 352-6631.


HELP WANTED
C6987
LAND DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY based in Freeport
with international sales
operation requires d
GENERAL MANAGER
Previous experience in land
development/real estate
industry essential. Position
carries overall control of
accounting, engineering,
administrative, lot control,
customer service and sales
functions, including the
initiation of sales programmes
and liaison with real
estate brokers in U.S.,
Bahamas and elsewhere,
Knowledge of U.S. land sales
regulatory requirements and
computerised accounting
systems desirable.
Salary commensurate with
qualifications and experience.
Application in writing, with
career resumes, should be sent
to: Managin3 Director,
Tamarind Developments
(Grand Bahama) Limited, P. 0.
Box F-614. Freeport Grand
Bahama.
C7079
Micoperi SPA has the following
job opportunities available for
construction of a new jetty at
BORCO REFINERY in
Freeport:
Radiography Technicians Metal
First Class Certified API
Standard 1104 or equivalent
Welders
Chief Certified API Standard
1104 or equivalent Welders
Welder Helpers
AIf work to be carried out
offshore and on board of
barges in the vicinity of the
already existing refinery jetties.
Applicants must have previous
experience in offshore work
and be specialized in the above
positions. Work shall start in
March 1973 and the estimated
duration of the project is from
2-3 months.
Only Bahamians need apply.
Please apply in writing to:
Micoperl SPA, P. 0. Box
F.2409. Freeoort.


I AND BAHAMA
JI1 FREEPORTTEL 352-660


-El


I


-L T. -


No ON


___a I


In-


I












Thursday, January 25. 1973.


Wht 'Wribunt


I ELP WANTED

C7085
ATTRACTIVE GIRL PIANIST
- who sings, and reads music.
Apply to PEARLE
SOLOMON, HOLIDAY INN,
1P. 0. Box F-760, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA. 373-1333
extension 85.
C8574
FIRST NATIONAL
CITY BANK
Requires for its Mortgage and
Real Estate Group in Freeport
an Executive Secretary with
good educational background,
typing and shorthand skills,
knowledge of mortgage loans,
real estate, conveyancing and
title research would be an
advantage. Apply Misselbrook
Mortgage Department, P. 0.
Box F-2681, Telephone No.
352-6741 for an appointment.

C8573
FIRST NATIONAL
CITY BANK
Requires for its Mortgage and
Real Estate Group in Freeport
a Mortgage Loan
Administration Assistant.
Successful candidate should
have good educational
background and preferably
experience in mortgage
banking, finance, real estate
and accounting and collections.
Full training programme
available for younger career
minded applicant. Interested
parties should send curriculum
vitae Estate Group, P. 0. Box
F-2681, Freeport, Grand
Bahama or telephone
Misselbrook Freeport
352-6741 for an appointment.

C7075
REAL ESTATE
SALESMEN
Rewarding and exciting
opportunity for sales people
with one of Freeport's largest
and expanding real estate
companies. Applicants should
be qualified to meet regulatory
requirements of the
Freeport/Lucaya Real Estate
Board. Ownership of own
automobile an asset.
Apply to First Atlantic Realty
Ltd., Phone 352-7411.

C7083
UTILITY MAN/PORTER:
Must keep kitchen clean, food
store room clean, pantry and
staff cafeteria clean.
(8) GARDENERS: Must be
willing to work outside all day
and keep grounds clean; must
be willing to keep lawns and
9ther grounds in good order.
LAUNDRY MACHINE
OPERATOR: Must be an
experienced laundry machines
operator, familiar with the
operation of all the machines
In the Laundry Department.
(4) KITCHEN PORTERS:
Must clean kitchen and area
around garbage bins.
1(3) POT WASHERS/
PORTERS: Must clean pots
and pans in Kitchen; Must
clean Kitchen.
CABINET MAKER: Must be a
fully experienced Cabinet
Maker with at least three years
experience in this field.
For all of the above, please
contact MISS .STAFFORD,
HOLIDAY INN, P. 0. BOX
F-760, FREEPORT,
BAHAMAS. 373-1333.


NELP MNTED
C7080
Compilation Department
Manager for telephone
directory publisher. Must have
prior experience with directory
compilation procedures used in
the industry, be able to train
and supervise directory clerks
and co-ordinate with printer in
United States.
Apply to General Manager,
West Indies Telephone Service
Company, Box F-2478,
Freeport, Bahamas or in person
to 2C Kipling Building,
Freeport.

C7088
BUS DRIVER/MESSENGER
- Candidate must hold clean
driver's licence. Must keep
vehicle clean and see to routine
maintenance. Work day starts
at 7:30 a.m., ends at 6 p.m. In
addition must transport people
to and from Harbour at change
of shifts at midnight. Driver
fully responsible to take people
to Harbour in mornings, to and
from lunch and home in
evening on time. Collects,
transports mails and goods.
Dependability absolute
necessity.
3 LINESMAN/GROUNDS-
MAN/CLEANER Must clean
and weed outdoor areas and
indoor including washrooms
and toilets. Handles ships lines
in docking and casting off.
Must be available for night
calls.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority Limited, P. 0.
Box F-2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7086
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT Individual will
be responsible to the Assistant
Division Manager who is
responsible for all landscaping,
janitorial, property
management and maintenance
activities for a group of
Companies. The Applicant will
also be responsible for the
general administration of the
department which includes
enquiries and complaints,
accurate typing and shorthand,
good English grammar and
efficient in filing. Successful
candidate should also have
knowledge about payroll time
sheets and costing. It is
incumbent that the individual
have a minimum of five years
experience in general office
procedures and secretarial
work.
IRRIGATION MAN -
Applicant must have.
knowledge -of and experience
with irrigation of golf courses
or related agriculture.
Irrigation knowledge must
include being familiar with
pipe routing, water
conservation, hydraulics and
soil-water relationships. Should
also be able to make any
repairs on an irrigation system
including pipe cementing and
splicing.
SPRAY MAN Applicant
must have knowledge of and
experience with handling,
preparation and application of
various dangerous chemicals
used on golf course grasses.
Must also have knowledge of
chemical characteristics and
compatibilities.
Apply to: Devco Personnel,
Box F-2666 or 18C Kipling
Bldg. Freeport, GBI.


Rupert and the Ninky Toys-4


Leaving the cowboy helper
to wait behind the bush, Rupert
scampers Indoors. Please
Mummy I" he pants. Do you
still have that pattern of
Ninky?" Mrs. Bear has to
gather her thoughts. I beHeve
'a among my sewing things
in that chest of drawers," the
says. Rupert searches hurriedly
ALL RIGHTS


and soon finds a sheet of
paper with shapes on it. This
must be it, Mummy," he says.
"May Santa borrow it ? Lots
of children want Mnky toys
this Christmas. but he can't get
them made without the pat-
tern," "I.ee," says Mrs. Bear
faintly. "Well I suppose--
yes, of course he may have it."
RESERVED


*~t rM tW~dI/IO~ iN 'W~ Ki~I4IN M~WlL~ !


CARROLL RIGHTER'S



from the Cafl RRitr Insthuts
GENERAL TENDENCIES: A day to take time
out to get the answers for which you have been
searching by investigating all phases of whatever activities that
are vital to your progress. Show devotion to those close to
you Avoid being too preoccupied with your own affairs.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr 19) Use tact in making collections
and then pay your bills that are pressing. Don't judge your
mate harshly, but give credit where credit is due. Avoid one
who doesn't appreciate you as you deserve.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Listen carefully to what
associates have to say and cooperate with them instead of
being so self-opinionated One who opposes you should be
avoided. A kinder attitude toward mate is wise.
GEMINI (May to June 21) Start working on those tasks
ahead of you instead of running off on some tangent. Take the
health treatments you need and stop putting them off. Take it
easy tonight. Take care of correspondence.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Although fun is
on your mind, be sure to handle obligations that are
important. You can enjoy recreations later in the day. Show
patience with mate at this time. Plan to save more money.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You have to be kind and gentle at
home or much trouble could ensue there before the day is
over. Don't rake up old coals and all is fine. Plan time to
arrange the future better. Relax tonight.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Much care in motion must be
exercised now or you could get into a great deal of trouble. A
kind word will turn away wrath. Don't jeopardize the
friendship of persons who mean much to you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You may think that money
can buy you anything youwhat, but this is not the case. Use
ethical methods in business dealings and be happier. A
financial expert can give you advice on handling a problem.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You have good ideas but
others are not in the mood to listen to them now, so wait for a
better time to express yourself. Take time to make yourself
look more attractive. More study is wise.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You may think you
have too many responsibilities, but you can easily handle them
and should do so now. You can also lend a helping hand to
others with their problems. Have a happy evening.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Make sure an opponent
does not try to force you into a situation you don't like. Show
that you have willpower. If you cannot be cheerful, sidestep a
social invitation, otherwise go and have fun.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Make sure you use more
than regular care in handling credit, vocational and business
affairs or bigwigs will surely criticize you. Show that you are
conscientious. Don't be harsh on others.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Study a new plan you want to
put in operation and get rid of the bugs in it. Avoid loss this
way. A new ally can give you the right pointers and help you
become more successful with this plan.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. .. he or she will be
one of those young people with much determination to get
things done and can have much success in life, provided you
teach fine ethics and give good religious background. Expose
to the finest types of individuals, otherwise the wrong kind of
people could be harmful to your progeny. A fine citizen here
who will be a real inspiration to others in the community.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Winning

Bridge

bridge. culminating In the
utnday Times International
Pairs. the most exclusive event
in the world. The most exclu-
sive socially, starting on 17th
January, is tre ~t. Moritz
tournament held in four of the
most luxurious hotels in Europe.
Several leading London p ayers
will be there, among tiem
George Lengyel, former Dutch
international, now a regular at
the Eccentric. Here is Lengyel
in lest year's tournament.
Dealer West: Love All.
North
4 A QJ 9 7
V 6
V 62
S6 !0 6 2
West East
85 43 3 10 6
V A 10 4 3 K


0 5
4K 7 3


0 K Q J 10 9 3
3 4 A 9 8 4
South
SK 2
8QJ98762
S J 5


West North East South
Pas 14+ Dble 20
Pass Pass 30 30
DbMe
West led the 07 and six
possible losers came into view-
a diamond, two clubs and three
trumps. Lengyel, South, went up
with the 0OA and continued witn
three top spades. East ruffed
with his VK and Lengyel shed
the 08. Next came the OK, and
thinking ahead, declarer ruffed
with the 9&
Now came the lowly 0(2. With
only the 95 on view West
wouldn't waste an honour and
suddenly a precious entry
appeared in dum ny. A club was
parted on theaj and another
n ahe 49. west ruffed and
scored his OA. Lengyel didn't
try to talk him out af thAt


Chess














T. K. Hemngwy (Black, to
move) won the Ha Samer 60
brlUany prize a the evening
andard London Open by an
elegant finish fsm te diagra
po= aon gatnst Jona n Sp-
man. What did Black play, and
how did the game end?
Par timtnes: 10 aeconwis, chess
master; 30 seconds, oM expert:
1 minute, county standard; 2
minutes, club a th; 5 min-
utes. verge; '10 minutes, nov-
ice.
SOLUTION NO 9866 -

Chess Solution
1...Kt-.Q7 dis chl; 2 P-B3,
Kt-K5l and White resigned. II
B x R mate, or if3 Rx B. Kt-B7
3 P xKt. BxP ch; 4 R-B3.
mate, or if 3 R-KBI. Kt xR
wins.


*


-- OW tman least one eight-letter word In
Swords of the ist. No plurals; no forelxn
T ou*r letters worAs; no Pnd er name..
Sor more can TODAT'S T OI : words.
you make good : 47 words. ery good: .5
L fro Im t h e words. excellent. Solution on
letters shown Monday.
Sphere? In
m a k in a VESTIDAT'S SOLUTION :
Sword each Filth filthy firth fitly flirt flirty
r |IE N letter m a flit fort forty fruit frith
he used once froth OT frothy hill
only. E ac h holt hot y lift oft lofty lth
word must contain the large rift rfty riot ryot iro loll trio
letter, and there must lie at troy t.vro.




riH,, Make Iou %er. C('OSS-word. The one with no nuimi ers
and except for the nrat In each section, no order to the clues.
(ON HINT : The tnree-letter word Is the one to help vou today
Siulihi on MoniIIIv.


a i i I I i I I I


Clues Aeross
Wholalse slanuhter. (9)
Colour. (4)
Bargain. (9)
Insane. (3)
Rtuplan name. (4)


Stay. (6) russle (.5
Water vessels. (0)
(Irl'r name. (4)
Clanger. (4)
Ixging animal. (4)
Three or four In a year. (5)
Clues Down
Knowledge after the event tI)l
Alcoholic drink. (5. 4)
shark-lnfepted sea. (6)
Above. (4) WeaDons. (9)
Without dis-
sent. (9) AL N
sut r f are.


Io.td. ( d Ma6)I
T h evi t N A
FI n t er-ln.
(5) re(*rAi's 0tties


Ii 31we Comic Pale


REX MORGAN, M.D.

I LONGT
FOR A OUY WHO'S JUST SEEN RELEASED HE9 E
FROM THE HOSPITAL, U'RE REALLY SHOOT
SWINWING, AREN'T YOU, CHAMP IT' fr TMORI
ALMOST FOUR IN THE
MON NAco ,


I JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS]

-WITHOUT HER BUT SHE TOLD BOTH ABBEY AND ME NO, BECAUSE SHE'S IN OTHER WORDS,
WHAT WOULD BE THE \ HUSBAND'S THAT SHE WAS AFRAID OF HER AMNESIC... DOESN'T WHATEVER SHE
COURT'S ATTITUDE IF I APPROVAL? HUSBAND... THAT'S REMEMBER ANYTHING FEARED BEFORE
ASKED A PSYCHIATRIST I WOULD WHY SHE LEFT HIM! DOES SHE PRIOR TO THE THE ACCIDENT, SHE
TO SEE LYNN FROWN ON STILL TELL ACCIDENT! NO LONGER FEARS!
SILVESTER? IT, SAM! YOU THAT ?












APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotxec

| SV R ER APPR. SCOTT MILES SAID HE'D KEEP US INFORMEr!

Mi j DISTANCE CALL TO BRYAN'S RENTS!













SSTEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


r_-


By DAL CURTIS


I



































































I


Although threatened with
accurate shooting from Ilarry
Woodside who came on in the
fourth quarter after being
benched with four fouls and
scored 13 of his 15, and Kevin
Rolle who carried a strong
offensive tackle, the strength
of Rahming, Bennett Davis.
Bernard Davis and Charles
Green proved too much for
Sweeting High who yesterday
drooped their second in three
games. It was Aquinas' fourth
win.
Aquinas playing a two one
two zone defence opened a
16-6 lead with a little over one
minute remaining in the first
quarter. Ben Davis who was
then working into foul
territory with three fouls was
substituted by Frank Young.
Raymond culmer later came in
for Danny Edgecombe.
Although Aquinas slackened
their defence a bit, Rahming
was still strong and gave them a
17-10 first quarter lead.
C. C: Sweeting High
adopting the whole court press
in the second quarter got a
momentary control of Aquinas
who by then was just beginning
to pickup the range of the
court. Holding the Aces to two
points for four minutes Harry
Woodside, Danny Stubbs and
Kevin Rolle moved C. C.


Sweeting to a 19 all tit' with
I 30 in the quarter.
BOOST FROM COACH'
However, a boost from
coach Gerry Harper saw
Aquinas retaliate to gain a
25-19 second auarter lead.
Coach Harper returning Ben
Davis. Bern iDavis. Rahming,
Green and I'dgecombe to the
court saw them moving the ball
effectively as they opened a
ten point lead (29-19) early in
the third quarter. Paced by
Rahming, who scored ten
points in that quarter, Aquinas
allowed C. C. Sweeting only
eight points while they went
on to dump in 24, pushing
them 47-26 in command. Rolle
scored Sweeting's eight.
Woodside, who was
substituted for earlier in the
game with four fouls, came on
and teamed up with Rolle to
wage war against Aquinas.
lHowever, Aquinas proved to
be no amateurs as they
continued to maintain their 20
point icead (62-42) in spite of
Woodside's accuracy as the
game approached it's final.
moments.
Sweeting High's efforts were
only enough to break the 20
point lead to 18 as Alfred
Walkes and Danny Edgecombe
finished them off with the final
baskets.


NORA ALBURY (33) OF PRINCE WILLIAMS HIGH
steadies for a field goal attempt while Aquinas' Janet
Duncombe moves in for the attack. Aquinas won 50-26.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


WARREN SPAN ELECTED

TO BASEBALL HALL OF FAME

NEW YORK (AP) Stylish Braves' left-hander Warren Spahn,
winner of 363 major league games, scored "the greatest victory of
my life" Wednesday by being elected to the Baseball Hall of
Fame.
'This is the epitome," he Hall of fame was delayed by


said.
Spahn was a landslide
choice, named on 316 of 380
ballots of the Baseball Wrtiers
Association of America. He
had 20 triumphs 13 different
seasons and is the winningest
southpaw in history.
A 75 per cent vote is
required for enshrinement at
the Baseball Hall in
Coopertown, New York, and
the 51-year-old Spahn had 83
per cent.
Whitey Ford, onetime clutch
lefty of the New York
Yankees, came close in his first
shot at the Hall with 67 per
cent. He got 255 votes and a
total of 284 was required.
Spahn's first chance at the


two seasons due to his brief
appearances in the Mexican
League in 1966 and with Tulsa
of the Pacific Coast League in
1967.
Ralph Kiner was a high
also-ran for the fourth straight
time. The ex-Pittsburgh home
run king had 235 votes the
same as last year and was
next behind Ford.
The late Gil Hodges, former
Dodger first baseman and
manager of the New York
Mets, was fourth with 218 and
Robin Roberts, a 20-game
winner six straight years for
the Philadelphia Phillies, was
fifth with 213 in his first shot
at the Hall.


Rahming scored a game high
of 25 points for the Aces with
Bernard Davis and Danny
Edgecombe adding 15 and 11
respectively.
Rolle topped C. C. Sweeting
with 21 points and Woodside
had 15.

The Aces' loss proved to be
St. John's College's gain as
former Aquinas Aces' guard
Prince Hepburn joined S. J. C.
yesterday and scored 19 points
to lead them to a 69-56 victory
over Government High School,
who as a result dropped their
fourth consecutive game.
S.J.C., starting without their
big forward Andrew Albury
and star' guard Ronald
Johnson, took an early 12-1
lead with Dexter Rolle
controlling the ball and setting
up the plays. However,
forward Robert Scott trying to
stop David Cleare. picked up
his first foul and Cleare scored
one of two free throws. From
there, (;.IH.S. rallied to a 15 all
tie but could not sustain their
thrust as S.J.C. came back to
take a 18-17 first quarter lead.
CONTROLLED GAMi
Johnson and Albury then
came on in the second quarter
to strengthen St. John's attack
and with Johnson controlling
the game, Albury and Sawyer
on the rebound, llepburn and
Rolle worked the fast break
and S.JC. increased their lead
37-28 by the end of the second
quarter. David Cleare held
G.II.S. together with six points
in that quarter.
Both sides in the third and
fourth quarter used the full
court press and although St.
John's slowed down the pace
in the fourth quarter, they
controlled the better part of
the game to win.
Accompanying Hepburn's
19, Andrew Albury scored 16,
Dexter Rolle dropped in 12
and Ronald Johnson scored 11.
David Cleare the backbone
for G.H.S. got a game high of
27 points while Eardley Moss
had 15.

The rookie team of the
Eastern Division L. W. Young
High after surprising
R.M.Bailey High with a 29-22
first half lead which they
held going into the third
quarter, lapsed in their defence
as Bailey High came through to
win 58-41 and their second in
three played.
"I was really pleased with
the team," commented coach
Brian Scrowcroft. "They really
began to play team ball."
Paced by Roger Brown and
Gregory Trotman with 17 and
14 points respectively, L. W.
Young controlled a 13-12 first
quarter edge before increasing
in 29-22 for the second
quarter.
Half way through the last
quarter, Bailey High took
advantage of a tiring L. W.
Young to win.
"I felt we were going to get
a real thrashing, but they really
surprised me," said Mr.
Scroweroft, who commended
forwards Leroy Whylly and
Greg Trotman for their great
defensive plays. "Whylly played
his best game in defence I've
ever seen him play," said Mr.
Scrowcroft. "Trotman played
well also."
James Clark top-scored for
Bailey Hligh with 14.
L. W. Young play their next
game on Monday against
Queen's College (1-2) and
"look out Q.C., we're coming,"
warned the coach.
MARK SPITZ TOPS
NEW YORK--Olympic swimming
champion Mark Spitz was the
overwhelming winner of the
Associated Press award as the
"Outstanding World Male Athlete
..-.,mmm--ma of 1972."


mSandy Torres says he's ready


10



Aquinas Aces win their 4th. in a



row, while Government Hieh



School lose their 4th. in a row

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
IT WAS A GOOD IDEA that coach Rodney Johnson of C. C. Sweeting High which does not
have a home court decided not to play their home game at Aquinas' Garfunkel Auditorium but at
the Queen Elizabeth Sport Centre. And yet, Aquinas College Aces overcame a shaky first half start
and, paced by captain Clifford Rahming's 16 points in the second half, outscored C. C. Sweeting
44-32 and won 69-51 overall preserving their unbeaten record.


ON SATURDAY, Nassau's
top amateur and professional
tennis players will meet to
compete in Nassau's first ever
pro-am tourney at the
Montagu Beach Hotel courts.
The organizer of the
tournament is Bradley
Demeritte, 22, who has been
the resident pro at the
Montagu for the last ten
months Saturday's tourney,
the Montagu Beach pro-Am
Tennis Championship, will be
Demeritte 's second
tournament.
The players who will be
battling for the $150 first prize
and the $80 runner's-up prize
are as follows; Fritz Schunk
(No. I) Leo Rolle (No. 2 Seed)
Bertram Knowles (No. 3 seed)
Robert lsaacs, Larry Rolle,
Bradley Demeritte, Felix Rolle,
Al Smith, Barry Farrington and
William Lifford.
Sponsors for the Tourney
are, Sidney Poiter star
Bahamian actor, Mr. Percy
Munnings and the Three
Queens Restaurant, Wulff
Road. The tourney will start at
11 a.m. on Saturday and the
final will be played at 3 p.m.
on Sunday.

NcALPINE CLASSIC

THIS SUNDAY
THIS SUNDAY the big guns
of Bahamian golf will meet for
the first time this season at the
Coral Harbour Golf Club where
they will battle for the
McAlpine Classic.
No doubt popular top
golfers such as Bob Slatter, Jim
Duncombe, Charles Saunders,
Basil Smith and others will be
eager to capture the McAlpine
Classic Title which is the first
BGA tournament for Hoerman
Cup points this season.
The tourney was won last
year by Bob Slatter when he
set a blistering pace at the
South Ocean Golf Club to
record a one-under-par 71 for a
5 stroke victory over Audnel
Clarke who finished with a 76.
Members wishing to enter
the tourney should give in their
names at either the Blue Hill,
Paradise, South Ocean or Coral
Harbour Golf clubs or
alternately by contacting
members of the tournament
committee.

CAR CLUB

AUTOTESTS
AN AUTOTEST meeting wa
held on Sunday, January 21 by the
Bahamas Racing & SPorts Car Club
in the car park of Quality
Supermarket, Village Road.
Results were as follows: Michael
Dillett (Mini) 140.2 seconds;
Michael Ballard (Spitfire) 146.4
seconds: Nick Wardle (M.G. Midget)
- 158.1 seconds: Barbara Ballard0
(Spitfire) 187.4 seconds; John
Owen (M.G.B.) 197.0 seconds;
Beth Bridges (Mini) 214.6
seconds: John Owen (Morris) -
223.3 seconds: Richard Kimble
(M.G.B.) 232.8 seconds; Robin
Bolton (V.W.) 237.0 seconds;
Ray Bridges (Mini) 253.3
seconds; Mavis Owen (Morris) -
322.8 seconds: Denise Kimble
(M.G.B.) 375.1 seconds.


BAHAMAS AMERICAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE Association
president Jeff Williams, announced today that following a request
by a delegation of Stingrays players yesterday, the deadline date
of January 24, set by the Association for the paying of a $5 fine
by each member of the Stingray team, has now been extended to
Tuesday, February 6.
The $5 fine was levied on the Stingrays team following their
walk out during the Crawfish Bowl game against the BAFL
Champions, the Nassau Jets, played last year at the Q. E. Sports
Centre, on December 31.
At that time the Association stated that, "any player who
elects not to pay this fine of $5 on or before January 24 will
automatically be suspended indefinitely from participating in any
official capacity, in Association sanctioned games."
Mr. Williams said that the Association had taken the Stingrays'
request into consideration because the Stingrays had allegedly not
yet had sufficient time to call a meeting between the player's
concerning the $5 fine.
Subsequently the deadline date for the fine had now been
extended to Tuesday February 6, when the BAFI Association will
hold a meeting to elect the BAFL officers for the coming season.


INDIA 113 FOR
KANPUR, INDIA, Jan. 25 (AP)
With a 2-1 lead in the Test series,
India made 51 runs for no loss by
the lunch interval Thursday in their
Fourth Test played in the Green
Park here. Att they were 113 for
two.
India won the toss and decided
to bat. This was the third time
skipper Ajit Wadekar had won the
toss. He won it in Delhi and
Calcutta but lost it in Madras.
He sent Sunil Gavaskar and
Chetan Chauhan to open the
innings. They were at 34 and 14
respectively at lunch. This Indian
score is the highest opening score in
the present test series.
English skipper Tony Lewis
began with Geoff Arnold and Chris
Old, but finding them not
successful he brought on Tony
Greig and Derek Underwood. As a
tast resort, just before lunch he
brought on Norman Gifford as his


2 AT TEA
last hope. But he too could not
topple the openers,
Gavaskar played a cautious game
and his runs included six
boundaries. He completed his
1,000th run in Test cricket when he
hit 22 today. Chauhlan was giving a
helping hand to his more aggressive
partner.
India's only change was to take
in Abid Ali in place of Salim
Durrani, who was dropped for
medical reasons.
But England made some drastic
changes. Off-spinner Pat Pocock
had to fly home to attend his
father's funeral, opening batsman
Barry Wood became 12th man and
the other opening batsman Dennis
Amiss was dropped.
England broke through after
lunch dismissing the opening
batsmen.
The successful bowlers were


I


PUBLIC NOTICE


As the usual annual outbreaks of canine distemper
have appeared much earlier this year all dbg-owners will
be well advised to consult their veterinarians regarding
booster shots against this disease.
All puppies over 7 weeks of age should be done as
soon as possible.

THIS IS A COMMUNITY SERVICE
ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE BAHAMAS HUMANE
SOCIETY.




BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST

WILDLIFE FILM SHOW
Saturday Jan27th. -8p.m.
Teacher's Training College Auditorium
OAKES FIELD
Featuring
IINHERIT THE WIND'
Audibon Lecturer D. J. Nelson
ADMISSION:
Adults20 Children 100
(Children who are Bahamas National
Trust Members Admission 50c.)


Underwood, and.Norman Birkenshaw


I MAKE A CONICIOUSI
My IlQUtDEa'
WNS N tuNINS UP
"< tu


AT IMPACT



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MARTELL


the great cognac brandy


IMPORTED AND DISTRIBUTED BY

3BA-XA.MAS BLETDJME3DRS L.II''3TE


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.......~ '


Thursday, January 25, 1973.


U


i /









BRADLEY DEMERITTE (left) smiles happily as Stanford Culmer, manager of the
Three Queens Restaurant Wulff Road, presents him with a cheque to help sponsor the
Montagu Pro-Am Tennis Championship, which will be played at the Montagu Beach Hotel
courts on Saturday. Other sponsors for the tourney are star Bahamian actor Sydney
Poitier and Mr. Percy Munnings.

FIRST EVER Stingrays' request for

PRO-AURNEY HER TENNIS to

TOURNEY HERE extension granted to Feb.6


for Elisha Obed tomorrow
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
"WE CAME ALL THE WAY OVER HERE and we will do our
best to carry the decision back to Puerto Rico," assured Johnny
Moran trainer/manager of Puerto Rican middleweight Sandy
Torres who arrived in Nassau yesterday for his scheduled
ten-rounder against Bahamas welterweight champ Elisha Obed
tomorrow night at the Nassau Stadium. "But win or lose, we
hope to put up a good fight," he added.
Torres, 21 weighing 152 division as this is his first bout
pounds is a former amateur in that division.
lightweight champ of Puerto "He is consistent in his
Rico. Torres started his boxing efforts," said Moran "he is a
career five years ago in the good boxer with long arms and
amateur division where he won good left jabs."
seven of his eight fights. "Most of my fights were
Moving into the professional very important to me," said
division in 1968 and still in the Torres, speaking through his
light weight division, Torres manager/trainer, "but the best
chalked up three wins before fight I had was when I knocked
losing his first one to Miamian out K.O. Kid of St. Thomas."
Joe Cartwright in Miami. "lie K. 0. Kid was the welterweight
was supposed to fight six champ of St. Thomas. "I feel
rounds and he only trained for great and confident of a win,"
six rounds and they changed it Torres added.
to ten rounds," explained Obed who will be making his
Moran. "They stopped the second appearance in the
fight because he (Torres) was middleweight division since
tired." defeating Philadelphia's Joe
Torres in 1970 moved into Hooks late last year arrived in
the welter weight division Nassau yesterday from Miami
where he had 13 fights losing where he was undergoing
only one on a split decision to extensive training under trainer
Puerto Rico's Tony Garcia. Moe Fleischer.
"Garcia is a good man," The event which starts at
commented Maron, "I know 8:45 will pit the new
him well." heavyweight sensational Bob
Like Obed, Torres is a Freeze against Sherwin
rookie in the middleweight Johnson in the semi-final.
M EM =


Whr Gribug