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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03246
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 15, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03246

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4 POWERFUL JET-PROP ENGINES
ARE MORE RELIABLE THAN 2.
--TELEPHONE 77303/77778-- |


c1u


(Regisoed wtth Potmaster of ahamM for postage conco within the ahama.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


'MINISTRY HAS OVERBUILT IN PRIMARY AREA &

UNDERBUILT IN SECONDARY AREA,' UNION CHARGES





No secondary schools





built in past 3


years causes


problem


By NICKI KELLY
BAD MANAGEMENT BY THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, resulting in over-construction in the primary
school level and under-construction in the secondary area has been blamed by the Bahamas Teachers Union for the


present space crisis being faced by the Ministry.
Calling a press conference accommodate both schools
Friday to explain its objections full-time, but the Education's
to a four-hour shift system for Management Section had not
students of still-unbuilt L. W. done everything it could to
Young junior high and C. 1. resolve the problem.
Gibson High, the union said it The 650 students of L. W.
was convinced the necessary Young are presently divided
space was available to between the auditoriums of C.


I. Gibson and Donald Davis
secondary.
Recommendations made
both to the Ministry and the
Minister to alleviate the
problems have thus far been
ignored, union president C. N.
Curling said.


'Welfare of students being trampled'



say fired Prince Williams Baptist



High teachers to school board

By MIKE LOTHIAN
ONLY THE STUDENTS AT PRINCE WILLIAMS High will suffer as a result of the school
board's decision to fire the entire teaching Staff on April 10.


4TH. TRAFFIC

DEATH OF YEAR
THERE was a road death at
Cat Island over the weekend,
police sources confirmed
today, but no details are
expected to be available until
the return to Nassau of a
traffic branch investigating
team which left for Cat Island
at 2 p.m. today.
The death brings to four the
number of persons who have
died in road accidents in the
Bahamas since the start of
1973 only two weeks ago.
There have been two deaths
from road accidents in New
Providence, one in Eleuthera
and the fourth, reportedly
occurring early Sunday, at Cat
Island.

Union come to aid

of teacher's widow
THE Bahamas Teachers'
Union last week presented a
cheque for one hundred
pounds to the widow of
26-year-old expatriate teacher
Brian Healey, who died
January 8 as the result of a
traffic accident at Eleuthera.
His widow returned to the
United Kingdom Friday
evening.
Mr. Healey was assigned by
the Ministry of Education to
the Secondary School at Alice
Town, Eleuthera.
SEND DONATION
TO HEART FUND
THE FAMILY of Hobby
Horse Race Track owner
Stanley (Jimmie)
Silberman, who died of a heart
attack in Miami on Friday, has
requested that anyone who had
intended to send flowers to his
funeral instead send a donation
to the Sir Victor Sassoon
(Bahamas) Heart Foundation
Funeral services for Mr.
Silberman were held in
Baltimore, Maryland, on
Sunday.
TEACHERS UNION
MEETING WEDNESDAY
A GENERAL meeting of the
Bahamas Teachers' Union will
be held 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
at the Teachers' College.


This was the opinion of
some of the school's fired
teachers. *
"The dismissal of the entire
teaching staff comes at a time
when approximately 30
percent of the student body is
preparing for (G.C.E.)
examinations in the next six
months," some of the teachers
said in a press release issue late
Sunday.
"This action and its timing
would undoubtedly hinder the
progress and development of
the students, and adversely
affects their chances of passing
the examinations.
"This key point clear as it
is was completely ignored by
the Board of Governors. The
welfare of the students is being
trampled and they would pay
the price for the rest of their
lives," the released warned.
The teachers said "the
recent appearance of accurate
but incomplete information in
the press with respect to the
dismissal of all staff, including
the headmaster, has created an
atmosphere of uncertainty and
anxiety among the students."
The teachers felt it was
necessary "to inform the
public generally and parents in
particular about recent events
at the school."
CRITICAL
The press release was
severely critical of the
chairman of the school board,
Mr. Artemus Cox. Mr. Cox was
in a meeting at the Finance
Ministry, where he is a budget
officer, all morning and could
not be contacted this morning.
Messages to call The Tribune
were left with his secretary,
but he did not return the calls.
The teacher ters' press release
said that Mr. Cox called a staff
meeting on Wednesday when
theteache ers were informed
that the Bahamas Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention, owner of the
school, was exercising its
contractual option to give all
teachers three months notice
of dismissal.
During the three months
teachers would be able to
inform the board whether they
were willing to enter into a
new contract, the terms of
which are not known.
Yesterday's press release said
Mr. Cox was asked for an
explanation of the firings.
"Mr. Cox provided three
reasons." the release said.
"Firstly, he claims that on
one morning seven teachers out
of 20 did not go to devotion, a
service which lasts about five
minutes every morning of
term.
"Secondly, one teacher who


presumably was hired by Mr.
Cox's board had to be
dismissed within two months
for reasons purely personal to
that one teacher.
"Thirdly, teachers did not
stand when Rev. Dr. R. E.
Cooper and Rev. Charles Smith
entered the staff room on the
last day of last term, after
school had been dismissed for
the Christmas vacation."
MEETING
The teachers charged that
Mr. Cox had met with the staff
members who had missed
morning devotion soon after
the incident, "at which time he
admitted that the staff had
never been advised that it was
compulsory to attend.
Furthermore, he assured that
staff that this matter had been
dismissed and would not be
raised again."
As regards the second reason
given by Mr. Cox for the
firings, that one teacher had
had to be fired earlier for
certain personal reasons, the
teachers said "it is our humble
view that it is unethical to
relate the actions of one
teacher to all the teachers.
"With respect to the
incident with Rev. Dr. R. E.
Cooper and Rev. Charles
Smith," the staff released
added, "the teachers have
always shown due respect to
the Baptist Convention of
which Dr. Cooper is
president."
The teachers charged that
the problems that have plagued
the school in recent years
"have all taken place under Mr.
Cox's administration."
NO PROBLEMS
The problems did not arise
when Dr. Cooper was
responsible for the school, they
said.
The teachers said Mr. Cox
"makes it a point to interfere
in the day-to-day affairs of the
school. He goes to great length,
to let everyone know that he is
boss. Even some students now
satirically call him 'god'."
The press release said that
"today, most teachers remain
at the Prince William Hligh
school only out of concern for
the children. We have worked
with these students and feel a
professional and human
obligation towards them. The
staff feels that the action taken
by the board excludes any
consideration of the possible
effects on the student body.
"Only these students would
suffer. Even if the school is
totally re-staffed, the students,
especially those who look
forward to successfully writing
G.C.E. examinations, will be
seriously hampered."


He warned that the
educational system would be
faced with serious problems in
the next year unless the two
new junior high schools,
scheduled originally to open
last September, are not
completed.
The difficulty was, he said,
"that the Ministry has
overbuilt in the primary area
and underbuilt in the
secondary area. In the last
three years no schools have
been built for secondary
education, and that is where
the problem is."
Mr. Curling pointed out that
at the moment the primary
schools were not crowded. One
floor of one such school was
empty and another, the E. P.
Roberts school, was under
construction.
In a letter to Education
Minister Livingston Coakley on
January 2, the union
recommended that the children
from Thatchberry Primary be
transferred to Oriah McPhee
Primary and other Primary
Schools in the area and L. W.
Young allowed to occupy
Thatchberry Primary.
"We are convinced that the
Thatchberry solution is
acceptable and would work,"
union president-elect A. L.
Archer told reporters.
He said the union had not
been given any reason why it
was not practical, except the
fact that the school lacked
certain facilities for teaching
science.
"It doesn't take a fool to see
that there are no facilities in
the auditoriums now being
used by the L. W. Young
students," Mr. Archer acidly
commented.
NO REASON
The Ministry has got
sufficient space to house all the
children and there is no reason
for the problem to have
arisen," Mr. Curling said.
The union has asked
Education Minister Coakley to
"thoroughly investigate" the
existing accommodation in all
the schools. Executive
members said they hoped the
Minister would act upon the
result of the investigation
"even if it means transferring
the head of the Management
Section."
Mr. Curling said that
although the union had not
discussed what action it would
take if there was no
constructive response from the
Ministry, it intended to make
additional representations and
if these failed, would have to
contemplate further action.
Asked concerning the
possible effect on the public
education system should the
Catholic schools be forced to
cut back, Mr. Curling replied
that the Catholic situation
would cause staff problems.
Commenting further on the
mass firing of staff at the
Baptist Prince Williams High
School Mr. Curling said that if
the reports were correct "then
it must mean they intend to
close the school down."
Mr. Archer explained that
none of the teachers at the
school were members of the
union, and therefore the union
had not become involved.
"Unless they approach and ask
for our assistance, we are not
in a position to do anything
about it."
Should the Prince Williams
teachers request assistance, Mr.
Archer said the union would go
to hat for them since Bahamian
children were involved.
Mr. Curling said he could
not understand the "thinking"
behind the dismissals.


Ir ttluu


VOL. LXX, No. 45. Monday, January 15, 1973. Price: I Cents


'um1uII


Miami Fire Chief gets V.I.P. welcome


MIAMI FIRE CHIEF Lawrence Kenny
(second from left) received a surprise V.I.P.
welcome at Nassau International Airport
yesterday from members of Nassau's fire
department. Mr. Kenny, with his wife, (fourth
from left) are here for the National Association
of Uniform Manufacturers' Convention being
held at Paradise Island. "He did so many good
things for us we thought we would return the
courtesy," commented Acting Director of Fire
Services John Sherman. He said Mr. Kenny did
not know the local firemen were coming to the


vA


airpr.rt. Mr. Kenny said he hoped to offer
cour es in fire fighting free to the Bahamas
department in the near future, Mr. Sherman
explained. Mrs. Effie Sherman, 1970 Mother of
the Year, and also Mr. Sherman's mother,
presented Mrs. Kenny with a bouquet of
flowers. Pictured from left are: Mr. Sherman,
Mr. Kenny, Mrs. Thelma Byles of the Ministry
of Tourism; Mrs. Kenny; Sgt. 203 Ivan
Blackman and Mrs. Sherman. Howard Hanna,
the acting fire chief, was on duty and unable to
attend the welcome
photo: Rickey Wells.


Lowell Mortimer, former science



department head, now a barrister

By SIDNEY DORSETT
MR. LOWELL JASON MORTIMER, 29, of Nassau, a former science department head with the
Ministry of Education and Culture. was admitted to the Bahamas Bar this morning.


The ceremonies, presided
over by Chief Justice Sir
Gordon Bryce on the lower
floor of the Law Courts
Building, was attended by
relatives and friends of the
New attorney. Also present
was the Hon. Milo Butler Sr.
Senator Gerald Cash. O.B.E.,
presenting Mr. Mortimer's
petition, said that he asked
without hesitation that the
petition be granted.
Mr. Mortimer, who left the
teaching profession in late
1969 to read law, is a member
of "one of the most respected
and esteemed families in this
Commonwealth," Senator (ash
said.
ie said he knew Mr.
Mortimer to be "a young man
of excellent character and high
integrity."
Mr. Mortimer is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Ulric J. Mortimer,
confectioners of East Street.
tie was admitted to the English
Bar on November 22 of last
year, passing his examinations
after two years of studies.
LINCOLN'S INN
Hte is also a member of
Lincoln's Inn, which he joined
in December 1969 and began
his legal studies in 1970. lie is
also the holder of a B.Sc.
degree in Biology, received at
Bethune-Cookman College of
Daytona Beach, Florida in
August of 1964.
He received his early
education in Nassau at the
Eastern Secondary School and
St. John's College, before
entering St. Paul's College,
Lawrenceville, Virginia, in
1960.
Joining the Ministry of

POLICE PICK UP

76 HAITIANS
SEVENTY-six Haitian
nationals aboard a lHaitian
sloop were intercepted Sunday
afternoon by two police boats
on routine patrol in the Exuma
Cays, a spokesman for the
Police Marine Division
confirmed today.
The spokesman said the
Haitians were intercepted at
about 2 p.m. off Staniel Cay
by police patrol boats Acklins
and San Salvador, and are
being held aboard their vessel
at Staniel Cay.
He said the Immigration
Department was to make
arrangements for a government
tender to pick the Haitians up
at Staniel Cay and transport
them to Nassau.
Just nine days ago, on
January 6, 38 Haitians were
found aboard a sloop in the
Exuma Cays by the police
launch Acklins. They were
being held at the Fox Hill
Prison pending deportation,
and their vessel was
confiscated.


NEW LAWYER Mr. Lowell J. Mortimer taking the
oath from Supreme Court clerk Fred Seymour at his call to
the Bar this morning.


Education and Culture's
teaching staff in October,
1964, he was appointed science
teacher at the Western
Secondary School and was
later transferred to the Eastern
Secondary School to head the
science department there.
Remaining at the Eastern
Secondary School for two
years, he left to study at the
University of the Westlndies,
Mona campus, in 1967.
Sir (ordon in welcoming the
new attorney said that Mr.
Mortimer had obviously not
wasted any time with his
studies as his achievements
bore it out.
PREPARATION
lie said that in nearly all
cases work is done before
coming to court. In preparing
his work. he said it would be
good to keep in mind what the
other attorney is going to say.
"It is a good thing to put
yourself in the position of the
attorney on the other side,"
Ilis Lordship said.
Wishing him success with his
practice, Sir Gordon said he
hoped to see him in court.
'Come frequently." he said.
The lion. Eugene Dupuch,
Q C., welcoming Mr. Mortimer
on behalf of the Inner Bar said
that the attorney'qualifications
as a biologist would be to his
advantage.
Recalling how he himself
attempted to study questions
to ask coroners during
inquests, he said he had
undergone a case of
"retrograde amnesia"
according to the coroner
when, in one instance. he
forgot what he had intended to
say.
Mr Dupuch agreed that the
"'Chief Justice's advice is very
sound about preparing a case."
This was the method used
himself, he said, adding that it
has proven to be
satisfactory."
HONOURED
Mr Dupuch's welcome
preceded that of Senator
Orville Turnquest whose
close relationship with the
family made him feel


"honoured" to welcome the
new attorney.
His admittance "swells the
Outer Bar into the upper 90's.
Each member stands willing to
give his assistance and support"
should Mr. Mortimer need it,
he said.
He also counselled that
despite the large number of
practising attorneys, Mr.
Mortimer can achieve "the
space at the top", which is
open if he "will always use
integrity, industry and
perfection."
As president of the Bahamas
Bar Association, Senator
Turnquest said he wanted the
new attorney to "throw
himself fully into the work
ahead."
A former vice-president of
the Bahamas Association for
Retarded Children, Mr.
Mortimer said in his reply that
"whenever there is a benefit
there is a corresponding
burden. Each Bahamian owes
our nation his duty to do any
job that he undertakes with all
the skill and competence that
he can muster."
PRIDE
Accepting the well wishes of
those welcoming him, he said
he had a considerable degree of
pride, emotion and sentiment
for the ceremonies taking place
this morning.
A member of the law firm of
Iubert Ingraham and
Company newly formed and
operating in chambers once
held by M.P. Loftas Roker,
Mr. Mortimer said that "at this
time in the history of our
nation, one cannot help but be
aware of the changes that our
little nation has undergone, is
presently undergoing and will
inevitably undergo.
"Every Bahamian must be
an integral force in effecting
the changes in our country
by exercising any influence
that he has in any of our
institutions."
Our institutions are not
separate entities and we must
not allow ourselves to be
deluded by this thought, he
said.


YOUTH GROUP

WANT CAPITAL

PUNISHMENT

ABOLISHED

TrIE KEMP ROAD Youth
foi Action have advocated the
abolition of capital punishment
if not completely, then at least
for a trial period.
The subject of capital
punishment, which has heated
advocates on both sides, was
described by the youth group
as "barbaric" and not fitting in
modem society.
In a discussion of the topic
at their last general meeting,
members argued that unlike
the position in other
countries, potential murderers
and murderers in the Bahamas
spring from "broken homes
and the disprivileged few."
This would be borne out by
statistics, they said.
It was also pointed out that
capital punishment had been
abolished in Great Britain and
some parts of the United
States.
Those who favoured the
supreme penalty considered it
a deterring force, although
others countered that the
murder rate has never been
affected.
Further arguments put up
cited the inhumanity of
making the condemned person
endure such a long wait,
especially if there was an
appeal pending.
The youth group felt that all
crimes was a part of society
and that it would always be
present.
'GRAVE INJUSTICE'
While some could be
punished for lesser crimes and
given a chance at
rehabilitation, no such
opportunity was afforded the
murderer. All crimes, it was
said, stemmed from "natural
faults, which no doubt can be
guarded against on second
chance."
When the individual was
executed however, there was
no second chance. The
organization felt this was a
"grave injustice".
Justice, i( was said, was a
matter of chance. Some
escaped murder convictions on
legal technicalities while others
were never caught.
Furthermore execution of
the individual left no room for
reprieve should there be a
miscarriage of justice.
The question of abolishing
capital punishment 1 was
argued from the moral,
religious and legal viewpoint.
One member, in briefly
outlining the history of capital
punishment said the only
difference between modern
and tribal society was that
today the executor took the
place of the bereaved tribal
family.
The Youth Group said it was
"most surprising" that the
Privy Council and the Queen
refused to grant a reprieve in a
recent Bahamian appeal
although there is no capital
punishment for murder in
Britain.


PRIME MINISTER

RAPS YOUTH
THE YOUTH of the
Bahamas as a group are not as
interested in politics as they
might be, Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling said Friday
night, pointing to the fact that
not many 18 and 19-year-olds
voted in the last election as
might have been expected.
Not underestimating their
strength, Mr. Pindling said such
young people could have a
massive effect on the country.
The Prime Minister blamed


their apathy on their having
achieved most of their political
objectives without hc-ing to
put up a fight for them.
He predicted that the next
Parliament and Cabinet would
be even younger than the
present seat holders.

NEW
SWIMWEAR
by
HEINZELMANN
from $14.95


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ENTIRE F MLY"


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2 UtU rribunt


Monday, January 15, 1973.


^Nel...ighights


CURTAILMENT OF BOMBING REPORTED
SAIGON (AP) In an apparent good will gesture during current' I .aice
negotiations, president Nixon is reported to liave ordered a It rtlh r
curtailmnicnt of tile bombing of North Vietnam. llowecver, U.S. soirccs itn
Saigon who reported the move declined to go into specifics.I Ihes also
refused to say if the new orders had gone into effect. (e See stories. this
page).
Nixon had ordered ;a essation of bombing above the 20th paralltil ilt
thle heartland of Nortll Vietnam prior ti, thi resumption of (lie latest
round of Paris talks.
lic U.S. (Commnand says it hias n, comment oi the rcpiort hut it referred
newsmen to its daily communique. I he communique reported that tin
I -52 missions or 30 strikes were flown in the southern panhandle of North
Vietnam during the latest 24 hours reporting period. Ilhati the l west
number of 5-2 missions in the nortll since the start of tlih aerial ilit/ in
Ieclembe r.
JURY ENTERS FOURTH DAY OF DELIBERATIONS.
I AIRI II. I), CA .L1 0(RN1A (All) I Ih I airfield, Calihorniia trial of
.icuLsed mass murderer Juan Corona is to 'noter i', fourth dli r(f itir
dlelilbeiitions Monday, but the deleiidanit remains hi,,ssitali/td siIfflritii
front alin apparent lieart attack.
After a one-day recess Suiday, tihe jury of tell Iniel anid tvwit wtlomien is to
icsincll deliberations in charges that ( otroita fatally hacked aitll ,tabbehhd 25
dilfters and field work.ters and then huried them in t rude gravies.
toris :at the ilt' V availle mt ediat lIfa tilitvy report Coronat i% r
comfortable and suflenirig 1no pain. I l i R t:rolt (Id larll dlioi ii ,ntr li tlr
has si1ftered two previous heart attacks.
IWATERGATE DEFENDANTS UNDER PRESSURE
WASIIIN(GTON (Al') lie Watergate political vsrspioniiae trial 'nt.rs,
;ts second week today will sonic of the rclnaiinng difelndants rrepirtl' lv
under heavy pressure to d irol, out. lhe rig it question today t ciitr's oit thn
intentions fl four Miami area delfendants l 'lo appear toi b .iiiiiie i ( ird
guilty pleas.
lie Washington P'ost Itoday (qItotes sources close t he ticnitl.iants ais
s: ying I.. tlow.irdi Hunt, a delenianti wlio already has pleaded iuilts lias
led the touir tit believe that it fllt'v <1i pCleadt guilt., lileir lanili.s I"wiuld the
tiken' c.ire of."
THREE MONTHS DELAY OF ROYAL BETROTHAL
I.ONDON (AlP) Queen Ili/abeth II has asked tier 22-year-old daughter
l'rincess Anne to wait thlre monlitlis before ainnouncing lher ibetrwrhal it I t.
Mark Phillips, 24 y ear-old cavalry officer and ace horseman, the VWeekly
Nev.;:. i, the World reported Sunda;y.
A Iluckingham I'alace spokesman conllllented "IThi is pure speculati;ton
ori gu'sswork. We have no inforniatii on (ii te matterr"
Anne's friendship with the tall, blonde l'hillips has hit tlie headlines i
'i( week.s. last Motnday the Princess gave hlll two gootldye kisses at the
uay.ilt' Iii llarwrich as lie embarked for \VWt (;'erti,a where lris
1igricetil is statitollt'ed.
P'llhip,,. a gold medallist in the British equestrian tI lam i enl at tl. ;
lMunichi (lympiic games, spent the last two weekends as ;a lose guest ii1
Itht ri \.i rusidtlleci t l Salldringltualn in ;eastern lt.ngland.
I lle News of the World said the (uteeln was surprised whien a previous
tI.e Iriendsllip, "between Anne and Richard Meade. atnotlr dashing
liisellianl, cooled. Ihe Queen wiisas fond of hlimn."
ANNE'S PARENTS TO VISIT PARENTS OF PHILLIPS
I NI)O()N (All) )ueen l lizabttl II and tir liusbandt Iritc I'hilip,
\ ie'l reptirted londay to be likely to visit tie parents til armnl lictitiia'lt
Mark Phillips, the dashing cavalry officer said to be romanticallv linked
vith theliir daughter. Princess Anne.
liet Inattss-circulation Sun Newspaper said tile royal olliiple \ier.
expected tit visit the Phlillips' 16th century tarnllouse lioiiec at (;rei.t
Soinierliird in southwest Ingland when they spend tlhe day at lhie nearby
Royal Air Iforce base at Lynehaini, Junic I5.
hie Sunrt's report came only a Iew da)s after it had beei saitl lit (I)ticern
had asked the 22-ye.ilr-ld princess to \\ait a few Ilontlis before atiiiilouii ii1'
tier engagement to Phillips, 24.
II has been tradition here to make iimembers of tlie royal l;inily lopitiig
to wed go through periods of separation to test their rliilatce. Il Ir Qetn'i
herself was separated from 'rince Philip for three years before tle%) \crrr
permitted to marry.
DELEGATION ON VISIT TO HANOI
TOKY(O (Al) Hanoi's Vietnam News Agency (VNA) reported Suinda:
the arrival in the North Vietnamese capital Saturday of a delegation of thni
Stockhlilni conference on Indochina.
VNA said the delegation included Bertil Jachrisson, then conference
president t. Swedish parliamentarian Ola Ullsten: I.xei Skun, president of tile
Norwegirian ron .and Metal Workers' Union: Italian writer Ilaniero .allr;
and Andrew llrewin, president of the Canadian of the Canadiani (Comiittee
for [Exteriial Relatiolis.
It said the visitors were welcomed by Prot. IHoang Minh Gianm, president
of the Vietnam ('olnmittee for Asian-African Solidarity, and Swedish,'
Ambassador to North Vietnam Oherg Jean Christophe.
PROPOSES MAXIMUM CRIME SENTENCE OF 25 YEARS
WASHINGTON (Al) A National Advisory CommissioIn in a
wide-ranging report Sunday, proposed that the maximum sentences for
crimes except murder he no greater than 25 years.
In addition, thle commissionn proposed that five years he the inaxinmum
felony seCnteCce for any offender who is not fourd to Ire a danger tol
others, except in murder cases.
The 22-inember Commission. after a year-long study, recommllended
what it called a model for state and local governments Ito use in reducing
crime and improving criminal justice.
lThe' 750-page report calls for decreased emphasis on iiimprislonment as a
crime deterrent, speedier trials and grass-roots citi/en action programmes
attacking crime at the neighbourhood level.
Tle findings, prepared by a 100-nielllber task lorce,. will lie reviewed
Jan. 23 at tlie National Conference on C'ritniiial Justice.
The two million dollars for the study carlme from tli gtoiverInment1t's L.aw
Enforc'iiieint Assistance Administration.
CIA ACCUSED OF SCHEME TO DESTROY MOVEMENT
'AIRO (Al') Palestinian guerrilla chieftain Yasser Arafat claimed
Saturday that the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (('A) was behind
schemes aimed at destroying the Palestinian guerrilla movement.
The Middle East News Agency quoted (PIFLOAG)as telling Palestinian
workers in Egypt that documents proving his allegation were found on
American soldiers who were taken prisoner during the civil war in Jordan
ill 1970.
Those documents, he added, proved the CIA wanted to 'annihilate tihe
Palestinian forces in Jordan and Syria.'
No further details were immediately available.
CRACKDOWN ON GUERRILLAS IN OMAN
have cracked down on pro-communist guerrilla stronglhilds, arrested 39
persons and captured large quantities of arms. a goverrrelllut statenltent said
Saturday.
The arrested guerrillas belong to the 'Popular I rout for the Liberation of
()man and the Arabian (Persian) (ulf (P l.OA(;' the statement said.
Tile crackdown was launched last montth in Murscat and tie nearby
towns of Mutrah, Nitwa, Sortok, Sor and Izki, where boxes oft
Chinese-made arms were found hidden in caches, the statement said.
The arnis, the government added, were supplied to thle guerrillas hv the
neighbuuring Republlc of South Yemen


BECAUSE OF PEACE PROGRESS


US suspends bombing



of North Vietnam;


peace report expected

By The Associated Press
THE UNITED STATES suspended al offensive military
operations in North Vietnam today amid increasing speculation
that the secret peace talks with the North Vietnamese may have
resulted in an agreement on a cease-fire.


President Nixon ordered the
halt effective at 10 a.n. EST
becausee of the progress
made" in the Paris peace talks,
press secretary Ronald L.
Zieglcr announced in Key
Biscayne, where Nixon is
staying.
Ziegler called the action "a
unilateral gesture" and refused
to comment on reports that
llrnry A. Kissinger, the
President's negotiator in the
secret talks, may have reached
1an agreement with Hanoi's Le
Due Tho.
Ziegler said Kissinger, who
conferred extensively with
Nixon on Sunday after his
return from Paris, had met
with Nixon again this morning
and would be going back to
Palis "at some point in the
relatively near future."
Nixon acted as reports in
SaIgon suggested that
cLompromises have been
reached on the issues that have
ieen blocking a settlement.
Ilhere was speculation that a
full cease-fire might even be
declared sometime this week.
Gen. Alexander M. flaig Jr.,
who has been President
Nixon's intermediary with
South Vietnamese President
Nguyen van Thieu, was en
route to Saigon and expected
to arrive early Tuesday.
'UNILATERAL GESTURE'
Ziegler said Nixon's order
took effect at 10 a.mn. EST and
includes "bombing, shelling
and any further mining of
North Vietnam."
lhe White House spokesman
described the move as "a
unilateral gesture" that
followed an exhaustive
presidential assessment of the
negotiations.
Zieglcr refused to discuss
reports that Kissinger, and
Ilanoi's Le Due Tho have, for
all practical purposes, already
reached an accord.
"Dr. Kissinger will be
returning to Paris at some
point in the relatively near
future."
Asked if North Vietnam had
agreed to scale down its
military operations in South
Vietnam in return for Nixon's
military concession, Ziegler
said the White House had no
information to indicate any
change in Hanoi's military
strategy.
"This action was not an
element of the negotiations,"
he said. Ziegler did say Hanoi
was aware that progress in the
Paris talks could lead to a U.S.
move of the type he
announced.
MEETING AGAIN
Nixon and Kissinger
conferred for an hour and a
half Monday morning at the
President's Bayside office here.
It was their fourth meeting in
two days since Kissinger flew
here from Paris early Sunday
morning.
Ziegler said Nixon
transmitted the order to halt
military operations in North
Vietnam late Sunday night
following one of his.
discussions with Kissinger.
Participating in the first talk
Sunday was Gen. Alexander M.
Haig Jr., the army's new Vice
Chief of Staff who has been
Nixon's go-between with
Thieu.
Haig flew off to Saigon at
Nixon's behest Sunday night
following Kissinger's return
from six days of peace
negotiations in Paris that the
President's foreign policy aide
described as "very extensive
and very useful."
White House press secretary
Ronald L. Ziegler said Haig
would "discuss the current
status of negotiations with
President Thieu" and with
leaders of Thailand, Laos and
Cambodia.
Haig made the same circuit
just before Christmas, after the
Paris talks were temporarily
broken off and the United
States launched the heaviest
bombing raids of the war
against Hanoi and Haiphong.
The raids in that section of


North Vietnam have been
suspended while a renewed
search for peace continued.
BACK TO PARIS?
Ziegler said he could not say
when Kissinger might return to
Paris to resume apparently
crucial talks with Hanoi's Le
Due Tho. The presidential
spokesman declined to say
anything substantive about the
negotiations
In a departure statement at
Orly Airport, Kissinger said he


will remain in close touch
"through our usual channel"
with Tho, the North
Vietnamese Politburo member
who heads the Hanoi
negotiating team.
"In the meantime," he
added, "Ambassador Sullivan is
staying here to continue his
negotiations with vice minister
Nguyen Co Thach on technical
matters. Special adviser Le Due
Tho is also remaining in Paris."
The negotiators held their
longest and largest session
Saturday in what speculation
had billed as an approaching
climax to their four-year-old
search for an end to the
Vietnam War.
Kissinger, Tho, and an
unusually large number of their
aides conferred for 7/2 hours in
the Saturday session.
PHOTOS TAKEN
Kissinger summoned a U.S.
embassy photographer to the
meeting in an American-owned
villa in suburban St. Nom La
Breteche, leading to
speculation that an official
photograph of the final session
may have been taken. Other
photographers and newsmen
were barred from the villa, on
the edge of an ice-bound golf
course. The embassy
photographer was ordered to
say nothing about what he saw
or did in the villa.
Kissinger flew into Paris Jan.
7 calling this round of talks
with Tho "one more major
effort" to reach a settlement
with North Vietnam.
The presidential security
adviser and the Hanoi
Politburo member broke off
the previous round of their
secret talks on Dec. 13 without
reaching final agreement on a
draft they had worked out in
October.
Following the bombing and
secret mediation efforts by
president Georges Pompidou of
France, Nixon limited the
bombing to below the 20th
parallel on New Year's Eve. In
return, the North Vietnamese
agreed to resume the secret
talks on Jan. 8.
The experts who never left
Paris during the break, went to
work almost immediately on
details of an agreement.
THREE CONDITIONS
Nixon stated three main
conditions for acceptance of an
agreement: the release of
American prisoners, safeguards
for South Vietnam's right to
self-determination and
adequate control machinery
for supervising the treaty.
Hanoi said, however, it
would reject any major changes
in the October draft. The north
Vietnamese maintained Nixon
was going back on his word by
refusing to sign it as it stood.
Throughout the week, the
top negotiators alternated as
hosts in the suburban villa at
St. Nom la Breteche and the
villa owned by the French
Communist Party in Gif sur
Yvette.
The new round opened at
Gif sur Yvette last Monday in
an atmosphere of icy
confrontation. In an apparent
show of resentment at the
American bombing, Tho sent
no one to open the door to
Kissinger and his staff and left
them waiting in the cold for
almost a minute. Kissinger
finally pushed open the door
himself and walked in.
The atmosphere warmed
noticeably as the meetings
continued through the week.
By Friday the two delegations
were again on hand-shaking
terms, although they avoided
appearing face to face in
public.
TOTAL SECRECY
Throughout the week, both
sides strictly kept to their
agreement to maintain total'
secrecy. They refused to make
any comment Friday night
when the American
Broadcasting Company
reported there were "clear
indications" of a


break-through.
In Saigon, South Vietnamese
sources said Hanoi had shown
"encouraging signs" of giving
way on one of the main
obstacles to agreement, formal
recognition of South Vietnam
as a sovereign state separate
from the North.
In return, the sources said,
Hanoi had demanded equal
recognition for the Viet Cdng's
revolutionary provisional
government.


SOVIET LEADER: WARNING


ATTEMPT ON


'3or4 more years of SOMOZA'S LIFE


PRESIDENT THIEU
... critical of U.S.


3 POLICE DIE IN


BOMB BLITZ IN


NORTH IRELAND
BELFAST (AP) Guerrillas
killed three police officers in
Northern Ireland Sunday night.
climaxing two days of the heaviest
bombing in the province in months.
At least eight bombs exploded,
and British Army experts defused
two others. One blast wrecked a
Belfast tavern frequented by
Roman Catholics Saturday night
and wounded 25 persons.
The provisional wing of the Irish
Republican Army was blamed for
most of the bombings, but
Protestant extremists were believed
responsible for at least two of
them, including the Belfast tavern
blast.
One policeman was killed by a
mine that exploded under his truck
on a lonely country road 35 miles
west of Belfast. Another policeman
with him was badly wounded. The
army said the 100-pound mine was
detonated by guerrillas hiding in
bushes 200 yards away.
Two hours later, two other
police officers were killed and two
critically wounded when a
20-pound booby-trap bomb under
their car exploded outside police
headquarters in Londonderry.
The deaths raised the confirmed
fatality toll in the province's 3V2
years of communal violence to 687,
including 20 police officers.
The Provisional IRA command in
Londonderry said the booby-trap
bomb outside the police station was
a warning to the provincial police
"who rigorously uphold the British
constitution and who play a large
part in the torture of internees."
The bombing was a major coup
for the guerrillas, who penetrated a
tight security cordon around the
bomb-gutted heart of the city
where the police headquarters is
located. The car was parked only
20 yards from an army checkpoint.
Elsewhere in the province
Sunday, a guerrilla fired a rocket at
a police station in Newtown
Hamilton 40 miles southwest of
Belfast and hit an empty barn.
Then a machine gunner riddled
buildings near the station.
including a hotel where the
customers dived on the floor as
bullets smashed through the bar
and lobby.
ARRESTS MADE
Snipers peppered army posts in
Catholic areas of Belfast but no
casualties were reported. Troops
arrested three men in the Catholic
Ballymurphy quarter when they
spotted them burying a rifle and
100 rounds of ammunition in a
backyard.
The army had trouble from the
Protestant militants of the Ulster
Defense Association, too. Soldiers
disarmed 40 masked UIA menl
armed with clubs in Belfast
Saturday night. Late Sunday night,
the army said, a group of UDA men
jumped a police-army patrol in
Southeast Belfast and wounded one
policeman.
Priests from the nearby Clonard
Monastery rushed to aid screaming
victims of the blast at Clarkin's Bar
in the busy Springfield Road.
NO WARNING
John Luney, 25, was carried in
agony over the shattered masonry
and splintered glass. "There was no
warning at all," he said as he lay on
a stretcher awaiting attention.
"Everyone was talking and
drinking. Then there was a flash,
screams, and people lying all over
the place. I caught it on the back of
my head and legs."
The explosion tore a gaping hole
in the side of the bar. Residents of
the area blamed the blast on
Protestant extremists.
Springfield Road runs through
both Protestant and Catholic areas
of Northern Ireland's capital.
Guerrilla bombers wrecked a
country hotel Saturday as security
forces uncovered hidden arms and
explosives in Belfast.
The bomb, an estimated 50
pounds of gelignite, destroyed the
Halfway House Hotel in
Cookstown, County Tyrone.
Customers rushed outdoors after a
telephone warning that explosives
had been left in the bar.
In the Protestant Shankill Road
district of Belfast, a British soldier
was surrounded by a hostile crowd
who began to jostle him. The
soldier fired a warning shot to
'extricate' himself from the
situation, an army spokesman said.
Troops surrounded a post office
in East Belfast after they heard the
alarm bell ring. A man was later
detained by police.
It another incident in the restless
capital a police patrol pursued a
stolen panel truck which later
crashed. Inside the vehicle police
found two shotguns, cartridges and
liquor.



CASHi


war' if peace not



reached this month

WASHINGTON (AP) President Nguyen van Thieu of South
Vietnam says if peace is not reached by the end of this month the
Vietnam War "will last three or four more years."


Thieu's views were expressed
in an interview published
Sunday in the New Republic.
The interview was conducted
Dec. 30 in Saigon by Italian
reporter Oriana Fallaci. Thieu
rarely speaks to reporters and
almost never grants interviews.
But the South Vietnamese
leader said, "there are still
hopes for peace. I still trust
that peace will come. Perhaps
it's a matter of weeks. Perhaps
a month."
Thieu indicated the fighting
will go on as long as the North
Vietnamese try to impose a
Communist government on the
South.
lie added that "either peace
comes within a few weeks, let's
say a month, or the war will
last three or four more years."
Miss Fallaci, who
interviewed Nixon adviser
Henry A. Kissinger for the New
Republic late last year,
questioned Thieu on the
relations between the two
men.
"My discussions with Dr.
Kissinger were very frank
indeed," Thieu said. "At
moments, I could say, they
were very hard. However, they
were also friendly; we must
deal as friends."
Nevertheless, the South
Vietnamese President indicated
he did not have full confidence
in the American commitment
to continue fighting for the
Saigon government.
LIFE & DEATH
Thieu said the United States
might be willing to give up on
South Vietnam in the interest
of other worldwide
considerations.
He said he told Kissinger,
"You can probably afford the
luxury of being easy in this
agreement. I cannot.
"A bad agreement means
nothing to you. To me, it's a
matter of life and death ...
"What is the loss of South
Vietnam if you look at it on
the world's map? Just a speck.
The loss of South Vietnam
may even be good for you ...
good for your world strategy."
On the other hand, Thieu
said, he had to remind
Kissinger that "our problem is
survival, not the worldly
interests of the great powers."
As to the tentative peace
settlement worked out in Paris
last October by Kissinger and
the North Vietnamese, the
Saigon leader said the plan had
two fundamentally
unacceptable provisions. "One
is the presence of the North
Vietnamese troops in South
Vietnam; the other is the
political formula that they
want to impose on the future
of South Vietnam."
QUITE CANDID
Thieu was repeating previous
criticisms of the October
agreement, but his description
of the American attitudess


concerning the settlement were
unusually candid.
Miss Fallaci asked Thieu if
he thought "Dr. Kissinger was
going to sell South Vietnam in
the interest of his world
strategy."
"I don't know if that was his
intention," Thieu answered.
"Maybe he thought in good
faith that it was a good
agreement, a right agreement."
But the Americans, Thieu
said "were too impatient to get
a peace, too impatient to
negotiate and sign. When you
negotiate with the
Communists, you shouldn't fix
a deadline ... otherwise they
will exploit you."
"If I had signed what
Kissinger wanted," Thieu said,
"within six months there
would be bloodshed."
In spite of his obvious
unhappiness with the American
negotiating position, Thieu said
he still trusts the United States
and will continue to do so "till
the day they abandon me. One
must trust his friends as one
does his wife, and the trust
must be reciprocal."
When asked what he would
do if President Nixon decides
to sign an agreement despite
Saigon's objections, Thieu said
he would fight until the last
bullet "and then the
Communists will conquer us."
He was also critical of what
he said was gradualismm" in the
American military policy and
said the United States should
have bombed more extensively
earlier in the war.
"Had we attacked North
Vietnam with a classical war,
had we bombed Vietnam
continuously, had we landed in
North Vietnam, the war would
be over by now," Thieu said.
He also suggested he still
would like to invade North
Vietnam, but only if the
United States would approve.


REPORT DENIED
MANAGUA, NICARAGUA
(AP)- The Nicaraguan government
Saturday officially denied that
there was an attempt on the life of
Gen. Anastasio Somoza, strongman
of this country.
"It is absolutely false that the
general of division Don Anastasit
Somoza, supreme chief of the
Nicaraguan armed forces, has been
the victim i an attempt against his
life," Ivan Osorio, secretary of
information and press of the
government Junta, said.
"Gen. Somoza is in perfect
health, in charge of his functions as
President of the National
Emergency Committee,' Osorio
added.
"It is really distressing," he
added, "that rumours of this type
are circulated because they only
tend to create unnecessary concern,
which is even more serious in these
moments of anguish the Nicaraguan
community is living in."
A report on former President
Somoza, who is heading Nicaragua's
reconstruction from a Dec. 23
earthquake which devastated this
capital city, was published Friday
by a Salvadoran newspaper.
Managua mayor Luis Barrios
Olivares said Saturday the capital
city will be rebuilt on the same site
despite nine large faults and three
small ones in the subsolid. He
said 600 blocks of the city were
destroyed by the earthquake and
1,200 will have to be cleared of
rubble.
A brigade front the Mexican
public works ministry, headed by
Carlos Almazan, is using nine trucks
to remove debris, Barrios Olivares
said. The trucks make 40 trips a
day and carry five cubic meters of
rubble on each trip. An estimated
six million cubic meters must be
cleared from the 600-block area
before reconstruction can start, the
mayor said.
Somoza is scheduled to speak
Monday from Managua


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Commonwealth of the Bahamas Islands


TENDERS FOR TREASURY BILLS


The Treasurer hereby gives notice that tenders will be received on Wednesday,
17th January, 1973 for Treasury Bills to be issued under the Public Treasury
Bills Act 1959 and the Public Treasury Bills Amendment Act 1965 on Friday,
19th January, 1973 as follows:-


Bills denominated and payable in
Bahamian dollars......B$3,750,000


The bills will be in minimum multiples of $100 and are redeemable ninety-one
(91) days from the date of issue.

The bills will be issued and paid at the Bahamas Monetary Authority. Details of
payment will be notified to successful tenderers in a letter of acceptance.

Each tender must be in a sealed envelope marked "Tender" addressed to:


THE BANKING MANAGER
Bahamas Monetary Authority


and should be delivered to the office of the Authority in the E. D. Sassoon
Building, corer of Shirley and Parliament Streets, Nassau before 3:00 p.m. on
Wednesday, 17th January.

Tenders must be made on special forms which may be obtained from the Bahamas
Monetary Authority and the Commercial Banks and must be for not less than the
minimum amount stated in paragraph 2. Tenders must state the net price per cent
(being a multiple of one cent) which will be paid.


The Treasurer reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


Ministry of Finance, Nassau
I Ith January, 1973


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Mnndav. January 15, 1973.


Uhr T ribunt
NLuus ADoDcrus JURAE IN VERBA MAGIST
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917.1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Monday, January 15, 1973.


EDITORIAL


Peace without honour?

By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the fourth in a series I am writing on America's
weakened position in the Viet Nam peace talks as a result of
internal dissension ... especially in Congress... at a time when the
nation should be united in strength.)
I CLEARLY remember the events of the Suez crisis.
I was desperately ill at the time at St. Vincent's Hospital in
New York. 1 had just undergone a critical operation from which it
was doubtful that I would recover.
When the news of John Foster Dulles' completely
irresponsible action reached me at the hospital I had the nurse
prop me up in bed and, with the aid of my wife who had stayed
at my bedside throughout my illness, I wrote a series of articles in
which I declared: "This is the end".
These articles attracted wide attention in England when the
late Lord Beaverbrook wrote an editorial about them in his
Evening Standard in which he quoted extensively from what 1
had written.
This was the end for Britain. Ever since then she has steadily
withdrawn from world responsibilities, which she had performed
with such courage and firm resolution, and now she has joined
the European Community in the Common Market.
At this point America moved to the centre of the world stage.
This has been a story of indecision and tragedy all along the line.
I will review a few events briefly.
Korea ... General MacArthur could have won this war and
settled affairs with China so that it would have taken her a 100
years to gain the commanding position she holds today.
The only compensating factor in the China situation is that she
and Russia are now rivals. Russia brought China into the
Communist camp in her policy of spreading the doctrine of
Communism throughout' the world.
Now they are enemies and it looks as though ... in the next war
... Russia will be forced back into the western camp for her own
survival. China and Japan are now the nations of the future.
As I pointed out in the first article in this series ... while the
U.S. was hamstringing Britain with one hand, she was building her
enemy Japan with the other. Now Japan has broken away from
the West and formed an alliance with her old enemy China.
Cuba ... and the disaster of the Bay of Pigs.
The present Viet Nam tragedy in which President Nixon,
who seems to be a strong, farsighted man, is being destroyed by
his own people.
Trinidad ... America found herself powerless to enforce a
defence treaty made with Britain after this tiny island became an
independent nation.
It wasn't until Communist Dr. Cheddi Jagan got control of
the government of Guyana that America realized the gravity of
the situation that was developing. Britain and the U.S. managed
to pry this man out of office. But see what they have finally got
out of all the manoeuvring!
Barbados ... when the Big Four Barbados, Trinidad and
Tobago,, Jamaica and Guyana ... recently made peace with Cuba
and China in defiance of their agreements as members of the
Organization of American States, the U.S. protested their action.
Tiny Barbados told Uncle Sam to go straight, clean plump to hell.
When Britain withdrew the Royal Navy from points "East of
Suez" America should have filled the gap. But she couldn't. And
so Russia stepped into the breach.
In Central and South America nations have accepted millions
of dollars in foreign aid from the U.S.... and whenever they were
ready they have fetched Uncle Sam a swift kick in the pants.
I have no hesitation in saying that America is the most liberal
.. and peace loving ... nation in recorded history. But
unfortunately even Christian peoples have not developed to the
point where they understand and appreciate kindness. This is
interpreted as evidence of weakness. America has yet to learn that
a great nation cannot buy friends. Friendship in national and
international affairs must be earned by strength. America wants
to be loved. There is no such thing as love in a world peopled by
rival races and nations. The only thing that matters is that a
nation is trusted and respected. This can be achieved .,only by
strength.
I have travelled around the world three times and across it
more than once. Wherever I have gone I have found that, while
people have gladly taken all the benefits they could get from
Uncle Sam, the American people are not liked.
The extraordinary thing about the world situation today is
reflected in a book written just after the second world war under
the title "An American In Britain".
I have forgotten the name of the author. I have the book at
home and so I have no way of checking the name. I think the
name was Dobie.
He was a professor at a major university in Britain during the
second world war. He saw the British people stand up
courageously in the Battle of Britain when war was brought to
the civilian population by the German Luftwaffe from the air.
Churchill described this period as the finest hour of the British
race.
In his book he expressed high admiration for the British
people. He reminded them that Admiral Lord Nelson should be
made an American hero because for a hundred years the Royal
Navy, which became world famous under the guidance of Nelson,
had enforced the Monroe Doctrine for America.
Today, alas, even powerful America is unable to enforce this
doctrine for herself as she is now faced with Cuba and the steady
encroachment of the Russian navy in the Caribbean.
It's all very sad, you know. It shouldn't have been this way.

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY


Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
The saddest are these: "It might have been".
WHITI'IER

Admirals all, for England's sake,
Honour be yours, and fame!
And honour, as long as waves shall break,
To Nelson's peerless name.
SIR HENRY NEWBOLT


Ubp UIribunr


Demandsinvestigationinto buses onGrand Bahama


EDITOR The Tribune
Please allow me a space in
your most valuable paper. We
the members of the Grand
Bahama Taxi Union, take this
opportunity to express our
feelings, and mind towards the
buses.
We had problems with those
buses from the time Mr.
Culmer was president of the
Grand Bahama Taxi Union.
During that time Mr. Reese had
nine buses, tie then decided to
kill the taxi business by
sticking up posters in each
hotel for the amount of
twenty-five cents per head, and
the body goes free.
Mr. Culmer protesting buses.
H artman Lightbourne
protesting buses, Mr. Michael
Pinder protesting buses, and
still yet the buses had not been
under control, for what reason,
I don't know
Mr. Noel Thompson was the
Deputy (ontroller in Freeport.
Hle told me that it was only
two Road Supervisors. If the
two supervisors can keep
nineteen taxis under control,
why cannot they keep about
fifty bus drivers under control.
1 asked Mr. Ferguson the


other day if something can't be
done with those buses, he said
to me Munnings, I know what
goes on but we don't have a
controller down here, and
buses do not have a schedule,
we hope that they will have a
new schedule soon. We are not
against buses, when anyone
applies for a franchise, he/she
subscribe the route where the
said buses will be running.
After the franchises are granted
they forget mighty quick.
Buses are running wild all
over the place, since the
bus-stop has been moved from
the west-drive-way of the
Iloliday Inn, to the East Drive
way, all I can see the buses
doing is touring line, like
taxi-cabs.
On Sunday the bus drivers
arrange with the guests to take
them to church, and when
church out they will be there
to take them back to the
hotels. reportt Taxi had a
fifty cents bus in the Lucayan
Beach area, on an hourly basis,
between flawksbill. Churchill


Square, and Lucayan Beach
area. Mr. Frank Cockburn had
dropped his fifty-cents bus, it
used to be the only bus that
ran on schedule.
We do not need anN
tour-cars for Randd Bahama at
this time, don't let us forget
that licence had been granted
by Grand Bahama Port
Authority, and approved by
the Bahamas Government
dated March 29. 19 8 permits
them to use tour-cars.
Mr. Frank Cockburn, could
have used tour-cars from 1968,
but he knew that it would hurt
the taxi business, so he decided
not to use any tour-cars.
To you men, who are
applying for tour-cars, be
careful, and know what you
are doing, always remember
that Ereeport Taxi can put on
more tour-cars than we can,
and they have the biggest
business that comes into the
island, so Grand Bahama be
ready for no tour-cars until the
next ten years
Freeport l axi. and Mr. Levi


Australia wants last 'relics of



colonialism' surrendered by Britain

By Peter Muccini
LONDON (AP)- Australia's Attorney General said Sunday he intends urging Britain to
surrender its last vestiges of authority over his country and thus abolish "continuing relics of
colonialism."


Demonstrations against Golda


Meir in Paris for meeting


of Socialist International
By Elias Antar
PARIS (AP) Golda Meir of Israel ignored French government
anger and student demonstrators who burned her in effigy
Saturday and attended a heavily guarded meeting of Socialist
leaders in Paris.


As the 74-year-old Premier
met with Socialist Party chiefs
from 18 countries at the Palais
du Luxembourg, pro-Arab
demonstrators in the nearby
Latin Quarter paraded through
the streets shouting, "Golda
murder!"
The students clashed briefly
with police a few blocks from
the Palais du Luxembourg,
headquarters of the French
Senate. Steel-helmeted riot
police made baton charges
against the stone-throwing
students and prevented them
from approaching the Senate
building.
President Georges Pompidou
said last week that Mrs. Meir
and the other Socialists were
unwelcome because their
presence here seven weeks
before the French elections
was an intrusion.
Nevertheless, the strongest
security measures seen in
recent years were laid down to
protect Mrs. Meir from
possible attacks by
Palestinians.
More than 1,000 policemen
swarmed through the narrow
streets around the Senate
building, armed with rifles, tear
gas and shields. A helicopter
hovered as police with guard
dogs stood outside the
building.
On hand when Mrs. Meir
arrived in a fast-moving
motorcade followed by an
ambulance were four burly
Israeli security agents with
walkie-talkies.
Press and public were barred
from the opening session of the
Socialist meeting.
Mrs. Meir has made no
public statement since arriving
Friday but has met with more
than two dozen politicians and
members of French-Israeli
friendship groups.
ARABS MARCH
The demonstration by the
French students was held
despite a government ban
against all public gatherings
until after the weekend.
About 300 youths marched
the Boulevard St. Michel in the
student quarter, brandishing
Palestinian flags and portraits
of Mahmoud Hamchari, a
Palestinian leader, who died
here Tuesday from wounds
suffered in a bomb blast.
Pro-Israeli groups had also
scheduled demonstrations but
apparently obeyed the
government ban.
The Syrian ambassador,
Ahmed Abdul Karim, sent a
message to the conference
drawing its attention to recent
Israeli raids on Syria which the
Damascus government says
killed scores of civilians.
The conference agenda
includes the Vietnam War, the
international political
situation, European security


and the Common Market. It
was not known whether Mrs.
Meir would talk about the
Middle East. Mrs. Meir is a vice
president of Socialist
International, as the grouping
of Socialist parties is known.
Her visit here is ostensibly a
private one in her capacity as
head of the Israeli Labour
Party.
Golda Meir calls on Pope
Paul VI Monday the first
Israeli Premier to enter the
Vatican for a discussion on
the Middle East, including the
status of Jerusalem.
Vatican sources said Mrs.
Meir's private audience with
the Pope may pave the way for
the establishment of formal
diplomatic relations between
the Vatican and the Jewish
state. The Vatican may also
have decided to play a larger
role in quest for a peaceful
Middle East settlement, the
sources said.
The Premier also scheduled
talks with Italian President
Giovanni Leone and Premier
Giulio Andreotti.
The surprise visit to Rome
and the Vatican came before
another round of diplomatic
activity to solve the Middle
East impasse. Mrs. Meir goes to
Washington next month.
Mrs. Meir arrived in Rome
from Paris Sunday night with
security at the airport the
tightest it has been in years.
About 500 armed policemen
ringed Fiumicino Airport. All
newsmen and photographers
were barred from approaching
the plane, which stopped on a
a lonely runway two
kilometers from the terminal
building.

GERMANY SEEKS

CLOSER CONTACT

WITH AMERICA
WASHINGTON (AP)-- Finance
Minister Helmut Schmidt of West
Germany said Saturday he came to
Washington to exchange views with
American officials before the heads
of Government of the two allied
countries make important public
statements later this month.
"It is desirable to have contacts
before President Nixon's
inauguration speech and his state of
the union message, and before we
issue our government declaration
next week," Schmidt told a press
conference.
His meeting with newsmen here
concluded a five-day visit to the
United States, during which he
delivered a speech warning the
United States that the Vietnam war
must be ended.
"The danger of alienation might
turn into reality and thereby deeply
influence the development of
European-American relations,'
Schmidt said Thursday in a speech
in North Carolina.
At his news conference, the
veteran Social Democrat, a frequent
visitor to the U.S., declined to
elaborate, but circles close to him
explained that in Western Europe
there is enormous pressure on
governments to react


Senator Lionel Murphy,
Attorney General and Minister
of Customs in Australia's new
Labour government,
announced in London he
will raise the issue with British
officials here later this month.
"I have no doubt that the
British authorities will be as
anxious as the new Australian
government to get rid of
continuing relics of
colonialism," he said in a
statement.
"To me it is unbelievable
that 73 years after Australia
became a Commonwealth,
Britain still has residual
legislative, executive and
judicial authority over
Australia."
The talks will mainly
concern the Privy Council, a
group of more than 300
eminent persons including
members of the British
Cabinet, which acts as special
adviser to Queen Elizabeth 11.
The Privy Council's judicial
committee is a supreme court
of appeal for several
Commonwealth nations. In
Australia's case it can bypass
even the Australian federal
supreme court.
REFUSAL
Australian Prime Minister
Gough Whitlam refused to
become a member of the Privy
Council when he came to
office. Whitlam also refused to
nominate Australians for the
honours presented by the
Queen on New Year's Day,
claiming this was an antiquated
system.
Australian officials in
London, however, stressed that
Australia would still regard the
Queen as its constitutional
head of state. They said there
was no question of the country
completely breaking its links
with Britain and becoming a
Republic.
Murphy also wants to get rid
of legal powers still held by the
British Parliament to pass
certain laws concerning
Australia.
A British Foreign Office
spokesman said Murphy will
have talks with British officials
Jan. 22 23 after he has
attended a Commonwealth law
conference.
"We think it is a good thing
to examine questions of this
kind," the spokesman said.
FEW REMAIN
If Australia withdraws, the
Privy Council's judicial
committee will remain as the
final court of appeal only for
the Channel Islands, the Isle of
Man, New Zealand, Malaysia
Singapore, independent
countries of the West Indies,
and Britain's remaining
colonies such as Hong Kong,
Gibraltar, and the Bahamas.
The number of overseas
appeals the committee hears
has fallen to about 35 a year
compared with 104 in 1946. In
the last law term only two
Australian appeals were heard.
Its withdrawal would not
affect the hearing, expected in
March, of an important test
case in which the committee
will have to decide whether an
Australian child can claim
damages for injuries suffered
when it was still in the
mother's womb.


I-ETTn 10 lH EDITO


Bahamas show that we care for
them.
ANDREW RALPH MUNNINGS,
Vice President,


Grand Bahama
Taxi Union
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Jan. 9. 1973.


SHELL She1 Bahamas Ltd.


are the only two operators that
run on schedule, and thiur
routes are prescribed by the
Bahamas Government. the only
difference between the buses
and us, is that they have a big
taxi, and we have a small one
Many of the hotels use the
buses as their main
transportation to take guests to
the beach, they called it a
free-package deal charging the
guest $2 round trip included
on their bill, buses taking
sightseeing tours do not have
any franchise for that type of
job, buses all over the hotels in
front of the lobby picking up
guest. The only job the taxi
drivers can get is from the
airport, to the hotel, and from
the hotel to the airport EIven
when the taxi drivers go to
church, and the spirit fall on
them to shout, you cannot get
to shout for the bus drivers
The bus drivers tells the guests
'don't worry' everywhere they
want to go, they will carry
them.
We are also members of
Government. deeply involved
with public transportation In
our opinion that is unfair to
Government, and the general
public. Sometimes we find
people standing around the
various supermarkets for hours
waiting on buses to go to their
various destinations, and
cannot get one, because they
are too busy engaged in the
tourist business.
We feel like if the controller
gives all the bus drivers their
various routes, and schedules
to go by, and if they break the
law, then their licence should
be suspended. According to the
Road Traffic Act chapter 284
sec 88 (1) subject to the
provisions of the sub-section
(2) of that section, the
authority may revoke, or
suspend a franchise in whole,
or in part on the grounds that
the holder has been convicted
of an offence, under this act,
or fails to comply with any
condition subject to which the
franchise was granted.
I spoke with a bus driver and
he told me that all over the
Eight Mile Rock area they wait
for buses to get to their jobs.
Whenever you need buses just
go to the Holiday Inn Hotel.
They are always parked in
front of the door. A lady told
me the other day that there
was a party of two to go to
Freeport from Eight Mile
Rock, the bus driver told the-'
that he will put them out at
the junction of Fight Mile
Rock Road, and Queen
Highway, and turn back,
because he can't go to Freeport
unless he has a load.
I humbly request an
investigation from the Road
Traffic Department concerning
this matter, for 1 feel that
justice was not done to the
taxi-men. We would like for
the Government to exercise
fundamental rights, and
freedom to all concerned.
I must extend this to all the
taxi drivers. A passenger is the
most important person in our
business. A passenger is not
dependant on us, we are
dependent on them, it is our
job to handle their
requirements.
As vice president of the
Grand Bahama Taxi Union, as
we enter 1973, to all the
drivers let courtesy be our pass
word. Courtesy is the heart of
Tourism, let us in the
Commonwealth of the


The Corporation
inconvenience caused


apologizes for the


A. F .(URLING
General Manager (Actg.)


Bihmas lelauCOmicatlus Ciporlatil


The Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation is pleased to announce the
activation of the new Technical Centre at Fight-Mile-Rock Grand Bahama on
Sunday, 21st January, 1973.

The Technical Centre will offer all Overseas facilities provided by BaTelCo
in addition to telephone service to Freeport.

The installation of telephones in the Light-Mile-Rock area will commence
on Monday, 15th January, 1973.


Installation charges are as follows:
Installation fee
Rental (Residence)
Rental (Business)
The above rates are under review and are subject to change in
future.


A Security Deposit will be required as follows:
Home Owners
Tenants
Business


$75.00
5.71
$8.57
the near



$50.00
100.00
100.00


Overseas facilities with the exception of DDD (outgoing) will be available
to all Eight-Mile-Rock subscribers without additional deposit.

Subscribers are requested to pay charges at BaTelCo's new Technical
Centre, Eight-Mile-Rock between the hours of 9.30 a.m. 4.30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
No installation will be made until installation fee and deposit are paid.
(Signed) A. E. CURLING
Acting General Manager
II I


I. ---- -.,-- --_ _


___


has a vacancy for a


SECRETARY

who must be a Bahamian Citizen

Candidate should have several years secretarial
experience, and be proficient in shorthand
and typing.

Starting salary will depend on qualifications
and experience.

Written applications should be made to P. O.
Box N3717. Nassau, giving details of past
experience.










IAHAIM S IRON STEEL COMPANY LO.

Require the services of a


GENERAL MANAGER

to head up its operations in Nassau.


Applications are invited from mature men who
have experience in the Steel fabrication and or
construction industry covering purchasing,
production and sales.

Possession of a qualification in engineering,
construction and for Business management is
desirable, but not essential.

Applications in writing only giving full
particulars of experience and qualifications should
be addressed to: The President, Bahamas Iron &
Steel Co., Ltd. P. O. Box N-4885 Nassau,
Bahamas.







NOTICE


Recently BATELCO has sent out certain bills
indicating charges and adjustments for Incoming
Collect Calls (ICC).

These adjustments only affected ICC calls and
were necessary because the worng rates were
applied on the previous bills. Calls which were
made on Week-days were billed at the Sunday rate
and calls which were made on Sundays were billed
at Week-day rates.


mw


^








4 _Ulb Uribunt
.. . m l


By Abigail Van Buren
DEAR ABBY: My wife is a former Playboy bunny.
We've been married about a year. I realize that she met a


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Exchanges 26. Conveyor belt
6. Price 29. "Great
10. Evening party Emancipator"
11. Benefit 30. Cheer
13. Hindu elixir 31. Transitory
of life 36. Attributes
14. Succinct 38. Card game
15. Soul: Fr. 39. Artificial
16. American language
Indian 40. Insertion
18.Sub --.. 42. Female ruffs
19. Impatient 44. Two-spot
22. Religieuse 45. History
23. Bankroll 46. Italian city
24. Impels 47. Dipper


A U U L M ARiPCI A



PEXENlN R E D
SP TI 0O
I C6 O VAL
r-I NE MO VE
lo~~s~ol VlAlLlo
L OC YA VIE LI
ONES ODE ED
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN


Government House Bal Iroom
Admission: Adults $1.00;Children 50







JOIN TNI
IMERALD BEACH CABANA CLUB
NOWI
1. Use of our Pool and 1-3 mile of Beach,(Complimentary)
2. Mats. Towels and Lounge Chairs (Complimentary)
3. Four Championship Tennis Courts Night Tennis
(Complimentary
4. His and Hers Sauna Baths (Complimentary)
5. Putting Green (Complimentary)
6. 10 p.c. off Weddings. Banquets and Meetings held at the
Resort
7. Additional Cocktail parties held throughout the year
8. Tennis and Swimming Clinics
9. 10 p.c. off all special parties and group dinners
10. Managers Complimentary Reception. Wed. 6:45pm -
7:30pm
11. Jumbala Torch Light Steak Cook out (Wed.)
12. Thursday. Champagne Dance 1ipm Fore N' Aft Iounge
13. International Buffet Hibiscus Dining Room
14. Sunday Feature Movie 9pm
15. For those of you who like to play bridge. the Nassau
Bridge Club meets every Tuesday and Friday at 8:00pm
in the Bird Cage.
PLEASE CALL MANAGER'S OFFICE 78001
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
II I II Il -ll l II!1


Ex-Bunny should hop

back into her wifely role
lot of men while she worked as a cocktail waitress at the
club-which is where I met her, but she still gets calls
asking if she'll have a drink or dinner with them.
She asked me if I "minded" if she saw some ot her old
favorites. I really never thought it was right for her to go,
but I said I didn't mind because I didn't want her to think I
was jealous.
She goes out about once a week. Am I being a chump?
If I took my secretary-or anyone else out, my wife would
throw a fit.
Even tho I said it was okay at the beginning, I've
changed my mind. So how do I tell now that I "mind"
without looking like a jealous husband?
CHANGED MY MIND
DEAR CHANGED: What's wrong with looking like a
jealous husband if that's what you are-and with good
reason. Tell your former Playboy bunny that her cottontail
past is behind her now, and it's time she hopped into the
role of a full-time wife.
DEAR ABBY: In our community we have a medical
group. I suppose you could call it a "clinic." I started
going to a physician there who was arrogant and generally
unpleasant. I wanted to switch to anothLs. doctor but didn't
know quite how to do it. My problem was solved, however,
when he went on vacation and one of his colleagues treated
me instead. The substitute physician was wonderful, so I
kept booking him for my treatments. [I get an inoculation
once a week. l
Yesterday at the clinic I ran into my first doctor, so I
smiled and said, "Good morning."
He replied sharply, "Who's treating you? Whoever
he is, he's doing a lousy job. You look like hell!"
Abby, I was so shocked I couldn't even respond. I just
walked away.
Was this ethical? I mean, downgrading one of his own
colleagues that way? How would you have handled it?
Should I report him?
PHILADELPHIA BULLETIN READER
DEAR READER: Probably just as you did. Either that
doctor needs a doctor, or he needs some lessons in tact,
self-control and manners. Yes, report this incident to the
administrator of the clinic.
DEAR ABBY: I am an elderly shut-in and have not
attended a wedding in 16 years. I sent one couple a beauti-
ful and expensive pair of pillow cases. I had them wrapped
in ribbons and bows and thought it would make a lovely
gift.
After going to all this trouble, a friend tells me that
this is out-of-date today. Now they put out a large tray and
everyone deposits money, starting at about $10. She said at
the last wedding she attended, the bridal couple took in
over $2,000!
Abby, I was shocked. I had heard of giving money to
family, but to every bride and groom, I can't agree. Is this
the new style now? SHOCKED IN N. Y.
DEAR SHOCKED: I imagine it has been done, but
wedding gifts are still very much in style. I Cash seems
crass. I
DEAR ABBY: I have read your column for years and
now I have something I would like to see printed. I am a
19-year-old girl, and what I have to say concerns "names."
Many people give their children cute or unusual names,
which is all right if care is used, but it can be a real dis-
aster.
I was baptized with a boy's name, "Peter," to be spe-
cific, and I would not wish it on my worst female enemy.
Records got confused. I got kicked out of class by teachers
who didn't believe I was wno I said I was, and the police
have even taken me down to the station under suspicion be-
cause they thought I was concealing my identity. It would
be bad enough if I were mannish-but I am very feminine.
Some people say a name is not important, but I can
tell you it is! A person's name affects intimately how he is
seen by others and how he sees himself. It was difficult
to think of myself as a girl with a name like Peter.
When I reached the age of 18 I had my name legally
changed, even tho I faced a great deal of opposition from
my family. So, parents of the world, please don't handicap
a boy with a girl's name or a girl with a boy's name. It's
not fair. Ask the person who has one.
BETHANY LYN BROWN
[Would you believe, formerly, "Peter Lucille
Josephine Brown?"]
DEAR BETHANY: I'm sure you will get no arguments
from the Sidneys, Pats, Tonys, Evelyns, Shellys, Marions,
Joyces, Kims, Kits, Kirbys, and Terrys.
CONFIDENTIAL TO "SCOLD ME OR SCARE ME IN
PASADENA, AGE 45": You deserve neither scolding nor
scaring. You are normal, so quit feeling guilty, Madame.

:, .. ....

ARRIVED TODAY: Joma j
from Jacksonville; Honesty
from Canada; Olympia from
New York, F1reeport from
Freeport; Hattingen from
Rotterdam
SAILED TODAY: Hattingen
for Vera Cruz; Freeport for
Freeport.
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Queen Elizabeth II from


WINNERS in the sixth annual Catholic schools spelling
contest on Friday was Edward Rolle, grade 5 of St. Francis
School, with Alladina Oliver, grade 5 of Our Lady's School
the runner-up. The two students are pictured above with
Mr. Edmund Moxey, Permanent Secretary for Community
Development. Young Rolle won the Bishop Leonard
Spelling Championship trophy for St. Francis and the
individual trophy. His teacher is Miss Beryl Lewis. Sister
Teresa Symonette teaches Alladina. Thirty finalists from
the Catholic schools in.New Providence and the Out Islands
received certificates. Bishop Paul Leonard Hagarty officially
opened the contest. Mr. Moxey represented the Hon.
Livingstone Coakley, Minister of Education, who was
unable to attend.


Wins Roger Sayers trophy
SENIOR Vice President Roger Sayers presented the
"Roger Sayers Challenge Trophy" to Lester W. Carroll,
manager of the East Hill District, Robinson Road at the
British-American Insurance Company's annual Christmas
party in the Governor's Hall of the Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel on December 23. Mr.. Carroll won the
trophy in a strongly contested Christmas sales competition
with the Nassau District under manager Arthur Thompson,
Blue Hill district under manager Carl Carroll and Grand
Bahama district under Perry Knowles. Mr. Sayers said that
all four districts and their managers deserved the highest
praise for their outstanding performance. Shown from left
- .-L. I.e.r.. C..r i .all. rd ran V_ t~Ihsn. team catain.


By The Associated Press
TODAY is MONDAY, Jan. 15,
the 15th day of 1973. There are
350 days left in the year.
HIGHLIGHTS in history on this
day:
1972 King Irederik the ninth
of Denmark died at the age of 72
and is succeeded by his eldest
daughter, Princess Margarethe.
1971 Aswan High Dam in
Egypt dedicated by Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat and Soviet
chief of state Nicolai V. Podgorny.
1966 13 persons known dead
and 62 missing after ferry and
warship collide off Pusan, South
Korea.
1963 President Tshombe of
Congo accepts U.N. plan for
secession of Katanga.
1945 Allied wartime supply
route from India to China
completed, replacing Japanese-held
Burma Road.
1922 Irish government formed
under Michael Collin
1919 Ignace Jan Paderewski


Curacao, Tropic Day from Port
Everglades; Emerald Seas,
Flavia from Miami.
TIDES
TIDES: High 5:17 a.m. and
5:39 p.m. Low 11:39 a.m. and
11:36 p.m.


ABBEY

INTENATION

FUND



OFF ALL
including SHW
FORO
STARTS.

$12.52 bonnet
Offered Price Bay & George Str
As of
January 12th, 1973


Monday, January 15, 1973.

i__,.om


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LAST DAY TUESDAY
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005


Peter Cushino JOAN COLLINS
SUGGESTED FOR MA TURE AUDIENCES.
PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Last Day Tuesday
Matinee continuous from 2
Evening 8:30
"TODAY WE KILL,
TOMORROW WE DIE" PG.
Montgomery Ford
Bud Spencer
PLUS
"IT'S YOUR THING" G.
Isley Brothers
Ike & Tina Turner


Last Day Tuesday
Continuous showings
from 2:30
Sunday continuous
from 4:30
"COME BACK
CHARLESTON
BLUE" PG.
Raymond St. Jacques
Godfrey Cambridge
PLUS


I
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'I
SI'

;I


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i

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WU'LFFR.I j 'Ku


EY T ra-ati


/








Mnaw Im Jnuarv 15 1973.


1 hr iXribun


mv~rrrlr ~~-~I --


Noted marine archeologist


to address historical society


JUST ARRIVED!
LATEST HITS BY
ELLISON PINDER &THE ISLANDERS
e I can see clearly now Memories of yesterday
APPEARING NIGHTLY AT
The Emerald Beach Hotel




NOTICE
All persons purchasing lots in Sumner's Subdivision from
Benjamin Sumner are hereby requested to make all future
payments direct to James M. Thompson, Frederick Street,
Nassau, Bahamas. Attorney for Benjamin Sumner. Failure
to adhere to this notice would be at the purchaser's risk.
Signed: BENJAMIN SUMNER


TYRES


All Popular Sizes

Now in Stock


HIDmMOTORS
PARTS DEPARTMENT


COLLINS AVE.


TEL. 2-1031


Mon-Fri. 8 a.m. 5:50 p.m.; Sat'y 8 a.m. I p.m.



FOR SALE BY TENDER


1 1966 Lambretta No. 202
1 1963 Lambretta No. 137


1 1968 Honda


No. 253


These Motor Scooters can be inspected by contacting
Mr. Nottage, Acting Chief Health Inspector (telephone
24934) who will make arrangement for the scooters to
be seen.
Sealed tenders clearly Marked TENDERS FOR MOTOR
SCOOTERS should be addressed to the Hospital
Administrator P. 0. Box N-3729 to arrive not later than
17th January, 1973.
The right is reserved to reject any or all tenders.
J. A. THOMPSON JR.
Hospital Administrator


GUEST SPI AKER at the
Bahamas Historical Society
meeting Friday, January 19,
will be Norman Scott. noted
marine archeologist who has
been involved in several
projects in the Bahamas
concerning wrecks of historical
value.
His subject will be "The
U.S.S. Tecumseh", an
American Civil War Union
Navy monitor sunk in Mobile
Bay by the Confederate forces
following a visit to Nassau. The
"Tecumseh" was the only (ivil
War warship sunken intact
except for a hole in its side.
The lecture which will be
delivered at 6 p.m. in the
Ballroom of Government
House, will include a scale
model of the ship and slides
illustrating the salvage
operation.
Norman Scott is a graduate
of the University of Virginia
and has been prominent in
marine archeology since 1957.
He has conducted a study of
wrecks in Bahamian waters for
the Bahamas Government, as
well as underwater projects for
the "National Geographic"
magazine, the Smithsonian
Institute, the Government of
SColombia, the Government of
Florida and the Mexican
Department of Anthopology
and History.
He is at present involved in
three major projects: the U.S.
Commemorative Centennial
Celebration, work on the port
of Cartagena for the
Colombian Government, and a
Jamaica Government project
on the sunken city of Port
Royal.
Mr. Scott has appeared on
all major U.S. television
networks


SINGSPIRATION TO
AID BIBLE SOCIETY
A SINGSPIRATION will he
held at Faith Temple,
Palmdale, at 9 p.m. on Sunday,
January 21, to help the Bible
Society of the West Indies and
to learn of its work.
The programme will consist
of musical selections and a
short Bible quiz.
A collection will be taken in
aid of the Society.
M"


ISLAND FLYING SERVICE


CHARTER OPERATIONS

MOVING JANUARY 15TH


Our Out Island CHARTER operations will move on January 15, 1973 from the
present location West of the Nassau International Airport Terminal to our
Customer Service Lounge. This is adjacent to our large hangar building East of
the Airport Terminal.

We will fumish at the new location complete handling facilities, including -



BAHAMAS IMMIGRATION SERVICE

BAHAMAS CUSTOMS FACILITY

FUEL AND RAMP SERVICE


For superior charter arrangements, phone 7-7168.



ISLAND FLYING SERVICE

OUT ISLAND AIRWAYS


"Growing with the Bahamas"


DOLLS for girls at the Ranfurly Homes for Children
donated by Citibank Club of the First National City Bank.
The dolls were entries in a doll-sewing contest among
female Citibankers. When the awards were made at the
Christmas party on December 18, the doll in African print,
held by Sterling Quant (stooping) was the winner. Other
members of the Citibank Club executive at the presentation
are from left: Glen Bannister, Keith Smith and Sterling
Quant. Next to Mr. Quant is Mrs. Della Davies, Ranfurly
Homes house mother.

WATCH DOGS GUARD PARADISE
DURING THE PAST several months a special division
composed of watch-dogs has been created on Paradise
Island by Mr. Fenelon Richards, director of security for the
island.
The German Shepherd dogs were put through a period of
intensive training by Supervisor Albert Hall who served in
the Royal Bahamas Police Force for twenty-one years. He
retired from the Force as a Sergeant, before joining the
security division of Paradise Island Limited.
Dogs are a new innovation of the island and form a part of
the programme to beef up security measures being taken to
prevent offences from being committed. They are being
used to patrol the casino and hotel areas as well as the long
strip of beach.
Photo below shows Left to Right: Supervisor Albert
Hall, and Officers C. Mclntosh. A. Brown, W. Cash, S.
Curtis.
-- .l J -


'HE .


MOON:
4 41 am


Rises 3 21 p. n Sets


BANK FAILURES

HAVE NOT HURT

US, SAYS PM
PRIME MINISTER Lynden
Pindling said on Radio
Bahamas last night that he did
not think the recent hank
failures here has adversely
affected the Bahamas's image
as a banking centre.
"I would think the
international banking
community would welcome
the government's efforts to rid
itself of less desirable elements.
I think this enhances rather
than detracts from our image."
Asked by interviewer Mary
Kelly if the government was
considering any protective
measures for depositors caught
by such failures, Mr. Pindling
said such measures were being
considered and would be
incorporated in the Central
Bank legislation to be
introduced later this year.
MOON


4'


DAILY BUFFET LUNCH

Announcing a great new eating idea. Now enjoy
a delicious Buffet Lunch Daily at the Halcyon
Balmoral Beach Hotel. The Buffet features
exotic International Dishes daily at the
reasonable price of $6.00 per person, plus
gratuties. Enjoy a sumptuous meal, in a
beautiful quiet setting, tomorrow, perfect
businessmen, working girls and couples who
want to relax, gracefully. Make your way to the
Balmoral on Cable Beach for a really great
dining experience. Lunch served from 12:30 to


I 2:30 p.m. daily.





i wnvttryou tooen>thinlgt9






FREEPORT JET WASH & AUTO MART
FEATURING

GIGANTIC B.F. GOODRICH TYRE SALE


78 SERIES
WIDE TRACK
DUTY PAID PRICES


-"i'c
rRF' ' ic


BELTED
4 PLY


2 PL FIBER GLASS
2 PLY POLYESTER


LOWER THAN YOU CAN BUY THIS QUALITY TYRE IN THE STATES.
LAST DAYOF SALE-FEB.10,1973
TUBELESS TYRE STYLE REGULAR SALE PR/CF

C 78x14 4 WHI TEWALL $36.00 26.00

E 78x14 ,"1 WHITEWALL $36.00 26.95

F 78x14 15- 14 WHITEWALL $37.00 $27.95
SG 78x14 ""~1" WHITEWALL $40.00 $29.95

F 78x15 "~5'x WHITEWALL $377.00

G 78x15,H251, WHITEWALL $40.00 $29.95

H 78x15(85515) WHITEWALL $45.00 $33.00
-
SJ78x15 "" 8 WHITEWALL $50.00 $36.00

L 78X15(915x5) WH/TWLL $5500 $41.00
m- -


We cannot repeat these special reduced tyre prices

after the present supply is sold out

PRICES INCLUDE FREE MOUNTING ON RIM -- MOUNTING ON CAR S1.00 ADDITIONAL CHARGE

Large stock of auto parts tools and accessories
to fit most U.S. and Foreign cars

CENTRAL SHOPPING CENTRE FREEPORT
TELEPHONE 352-7441 P.O. BOX F-238


I


III


'~"~""'


<41:>


r


Wins'Name mte G.oat contest
ANNETTE IFILL of Soldier Road receives her prize for
winning The Bahamas Humane Society's "Name the Goat
Contest". The Society's resident goat has been christened
"Melinda" the name submitted by Annette. Giving the prize is
Mrs. Caroline Brogden who heads the Junior Committee.
Annette, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Ifill is a lover of animals
and will be remembered for rescuing a cat that was reported
several months ago as being mistreated.
-- PHOTO: Gus Roberts


-1










1 mhr ribunn


Monday, January 15, 1973.


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon.toFri. Sat. 9a.m. to p.m.

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT FOR RENT FOR SALE SCHOOLS HELP WANTED HELP MITED I ELP WANTED


C8303 C8267 I C8 3


IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's home, quest
cottage, fireplace, 2'/2 baths,
patio, marvellous view,
swimming, fishing. H.H. Larkin
c/o box 101, Harbour Island.
C8405
LOT 75' x 100' just off
Carmichael Road, $3.300. Call.
McPherson & Brown Real
Estate 2-2680 2-2681.
C8282
LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East End.
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.
C8418
LOT IN HIGH VISTA
ESTATE. Best buy of the year.
Market price $7,200.00. Selling
now for only $5,500.00. Phone
21731 day. 41584 Nite. Ask
for Albert.
C8427
FOR SALE
APARTMENT BUILDING
Deluxe 2-storey unit. One
bedroom 1 bath fully furnished
and equipped, laundry and
extra large swimming pool. Out
East, quiet area, Private
balcony. Master TV hook-up.
Garbage disposal. Gross income
$32,000.00. Owner willing
seller for $250,000.00.
DAMIANOS AND
ASSOCIATES. Dial 22033,
22305, Nite 41197.
C8454
FOR SALE
TWO BEDROOMS, TWO
BATHS POOL AND PATIO
Out East. With some views, was
$65,000.00 for an
immediate sale. Owner will
take $50,000.00. Some
financing. See by appointment.
DIAL NICK DAMIANOS
22033, nite 41197.
C8463
BEACHFRONT GORGEOUS
acre, exclusive fashionable out
island resort. Sacrifice, easy
terms $10,000. Phone owner
5-7224 evenings.
C8460
CASH FOR YOUR
PROPERTY. FOX BROS. Tel.
28012, Box 6104, Nassau.
C84481
PRECISION PERFECT
Elegant in detail. Designed
for gracious living,
entertaining. 3 Bedrooms, 2
baths, plus complete bedroom
and bath as maids quarters.
House has Air, ceiling fans,
carpeted, spacious family room
overlooks spacious screened
patio. Ideal for cocktailing,
high class entertaining. 2-car
garage, landscaped grounds
with fruit trees. Immaculately
kept and rights to SANDY
BEACH.
STOP LOOKING Come see
this one. Has 4 bedrooms 21/2
baths, maids room. Has Air.
Completely furnished with
colour TV, Deepfreeze, washer.
Fruited. Two patios. Was
$65,000.00 come make offer
of $50,000.00. Can offer
terms.
OWNER MUST LEAVE -
wishes to sell. Everything stays.
Including dishwasher, pots,
pans, dishes. Furnished with 3
bedrooms 2 baths. Carpeted,
draped, tool room, car porte.
HIGHLAND PARK AREA,
surprising low cost of
$42,000.00.
LARGE POOL HOUSE -
SKYLINE DRIVE pool plus
two patios, can accommodate
300 guests. Has 4 bedrooms 3
baths. Built-in stereo.
Tastefully furnished.
BUY ME I AM CHEAP. -4
bedroom, half block from
sandy beach. 2 miles from
town. Spacious landscaped
grounds, over half-acre
enclosed grounds. Selling cheap
but needs decorating.
Worthwhile seeing, worthwhile
buying. Only $50,000.00.
HOME PLUS RENTAL
INCOME Spotless 2
bedroom plus one bedroom
apartment, both furnished.
City limits. Live-in one-and
rent the other. Only
$45,000.00. CALL NICK
DAMIANOS, REALTOR
Action numbers 22033, Nite
41197.
C8373
TUITION


THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE. World-famous
postal tuition for the GCE.
School Cert and
Accountancy, Banking,
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinat-
ions. For details of our
specialized courses write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Results College Dept. VHI
Tuition Houa London
SW19 4DS

Usiaa "Fir
* pillainl--E. ~i /tafG~jJ.'*/
l~lBB~fH~yj tl1iC


2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. t or
information call 3-6644.

C8265
LARGE 1 B[ DROOMv
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real ELstt
2-4777-8.
C8286
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHIt )
airconditioned orne bedroiorr
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152. F evenings
5-4926.

C8268
ONE EFFICIENCY apartment.
basically furnished, Victoria
Court Apa rt ments, on
Elizabeth Avenue between Bay
and Shirley Streets. Facilities,
Iaundry, parking. Phone
5-4631. After five 3-2397.

C8346
ONE 2-BEDROOM apartment,
basically furnished Palmdale
no children or pets. Ring
5-4980 after 6 p.m.
C8264
LOVE EtIACH COLONY
CLUB eachc) and NASSAU
HILLCR[ST TOWERS (Third
Terrace West Centreville)
Elegant, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 hath
apartments, airconditioned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842,
7-4116, 2-8224 or 2-8248.

C8289
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

C8410
BACHELOR ROOM in
respectable home in Palmdale
with private entrance. For
information call 5-1044.
C7039
NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroom/2
bath, situated Domingo
Heights, East St., South.
Contact: Nassau 5-6234.
C8285
ONE BEDROOM and one two
bedroom two bath, large living
and dining room, Bahama
room apartment. Basically
furnished on beautiful
landscaped grounds. Third
Terrace Centreville. Facilities,
laundry, phone, parking, fully
airconditioned. Phone 5-4631
-after five 3-2397.

C8429
ONE UNFURNISHED 2
bedroom apartment Hawkins
Hill $160. Telephone 51835
before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m.

C8473
1. LOVE BEACH: Brand
new modern house.
Lovely beach. 4
bedrooms, 41/2 baths.
2. VILLAGE RD.: Nicely
furnished large house with
sunroom, patio and office.
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Ideal
for entertaining.
3. SAN SOUCI: Small house
with nice garden. 3
bedrooms. 1 bath.
FURNISHED APARTMENT
AT BAYCROFT
4. Delightful 2 bedroom
ground floor apartment
fully furnished. New
refrigeratoror and gas
stove. Swimming pool,
parking lot. On exclusive
Montagu Foreshore.
$325.00 per month on
lonq lease.
H. G. CHRISTIE REAL ESTATE
309 Bay Street, P. O. Box
N8164, Nassau
Tel: 2-1041, 2-1042

C8446
1. UnlFICE SPACE: Roberts
Building, East Street.
120 sq. ft. $90.00 per month
270 sq. ft. 135.00 per month
360 sq. ft. 180.00 per month
975 so. ft. 400.00 per month
2. OFFICE & STORE: space
Out Island Traders Shopping
Centre, opposite Potters Cay.
Ideal location available for
takeout restaurant -- $308.33
per month. Store and office
space available from as little as
$277.00 Der month.
3. OAKES FIELD AREA: one
bedroom apartments,
unfurnished $140.00 per
month.


4. OFFICE SPACE OAKES
FIELD AREA: 868 sq. ft.
$290.00 per month.
5. APARTMENTS out East
- 1 & 2 bedrooms, fully
furnished, airconditioning,
swimming pool, $255.00 &
$265.00 per month.


6. LOVELY EXECUTIVE 2
bedroom apartment, in the
east, redecorated and
refurbished $375.00 per
month.
All enquiries on the above
should be directed to Bert L.
Roberts Limited telephone
NRS. 2-3177/2-3178


SPACIOUS
furnished
overlooking
Street. Rent


2 bedroom
apart ment,
sea, East Bay
$275 per month.


Call 21631 2.

C8430
2 OFFICES Oakes Field
area, Crawford Street. Second
floor were $250.00 now
$200.00 per month. DIAL
DAMIANOS 22033, 22305.
C8436
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
house Crawford Street.
Telephone 36653.

C4302
NEWLY FURNISHED
apartment with wall to wall
carpeting, airconditioned, T.V.
and laundromat. Located on
Roosevelt Avenue off Mackey
Street. Phone 53301. Live in
luxury.

C8428
OFFICE BUILDING -
PALMDALE AND BRADLEY
1400 sq. ft. Ideal for doctor,
lawyer or agency offices. Neat,
clean plus loads of parking.
Only $400.00 per month. See
anytime. DIAL DAMIANOS
22033, Nite 41197.

C8406
AIRCONDITIONED furnished
apartment. $150 per month.
Call 2-4635.

FORSALE R REL
C8462
COLONIAL DIGNIFIED
stone hilltop, two bathroom,
nicely furnished residence.
Overlooks western edge town.
Lease $300 month, spacious,
tiled livingroom patios,
laundry, maid's quarters,
phone, television, children's
pool, acre grounds. Convenient
beaches, golf, airport. Phone
5-7224, evenings.


CARS FOR SALE
C8416
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
SUBSTANTIAL END OF
SEASON REDUCTIONS


1970 Victor
Automatic
1970 Chevrolet
Impala
1970 Rover 2000
A/C Automatic
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic Beige
4 Dr.
1969 Vauxhall
Viva 4 Dr. Std.
1968 Javelin A/C
1971 Vauxhall
Victor 2000
Automatic Grey
1968 Ford
Escort Std. 2 Dr.
White
1971 Vauxhall Viva
2 Dr. Auto. Green
1971 Mercury
Comet Auto. Green
1970 Mustang
Red. A/C
1969 Dodge Monaco
A/C Vinyl
1963 S/Wagon
Ford Auto


Trade-Ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8.


$1500

$2800

$2400

$1895

$825
$1600


$2300


$650

$1895

$2800

$2400

$1795

$450


C8458
USA-4. 71 4-dr. Ford LTD
Brougham. Fully loaded
include factory stereo tape
system. Steel Michelin tires.
20,000 miles. $3800. Buyer
must pay duty. Call
Commander Fliegel 21181
(work), 77351 (home)


C8445
1971-MK


III SPITFIRE -


maroon, soft top, radio,
11,500 $1,700 O.N.O.
Phone 34068.

C8404
1965 AMPI CAR Triumph
Herald 1200 cc Engine. Owner
must leave colony. Phone
2-2441.
C8377
2 YEAR OLD automatic
Cortina. Excellent condition.
Only 12000 miles. $1700.
Owner leaving. Phone 41365.
I
C8358
1967 MORRIS 1000 Traveller
- good running condition.
$650 or nearest offer. Call*
2-4173 between 9 a.m. 5
p.m. weekdays.

C8402
1970 MORRIS 1100 for sale.
Good condition. Phone 24076,
or 53746
C8434
1968 FIREBIRD -- power
steering, power brakes tape
deck included. Phone: 28616
day. Night 41298.


PETS FOR SALE
C8383
THOROUGHBRED
LABRADOR puppies, six
weeks old with shots. Parents
A.K.C. registered. Phone
3-1457.


C8401
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
including bedroom sets, fridge,
gas stove, washing machine,
airconditioner, furniture TV,
etc. etc. Phone 51372 after 5
p.m.
C8437
Airconditioner 10000 BTU
TV -- antenna and booster
Lamps, end tables, coffee table
Record Player and other
household items. Lot in High
Vista. Phone 24746.

C8422
1968 2-DOOR JAVELIN.
$1,000.00.
1 18-ft. Capri Boat with 40
,h.p. outboard Evinrude and
trailer $1,200.00 or nearest
offer.
1 16-MM. Sound Projector.
$400.00.
1 Electric Arc Welder.
$350.00. Phone 32235 or
42421.

C8344
BAY STREET BUSINESS
LADIES FASHION STORE
FOR PARTICULARS
ON LEASE OR SALE
Tel: 24148/23027 or 22794
Morley & O'Brien
Real Estate Ltd.

C8443
'BROTHER' portable electric
sewing machine swing
needle used twice. Phone
34068.
C8444
HOOVER HAIRDRYER
$10.00
Electric hand mixer $10.00
Bridesmaid's dress size 12,
turquoise empire line. Phone
34068.


C8440
PANASONIC 4 speed stereo
record player, AF/AM/AF
radio and stereo cassette, black
and chrome finish Phone
34068.

PETS
C8468
WE'LL MAKE YOU AN
OFFER YOU CAN'T REFUSE
Free-Pedigree Potcake Puppies
6 weeks old. Must be good
home! Telephone day 53811 -
Night 31471.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C8356 NOTICE
SHEPHERD L. KEY will sell
by Public Auction on Saturday
the 20th day of January, A.D.
1973 at Twelve O'clock noon
at Auction Galleries Limited,
6th Terrace, Centreville, the
following property:
ALL THAT piece parcel or I
lot of land being Lot *
Number Sixty-two (62) of
Claridgedale Gardens
Sub-division situate in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence and
bounded on the NORTH by
Lot Number Sixty-three
(63) of Claridgedale Gardens
and running thereon Forty
(40) feet on the EAST by
Raymond Road on the
SOUTH by Karl Drive and
on the WEST by Lot
Number Sixty-one (61) of
Claridgedale Gardens and
running thereon Eighty (80)
feet which said piece parcel
or lot of land has such
position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions as are
shown on the diagram or
plan Numbered 271 N.P. in
the Crown Lands Office of
the City of Nassau on the
Island of New Providence
aforesaid.
The above property known as
the property of Jenniemae
Porter is being sold under an
Indenture of Mortgage dated
the 7th November, 1971.
The sale is subject to a Reserve
Price and to a right to the
Auctioneer or any one on his
behalf to bid up to that price.
TERMS: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on delivery of title.
Dated this 3rd day of January,
A.D. 1973
SHEPHERD L. KEY
Public Auctioneer.

I ANNO CEMENTS
C8464
REVIVAL NIGHTLY
AT 7:30 P.M.
FAITH TEMPLE
PALMDALE
Rev. Daniel Hampton,
Evangelist.

SCHOOLS

C8409
GUITAR LESSONS .... taught
by Derek. For information call
5-2354.


C8396
BOOK-KEEPING II. Students
wishing to register for Evening
Classes commencing 18th
January are asked to contact
Mr. Smith at 2=8901 or
3-4843.


C8335
ENROLL FOR EASTER
TERM
Typing
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Commercial Mathematics
Office Practice
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier (NCR
4200)
Dictaphone-Typist
Filing
Telex Operator
B.J.C. and G.C.E. Classes:-
English
Mathematics
Literature
History
Spanish
NASSAU ACADEMY OF
BUSINESS
Shirley Street opp. Collins
Avenue Phone 24993


MARINE SUPPLIES
C8283
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleeps
six; private bathroom with
vanity, shower and head;
stove refrigerator, sink,
stereo ship-to-shore, twin 230
h.p. engines with less than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
C8384
BAHAMAS YACHT SALES
JAMES W. ALBURY
P. o BOX 599OO
NASSAU BAHAMAS
TEL PA0o7
DISTRIBUTOR FOR

TROJANYAGHT C
A DIVISION OF
WHITTAKER
CORPOR..,TO


APPRECIATION
C8459


MR. & MRS. WELLINGTON
CURTIS who were married
17th December 1972 would
like to thank the many
relatives and friends who
helped to make their day such
a happy one and for their
lovely gifts.



C8453
THIS IS TO INFORM the
public that Arthur George
Dorsett is no longer employed
by British American Insurance
Co. Ltd., and he has no
authority to collect or do
business of any nature for
British American Insurance Co.
Ltd.

POSITION WANTED
C7050
ADVERTISER has wide
ranging experience here and
abroad in securities investment
and allied fields, administrative
ability and entrepreneurial
traits, seeks a senior position.
Write in confidence to: Adv.
No. C-7050, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau,
Bahamas.

WANTED
C8439
TEACHER FOR simple
accordian lessons for young
boy. Telephone 5-3463 after 6
p.m.

HELP WANTED
C8271
REFRIGERATION
MECHANIC. Should have 3 to
5 years experience on domestic
appliances. Salary subject to
negotiations. Phone BESCO
2-1070.


C8433
BAHAMAS HOTEL
TRAINING COUNCIL
The newly established Council,
representative of Government
and Hotel Industry, requires a
Secretary for the Hotel
Training Director soon to be
appointed.
Candidates should be highly
proficient in shorthand and
typing and experienced in
administration and keeping
accounts.
Applications to: Chairman
Bahamas Hotel Training
Council P. O. Box N-7799
Nassau.


C8426
LAND SURVEYOR
Qualified Land Surveyor
required by construction firm.
Must be willing to work
extensively on the Out Islands,
and have basic knowledge
concerning structural layout
for roads and airports. Details
of past employment and
references required.
WELDER
Qualified Welder required with
at least 5 years experience.
Applicant must be willing to
work and live extensively on
the Out Islands. Details of past
employment and references
required.
ENGINEER
Experienced Marine Diesel
Engineer required for 300 ton
landing craft inter
island/United States. Details of
past employment and
references required.
Apply in writing giving age,
experience and qualifications
to Personnel Manager, Ervin
Knowles Construction
Company Limited, P. O. Box
N7772, Nassau.


C8425
REQUIRED: TENNIS PRO
FOR CAPE ELEUTHERA
Job Title: Tennis Instructor or
Tennis Teach Professional
Education: High School
Technical: None
Experience: (a) Three or more
years as instructor or teaching
pro.
(b) Have a practical knowledge
of equipment purchasing and.
sales.
Other requirements:
Knowledge of scheduling of
matches and guest
participation events.

GOLF PROFESSIONAL &
PRO SHOP MANAGER
FOR CAPE ELEUTHERA
Required Qualifications:
1. Preferably husband-wife
team.
2. Membership in good
standing of P.G.A. (Class "A")
Job requirements/Duties:
1. Manage and direct all facets,
of the golf course and related
facilities in consort with pro
shop manager.
2. Purchase and sale of all golf
equipment and wearing
apparel.
(Pro shop manager)
3. Make necessary repairs to
equipment.
4. Golf instructions and train
assistant when needed (in all
phases including playing and
instruction).
5. Conduct golf tournaments:
(a) Club Tournaments
.(b) National or International
6. Work with local P.G.A. on a
junior golf development
programme and other
promotional activities.
7. Work in an advisory capacity
with golf course
superintendent. (Greens-
keeper).
Please apply to: G. A. C.
ELEUTHERA, P. O. Box
N7782, Nassau. or Telephone
24596/7 for interview.
C8447
BURROUGHS BAHAMAS
LIMITED is seeking a General
Manager to control the
company operations within the
Bahamas. The applicant should
have received at least five
years' working experience
within the Burroughs
Corporation of Detroit and will
be conversant with company
policy in respect of:--
1. Marketing
2. Field Engineering
3. Forecasting
4. Budgeting and Accounting
5. Pricing
6. Office Administration
7. Training
8. Recruitment
Salary will be commensurate
with experience and
background. Interested
applicants of Bahamian status
only please reply in confidence
to:
"General Manager"
P. O. Box ES 6266,
Nassau, Bahamas.

C8471 W 've



Added 3

More

Presses For

Your

Service


BAHAMAS'
LARGEST
PRINT SHOP


MONUMENT
PRINTING

TELEPHON? 3.5665
By Oakes Monument
Oakes Field,
HAWTHORNE RD.


please write to P.
F-2442, Freeport,
Bahama.


0. Box
Grand


I


I


C8449
OPrNING for Caulker of hulls
and decks of wooden vessels.
Must have at least five years
experience as ships'
caulker. Apply in person to Mr.
Gordon Pinder, Nassau
Shipyards, East Bay Street.
C8452
N. M. ROTHSCHILD AND
SONS LIMITED require the
services of a Solicitor or
Chartered Accountant for the
Trust and Tax Department
with considerable
opportunities for advancement.
The individual we seek must be
personable, knowledgeable and
able to deal with the personal
affairs of wealthy clients. A
substantial salary and fringe
benefits.are available to the
right man. Please write to: The
Staff Manager, N. M.
Rothschild and Sons Limited,
P. O. Box 185, New Court, St.
Swithin's Lane, London, EC4P
4DU.
C8456
REQUIRED Gardener/
handyman to maintain garden
and some household duties.
Male, preferably aged 30/40,
but this is not a restrictive
criterion. Must have knowledge
of maintenance of trees and
shrubs. It is essential that
candidate be prepared to live
in. Bahamians only need apply.
Please write to The Royal Bank
of Canada International
Limited, P. O. Box N 1445,
Nassau, Bahamas.

C8450
PUBLIC RELATIONS
MANAGER required for
expanding business. Minimum
of five years business
experience in merchandising,
promotion, supervision and
training. Write to P. O. Box N
1237, Nassau.
C8451
BANK OF MONTREAL
(BAHAMAS & CARIBBEAN)
Limited requires an
Accounting Manager, who
will be responsible for collation
of all statistical data required
for management information
and Central Bank reporting
requirements, as well as the
uniformity and optimum
applicability of accounting
procedures throughout the
Bank's system.
Applicants must have at least 8
years experience to include
domestic Branch Banking and
International Banking
accounting. Apply in writing to
Personnel Officer, P. O. Box
N7118, Nassau.
C8461
EXPERIENCED sales person
required for retail shop. Please
write to P. O. Box N-804 giving
details.
C8470
THE ROYAL Bank of Canada
requires the services of four
stenographers. Applicants must
be able to type a minimum of
45 words per minute and take
100 words per minute
shorthand. For an interview,
telephone Personnel
Department, 2-8701.

C8466
SHOP MANAGERESS for
international firm, must be
able to assume training of
Personnel. At least (5) five
years experience in China,
Crystal and Giftware as well as
purchasing knowledge of
components on Lead Crystal
and Fine Bone China is
essential.
Ideal applicant should be able
to read and understand French
or German. For interview,


question The
Classified
hears often. And
there is no "best


C8412


SUOPI APARINT FOR SALE



















One of the Nicest of Baycroft Condominium One-Bedroom
Apartments.

o COMPLETELY FURNISHED & EQUIPPED
VIEW OF SEA FROM PRIVATE BALCONY
USE OF SWIMMING POOL


27,500 (FirmPrice)


a I~I I.,


N


TELEPHONE 4-2113
MORNINGS ONLY PLEASE.


i -


i1 i I


C8378
WANTED: Gardener-
Handyman. Full time. Inquire
3-1975.
C8467
OPERATIONS AGENT
FREEPORT
EASTERN AIRLINES has an
immediate opening for an
Operations Agent at Freeport
International Airport.
Responsibilities of the position
include complete handling of
all functions associated with
the arrival and departure of
aircraft; radio and teletype
communications; and baggage
service.
Minimum qualifications: Age:
21 and older
Education: High School
diploma or equivalent
certification College training is
preferred. Send resume to:
Post Box 2583, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

TRADE SERVICES
C8279

/Andrp Cdomj

roera4e Ltd.
Madkey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
-P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVINGSTORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C8102
AFTER CHRISTMAS MESS?
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCO TEL:51071-2-3-4.

C8281 -
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.
C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERt,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.


Which day

is best for

a Want Ad?


That's a
Tribune
Department
fortunately,
day".


Each day there are people
with new wants and needs.
Each day brings new readers,
as well as old ones to the
Classified pages.
So start your ad when your
"want" arises, and cancel it
when it brings results.
Stop-by The Tribune office
to place yours. Every day is
the best day to advertise with
The Tribune Classified Ads.


--I-


II I I I I


I


--


I


I


~II L~I LIl























S FO SALE
C7046
5.5 Meter racing Yacht
3 Suits Sails Good condition
$1200 O.N.O.
Telephone 352-5635 Days
373-1585 Evenings.
C7038
1959 Chevrolet 1 ton Pick-Uo
with utility body $200.00
1965 Volkswagon Pick-Up
$200.00
1961 Singer Station Wagon,
Automatic $400,00
ALL DUTY PAID. Phone
352-6239


HELP WANTED
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeoort office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.

C7051
PLANT SUPERINTENDENT
for Soft Drink Bottling Plant.
Must be experienced Filler
Operator and Bottling Line
Mechanic, with minimum of 5
years experience in Modern
Bottling Plant back shop
operation. Alsp capable of
figuring formula for drinks and
understanding of temperatures
and pressures in bottling,
maintenance of delivery
equipment and ability to
handle men. Give references as
to honesty and dependability
with reply. Good salary
commensurate with ability and
experience.
Leader Beverages Ltd., P. O.
Box F-110, Freeport, Bahamas.
C7048
L I N E S M A N/
GROUNDSMAN/CLEANER -
Must clean and weed outdoor
areas and indoor including
washrooms and toilets. Handles
ships lines in docking and
casting off. Must be available
for night calls.
LEGAL SECRETARIES -
Experience in legal secretarial
work required. Excellent
secretarial skills and knowledge
of legal terminology and
documents needed.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
- To senior officers.
Significant prior experience as
secretary required. Must be fast
and accurate at shorthand,
typing, filing; able to handle
visitors and telephone calls.
TALLYMAN Knowledge
and experience of
checking/Tallying cargo
Discharged/Loaded from/in
ships and in General Cargo
Vans. Also checking cargo in
Warehouses and Delivery of
Goods to Consignees.
METER READER
SUPERINTENDENT Must
be thoroughly familiar with
Freeport area. Must be able to
organize meter reading routes
and control and check on work
of meter readers. Should be
able to prepare data from
meter books for computer
input and also to assist with
accounts receivable and
collection problems.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority Limited, P. O.
Box F-2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7054
MECHANIC REQUIRED:
Complete knowledge of the
workings of Lister-Blackstone
general motors and Deutz
diesel engines. Must be familiar
with generation and
distribution equipment. Five
years experience is required.
Reference letters needed.
SECRETARY REQUIRED:
Must be able to work with
large Conventions. Typing and
Shorthand required at 60
w.p.m. Must be neat in
appearance and be able to
work on own.
LAUNDRY MAN Two to three
years experience is required.
Must be able to work with
large laundry machines. This
job requires a lot of standing.
COMPTROLLER: Must have
College degree in accounting
with at least 10 years of public
accounting or equivalent in
Hotel industry. To control
operations of 600 room
Hotel-Marina-Stores-Res-
taurants and Bars.
TYPIST CASHIER: Must be
able to type accurately at 55
w.p.m., must be able to do
cashier work and know how to
operate NCR 4200 machine.
Must also be able to work on
her own. Pleasant personality,
neat in appearance.
PROGRAMMER: Must have at
least 5 years experience in
Fortran IV and R.P.G.
computer languages, and know
all phases of hotel data


processing systems.
Interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL
,AND COUNTRY CLUB,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA PERSONNEL
OFFICE BETWEEN THE
HOURS OF 9 A.M. and 3 P.M.,
MONDAY THROUGH
FRIDAY.


HELP WANTED
C7045
HEAVY DUTY diesel and gas
mechanic with a knowledge of
operating and maintaining
diesel generators, hydraulically
driven equipment and systems.
3 years experience.
Apply to Grand Bahama
Engineering, P. O. Box F-2,
Freeport, Phone 352-6239.


C7047
SEVEN MEN and seven
women required for poultry
processing plant, no experience
necessary.
Also 2 experienced men for
chicken growing operation.
Must be willing to work.
Bahamians preferred.
Contact Bahamas Poultry Co.,
Ltd., P. O. Box F-137, Phone
352-7897.
C7056
NIGHT PORTER Individual
should be prepared to do
general janitorial work which
consists of general cleaning of
offices and toilets. Only
applicants who are prepared to
work each day will be
considered.
Apply to: Devco Personnel,
18C Kipling, Bldg., P. O. Box
F-2666, Freeport, GBI.
C7057
15 GARBAGE COLLECTORS
- no experience necessary,
must be over 21 years old.
1 GARBAGE TRUCK
MECHANIC 3 to 5 years
experience in multi sequence
hydraulics and diesel engine
repairs. Must have automatic
transmission experience in
repairs and heavy equipment
repairs. Apply in person to:
Sanitation Services Co., Ltd.,
Keats St. Freeport.

C7059
EXPERIENCED
HAIRSTYLIST capable of
cutting and styling, coloring
and perming ladies' hair.
EXPERIENCED BARBER -
capable of all phases of cutting,
styling, coloring and
perming men's hair. Ability to
style ladies' hair an asset.
COSMETOLOGIST capable
of giving facial treatments,
manicures and pedicures. Body
massage an asset.
YOUNG LADIES' to train as
Hairstylists. /
International Hotel Beauty
Salon, P. 0. Box F-775,
Freeport.
C7058
REFRIGERATION AND
Al R-CONDITIONING
ENGINEER: CERTIFICATE
FROM ACCREDITED
AIR-CONDITIONING AND
REFRIGERATION SCHOOL
REQUIRED. MUST BE ABLE
TO DESIGN, ESTIMATE AND
MAINTAIN ALL TYPES OF
REFRIGERATION AND
AIR-CONDITIONING UNITS
AND ALLIED EQUIPMENT
AND HAVE A GOOD
KNOWLEDGE OF
ELECTRICITY.
PLEASE REPLY TO: FOOD
FAIR STORE, P. O. BOX
F-2416, FREEPORT.

C7060
BOILER OPERATOR -
required with at least three
years experience in this
capacity. Applicant must have
knowledge of boiler water
treatment, cooling tower
equipment and domestic watel
systems.
Interested persons should
contact Miss M. Adderley at
the International Hotel, P. O
Box F-684, Freeport, Granc
Bahama or telephone 352-9661
for interview.

C7053
ONE HOUSEMAN to clean
hallways, vacuum, transport
linen to and from Linen Room,
sweep and attend all requests
by supervisor, experienced
applicant preferred.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to Kinq's Inn & Golf
Club, Personnel Department.

C7052
4 FOOD WAITRESSES.- to
work split shift, neat in
appearance, must be able to
read and write, experienced
applicant preferred.
3 BUS BOYS to work shift,
neat in appearance, able to
read and write.
STOREKEEPER/CLERK -
Male, to take charge of
Engineering stores, Purchase
requisitions, answer telephone,
co-ordinate service calls, attend
to clerical duties, must be
familiar with engineering
materials.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to King's Inn & Golf
Club, Personnel Department.


QIO Qrtibunt


CLASSIFIED ADVS.

BRING RESULTS-FAST

TELEPHONE

362-6608


Ib Ur rtbunt


SOAROLL NIOHTeRi




from Ntw Cirtg R l~st IhMW


I


Winning

Bridge
Miy VMT MOLLO
DaMWr wif: ba vul.
werth
IA J 7
I 9 8 7
SAK 4 3
*A K 2
WWest ast
SK 8 4
VA K QJ 10 2 e I 5
S10O 6 5 J 9 8 7
boeth
4 9 10 643 9
09 4 3

West iw= BuSt South
IV Dibe 3 A*
hall we oack declarer or the
deeape? It looks easy enough
wor soUth. The trutp finesse
belit rft. he wll lose two
mears and a diamond. What
olse?
INlnety-nlne Westc out of a
bundrea wil lead out te t nee
sop heats, Mas stignahun wa.n
e 4 the third time. h'e hun-
dredn Wet will pause after the
tist two trLcks to look for ue
Othei two heeded to breal the
ootraot. ,The diamonds may pro.
vide a tdak, but tem aelb's can
so a trump is the oMly hope. U
ast has tne 410 all is wel, but
even the 4d ill suffice-tf lst
ua it to ruff a heart, promot-
ing a trlk for West. To make
mre that Must does his daiy.
West leads not a top heart but
the loly s. The 4 forces out
thae .0, and now. ..
OiM t ak tne defence?
So? Quite right, for, of course.
South doan't have to over-rmtf.
Ke dlacards a losing dimod
S neotlates the tiip
cailsTabl0e Up."


Chess
By LBONARD BARDIN













White to move and wun. Ibis
endgme by L. Prokes is an
Ideal solving postc because
White ( yig up the board.
from bottom to top of the
ae) looks co letey lost. The
lck KtP is about to Queen
while if the White rook attacks
this pawn the KRP is free to
advance.
So how does Whte win ?
Par times: 20 seconds, end-
game master; 1 minute, end-
game expert; 3 minutes, county
player: 6 minutes, Cub
standard; 12 minutes, average:
25 minutes. novice.
SOLUTION No 9557 -

Chess Solution
1 R-KtS, P-R6; 2 R-Kt4,ch,
P-KtS oh; 3 K-B4, P-R7; 4
R-Kt3, either P=Q; 5 R-R3
ch. PxR; 6 P-Kt3 mate.


H wor letter., md there mut be at
I o aur letters lait one eight-letter word in he
or msoe a lst. No plrals; ofore inwords
momm a 0no proelr names. TODAY'l
from the TAIC'TT: 48 words, good
A Letters shown 8 %uords, me good; 68 wor ds
ere? in excellent. glolutlon on Monday. LU
n k IonI YIEaTEIRDAY'S SOLUTION:
word. each Allow allow bawl bawn blow
letter m a blown bowl lawn sallow swn
be used once slaw olow nlow SNOWBALL
onb. Each sown swab swan swob wall.


LL
2 1
...Ho. ... ...l U


No. .l0?4 . by TIM McKAY
Across%
I. lie convinced hlv licas (3. ii)
u. shape. (4)
N. Kaotern rulers. (,)
Ill. Advice on horse-track form.
(6. 3)
II. Long river. (I)


I How the tlone fell in the
river. (7. '2)
15. How the dale behaved ? 7)
I1. Ct'llat ei cmllnotlnn. (1. 4)
'lo. l~'r. an or. (4.)
I. -Kallmai (4)
I3 Show jubilance. (4)
Down
I. Old melal. 1>. 4)
t. Fencing In ( 9)
3. Part of hanrless. (4)
4. Satllnsl 15)
.. AInerican NSlle. (4)
7. Paddle. (3)
8. selssrs
(8() L't.ll
9I Pr lckly
(4)
I1. Meadow.
(3)
II. t. (4)
14. F I nor-
C o Ver-
on. y, one.
i ) v el.
(:3)


Monday, January 15, 1973.




RANDD BAHAMA

IN FREEPORT TEL 352-6680


S) GENERAL TENDENCIES: A day and evening
when you need to begin the new week with an
open mind where ideas and methods for putting these in effect
in the future are concerned You have some surprise assistance.
But if you try to hold on to, or work out, matters from the
past, you can have many delays and get just nowhere.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Associates give you fine ideas
for becoming more successful in the future, so go along with
them and put in action right away. Get away for a while from
that job that has you up a tree. Return to it later and all's fine.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Get busy with duties that
improve relations with fellow workers and conditions around
you and you make big headway. Not a good day to make
collections, but tomorrow is better for such Avoid the
limelight tonight.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You feel frustrated early, but
if you get out into the active or social world, you soon become
inspired and can accomplish a good deal. Seek the company of
cheerful person. Mate needs encouragement in p.m. Give it.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You are frustrated
about finances in a.m, but kin can be of help to you later
when you need it most Consider whatever is basic in your life
and build from there. Regain your composure, be sure of
yourself again.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) If you discuss what is on your
mind openly with others, you find you make big headway
instead of trying to complete work that can wait Good day
for shopping and getting real buys Keep appointments on
time.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept. 22) You can handle those
financial matters well if you use a different and more modern
method now Use good judgment instead of your hunches
which are not working just right. Take it easy tonight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) You have excellent ideas and
can now do much to help yourself and others, so your life
takes on a more even and successful tone. Improve your health
and appearance in some way.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov 21) Avoid tiresome chores and
get into that research work that will clear up whatever is very
puzzling to you now. Co-workers are not in a good humor
right now An adviser gives fine suggestions, however.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) Don't rely on fellow
workers too much today since they are still in a weekend
mood, but keep busy at own job wisely However, the social is
also fine later in the day Join groups where the people are
congenial, charming.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) Before you get into all
those job details, learn what it is that bigwigs expect of you,
and then proceed intelligently. Work out debatable civic
problems wisely. Evening is best spent at home with kin.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) You are inspired just how
to handle all of your problems in a most clever way and should
do just that now Listen to what new acquaintances have to
say to help you advance faster There are good ideas that
should be followed
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Forget home problems that
need only time to straighten themselves out, and get busy with
outside matters so you can progress faster in business. Follow
your hunches instead of others' suggestions. Think
constructively.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who can easily gain the
backing of higher-ups, especially those who are progressive and
modern thinking, so see to it that your child comes in contact
with such persons early There is much artistic, musical ability
here and the education should be slanted along such lines, as
well as whatever has to do with religion, oratory, or whatever
will place your son, daughter before the public.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


By Alex Kotzky


ISTEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


by saunders & overgard


-je Com c Pce|



REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

WELUL.THAT WASN'T WHO DOE$ THAT BARON THINk HE K ENH, WHAT PI' 0uV SOMC PEOPLE
TOO MUCH OF AN I i--- t CAN GET FIFTH OTNER SAV TO THAT MAN /NEVER WANTTO
AFTER MEETING ORDEAL, WAS IT r PROFESSIONAL GOLFERS E'S WALKING OUT0 E TOLP THE
THE ACCOUNT TO DO THOSE PLEASE IN A HUFF WITH TRUTH, JUNE
EXECUTIVE S COMMERCIALS / CHARLEY--- HE RAFE FOLLOWING
KEN &ARON YOU SHOULD WAS JUST H im/ r Vt
RETURNS TO ASk RAFE' kIPPIN&--












JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS




THEY LEARN THAT HE WANTS TO TALK
As5AA, ABBEY AND REMEMBER HER -BE OUT 'N A FEW MINUTES' WIFE! I'M VERY
ROCKY RETURN TO NAME OR THAT I'M . 'P- WHY DON'T yOU WAIT IN WORRIED
THE HOSPITAL FLOOR, HER HUSBAND ? THE OLARIUM? I KNOW ABOUT HER
i THEY LEARN THAT H WANTS


CONSCIOUSNESS BUT v;\ "
THAT SHE'S AMNESIC' VIP r J


1


r-


APARTMENT 3-G


I











Monday, January 15, 1973.


ihr i ribunt


U


f iMiami Dolphins keep Mug



unbeaten record in r


Super Bowl win

By Bruce Lowitt
LOS ANGELES (AP) The Washinton Redskins, carrying the
slim role of one-point favourites, met the unbeaten Miami
Dolphins Sunday after a cannon salute and an Apollo 17 space
capsule display ushered in the start of Super Bowl VII. At the end
of the game the Dolphins kept their unbeaten record with a 14-7
victory.


The Redskins, making their
first appearance in a National
Football League championship
game since 1945, were the
heavy favourites of the sellout
crowd of more than 90,000
fans in Memorial Coliseum.
A bright sun shone down
onto the field, sending the
kickoff temperature up to 84
degrees with 44 per cent
humidity. The sky was
cloudless but a veil of smog
obscured the view of the
nearby San Gabriel mountains.
The Dolphins were seeking
to avenge their 24-3 loss to the
Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl
VI a year ago in New Orleans.
And coach Don Shula was
looking for his first victory in
three championship games. His
Baltimore Colts lost 16-7 to
the New york Jets in 1969.
The Dolphins, with Bob
Griese returning as the starting
quarterback for the first time
since being injured in the fifth
regular-season game, carried a
perfect 16-0 record into the
Super Bowl. They beat
Cleveland 20-14 and Pittsburgh
21-17 in the playoffs.
The Redskins quarterbacked
by Billy Kilmer, finished their
season at 11-3, the most
victories in Washington history,
then won the National
Conference crown by beating
Green Bay 16-3. and Dallas
26-3.
GRIESE ON TARGET
Miami took a 7-0 lead with
one second remaining in the
first quarter when Bob Griese
hit Howard Twilley with a
28-yard pass to cap a six-play,
63-yard drive.
A pair of runs by Jim Kiick
and an 18-yard Griese-to-Paul
Warfield pass set up the scoring
play. Twilley beat cornerback
Pat Fischer, caught the ball on
the six-yard line and dragged
Fischer into the end zone.
Miami failed to pick up a
first down on its opening series


and, for a moment, it appeared
Washingtn had a big break
when linebacker Harold
McLinton recovered a fumbled
snap from centre at the
Dolphins' 27-yard line. But
McLinton was called for illegal
procedure, having interfered
with the snap. On the ensuing
punt, the Redskins took over
on their own 25.
The two teams played
cautious, defensive football
through the opening minutes.
Linebacker Nick
Buoniconti's interception of a
Kilmer pass and his 32-yard
return to the Washington 27
set up Miami's second-period
score, a one-yard Jim Kiick
touchdown plunge that made it
14-0 with 18 seconds left in
the half.
Griese's 19-yard pass to Jim
Mandich on the right sideline
preceded a pair of one-yard
runs by Kiick the second
into the end zone behind Larry
Little's block.
INTERCEPTION
In the opening minutes of
the second period, Jake Scott
intercepted a Kilmer pass near
midfield but a penalty for an
illegal receiver downfield wiped
out a 20-yard Griese-to-Marve
Fleming pass and Miami had to
punt.
They got it right back, by
containing Washington, and
apparently had another
touchdown on a 47-yard
Griese-to-Warfield pass but
illegal motion on Marlin
Briscoe nullified the play and
the drive.
The Redskins, starting from
their own 17, made it into
Miami territory with about two
minutes remaining in the half
but Buoniconti's
interception turned things
around.
So dominant were the
Miamians in the first half, it
appeared Washington's
"Over-The-Hill-Gang" really
was over it.
The Dolphins beat Allen at
his own game defense.
Even Washington's
placekicker, Curt Knight, who
had converted all seven of his
field-goal attempts in two
previous playoff games, was
harried by the Dolphins'


defense. Knight muffed a
32-yard attempt in the third
period under heavy pressure
from Lloyd Mumphord.
The Redskins didn't score
until only 2:07 remained in the
struggle, and they shouldn't
have scored then.
Safety Jake Scott, the day's
Most Valuable Player, had
intercepted a Bill Kilmer pass
in the end zone and raced 55
yards. Moments later, Garo
Yepremian entered for a
42-yard field goal attempt.
Somehow tackle Bill
Brundige broke through the
usually reliable Dolphin
protection and blocked Garo's
kick before it got much
altitude.
SUPER HERO
Yepremian scurried to his
right and grabbed the bouncing
ball. Rather than eat it, he
apparently decided to become
a super hero.
As Shula almost fainted,
Garo passed on the run. But
cornerback Mike Bass leaped
up at the Dolphins' 49 and
picked off the fumble in the
air.
He went down the sideline
to a touchdown. Only
Yepremian had any kind of a
shot at Bass, and Garos try at
the Miami 20 was considerably
less than heroic.
It was officially declared a
fumble recovery by Bass, but it
was no such thing. Garo was
throwing.
The partisan mob then had
hopes, if faint, of the Redskins
stopping the Dolphins after the
deep kickoff, wresting
possession and forcing sudden
death with a tying touchdown.


OVERTHROWS
The aroused Redskin
defense did stop Miami after
one first down, forced a punt
and took over at the
Washington 30 with 1:14 left.
But Kilmer, for all his
reputation as pressure-proof
quarterback, seemed to be
feeling an apple in his throat.
He badly overthrew Larry
Brown on a sideline pass. Then
he overshot Charley Taylor by
an even bigger margin. And
when Kilmer did locate Brown
with a swing pass, end Bill
Stanfill wrapped up Larry for a


four-yard loss.
Then the perfect season
ended on a perfect note.
Kilmer dropped back for a
final pass attempt and Vern
Den Herder and Stanfill sacked
him for a nine-yard loss with
33 seconds left.
The Dolphins took no
chances. They let the clock
expire without getting off a
play, then began looking
forward to the $15,000
winners' booty and their Super
Bowl ring.
SUPER DEFENSE
Super was the word for
Miami's defense.
Brown, the NFL's Most
Valuable Player for 1972, was
limited to 72 yards (and a long
gain of 11 yards) in 22 carries.
With tackle Manny
Fernandez playing the game of
his life, the defenders budgeted
the Redskins to 141 yards in
36 rushing plays.
"We thought we could run
on Miami but we couldn't,"
said Allen. "There'll be a lot of
hours of agony tonight.
"1 can't get out of here (Los
Angeles) fast enough."
At first glance, Kilmer's
passing statistics look decent -
14 of 28. But he netted only
104 yards passing and had
three intercepted and returned
for 95 yards.
Miami's White Knight,
quarterback Griese, was
percent during the Dolphins'
extremely impressive first half.
Making his first start in 12
games, Griese hit six of six
throws in the first half. He
wound up eight for 11 and 88
yards despite his tender right
leg broken Oct. 15.
The Redskins sacked Griese
only twice, and once he simply
had nobody open.
Griese's main man was
Csonka. Running on the grass
he loves so much, Csonka
-powered 112 yards in 15
'smashes through the defense
that allowed neither Green Bay
nor Dallas a playoff
touchdown.
Zonk even had a breakaway
dash of 49 yards in the third
quarter when a mere mortal
would have been legweary.


,,


EASY VICTORY Gary Bain, last year's champion
jockey, is shown as he wins easily on Spanish Dancer (7)
over Sling Shot (6), ridden by Alfred Gibbs in the fifth race
of Saturday's race meet at the Hobby Horse Race Track.
Bain showed fine form at the meet by completing the day
with four wins, riding to victory on Real News in the first
race, Jublis in the fourth, Spanish Dancer in the fifth and
finally Peace Maker in the eighth.
PHOTO: RICKEY WELLS


Tropigas win 4th.straight game,



Paradise redeem themselves
By IVAN JOIINSON
TROPIGAS RECORDED their fourth straight win when they beat St.
George's I-0 in the New Providence Sunday Soccer League played at


are on target more often than not.
Yesterday Cole was outstanding
in defence at left-back tackling hard
and getting up well on numerous
occasions to head away one or two
dangerous looking crosses while
skipper Randy Rodgers played his
usual calm and well-controlled
game in the middle. Grimsby also
had a good game pulling off several
good saves in the Tropigas goal.
The Saints had their chances in
spite of the stout Tropigas defence,
but lady luck was with Tropigas
and they fired high and wide
throwing away numerous chances
of scoring, thus forcing Tropigas to
revert to a more attacking game.
With some 15 minutes of the
game remaining the Saints threw
everything into the attack but the
Tropigas defence survived the storm
and emerged from the game with
their fourth straight win and they
now look very favourably placed to
take the Championship with only
three games to play.
In the second fixture of the
afternoon Paradise redeemed
themselves when they trounced
Dynamos to the tune of 5-1 after
S-1 after losing 3-2 to the same
opponents last week in what could
only be described as a fiasco.
Paradise dominated throughout
the game but in spite of this they
failed to score in the first half with
the ball passing hair-raisingly close
to the woodwork on several
occasions. Dynamos played as well
as could be expected but as usual
they had no might to go with their
fight.
For Paradise Juliano lacoppi
scored twice, Barrett also scored
two goals the second one being a
superb powerpack drive from
outside the Dynamos box into the
top of the netting and Pierro Conti
scored the fifth.
The Dynamos goal was a 'typical'
Dynamos goal the Paradise
goalkeeper punched' away a cross
with considerable force only to see
the ball strike the head of a
Dynamos forward and to his utter
amazement rebound into his own
goal!


. Champ jockey Gary Bain



JI 1in fine form with 4 wins

i LAST YEAR'S CHAMPION JOCKEY, Gary Bain continued t
show fine form on Saturday when he captured four wins and on
third race during the fourth meet of the 1973 Horse Racin
season at the Hobby Horse Race track.
In the previous meet, last meet on Spanish Dancer in the
tues _ay,-..a 3e1 in ... &.:-1.n


FOLLOWING are the results and
payoffs of Saturday's racing:
FIRST RACE 41/2 Furlongs.
I. Joy Rider (Spot) (3) M.
Brown $7.15, $4.15, $2.40.
2. Lady Chester (Daddy's Thing)
(1) R. Ferguson $11.15, $3.70
3. Golden Eagle (7) G. Bain
$2.35.
SECOND RACE 6 Furlongs
1. Real News (9) G. Bain
$3.80. $3.10, $2.35.
2. Miss Power (5) E. Sturrup
$6.45, $4.80, 3. Lady Rolle (4) -
Jo Bain $2.75 Daily Double (3-9)
$16.40.
First Quinella (5-9) S58.95.
THIRI) RACE 4'/ Furlongs
I. Winchester (Royal Dream) (8)
- J. Bain $19.80, $6.65, $5.90.
2. Totino (9) A. Saunders
$4.15, $3.95.
3. Luckey Girl (2) A. Sands
$8.40.
Second Quinella (8-9) $45.15.
FOURTH RACE 5 Furlongs
I. Jublis (5)- G. Bain $2.65,
$2.70, $2.45
2. Donna Alicia II (8) A. Gibbs
$5.90. $3.80
3. Fancy Fire (4) A. Saunders
$3.35 Third Quinella (5-8) $36.65.
FIFTH RACE 4'z Furlongs
I. Spanish Dancer (7) G. Bain
$3.25, $2.20, $2.20.
2. Sling Shot (6) A. Gibbs
$2.25, $2.55.
3. Sweetness (3) J. Horton
$3.25, Fourth Quinella ( 7-7)
$5.30.
SIXTH RACE 5 Furlongs
1. Regals Maiden (7) A. Gibbs
$4.85 $2.10. $2.15.
2. Al's Twist (1) J. Bain $2.75,
$2.30.
3. Stilleto (5) N. Sweeting
$2.20 Fifth Quinella (1-7) $9.35
SEVENTH RACE 4/ Furlongs
I. Gone Away (2) A. Saunders
$3.95 $3.00 $3.00.
2. Sea Fury (3) S. McNeil
$2.70, $2.50
3. Mrs. AD (6) Anthony
Saunders $13.95. Sixth Quinella
(2-3) $7.50
EIGHTH RACE 5 Furlongs
1. Peace Maker (9) G. Bain
$5.40, $2.85. $3.90
2. The Outsider (2) H.
Woodside $9.25, $10.40.
3. Sib (5) D. Smith $4.50
Seventh Quinella (2-9) $50.30.


AMATEUR GOLFERS
MEET WEDNESDAY
THE BAHAMAS Amateur
Golf Club will be holding a
membership meeting at the
Blue Hill Golf Club on January
17 at 7:30 p.m. Speaking at the
meeting will be president of
the Bahamas Golf Association
Mr. Roy Bowe and his topic
will be "Golf in General." All
amateur golfers and interested
persons are invited.


Tuesday, Bam i inishea in
first place three times after
only managing two wins in the
first two meets of the season.
But on yesterday's display he
confirmed his return to form.
Bain's first win came in the
back half of the daily double
when he rode Real News to
victory ahead of Miss Power,
ridden by Eddie Sturrup. In the
fourth race he cruised
comfortably home on Jubilis
over Donna Alicia, ridden by
Alfred Gibbs. Bain then
completed his hat-trick of wins
for the second consecutive


o
e
g

e


fifth race and tollowmg this ne
rounded off another successful
day with his final win on Peace
Maker in the eighth race.
The highest payoff of the
day was sent out during the
first quinella when Real News
and Miss Power made up the
quinella. This 5-9 combination
paid out $58.95 to the lucky
ticket holders.The second
highest payoff came in the
eigth race when Peace Maker
and the Outsider finished first
and second respectively to send
out a $50.30 payoff tc ticket
holders.


HOBBY HORSE RACING LINEUP


THE FOLLOWING is the lineup
for the fifth race meeting at Hobby
Horse Race track tomorrow.
FIRST RACE 41 FURLONGS
1ST. HALF DAILY DOUBLE
1. Hot Tomato 115
2. Tamico 118
3. Miss Cuda 118
4. Moon Walk (Tell Daddy) 121
5. Debi 112
6. Go Sugar 112
7. Restless Wind
(Ball of Confusion) 116
9. Added Sugar 118
SUB: Chime Song 116
Gold Gall 112
SECOND RACE 4'A FURLONGS
2ND. HALF DAILY DOUBLE
1. Little Tiger 118
2. Consider Me 113
3. Empire 113
4. Hot Rod 118
5. Flying Jo 113
6. Forest Fire II 118
7. Stephanotis 113
8.County 118
9. El Spyrow 118


Sub. Ugly
Roman Dancer
THIRD RACE 4V/ FURLC
1. Lena Rey
2. Queen of the Road
3. Amalone
4. Winged Duchess
(Red Rose 11)
S. Jungle Pie
6. Jewel's Reward
7. Lady Marina
8. Queen of Hearts
9. Sweet Rose
FOURTH RACE 6 FURLC
1. Doe Doe
2. King Fire
3. Aries Moon
4. Scare Um
5. Big Deal
6. Hydra
7. Magic Prince
8. Young Bahamian
9. Lady Mary
Sub: Dot
Fail Safe
The Hustler
FIFTH RACE- FEATURE
RACE 9 FURLONGS
1. Tassel
2. More Sugar
3. Boomerang


122
113
)NGS
110
110
116
120
120
116
110
114
114
ONGS
118
114
114
114
114
114
118
114
118
118
116
114


4. Antries 115
5. La Ebony 113
6. Fantasma l18
7. Anonymous 115
8. Snow Ball 113
9. Corina 118
SUB: Desert Fox 115
SIXTH RACE 6 FURLONGS.
1. Spanish John 117
2. My Account 112
3. Mrs. Conch Salad 117
4. Donna Alicia 1 112
5. Mystery 117
6. Banquero 117
7. Son O Pie 117
8. Magic Woman 112
9. Black Magic 117
SUB: Sea Fire 114
SEVENTH RACE 4 FURLONGS.
1. Security 118
2. Star Marie 118
3. Catherina 1 18
4. Lady Cleo 11
5. Royal Order 118
6. Milk Face 118
7. Secret Sugar 111
8. Lady Lucks 118
9 Skeeter 121
SUB: Five by Five 118
EIGHTH RACE 5 FURLONGS
I. Carmichael Queen 115
2. Fair Lady l18
3. Soul Dancer 118
4. Tam Twist 118
5. Madison Life 115
6. Cigarillo 1I
7. Lollipop 115
8. Respect Toy 111
9. Miss Millie I18
SUB: Thricie I11

BRUCE CRAMPTON


WINS PHOENIX OPEN
PHOENIX, ARIZONA (AP)-
Australian veteran Bruce Crampton
negotiated a 20-foot birdie putt on
the final hole to break a five-man
deadlock and win the $30,000 first
prize Sunday in the Phoenix Open
golf tournament.
The ?'-year-old Crampton, a
stem, unsmiling man on the golf
course but a cheerful and pleasant
character away from it played a
five-under-par 65 in the final round
for a 268otal.


Clifford Park over the weekend..
And Tropigas now move four
points ahead of their nearest
contenders, McAlpine, at the top of
the League table with 12 points
from seven games. The Clan on the
other hand are by no means out of
the championship race they have
8 points from 5 games which means
they still have two games in hand,
and provided the inuured Haywood
and Stanham are fit next week and
they have adjusted to the absence
of their captain Dick Wilson who
will be out for the rest of the
season with a broken leg the Clan
should chase Tropigas all the way.
Yesterday's game was
something of a scrappy affair with
the Saints playing their usual hard
game-making them as always, a
difficult side to beat.
The Saints dominated the first
half due mainly to Pat Louison and
Luis Renoso in midfield who both
contributed no end to the Saints'
effort with their tireless running
and scything passes to the
aggressive Larry Minns in the front
line.
Minns had a good first half and
he might well have scored on
several occasions but as the game
progressed he faded from the scene
of play after the referee had given
several free kicks against him for
persistent fouling in the Tropigas
box. Minns seemed to think that his
actions were perfectly normal, the
referee thought otherwise!
Both teams had their chances but
it was not until three minutes from
the end of the first half that
Tropigas scored the one and only
goal of the match. Fritz Etienne
made an atrocious pass back to his
goalkeeper who was beaten all the
way by the pass and Phil Davis ran
onto the ball to shoot into the open
Saints' goalmouth.
DEFENSIVE PATTERN
In the second half Tropigas
realising that goals were not going
to be easy to come by reverted to a
defensive pattern of play in an
effort to hold onto their one goal
lead. The front line retreated into
the defensive ranks whenever the
Saints threatened and St. George's
found it increasingly more difficult
to get within range of the Tropigas
goal.
The Tropigas defence is
probably Wlie most competent in
the league and combined with a
good frontline they make a fine
well-balanced side.
Skipper Randy Rodgers provides
the necessary drive from the
midfield, admirably supported by
Kenny Love and Croft, Churchill,
Cole and make up an excellent
back four with Colin Grimsby in
goal. In the front line Murray, Davis
and Elliot are always dangerous and


INTER-SCHOOLS

BASKETBALL

SERIES OPENS
FAVOURITES St. John's
College were to put their
exuberance to the test this
afternoon when they meet C.C.
Sweeting High in the opening game
of the Inter-School 1973 Basketball
series at 4 o'clock at the Southern
Recreation Grounds.
Although they expect
competition from Aquinas College
only, S. J. C. with Ronald "Buck"
Johnson, Kenneth Trotman and
Andrew Albury on the guard
position and Tyrone Sawyer and
Robert Scott handling the
rebounds, have high hopes of
running through this series
undefeated.
Defending champions, St.
Augustine's College, have an easy
start this afternoon when they take
on the rookie team of the series L.
W. Young High, at 4 o'clock on
their home grounds.
Impressed with his team's
performance during the Basketball
Jamboree on Friday, L. W. Young
coach Brian Scowcroft will be
starting Leroy Whylly and Greg
Trotman at forward with Bernard
Shepherd, Claude McPhee and
Courtney Stubbs handling the ball.
"I think they gained a lot of
experience during the Jamboree,"
said coach Scowcroft. "Actually,
we're not interested in winning.
Well play together as a team ... pass
and move and get the ball to the big
man."
The S. A. C. era who are pretty
quiet this season will be starting 6 ft.
4 ins. Noel Munroe at centre with
Julian Russell and Livingstone
Barbes at forward. It is not yet
certain who will team up with
Munroe at guard but coach Vince
Ferguson said it will be any one of
Greg Cooper, George Mills, Peter
Isaacs, Edgar Bain and Bruce
Arnold.
A. F. Adderley will really have to
fight for a win tonight when they
clash with Aquinas College at 7:30
at the Garfunkel Auditorium.
It wil be Harvey Roker and
Mark Bethel for Adderley against
Bennett Davis and Danny
Edgecombe for Aquinas fighting for
the rebounds. Adderley's guards are
not yet together, but Charles
Green, Bernard Davis and CllHord
Rahming will start at guard for
Aquinas.


GATES OPEN11.30a.m.


POST TIME 1.1sp.m.

11111 TIIlaY II mIlulln


11111 1111l 1st 1 211 ICIS

AIU NIIIELLA
GOVERNMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL
BETTING.
COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM & BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


_ _~ _. ___ __. _._ _ ~_____ I~


Ii


t.--7


I


[E~~I I'I