<%BANNER%> GJbr Sribunr
Tuesday, January 9, 1973.
Stingray 'clarifies' position over
their walkout of Crawfish Bowl game
MR SPORTS I diior
Now that the Stingray
Football Team has
been brought 'guilty by the
partisan officiali \ the
NPAI I an open letter to the
press is needed to clarif) the
situation
Every spcuts media h.is
proclaimed that the Si: ,
were "umportsmenlike" in
their ictiom however I
believe that it is only right is
a Stingray, to set the record
straight only on certain
matters ,u tins time, (he
others will come in due
course
In the words of the "bias
reporter of the year" Ivan
Johnson of the Tribune "If
a sportsman caitl accept a
referee's decision, then hj
shouldn't take par) in
sports." Apparently the good
reporter hasn't been ki
up with the times |0 I shall
refresh his memory
Undoubtedly Mr, Johnson
will agree thai referees should
be consistent in their
ile, isions if sinnl.ii I
occur.During a game between
the Jets and the Marlins, the
two teams began lighting and
both teams weie attacking
each other on the field, the
result no playei
ejected from the game
However when a Stingray and
a Jet began to fight only the
Stingray is ejected and
according to one of the
officials "Allan Ingraham was
the only person he saw
throwing the punches Can
you imagine Allan Ingraham
punching Megon Knowles and
Megon not retaliating''
In the words of Mr.
Johnson "The Stingrays were
not justified in walking off
the field" Since the
officials couldn't control the
game, then the game ma)
have ended in a free lor all
brawl and if you don't believe
me ask any of the interim
linesmen if illegal tactics were
not being used. I guess Mi
Johnson would have
preferred the Stingrays to
retaliate than switch.
The Stingray football team
agrees that the referees
should control the game,
however the referees have to
be consistent.
(1) For example the
"precontroversy play"
occurred when a Stingray
defensive player recovered a
Jet fumble in the end cone
and the mere fact that the
ball was downed in the end
zone is an automatic touch
back. However, the officials
allowed three Jet offensive
players to "pile on" and
attempt to take the ball away
from the Stingray defensive
player, and did not call a
penalty. Because of this.
Allan Ingraham went to the
aide of his defensive colleague
and this is when the fight
began. Notice, no piling on
penalty was issued against the
Jets.
(2) A similar type of play
occurred when only two
Stingrays piled Earl Bostwick
and took him out of hounds.
This was necessary because
LETTERS TO SPORTS DESK
OH I play in the second
quarter, Bar! appeared lo be
down and in fai i gained an
additional 5 yards
defensive man who has
pla) ed against I arl knows
that J CHI have to really hold
I ail Howevet a piling on
penaii i against the
Stingray i
Williams,
wears glasses, has observed
thai ihe "Stingray fans ofl
the field has mine control
over them than the coach,"
r. this same lefl
Williams could not see the
interference by the
defensive hack lony
Rahming on the Stingrays
Hue O. J Sands, when the
ball was ill the air Again no
penalty was issued against the
let! However, this same Jell
Williams wants to issue a ss
penalty against all the
Stingrays
I he I ime to play
ill, which we did, but
we couldn't play the officials
at the same time
The above comments .ire
only a few of the glaring
behind the game which the
sports reporters refused to
acknowledge Ihe officials
gave then report, the Jets
gave their report, why
weren't the Stingrays allowed
to state their case to the
media before they rushed
into print condemning the
Stingrays And in the words
of a Jet player "Very simple,
next year the Stingrays will
have to bring their own
referees.11
What does this imply''
In anticipation thai tins
will be printed
WILLIAM K WALLACI
Mr. Ivan Johnson replies to
Mr. Wallace's letter
In reply to Mr Wallace's
rather inaccurate letter there
are four points which I would
like to clarify:
(I) If the Stingrays wished
to protest against the
dec isions ol the referee then
they should have lodged an
official complaint alter the
game to tin- \V\\ I
Committee stating that in
their opinion Ihe referee was
biased in Ins decisions
towards the Jets as any
mature group of men would
have done. Instead they chose
to storm off the iield of play
like a group of scolded
children. Not only is such
behaviour 'unsportsmanlike'
but it is also childish
i 'i Allan Ingraham is
renowned for starting fights.
I arlier in the \PALL regular
season Ingraham was involved
in two similar incidences as
mentioned in Mr Wallace's
litui At the start of the
season he was involved in a
light with Basil 'Barr' Davis
of the Jets the result of this
clash was that Davis was
elected from the game. On
December .1 of last year
Ingraham i.e. elected from
the game for fighting with
Knowles of the Jets
raking these facts into
consideration it is not
surprising lhat the referee
elected Ingraham from the
Ish Bowl game without
any hesitation because of his
past record. Mr Wallace also
lays or implies that Knowles
retaliated and lor tins he too
should have been elected
from the game. This is nol
Hue Knowles tried to
ol diate but he was quuklv
removed from the scene of
the incident by his teammates
he could lash out al
Ingraham
(3) III his letter Mr. Wallace
states that the piling on
penalty issued against the
Stingrays for tackling Larl
Uostwick out of bounds was
not justified Whal Mi
Wallace fails to mention is Ihe
fact that the piling on penalty
was not issued against the
Stingrays because the two
Stingrays players carried
Uostwick out of bounds but
ie alter they had carried
Uostwick out of bounds
Melvin Burnside also hit
Bostwick when he was out of
bounds and being held by the
Stingray players. It was for
this reason thai the piling on
penally was awarded against
the Stingrays.
(4) Mr Wallace concludes
by saying that the Stingrays
were not given a chance to
state their case to the media
being condemned by
the press What better person
than the Stingrays' captain
himself to express the feelings
of his team? When asked
aboul Ihe behaviour of his
team Stingrays' captain
"Minky Is.i.i, s said. "The S5
dollar line was undoubtedly
instilled and my team should
never have left the field."
The Stingrays WIR1
consulted before the press
rushed into print
condemning the Stingrays,' as
Mr. Wallace claims.
TENNIS LEAGUE FORMED
THE BAHAMAS LAWN TENNIS ASSOCIATION is organizing
a new type of team competition to stimulate local tennis activity.
The scheme is a departure from the usual type of inter-club
competition common in other countries where clubs are
numerous. For various reasons efforts to organize inter-club
competition here have proved fruitless over the years.
HAITIAN LADIES VOLLEYBALL TEAM
THE HAITIAN LADIES VOLLEYBALL TEAM who held Junos Volleyball Club tied
for first place during most of the Bahamas third Invitational Volleyball Tournament until
they forfeited two games to the Bahamas, placed second with a four and four win-loss
record. From left standing: Ernist Bernadin (assistant coach) Ketlyne Lemoine, Mireille
Jospeh, Daniel Deas, Elsie Baptiste, Elisabett Herisse, Margareth Clermont, (Kneeling
from left) Carolle Lapointe, Edwige Brisson, Mie Carmelle Desire, Elsie Herisse, Mie
Helene Pierre, At extreme riqht in light suit is the Haitian Consul Julios Bordes.
CLAIMS SLUR ON CHARACTER'
STILL NO WORD OVER BASKETBALL
TllliRE IS STILL no
definite word on the fate of
the Bahamas Amateur
Baikethall Association's
1972-'7.t series which was
scheduled to resume on
January 3 but was cancelled
when no gymnasiums were
available.
The A. I- Adderley Gym,
which was used by the
Association for Ihe first half
of Ihe season, is presently
being used by students hiking
the General Certificate exam.
The president of the
B ABA., Mr. Vince
Ferguson, said that he
contacted the Ministry of
Education yesterday but was
told that no definite decision
has yet been reached to
vacate either the Pyfiom
Road (Jym or the Eastern
Secondary School Gym
which presently houses
students of the proposed L.
W. Young School.
I Dl I OK Ihe Iribune
Dear Sir
Ordinarily, I frown upon
letters to the 1 ditor. However,
at Ibis time I fed It lie, ess.iiv
to correct what I consider to
be a slur upon my character
and a misconception of the
esteem in which I hold the
Bahamas Amateur Basketball
Association.
I refer to a story earned in
the Tribune on 5 January
1973. Although completely
irrevclant to the report, my
presence and subsequent
happenings are included. In the
interest of more complete,
efficient, and factual news
reporting, as well as in the
regard of any individual for his
personal reputation, I believe
that a more accurate
representation of the incident
is prescribed.
At theopening of the
meeting, the President of the
B.A.B.A. asked club
representatives to identify
themselves and stated that he
was afraid that all other
persons would be asked to
leave. At this time, I stated my
purpose in attending, said
purpose being to learn Ihe
definition of an amateur
athlete, which definition had
been announced in the news
media as to be brought forth in
the meeting. (As an individual
directly involved with amateur
athletes every day, I feel a
definite obligation to maintain
an up-to-date knowledge of
details which may affect such
athletes.)
The implication in the
Tribune story, and one which I
deeply resent, is that I was
personally and directly asked
to leave, this is not the case.
The President reiterated the
statement that the meeting was
for club representatives only,
and that unfortunately I could
not remain, as I did not fall
into this category. Therefore, I
immediately left without
further comment or question. I
did so in deference to the
authority of the President of
the B.A.B.A,. and because I am
aware of the rules of the
B.A.B.A., having been partially
responsible for the
establishment of these rules. I
did not wait to see it any otner
persons left, nor am I aware of
any statements or comments
which may have been made by
anyone alter my departure.
Ihe Iribune slory stales
thai I "sullenly left the room".
I his is a damaging
misinterpretation of my
attitude and action. Not only is
the entire reference to me of
no relevance to the report, hut
tins statement In itsell is
incorrect, 1 simply left
immediately and without
question or comment. Prom
this statement I can infer only
one ol two things. (Ill hal the
Tribune reporter is so little
used lo someone not
questioning authority that he
failed to recognize the
situation tot what il was. 01 I 2 I
that thy Tribune reporter has
an inadequate command of the
language which resulted in an
unfortunate, disparaging,
embarrassing, and damaging
choice of words.
1 feel that I deserve s
complete and immediate
apology. However, being a
more experienced sports and
feature writer than the author
of the Tribune article I am
probably more aware that a
retraction, correction, or
apology can never undo the
damage done by an original
story, especially lo an
individual such as myself in a
public position.
As a footnote, I would like
to point out that although the
meeting in question was open
only to club representatives,
the author of the Tribune
article remained in attendance,
despite the fact that he is
neither a player, coach, or
official ot tin- B.A.B.A.
In order to correct what I
believe to be a misrepresent.il-
ion of facts because what
should have been an objective
report retained some measure
ot opinionated conjecture, I
request that this letter be
printed in full.
I thank you for this
opportunity to show the need
for factual repotting to In-
complete and strictly factual.
GERALD I. HARPER IK
(We are happy to publish
Mr. Harper's letter as he
requests, but fail to see how
he can claim the reference
to his presence there as
"completely irrelevant"
when he admits himself he
attended the meeting "to
learn the definition of an
amateur athlete. which
definition had been
announced in the news
media as to be brought
forth at the meeting."
However, we apologise to
Mr. Harper for remarks that
he considers damaging to
him ED.)
The new scheme ignores the
club base altogether. Instead,
interested players, whether
they belong to a club or not,
are invited to form small teams
and enter them as individual
units.
Two League Divisions will
be established. The A Division
will include all of the top-flight
players wishing to participate,
but in order to spread such
talent and skill no team may
contain more than two such
players. The association has
produced a list of these
"named" players who will be
restricted to the A Division
competition. Teams without
named players may elect to
enter in either the A or B
Division, but the Association
reserves the right to exclude
obviously weak teams from the
A Division.
Each team will consist of 4
singles players and 2 doubles
pairs, the latter being made up
of the singles players or others
Kach team play-off (or "tie")
will therefore consist of 4
singles and 2 doubles matches.
Each team will be scheduled to
play each other team of the
same Division during the
course of the League season,
which will probably last several
months.
If the number of teams
entering the competition is
larger than expected, the
Division affected will be split
into two Sections, with the
Sectional winners meeting for
the Division championship at
the end of the season.
The B.L.T.A. plans to start
the league season early in
February, so those players
wishing to participate have
until the end of this month to
organize themselves into teams
The rules governing the
competition have been printed
and are available free at the
Fort Montagu Beach Hotel
clubhouse, at Rodger's Sports
Shop, and at Lowe's Pharmacy
on Market Street.
JUNIOR BALL CLUBS
FEES ARE DOUBLED
AN ATTKMPT by the Bahamas
baseball Association to increase
its Junior league entrance fee by
$70 per club, was vigorously
rejected by Junior League
representatives last night during a
meeting, nul after much debate, a
$30 increase was eventually
agreed upon. Junior Clubs that
used to pay $30 entrance fM Will
now pay $60. Senior clubs pay an
entrance fee of $300.
Junior League representatives
protesting the $70 hike claimed
that their league has been
constantly neglected in the Mritl
during which time the Senior
League is giver, precedence.
Scheduled to begin 1ft
1972 73 senior series on March
5 and its junior series on March 10
the B.B.A. has set January IS
with four days grace period as the
deadline for all teams and
sponsors' fees to be in. On
January 22, the Association will
entertain new applications
So far. there are sin senior
u-.niis entering the series
comprising Beck's Beer. Del Jane
Saints. Schlit? Beer. Bahamas
Blenders. Paradise Island and Ihe
former Vat 19 who are newly
sponsored. Uncertainty surrounds
M.inr Kelly and the Nassau Mets
UNBELIEVABLE!
YOUR BEAUTIFUL COLOUR
PORTRAIT
970
5/S
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--------------- MO,oclaf.
on the Waterfront
East Bay St. & William St.
Phone 5-4641
our sensational January Special to keep our
taff busy through the After-Christmas Lull
ROYAL MAIL
LINES LIMITED
REGULAR FREIGHT
SERVICE FROM
U.K. TO NASSAU
THE PACIFIC STEAM
NAVIGATION CO.
For information contact the agents
R.H.CURRY&Co.,Ltd.
PHONE 2-8683 2 8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET
EXCITING NEWS FROM
CHARLES OF THE RITZ!
The entire line of Charles of the Ritz Cosmetics
will now be sold in the Bahamas at a 10% savings
over United States Retail prices.
TO CELEBRATE THIS ANNOUNCEMENT We
have a gift waiting for you, our valued customer.
A beautiful gift box containing four fabulous
products. Veilesscence foundation, Highlight
Dreme, Firmesscence anti-wrinkle lotion and the
all-time favourite, Ritual Eau de Parfum spray.
Yours with a purchase of $7.50 or more at
THE CARB SHOPS
Bay Street


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03242
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 10, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03242

Full Text











POWERFUL JET.PROP ES IIStiTI)

ARE MORE RELIA'- 7, --AUDLEY C. KEMP
-TELEPHONi ;7403/77;- 1 h --

asNtered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage cniceulons within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX, No.4 Wednesdau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaperry 10, 1973.
VOL. LXX, No. 41 Wednesday, January 10, 1973. Price: 15 Cents
IIL IX X iii li I ,I


C.A.B. TURNS DOWN LOCAL AIRLINE'S

BID FOR CHARTER RIGHTS TO U.S., SAYS---





BW s financial situation







'precarious' and question






of ownership is queried


BAHAMAS WORLD AIRLINES' bid for Civil Aeronautics Board permission to operate charter flights between
the Bahamas and the United States, and between Europe and the United States has been turned down, an
Associated Press report from Washington said today.


According to the AP
dispatch a CAB examiner has
ruled that BWA "lacks the
qualifications for authority" to
operate charter flights to the
United States.
E. xa m i n e r Thomas
Sheehan said in a December 15
ruling that BWA "failed to
show that it was owned and
effectively controlled by
citizens of the Bahamas," as
required by U.S. regulations.
Sheehan added that the
company's financial situation is
"precarious," its management
staff is "not qualified", and it
lacks "firm, economically


feasible plans for the proposed
charter services to the U.S. and
to 20 European countries."
The examiner observed that
it was unfortunate that this
was so, "since the Bahamas
government has maintained a
liberal policy toward U.S. air
traffic rights, and reciprocal
consideration is customary."
ANOTHER CHANCE
For that season, Sheehan
said, BWA "should be afforded
another opportunity" to solve
its financial, organizational and
managerial problems, and come
up with a new application.
The AP story said BWA has


filed an exception to the
ruling, and briefs are to be
submitted later this month.
Thereafter the ('AB may either
affirm the examiner or set the
proceeding down for oral
argument.
The Tribune however was
unable to contact BWA
vice-president Madison
McDonald for comment. Mr
McDonald was said to be in a
meeting and Board chairman
Everette Bannister could not
be reached.
BWA filed its application
with the CAB on April 26 and
the hearing was set for August


FNM rebut 'betrayal' charge by




Watkins, level counter charges at



- 'thoroughly dishonest' detractors


THOSE WHO ACCUSE the Free National Movement leadership of betraying the people on the
independence issue are being "thoroughly dishonest," the FNM declared in a hard-hitting press


release today.


Catholic appeal


reaches the


half-way mark

THE HALF-way mark has
been passed in the Catholic
Diocese's Stewardship
Programme, a bid to raise
$650,000 over the next three
years and to end the diocese's
dependence on donations from
foreign sources, it was
announced today.
A press release said pledges
so far received for
time-payments over the next
36 months from Catholics in
New Providence now
total $381,920.
The release was based on
information supplied at a
Programme report meeting in
Garfunkel Auditorium Tuesday
night, when volunteer workers
from the 11 New Providence
parishes reported pledges
worth $281,920
A "special appeal" to
sources wishing to remain
anonymous has so far yielded
$100,000.
Parishes in Grand Bahama
and the out islands are
expected to raise at least
$165,000 when the programme
is started in those areas shortly.
The programme, known as
"Project:Bahamas" is designed
to increase Bahamian
participation in supporting the
church's activities. The funds
raised will be used to eliminate
a $150,000 diocesan debt and
to pay for Catholic education
and medical facilities, and
other services.
The programme got
underway in New Providence
in early November.


BEAUTIFUL
CHINESE
JARDINIERES
GREAT FOR
POTTED PLANTS
DOLLY MADISON
FURNITURE
NASSAU-FREEPORT


The release pointed out that
the FNM's Declaration of
Commitment, unanimously
adopted by the party
convention early last year,
states clearly that "the party
opposed the Government's
timetable for independence in
1973 but agreed with the
decision of the British
Government that the issue
should be decided by the
people in a general election.
The mandate given to the
PLP .during the general
elections in September, 1972
left "no moral or legal grounds
to justify any attempt to
reverse the decision of the
people."
Further, the official position
of the party, contained in a
statement approved by the
FNM's Central Council and
released on October 6, left no
doubt that the party accepted
the decision of the majority of
the Bahamian people.
The press release was nade
in reply to numerous
statements in recent weeks by
Marsh Harbour M.P. Errington
Watkins that the FNM
delegation to last ninth's
constitutional talks in London
did not act in accordance with
the policy of the party on
independence and that the
delegation "somehow betrayed
those who were pressing in
London for separation of
Abaco from the rest of the
Bahamas."
Today's press release said
that "no one, including Mr.
Watkins, raised any objection"
to the party's position as stated
on Oct. 6.
DISIIONlST
"Those who now seek to
malign the leaders of the INM
as having betrayed the cause of
the people are being
thoroughly dishonest.
"It was not until the
constitutional conference
became imminent that Mr.
Watkins and others became
agitated. Mr. Watkins niade it
obvious that he wanted to
appoint himself as one of the
FNM's delegates to the
conference.
"He did not, however, make
it clear at that stage exactly
what he wanted to advocate at
the conference. Subsequent
developments indicated
without a shadow of doubt


that what Mr. Watkins and his
supporters were after was not
one last stand to delay
independence, but rather to,
seek the separation of Abaco
front the rest of the Bahamas.
"In their official proposal to
the British Government Mr.
Watkins and his group made no
attempt to convince the British
Government that there were
grounds upon which
independence for the Bahamas
should be delayed. They
sought only the separation ot
Abaco.
HYPOCRISY
"Such is the hypocrisy of
the man who would not seek
to persuade the Bahamian
people that the FNM did not
act with honour and integrity
on this issue."
The press release went on to
say that any suggestion that
the FNM delegation to London
betrayed the separatist group is
-'absolutely without
foundation and can be
charitably described only as a
mischievous lie.
"The FNM has never, by
private resolution nor public
statement, adopted a policy ot
separation of any of the islands
of the Bahamas and such a
suggestion was never put to the
councill by any member of this
organisation."
RACISTS
The release also charged that
"information is now available
to the executive of the FNM to
the effect that the separatist
movement is being encouraged
mainly by a group of extreme
right wing politicians in Great
Britain who adhere to the
racist policies of Mr. Enoch
I'owell.
"Even if individual members
could have been persuaded to
support the separatist
movement they could not in
good conscience, as Bahamians
and as adherents to the
philosophy of the INM. ally
themselves with that racist
clement in England.
"It is Mr. Watkins and his
extremist group who have
betrayed the people of Abaco
and the people of the Bahamas,
since what they seek is not the
peace and prosperity of Abaco
and the Bahamas, but rather to
take advantage of the sincere
and genuine sentiments of the
good people of Abaco to serve
their own selfish interests."


I in Washington.
Chances that CAB approval
would he granted appeared
slim at the time, in view of the
fact thai five major U.S.
scheduled carriers had
registered their objections to
the application.
PROT1-STERS
Those protesting were:
Eastern Aitlines. National, Pan
American, Trans World Airlines
and Trans International
Airlines, all of whom felt that
the Bahamas carrier would be
undercutting their business.
BWA, in its application to
the CAB, had asked for
permission to run charter,
freight and inclusive tours
originating and terminating in
the Bahamas or originating
from part or parts other than
the Bahamas i.e. from here to
the U.S. and elsewhere or from
elsewhere to the States and the
Bahamas.
These inclusive tour charter
flights would be between
Austria,. Belgium, Cyprus,
l)enmark, Finland, France,
Germany, the western sector of
Berlin, Greece, Ireland, Italy,
Luxembourg, Malta, the
Netherlands, Norway, Portugal,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland,
Yugoslavia and any point or
points in the U.S.
To receive approval BWA
would among other things,
have had to show that it was
substantially owned by British
subjects.
Ilowever the only
individuals mentioned in
connection with the airline
,t her than its chairman,
Edward Bannister, are known
to be American nationals.
One of them is Mr. Murray
Vidocker, who was also
responsible for the formation
of Caledonian Airlines.
CALEDONIAN LINK
It is believed there is still a
connection between
Caledonian and BWA inasmuch
as a (aledonian crew was used
initially to fly it; Boeing 707
and five Bahamian pilots were
given their basic 707 training
with Caledonian Airways at
Gatwick Airport.
However there has been no
explanation concerning the
funding of BWA, whose
subsidiary, Esplanade
Holdings, is already in debt to
employees of its two hotels,
the Anchorage in Nassau and
the Lucayan Harbour Inn at
Freeport.
In July last year it was
announced that BWA and its
subsidiary Flamingo Airlines
had severed their association,
with Senator (Cadwell
A rn b rister form early
vice-president of BWA and
president of Flamingo, taking
over the ownership of
Flamingo.
This was done through the
financial assistance of Nassau
Bank and Trust, investment
bankers at the start for both
Flamingo and BWA.
Nassau Bank board chairman
Albert Buchbinder refused at
the time however to comment
on the future relationship of
BWA with Nassau Bank and
['rust.
In the same month BWA
began flying back-to-back
charters between St. Lucia and
Belgium.
Beginning with one
147-passenger Boeing 707, the
company has now also
acquired two 180 passenger
707s which are being used oni
charter work in Africa.
Maintenance of the aircraft
is being done by Braniff
Airlines in Miami and at their
home base in Texas.


MEMBERS OF THE LEGAL FRATERNITY this morning attended services at Christ
Church Cathedral marking the opening of January's criminal assizes. In front row are
Chief Justice Sir Gordon Bryce and Mr. Justice James Smith. Directly behnid is the Hon.
Milo Butler Sr., Minister without portfolio, who has been named Governer-General
designate.




Ruling in Election Court case



expected tomorrow morning

By MIKE LOTHIAN
TWO SUPREME COURT JUDGES presiding in the Election Court are expected to rule
Thursday morning on whether there is to be a scrutiny of certain votes cast in the September 19
North End Long Island election, which specific ballots are to be scrutinized and whether protest
votes are to be tested for validity at the same time.


Hanging in the balance is
which of two men is entitled to
represent the North End Long
Island, Rum C'ay and San
Salvador constituency: Philip
Smith of the PLP, who was
returned as the Member of
Parliament, or Cyril Fountain
of the FNM, who claims that
he and not Mr. Smith should
have been declared the winner.
Five full days of hearings
eclkd Tuesday afternoon, and
the proceedings had to be
adjourned to 'Thursday because
today Chief Justice Sir Gordon
Bryce and Mr. Justice James
Smith, presiding in the
Election Court, were involved
in the opening ceremonies of
the January Criminal Assizes.
The hearings resulted from
an election petition filed by
Mr. Fountain.
Returning Officer Livingston
Smith found after the Sept. 19
election that both the PLP and
the FNM candidates had
received 473 regular votes.
With that finding he was
obliged under the
Representation of the People
Act to declare the election
void. He called for a fresh poll
on Oct. 6, from which the PLP
candidate emerged the winner
as FNM voters were advised to
boycott the polls.
NOT CAST
In his petition Mr. Fountain
claimed that one vote counted
in the Sept. 19 poll should
never have been cast because
the voter was improperly
registered, that three women
who voted should have been
disqualified from doing so
because they failed to meet
residency requirements, that
two votes rejected by the
Returning Officer on recount
should have been accepted, and
that another ballot which was
counted should have been
rejected.
The hearing opened last
Wednesday morning with a
"preliminary argument" by
attorneys representing the PLP
candidate that the fact that the
Oct. 6 poll took place blocked
the Flection (ourt from
considering matters related to
the Sept. 19 poll.
After a day and a halt of
legal arguments on that point
the court ruled that it did have
jurisdiction, and the hearings
began in earnest.
Witnesses were called by Mr.
Fountain's attorney's to
sup port the petitioner's
contentions.
When the evidence had all
been heard, the I N1 side
conceded that no evidence had
been brought to substantiate
its claim in relation to one of
the women who had voted
although allegedly non-resident
in the constituency.
On the PLP side it was
admitted that one voter who
cast his ballot was not in fact
properly registered and his
ballot should therefore be
rejected, and that there should
be a scrutiny to determine
whether the Returning Officer
had been correct in rejecting
two votes and admitting a


third.
There the agreements ended.
DISAGREE I
The PLP lawyers claimed
that the FNM had not proved
the non-residency of the other
two women whose votes were
in question, and at the same
time declared that if there was
to be a scrutiny the protest
votes cast in the election must
be tested for validity and either
added to the regular vote tally
or rejected completely.
The FNM replied that there
was no obligation on their part
to prove the non-residency of
the women, but only to
establish a prima facie case
which must be either rebutted
by the PLP or accepted as
proof by the Court.
On the protest vote issue,
the FNM argued that at this
stage in the hearing the PLP
could not, under the law,
introduce the entirely new
matter for the court's
consideration.
Most of the court's time so
far has been taken up by
ar g I en ts on t h e
interpretation and application
of numerous provisions of law,
and in the quoting of
authorities and precedents
designed to support the
differing views.
LAWY E RS
Seven attorneys have been
actively participating in the
hearings.
Jamaican attorneys Vivien
Blake. Q.C., and Dr. Lloyd
George Barnett with Bahamian
Mrs. Ruby Nottage have
appeared for the PLP's Philip
Smith.
Bahamians the lion. Eugene
Dupuch, Q.C., and Bradley
(allender have been
representing Mr. Fountain.
while Attorney General of the
Bahamas Gerald Collett, Q.C.,
and Crown Counsel Alpin
Russell, Jr., have appeared for
Returning Officer Smith.
If the judges rule Thursday
that there should be a scrutiny
and/or testing of protest votes,
the process will be carried out
behind closed doors with only
the judges, the parties
concerned and their attorneys
present, in order to preserve
the secrecy of the ballot.
The judges' ruling Thursday
will have the immediate effect
of declaring either the rejection
or acceptance of three votes.
The scrutiny, if any, of the
two votes rejected allegedly
without sufficient cause, and
the one counted when it
allegedly should not have been
will be only a prelude to
further legal argument on
whether under the law the
Returning Officer had acted
properly.
A ruling in favour of the
PLP's submission on )he
protest votes in the court's
having to consider more
arguments on whether the
ballots should be rejected or
re-designated as regular votes
There are four protest votes
for Mr. Smith and one for Mr
Fountain.


MILLS NOW U.N.

AMBASSADOR

FOR JAMAICA
DONALD
OWEN MILLS,
51, a former
permanent
secretary in the
Bahamas I)Devel-
opment Ministry,
0n Tuesday
became Jamaica's DON MILLS
new ambassador
to the United Nations when he
presented his credentials to
U.N. Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim.
Mr. Mills held his Bahamas
appointment during 1969 and
1970 by arrangement with the
Jamaican Government, whose
ULrban Develop ient
Corporation inspired the
18-month old Bahamas
Development Corporation.
During the past two years
Mr. Mills represented Jamaica,
the Bahamas, Canada and
Ireland as an alternate
executive director of the
International Monetary Fund
in Washington.
Before coming to the
Bahamas in 1969, Mr. Mills had
been deputy director of the
central l Bureau of Statistics,
director of the centrall
Planning Union and Registrar
of the Uniuversity of the W:st
Indies, all in Jamaica.
Mr. Mills takes over as
Jamaican ambassador to he
U.N. from Keith John
Johnson. who has been named
:,:nhassador to Bonn, West
Germany

3 GOVERNMENT

BOARDS ANNOUNCED
1TE (,OVI RNM l N I today
announced the appointment of
three further Boards and
Committees for the period
ending I)December 3 1, 1973.
Ihey are
RACING ( OMMISION
Wen/el Nichols. chairmann ;
Joseph Sweeting, Sidney
Wilson, leroy Ferguson, Otis
Brown
BAIIAMAS I LFCTIRICITY
CORPORATION
Preston Albury. chairmann ;
Bismark ('oakley. Roger
Blackshaw, Edward Williams,
Richard Treco.
R O A D T RAFI: C
AUTHORITY
I dwin C o le by
Vic e-(Chairman. Melvin
Saundleis. (;. I. Thompson,
Ilenry Flerguson, William
M\1illr (ladstone Rolle.

FUNERAL SERVICES
I I\ R \L services for Mr.
lloyd Lowe, 51, of Fox Hill,
s who died early Sunday
milorning, have been set for 4
p.nm Thursday at Calvary Bible
r Church, Centreville. Intermenl
in the Western Cemetery wil
s follow the services.
lHe is survived by his wifi
Merril, 2 daughters, and 2 sons


4th. SUPREME

COURT JUDGE


EXPECTED SOON
By SIDNEY DORSETT
CHIEF JUSTICE Sir Gordon
ryce, officially declaring the
january Supreme Court Assizes
pen, this morning disclosed
or the first time that the
ahamas would soon be having
fourth Justice.
The disclosure camera shortly
ifter the Chief Justice,
attended by Mr Justice James
Smith. ended their review of a
23-member honour guard
drawn up outside the Law
Courts building in ceremonies
following the annual Assize
Services at Christ Church
Cathedral.
He told some 40 members of
the Bar that the presence of
another judge would call for
another court and that
preparations are to be made to
convert the present Registry
and Records Department into a
courtroom for the judge.
Although the name of the
new judge has not yet been
disclosed, Government House
is expected to issue a statement
shortly on the new
appointment.
In opening the sessions Sir
(ordon noted that "crime still
continues to increase" in the
Bahamas adding that "in the
courts we have to do what we
can to discourage" crime from
spreading.
Though the court has a
responsibility, he said, it is also
for society to assist in
discouraging crime.
26 CASES
The present calendar listed
26 cases to be heard during this
month's Assi/es. Of them, two
cases heard last year and
ordered for re-trial had dates
tentatively set for them,
declaredd a mistrial by Sir
Gordon, the fraud case of
Autrey B. Newbold, a
23-year-pold accountant and
Le ter Joseph Evans, 25, a
B hamas Electricity
Corporation employee, is to be
heard.
Also up for re-trial and
charged with the murder of
drug-store operator Leonard
("Lenny") Davis Sr., are James
Andrews, James Strachan anc
Samuel Sands.
The three accused
represented by attorneys Keith
Duncombe, Jeanne Thompson
and Cay Gottleib, respectively,
this morning entered a first
plea of not guilty to both
charges.
Previously convicted and
sentenced to eight yeats for
armed robbery, the men were
also ordered to be hanged
when their case ended in its
ninth day on May 11.
UPHELD
Taking their appeal to the
Bahamnas (ourt of Appeal, the
trio had their grounds of
appeal upheld when the
presiding judges found that the
trial judge had misdirected the
jury with reference to the use
of statements purportedly
obtained from the accused
men.
'Ihe men were represented in
their appeals by attorneys
Duncombe, Miss Thompson
and David Bethell, who had
been appointed by the court
when the order for a re-trial
was made on November 23.
Their case is one of four
during the January Assizes.
Also on the calendar are
Redford Raymond Davis,
charged with murder
The pleas of the three men
accused with the murder ot
Lenny Davis and the plea of
Scots solicitor Andrew
Mc('ulloch 37, were the only
ones taken during the opening
this morning. They each
entered pleas of not guilty.
ATTEMPTED MURDER
McCulloch, represented by
attorney Henry Bostwick, is
accused of the attempted


murder of fellow Scotsman
James Mitchell, a 45-year-old
dentist and president of Jason
Investments (Bahamas) Ltd.,
on October 24.
Also charged with attempted
murder is Leonard Jarvis who
faces additional charges of use
of a deadly means of harm and
possession of a firearm.


III


NEWli
-I' l -.ci l


I II


t


e,
i.











Skhe rrlhnnt


Wednesday, January 10, 1973.


MANAGUA WILL BE REBUILT
MANAGUA, NICARAGUA (AP) Nicaragua's capital of Managua will
be rebuilt, with its commercial centre about six miles from where it was
when an earthquake struck Dec. 23, former President Anastasio Somoza
said Tuesday.
The earthquake devastated the commercial district in the north. The
new business district will be on the west, east and south sides of the city.
Somoza, speaking at a news conference, said the half-million homeless
needed beans, corn, powdered milk and other goods. He said also that 90
per cent of the government installations and all the national guard facilities
were destroyed.
Although a three-man council technically governs Nicaragua, Somoza
still heads the armed forces and is considered to be in control. lie heads the
national emergency committee directing disaster relief.
NEW ORLEANS SNIPER IDENTIFIED
NEW ORLEANS (AP) The corner' office Tuesday tentatively
identified the dead sniper, killed on the roof of a hotel Sunday night after
six persons were shot to death, as Mark J. Essex, 24, of Emporia, Kansas.
A spokesman for the corner said the tentative identification came from
fingerprints checked in Washington. He said relatives were coming to make
positive identification.
The name was made public while Police Supt. Clarence Giarrusso was
talking to newsmen about other aspects of the shootings, which began
Sunday morning at the 18-storey downtown Howard Johnson's hotel and
did not end until police stormed the hotel roof Monday afternoon.
On Monday night, Giarrusso had refused to discuss some details of the
shootings with newsmen, and many questions remained unanswered.
WATERGATE CASE JURY SELECTED
WASHINGTON (AP)' A jury of eight women and four men was
selected Tuesdau to hear the trial of seven men charged with breaking into
Democratic national headquarters last summer.
The panel, which includes seven black and one white woman and three
black and one white man, was agreed to by opposing attorneys after two
days of sifting through an initial group of about 250.
At one point in the early proceedings with the pool of potential jurors
down to 98, they were asked how many had heard about the Watergate
case before coming to the court, and all but nine stood.
The democratic headquarters were in the Watergate building complex.
In apparent preparation for future appeal, the defense asked that the
records show the widespread familiarity with the case.
An additional six alternates must be seated before the jury starts hearing
evidence, probably sometime Wednesday.
Judge John J. Sirica will try the case.
STATE OF UNION MESSAGE WILL NOT BE READ
WASHINGTON (AP The White House announced Tuesday President
Nixon will submit his annual State of the Union message to Congress later
this month.
In the past Nixon had taken the occasion to make a speech at a joint
session of the House and Senate, as was the custom with most recent
presidents.
Press Secretary Ronald L. Ziegler decided against an oral address this
year because the message will be submitted shortly after he delivers his Jan.
20 inaugural address.
127 WOMEN WILL RETAIN ADMINISTRATION JOBS
WASHINGTON (AP White House sources say President Nixon will
keep almost all of his top-level women appointees for the second term. In
all, Nixon will soon announce that 127 women will retain administration
jobs ranging from ambassador posts to assistant department heads.
So far, he has named only one new top-level woman appointee Anne
Armstrong former vice chairman of the Republican National Committee,
who will be a cabinet-ranking counselor to the President.
Administration sources say few other major appointments of women are
to be expected in the near future. But most of those serving during the past
four years are assured of their jobs.
ZlEGLER DENIES BEING AT ODDS WITH KLEIN
WASHINGTON (AP) Ronald L. Ziegler, the White House Press
Secretary said Tuesday he may have an expanded role in the second term
but firmly denied speculation he has been at odds with President Nixon's
Director of Communications, Herbert G. Klein.
Questioned at length about a Washington Post report that he had won a
power struggle over reorganization of White House public relations
machinery, Ziegler said he will remain as Press Secretary and Klein will
keep his post. "1 like the job I've got," said Ziegler.
He acknowledged that he and Klein have been discussing "ways that we
can do a better job" and that changes in both their offices may well be
announced later.
However, In noting that Klein intends tc lear- his post at some furure
date, Ziegler said the post of Director of C .qmunications would be
maintained. He said whoever might succeed I. would not be under his
juridictin.
Zeleor was emphatic in declaring that if there has been any power
struggle over Which House reorganization, "I have been unaware of it."
The Post reported Ziegler soon would be named as Nixon's principal
adviser on information policy.
FROM RAGS TO RICHES
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) A real estate developer who arrived in
America as a penniless teen-aged Polish immigrant left $13 million when he
died, a probate appraisal shows.
Samuel Hamburger, who died in 1971 at age 86, left $8.5 million in
stocks, $3.2 million in real estate and $1.3 million in cash and bank
accounts, according to papers filed Monday in Supe.ior Court.
Beneficiaries of the estate include his widow Ann, two stepchildren,
numerous charities, the city of San Francisco and 30 other relatives.
As associate said Hamburger supervised his investments in real estate
development, commercial properties and farm holdings from an office in
his best-known property, the Flatiron Building in downtown San
Francisco.
ME -


IAIAMAS OIsIgCAL SOCIETY


Lecture by


i.HANM STT


noted marine archaeologist, writer, writer and
underwater explorer on the discovery of the
wreck of the


11s..It111S


Friday January 19th at 6:00p.m.

Government House Bal Irom

Admission: Adults $1.00;Chilren 50










"White Label"


Dewar's


- it never varies






"White Label"
SCOTCH WHISKY-by

DEWAR'S


Distributed by BUTLER & SANDS
Avlable throughout the Bahamas


3RD. DAY OF PARIS TALKS BIG U.. UNION WINTER STORMS HIT U.S.


French active behind REVOLT BRINGS Atlanta hit by its
s lJa irily, M l s mt


scenes in wettinor


AIRPORTS T


.e.0..f.. . STANDSTILL

peace talks renewed By EdBlanch
^L c "^ I ri nnm- f. A %


PARIS, JAN. 10 (AP)- Henry A. Kissinger and Le Due Tho
met today in the third meeting of their new secret peace session
in suburban Gif Sur Yvette. Tho was host in the vila owned by
the French Communist Party.


For the third time in
succession, the two delegations
avoided any face-to-face
encounter in public view. But
as the U.S. presidential envoy
entered the villa, he could be
seen shaking hands with
someone inside. It was the first
handshake seen by newsmen
since the sessions opened
Monday in an atmosphere of
apparent icy confrontation.
Kissinger and Tho
maintained a news blackout on
their talks.
The two top negotiators met
in an apparently more relaxed
atmosphere, for six hours in an
American-owned villa in
suburban St. Nom la Breteche.
ICY OPENING
The two envoys resumed
their talks Monday in an
atmosphere of icy.
confrontation following 11
days of American bombing of
the North Vietnamese
heartland and a suspension of
the talks that lasted nearly four
weeks.
Kissinger and Tho seemed
more relaxed at the end of
Tuesday's meeting. They
smiled as they walked


U.S. BOMBING BLITZ

HAS CURTAILED


SAIGON'S WAR THREAT

WASHINGTON (AP)- Adm.
Thomas H. Moorer said Tuesday
the 12-day bombing blitz of Hgnoi
and Haiphong effectively curtailed
North Vietnam's ability to wage
war in the south.
The chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff also said the Pentagon has
contingency plans for more
bombing but said "I, like everyone
else, hope a settlement can be
reached."
Moorer told newsmen the
massive U.S. bombing was aimed
"at North Vietnam's capability to
maintain the land war in the south
and in these terms I think it was
very effective."
Asked if the bombing destroyed
Hanoi's capability to invade the
south, Moorer said "North Vietnam
already has IS divisions in the
south so the question of an invasion
is academic."
He said more than 1,000
Soviet-built SA2 anti-aircraft
missiles were fired on U.S. B52
stratofortresses and jetfighters
during the strikes "which is some
kind of record."
Moorer talked to newsmen
briefly after briefing the house
appropriations committee in
closed-session, using bombing
damage reports and photographs.
He said they showed among
other things that U.S. bombs did
not hit the American prisoner of
war camp in Hanoi.
Moorer's report marked the first
response to requests by congressmen
for more information about the
bombing.
Secretary of defense nominee
Elliot Richardson, meanwhile, told
Senators he believes President
Nixon's efforts to win and
honorable peace-including the
bombing-are "wise and
conscientious."
"I believe that all actions have
been taken for the sole objective of
achieving peace on terms that
minimize risk to the preservation of
that peace," he told the Senate
armed services committee.
Richardson is currently secretary of
health, education and welfare
Richardson also told the
Senators at his confirmation
hearing that increased defense
spending is needed to meet the
Soviet military capacity, then he
added, "also the people's Republic
of China."
Calling China "an approaching
danger," Sen. Strom Thurmond,
(R-S.C.) said he was surprised to
learn at an earlier Central
intelligence Agency briefing for the
committee of China's progress "In
the ability to deliver nuclear
weapons."
Richardson said he will do his
utmost to assure that the phase 2
U.S.-Soviet arms limitation talks
now under way do not undermine
the U.S. war deterrent.


separately past newsmen and
photographers waiting near the
villa on the grounds of one of
France's most exclusive golf
clubs. They again avoided
meeting face to face in public
view, however, and there were
no visible handshakes.
Before the U.S. bombing
offensive, their meetings were
marked by numerous displays
of cordiality. But there was no
indication whether the surface
changes reflected lack of
progress in the talks.
NEWS BLACKOUT
Both delegations maintained
their news blackout and
divulged nothing of what was
discussed. The main obstacles
to agreement are believed to be
South Vietnam's claim to
sovereignty over all the south,
a cease-tire police force and the
continued presence of North
Vietnamese troops in the
south.
Technical experts of the two
sides met separately for the
seventh time since President
Nixon restricted the bombing
to below the 20th parallel on
New Year's eve. The technical
meetings apparently dealt with


the fine print of any future
agreement and avoided the
major issues still to be resolved.
President Georges Pompidou
of France told a news
conference Tuesday that the
unresolved issues should not be
underestimated, but added: "I
hope the talks will succeed,
and they must succeed."
BACKSTAGE ROLE
Pompidou said he
corresponded with Nixon
during the bombing and played
a role in backstage contacts
that led to the partial bombing
halt and resumption of the
peace talks.
He said France had a special
interest in "the four states of
Indochina" apparently
contradicting the North
Vietnamese position that therb
are only three states because
North and South Vietnam
constitute a single state. The
other two are Laos and
Cambodia which are like
Vietnam, former French
colonies.
At the same time, Pompidou
seemed to criticize the
American view that peace is
obstructed mainly by North
Vietnamese intransigence. He
quoted an expression of the
19th century French-Swiss
writer Benjamin Constant, who
said: "The fact that they
defend themselves proves they
want war."
"Above all, I would not like
to see the American
government adopt (this)
expression as its own,"
Pompidou declared.
The North Vietnamese
government, although pursuing
the renewed peace talks,
announced reinforcement of
anti-aircraft defenses in
apparent fear of possible new
U.S. bombing raids on Hanoi
and Haiphong in case the talks
should break down.
Before Kissinger, Nixon's
top foreign policy aide, began
Tuesday's meeting with Tho,
the official Hanoi newspaper
Nhan Dan indicated doubt the
talks would produce
agreement.

"There has not been any
sign showing that the
negotiations will reach any
results," the paper said. "In the
contrary, very bad signs on the
part of the United States have
been repeated again and
again."


0 A worst ice stormin
*.g


LONDON. ., JAN. 10
(AP)-Major airports and
government offices throughout
Britain were brought to a
standstill Wednesday when
thousands of government
employees staged the first big
union revolt against Prime
Minister Edward Heath's wage
freeze.
The nationwide protest hit
close to home for Heath. His
Cabinet office at 10 Downing
Street, nerve-centre of the
government machine, was out
of action for several hours
when 140 clerks walked out.
They later handed in a
protest letter demanding Heath
lift the freeze amid indications
the Prime Minister will extend
it until April.
As the rebel civil servants,
members of two unions which
represent 400,000 government
employees, held their protest,
Britons were threatened with a
cutoff in gas supplies when the
normally moderate General
and Municipal Workers' Union
ordered its 42,000 members in
the gas industry to launch an
overtime ban Jan. 17 to protest
the freeze.
Thousands of airline
passengers at British airports
faced long delays as 2,000 air
traffic controllers, customs and
immigration officers and
administrative staff, all civil
servants, staged a three-hour
stoppage.
CHAIN REACTION
The walkout looked like
triggering a chain reaction of
chaos, with as many as 60
flights delayed at London's
Heathrow Airport and
thousands of passengers
jammed behind unmanned
immigration checkpoints.
The stoppage hit Heathrow
at a critical time when at least
40 intercontinental flights were
scheduled to take off.
The civil aviation authority
warned other countries' planes
flying through British airspace
would probably have to be
restricted while the traffic
controllers left their radar sets
unmanned.
Prestwick Airport in
Scotland and Manchester
Airport, two key provincial air
centres, were hit by the
walkout. Customs and
immigration men stopped work
at several major seaports
around midday.
Work at several government
departments in the capital
slowed as hundreds of staffers
left their desks to attend
protest rallies. The massive
pillars of the British Museum
were plastered with posters
proclaiming "civil servants
demand fair play on pay."
The museum was closed and
security tightened to guard its
treasures during the walkout.
Welfare offices paying out
weekly social security checks
were closed for a time in
several areas.
Heath imposed the freeze
Nov. 6 in a bid to curb
inflation. It meant all pay
claims were shelved until the
government lifted the
restrictions.
The government employees'
unions charge the freeze halted
a Jan. 1 review of salaries.
They are demanding pay
increase free of all restrictions.
However, Heath has
stubbornly refused similar
demands from other unions in
the last few weeks.
MICHAEL CAINE & GUYANA
BEAUTY QUEEN WED
LAS VEGAS, JAN. 9 (AP) -
British actor Michael Caine and
former beauty queen Shakira
Baksh, of Guyana, were married
here Monday night.
Caine used his real name of
Maurice Joseph Micklewhite
moments before the marriage to
obtain a licence at the Clark
County Marriage Licence Bureau.


decades, power fails

By The Associated Press
'THERE WAS SNOW IN NEVADA and ice in Georgia on
Tuesday. New Yorkers shivered and California citrus growers
worried about frost, as wide sections of the nation reported cold
weather and resulting power problems.


Atlanta was hit by its worst
ice storm in decades. Some
150,000 customers were
without electric service and a
spokesman for the Georgia
Power Co. said it could take
the rest of the week to restore
power completely because
"some distribution systems are
going to have to be rebuilt."
The storm was blamed for
the deaths of two women -
elederly sisters who perished in
a fire started by a broken
power line.
The area around Norfolk
and Virginia Beach in Virginia
dug out from an 8.6-inch
snowfall; heaviest since 1958,
while Nevada, Oklahoma and
New Mexico faced new storms.
Snow spread as far south as
Las Vegas and more than five
inches piled up in Reno as a
major system moved across
Nevada. Snow and ice plastered
New Mexico and Oklahoma,
clogging toads and forcing
some schools to close.
POWER FAILED
In Atlanta, Maj. Gen. Joel B.
Parrish III, state adjutant
general, said generators and
blankets had been supplied
nursing homes, hospitals and
similar institutions where
power failed.
The U.S. weather service
said slightly warmer
temperatures Tuesday
afternoon and Wednesday in
Atlanta would produce some
thawing, but one forecaster
added that there was a chance
more precipitation might move
into the state Wednesday night
amid below-freezing
temperatures.
Citrus growers in southern
and central California used
heaters to keep their orchards
warm as temperatures dropped
below freezing overnight. The
new cold came as the,
agricultural commissioner in.
Kern County reported that
recent freezing temperatures
caused $3.5-million damage to
the county's $7.9-million crop
of navel oranges.
New Yorkers faced the
coldest weather so far this
winter 10 degree
temperatures Tuesday
morning. The city reported
receiving 2,800 complaints
about lack of heat on Monday
and another 1.700 between


DROUGHT IN INDIA
NEW DELHI (AP)- "The
drought is not so bad as it was in
the middle '60s. If it were, I'm
afraid they would just have to
starve."
A western economist is talking.
His view is about as close as
anybody can come to an accurate
appraisal of a 10-month-long
drought that has Indians talking of
famine. Even the government says
it doesn't know how much grain
will have to be imported to tide
over India's hungry millions until
next spring's crops come in, if they
do.
... AND IN LEBANON
BEIRUT (AP)- Lebanon is
looking for rain at a time when
parts of the United States are
getting more rain than usual.
For this small Mediterranean
country and its neighbours Israel
to the south and Syria to the north
and east is facing the biggest
drought in almost 40 years.
Ski resort owners lost most of
their holiday bookings because
there was not enough snow in the
mountains. Farmers managed to
survive the coldest weather in 10
years
****** ****
YOU CAN RUN THE COMPUTERS
THAT RUN THE WORLD
Lurm to be a

COMPUTER

PROFESSIONAL
intke .SW
COMPUTER KEYPUNCH
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Your country needs professionals
trained in the booming field of
airlines, travel, hotels. banking. etc.
The computer is your key to higher
income and advancement. Come to
the U.S.A. schools that pecialize in
the training of computer and
keypunch profhssionnls.
OUR SUPERIOR TRAINING
HELPS YOU TO E A SUCCESS.
Apply now. Internatlonal Insitute is
pprond by the N.J. Stt Dept of
Education and authorind under th,
fedel law to *eo ino inmmrannt lonln
StudSnts. Write tot

INSTITUTE
1697 Oak Tren Road
Edison, NJ., U.S.A. 0817
**********r.+Ir


midnight and 11:30 a.m. on
Tuesday.
There was a shortage of
steam on Monday, due to
inoperative Consolidated
Edison boilers. The company
said the boilers were back in
service Tuesday, but office
building operators were asked
to keep thermostats at 65
degrees to conserve steam.
Overnight temperatures in
Texas were near zero in the
nanhandle and the northwest


NEW IILEANS

POLICE SEEK

SECOND SNIPER
By Guy Coates
NEW ORLEANS (AP)-Police,
seeking clues for a possible second
gunman in a sniper Incident that
left six persons dead, kept a
downtown hotel closed today and
checked.records and leads in other
places.
Numerous questions remained
unanswered, and police Supt.
Clarence Glarrusso said he would
meet with newsmen to discuss some
of them, particularly those he
refused to talk about Monday night
after police searched the hotel and
failed to find a second gunman they
had thought was on the roof.
Among reports checked out,
police said, was one at midday
Tuesday that there had been a new
shooting in another building. The
reports proved erroneous, a
spokesman said.
A major unsolved question-
involved what evidence police
might have that there was morss,
than a single sniper at the hotel.
Giarrumo acknowledged Monday
night there could have been just
one, but he also said there could
have been two or three that police


has a vacancy tor a


SECRETARY

who mustbe a Bahamian Citizen


Candidate houla have several years secretarial
experience, and be proficient in shorthand
and typing.

Starting salary will depend on qualifications
and experience.

Written applications should be made to P. O
Box N3717. Nassau, giving details of pea
experience.


~--- -- r-----r-` ---


_ _


e


p.- ..... .-- let get away or snat escaped ,
third of the state was covered because they were smart. He would
with ice and snow. not talk about other evidence at the-
Furnaces in 31 campus time.
buildings at the Univc.sity of Among potential evidence being
Texas closed for the holidays checked, apparently, were
Texas closed for the holidays comments by police sharpshooters
until Jan. 15 were shut down who said they had seen more than 01
because of a gas shortage and one sniper. is
Austin mayor Roy Butler Policeman John E. Melds, who
t ao was in the 1th floor of city hall,
appealed to citizens to cut three blocks from the hotel, with a T
back on the use of electricity. 12-power telescopic sight on his n
ICE STORM elephant gun, told the Associated
Georgia state climatologist Press, "I could see two others. One
Horace Carter said there have of them I saw clearly enough to tell U
what he looks like. The other figure
been only 33 ice storms in the was less distinct, but I could see it
state since 1893 and only 16 of clearly enough to tell it was another
those were classified as major guy."
St Fields, who was not allowed to
like the current one. fire the powerful, .300-caliber
"Very definitely, this is the weapon for fear of killing police a:
most damaging type of winter buildings behind the target, said o o
storm we have," said David the sniper who was killed, "I saw
Barnes, deputy metereologist him before he got shot, sticking his
nose out and looking around." e
in charge of the Atlanta Capt. Edward Laporte, beside
weather service. Fields with less powerful
Hardware stores and binoculars, also said there
firewood suppliers reported a "appeed to be another guy firing
beoom bsppinerswith" the sniper.
booming business. Pdflceman Frederick O'Sullivan,
"Business is real good," said wounded Monday morning in a
a firewood merchant. "The stairwell near the roof, said he saw b
telephone just rings the man, orat least the muzzle
blasts from his weapon.
constantly." Other policemen said they heard
"We had one of our biggest more than one man talking on the S
days in many years," said a roof.
hardware dealer. "We had a If the sniper killed Sunday night
pretty much sellout on such by police gunfire was not alone,
pretty much sellout on such how did any other snipers get
things as fuel, camp stoves, fuel away?
cans, oil lamps." "There's a gamut of possibilities,
Even in the emergency there ranging from police negligence to a r
were those to lend a helping superbrain sniper," Glarrusso said.
were those to lend a helping Hewould not elaborate.
hand.
Emmett Godfrey of
Marietta, an employ of 1C
Lockheed-Georgia, had been
cutting, splitting and stacking A
firewood all fall. During the ll N il
storm he gave away wood, DOWNTOWN MIAMI
going out in wet and cold to
help load pickup trucks. plll


THE IIlIIIn Ilte
BEAUTY BOX Single $9
THELMA CANCING Double $11
BEN ABRANOFF Triple $13
Beauty SpeclJllsts Quadruple $16
Specliblzing in Facialse of the
PHONE 2-6305 Home of the
FREEPORT ARCADE AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
PIONEER WAY. FEDERATION
DOWNTOWN, FREEPORT.








LADIES SUEDE SHOES
ONLY
$999 reg. price
09 $14.75



FOX'S
Collins Ave. & 6th Terrace
(Next to Donald's Furniture)
OPEN: MON.- THUR.'til 6 P.M.
FRI. & SAT. 'til 8 P.M.






SELL Shell Biamas Ld.







*




U


htr UBrtbunt
NuLus Aomzcrus JOuAM IN VERBA MAGTmI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH,Putbllsher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Ltt., LL.D.
PublisherlEditor 1917.1972
Contributing Editor 1972-
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986,2-2768

Wednesday, January 10, 1973.


EDITORIAL

Moving to the left?


kil


iritish Guiana is now independent and bears the name of
Gugana. Early this year the Prime Minister of Guyana moved
Leftward. He formed an alliance with China and accepted a large
interest-free loan from Peking.
China is strengthening her influence among small independent
states all over the world by cultivating trade relations with these
small governments, many of which have seats in the OAS and the
U.N. She follows up the trade tie by making substantial
interest-free loans to her new associates. You will recall that not
long ago Emperor Halle Selassie was in Peking to collect a fat
interest-free money bag for his government.
Ii now appears that Guyana is spreading its influence in the
Wei.Indies. As you know, Guyana was Britain's only colony on
the mainland of South America. The only other British colony on
the mainland is British Honduras in Central America which also


r -1


b Wr rtibun


RECEIVE LONG

SERVICE AWARDS
MEMBERS of the
Housekeeping Staff of the
Nassau Beach Hotel receive
ten year long service pins.
Also present for the special
occasion were George Myers
(back row) vice president &
general manager; Frank
Crothers (right) director and
Don Cooke (left) resident
manager.


240 Nassau Beach staff


win long service awards

MORE THAN 240 members of the staff at the Nassau Beach Hotel were recently awarded five
and ten year long service pins by the vice president and general manager, George Myers, and
director, Frank Crothers.


1


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
SINCE the change of government in Jamaica earlier this year
one hears conflicting reports about what is going on in that
island.
An appraisal of the situation depends on with whom one talks.
This is to be expected because every man believes that his side is
right.
There has been some concern as to how far left a government
under the son of Norman Manley might go.
Jamaica was taken through all the stages of political reform ...
from the status of a full Crown Colony state into independence
.... by Sir Alexander :Bustamente.
Bustamente was a diamond in the rough. In his public
appearances he got right down to the level of his audiences.
occasionally lacing his speeches with a juicy piece of Jamaican
vulgarity. The common people loved this approach. The business
element and the socially elite of the island found this kind of
public behaviour difficult to accept.
But Bustamente found support in his opposition.
His cousin, Norman Manley, was the leader of the Opposition.
He enjoyed the reputation of having the finest brain in the West
Indies. He took law and won many famous cases at the Jamaican
bar. He was so brilliant that on more than one occasion he was
called to England on a case.
But he was far Left in his politics. He styled himself as a
Socialist but many of his followers were suspected of being
Communist.
This fact caused great concern among the elite of Jamaica from
whom an intellectual like Manley would normally draw strong
support. These people didn't like Bustamente's rough-and-ready
manner but they, felt safer in his hands than under the leadership
of a possibly Communist-oriented government.
As a result of this complex situation Bustamente dominated
the political life of the island almost uninterrupted until illness
for d his retirement.
Otly once during his active years did Bustamente lose control
of the government to Manley. But he recovered his position on
the Issue of Federation.
+* ********
As the British islands in the West Indies demanded more and
more political power Britain tried to unite the major islands in a
strqpg Federation. It was felt that a united independent West
Indies Federal Government would be a stronger unit in the family
of nations than small independent units.
The Bahamas would have nothing to do with this proposal and
British Guiana also stood aloof. But Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados,
Antigua and other islands in the Leeward and Windward group
joined in this movement.
The British architects of this plan proposed that the Federal
Gc~ernment should be located in one of the smaller islands. I
thifk Antigua was suggested. I felt at the time that Barbados
would have been a better choice because the Barbadians had a
lorikhistory of government with a constitution that was a survival
of Byitish colonial government in the Americas.
Oply two other colonies the Bahamas and Bermuda had
suctl an advanced form of internal self-government. In my tour
through the West Indies I found the average Barbadian a
welloducated, strong and stable character.
Bgt Trinidad wanted the distinction of being the centre of
govdenment in the Federation.
Ittwas argued that Jamaica, the other big island in the group,
had been given the West Indies University by Britain, and also
that'Trinidad was nearer to the federated group than Jamaica.
BFdtain agreed. Trinidad became the headquarters for the
Federation. That day the movement died. Manley, who then
head the Jamaican government, favoured Federation,
Bust*mente crusaded against it.
At the height of the campaign my wife and I went on a tour of
the %aribbean. I felt that the Federation would fail because
Jamgica would not accept leadership from a government based in
Trinigad. At the end of our tour I predicted that Manley would
be defeated and Jamaica would break away from the Federation.
This is exactly what happened. And because Jamaica's
population was more than the combined populations of all the
othyr federated islands ... and also because Jamaica was
contributing the largest block of financial support to the group
;.... federation soon collapsed.
Since then Britain has tried to unite some of the smaller islands
in t$e Leeward and Windwards. This also didn't succeed. Finally
she took the small groups under her wing as Associated States,
giving them a large measure of internal self-government with
Britn retaining responsibility for defence and foreign affairs.
Out this is failing too. Anguilla broke away from the St.
Kitts-Nevis combine because the people strongly objected to the
administrative methods of Premier Bradshaw. Now Antigua and
Grehada want complete independence from Britain.

After the death of Norman Manley his son, Michael, headed his
party and early this year he upset Bustamente's Jamaica Labour
Party which is now led by Hugh Shearer.
Shearer has once again raised the fear of Communist
infiltration into Jamaica.
i***+i


on a yearly basis knowing that
they would be greeted by
familiar faces. lie said of all the
hotels in the Bahamas he
believed the Nassau Beach had
an enviable record of long
service staff and that he looked
forward to the day, which
would be here very shortly,
when he could present the 15
years awards.
Mr. Crothers said it gave him
great pleasure to see how many
of the staff had gained valuable


experience from their jobs and
that with on-the-job training
and classes at the technical
college had been promoted to
senior positions in the hotel.
He said members of the
Housekeeping Department
were to be greatly commended
on their fine record of 21
ten-year awards and 25
five-year awards, not far
behind were the Kitchen Staff
with 13 ten-year pins and
22-five-year pins.


Miamian ordered to pay


$300 fine in fraud case


Speaking at a special
ceremony in honour of the
occasion Mr. Myers said how
proud he was to be able to say
that half of the staff working
at the hotel had been
employed for between five and
fourteen years. In an industry
where the staff are frequently
moving from job to job, Mr.
Myers said he felt the staff's
devotion to duty had greatly
enhanced the hotel's image and
that the guests often returned

EXTENSIVE

DAMAGE TO

6-ROOM HOME

EXTENSIVE damage was
suffered by Hospital Lane
residents Ellis Martin and
Frederica Bowe when fire
broke out in their six-room
rented wooden home Saturday
afternoon.
Firemen, called to
extinguish the blaze, met the
back of the building on
Hospital Lane near John Street
still burning at 2:23 p.m. The
building is owned by Clifton
Mortimer. It is not known
whether it is insured and
firemen have not yet
determined the cause of the
blaze.
Two fire calls were also
answered late yesterday when a
bush fire, resulting in minor
damage, broke out along
Kenneddy Subdivision at 6:05
p.m. and was followed by a car
fire at Paradise Island at 11:55
p.m.
The car, owned by Harriet
Mace of Prospect Ridge, was
slightly damaged. Firemen
reported that upon their arrival
on Paradise Island, the car, a
1967 Cortina station wagon,
which was parked in front of
the Flagler Inn Hotel, was no
longer burning.
Sidney Coakley, a worker in
the Buccaneer Lounge, Flagler
Inn, had already put out the
blaze, they reported.
Firemen were also called out
to two bush fires which broke
out early this afternoon at Old
Trail, off Soldier Road at
12:43 and another at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre,
Oakes Field, at 12:48;


SAILED TODAY: Freeport
for Freeport
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Palamedes from Amsterdam,
Southward from Virgin Islands.


wants independence but is cautiously waiting because of the
threat of Guatemala on her borders. Guatemala has long had
conflict with Britain over this territory which she claims as her
own.
Recently it was announced that Guyana, Trinidad, Barbados
and Jamaica were uniting in a plan to open up friendly relations
with Cuba and to establish trade with China.
Some of the big South and Central American states in the OAS
(Organization of American States) registered a strong protest to
such a proposal, threatening expulsion of the foursome from the
Organization if they go through with the plan.
Since then the four have gone all the way with Cuba. They
have decided to establish embassies in that island, thus helping to
break down the barrier erected against Castro in this hemisphere.
A news despatch out of Bridgetown, Barbados reports that
"Hugh Shearer, the former Prime Minister of Jamaica, who was
ousted along with his Jamaica Labour Party in the general
elections earlier this year, has accused the new government of
taking the island-nation into the Communist bloc and of
nanoeuvering Jamaica's entry into a new West Indies Federation.
"Shearer cited moves to establish diplomatic and trade
relations with China, Cuba and some East European countries as
evidence that the government, headed by Michael Manley, was
drastically changing Jamaica's foreign policy.
'Let me go on record as saying that the Jamaica Labour Party
is finely opposed to Communist doctrine'," Shearer told his
party's annual conference. "The JLP will always be a bastion
against Conmmununism in this country."
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
There was a young lady of Riga,
Who rode with a smile on a tiger;
They returned from the ride
With the girl inside,
And the smile on the face of the tiger.
ANONYMOUS


to pay $200 or four months
and $100 or three months for
using the card to purchase the
shoes, which were valued at
$14.70. *.
Mr. Bowe, who asked the
Magistrate not to imprison his -- *
client, told the court that -
Washington was feeling very .
remorseful concerning his S'i .
dishonesty.
He was the member of a
very well-known family in
Miami and was very badly
needed to help in the operation
of a store which is run by his
sister, Mr. Bowe said.
Washington was told to
return home to his family as
soon as possible by the
Magistrate who also said that it
was only the "striving plea" of
his attorney that prevented
him from being imprisoned.





[QQl~w/wtwe1f1TT


We've put our flavour fresh Eggs


in Newclear plastic cartons.


Empty containers have many handy uses...

as ice cube trays...as button holders...

keeps fish hooks sorted... asa jellomold

and many other uses...

the price is right tool


Hatchet Bay-The Bahamian Way


Wednesday. January 10. 1973.


GRAND BAHAMA TELEPHONE

COMPANY

is acccptin aipplitatiolls t or ttle lphOi installation
trainees. Must haLve ood knowledge of I english.
Math and Science. I)ri\ cr, liIcncc required.
Career opporitlulitliti o qualified applicants. Apply
in person to 2( K iplig Building.


I ____,~ __ ___ __ __ _____ __-____ _


__


I


Do
o-WA
w .. ..... ..


ANTHONY Washington, a
26-year-old Miamian who
pleaded guilty to two counts of
fraud by false pretences, was
ordered to pay $300 in fines
when he appeared before
Acting Chief Magistrate Wilton
Hercules Monday morning with
a friend, Ricardo Maxwell
Bowe.
Bowe, jointly charged with
Washington on the first count
of attempting to defraud
Alpina Jewellers of $168 had
his charge dropped when
Inspector Silas Nixon offered
no evidence against him.
Represented by attorney
Nigel Bowe, Washington
pleaded guilty to attempting to
purchase a $168 wrist-watch
from the jewellery store on
January 5 with a Master-Charge
card, which he had used earlier
that day to purchase a pair of
shoes from Vangy's
Department Store.
Washington was arrested and
charged after he tried to
purchase the wrist-watch with
the credit card which bore the
name of William Hopkins, the
victim of a robbery in the
United States.
A call to the Master-Charge
head office by the store
attendant showed that the card
had been stolen and she told
the accused she couldn't
honour the card, Mr. Nixon
said. When he insisted that he
was William Hopkins, the CID
were contacted, the court was
told.
For attempting to defraud
the jewellery store, Magistrate
Hercules ordered Washington


- -.0


ARRIVED TODAY:
Freeport from Freeport,
Tsunami, Sunward from Miami
Fraternity from London and
Liverpool


I


j


I








Wednesday, January 10, 19-


ghb grtibunt


YOUR FRIENDLY SUPERMARKET SPECIAL SAVINGS!












FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE WE
WILL OPEN SUNDAYS 7 a.m. 10 a.m.
LOTS OF OTHER INSTORE SPECIALS
JUST FOR YOUI
COME and SEE USI-
FRMORGRCREPRMN


WHERE PARKING
IS A PLEASURE ...
AND SHOPPING
A DELIGHT!!


BB. Whole Tomato .
FOX'S lacier Mints ...
SCOTT or VIVA Mand Towels
Cologate Toothpaste
SAWYERS Pigeon Peas,..
THREE BULLS Corned Beef
Wesson Oil ....*
GREEN GIANT'S Corn on Cob
Quaker Orits *****
Sparky Charcoal *
CAMPBELLS Vegetable SoM


CABBAGES....... LB. 11

CARROTS ............... 3 57
NATIVE GROWN

Oranges.......... LRG. 10 0o


.. .. 2oz. 596
. ........ 69*
.......2/ *1"
* (SUPER EA('CH) $4
. .10 0o. 5/$1"
* *EACH 12 oz. 796
* EA(' Il oz. 1
* * 20 oz. 59
S.. -.." 59'


op *


2/*1"
5/*1"


- .FomOu5Met ep.1


Native Pork .............Per lb.
Mutton ....... ......... Per lb.
New Zealand Leg of Lamb. Per lb.
Hamburger Patties .2 LBS. PKG.
Rath Wieners ............ per b.
Turkey Hind-Quarters ... Per b.


89*
99'
89'
$1"
79'
39'


Fresh Cut-up Chicken .......lb. 79'
Cure 81 Hams ............. b. $I


MINUTE MAID
Orange Juice *

TREE TOP
Apple Juice...

HATCHET BAY
Ice Cream ..*


S.....* .o 39'


* . 12 oz.79'


All lavours GAL. $1 29


Rath Bacon


1899C

VALUES GOOD JANUARY 11th
THRU JANUARY 14th


I


i mu


QUANTITY
RIeHTS
RESERVED





:1 10
L IL L
.488


B I I


--


i ,1


HATCHET B


ILK
QTS

c


9 9 --_


I ro enuinBy


* C,
1 *4


r
F
r
I
i


iIw&
r-l
F;9
t-*


1 .
-
u-
c


W







Wednesday, January 10, 1973.


THE
BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Value!


BUT WE TRY TO GIVE MORE FOR YOUR FOOD
SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 11th, THROUGH JANUARY 14th, 1973.~ l l


T-BONE STEAK


Per lb 1.99


PORTER HOUSE STEAK Per bl .99


TOP ROUND STEAK
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
ROUND ROAST
BAiHAMIAN GROWN
PORK-All Cuts


Perlb 1.69
Per lb 1.79


Pe


I -FRO OU GOERI1 YEt 4


Per Ilb 1.59

Srlb .89

tea bags


COUNTY KIST DIAGONAL CUT
GREEN BEANSsave.11c
HELLMANNS
MAYONNAISE Save.l1Oc


BUSH
BLACKEYE PEAS


SUNSWEET
PRUNE JUICE Save.16c
HAWAIIAN RED
APPLE DRINK Sdve.16c


8-oz 3/.49
16-oz .65


15-oz 3/.69


32-oz .79

46-oz .59


YORK
CORN-ON- COB Save .14c 4 Ears


.59


YORK
SALTED PEANUTS S1e3oz .85
B.B. Sav
TOMATO PASTE 10-oz 2/.79


LIBBY'S
SLICED PEACHES


LIPTON'S
TEA BAGS


Save .10c


29-oz .65
50's .65


LIBBY'S
SLICED BEETSsave.1c 8-oz4/.89
LIBBY'S
SLICED PEACHES 8avz 4/.99


WALDORD ASST.
BATHROOM TISSUE 4 Rolls


CELEBRITY
LUNCHEON MEAT


.65


12-oz 3/.89
Save .16c


SURF
DETERGENT Save.36c 16-oz 3/.99


MELLOW CRISP
SLICED BACON
OSCAR MAYER
SALAMI FOR BEER
OSCAR MAYER SLICED
LUNCHEON MEAT
MAPLE LEAF WEINERS


1-lb .99
8-oz .79
-oz .75
1-lb. .79


FAMILY FARE
ORANGE JUICE
KRAFT AMERICAN
CHEESE SINGLES
MAPLE LEAF
SLICED CHEESE


-FRiEN FOOD TREATS -


I FLORIDA SWEET
GRAPEFRUIT
RED GRAPES
i BAH4AMIAN GROWN
5WE TOMATOES
BAHAMIAN GROWN
CUCUMBERS


each .29
Perlb .79

Perlb .20

Perlb .25


GREEN GIANT
SMACKWICHES -o
BEATRICE
CHOCOLATE MOUSSE
BIRDSEYE
LOAF SPINACH ,-oz
BIRDSEYE
CORN-ON-COB 4E
BIRDSEYE COOL
WHIP TOPPING 9-


U .\N
M ,


ONE


64-oz

16-oz
8-oz.


S 10


1.29

1.29
.75


2/.99
1-oz .75
3/.99
ars .79


.85


BAHAMIAN GROWN 494
WholeFRYERS Per lb -


Dc


- . I - ~~ -"-;~i~e--~"-- ---11- c --


I U.S. CHOICE MEATS I


Chum




I Ir
DOG FOOD ~t
(3FL AV t n RS


I SANDWICH MEA^^TS i-


7ra y*'
PIEO PA





3/9


I -FARM FRESH POB-lE


/


oz


* -- *
m'-








IMht _____lWW er


SHOP OUR EVERYDAY FOOD SPECIALS


Milk Liquid Detergent (22 ozs.) 2 for 9c HARDING' S TIP-TOP MARKET
Milkmaid Milk 4 tins 99 MARKET STREET
Vim (large) 2 tins 70c FOOD STORE PHONE 2-3067


Quaker Grits (5 Ibs.)
Lantic Sugar (5 Ibs.)
Carmen Rice (5 Ibs.)
Drive Detergent (giant)
Carnation Cream (large) 3 tins
Junkanoo Smash 7 tins
Champion Brand Pigeon Peas (small) 5 tins
Lux Soap (small) 3 bars
Campbell Vegetable Soup 4 tins
Onions 3 Ibs.
Jewel Shortening (3 Ib. tin)
Hatuey Malt Tonic (6 bottles)
Mahatma Rice 25 Ibs.


59c
79c
79c
99c
79c
99c
$1.00
45c
89c
59c
79c
$1.29
$4.40


NZ. ROUND STEAK

DANISH SPARE RIBS


$1.00 Ib


59C Ib


US. CHOICE ROUND STEAK $1.65 Ib


; LAMB SHOULDER 650 Ib
BOLOGNA Islicedl 55 Ilb.
BOILED HAM 99C Ib
FRESH MUTTON 90C Ib
FRESH PORK 85C Ib
PORK CHOPS 890 Ib


M.C. FOOD STORE
PHONE 3-4847 LOCATED IN ENGLERSTON
NEXT TO ST. LUKE'S BAPTIST CHURCH


US. CHOICE T. BNE STEAK $1.19 lb.


LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS


TURKEY DRUM STICKS


FRESH MUTTON


79C Ib.


49 Ilb.


95 Ilb.


NATIVE PORK
$1.00 Ib.

TURKEY WINGS
49t lb.


Ajax Detergent (giant)
Libby's Sweet Peas 3 for
Campbell's Vegetable Soup 4 for
Luncheon Meat 2 for
Nescafe Coffee(4 ozs)
Libby's Spaghetti & Meat Balls 2 for
Libby's Whole Kernel Corn 3 for
Libby's Sliced Beets 3 for
i Libby's Ketchup (20 ozs) 2 for


99c
99c
89c
65c
99c
89c
99c
99c
$1.09


Maxwell House Instant Coffee 6 oz. $1.53
Wesson Oil 48 oz. $1.53
Ocean Spray Cranapple Drink 32 oz. .74c
Hunts Fruit Cocktail 2% .63c
Hunts Bartlett Pears/22 .63c
Drive Detergent King $1.75
Kerry Gold Butter 8 oz. pkg. 32c.
Vanish 20 oz. 99c -
Franco American Spaghetti & Meat Balls .45c
Green Giant Cream Style Corn 303 .32c SHIRLEY STREE r
B.B. Mushrooms 6 oz. 89c.
Parson's Sudsy Ammonia 56 oz. 65c
ppwq-7--.


I


Wednesday, January 10, 1973.


3Ihp lribntm


,q









Wednesday, January 10, 1973.
HWE^RMFESrm


mORE CVERVDAY


LOW PRICeS


4~17


DRIVE
DETERGENT


DANISH
SPARE RIBS


~i~i~u~---
d*-
i _.-- I
eY
-rre
b n~


GIANT


SHASTA
SODAS



12-OZ.
CANS


LB.


ANTI
SUGAR



s69i


16 O1. W.O
BOLOGNA
1602 W.O. 16 0W 0 HICKORY
FRANKS .89 B SWEET BACON
W.. BRANO U.S CHOICE
GROUND BEEF .59 l DELMONICO STEAK
U.S. CHOICE US CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST 1.19 L RIB STEAK
U.S. CHOICE U.S CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST ......89 SHOULDER STEAK


-


89 LB

.99LB


2.29 Lt
1.79 is
1.29 LB


16-0 OSCAR MAYER
BEEF FRANKS
2 LB. PACKAGE CITY MARKET
BEEF BURGER
U.S. CHOICE
RIB ROAST
US. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK


3-BULLS
CORNED BEEF


.99 LB


1.79


1.69 LB
.99 tL


I12-OZ.
CAN


FR OM OUR PRODUCE. DESPh


LAYS 6 PACK


CHIPS


FOR99c


YELLOW
ONIONS


3
LBS


QUANTITY RIGTS RESERVED PRICES GOOD
JANUARY 11, THRU JANUARY 13,1973.
BUY BAHAMIAN
BAHAMIAN
TOMATOES .................... LB.25
GREEN BAHAMIAN FROWN
CABBAGES .................... 19
ORANGESBAHAMIAN 10 OR .99
5-L4. US
APP LES............................. 1.09
BAHAMIAN GROWN
BANANAS ................... L .19


Mahatma
j LON ORAIN R ICE


RICE



SAO


14-oZ.
PKGS.


24 02. DIXIE MIXED
VEGETABLES.......
10-O. BIROS EYE
CAULIFLOWER ......
1002. GREEN GIANT FROZEN
LIMA BEANS ....
1101. MORTONS CHICKEN AND TURKEY
TV DINNERS...


.69


.45
.55


....59


WINK DIXIE AMERICAN SUED
CHEESE


S BAKERITE
SHORTENING



ANLB.79


LIPTON'S B & W
TEA.


ST. PAULI
GIRL MALT


619
PAOK


ILB KRAFT PARKWAY DIET
MARhARINE ......................55
OUART KRAFT
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE ..... .69


SARNMTIII
EVAPORATED MILK



oANS .


CAmplOURYN
CHAMPION eIAl


'OL ON pl'i


,
L


PIGEON PEAS


20-z.
UNs


2 OR .99


200 CT SCOTT ASSORTED FACIAL 8 OZ NESCAFE I-LI ROBERTSON STRAWBERRY
TISSUES..... 2R.88 INSTANT COFFEE .......1.99 JAM.......
20-02 DOLE SLICED LARGE 4-01 STOKILY'S
PINE LE..... 2 FOR.99 RIBENA ..........75 PINEAPPLE JUICE.
303 CA NS STfELY'S HONEY POD 1002. CHAMPION 303 CUS LIB1YS
PEAS.................. 3.99 TOMATO PASTE... 2FO79 FRUIT COCKTAIL...
REGULAR PALMOLIVE PINK OR GOLD KING SIZE 14-01. DAYGON
SOAP ............... .. 6 89 MR CLEAN ..... 1.25 INSECT BOMB.....
THE BtAHAF AS LARGEST AfD mOST CSTABLISHCD
POOD STORES.PIRST WITH BIAHAmIAPSi SinCC 1934.


2 FOR .99
2 FoR .99
2 FOR .85
1.35


R. BALLARI
UVER, BEEF AHD ONIKEN
DOG FOOD


6
Ib OZ.
CANS


WQtibnttw


7


ShaRina j


.4




4,
4 4


STOKELY'S
CORN ON COB


TALL
CANS


SARA LEE
CAKES


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ghrt Qribunt


Wednesday January 10, 1973.


Pellerin-Burrows wedding


SHRE LST DAY THUR fARIN


LAST DAY THUR
Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, evening 8:30'


I 4,









BILL O(SBY.,ROBE



SUGGESTED FOR MA TURE.
PARENTAL DISCRETION
Reservations not claimed by I
sold on first come, first ser


I LY [. 'J"
Now thru Friday
Matinee continuous
From 2:00 Evening 8:30
"SUBMARINE X 1" G.
James Caan, David Sumner
plus
"YOUNG BILLY
YOUNG" G.
Robert Mitchum,
Angle Dickinson
*'_.nni aCl.4


mE
Las
Cont

"PAYM
Guy M


"COC

No on
No on


NUW SMUW
atinee continuous from 2:00, ev
oCM ..
W WMDPLmIEAMIARM


- Stnrring ROBERT HOOKS fl
20UI,^
IIStw- atifcSD $


MARJORIE Remelda
Burrows, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Neville Burrows of
Lower Deadman's Cay, Long
Island, became the bride of
Michael Pellerin, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Pellerin of
Quebec, Canada, on December
27 at 4:30 p.m. at St. Peter
and Pual Catholic church. Fr.
Walter Cerbin and Fr. Paul
Ortner officiated.
The bride, given in marriage
by her father, wore a long
gown of white satin with
sleeveless bodice and a
matching cape and hood.
The cape, trimmed with
embroidered French lace was
attached to her hood which
was also bordered with
identical trimming.



Urp, ca


She carried a bouquet of
white and blue carnations and
wore blue shoes.
Patricia Burrows and
Bernadette Burrows, both
sisters of the bride, were
bridesmaids. Matron-of-honour
was Antionette Burrows, also a
sister of the bride.
Neville Burrows Jr., was Mr.
Pellerin's best man. Ushers
were Raleigh Carroll and
Dorsheild Burrows. The bride's
mother wore a long pink dress,
trimmed with silver sequins
and white accessories. The
groom's mother wore a long
printed dress with green
accessories and a matching
hood.
The reception, following the
ceremony, was held at the
home of the bride's parents.
The newlyweds are presently
honeymooning in Montreal,
Canada, and will return to
Nassau Thursday for a brief
stay, after which, they will
return to Quebec where they


WSDAY
phone 21004 21005

They're not I
cool slick
heroes.
They're worn,
tough men
and that's why
they're so
dangerous.






ERT CILP I



AUDIENCES.
ADVISED.
8:15 will be
ved basis

JIIIIM I
t Day Thursday
tinuous Showings
from 3:00
ENT IN BLOOD" R.
ladison, Edd Brynes
plus
3GAN'S BLUFF" R.
'lint Eastwood,
Lee J. Cobb
e under 17 admitted.

S

ng 8:30 'phone 34666






I







Yia
crblvp Mu


HOUSE FO SAL[ OR ION LEASE


On West Bay Street by The Grove and close
to the Beach.
The house is built around a large patio in a
secluded garden with a private entrance at the
rear of the property to a separate garage.
The accommodation comprises: three large
bedrooms, two bathrooms, a spacious living
room with adjoining dining room, a Bahama
room and a large kitchen. Own rainwater tank.
For sale at $65,000.00 fully furnished or for
rental on a long lease. Telephone: 34317


A shower of

bath arguments

DEAR SQUARE: Ceader It doie. It's not easy to star
thr while you're heldt g your nos.
PrblMs Tn's fll letter 7 y"o get eIff uar Shrt.
Fwr a permal repy. wrMte t AB"D: Box No. eN. L A..
c.n. MIN. alms e slApo4, sfrfin eSwe-.
lbow


~-~3


By Abigail Van Buren
a Ion caesr C wM T Y. News s5., Isc.
DEAR ABBY: Germaine Greer is going to crucify you.
She went on record as saying that a woman's natural odor
is nothing to be ashamed of, and any man who didn't like it
could go jump in the lake. And now you come along with
your statement that a man should bathe daily and a woman
can't bathe enough!
As the world's most widely read columnist, how are
you going to defend yourself against Germaine Greer, the
most outspoken proponent of Women's Lib?
ABBY FAN IN BOSTON
DEAR FAN: Germalne Greer can go to her mikveh
and I'll go to mine. [P. 8. Mikveh means bath.]

DEAR ABBY: I am mystified over your remarks on
bathing. Thanks for enlightening me. I had always heard
that all men were created equal. I never realized that
women were born "dirtier" than men. I knew that a woman
is paid less for doing the same job as a man, but until now
I didn't know it was because she is offensive.
I'm amazed at you, Abby. You must have water on the
brain from spending so much time in the bathtub. S. K. H.
DEAR S. K. H.: Men and women are NOT created
equal-anatomically speaking. Unlike the male reproductive
organ, the female's is an orifice which constantly produces
a secretion which is normally somewhat odoriferous. She is
not necessarily "unclean," but a woman who wants to be
forever fragrant will not spare the soap and water.

DEAR ABBY: In conjunction with your recent letter
concerning bathing: Will you please stress the fact that
MEN need underarm deodorants as well as women?
My husband and I are square dancers, and I sure wish
I could tell some of these men that it isn't their swinging
that makes me dizzy, it's just the fact that I am holding
my breath-and a gal can hold her breath just so long
before she loses consciousness.
Please print this, Abby. There are a lot of square
dancers, and it could be a lot more fun.
A SQUARE IN MICHIGAN


I'


S


4 E


BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND


WWI


---- ----


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^SH E R AT ON ^^^^^^^^^^
BRITISH COLONIAL HOTEL^^
kL, ne By treeissou, T l '13 iM


I


-


)


'44%-


TONY SEYMOUR

&

THE NITEBEATERS




BRITANNIA BAR

Monday Sunday

Off Tuesdays

7:30p.m. la.m.


c-,











Wednesday, January 10, 1973.


ih, Oribunt


* <. _' .-







LF44 the lob done I


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


REAL ESTATE FO l RENT CARS FOR SALE CARS FOR SALE SCHOOLS M INE SWFULIS TRADE SERVICES TRA SERVICES
I 5'i


LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East End.
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.
C8303
IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's home, guest
cottage, fireplace, 2h baths,
patio, marvellous view,
swimming, fishing. H.H. Larkin
c/o Box 101, Harbour Island.

C8311
FOR SALE
Lot must be sold immediately.
$3,000. Call 5,6600 9:30 a.m.
5 p.m. night 3-4564 Mrs.
Johnson.

C8314
ATTRACTIVE 3-BEDROOM,
4-bath residence, Blair Estates.
Living-dining room, recreation
room, study, laundry, ample
storage space, patio, etc. Lot
100'.x 150', Call 3-1077.

C8336
WHY BUY A HOUSE? Live
aboard a 50 foot yacht. Three
state-rooms, spacious saloon,
dinette, modern galley, shower
and two heads, and all
furnishings. Leaving Island
must sell. Call 3-1424 for
information or see "NANCY
III", Yacht Haven Eastern
dock.

C8405
LOT 75' x 100' just off
Carmichael Road, $3,300. Call:
McPherson & Brown Real
Estate 2-2680 2-2681.

FORSAILEOR RENT
C8381
BEACHFRONT secluded
cottage, popular fashionable
out-island resort. Rental $500
winter. Sacrifice sale $12,000,
easy terms $500 down.
Phone 5-7224 evenings.


FOR RENT
C8267
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.


C8265
LARGE 1 BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C8286
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152. Evenings
5-4926.

C8289
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C8334
Two two-bedroom unfurnished
apartments on Soldier Road,
one block east of East Street.
Interested persons telephone
Valderine Adderley, Fresh
Creek, Andros, Radio Station.

C8357
1. 3000 Sq. Ft. of store and
warehouse space on
Dowdeswell Street. Location
formerly occupied by BESCO
LTD. $750.00 per month.
2. Ground floor store space in
the Roberts building on East
Street near Bay Street, 1200
So. Ft. al $750.00 per month.
3. OFFICE SPACE: Roberts
Building, East Street.
120 sq. ft. $90.00 per month
270 sq. ft. 135.00 per month
360 sq. ft. 180.00 per month
975 so. ft. 400.00 per month
4 OFFICE & STORE: space
Out Island Traders Shopping
Centre, opposite Potters Cay.
Ideal location available for
takeout restaurant $308.33
per month. Store and office
space available from as little as
$277.00 per month.
5. OAKES FIELD AREA: one
bedroom apartments,
unfurnished $140.00 per
month.
d. OFFICE SPACE OAKES
FIELD AREA: 868 sq. ft.
$290.00 per month.


7. APARTMENTS out East
- 1 & 2 bedrooms, fully
furnished, airconditioning,
swimming pool, $255.00 &
$265.00 per month.
S. EFFICIENCY
APARTMENTS: close to town,
fully furnished, airconditioned
- $150.00 per month.
9. LOVELY EXECUTIVE 2
bedroom apartment, in the
east, redecorated and
refurbihed $375.00 per
month.
All enquiries on the above
should be directed to Bert L.
Roberts Limited telephone
MRS. 2-3177/2-3178


LC885
ONE BEDROOM and one two
bedroom two bath, large living
and dining room, Bahama
room apartment. Basically
furnished on beautiful
landscaped grounds. Third
Terrace Centreville. Facilities,
laundry, phone, parking, fully
airconditioned. Phone 5-4631
- after five 3-2397.

C8347
5 ROOM APARTMENT in
Churchill Subdivision one
bath, with water and
electricity. $35 per week. Write
P. O. Box N3523, Nassau.


C8346
ONE 2-BEDROOM apartment,
basically furnished Palmdale
- no children or pets. Ring
5-4980 after 6 p.m.
C8264
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
HILLCREST TOWERS (Third
Terrace West Centreville) -
Elegant, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
apartments, airconditioned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842,
7=4116, 2-8224 or'2-8248.

C 8268
ONE EFFICIENCY apartment,
basically furnished, Victoria
Court Apartments, on
Elizabeth Avenue between Bay
and Shirley Streets. Facilities,
laundry, parking. Phone
5-4631. After five 3-2397.

C8392
PRIME OFFICE space
available in IBM HOUSE, with
central airconditioning and
ample parking. For further
information call 32351/4.

C8390
COLONIAL MANOR
APARTMENTS, Collins
Avenue, 2nd Terrace West -
One bedroom furnished
a partmen ts with
a irconditioning, swimming
pool, laundry facilities No
children or pets. Telephone
2-8808 between 9 a.m. and 1
p.m.
C8270
IN TOWN furnished rooms,
efficiency apartment, also
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.

C8410
BACHELOR ROOM in
respectable home in Palmdale
with private entrance. For
information call 5-1044.
C8406
AIRCONDITIONED furnished
apartment. $150 per month.
Call 2-4645.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE
C8344
BAY STREET BUSINESS
LADIES FASHION STORE
FOR PARTICULARS
ON LEASE OR SALE
Tel: 24148/23027 or 22794
Morley & O'Brien
Real Estate Ltd.
C8313

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
including utensils, furniture,
toys, clothing etc. Blair
Estates, Sheffield Steet No.
141. Phone 3-1077.


C8375
ROLLEIFLEX SL35mm
camera with telephoto and
wide angle lenses.
Rolleiflex SL84 Super 8 Movie
Camera
Minolta Repo-S 35 mm Camera
Dual 8 Film Editor
Leitz Pradovit 35 mm Slide
Projector.
Philips HI Fi: 4500 Stereo
Tape Deck with 202 Electronic
Turntable, RH 580 Amplifier,
RH 690 Tuner, Two 8"
Speaker Units.
One Set Royal Doulton
chinaware (dinner and tea
service) for six.
Assorted Stuart and Edinburgh
crystal ware.
Canteen of cutlery, six place
setting (53 pieces).
Wilson pram, push chair,
playpen, highchair, cot.
Tea trolley
Please contact Chief Clerk Tel.
2-1161.

C8320
ONE LARGE avacado gas
stove only $200.00. Contact
Roberts at 2-8437 before 5:00
p.m.

C8401
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
including bedroom sets, fridge,
gas stove, washing machine,
alrconditioner, furniture TV,
etc. etc. Phone 51372 after 5
p.m.


C8399
ZENITH PORTABLE TV with
stand $40.00
Cedar Chest $65.00
Mothercare Carrycot $15.00
Sunbeam Party Grill $15.00
Skil Electric Drill with
accessories $25.00
Also other Items. 31626.


L


I837J


ABC MOTORS
Budget-priced,
A-i used cars.
Best value for
your money.
1971 FORD PINTO
2-door, automatic
transmission, radio $2,500
1971 FORD LTD
automatic transmission,
air-conditioned, radio $3,500
1971 FORD ESCORT
4-door, automatic
transmission $1,900
1971 FORD PINTO
2-door, automatic
transmission, radio $2,500
1972 CHEVROLET VEGA
2-door, automatic
transmission, radio $3,300
1970 FORD TORINO
2-door, G.T., automatic
transmission, radio
airconditioned $2,650
1971 FORD LTD
4-door, automatic
transmission, radio
air conditioned $3,300
1971 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE
4-door, automatic
transmission $2,500
1970 HILLMAN MINX
standard $1,100
1970 MERCURY MARQUIS
4-door, automatic
transmission,
radio, stereo,
airconditioned $2,800
1970 TOYOTA COROLLA
4-door, automatic
transmission, radio $1,100
1970 FORD CORTIN.I
E/C standard $1,600
1969 FORD GALAXIES
500 4-door, automatic
transmission, radio,
air conditioned $900
1970 OLDSMOBILE STATION
WAGON, automatic
transmission, radio,
air conditioned $3,200
1969 FORD CORTINA
ESTATE 4-door $1,100
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON
4-door, standard $1,000
1969 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
4-door, automatic
transmission, air
conditioned, radio,
stereo $4,000
,969 FAIRLANE
500 4-door, automatic
transmission, radio $1,000
1969 FORD FALCON
4-door, automatic
transmission $1,100
1967 CORTINA E/C $150
ABC MOTORS
COLLINS AVENUE
CENTREVILLE
PHONE 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8 A.M. to 6 P.M.
SATURDAY
8 A.M. to 5 P.M.


C8272
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LIMITED
SUBSTANTIAL
END OF SEASON
REDUCTIONS
1970 Chevrolet
Impala 2 dr. A/C $2800
1970 Rover 2000
A/C Automatic $2400
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic, Beige
4 dr. $1895
1968 Viva 2 Dr.
Automatic $850
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic $1600
1969 Caprice A/C
Vinyl 4 Dr. H/T $2000
1968 Javelin A/C $1600
1970 Singer Gazelle
Auto. White $1295
1970 Wolsey 16/60
Auto Grey $1295
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8.


C8337
1969 SKYLARK Buick,
automatic 2 door, V-8,
airconditioned red with
black vinyl top, white interior.
Call 22209 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

C8323
1971 DODGE AVENGER G.
L. Automatic with radio.
$1600 or best offer. Phone
2-3106 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Phone
5-3590 after 5 p.m.
C8358
1967 MORRIS 1000 Traveller
- good running condition.
$650 or nearest offer. Call
2-1473 between 9 a.m. 5
p.m. weekdays.

C8374
1970 MORRIS 1100. 15,000
miles. B$1,200.00 O.N.O.
Phone 2-1161.

C8377
2 YEAR OLD automatic
Cortina. Excellent condition.
Only 12000 miles. $1700.
Owner leaving. Phone 41365.
C8402
1970 MORRIS 1100 for sale.
Good condition. Phone 24076,
or 53746
C8408
BARGAIN
Rambler American 440
Automatic, power-steering.
Good condition new battery,
new radiator-core, 4 new
tyres, $800. Call for C.
Russell at 55521 and leave
your address or phone number
to view.


I roqOn1 Ia-3a -A--- 1


C8397
ONE FEMALE half boxer
puppy. Had all shots. $50.00.
Call 5-4209 evenings.

POSITION WANTED
C8348
SALESMAN. Hard working
honest and reliable 10 year!
experience seeks position
Phone 51828.

C8385
QUALIFIED Bahamian
Accountant seeks executive
position as assistant to chief
accountant in well-established
and reputable firm. Only large
firms of the type need reply.
To: "Accountant," Box 5035,
Nassau.


C8386
1971 MORRIS 1000 Traveller,
aqua blue, 1100 miles. $1,400.
Telephone 28894 or 58713.
Owner leaving.
C8387
BEST BUY OF THE
YEAR 1971 Pontiac Ventura.
Call Hubert Lewis, Lyford Cay
Club 7-4271.

LOST
C8354
3/4 COLLIE. Wearing chain
with licence No. 601. If found
please call 3-1348. Reward
offered.

C8350
SMALL MALE SEALPOINT
SIAMESE lost between
Camperdown/Tower Heights.
Contact Dobell 41515.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C8356 NOTICE
SHEPHERD L. KEY will sell
by Public Auction on Saturday
the 20th day of January, A.D.
1973 at Twelve O'clock noon
at Auction Galleries Limited,
6th Terrace, Centreville, the
following orooertv:
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot
Number Sixty-two (62) of
Claridgedale Gardens
Sub-division situate in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence and
bounded on the NORTH by
Lot Number Sixty-three
(63) of Claridgedale Gardens

and running thereon Forty
(40) feet on the EAST by
Raymond Road on the
SOUTH by Karl Drive and
on the WEST by Lot
Number Sixty-one (61) of
Claridgedale Gardens and
running thereon Eighty (80)
feet which said piece parcel
or lot of land has such
position boundaries shape
marks and dimension, as are
shown on the diagram or
plan Numbered 271 N.P. in
the Crown Lands Office of
the City of Nassau on the
Island of New Providence
aforesaid.

The above property known as
the property of Jenniemae
Porter is being sold under an
Indenture of Mortgage dated
the 7th November, 1971.
The sale is subject to a Reserve
Price and to a right to the
Auctioneer or any one on his
behalf to bid up to that price.
TERMS: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on delivery of title.
Dated this 3rd day of January,
A.D. 1973
SHEPHERD L. KEY
Public Auctioneer.

PETS FOR SALE
C8383
THOROUGH BREC
LABRADOR puppies, si>
weeks old wth shots. Parents
A.K.C. registered. Phoni
3-1457.
C8411
One six week old black male
Labrador puppy.
Thoroughbred. Phone 4-1314.


C8400
NOTICE IS HEREBY given
that Daniel Joseph of
Robinson Road and Montel
Heights is applying to the
Governor for naturalisation,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and- -signed statement of the
facts to the Deputy Governor,
Bahamas.

MARINE SUPPLIES
C8283
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleeps
six; private bathroom with
vanity, shower and head;
stove refrigerator, sink,
stereo ship-to-shore, twin 230
h.p. engines with less than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.

C8369
CAL 25' Ocean Racer family
cruiser. Full headroom,
dinette, enclosed head, 7.5
H.P. Mercury, galley etc.
$6,000. Call 24635 Night
41456.

C8384
BAHAMAS YACHT SALES
JAMFR W ALBURY
P. o BX e569
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
TEL 2ao70
DisTRIBUTORI FOR

TROJANYACHT f


I-


C8372
CHRIS CRAFT Commander,
27' fibreglass. Two Chrysler
185 H.P. Engines. $12,000.
Telephone 7-7832 after 6 p.m.

I HELP WANTED
C8271
REFRIGERATION
MECHANIC. Should have 3 to
5 years experience on domestic
appliances. Salary subject to
negotiations. Phone BESCO
2-1070.


TUITION
C8322
GUITAR LESSONS ... taught
by Derek. For information call
5-2354
C8364
Central Baptist Church Nursery
School reopens January 8th.
For information call 4-1595,
5-8210 or 4-2873.

C8335
ENROLL FOR EASTER
TERM
Typing
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Commercial Mathematics
Office Practice
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier (NCR
4200)
Dictaphone-Typist
Filing
Telex Operator
B.J.C. and G.C.E. Classes:-
English
Mathematics
Literature
History
Spanish
NASSAU ACADEMY OF
BUSINESS
Shirley Street opp. Collins
Avenue Phone 24993

C8396
BOOK-KEEPING II. Students
wishing to register for Evening
Classes commencing 18th
January are asked to contact
Mr. Smith at 2=8901 or
3-4843.



C8394
IN THE ESTATE of Levi
Ferguson late of the Western
District of the Island of New
Providence, Retired
Shopkeeper, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that
all persons having any claims or
demands against the above
Estate are requested to send
the same duly certified and
those indebted thereto to make
payment to the undersigned on
or before the 10th day of
February, A.D. 1973.
AND NOTICE is hereby also
given that at the expiration of
the time above mentioned the
Administratrix will proceed to
distribute the assets of the
deceased among the persons
entitled thereto having regard
only to the claims of which she
shall then have had notice.
David C. Bethell
Attorney for Administratrix


a. '
In sad but loving memory of
the late David Otis Bonamy
who departed this life Jan. 8th
1972.
Gone But not forgotten.
David we loved you but Jesus
loved you best.
Sleep on dear one and take
your rest.
Left to mourn, his wife Iris,
five children, Gregory, Dawn,
Ingrid, Devy and Elain, his
mother, five brothers and one
sister, and a host of relatives
and friends.

TR ADE SERVICES
C8279

m Custom,

~rokae r Lld.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
N/,SSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434


C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.
C8275
TROUBLES ......small or large
call The Plumber on Wheels:-
ROBERT M. BAILEY
P. 0. Box N56,
Nassau
Telephone: 3-5870.


C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.

C8102
APTER CHRISTMAS MESS?
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCO TEL:51071-2-34.


El________


HELP WANTED _
C7036
1-UTILITY COOK Must
have three years minimum
experience in First Class Hotels
and Restaurants. Must be able
to relieve Pastry Chef and
Garde Manqer.
Police Certificate and Good
References required.
Please apply to Personnel
Department: EL CASINO, P.
0. Box F-787, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7026
CHEFS: TO TAKE
COMPLETE CHARGE OF
STATION. SUPERVISE AND
DIRECT ASSISTANTS IN
PREPARATION OF FRENCH
& INTERNATIONAL
CUISINE.
APPLY: PERSONNEL
DEPARTMENT, OCEANUS
HOTELS LTD., P. O. BOX
F-531, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.


HELP WANTED
C7025
FOOD AND BEVERAqE
NIGHT AUDITOR: Must have
experience of working in hotel
doing Food and Beverage Night
Audit. Must be Bahamian.
APPLY HOLIDAY INN -
FREEPORT, P. O. BOX F-760,
373-1333. MISS STAFFORD.
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeoort office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. 0. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas. "

C7035
LIVE-IN MAID/COOK.
REFERENCES REQUIRED.
BAHAMIANS ONLY APPLY.
WRITE TO R. ANTONI, P. O.
BOX F-170, FRFFPORT


_____________________________________________________________ a


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT


TEL.352-6608


~CVI ~~~------


i


I .... I a


*


C8378
WANTED: Gardener-
Handyman. Full time. Inquire
3-1975.
C8367
BAHAMIAN maid to live-in.
Eastern Road. Phone 5-1137.

C8363
GARDENER Bahamian, or
Haitian with permit. Call
7-7240.
C8328.
E X P E R IE NC ED
BOOKKEEPER REQUIRED -
for International Advertising
Firm. Person of senior
background capable of
handling all books of original
entry to preparation of Profit
and Loss Statement and
Balance Sheet. Must be able to
perform all functions with
minimal supervision. Up to
$10,000 commensurate with
experience. Please apply in
writing to P. 0. Box N3910,
Nassau.

C8393,.
TWO FARMERS -- 32-35
years. $35 weekly. Write Jesse
McMinns, c/o General Post
Office, Nassau.

C8389
LIVE-IN niabt time maid
wanted to take care of 2
children. P4one 2-2026
between 10 a.m. and 12 noon.
C8407
CHILDREN'S NANNY
Must be willing to live in and
have experience in looking
after young children and be
able to drive and swim.
References required.
Write: Adv. No C8407, C/O
The Tribune, P. 0. Box N3207,
Nassau.


C8403
THE BANK OF NOVA
SCOTIA requires Accountant
for their Main Nassau Branch.
Applicants should have at least
12 years banking experience
and preferably be Fellow of
Institute of Canadian Bankers
or similar qualifications.
Bahamians only need apply.
Please apply in person Bank of
Nova Scotia, Rawson Square
and Bay Street, Nassau.

IN MEMORIAlM
C8395
=I LL


"'


I











10 (bv Wribunt


Champion jockey wins .



3 races at third meet


LAST YEAR'S CHAMPION JOCKEY Gary Bain crossed the
finishing line in first place three times at the Hobby Horse Race
track yesterday reminding all those present that he will not be
easily removed from his throne.


Bain rode Gold Gail to
victory in the first race of the
day, three races later he took
first place again on Lena Rey
and finally he rounded off a
successful day by winning the
eighth and last race on Peace
Maker.
The feature race of the
afternoon for 'A' class horses
yesterday was won by Miss
Advantage. This was Miss
Advantages' second win in as
many races this season. She
outran Horan Shoran and
Reina de Whyon who both tied
for second place. (See picture
this page)
Ridden by Austin Saunders,
Miss Advantage looked a
winner all the way, taking the
lead from the start of the race
and never letting up. Iloran,
ridden by David Patel ran a
superb race coming strongly
from the back of the field to
finish in second place while
John Bain on Reira le Whyon
showed great determination in
finishing third after smashingt
h i s ankle against the
gate-railing as the horses set
off. X-rays revealed that the
inkle was only badly bruised.
The highest payoff during
the meet came in the daily
double when the 3-3
combination paid out S51.15.
THEl. FOLI.OWIN(; are the results
of yesterday's racing:
1st RACE- 6 furlongs (old Gail
(3) G. Bain $6.70, $4.45, $3.05:
Fantasma (9) J. Bain $7.80, $4.65;
Tassel (4) A. Gibhhs $4.15.
2nd RACE 4/ furlongs
Complete Image (3) M. Brown
$14.45, $5.75, $4.20; Sea Fire (6)
A. Saunders $3.25, $2.80; Ring of
Fire (4) C. Major $4.60. Daily
Double (3-3) $51.15 First Quinella
(3-6) $19.30
3rd RACE 4/ furlongs
Banquero (5) H. Fernander $8.15,
$4.80, $2.65; Al's Twist (4) J. Bain
$4.45, $2.80: Last Hope (3) D'Patel
$3. Second Quinella (4-5) $7.75
4th RACE 5 furlongs Lena
Rey (5) G. Bain $5.50, $4.40,
$3.30; Bundio (1) K. Johnson
$4.20, $4.10; Connie (2) C.
Munnings $3.75 Third Quinella
(1-5) $18.75.
5th RACE 6 furlongs Miss
Advantage (2) A. Saunders $7.90,
$2.45, $2.35; Horan Shoran (1)1).
Patel $3.35, $2.90; Reina )e
Whyon (6) J. Bain $2.60; $3.30.
Fourth Quinella (1-2) $5.60 (2-6)
$4.05
6th RACE 5 furlongs l)oger
Lossa (9) K. Johnson $4.80, $2.25.
$2.70: Cheda (6) R. Ierguson


$2.25, $2.40:. Noksl Prince (2) 1'.
)emeritte 54.45 5th Quinell.i (6 9)
$5.10.
7th RACt( 6 turloings PRoman
Dancer (3) J. Horton $1 1.10,
$4.75, 53.10; Iail Safe (4) A.
Saurnders $3.30, .$3.25; Yiiung
Blahamian (8) S. McNeil '4.05. 6th
:)uinella (.1-4) $ 3.30.
Mth RACl 4'. furlong's I'ace
Maker (h) G;. Haam S9.95, 13.70,
$3.20. Pat (4) II. Woodsit $.5.5.
$4.75; Rockola (I) A. Sauntdrs
S14."0. 7th Quinella (4-M) $34.05


INTO THE HOME STRAIGHT Stan McNeil ridinq Sir D (41 streaks round the final
bend and onto the home stretch followed closely by Austin Saunders (8) on Ugly
and John Bain (9) on Winchester during the 6th race of the second meet of the Hobby
Horse Race Track 1973 season on Saturday. The position of the riders did not change
down the stretch and McNeil took first place followed by Saunders and J. Bain in third.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


SECOND HALF GETS UNDERWAY
THE SECOND HALF of the 1972.1973 Bowling season got
underway last week after everyone survived the past two weeks of
activities, whitewashed Maura's by


SEASON'S FIRST DEAD HEAT came on Tuesday's
third meet of the season when the track paid for two
combinations in the fifth race. The dead heat came when
No. 1 mare Horan Shoran came from behind to tie for a
second place with No. 6 Reina De Whyon. The track paid
for the two combinations of (2-1) and (2-6) at $5.60 and
$4.05 to ticket holders. Winner of the exciting fifth race
was Miss Advantage who won her second race of the season.
She was ridden by jockey Austin Saunders.


Mercury seems to be on the
way towards winning the
second half as they demolished
first half winners, City Market
in the Plaza League. Larry
d'Albenas 255 (664) turned in
an excellent score as he lead all
bowlers that night.
Larry was assisted by Cedric
Saunders 205 (558) and
Tommy Russell 218 (566).
Jerry Fryers 198 (584) and
Winston Bethel 214 (569) were
top for the foodmen.
Elsewhere in the League,
Finco had a two point win over
Out Island Airways. Billy
Kemp and Doug Roberts
scored high for FINCO and
OIA respectively.
Sawyer's edged Home
Furniture by winning two
games by close scores. Ken
Sawyer 196 (524) was high for
Sawyer's and Tony Zervos was
top for the Furnituremen.
ZEPHYR.' LEAGUE
Home Furniture had a good
opening night as they


A review of high school basketball

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, revolving around forwards Robert Scott, Tyrone Sawyer and Centre
Andrew Albury all over six feet with Ronald "Buck" Johnson, Kenneth Trotman and Dexter
Rolle vicing for the goals. are favourites to top the Western Division of the Inter-School Senior
Basketball Series which begins on Monday.


"We have a very good
chance of winning and expect
competition from Aquinas
College only," said Albury,
who acted as spokesman for
the team.
St. John's have a very good
all around team and the
majority of the players six n,
whom play in the Bahamas
Amateur Basketball
Association's series have
been playing together as a team
for the past two seasons. "We


NOTICE


PUBLIC AUCTION


Harry D. Malone will sell at his premises on Albury
Lane situate five (5) doors from Shirley Street South
on the right hand side on Friday 12th., January 1973
at 12 o'clock noon properties previously advertised
for sale on behalf of The People's Penny Savings
Bank, Ltd. which was postponed from the 7th
December 1972.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.



D6 a ui a o fie Iga
S CAEERI IOPPORINITY

SApplications are Invited for the position of Local Manager
of wellknown Engineering Firm in Nassau. Applicants must
be Bahamian, vith minimum educational standard
Equivalent to Five "0" Levels or preferably ordinary
national certificate in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering.
At ait five year's engineering experience is essential, and
applicants must have sufficient commercial knowledge to
enable them to take charge of a sales & service organization
serving the whole of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
The successful applicant would be required to undergo a |
comprehensive training programme at the companies'
factories overseas n order to become fully conversant with
the companies' products.
SApplicants without the full engineering background
ncessary, but with the potential and personality to enable
them to successfully train for the position, will be
conrided. ,
S Ipp n own hand-wrlting to: Box No. DA3962 c/o The
I rbune, NaNu.
Umm -mm mmii mmemmamm s mn M m


already know each others
moves and set-ups, so it
should be easy for us this
season," boasted a confident
player.
Year in and year out, the
best coaching job in the
Western Division is done by
Aquinas' Gerry Harper who
tili :,eason has lost three of his
best starters Van Ferguson,
Prince lHepburn and Lewis
flanna.
"It is an unfortunate thing,"
said Mr. Harper, "but we have
to make it without them."
Despite the loss, Aquinas is
still in excellent shape to give
St. John's the competition
needed to win.
Centred around Charles
Green 6-3, Frank Young 6-2,
Ronald Saunders 6-4 and
Danny Edgecombe 5-10, all
centre/forwards, Aquinas
College will have the
rebounding power all to
themselves for Clifford
Rahming and Bennet Davis to
find the hoops.
"We have a little more
balanced and aggressive team,"
explained Mr. Harper with
Bernard Davis, Ray Culmer and
Barry Smith potent shooters.
Although Prince William
High last season's division
winners have a tall team,
coach Harper feels that they
are inexperienced and the team
to beat will be St. John's
College.
Although coach Harper does
not like to predict, "I feel
we're strong," he said.
Aquinas, who ended last season
with a seven and one win-loss
record, lost the playoffs to
Prince Will.
GOOD COACH
Coach John Todd with his
ability to transform a team the
way he did Brown's Arawaks,
moving them from the cellar to
the top of the B.A.B.A.'s
junior league standings only
needs co-operation from Prince
Will to make them the number
one upsetters in the Western
Division.
The official coach, Caswell
Thompson, with Todd
assisting, have a fairly new crop
to work with since losing
6ft.7ins Charles Thompson
who last season powered them
to the playoffs.
Controlling the boards for
Prince Will are 6-3 David
Molley, 6-1 Lenhurst Johnson
and 6-0 David Bullard. 6ft.2ins.
Leonard Stuart is the first
picked centre along with Ghaly
Swann and Pat Sweeting
substituting.
Leading the shooting power
will be Ray Rose with Sherwan


Coakley, Mark Clark and
Cardinal King on the ball.
Coach Samuel Gardiner will
have a tough job this season
keeping Government High on
the boards among St. John's,
Prince Will and Aquinas.
In spite of this, "if my team
play the way they are capable
of, we should win,"
commented Gardiner.
Acquiring Levant Carey
from St. Augustine's College to
team up with Peter Mitchel and
Greg Rahming on the boards
greatly improves Government
High's rebounding strength.
Erdlie Moss, David Cleare
and Phillip Adderley will be
working the points while they
get some help from Bernice
Pinder. Rounding out the team
will be Michael Clark and
Claud Quant, brother of
B.A.B.A.'s star Sterling Quant.
Senior High has a slight
problem. They are not too well
together, explained coach
Rodney Johnson. However,
this is not to say that Senior
High is headed for the cellar. A
late starter could very well end
up on top.
A. F. Adderley High which
has a fairly young team with
not a great deal of height will
be leaning heavily on forwards
llarvy Roker and Mark Bethel.
With only four of last
season's players back, Adderley
High will have to show great
potential in order to survive
among the tougher teams of
the division.
Iligh School coaches are to
attend a coaching clinic
tomorrow night at 7 o'clock at
.the Garfunkel Auditorium.


winning all three games. Bea
Brown 172 (488) spearheaded
the furniture ladies while
Tootsie Thompson had a
respectable score for Maura's.
New Oriental proved they
could be contenders for the
championship crown as they
blasted defending champs,
Amoury's, for two victories.
Joyce Waugh.Lee Malone and
Sandy Bethel were high for
N.O.L. while both Rosie
Saunders and Pallas Roberts
were best scorers in Amoury's
lone win.
Thompson's did not look
like the champions they are as
they lost two games to Super
Value. Annie Russell 181 (502)
had a good set for the food
ladies while Patricia Sweeting
mustered-up the best score for
the first half champs,
Thompson's.
MADEIRA
Pritchard's handed Albury's
two defeats as the first half
champions did not look like
the champions they are and
should be. Sonny Bethel 190
(530) and Ivan Sands
combined their high games in
defeating Albury's. Perry
Cooke 203 (564) and Mike
Albury 219 (628) had
respectable scores for Albury's.
The Esso Tigers seem to be
on the move as they beat the
tough Claridge team in two
games. Sydney French 209
(586) and Kenaz Russell 210
(551) had good sets for the
now roaring Tigers. Bradley
Friesen 203 (587) had the only
good set for Claridge's.
K. C. Auto Sales outlasted
Heineken's as they won two
games. Tim Stubbs and Tom
Poitier 195 (543) were high for
K. C. and Heinekins
respectively.
The great upsetters,
Guinness, won two games from
Tinker's Paint by great margins
and lost one by only a whisker.
Jeff Albury 225 (566), Charles
Lunn 192 (549) and Valdo
Prosa 189 (534) were high for
Giinness as Ronn Wells and
Shanndoah Evans were top for
Tinker's.
BOWLER OF MONTH
Bowler of the month for
December was held on Friday
night. Congratulations to
Charges Cooke, Jeanie Lolis
and Bradley Friesen for
winning the contest for their
respective leagues.

ALL BLACKS WIN
TWICKENHAM, ENGLAND
(AP)--New Zealand the All Blacks
-overcame England 9-0 in a
gruelling rugby union match at
Twickenham Saturday the third
international victory of their British
tour.
The All Blacks led 6-0 at
half-time.
lan Kirkpatrick scored a try for
New Zealand in the eighth minute
and Joe Karam converted. Brian
Williams added a drop goal in the
58th minute.
New Zealand had previously
beaten Wales and Scotland.
The New Zealanders still have to
play Ireland and France.


english


Soccer Cup Saturday and that means problems for mte top teams
and maybe glory for giant killers in the most unpredictable of


knockout tournaments.
The pressures of the annual
race to the league
championship are off this
week. They are only replaced,
however, by nerve -straining
problems of a different kind as
the first division clubs enter
the cup fray for the first time.
Most of the no-hopers have
already dropped by the
wayside, but, two little
non-league clubs. Margate and
Chelmsford, will be trying to
knock mighty first division
teams into the mud.
Strictly speaking they have
no chance, but strange things
happen in the ('up.
Margate have a home match
with Tottenham, while
(helmsford are at home to
Ipswirh.
NOT FASY
The first division teams
won't find it easy to win on
small, unfamiliar pitches, while
the little clubs will have the
incentive rewards from a long
Cup run.
The Cup has thrown up
several other intriguing
contests.
League leaders Liverpool are
away to Burnley, an attractive
side currently heading Division
Two. Perhaps class will tell but
how much a difference is there
between first and second
division soccer?
First Division Chelsea have
just a 50-mile trip down to
Brighton on the south coast for
what should be a mere
formality.
Brighton, hopelessly placed
at the foot of the Second
Division, are certain of a
sellout 35,000 crowd for the
visit of their more illustrious
neighbours.
Chelsea manager Dave
Sexton said he wasn't taking
any chances over the result and
declared: "Anything can
happen in the Cup and we are
working like hell to win. A
good run in the Cup can have a
most magical effect."
Troubled Manchester
United, bottom of the First
Division, could maybe have
done with a confidence
boosting result against an easy
opponent. But the luck of the
draw has pitted them against
Wolverhampton, one of
England's most redoutable Cup
fighting outfits.

IDELETTE LOSES AGAIN
EUGENE II)LETTE, who on
December 27 lost a fourth round
technical knockout to Bahamian
heavyweight Bert P'erry, suffered
his seventh loss last night to English
heavyweight Billy Williams.


JUNIOR BASEBALL MEETING
THE $30 entrance fee hike
imposed on Junior League clubs by
the Bahamas Baseball Association
will be discussed by the junior
league's at a meeting called for all
junior league representatives
tomorrow night at 7:30 at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.
The B.B.A. attempted to impose
a $70 hike on the Junior League's
entrance fee. However, after much
debate, it was reduced to $30.
Six teams so far have entered this
season's junior league series. They
are the Flamingo A's, Lee's
Cardinals, A.I.). Royals, Budweiser
Eagles, Killarney Pros and the
Super A's.

FOREMAN IMPRESSIVE
KIN(GSTON. JAMAICA
(AP)--Heavyweight challenger
George Foreman showed the power
of his punches in a very impressive
training session here Monday
afternoon, decking one of his
sparring partners and jolting four
others in his six-round drill for his
upcoming fight with world
champion Joe Irazier.
Frazier also was impressive as he
went through five rounds, three of
which were with eighth-ranked
heavyweight Ray Norton.
The Foreman camp received
added staff Monday night with the
arrival of Sandy Saddler, former
world featherweight champion.
TICKETS FOR FIGHT
ROUND TRIP tickets which
include admission, air fare, hotel
and meals for the world
heavyweight championship fight
between Joe Frazier and George
Foreman scheduled for January 22
in Kingston, Jamaica may be
purchased at Mundy Tours on
Shirley Street.
Freeporters may contact Lavern
Lockhart or Kermit Hutcheson at
the Holiday Inn.
FUNDS FOR OLYMPICS
OTTAWA, JAN. 9 (AP)--The
Canadian government has not
changed its views on providing
funds for the 1976 Olympic (ames
in Montreal, urban affairs minister
Ron Basford said Tuesday.
Replying in the Commons to
Mark Rose NI)P-Fraser Valley West.
Basford said the government
position remains as it was first
stated by Prime Minister Trudeau.
The government has said it will
not provide money for the Olympic
Games, aside from funds which can
be obtained under existing federal
programmes.
A budget has been submitted to
the federal government by the
Montreal organizing committee for
the 1976 Olympics.
SHANE GOULD WINS
SYDNEY (AP)--Triple Olympic
gold medalist Shane Gould swam a
sub one minute 100 meters to win
the New South Wales women's
freestyle title at the open air North
Sydney pool Saturday.
The 1 6-year-old blonde, who will
spend several months at school in
Los Altos, California, this year
clocked 0:59.8 to win by 0:00.9
from up and coming star
15-year-old Suzanne Anderson of
Queensland.


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