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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03240
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 8, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03240

Full Text
4 POWERFUL JET-PROP ENr.
ARE MORE RELIAP'
TELEPHONE 77J03/77.,
tttbe Sribum*
piwrad with Poatmaiter of hmi lot poaiag* concmilona within th* Bahamas |
Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
BIG SPECIAL
LUDEN LIMITED LIQUOR SUPPLY
Dowdeswell Street. Nassau
Phone 2-2117
VOL. LXX, Mo. 39
Monday, January 8, 1973.
Price: 15 Cents
ANGERED BY DEPUTY PM'S DISCRIMINATION
CHARGE, 77 < No one at Mademoiselle
ever fired for being PLP
THE STAFF OF MADEMOISELLE, most of whom, by their own admission, are probably PLP, have struck back
at Deputy Prime Minister Arthur Hanna's discrimination charges made against owner Norman Solomon in the
House of Assembly.
PLP lawyer concedes in North Long
Island election case that one
vote should never have been counted
ii
ii
By MIKE LOTHIAN
JAMAICAN Q.C., VIVIEN BLAKE, conceded in the Election Court fob) that there should he
a scrutiny of four votes cast in he September 19 North End Long Island Election, but he charged
that the evidence heard has not established grounds for I scrutiny of two other ballots cast in the
election.
Mr. Blake conceded that the
GOVERNMENT
SAND BARGE
BACK ON 10B
THE SAND barge David
Morrison, out of commission
for a week with crane
problems, is now operative and
delivering sand to Malcolm's
Park.
Truckers were unable last
week to meet the demands of
consumers when the barge
crane malfunctioned
1 ii. i it>Jc m tut ii
corrected and the first load of
sand was brought in on the
weekend.
The Tribune revealed
Saturday that Bahama!
Utilities Ltd. had its sand
dredging licence cancelled on
December 31, but negotiations
are presently underway with
Transport Minister I).null
RoUe.
Bahamas Utilities, which in
1970 was denied the use of
Malcolm's Park sand depot to
hoard sand, was the main
supplier of sand to the public.
SHARl
The government's barge
David Morrison and Rick
Penn's Square Deal Trucking
Company were permittei' by
government to share Malcolm
Park for their sand dredging
operations.
It is understood that the
Ministry of Transport gave Mr.
Penn an ultimatum to remove
the barge within a prescribed
time or it would be moved by
the Ministry and the costs
charged to him.
The grace period has
reportedly expired, but the
barge has yet to be moved.
The Transport Ministry was
not prepared to comment
today.
Gets 2 years for
shop-breaking
I I ROY Brown, a Paradise
Island employee charged with
two counts oi shop breaking
was sentenced to two yean
imprisonment this morning
Brown, of Wulff Road, was
accused of breaking into the
Nassau and Meadow Streets
branch of the Super-Value
Foodstore between July 23-34
last year. (onvicted of the
offence. Brown, who was
represented by attorney
Charles Barnwell, changed his
not guilty plea to guilty on a
KCOnd charge of breaking into
the Wulff Road A.I.D. centre.
Brown's palmprint, found
on a piece of metal siding
which had been cut from the
foodstore to gain entrance led
to his being charged, detective
Joseph Sail riders told the
evidence has established
"beyond doubt" that one of
the votes counted in the
election should never have
been cast because the VOl
improper!) registered.
But there may be legal
arguments to he heard on the
validity ot the Hue.
votes thai ought to he
scrutinised, based on the result
I scrutiny.
I he attorney chaUeng)
pion for a scrutiny it
tv.o votes which wen.
on grounds of tl. i
non-residency of tl i
green line across It, v. as
accepted and counted by the
Returning Officer
PR1MA I \( II
Mr. Blake in his summation
tin. morning conceded that "it
would seem that a puma lacie
CM has been made out" in
relation to the need lor a
scrutiny of the three ballots.
But he added that subject to
the results of the scrutiny there-
ntaj be legal argument-, thai
can properly he given to the
court in relation to the validity
or otherwise of the ballots
under an interpretation of
relevant provisions in the
eined becal I Representation ot the People
evidence "fell tar short' of Act
Lovely
GINGER JAR
LAMPS
DOLLY MADISON
FURNITURE
(NASSAU ONLY)
proving non-residency.
No evidence was offered
concerning a third vote
challenged on the ground of
non-residency.
Mr. Blake's submission
immediately followed the
conclusion of the taking of
evidence in the flection
Court's hearing of the election
petition.
The petition for a scrutiny
was filed by FNM candidate in
the election Cyril Fountain, de-
claimed that one person voted
although he was Improper!)
registered, that three others
east ballots in the election
although they did not meet
residency qualifications, that
two ballots rejected by
Returning Officei Livingston
Smith should have been
counted, and that one ballot
counted by Mr. Smith should
have been rejected.
WINNFR
Mr. Fountain claims that a
scrutiny of the ballots in
question and a recount would
reveal him the winner in the
Sept. 19 election.
At the time, however, the
Returning Officer found an
equalit) Of votes between Mr.
Fountain and PLP candidate
Philip Smith, declared the
election void and called fot a
fresh poll on October <>. I NM
supporters boycotted the
second poll and Mr. Smith was.
returned as representative fot
the North Fnd Long Island.
Rum Cay and San Salvador
constituency.
Parliamentary Registrar
Fdwin Davis testified earl) m
the Election Court hearing,
which began last Wednasda).
that a Mr. Neil I Medley, who
voted in the Sept. 19 election.
did not register as a voter until
August I, 1972. one das too
late if he was to he eligible to
vote on Sept. 19.
Mr. Blake, who represents
Philip Smith in the bearings,
this morning conceded that Mr.
Davis' evidence established that
Mr. lledley should not base
voted and Ins ballot must
therefore In- rejected.
Mr. Fountain himself gave
evidence that two ball-its
one with an 'Y against his own
name hut also with a green ink
line across it. and the second
with no 'X' bill with the words
"Cyril Fountain" hand-written
under the candidate's printed
name were rejected by
Returning Officer Smith on the
teeo int. Mr. Fountain also
testified thai another ballot,
With an 'X' for the PLP
candidate and again with a
In the third category of
votes challenged by Mr.
Fountain, three women
Merlene lav lor. Delores
Cart wright and Melvira
Cartwright were challenged
during the election on grounds
that they had not been
"ordinaril) resident" in the
North End Long Island
constituency during th
months priot to election da).
Seven witnesses, including
assistant education director
Susan Wallace, district
education officer Admiral
I eiguson, Chiel Inspector
iikell Cartwright, Tourism
Ministry photographer Howard
Class and three Long Island
natives, were called in a bid to
prove the non residency in the
constituency of the two
Cartwright women.
Evidence taken from the
witnesses showed thai the two
women were for three years
students at the San Salvadot
readier*' College, bul thai
they completed the coins, in
June. 1971, and have been
leaching in Headman's Cay and
Lowet Headman's Cay since
the Litter part of 1971. Both
settlements are in the Clarence
I own constituency, adjacent
to North End Long Island
NOTENOI CM
I Ins much was also
conceded by Mr. Blake, but he
said that it was not sufficient
evidence "to prove that neither
ot the Cartwright women
irdinarily resided in the
i onstituenc) tor some time, no
mattei how long, during the
period of six months before
the election."
He said that since the two
women were registered in the
North End Long Island
constituency, the onus was on
the petitlonei to prove they
were living elsewhere, He said
the only evidence heard was
that the two were working
outside the constituency in the
relevant period and were seen
,' their parents' home m
Lower Headman's Cay
That did not prove their
tton-residcnc) In the North
I nd Lone Island constituency.
he said
Mr. Blake had not vet
completed his submissions
when Couit adjourned for
luncheon at 12:45. He was
expected to complete his
arguments this afternoon
' Fore Attorney General
l.erald Collett, Q.C.,
representing the Returning
officer, and the Hon. Eugene
Dupuch. (.I.C.. representing Mr.
fountain, made their own
submissions on th* issue
In a legislative debate in
Novembei Mr, Hanna accused
Mr. Solomon. Opposition FNM
representative lor St. I
and Dunmore, of firing
Mademoiselle personnel who
were thought to have voted
PLP in the recent elections.
Angered by the allegation,
the store's employees wrote a
letter to Mi II,inn.i on January
2 and tddreased opiea lo the
arm,' the signatures of
some 77 stall.
In it the) claimed that "no
one who ever worked for
Mademoiselle was evet fired
before, during, or alter any
election tor being I'll'.
"As a matter ot fact," said
the letter, "the probability is
that the majority ol those who
work at Mademoiselle are
PLP supporters and we are all
still here as most of us have
been here lor some years
living evidence that what was
said in the House of Assembly
is just not so.
UNFAIR
Continued the letter:
Because it seems to us unfair
that untruths are allowed in
the lluise of Assembly, we felt
this letter should be written.
"I OCal newspapers have
quoted the Deputy Prime
Minister as saying that
Mademoiselle fired all the PI P
employees after the election
Simply put. this is not tnie.
"No one has ever tried to
find out how many PI P and
how many FNM supporters
work at Mademoiselle No one
who applied for a |ob with
mademoiselle is ever asked
what political party they
support.
"The management ol
Mademoiselle, as far as we the
employees are concerned.
judges us by what we do not
by what we are Those who
deserve it receive advancement
and on occasion those who
deserve it receive discharge
"We would also like to point
out to those who do not know
what they are talking about
that any damage done to the
management ol Mademoiselle
is also damage done to the
workers Ol Mademoiselle. And
as we said earlier, most ol us
are probably PI I'.
"We trust that as many
Bahamians will read this true
report as there were who read
the false one."
Mr. Hanna declared in the
H ise that he now knew
officially that Mr. Solomon
fired everybody who
Mademoiselle thought was PI P
and hired FNMl
"We will get Mademoiselle in
Hie end just as they got us In-
declared.
ROSCOE PYFROM
BUYS LAS BRISAS
FOR $250,000
NASSAU businessman
Roscoe Pyfrom has purchased
i is Brian, the Eastern Road
estate belonging to Mis I l(
< hampion, Canadian.
Ihe sale was negotiated by
Damianoa Realty for $250,000
from an asking price ol
$375,000.
I ocated next to The
hermitage, the house is set ill
approximately 1.40 acres on
the northern ridge oil I astern
R id
The house has live bedrooms
and six bathrooms. Many of
Ihe floors are of teak parquet,
while a feature of the dining
r un is the north wall which i~
all glass. A system of pulleys
Ii wen the entire wall into the
ground so that the room can be
open-air, or a screen may be
put in place of the glass
The house has central
air conditioning, a guest house
and salt water swimming pool


Crippled Children's Raffle starts
RAFFLE tickets for two cars donated by Mr.
Alexis Nihon to raise funds for the Crippled
Children's Fund went on sale today. Here M'
Robert Orr, a long time member ot rl
committee and chairman for this year's raffle, is
shown receiving the keys of the Chrysler from
Mr. Leonard Kemp of Kemp's Garage,
Shirley Street. The first clinic for crippled
children this year, which is dependent upon
proceeds from the raffle, will be held in March.
Pictured irom left to right are Mrs. Shirley
Oakes Butler, chairman of the committee, Mrs.
Margaret McDonald, Mrs. Orr, Mr. Kemp and
Miss Verneitta Mott, publicity chairman.
WALTER ENGLERT
... back to New York
WALT ENGLERT
LEAVES NASSAU
MR. WALTER Fnglcrt. Pan
American Airways sales
manager in the Bahamas for
the past four years, returned to
Pan American's New York
division to lake up his new-
post today in charge of groups,
tours and charters.
He left Nassau yesterday.
His wife, Adcla. will join him
at the end of the month. Thcir
17-year-old daughter will
remain in Nassau to complete
her studies at St. Andrew's
School and sit her G.t I
seminations in June.
While in Nassau Mr. Fnglcrt
live in the Fast Nassau
Rotary Club. and the
Bahamas-German Society. His
wife was a board member of
the Inner Wheel and a board
member of the American
Women's Club. She also served
as a Yellowhird Bl the Princess
Margaret Hospital.
Denied work permits
for Haitians'crab lady'
leaves after 30 years
BECAUSE OF IMMIGRATION DIFFICULTIES, which made
it impossible for her to stay in business. Mrs. Nola Musgrove
Daniel has sold out her entire holdings here, including her crab
factory, and moved with all her family to her native Turks Island
Mrs. Musgrove, who is Movement, with which the
I to a Bahamian, Leon UBP merged
Daniel, has been denied work
permits tor two Haitians who
have been with her factory lor
I' years and are considered
essential to its operation. She
was given 30 .lays last
to et the Haitians out
I he tribune understands
thai the Turks government has
offered Mrs, Musgrove 50 acres
of land and also approved
permits for the Haitians.
A member of her family said
that the "crab lady", whose
products were something of a
Bahamian institution, plans to
start her crab business from
scratch again, just as she did
when she came to the Bahamas
some 30 years ago.
M Musgrove left the
Bahamas Friday, taking her
children and grandchildren,
VICTIMIZATION
Her husband, who is blind,
will be joining her this week.
He attributed refusal of the
work permits to nothing less
than "political victimization."
Mrs. Musgrove had always
been a staunch and outspoken
supporter of the United
Bahamian Party and later the
Opposition Free National
Without the Haitians, who
were responsible for boiling 30
to 40 barrels of crabs day,
the factory could not function.
Mr Daniel was quoted as
|| could not pel
Bahamians to boil so many
barrels of crabs per day so we
were forced to close it down."
Ihe 5 I year-old Mrs,
Musgrove came to the Bahamas
while in her early 20s.
Shortly after she began
preparing stuffed crab and
selling it from door to dooi to
help support her family
Hie delicacy becami
popular that in time she
abb to expand the business
and put up her factory on
Carniichael Road.
Mi Daniel, who became
blind 1S years ago, said his
wite took care of him and kept
the business running N
nutter how many crabs were
shipped to her by her agents in
the Out Islands she always
. led them
Ihe crab lady's" specially,
was rated so highly that it was
served to the Queen on her
visit to the Bahamas in I'((.6.
Heart Foundation seeks nominations
for its 1972 Golden Heart Award
THE SIR VICTOR SASSOON
campaign for nominations for the
The award will lie presented
10 the winner at the annual
Heart Ball to In- held in the
Crown Ballroom ol I oewi
Paradise island Hotel &. Villas
iii February 17. I he award is
presented to thai person "who
has given of hunscll unselfishly
10 promote human welfare and
dignity while making life better
or his fellow man."
The a* trd started by
the I oundation U mi > i
It gives recognition "to i
person who lias laboured
un publicized for his or her
deeds; gives recognition so that
the person honoured may
receive a moment ol public
awareness and everlasting
gratitude, gives recognition to
the need lor such unselfish
promoters of human welfare
and dignity to continue with
I In- ii much needed and
dedicated work. gives
recognition and encouragement
to unknown and unassuming
practitioners ol the golden rule
'I will help him for he is my
brother.' "
I he Foundation, through
the Golden Heart
"hopes that one annual
recognition spiritually gives
Satisfaction tO th< many others
who also serve and deserve
(BAHAMAS) HEART FOUNDATION today launched its annual
Golden Heart Award, 1972,
Winnei ol the 1971 Golden
Heart Award was Mrs. Denny
Cooper, a Yellowbird volunteei
at the Princess Margaret
Hospital, who was recognized
loi the hundreds of hours she
has freely donated as a
volunteer worker at the
hospital.
Winnei ol the 1970 award
was Mrs. Sybil Blyden.
headmistress ol the Stapledon
School lor Retarded Children.
better known as Us "guardian
angel." In accepting the award
Mis. Blyden said, "I accept it
as a challenge and with (iod's
help I will continue trying to
make the world a better place
for unfortunate little ones."
I Ins she has done, and lor this
"the whole community
recognizes her love and
devotion through the Golden
Heart \w.ud." I release said
today
Winner ol the 1969 (.olden
He.lit \w.nd w is Dr. Timothy
Mi < artney, a consulting
psychologist at Sandilandi
Rehabilitation ( entre, who has
helped countless people with
alcoholic and mental health
problems. Much of his work is
done alter hours and he gives
freely ot ins timi and
knowledge in this field,
Winnei ol the first Golden
II el \w.iid was Dr. Mam
li in in. Clinical Director of
St I rant is Yivicr's Free
Health and Pie natal clinic. She
recognized for her
unpublicized work among the
po.u and elderly during her 14
n the Bahamas.
Ihe I.olden Heart Award
Itee has asked that
nominations be sent to P. O.
Bo* NI706 Nassau. Deadline
for nominations is February
10.
I he Committee stressed that
iius is not .i popularity award,
Ili.il a single nomination could
be the winnei. All nominations
are given careful investigation
so thai the purpose of the
Golden Heart Award may he
maintained.
DEATH
Miss Maud Prilchaid. 93,
eldest daughter ol Ihe lal Ml
and Mrs, (). I Prilchaid died
at her residence this morning
alter a short illness
She is survived by two
sisters. Mrs Anna llowitt, Miss
Hilda Pritchard and Several
nephews and nieces
Funeral arrangements have
not yet been made
Gleneagles
Hotel closes
for business
IHI t.l I M V.I I S Hotel.
under a purchase agreement
with a i anadian busine
was temporarily closed Friday
and its 30 staff given one
week's severance pay when the
prospective buyer failed to
meet certain financial
commitments
The 71 loom hotel has been
repossessed by th amounting
firm of louche K
Company as receivers for the
mortgagee, Mrs Papandi
Alexiou, who is also th.
Of the hotel
Purchased originally by the
Alexiou family, and extended
in 1967, the Cileneagles was
leased to Mr. James llerrington
ol Kingston. Ontario In July
197 1 Mr. Herrington'i
company Shearwater Ltd ,
agreed to purchase the hotel in
a SI million-dollar deal
Two months earlier Mrs
Alexiou'a husband Anthony
was slain in his Eastern Road
home by three youthful
intruders and his widow
became the first mortg I
MONTHS I.Ml
Ihe Tribune was told that
Mr. Herrir fell behind in
his r .i 'bout five
month! mugh Mrs.
Alexiou "it wish lo
return to tin hotel business she
is anxious to claim the monies
owed her
A family member said there
vas still a very large sum
lutstanding
Mrs Alexiou will fly to
Canada later this week lo
consult with .her lawyers
concerning future action on
the hotel.
It is understood she is
hoping to renegotiate a sale of
'dry.
guests booked at
ilu Gleneagles were transferred
10 the Montagu Beach Hotel.
Ihe hotel remains under
guardian maintenance until
some arrangement for
re opening can be made
U.K. TEACHER IS
FIRST OUT ISLAND
TRAFFIC DEATH
BRIAN HEALEY, 26. an
I nglish school teacher
employed with the Ministry of
Education and Culture and
assigned tc the Secondary
School at Alice Town,
I leuthera. was this morning
pronounced dead on arrival at
the Princess Margaret Hospital
Ilealey. sources state, was
the Victim ol a traffic accident
at I leuthera Upon his arrival
at the hospital at 12 17 a.m.
doctors pronounced him dead.
\t present, Sgt. Simmons of
the Road Traffic Department
and a police photographer are
at I leuthera investigating the
accident. Fhe two officers left
Nassau for that island early
Iwentytive accidents were
reported In Nassau over the
ind, four of them
involving injuries of "a very
minor nature," Road Traffic
Department reported today.
Nobody involved in any of
. identS was detained at
the hospital.
CARRIES CUTLASS,
FINED $30 TODAY
I I WIS Archer, an I arnest
Si reel night watchman.
charged with carrying arms,
was lined $30 or 30 days by
Magistrate Wilton Hercules this
morning
Archer, pleading guilty with
an explanation, said that he
had been using the cutlass lo
open coconuts to drink with
gin.
He was accused of carryinf
the black handled cutlass stuck
in his waist-hand at 11:59 p.m.
on January 5. The magistrate,
failing to believe his story
about the coconuts, told him
that gin and coconut water was
a drink for Sunday mornings
and not for the night.
NEW
BLOUSES
by
JOHN CRAIcy
from
$13.95
h
UruunMJUJL


Chf Jribimp
Monday, January 8, 1973.
News highlights
BRITAIN'S INFLUENZA KILLS NEARLY 1.000
LONDON (API Britain's influenza epidemic h.s killed nearly I.00O
persons this winter and shows signs of worsening in many parts <>l dM
country, the Health Ministry has said.
Latest figures showed that 473 persons died in the last week of
December, the wimf toll for flu- period in three years, according to
Ministry figures published Saturday.
Nine thousand persons died in the last big flu epidemic in the winter ol
1969-70.
The Sunday Times reported a second flu wave has apparently hit
London, where hospitals have been on yellow afert to cope with flu
victims for several weeks. II said the epidemic would likely worsen later
this month as the first and second wives spread during the colder weather
that is expected.
The weather bureau has forecast a below-average cold spell for the end
of January.
The worst-hit areas at present are the east, midlands and northvs.st.
where one major hospital in ivterh.irough was forced Saturday to reduce
Its surgery schedule because 90 nurses and many other employees were
down with influenza.
The epidemic continued to hit sport. Seven major league soccer
matches were postponed Saturday liecausc llu had decimated teams
STILL NO OFFICIAL COUNT OF EARTHQUAKE DEAD
MANAGUA. Jan. 8 (Al'l Health officials made a sesotid sis, ep through
downtown Managua today spraying insecticide own the rums of DM it.
devasted by a Dec. 2J earth-ou.ke. The main purpose of the spraying was
to kill the millions of flys which hase appeared in Managua as the bodies 01
victims trapped in the ruins continued to decay.
There was still no official count "1 the dead. Estimate! were that about
4,000 to 6,000 of the cits's 100.000 i.ih..r.ilanls died and perhaps 20.000
more were Injured. ... ,. ,
The government announced the radio II......M al Ni.oa;,,., couM.Uol
today, break off from the government controlled nationwide hookup It 5
p.m. dally. But the government forbid the stations la broadcast Ul) IWWI
programming or commentaries other than those trans.....ted by the
government station during the hookup. One Million
suspended last week for breaking
news programme.
In another development, the g
Debayle decreed that the work week, which had been 4K hours, would t
Increased to 60 hours until the emergency pastes.
NO WELCOME FOR U.S. SNIPERS HOLE OP PO- LOSING 81.75m. A WEEK ANNE HAS TO
Icy atmosphere seen IN NEW ORLEANS UK police on trail ***" MTAL
as Paris peace HOTEL, KILL 7 0f phantom 'dial
NEW ORLEANS (API
negotiationsresumed
PARIS, Jan 8 (AP) Henry A. Kissinger and Le Due Tho
resumed peace negotiations loday in an apparently icy
atmosphere.
off the chain and broadcasting its own
eminent of Gats. Anastasio Somoia
SCOWCROFT TO SUCCEED HAIC JR. ON NSC STAFF
WASHINGTON (API l-resident Nixon has select,-,I OTIC "I the
military's leading espcrls on global politics to become Henry A. Kissinger's
top assistant on a u>.igam/ed National Security Council staff.
Sources said Saturday thai all force Brig. (ien. Hunt Scowcroft. now
Nixon's military assistant, will succeed Gen. Alexander Irl. Haig Jr. as no. I
man on the NSC staff.
Haig, who has played a major role in the Vietnam peace negotiations,
moved to the Pentagon this week to become the army's Deputy Chill ol
Staff.
Officials indicated that Scowcroft's NSC role could differ from Haig's
because of the planned reorganization of the NSC staff for Nixon's second
term.
Kissinger, busy with Vietnam peace efforts, is yet to complete work on
the reogranuatinn of the council which supplies Nixon with foreign policy
options.
Scowcroft. 47. csme to the White House in rcbruary to head the staff of
presidential military aides. A pilot and graduate of West Point. In holds
master's and doctorate degrees In internalicuial relations from Columbia
University, and has attended the National War College and the Georgetown
University school u1 linguistics.
EGYPTIANS TO REPLACE EXPELLED UGANDAN-ASIANS
CAIRO (AP) A hundred rgyptian industrial experts will go I" Uganda
to replace expelled Kuropeans and Asians in running ta. tones, the weekly
newspaper Akhbar H Youm said Sunday.
ASTRONAUT LOVELL RETIRING
SPACE CENTRE. Houston (AP)- James A l.ovell Jr.. the world's most
experienced spaceman, announced he b retiring March I from tin Spact
Agency and from the U.S. Navy to become an executive with a Houston
corporation.
Lovell, 44-year-old veteran of America's longest space flight, of
mankind's first voyage around the moon and of the only deep space
emergency, will become senior executive vice president ot Bay Houston
Towing Co., a diversified firm with interests in water transport......n.
harbour lowing, shipping, agriculture, mining, ranching and petrilcum.
Lovell Dew into space four times and spent more time in space than any
other human a total of 71 5 hours, nearly J0 days.
RUSSIANS CONDUCT SUCCESSFUL ICBM FLIGHT?
WASHINGTON (AP) The Russians have conducted what some U.S.
intelligence experts believe was the first successful flight of a big and
improved new missile with Intercontinental range.
Military sources said the new missile is about as big as the giant Soviet
SS9 and probably incorporates advances over that weapon. The SS9
already is regarded as a possible threat to knock out U.S. land-based
Minutemen missiles in a surprise attack.
The SS9 is Russia's most accurate missile, but U.S. experts said the
Soviets have been working to improve both the accuracy and reliability of
their long-range weapons.
More definite conclusions about the characteristics of the new Russian
missile await study of the technical data of the Dec. 29 test flight over a
3.900-mile distance from Tyuratam in central Russia to the Kamachatka
peninsuls.
The missile carries only a single payload, so American experts said it did
not involve a test of any multiple warhead technology.
The Russians have developed triple warheads which can be fired in
shotgun fashion, hut have not yet achieved the ability to guide multiple
warheads tu separate targets with precision, as the United States can.
HUSSEIN COMMUTES DEATH SENTENCES
AMMAN, Jordan (AP)- King Hussein commuted on Sunday the death
sentences against the three leaders of November's abortive coup, the
government announced.
Death penalties against Major. Kafi Hindawi. Mahmoud lewfik Al
Khalili and Said Dajani were commuted to life imprisonment. IS years and
10 years respectively The coup was allegedly financed by the Libyan
military regime whose leader. Col. Muammar Kadafi, has often declared
hostility toward Hussein for crushing the Palestinian guerrilla groups in
1970.
A royal decree also pardoned ISO convicts and commuted sentences
against I OS others including several Palestinians jailed since September, the
announcement added.
The move was to mark the Moslem feast of Bairam and was regarded as a
gift from the King on the occasion of his marriage to Oueen Alia Al
Hussein, sources said.
CHINA ACCUSES RUSSIA OF DAMAGING HtR PRESTIGE
TOKYO (AP) China said Monday the Soviet Union "has resorted to
every base and despicable trick to damage China's prestige."
The Chinescs accusation was in an article broadcast by Peking's official
news agency. Hsinhua, and monitored in Tokyo.
It said the Soviet official news agency, Tass, had "spread a sensational
rumor on Dec. 17, 1972. alleging that 'China earns at least 12.000
million-1S.000. million dollars at opium trade abroad."
President Nixon's national
security adviser and Ihe North
Vietnamese Politburo member
met lor the first time in almost
four weeks at a house owned
by the French Communist
Party in (iif Sur Yvette, a
suburb 15 miles southwest of
Paris
lor the first time, no North
Vietnamese official was waiting
al the doorstep to welcome
Kissinger and his aides
Kissinger waited outside for
S.VIETNAM WANTS
25,000 TROOPS TO
ENFORCE CEASEFIRE
SAIGON (AP) South
Vietnam wants an international
peacekeeping force of 25,000
troops to enforce a cease-fire
and has asked several countries
to participate, a ranking
government official said
Saturday.
The figure is five times
higher than that said to be
envisioned by the United
States, and 100 times more
than North Vietnam wants,
according to a Dec Ift
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P.O. Box N 1411 Bay Street. Nassau, Bahamas Ph. 2-1179
statement by Henry
Kissinger.
The official, who has close
ties to President Nguyen van
Thieu, also said Hanoi in recent
weeks has privately dropped its
demand thai a national council
to help supervise the cease -fin
and new elections be defined as
a "government" rather than a
"administralive" structure.
This reported concession
was made after the U.S.
intensified bombing campaign
began Dec. 18, but there was
no direct connection between
Ihe two events, the source said.
North Vietnam's demand
that a so-called National
Council of Reconciliation and
Concord be described as a
governmental structure was
one of the main obstacles. to
signing of the draft peace pact
in October.
The allied side saw the
council as an administrative
body to "help promote
maintenance of the cease-fire
and supervise elections."
South Vietnam objected lo
Hanoi's version, charging thai
it would create a disguised
coalition government
extending from top to bottom
over Saigon's existing
government and usurping ils
functions.
The official said the North
Vietnamese had given up their
original concept "because they
r.ili/ed it was illogical."
He would not indicate
whether Saigon has made any
fresh private concessions of ils
own toward the peace
settlement, but asserted that
"Thieu has made the maximum
concessions that he can make,"
and that he is firm on his two
major demands.
One of these is recognition
of North and South Vietnam as
two separate states, and ihe
other is a total withdrawal of
all northern troops from South
Vietnam.
A PROBLEM'
The official declined to say
what countries have been
consulted on the question of
supplying the cease-fire
enforcement troops.
He said the countries
themselves would be expected
to underwrite the cost of
contributing to the
peacekeeping force. Conceding
that finding the troops "would
be a problem," he said this was
why South Vietnam had begun
discussions with other
countries on the subject.
Diplomatic and other
sources have said that Canada,
Indonesia. Hungary and Poland
have been asked to contribute
troops to the four-nation force
called for in the draft
agreement. Washington sources
have indicated the United
States foresees a total strength
of about 5,000 troops.
The question of the force's
size was not known to be an
issue in October, hut surfaced
after the secret talks in Paris
broke down a second time in
December.
1 his UCv. 6 new*
conference in Washington,
Kissinger said the United States
wanted "several thousand"
troops but Hanoi was insisting
on a force of only 250. With
very limited transportation,
communications and logistic-
support, such a force would be
incapable of investigating
cease-fire violations, he said.
nearly a minute, then pushed
open the door and entered.
The lack of a friendly
reception presumably was an
expression of anger at the U.S.
bombing of Hanoi and
Haiphong last month.
Tho and Xuan Thuy, the
head of the North Vietnamese
delegation in Paris, arrived
more than 20 minutes before
the Americans and smiled and
waved at the waiting newsmen.
Most of the Americans had
tense, serious expressions when
they arrived.
Before he left Washington
Kissinger declined comment at
pljneside when asked whether
this time he expects to reach
agreement with Hanoi's
negotiator Le Due Tho. His
response was in keeping with
the administration's
no-prediction policy about the
outcome of the secret talks.
Avoiding waiting
microphones at Andrews Air
Base, Kissinger paused only
long enough for a quick photo
before stepping into the air
force jetliner whisking him to
the French capital.
DECISIVE MOM I M
Tho said upon his arrival in
Paris Saturday that "now the
decisive moment has come:
Hither to rapidly settle
peacefully the Vietnam
problem and sign the agreed
accord or to continue the
war."
Lengthy Kissinger-Tho
sessions came to a head last
October with a tentative
nine-point agreement which
Kissinger said indicates "peace
is at hand."
But the followup round at
Paris broke off Dec. 13 with
Kissinger accusing North
Vietnamese negotiators of
stalling tactics. President Nixon
ordered heavy U.S. bombing
over North Vietnam's
heartland.
The White House announced
Dec. 30 a halt to the US',
bombing north of the 20th
parallel and resumption of the
talks Jan. 8. Administration
officials have been cautious
about forecasting the outcome,
however, except to say Hanoi
indicated it wanted to renew
"serious" negotiating.
Nixon, who gave Kissinger
final instructions during a
two-hour session at Camp
David Saturday, said to
Congressional leaders Friday "I
cannot tell you the prospects
are optimistic or pessimistic."
Still concealed behind the
public swirl of charges and
counter charges are the exact
issues separating the two sides.
Privately, administration
sources portray Nixon as
determined to stiffen the
nine-point draft to a point
where he thinks it will serve as
a basis for a long-term peace
and not just a temporary truce
likely to break down soon after
a U.S. pullout from Vietnam
This would include some
commitment by Hanoi that it
wdl not try to impose its will
on South Vietnam by force
and provision for an
international cease-fire
supervisory force far stronger
than the toothless 250-man
contingent proposed by North
Vietnam.
Nixon told the
Congressional leaders he wants
three elements in a pact -
'The return of American
prisoners of war, a cease-fire in
Vietnam, and an agreement to
allow all parties in South
Vietnam to determine their
future."
Le Due Tho renewed
Hanoi's call for a U.S. signing
of the nine-point proposal
without "unreasonable changes
bearing upon the principles and
content" which he said are
being demanded by the United
States.
South Vietnam's President
Nguyen van Thieu repeated his
demands that an agreement
provide for withdrawal of
North Vietnam's troops from
the south a stipulation not in
the nine points and for
recognition of Saigon's
government as sovereign over
the south.
Administration sources said
the United States is not
insisting that Thieu's
troop-withdrawal condition be
included in the nine points.
They expressed confidence
that the sovereignty issue, from
the U.S. standpoint if not
Thieu's, would be dealt with
satisfactorily in a final
agreement
NEW ORLEANS (AP)
Police gunners at the ready in a
Marine helicopter hovered over
a battle-scarred downtown
hotel today but couldn't spot
two snipers believed to be still
alive after an overnight
shooting spree in which seven
persons were killed and 16
inittred.
It was one of the few passes
by the big Chinook chopper
that did not draw gunfire.
City officials blockaded
many streets around the
downtown Howard Johnson
Hotel for fear somebody might
b) hit by stray bullets or
ri< ochetl if firing resumed.
Police were moving
cautiously in an effort to
prevent further fatalities. The
18-floor hotel was deserted
except for police and the
surviving snipers.
One of the snipers was killed
Sunday night, gunned down by
policemen riding the big
marine Sikorsky during one of
many assaults on the concrete
structure atop the roof where
the snipers holed up.
A firefight flared before
dawn when another pass
overhead by the chopper, with
policemen firing, forced one of
the snipers down a stairwell
where three policemen were
trying to get into firing range.
The three policemen were,
superficially wounded in the
gunfight before it was broken
off.
ALL BLACKS
It all started at about 10:30
a.m. Sunday when the snipers,
described by police as blacks,
began setting fires in the hotel.
When firemen arrived, they
came under gunfire.
The dead policemen were
identified as Deputy Supt.
Louis Sirgo aand patrolmen
Philipp Coleman and Paul
Persigo. The identity of the
fourth known victim was not
learned immediately.
Firemen continued to fight
the blaze while police covered
them with gunfire from
neighbouring buildings.
Patrick Brcaux, assistant
director of Charity Hospital
where the wounded were
taken, said about 14 other
persons, including policemen,
firemen and civilians, were in
emergency rooms.
Hotel manager Dennis Lacey
said many of the guests had
been evacuated but an
undetermined number still
remained on upper floors.
Several guests could be seen
leaning out balconies to escape
smoke and firemen with
bullhorns called to them not to
jump.
A police spokesman said
earlier that the gunfire
appeared to be from a
high-powered rifle and
reported that several fires had
been set in various locations in
the hotel.
First meeting of
Common Market's
executive Commission
BRUSSELS (AP) The
Common Market's expanded
executive cornmtskion met officially
for the Tint time Saturday and
began distributing jobs under
Commission president
I'rancois-Xavier Urloli of France.
The 13-man Commission met
behind closed doors on the 13th
floor of the Berlaymont, capital of
the Common Market.
The key foreign affairs post was
expected to go to Sir Christopher
' 11.mil-- one of the British members
of the Commission.
The jobs, similar to Cabinet
positions, must be filled before the
Commission appears Tuesday in
Luxembourg before the Luropean
Court of Justice to swear to uphold
international impartiality and not
to accept Instructions from their
home governments.
Before the meeting began, Ortoli
told Commission members and
newsmen that the enlargement of
the Common Market meant much
more than a wider geographical
limit.
"It means that the community
has a new dimension which will
enable it which will in fact
require il to accept
responsibilities, which are also
enlarged, toward the peoples of our
own countries and toward Ihe rest
of the world," the new president
said.
One of the first messages of
congratulations to the new
Commission was Irom President
Nixon who assured the members of
the United States' "continued
interest in a constructive
relationship with the community."
"The coming year should prove
especially challenging as the
Commission draws up programmes
tit action to carry out the ambitious
goals set by the leaders of your
member states at their recent
summit meeting.
"We face major common tasks
and an unparalleled opportunity to
build a more equitable and open
international system," Nixon said.
The original six members of the
Common Market were joined by
three new members; Britain,
Denmark, and Ireland on Jan. I.
With their entrance Into the
market, the executive commission
expanded from nine to 13
members.
a diddle' defrauder
By Ed Blanche
LONDON (AP) Police are on the trail of the phantom
"phone phreak" who rigged a British city's telephone exchange
and let 2.000 students make calls all over the world for free.
Government
SANCTION OVER
HER ROMANCE
investigators
traced the secret wiring in the
ancient southwest England city
of Bath last month
But they fear the phantom
has already wired up other
cities with his gadgets that are
costing the post office, which
operates Britain's telephone
system, a fortune in lost
revenue.
And worse, they believe
there may be more than one
phantom.
"This is a serious national
problem," a post office
spokesman said. "We are
making investigations in other
towns all over the country to
get to the bottom of this
fraud."
The Bath affair was the first
"Dial a Diddle" fraud
investigators had cracked.
They found that the
Kingsmead exchange in the
historic city, which dates back
to Roman times, had been
illegally wired and that at least
2,000 s.udents at the
university there knew about it.
Investigators installed a
special monitoring machine
that enabled them to trace the
illegal calls and trap nine
students using the "free
phone". The nine were each
fined a nominal two pounds
(4.70 dollars) last week for
"dishonestly obtaining
electricity from the post
office."
OPEN FREE LINE
But the university's students
and many townspeople knew
the special dialing code that
activated the hook-up to
obtain an open line to
anywhere in the world without
the call being registered.
Police said the secret circuit
was "extensively used."
The president of the
university's student union, Bill
Moger, said: "Just about
everyone here knew the code
"It's been going on for a
long time and it seems the post
office left it operating to try to
catch the people responsible
for putting it there. But they
got the wrong people."
Just who did the wiring is a
mystery. Police said there was
"insufficient evidence at this
stage to establish the identity
of the person or persons
responsible."
But the phantom and his
friends apparently took up
where America's legendary
"(aptam Crunch," aUas John
T. Draper, left off when he was
arrested in San Francisco for
phone-fiddling last year.
The 29-year-old Draper
became famous as "Captain
Crunch" after he discovered
the toy whistles in Captain
Crunch cereal b'oxes
reproduced Bell Telephone
Company tone signals. That
enabled him to make free calls
to anywhere in the world.
He later sophisticated his
technique with his "blue
box", an electronic gadget that
duplicated the telephone
company's multi-frequency
signals.
FOLK HERO
He became a folk hero with
many imitators before he was
caught phoning a radio
station in Sydney, Australia,
without paying the 10-dollar
charge. He was fined 1,000
dollars on a toll fraud charge
last month.
Police and post office
authorities suspect the illegal
wiring method may have
spread around the country. No
one knows how much it has
cost the post office, which is
running at a loss of more
than 750,000 pounds (1.76
million dollars) a week.
But a spokesman said it was
likely a "vast sum".
I n ves t iga t ors were
tight-lipped about their
nitionwide hunt for the
pkantom, but the spokesman
hinted they might be closing
in. "It is possible there will be
further prosecutions." he said.
Andrew McFarland, an
attorney who represented one
of the Bath students, said: "I
understand there is a certain
civil service department where
suspicion has been lingering."
LONDON (AP) -Britain's
Princess Anne, daughter of Queen
Hi.abeth 11. and dashing young
Cavalry Lieutenant Mark Malls
arc in love but royal protocol has
forced them to keep it quiet, a
close friend "f Phillips claimed
Monday.
The unidentified source was
quoted as saying in the
mass-circulation Sun newspaper
that the couple can say nothing
until the royal family
ways so. __
'It takes a very strong love to
survive in such s situation under
these pressures," the friend ssid.
Phillips, 24, has persistently
denied rumours that have butied
around Britain for weeks that he
and the 22-year-old Princess would
hecome engaged.
Bul the couple have been seen
regularly together.
Phillips has entertained the
blonde Princess al his wealthy
family's 16th century Wiltshire
farm several times and has twice
been a weekend guest at the Royal
Family's 2,000-acre Sandringham
estate.
They rode together through the
mist at Sandringham this weekend
when Phillips apparently said
goodbye to tb Princess. He leaves
for west Germany Monday with his
regiment, the Queen's Dragoon
Guards, for a two-year tour of
duty.
Although Phillips is expected to
mjke periodic trips to Britain, the
Princess has s hectic schedule
ahead, including official tours of
North African countries.
The Sun quoted the Phillips'
friend as saying the handsome
young officer, a member of
Britain's gold medal equestrian
team at the Munich Olympics,
"must wait patiently for the royal
family to make the first move
before making any public
statements himself" about the
reported romance.
Any Royal announcemen.
concerning the couple would likely
be to announce their engagement.
But, the friend was quoted as
saying, "it would be extremely bad
form for him to talk about his
romance with the Princess. A young
serfing officer in this position is
faced with many problems of
protocol.
"He can never betray by any
gesture, either in private or in
public, what his true feelings are.
"In this sort of unreal situstion,
a romance that would normally
blossom into msrrisge is conducted
in a goldfish howl atmosphere."
ABBEY
IMTEWUTIOMALJ
FUND
GRAND BAHAMA TELEPHONE
COMPANY
is accepting applications for telephone installation
trainees. Must have good knowledge of English,
Math and Science. Drivers licence required.
Career opportunities to qualified applicants. Apply
in person to 2C Kipling Building.
$12.34
Offered Price
As of
January 5th., 1973.
ISLAND FLYING SERVICE
CHARTER OPERATIONS
MOVING JANUARY 15TH
Our Out Island CHARTER operations will move on January 15. 1973 from the
present location West of the Nassau International Airport Terminal to our
Customer Service Lounge This is adjacent to our large hangar building East of
the Airport Terminal
Wp will furnish at the new location complete handling facilities, including
BAHAMAS IMMIGRATION SERVICE
BAHAMAS CUSTOMS FACILITY
FUEL AND RAMP SERVICE
For superior charter arrangements, phone 7-7168.
ISLAND FLYING SERVICE
OUT ISLAND AIRWAYS
"Growing with the Bahamas'
."
t"


Monday, January 8, 1973.
abr arttmur
2Jbr (Eribunr
Nulliui Addictus Jurare In Versa Macistri
Bang Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH. PubUihtr/Edltor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH. O.B.E.. K.r.S.C.D.Lltt.. LL.D.
Publisher /f tttor 1917-1972
Contribute i Editor 1973
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON.M.Sc, B.A.. LL.B..
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday lo Saturday
EDITORIAL
What is independence?
By ETIENNE DUPUCH
THE ISLAND of Haiti has been independent for 168 years.
The slaves in that republic ... the first independent black state in
this hemisphere ... won their independence by defeating the
troops of Napoleon Bonaparte in battle.
The Haitians were the first to administer defeat on the proud
Bonapartist troops. The Haitians were probably pioneers in jungle
warfare ... a type of conflict for which the French were not
trained.
Independence is supposed to be the highest aim of any
developed people. But Britain's famed Prime Minister, Benjamin
Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield, declared on February 5, 1863 that
"colonies do not cease to be colonies because they are
independent".
By this he meant that, although small states may bear all the
trappings of independence, they continue to be dependent on the
larger nations for their development. Failing such an arrangement,
they are bound to sink into the depths of abject poverty.
Because Napoleon betrayed the confidence of Toussaint
Louverture, liberator of the island, the Haitian people uprooted
and destroyed the entire French social and economic structure in
the island.
As a result the new republic sank to the level of the slave rulers
who took over control of the government.
Except a brief period when U.S. Marines were stationed in the
island, Haiti has maintained its own independent government.
Unfortunately Haitian independence has been a story of brutal
dictators who robbed the treasury and inflicted indescribable
tortures on the people, so that it might be correctly said that the
Haitian people are free in name only. Nothing more.
Haiti is a rich, lush country but its people are the poorest in
this hemisphere. With proper organization and stable government
the island could be developed into a prosperous agricultural
country.
I want to say that the Haitian people are a fine lot. I got to
know ... and like them ... during the second world war when I was
the Honorary Consul in Nassau for the Republic.
The island has a highly educated, polished class in
its upper social structure but so tar the country has failed to
produce a constructive government.
Even foreign aid that has been given to the island, mostly by
the U.S., has not been used for the purpose it was intended.
I had high hopes for the administration of President Magloire.
He took office during the time I was the Honorary Haitian Consul
in Nassau. Before he took over I found it difficult to
communicate with officials in the Foreign Office in
Port-au-Prince. They were hopelessly inefficient. Under Magloire
everything moved smoothly and efficiently.
But, alas, when he was driven out of office nothing was left in
the Treasury and it was claimed that he had taken all the money
with him.
This is one of the weaknesses of many governments in the
Caribbean, Central and South America.
Some years ago 1 was discussing the importance of honesty in
government with a South American when he commented dryly:
"If you tie a horse out in pasture ain't you expect him to
ggraze?"
"Grazing" in government seems to be the accepted way of life
in these countries. People seem to expect their officials to accept
bribes and to be generally dishonest. They get vexed only when a
public man grazes too hoggishly.
You can gauge the poverty of the Haitian people by the fact
that thousands of men and women risk their lives in trying to
reach the Bahamas where they can earn a living. Many of them
have died ... or were killed ... before they reached Nassau.
Despite the fact that the PLP Government hunted these poor
people in the bush with dogs, they continued to come.
The flow into the Bahamas has not been as heavy as it had
been because the job market in the islands has been drying up for
the past three years.
The Bahamas had been the first objective of Haitians who
escaped the tyranny ... .m-. starvation ... of the Papa Doc regime.
But now refugee groups seem to be shying away from the
Bahamas.
"When the Bahamas gets independence I am going back to
i Haiti," a Haitian labourer in Nassau on a legitimate work permit
told me some months ago. "It's bad in my country but I know
how to take care of myself there. I wouldn't know how to dodge
the terror in an independent Bahamas."
Since the election he has returned to Haiti.
Whether he is right or not remains to be seen. But it is clear
that Haitians are now looking for another place of refuge.
And so a leaking schooner ran aground on Pompano Beach,
Florida recently with 65 Haitians who were looking for political
asylum in the U.S.
They claimed that they had been to sea 19 days. Their first
stop was Cuba but they shoved off from that island when they
were told that they must become Communists. Their next stop
was Bimini, where they were given food and water by the people.
But they made no attempt to land there. Apparently they feared
an independent Bahamas.
Finally they landed at Pompano Beach where they ran their
vessel aground and threw themselves on the mercy of the
American people. They are asking for political asylum.
bombing his palace."
Many thousands of Cubans have been granted asylum in the
U.S. There are so many Cubans in the Florida area that it is a
question today whether one hears more Spanish or English
spoken in the shops and on the streets in the city of Miami and Its
environs. But this is a special concession granted to Cubans only.
It it possible that America has a guilty conscience over the Bay ol
Pigs betrayal of the Cuban army of liberation by the late
President John F. Kennedy.
"We grant asylum to all Cubans on the basis of an agreement
and a memorandum which has been issued by Washington," an
imnigratlon official said in Florida. "In any other case we have to
gc according to the circumstances."

It was hoped by many observers that "Baby Doc" would give
Haiti a more enlightened government than his tyrannical father,
but the refugees who landed on Pompano Beach did not share
this optimism.
"Like father, like son," one of the refugees said of Jean Claude
Duvalier, who assumed power in Haiti in the spring of 1971 after
the death of his father Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier, reports The
Herald.
"With a full belly like that fat young one you cannot
understand hunger," he said of the plump Haitian ruler. "When
you live in a palace you do not know the meaning of misery.'
The refugee who made this statement would not give his name.
Several of the Haitians said they were afraid to give their names
because they feared reprisals against relatives still in Haiti.
Haiti is a classic example of the fact that independence does
not necessarily mean freedom. In many cases it means tyranny
and starvation for a people.
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Democracy passes into despotism.
PLATO(429-347B.C.)

No great improvements in the lot of mankind are possible,
until a great change takes place in the fundamental constitution
of their modes of thought.
- JOHN STUART MILL
Top US man says Jamaica 'has
all ingredients investor looks for'
KINGSTON, Jamaica Mr.
John B. Connally, former
Secretary of the United States
Treasury and former U.S.
Governor of the International
Bank tor Reconstruction and
Development, said today that
Jamaica has .ill the ingredient*
that an investor looks for
including political and
economic stability as well as
security.
He stated that the Jamaican
people had the ambition,
determination and drive to
create and to enrich their own
standard of living and their
own way of life.
Mr. Connally was speaking
at a Press Conference at
Jamaica House.
The Prime Minister, Hon.
Michael Manlcy. announced at
the conference lhat Mr.
Connally, Mr. John W. Rollins,
former Lieutenant Governor of
Delaware and one of the largest
hotel operators in Jamaica and
Mr. Pollard Simons, real estate
operator and president of
Tryall Hotel have decided to
enter into a joint venture with
the government for the
development of the cattle
industry.
I ins development will
include the establishment of a
5 million dollar meal packing
plant, tcediot operations and
later on a quarantine Station.
Associated with Mr. Manley
at the conference were the
IImi iv j. Patterson, Minister
of Industry and Tourism, and
the Hon. Keble Munn, Minister
of Agriculture.
Following is Mr. Connelly's
reply to a question .is to
whether Jamaica was a suitable
place loi investment
"There are a number of
things which we need to attract
capil.il i" mi part of the
world.
"We start off with th, bafjt
assumption tli.it there is a
world shortage of
Everyone seems to thil k thai
the U.S.A. have unl
affluence and unlimited
resources of capil.il. Ih.it :s not
true. We do have On .1 relative
basis a great deal ol capital hut
we also have .1 peal nrj
problems.
"The problem of
environment ami pollution is
imposing enormous demands
on our own capital capability.
I his is going to continue and in
fad affed th* rest of the world
as well.
"I he first thing investors
look for is the haste stability of
a country. They look to the
security and stability of a
government and the leadership
which the country provides
because this is important.
"No geography however
magnificent however beautiful
can really provide the security
and stability that capital looks
for.
"It has to be in the
leadership of a country large or
small. And Jamaica his all this.
"Investors further look to
the willingness of the people of
.111 area however large or small.
"They look to see whether
or not the people have the
adaptability. They look to see
whether or not the people have
the determination and the will
to do things, whether or not
the people have the ambition
and pride to create and to
expand to enrich their own
standard of living and their
own way of life. All these
things are in abundance in
Jamaica.
"You are a young country
You are fired with enthusiasm
of growth and of proving that
as a people you can eteatl
build and enrich.
"You have the ability of a
highly intelligent government
that understands the problems
of the country and understands
its people and that has the
determination and the will to
create both the political anil
economic stability that attm ti
capital. So all the ingredient;
that a normal investor looks
for are here.
"Your Prime Minister, Mr
Manley, is a man of umqu-
ability and unquestioned and
deepest dedication to 1>"
country, to the development ol
its people and its resources, to
their well being and to then
advancement. 1 would certainly
rank him among the top
leaders of the nations that I
have known. 1 have the decpesi
respect and admiration for
him.
"This is one of the reasons
why we have decided to g 1
into this joint venture with the
government of Jamaica."
A TV commentator recalls that some time ago a group of
Haitians who had escaped from the Bahamas and sought asylum
in the U.S., were sent back to the Bahamas. These people were
finally sent back to Haiti by the Bahamas Government. The
commentator recalls that three of these men were executed by
order of the Haitian government. ,
A story in 77ie- Miami Herald recalls that "in 1967 the U.S.
Court of Appeals granted asylum to two Haitians who fled the
Bahamas and were smuggled into the United States. Fears that
many Haitian refugees from the Bahamas, where an estimated
10 000 live, would flood South Florida didn't materialize then.
"In 1970," continued 77ie Herald story, "the United States
granted asylum to H7 Haitians who constituted the entire
Haitian navy after an unsuccessful attempt to unseat Duvalier by'
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It is now available at better cosmetic
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(Tbf QJribunf
Monday, January 8, 1973.
Wanted: One raffle car for
Bahamas Humane Society
THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY is in need of someone to donate the car which will be offered as tint prize in next month's
raffle, the major fund-raising event on the mkicK s calendar.
Mrs. Betty Kenning,
president of the humane
told I he I ribune that
the rafllc pToeaadl would be
cut down considerably if the
COM i| the vehicle had to be
deducted.
"We depend on the
February raffle to keep the
octet) 'i (I1 ton open Mid
Mrs. Kenning, "and we would
be happy if someone were to
contribute towards the
purchase ot the ut."
Last year, as a result of the
publicity given in the press in
anonymous donor came
forward to present the
with a car.
Mr.. Kenning estimated that
it soil the tociet) 170.000 a
.i ,ir t. operate and pay staff.
"Normally, the society chargei
lot its service, t>111 no one is
turned away who cannot
afford to pay. However, colts
are going up all the tune." she
said.
Henry I nulsa> ,24,1
trainee leaves this month on
the first ot two courses which
are being paid for by (he
society. He will train in the
United States in annual cars .il
humane society centres there.
later, he will be sent to
LADIES SUEDE SHOES
ONLY
$99
reg. price
$14.75
FOX'S
Collins Ave. & 6th Terrace
(Next to Donald's Furniture) f
OPEN: MON. THUR.'til 6 P.M. .
FRI. & SAT. 'til 8 P.M.
London tor a seven-month
course with the KSI'i \
"We would like to expand
our services in or.lei to he able
to lake on more Bahamians foi
training and do work in the
Out Islands on a Israel Kale,"
s.nd Mrs. Kenning. "There is
. >ik toi three or lour
inspet tors right on this island
and we hope more and more
Bahamian! will seek training in
this field."
Among the new equipment
i eded b) the humane society
is a horse trailer which can be
attached to the ambulance.
I hose trailers which are used to
pick up large sick or stray
animals, are expensive but
sary. Horses are a
major concern of the society.
Government, at the lociety'i
request, constructed a surrey
horse shelter at the Market
Kange. A second horse
drinking trough is now being
completed by the society at
Fort Charlotte,
Proceeds from the February
raffle will help keep the visiting
ambulance service going. Mrs.
Kenning explained that the
ambulance made periodic visits
to outlying districts ol the
island such as Adelaide and
FOX Hill to help animals whose
owners CAnnnJ afford to brine
them to the society's
I hippingham clinic. Jack
Kycroft, the society's RSPt'A
inspector, is in charge of this
service.
Mr. Rycroft tours New
Pros ulc in e schools ['is i ne
lectures and demonstrate
the care ol animals. Often he
takes along an animal for the
demonstration.
I he society, laid Mis.
rould li
this service by getting a
projector, slides could then be
shown to the children to assist
in the teaching of animal care.
I " li year, the expenses ol
the humane society increase
During the year, which ended
in Match 1972, 4fi percent of
the treatments given 11 the
clinic were free ol chaff) to
the owners. I Ins is an Increase
of 14 percent ovei the previous
year.
During thai year, the loclet)
staff gave i.i 19 vaccinations,
358 spays, 497 operations, 665
ambulance calls, found homes
for 314 dogs.
With so many people leaving
the island, the numbei ol
animals sent to the so, let) foi
adoption has soared in recent
scars. They are kept as long as
possible but sometimes the)
must be put down because no
one will give them a home.
Their care and feeding costs
the humane so, jet) a great deal
it money each year.
Mis. Kenning said that
unless a donor could be found
for the entire COSl or part of
the cost of the raffle car, the
proceeds would be cut
considerably, and of necessity,
Ihc service! would also suiter.
By Aoiqail Van Burn
t H7J > cum Tnia*r v. H DEAR ABBY: I have a daughter who is 28 years old
and she never lifts a finger in the house to help me. I have
had gall bladder surgery and trouble with my nerves due to
"the change" and I can't stand the aggravation this girl
rives me.
She throws her clothes around and I am always picking
up after her She never finishes anything she starts. She
started to sew a dress and left the hem and zip-er for me.
You should see her room! I have to keep her door
looked so no one will see it.
She used to give me $10 a week room and board, but I
haven't seen a penny for a year as she is saving to get
married. Meanwhile, she doesn't have anybody steady, but
she invites a different fellow over here for supper nearly
every night and I do the cooking and wait on them like
I'm the maid, and she leaves the mess for me to clean up.
Even my husband doesn't help me. He's too lazy to
wash the car so I have to do it. I could write a book.
Please help me. DOORMAT
DEAR DOORMAT: You can't be a doormat unless you
lie down first. Refuse to pick up after your daughter and
don't let her make a servant of you. Same goes tor your
husband. If you don't put your foot down, they will. On
you!
DEAR ABBY: My husband has a 26-year-old daughter
by his first wife. Sally is being married soon. She has
already had two weddings and two divorces, but she wants
a lovely big wedding so her father can "give her away"
again. I think this is ridiculous, especially since the man
Sally is marrying has also been married twice, besides
which he and Sally have been living together for a year.
I say Sally and her fiance ought to go away and quietly
get married and forget the wedding. Her father says what-
ever she wants to do is all right with him.
I'd like your opinion. UP TO HERE IN GEORGIA
DEAR UP: Under the circumstances, the less conspicu-
ous the wedding, the better. (P. S. One thing is certain,
these two won't need a rehearsal.)
DEAR ABBY: I am a married woman, happily married
with two children. My parents divorced when I was 12.
That was IS years ago, but to hear my mother talk, you
would think it happened only yesterday. She is so bitter and
full of resentment, all she ever talks about is how much she
hates my father.
I don't happen to see him the way she does. Fortunate-
ly, Mother lives out of town, but she telephones me often to
give her long, miserable monologs leaving me drained,
depressed, and angry. I am sending my parents the follow-
ing letter. I should have written it years ago:
Dear Divorced Parents:
I love you both for different reasons, so please don't
feel that because I love one of you I cannot love the other.
Try to understand that even tho you no longer love each
other. I still love both of you.
I cannot be expected to know what went wrong with
your marriage, nor do I want to know the details of who
did what to whom, so please don't try to tell me your side
of it. Don't ask me to judge either one of you, just help me
to accept your parting so that I can build a life of my own
tho my parents live apart
I still need to be loved by both of you, so please don't
allow your resentment, I owevv.r justified, to destroy my
relationshi-s with my grandparents, aunts, uncles, and
cousins on both sides.
I know that you both love me, so please let me love you
both Y0UR CHILD
DEAR ABBY: I think your answer, "If a 17-year-old
girl asks her mother for the pill, she should have it," is a
disgrace. Your "better-safe-than-sorry" attitude will give
teen-agers the idea that premarital sex is all right.
I say if people sin. let them pay the price.
DISAPPOINTED IN CHICAGO
DEAR DISAPPOINTED: 1 do not, and never have con-
doned premarital sex for minors, but I think the price-
bringing an unwanted child into the worldis too high for
the "crime." One serious deficiency of the pill Is that It
does not prevent VI)just pregnancy.
\C mSm
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c llll DREN UNDFR 12 I -HI 1 '
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___MOTORS
PARTS DEPARTMENT
HUMANE SOCIETY TRAINEE HENRY Lindsay leave,
! today for further training in animal care as part of the
I Society's efforts to interest and recruit Bahamians tor work
i with the organization. Although with the Humane Society
\ km than year, Henry seems to have a special knack for
the job as this picture shows. With h.m right is RSPCA
Inspector Jack Rycroft under whggyyr^ been trained in Nassau.
Tropical
Eiterminators
IAWN Ff RTI LI ZINC
OS PKIM I ( II \KI I S \V I
Mil I I \SI Ol SOI till k Kii Ml
I COLLINS AVE
TEL 2-1031
Mon.Fn.la.m. 5:50 p.m.; Sat y I am I p m.

LIONS ARE BEST
j 'BELL RINGERS'
| Tin lions Club of Natnu
1 was again declared the winner
I of the Salvation Army's
. .J Christ mil Kettle "Bell
GROWS IIGSI
NOW APPEARING
THRU JANUARY 20th.
GIFTED & MULTI-FACED ENTERTAINER
JOYCE BRYANT
With Vince Martin's Combo
Joyce Bryant
For Reservations
Call 5-6451
COMPLETE DINNER $11.00
Excellent Dining & Dancing
from 7 p.m. onward.
Showtimts:
8:30 p.m. t, II p.m.
No Cover Charge
Bridge ticket may be used
for one drink .. .
2vwL
PffldiM liund
NMUu B^*"il
The most accommodating people in the world.
Ringers" eonlcsl held on
December Id and 23.
Nine clubs took part in the
effort to raise money for the
Salvation Army Christmas
Good Cheer fund.
The Lions Club, which had
for their mono "We have
done it before, we can do it
again." were again the winners
of the trophy. following
them, and in order of the
moneys rated were: the
Nassau Kotary Club, the I all
Nassau Kolaiv Club; the West
Nassau Rotary (Tub; Kiwanis
West: kiwanis Club It.
Montagu; Kiwanis Club.
Nassau; the Interact and the
Key Club. Government High
School.
The "floating" troph) will
be presented to the 1 ions Club
at an early dale in January, as
well as an inter-Club plaque to
Ihc West Rotary Club and the
West Kiwanis Club.
Major Henry Ruuell,
Regional Coiihii.iihIii foi the
Salvation Ami) in the
Bahamas, expressed his thanks
not onl) to those who
participated in these I wo
Ipeclal days of effort, hul to
the man) doiton who gave so
generously lo make this year's
effort j mcceM
HUMANE SOCIETY
OPEN HOUSE
llll BAHAMAS Humane
Society will hold an open
ho,iv j| the Society's yard.
Chipptngham, on Saturday,
Unitary 20 from I 1.30 a.in to
1.30 p.m.
Refreshments will be served
MOON
Rises 9:26 a.m. Sets :27
p.m.
UNBELIEVABLE!
YOUR BEAUTIFUL COLOUR
PORTRAIT
970
^
/ooqo'
on the Waterfront
East Bay St. & William St.
Phone 5-4641
our sensational January Special to keep our
tail busy through the Alicr-Christmas Lull
MVJOW SHOWING *
AT7&
10:30
THE LIMIT"
e
AND at 8:50
THE BUS IS COMING
Self Service Restaurant
je*
Announcing a great new eating idea. Now enjoy
a delicious Buffet Lunch Daily at the Halcyon
Balmoral Beach Hotel. The Buffet features
exotic International Dishes daily at the
reasonable price of $6.00 per person, plus
gratuties. Enjoy a sumptuous meal, in a
beautiful quiet setting, tomorrow, perfect
businessmen, working girls and couples who
want to relax, gracefully. Make your way to the
Balmoral on Cable Beach for a really great
dining experience. Lunch served from 12:30 to
2:30 p.m. daily.
TheHoUyon
Balmoral Beach Hotel
irwifa/ you to /oriK^hing /jpcniol Today
THE 2 BIGGEST BONDS OF ALL
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Now Showing Thru Thursday
Malinee 3:00 & 5:00.evening 8:30 'phone 21004 21005

V, >tl ij^ ' ^ falri jAf a They're worn.
tough men
and that's why
they're so
dangerous.
*/ \
BILL COSl!
UOItllU < (JL1>
liHMYMUM.(;S
United Artists
SI I /'// STED FOR MA TURF A UDIENCES,
PARFNTA I. DISCRETION AD VISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be
sold on first come, first served basis
SAVOVfl-o-cel CAPITOL c
I


I
I
Last Day Tuesday
Malinee continuous
from 2:00
Evening 8: 30
"BLACULA"PC.
William Marshall.
Denise Nicholas
plus
DAY OF THE
EVIL GUN" PC.
Glenn Ford,
Arthur Kennedy
Plus late feature
Tuesday night.
'phone 22534
Last Day Tuesday
Sunday continuous
from 5:00
"HAMMER" R.
Fred Williamson.
Vonetta Mcgee
plus
"A TOWN CALLED
HELL'R.
Telly Savalas. Robert Shaw
No one under 17 admitted
A1H CONDITIONED
AMPLE MARKING
WULFF RD. Thetfie,
Now Thru Tuesday
One Matinee al 2:30. Evening 8:30 phone 34666
ROD STEIGER JAMES COBURN
WILL BLOW YOU APART i II WILL BLOW YOU APART!
A FISTFUL OF MMMITE
5&
SI 'GGESTi I) I OR U I TURF A UDII Ml S
PARFXTAI. DISCRETION Al) VISFT).
m

INK
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J _
-Sl\


Monday, January 8, 1973.
Ilie Irtbunp
Canadian packs in desk job to enjoy life
with his pretty wife as sailor &adventurer
WhV DOES A MAN CHUCK A GOOD JOB. buy a 20 foot sail boat which he doesn't know how to sail, and set out from Lake Huron in
Canada to the Bahamas and points south to wander the hemisphere until the money runs out?
W. Mac McKen/.ic, who
describes himself as "an
executive drop-out," put it
simply. "Cemeteries are full of
people who waited too long to
do something." Mac, 44.
worked in Toronto, Ontario, as
the executive vice-president '
the Canadian Cystic Rbrosis
In.Undalion. Clean shaven with
prematurely white hair. In'
looked the picture of the
typical job-tied man
who would probably
retire at 65 with a gold watch.
The only thing which put the
question mark on the gold
watch was his penchant f..r
striped shirts and wide tics.
During the Christ m.is
holidays, Mac and his pretty
wife Carolyn. 30, sailed into
Nassau Harbour and tied up at
Potter's Cay, 2,500 inik
from his office desk and that
pile of work in the "in" Irjy
He could have been Neptune
himself or Father Christinas. \
neatly trimmed white beard
I tin- bull it
I.K ('.It
ami his sailor's loll
I'M shunned on Ho
Strvet. I OTOntO ll not
Mac and I :1 out
from I aki Huron, whi
'in and brought up. on
September .';. ITii tri|
inland most ol the
Ontario to the I ml' d
into the 1 rie < ana!, al
Hudson Kni'i oi,i into I hi
Intel (
imi.
Mil HI SI
I his isn't the best timi
roaming around in
up north. Wintet i .him in with
.1 lo.i! 'II
with u ! and now .ri.i
tcmpei il
to IK miserable deg
"Often we slept in our
deeping rith all oui
clothes on
s.nlt
They
.1

has a vacancy for a
MANAGEMENT
SECRETARY
who must be a Bahamian Citizen
Candidate should have several years secretarial
experience, and be proficient in shorthand
and typing.
Starting salary wil
and experience.
depend on qualification!
Written applications should be made to P. O.
Box N3717. Nassau, giving details of past
experience.
il !i i,I I!
and-a-half horsepowei
ml motor,
i,limited that the trip
\i imi to the Bahamas
frightening experience"
il was a rel.ilivch
iiuiii irossing.
left Miami at midnight
i i a fairly good crossing
,1 the Lull Stream Init the
was rough aftei Bimini.
,i all ( Imstinas da) ami
ih.it nighl i rossing the Bahama
A running sea
Which at tunes 11, Huled the
I huls two hours ol
i ontinuous sailing'"
boat is called
"i aramac" aftei her owners.
a :u loot Grampion
in.i niila- turered bj the
boa) building firm of
i Marine in Clarkaon,
liisl outside loronto. "Th*
is probabl) the smaliesi
In have made this
journi "said N'
I l \\ Id \s
Before he .mil ( irolyn lefl
Canada, Mae look ,i lew runs
on I ake Huron in the Caraniac
but oilier than that, he learned
to s.ul on the trip. < ii 'K n aets
as navigator ami she too
learned by trial and error.
"We used the li.ihain.is
- Nlising guide but it was vet)
lonel) crossing the Bahamas
Bank," said Mae "There were
only i lights along
the way and while ihe charts
said there were no reels, in th e
dark sou can'l help
: ring."
Sailing the Bahamas will he
their true lest "tte hope to gal
s.ml Mac.
I he nexl stop all. i Viss.iu is
llu I Minus then further south
to ( u|.a and the otiier islands
ot ihe i aribbean with thi hope
ot returning to sail the
northern Bahamas in the
Tropical
Exterminators
(oi Pest Problems
spring. Ihes budget them
.i week ami supplement
.1 allowance bj atching
tisii v, hen the mone) runs out,
tht \K ken/ies stop sailing.
"I don't know it I will be
able to adjust to the routine ol
a landlubber's hi.- when
Carolyn and I return to
I said Mae. "I think I
would l.,ke a lesser
paying job around Lake
Huron where I was horn. Life
ire simple there than in
th. iiies."
m.i is considering writing
then experiences for
publication hut "we're still so
Hold this up to a
Pilkington mirror.
And you'll see why
you should buy one.
.., W.O.H U:iH.,v.,IS ^
ijgniilH
loniM
03JJ3MAH3 3VOT2 (MA QaJOTKX)
rti sbfit/

First you'll notice how a Pilkington mirror shows
everything clearly, without distortion. You can read
every word of our label.
It tells you that Pilkington mirrors are made from
British Float the world's finest glass by the world's
leading glassmakers who invented it, Pilkington Brothers
of England.
You'll also discover that Pilkington mirrors are not
only silvered, but protected by a coppered and stove
enamelled backing.
See Pilkington quality mirrors for yourself at glass
dealers or hardware stores.
And make sure you look for the label.
Trade enquiries to: Nassau Glass
Company Ltd., Mackey Street, Nassau.
Phone:2-8165.
PILKINGTON
lead the world e$**) in glassmaking
il this thai we nave no
P'oni ot reference with which
mpare what has been
ning to as."
Before joining the < vst
l-ihrosis I oundation
Mac was .in Industri i
sioner in Owen
and in Brantlord. He was also j
radio announcer and
nl.ilor on the local
station. Hut right now. he's an
adventurer and a sailor.
"I've always wanted to do
aomething like this." he said.
"> ou have only one life to live
and there is so much ol the
world to know."
MAC AND CAROLYN McKENZIE aboard the Caramac at Potter's Cay.
are full ot people who waited too long to do something."
"Cemeteries
Singer Cy Roberts signs up with Kangaroo Enterprises
I. VNGAROO I nterprises,
headed by "Fireball" I reddie
l.o lot has signed up Its lirst
performing artist sin
Roberts.
Mr. I ay lor said Ka .
contract with Mr. Roberts was
signed rhursday, and the
company was hoping to book
him in some ol the leading
supper clubs 111 Nassau and
I reeport.
Prom this start Kangaroo
will be making arrangements to
p 1 a e e Mr. Roberts
internationally.
Mr. Taylor pointed out that
this was the lnsl time a
booking sgenc) had been
attempted here. As the sole
hooker lor the union. Mr.
I ,u lot said he hoped tot
performers ol Ihe worn ot
finding their own jobs.
"We take on the |
negotiating suitable pa) and
working conditions, leaving the
performer fret to develop
himself."
Mr Roberts is ahead) well
known m the Bahamas, and he
has also appeared successful!)
.ibio.nl. "I Ive as One'' .1 45
rpm. was one of his
ling hits.
Kangaroo is trying to
encourage other Bahamian
entertainers to take advantage
it its services. I he .1:
lot ated in the Muafa ians Union
building, Nassau Court.
SINGER CY ROBERTS SINGER, signs the first entertainer's contract with Kangaroo
Enterprises, Nassau's first booking agency. Shown with him from left are: Robert
Gordon, a member of the executive Board of the Bahamas Musicians and Entertainers
Union; Leroy Duke Hanna, president of the union; Mr. Roberts; Fireball Freddie Taylor,
president of Kangaroo; Freddie Munnings, one of the executives of the union and King
Fric, vice president of the B.M.E.
AKKIV1 I) TODAY; Joms
from Jacksonville; Preeporl
from I reeport
SAIL 1 I) IODAY: Jorna lor
Jacksonville. Ireeport lor
1 port.
ARRIVING TOMORROW
Atlantic Sky from New York;
Tropic Day from West Palm
Beach; Emerald Seas, PUvia
from Miami.
s \ll ING TOMORROW
tropic ll.i. lor West Palm
Beach
TIDES
High. 9:56 a.m. and 10 JO
p.m.
Low < to .i.ni. and
p.m.
WEATHER
WIND South to
southwest 8-18 111.ph.
Wl A I 111 K I .111 ex
few showers
SI \ Smooth to slight
II Ml' Mm. tonight 59 Max.
tomorrow 82
SUN
Rises (. 56 a.m. Sets 5 16
p.m.
DR ARCHIE R DONALDSON. MD
OBSTETRICIAN GYNECOLOGIST
AND
DR SHIRLEY M. DONALDSONJD.
PEDIATRICIAN
Would like to inform the public that
their offices have been moved from the
Beaumont House Bay St. to the
Donaldson's Medical Building on Collins
Avenue 8t Fourth Terrace (near Tiny
Shop)
IT ALL ADDS UP
your reusahlp hut unwanted
items of
clothing, tools,
appliances, clocks,
fans, etc. . clear out
your ciosets, garage, storeroom
all can be of help
to someone else.
Donate them to
SamMandt
Bazaar
ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE
The Sign of Better Taste
Make the sign of better tastc-V for Vat 19
Smoothest rum there's ever been~.V for Vat 19
On the rocks or in a punch
The spirit of Trinidad. The rum to ask for-Vat 19.
19J
Trinidad
The best you've ever had-.
ifl
-i
at's
better!
DMrlbutiil '" ""' Bahamas b)
lk iii.lt Robertson i i I i.l
M
SMEARED


(Ehr Srtbuiu
Monday. January 8, 1973.
get the job done
I
Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.
REAL ESTATE
C8282
LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at I ast I id
Hilltop starting at ONLV
$14,000 Waterfront starting al
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.
C8303
IN OUT ISLANDS
- FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's home, quest
cottage, fireplace, 2'.- baths,
patio. marvellous
swimming, fishing. II 'i La'km
c/o Box 101. Harbour Island.
C8314
ATTRACTIVE 3-BEDROOM.
4-oath residence, Blair 1
Living-dir.ing room, recreation
room, study, laundry, ample
storage space, patio, etc. I Ol
100' x 150'. Call 3-1077
C8311
FOR SALF
Lot must be sold immediately.
$3,000. Call 5,6600 9:30 a.m.
5 p.m. night 3-4564
Johnson.
FOR SALE OR RENT
m RENT
C8381
BEACHFRONT secluded
cottage, popular fashionable
out-island resort. Rental $500
winter. Sacrifice sale $12,000,
easy terms $500 down.
Phone 5-7224 evenings.
FOR RENT
C8267
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.
C7015
NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroom/2
bath. situated Domingo
Heights. East St., South.
Contact: Nassau 5-6234 or Mr.
Pratt at Freeport 352-9007
(collect) between 9-5.
C8265
LARGE 1 BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
C8264
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
HILLCREST TOWERS (Thud
Terrace West Centreville)
Elegant, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
apartments, airconditioned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 21841, 2-1842.
7-4116, 2-8224 0^2 8248.
C8347
5 ROOM APARTMENT in
Churchill Subdivision one
bath, with water and
electricity. $35 per week. Write
P. O. Box N3523, Nassau.
C8285
ONE BEDROOM and one two
bedroom two bath, large living
and dining room, Bahama
room apartment. Basically
furnished on beautiful
landscaped grounds. Third
Terrace Centreville. Facilities,
laundry, phone, parking, fully
airconditioned. Phone 5-4631
-after five 3-2397.
C8357
1. 3000 Sq. Ft. of store and
warehouse space on
Dowdeswell Street. Location
formerly occupied by BESCO
LTD. $750.00 per month.
2. Ground floor store space in
the Roberts building on East
Street near Bay Street. 1200
Sa. Ft. al $750.00 per month.
3. OFFICE SPACE: Roberts
Building, East Street.
120 sq. ft. $90.00 per month
270 sq. ft. 135.00 per month
360 sq. ft. 180.00 per month
975 sa. ft. 400.00 per month
4 OFFICE . STORE: space
Out Island Traders Shopping
Centre, opposite Potters Cay.
Ideal location available for
takeout restaurant $308.33
per month. Store and office
space available from as little as
$277.00 per month.
5. OAKES FIELD AREA: one
bedroom apartments,
unfurnished $140.00 per
month.
6. OFFICE SPACE OAKES
FIELD AREA: 868 sq. ft.
$290.00 per month.
7. APARTMENTS out East
1 & 2 bedrooms, fully
furnished, aircondltioning,
swimming pool. $255.00 &
$265.00 per month.
8. EFFICIENCY
APARTMENTS: close to town,
fully furnished, airconditioned
-$150.00 per month,
9. LOVELY EXECUTIVE 2
bedroom apartment, in the
east, redecorated and
refurbished $375.00 per
month.
All enquiries on the above
should be directed to Bert L.
Roberts Limited telephone
NRS. 2-3177/2-3178
C8281
OFFH.E OR STORE SPACE
Chailotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Ir.rn.ire 4-2017
C828I,
BEAUTIFULLY l-URN
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152 Lvemngs
5-4926.
C8332
ONE 2 BEDROOM
unfurnished apartment
Centreville and 2 unfurnished 3
bedroom apartments Soldier
Road. Telephone 3-4128.
C8346
ONE 2-BEDROOM apartment,
basically furnished I'almdale
no children or pets. Ring
5-4980 after 6 p.m.
C8333
3 BEDROOM fully furnished
house Mount Royal &
Madeira. $250 per month. Call
5-8954 evenings.
C8334
Two two-bedroom unfurnished
apartments on Soldiei Road,
one block east of East
Interested persons telephone
Valderine Adderley, Fresh
Creek, Andros, Radio Station.
C8268
ONF EFFICIENCY apartment,
basically furnished. Victoria
Court Apartments. on
Elizabeth Avenue between Bay
and Shirley Streets. Facilities,
laundry, parking. Phone
5-4631. After five 3-2397.
C8371
ONE 4 bedroom, 3 bath
dwelling house in Eastern
District, also one two and three
bedroom apartments. Phone
31804.
C8304
SECLUDED BEACH cottage,
fashionable Out Island Colony.
$500 year. Phone 5-7224
evenings.
C8307
MILLIONAIRES COUNTRY
ESTATE. $300 month
'umished no rentals are that
cheap but available lovely
spacious stone colonial two
baths pool maids room,
laundry, phone western edge
town near beaches golf -
completely equipped acres
Mowers, trees. Phone 5-7224
evenings.
C8366
FURNISHED 1-bedroom
air-conditioned apartment,
Shirley Park Avenue. Vacant
Feb. 5th. $200 month not
including utilities. Telephone
5-8134.
( B379
SANSSOUCI
Attractively furnished and
decorated duplex house in Sans
Souci: Upstairs and downstairs;
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, large
closet space, large Bahama
room. New Washing machine
and gas stove, airconditioned:
small garden. Rent: $350.00
per month.
RENT FREE UNTIL 1st.
FEBRUARY. FOR
APPOINTMENT TO VIEWtel:
2-1741/2.
FOR SALE
C8313
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
including utensils, furniture,
toys, clothing etc. Blair
Estates. Sheffield Street No.
141. Phone 3-1077.
C8301
1972 Toyota Corona MK 11-4
door. Like new. $2,600.
O.N.O.
******
Girl's Bicycle, also Elna Zig Zag
sewing machine both $140.
Phone 3-4631.
FOR SALE
C8344
BAY STREET BUSINESS
LADIES FASHION STORE
FOR PARTICULARS
ON LEASE OR SALE
Tel 24148/23027 or 22794
Morley & O'Brien
Real Estate Ltd.
C8375
ROLLEIFLEX SL35mm
camera with telephoto and
wide angle lenses.
Rolleiflex SL84 Super 8 Movie
Camera
Minolta Repo-S 35 mm Camera
Dual 8 Film Editor
Leitz Pradovit 35 mm Slide
Projector.
Philips HI Fi: 4500 Stereo
Tape Deck with 202 Electronic
Turntable, RH 580 Amplifier,
RH 690 Tuner, Two 8"
Speaker Units.
One Set Royal Doulton
chinaware (dinner and tea
service) for six.
Assorted Stuart and Edinburgh
crystal ware.
Canteen of cutlery, six place
setting (53 pieces).
Wilson pram, push chair.
playpen, highchair, cot.
Tea trolley
Please contact Chief Clerk Tel.
2-1161.
FM SALE
C8320
ONE LARGE avacado gas
stove only $200.00. Contact
Roberts at 2-8437 before 500
p.m.
C8339
1968 2-door Javelin. $1,000.00
1 18 It. Capri Boat with 40
h.p. outboard Evinrude and
trailer $1,200.00 or nearest
offer.
1 16-MM. Sound Projector
$400.00.
1 Electric Arc Welder.
$350.00. Phone 32235.
BUSINESS
JOPPORTUNITIES
C8351
INTERNATIONAL Publishing
Company has a top earning
opportunity for a Bahamian to
act as our local agent. Must
have business experience and
be known in the community.
Send resume to "Home Library
Institute", P. O. Box 2323.
Hato Rey. Puerto Rico. 00919
CARS FOR SALE
C8272
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LIMITED
SUBSTANTIAL
END OF SEASON
REDUCTIONS
1970 Chevrolet
Impala 2 dr. A/C $2800
1970 Rover 2000
A/C Automatic $2400
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic, Beige
4 dr. $1895
1968 Viva 2 Dr.
Automatic $850
1971 Morns 1300
S/W Automatic $1600
1969 Caprice A/C
Vinyl 4 Dr. H/T $2000
1968 Javelin A/C $1600
1970 Singer Gazelle
Auto. White $1295
1970 Wolsey 16/60
Auto Grey $1295
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8.
C8376
ABC MOTORS
Budget-priced,
a 1 used cars.
Best value for
your money.
1971 FORD PINTO
2-door, automatic
transmission, radio $2,500
1971 FORD LTD
automatic transmission,
air-conditioned, radio $3,500
1971 FORD ESCORT
4-door, automatic
transmission $1,900
1971 FORD PINTO
2-door. automatic
transmission, radio $2,500
1972 CHEVROLET VEGA
2-door, automatic
transmission, radio $3,300
1970 FORD TORINO
2-door, G.T.. automatic
transmission, radio
auconditioned $2,650
1971 FORD LTD
4-door, automatic
transmission, radio
air conditioned $3,300
1971 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE
4-door, automatic
transmission $2,500
1970 HILLMAN MINX
standard $1,100
1970 MERCURY MARQUIS
4-door, automatic
transmission,
radio, stereo,
airconditioned $2,800
1970 TOYOTA COROLLA
4-door, automatic
transmission, radio $1,100
1970 FORD CORTINA
E/C standard $1,600
1969 FORD GALAXIE
500 4-door, automatic
transmission, radio,
air conditioned $900
1970 OLDSMOBILE STATION
WAGON, automatic
transmission, radio,
air conditioned $3,200
1969 FORD CORTINA
ESTATE 4-door $1,100
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON
4-door, standard $1,000
1969 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
4-door. automatic
transmission, air
conditioned, radio,
stereo $4,000
1969FAIRLANE
500 4-door, automatic
transmission, radio $1,000
1969 FORD FALCON
4-door, automatic
transmission $1,100
1967 CORTINA E/C $150
ABC MOTORS
COLLINS AVENUE
CENTREVILLE
PHONE 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8 A.M. to 6 P.M.
SATURDAY
8 A.M. to 5 P.M.
C8323
1971 DODGE AVENGER G.
L. Automatic with radio.
$1600 or best offer. Phone
2-3106 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Phone
5 3590 after 5 p.m.
C8337
1969 SKYLARK Buick.
automatic 2 door, V-8.
airconditioned red with
black vinyl top, white interior.
Call 222Q9 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
CARS FOR SALE
C8358
1967 MORRIS 1000 Traveller |
- good running condition. ;
$650 or nearest offer. Call
2-14 73 between 9 a.m. 5
p.m. weekdays.
SCHOOLS
C8374
1970 MORRIS 1100. 15.000
miles. B$l.200.00 O.N.O
Phone 2-1161.
C8377
2 YEAR OLD automatic
Cortina. Excellent condition.
Only 12000 miles. $1700. !
Owner leaving. Phone 41365
LOST
C8350
SMALL MALE SEALPOINT
SIAMESE lost between
Camperdown/Tower Heights.
Contact Dobell 41515.
C8370
A PINK folder containing
music sheets and books,
between Dolphin Hotel and
Blue Vista. Phone 41411.
C8354
3/4 COLLIE. Wearing chain
with licence No. 601. If found
please call 3-1348. Reward
offered.
MARINE SUPPLIES
C8283
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.
rooop
35' BERTRAM SPORT
FISHERMAN bought NEW
JUNE 1971 powered by
twin Cummins Diesels 210 HP
each 200 hours on each
engine, central airconditioning
- 7 KW Diesel generator fly
bridge and dual controls
many other extras. Absolutely
AS NEW. Phone 3-4953 Nite
2-1722-3-4-5 days.
C8336
50 FOOT live-aboard yacht.
Completely furnished. Leaving
Island must sell. "Nancy III".
Yacht Haven, eastern dock.
Owner aboard .... come see!
C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleeps
six; private bathroom with
vanity, shower and head;
stove refrigerator, sink,
stereo ship-to-shore, twin 230
h.p. engines with less than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
C8331
FOR SALE OR CHARTER
125ft. x 23ft. 4ft. draft, steel
hull. 290 tons, powered by
new Cat. 343 diesel 15 ton
crane up to date load line. 2
cargo hatches, one 14ft x 24ft.
and one 14ft x 42ft. double
bottom and In excellent shape.
Contaci.
SANDS CONSTRUCTION &
SHIPPING. Marsh Harbour, P.
O. Box 489, Treasure Cay
Abaco. Phone 159.
C8372
CHRIS CRAFT Commander,
27' fibreglass. Two Chrysler
185 H.P. Engines. $12,000.
Telephone 7-7832 after 6 p.m.
C8369
CAL 25' Ocean Racer family
cruiser. Full headroom,
dinette, enclosed head, 7.5
H.P. Mercury, galley etc.
$6,000. Call 24635 Night
41456.
POSITION WANTED
C8348
SALESMAN. Hard working
honest and reliable 10 year1
experience seeks position
Phone 51828.
C8359
YOUNG AMERICAN M.D
willing to baby-sit your house
or home in Nassau. Minimum:
One month. No fees. Please
leave your number with
operator 2-2861.
SCHOOLS
THE NASSAU CIVIC
BALLET SCHOOL will
commence its Winter Term
session on Monday, January
8th. For information please
call 5-2353.
C8J64
Central Baptist Church Nursery
School reopens January 8th.
For infornation call 4-1595,
5-8210 or 4-2873.
TUITION
C8322
GUITAR LESSONS ... taught
by Derek. For information call
-2354 __________________
C8335
ENROLL FOR EASTER
TERM
Typing
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Commercial Mathematics
Office Practice
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier (NCR
4200)
Dictaphone-Typist
Filing
Telex Operator
B.J.C. and G.C.E. Classes:-
English
Mathematics
Literature
History
Spanish
NASSAU ACADEMY OF
BUSINESS
Shirley Street opp. Collins
Avenue Phone 24993
HELP WANTED
C8308
BAHAMIAiM HOUSEKEEPER
to live-in. Must be able to
drive. Phone 5-1137.
C8271
REFRIGERATION
MECHANIC. Should have 3 to
5 years experience on domestic
appliances. Salary subject to
negotiations. Phone BESCO
2-1070.
C8349
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
DIRECTOR for 535 room
resort property. Must have 3-5
years previous experience as
Food and Beverage Director.
Please telephone for
appointment Holiday Inn,
Paradise Island 5-6451 ext.
7101/2.
C8328
EXPERIENCED
BOOKKEEPER REQUIRED
for International Advertising
Firm. Person of senior
background capable of
handling all books of original
entry to preparation of Profit
and Loss Statement and
Balance Sheet. Must be able to
perform all functions with
minimal supervision. Up to
$10,000 commensurate with
experience. Please apply in
writing to P. O. Box N3910,
Nassau.
C8363
GARDENER Bahamian, or
Haitian with permit. Call
7-7240.
C8362
CHARTERED AND certified
accountants are sought for
positions with the Nassau and
Freeport offices of Price
Waterhouse & Co. Handwritten
applications in the first
instance, please to P. O. Box
N-3910. Nassau
C8361
EXPERIENCED CREW for
sailing yacht. Must know
Bahamian waters well. First
class references. Send resume
of training, experience and
references to Adv. C8361, C/O
The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau.
C8355
THE NASSAU
BEACH HOTEL
has vacancies for Senior Night
Auditors with the following
qualifications:
(1) At least 5 years experience
at senior level with large hotel.
(2) Good references and
unblemished character.
(3) Ability to co-ordinate all
work between front desk and
accounting department, and be
prepared to teach and instruct
other employees in this field.
Salary will be commensurated
with qualifications and
experience.
Interested parties should apply
to Department of Human
Resources, Nassau Beach
Hotel, P. O. Box N-7 756.
Telephone 7-7711. Written
resume stating full
qualifications, experience and
references must be furnished.
C8367
BAHAMIAN maid to live-in.
Eastern Road. Phone 5-1137.
C8380
WANTED 4 Bar Waiters and
1 Bartender. Apply in person
to Mr. Bosfield, Bar Manager.
Lyford Cay Club, Tel: 74271.
C8373
TUITION
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE. World-famous
postal tuition for the GCE.
School Cert and
Accountancy, Banking.
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinat-
ions. For details of our
specialised courses write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Results College Dept. VH1
Tuition House London
SWI9 4DS
HELP WANTED
TRADE SERVICES
C8378
WANTED: Gardener-
Handyman. Full time. Inquire
3-1975
C8382
EXPERIENCED Head
Gardener required for
SIGRIST HOUSE, PROSPECT
RIDGE. Must be capable of
supervising under-gardeners
and have full knowledge of
vegetable garden and fruit tree
growing. Good wages.
Telephone: 7-7768/9 for
interview.
TRADE SERVICES
C8340
FOR THE BEST in Sales,
Service, Repairs and T. V.
Antenna installation call Rayco
Electronic and Appliances
located in the Out Island
Traders Building at telephone
32235. We service all makes
and models.
C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.
C8102
AFTER CHRISTMAS MESS?
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCOTEL:51071-2-3-4.
C8279
Pinder i Customs
Brokerage ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N37I4
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795,2 3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434
C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS. SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.
GRAND BAHAMA
CLASSIFIED
IN FREEPORT
TEL .352-6608
ANNOUNCEMENTS
C7006
LADIES AND 'GENTLE-
MEN!!! get your newly
styled Holiday garments made
by ABC Tailor Shop Pinders
Point (right near the Baptist
Churchl.
HELP WANTED
C7026
CHEFS: TO TAKE
COMPLETE CHARGE OF
STATION. SUPERVISE AND
DIRECT ASSISTANTS IN
PREPARATION OF FRENCH
& INTERNATIONAL
CUISINE.
APPLY: PERSONNEL
DEPARTMENT, OCEANUS
HOTELS LTD., P. O. BOX
F-531, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM cf
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Boit F-2415.
Freeport, Bahamas. '
C7027
MEDICAL LABORATORY
TECHNICIAN wanted
immediately to work at
Lucayan Medical Building.
Full time or part time
considered. Salary according to
experience.
Contact Dr. Tait, P. O. Box
F-827. (Tel: 352-7288).
C7031
a) 2 KITCHEN PORTERS.
Responsible for cleaning of
kitchen and disposal of
garbage. Applicant should be
willing to work hard. Police
Certificate required.
b)2 DINING ROOM
CAPTAINS. Experienced in
French Service; minimum of
three years as Captain in first
class Hotels and restaurants.
Good references and Police
Certificate required.
c) 1 TOURNAND CHEF. Must
have three years experience in
fi'st class Hotels and
restaurants in pieparation in
International Cuisine. Good
references and Police
Certificate required.
d) 1 HEAD CHEF
Experienced in all aspects of
International Cuisine. Must
have ability to organize, train
and supervise kitchen
personnel. Knowledge of food
stocks and requirements
necessary, willing to work long
hours. Five years minimum
experience as Head Chef in
first class hotels or restaurants.
Good references and Police
Certificate required.
* Please apply to Personnel De-
partment:- EL CASINO, P. O
Box F-787, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
HELP WANTED
C7025
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
NIGHT AUDITOR: Must have
experience of working in hotel
doing Food and Beverage Night
Audit. Must be Bahamian.
APPLY HOLIDAY INN
FREEPORT, P. O. BOX F-760,
373-1333. MISS STAFFORD.
C7029
ONE DISHWASHER AND 2
HANDYMEN FOR
JOHNSONS SEAFOOD
RESTAURANT.
PLEASE CONTACT: RHONA
JOHNSON FOR INTERVIEW.
C7030
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY.
PACKING AND SHIPPING
MANAGER. MUST HAVE 5
YEARS EXPERIENCE IN
ESTIMATING. COMPUTING
RATES FOR INTER-
NATIONAL SHIPPING AND
SUPERVISIONAL ABILITY.
TELEPHONE FREEPORT
TRANSFER LTD. FOR
APPOINTMENT AND
INTERVIEW.
C7028
MANAGER FOR
AMUSEMENT PARK must be
able to assume full
responsibility of all
Amusement Rides and
equipment and full knowledge
of Amusement Park operation.
Must have 3 to 5 years
experience in public
Amusement Park operation.
Male preferred.
For interview call 352-7438 or
write to: P. O. Box F- 839
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C7035
LIVE-IN MAID/COOK.
REFERENCES REQUIRED.
BAHAMIANS ONLY APPLY.
WRITE TO R. ANTONI, P. O.
BOX F-170, FREEPORT.
News Brief*
FOREIGNOWNED
CONCERNS CONTINUE
TO BE NATIONALIZED
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP)-
Anot her six foreign-owned
companies, four of them British^
hava hom nationalized by l'roul-'i!
Ui Amin's government, it was
announced Saturday.
.The British companiei arc all
subsidiaries ol the Mitchell Colts
goup. Of the other two firms, one is
Kenyan and the other partly
Italian-owned.
A notice in the Official
Government Gazette said estates,
thri-r- ol tlu-m British-owned, had
meanwhile Been deleted from the
list of 26 estates nationalized last
month.
General Amin's decision not to
renew the trading licences of R8
British companies is expected to
cause another 150 to 200 Britons
to leave Uganda. No deadline has
Been fixed for their departure.
CALL TO UGANDANS
TO RETURN HOME
LONDON (AP)- President Idi
Amin is calling on Ugandans living
in Europe to return home to fill
key jobs vacated by the Asians he
expelled last year, diplomatic
sources said Sunday.
Uganda's acting High
Commissioner in London, S. M.
Musoke was reported to have made
the come-home appeal to about
200 Ugandan citizens at a Drivate
meeting Saturday night; but
Musoke denied a London
newspaper report that Amin had
changed his policy on Asians and
now wanted them back in Uganda,
where industries, schools and
hospitals have been hard hit by the
expulsion ui lUktod workers.
OFFICIAL COUNT SHOWS
NIXON ELECTED PRESIDENT
WASHINGTON (AP)- They
cranked up the electoral college
machinery Saturday and Richard
M. Nixon was elected President,
just as he was back on Nov. 7.
Vice President Spin) T. Agnew
put the official seal on NbtOtTl
re-election at 1:45 p.m. after the
538 electoral votes had
be counted at a joint session of
Congress.
Nixon won 520 of them and
George S. McGovern received 17.
John Hospers, a California
professor, got one.
HELP WANTED
C7036
1-UTILITY COOK Must
have three years minimum
experience in First Class Hotels
and Restaurants. Must be able
to relieve Pastry Chef and
Garde Manqer.
Police Certificate and Good
References required.
Please apply to Personnel
Department: EL CASINO. P.
O. Box F-787, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C7032
ONE STORAGE
ATTENDANT, to maintain
and clean storage area, load
and transport Golf Carts
between courses, must be neat
and have pleasant manner also
possess a valid driver's Licence,
Male applicant required.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to King's Inn & Golf
Club, Personnel Department.
C7033
ONE MACHINE OPERATOR,
to operate NCR 3300 Machine
for Receivables. Applicant
should have good general
education and two years
experience in operation of
NCR 3300 Machine.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to King's Inn & Golf
Club, Personnel Deoartment
C7034
ONE RANGE-MAN, to pick up
golf balls off range by using a
Range Ball Machine. Must
possess a valid Driver's licence.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to King's Inn & Golf
Club. Personnel Department.
The Tribune classified Ads
bring results Fast To place
your Adv. Telephone 352-6608
Ji
"HOPEOALE CENTRE"
A remedial school for the exceptional child
(retarded, autistic, learning disabilities,
behaviour problems).
Registrations now being accepted.
Limited enrolment.
Qualified, experienced staff.
vmm
m.&.mw&


Monday, January 8, 1973.
glhr (gribunr
OFFICE HOURS
"Yea, I can think of something more exasperating
than working with men working without them."
Rupert and the Beanstalk47
i/f,. .."J'i'L, u',tapt
At the end of the long
downward climb the two
friends find the Autumn Elves
waiting to greet them. As soon
as they set foot on the ground
Ruperts companion is given a
hero's welcome. And what
about the giant seeds?" asks
AH RIGHTS
the leader. Did you get
them ?" Rupert opens the
well -f Hied pouch and says:
" Here you are I Is that
enough?" "Oh yes. there
is more than we need I The
leader is delighted. You shall
have some for yourself."
RCSERVEO
Brother uumper
1 CARROLL RIOHTBR'S
from the Carroll Right** Institute
, y GENERAL TENDENCIES: Now you find you
^ have all kinds of wonderful aspects to put in
motion, particularly if they pertain to the loftier attributes of
the spirit, mind, culture, etc Highly placed persons are
receptive to your ambitions. Thing big.
ARIES (Max. 21 to Apr. 19) Get together with a bigwig you
know for the data and support you need at this time. You
have good hunches that should be followed since they can be
helpful to you. Don't try to fool others.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Good friends, though
demanding, can be of real help to you now, so contact them
early Join a group that can be a means of your getting ahead
faster in the future. Show you are a worthwhile person.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You can go ahead with those
activities now that will help you in your career. Straighten out
a credit matter so you can advance more quickly Don't waste
time just sitting around. Take action.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Study new ideas
that can bring more success into your life and get the
appreciation of higher-ups. Do the research work necessary.
Know what your potentials are and make good use of them.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Your intuition will tell you now
how to make bigger headway toward you goals since mere
facts are not sufficient. Mate goes along with a fine plan you
have. Try to be more philosophical
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Show that you know exactly
where you stand with associates in joint projects and make
bigger headway. A vital plan you have is accepted now in
public life. Avoid one who is unfriendly to you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) With all that work ahead of
you, try to gain the cooperation of co-workers so your duties
are done with everyone benefitting. Later, take steps to
improve your wardrobe. Throw out whatever is obsolete.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Taking a chance on those
fine ideas you have will prove successful now where it was
impossible in the past Come to a more romantic
understanding with mate. Happiness can be increased now.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) If you persevere, you
find you can improve conditions at home to your satisfaction,
plus the satisfaction of others. Study a plan that will make you
more successful Control your temper.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) Make appointments now
that can bring you the necessary help to advance ir business.
You are thinking very clearly and can now put your points
across easily. Evening is best for making future plans.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) There are fine aspects
today for putting ideas across that will aid you to have greater
income in the near future. Don't procrastinate. Steer clear of a
person who does not understand you.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You have the energy now to
put in a good day's work, and then delve into the social that
can help you get ahead in business Show that you are a
charming and intelligent person. Control your temper.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . he or she will be
one of those alert young people with an inquisitive mind and
therefore should be supervised and taught the facts of life at
an early age. Otherwise your progeny could get into all sorts of
trouble because of the great imagination and energy here. This
chart can be a most successful guide in whatever has to do
with the artistic, social and cultural Religion is a must here.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!
ZJne (^omic ^a
Oft
REX MORGAN, M.D.
By DAL CURTIS
0
Winning
Bridge
Chess
By LEONARD ARDN
"Heaven mutt be nice place to visit, but I wouldn't mind
living there."
CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1, Tennis cup
6. Lodginghouse
12. Thais
13. Beethoven's
Third
Symphony
14. Aureole
16. Startle
17. Fireplace
19. Thrash
20. Oppose
22. Roman helmet
24. Appointed time
25. German river
26. Function
28. Syllable of
hesitation
29 Arrears
30 Sport
31. Skeleton lorce
32 Mother's
warning
33. Bedouin
35. Mail
37. Foyer
39. Lump ol gold
42. Purloined
44. Colander
45 Belgian port
46 Weird
DOWN
1. One of the
Dwarfs
T
L l c 1 m- 0 R O 1 t\
1 M A N i '-' E O P L e\
M 1 M O 5 aHv O r E M
A r kBLL 1 |M 1 m
1 V A L L 1 pH? TIE A R E E S
o r 1 t| i Isl L O 6 e|
w E Al SEE 1 M U
B1-' R A V OBA L. A
,OP E e A|A V 1 T A L
RE C i P EBe T 1 r E
T A u o H tMa A C t S
,, VICTOR MOLLO
WHAT U t.-je greater g-.u that
a lany gjdmouner couOq bestow
on a t>.-jjge baby? None cou-j
be more u-ecouj than imagine-
tion. Tejnaique ana even iozic
can be ouu.cvaied. Bu: in:.filia-
tion u uiDorn and were are no
tcxJwilcj to uioUl it. An
example ij Ujj hand played
near.y 40 years ago uy an
unknown young woman.
North
? A Kti i
071
O 9 863
4 A KB
Wet* tut
- *0)3
V A Q 10 fl V g j a 8 4 3
0 7 2 o J 10 5
J t> ,
South
* to f
O A K 4
*,'.
CONTRACT .>* LEAD 4.1
,.S'..7IP a Palw cvent an" 'be
uyw looked tor a wav to make
an extra trie*. Ttie only h-pe
seemed to be a 3-3 diamond
break allowing the 02 to be
discarded on dummy's jonz
diamond. But If decra.-er tried
to set up a diamond, defenders
would surety cosh trie i?A. What,
then, was the solution ?
The dYW playea low from
dummy at trie* one Winning
wiBri bhe UQ, Bait duly switched
to the OJ, up to dummy's weak-
ness. What East wouldn't y
South could now throw her
third diamond on u top spade,
set up ,i diamond and discard
her 02.
The unknown young mu
was Helen Sabel. who came tJ
be accepted as the gveate.t
woman ixlaver of the dav
(S5S4)
Can you boat a world tale
contendei' ? In this posttlcn
from Alekhine v. Bogolyubov.
world championship match
1929. Bogolyubov (Black, to
move) has to choose between
lai KKt5 and lb) KKS. One
move draws, Che cither loses.
Bogolyubov chose wrongly. Can
you rmd the right move, and
spot how Hie actual gamr
ended ?
Par times: 30 seconds, chess
master; 1 minute, chess expert:
2 minutes, county player: i
minutes, club strength; 10
minutes, average; 20 mmuien.
novice.
SOLUTION No 9554
Chens Solution
lb) Is right. Bogolyubox' chose
(a) I . KKli? and lost
alter 2 PKt7. PB4: 3 PKtS
= 9. RxO; 4 RxR, PB$. S
K9S. PBS; t KK4, PB7;
7 RKU8. KKte; K-K3.
when Black resinned since A
loses his pawn.
I . K~K~5 stops Alefchlne's
uXnnlno plan because U *eep
out the White kino. White
then has to give up his rook
lor Black's pawn ana the oame
is a draw
TU& OAMBOLS .
^f/faHrdm&t
f uexT TIME ,
/ BUY VOU A BOOK TO
eiAO I'LL MAKE UBE
\ THAT IT HAS A
TARGET
THE FIND ALL THE WORDS GAME
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
2. Overseas
address
3. Confirm
4. Ridicule
5. Trilled
6 That man
Par lima 21 min.
*f> Ntwifxilum
7. Italian
daybreeze
8 Unite
9 Jeweled crown
10. Light tan
11. Bm
15 School subject
18 Auroral
20. Presidential
monogram
21. Attention
23. French article
25.Espoused
26 Rifle
27 Canadian
province abbr
29. Play at
30 Falsifier
31 Discoverer of
Labrador
32. Motherless calf
33.Including
34 Decomposes
36 Ponder
38 Craving
40. Midianite king
41. Golf gadget
43. Fhckertail
State: abbr.
word must
How many
word* uf
four letters
or iiimi,. can
v o u in a k r
Tlrnm the
letltrx shown
here? In
in h k I n K a
word, each
letter m .< v
be used uncr
nllly. Kach
contnhl thr lnrre
letter, and there must lie lit
lean one elilit-letler weird in the
list. NiipluruN: mi Inreltn oro:
no proper inline*. THHti.*
TAKtiBT: 31 word*, oood :
:t(i wiirdH. very gix>d : 41 word*.
excellent, .solution tomorrow.
VBSTMUAV1 MH.ITION:
Acne aeon HACK HONK liai on
liane link beacon neun lierkon
lionce bone cane canoe cone
cunk ebon knob uubob neck
nock oaken ocean once.
r
I
1
\~
1 I
W' I
19


III I'llbl |5l
li Rloi inlut. mnas.i ivi
:i ''ii.ini-h pennant 141
?! Scots rl\er. i3l
!:l \ol al the frnnl entrance
(t. .-.i
now ii
I. :>e e\|iertt MU
t ii- wav ol. 13)
No Mil In MM McK\Y
Across
I r.rroi till
7. Ilei'r measure it)
s -h..n mi
Hi Ylllllnry exiierl tin
Ii lilCst l.'ll
i:l Itiirnl dean or ilcnr pcrhans
llli
I'n\ered with
substance. (Ol
I Senlni III!
> Serious (41
: I'.ii i in i of n
i Weaken tal
ii in paslry
! s Ii ii r I
talk i4i
I II a ni p
i.'ii
i II o u-a'O
hjmself
: llilriliu
141
l II e e i
III
i llelresb.
Inn drink
111
exlraurous
inorllce 1.11
DAGWOOO,
MY FEEr AOE PHEEZiNG
WILL VOU PL.EASE t5ET
THE ELECTRIC
HEATING PAD?
s-^te:
$'
\\ 1.
,<*$hm ^>
jg
-kttfiV "^
*__^SLf \


Shr vTrtbunr
Monday, January 8, 1973.
BAHAMAS MEN SECOND, GIRLS TEAM LAST
Haitian Men's team dominate Volleyball
tournament, their girl's team forefeit
2 games,come second to Canadian girls
H\ (,i tDSTONI mi usiON
THE HAITIAN MEN'S N VII(>N\I VOI l.l Vl;M I. II JAM with ah win* and no Iowa, Mid the
Junos Ladies Volleyball Club "I Ontario, I wdi with fhra win and three lossea, took lop honours
Saturday in the men and tadiei dKision durinf Ihe Bahamas' 1 hard Vnnual Volleyball Tournament
held at the Eastern Secondary School Gvm.
After losing two defaulted
games to the Bahamas' I adie
National Volleyball ream
when they failed to turn up foi
their second and Final sets, the
Haitian's I idlea [earn droppc i
from a persistenl first pi
with Junos to second Both
Itinos and the Haitian I
lost two games each ti
other
The Bahanus I sdiei team
who found Junos just as hard
to heal a- in the exhil
and the Itabilit) of the
Haitians unconqu
third in the I
winning only one ol lh
games played and gettir
two defaulted
Haiti
"Actually, we could have
done much bettei it
able to get ourseh
commented Barbara Ki
captain of the Bah
kboul then imiii vith
Admitting that thej placed
their best durine the exhibition
l tl i we did much
in the exhibitions than
did todaj ISatut
ies added
llowevci B
that Junos
were during
ed to
gethei uomi
what they can
MUCH IMPRON l i
Knowles, who is a
the defending
1
mied lh. I
ball com
urnament i I
le Haitian g
tpi said,
I ihem is
Iheii attitude l
hci '
bed by l)i Norman
the it.
1 ir | the two
defaulted (am il I
Junos I S-7 in one ol foul sets
they played.
coach of
fell that her team
. ; i also, I lies
il been playing as well
I ia> I ,i il all week
d "I expet ted Haiti to
i ilH(ii|!h I hey play our
i ball, but it's just thai
i.nlcd to lose a few points
I lain had the ball
i was playing good
ind good offence
learned a lot from this
intent and we enjoyed it
to hope for another
, Voiles hall Club left
1 tnada yesterday as the
members who
lity students, have to
attend school today
DOMINATI li
ched by Clermonl
tine with l.rnisi
idin assisting, the ii.nn."
nun's team completely
ted play in then
division Including a 15-0
it which Ihey handed to
I omo
\T l^
DOMINATORS IN THE MEN'S DIVISION of the Bahamas' Third Annual Volleyball
Tournament, the Haitian's Men National Volleyball Team (above) took first place,
winning all six qames played. The Team (standing from left) Ronald Leger, Frit? Pierre]
Georges Denis. Jean Desse, Alex Dolce, Frantz Dolce, Clermont Lamartine (coach of the
Haitian teams) and a representative of the Haitian Volleyball Federation (Kneeling from
left) Daniel Moinpoint, Frantz Bernadine, Max Gamier, Jean Toussain, Georges Brisson
and Max Bernabe.
mm
ft n
Ufr/i
/
i"-
EDWIGE BRISSON of Haiti playing right forward, spikes her way through the
defensive blocking of Judy Alaszkiewicz of the Junos Volleyball Club of Canada. Both
teams were evenly matched and lost two sets each to each other. Photo: Rickey Wells
Led by their captain and the
tournament's most valuable
player in the men's division
Daniel Moinpoint along
with Jean Desse, Georges
and Jean Herbert
I. uss lint. Haiti smashed their
i .iv through the little defence
l.eroy Pawkes, Oswald Moore,
i.irnette Lockharl and
Demeritte could muster and
returned the best the Bahamas
could give. Haiti gave the
Bahamas their only two losses
and 1 5 7 in the tirsl men's
sets when they took the
.ited lead
"Our learn played far below
i.u ion." commented
coach Leonard Archer when
Haiti had claimed the win.
I oach Archer Kit that the
Bahamas men were able to do
much belter than they did
against the Haitians though he
considers Ihem the best in this
region.
POOR EXECUTION
"Very poor execution of the
fundamentals of volleyball,"
was the way coach Archer
described the Bahamas* loss
In revenge, the Bahamas
bounced back and defeated
Lake Como 15-3 and 15-7
dropping them in the cellai
Where they stayed.
Piccolo Volleyball Club
threatened the Bahamas'
second place when in their first
set. Piccolo pushed on to deuce
the game, but the Bahamas
came out on top 16-14 and
went on to win the second set
15-8.
Commendations were
,1 on the Bahamian
team by Jacques Joachim, the
nl of the Haitian
\ ill federation. "You
havi a very good team." he
said "Ihey have good
potential and should have a
very good future."
REE. COMMENDED
Mr. Joachim also
commended the referceing of
Tom Granl who was chief of
the officials during the
tournament. "Tom (Irani is a
very good referee," he said.
"He has keen eyes and an
excellent knowledge of the
rules Remembering Grant's
visil to Haiti, "he referecd very
i Haiti and had all the
fails
lake Como who finished
third in the Miami Invitational
Tournament late last year
nevei stood a chance in
Saturday's tournament as they
went down six straight ending
in last place winless.
I'i'colo, another strong team
in the Miami Invitational, was
able to muster only two games
which they did over the less
versatile Lake Como 15-5 and
156. taking third place in the
tournament.
Although all ended on a
happy noie. Jack Plants of
Lake Como declared his
possible resignation front active
volleyball. "I have been
seriously thinking about giving
it up for a long time now," said
the 45-year-old veteran who
was the oldest player in the
tournament. "I am getting too
old for the game, actually, it's
a young man's game."
Plants. who is a store
designer, has been playing with
Lake Como for over three
years. "I don't really have the
time to take in all the
tournaments," he said
Photo: Rickey Wells
However when time allow,.
Plants said thai he will be
travelling with the team
IUNOS WIN
Junos after beating the
Bahamas 15-4 and 15-11 in the
first match went on and split
one set each 15-9 and 8-15
with Haiti, tieing up for tirsi
pi ii Meeting again In the
second sets. Junos again split
two sets with Haiti 15-12 and
8-15 which continued their tie
for first place
Junos dropped their first
game to the Bahamas when
they spin ihen final sets 15-7
and 7-15. This gave Haiti
who had two more sels to play
the Bahamas a chance to
win.
However. the Haitian
contingent left immediately
following their final match
with Junos and forfeited the
two games to the Bahamas.
I he volleyball contingents
on Saturday night were hosted
at the Central Highway Inn for
the awards presentation
dinner-dance.
When neither Dr. Norman
Cay. the president of the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation
nor Tom Grant, the publicity
director, was there for the
presentation of awards, the
indispensable Mart;, Goldstein
took over at mike side and
transformed what could have
been an embarrassing loment
for the Federation into a
memorable event.
FINAL STANDINGS
MEN'S DIVISION
W L
HAITI 6 0
BAHAMAS 4 2
PICCOLO 2 4
LAKECOMO 0 6
LADIES DIVISION
CANADA (JUNOS) 5 3
HAITI 4 4
BAHAMAS 3 5
REGALS MAIDEN PAYS OUT $175.15
REGALS MAIDEN ridden by Alfred Gibbs and Sheila's Pet
ridden by Noel McKenzie provided the biggest payoff in the
third race on Saturday during the second meet of the 1973
Hobbv Horse Track season.
The 2-5 combination paid
out 5175.15 to the lucky
ticket holders. Regals Maiden
took the race by several lengths
over Sheila's Pel. who was
chased all the way by Sib in
third place. All of the other
taces gave low payoffs as the
horses ran to expectations.
SATURDAY'S KKSUI.TS AND
PAYOFFS:
lit. RACE 4'/, furlunp: I nil,
I'op (9) (".. Il.no $2.10, J2.I0.
$2.10; Mighty Joe (6) R. Ferguson
J2.S0, $2.20. Uarduu Hoy (3) S.
McNeil $2. IS.
2nd RAC'I 4M furlongs Top
Secret (8) J. hum $5.30, $3.75,
$3.25. Spanish (ontessa (9) (.. Ball
$3.30. $2.60; Sling Shot (7) N.
McKentk $12.40; Daily Double
(9-8) $11.10. 1st. .iiimhII i (8-9)
$4.65.
3rd RACf 9 lurlongs Regal
Maidens (5) A (lint* $4.10, $2.85.
$2.80; Sheila's Pet (2) N. McKeniie
$22.55 $6.80; Sib (3) D. Smith
$4.50. 2nd quill, lla (2-5) $17S.I5
4th RACE 6 lurlongs Anlries
(9) A. GibbS $5.25, $2.50. $2.10;
II Pulsar A. Saunders $3.30 $2.20:
Runway Child (5) 0. Hain $2.10:
3rd .)milsll.i (1-9) $9.45
Slh RACE 6 furlongs Wolf
Hunter (9) K. Johnson $4.25 $2.55
$2.45; Moon Walk (7) II. Icrnander
$4.45 $3.70; Chime Song (4) A.
Saunders $3.15 4lh urn, II., (7-9)
$18.40
(.Hi RACK 41/, furlongs Sir Dee
(4) S. McNeil $6.30 $3.70 $2.25;
Ugly (H) A. Saunders $5.45 $2.20;
Uiiuhesier (9) J. Hain $2.20. 5th
quIneUa (4-8) $9.60
7th RACE 4V, furlongs Neysa's
Joy (3) N. Woodside $4.60 $2.45
$2.20; Dead Heal (2) M. BfOWB
$3.00 $2.70; Concha Bay (8) A.
i.ii'i- $3.30. 6th quinella (2-3)
$11.05
8th RAM 5 furlongs Bahama
Rule (7) R. Ferguson $3.25 $4.80
$2.10: < .limn i,.n-l (Jueen (I) A.
Saunders $3.20 $2.10; Lady Rolle
(5) I. Bain $2.45 7th iiuinella (1-7)
$3.50
TROPIGAS MOVE
r TOP OF LEAGUE,
AND DYNAMOS
WIN AT LAST
H\ IVAN JOHNSON
vim D H\ h CERTAIN amount
ol good fortune Tropigas heal St.
George*! J I in an encellc.nl game
"i MCCtf in the Ne prmiden.e
Sunday Soccer league, played at
Clifford Hark over the weekend.
I tns Mi putt riopipl at the top of
ilic i c.tiru. i.ibic wUh io points
(rom f> ffanies wild \U Alpine in
MCOnd plate with B points from 5
games.
In Hie other match the Dynamo*
finally managed to record their first
win of the season when they
produced the biggest surprise of the
IMtOfl by heating the erraetk
1-2. Paradise had Id play
the flnl hall' with only <* men and
the iccond half wilh 9 men plus jn
injureJ 12th man hut in spile of
this full credit must go to the
Dynamor who played hard
throughout and deserved Iheir first
win ot the season.
lh.- rtoplfn st Georgee clash
was undoubtedly one of the best
matches seen this season the
tiers -tempered members of the
S.imts U'jm were, for nine,
suhdued and hoth sides produced
some truly fine foothall.
GOOD FOOTBALL
I he T.nul.ird of football was
high throughout Ihe first half with
both learns building up their
.illacks well out of defence with
good, crisp accurate passing,
particularly < midfield.
lor rropigtt, Qavln Turner in
midfield pUyd an excellent game
jiongM.it skipper Randy Rodgers.
Ihese two were as dominant ,ts
maypoles throughout ihe match.
while Sammy Haven made a more
than useful contribution on Ihe
right-wing.
Midfield man Smiles generated a
hit of life into the Saint's attack
with his endless running and
Wll timed passes Io Nicholls .iml
Minns up Front, who both had good
games I uis RenotO gave the
rropfgu defence a number of
cam ii he sent over numeroua
eroam from ihe left during the first
half.
NKT BRI AKI it
l ropigai opened ihe scoring aftei
10 minutes when Gavin Turner let
looac with I *0 \ .ird net-breaker
Which left the Saints goalkeeper
with no chance and sonit 8 minutes
later Smiles scored for the Saints in
a similar fashion when he also drove
I power pack shol into the top of
Ihe Tropigas net to make the score
II.
After 35 minutes Tropigas went
into the lead i>miii with another
superb goal. Turner took the hall
pasl three players on the righ wing
and sent OVUI I line cross which
ftiund Ihe head of Sammy Haven in
Ihe Saint's area ;is he rose above Ihe
defence IO head the hall into the
net .i great goal I
Ihe s.imts were unlucky not to
equalize before half-time when
Colin (irimmsey produced two
extraordinarily fine saves in Ihe
Tropigas goalmouth to keep the
score at 2 1 in favour of Tropigas at
the halfway mark.
PACE DROPS
In the second half Ihe puce and
quality of the football dropped a
little, the Saints appeared to he
wear) iftei the rather testing first
half and lor Ihe first 25 minutes
Tropigas dominated.
Smiles, who had done such a
good job in midfield for the Saint's
in the first half was anonymous
during this period of time and
rropIgM surged forward in
mounting vsave after wave of
Bttackl with Kand> Rodgers and
limmy Murray doing as they
pleased in midfield. Nevertheless
the Saints held oui and TropIgM
were unable to icora in spite uf
(heir considerable territorial
advantage.
Suddenly the Saints came to life
again in Ihe last 20 minutes hut
they, too, were unable to score
with Minns. I tic tine and Davis all
blasting wide and high in front of
an open goal.
These errors gave Tropigas a
reprieve and Ihey gladly took
advantage of such lavish generosity
when Gary Croft made it Jl in the
closing minutes of the game during
I goal mouth scramble.
I IKS I WIN
In the second fixture of the
afternoon bottom-of the table
Dynamos recorded their first win of
the season when they downed
Paradise 3-2.
Paradise went into the first half
wilh only 8 men. this was boosted
to nine after 15 minutes. The first
half saw both sides having more or
less equal possession of the hall and
Paradise surprisingly went into the
lead after 30 minutes when Juliano
scored following a cross from the
wto| by Stan Uocus.
Dynamos did not open (heir
scoring until shortly after half time
when Rick Adderley managed to
get i foot to a lose ball in a
goalmouth strap 5 minutes lad r
Adderley pul Ihe'Dynamos in the
lead with an unbelievable first lime
shot as he ran onto a centre from
the right.
The Dynamos right winger then
m.idV it 3-1 when he miscued a
cross and the Paradise goalkeeper
was beaten by Ihe late swing and
the ball spun into the top nghthand
corner of Ihe I'aradise goal.
With 10 minutes remaining Mie/
made it 3-2 following a good cross
from Cole man on the righl Hank.
Several minutes later Barrett hud
the ball in the Dynamos net again
but Ihe referee ruled him OfftMe
and the goal was disallowed.
COCA COLA
WINNERS
CRUNCH Midfield man Gavin Turner (far right) is
shown as he clashes with a St. George's defender during
Sunday's game played at Clifford Park. Looking on
anxiously in the background are Tropigas captain, Randy
Rodgers (far left) and Charles Moss (second from left).
Tropigas won the match 3-1 and as a result moved to the
top of the League table with 10 points from 6 games. In
second position are last year's League Champions,
McAlpine with 8 points in 5 games. Photo: RICKEY WELLS
(Re,
'>(*
*
BECKsBlEB
J
m
Nick Radford and Bill
Govan defeated Fred Higgs and
Basil Hall on the first hole of a
sudden death playoff to
capture the Coca Cola Golf
Tourney gross title at Paradise
I si mil Sunday.
The winners and the
defending champions Higgs and
Smith had finished the tourney
at a one over par 73.