<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03237
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 4, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03237

Full Text










4 POWERFUL JET-PROP ENGINES
ARE MORE RELIABLE THA" ?
-TELEPHONE 77303/777 ;-


Srtbutte


(Registered with Potmaster of Bahamas for potage concessi...on within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 36 Thursday, January 4, 1973. Price: I 5 Cents


PATRICK POWER
...leaves tomorrow


WORK PERMIT

OF EMPLOYERS

DIRECTOR REFUSED

BAHAMAS EMPLOYERS
Confederation director Patrick
Power is to leave the Bahamas
tomorrow after having his
work permit turned down and
no replacement found to take
over his duties.
Here since February 1969.
Mr. Power has, in the past four
years played a significant role
in strengthening the I
membership of the
Confederation and assisting in
the settlement of various
disputes and contract
negotiations between
management and labour.
From Nassau he will go to
Nevada where he has accepted
a partnership in an electronics
firm whose research and
development centre is located
in Gardnerville, near Reno,
Nevada.
Mr. Power has been named
vice-president and general
manager of the company.
Reference to Mr. Power's
departure, and the difficult
position in which this now
places the Confederation was
made in that organization's
annual report.
STAFF
Under the heading 'Staff,['*
it was stated that the
Confederation lost its previous
secretary, Mrs. Bryn Stewart,
when the Immigration Board
refused to renew her work
permit.
This was followed by the
Board's rejection of the
Confederation's application for
renewal of the executive
vice-president's work permit
for three years.
Mr. Power's permit was
finally approved for a period of
six months.
"Following repeated but
fruitless appeals," the report
said, "your Council acceded to
Mr. Power's request that the
matter no longer be pursued
and that it should proceed with
the more productive process of
obtaining a suitable successor."
To date no suitable
candidate has yet been
obtained, and "members must
be resigned to the fact that it
appears unlikely that any
successor of Mr. Power's
calibre will be obtained," it
was stated.
Commented the report:
"This is considered to be a
most unfortunate development
that this crucial stage in the
Commonwealth's industrial
relations development with the
growing militancy of trade
unions and an employers'
organization deprived of the
service of a suitably-
experienced and qualified
professional officer."
The report pointed out that
there was in addition, a
principle at stake in this
situation which could involve a
breach of the Internationi
Labour Organization
Convention the freedom of
association.
"In short, Confederation
members have expressed their
concern with the difficult
situation which has arisen
which makes it difficult for the
organization to exercise its
right freely to appoint its own
staff," the report said.
Born in China of Irish
parents, Mr. Power spent nine
years as industrial relations
adviser to the mining industry
in Malaysia before coming to
the Bahamas.


LUXURIOUS

VELVET
BEDSPREADS

DOLLY MADISON


ELECTIONS COURT

I RULES IT HAS

S JURISDICTION TO

HEAR FNM CASE

By MIKE LOTHIAN
/ CHIEF JUSTICE SIR
Gordon Bryce, speaking for the
j Elections Court, this afternoon
ruled that after having
"carefully considered" the
arguments of counsel the Court
had omne to the conclusion
that it did have jurisdiction and
could "entertain" the petition
of FNM candidate Cyril
s* 1Fountain.


HOTEL LOSES HEAVILY IN

MONEY AND GOODWILL




King's Inn waiters





ran amok in




wildcat strike


By NICKI KELLY
WAITERS ON A WILDCAT STRIKE at the Freeport King's Inn Hotel and Golf
Club ran amok in the dining room Saturday evening, sending some 750 guests fleeing
as they overturned tables and smashed dishes.


The incident was the
culmination of a dispute
between management and the
hotel union on the manner in
which salary was to be paid.
According to hotel manager


and two young children,
(George anid '.vangeline, to the
Bahamas in 1933 and the
following year moved his shop
to Trinity Place where he
stayed fIor 28 years before
moving to Shirley St iet where
the business is now located.
The Moskos have four
children and 14 grandchildren.
Their daughter, -vangeline
Christopher, her husband and
four children, arrived in Nassau
two weeks ago especially for
the celebrations. They returned
to Boston today.
Missing from the family
gathering last night was the
Moskos' third child, Cally
Nicholaidis, who, with her
husband and four children, has
made her home in Greece.
Pictured from left to right
front row: Mrs. loana Mosko
Sto w f is holding her
14-month-o(ld son, Niki, Mary


Mosko (daughter of George
Mosko), Mrs. Evangeline
Mosko Christopher, behind her
her husband, Chris, and next to
her het father James Mosko,
Mrs. James Mosko and behind
her Mr. anid Mrs. George
Mosko.: Ibehind George is
Dianna Christopher and to his
left is Mrs. Lauri Christopher
and her husband, John, ( son uof
Chris Christopher). Mr. James
Mosko tests his hands on the
shoulders of grandson Jimmy
C h r i s t o p h e r a n d
grand daLughiter Alexandra
Moskoi stands in front of her
father, George.
From left to right in the
back row are: John Stowfis
(loana's husband); John,
Milton and James Mosko
(George's sons): Mary
Christopher Constandakis and
her husband, Jim.
Photo: Toogood's Photography.


Cyril Fountain meets all .pre-


conditions for for filing election


petition, claims Dupuch QC

CYRIL FOUNTAIN met all the pre-conditions to filing an
election petition, the Hon. Eugene Dupuch, Q.C., leading council
for the FNM candidate in the September 19 North End Long
Island election, contended late Wednesday in his argument against


Charless Schlakman, the union,
through its shop steward, and
the Ministry of Labour's
representative at Freeport were
informed by letter on
November 13 that the hotel


proposed to pay its staff twice
monthly, rather than weekly as
was the case before.
IThe change was to go into
effect on November 16, the
day the King's Inn re-opened
following a large fire during the
sui tmmer.
"No ohiections were raised
at the time and the union
indicated it was willing to give
the scheme a try," Mr.
Schiak man said.
In adopting the new pay
ietliod "we are exercising our
right to manage and make
decisions in the best interests
of the hotel." lie added.
The union has claimed that
the King's Inn changed the pay
system without first advising
workers.
COMPLAINTS
Leader Ilurie Bodie said
management was approached
on November 23 and informed
of the workers' complaints
about the difficulty of meeting
weekly bills, rent and shopping
etc.
On Saturday evening at
about 6.30 p.m., the dining
room staff staged a wildctL
strike'and four or five meetings
had already been held between
hotel officials and the union
when the waiters about one
dozen of them went on their
rampage.
"When the strike first
started I used a microphone to
explain the situation to guests
but without blaming anyone,"
Mr. Schlakman said.
The guests, he said, were
understanding and cooperated
as executive members of staff
and office personnel pitched in
to set up a buffet to see that
the guests were fed.
TERRORISM
"For the first hour everyone
was in a good mood until the
terrorism began."
The action of the waiters has
cost the hotel heavily both in
money and goodwill. Mr.
Schlakman said.
A number of guests
transferred to other hotels
while others left Randnd
Bahama altogether.
"As far as the hotel was
concerned, we suffered
financially in that we had to
give a refund on the dinner and
also lost out on the new show
which was to have opened that
night.
"In addition our other
nightclubs became inoperative
as there was no one to serve
the guests," the King's Inn
manager said.
COST A LOT
Feeling it incumbent upon
them to make amends to the
remaining guests, "on behalf of
the hotel, Freeport and all the
Bahamas." management the
next morning served
champagne at breakfast and
around the pool and also
provided a basket of fruit to
every guest in the 800-room
hotel.
"Whatever the cost, we felt
it was up to us to make it up to
our guests after the melee,"
Mr. Schlakman said.
Meantime talks between the
union and management went
on from midnight Saturday
until 3 a.m. Sunday. Also
present at the talks was Grand
Bahama representative Kendal
Nottage who was instrumental,
Mr. Schlakman said, in getting
the waiters to leave the
premises after the outburst in
the dining room.
At the late night meeting it
was basically agreed that
everyone would return to work
the next day, including those
involved in the dininit room
episode, and that a further
meeting would be held
Tuesday.
The matter is still under
discussion. Mr. Schlakman said.


Celebrate Golden Wedding anniversary


Mr. Fountain is claiming
that he should have been
returned as the elected
representative fhr North End
long Island in the September
19) general election.
The polling in the North
End Long Island district was
declared void by Returning
Officer Livingstone Smith.
Fie Returning Officer
voided the voting because of an
apparent equality of votes,
andthe PLP's Philip Smith won
the seat when a fresh poll was
taken on October 0.
It the Election Court has no
jurisdiction under election laws
to question a declaration that
an election was void, then the
legislature may have
overstepped its powers by
reducing the Court's
constitutionally-conferred
jurisdictions, Attorney (;General
Gerald Collett said Wednesday
Mr. Collett's remarks came
after Jamaican attorney Vivien
Blake, Q.C., representing
Philip Smith in the hearing,
said that under the
Representation of the People
Act the Elections Court could
not entertain a petition relatitw
to a void election '
Questioning that claim, Mr.
Collett referred to Section 41
of the Bahamas Constitution
which said "an Election Court
shall have jurisdiction to hear
and determine any question
whether any person has been
validly elected as a
representative."
The Attorney General,
representing Returning Officer
Smith in the hearing told the
Court that if the 1969
Representation of the People
Act did bar the Court from
considering void elections as
Mr. Blake claimed "is not such
provision repugnant to Section
41 of the Constitution as
seeking to cut down the
jurisdiction there conferred by
the Constitution?
"If in fact there was a true
equality of regular votes the
Returning Officer had no
option but to declare the
election void.
"But if the C('ourt were to
find that there was not an
equality of votes, that certain
votes should have been allowed
and certain others disallowed,as
the court not entitled to look
behind the curtain which
dropped on Sept. 22 when the
election was declared void, to
determine whether in fact the
election should have been
declared."

Banned from driving
KEVIN Toote, 18, a
Kenilworth Street waiter who
pleaded guilty to four traffic
offences this morning, was
fined $240 and disqualified
from driving for 12-months by
Magistrate Wilton Hercules.
Toote pleaded guilty to
removing his sister's car
without her permission and
driving it "without due care
and attention" along Wulff
Road on December 31.
The car was not insured and
Toote had no licence. He was
also involved in an accident
when he collided into the back
of another car and damaged it
extensively, Insp. Silas Nixon
told the court.
Sentences amounting to
eight months were imposed as
an alternative should he fail to
pay the fines.
HHIBlBHHH

^^ i^^BR-lilt %^^

lll- H iHltll i


MK~lIl n


MR. AND MRS. JAMES
MOSKO, surrounded hy their
family, celebrated their golden
wedding anniversary last night
at ,i party given in their honour
by their only son. George, at
his home "Villa Meltene" on
the eastern Road. About 300
guests congratulated the couple
and Bishop Ciermanos
Poli.zoides of the ( ree k
Orthodox church h in North
Amterica, gve themIn his
blessing.
Mr. Mosko, who arrived in
the Bahamas from Greece in
1925, established a woodwork
business on Flizabeth Avenue
where Barclays Bank is now
located. lie brought his wife


TWO-THIRDS OF

LOCAL BANK SOLD

TO U.S. INTERESTS

AN agreement hbi been
reached to sell two-thirds of
Mercantile Bank & Trust
Company Ltd., Freeport, to
International Bank of
Washington D. C.
This announcement was
made jointly today by I.
Gordon Mosvold, chairman of
the Mercantile Group of
companies and General George
Olmsted, chairman and
president of International
Bank.
International Bank is a
major diversified financial
services company with banking
and insurance interests
throughout the U.S. and
overseas. In addition to a long
established subsidiary in
Nassau, they have operations in
Barbados, Belgium, Cayman
Islands, England, Holland,
Jamaica, Lebanon, Liberia,
Lux embourg, Switzerland.
Trinidad & Tobago, Virgin
Islands and West Germany.
Gen Olmsted said the
acquisition will complement
International Bank's position
in the Caribbean area and Mr.
Mosvold indicated his pleasure
in becoming associated with a
large progressive international
financial organization.


To stand trial on

death driving charge

WELLINGTON Scantlebury,
22, of Jerome Street east ofl
Mount Royal Avenue, and a
reservations manager at
Paradise Island, was yesterday
committed to stand trial at the
January Criminal Sessions of
the Supreme Court on a charge
of killing in the course of
dangerous driving.
Scantlebury is charged with
causing the deaths of two
American tourists, Jacquelyn
Prinm Gavin, 24, and Comett
William Martin, 34, early on
the morning of June 11 last
year.
The two tourists, guests at
the Holiday Inn Hotel, Paradise
Island, and residents of Florida
died after their rented
motorcycle was involved in a
collision with Scantelbury's car
on the Paradise Island Bridge.
The motorcycle burst into
flames, pinning both riders
beneath it. Mr. Martin was
pronounced dead on arrival at
the Princess Margaret Hospital
and Miss Gavin died shortly
after.
Attorney Oswald Isaacs of
the law firm of Isaacs, Johnson
and Thompson is representing
Scantlebury.


Court had no jurisdiction in the

equality of votes.
"Ihe law says a fresh poll
must be taken, not a fresh
election.
"If it was another election it
would be a by-election and
(upen to anyone qualified to
nmmiinate as a candidate. But
that was not possible in this
case.
"It is quite true no return
was made in respect of the first
poll, but a return was made in
October, a return in respect of
lic same election.
"We are not petitioning
against a void election," Mr.
Dupuch declared, "but against
the return of an elected
candidate on the ground that
the petitioner was elected in an
earlier poll.
NO AUTHORITIES
Mr. Dupuch added that it
was Mr. Blake's contention
that "a decision of a minor
civil servant. no matter how
arbitrary or how wrong,
excludes the jurisdiction of this
court. Hle has produced no
authorities and I expect there
are no authorities in the whole
of english Law."
Mr. Dupuch backed his
arguments with references to
more than a do/en authorities
and precedents.
In a reply this morning Mr.
Blake reiterated that "the
(Court cannot go behind the
fresh poll," and "the Act does
not give the Court power to
grant relief in a void election."
Mr. Blake's reply ended
about 11 o'clock this morning,
and the hearing was adjourned
to 2:30 this afternoon
Chief Justice Sir Gordon
Bryce and Mr. Justice James
Smith, presiding at the
hearings, were expected to
hand down their decision on
the question of jurisdiction
when court resumed this
afternoon.
FIRST CHILD
A SON was born to the wife
of Mr. Michael Lightbourn,
representative for Clarence
Town, at the Princess Margaret
Hospital yesterday.
This is the couple's first
child.


BOLAM chief gives $1,000



to Red Cross'quake fund

THE BANK OF LONDON AND MONTREAL (BOLAM) gave


their full support today to the
appeal for funds to assist the
Nicaraguan earthquake.
General manager Michael
Young, on behalf of
BOMALM, this morning
delivered a cheque tor $1,000
to Red Cross headquarters.
"This is a very worthwhile
cause," Mr. Young said, "and
we will do anything that we
can to help."
The donation to the local
Red Cross is only a small part
of a larger general fund being
organized in London by
BOLAM's parent bank, Lloyds
& BOLSA International.
In addition, BOLAM's staff
are organizing a fund for their
own staff who suffered in the
Managua quake.
LOAN
BOLAM has also offered the
Nicaraguan government a $2
million loan through its
Central Bank to assist in the
rehabilitation of the country's
banking system.
Special permits were
obtained for two of BOLAM's
staff to fly by way of Costa
Rica to Managua to get a first
hand report and to assist their
staff there.
Mr. A. B. Buchanan,
manager of BOLAM's
international department, and
Mr. Peter Turner,
administration manager, left
for managua on Monday and
have -reported that of the
bank's 77 staff members all but
two are accounted for. They
have not established whether
these two members, both
Managuans, have been killed or
whether they are alive, but
missing.
Aerial photographs taken
shortly after the disaster
established that the Bank of
London and Montreal building
was one of the few buildings
standing in Managua.
It is understood, however,
that under a government order
this building will have to be
demolished as part of
government's clean-up
programme. Ninety percent of
the city of Managua was
destroyed, with an estimated
6,000 persons dead.
While in Managua Mr.
Buchanan and Mr. Turner will
try to rehabilitate BOLAM's
banking operations there. Mr.
Young said that fortunately
the bank had agencies outside
the city of Managua that were
now being used to revive
banking operations in
Nicaragua.
GENEROUS
The League of Red Cross
Societies has announced that
the appeal launched by the
League on December 24 for
immediate aid to the victims
has been "generously
responded" to by national
societies.
Twenty-five national
societies Australia, Austria,
Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Costa
Rica, Denmark, Finland,
France, Germany (Fed. Rep.),
'Guatemala, Iceland, Iran,
Ireland, Italy; Japan, Mexico.
Netherlands, New Zealand,
Peru, Spain, Sudan,
Switzerland, the United
Kingdom and the U.S.A. --


Bahamas Red Cross Society's
victims of the December 23

have already in a de
contributions is cash and kind.
"Medicaments, plasma,
foodstuffs, tents, blankets,
layettes and other items of
prime necessity have been sent
by the fastest means to the
disaster area," a release froni
the League said.
"Red Cross rescue teams and
medical personnel are working
without respite day and night
under extremely difficult
conditions to save human
lives, give medical care to the
injured and sick, prevent
epidemics, evacuate as large a
number of people as possible
and distribute water and food.
The Nicaraguan Red Cross has
set up an emergency tent city
giving shelter to 1,500 families.
"Communications with
Managua are still very
difficult," the League's release
said. "Three League liaison
officers are working in close
cooperation with the
Nicaraguan Red Cross, the
authorities and neighboring
counties, to coordinate the
international relief action on
the spot.
"In a circular being sent to
its member Societies, the
League recommends that
efforts be concentrated on
fund raising in order to speed
up assistance in a region where
all the normal infrastructures
have been destroyed", the
release said.
TWO YEARS
In an Associated Press report
today from Managua,
Nicaragua, former president
Anastasio Somoza said that
60,000 homes were destroyed
in the quake. To clean up the
city will be a two-year effort,
he said
An estimate of the total
damage caused by the quake
was put at one billion dollars
by Somoza.
Somoza, who heads the
National Guard and the
National Emergency
Committee. said that the
damage estimate was concurred
by Maurice Williams, President
Nixon's special envoy sent to
coordinate U.S. emergency aid
for Nicaragua.
Williams, said Somoza,
would meet with U.S. and
Central American bankers this
week to obtain maximum
economic aid for Nicaragua.
"It is urgent that we have
more help," said Somoza at a
press conference. 'The gross
national product dropped 40
per cent in 1972 because of a
drought and we will have to
import foodstuffs until the end
of 1973 that is if we have
sufficient rain."
He estimated that besides
the aid that has poured in from
many countries around the
world, Nicaragua would have
to import about 80 million
dollars worth of food this year.
SEWING PARTY
MEMBERS of the Queen
Mary s London and Bahamas
Needle-work Guild will hold a
sewing party at Government
House on Monday, January 8,
at 4 p.m.


a submission that the Elections
matter.
Mr. Dupuch, who appears
with his junior, attorney
Bradley C('allender, for Mr.
Fountain in the Election Court
hearings which opened
Wednesday morning, spent
several hours yesterday
aft ernoon rebutting the
arguments of Jamaican Q.C.
Vivien Blake. Mr. Blake
represents the PLP's Phihip
Smith, who was declared the
winner of the election
following a fresh poll oni
Oct ober 6.
Mr. Blake contended that as
Returning Officer Livingston
Smith declared, rightly or
wrongly, that the Sept. 19
balloting was void in view of an
apparent equality of regular
votes for both candidates, Mr.
Fountain had no recourse to
the Election Court under the
1969 Representation of the
People Act, and the Court had
no jurisdiction to hear the case.
lie held that "no election
petition can be presented
before someone has been
returned as representative. Ihei
petition must be presented
after the production of the
writ (of election) and the writ
can only be produced after
return has been made. In the
case of a void election these
conditions cannot be
satisfied," as no writ can be
produced in respect of a void
election in which no one is
declared the winner.
Mr. Dupuch in his reply
agreed that "in order to
petition this court there must
be an election and there must
he a candidate declared
elected. I have no quarrel with
that: that is exactly what
happened.
TWO POLLS
"But my learned friend Mr.
Blake has dealt with two polls
as two elections.
"There was a general
election on Sept. 19," Mr.
Dupuch said "One seat in issue
was North End Long Island. A
poll was held on Sept. 19 and
then the Returning Officer was
obliged to declare the election
void because he found, rightly
or wrongly, that there was an


-f


Libby Available
Libby at
ubbyor your Favourite

LObbg" Food Store


NASSAU ONLY


Sihe


I











Uhbtr Uribunt


Thursday, January 4,1973.


PEACE TALKS RESUME TODAY UGANDANS TO


93RD. CONGRESS OPENS


ANTI-NARKETEE


N. Vietnam stresses


US. COMMAND ADMITS LOSS OF SECOND Fill 1
SAIGON, Jan. 4 (AP)-Communist forces made more than o100 attacks
across South Vietnam Wednesday and Thursday, and the U.S. command
belatedly announced the loss of another $15 million 1 I I fighter-bomber
over North Vietnam nearly two weeks ago.
It was the second of the swing-wing FI Is the Command has admitted
losing in the two-week blitz on the Hanoi and Haiphong areas and the 29th
aircraft acknowledged lost in operations against North Vietnam since Dec.
I&. A total of 97 American airmen are missing, killed or captured in these
crashes.
The Command said the FI I 1 was downed west of Hanoi on Dec. 22.


MORE THAN 1000 SORTIES OVER N. VIET IN TEN DAYS
TOKYO, JAN. 4 (AP)-North Vietnam announced Thursday that
preliminary figures showed 1.,318 persons were killed by BS52 bombing
raids on Hanoi and added that it had found no sign the United States is
ready to renounce further 'aggression.'
A communique of a special Hanoi investigating committee said that in
the 10 days between Dec. 18 and Dec. 29 American planes made more
than 1,000 sorties, among them 500 BS52 attacks against the North
Vietnamese capital. It said there had been 2,579 dead and wounded under
the rain of 40,000 tons of bombs v'hich devastated densely populated
areas.
Economic, educational, social and cultural establishments were razed in
353 places, it said. Some areas were hit as many as 10 times, it added.
The workers quarter of An Duong was totally exterminated on Dec. 21
by 600 bombs from the huge BS52 bombers, asserted the communique,
distributed by Hanoi's Vietnam press monitored in Tokyo.

PROTESTANTS ARRAIGNED FOR KILLING CATHOLICS
BELFAST, JAN. 4 (AP).-British troops came under fire in Anroma
Catholic district of Belfast, but the only casualty was a householder who
kept turning on lights to aid the snipers.
The army said the man turned on an outside light Wednesday night as
the soldiers were fired at in the Ardoyne area. A soldier smashed the light
with his rifle butt, a spokesman said, but "the man went back into the
house, leaving his door open and an inside light on. "The security forces
were fired on again, and the man was hit in the back. The soldiers did not
fire at all," an army spokesman said.
Police said the man's condition was serious.
Meanwhile, three Protestants from east Belfast appeared in court
Wednesday on charges of killing three Catholics last summer. They were
the first to be taken before a court on such charges since the British
government set up a special army-police task force to track down the
murder squads that have taken 82 Catholic and 40 Protestant lives.
Eight other men will appear in court in the next few weeks on similar
charges.
HIGHEST AMERICAN CASUALTIES IN TWO YEARS
SAIGON, JAN. 4 (AP)--The U.S. Command today announced the loss of
another BS2 heavy bomber and another FI I I fighter-bomber in the air war
against North Vietnam. It also reported that the recent air blitz on Hanoi
and Haiphong pushed the total number of Americans killed, missing or
captured during the last two weeks of 1972 to 109, the greatest number of
American war casualties in two years.
The South Vietnamese Command reported 116 enemy attacks across the
country during the past 24 hours, including 82 rocket and mortar attacks.
It was the highest 24-hour total in two months; but most, apparently, were
small. First reports from the Saigon Command said four civilians were
killed and 43 wounded; no American casualties were reported.
IRAQI-TRAINED SABOTEURS EXECUTED
TEHRAN, JAN. 4 (AP)-Five Iraqi-trained saboteurs were executed by
firing squad Thursday for planting bombs in public places, a government
communique announced. It said the five were caught trying to put a bomb
In a gas station at Sannandej, 70 miles from the Iraqi border, where the
executions took place.
They admitted at their trial they were trained in camps in Iraq, it added.
One said he went to Iraq because he was wanted in Iran for the murder of a
woman.
More than a hundred leftist terrorists have been executed or killed in
shootouts in the past two years. A government spokesman said urban
guerrilla activity has now been virtually eliminated except near the Iraqi
border.
WALDHEIM MAY VISIT ISRAEL
TEL AVIV, Jan. 3 (AP)-U.N. Secretary General Kurt Waldheim has
Informed Israel he is prepared to visit the Middle East if it would help
promote a peace settlement between Israel and the Arabs, the state radio
reported Wednesday.
Waldheim made the offer recently to Israel's Ambassador to the United
Nations, Yosef Tekoah, the radio said.


ROYAL ROMANCE STILL SUBJECT FOR SPECULATION
LONDON (AP)-Britain is buzzing about rumours of a romance between
Princess Anne and Olympic horseman Mark Phillips, since the news spread
that he had spent the New Year's weekend with the royal family at their
Sandringham estate.
According to the London "daily Mirror," friends are predicting an
engagement soon between Queen Elizabeth's 22-year-old daughter and the
24-year-old lieutenant in the Queen's Dragoon Guards.
Phillips has been a frequent companion of the Princess, but his weekend
at the royal estate in Norfolk was his first official invite into the family
circle. Informed sources say his invitation was sent personally by the
Queen.
While at Sandringham, Phillips went shooting with Anne's father, Prince
Philip, and her older brother, Prince Charles, heir to the throne.
Phillips, who was a member of Britain's gold medal equestrian team at
the Munich Olympics, has denied several times than an engagement is in
the offing. However, he's due to go with his regiment to Germany next
month, and friends are speculating that an engagement could be announced
before he leaves.

U.S. SAILOR ACCIDENTLY SHOT IN HEAD
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, Jan. 2 (AP)-An American sailor was shot in
the head aboard the Polaris submarine depot ship Canopous at the Holy
Loch naval base early Tuesday, the U.S. navy reported.
The wounded seaman Robert J. O'Leary, 23, was described as in "fairly
satisfactory" condition at Glasgow's General Hospital.
The Canopous' communications officer, Commander Mark Byrd, told
the Associated Press the shooting was "purely accidental". O'Leary was
being shown a .45 pistol by a shipmate when it went off accidentally, he
reported.
The Canopous' Commander, Capt. Walter Brooks, later ordered an
investigation.


Electrophoni/Garrard


A4nm e unit incdbuilt-in 8-TRACK stero tape,


A5im ,a -c1a S 'e^h5a.w ^ *
nc AM/FM FM 4m uk iilradio-..h




&M% m ... b As

BsMhenlmvss ,, s Mw.d.Aasee M .

ra ~ nd a sa through a a









SBESCOL

SHIRLEY STREET, EAST PHONE 2-2143


indivisibilityy' of


N. and S. Vietnam

By Paul Treuthardt

PARIS (AP)- North Vietnam stressed twice on Wednesday
that recognition of North and South Vietnam as one nation is the
key to the peace agreement sought in secret and semi-public talks
set to resume here in a climate of continuing conflict.


The point was expected to
be hammered home again
Thursday at the 172nd session
of the semi-public four power
meetings, suspended for three
weeks during the bombing of
North Vietnam.


N.VIETS DOUBLE

THEIR ATTACKS,

U.S. INTENSIFY

THEIR AIR STRIKES
SAIGON (AP)- North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces
doubled their ground attacks
Wednesday to the highest number
.n nearly a month as American
bombers kept up their pounding of
the North Vietnamese panhandle.
The South Vietnamese military
command reported 81
enemy-initiated incidents during
the 24-hour period ending at dawn
Wednesday. In the most serious, an
enemy mine damaged a bridge on
highway 4 about five miles
southwest of Can Tho along the
rout linking Saigon with the
food-producing Mekong Delta.
Most of the attacks were indirect
fire attacks such as shelling or
mortar barrages, the command said.
The attacks came as envoys in Paris
prepared for another major round
of peace talks.
U.S. B52s and smaller
fighter-bombers flew more than
120 strikes Thursday and
Wednesday in South Vietnam and
the southern section of North
Vietnam below the 20th parallel,
the U.S. command reported.
Announcement of a new loss
brought to 95 the number of
airmen killed, captured or missing,
and to 28 the number of airplanes
acknowledged lost in less than three
weeks.
The latest warplane loss
acknowledged by the U.S.
Command was a marine corps A6
Intruder fighter-bomber, which
crashed as the result of "unknown
causes" while on a mission over
North Vietnam last Thursday.
The command would not say
where the plane went down, but
bther sources said it crashed
somewhere below the 20th parallel
and the two crewmen were missing.
HEAVIEST AIR BLITZ
The loss of the plane, announced
in a delayed report, came during
the heaviest American air and naval
bombardment of the war against
North Vietnam, a blitz that was
stopped by President Nixon on
Saturday.
Ending the raids above the 20th
parallel against Hanoi and haiphong
is linked with the resumption of the
Paris peace Talks. But raids south
of that line and in South Vietnam
are continuing.
For the first time since the
massive air campaign was launched
over the north on Dec. I8, the U.S.
Command reported the number of
raids on a daily basis.
A command spokesman said
fighter-bombers flew 84 strikes in
North Vietnam's southern
panhandle during the 19-hour
period ending at daybreak
Wednesday. BS2 bombers flew 40
strikes during the same period, he
reported.
Assessing the bomb damage was
impossible, the command said.
because of overcast skies.
The BS2s penetrated as far north
as Vinh, the command said, just
above the city's port area about
145 miles north of the
demilitarized zone. The
no-bombing line at the 20th parallel
is about 75 miles south of Hanoi,
the capital and 60 miles south of
Haiphong, North Vietnam's chief
port.
The B52s also hit supply routes
leading into the Mu Gia and Ban
Karal passes, which lead to the Ho
Chi Minh network of supply trails
in Laos.
The command also reported that
fighter-bombers flew 229 strikes
across South Vietnam during the
24-hour period ending at 8 a.m.
Saigon time Wednesday, about half
of them against North
Vietnamese positions just below the
demilitarized zone. In addition, the
command said, American BS2s flew
105 strikes in the south during a
38-hour period ending at the same
time. The strikes ranged from the
northern area just below the
Demilitarzied Zone to the Mekong
Delta in the south of the country.
As the war ground on,
preparations for resumption of the
peace talks in Paris continued.
Peking's official Hainhua news
agency reported, that North
Vietnamese negotiator Let Duc Tho
stopped in Peking on his way to the
talks, scheduled to reopen Monday.
Tho had "a very cordial and
friendly conversation" with Premier
Chou en-Lai and Chang Chun-Chio,
described as a top-ranking member
of the Chinese Politburo. No details
were given.
In announcing Tho's departure
earlier Wednesday Radio Hanoi sid
"whether the negotiations will
attain any success and if the peace
will be returned in Vietnam at an
early date, or If the war is still


prolonged, completely depends on
the U.S. side."
Enemy forces In Cambodia
grabbed another government
outpost near Phnom Penh, the third
in two days. Fighting that broke
out as they attacked government
soldiers in half a dozen other towns
drove villagers and farmers from
their homes.
The refugees, leading children
and farm animals, formed a column
that stretched 10 miles northward
from Tram Phar. a provincial
capital under attack


North Vietnam and the Viet
Cong only Wednesday gave a
firm agreement to the
resumption of the semi-public
talks. They walked out of the
Dec. 21 session protesting the
bombing and the allied side
rejected their proposal of a
Dec. 28 session.
U.S. and Hanoi experts met
again in secret session
Wednesday working on
annexes to an eventual
cease-fire agreement. In a
6-hour, 50-minute session, the
longest since the secret talks
were first announced, the
technical experts reportedly
considered cease-fire
supervision arrangements.
The supervision issue is one
of the stumbling blocks the
United States said have
emerged since the October
cease-fire draft was put
together in secret talks.
They meet again Thursday.
But the major issue, which
appears to turn around the
sovereignty of South Vietnam,
was left for Henry A. Kissinger
and Hanoi's Le Duc Tho when
they resume their secret
negotiations Monday.
Tho was reported in Peking
on his way back from Hanoi,
with a second stop scheduled
in Moscow. Kissinger, President
Nixon's top foreign policy
aide, was expected in Paris on
Sunday after intensive talks
with the President in
Washington.
ONE STATE
Both Hanoi's official
Vietnam news agency and its
peace talks delegation in Paris
took pains to stress the
indivisibility of Vietnam.
"It is a universally
recognized fact that the
Vietnamese nation is one and
Vietnam is one," the agency
said.
The Paris delegation
maintained the United States
had already agreed as point 1
of the draft prepared by
Kissinger and Tho last October
that "the United States
respects the independence,
sovereignty, unity and territorial
integrity of Vietnam, provided
for by the 1954 Geneva
agreements."
"We do not cease to demand
the respect by the United
States of their engagements,
principles, contents and text of
the agreement already
considered by the American
side as concluded since Oct.
20, 1972," the delegation said.
U.S. ambassador William J.
Porter, the fifth chief U.S.
negotiator since the
semi-public four power talks
started Jan. 25, 1969 paid a
farewell courtesy call on
French Premier Pierre
Messmer.
Porter was expected to lead
the delegation for the final
time at the Hotel Majestic talks
Thursday.
Porter shortly is heading for
Washington to take up a new
job as undersecretary of state
for political affairs.
Across the table Thursday
will be second-ranking
Communist negotiators,
Nguyen Minh Vy, sitting in for
Hanoi's Xuan Thuy and Dinh
Ba Thi for the Viet Cong's
Nguyen Thi Binh, last reported
in Peking.
CONDEMNATION
South Vietnamese officials
would not say if their
delegation head Pham Dang
Lam would attend the
Thursday meeting -
Porter was expected to hear
further North Vietnamese
condemnation on the bombing
of Hanoi and Haiphong. North
Vietnam's delegation qualified
as "lies" Pentagon statements
that Bach Mai Hospital in
Hanoi was hit "accidentally"
or by falling North Vietnamese
antiaircraft projectiles.
It said the hospital had been
hit by B52 raids on Dec. 19
and 22, and that the
installation, "one of the biggest
health units in North


Vietnam," had been
"completely flattened." The
delegation charged that the
bombs killed doctors, nurses or
medical students, and two
children, and destroyed a stock
of serum and blood plasma and
a large quantity of medicines.
"Many diplomats, journalists
and foreign visitors, including
Americans, went to the spot
and witnessed these new crimes
of the administration," it said.


TAKEOVER 500 Demos call for an


BRITISH FIRMS immediate end


KAMPALA, UGANDA,
JAN. 4 (AP)-President Idi
Amin announced, Thursday
500 British companies will be
handed over to Ugandans.
In an announcement to the
nation through Radio Uganda,
Amin also said he will shortly
nominate a new High
Commissioner to London.
Amin told acting British
high commissioner Henry
Brind that another 94 British
firms are to remain under
British ownership.
According to the radio,
Amin said that "90 per cent of
the companies would be
handed to Ugandans and that
the remainder would be the
property of the British.
"These number about 94
companies, while about 500
will be taken over by
Ugandans," he said.
Amin said a list of the
companies affected would be
issued by the Cabinet
committee on British affairs,
adding that they will "not be
taken over in a hurry."
'MINOR INCIDENT'
He described the takeovers
as "a minor incident which
should not spoil the relations
between Uganda and Britain."
The radio did not say how
the takeovers would be
effected, but usually
well-informed sources said the
companies concerned will not
have their trading licences
renewed for the current year.
Their owners will then have
to sell out to Ugandans in the
private sector.
Brind reserved the British
government's position on the
takeovers. He added that
Britain would expect full
compensation to be paid.
The last Ugandan high
commissioner in London,
Lieutenant Col. Samuel
Lukakamwa, was recalled in
October after Amin had
ordered the British high
commissioner here, Richard
Slater, to leave Uganda with
the last of the expelled
non-citizen Asians.
STILL 'BEST FRIENDS'
"Since Uganda is not going
to leave the Commonwealth",
Amin said, "and since the
Queen is head of the
Commonwealth, it is essential
that Uganda maintain people at
her High Commission to look
after Uganda's interests in
Britain."
He added that he would
replace most of the present
staff of the High Commission
with Ugandans who were
familiar with recent economic
changes here.
The takeover of 34
British-owned farms and
companies two weeks ago was
not anti-British, Amin said. On
the contrary, the people of
Britain were still his "best
friends".
"Putting the economy of
Uganda into the hands of the
country's nationals should not
be allowed to mar the good
relations that have existed
between the two countries," he
said.


THALIDOMIDE

COMPENSATION

ROW GROWING

LONDON, JAN. 4 (AP)-The
Distillers Company, which
manufactured thalidomide in
Britain, Thursday agreed to
meet powerful institutional
shareholders to discuss a row
over compensation for 340
children deformed by the drug.
The move came as the
Prudential Assurance
Company, Distillers' biggest
shareholder with 22 million
dollars worth of stock ,
expressed public dissatisfaction
with the current compensation
terms.
A Distillers spokesman said
the meeting would be held in
secret Thursday and would
probably be followed by a
statement.
At the same time a father
campaigning to win
compensation for the children
flew to Washington to seek
help from American consumer
crusader Ralph Nader and U.S.
Senator Edward Kennedy.
,Nader has offered to
organize a boycott in the
United States of the products
of the Distillers Company,
British manufacturers of the
drug, unless it offers
compensation acceptable to
the victims.
David Mason, whose
10-year-old daughter Louise is
a thalidomide victim, said
before flying out: "I have
massive confidence in what Mr.
Nader can do in the United
States."


to Vietnam conflict

By Carl P. Leubsdorf
WASHINGTON (AP) The Democratic controlled 93rd
Congress opened Wednesday with Senate Democrats unanimously
endorsing their leader's call for an immediate end to U.S.
involvement in Indochina while ".Republicans gave split-decision
support to President Nixon's peace efforts.


With families and staff
members packing the galleries
to watch, both Senate and
House went through the
opening day rituals, swearing in
new members and electing
their leaders.
Vice President Spiro T.
Agnew presided over the
Senate, while Pat Jennings, its
clerk, led the House until Carl
Albert was formally re-elected
for another two years as
Speaker.
The major action of
the day came earlier.
Senate Democrats, putting
aside until at least Thursday a
series of policy proposals on
the war and other issues,
endorsed the lengthy statement
delivered to them by Sen. Mike
Mansfield of Montana, elected
for an unprecedented seventh
two-year term as majority
leader.
It declares "There is no
greater national need than the
termination, forthwith, of our
involvement in the war in
Vietnam," and urges that
Senators take whatever steps
are necessary "to bring about
complete disinvolvement."
GOP FOR NIXON
Republications, meanwhile,
voted 16 to 10 in favour of a
resolution by Sen. Charles
Percy of Illinois that expresses
full support for Nixon's efforts
"to end the tragic conflict in
Indochina now through a
negotiated settlement."
Sen. Norris Cotton of New
Hampshire, the new chairman
of the GOP conference, said he
and others opposed Percy's
proposal because they thought
action was too hurried.
Cotton won his post
unanimously when his only
rival, Sen. Wallace Bennett of
Utah, dropped out and
accepted the conference
secretary's spot.
In GOP contests, two
Southern Conservatives, Sen.
John G. Tower of Texas and


William E. Brock of Tennessee,
were elected to chair the
party's policy committee and
campaign committee.
Republican leader Hugh
Scott of Pennsylvania and
assistant leader Robert P.
Griffin of Michigan were
re-elected.
NEW MEMBERS
Two of the Senators first
elected last November, Sam
Nunn of Georgia and J.
Bennett Johnston of Louisiana,
took their seats right after the
election.
Those being sworn in for the
first time included Democrats
Dick Clark of Iowa, Floyd V.
Haskell of Colorado, William
Hathaway of Maine, Walter
Dee Huddleston of Kentucky
and James Abourezk of South
Dakota.
New Republicans include
Jessee Helms of North
Carolina, James McClure of
Idaho, Peter Domenici of New
Mexico, Dewey Bartlett of
Oklahoma and William L. Scott
of Virginia.
Sen.-elect Joseph R. Biden
Jr., (D-Del.) who will be the
youngest Senator, will be
sworn in Friday at a
Wilmington Hospital where
two young sons are recovering
from injuries sustained in an
auto accident that killed his
wife and 13-month-old
daughter.
WHITE HOUSE WARNING
ON CONGRESS MOVE
WASHINGTON (AP) The
White House cautioned today
that Congressional moves to cut off
funds for the war in Vietnam could
prolong peace negotiations. White
House news secretary Ronald
Ziegler said: "The President must
proceed with negotiations and
policies in Vietnam which he
considers right."
President Nixon had a breakfast
meeting with House Speaker Carl
Albert today in an apparent
effort to block Congressional
anti-war legislation.
The White House news secretary
would not say how long peace
negotiations in Paris might last.


SUPPLY THE GOOD THINGS OF THIS
WORLD TO THE SHOPS AND STORES OF
THE BAHAMAS AND EARN EXTRA
INCOME.
May we send you (free of charge) a 16 page booklet that
shows how you can supply the shops and stores with
foodstuffs, wines, radios, television sets, cosmetics,
clothing, textiles, motor cycles, stationery, etc. etc. by
starting your own Export-Import Agency (In sparetime
or full). No Investment, no licences needed.
A WADE (CONSULTANTS) LTD.
Dpt/5, Rylstone, Holdershill Crescent, London NW4 INB


BOO QUEEN AT


OPERA HOUSE
LONDON (AP)- A booing and
chanting crowd greeted Queen
Elizabeth II and other honoured
guests Wednesday night at the
Covent Garden opera house when
they arrived for the opening of
"Fanfare for Europe."
It is the official festival marking
Britain's entry into the Common
Market.
Stink bombs were thrown as
about 200 anti-marketeers were
kept back by police.
Traffic was checked on all soads
approaching the opera house.
The Fanfare, a lavish spectacular
gala performance before what was
described as "an unprecedented
number of distinguished guests,"
began 11 days of official
celebrations to mark the
enlargement of the European
Economic Community.
Diplomats from the Common
Market countries and
Commonwealth members, as well as
top British dignataries, heard the
shouting as they entered the foyer.
As Prime Minister Edward Heath
greeted the Queen the crowd
chanted "Heath out."
Demonstrators carried placards
condemning Britain's entry into the
market. There were no reports of
violence.
As the doors closed behind the
Queen, the shouting subsided.
Inside the opera house, the
auditorium and grand staircase were
decorated with an estimated 10
million flowers. Fairy lights
adorned the balconies.
The British government set aside
350,000 pounds 820,000 dollars
for the evening's lush
celebrations.
More than 200 opera singers,
state trumpeters, the full opera
house orchestra and top stage
personalities were participating in
the event.
SENATOR WANTS 'MASSIVE
BOMBING' EXPLANATION


WASHINGTON (AP) A key
Senate Democratic supporter of
administration Vietnam war
policies called today for an
explanation of the recent "massive
bombing" of North Vietnam.
Sen. Henry M. Jackson,
(D-Wash.) said the lack of a public
status report by the President on
peace negotiations fanned the
current "End-the-war" fervour in
Congress.
President Nixon would have been
in a stronger position with Congress
if the bombing decision had been
explained, Jackson told newsmen.
"It has serious Implications for the
next four years," he said, adding
that it is the "wrong way" to start a
second term.
House Democrats voted in
caucus Tuesday to support a fund
cut-off for the Vietnam War if a
peace settlement is not achieved
promptly.




McAllistMr Hotel
DOWNTOWN MIAMI



Mmlii hltu
I|PINl
NIIIII Ill1ll1


Single
Double
Triple
Quadruple


$ 9
$11
$13
$16


Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


E~~El


DISTRIBUTED IN THE BAHAMAS BY


Letel Iobertson & C o. '4 5


0 Alk &Ab---





Shr (ritbunt


Ubl Wribmunt
NuXJus ADDICTUs JURABE IN VERBA MAGISTI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G.,D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Ediror 1917-1972
Contribution Editor 1972. -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972. -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768


Thursday, January 4, 1973.


EDITORIAL

Ripeness is all


W *TELEGRAPH QUOTES WATKINS SAYING:
Minority parties in House willnow Wewlshdb

i .W 8 W will shed blood


be eligible for seats in Senate

THE SENATE, as constituted after independence, will allow for representation of a minority party with
reasonable representation in the House of Assembly but not sufficient to be the official opposition


P
P
n

h
r
ta
a
a
d



c
a
a
a
t


t


I


This was made clear by
rime Minister Lynden
indling in his address to the
ation New Year's Day.
The Prime Minister's
alf-hour talk outlined the
results of the constitutional
alks in London last month,
nd pointed out the various
reas on which there was
discussion.
As at present, the Senate
ill consist of nine government
members appointed by the
Governor General on the
advice of the Prime Minister
nd four Opposition members
appointed by the Governor on
he advice of the leader.
In addition a further three
members will be appointed by
;he Governor General on the
advice of the Prime Minister
after consultation with the
Leader of the Opposition.
BALANCE
Said Mr. Pindling: "The
appointment of these last three
members will be made with the
purpose of securing that the
political balance of the Senate
reflects that of the House of
Assembly at the time.
"This formula allows for
representation in the Senate of
a minority party with
reasonable representation in
the House but not sufficient to
be the official opposition, and
it eliminates the so-called
"independent senator."
Mr. Pindling explained that
the House of Assembly will
initially consist of 38 members
as at present, but this number
may be increased by an Order
approved by the House
following a recommendation
from the Constituencies
Commission.
He said that if the number
of members is increased the
quorum in the House will be
adjusted accordingly.
The Constituencies
Commission will replace the
existing Boundaries
Commission and will, at
intervals of not more than five
years, review the number as
well as the boundaries of the
constituencies into which the
Bahamas is divided.
If necessary, it will make
recommendations to the
Governor General.
APPROVAL
Orders giving effect to such
recommendations will require
the approval in draft by the
House of Assembly.
The Prime Minister said
Parliament may make provision


for a right to challenge in the
Supreme Court the
recommendations of the
Commission on the grounds
that the Commission had
departed from the principles
laid down by the constitution
for such a review.
Under terms of the
independence constitution,
Parliament will be prorogued


or dissolved by the Governor
General on the advice of the
Prime Minister, provided that if
the Prime Minister has lost the
support of the majority of
members of the House of
Assembly the Governor
General will dissolve
Parliament if no successor can
otherwise be found.
In any event, Parliament will


not continue for more than
five years from the date of its
first sitting after any
dissolution.
In times of war however, the
Prime Minister said, Parliament
itself may extend its life for a
period of not more than 12
months at a time, but only up
to a maximum of two years.


'Useful safeguard' for legislators


ANY MEMBER of the
Legislature may appeal to the
Supreme Court if it is
discovered that he has an
interest in a government
contract but has not disclosed
this fact and been exempted
from vacating his seat.
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling, discussing the
implications of the country's


new constitution, said that no
person will be qualified to
remain a senator or a member
of the House if he knowingly
becomes interested in any
government contract, unless he
has disclosed such interest and
been exempted from
disqualification by either
chamber.
If however, he is not so


'Unduly high' company



fee criticized in



new tax haven survey


THE FEE OF $260 now being imposed annually on all
Bahamian registered companies has been criticized in a recently
published tax haven survey as "unduly high", particularly since
the Bahamas gives no long-term guarantees against future taxes.


The booklet, published by
Manacon Services Ltd., is
written by tax expert Marshall
J. Langer, and listed as a "1973
Survey of Foreign Tax
Havens."
Mr. Langer, who is
well-known here, says that
despite controversy during the
past few years, the Bahamas
still remains one of the best
known tax havens in the world.
"It probably has the largest
volume of tax haven business
in the Caribbean. Many of its
thousands of companies and
trusts came to the Bahamas at
a time when it was the major
Caribbean tax haven actively
seeking such business," Mr.
Langer says.
Pointing to this country's
advantageous airline proximity
to Europe and North and
South America, he however
cites the government's
immigration policy towards


By ETIENNE DUPUCH a
AS THE END of the year approached the Bahamas lost some'
of its most valuable citizens ... men and women who made a
definite and an unselfish contribution to an era in the history of,
the islands that is fast going into eclipse.
It started with the sudden passing of Mrs. P. M. Lightbourn,
followed by Mrs. T. A. Toote and Mr. W. B. Johnson. Finally Mr.
Elgin W. Forsyth left us.
All these people had passed the life span accorded to man of
threescore years and ten. The three first were in thoir qeventies.
Mr. Forsyth was approaching his century. I felt he would make I
his century but he lost interest in life when his hearing and sight'
failed and he was no longer able to communicate with his friends
Communication was important to Mr. Forsyth. He was a man
,with a remarkable brain and so he was unable to live in a blank
world.
Up to the time he lost his sight a couple of years ago he read
for at least 18 hours a day ... he also found time for long intervals
with people who wanted information on unrecorded information
out of the past. He was an unfailing source of information on
events stretching far beyond his life span.
The last in a long line of distinguished Bahamians he was the
custodian of information that had been passed down from
generation to generation.
I am sure that many fine people died in the Bahamas during
the period of which I write. But I can write about the four people
mentioned in this article because of a lifelong association with
them Our lines crossed and recrossed many times during the last
half century ... and on each occasion they were concerned with
unselfish public service. This fact is particularly interesting
because all these people were drawn from a different social level
in the colony. But they had a common interest ... service to
humanity.
I have already written an appreciation of Mrs. Lightbourn, Mrs.
Toote and W. B. Johnson. An item I overlooked in writing about
7-Mrs. Lightbourn was that she was a talented artist. One of my
valued possessions is a landscape she did specially for me a couple
jp f years ago. It is a seagrape beach scene along the western
foreshore near the Caves.
The story of the Forsyth family is concerned principally with
service among people in the Out Islands. They were originally
connected with Rum Cay. The family house is at that island.
Some of them must have been early parishioners of St.
Matthew's Church. the oldest Anglican church in the Bahamas.
The family plot is outside the northern door of this church. It is
the only burial spot on the northern side of the church right up
against the wall of the building. The last time this plot was
opened was for the burial of Mrs. William Aranha who was a
Forsyth.
But Mr. Forsyth's father transferred his affection to Andros.
He gave most of his life to the service of the people of Andros as
their Commissioner. And when he died his son, Elgin, of whom I
now write, took up where he left off.
There is a small church in the settlement of Mangrove Cay and
the senior Forsyth built a house there which came to be regarded
as the family homestead. In the neat little burial ground at this
church lie his parents and his wife. It had always been his wish
that he should join them there.
And so, when his health finally failed and he began fading fast,
he was moved to the house at Mangrove Cay where he was taken
care of by the people of the settlement who had looked up to
him as a father.
This is a relationship that belonged to a period that has passed
in the life of the Bahamas. People like Mr. Forsyth gave their lives
to service in areas where their help was most needed. They
became a father to a neglected people who leaned on them for
help and guidance. They never failed these people. Their only
reward was a simple devotion and a quality of love that has no
price.
Although Mr. Forsyth had lived quietly in Nassau for many
years he never lost touch with his people in Andros. Because he
knew that he had never lost his place in the hearts of these
people, in the end, he returned to them ... and, as he had never
failed them in life, they didn't fail him in his passing hours.
Gentle and loving hands cared for him in his last illness and in
death old people came from distant places in the island to pay
their last respects to a man who had been a father to them during
their years of greatest need.
I valued Mr. Forsyth for many years. He was very valuable and
useful to me in my work because I could always turn to him for
information when all other sources failed. He was also a person to
whom I could always refer my newspaper friends from abroad
who wanted to get an honest "feel" of the Bahamas and its
people. But, most of all, I valued his friendship because he always
stood firmly behind me during the years when I was battling for
long-overdue reforms in the colony'
He was one of the very few people in his group who
understood what I was trying to do. Because he was near to the
heart of the people, he had his fingers on their pulse and he
understood ... as I did ... that if the Old Guard failed to lead
reform the human movement would over-run them and produce
the chaotic state which now faces the Bahamian people.
Like all the early settlers in tae colony Mr. Forsyth's life was
Connected with the sea. He had a love of boats and an
understanding of the moods of the sea that is an attribute of all
great sailors.
In retirement his time was devoted to building boats. He lived
by the seaside and way into his eighties he was daily on the
waterfront designing or building boats. He was engaged in
building a boat which he planned to sail alone on a long voyage
through the Caribbean when he slipped on a mossy rock near the
waterline and suffered an injury to his hip that slowed him up. He
never made that trip but it was a long time after the accident
before he stopped talking about it and planning the course he
would follow on this last great voyage of his life. When he
Stopped talking about it his friends realized that he was beginning
o surrender his great spirit to the slow but unfailing inroads of
time"


qualified foreigners as a "minus
factor."'
ARCHAIC
Mr. Langer describes the
Bahamas Companies Act as
more than 100 years old and
"archaic."
In addition, "the distinct tax
haven status of Freepoort has
been tarnished since the
immigration controversy, and
some investors feel that if the
government can abrogate
concessions relating to
immigration, it might later do
the same to tax concessions.
Continues Mr. Langer:
"Despite assurances to the
contrary by government
officials, there is fear among
some offshore investors that
foreign currency deposits such
as those in U.S. dollars
maintained by non-residents of
the Bahamas might similarly be
converted automatically into
Bahamian dollars, that this
could be followed by a
devaluation of the Bahamian
dollar."'
This is a reference to the
Monetary Authority's decision,
following a "float" of the
pound, to atuomatically
convert into Bahamian dollars
all foreign currency deposits
maintained in the Bahamas by
local residents and by most
foreigners with work permits.
IMPROVE IMAGE
Recent developments are
not all bad, however, he
continues. "The Bahamian
government has taken pains
during the past few years to
improve the image of the
Bahamas by driving away
undesirable elements.
"Banking legislation has
succeeded in eliminating
undesirable persons who had
previously operated banks
from the Bahamas. The
Bahamas has become one of
the world's important offshore
banking centres and large
Eurodollar transactions are
now handled through Nassau."
Mr. Langer also refers to
recent insurance legislation and
the comprehensive Securities
Act designed to control mutual
funds and all offerings of
securities made from the
Bahamas.
He points out, however, that
the proclamation putting this
law into effect has yet to be
issued.


exempted, he will have the
right of appeal to the Supreme
Court, which may exempt him
on being satisfied that he was
unaware of his interest in a
contract and acted reasonably.
Mr. Pindling said that this
was a "new and useful
safeguard" for the members of
either House.


WHY DR. DORIS

OFF PREROGATIVE OF

MERCY COMMITTEE

GOVI- RNMENT Senate
member Dr. Doris Johnson
forfeited her place on the
Prerogative of Mercy
Committee when she ceased to
be a Cabinet Minister, The
Tribune was told today.
On December 15, a Bahamas
Information Services release
said that Minister of State Paul
Adderley had been named a
member of the Advisory
Committee on the Prerogative
of Mercy to replace Dr.
Johnson who had resigned.
Dr. Johnson, who was in
London at the time,
announced on her return that
she had not resigned and was.
as far as she knew, still a
member of the committee.
Under Section 27 (2) of the
Constitution, which spells out
the terms of appointment to
the Mercy committee, it is
stated that a person who was a
Minister at the time of his
appointment will cease to hold
a seat when he no longer serves
as a Minister.


Mr. Watkins, newly,
returned from his bid to have
the British government agree to
separatism for the island, was
accompanied on his tour of the
district by Daily TelegrIph
reporter Richard Beeston.
Mr. Beeston's story, which
appeared in the December 22
issue of The Telegraph, said
that Mr. Watkins has warned
the Bahamas government that
the inhabitants of Abaco were
ready to fight if necessary to
remain under t e British
Crown.
"We will never submit to
the t"trident black nationalism
of Nassau peace can only be
preserved by separation," Mr.
Watkins is said to have told the
Abaconians.
According to the Daily
Tel egraph reporter, the
separatist leader was touring
the island in an attempt to
drum up support for his efforts
to obtain an Anguilla-type
solution for the island, despite
his rebuff by the British
government.
During the rally, the
Telegraph reporter said, Mr.
Watkins compared Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling to
the late "Papa Doc" Duvalier
of Haiti and accused him of
preying on the ignorance of the
people.
The Marsh HIarbour
representative reportedly told
his listeners that "within six
months of independence you
can bet your last nickel the
Bahamas will be a
dictatorship."
According to Mr. Beeston,
the islanders are deeply
suspicious of the Pindling
government and many are
convinced that Mr. Pindling
will go back on any


constitutional commitments
made in London which do not
suit him, once the Bahamas
becomes independent.
Despite this, he added, the
islanders are by no means
united behind the secessionists.
Many believe that Abaco is far
too small and poor to go it
alone.
MONDAY CLUB
Meantime in London the
right wing Monday Club has
attacked the unwillingness of
the British government to
allow Abaco to become a
crown colony when the other
Bahama islands become
independent.
The club pointed out that
more than nine-thenths of the
6,500 inhabitants were
descended from British
loyalists who were settled there
after the American war of
Independence with grants of
Crown land.
"They are being abandoned
to the mercy of a black
nationalist government in
distant Nassau which appears
to take it for granted they will
become refugees again," the
statement said.
On Saturday Captain
Leonard Thompson, who
spearheaded the Abaco
separatist move, but was
defeated as an FNM candidate
in the last election, announced
he had resigned from the party
because it had "blatantly
ignored" the wishes of its
anti-independence supporters.
Emphasizing his stand
against the use of violence in
Abaco's bid for separation on
independence, Mr. Thompson
expressed the view that
sessionist support in the U.K.
parliament represents Abaco's
last chance for legal separation.


Is there a new type of 'flu virus



that we should be careful of ?


NEW YORK (AP) Are there
low?
Many people could well
think so, from getting ailments
and miseries they never had
before. Like a virus that likes
to play around just in your
chest. Or one specializing in
intestinal agonies, or mostly
making muscles hurt, or seeing
what degree of headache it can
produce. And, of course,
there's the super all-body
influenza virus. Are they new'?
Some are or may be, in the
sense of being new strains or
"cousins" of already known
kinds of viruses. Thus the
London Flu virus is a new
strain related to the Hong
Kong flu virus. The new strain
was first isolated in England in
January 1972, hence the name
"London."
But there's some debate
among experts whether an
entirely new virus has or will
come along that our ancestors
had never experienced
somewhere along the line.
If a truly new virus did
appear, it could escape notice
for a long time if it caused only
very mild illness. There could
be little inclination to run tests
to get the identification or
licence number of a virus
involved in very brief hit-run
attacks.
DANGEROUS
A truly new virus might very


By Alton Blakeslee
brand-new kinds of kooky viruses running around laying people


well kill thousands of people,
perhaps millions, because
humans had no immunity to it.
The situation is analogous to
primitive peoples being
decimated by viruses, like
smallpox, introduced by
visitors or hunters who did
have immunity.
But there's no question the
virus-cold and flu season is
here. Flu may have influenced
the outcome of last Sunday's
pro football championship
games by having hit and
weakened some players.
The new London flu is one
concern. It's an A-type of
influenza like Hong Kong flu,
which was blamed for killing
27,900 Americans in 1968-69
and making hundreds of
thousands memorably sick.
It cannot yet be predicted
how widespread London flu
will be this year, says a
spokesman for the centre for
disease control in Atlanta, Ga.
Possibly, he adds, a major part
of the population already has
some immunity from prior flu
viruses. The currently available
flu vaccine should offer some
protection against the new
strain, he thinks.
MANY MYSTERIES
The flu virus presents many
mysteries, including
puzzlement over exactly how


Acute air pollution in Italy causes

50,000 workers to be given gas maskE


VENICE, ITALY, Jan. 4
(AP) Air pollution is so
acute at a giant industrial
complex near Venice that
factories have been ordered to
supply gas masks to workers.
The action dramatized the
deteriorating environment in
Italy.
A labour inspector told the
205 factories in Marghera, a
mammoth port 21/ miles inland
from Venice, that all 50,000
workers in the area must be
equipped with the masks.
Factories most of them
petroleum, chemical and
aluminum plants will have to
bear the cost, the official said.


A year ago about 50 workers
were hospitalized after inhaling
gas.
The decision was the latest
in a long controversy involving
Marghera and the damage its
industry is said to inflict on
canal-laced Venice. The
sulphurous air pollution from
Marghera and nearby Mestre
blends easily with the high
carbon content of Venice's
marble statues, eroding them,
Venetians call it "marble
cancer."
The Marghera controversy
also brought to light the
deteriorating environment in
Italy, the world's sixth largest


industrialized nation.
Rivers, including the Po in
the north and the Tiber in
Rome, are so filthy that fish
die and float to the surface.
Scores of beaches, all the
way from the Riveira around
Genoa to Naples, were ordered
closed last summer because of
excessive contamination.
Anti-pollution laws that
went unnoticed are now being
enforced. Last year, Milan's
prosecutor filed charges against
15 industrialists for failing to
comply with anti-pollution
Laws. Those convicted can
receive prison terms of up to
four years.


new strains appear. When a
very different one comes along,
previous vaccines usually don't
work against it.
Some new Chinese-American
co-operation is exploring some
of the problems. Dr. Robert
Webster of St. Jude's
Children's Research Hospital in
Memphis, Tenn., visited China
last fall, and returned with
samples of virus that caused flu
outbreaks in 1957 and 1971.
He now is growing those
viruses in his laboratory.
There are two theories as to
how a new strain or mutant
appears, Webster explains. One
is that it is simply a change in
an existing form of the virus.
The other is that it results from
a recombination or genetic
interchange between a human
type of virus and one that
affects animals or birds.
A new strain can be lethal. A
worldwide flu epidemic in
1918 is estimated to have
killed some 21 million people,
including 500,000 Americans.
Asian flu in 1957 was wicked
and deadly. So was Hong Kong
flu some 10 years later.
FROM CHINA
Both the Asian and Hong
Kong strains are known to have
originated in China, Webster
said in an interview. But
neither was entirely new; each
had been around in the world
before, he adds.
Understanding how the new
strains originate might increase
the chances of preparing
Vaccines, in advance, for
defense when a deadly new
strain did appear. The viruses
he obtained from China will be
useful in this study, Webster
said. He gave Chinese scientists
serums that make it possible to
type or identify strains of flu
virus more accurately than
with older methods.
Webster said the Chinese
virus laboratory he visited in
Peking "is right up to date.
They know their stuff. For
example, they knew of work 1
had published only a few
months before."
TIDES
High: 7:29 a.m. and 7:46
p.m. Low: 12:57 a.m. and
1:46 p.m.


Al


if necessary to stay



under British Crown


"WE ARE DETERMINED to remain under the British Crown,
to whom we owe our loyalty and our heritage, even if it means
the shedding of blood," Marsh Harbour representative Errington
Watkins was quoted as saying at a recent political rally at Abaco.


A great many stories have been written about the Forsyths ...
all creditable.
The story I like most ... and is probably most typical of the
family story ... is about the young boy from Rum Cay who went
out into the world to seek his fortune. This little boy was an
uncle of Mr. Elgin Forsyth.
His footsteps took him to the U.S. There he turned his
attention to the one thing he knew best and loved the most ... the
sea.
He enlisted in the American Navy as a "sailor before the mast".
One day his ship had to land a party in rough sea on a rugged
coast. No one on the ship knew how to negotiate lifeboats
through breakers.
This little Forsyth boy knew how to handle a small boat in
towering seas.
"Take 'em in backwards," he advised.
He was still a little boy but he convinced the officers that he
understood the sea and small boats. They entrusted him with the
job. He took them in safely. This gave him a start.
Years later young Forsyth ended up with the rank of Admiral
in the U.S. Navy, the only Bahamian in history to achieve such a
commanding position in the armed forces of a great nation.
Admiral Forsyth was an old man when he came home on a
visit. I remember him because he came to see my father at The
Tribune office on several occasions while he was in the island.
Another Bahamian who had achieved some distinction in the
Royal Navy during the Boer War was an old black man living far
south on East Street. He was decorated for a daring exploit when
a Boer shell fell on the deck of the ship on which he was serving.
He grabbed it up and threw it overboard before it exploded.
Don't ask me to explain how this was. done but it is a story I
often heard when I was a small boy in my father's office. I knew
Mr. Davis well. He and his wife were among the friends I had on
my newspaper delivery route in the southern district. A frail little
boy they had adopted was among my special friends in the area.
I remember these two old veterans. They were big men. When I
knew them age had already laid its heavy hand on their massive
frames. They stooped under the weight of medals which they
wore proudly on their breast. A picture my father had made of
them at that time stands out clearly in my memory.
The Davis family passed on a long time ago. Their adopted son
died young. I don't know of any connection they have left
behind.
And now another aged Forsyth has gone silently to the grave
leaving behind a creditable record of service to humanity.
Mr. Forsyth has left behind an adopted daughter ... a charming
woman, a worthy representative of a great family whose
watchword was ... service.
And so time marches on.
We often say that "time passes". Commenting on The Parade
of Time, Henry Dobson wrote in the last century:
Time goes, you say, Ah no!
Alas, Time stays, we go.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Must endure
Their going hence, even as their coming hither;
Ripeness is all.
SHAKESPEARE


Thursday, January 4, 1973.












Thursday, January 4, 1973.


Camaro add new LT to their
,W v


LAST YEAR, Camaro
meant instant hit for the
Chevrolet people. This
year, the 1973 Camaro is
cause for even more
celebrations thanks to the
addition to the line of the
Type LT.
The LT and the other
models -- Z28, sport coupe and
the standard Camaro are all
available at Central Garage,
Oakes Field.
The latest Camaro, Type LT,
has been designed for people
who like lots of luxury with
their sports car. The "L"
stands for luxury and the "T"
for touring s(f the driver and
passengers have the best of all
worlds.
It has a standard Turbo-Fire
350-2 V8 engine and variable
ratio power steering. On the
driver's side, there is a remote
control sport mirror. The
passenger side is equipped with
an identical manually operated
sport mirror. Hide-away
windshield wipers tuck neatly
out of the way when not in use
and the black finished body
sills underneath the doors
accent Camaro's low lines.
The LT looks special on the
outside and this is carried
through to the interior which
features a meticulously
designed instrument panel
from both the functional and
appearance points of view. The
panel has wooden-grain vinyl
accents and the lower portion
has accents in a silver finish.
With the standard
instrumentation, Camaro LT
has a tachometer, an ammeter
and temperature gauge plus an
electric clock. An AM/FM
radio installation is available to
give even more luxury to the
panel.
The LT interior is purely its
own from the foam molded
bucket seats in front to the


foam molded rear seat, all of
which have been made for
comfort and support for driver
and passengers.
THREE COLOURS
These seats are covered in a
choice of three mixed-tone
1'j4 and vinyl combinations -
black and white, black and


'73 models


A THE NEW CAMARO
TYPE LT destined for
great things in 1973. See the
Camaros at Central Garage,
Oakes Field.


Exemntr


blue or green and blue plus
two all-vinyl selections black
or neutral. The floor is covered
in colour-keyed carpeting.
The LT is equipped with the
new interior decor quiet sound
group which is optional on the
other Camaro models.
This group features sound
deadeners on the floor,
cowl-to-fender seals, inner roof
panel insulator and a fully
molded hood insulation to
reduce even further Camaro's
interior sound level.
There is flow-through
ventilation even with the
windows up.
Altogether the Camaro LT is
a truly fine car for 1973, but
there are other Camaro
models from which to choose.
The sport coupe has
independent front coil
suspension, forward mounted
steering linkage plus multi-leaf
rear springs with bias mounted
shock absorbers all of which
give the coupe superb handling
and excellent ride control.
NEW BUMPER
There is a new front bumper
this year with stronger
mounting and front bumper
guards with resilient inserts.
The Turbo-Thrift 250 six
cylinder or the Turbo-Fire 307
V8 engine is standard. Disc
brakes are on the front wheels.
The standard Camaro
interior is designed to combine
a sporty feel with room for
four adults. There are high
backed bucket seats in front


and a foam molded bench in
the rear.
Matching vinyl panels are on
the doors and sidewalls and the
carpet is colour keyed to the
interior.
The Z28 is better known as
just plain "Z" but it is far from
plain. This is the model for
those who like a little more
performance from their car and
it features the Turbo-Fire
Special 350-4 V8 engine with a
four-barrel carburetor and dual
exhaust system.
The Z28 is available with
either of two manual four
speeds or the Turbo-Hydra-
matic t transmission.
Airconditioning is available on
the model for the first time
this year and front and rear
spoilers can be added.
The Rally Sport package has
been designed to give any
Camaro model a different look.
It includes a special black grille
with' silver accents and Rally
Sport nameplates. The grille is
surrounded by a resilient frame
to help guard against dents and
on either side of the grille there
are small bumperettes.
Lots of other changes can be
ordered to fit the standard
Camaro, the Sport Coupe,
Type LT or the Z28.
Camaro is destined to strike
the winning cord in the
motoring world again this year
and the various models are on
display now at Central Garage,
Oakes Field.


AMERICAN CARMAKERS will
be getting more money for their
vehicles this current season
following price boosts. Chrysler
hiked its prices an average of $40 or
one per cent; General Motors upped
prices some $54 or one and
two-tenths per cent; and Ford
boosted prices an average of about
$63 or one and one-half per cent.
The fate of the airbag as an
automotive safety device is caught
up in a whirlwind of controversy
over the best way to keep drivers
from killing themselves on the
nation's highways.
The arguments flared anew after
the sixth U.S. Court of Appeals
decided last Tuesday week to delay
the timetable for airbag safety
restraints on automobiles until the
national highway traffic safety
administration redesigns its testing
procedures for the devices.
Mandatory installation of air
hags had been scheduled for August
of 1975.
Simply stated, the airbag is a
balloon device which is stored in
the car deflated.
In the event of a front-end
collision, a sensor triggers the airbag
and within fractions of a second,
the bag is designed to inflate and
prevent occupants of the vehicle
from hitting the interior portions of
the car.
The beauty of the airbag system,
in the government's eyes, is its
passive nature. The motorist is not
required to do anything, such as
buckle a seatbelt, to be protected.
The concept certainly sounds
good. So why the objections?
The auto companies say the
reliability of the air bag system has
not been proven; that there is a
problem if the bag goes off when a
person is not in the right position
to meet the bug. And there is a fear


FESTIVE BRIDGE


SOMETIMES, as a sort of
,special treat for special
occasions, Bridge players
)indulge themselves by dealing
1the cards in 3's, 4's, or 5's
instead of ones. They call it
'goulash. The result of course, is
'a series of wildly improbable
hands with freak distributions
iof every kind.
SWhen, in the course of
normal dealing, such a hand
does turn up, it creates much
excitement, and is talked about
for days or weeks afterwards.
It is difficult to see the
objection to dealing goulash
.more often, since excitement
can't be all that objectionable.
It is probably because players
:would have to adapt their
notions of what is 'normal' to
ithe new norms; maybe it is the
'same objection that we would
,raise if the prospect of our
favourite delicacy being served
'at every meal were to arise: too
'much of a good thing.
The hands which follow
Were dealt in goulash style,
hence the outlandish
hand-patterns. The
Circumstances were also a little
frivolous, in that the
participants were in a holiday
pnood, and wanted to get that
little extra something from
their game of rubber.
MOON
Rises: 6:54 a.m. Sets: 5:44
p.m. New Moon 10:42 a.m.


J 8643
A 8 5 3


none
2
QJ 1097542
AKQ 10


Q 106
K3
9875432


KQ 109752
KJ 974


none
This hand was a triumph of
restrained bidding and subtle
defence by the West players,
who had goulashed often
before, and knew that even an
international expert like South
could be lured to destruction.


E
3C
pass
pass
pass
pass


w
pass(!)
5C
6C
pass
all pass


N
4S
pass
pass
6H


West's pass over 3 Spades,
and his subsequent reluctant
retreat first to 5 Clubs, then to
6 Clubs, showed his mastery of
the goulash game. And his
defence was no less
imaginative. Instead of the
obvious Ace of Clubs, or the
slightly less obvious Queen of
Diamonds, he led the 2 of
Diamonds. South won and led
a Spade to East's Ace. East
returned a Diamond, and
South was now completely in


the dark about the distribution
of any of the side suits.
Everything hinged on
finding the Queen of Hearts.
East had opened with a
pre-emptive bid, and had
shown up with both the Ace of
Spades and the King of
Diamonds; surely he had at
least one high Club honour as
well, since West hadn't
immediately supported the
suit. That would give him
about 10 points; it would make
his holding the Queen of
Hearts impossible. So South
played out the King and Ace of
Hearts, hoping to drop the
Queen, and had to go one
down.
At a festive gathering one
holiday time, four avid Bridge
players slunk away from the
revelry, found a quiet room,
produced some cards, and
carefully adjusting their paper
hats, dealt goulash. It was not
long before this comedy of
errors took place:
AJ 9
A 1098
AKQ
KQJ
K2 874
K 763
J 1098765432 none
none 8765432
Q 10653
QJ 542
none
A 109
North, who was the most timid


FRDAY5TH*

SP ECILA &SAT.6TH.

SALE ON VOGUE & BUTTERICK PATTERNS


NEW ARRIK\ALSI

* SLIPPERS for the whole family ,/v "-
* BODY SHIRTS Infants', children's, women's
* PULLOVER BLOUSES* LADIES' SHIRTS
* KNEE HIGH SOCKS
* SCHOOL PANTS SHIRTS* BLOUSES!


ARE VIA
W& MOAD at MACKEY STREET


NEW STORE HOURS -
8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mon. to Fri.
Saturday 'til 8 p.m.


of the quartette, dealt and
opened 2NT. East passed, and
South, with his sights set on a
major suit slam, responded
with a Stayman 3 Clubs. West
poked in a bid of 3 Diamonds,
but North, to whom Stayman
was' something to do with
flowers, leapt straight to 6
Clubs. South didn't know what
to make of that, but presumed
his partner knew what he was
doing, and since nobody had
doubled, he passed.
West, for the first time in his
life, led from the top of a
10-card suit. Dummy went
down, and South felt slightly
sick. But he rallied, played the
Queen of Diamonds, and when
East ruffed, he over-ruffed.
Next he led a Spade to the
Jack; then the King of
Diamonds, again ruffed by
East, again over-ruffed by
South.
Now the play of the Queen
of Hearts brought the King
from West and the Ace from
dummy. The last Diamond
honour was played, and the
busy East once again produced
a trump, South using his last
trump to over-ruff. Then he
made another two Hearts and
another two Spades, and
dummy's K.Q.J of trumps.
"Good thing I didn't
double", remarked East;
West glared at him.
South started to preen
himself by recounting how he
had negotiated the 7-0 trump
break, but West cut him short
by pointing out that not only
were 7 Spades or 7 Hearts cold,
but also 7NT.
"And that's not all" added
West, who took his Bridge a
little more seriously than the
others. "Partner, you are
looking at 10 trumps, 7 in your
own hand and 3 in dummy. So
you know declarer's only got 3
himself. Instead of ruffing any
Diamonds, just discard Spades
or Hearts, and when he leads
them, you ruff and return a
trump. Just as well you didn't
double if you didn't intend to
beat the contract."
RC
FASHION SHOW
FOR CHARITY
THE FASHION show and
dance scheduled for December
25 by Hycitli Beauty Salon will
now be held Friday, January
19 at the Dundas Civic Centre.
The programme will begin at
6 p.m. Proceeds are in aid of
charity.


that the bag may inflate when it is
not needed, obscuring the vision of
the driver.
The safety administration has
estimated that the installation of
airbags in all cars could result in a
cut of 50 per cent in the number of
persons who are killed each year in
U.S. traffic accidents a figure
now about 55,000.
But Len Barnes, who edits the
automobile club of Michigan's
monthly magazine, has charged that
government estimates on the
number of lives that would be saved
with airbags have been vastly
exaggerated, even assuming the bags
always worked perfectly.
The American Automobile
Association has blamed auto critic
Ralph Nader and the federal
department of transportation with
"trying to foist the airbag on the
nation's drivers without adequate
testing."
The auto companies have
contended all along that
considerable research and testing is
needed before the airbag system
can be proven reliable and effective.
There have been several
publicized tests where cars
containing dummies and equipped
with airbags have been smashed
into barriers at speeds up to 50
miles per hour. On most occasions,
the bags inflated properly; but on a
few they did not.
POLLUTION
The government's environmental
protection agency probably will
postpone for another year the
regulations it proposed nine months
ago to phase out the use of lead in
gasoline.
But the agency is expected to
adopt tougher rules than originally
planned when it does act.


AUSTIN MAXI

REVOLUTIONARY

5 DOOR SEDAN WAGON
1750 CC OVERHEAD CAM ENGINE FOR GET UP AND GO


This,
Seasons

Car

Z.N.S. SPECIAL
LISTEN TO
THE 8:00 A.M. NEWS
EVERY FRIDAY
AND SATURDAY ON ZNS


Normally, of course, it's a saloon. With up to
45" of legroom up front. And with plenty of
room for 5 people and bags of space at the back
for luggage. If you remove the rear parcel shelf,
it'll take even more.
With the back seat folded forward, you've got
yourself an estate. Big enough to take anything
from a chest of drawers to a pram or
lawnmower.
Drop all the seats back and they form a
full-sized double bed. Making the Maxi a
sleeping car. Which could come in useful if you
ever get stuck for accommodation.


JS lHaija fMlr r CLonipa oCA ilw
"QUALITY and SERVICE"
PHOqE. W 8-. SHIRLEY STREET P.O. BOX NI.6


UI


HAPPY NiEW YEAR FOLKS


1970 FORD TORINO.. .$2,500


1970 MORRIS 1300
Standard Shift, Good Condition
1972 DODGE AVENGER
Like New Low Mileage
1970 VOLKSWAGON S/W
Radio A Fine Work Car.
1968 CHEVEROLET IMPALA
Fine Family Car or Taxi
1972 VEGA COUPE
White Radio Fine Sports Car.
1971 PONTIAC VENTRA II
Like New Good Condition
1969 CHEVY CAMARO
A Good buy
1970 FORD CONTINA
Clean


$900.00
$2000.00
$1200.00
$1200.00
$3975.00
$2975.00
$1995.00
$1150.00


1969 RILEY
Must Go
1970 VOLKSWAGON
A Fine Car
1972 LAND ROVER
A Good Bargain
1971 FORD TORINO
What you were looking for
1966 FORD MUSTANG
Good Buy
1972 FORD PINTO
Like New
1970 FIAT BUS
A Good Buy
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
Fine Car


$250.00

$995.00
$4300.00
$2650.00
$675.00
$3850.00
$395.00
$1250.00


CENTRAL GARAGE LTD keField Phone 34711
CENTRAL GA G LTD. P. 0. Box N-1525 Nassau, Bahamas
^ LET ONE OF OUR FRIENDLY SALES TEAM HELP YOU
I I


E. GIBSON


C. MORRISON


R. GARDINER


J. ALLEYNE


D. MILLER


0. MILLER


K


Get to college

the Collegiate way...
in New York,'U.S.A.
Prepir for sege de In see flld of Aounting, Buminess
Administrsion, Mueememnt. Merkefn S atreSIadiwS en
Te*ting. Also piald Sompi hy. Typand el BDokkeepIn
STUDENT VISA PAPERS PREPARED
SPECIAL ENGLISH COURSES PROVIDED
APPROVED BY DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION
Registered by New York State Board of Regents
Nationally Accredited. WRITE FOR CATALOG
Two-Year Associate Degree Courses
ENROLL NOW FOR FALL AND SPRING SEMESTERS

onds AUEIATN E INCSffSV. E
501 Madison Ave., New York Cty, U.S.A. 10022


I AU10 NFWS I


I MdDCA CO[UMH :1


Abe (ribunR












Thursday, January 4, 1973.
mi


SUGGESTED FOR
PARENTAL DIS
Reservations not cla
on first come, ft


Last Day Friday
Matinee continuous from 2
Evening 8:30
"THE
TODD KILLINGS" R.
Robert Lyons
Richard Thomas
m PLUS
"COLOR ME DEAD" R.
Tom Tryon


2-1004,2-1005


They're not

They're worn,
and that's why
dangerous 2-1004, 2-1005

SI






I
and statAtes hy







A AUDIENCES.
ADVISED.
5 will be sold
BA.


Starts Friday
ous showings from I

'HAMMER" R.
Fred Williamson
Venetta McGee

PLUS

A TOWN CALLED
HELL" R.

Telly Savalas I
Robert Shaw

e Under 17 Admitted. l


.1 ^^^ ^ *


The bride, given in marriage
by her father, wore a white
floor-length wedding gown of
imported silk peau de soie.
The back of the gown had
soft pleats terminating in a
chapel train. She wore a
matching headpiece of French
silk illusion.
The bride's attendants wore
identical floor-length gowns
designed with delicate pink
chiffon bodices trimmed with
Venice lace, and candy pink
velvet skirts with matching
accessories.
The maid of honour was
Miss Kathy Busch of Geneva,
Illinois.
The bridesmaids were: Carol
Dolezal, sister of the groom,


"IvNU w HO WINI
AT 7:00 & 10:40
Two comnfy... j-if
Thm s,


oIF




MARSHALL THOMPSON EA "
Plus at 8:50
**RIO LOBO"
m i , I


and Roxy Daleo of Fort Lee,
New Jersey.
The flower girls were Alice
and Maria Bethell, sisters of the
bride. The best man was Mr.
Edward D'Allesandro of
Bethesda, Maryland.
The ushers were Philip R. M.
Bethell, brother of the bride,
George King of Washington,
D.C. and William Summers of
Mentor, Ohio.
A reception followed the
ceremony at "Brigadoon," the
home of the bride's parents on
Eastern Road.
The toast to the bride was
proposed by the bride's uncle
Mr. John K. O'Brien.
Out-of-town guests included
the groom's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Dolezal of
Bangkok, Thailand.
Mr. Dolezal is a member of
the United States foreign
service, and is presently based
in Thailand.
Others from out-of-town
were: Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Daleo of Fort Lee, New Jersey
and Misses: Gloria Weliska,
Valerie Turtle, Sally Snell,
Cathy Hirsch and Suellynn
Stark, all college friends of the
bride, as well as Messrs. Wayne
Knibloe, Peter Carl and Steve
Sluznis, fraternity brothers of
the groom.
Following a honeymoon at
Harbour Island Mr. and Mrs.
Dolezal Jr. will take up
residence in Washington, D.C.
where Mr. Dolezal is a student
at American University.


... IT ALL ADDS UP




your reusable hut unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc... clear out

your closets, garage, storeroom ...

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to







ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


UNBELIEVABLE!
YOUR BEAUTIFUL COLOUR
PORTRAIT





on the Waterfront
East Bay St. & William St.
Phone 5-4641
*our sensational January Special to' keep our
staff busy through the After--Christmas Lull


I
I

I
1
I

'I
: i


PAUL-DEAN

WEDDING
MtSS INEi uigeia Dea.,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Leroy Dean of White's
Addition, became the bride of
Patrick Philip Paul, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Leonard Paul of
Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, on
Christmas Eve in a ceremony
held at the Lively Hope Baptist
Church. Rev. R. G. Adderley
officiated.
A large number of friends
and relatives attended the
double-ring ceremony. The
programme of nupital music
was performed by organist, Mr.
Heanon Gibson.
The bride, given in marriage
by her father, wore a gown of
white chiffon, the bodice
styled with long loose-fitting
sleeves and a high neckline
with straight collar and
trimmed with embroided white
medallions; the skirt, following
the vogue of the day, had the
fullness at the back and
terminated in a long train.
Her veil, adjusted to her
coiffure with a white chiffon
head-band, was also trimmed
with embroidered white
medallions and she carried a
shower bouquet of yellow,
green and white
chysanthemums.
Mrs. Dorothy L. Powell,
eldest sister of the bride, was
matron-of-honour and the
bridesmaids were Miss
Jacqueline Carey and Miss
Veronica Dean, youngest sister
of the bride.
The bridesmaids, carrying
trimmed bouquets of red and
white carnations, wore gowns
with a bodice of red velvet
with loose-fitting
"leg-o-mutton" sleeves and
fashioned along lines similar to
that of the bridal gown with
miniature red rose blossoms in
their coiffure.
Mrs. Powell wore a dress of
lime-green with velvet bodice
and polyester skirt, and carried
a trimmed bouquet of yellow
carnations.
Attorney Richard
Lightbourne was Mr. Paul's
best-man. The groomsmen
were Errol Ward and Tony
Hepburn.
The ceremony was followed
by a wedding breakfast in the
Bahama Room of the
Sheraton-British Colonial
Hotel.
The bride is a
student-teacher at the Bahamas
Teachers' College and Mr. Paul,
a Bahamian model of New
York, is connected with the
Bonneville Bones clothiers, Bay
Street.
The couple has taken up
residence on Baillou Hill Road.
















SHIRLEY E. BURROWS

Gets B.Sc.


Degree
SHIRLEY E. Burrows,
Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera,
has completed all the
requirements for a Bachelor of
Science degree at Bryan
College in Dayton, Tennessee.
The daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
S Edwin Burrows, she will
" receive her diploma during the
May commencement exercises
. of the college.
Shirley is a 1959 graduate of
PN the Governor's Harbour Public
School. Since graduating from
high school, she has attended
the Princess Margaret Hospital
School of Professional Nursing.
" She was on the Dean's list
while at Bryan.


M.
MR. &


o


MRS PATRICK PAUL


An all Lowe affair
MR. and Mrs. H. Eric Lowe Mrs. Sidney Lowe of Green
f Montgomery Street has Turtle Cay, Abaco.


announced the engagement of
their daughter, Myrtie, to Mr.
Scott Lowe, son of Mr. and


RACHAEL CARTWRIGHT

Engaged
MRS. ADDIE Cartwright,
wife of the late Mr. Curtis
Cartwright, announced the
engagement of her daughter,
Rachael Victoria, to Mr.
Christopher Benson Knowles,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge
Knowles of Nassau.
A former student of Queen's
College, Village Road, Miss
Cartwright is employed at the
Bank of Nova Scotia, Bay
Street.
Mr. Knowles is an employee
of Nassau Air Dispatch. The
couple plan to wed in
February.


The wedding date has been
set for late October.


-erf&lhe e


RENEWAL OF MARRIAGE
VOWS AT MARY STAR
THE ANNUAL renewal of
marriage vows will take place
at the 6:30 evening mass on
Sunday the Feast of the
Epiphany, at Mary, Star of the
Sea Church, Freeport.
"All married couples in the
parish and in Freeport are
invited to take advantage of
this opportunity to renew
again the spirit of generosity
characteristic of the day of
marriage, and to receive theO
special blessing," a church
release said.
This annual service is
attended by many visitors who
arrange their holiday in order
to participate.
ST. AUGUSTINE'S
PTA MEETING FRIDAY
A MEETING of the St.
Augustine's Parent-Teachers
Association will be held 8 p.m.
Friday in the school cafeteria.
Business will include the
preparation and planning for
the dinner-dance to be held
January 12, and the
nomination of new officers.


FUNERAL SERVICES
FOR AUDREY NIXON
FUNERAL services for
nurse Audrey Nixon, 42, of
Regency Park were held at St.-
Matthew's Church Saturday
with Canon Addington
Johnson and Bishop Donald
Knowles officiating.
Mrs. Nixon died suddenly at
her home at 7:45 p.m. on
Wednesday, December 27. She
is survived by her husband,
Neville, her five-year-old
daughter, Lisa; two sisters, Mrs.
Marjorie Bosfield and nurse
Louise Tynes, and one brother
Harcourt Toote and her
mother, Mrs. Wilfred Toote.
She was buried in the family
plot in St. Matthew's cemetery.
Attatched to the staff of the
Geriatrics hospital Nurse Nixon
was the niece of the late Mrs.
Clarita Toote.
Born September 22, 1930 in
Nassau, Mrs. Nixon was
actively involved in health
programmes in the Bahamas
and was an organizer of the
recent Mental Health Week
project.
SUN
Rises 6:55 a.m. Sets: 5:32
p.m.


JENNIFER MORTEMORE
& ARRAN GEE

Marry in

March
THE ENGAGEMENT has
been announced of Jennifer
Evelyn Mortemore, only
daughter of Superintendant
and Mrs. E. A. Mortemore of
Nassau, and Worthing, Sussex,
to Arran Gee, only son of Mr.
and Mrs. R. T. Gee of
Rossendale, Lancanshire.
The couple will be married
in evening ceremonies at the
Christ Church Cathedral on
March 31. Cannon J. W.
Granger will officiate.


DONATIONS TO RETARDED CHILDREN


THE following donations
have been received by the
Bahamas Association for
Retarded Children.
Mike's Shoe Store, $30;
Form I, Government High
School, $7; Women's
Department, New Providence,
Bahamas Baptist Union, $50;
Donald Davis School, $50;


Staff, Paradise Island, $200; In
memory of Corinne Stephens,
$50; Anonymous, $20; Prince
Hall Grand Chapter Order of
Eastern Star, $100; Deltec
Banking, $300; Ebenezer
Church, $400; Family
Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd.,
$25; Bahamas International
Trust Co. Ltd., $100; A. R.
Knowles, $15; World Banking
Corporation, $50; Salem Union
Baptist Church (Quarterly
Donation) $50; P. Alexious
(Monthly donation), $2.86; W.
Smith (Monthly donation),
$7.14 and Roywest Banking
Corporation Ltd., $300.




FREE

TO THE
PUBLIC

The Bahamas Youth
Evangelism Fellowship,
invites you to come and
see the film, "Fast Way
Nowhere,," Completely
FREE OF CHARGE to
ALL, on January 6th, at 8
o'clock, p.m., at the
Garfunkel Auditorium in
Palmdale. Bring a friend.


NORFORMS




3Mo effeciv6 thi


GrMida Desraut
The cautious and practical marked
woman of oday, pit M her aos
dance in the cfrectivnemss of
NORFORMS feminine supplstol s
became they oler.
Pemmhe Pmsae aains -
raasin roblM wI tair
peifecud Iwmtm dal formula.
pehld Pre"iIm ia aeldag of.
fensive odor wlh dir raid dodo-
rant actim
Nfems dimolve at sone body
tempersture, ferminga pratedv
sfilm. ethe a ed ham
douching. They are tay toaspi-
do not hadiate oi domaeis.
Sold at eN p Mineck i npeefaf
of IS 124 mand4.


ma g ea
Majam.


w- e:
elniseatA. w btookn. write i19:


Wie Srtbunr


MATURE
CREATION.
imed by 8:1
rst served ba

InK


Continue


"4


MwAUiWM
ONkMSUU mImm


IWULFFR


FOR SALE BY TENDER


1 1966 Lambretta No. 202
1 1963 Lambretta No. 137
1 1968 Honda No. 253

These Motor Scooters can be inspected by contacting
Mr. Nottage, Acting Chief Health Inspector (telephone
24934) who will make arrangement for the scooters to
be seen.
Sealed tendrs- clearly Marked TENDERS FOR MOTOR
SCOOTERS should be addressed to the Hospital
Administrator P. 0. Box N-3729 to arrive not later than
17th january, 1973.
The right is reserved to reject any or all tenders.

J. A. THOMPSON JR.
Hospital Administrator


tN













Thursday, January 4, 1973.


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune orcal 2-1986 Ext.5 Nasau,352 -6608 in Frgeeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon.to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.

Come by Classified Counter at TheTribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5pm. Mon. to Fri. -Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.
I noamWIhWWm I I ra a I I -~wAtm msw I I I


E TATSEL AER


C8282
LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East End.
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.


C8303
IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's home, guest
cottage, fireplace, 21/ baths,
patio, marvellous view,
swimming, fishing. H.H. Larkin
c/o Box 101, Harbour Island.
C8284
HOUSE FOR SALE Owner
leaving. Must sacrifice.
$35,000. Phone 2-8511 days
only.
C8311
FOR SALE
Lot must be sold immediately.
$3,000. Call 5,6600 9:30 a.m.
5 p.m. night 3-4564 Mrs.
Johnson.

C8314
ATTRACTIVE 3-BEDROOM,
4-bath residence, Blair Estates.
Living-dining room, recreation
room, study, laundry, ample
storage space, patio, etc. Lot
100' x 150'. Call 3-1077.


I WANTS TO SNARE
C8290
2 GIRLS (preferably teachers)
to share 3 bedroom house,
Norfolk Street, Shirlea.
Telephone 2-1531 (work).
Home 3-4186.

FOR RENT
C8297
2 BEDROOM unfurnished -
Madeira Street opposite John
S. George. For information call
23170.
C7015
NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroom/2
bath, situated Domingo
Heights, East St., South.
Contact: Nassau 5-6234 or Mr.
Pr tt at Freeport 352-9007
collectt) between 9-5.
C8286
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
'Day call 2-2152. Evenings
5-4926.
C8287
ONE GROUND FLOOR 2
BEDROOM APARTMENT, off
East Bay Street, near Out
Island Traders Building.
Telephone 4-1563 after 5 p.m.

C8289
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C8268
ONE EFFICIENCY apartment,
basically furnished, Victoria
Court Apartments, on
Elizabeth Avenue between Bay
and Shirley Streets. Facilities,
laundry, parking. Phone
54631. After five 3-2397.

C8267
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
Information call 3-6644.
C8285
ONE BEDROOM and one two
bedroom two bath, large living
and dining room, Bahama
room apartment. Basically
furnished on,. beautiful
landscaped grounds. Third
Terrace Centreville. Facilities,
laundry, phone, parking, fully
airconditioned. Phone 54631
after five 3-2397.

C8265
LARGE 1 BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
I $250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-477748.

LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
HILLCREST TOWERS (Third.
Terrace West Centrevllle) -
Elegant, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
apartments, airconditioned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842
74116, 2-8224 or2-8248.

3 BEDROOM fully furnished
house Mount Royal &
Madsira. $250 per month. Call
'54954 evenings.


C8332
ONE 2 BEDROOM
unfinished apartment -
ICntroville and 2 unfurnished 3
bedroom apartments Soldier
Road. Telephone 34128.
C5324
IDEALLY located two
-bdroom apartment, private
alcconles all around,
verteolking the se. East Bay
Street near The Pilot House.
ent $300 per month. Calf
8-1 81/4.


I I rM KtN


'


C8253
GERMAN SHEPHERD
Price $145.00. Seven
old. See Alexander
Durham Street off
Royal Avenue.


PUPS.
weeks
Virgil,
Mount


MARINE SIPPLIES
C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleeps
six; private bathroom with
vanity, shower and head;
stove refrigerator, sink,
stereo ship-to-shore, twin 230
h.p. engines with less than 200
hours other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.

C8331
FOR SALE OR CHARTER
125ft. x 23ft. 4ft. draft, steel
hull. 290 tons, powered by
new Cat. 343 diesel 15 ton
crane up to date load line, 2
cargo hatches, one 14ft x 24ft.
and one 14ft x 42ft. double
bottom and In excellent shape.
Contact:
SANDS CONSTRUCTION &
SHIPPING Marsh Harbour, P.
0. Box 489, Treasure Cay -
Abaco, Phone 159.

Cat283
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


E NIRAM SUPPLIES


C8288
35' BERTRAM SPORT-
FISHERMAN bought NEW
JUNE 1971 powered by
twin Cummins Diesels 210 HP
each 200 hours on each
engine, central airconditioning
- 7 KW Diesel generator fly
bridge and dual controls -
many other extras. Absolutely
AS NEW. Phone 3-4953 Nite -
2-1722-3-4-5 days.

LOST
C8315
FROM VILLAGE ROAD area
Labrador/Alsatian dog-sandy
coloured, white throat. When
last seen was wearing red collar
with Humane Society and
licence tags attached. Finder is
asked to contact McLees,
Harmony Hill telephone 31422
or 27466. A REWARD IS
OFFERED.

SCHOOLS
TUITION
C8322
GUITAR LESSONS ... taught
by Derek. For information call
5-2354

C8317


C8325
UN FURN ISHED
APARTMENT' Telephone
54643.
C8334
Two two-bedroom unfurnished
apartments on Soldier Road,
one block east of East Street.
Interested persons telephone
Valderine Adderley, Fresh
Creek, Andros, Radio Station.

CARS FOR SALE
C8261
1969 FIAT 124 Station wagon.
Lively. Cheap to run. $1000.
Owner leaving. Phone 41365.

C8162
1969 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
with radio. Owner must leave
colony. Contact: Rudolph
Ferguson telephone 22441.
C8272
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LIMITED
SUBSTANTIAL
END OF SEASON
REDUCTIONS
1970 Chevrolet
Impala 2 dr. A/C $2800
1970 Rover 2000
A/C Automatic $2400
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic, Beige
4 dr. $1895
1968 Viva 2 Dr.
Automatic $850
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic $1600
1969 Caprice A/C
Vinyl 4 Dr. H/T $2000
1968 Javelin A/C $1600
1970 Singer Gazelle
Auto. White $1295
1970 Wolsey 16/60
Auto Grey $1295
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8.
C8323
1971 DODGE AVENGER G.
L Automatic with radio.
$1600 or best offer. Phone
2-3106 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Phone
5-3590 after 5 p.m.



C8301
1972 Toyota Corona MK 114
door. Like new. $2,600.
O.N.O.
31rl's Bicycle, also Eina Zig Zag
sewing machine both $140.
Phone 3-4631.
C8295
CHRISTMAS FLOWERS,
Ornaments and gifts at half
price for one week only.
NASSAU FLORIST, East
Shirley near Church Street -
5-2598 and 24223.

C8320
ONE LARGE avacado gas
stove only $200.00. Contact
Roberts at 2-8437 before 5:00
p.m.
C8329
SEARS MOTOR Scooter -
good condition $175.00.
Phone 3-1278.
C8313
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
Including utensils, furniture,
toys, clothing etc. Blair
Estates, Sheffield Street No.
141. Phone 3-1077.

C8327
VESPA 150 cc scooter ie968,
baby blue. $225.00. John
White, East Bay Marina.


PETS FORSALE


IN bAU but loving memory of
Mr. Horace Lowell Demeritte,
who departed this life January
4th 1972.
Sunset and evening sun
And one clear call for me
And may there be no mourning
of the bar*
When I set out to sea.
Left to mourn: Mother Mrs.
McQueen Demeritte; wife -
Elizabeth; 2 sonsiDarvllle and
Rodger; 1 daughter, Iris; 3
brothers; 4 sisters and a host of
other relatives and friends.

C8316
IN PRECIOUS memory of
Miriam beloved mother of
Erma and Carl, who passed
January 4th 1959, fourteen sad
years ago.
Oh my mother, precious
mother
Some glad day I'm coming
home to you.
Children: Mrs. Erma Archer
and Carl Bethel.


EIIOZC
C8309
NOTICE Is hereby given that
the roadway passing through
the Charlotte Street Carpark,
between Parliament Street and
Charlotte Street, will be closed
for passage from Saturday,
January 6, 1973 at 6 p.m.
through Monday, January 8,
1973 at 8 p.m.
Dated: January 4, 1973
Signed: Dorothy L. Atwood,
Umited, Agent for Charlotte
Street Carpark.


P LEII MATED


C8326
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Young person with previous
experience as a cashier. Some
typing and bookkeeping
experience also necessary.
Reply in own handwriting to
Adv. C8326, c/o The Tribune,
P. 0. Box N3207, Nassau,
giving resume of personal
details, previous experience
and quoting references which
are essential. Salary in the
range of $80 to $120 per week
depending on age and previous
experience.

C8294
SALES GIRLS ages 18-30.
Experience not necessary -
will train. Salary plus
commission. Apply in person
to Mr. Fondas at Chris 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.

C8161
BOAT CAPTAIN,
Sportsfisherman. must have 5
years experience. Steady well
paying position for right man.
Reply to: Adv. C8161, c/o The
Tribune, P. 0. Box N3207,
Nassau.
C8308
BAHAMIAN HOUSEKEEPER
to live-In. Must be able to
drive. Phone 5-1137.
C8310
WANTED
EXPERIENCED GARDENER.
Contact Beryl Bain, B and B
Grocery, McCullough Corner
and Sandy Road.

C8321
BOOKKEEPER REQUIRED.
Preferably older person with
good practical experience.
Apply only in own hand-
writing giving full details of
experience to Package Delivery
Service, Ltd., P. 0. Box
N4205, Nassau.
C8318
The Trust Company requires
an individual with excellent
typing, shorthand/speedwriting
abilities, who is fluent in
writing, reading and speaking,
English, Spanish and French.
Position involves work with
Mutual Funds and experience
helpful but not pre-requisite.
BAHAMIANS ONLY NEED
APPLY
Contact Mrs. Emily
Lightbourne at telephone
24240 for appointment.
C8328
EX PERIENCED
BOOKKEEPER REQUIRED -
for International Advertising
Firm. Person of senior
background capable of
handling all books of original
entry to preparation of Profit
and Loss Statement and
*Balance Sheet. Must be able to
perform all functions with
minimal supervision. Up to
$10,000 commensurate with
experience. Please apply in
writing to P. 0. Box N3910,
Nassau.
C8330
THE NASSAU BEACH
HOTEL has a vacancy for the
position of Financial
Comptroller. The applicant
must have had experience in a
similar position with a large
resort hotel. Duties will include
complete responsibility for the
accounting and control
functions within the hotel
including front office, food
and beverage control and all
back office accounting
procedure. Applicant should
also have had some exposure to
hotel data processing
applications. Interested persons
should contact The Director of
Humane Resources, telephone
7-7711.

TRADE SERVICES
C8279



Iokomro Ltd.
Macltey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
'P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVINGSTORAGE
& PACKING


STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795,2-3796,
2-3797,2-3798
Airport 77434


C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.


E DART SERVICES


C8102
AFTER CHRISTMAS MESS?
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCO TEL:51071-2-34.
C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.

WANTED

C8319
ONE ELECTRIC mini
executive office type fridge -
in good condition.
Approximately 20" high.
Telephone 42766.


Which day

is best for

a Want Ad?


That's a
Tribune
Department
fortunately,
day".


Each day there are people
with new wants and needs.
Each day brings new readers,
as well as old ones to the
Classified pages.
So start your ad when your
"want" arises, and cancel it
when it brings results.
Stop-by The Tribune office
to place yours. Every day is
the best day to advertise with
The Tribune Classified Ads.


OecLIAf~i


question The
Classified
hears often. And
there is no "best


I ANNOUNCEMENTS
C 7006
LADIES AND 'GENTLE-
MEN!!! get your newly
styled Holiday garments made
by ABC Tailor Shop Pinders
Point (right near the Baptist
Churchl..

HELP WANTED

C7019
ONE FREEZER MAN able
to work in Freezer under
extreme temperatures, must
have knowledge of different
meats and fish products, also
able to sort and issue meats.
1-3 years experience in
Freezers.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 12
noon only, to King's Inn &
Golf Club, Personnel
Department.
C7013
SOCIAL HOSTESS
REQUIRED: Must have at
least 1 years experience as
Social Hostess or Tour Escort.
Must be 21 or older. Mist be
neatly dressed, have pleasing
personality. Must be able to
work with large sums of
money. Typing experience is
preferred. References are
required along with Police
Certificate.
FRONT OFFICE WORKER:
Must have at least 1 year
experience in Front office
Work. Must be able to work
with NCR 4200 machine. Must
be able to- handle large sums of
money. References are
required along with recent
Police Certificate.
Interested Persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL
AND COUNTRY CLUB,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, PERSONNEL
OFFICE BETWEEN THE
HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. AND
3:00 P.M., MONDAY
THROUGH FRIDAY.
C7012
One JOURNEYMAN/
PLUMBER for all phases of
Plumbing work, estimating,
warehouses rvicing, on call at
night. Ten years experience.
Write: Grand Bahama
Plumbing, P. 0. Box F-2655,
Freeport.

C7023
ONE BOOKKEEPER/
ACCOUNTANT must be
familiar with Methods &
Procedures of handling all
group receivables, setting up
masters, controlling of billings,
distribution of payments and
accounting reports for same.
Male applicant preferred, 3
years hotel experience
required.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to King's Inn & Golf
Club, Personnel Department.


C7022
ONE WINDOW CLEANER -
Male applicant preferred, to
clean Guest Rooms & Villa
windows daily.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9 a.m. and 12 Noon
only, to King's Inn & Golf
Club. Personnel Department.


HIELP UNITED
C7017
Fully experienced mechanic
required for our Service
Department, must have
minimum of 3 years with
knowledge of General Motors
products. Full Company
benefits with factory training.
Bahamians need only apply.
Five Wheels (Grand Bahama)
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.
C7016
Fully experienced body man
required, must be able to repair
all types of vehicles and install
replacement parts and
complete up to re-finishing
stage.
Minimum 3 years experience,
full Company benefits.
Bahamians only need apply.
Five Wheels (Grand Bahama)
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.
C7018
1 PUBLICITY/PUBLIC
RELATIONS OFFICER to
plan and conduct public
relations, publicity and
advertising programmes,
arrange associated photography
and write associated news
releases. Must have a thorough
knowledge of the media both
on island and abroad and be
capable of selecting where
advertising and publicity
releases will create the most
favorable impression.
Applicant must also handle
own correspondence and type
his own news stories. Applicant
will be responsible for
entertaining visiting press
people, radio and television
representatives and other
publicity media representa-
tives. At least four years
experience required.
2 DINING ROOM
CAPTAINS: Experienced in
First Class Hotels, Restaurants
with French Services:
minimum of three years as as a
Captain. Good references and
Police Certificate required.
Please apply to Personnel
Department: El Casino, P. 0.
Box F-787, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. 0. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.
C7020
WANTED Manager for
Heren china and antique end of
luxury Boutique. Must have
experience in projecting sales, a
year in advance and be able to
handle training programmes for
packers and warehouse staff.
Contact: Caprice (Grand
Bahama)Ltd. (352-9414).


C7024
AN EX ECU
SECRETARY able i
general office work an
correspondence or
initiative, also take s
at 80 wpm., 2-!
experience.
Apply: Monday
Friday between 9 a.m
Noon only, to King'
Golf Club, Pe
Department.


HELP HINTED
C7025
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
NIGHT AUDITOR: Must have
experience of working in hotel
doing Food and Beverage Night
Audit. Must be Bahamian.
APPLY HOLIDAY INN -
FREEPORT, P. O. BOX F-760,
373-1333. MISS STAFFORD.


C7021
WANTED EXECUTIVE
Manager to control overall
luxury Boutique operation,
must be able to do
bookkeeping to trial balance
and have 5 years experience in
European buying of antiques,
object d'art and ladies'
fashions. References and
ability to be Bonded required.
Contact: Caprice (Grand
Bahama) Ltd. (352-9414).


The Tribune classifli
bring results-Fat- T
your Adv. Telephone.



IELP WANTED


C7026
CHEFS: TO TAKE
COMPLETE CHARGE OF
STATION. SUPERVISE AND
DIRECT ASSISTANTS IN
PREPARATION OF. FRENCH
& INTERNATIONAL
CUISINE.
APPLY: PERSONNEL
DEPARTMENT, OCEANUS
HOTELS LTD., P. 0. BOX
F-531, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.


Change names?

I'll second that

By Abigail Van Buren
0 im I ChiMCa Tribe-N. Y. MNew Std., lic.
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I named our son John
Allen Jones n after my husband. We used "the second"
because we didn't want to call the baby "Junior." We were
later told that "the second" should not be used when a boy
is named after his father. It is used only when a boy Is
named after another relative bearing the same name. We
know several people who have used "the second" when
naming a son after his father. Have all these people made
a mistake or has the rule changed?
In this state [Tennessee] we have one year in which to
make a change in a name without any difficulties. Please
tell us whether we should change "the second" to "Junior."
NEEDS TO KNOW
DEAR NEEDS: Change your son's name from "the see-
ond" to "Junior." A child bearing the same name as his
father Is Junior. If a child bears his grandfather's name,
which is different from his father's name, he is "the see-
ond." If grandfather, son and grandson all have the same
name, the father of course is "Junior" and the grandson is
"the third."
The use of "the second" indicates that the bearer of the
name is a cousin, nephew, or grandson of the original
bolder of It.

DEAR ABBY: We are two girls who are having a big
argument. She's 17 and I'm 18. She's a virgin and I'm not,
and she says a guy can tell whether a girl is a virgin or
not by the way she walks.
I say a girl doesn't walk any differently after she's
gone all the way with a guy than she did before.
We'll be looking for your answer.
WAITING IN COLORADO
DEAR WAITING: You can't tell if a girl is a virgin by
the way she walks. But you can sometimes tell by the way
she TALKS.
DEAR ABBY: The other day I was with a young friend
who told me [with no shame whatsoever] that she was
using her husband's telephone credit card given to him by
his firm to be used for business calls only. She bragged
that she made long distance telephone calls to her parents
and friends all over the United States and thinks nothing of
it. And she said her husband said it was okay.
This young woman has four children and she would be
furious if one of her children "stole" anything. Yet that is
exactly what she is doing. I can't understand some parents.
No wonder their children don't respect them.
I am sure her husband would lose his job if his firm
ever caught on. Or do all businesses expect a certain
amount of chiseling? NO NAME, NATURALLY
DEAR NO NAME: I'm sure they don't. Your friend Is
not only dishonest, she's stupid. Somebody should tell her
.husband to wise up, get his credit card back and go
straight. Companies cheek p on that sort of thing.

CONFIDENTIAL TO WORRIED IN CEDAR RAPIDS:
My doctor said: "Tel the 49-year-old lady with the 52-year-
old husband to keep her guard up. She is not beyond the
age of child-bearing."
Problems? Trust Abby. Feor a personal reply, write to
ABBY, BOX 7sN, L. A., CALIF. 9i and eaelese a
stamped, addressed eeveiope.


GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TELa.3M668


_____________ a I


ed Ads
'o place
352-6608





TIVE
to handle
id answer
I own
horthand
5 years
through
n. and 12
's Inn & ;
irsonnel


_, -t(gh iltbutt


a II


- i i


-7


THE NASSAU CIVIC
BALLET SCHOOL will
commence its Winter Term
session on Monday, January
8th. For information please
call 5-2353.

C8335
ENROLL FOR EASTER
TERM
Typing
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Commercial Mathematics
Office Practice
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier (NCR
4200)
Dictaphone-Typist
Filing
Telex Operator
B.J.C. and G.C.E. Classes:-
English
Mathematics
Literature
History
Spanish
NASSAU ACADEMY OF
BUSINESS
Shirley Street opp. Collins
Avenue Phone 24993

SIN MEMORIAl
C8338
,A


-I


I


. L


-V


I


L -I = . . ..











Thursday, January 4, 1973.


Qhbr rribunr


r MICOlll


"Why didn't someone TELL ME it would be so easy to
get credit after you got a steady office job? "

RKupert and the Beanstalk--44
IrI i 40 rfm


After all the excitement,
the giant prepares a meal of
runner beans. How I shall
enjoy them I" he declares.
"It will be a new and tasty
dish for me." "And if you
save some of the bean seeds,"
says Rupert, you'H be able to
grow some magic beanstalks
ALL RIGHTS


of your own." The giant is
highly pleased, and when it is
time for the little friends to
leave he bids them a warm
farewell. "I would like to see
the place you call Nutwood,"
he smiles. "Later on today I
will climb down the beanstalk
and pay your people a visit."
RESERVED


U' ot m W rJulnioer
B IN other 9 uW. e

Brother Juniper


"With him it's the spirit that counts; NOT the letter."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE

1. Elongated 27. Orange seed
5. Hauteur 29. Japanese
8. Man's admiral
nickname 30. Siouan
11. Bouquet 32. Base
12. Extinct bird 34. ---Rogers
13. Short for a 35. Musical
kind of lace exercise
14. Blood fluids 37. Desert alkali
15. Semi 39. Sublease
17. Coarse 41. Shout
hulled corn 45. Con
18. Special 47. Heavy wagon
19. Charioteer 48. Peacock
21. Arthur Halley butterflies
novel 49. One In Bonn
24. Write down 50. Escalate


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
51. Wager 3. Standard
52. Deserter 4. Map
53. Termites
DOWN 5. Endanger
6. Cajole
1. Waste 7. Soil
2. Concert halls 8. Pilot
r-,5- 9. Bleat
10. Annex
S16. Rapid run
20. Risen
22. Conceit
23. Hollywood's
Myrna
24.-- -Namath
SI 25. Mel.--
26. Sightseer
28. Forewarning
31. Paradise
33. Ourselves
3 36. Church officer
38. Mythical
I 4 ? monster
40. Well-known
"4 pseudonym
42. Ireland
43. Final
44. Harsh alkalis
1 45. Sister
~.6 ..... 46. Trouble


CARROLL RIGHTnR'S



from she Carrel Ri- ter hlatetute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: After completing in
a sensible manner whatever remaining duties
face you, you are able to get some brilliant new ideas on how
to proceed best in the days ahead. Discuss with bigwigs the
assistance they will give you to make your life function more
successfully Plan trip if you wish one.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) You find you can easily get the
cooperation of bigwigs for the fine ideas you have in mind, so
see them early Participate in civic work you can do very well
and make headway in this fashion, also. Avoid one who
bickers.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Make new contacts and get
into new outlets that can cause your life to be more interesting
and profitable in the future Communicate with
out-of-towners and secure the data you need. Take care you
do not go off on tangents.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Make an alliance with one
who can aid you in handling responsibilities in a more efficient
and easy way Mate wants you to be more open-minded to
ways of advancing. Do just that Avoid whatever has an
element of danger in it.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You are now able
to meet the associates who can give you the backing you need
for important projects. Plan what must be done to improve
your image with the public in general and do it. Stop laboring
under unnecessary handicaps.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You have new ideas that can help
you work more successfully with co-workers, so both of you
will get ahead faster Plan how to improve the state of your
health. Become a more effective, successful person.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Get into that amusement you
have in mind that will lift you out of the slough of
despondency you find yourself in now Take only oongenials
along with you. Make sure you drive with utmost care, though.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) You know what it is that kin
expect from you and can do your utmost to please them.
Show you can be very practical where the financial side of life
is concerned. Take the lead now
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Impart those new ideas to
others who can cooperate with you for mutual success. Make
the future much brighter, more constructive. Get the
information you need so you can increase prosperity you now
enjoy.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You have aspirations
to become more successful and you have hit on the right
formula today, so put it in action quickly. Follow your
hunches which are working efficiently. Take it easy tonight.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You can add much to
prestige you now enjoy by gadding about socially in right
circles, stating your aims to key persons. Get on the good side
of experts, bigwigs. Avoid one who is antagonistic to your best
interests.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Contacting those who
have the facts you require to make your dreams materialize is
wise now. Your intuitive faculties are working well, so follow
their promptings. Get on the right track to reach your
destination.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) It is wise now to make
contacts that are helpful in your career, and to be active and
enthusiastic. Social affairs can be most worthwhile in the
evening. Avoid one who never fails to raise your ire.


Bridge
Iv VICTOR MOLLO
THE vanishing trIoK isn't alway-s
the orerogative of Indian takers.
Here it is, performed by Irving
Hose, bridge host at the thocen-
6ric Club, playing against Scot-
land min the Camroso up, the
home international.
North
V Q 7 6 5 4
0 10
4 A54
West East
*KQJ 3 4942
V KJ32 V --
OKQ2 0A98"73
696 4QJ 10 87
South
4 10 8
V A 10 9 8
0 J 6 5 4
4K 32
CONTRACT: 4V DOUBLED.
What will be the result? A
knowledgeable England sup-
porter assessed the damage at
500 and Quicklv left the room.
West led a trump, and coming
in with a diamond at trick two.
led a second trump. Rose. South.
won in his hand and ducked a
spade 'to West. who returned
another wpade. Having lost two
tricks, Irving Ross still had a
tIrump and a club to lose. Now
wab'jh the vanishlin trick.
Qo.ng up with the 4A. Rose
ruffed a apade, ruffed a dia-
mond, and after cashing the 4K
and 4A, ruffed dummy's last
ipade 'with the ViA. !Now camne
the fourth diamond, the coup de
grace, West's last two cards were
the (,KJ and in no way could he
prevent the VQ poised over him,
from scoring declare's tenth
trick.
A third trump from West.
when he is in with a spade, costs
a trump trick, but beats the
contract.

,TARGET**BBBBIBBB^BBBB**^^^


S OW many
W E words of
W E r ou'r letters
or more can
Iyou make
S rom the
letters shown
here ? In
minakIn a
A N word, Lach
S T letter may
be used
o nc e only.
EaLh word must contain the
large letter, and there must be
at least one eight-letter word In
the list. No plurals; no foreign
words; no proper names. TO-
DAY'S TARGET: 32 words
good 42 words, very good; 52
words, excellent. Solution
on Monday.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Acid anil caddy candid CAN-
DIDLY candy cany clad clan
clay dally dandy dial dyad
dyadic Inlay lacy lady laic laid
lain land nail.


Chess
By LEONARD BARDIN


Whye to move; Who hass
the better game and why?
Whlte has already moved his
king and so cannot castle.
jwo Polish maters and an
East German annotator all
made a Jhasn of this tricky
tournament piay ending,
which Is offered as a warm-
,up for competitors in this
weekend's Evening Standard
London congress.
Par times: 2 minutes
chess master; 5 minutes
dheea e-ert,; 10 minutes
county player; 20
inlnmtes, club s dlandrd;
30 m I n u it e s, average;
50 minutes, novice.
bu.uT'ION No 9548 -


Chess Solution
With correct play, Black
regains his lost knight with
a pawn interest and White
has to struggle for a draw U.
after 1 K-B-2. KtxKt 2 -J
KtxKt. RxKt ch; 3 K-Kt3. 0
RxQKtP.
But both masters thouf t
White was winning I After 1
K-Q2, Black resigned
believing that 1. .. KtxKt;
2 R--I1 leaves White a
piece up. Thcy missed 2 . .
Kt-Kt61; 3 RxR, Kt-B8
ch; 4 K-K2, KtxR and
Black either wins one of the
KKtPs or has a strong edge
after 5 K-B3, Kt-B7; 6
R-KtI. k-K-f
No better for White is 1
K-B2. KtxKt; 2 R-K1, Kt
--9B/; 3 RxR, Kt-Q8 ch;
4 K-B3, RxR ch; 5 K-B4.
P--KR31; 6 Kt--Jt3. P-Kt4
oh; 7 K-BS, KtxP and O
Black should win.


i!e---y^ CR S -odizL


THE Make You Very CROSS-word. The one with no numbers and.
except for the first In each section, no order to the clues. One
hint by compiler TIM McKAY : Hunt out the eight-letter words
-they are easy to pla"e. Solution on Monday.


Battle. (5)
ieottish mountain. (3)
rart of a circle. (3)
SOld lAdam's mate. (3)
- Open space (4)
Hurry. s)
J -- British lrIme Minister.
Clues Down
S- Army order. (5. 4)
Involved. (9)
Untruth, (3)
i-reak. (4)
Crowded. (0)
Dismay. (4)
- - - harvest. 44)

-- -- (-) -Sea

Clues Across Iand mea-
sure. (4)
featured In many a painting Get rid of
(I 4) that beard.
I4ast word. I[ $
Ma well e solid. () olf title vi
Creepj creature. () (4) r*estrd'
Trveui i. (cL3. 4)
Bishop's Rear. (S)


34e Comic Pare


I REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS I


I JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLSi
WHAT CAN I UNDERSTAND THAT YOU TOOK I DON'T 1 THINK YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN,
HELLO, LIEUTENANT! I DO FOR ROCKY SILVESTER OUT TO KNOW WHAT LIEUTENANT DO YOU MAKE A REPORT
MAY I TALK TO YOU YOU, MR. SPENCER FARMS TO SEE YOU MEAN BY TO THE EFFECT THAT ONE ROCKY SILVESTER
FOR A FEW MINUTES? DRIVER? HIS WIFE! WAS IT 'OFFICIAL' ASKED YOU ABOUT A MISSING WIFE AND
OFFICIAL BUSINESS ? BUSINESS! YOU TOOK HIM IN YOUR CAR TO CHECK
OUT WHETHER OR NOT SHE WAS
AT SPENCER FARMS ?


S 1-4








APARTMENT 3-G B AlexI Kotzlcg


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard

YE, IN MY IDEALISTIC THERE'S AN OLD SAYING: "IF A I 1 AS A CARD-CARRYING
DOE YOUR SECRET AND IMPETUOUS YOUTH;- MAN 15 INOT A SOCIALIST AT 20. UP TO THEN MEMBER OF THE
INVOLVE A MAN JENNY-AND I WERE HE HA NO HEART; IF HE YOU WERE A COMMUNIST PARTY./
NAMED ENNIN, A CIATES CONTINUES TO SE ONE, i O0CIALUT
MAJOR HE1HAS NONHEADM, WA I
DISILLUSIONED!


7


I^


MEN


w


RR- -- - I -


#I IT4JI
I1. "-- 1
UZ1RS6
A 0; Uo"


I










(Ub Wrtbunt


Thursday, January 4, 1973.


Stingrays fined$5per.



player for walkout


-3 NEW TEAMS NEXT SEASON?

By IVAN JOHNSON
FOLLOWING A MEETING of the New Providence American
Football League Committee last night it was announced today by
president Geof Williams that each member of the Stingrays team
must pay a fine of $5 for walking off the field and refusing to
play in the Crawfish Bowi game against the Jets last Sunday.
Mr. Williams also said that game.
any player who refused to pay Several plays later Melvin
the fine of $5 would be Burnside of the Stingrays
subsequently banned from tackled Earl Bostwick, the Jets'
playing in the NPAFL until star running back when he was,
such time as he decided to pay in the opinion of the referee.
the fine. 'out of hounds'. The referee
Last Sunday, American subsequently awarded a 'pile
Football fans witnessed the on' toul against the Stingrays
biggest anti-climax of the whereupon the Stingrays held a
NPAFL season at the Sports brief parley to decide whether
Centre, when the Stingrays they should continue playing
walked off the field of play t he general feeling was that the
during the Crawfish Bowl late rcferee was biased in his
in the third quarter with the decisions towards the Jets.
score standing at 14-12 in the At first it seemed that the
favour of their opponents, the Stingrays had chosen to play
Nassau Jets. n b hut one or two vociferous
At this point the game wais fans soon changed their minds
set for a thrilling ending with and to the ama/ement of all
the Jets leading by the narrow present the fans saw the
margin of two points and one c\,,dus from the field of the
quarter of the game remaining. c ine Stingrays team
Unfortunately the Stingrays NOT JUSTIF 1I1I)
chose to give the Jets thI Whether the decisions of the
coveted Crawfish Bowl bY refcrce were right or not the
leaving the field thus making Stingrays were not justified in
the Jets Champions of the walking off the field and
Bahamas and Leagit refusing to play.
Champions for the !972 In any game the decision of
NPAFL season. the referee is final.
DISCONTENT Stingrays central captain
The Stingrays began to show Irrington 'Minky' Isaacs said
a certain amount of discontent that he felt that the $5 dollar
earlier in the game when Allen fine was undoubtedly justified
Ingraham was ejected from the and that his team should not
game for fighting with Frankie havc left the field.
Knowles of the Jets. The With regards to the incident
Stingrays felt that both Isaacs said he and several other
Ingraham and Knowles should players had persuaded the
have been ejected from the ,oh,,r mermrishr of the tpim


lack Nicklaus heads

144 pros at

Los Angeles Open
LOS ANGELES (AP) Jack
Nicklaus, looking for
improvement over the
magnificent season he had a
year ago, loomed in awesome
fashion ahead of the impressive
field arrayed for the
$135,000 Glen Campbell Los
Angeles Open golf tournament.
The 72-hole event that
begins Thursday returns to the
Riviera Country Club for the
first time in more than 20
years, a move that has helped
lure an extremely impressive
field for this event that
inaugurates the 1973 tour
schedule.
Nicklaus, for example, is
playing in the Los Angeles
tournament for the first time
in six years. Sam Snead is
entered for the first time since
the early '50s. Julius Boros is
back for the first time in a
decade.
Some of the men who won
$100,000 or more last season
are in the lineup of 144 pros,
along with almost all the 1972
tournament winners and such
multiple champions as
defending titleholders George
Archer, British Open champion
Lee Trevino, Jerry Heard, Grier
Jones and Australian Bruce
Devlin.
And, too, there's the
still-impressive figure of Arnold
Palmer, England's Tony Jacklin
and Australian Bruce
Crampton.


to continue playing but
unfortunately, shortly after
this they chose to pay more
attention to the fans than to
the coach and himself and the
minority who wanted to play
on were outnumbered by those
who chose to leave the field.
This resulted in the exodus of
the team.
SOME REFUSED
When the NPAFL
announced that each member
of the Stingrays would have to
pay a $5 fine several of the
Stingrays players reportedly
said they would refuse to pay
the fine.
However, captain 'Minky'
Isaacs said this morning that a
meeting of the team would be
held today and he was
confident that a:i his players
would be persuaded to pay the
fine. "If any of them remained
adamant about not paying the
fine then presumably they no
longer wished to continue
playing American Football,' he
added.
Next season 'Minky' Isaacs
will be captaining one of three
new teams that are expected to
join in the NPAFL namely
the Classic Pros, which will be
sponsored by Classic Beauty
Salon. Isaacs has officially
announced his resignation from
the Stingrays.
As regards the two other
teams that will be playing in
the NPAF League next season,
NPAFL president, Geof
Williams, said that details and
information about the teams
could not be disclosed until
early next week, following a
meeting of the NPAFL
Committee.


Advice to hooKers


V v^Tum CLuJIMAO '(,



Hitting low into the wind
--", 61 N S-M'M


JUNOS VOLLEYBALL CLUB of Ontario, Canada, presently in the Bahamas for the
Bahamas' Third Invitational Volleyball Tournament are from left (standing: Wanda
Fracezewski (manager), Judy Alaszkiewiez, Lynn McAvoy, Denise McLafferty, Debbie
Seeley, Gail Beach and Frans Wigston. Kneeling from left: Jane McDonald, Mary
Chisholm, Cherese Quigley, Marion Munroe (captain) and Marilyn Ellis.


CBS sell NY Yankees



for $10 million--$3.2m.



less than bought for

By HUBERT MIZELL
NEW YORK (AP) Baseball's tradition-rich New York
Yankees were sold Wednesday with CBS receiving $3.2 million


less than it pa;' for the American
"It's the best buy in sports
today," said Cleveland
shipbuilder George
Steinbrenner, part of a 12-man
syndicate which paid the
network $10 million cash for
the Yankees.
"The Yankees belong in
Yankee Stadium. And, they
should always be winners. We
don't plan to move anywhere
except upward in the
standings."
Michael Burke, a former
CBS vice president assigned to
operate the Yankees,
negotiated the purchase with
his former boss, William Paley,
president of the network.
Burke, who remains as
Yankee president, said CBS
"broke even" over the years
despite the reduced selling
price. He said some years were
financially profitable. "CBS
was a good owner, one that
showed great patience and
strength during some difficult
years." he said.
EMBARRASSED
Burke, no longer associated
with CBS, admitted the
network was embarrassed at
times to have a team that had
become a loser after
dominating major league
baseball for more than 40
years.
New York's pinstripers were
artistic failures compared to
the old days. The Yanks had
won 29 pennants and 14 of
the last 16 when the
network took control. In the
eight seasons since, New York
finished no higher than third
under the CBS eye.
Attendance slumped to
966,328 in 1972, the first time
the Yankees failed to crack a
million since World War II.
Meanwhile, the Mets were
packing in 2,134,185 across
town.
BACK ON TOP
"We've won our way back to
the top," said Burke, brushing
his mod gray hair. "Two
excellent hitters, Graig Nettles
and Matty Alou, have been
obtained. We think we can take
all the marbles in 1973."
Ralph Houk signed a


League team in 1964.
three-year extension to his
contract as Yankee manager
late last summer. Houk, as the
rest of the organization, "will
remain intact," according to
Burke.
Steinbrenner, 43, has
dabbled in sports ownership
before. He once had the
Cleveland Pipers of Abe
Saperstein's ill-fated American
Basketball League. He currently
owns a chunk of the Chicago
Bulls in the National Basketball
Association.
One of the other owners
may be Lamar Hunt, owner of
the National Football League
Kansas City Chiefs, who is
related to Steinbrenner as
fellow member of the board of
directors of the Bulls.
ABSENTEES
"We plan absentee
ownership as far as running the
Yankees is concerned," said
Steinbrenner, the president of
the American Shipbuilding Co.
of Cleveland. "We're not going
to pretend we're something we
aren't. I'll stick to building
ships."
The announcement of the
sale, which must be approved
by the league, came in a
private club at Yankee
Stadium. Retired uniforms of
Yank greats decked the wall,
the No. 3 of Babe Ruth, the 4
of Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio's
5 and Mickey Mantle's 7.
Yankee heroes from the
glory years of the Fifties were
there, like Phil Rizzuto. You
could glance toward centre
field, where the famous
monuments honour Ruth,
former manager Miller Huggins
and onetime owner Col. Jacob
Ruppert.
SYankee Stadium, baseball's
most famous structure, is
crumbling with age after more
than 50 years and will soon
undergo a $24 million
facelifting.
Crews will begin tearing
away and rebuilding after the
Yankees complete their
upcoming season. It won't be
finished until 1976, and the
Yanks will share Shea Stadium
with the Mets in 1974-75.


ENGLAND LOSE

TEST TO INDIA
(ALCIITTA, JAN. 4 (AP)-India
swon the Second Test against
England Thursday by 28 runs,
levelling the series at one each.
Tihe visiting MCC team began the
game in the morning in a
dominating position, needing only
87 runs with six wickets in hand.
But by lunch England had lost five
wickets for 55 runs.
The last wicket fell five minutes
after lunch, when England's second
innings score was 163.
Final scores are: India 210 and
155. England 174 and 163.
in a game of fluctuating
fortunes, the spinners dictated the
termnis Thursday. B. S.
Chandrasekshar took 4 wickets for
27 runs and Bishen Singh Bedi two
for 25.
The first batsman to go was
Tony Greig, leg before wicket to
Chandrasekshar for an addition of
seven runs to his overnight 60. His
fifth wicket partnership with Mike
Denness had yielded 97 invaluable
runs.
Alan Knott followed soon after,
caught. Durrani off Chandrasekhar
for two runs.
Denness, who had given
magnificent support in his stand
with Greig, was then L.B.W. to
Chandrasekshar for an addition of
four runs to his overnight 28.
Pat Pocock was caught and
bowled by Bedi for four and Der-k
Underwood caught by Wadekar off
Bedi for four. The ninth wicket fell
with the score at 138 runs.
Chris Old and Bob Cottam were
at the crease with 16 and II
respectively at lunch. But after
three runs had been added Cottam
was L.B.W. to Chandrasekshar for
13.
England won the First Test il
New Delhi by six wickets. The
Third Test of the five test-series will
begin in Madras Jan. 12.

AUSSIES WIN TEST

BY 92-4 SERIES
MELBOURNE, JAN. 3 (AP)-
Pakistan, left to score 293 runs in
325 minutes to win the Second
Test against Australia, went down
to a 92-run defeat here Wednesday.
Australia, which also won the
First Test, thus clinched the
three-match series.
Pakistan had bundled out the last
two Australian tailenders for only
nine runs and approached the
batting task with plenty of
confidence for the pitch was still
easy-paced and appeared full of
runs.
But in less than half an hour
opening batsman Saeed and Sadiz
were both hack in the dressing
room for only 15 runs.
Fast bowler Dennis Lillee started
Pakistan's troubles when he had
Saeed caught at mid on. Sadiz,
batting under the handicap of three
stitches in the webbing of his right
hand, was unlucky to get a good
ball from Walker which lifted and
swung away late for a catch at the
wicket.
Majid Khan stayed with Zaheer
Abbas until lunch at 60 for two.
But 20 minutes after lunch
Zaheer pushed a ball from Mallett
in front of square leg and run.
O'Keefe's perfect throw to Mallett
caught Abbas out of his ground.
Majid, with a mixture of brilliant
and uncertain strokes, went to 47,
then tried to glance Lillee down to
fine leg. All he did was get a very
faint edge and Marsh gleefully
grabbed the catch.
Then as though to prove it was
not Parkistan's day, Asif and
Mushtaq became involved in a
horrible run out mess. Both'
batsmen finished at the same end
and Mushtaq had to depart for 13.
Asif, 32 at the time, made only
five more before cracking a short
ball from Walker to be caught
behind point and Pakistan was 138
for six.
Wasim tried to play an
out-of-character innings by
defending but only succeeded in
being bowled by Walker.
Pakistan's position deteriorated
further half an hour after tea when
Saleem Altaf pushed a ball from
O'Keefe hard into the pitch only to
see it spring back and slowly roll
onto the leg stump.
Intikhab Alam cut loose towards
the end and reached a brave 48
before being the last wicket to fall,
caught at first slip.

COCA COLA


ONLY 7 TEAMS IN VOLLEYBALL TOURNEY



Canadian girls' team defeat



Bahamas in 3 straight sets

LACK OF PLAYING FACILITIES has not only affected the resumption of the Bahamas
Amateur Basketball Association's 1972-'73 series but also the number of entries in Saturday's
Bahamas' Third Invitational Volleyball Tournament.


Due to limited space,
president of the Bahamas
Volleyball Federation Dr.
Norman Gay said the
Association had to cut back on
the number of entries for
Saturday's one day
tournament.
The Federation sent out
invitations to more than 20
teams including defending
Bahamas Invitational
champions, Sarasota Volleyball
Club, and Miami Invitational
rivals, Lake Como, both of
which have already sent in
their rosters.
Expecting to use two gyms,
it soon came to the knowledge
of the Federation that only
one gym the Eastern
Secondary School gym
would be available. A
spokesman for the B.V.F. said
that only seven teams are now
expected, including the three
Bahamian teams.
LACK OF FUNDS
Of the other foreign teams
now expected only the Junos
Volleyball Club of Ontario,
Canada, has arrived for the
tournament which is only
two days away. It is
understood that due to lack of
financial backing, the Bahamas
team is not able to host a
Haitian team that had accepted
an invitation to attend.
Playing exhibition warm-up
matches against the Bahamas
Ladies National team,
Junos for the second
straight night last night
defeated the Bahamas' team
15-12, 15-4 and 15-11.
However, there are high
hopes in the Bahamas camp
that Flo Rolle, Barbara
Knowles, Margaret Albury,
Hattie Moxey and Wendy
Jackman will help pull the
Bahamas to a respectable
position.
Although the calibre of
volleyball playing in the
Bahamas surprises most
countries with whom they
compete, "in order to improve,
you have to play teams that are
better than you are,"
commented Dr. Gay, coach of
the Bahamas' ladies team.
Fran Wigston, coach of the
Junos, made the same
observation after watching the
Bahamas. "What they need is a
little more competition," said
Wigston.




NORWICH IN CUP FINAL
NORWICH, ENGLAND, Jan. 3
(AP)--Unrated Norwich moved into
its first ever Soccer Cup Final with
a I-0 victory over Chelsea Tuesday
night.
The goal, brilliantly headed in by
Steve Govier from a corner in the
50th minute of the second leg, gave
Norwich a 3-0 aggregate score in
the League Cup semifinal.
Norwich, promoted to the first
division this season, now meets
Tottenham in the final at Wembley,
March 3.
AUSSIE TOURING TEAM
SYDNEY, JAN. 4 (Ai')-The
Australian hoard of cricket control
announcedd the following IS players
have been chosen to tour the West
Indies later this year:
J. Benaud, G. S. Chappell. I.M
Chappell. P. Edwards, J. R.
Hammond. T. J. Jenner, D). D.
Lillee, R. W. Marsh, R. A. L..
Massie, J. J. O'Keefe, 1. R. Redpath
K. R. Stackpole, M. Walker, K. D.
Walters, J. Watkins.
I. M. Chappell was named
captain and Stackpole vice captain
ABC PAY $25M. FOR
TV SUMMER GAMES
NEW YORK (AP)-The ABC
Television network said Wednesday
it has bought the disputed U.S.
television rights to the 1976
Summer Olympics at an
unprecedented price of $25 million.
Its announcement came in the
wake of earlier charges by the NBC
Television network of foul play in
preliminary negotiations for rights
to the Games, to be held in
Montreal. Canada.

NBA GAMES
Baltimore 89, Cleveland 80
Detroit 119, Phoenix 105
Houston 123, Boston 112
Milwaukee 105, Atlanta 97
Seattle 107, Kansas City
-Omaha 100


OPEN SUNDAY


STARTS NEW BGA SEASON


THIS WEEKEND sees the
opening of the 1973 BGA
Season with the Coca Cola
Open at Paradise Island Golf
Course on Sunday, January 7.
The tournament will be a
baseball competition played
over 18 holes with numerous
other side attractions attached
to the tournament such as a
driving contest nearest the pin,


best dressed team and others.
The defending winners of
the 1972 Coca Cola Open are
Basil Smith and BGA
vice-president, Freddie Higgs,
who returned a two over par
74 to slip past Senator Gerald
Cash and Valdo Prosa
Contestants for the
competition may enter at the
Blue Hill Golf Club


UP, UP AND AWAY
JOHN WILLIAMS of McAlpine leaps into the air to try
and volley the ball into the Red Lion Goal while Don
Maples (right) of the Lions attempts to block, being tightly
marked by Dave Jenner of McAlpine behind Maples. This
was part of the action in Monday's President's Cup match
at Clifford Park when defending champions, Clan
McAlpine, went down in defeat 3-1 to the Lions. It was
McAlpine's second loss in two days, as they-. lost 2-1 to
Tropigas in the Sunday League.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


PRO BALL PLAYERS MAY

BE BANNED FROM B.A.B.A.
BAHAMAS AMATEUR Basketball Association's Nassau
and Paradise League leaders Beck's Cougars and Kentucky
Colonels are expected to come under fire tonight during a
meeting between the Association and club members called
to discuss the status of an amateur athlete.
Beginning at 8:30 at St. Joseph's School, the Association
will also discuss the future of the B.A.B.A.'s 1972-'73 series
which was scheduled to begin last night but had to be
cancelled due to the lack of playing facilities.
It is understood that players who have participated
professionally in a sport will not be allowed to play in the
B.A.B.A. series. Players affected will be brothers Wenty and
Eddie Ford, and Roosevelt Turner of the Kentucky
Colonels and Fred "Papa" Smith and Jason Moxey of
Beck's Cougars, all of whom participated at some time in
pro baseball.
Sterling Quant, also of the Kentucky Colonels, who was
drafted by the Dallas Chaparells of the American Basketball
Association will have his status scrutinized. Although
drafted, Quant, it is understood, never had a contract with
the team.


FOR SALE














A NEW YEARS GIFT TO THE WHOLE FAMILY
1972 MODEL DREAMBOAT. TWO 140 H.P.
MERCRUISERS AND LOADED WITH MANY
VALUABLE EXTRAS. SLEEPS 4 PEOPLE.
$13,500.

TEL: 2-1012

ASK FOR RICK. (day only)

-- a


I.


has a vacancy for a


MANAGEMENT

SECRETARY

who must be a Bahamian Citizen

Candidate should have several years secretarial
experience, and be proficient in shorthand
and typing.

Starting salary will depend on qualifications
and experience.

Written applications should be made to P. 0.
Box N3717. Nassau, giving details of past
experience.


U'


Lwow LIC) A P I A Y r R S G 0 1- F CA AS