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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03236
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 3, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03236

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(Regitred with PoeutMOr of Bahamas for postae concession within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


SRIqal laNo Ioic

) DISTRIBL. 1) BY

I AUIEY C.KEEP
I ast Stret S south Phone 2-4796


LONG ISLAND ELECTION HEARING

BEGINS BEFORE 2 LOCAL JUDGES


the hotel.
In an attempt last inonth to
repossess the hotel gkpertise
locked the hotel's dofs and
arriving guests stood outside
for about an hour before,,Ahey
were permitted to enter and
register.
Expertise, which owns the
114-room building, ran the
hotel since October 10 "under
an arrangement with and as
agents" for the Canadian
group, who are the operators.
According to an earlier
statement by Expertise,
Granite is "responsible for the
payment of utilities and all
operational expenses, including
the management charges of
Expertise."
In a press release Expertise
said that the "expenses have
not been paid to date by
Granite."
As a result manager Mike
Mosko and the Expertise
management team resigned.
However, Granite has
continued to operate the hotel,
which has been fully booked
over the Christmas holidays.
DENIAL
Granite denied that
Expertise owns the hotel.
Granite president Gustav
Fisher told The Tribune that
his company took possession
of the hotel on November 23
under an amendment to the
original purchase agreement.
Under this agreement Mr.
Fisher said Granite got
immediate possession of the
property as owners. Under that
arrangement Expertise was no
longer owners, but mortgagees,
he said.
Mr. Roy Henderson,
attorney for Granite, admitted
today that Granite had not
paid some of the rent that fell
due under the November
agreement. But, he said, this
was because Expertise did not
have the hotel in full
operational condition.
His clients maintain that if
they set off Expertise's costs to
make the hotel fully
operational against what is
owed by them in rent and
payment for utilities, there
would still be a balance in their
favour.
For example, said Mr.
Henderson, the Steak House,
which can seat 70 persons, has
never been used because it has
not been airconditioned by
Expertise.
Mr. Henderson said his
clients were "still operating on


ITALIAN GLASS

END TABLES


i DOLLY NAMSON
FURNITURE
NASSAU-FREEPORT


a conditional licence because
all the work at the hotel has
not been completed."
Granite had been caused
"considerable embarrassment",
Mr. Henderson said, "by
Expertise's announcement that
the hotel was closed. There are
still a number of people who
believe the hotel is closed."
OPERATIONAL
However, the hotel is fully
operational under Granite
management, and except for
the lower on December 19
when guests were locked out
by Expertise, the hotel's doors
have never closed.
"As a matter of fact we have
200 guests, leaving by bus right
now and that number coming
in to replace them in an hour,"
a hotel spokesman said
yesterday.
He said that in the past few
days the hotel had one vacant
room. "It is a little quiet this
week, but we are full next
week," he said.
Granite's subsidiary, Vista
Tours, Ltd., has its charter
planes bringing guests to Blue
Vista "fairly full" to April 14.
Expertise's writ dated
December 20, asks the court
for a declaration that Granite
"is not entitled by itself, its
servants agents licensees or
invitees to enter into or remain
upon the plaintiff's premises
known as the Blue Vista Hotel
or the plaintiff's adjoining
property known as Stella Maris
or any portion thereof situate
in the Western District" of
New Providence.
RESTRAINT
The claim further asks for an
injuction to restrain Granite,
their "servants, agents,
licensees, invitees or
otherwise" from entering or
remaining on Expertise's
premises.
Expertise also claims damage
for trespass and /or in the
alternative possession of the
premises and rental from the
premises at the rate agreed
between Expertise and
Granite's agents or assignors,
Nicholas Bullut and Michael
Soer "as being applicable from
the period 10th October 1972
until possession is delivered
up."
And/or in the alternative
damages for use and
occupation of Expertise's
premises, or in the further
alternative mesnee profits from
the said 10th day of October
1972 or such other date as the
court may deem fit, until
possession is delivered up."
The writ was served
yesterday at the chambers of
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
the firm representing Granite.
Granite intends to contest
the action and will enter an
appearance within the next
eight days.


Mr. Livingston Smith,
returning officer for the
constituency during the
election, declared the
September 19 election void
when both Mr. Fountain and
the PLP's Philip Smith polled
473 regular votes, and called
for a fresh poll on October 6.


Price: 15 Cents


PANAM TO


CUT FARES


ACROSS THE


"Elections Court has no





jurisdictionm-Jamaican QC



By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE ELECTIONS COURT has no jurisdiction under the Representation of the People Act to hear a claim by the
Free National Movement's Cyril Fountain that he should have been declared the winner in the September 19
election at North End Long Island, it was claimed this morning.


The FNM voters boycotted the
second election and Mr. Smith
was declared the winner.
In his petition Mr. Fountain
claims that a scrutiny of
protest votes cast and a
recount would show he should
have been declared the winner
in the September 19 election.


Jamaican Vivien Blake, Q.C.,
representing Mr. Smith,
declared at the opening of the
Elections Court hearing this
morning:
"The returning officer,
having declared the election of
September 19 void, and
pursuant to that declaration a
fresh poll having been taken,
this court on a proper
construction of the
Representation of the People
Act has no jurisdiction to
entertain the petition or to
grant the petitioner the relief
which he is claiming or any
part of it."
Mr. Blake, referring to
several sections of the Act,
backed his claim with two
submissions: that a returning
officer's declaration of an
election as void is
"unchallengeable," and that no
election petition can be
entertained in respect of an
election in which no candidate
has been declared the winner.
Developing his argument,
Mr. Blake said:
"The respondent (Mr. Philip
Smith) is submitting that on
-the basis of the undisputed
facts and even assuming the
petitioner can establish all the
facts in dispute, this court has
no jurisdiction to entertain the
petition."
Hie referred to the returning
officer's responsibility under
the act to decide whether a
protest vote would be counted,
and the fact that the returning
officer's decision was subject
to review by the Elections
Court on petition.
But, "the fact that any such
decision can be reviewed is
quite irrelevant to the
statutory consequences of an
equality of votes."
PROVISION
Certain sections of the Act
"make provision as to the
manner in which a contested
election is to be resolved
subsequent to recount by the
returning officer, and those
sections deal with four distinct
cases or situations which might
arise after the recount and the
statute makes provision as to
what is to happen to resolve
the contest."
He said all four cases
involved the return of one
candidate as duly elected and
the application by another
candidate for the Election
Court's scrutiny of protest
ballots.
Because of that, Mr. Blake
said, the intention of the Act
was that "only after the return
of the (election) writ to
Parliament (in this case on
October 18) is the return
challengeable in this court."
No writ was returned in the
Sept. 19 election because the
returning officer declared the
election on that day void.
"There is no return of a
re presentative when the
election is declared void," Mr.
Blake continued, "and so far as
that particular election is
concerned there can be nothing
to found an election petition
and nothing to found the
jurisdiction of this court."
Summarising his preliminary
argument against the Court's
hearing the petition, Mr. Blake
said:
"One: the election of Sept.
19 and the Oct. 6 election were
held pursuant to the provisions
of the Representation of the
People Act and the petition
before the court has been
brought under that statute.
"Two: by virtue of section
41 subsection one of the
Constitution of the Bahamas
the Elections Court is given
jurisdiction to hear and


Dispute over ownership



of Blue Vista hotel



now to go before courts

EXPERTISE (BAHAMAS) LTD., which claims to be the legal
owners of the Blue Vista Hotel, has filed a writ asking for an
injunction to restrain Granite Enterprises Ltd. from remaining at


(AP)-Secretary-General Kurt
Waldheim held two hours of
discussions over the weekend
with Secretary of State William
P. Rogers, concentrating on the
Vietnam war, a U.N.
spokesman reported Tuesday.
The spokesman said


Waldheim, who repeatedly has
expressed willingness to
intercede to bring peace to
Vietnam, met Rogers at the
latter's request Saturday on
Eleuthera, an island in the
Bahamas where both were
vacationing.


determine any questions as to
whether any person has been
validly elected as a
representative.
"Three: under section 41
subsection two of the
Constitution the legislature is
empowered to make provision
by law for the institution of
proceedings for the
determination of the questions
referred to in subsection one
and as well to make provision
as to the powers, practices and
procedures of the court in such
proceedings.
"Four: the legislature has
made provision for these
matters in the 1969
Representation of the People
Act and it is to that Act that
the court must look to
ascertain its powers and the
competence of any proceedings
brought in the court.
"Five: on a proper
construction of the Act an
election petition can not be
brought for the purpose of
questioning a declaration that
an election is void by reason of
an equality of votes between
candidates on the result of a
recount, nor can any challenge
be made in this court to the
taking of a fresh poll
consequent upon the
declaration of a void election
for the following reasons:
EQUALITY
(a) Section 66 of the Act is
the sole and specific provision
in the Act dealing with cases of
equality of votes between
candidates and no general
provisions can override that
section.
"(b) Section 66 imposes in
mandatory language a duty
upon the returning officer to
act in accordance with the
provision when an equality of
votes exists.
"It would be absurd to
ascribe to the legislature an
intention that the electorate
should go to the polls on a
fresh election while the results
of the first election were still
unresolved and capable of
resolution so as to render the
second election an expensive
and futile exercise."
He listed several conditions
he said must be fulfilled before
an election petition could be
presented.
"No election petition can be
presented before someone has
been returned as a
representative," he said. "The
petition must be presented
after the production of the
writ, and the writ can only be
produced after return has been
made. In the case of a void
election those conditions
cannot be satisfied," Mr. Blake
declared.
Appearing with Mr. Blake
for Mr. Smith are Dr. Lloyd
George Barnett, also of
Jamaica. and Mrs. Ruby
Nottage, a Bahamian.
Representing Mr. Fountain ,
and expected to reply to Mr.
Blake's arguments when the
case continues this afternoon,
are the Hon. Eugene Dupuch,
Q.C. and Bradley Callender,
both Bahamians.
Bahamas Attorney General
Gerald Collett represents
Returning Officer Smith.
Presiding over the Elections
Court are Chief Justice Sir
Gordon Bryce and Mr. Justice
James Smith.


I-INM.KAl services tor John
(Sonny) Shepherd, 65. who
introduced Wome tco
Enterprises Inc. to the
Bahamas, will be held at 11
a.m. tomorrow at All Souls
Episcopal Church, Miami
Beach.
Mr. Shepherd was vice
president in charge of Miami
Beach theatres for Wometco,
and was the liaison officer
between Miami and Nassau tfr
Wometco, an affiliate of
Theatres of Nassau, Ltd. He
was well known in Nassau,
having made many friends
during his 46 years association
with the Bahamas.
Mr. Shepherd, associated
with Wometco for 46 years,
promoted motion picture
premieres on the Beach for
Hollywood stars from Al
Jolson to Susan Hayward,
whom he knew personally.
Hie joined Wometco in 1926
as a motion picture
projectionist. Later that year
he was made director of
publicity. He was appointed
vice president in 1 959.
In 1931 he managed
Wometco's Biltmore Theatre
when it became the
headquarters for the United
States' first Mickey Mouse
Club.
Mr. Shepherd was president
of the Miami Beach Kiwanis
Club and a member of the
American Legion, Veterans ot
Foreign Wars, Motion Picture
Pioneers and Scottish Rite, and
was a past director of Variety
Club.
He was ill for a number of
years.
He is survived by his wife,
Sallie. two daughters, Jean
Haggerty and Sheryl Louise
Poor, and one son, John.

SUEL BROWN DIES
MR. SUEL Brown, 75, of
Mount Royal Avenue, died at
9:10 p.m. Monday at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
after a short illness.
Admitted to the hospital
five weeks before his death,
Mr. Brown was a civil servant
attached to the General Post
Office. He first began his work
with that department as a
mail-man and was later
assigned to the new post office
building on Market and East
Hill Streets as watchman.
A former sexton at St.
Agnes Anglican Church, Blue
Hill Road, where he will be
buried at 2 p.m. Sunday by Fr.
William Thompson, Mr. Brown
is survived by three sisters,
Grace Wilson, Cecilia Culmer
and Agnes Clarke and one
brother, Eric Brown of
Farrington Road.


j
/


RACE GIFT TO CRIPPLED CHILDREN
CHEQUES totalling $2,324 were presented yesterday at the opening of the 1973
Hobby Horse Race Track season to the Crippled Children's Committee by Deputy Prime
Minister Arthur Hanna. The cheques of $1,300 from Bahamas Raceco Ltd., and $1,024
from the Racing Commission represent the takings from Charity Day of the 1972 racing
season. The cheques were presented to Mrs. Shirley Oakes Butler, chairman of the
committee. Pictured from left to right are Harold Smith, racing secretary and
handicapper, Mr. Hanna, Mrs. Butler and Mr. Wenzel Nicholls, chairman of the Racing
Commission. Photo: Rickey Wells


FUNERAL FOR Problems over 2,000

SONNY SHEPHERD students force meeting

TOMORROW students force meeting


ONE PERSON was killed
and three others were injured
in two separate traffic
accidents Tuesday.
Frederick Ferguson of Lyon
Road was killed at 1:30 a.m.
Tuesday when he was
involved in an accident on East
Shirley Street with a car driven
by Mrs. Deborah Pritchard of
Blair Estates.
Ferguson was a pedestrian at
the time of the accident.
Also injured at 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday were Ann Nebhl, 23, a
guest of the Nassau Beach
Hotel after she was involved in
an accident with scooter N-695
which was being ridden by
George Wilson 29, of Woods
Alley.
in the accident, which
occurred on West Bay Street,
Leighton Thompson, also of
Woods Alley, and a passenger
on the scooter was injured. He
was treated and discharged
from the hospital. Mrs. Nebhl
and Wilson, who both
sustained head injuries,_were
detained at the hospital.
Mrs. Nebhl is listed in
satisfactory condition and
Wilson, as "fairly satisfactory"


between staff & Minister

By NICK KELLY
MAKESHIFT EFFORTS by the Ministry of Education to
House children destined for the still unbuilt L. W. Young junior
high school have reportedly run into problems necessitating an
emergency meeting this morning between the Minister and staff.


L. W. Young was one of two
junior high schools which were
to have been built with the aid
of an $1) million loan from
the Export-Import Bank of
Washington.
The schools, sited for
Bernard Road and Carmichael
Road respectively, were to
have opened in September but
failed to materialize when the
Ex-Imp bank turned down the
government's loan request.
As a result the
approximately 2,000 students
enrolled for both schools had
to be relocated. Those
supposed to have been taken
by S. C. McPherson Junior
High on Carmichael, went to
the former Prince William Iligh
campus on Baillou Ilill Road.
Students intended for L. W.
Young were split between C. I.
Gibson junior high (formerly
Pyfrom Road Secondary) off
Wulff Road South, and Donald
Davis Secondary (formerly
Eastern Secondary) on Mackey
Street.
ONE HEAD
These children were the


2 MAILBOATS IN

DISTRESS, SAFE

TWO MAIL boats on their
way to Nassau were disabled
with engine trouble last night
and had to be towed into safe
harbour, along with a visiting
American ketch the Bobo.
The m.v. Church Bay,
recently out of dry dock at
Abaco for mechanical repairs,
was towed into Ship Channel
Cay by the Texaco Bahamas
last night. The Texaco
Bahamas discovered the
disabled mailboat while on its
way to San Salvador.
With one engine repaired
late this morning, the Church
Bay is reported to be on her
way to Nassau, and is expected
to dock sometime late this
evening. Passengers and crew
aboard the mailboat are safe.
The boat was reported to be on
her way from Cat Island to
Nassau at the time of the
breakdown.
The Staniel Cay Express is
reported safe at Cistern Cay,
Exuma, after being towed
there sometime after 10 p.m.
Tuesday with engine failure.
BASRA reported this
morning that a visiting boat,
the Bobo, had to be towed into
Chub Cay by the Kay-J after
sending out signals for help,
which were picked up by
marine operator Patricia
Roberts. The visiting yacht was
towed into safe harbour after
the marine operator informed
the BASRA unit at Crown
Colony Club, Chub Cay.


joint responsibility of the
headmistress who was to have
been in charge of thee n .v
school.
She was required to
commute between the two
schools, it is understood.
The arrangement has
reportedly been found to be
quite unsatisfactory and the
Ministry is now anxious to
house all the Walton Young
children in one school.
Because of their number this
is presently impossible except
on a shift basis which the
Ministry is said to have under
consideration.
A notice issued by that
department yesterday called
for all staff members at 9 a.m.
today in the music room of C.
I. Gibson.
The Ministry's only
comment today was that the
meeting was intended as a
discussion between the
Minister and the teachers and
that it was not expected any
public statement would be
made.
It is understood, however,
that the Ministry wants the
students all located at C. I.
Gibson on a two-shift basis.
The first shift would attend
between 9 and 1 p.m. and the
second between 1 p.m. and 5
p.m.
Teacher reaction to the
suggestion is reportedly mixed.


ATLANTIC
S IARPLY ['d ucvd
transatlantic air fares as low as
$199 roundtrip between New
York and London are being
proposed by Pan American
World Airways.
James O. Lcit. exectilive
vice presulent-tni: k ting, said
that "the new .i' structure
tiled v. tih the ( vil aeronauticss
ioardi \ill telfcr the public
simplified l(ow tinsatlantic
fares while at the saime time
being more cinpeLnsa,totoy to
the airlines."
Mr. Leet stressed the
proposed scheduled fars are
just one part oit l'.an \m'stotal
price package that includes
previously announced lw fares
for charter services.
"When our proposal is
approved, Pan Am will offer a
variety of fares for its
scheduled services specially
designed to meet the rneds (f
all segments of the travelling
public," Mr. Leet said.
"Pan Am's total service
philosophy calls for emphasis
on both the individually-
ticketed passengers and
passenger who wishes to travel
as part of a charter group," he
said.
The scheduled fare package,
to become effective April 1,
1973, subject to necessary
government approvals., consists
of five basic individual fares:
A 14-45 day excursion
fare. This fare would replace
the current 14-21 day and
22-45 day excursion fares, at a
level between them. (For
example, the New
York-London fare would be
$299 in 'he -inter, $325 in the
spring/fall shoulder season, an-I
$410 in the peak summer
season.
An advance purchase fare
for trips of 14-45 days. This
fare would require a
non-refundable 25 percent
deposit at least 90 days prior
to the trip, and full payment
60 days prior to the travel
date. Fare level between New
York and London would be
$199 in winter, $230 in the
spring and fall, and $229 in the
summer season.
An individual tour fare for
those who purchase a tour
package in conjunction with
their trip. These fares would be
available for trips of 14-21
days. Fare levels between New
York and London would be
$210 in winter, $245 in the
shoulder, and $310 in the
summer. These three
promotional fares will have a
surcharge for weekend travel.
Economy class fares would
be generally reduced from
current levels. For example.
the fare between New York
and London would drop from
$430 to $410 in winter, from
$484 to $460 in the shoulder
season. The fare would remain
the same in summer.
First class fares would
remain the same. Fares quoted
are roundtrip, and would be
the same in both directions.


by hospital authorities. Police
also reported eight traffic
accidents taking place last
night, none of which were
serious.
'WARM WISHES' FOR
NEW YEAR FROM U.K.
British Foreign Secretary of
State Sir Alec Douglas-Ilome
has extended his "warm good
wishes" to the people of the
Bahamas for the new year.
In a telegram released
through Government Hlouse,
Sir Alec assured this country
and its people and the theirr
dependent territories that the
progress and well-being of the
territories would continue to
be the concern of
his colleagues and all
members of his staff.


VUL. LA, Nio..t .


Wednesday. January 3, 1973.


PEDESTRIAN IS FIRST ROAD

TRAFFIC FATALITY OF 1973


PEACE TALKS HELD ON ELEUTHERA


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Wednesday, January 3, 1973.


U7hr Urtbunt


ECM MEMBERS MUST FORGE COMMON POLICY
ItAMI'FON COURT, F.N(;.ANI)D. JAN. 2 (Al')-l'rifne Minister F-dward
ffteth I tuesday urged the nine nations of the newly enlarged l uropean
('mitmion Market to forge common policies toward the United States and
I astern I rope.
In a major speech marking British entry into tihe West Fluropean trading
bloc, Hl.ath stressed that the time had come to move from economic to
political co-operation as well.
"Our ;aim in lurope must tIe to build up our own strength, and our own
ucontnily of purpose across the whole field of policy," he declared. "Our
.Ait n ust he that Furope can emerge as a valid partner of the United States
in strenlgthlieniti the prospects for peace and prosperity across the world.
"'h.at is tie tAn which I will have at the forefront otf my mind when I
ditctuss these matters with President Nixon at the beginning of next
month," Ihatth added.
"A cotinmin policy is equally necessary in our dealings with the Soviet
Union and I stern tiurope," he emphasized. "Members of the community,
with their uniquely successful experience of the policies of reconciliation,
have an itnportant contribution to make a better relationship with Lastem
I uropc."
CONFRONTATIONN BETWEEN DISTILLERS CO. & U.K. GOVT.
li (ND()N, Jan. 2 (AI')--A British drug company which manufactured
the htad- Thet IDistillers' ('Company tld the kovrnmnent its l offer to thalidomide
victims will lapse unless it gets tax cmtncessit(nis.
Ti"- ultit'satunm followed a letter sent to the company by Anthony
lilrber. ('hancellor of the I \chequer. lic said the company could not take
dlvant:ge tt tax concessions to bt ost its compensation offer from 5
twtillitn pounds 11.6 million dollars tt ah(ut 12 million pounds, or
27.7 million dollars.
The latest moves followed mounting criticism over delays in paying
,tmpensation It, 140 deformed children whose pregnant mothers took the
drug in I t9 1.
HIJACKER GIVES UP QUIETLY
BAI. IIMtOR., Jan. 3 (AlP)-A Roman (atlholic cardinal, a veteran I BI
agent and a psychiatrist talked an armed man into giving himself up after
he ctoiinantdered an airliner in the year's first hijack attempt. No one was
iirt., .id the plane didn't get off the ground.
The suspect, identified as Charles A. Wenige, 37, of Baltimore, passively
rrendered Tuesday night some three hours after he took two
-,ward .sses hostage aboard a Piedmont Airlines plane and demanded to bhe
tl.iwn tt I oronto, Canada, authorities said. It turned out that his pistol
v>:isn't 1'iiided.
Sot,- two hours after the tense ordeal began, the gunman freed the
lteward; sses following on-hoard ncgotliatins with 1 11 agent Thomas 1H.
I arrow and radio conversations with L.awrence Cardinal Shehan and Dr.
John liona, a psychiatrist.
The agent reported that the gunman told him lie greatly admired the
Cardinal. Dr. l.ytn was familiar with Wenige, authorities said.
narrow said Wenige talked of unspecified "personal problems" and
drank alcoholic beverages while aboard the twin-engine turbojet. Wenige
told authorities he had been released 'I tuesday from a fairfax, Virginia.
hospital. lie said he was an army veteran and had been wounded in Korea,
the agent reported.
Farrow said Wenige would he arraigned Wednesday on federal charges of
attempting to hijack an airplane and interfering with a flight crew.


TODAY'S FLYING "ONE LONG MAD RUSH"
LONDON, JAN. 2 (Al')--lorty-four captains of British European
Airways (HIl.A) charged Tuesday that younger pilots in the state-owned
airline have "a complete lack of experience generally, especially on
high-speed jets." They said flying has become "one long mad rush" fi.:
pilhrts who have to spend too long at the controls because of the
in, perience of their young co-pilots.
the charge came in a statement read to an inquiry into the crash of a
Iff A Trident near London last June, which killed 118 persons including 35
Americans. Capt. George Stone, a pilot for 31 years, wrote the statement
ounirter-signed by his colleagues. In it he said:
'After a long day, I wonder if I am mentally fit enough to make a
halanced judgement on continuing a flight or not, bearing in mind all the
',ttside influences that can be brought to bear."
Stone's shock statement on pilot fatigue stressed that exhausting hours
,it the controls had brought a "general lowering of flight safety standards"
that made a farce of checks on his skill and judgment.
The inquiry previously heard evidence the captain may have suffered a
cart attack just before the crash, leaving the plane in the hands of the
to-pilnts.
B4TAIN REFUSES TO INCREASE MALTESE RENT
S NIX)ON, Jan. 2 (AlP)--British authorities said Tuesday they had refused
t.'. a~t higher rent for the North Atlantic Alliance NATO base
I -llHt.i. on Malta and might have to withdraw the 3,000 British troops
trom the strategic Mediterranean island.
Government sources said the first quarterly rental for the Maltese base
facilities was handed over on New Year's iay, but refused by Premier Dom
Mintoff's government as inadequate.
The sources said the money remained available if Mintoff changed his
mind, but that meantime the British would wait and see what the Maltese
klader does next.
Throughout the long dispute over payment for the Malta base, there has
been an implied threat that the island's facilities could be made available to
the Soviet navy. Britain, however, was reliably reported to be firmly
against aiy t>f the NATO allies offering Mintoff more money. This British
view was presented at a meeting of the NATO Council in Brussels earlier in
the day, the sources here said.
EMPLOYEES WILL JOIN UNION OF OWN CHOOSING
iHIII)(I IOWN, BARIIAI)OS, Jan. 2 (AP)-The Barbados Workers
Uinitn has warned foreign-owned companies that they must allow
employees to join the trade union of their choice. The union's General
Secretary, I-rank Walcott, charged that some investors had already told
their workers they could not unionize.
"If anyone is of the view that Barbados industrial development must
take place on the altar of sacrificing the rights of the workers to organize
and to bargain collectively, they are mistaken," Walcott said.
"The future would be bleak", Walcott said, "if this was the case. This
was a battle the union intended to wage with anyone at any time."
Walcott said he realized that investors coming to Barbados were entitled
to make profits. But these profits have to be equitably shared with the
workers and his union was there to see that they are, he added.
CONGRESS NAMES TOP LEADERSHIP
WASHINGTON (AP)-The Democrats renominated Rep. Carl Albert of
Oklahoma as House Speaker Tuesday, easily turning back a challenge by
Rep. John Conyers Jr., of Michigan. Albert will be formally elected
Speaker Wednesday when the 93rd Congress convenes with Democrats
continuing in power as the majority party.
Conyers, who was defeated 220 to 20 when he ran against Albert two
years ago, said the House needs more aggressive, imaginative leadership
than Albert has provided.
Rep. Thomas P. ('Neill, of Massachusetts, will be the new Majority
Leader. succeeding Rep. Hale Boggs of Louisiana, who went down in a
plane crash in Alaska last October.
O'Neill was unchallenged in the Deomcratic caucus.
With the top leadership posts filled, the Democrats turned to more
controversial matters, including consideration of a party position on the
Vietnam war.
Antiwar Democrats are uging adoption of a resolution declaring it to be
Democratic policy that no further public funds be authorized,
appropriated or spent for U.S. military combat operations in or over
Indochina.









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PENTAGON STAND REVERSED


US now admits'limited BLAME BRITISN
FOR ULSTER'S


accidental damage'


to N. Viet hospital

By Fred S. Hoffman
WASHINGTON (AP)- Backtracking from a previous denial,
the Pentagon Tuesday acknowledged that U.S. bombers may have
inflicted "some limited accidental damage" on a North


Vietnamese hospital.
Spokesman Jerry W.
Friedheim did not go so far as
to admit U.S. bombs did the
damage to the Bac Mai
Hospital and the Gia Lam Field
normally used by civilian
airliners. He said the cause still
is uncertain and suggested both
hits could have resulted from
North Vietnamese anti-aircraft
explosives.
But Friedheim's new
statement, volunteered at a
briefing, was a partial
turnabout from his flat denials
last week that U.S. bombs had
struck a North Vietnamese
hospital at Bac Mai, seven miles
southwest of Hanoi.
It was the second time in
more than two months that the
Pentagon has conceded
accidental damage to
non-military facilities during
U.S. bombings of military
targets in the Hanoi area. Last
October, the defense
department admitted that a
U.S. navy bomb "inadvertently
struck" the French diplomatic
mission.
In his formal statement
Tuesday, Friedheim said:
"It appears that some
limited accidental damage has
occurred to some facilities as
Gia Lam Airport and at a
hospital the enemy calls Bac
Mai.
"The exact extent of this
damage is uncertain, as is its
cause.
"Our information does not
square with Hanoi's
propaganda claims of massive
destruction at these sites."
DIFFERENT PICTURE
At roughly the time
Friedheim was meeting with
newsmen, an antiwar activist
who was in Hanoi during
nearly two weeks of non-stop
U.S. bombing gave a different
picture to another group of
reporters elsewhere in
Washington.
The Rev. Michael Allen of
the Yale Divinity School said
he was shown a civilian
hospital and that "by all
standards I know the hospital
was destroyed." He said he was
certain he was shown the Bac
Mai Hospital.
He quoted North
Vietnamese officials as saying
that 25 staff members were
killed at the 955-bed facility.
Pentagon spokesman
Friedheim stressed, as he has
repeatedly, that "our strikes
have been targeted only at
military targets."
But, he said, "we
know....that from time to time
accidental damage to other
than military targets occurs,
sometimes involving United
States ordnance or aircraft and
sometimes involving North
Vietnamese ordnance or
aircraft."
According to Friedheim, the
Bac Mai Hospital and the Gia
Lam airfield were damaged
during U.S. bombing attacks to
military targets that were 100
years away.
AIRFIELD SPARED
The Gia Lam Airport has
been spared U.S. bombing
throughout the air war because
it is used by Soviet and other
non-North Vietnamese air
transports.
Friedheim said the nearby
Gia Lam railroad yard was the
target of U.S. bombing, and
that some Communist MIG Jet
fighters were hit at the airfield.
Friedheim said that
information indicating damage
had been caused at the hospital
reached him after his denial on
Dec. 27 and his repetition of
that denial two days later
He refused to say how the
later information was obtained,
although indicating it resulted
from U.S. aerial reconnaissance
photographs. A
At the White House, deputy


press secretary Gerald L.
Warren told newsmen the
current bombing suspension
would remain in effect as long
as serious negotiations for
peace are underway.
"If you look, you will find
that when serious negotiations
were entered into there was a
discontinuation of bombing
above the 20th parallel,"
Warren said in reference to the
bombing suspension that ended
Dec. 18.
NO PUNISHMENT


The Pentagon spokesman
said there is no action being
taken to punish any U.S.
pilots for accidentally bombing
the hospital and the airfield
because "as of this point, we
are not certain" that the
damage resulted from
American actions.
While changing position on
damage to the Bac Mai
Hospital, Friedheim stood on
his previous flat denial that
U.S. bombs have struck a
prisoner of war camp housing
captured American crewmen in
Hanoi.
"There is no reason to
change that statement,"
Friedheim said of his past
denial of American bombs
hitting any POW camp. He said
he felt he had "laid that to
rest" last week.
Although questioned
repeatedly, Friedheim refused
to go into any detail on what
constituted the "limited"
damage to the hospital and
airport.
He said the military targets
nearby were struck by both
B52s and smaller fighter
bombers.
Once before, the Pentagon
has backtracked from its denial
of claims that American
bombers had hit civilian
targets.
During the fall, the Pentagon
belatedly acknowledged what
it said was accidental bomb
damage to the French
diplomatic mission in Hanoi.
REFUSAL
Although Friedheim
previously had referred to
"very significant damage" to
military targets during the
recent intense bombings of the
Hanoi-Haiphong area, he
refused today to discuss that
question, giving as his reason
the "serious and sensitive"
negotiating situation.
President Nixon cut back
the bombing of North Vietnam
to below the 20th parallel last
Friday night Washington time,
ostensibly to create a
favourable climate for resumed
negotiations with the North
Vietnamese in Paris.
So far as U.S. losses are
concerned, Friedheim said that
about half a dozen B52s were
damaged in the unprecedented
raids on the Hanoi area and
returned to U.S. bases in
Thailand. This was in addition
to 15 B52s announced as
having been shot down.
Friedheim said it has not yet
been determined how many of
these six damaged B52s can be
repaired and returned to duty,
but said he believed some of
them would be operational
again.
Taken together, the 21 B52s
downed and damaged
represented about 10 per cent
of the total B52 force
deployed for the Indochina
War.
DENIAL
Friedheim denied published
reports that the North
Vietnamese had sent up some
advanced new version of the
surface-to-air missile, saying
that "in our judgment it was
the same old SAM."
In the last day or so of the
bombing, Friedheim said, there
was "some slackening off" in
SAM fire which had been


NIXON-KISSINIER SET FOR TALKS


WASHINGTON (AP)- As the
White House linked the U.S.
bombing policy to peace
negotiations. President Nixon
awaited Tuesday the return of
Henry Kissinger for consultations
before the Paris negotiations
resume next Monday.
Nixon's assistant for national
security affairs had been
vacationing at Palm Springs, Calif.,
and a White House spokesman laid
he is to return to Washington late
this afternoon.
The spokesman, deputy preo
secretary Gerald L. Warren, said
Nixon and Klkinpr would begin
late today a series of meeting to
prepare the U.S. stance when
KiMlnpr's talks with North
Vietnam's .e Due Tho reopen.


The White House announced
Saturday the scheduled resumption
of the Paris talks after Nixon halted
massive bombing of North Vietnam
above the 20th parallel. The
bombing had been resumed on Dec.
18 after a two-month suspension.
Press secretary Ronald L. Ziegler
aid the object was to thwart a
Communist build-u.
yesterday responding to
newmien's questions, Warren tied
the bombing policy directly to
negotiations. "If you look, you will
find that when serious negotiations
were entered into there was a
discontinuation of bombing above
the 20th parallel," he said In
reference to the bombing
suspensMion which ended Dec. IA.


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CATNOLIC LEADERS CEASEFIRE IN A.NGER


WASHINGTON (AP) In a first
step to challenge President Nixon's
freezing of funds appropriated by
Congress, key Senate Democrats are
joining in court action to free
billions of dollars for highway
construction.
The move, led by Sen. Sam J.
Ervin, Jr., (D.N.C.) chairman of the
Senate government operations
committee, is to be followed by
legislative action in what promises
to be a major battle for control of
government spending.
Nixon has Impounded some $10
billion in appropriated funds in an
effort to keep federal outlays down
to $250 billion in the current fiscal
year as part of his fight against
inflation.
Congress refused last year to pass
legislation Nixon requested to set a
$250 billion spending ceiling, with
the President empowered to make
whatever cuts were necessary in
appropriations.
Opponents argued that Congress,
not the chief executive, should
determine spending priorities an
issue that will carry over into the
new session starting Wednesday.
The court action being taken by
Ervin and others is the filing of a
friend-of-the-court brief in support
of a suit brought by the Missouri
State Highway Commission to free
over $80 million in highway trust
funds frozen by Nixon.
The money is the state's share of
around $7 billion in federal
highway money that has been
presidentially impounded to hold
down federal spending.
A federal district judge ruled in
favour of the Missouri Highway
Commission last summer, holding
that legislation passed by Congress
prohibited the withholding of
highway trust funds.
The case now is on appeal to the
8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal in
Kansas City, where the brief by
Senate Democratic leaders was
being filed in support of Missouri's
suit.
In addition to Ervin,
Senate aides reported, those joining
in the move include majority leader
Mike Mansfield of Montana: Sen.
John L. McCellan, (D-Ark.)
Chairman of the Senate
appropriations committee: and Sen.
James o. Eastland, (D-Mils.)
chairman of the Senate judiciary


committee.
Ervin plans to reoffer legislation
that would give the Senate and the
House a veto of any impoundment
of funds by the President.
The measure would require the
President to report to Congress
whenever he impounds
appropriations. The impoundment
would be illegal if not approved by
Congress within 60 days.

CRAZY HORSE NOT
REALLY A "HORSE"
LONDON, Jan. 3 (AP) Model
Jane Von Haag and her American
husband Michael are christening
their new-born son Crazy Horse.
"What's wrong with the name?"
28-year-old Jane demanded of
inquiring newsmen at St. Mary's
hospital in Paddington district.
"Crazy Horse was a very special
character half-priest, half warrior.
I hope our baby will grow up to be
just like him."
Michael Von Haag, a 29-year-old
writer who came to live in Britain
eight years ago, said: "the name
has great and noble associations.
"Plenty of people have named their
children after American army
generals. I decided to call my son
after a great Indian Chief."
The seven-pound baby, born on
New Year's Day, will have a choice
of names when he grows up.



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'EAL CRASH PILOT


Syrian & Israel jets NAD FAILING VISION'
REPORT IS PROBED


WAVE OF VIOLENCE clash over Lebanon.
14


BELFAST. NORTHERN
RELAND (AP) Roman Catholic
leaders said Tuesday that British
authorities share the blame for a
wave of sectarian assassinations
because the army has failed to track
lown the killers.
The shadowy murderers claimed
another victim Monday night when
a Catholic factory worker was slain
outside his factory. The killings, a
airly recent development in
Northern Ireland's communal
confrontationn have taken
Protestant and Catholic victims.
The assassination squads are
believed to be Protestant
evenge-seekers or IRA hit men out
o settle the secret army's accounts
with betrayers.
The Catholic leaders also accused
he British of launching another
year of "the maximum of
repression and the minimum of
justice" after the army jailed a
lark-haired Irish beauty it claimed
was a guerrilla.
The Catholic ex-servicemen's
association had called on all
Catholic workers in Northern
Ireland to go on strike Tuesday to
protest the sectarian slaying.
But few answered the call. Major
plants reported hardly any
absentees and smaller businesses
said most Catholic workers were at
work.
The association claimed the
slaying went on because of "the
failure of the Whitelaw
administration to act against those
responsible."
William Whitelaw, Britain's
administrator in Northern Ireland,
formed an army-police task force
last month to hunt down the
assassins. But like earlier dragnets,
the task force has still not tracked
down any of the killers because
of the Mafia-like silence that
surrounds the gangs.
STRIKE CALL
The strike call followed the
shooting of 31-year-old Jack
Mooney as he drove to work the
night shift at Rolls-Royce's plant in
Belfast's eastern suburbs Monday
night.
Paddy Devlin, a leader of the
Catholic-based Social Democratic
and Labour Party, who has survived
several assassination tries himself,
charged the British government was
"standing by while the assassin's
midnight knock escalated to
machine-gun attacks in public."
But trade union officials urged
their men to keep sectarian feuding
off the factory floor or risk losing
their jobs by undermining the
province's economy, already
damaged by more than three years
of violence.
The Northern Ireland civil rights
association, a Catholic-based group,
condemned Monday's detention of
20-year-old Elizabeth McKee.
The British army claimed the
girl, arrested by troops last Friday
in the turbulent Catholic
Andersonstown district of Belfast,
was an officer in the outlawed Irish
Republican Army. She was held
under an interim custody order, the
first woman to be detained this way
in Northern Ireland.
"It is clear the British
government has started the year as
they intend to continue it, with the
maximum of repression and the
minimum of justice," the
association said.
South of the border in the Irish
Republic, police said two young
lovers killed near the border early
Monday were believed to be the
victims of Protestant extremists
carrying their bloody vendetta into
the Republic in revenge for IRA
raids.
In Dublin, Prime Minister Jack
Lynch leaves Friday for the United
States, where he was expected to
appeal to Irish-Americans to stop
pumping dollars into the IRA's
coffers.


Israelis down 2 MIG's


By Harry Dunphy
BEIRUT (AP) Syrian and Israeli jets clashed in clear skies
Tuesday over Lebanon's snow-capped mountains in the latest
chapter of an escalating military confrontation that could
endanger the Middle East cease-fire.


The Lebanese government
said two fighters were shot
down in the 13-minute
encounter.
Two Syrian pilots bailed out
and were rescued, although one
suffered broken legs, a
high-ranking Lebanese officer
said. Since a MIG21, Syria's
chief warplane, carries only
one pilot, this led observers to
speculate that both downed
planes were Syrian.
Explosions and sonic booms
were heard over a wide area of
Lebanon during the early
afternoon encounter.
"We were nearly blown out
of our seats," said the Rev.
Ronald Roberts, a British
priest who runs a school for
handicapped children in the
mountains near Beirut.
"We rushed outside and saw
one plane trailing black smoke
that was headed toward the
sea."
CRASHED IN SEA
The Lebanese government
statement said "one
unidentified plane was seen
crashing in the sea west of
Abde and another, which was
later determined to be Syrian,
fell near the Faraya ski resort,"
40 miles northeast of Beirut.
Abde is near Tripoli, 48
miles north of Beirut on the
Mediterranean coast.
Israel said it knocked down
one MIG21 fighter and
reported all its planes returned
safely.
Syria said it hit one Israeli
plane and acknowledged that
one Syrian plane also was hit.
The Syrian statement
broadcast over Damascus
Radio did not say if the
damaged plane returned to its
base.
A Lebanese officer said "5
to27 Israeli planes were sighted
on radar about the time Israel
reported the dogfight took
place.
EXPLOSIONS
Beirut residents rushing to
their balconies after a series of
muffled explosions saw vapour
trails of at least five aircraft
over the city, Lebanon's
capital.
The Beirut airport remained
open to commercial traffic but
Damascus Airport was closed
for 70 minutes. Damascus
Radio said Syrian planes
pursued an Israeli aerial patrol
over Syrian territory, chasing
the Israeli jets into Lebanese
airspace.
An Israeli military
spokesman in Tel Aviv said the


dogfight erupted when the
Syrian aircraft attempted to
intercept the Israeli patrol.
According to the Israelis, it was
the first air battle since Nov.
21, when the Israelis claimed
knocking down six Syrian
MIG21s in air and ground
fighting along the increasingly
tense Golan Heights cease-fire
line.
That battle was described as
the heaviest since the
two-year-old Middle East
cease-fire inspired by U.S.
diplomacy.
NIGHT DOGFIGHT
But according to statements
from Damascus over the
weekend, Syrian jets rose to
challenge Israeli planes
Saturday night in the first
nighttime dogfight since the
1967 war.
A military spokesman in
Damascus said one Israeli plane
was hit during that encounter.
Israeli jets attacked an army
camp 44 miles northeast of
Damascus Saturday night in
retaliation for Syrian artillery
shelling of Israeli positions and
settlements in the occupied
Golan Heights.
The Syrians were responding
to an Israeli air raid on two
towns on the Syrian-Jordanian
border Dec. 27, which the
Israelis said was prompted by
infiltration of Arab guerrillas
into Israeli-held territory three
times at Christmastime.
It was this lengthening chain
of strikes and responses that
gave rise to fears the cease-fire
could go under.
Israel, in a decision
stemming from the massacre of
its Olympic athletes at Munich,
has adopted a policy of swift
retaliation for any guerrilla
activity, even minor.
The Syrian government,
whose arsenal has recently
been bolstered with new Soviet
weapons, feels obligated to
respond. Observers feel the
Golan Heights exchanges could
lead to additional fighting
between another Arab state
backing Syria and, from there,
to a general breakdown of the
cease-fire.


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MIAMI, FLA. (AP) The bodies
of 39 victims of the crash of an
Eastern Air Lines Tristar jetliner
remained unclaimed at the Dade
County morgue four days after the
disaster, an airline spokesman said
Tuesday.
At latest count, 60 bodies had
been identified, 39 more were
unidentified and unclaimed and 77
survived, said EAL spokesman Hill
Woolen.
More than 200 relatives of the
estimated 176 passengers on the
jumbo jet, which plunged into the
Everglades swamp Friday night.
have been flown to Miami by the
airline.
Ed Slattery, spokesman for the
national transportation safety
board, said a sophisticated, new
flight-data recorder has been
recovered from the site of the
wrecked Lockheed 1011 aircraft.
He said it could provide extensive
data on what happened before the
plane went down.
Slattery said the recorder "has
64 value inputs, and it's the first
time it has been used. The previous
ones gave only five, principally
speed, altitude and heading."
He said a "myriad of details" on
the stresses and operation of the
plane's systems, broken into lOths
of a second development, would be
provided by the recorder.
BEING ANALYZED
After being analyzed by
Lockheed in Ontario, Calif., the
information will be correlated with
the cockpit voice tapes and those
from the air traffic control tower.
"All these will give us a very
good picture of what happened in
the dark space west .f the airfield
before the accident," Slattery said.
"However, it's not necessarily going
to give us the exact cause."
The St. Petersburg Times
reported Tuesday that a federal
flight surgeon said the eyesight of
the crashed jet's pilot had
deteriorated from 20-40 to 20-100
in a six-month period.
The Fe deal Aviation
Administration surgeon, who was
not named, also said a tumor found
in Capt. Robert A. Loft's brain by a
medical examiner during a physical
examination eist Nov. 21 could
hhve heIal presing against his eye
nerves enough to affect his vision,"
the newspaper reported.
CO-PILOT FLYING
Eastern Air Lines has said.
however, that the co-pilot, not
Loft, was at the controls ,.f the jet
when it crashed.
A spokesman said the airline is
investigating the report about
Loft's allegedly failing eyesight, and
declined immediate comments.
The St. Petersburg Times said the
FAA surgeon learned of Loft's
vision from a report on a medical
examination given the pilot in
November.


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Ofhe ribunt
Nutuus ADDICTS JURABE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt.. LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday, January 3, 1973.


I EDITORIAL


Who's living a lie now?


By ETIENNE DUPUCII
EVERY TIME I go on a long trip abroad I miss something
important. I try to catch up on the news but I never do
completely.
It seems that I missed an important bit of information while I
was on a world tour during the summer of 1970.
1 was looking through some old files while I was home for the
Christmas week-end and I came across a "dillie ".
It was the report of an N.D.P. meeting held on the Southern
Recreation Grounds on the evening of Friday, July 31, 1970
....only 17 months ago.
The report of the meeting appeared under the heading:
"N.D.P. Speakers Lash Waste of Public Money ... 'Government
Corrupt From Top To Bottom'."
The principal speaker at this meeting was the now Ilonourable
Paul Adderley, Government Leader of the Senate, Minister
Without Portfolio in the P.L.P. Government and a Government
delegate to the recent Independence Conference in London.
In his speech Mr. Adderley charged that the P.L.P. Government
was "living a lie". Since there has been no change in the structure
or nature of the P.L.P. Government ... I suppose I am justified in
asking the Honourable Paul Adderley who is living a lie now?
This situation recalls a visit Prime Minister Pindling made to
London a few years ago when, as Mr. Adderley points out in his
speech, he strongly opposed any suggestion of independence.
In an interview with the Press Mr. Pindling told reporters that
it would be many years before the Bahamas could consider
Independence.
A few days after his return to Nassau the Governor convened
the Legislature with a speech prepared for him by the P.L.P.
Government. In this speech he fixed 1973 as the target time for
the P.L.P. to take the colony into Independence.
Questioned on this quick turn about Mr. Pindling declared
from "where I now sit" he could see great benefits for an
Independent Bahamas.
Now Mr. Adderley has had visions too!


Here is a full report of the N.D.P. meeting. Read it and weep
for the apparent insincerity of the men who now shape the
destiny of the Bahamian people!
Charging that corruption exists in the PLP government from
the highest echelons and filters down through the entire rank
National Democratic Party speaker Mel Wells told a small crowd
at the Eastern Parade last night that "never before in the annals
of our history has so much money been paid to so many to do so
little for so few so incompetently."
"The Dud Maynard issue is an absolute disgrace," said Mr.
Wells. "The Hawksbill Creek dilemma has crippled Freeport and
the $2 million East Hill Street post office has already cost us $4
million and will probably be closer to $5 million if and when it is
completed.
"I can go on ad infinitum mentioning Government funds
your money that have been carelessly thrown away and given
to friends and relatives of our present government."
Mr. Wells, the second speaker, at what was described as one of
a series of NDP rallies, went on to say that he was on the NDP
platform because "I am in a state of rebellion. I am that way
because, like many of you, I have become completely
disillusioned and thoroughly disgusted when I see our beloved
islands in a rapid state of decline due to money hungry, corrupt,
power crazy politicians of the Progressive Liberal Party."
IRREPARABLE DAMAGE
He said that over the past three years, the PIP had done
irreparable damage to the economy of the Bahamas. "Since the
Bahamas Government can ho longer be trusted then neither can
the people of these islands be trusted so reasons the foreign
investor and tourists," Mr. Wells declared.
The NDP meeting which started about an hour late at 9 p.m.
was chaired by Mr. Ian Allen and was highlighted with a dynamic
speech by party leader Mr. Paul Adderley who dealt mainly with
the question of Independence.
Drawing his listeners' attention to the bold slogan on the NDP
banner atop the rostrum "NDP in '73" Mr. Adderley, who
had been described by the chairman as being capable of replacing
"10 UBPs in the House of Assembly." said that whenever the PLP
decided to call an election they would surely lose many of the 29
seats that they now have.
Mr. Adderley's remark that the country will never again accept
the United Bahamian Party brought a smart rejoinder from a UBP
supporter many of whom dominated last night's meeting "How
'bout you Paul, you wanna bet?"
'LIVING A LIE'
Deciding not to continue that trend, Mr. Adderley reverted to
the Independence issue telling his audience that five years ago the
PLP had taken a delegation to London in opposition to
Independence.
He said that the party had made the people believe that they
never wanted independence and now they were faced with the
task of "living a lie".
He drew attention to the Freeport problem and bei~oaned the
fact that the PLP administration "in an endeavour to spite
Wallace Groves and Stafford Sands are putting in peril the
livelihood of thousands of Bahamians who live and work in the
area."
But he said that the Bahamas was ill-prepared for independence
and were the PLP government to rush into it "we would become
economic slaves to Washington."
"We are more indebted to the United States now than we have
ever been to Great Britain. We owe "millions of dollars to that
country. Come independence, will we become another American
state?"
NO MIRACLE
"The people of this country are not told what the situation is,"
asserted Mr. Adderley. "They are being led to believe that
Independence carries with it some miraculous power which will
make all good and well. But this is not the case. Independe ice
will cost you money. And if you think that you are being taxed
now, just wait until you become independent under the PLP
administration."


Government Boards for1973


A PORTION of the Boards
and Committees for 1973 was5,
announced today 'I Baliamias
Information Services. () lher
appointments will be released
at a later date, it was stated.
Following is the list of
Boards.
MEDICAL (QUALIFICATION)
BOARDS
Dr. G.P. Duffy Chairman,
D)r. (eorge Sherman, D)r.
Ilenry Podlowski, O.B.i., Dr.
Kirkland Culmer. Dr. Norman
Gay.
DI NTAI (QUA LIFI(A fIINS;
BOA RD)
Dr. Jackson Burnside
chairmann Dr. Ial Leland, DI)r.
John I. Louis, Dr. Cleveland
Fneas, Jr. Di. Edward Baile.


DISCHARGED PRISON lRS
AID COM MITTE'Il
(Canon Willianm J.
Granger, Rev. Earl
Francis, Mr. Carl Treco, Mr.
Cecil ('artwright, Mr. Mike
Stubbs, Mr. Walter Cox, Mi.
Neville Carey, MIr. Arnold
(argill, Mr. Oscar Phillips, Mr.
Bill Martin and Mr. John
Pierson.
PORT AUTHORITY
FOR NEW PROVIDENCE
Sen. The Ilon. Lockinvar


Lockhart


Random i lph ) can
Vice-Chairman. Mr. I dard
Frit/gerald, Mr. Andrew Smithi
and Mr. Neville Woodside.
(ABSIllA( KNI CARRIAGI
BOARD FOR
BAIIAMA ISLANDS
Controller of Road I ra.ftic.
Dr. Gordon la Im and Mr.
Harold Smlith.
\ I il\I, ( I I M lI I IF
BOYS' IIDt )I RI %1
SCHOOL
Rev. .II. AdderIle
Chai nian, Mr. James Sweeting.
Mr I .1. Sands Mr. ILmnolnh
Cox, Mn Julian I rain is. Mis.
(wcndlriil\l i ('opCI arid M\l.
Urban Mirller.
VSIITIN(; (COMMIII I1
(;IRILS' INI)USTRlIAIL
SCHOOL
Mrs. Bertha Isaacs
Chairman, Mrs. crliyl Francis
Culmer, Mrs. HIeln )Demecritte,
Mr. Robert I)illette, Mr.
Horick Bicc., M Kingsley
Wilson, Mr. MNci- n Darling,
Miss Miriam Rokei, Mi.s Lfftic
Walkes and Mis Barbara
Benchy.
(ARTS ANI) DRAYS
BOARD)
Co('Nm issioner i(l PolicCe, Dr.
Gordon Lcain and Mr. Harold


CBS SELL NEW YORK YANKEES

TO NEW UNDISCLOSED GROUP
NIW YORK Jan 3 (Al') Ihe Ncsew York Yankrcs have been
sold by the Co)liiibia. Broadcasti.g Ss.tem to a gi',ip that will
retain President Mike Burke and (;eneril Manager I ce MacPhail
to riun the orgaiii/ation n r informed soirce teld Ith Associated
Press today
The identify of the new owners was not iiimrunedialcly known
Burke was believed to be a part of the ncv. griimp
CBS bought 80 per cent of the Yankees ,i 104 andi mipleted
100 per c ii l puro-lhase ol the club in 1H 9 i oi .n l t 't i 11 total of
$11 i rinlli h ii
Burke a (CBS vice president, was named Presuident and
Chairman ol the Board of the Yankees
Last Sept 3 the Yanks announced that MaLl'h.il and manager
Ralph Houk had signed new three-year contracts carrying through
1975.


Doesn't believe Editor


EDITOR, The Tribune,
It is with disgust that I write
this letter because I do not go
in for criticising any one, but
Sir, some time a man has to
put his foot down.
I am writing about your
editorial where you made a
remark to your wife in the
back of a taxi of missing some
big function and in seconds the
cab driver made a reply to you,
Mr. Editor.
I have been driving a taxi for
years and I have not made a
reply to anyone who did not
address me. It is just not done.
One more thing I will say is
that 90% of the drivers at the
Miami airport are Cubans or
Latin Americans who, when
you address them they cannot
understand you at first.
Mr. Editor, if you have
something to say about the
Prime Minister or anyone else
be a man and say it first hand
and stop putting a third person
on the spot. If you feel that
the Prime Minister is short on
common sense say so but don't
hide behind someone and


throw stones.
Sir, I don't believe a word
that you sid about the poor
Taxi IDrivers.
ZACH WEMYSS
Taxi Driver
Nassau,
December 21,

Sir Etienne Dupuch is
noted for calling a spade a
spade. He has always said
exactly what he has meant
and has never had to hide
behind anyone to tell his
readers what he was thinking
least of all a taxi driver!.
Mr. Wemyss has obviously.
not been to Miami for a very
long time there are many
taxi drivers who speak
English and very good
English at that and when they
hear one is from the Bahamas
are most anxious to talk
about the Bahamas
government. To date we have
not heard anything said in
favour of present
Government policy by the
Miami taxi drivers with whom
we have driven Ed.)


He said that money was 'tight' the world over and the Bahamas
was no exception, yet Government spent money as if it was about
to go out of style.
He saidthat thte dictatorships of Cuba and Haiti were constant
threats to this country and said that "were we independent we
vould not be able to protect ourselves from such forces."
Mr. Adderley pointed out that the Government was aware of
the Haitian problem and had decided to maintain a good
relationship with that country.
"Because of our size and position. Because we are so small. we
lie to make.friends with a dictatorship. This is our position.
Tris is what we are up against if and when we go independent."
Deploring Government's contribution to the Caribbean Bank.
Mr. Adderley said "when so much needs to be done in this
country, our government has seen fit to give away more than $3
million. We will never get any benefit from that bank. The West
Indies Federation failed and this bank will never be of any use to
us. But Government sought to enhance its international status
by "giving away three million when so much needs to be done at
home.'"
LET DOWN FEELING
He said the people of this country were sold the idea that the
replacement of white faces by black faces would solve the
problems. "The PLP has sold Black Power well in this country,"
Mr. Adderlev said.
"There are many who realize that they have been let down but
they are ashamed to admit that the Progressive Liberal Party has
not lived up to their expectations. They still maintain that "dutch
pride" and remain quiet. They know that they have been
betrayed, but they permit tihe PLP to continue its plunder of this
country."
Other speakers at the NDP meeting were Mr. Spurgeon Bethel,
the husband of controversial Unicoimm president, Mr. Pat
Bosfield, and Mr. Audley Ilumes.
Mr. Humes told the audience that though the PI.P had
promised no taxes, the cost of living has taken a 7.2''r rise in the
past few months and that all public utilities were being hiked.
He felt that the people had been misled by "their Moses and
that the people of the Bahamas may look forward to more
suffering under the PLP regime
Mr. Bosfield gave a lengthy talk on several subjects including
independence and the cost of living.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
t A people get the kind of government they deserve.
ANONYMOl'S


BAll \\M
II 11 CO((MMI \1(N \1 10NS
( t()Rl'( < \N I I)\
l I. J . I i ( hi l; l.inll
.; l M i I . t R H11<
\ir -(h li.iiii li N1 1 I M1 ii[. .
Mh ( ( .i '\ t!' 1 : I .'.
kn iiwles.
VISI -IIN\( ( )IN11I Ill
10 III R M1\t SIn S

\l A I'KO()\ IN Mt I
Rc.'. \itlini ( rrll'i r uke
( h~luiii t n ,n i- \nui llilnna.
Hiublp Ntin s. ItM,,.. Mr.

J(lAnul .i \ IdI,() '


( MIN I III I 1 1Ii
V I\INI lI I 1 ) I N.I )tI 1<

N il ional ii ii i iii Pi'i inu t'n!
P lji III', l i 11 ,111 I :,! S ; l a,-I it I
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I dts M till (1c,

\li. ) dlL\ \ .i n \ r.
I h lcu' tiur I T I ,o 11.
\, l\ 1uilles. S'nini ir
(; ,\MIN(, l' ) \ll)
Mh .\il i't 't" I ill.' i


tlii nutm M1,. ( \. l!rPi.hcs
rotd 1 l N *\ p. I' .
it \II \\1 AS HRO \I \SI I\(
(\\ \I Il,\ 1( IS\SI\

S h n l ,1C ll n it M\ 1 1 -. k it ll ,I
j H % ll l,! ;!: I I ; M l ( Vo mI i
( ni l li \ I ,' h li'n i W 1 li.
K n ,, B r. ,v n tM L\ ,n
K l onow les ,iult Ml l'<. i \
C( sl,!


ONCE IN A IFEIHIE OPPORTUNITY


Or ofr th. >,rlitrg InttrIntia
101 t N s..,. .' lifr


BLACK


r.I: [. )' utir it 'i.'. of I lducationr al Mater ials will soon open


HISTORY LIBRARY


A P!)I; J) X..* ,' .'-!,! 'tnl th po..ttIon o f

LOCAL AGENT
Alpi'I, t' 1 i t bte i.(1 hIr !aIfIn I ,I 1 f '.V'11 1 rtv!i tin th no om m unity. This position calls for
f i I'. ,( ,' who is w' -illing to work whatever evening

'ntetview,' ttutir.LH ,, i.,ir ,i ', -Iltth ft ln 10 a.m to 4:00 p.m.
Sh.ri j* '.l; lhr t';,h ',)J lial H otel
..ni I N o, I .n ~,, Ruotin) ONE DAY ONLY.
At tn li' i. ,.. w also wi i *m, w i IttrI ,~I i i ii iti(ns from men or women, for the posts
'orf i IrN l I I JtI "I 1) 0. Hox i l,, it I He I'ur tf) RicO, 00919.


Wdnesda J 3


3


KARATE
fhe Bahamas Karate School invite men, women and
Children to become members of the School to learn the
inhre art of self defence. Those men and women who
,,h only physical exercise can also enroll at the same
pi.ii School opens Monday, January 8th at 6 p.m.
laisc aie five days per week Monday through Friday, 6
! ,' p .'n
The S( hool is located on West Street across from St.
F t,im i, t(hurch
Master KERMIT A. FORD/Director
2 Dan Black Belt.


ENROL NOW For a One -Year Course in


DRESSMAKING


SYLVIA LARAMORE -CRAWFORD


THE BAHAMAS ADULT STUDY CENTRE

35862 (DAYS) OR 36351 (AFTER 6)


LEARN HOWTO SEW FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY


S..but with i
Distributed in the Bahamas by Bethell Robertson & Co. Ltd.


Chairmr n. Mr. Smith.












Gk Gribunt


Wednesday, January 3.1973.


A NEW KIND

OF COURSE FOR

STUDY CENTRE

A PACKED auditorium at
the Teachers' College witnessed
the graduation exercises of
students of the Bahamas Adult
Study Centre recently.
Successful students, after
receiving their awards, were
able to watch a modelling
display by members of the
Dressmaking Classes. Not only
were dresses, shirts and school
uniforms made by the students
themselves put on display, but
there was also a parade of the
Freedom Frocks designed and
created by the supervisor ol
the classes, Mrs. Sylvia
Laramore-Crawford. These
avant-garde gowns attracted
much comment.
The principal of the centre,
Mr. Richard Crawford,
announced a departure from
the traditional method of
selecting speakers to perform
the duties associated with
graduations. He told the
audience of his pride in the
standards and progress
achieved by the Public
Relations course students, and
his feeling of confidence that
they could give an excellent
account of themselves on a
public platform. In order to
give practical effect to this
pride and confidence, he said,
it had been decided that,
starting that evening, past
students who had passed at 'A'
Level would be invited to do
the honours.
On hand for the ceremonies
were Mrs Ruth king-Outten,
who attained a distinction in
her course several months ago,
and Mrs. Gayle Culmer, who
achieved the same high award.
Mrs. Outten gave a sincere and
moving address in which she
paid tribute to the way her
personal horizons had been
extended. Mrs. Culmer, despite
a leg injury sustained the day
before, made a professional job
of awarding certificates and
acting as the commentator for
the fashion show.
NEW COURSE
The course in Public
Relations, for some years a
notable feature of the Centre's
curriculum, now gives way to a
new kind of course. It has been
gamed Primacel, each letter of
4td name standing for the initial
of one of its component
features.
Questioned on the reasons
for the introduction of this
new course, Mr. Crawford said
that with the advances in
education made during the last
five years, there were now a
large number of young adults
whose minds had been
sharpened by the more
effective teaching methods in
use in the schools, but for
whom there was no adequate
'bridge' to lead them from the
mass education of the school
system, which was largely
passive, to the exacting world
of individual self-improvement,
which depended so much on
whole-mind training and the
effective harnessing of
personality forces, especially in
the realm of human
communication. Primacel, he
said, was specifically designed
to bridge that gap.
Awards were made to the
following students:
DRESSMAKING, phase
one: Gladys Evans, Inez
Duncombe, Alvera Tucker,
Gloriann Pratt, Princess Pratt,
Corrine Davis, Isadora
Johnson, Carolyn Symonette,
Stephanie Rahming, Vernae
Jennings, Patricia Mitchell,
Merceleta O'Brien, Vanreah
Cargill, Pearlene Stubbs, Marge
Cargill, Renee Claridge,
Winifred Major, Marina Collie,
Lily Fountain (credit), Sylvia
Wilson (credit), Shelia Bastian
(distinction), Sandra
Cunningham (distniction),


.. .....





b-A o-




By Abigail Van Buren
c 1973 by ChiCago TribulN -N. Y. News Synd., Ifc.
DEAR ABBY: This is for "Offended in Houston" who
doesn't like to give a secretary his name on the phone. I
am a secretary and could not follow my bosses' instructions
without asking names:
"Don't interrupt my conference unless Mr. X calls from
New York. Don't accept any calls from Mr. Y in Seattle.
He expects quotes on a contract for which I don't have the
figures, and I don't want him to waste a call. If Mr. Z calls
from Kansa City, tell him I'm in Europe. I'm tired of
fooling with that character. If Mr. B calls from Chicago,
tell him it's a deal."
My grandfather, who came over from Scotland, always
said, "Never trust a man who will not proudly tell you his
name." ANOTHER SECRETARY

DEAR ABBY: "Offended in Houston" would be less
offended if his secretary knew how to place a telephone
call.
She should say, "Mr. Draykaup of Draykaup Nuts and
Bolts would like to speak to Mr. Yourboss, please." That
way Mr. Yourboss' secretary wouldn't have to ask who was
calling.
But what really burns me is when Mr. Bigshot's secre-
tary telephones and asks me to get my boss on the line,
and then my boss has to wait forever until Mr. Bigshot
finally gets on the line.
I now have a sure cure for that. When a secretary who
makes a practice of doing this calls and says, "Mr. Bigshot
wants to talk to Mr. Yourboss," I say, "Then please have
Mr. Bigshot call him!" and I hang up.
ST. LOUIS SECRETARY

DEAR ABBY: Doesn't that idiot signed "Offended in
Houston" realize that a busy executive doesn't have time to
talk to everybody who calls him?
When I'm in a meeting or on another telephone call, I
don't want to be disturbed, so I ask my secretary to find
out who's calling so I can return the calls when I am free.
Some calls I don't return at all because the caller is a pest
and a time waster.
People who solicit funds on the telephone are a pain in
the neck. I rarely return their calls, but I do give consider-
ation to those who write letters. BUSY EXECUTIVE

DEAR ABBY: I don't mind being asked by a secretary,
"May I tell him who is calling?" But what really bugs me
is having a child answer the telephone, and in a whining
voice ask, "Who is this?"


What's in a name


over the telephone?

DEAR ABBY: When I make a telephone call, I say,
"Hello, my name is Nicky Thompson." This establishes
every thing from the start. And when I pronounce my
name, I say it clearly. I am so annoyed when a person
mumbles his name as tho he were ashamed of it. I don't
mean to sound smug, but it is so simple to identify oneself
and thus relieve the other party of asking who you are.
MRS. NICKY THOMPSON
Problems? Trust Abby. For a personal reply, write to
ABBY, BOX 97.00, L. A., CALIF. 000 and enclose a
stamped, addressed envelope.

For Abby's booklet. "How to Have a Lovely Weddlsg,"
send $1 to Abby. Box 69700, Los Angeles, Cal. 009.



NASSAU BICYCLE

Tel. 28 CO. LTD.





LOOK AT THE LOW PRICE

$3,105?0 15-ft. TORINO
50 H.P. WITH GENERATOR
PUSH-BUTTON ELECTRIC CONTROLS.
All other sizes on request.


Look Cast or west
our service is the Best.

WE RENT BOATS ALSO


WESTERN AUTO
EAST BAY ST. SALES, SERVICE & REPAIRS.CYCLE
M/CYCLES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHING MACHINES.
GUNS AND BEACH ITEMS. PHONE 28511


Shirley Strachan (distinction).
DRESSMAKING, phase
two: Lorraine Thompson,
Albertha Simms, Brenetta Mac
Johnson (credit), Beres
Williams, (credit), Carol Hanna
(distinction.
DRESSMAKING post
graduate students: Nurse
Icelyn Forbes (Distinction),
Mizpah Miller (distinction),
Queenie Russell (distinction).
PUBLIC RELATIONS and
the use of english: Passed at 'E'
Level: Charles Morris, Eleanor
Munroe, Albertha Humes,
Muriel Almonord, Karran
Sturrup
Passed at '0' Level: Yvonne
Donald, Keith Bethel, Edith
Smith, Grace Cumberbatch
Passed at 'A' Level:
Veronica Cooper, Vernae
Jennings, Edna Cunningham
Patricia Dupuch (credit),
Ancilla Lockhart (credit),
Janet Dean (distinction).

TIDES
High: 6:50 a.m. and 7:07
p.m. Low: 12:15 a.m. and
1:15 p.m.


FLAMINGO


Airlines Limited







EFFECTIVE JANUARY 2,


1973


ARTHUR'S TOWN TO: (AAY) Freq.
Crooked Island Tu-Th
Nassau Tu-Th
THE BIGHT TO: (BIF)
Nassau Mo-We
San Salvador Mo-We

CROOKED ISLAND TO: (CRI)
Arthur's Town Tu-Th
Nassau Tu-Th


DEADMAN'S CAY TO: (LGI)
George Town
George Town
Nassau Tu-T
Nassau
FREEPORT TO: (FPO)
Nassau I
Nassau I
Nassau I
Nassau I
Nassau F
Port-Au-Prince F


GEORGE TOWN TO: (GGT
Deadman's Cay T
Mayaguana
Inagua
Nassau
Nassau T
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau
San Salvador
Stella Maris
Stella Maris
INAGUA TO: (INA)
George Town
Nassau
MAYAGUANA TO: (MYG)
Inagua
George Town
Nassau
NASSAU TO: (NAS)
Arthur's Town
The Bight
Crooked Island
Deadman's Cay 1
Deadman's Cay
Deadman's Cay
Freeport'
Freeport
Freeport
Freeport
Freeport
George Town
George Town 1
George Town
George Town
George Town
George Town
George Town
George Town
Inagua
Mayaguana
Port-Au-Prince
San Salvador
San Salvador
San Salvador
Stella Maris
Stella Maris


Dep.
ll:50am
2:20pm


Arr.
12:50pm
3:05pm


2:45pm f:05pnm 206
2:45pm 3:15pm 206


1:05pm
1:05pm


Sa 3:00pm
Fr 10:15am
rh-Sa 10:15am
Sa 3:00pm


9:00am
1:00pm
5:30pm
7:30pm
8:15pm
1:00pm

9:45am
2:15pm
2:15pm
9:45am
9:45am
2:41pm
3:30pm
2:45pm
5:15pm
10:45am
9:45am
9:45am
2:45pm
9:45am


Daily
Daily
)aily
)aily
Fr-Su
'r-Su


r)
u-Th-Sa
Mo-We
Mo-We
Mo-We
u-Th-Sa
Tu-Th
Sa
Fr-Su
Mo-We
Fr
Su
Su
Tu-Th
Su


Tu-
Mo-'
Tu-
'u-Th


Da
Da
Da
Da
Fr
Mo-
ru-Th

Mo-
Tu
Fr
Mo-
Mo-
Fr
Mo-

Tu


PORT-AU-PRINCE TO: (PAP)
Freeport Fr
Nassau Fr


SAN SALVADOR TO: (ZSA)
Deadman's Cay
George Town
Nassau
Nassau
Nassau

STELLA MARIS TO: (SML)
Nassau
Nassau
San Salvador


Mo-


-Th 10:45am
We 2:00pm
-Th 10:45am
-Sa 9:00am
Sa 2:00pm
Fr 9:00am
lily 8:00am
lily 12:00noon
lily 4:30pm
lily 6:30pm
-Su 7:30pm
We 9:00am
-Sa 9:00amr
Fr 9:00am
Su 9:00am
We 1:30pm
-Th 2:00pmr
Sa 2:00pm
-Su 2:00pm
We 1:30pm
We 1:30pm
-Su 3:00pm
We 2:00pm
Fr 9:00am
Su 9:00am
-Th 2:00pm
Su 9:00am

-Su 5:15pm
-Su 5:15pm

Fr 9:45am
Fr 9:45am
We 3:30pm
Fr 9:45am
Su 10:45am


2:05pm 301
3:05pm 302


3:15pm
10:30am
11:00am
4:00pm'

9:30am
1:30pm
6:00pm
8:00pm
8:45pm
4:45pm

10:00am
3:00pm
3:45pm
10:15am
11:00am
3:50pm
4:00pm
3:15pm
5:45pm
11:20am
11:20am
10:3Cam
3:00pm
10:00am

5:00pm
5:45pm

3:45pm
5:00pm
5:45pm

1l:35am
2:30pm
12:50pm
10:00am
2:45pm
10:00am
8:30am
12:30pm
5:00pm
7:00pm
8:00pm
9:30am
9:30am
10:30am
9:30am
2:00pm
2:30pm
2:30pm
2:30pm
3:45pm
3:00pm
4:45pm
3:15pm
10:30am
9:30am
3:00pm
10:00am


8:00pm 502-400
7:00pm 502


10:00am
10:30am
4:06pm
11:20am
11:20am


Tu-Th 3:15pm 3:50pm 208
Su 10: 5am 11:20am 212
Su 10:15am 10:45am 212


NOE: NEW FARE INA/GGT $20.00 O/W



MYG/GGT $20.00 O/W


FLA


I


Airlines Limited


A


1I


Fit. No.
301
302


Mo-We 4:00pm
Mo-We 4:00pm

Mo-We 3:35pm
Mo-We 3:15pm
Mo-We 3:15pm


210
214
204
210

402
404
406
408
410
404-501

204
215
215
202
204
208
210
218
216
214
212
212
208
212

216
216

216
216
216

301
205
301
203
209
213
401
403
405
407
409
201
203
213
211
215
207
209
217
215
215
501
205
211
213
207
211


Equip.
Convair
Convair

Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop


Convair
Convair

Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop


Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop


Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop

Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop

Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop

Convair
Jet-Prop
Convair
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop


Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop

Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop

Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop
Jet-Prop


0


4 waro


mw---m


I


I


I-QIK REBIBFRENCE I






Wednesday, January 3, 1973.


VAERE SHn


WIhviY


PAY


NMQRc


QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED PRICES GOOD
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, THRU SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1973.

,aam lei, ,Glv


GAME HENS


LIBBYS
VIENNA SAUSAGE


4-0Z.


EACH


SIRLOIN STEAK


Ib 1.79


T.BONE AND PORTER HOUSE STEAK Ib 1.89


TOP ROUND STEAK
FULL CUT ROUND
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
BOTTOM ROUND ROAST


Ib 1.69
Ib 1.59
Ib 1.79
Ib 1.69


GROUND BEEF
W.D.FRANKS


Ib .59
1 lb .89


W.D. HICKORY SWEET BACON 1 lb .99


W. D. BOLOGNA


CITYMARKETS COOKEDHAM


1 lb .89
Ib 1.59


THE BAHAmAS LARGEST AnD mOST ESTABLISHED
. FOOD STORES,FIRST WITH BAHRmlRnS sinCC 1934.


IMPERIAL
CORNED BEEF


12-OZ. 79r
ANS


Green Peppers 5/79


BAHAMIAN
GROWN
TOMATOES


LB.


Lemons 6
LARGE AND JUICY &
RedGrapesPER LB.
YELLOW
ONIONS 3LBS BAG


/59

.69

.69


KRAFT MILD & MEDIUM 12 oz.
CheddarCheese


CHAMPION BIIA


'-iEI


.95


CNPPION
PIGEON PEAS


O CANS


CANS


ASTOR
ORTENING



I9


8-OZ.
CUPS


FRESH
FROZEN PIES


FLEISCHMANNS CORN OIL
Margarine 1-LB.
HARVEST FRESH
Orange Juice


.55


Y2-GAL.


1.09


MORTON
FRIED CHICKEN 2 LB.
THOMAS
ENGLISH MUFFINS


TOMATO SAUCE


11 -OZ
CANS,,J


2.95


JJUNIOR
GERBER'S
BABY FOOD



5994


Apple Pi
do.p-dlsh


OIE~IM EWE


PEAS

BIRDS EY
BROC


m39 v. T
lo.TCOCKTAIL65
10-oz. .65 K i i


COLI SPEARS
10-oz. 2/99


STOKELY
FRUIT COCKTAIL


-2
303
CANS


FROMOUR GSROCE V BES'T.


DELTA
BATHROOM TISSUE


ILL
L0


LUX SOAP
VIM
MILO
TANG ORANGE


BATH ASST. ENG.


5/99


LARGE .35
14 oz. .99
27 oz. $1.75


MAXIM FREEZE DRY COFFEE 8oz.


SCOTT FAMILY NAPKINS
U.S. TIDE


$2.49


60 ct. 5/99
GIANT .99


IVORY LIQUID DETERGENT KING


1.09


,,--,-,%/,co. r .- c r-m--rM CAmKC 2l03 92/RQ


S K F .T LF II14-40 aw-3


LIBBY'S POTTED MEAT
B.B. TOMATO PASTE


3 oz. 5/99
10 oz. 2/79


LIBBY CANADIAN LIMA BEANS 14 nz.


KLEENEX TOWELS
FRENCH MUSTARD
LIBBY'S CUT BEETS


9 LIVES TUNA


2/69


2 pk. ASSORTED .65
6 oz. 2/37


CAT FOOD


CORNET FACIAL TliSUE


303 4/99
6 oz. 4/88
200 3/99


STOKELY'S
CATSUP


14-OZ.
BOTTLES
L


ROBIN HOOD
FLOUR



9


5.LB.


RED PATH
SUGAR


LB.
BAG


LB.
CAN


She Xritmnt


k I F


*IG.ei


E:


3--I f










Wh*F* W4hn0"4dn91Va, Jnay3 03


Tomatoes plentiful


this week at


the Exchanges

THEY GROW WILD on the slopes of the Andes in their native
South America. At one time, they were thought to possess
aphrodisiac qualities. Perhaps this accounts for their having
become one of the most widely grown vegetables in the tropics.
They come in green, red, yellow and even white and in all shapes
from large or small round balls to something that looks like a
pear The botanical name is Lycopersicum, but most people know
gagJ them as common-o-garden tomatoes.


ENJOYING THEIR PARTY at the Queen Elizabeth's Sports Centre on Thursday are
from left to right: Kenneth Storr, Dave Smalley, Preston Lowe, Mrs Isobel Roberts at the
and of the table, Edwin Braynen (deaf mute), Eloise Penn (a friend of the Wheel Chair
ClUb), John Sands, and Mrs. T. T. Bowles. Standing from the left are friends of the club:
Veta Blyden, Tom McShane, Christine Hopton, John Wanklyn, Dutch Holland, Alice
Langford, Mrs. Dave Smalley, Edith McShane, Anthony Roberts, L. M. Davies (deputy
governor), and Mrs. and Mr. B. E. Ferguson.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


Wheelchair Club & friends enjoy



swinging Christmas dinner party
MEMBERS of the Wheelchair Club and their friends celebrated Christmas with a swinging
dinner party at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre amid a clutter of balloons, flags, flowers, and
most important, food.


P. Anthony White was Santa
Claus for the evening. He
distributed gifts to all the
wheelchair members and one
for the club itself a large
table on which 106 different
games can be played on one
board.
Croupiers from the Paradise
Island Casino collected $100
for the party and friends of the
members donated parts of the
feast.
The head chef at the Loew's
Paradise Island Hotel prepared
a spectacular cake with cherries
and whipped cream spread
thickly between the many
layers. On the top was the
simple wish for all; "Merry




FREE

TO THE
PUBLIC
The Bahamas Youth
Evangelism Fellowship,
invites you to come and
see the film, "Fast Way
Nowhere,," Completely
FREE OF CHARGE to
ALL, on January 6th, at 8
o'clock, p.m., at the
Garfunkel Auditorium in
Palmdale. Bring a friend.


Christmas".
The menu included sliced
ham and turkey, macaroni,
beets, potato salad and meat
patties.
Whitney Mortimer, 22, ran
the turn-table which sent
rushing music swirling around
the room. Whitney contracted
polio when he was two. He
takes a keen interest in
electronics which he is
studying at the Technical
College.
MIXING
"We stress in the club
coming out into social life and
mixing with people," said Dave
Smalley who spends most of
his life in a wheelchair. Dave is
part-owner and treasurer of
Bahamas Pavers.
"Members must not be too
shy to talk. Perhaps our first
desire is to get well, but we
want friends for the wheelchair
club. We don't stress money,
just friendship.
"Second priority," he said,
"is education. We want to learn
to make money and find
employment, but we find that
there is some hesitation among
employers to employ the
handicapped."
Four members of the club
are employed. With David
Smalley are John Sands,
clerk/typist at the Red Cross,
Brian Rolle, photographic
processor for Island Merchants,


FOR SALE


Food Storewith large Warehouse

5 Large Refrigerators, Big Meat Cutting
machine and many more extra facilities.
Presently grossing $2,500 per week. Rent
$300 per month. Cash Salel Owner leaving
colony.

Phone 5-4477
10a.m. 1 p.m. or6 p.m. 7:30 p.m.
ask for Mr. IMAD


Graves Apple Juice (46 ozs.)
Libby's French Style Beans (303) 3 tins
Libby's Vienna Sausages (4 ozs.) 3 tins
-Comet Cleanser (17 ozs.)
Danish Sardines 6 tins
Jewel Shortening (3 Ibs.)
Tide Detergent king)
Ribena (large)
:Suncrest Evaporated Milk 4 tins
Morton Salt
Campbell's Tomato Soup


and floward Black who does
volunteer work at the Teachers
Training College library and
has his own answering service.
GOOD JOB
Dave, a victim of muscular
distrophy, said that there was a
lower turnover of people who
were disabled than among
those who could walk. "The
disabled have more interest in
doing a good job and they
usually stay at the same jot
longer."
Dave has had muscular
distrophy for 30 years. He
failed high school twice in the
States and took 10 years to
obtain his high school diploma.
He went to the University of
Miami night school for four
years to earn credits for his
first year. His father then
began attending the day
sessions with him and Dave
finished three years' work in
two, graduating cum laude. He
has his degree in business
administration, accountancy
and management.
Looking at the group during
their Christmas party, one
would not realize the
tremendous load these people
carry with them every day of
life. "But they only want to
take their places in the
community as other
Bahamians," said Dave.
"They are not looking for
handouts. They want to make
a living like everyone else."

NUN WILL LEAD

STUDY TOUR TL


EUROPE IN SUMMER
A TEACHER at St.
Augustine College is going to
fly to Europe next summer
with a group of students to
attend classes at schools in
Geneva, Paris and London.
Sister Maria Rahming of St.
Martin Convent, Nassau Street,
has been appointed by the
American Institute for Foreign
Study (AIFS), Greenwich,
Connecticut, to chaperone a
group of students on a
four-week European study tour


69c
99c
99c
34c U.S. CHOICE

8 CHUCK ROAST
$1.69
$1.89 $1.08 Ib.
95c
22c
19c


Tomatoes belong to the
potato family (Solanaceae) and
while the potato is the dieter's
downfall, the tomato can save
the day. A medium
two-and-a-half incher is only
30 calories. Four ounces of
tomato juice adds only 25
calories and tomatoes are very
high in vitamin C.
Most people probably have a
tomato plant or two
somewhere around the house
but for those who don't, the
Potter's Cay Produce Exchange
has them by the hundreds and
will have for weeks to come.
We'll do several columns on
tomatoes maybe more
depending on the supply of
recipes. This week hot dishes.
Next week, the cold salady
ones.
A simple way to prepare
tomatoes is to stew them. Peel,
seed and half two pounds or
about six tomatoes and cook
them with a quarter teaspoon
sugar and salt and pepper to
taste, and quarter cup of
butter. Cook over low heat for
about 5 minutes. Add a cup of
heavy cream and cook for five


Roman Catholics

plan seminar for

priests & lay leaders


A FOUR-evening seminar
for priests, religious and lay
leaders scheduled by the
Roman Catholic Diocese of
Nassau will open at 7:30 p.m.
Monday, January 15, in St.
Francis Parish Hall, Priory
grounds.
Featured topics will be an
introduction to the Gospel
message and an adult
spirituality for modem man.
Leading the seminar for
Scripture will be one of the
contributing editors to the
Jerome Biblical Commentary,
Rev. Richard J. Dillon, of St.
Joseph's Seminary,
Dunwoodie, New York. In the
area of adult spirituality, Rev.
Michel DeVerteuil,
Trinidadian-born rector of the,
Seminary of St. John Vianney
in Port-of Spain, Trinidad, will
share the insights and
experiences he has gained
through wide travel and study
in the Caribbean. One of
Father DeVerteuil's special
interests is ecumenism. He is
well know by church leaders of
all denominations.
The seminar will last four
consecutive evenings, beginning
January 15, and is open to the
general public. A special
invitation is being extended to
teachers, parish council
members, and interested
parents.
The seminar is sponsored in
conjunction will the seminar
for candidates for the
Permanent Diaconate to be
held at the residence of Bishop
Paul Leonard Hagarty during
the week of January 15 to 19.


SHIRLEY STREET


'ANISI PORK LOIN ROAST
95 Ilb.

U.S. CHOICE LAMB LESS

$1.25 lb.

k FRESH H IOLEG CHICKEN

1ot lt.


minutes more.
Lift out the tomatoes and
place in a dish. Keep them
warm while reducing the sauce
to about half. Pour the sauce
over the tomatoes.
COLORFUL
Cherry tomatoes and small
white onions make a colourful
dish. Saute the cherry
tomatoes in butter with a little
salt and sugar. Cook until the
skins are shiny and lightly
caramelized by the sugar. Peel
the small onions and cook
them in a little boiling water
covered until they are tender.
Dry them on paper towel then
saute them in butter also with
salt and sugar. Mix the
tomatoes and onions and serve.
Tomatoes can be cooked
over coals at a barbecue by
wrapping each in a square of
aluminum foil. Put a bit of
butter on the tomato and fold
the foil around it. Grill for
about 20 minutes.
Tomato soup is always a
favourite and this one is quite
easy. Saute a cup of finely
chopped onion, half a cup
diced carrots, and a little diced
celery in a soup kettle with a
quarter cup of butter. When
the vegetables are soft, add
about six ripe tomatoes
chopped coarsely, a tablespoon
tomato paste, a teaspoon each
chopped garlic, salt and sugar.
Add a bouquet garni of
parsley, thyme and bay leaves.
Bring to a boil and simmer
covered for 20 minutes.
Strain the mixture through a


BEST BUYS--
LOOK for lots of tomatoes
and cabbages at the Potter's
Cay Exchange this week.
There are some huge
avacados, bags of hot red
peppers and goat peppers
(very hot). Pawpaws are
plentiful. So are citrus --
lemons, oranges and
grapefruit. Okra is still
available.


sieve rubbing as much of the
solid vegetables through as
possible. Add four cups of
chicken stock or turkey stock
if there is still any around from
Christmas. Simmer for 10
minutes and serve
BAKED
Baked tomatoes are
excellent as a vegetable or as a
garnish for meat. Halve some
large tomatoes and scoop out a
small portion of of the pulp
from each. Combine this in a
bowl with some chopped green
peppers and chopped scallions.
Sprinkle the halves with
brown sugar and pepper and
spoon the mixture back into
the tomatoes. Sprinkle with
Permesan cheese and bake at
350 degrees for about 15
minutes.
A tomato quiche with herbs
is a simple luncheon dish. In a
bowl, combine a cup of heavy
cream, half a cup of light
cream, two eggs and two egg
yolks. Add a little tomato
paste, a quarter cup each of
grated Swiss and Parmesan
cheese, half a teaspoon salt and
some pepper. Mix thoroughly.
Pour the custard mixture
into a cooked pie shell. Cover
the top with inch-thick tomato
slices. These will sink into the
mixture and only the tops will
SHIPPING
ARRIVED TODAY:
Freeport, Sunward, Emerald
Seas, Bahama Star, Flavia from
Miami; Arcadia from Port
Everglades.
SAILED TODAY: Freeport
for Freeport, Arcadia for Port
Everglades.
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Day from West Palm
Beach
SAILING TOMORROW:
Emerald Seas for Miami;
Bahama Star, Flavia for


Freeport.
SUN
Rises 6:55
p.m.
MOON
Rises 6:08


p.m.


a.m. Sets: 5:32


a.m. Sets: 4:50


show. Sprinkle with salt, Dot with butter and bake at
pepper and thyme, a little of 375 for about 25 minutes.
the grated Swiss and Parmesan. Sprinkle with chopped parsley.
dlmmme -i m m mm mm mm.i-mi

I CAREER OPHIIUNITY
Applications are invited for tne position of Local Manager
of well-known Engineering Firm in Nassau. Applicants must
*e Bahamian, with minimum educational standard
Equivalent to Five "0" Levels or preferably ordinary
national certificate in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering.
At least five year's engineering experience is essential, and
applicants must have sufficient commercial knowledge to 1
enable them to take charge of a sales & service organization
serving the whole of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. i
The successful applicant would be required to undergo a P
comprehensive training programme at the companies'
factories overseas in order to become fully conversant with
the companies' products.
Applicants without the full engineering background
necessary, but with the potential and personality to enable I
them to successfully train for the position, will be |
considered.
Apply In own hand-writing to: Box No. DA3962 c/o The
Tribune, Nassau. m
L IMm mmeii


...IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusahlA hut unwanted


items of


clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc... clear out


your closets, garage, storeroom ...

all can be of help


to someone else.

Donate them to


ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


the best



on the



market...














JUICES ,


-S7*


Wednmday, January 3,1973.


r atS Grtbunt















SUPERMARKETS


If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Value!


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK
ENDING JANUARY 4TH,
THROUGH JANUARY 7TH, 1973.
Quantity Rights Reserved


N I~rDPr


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
SHORT RIBS
U.S. CHOICE
STEW BEEF
U.S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK
DANISH LEAN
PORK CHOPS
DAISY CHEESE


Per lb 1.09
Perlb '1.19
Per lb 11.29


Per Ib
Per lb
Per lb
Per Ib
Per Ib


^I SANDWICH MEATS


OSCAR MAYER
BOLOGNA ALL MEAT
OSCAR MAYER
BOLOGNA PURE BEEF
OSCAR MAYER
COTTO,.SALAMI
OSCAR MAYER
SMOKIE LINKS


12-oz


12-oz


I G R C E V D P S F


CARNATION
SKIM MILK


HART
GREEN LIMA BEANS
STOKELY
FRUIT COCKTAIL


TARGET
CORNED BEEF


16-oz 3/99


16-oz


12-oz


2/994


79l


MILO


L RODUCE DEPSF


16-oz


iUNKANOO SMASH
SCOTTI ES
FACIAL TISSUE ASST.
VIVA


PAPER TOWELS


12-oz

200's


Big Roll


' V


$1.09

7/99

2/99t
2/99t


14T


V v-


IRV


SARA LEE
ORANGE CAKES
MINUTE MAID
ORANGE IUICE


13-oz


6-oz.


GREEN GIANT
NIBLETS CORN SAUCE 10-z
GREEN GIANT


0 1


DANICA BRAND
BUTTER


990


I
ha~


2/79

2/990


* 1


I BROCCOLI SPEARS'CT o",z 590


KRAFT SLICED AMERICAN
CHEESE SINGLES 8o..
KRAFT SLICED
PIMENTO CHEESE oz.
KRAFT SLICED
SWISS CHEESE 8-oz.
KRAFT SLICED
S.BUTTERMILK BISCUITSo,z


a 1


v v


89C
11.19


99C
890
990


v v'


950
99


SOZ $1.09
12-oz


v -


13-oz


5/990


FROZE N 0FOOD


2/690

73'


13(
3/494


,, 6


w


7


14


7114


T4MV





I


AT NEW YEAR'S JUNKANOO PARADE


Opens 6:30-Shows start / p.m.
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE!
See 2 features late as 9:30
* STARTS TONITE *
"THUNDERBALL" 7 & 11:35
"ONLY LIVE TWICE" 9:30


WALLACE'S SIXTH SURGICAL OPERATION
MONTGOMERY, ALA. (AP)-Gov. George C. Wallace has decided to
undergo surgery for the sixth time to repair the damage a would-be
assassin's bullet did to his internal organs.
His Press Secretary, Billy Joe Camp, confirmed Tuesday that the
governor will be operated on, at an undetermined date, in an effort to
prevent urinary infections.
Camp said the surgery is neither serious nor mandatory and "can be
done at any time." The date will be set after Wallace returns, probably
Wednesday, from a week-long vacation in Miami, l-la.
Since he was shot down at Laurel, Md., last May IS while campaigning
for the Democratic presidential nomination, the governor has undergone
surgery five times to control abdominal infections. His doctors say that
the problem has cleared up, but Wallace is still paralyzed in both legs.
The impending operation, one physician said, was recommended because
of an enlargement of the governor's prostate gland which could interfere
with the flow of urine from his bladder.
Many men experience similar problems as they grow old, the doctor
explained, and many undergo corrective surgery. Usually it occurs to men
in their 60s or older; Wallace is 53.
Wallace has been spending the past week in Florida and, while there, was
fitted with an experimental device to control pain impulses to his brain. fie
has suffered considerable pain because of damage the bullet did to his
spinal column.
CHAIN COLLISION ON AUTOBAHN
MUENSTER, G(ERMANY, Jan. 2 (AP)-Fog and ice contributed to a
massive, chain collision involving some 90 cars and trucks on the
Cologne-Bremen Autobahn Tuesday. At least 30 persons were injured,
some of them seriously.
The accident occurred between the Hamm-Werne and Ascheberg
turnoffs of the super-highway, known as the Hansalinle. The northbound
lane of the hirhwav was blocked for four hours.
BUMP IN ROAD BRINGS BOY BACK FROM THE DEAD
NOTTINGHAM, ENGLAND (Al') Seven-year-old Ian Allison came
back from the dead thanks to a bump in the road.
The beatie-mopped youngster's heart stopped beating for 20 minutes,
Friday when he fell into a mountain of wet, suffocating sand as he played
on a construction site near his home in the Midlands city.
Workers clawed for 15 minutes at the sand and drugged ian's apparently
lifeless body out. His heart was not beating and sand clogged his nose and
mouth. Ambulancemen tried everything to get his heart pumping again but
eventually gave him up for dead. They loaded his body in an ambulance
o and drove off for the morgue.
SThe vehicle lurched over a bump in the road leading from the site and
that jerked Ian's heart back into action.
Disbelieving ambulancemen spotted two tiny bubbles appear at the
corners of his mouth and his chest slowly begin to move as the boy
spluttered weakly back to life.
Saturday, after a night in an oxygen tent, young Ian smiled weakly at his
parents in hospital.
'It's nothing short of a miracle,' plan's father, 32-year-old salesman
Warren Allison exclaimed.
NEWSMAN WHO REFUSES TO TELL STILL IN PRISON
LOS ANGELES (AP) William Farr spent his 31st day in iail
Thursday, marking what his defense committee said was the longest term
yet served by a U.S. newsman for refusing to reveal his sources. The
committee said the only longer related term on record was that of colonial
newspaper publisher John Peter Zenger, who served nine months on libel
charges before being acquitted In the 1700s.
Farr's sentence, imposed by Superior Court Judge Charles H. Older is
indeterminate. The newsman's attorney has said it is "tantamotint to life
imprisonment."
Appeals of Farr's sentence are pending in State and Federal courts, but
there has been no indication of when those courts will rule. Older has said
hell keep Farr in prison until the reporter reveals who gave him
information for a story written during the Charles Manson murder trial.


I


BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND


TONY SEYMOUR

&

THE NITEBEATERS



BRITANNIA BAR

Monday Sunday

Off Tuesdays

7:30p.m. 1a.m.


BRITISH COLONIAL H
LLkm


THE MIGHTY VIKINGS took the first prize in the
Adult Group section of the New Year's Day Junkanoo
Parade with their depiction of the Coat of Arms of the
World. Shown left: The Dominican coat of arms. and at
right the new Bahamas coat of arms.
Photos: Philip Symonette.

MASQUERADE COMMITTEE DONAlOINS


THE FOLLOWING
donations were made to the
Masquerade Committee:
Sweetings Funeral Home,
$100; V. G. Collie
Construction, $100; First,
National City Bank, $100;
Geoffrey Johnstone $100;
WEATHER
WIND: Southeast to
south-south-east 5-15 m.p.h.
WEATHER: Mainly fair
except for isolated showers
SEA: Smooth to slight
TEMP: Min. tonight 69 Max.
tomorrow 80


PEGASUS, perched atop this little cottage, won it's
carrier third prize in the adults individual parade during the
New Years Junkanoo.
Photo: Philip Symonette


M.C.


American Women's Club, $50;
Peter Cole & Associates, $50;
Columbus Pharmacy, $25;
Parisian, $20; Godfrey Higgs,
$15; Mrs. Natalie Boswell, $10;
Miss Roslyn Bethel, $10;
Palmdale Furniture, $10; City
Restaurant, $10; Mrs. Gertrude
Fernander, $5; P. Tsavoussis,
$5; Dr. C. Maxwell Joyner, $5.



TrEhca


* NOW SHOWING 1st-RUN! *
AT 7:00 & 10:40


Eastman Color # lZ...... 1
A film for the whole family, filmed entirely in the Swiss Alps.
STARRING
MARSHALL THOMPSON JACK MULLANEY INGE SCHONER
and "GEORGE"the loveable misfit.
.wct s ,WALLACE C BENNETT


Plus at 8:50
'RIOLOBO"


Starring
John Wayne


.4 .E -SE VICF" . "b E S NT


FOOD STORE


PHONE 3-4847 LOCATED IN ENGLERSTON
NEXT TO ST. LUKE'S BAPTIST CHURCH


U.S. CHOICE T-BONE STEAK $1.89 lb.


LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS


TURKEY DRUM STICKS


FRESH MUTTON


A;


79C lb.


49C lb.


95C lb.


NATIVE PORK

$1.00 Ib.

TURKEY WINGS

49C lb.


' Ajax Detergent (giant)
Libby's Sweet Peas 3 for
Campbell's Vegetable Soup 4 for
Luncheon Meat 2 for
Nescafe Coffee(4 ozs)
Libby's Spaghetti & Meat Balls 2 for
Libby's Whole Kernel Corn 3 for
Libby's Sliced Beets 3 for
Libby's Ketchup (20 ozs) 2 for


-BtKUI~aI -*

W Ru S m ugit9
"THUN DERBMIi-
cu-,- see ieeiXMu .i Rf t a t Utt1
.....TERENCE YOUNG .~.RHMRO MAiU.WU OHN HOPKINS
..t:KEVIN Mc.ORY JACK IIINGA-..IAN FLEtiN
PAAN' ISEM' Olr





IAN "miI"
FMINGS

ABERTR BROCCOLI HARRYSAITlMAN






LAST DAY THURSDAY
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005'::














O SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES. 7:
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISED.
IN











SUGGESTED FOR MA TORE AUDIENCES
SPA RENTA DISCRETION AD VISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Now thru Friday Last Day Thursday
Matinee continuous from 2 Continuous showings from 3
Evening 8:30 -
"DEATH BY
'THE INVITATION" R.
TODD KILLINGS" R. Shelby Leverington
Robert Lyons Aaron Phillips "
Richard Thomas
PLUS
PLUS
"THE VELVET
"COLOR ME DEAD" R. VAMPIRES" R.
Tom Tryon Celeste Yarnall
Carolyn Jones Sherry Miles
No One Under 17 Admitted. No One Under 17 Admitted.:


NOW SHOWING
One Ma,mnee at 2:30, Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4666 -
RODSTEIER AMESCOBUR
S WILLBLOWYOUAART! WILLBLOWYOUAPRTI
t g


99c
99c
89c
65c
99c
89c
99c
99c
$1.09


*O


*II


* '


Or Sributtt


$


0 Wvo


I


n m r.nr 7 L l # l-


Wednesday, January 3, 1973.


News highlights


)t-A

L-j' L N I N

IF


w


-ok


go


7


do"'





- Wednesday, January 3, 1973.
Ui4" ^^


A11


YOUR FRIENDLY SUPERMARKET SPECIAL SAVING!
VALUES GOOD JANUARY 4th
THRU JANUARY 8th


WHERE PARKING
IS A PLEASURE...
AND SHOPPING
A DELIGHT!!


BUY


BAHAMIAI
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE WE
WILL OPEN SUNDAYS 7 a.m. 10 a.m.


LOTS OF OTHER INSTORE SPECIALS
JUST FOR YOU!
COME and SEE USI--


SAWYERS Red Kidney Beans ............. oz 3/99*
SAWYERS Blackeye Peas...............16 13/99'
SAWYERS Lima Beans ......................160.. oz3/89
SAWYERS Tomato Paste...................10-0. 3/99
SAWYERS Pigeon Peas ...................... 20 z 3/99'
SAWYERS Whole Tomatoes................ 20 oz. 2/89
B & BWhole Tomatoes ................20.... 2/89'
B & B Pigeon Peas .......................... o oz. 5/99'
B & B Tomato Paste ........................ LRG. 3/99
Marcal Towels.............................. 2PK 59P
. Quaker Orits ..............................1... b 59'
Sparky Charcoal .........................5 lb2/'1"
Campbells Vegetable Soup ......... ,0.o 5 5/o$




NATIVE GROWN
Cucumbers............EACH 15


String Beans..
NATIVE GROWN
Oranges ..........


.......... LB.

LRG. 10for


Fro(m PenguinBay


49 Native Pork ............ Perb. 89
Mutton ................. Per b. 99c
$100 ^ Oscar Mayer Jubilee Ham lb. $
1 Sweet Mousal b.Sl1
Hormel Bacon .............. *b. $1
Hormel Ham Steaks ......b. $ 19
S.S.HOICELamb Rib Chops ... lb. $1 19
NEW ZEALAND eC
7 _amb Shoulder H OL


MINUTE MAID 12 oz.
Orange Juice ............83c
BORDENS
BUY ONE
ICE CREAM PTS. GET ONE
FREE!


ALL FLAVOURS
BORDENS YOGURT......... 4/$100
GOLDEN ISLES
M ILK ...................... Gal. 79'


6/89


LNew l ot
^^^New Zealand


EMMMIMINNO -- MMMIMMML-


IA


BLAN~CO\










0o The Tribiue


Wednesday, January 3, 1973.


*U NN* 5get the jb(ln


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m to p.m.


REAL ESTATE


!i


C8282
LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfront lots at East End.
Hilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2-2680.
C8303
IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's home, guest
cottage, fireplace, 2/ ? bath ,
patio, marvellous vi'w,
swimming,fishing. H.H. Larkin
c/o Box 101, Harbour Island.

C8311
FOR SALE
Lot must be sold immediately.
$3,000. Call 5-6600 Mrs.
Johnson.


WANTS TO SHARE
C8290
2 GIRLS (preferably teachers)
to share 3 bedroom house,
Norfolk Street, Shirlea.
Telephone 2-1531 (work).
Home 3-4186.

FOR RENT
C7015
NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroom/2
bath, situated Domingo
Heights, East St., South.
Contact: Nassau 5-6234 or Mr.
Pratt at Freeport 352-9007
(collect) between 9-5.
C8297
2 BEDROOM unfurnished -
Madeira Street opposite John
S. George. For information call
23170.
C8264
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
HILLCREST TOWERS (Third
Terrace West Centreville) --
Elegant, fully furnished and
equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
apartments, airconditioned,
swimming pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842,
7-4116, 2-8224 or 2-8248.

C8267
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Boyd Subdivision
off Foster Street. For
information call 3-6644.
C8265
LARGE 1 BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
2-4777-8.
C8270
IN TOWN furnished rooms,
efficiency apartment, also
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.

C8268
ONE EFFICIENCY apartment,
basically furnished, Victoria
Court Apartments, on
Elizabeth Avenue between Bay
and Shirley Streets. Facilities,
laundry, parking. Phone
5-4631. After five 3-2397.

C8286
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152. Evenings
5-4926.
C8285
ONE BEDROOM and one two
bedroom two bath, large living
and dining room, Bahama
room apartment. Basically
furnished on. beautiful
landscaped grounds. Third
Terrace Centreville. Facilities,
laundry, phone, parking, fully
airconditioned. Phone 5-4631
-after five 3-2397.

C8287
ONE GROUND FLOOR 2
BEDROOM APARTMENT, off
East Bay Street, near Out
Island Traders Building.
Telephone 4-1563 after 5 p.m.

C8289
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

C8258
UNFURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
bath house. South Beach
Estates. Telephone 35218.

L BSIlNESS
-OPPORTUNITIES__J


C8240
THRIVING FOOD business for
sale, Including wholesale
agency. Gross $15,000 per
month, net $2000 plus. Reply:
Adv. C8240, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

C82udv
DRY GOODS, Dress and Gift
Shop for sale. Ideal location
with parking. For large
Investment, If interested, write:
Adv. C8239, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

The Tribune clifed Ads
brtlln reults-Fast--To place
yMu Adv. Telephone 21986.


FOR SALE


II


C829:
CHRISTMAS FLOWERS,
Ornaments and gifts at half
price for one week only.
NASSAU FLORIST, East
Shirley near Church Street -
5-2598 and 2-4223.
C8301
1972 Toyota Corona MK 11-4
door. Like new. $2,600.
O. N.O.
Girl's Bicycle, also Elna Zig Zag
sewing machine both $140.
Phone 3-4631.
C8320
ONE LARGE avacado gas
stove only $200.00. Contact
Roberts at 2-8437 before 5:00
p.m.

C8312
MAGAZINES AND SCHOOL
SUPPLIES AT LOWER
PRICES
PARENTS. Buy your
children's School supplies at
KMBC School Supplies &
Stationers Shop. All popular
magazines, The Sunday edition
of The MIAMI HERALD, lots
of other knick-knacks. KMBC
SCHOOL SUPPLIES &
STATIONERS SHOP Collins
Ave, near Xerox Bldg.

CARS FOR SALE
C8261
1969 FIAT 124 Station wagon.
Lively. Cheap to run. $1000.
Owner leaving. Phone 41365.
C8162
1969 VOLKSWAGEN 130()0
with radio. Owner must leaw i
colony. Contact: Rudolph
Ferguson telephone 22441.
C8272
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LIMITED
SUBSTANTIAL
END OF SEASON
REDUCTIONS
1970 Chevrolet
Impala 2 dr. A/C $2800
1970 Rover 2000
A/C Automatic $2400
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic, Beige
4 dr.. $1895
1968 Viva 2 Dr.
Automatic $850
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic $1600
1969 Caprice A/C
Vinyl 4 Dr. H/T $2000
1968 Javelin A/C $1600
1970 Sinqer Gazelle
Auto. White $1295
1970 Wolsey 16/60
Auto Grey $1295
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8.


PETS FOR SALE


C8253
GERMAN SHEPHERD
Price $145.00. Seven
')ld. See Alexander
Durham Street off
Royal Avenue.


PUPS.
weeks
Virgil,
Mount


MARINE SUPPLIES
C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleer
six; private bathroom wit;,
vanity, shower and head; stove.,
refrigerator, sink, stereo
ship-to-shore- twin 230 h.p.
engines with less than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
C8238
22 FT. AQUA SPORT twin
55 horse power Johnson
Outboards in good condition -
price $3,800.00. Call 35171
day 41632 after 5 p.m.

C8283
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

Cb288
35' BERTRAM SPORT-
FISHERMAN bought NEW
JUNE 1971 powered by
twin Cummins Diesels 210 HP
each 200 hours on each
engine, central airconditioning
- 7 KW Diesel generator fly
bridge and dual controls -
many other extras. Absolutely
AS NEW. Phone 3-4953 Nite -
2-1722-3-4-5 days.

I LOST
C8315
FROM VILLAGE ROAD area
Labrador/Alsatian dog-sandy
coloured, white throat. When
last seen was wearing red collar
with Humane Society and
licence tags attached. Finder is
asked to contact McLees,
Harmony Hill telephone 31422
or 27466. A REWARD IS
OFFERED.

SCHOOLS
TUITION
C8322
GUITAR LESSONS ... taught
by Derek. For information call
5-2354


SCHOOLS


C8317


I I


THE NASSAU CIVIC
BALLET SCHOOL will
commence its Winter Term
session on Monday, January
8th. For information please
call 5-2353.


HELP WANTED

C8310
WANTED
EXPERIENCED GARDENER.
Contact Beryl Bain, B and B
Grocery, McCullough Corner
and Sandy Road.


C8161
BOAT CAPTAIN,
Sportsfisherman, must have 5
years experience. Steady well
paying position for right man.
Reply to: Adv. C8161, c/o The
Tribune, P. 0. Box N3207,
Nassau.
C8294
SALES GIRLS ages 18-30.
Experience not necessary -
will train. Salary plus
commission. Apply in person
to Mr. Fondas at Chris 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.

C8308
BAHAMIAN HOUSEKEEPER
to live-in. Must be able to
drive. Phone 5-1137.

C8112
WANTED Registered nurses,
LPN's and physical therapist
for Opa Locka General
Hospital. Telephone
305-685-7333 or write to Mrs.
Virginia Tresvant,
Administrator, Opa Locka
General Hospital, 14310 N. W.
22nd Avenue, Opa Locka,
Florida 33054.
C8321
BOOKKEEPER REQUIRED.
Preferably older person with
good practical experience.
Apply only in own hand-
writing giving full details of
experience to Package Delivery
Service, Ltd., P. 0. Box
N-4205, Nassau.

C8271
RE FRIGERATION
MECHANIC. Should have 3 to
5 years experience on domestic
appliances. Salary subject to
negotiations. Phone BESCO
2-1070.
C8318
The Trust Company requires
an individual with excellent
typing, shorthand/speedwriting
abilities, who is fluent in
writing, reading and speaking,
English, Spanish and French.
Position involves work with
Mutual Funds and experience
helpful hut not pre-requisite.
BAHAMIANS ONLY NEED
APPLY
Contact Mrs. Emily
Lightbourne at telephone
2-4240 for appointment.



C8293
NOTICE IS HEREBY given
that James Dodds of Nassau
City West District is applying
to the Governor for
naturalisation, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts to the Deputy
Governor, Bahamas.

TRADE SERVICES

C8279

Plader's CatomM

Brokerae Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
-P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE

& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN BINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2.3795,2-3796,
2-3797, 2"3798
Airport 77434


TRADE SERVICES


C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.
C8102
AFTER CHRISTMAS MESS?
WE'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
ABCO TEL:51071-2-3-4.
C8275
TROUBLES ......small or large
call The Plumber on Wheels:-
ROBERT M. BAILEY
P. 0. Box N56,
Nassau
Telephone: 3-5870.


- iMA -


I TRADE SERVICES


C8299
WITH 14 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
CARTWRIGHT


Now offers Swimming Pool
Service at a very low price.
Plus:- acid wash, paint and
repairs. Call 3-4126 day or
night.

C8281
T. V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments and
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Chuck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
or 2-1662, WORLD OF
MUSIC, Dewgard Plaza.


Nassau and Bahama Islands


Leading Newspaper


6Get




Jhkis- doe


I ANNOUNCEMENTS
C7006
LADIES AND GENTLE-
MEN!!! get your newly
styled Holiday garments made
by ABC Tailor Shop Pinders
Point (right near the Baptist
Church).

IHNELP WANTED
C7013
SOCIAL HOSTESS
REQUIRED: Must have at
least 11/ vears experience as
Social Hostess or Tour Escort.
Must be 21 or older. Mist be
neatly dressed, have pleasing
personality. Must be able to
work with large sums of
money. Typing experience is
preferred. References are
required along with Police
Certificate.
FRONT OFFICE WORKER:
Must have at least 1 year
experience in Front office
Work. Must be able to work
with NCR 4200 machine. Must
be able to handle large sums of
money. References are
required along with recent
Police Certificate.
Interested Persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL
AND COUNTRY CLUB,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, PERSONNEL
OFFICE BETWEEN THE
HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. AND
3:00 P.M., MONDAY
THROUGH FRIDAY.

C7012
One JOURNEYMAN/
PLUMBER -- for all phases of
Plumbing work, estimating,
warehouse servicing, on call at
night. Ten years experience.
Write: Grand Bahama
Plumbing, P. 0. Box F-2655,
Freeport.
C7017
Fully experienced mechanic
required for our Service
Department, must have
minimum of 3 years with
knowledge of General Motors
products. Full Company
benefits with factory training.
Bahamians need only apply.
Five Wheels (Grand Bahama)
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.
C7016
Fully experienced body man
required, must be able to repair
all types of vehicles and install
replacement parts and
complete up to re-finishing
stage.
Minimum 3 years experience,
full Company benefits.
Bahamians only need apply.
Five Wheels (Grand Bahama)
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.


-I


You'll see by the paper what's ne\,, what's go-


ing on, what's to do. In your newspaper, your


whole family finds entertainment and informa-


tion. What's more, your newspaper is your


marketplace, where advertising competition


thrives, and you discover how to get best values


from your shopping dollars.




call


CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT


I HELP WANTED
C7008
STEEL ERECTOR FOPEMAN
FOR PRE-ENGINEERING
BUILDING, MINIMUM 5
YEARS EXPERIENCE.
PHONE 352-9328, IVAN
ALEXANDER CONSTRUC-
TION CO., LTD.
C7019
ONE FREEZER MAN able
to work in Freezer under
extreme temperatures, must
have knowledge of different
meats and fish products, also
able to sort and issue meats.
1-3 years experience in
Freezers.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 12
noon only, to King's Inn &
Golf Club, Personnel
Department.
C7018
1 PUBLICITY/PUBLIC
RELATIONS OFFICER to
plan and conduct public
relations, publicity and
advertising programmes,
arrange associated photography
and write associated news
releases. Must have a thorough
knowledge of the media both
on island and abroad and be
capable of selecting where
advertising and publicity
releases will create the most
favorable impression.
Applicant must also handle
own correspondence and type
his own news stories. Applicant
will be responsible for
entertaining visiting press
people, radio and television
representatives and other
publicity media representa-
tives. At least four years
experience required.
2 DINING ROOM
CAPTAINS: Experienced in
First Class Hotels, Restaurants
with French Services:
minimum of three years as a
Captain. Good references and
Police Certificate required.
Please apply to Personnel
Department: El Casino, P. 0.
Box F-787, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C8300
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. 0. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas. '


the big switch


SI'A 1-7 0


GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED


IN FREEPORT

TEL. 352-6608


I


I


l


L-











Mhr Mribunt


"Of course that's an exception to the treatment we're
demanding to be treated as equal as "

Rupert and the Beanstalk-43


* Giant Trugg carefully stands
Rupert on the table, and then
puts his pet mouse in its
cage. Twas a good thing I
et it free," he says. "Now.
we must see what this casket
contains." First he fetcnes the
If so that both tiny visitors
(nay watch. My I It's like a
ALL RIGHTS


treasure chest I gasps Rupert
as the lid is raised, revealing
a mass of jewellery. Trugg
whoops with joy and picks up
a glittering gem. "I am no
longer the poorest of the
giants I he shouts. At last
my family's riches have been
found I It is a wonderful day I "
RESERVED


JGOTA LOT OF SeFCWOCM...A'A
U OF CL0MC MY OLKS.

Brother Juniper


"Do you MIND? Y


cROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
l Chestnut 31. Having three
5. Astound parts
8, Chatter 34. Stares
111 Pinnacle 37. French friend
12i Unite 38. Capri
131 Kind of coffee 40. Document
14 Desire 44. True
151 Dakota Indian 47. Temperature
17; Sailboat setting
191 Beige 48. Eggs
20i Kiwi 49. Walk on the
22: Tapestry moon
25, Framework 50. Enjoyment
29 Gelderland 51. Bengal quince


you're blocking the light."












SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
5. Milkfish
DOWN 6. Existed
7. Decree
1. Jowls 8. Soft hail
2. Girasol 9. Tune
3. Gambling game 10. Anaconda
4. Blackmail 16. Long-tailed ape
F" r P I 18. Hawaiian food
Staple
13 21. Perform
S 23. Cyprinoid fish
24. Gender
- 25. Loiter
S J w 26. Bits of
7- .- -. interest
27. Characteristic
S2 28. Generation
SG 32. Rascal
oS 33. Porch
35. Timetable
abbreviation
39. Roof edge
q-2 41. Pare
S 3 __ 42. Formerly
1o 43. Newspaper
I color section
S44. Watch pocket
45. Prayer bead
swfeatures 14 46. Statute


MOlMIC HOUR


too.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) You have a good friend who,
has fine ideas for you, but some of which are not good, so pick
out the best and follow through on them Not a very good day
for, social matters Look into practical affairs more
intelligently
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those young people who needs much cheering up early,
since the attitude will be rather morose Encouragement will
also bring out the fine organizing ability latent in this chart,
which can lead to big success in almost any field of endeavor
Take good care of the diet and teach to smile early Give
sports that are helpful A slow starter here, but one who soon
catches up and then goes ahead of others.
'The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Winning

Bridge
By VIC M1OLLO
Deaer Weis N/S Vul.:
North
a86
t 109 6

4K 4 3B
SAK QJ 6 3

West North E So,
1 Pas 10 DAe
4 21NT Paeg 4V
eodae tMe K and
s1itheso the 05. IHw shoud
A 1 SI 'TIe OK tlb rely
with ia in which case Wews
tiews the*A to JuOst yfci qpen-
Iug. i-, declarer's pa oa
v'w bo h the cards ttat matter
are llke to be wrong and his
problem is to avoid losing two
spades in addition to a club and
a diamond. Oome what may, he
anr.ot afford to let Eaast in to
lead a ap ) tirtmigh the clicked
hand.
.o_ up th, the OA,. i&.
Leac thei 6q 't),winq en it hu
second dtmond 1i loer on loser
p a.. He wins the ne c trtc.
outaese s adub, tbtih he ruffs
daw two rounds at
Utsiipa ending kin.imnuy, and
leadB Ae OQ. Pbykig hat tor
the OK.
West East
A 9 7 J 105

.. OK is ed h e nd
taee's0 ettIl a tranp etrvv In
dummy ta three gocd dfanTOnjck


Chess
By LIONARO GARDEN


White naites in tree
moves (by J. Kotrec). This
40-year-old problems has
been highly praised ,by
previous solvers tor Its
improbae key and elegant
nmattg va rations.
Par times: 1 minute
problem matter; 3
aninte, Drdblem expert;
10 amnumtes, good; 20
sinutes, average; 35
minutes. novice.
SOLUTION No 9547 15-

Chess Solution
I R-R4. If I . KxR;
2 B-86 ch. and if 2 ... K-
Kt6; 3 Q-QKt8 mate, or if
2 . K-R4; 3 Q-R7. If
1 . K-BS; 2 Q-" 1, and
if 2 . K-5; 3 Q-B3, or
K-B4; 3 QxP, or K-K6; 2
Q-4.. I I . P--Kt6; 2
1- KxR: 3 B-,B6, or If
here 2 .. K-Kt3; 3 Q--R5.


N-l :.Oiui I rim'l MeKAV
a hrini *iuiaierli'4Pa l it s
the helii ad :a-i
8. Weik'nii 4s)
Is 'Iprite. ,11)
II. l4sateiedl. (t)
I I $lltII'iI lUis t riiiii ii'n 1 n111I'
thisei s.'lt)
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I MORGAN, M.D. CoicDAL CUa TIS


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


re n,2


Y CARROLL RIGHTER'



from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: During the day it is
Difficult for you to organize your affairs for the
future, but later you find you can study them more
objectively and get some answers that are just what you have
been looking for. Wind up incomplete matters
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Show that you handle your
activities intelligently and make big headway with the goodwill
of higher-ups Use wisdom in handling civic matters Change
tactics with mate and get better results
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Those new ideas you have
need more study before putting into action, or you can get
yourself in trouble through them Contact out-of-towners for
the data you require Save time for one who needs your help
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You have responsibilities left
over from last year that require your full attention right now
so they are handled properly. Show more affection for mate
and come to a better understanding, harmony
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Take care you do
and say nothing that could start arguments with close ties,
associates, any who mean much to your well-being Although
others do something you do not agree with, await a better
time to talk it over with them-
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Study well what your duties are
and then roll up your sleeves and get right to work on them,
put them behind you quickly Take more of those health
treatments that have been helpful in the past Show you are a
logical thinker.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Although you want to have
fun, be sure to get into proven activities that bring real
pleasure Don't take risks where your devotions are concerned
Avoid one who likes to argue too much
LIBkA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Being more cheerful and kind
with those who dwell with you brings about more harmony at
home now Do work that is necessary Get rid of obsolete
articles around you and replace with the new
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov 21) Plan your daily duties more
efficiently so you have more spare time for other activities,
pleasure. State clearly what your motives are with associates
Then you get the right kind of cooperation
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) If the financial side of
your life is not going well, analyze where the trouble is and do
something about it Get information from an expert in
business if you have any doubts about something Help one
who is ill.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Analyze whether you are
making the right contacts, bringing the right interests into
your life, otherwise make them now Get into some new group
gathering that can be just what you need Avoid one who has a
bad temper.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Closet yourself with an
expert and put your affairs in better order instead of gadding
about so gregariously A good friend has a problem that you
can help with, so do just that A wise person gives good advice,


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard
LETS NOT WASTE MY CLO6E THE DOOR.1-I WANT TO
U UAL FOR A MAN MAJOR MCOY 15 AN WELL, MAJOR' STRENGTH IN SMALL TELL YOU A SECRET NE KEPT FOR
HI AGE TO RECOVER UNUSUAL PERSON, GOOD TO -TALK, ROPER./ L ALMOST HALF
FLUENT SPEECH 50 DOCTOR/--riL 6 'OU PLEAE A CENTURY.
QUICKLY MR. ROPER/ RIGHT UP. LEAVE US,


HOW man- list. No plurals; no foreign words;
SV words of no roer names. TODA'S
NII four letters TAROE: 18 words good:
or more can 18 word, very good ; zS words,
-- o--- ou mmak e excelant. 8olutuion tomorrow.
Sr m t h YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
D C letters shown Coder ooper cord core cored
he r? In crop croup croupde crude curd
as an n care cured doer tdour drop
D word. eact druge duper cru order ordure
L I letter y perau o pored pour poured UJ
be used once procure PROCURED prod pro-
o n I y. Each duce PRODUCER proud prude O
word must contain the large pure purr purred record recoup
letter, and there must be at recur redo rode e re roped roup
least one eight-letter word in the rouped rude rued.

-J
. .. ..._________ J b d1su sl.irswe rlugims.. (4


I JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLSI


i


I APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


(9547)


OW". I











12 Obr Writhbunr

BASKETBALL ....--
,~mp \ I~


S CANCELLED: NO

S: GYM AVAILABLE
/ L ^ | UNABLE to acquire a
I gymnasium, the Bahamas Amateur
Basketball Association has been
forced to cancel tonight's thriller
Eagles and second place Classic ..
Pros.
VPresident of the Association, Mr. : X
Vince Ferguson, said that the latest -.j(|%" t '
Sword he received from the Ministr)
of Education Education was that
officials of Pyfrom Road School
Sand the Ministry were trying to i
reach an agreement on a plan which
I would hopefully vacate either the 1'*
Pyfrom Road Gym or the Fastern .
Secondary School Gym.
Ss during the latter part of 1972, THE JUNOS VOLLEYB,
Q. the B.A.B.A. series was being held Volleyball Tournament on S
I in the A. F. Adderley Gym. That Marilyn Ellis, Judy Alazkiew
gym is presently being used by Mary Chisholm, Jane McDor
students taking the General
C U certificate of Education
examiination.
Mr. Ferguson said that no word
can be given until an agreement has f d h
Been reached and an agreement is e season
expected to be reached within a
I week.
"We can only keep our fingers increase In
crossed hopefully that there will be
a positive solution," commented
la Mr. Ferguson. "If we can start
within a week, then we can make
up the lost games or else we will THE 1973 HORSE RACING
have to judge the teams on a Deputy Prime Minister A. D. Hai
percentage basis." As was predicted by the
The L W. Young School is Race Track management the
0 J I presently split between the Pyfrom
Road Gym and the Eastern attendances and pari-mutual
Secondary School Gym. Although handle for the opening day was
the Eastern School Gym is better than in previous years.
presently vacated bystudents, it is According to official reports
being used by the Bahamas
Volleyball Association for the the crowd and betting for this
Bahamas' Third Annual Volleyball year's opening day showed an
Tournament which runs through increase of 30 percent.
SSaturday. Yrticipating in the sterday's take was
S.A.B.A. series which used to start $131,526 a sizeable increase
in October and end in March, used over the $101,040 in 1972
to play each other four times. This and the attendance total
W I season, due to lack of facilities, the
Association was forced to cut it's Tuesday was 2,567 an
season in half whereby it's 24 increase of 748 over the 1819
I member clubs play each other only that attended last year's
twice. Already this year it has been opening day.
Interrupted by unscheduled events.
I TheAssociation has therefore Racing fans were, however,
called a special meeting for all the not able to bet eight races as
participating clubs for tomorrow promised. Eight events were on
night at St. Joseph's School on the programme but the second
SBoyd Road at 8 o'clock to discuss
the future of the 1972-'73 season as race of the day was only run to
well as to inform members of the make up the daily double as no
status of an amateur athlete. quinella tickets were sold due


0, IsChampions go down to



Tropigas;St.Georges stop


O Lions in scrappy game
Id By IVAN JOHNSON
I 'UPSETS' were the order of the day at Clifford Park on
| Sunday when last year's League Champions, McAlpine lost 2-1 to
Tropigs and Red Lion were beaten 3-2 by St. Georges, in the
New Providence Football League soccer matches.
G In the first match St. the score 3-2.
I Georges playing as though they After this goal the game
were determined to win at all became a total 'shambles'
costs, particularly in the mainly due to the fact that the
second half, put an end to Red St. Georges goalkeeper,
Lions winning streak with Pedrini, refused to be sent off
Roscoe Davis scoring twice and for swearing. In the end he left
a m |,Jim Smiles (1). Mike Parnell the field after arguing violently
and Don Maples were the with the referee.
St goal-scorers for Red Lion. The whole incident was
The McAlpine-Tropigas clash absurd. If players were sent off
proved to be a tough one with every time they swore then I
I Tropigas inflicting the League don't think that there would
I Champions a first defeat of the be more than a handful of
C season when Gray scored 3 players left on the field at the
minutes from the end to enable end of every match.
S|Tropigas to clinch the match. The decision by the referee
Sammy Haven scored for the to send off Pedrini seemed to
% 1I Clan and Goodger netted create an atmosphere of
i Tropigas' other goal. animosity amongst the players
S- Sunday's matches were and spectators alike and the
S- I marred by a number of game continued with the
S disputes and skirmishes. In the object being to kick the man
i Red Lion St. Georges match rather than the ball -
several players were sent off consequently when the
^ g I and the game ended with a free final whistle sounded, to put it
Sfor all brawl between players bluntly, 'all hell broke lose'.
-V I ~and spectators luckily no In the second match
lI |one was seriously hurt. Tropigas went into the lead
I SEVERAL CLASHES almost immediately after the
l.. I Throughout both games start when Sammy Haven
U ) I tempers flared and several pounced on a ball which the
sI clashes between players went Clan goalkeeper thought was
unnoticed by the referee, going wide of the left post but
i S I St. Georges opened the instead hit the post and
I afternoon's scoring when bounced back into play.
outside left Roscoe Davis ran Minutes later it became
I onto a through ball and evident that this was not
Managed to guide it gently past McAlpine's day when their
the entranced Paul Johnson in captain, Dick Wilson, was
Sthe Red Lion goal. brou g h t do w n and


Following this early goal by subsequently taken off the
St. Georges Red Lion began to field with a broken leg.
get into top gear and they FINE YOUNGSTERS
harassed the St. Georges' With the loss of their captain
goalmouth with a series of the Clan seemed a little 'at sea'
I raids. Full credit must go to and Tropigas dominated
the St. Georges' defence who throughout the match aided by
defended with fierce some fine performances from
,, determination. youngsters Robert Brown,
I U Inevitably the Lions were Gavin Turner and Van Bethel
SI rewarded for their efforts when who are at present on vacation
the St. Georges goalkeeper from their Universities in the
Is Franco Pedrini failed to push a States.
l shot from Mike Parnell on the Just before half time the
I Z left wing around the post. Clan, breaking quickly out of
I l Unperturbed by the Lions' defence, equalised. Ra)
goal St. Georges soon went Simpson after beating the ful
back into the lead when Davis back on the right wing scni
I I struck again in the 25th minute over a good cross and Mik(
from a corner, the ball going Goodger, following up, drove
0 *i through the goalkeepers legs home from 15 yards to makt
b after he had been left the score I-I at half time.
I unsighted by his own right With three minutes of the
back. match remaining Tropiga
Z Five minutes into the second clinched the match when Grey
half St. Georges made it 3-1 and the Clan goalkeeper botl
when striker Smiles scored, but went up to meet a cross front
I seven minutes later Don Maples the right and the end result a
J pounced on a lose ball from a their mid-air clash was that thi
corner and sent it sizzling into ball trickled into the McAlpin
m m/ the St. Georges net to make goalmouth.


ALL CLUB of Canada here for the Bahamas' Third Annual
Saturday from left: Therese Quigley, Marion Munroe (captain)
viez, Lynn McAvoy (co-captain), Debbie Seeley, Gall Beach.
sald and Denise McLafferty.
Photo: PHILIP SYMONETTE.


i opens with 30 percent


bets and attendance
SEASON got under way yesterday and was officially opened by
nna when he cut the ceremonial ribbon at the finishing line.


I


to the fact that the switch over
to the manual machines after
the first race was not made
quickly enough.
Apart from this slight hitch
everything else went smoothly
and race track owner Jimmie
Silberman said he had "no


complaints".
A $2,324
presented to
Children's
representative,


cheque was
the Crippled
Committee
Mrs. Shirley


Butler, by Deputy Prime
Minister Hanna on behalf of
the Bahamas Raceco Ltd. and
the Bahamas Racing
Commission. The money was
the proceeds from last year's
Charity Day.
FOLLOWING are the results and
payoffs for the meet;
FIRST RACE 5 furlongs-
Troy (7) S. McNeill $6.60, $3.35,
$2.55 Skeeter (3) M. Brown -
$4.30, $3.15 Fall Safe (5) A.
Saunders $3.50
2nd RACE 5 furlongs Chime
Song (5) A. Saunders Free For
Annie (4) J. Horton Boomerang
(8) D. Patel Daily Double (7-5)
$11.60
3rd RACE 5 furlongs My Dear
(4) C. Munnings $39.10,
$8.55, $2.95 Royal Order (3) A.
Gibbs $11.30, $3.00 Lady Mary
(7) G. Bain $2.50. Second
quinella (3-4) $84.25
4th RACE 4'A furlongs The
Hustler (2) J. Horton $4.80,
$4.00, $2.85 Sea Fire (5) A.
Saunders $5.40, $4.20 Glory
Stopper (8) S. McNeil (4.10
Third Quinella (2-5) $19.65.
Sth RACE 5 furlongs Miss
Advantage (2) A. Saunders
$6.25, $3.15, $2.70 Go Go Girl (8)
M. Brown $5.05, $3.55 Dat Like
Dat (4) G. Bain $3.20 Fourth


Quinella (2-8) $11.65.
6th RACE 6 furlongs Horan
Shoran (4) D. Patel $8.55, $6.00,
$3.55 Golden Missile (5) C.
Major $25.30, $12.30 Lady
Stella (1) G. Bain $3.40 Fifth
quinella (4-5) $56.00
7th RACE 4'/z furlongs The
Outsider (5) G. Bain $4.60,
$3.70, $2.40. Doger Lossa (8) K.
Johnson $4.40, $2.75 Chenda (3) -
R. Ferguson (2.50 Sixth Quinella
(5-8) $13.65
8th RACE 5 furlongs Fancy
Fire (3) A. Saunders $7.95,
$2.50, $2.35 Banquero (5) H.
Fernander $2.65, $2.20 Last Hope
(4) D. Patel $2.45 Seventh
Quinella (3-51


t






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t
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Canadian girls in winning


form thrash local girls 4-1
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
CANADA'S JUNE VOLLEYBALL CLUB, led on the
offensive by captain Marion Munroe and co-captain Lynn
McAvoy, showed winning form last night when they defeated the
Bahamas' Ladies National Volleyball team 4-1 in five sets during
exhibition warm-ups in preparation for the Bahamas' Third
Annual Volleyball Tournament on Saturday.


However, assistant coach
of the Bahamas' team, Tom
Grant was quick to say "This is
just an exhibition match. The
real thing is on Saturday."
Coached by Fran Wingston
the ten-member team are all
students from the University of
Western Ontario three of
whom Munroe, Judy
Alazkiewicz and Mary
Chisholm play on the Canadian
National Volleyball team.
Although they show more
experience in their tactics, they
had no forwards to top the
spiking and blocking of Flo
Rolle, Barbara Knowles,
Margaret Albury and Hattie
Moxey.
"Those girls are good,"
commented Munroe. "Give
them an inch and they take a
mile."
DIFFERENT GAME
Coach Wigston, who also
kept a close eye on the
Bahamian girls, said that they
have a good potential, "but
what they need is a little more
competition. We play a
completely different type of
game. I guess after playing
together, on Saturday, they
will give us a run for our
money," she said.
In the first set which the
Bahamas lost 15-12, both sides
swopped the service five times
i, nj _.W1 ^a Ic


before Albury, on the service,
gave the Bahamas a 1-0 lead.
Canada immediately moved
to an 11-5 lead before coach
Dr. Norman Gay called a time
out. Returning to the court
with Rolle, Knowles and
Clestine Wilson on the forward
line and Elsine Thompson
serving, the Bahamas moved to
within two points of the lead
(13-11) before the ball was
served into the nets.
"They are very swift,"
commented Barbara Knowles
captain for the Bahamas' team,
"'but, they are not all that hard
to beat."
In the second set, which the
Bahamas lost 15-9, Munro,
Alazkicwicz and Denise
McLafferty again proved too
much for the less experienced
Bahamian side.
Bouncing back in the third
set behind the playing of Rolle,
Moxey, Knowles and Albury,
the Bahamas held Canada to
only three to win 15-3 but gave
away the other two sets 15-3
and 15-5.
Exhibition games will
continue tonight at 7:30 at the
Eastern Secondary School
Gym between the Bahamas
Islanders, the Bahamas
Commonwealthers, the Ladies
National Team and the
Canadian Ladies team.



1 11
B.Utr 'ft'1 ;


THEY'RE OFF! TO START THE 1973 RACING SEASON at Hobby Horse Race
Track with the horses jumping out of the modified starting gate. Photo: Rickey Wells.
.........ph to: ick y Wells..


I-


Wednesday, January 3, 1973.


tOQK/vffwaefm/v~/w'


We've put our flavour fresh Eggs


in New clear plastic cartons.


Empty containers have many handy uses...

as ice cube trays...as button holders...

keeps fish hooks sorted... ab a jellomold

and many other uses,..


the price is right tool


Hatchet Bay The Bahamian Way


6