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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 2, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03235

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lrrtiunti


(oeglsteed with Postmaster of Bahamas for postege concessions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 34 Tuesday, January 2,1973. Price: I 5 Cents


Election petition result





could put 'referendum





clause' to the test


THE OUTCOME OF TWO OPPOSITION
have a significant effect on the use of a
independence constitution.


No


FNM election petitions to be heard before the courts this month could
referendum to amend specially entrenched provisions of the new


'automatic citizenship'


Belongers,


for


says L.O. Pindling


BY THE PRIME MINISTER'S OWN ADMISSION, the "sin
difficult point dealth with by the independence conference was
automatically made citizens of an independent Bahamas," Pri
disclosed on Radio Bahamas last night.
In a half hour address to the that the British had proposed,
nation he pointed out that the but it was not agreed, that
category of "registered" citizen Bahamian citizenship should be
was unknown to the whole automatically acquired at the
Bahamas delegation until it was time of independence by all
brought up by the British persons who, before
government, independence, had become
Mr. Pindling pointed out citizens of the United Kingdom


PM spells out 3 categories


under constitution


PROVISIONS in the
Bahamas' independence
constitution have been
classified according to three
-- 'attgoies, Prime 1M ais~i,
Lynden Pindling disclosed in
his address to the nation
speech on Radio Bahamas
yesterday.
The first category, which is
"specially entrenched," would
require a three quarters
majority of each House of the
Parliament, followed by
approval from a simple
majority of the electorate in a
referendum in order to be
amended.
Provisions considered
"specially entrenched" are
those relating to citizenship,
the protection of Fundamental
Rights and Freedoms, the
establishment of Parliament, its
Sessions, Prorogation and
Dissolution, the appointment
of Senators, the determination
of membership of the House of
Assembly, the power to make
laws, alterations to the
Constitution, the Executive
Authority and the Cabinet, the
Supreme Court and the several
Appeals Courts.
"Ordinarily entrenched"
provisions can be amended if
there is a two-thirds majority
by each House followed by a
simple majority in a
referendum.
Under this category are
provisions relating to the
establishment of the office of
Governor General and exercise
of his functions, qualifications,
disqualification and tenure of

Limits put on

state of emergency

THE BAHAMAS' new
constitution will put a
limitation on the length of
time during which a
proclamation for a state of
emergency can remain in force.
Government's right to
postpone general elections in
the event of "national
emergency" was among the
issues raised at the conference
by the Opposition FNlM.
The compromise reached at
the conference would permit a
state of emergency to remain
in force for six months, after
which it would have to be
extended by' a vote of a
majority of members in the
House of Assembly.

COLOURFUL HAITIAN

AREA RUGS
(HANDMADE)

DOLLY MADISON
FURNITURE
MACKEY ST., NASSAU.


office of Senators and
members of the House of
Assembly, the Public Service
and Finance.
Th. .;ema..iing provisions ot
the Constitution can be
amended by only a simple
majority vote in each House of
the Parliament.

PM praises FNM

& government

delegates to talks
PRIME MINISTER Lynden
Pindling used the occasion of a
nationwide broadcast
yesterday to praise the manner
in which government and
Opposition had conducted
themselves at last month's
independence talks in London.
At the conference, he said,
he saw no evidence of the
politics of desperation .... no
evidence of the philosophy of
dynamite death and
destruction -. both allusions to
the charges and counter-
charges levelled at each other
by government and the
Opposition during the election
campaign.
The Prime Minister said that
instead he saw political
opponents strongly advocating
their several points of view
without violence, without
malice and without rancour.
"Both government and
Opposition delegates got a new
and illuminating glimpse of
what it really meant to be a
Bahamian and both
delegations, independently of
each other, sensed the urgency
to protect the vital Bahamian
interest whenever it seemed
threatened," he said.

Defence & finance

talks are slated
BEFORE the Bahamas
becomes independent in July
there are to be discussions
between this government and
the British government
concerning future financial and
defence arrangements, Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling told'
radio listeners yesterday.
By March or April there also
will be tripartite discussions on
these subjects between the
governments of the United
Kingdom, the United States of
America and the Bahamas.
Both Great Britain and the
U.S. have at different times
indicated that they were not
prepared to assume defence
responsibilities for the
Bahamas once it becomes
independent.
The Tribune understands,
however, that the Bahamas is
hoping to elicit certain
guarantees on this question.


gle most important and most
the question of who should be
ime Minister Lynden Pindling

and Colonies solely by reason
of their connection with the
Bahamas.
This category, he said,
embraced aliens who had been
naturalized in the Bahamas and
former citizens of other
Commonwealth countries who
had registered in the Bahamas
as citizens of the United
Kingdom and Colonies.
"The latter category of
"registered' citizen was
unknown to the whole
Bahamas delegation," the
Prime Minister said.
The argument put forth by
the British government was
that it could not accept
responsibility for any person
who was a U.K. and Colonies
citizen unless such a person
had acquired such citizenship
either by ancestral connections
with Britain or by reason of his
connections with a territory
which continued to remain a
colony after independence was
granted the Bahamas.
HIE EXPLAINED
"It was obvious," the Prime
Minister said, "that the British
did not understand the special
circumstances of the
Bahamas." lie told listeners
that he had an opportunity to
explain these circumstances at
a special meeting with British
Prime Minister Edward Heath.
The British delegation
finally accepted a proposal
which the entire Bahamas
government and Opposition
delegations supported, Mr.
Pindling continued.
This proposal was that at
independence, automatic
citizenship would also extend
to U.K. and Colonies citizens
who had acquired that status
through naturalisation or
registration in the Bahamas but
with certain exceptions.
Excluded from automatic
citizenship would be:
Those persons who had
dual nationality;
Those registered persons
who were not ordinarily
resident in the Bahamas at the
end of 1972;
Those persons registering
in the Bahamas after the end of
1972 and
Those naturalised persons
who indicated that they do not
wish to accept Bahamas
citizeiiship.
'BELONGERS'
The Prime Minister made it
clear that this final agreement
did not include automatic
citizenship for, "and the
British were not concerned
with the category of persons
known as 'Belongers.' "
He said his government's
proposals for this category of
persons were acceptable.
"In any event," he added,
"the British were prepared to
continue to have responsibility
for those citizens of the United
Kingdom and Colonies who
had that 'qualifying ancestral
connection' with Britain.
Such qualification was
possible if the person's father
or his father's father had been
born in the United Kingdom.
It was also agreed that the
Bahamas could make its own
laws, as was usual for any
independent country, for the
deprivation or renunciation of
citizenship acquired by
naturalisation or registration,
the Prime Minister said.


The election court will sit
tomorrow to hear the petition
of FNM election candidate
Cyril Fountain against the
return of the PLP's Philip
Smith as the representative for
North End, Long Island, Rum
Cay and San Salvador.
The petition of Bert
Williams of Dundas Town,
Abaco, claiming Captain
Leonard Thompson as the
rightful representative for
Cooper's Town in place of the
PLP's Scherling C. Bootle will
be heard January 8.
If the FNM is successful in
winning both petitions it will
then have ten members in the
House of Assembly -
sufficient to block the
government from obtaining the
three quarters majority it
requires to have "specially
entrenched" provisions of the
constitution put to the
electorate for amendment by
referendum.
The amendments could be
carried by a simple majority of
those voting in the referendum.
STALEMATE
With action stalemated in
t.ie House, there would
probably never be need to have
them put in the form of a
referendum.
Under terms of the new
constitution, "specially
entrenched" provisions of the
constitution can only be
amended by a three quarters
majority in each House of the
Parliament followed by
approval of the amendments
by simple majority in a
referendum.
The Tribune was told that
constitutional requirement is
for three quarters of the total
membership of each chamber,
not just the number of
members present.
It is understood that the
British government, which had
refused to agree to a
referendum by the British
people for entry into the
Common Market, appreciated
the fact that the Opposition in
the Bahamas was not
sufficiently strong numerically
to stop constitutional
amendments being made by
the government at whim.
SAFEGUARD
The referendum is therefore
a built-in safeguard with the
effect of isolating the
particular amendment being
sought and asking the election
to vote on whether it approves
of the change or not.
In the Long Island election
petition Mr. Fountain is being
represented by the Hon.
Eugene Dupuch, Q.C., with Mr.
Bradley Callendar as junior.
Mrs. Ruby Nottage of the
firm of Nottage and Nottage
has up to now been appearing
for Mr. Smith. However
Jamaican Vivien Blake, Q.C.
will be leading during the
hearing.
The Attorney General will
represent returning officer
Livingstone A. Smith.
The Cooper's Town petition
is somewhat more complicated
inasmuch as the FNM's
election candidate Captain
Thompson has since resigned
from the party.
Mr. Thompson however, did
not file the election petition,
and theoretically he can be
seated against his will, in which
case, should the petition be
upheld, he would have to
officially resign if he did not
wish to keep the seat.

BASRA MEETINGS
Bahamas Air Sea Rescue
Association (BASRA) will hold
a general meeting at the
Association's headquarters at 8
p.m. Wednesday, January 10.
There will be no meeting
tomorrow night.
There also will be a meeting
of the new board of directors
on Monday, January 8 at 5:30
p.m. at headquarters.


PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING prepares to
make his address to the nation yesterday New Year's
Day. The radio broadcast from the studios of Radio
Bahamas was filmed by a special crew from New York.
Standing directly behind the Prime Minister is Bahamas
Broadcasting Corporation chairman Milo Butler Jr. Mrs.
Pindling is seated at rear.



7 Bahamians honoured



by HM the Queen

SEVEN BAHAMIANS, including one now deceased, received
awards in the Queen's New Year's Honours officially released


Sunday.
Mr. Oris Russell, permanent
secretary, Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries, was
made an Officer of the Most
Excellent Order of the British
Empire (O.B.E. Civil Division)
and Mr. George Henry
Cumberbatch, building
superintendent, Ministry of
Works, designated a Member of
the Order (M.B.E.)
The Colonial Police Medal
for Meritorious Service went to
Mr. Allen Delemore Gibson, a
sergeant in the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, and the Imperial
Service Order to the late
Claude Albury Saunders,
formerly Postmaster, Post
Office Department, who was
advised of his award prior to
his death on December 14.
Mr. Russell, 50, entered the
public service in 1940 and held
various posts before
appointment as Director of
Agriculture in 1954 and
permanent secretary in 1965.
He has acted as Deputy
Colonial Secretary, Colonial
Secretary, Deputy Cabinet
Secretary, Chief Secretary on a
number of occasions and was
the governor's deputy on three
occasions in 1968.
Mr. Russell has been
Hurricane Information Officer
1961-63; a member and
president of the Bahamas
National Trust, honorary
secretary Boys' Scout
Association, trustee Bahamas
Historical Society and a
member of the Advisory
Committee of the Bahamas
Branch of the British Red
Cross Society.
Mr. Cumberbatch, 59, was
appointed to the Public Works
Department in 1937. He was
promoted to construction
foreman in 1950,
superintendent of Works in
1955 and to his present post in
1965.
In his present post he is
responsible for the
maintenance of and minor
improvements to all
government buildings in New
Providence.
Sergeant Gibson has been an
officer of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force for 11 years
during which time he has
received seven commendations
from the Commissioner of
Police.
He is currently serving in the
Criminal Investigation
Department.
Mr. Saunders entered the
public service in 1937 as an
Out Island Commissioner. He
subsequently served in the
Treasury from 1941 to 1949
and in the Public Works
Department from 1949 until
1955.
He was then appointed
assistant treasurer prior to
assuming the post of
Postmaster which he held from
1960 until his death in 1972.
Mr. Saunders was ordained
deacon the Anglican Church
on October 24, 1950 and priest
on May 21, 1967.
Queen's Certificate and
Badge of Honour recipient
Herbert Woodside was born
August 5, 1913 and has given
long and dedicated service to
the community in Grand
Bahama.


Mrs. Cox, who also received
the same award, joined the
Prison Service in June, 1937
and has served as matron of the
Female Department of Fox
Hill Prison since that date.
Mrs. Mullings has been very
active in community work
through the Inagua Branch of
the Red Cross and the Zion
Baptist Church's auxiliaries.
She has also undertaken
considerable charity work,
notably as a social worker in
operating her boarding house
in Matthew Town, Inagua.

St. Paul's Baptist

deacon dies at

church service

MR. BERTRAM
MITCHELL, 62, deacon of St.
Paul's Baptist Church, a
Strachan's Comer painter, died
early New Year's morning
while taking part in a
programme sponsored by the
Junior Choir of St. Paul's at
the church on Bias Street, off
Grant's Town.
Falling to the floor of the
church after an apparent heart
seizure, Mr. Mitchell was given
first aid by a visiting nurse,
Miss Rene Grant, an
unidentified Miami medical
student. He was also attended
by Mrs. Betsy Colebrook, wife
of the church's pastor, Rev. S.
A. ('olebrook.
Mrs. Colebrook said she had
gone to his assistance after
being told he had fainted.
Before he fell, she said, he was
singing and clapping and
seemed to be in high spirits.
His death came very suddenly,
she said.
lie had just returned to the
building after starting to leave
for home, but came back when
the local gospel group, The
Visionaires, began to sing.
"Hle liked singing and had a
good tenor voice himself," she
said.
Nurse ;Grant, a member of
the Children Ward's team of
the Princess Margaret Hospital,
said today she was present at
the programme after being
invited to sing.
The incident occurred
between "2:30 and 3 a.m.,"
she said. The singing
programme was being held
after the church's Watch Night
services. She was tapped on the
shoulder while singing and told
what had happened, she said.
She said she began giving
first aid after "it appeared he
wasn't breathing and cold
sweat had broken out on his
face."
Assisting her was a visiting
medical student from Miami,
she said. The student called an
ambulance, which took Mr.
Mitchell to hospital where he
was pronounced dead on
arrival.
Mr. Mitchell is survived by
his wife, Julia, and two sons.
Funeral services, to be
conducted by Rev. tAr.
Colebrook, will be held at St.
Paul's Baptist Church at 2:30
p.m. on Sunday.


2 SURVIVE SEAPLANE CRASH

OFF GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR



After miracle escape



survivor says: 'I'm all



right you so-and-so's'


GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR: An Eleuthera man and ;nt
American visitor narrowly escaped death Sunday ,.hii the


seaplane in which they were f
minutes after takeoff.
David Mitchell. 59, of
Governor's Harbour, and (apt.
Jack Neiman, 49, of
Gatlinburg, Tenn., climbed out
of the plane after it turned
over in the air and hit the
ground upside down
Mitchell suffered head cuts
and possible broken ribs. Capt
Neiman was badly bruised. The
plane, a Buccaneer
single-engine amphibian, was
totally demolished, but did not
catch fire.
Capt. Neiman, a retired U S.
Navy pilot staying at
Tranquility Bay Club,
Governor's Harbour, was flying
the plane which he owned.
Mitchell said they took off
at 2 p.m. Sunday bound for
the Exumas to deliver some
boat carts. He said they taxied
to an island about a third of a
mile off shore from Mitchell's
home and business, The
Eleuthera Marine and Scuba
Resort in Governor's Harbour.
HATCH OPEN
He said they began taxiing
northward towards shore.
When they got about 200
yards, Capt. Neiman noticed
that the hatch over the cockpit
had blown open.
Mitchell said Capt. Neiman
stopped to close the hatch,
then continued taxiing towards
shore, hoping to develop speed
in time to take off and clear
the shore.
Mitchell's wife, Cazna, 48,
his son, Marcus, 15, and Lester
Lathrop, 26, a marine
technician in Mitchell's
business, watched from shore.
Lathrop said the plane left the
water about 100 yards before
shore, but that it could not
clear the tall casuarina trees
lining the shore
The plane's wing sliced off a
branch of one tree and the
plane grazed the roof of the
Mitchell home. The plane then
sliced off the top of a coconut
palm, turned in mid-air, and
apparently, the nose and
engine hit the ground. The
plane then skidded 10 feet
before it shrivelled in its final
impact, Lathrop said.
The wreck is still on the
Mitchell property.
"It's an amazing sensation
feeling land come down on top
of you," Mitchell said.
"When the plane turned
upside down I was sure I was
going to die," was Capt.
Neiman's comment.
SILENCE
"I'll never forget that
moment of silence, after the
engine stopped before we
heard voices," Mitchell
recalled.
He said he was hanging
upside down from his seat belt,
pinned on all sides by the
plane.
Lathrop said he and Marcus
rushed to the plane. "I was
hollering, 'Dave' and Marcus,
'Dad'. We thought he was dead,
but we kept hollering.
Suddenly Dave called, 'I'm all
right you so-and-so's'."
Mrs. Mitchell telephoned .
Government nurse Enid Howell
and took the victims to the
U.S Naval facility where the
nurse treated them. Mitchell
received several stitches in his
head and knee. Capt. Neiman
was cut on his legs, and arms
and was badly bruised. "I wish
we could commend Nurse
Howell," Mitchell said.
Talking of the crash,
Mitchell said he later realized
that it was amazing the plane
did not catch fire. He said this
probably was because the
batteries were disconnected in
the crash, and there was no
fuel tank rupture.
Mitchell, a Belonger, is an
Englishman who came to the
Bahamas 18 years ago by way
of New Zealand. His Eleuthera
Marine & Scuba Resorts is an
outlet for the rental and sale of
boating, scuba and water skiing
equipment. He has recently
started to charter yachts for


lying crashed into t1,, ground

cruising.
Capt. Neiman owns a plane
chartering business in
Tennessee.

CHALK PLANE

LANDS SAFELY

IN MIAMI
A CHALK Airlines Mallard
(G 73 charter aircraft with 11
passengers and two crew
aboard landed safely at Miami
International Airport today
after one of its two main
landing gears collapsed as the
plane touched down on a flight
from Bimini.
A Chalk Airlines
representative in Miami said
the amphibean had left Bimini
about 8.30 a.m. for the
25-minute hop to Miami. While
en route one of the fears came
out partway and failed to hold
when the plane landed.
There were no injuries.
Chalk has been flying
between the Bahamas nmd
Florida for 53 years without
casualty.

Privy Council

turn down appeal

of Alexiou killers

THE PRIVY Council has
turned down the appeal of
Philip ( 'Smooth '')
Farquharson, who with two
other Bahamians was convicted
and sentenced to death for the
April 21 murder last year of
Greek-Bahamian hotelier
Anthony Alexiou, 62, at his
Eastern Road home.
Farquharson of McCullough
Corner, Alexander t"Shine")
Pinder and Bernard Darling, a
Rolle Avenue waiter, were also
found guilty of attempting to
murder the dead man's wife,
Mrs. Papandi Alexiou, and of
housebreaking and stealing.
Attorney David Bethell
represented Farquharson in his
appeal.
The appeal to the Privy
Council, London, was made
after an 18-page reserved
judgment by the Bahamas
Court of Appeal, delivered by
Sir Paget Bourke on March 23
this year, dismissed the three
men's appeal on all grounds.
Although a petition on
behalf of the three men has
been sent to the Prerogative
of Mercy committee, nothing
has been heard from the
committee on the matter.

MARTONMERE GETS G.B.E.
LORD MARTONMERE,
recently retired governor of
Bermuda. and now a Nassau
resident, has been appointed
Knight Grand Cross of The
British Empire (G.B.E.),
Government House announced
Sunday.
Lord Martonmere, who as
Sir Roland Robinson was
well known here before his
appointment as governor,
served in Bermuda from 1964
until his retirement last year.
His appointment as a G.B.E.
was issued by Government
House in addition to the names
of the seven Bahamians cited in
the Queen's New Year
Honours.
Lord and Lady Martonmere
live at Star Acres on Prospect
Ridge.


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PEACE TALKS ARE ON AGAIN S. VIET POLITICIANS 97 DIE, 80 Sli vIVE CRASH NEW YEAR


TRUDEAU AND/OTHER DIGNATARIES PAY TRIBUTE
OTTAWA (AP) Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau of Canada and
the Governor-General led the scores of dignitaries who viewed the casket
Saturday of the late Prime Minister Lester Pearson lying in state in
Parliament.
Trudeau, Governor General Roland Michener and their wives paused for
several minutes before the flag-draped casket In the Hall of Honour.
Pearson, who died at 75 on Wednesday, was buried Sunday.
The late Liberal Prime Minister won the Nobel Prize for peace for his
work in 1956 in establishing a Middle East peace-keeping force while he
was External Affairs Minister.
EASY TO CONDEMN, SAYS HEATH
LONDON. )EC. 30 (AP) Prime Minister Edward Heath warmly
welcomed the Washington announcement Saturday that Vietnam peace
talks will resume in Paris next month and declared "we must all pray that
they will lead to a successful outcome."
The British leader also reminded his critics that "it is easy to demand
condemnatory statements" but past experience shows this is "not always
the best way of bringing peace nearer."
Heath has been under strong pressure from the Opposition Labour Party
to speak out and condemn Presidnet Nixon's recent resumption of
bombing raids north of the 20th parallel. But he has preferred to make
Britain's views known in unpublicized contacts with the U.S. government.
It was understood here that Heath received advance word on the
resumption of the Paris talks and delayed his reply to his critics until the
Washington announcement was made.
IRISH REPUBLIC ENTERS ECM QUIETLY
DUBLIN (AlP) The Irish Republic entered the European Common
Market Monday with little fuss or ceremony.
In Dublin, nine trees each representing a country in the enlarged
community were planted along the banks of the Royal Canal by Senator
.soin Ryan, chairman of the Executive Council of the European movement.
Prime Minister Jack Lynch said the process of national adjustment
toward a way of life in a new European dimension had already begun.
The bells of Christchurch Cathedral in Dublin rang in the new year and
Common Market entry hbut people appeared less concerned with the
community than with the troubles in Northern Ireland. The fighting there
has recently spilled over into the Republic, with violence claiming four
lives on this side of the angry border.
MANY DIE IN VOODOO CEREMONIES
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) More than 70 persons died in Brazil's two
main cities Rio and Sao Paulo in the wake of frantic voodoo
ceremonies and new year's parties.
The New Year in Brazil usually is welcomed with throbbing carnival
rhythms which echo until the start of the actual carnival festivities this
year in March.
In Rio de Janeiro, more than 300,000 persons crowded the beaches to
venerate the ocean goddess lemanja. Worshippers sent candle-lit floats and
altars into the surf.
Rio police said more than 35 persons died in traffic accidents caused
mostly by drunken driving. The death toll stood also at 35 in Sao Paulo.
EARLY TRY FOR ARAB/ISRAELI SETTLEMENT
JERUSALEM (AP) Foreign Minister Abba Eban Monday predicted
renewed attempts early in 1973 to bring Israel and the Arabs into a partial
Middle Fast peace settlement. "I foresee that attempts will be made early
in the year to explore the possibility of a partial settlement," Eban told the
state Radio. "I am certain the eticrt will be made but to what it will lead I
don't know," he said.
The partial settlement idea, raised by the United States, centres around
reopening the war-blocked Suez Canal as a way of cooling off Mideast
tensions.
Washington's efforts to get the talks moving have been bogged down for
months over Cairo's refusal to take part.
Eban also said there was a "strong chance the cease-fire will be
maintained" on the canal in 1973. It has been in effect since August 1970
with only a few infractions.
SHARP DROP IN BRITISH RESERVES IN 1972
LONDON, Jan. 2 (AP) Britain's official reserves of gold and foreign
currency backing the troubled pound sterling fell sharply in 1972,
government figures showed Tuesday. The reserves had increased
substantially in 1971.
A Treasury announcement said the reserves fell in December by 249
million dollars and stood at 5,646 million dollars at the end of 1972.
The figures represented a drop of nearly 1,000 million dollars from the
1971 yearend total of 6,567 million dollars. They significantly reversed the
pattern of steadily rising reserves during 1971, which more than doubled
from a 1970 yearend total of 2,827 million dollars.
The Treasury gave no reason for the drop in reserves in 1972, but a
major factor was clearly the trouble surrounding the decision to float the
pound sterling in June.
ST. VINCENT DOCTORS END STRIKE
KINGSTOWN, St. Vincent (AP) The medical crisis in St. Vincent
ended Friday when eighteen doctors who were withholding their normal
services returned work.
The solution came about with the arrival of Dr. Dorian Shillingford from
Dominica to take up the post of Senior Medical Officer.
The physicians walked off their jobs in protest against the appointment
of surgeon Cecil Cyrus as acting Senior Medical Officer effective December
Sth.
CROSSBOWS IN A GRAVEYARD
LONDON (AP) A man with a crossbow and deadly steel-tipped arrows
held off a squad of police patrolmen in a bizarre through a West
London cemetery early Saturday.
The officers, who moved in after a man was reported "going berserk"
and firing wildly at passers-by, dived for cover behind gravestones as they
ringed the madly-firing bowman.
They eventually overpowered him when he ran out of arrows and hauled
him off to the police station. None of the officers were reported hurt.
RELEASED FOR V2 MILLION DOLLAR RANSOM
BUENOS AIRES (AP) Argentine guerrillas released unharmed an
Italian executive of a subsidiary of a U.S. firm Friday night after collecting
ransom of more than SSOO,000 a company spokesman said.
Vicente Russo, 46, employed by Standard Electric Argentina, a
subsidiary of International Telephone & Telegraph Corp., was set free on a
suburban road by kidnappers identified as montoneros, a group backing
former dictator Juan Peron.
HUSSEIN COMMUTES IS DEATH SENTENCES
AMMAN, JORDAN (AP) King Hussein Saturday commuted death
sentences for IS persons, most of them Palestinian guerrillas, to long prison
terms.
The royal decree did not mention it, but the move apparently was made
to mark the King's marriage last week to a Palestinian girl.
In recent weeks guerrilla groups claimed seven guerrillas were hanged in
Jordan. Authorities here denied the report.




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US halts bombing


as Hanoi agrees to

'serious negotiations


PARIS, JAN. 2 (AP) United States and North Vietnamese
technical experts sat down topther Tuesday for the first time
since Dec. 23 to work out details of an eventual Vietnamese cease
fire. The meetings had been suspended because of North
Vietnamese protests over American bombings of the north.


Nguyen Co Thach, North
Vietnamese deputy foreign
minister, and William Sullivan,
deputy assistant secretary of
state for Southeast Asian
affairs, headed the two
delegations as they resumed
work at a villa in suburban
Choisy-le-Roi, near the
headquarters of the North
Vietnamese delegation to the
Paris Peace Talks.
The technical meetings are
an offshoot of the top level
negotiations led by Henry A.
Kissinger and Le Duc Tho, a
member of the Hanoi
Politburo. The Kissinger-Tho
meetings were broken off Dec.
13, and will be resumed Jan. 8.
French President Georges
Pompidou said there are "real,
precise difficulties, hard to
overcome," in the negotiations.
President Nixon halted the
massive bombing of North
Vietnam's heartland Saturday
after North Vietnam agreed to
resume "serious negotiations"
with Henry Kissinger on Jan. 8.
The White House
announcement came against a
backdrop of protests at home
and abroad* of the war's
heaviest raids on the
Hanoi-Haiphong complex. And
it apparently followed a clear
signal from Hanoi's leaders that
they are ready to bargain
earnestly with Kissinger,
Nixon's assistant for National
Security Affairs.
START MONDAY
Deputy press secretary
Gerald L. Warren announced
that Kissinger's negotiations
with North Vietnam's Le Duc
Tho and Xuan Thuy would
resume in Paris on Monday,
Jan. 8, and that technical talks
between experts from both
sides would resume on
Tuesday, Jan. 2.
Then, in response to
questions, Warren said: "The
President has ordered that all
bombing will be discontinued
above the 20th parallel as long
as serious negotiations are
under way."
He said that Nixon's order
to halt the raids went out "as
soon as it was clear that serious
negotiations could be resumed
at both the technical level and
between the principals..."
In Paris, the North
Vietnamese delegation to the
peace talks confirmed that
negotiations would resume and
said the bombing halt had
already gone into effect. The
Viet Cong issued a statement
indicating approval of the
resumption of bilateral talks.
Negotiations broke off on
Dec. 13, with each side
accusing the other of raising
new issues to thwart the
signing of a peace agreement
drafted in October, when the
presidential assistant said
"peace is at hand."
BOMBING ORDER
On Dec. 18, Nixon ordered
full-scale bombing resumed
above the 20th parallel. Since
then, except for a brief
Christmas pause, American


B52 bombers and other
warplanes have steadily
pounded targets in the
Haiphong-Hanoi area with the
most massive bombardment of
the war.


After the White House news
conference, Warren would not
say how or when Hanoi
signalled its willingness to
resume talks.
But it was understood that
Kissinger had been in direct
contact with the Communists
and had received a clear signal
of their readiness to bargain
earnestly. There was no sign,
however, that Hanoi had
agreed to make major
concessions to reach a
settlement.
Apparently because of this,
indications were that Nixon
viewed resumption of
negotiations with wariness and
wants to be shown that Hanoi,
indeed, is willing to negotiate
seriously.
Officials have said
repeatedly that the President is
determined to continue
military pressure on North
Vietnam until a settlement is
reached.
Press secretary Ronald L.
Ziegler, in announcing on Dec.
18 that air raids had resumed
after a two-month suspension,
said the bombing policy "will
continue until such time as a
settlement is arrived at."
U.S. officials said the air
raids were aimed at military
targets and were intended to
knock out North Vietnam's
ability to wage war. Hanoi
claimed the bombing was
indiscriminate and caused
heavy civilian casualties.
WIDE CRITICISM
The intensive raids brought a
barrage of criticism from
foreign capitals, allied as well
as Communist. Chinese Premier
Chou en-Lai said U.S.-Chinese
relations could not improve so
long as the raids were taking
place, and Soviet leader Leonid
Brezhnev reportedly decided to
delay his planned spring visit to
the United States because of
the air attacks.
There was mounting
criticism in Congress, too,
with some previous
supporters of Nixon's policy
joining ranks with Capitol
Hill's antiwar forces.
Senate Republican leader
Hugh Scott said: "I hope and
pray that the resumed
negotiations will prove to be
fruitful and will finally lead to
a lasting peace and the return
of our POW's and total
accountability of those missing
in action."
The national peace action
coalition said the
announcement will not deter
its plans for an antiwar march
on Washington Inauguration
Day.
"No one should give any
credence to Nixon's latest
shabby pretense of seeking
peace," said co-ordinator Jerry
Gordon.


ANGRY AT THIEE'S

DICTATORSHIP MOVE

SAIGON (AP) Angry South
Vietnamese politicians accused
President Nguyen van Thieu
Saturday of attempting to create a
one-party dictatorship in this
war-torn nation.
The politicians were reacting to a
decree signed Wednesday by Thieu
which sets out stringent
membership and election
performance criteria for political
parties.
Under provisions of the new
decree, only five of the country's
24-26 political parties can survive.
The government-controlled
newspaper Tin Song said three
would survive but many political
leaders believe only Thieu's New
Democracy Party can meet the
tough requirements.
"Very few parties will be able to
comply with the new regulations.'
said Tran van Tuyen, a former Vict
Premier and leader of the Vietnam
Kuomingtang Party. "Almost all
will be compelled to disband.
Members of these parties will have
only one choice: to join Thieu's
party or to side with the
Communists."
Tuyen, a prominent Saigon
lawyer, called the decree "a stupid
action, an attempt to monopolize
politics for his own party. A move
extremely hurtful for himself and
the nation."
IHa Thuc Ky, unsuccessful
Presidential Dai Viet Party, said the
new law will lead South Vietnam
toward a one-party dictatorship.


'Complete turnabout

in Australia's

foreign policy

By Gordon Tait
SYDNEY (AP) Australia's new
Labour government bustled into
1973 with swift decisions signalling
major changes for the country's 12
million people and its allies around
the world.
Prime Minister Gough Whitlam
led the Labour Party to victory last
month after the Liberal-Country
Party coalition had ruled Australia
for 23 years.
One of Whitlam's first official
acts was to abolish the draft. This
was followed by complete
withdrawal from South Vietnam of
Australian aid and soldiers.
The government told
20-year-olds to disregard their draft
notices. Officers were told to
release draftees who wanted to
leave. Draft dodgers were released
from jail and draftees in army
prisons for such offenses as being
absent without leave were ordered
released.
Australia also broke diplomatic
relations with the Nationalist
Chinese regime on Taiwan and
established relations with China and
East Germany.
The Sydney Morning Herald
interpreted the government's
foreign policy decisions and
statements by ministers as "a
complete turnabout in foreign
policy."
The newspaper said that "the
United States for so long our ally
and our great and powerful friend is
now the target for the Australian
government's criticism and virulent
abuse."
The newspaper wrote that Clyde
Cameconn, the minister for labour,
said in an interview Friday that
"maniacs" seem to be controlling
U.S. policy in Vietnam.
In domestic affairs, Whitlam's
government has:
*-Revalued the Australian dollar.
*-Lowered the cost of birth
control by removing the sales tax
on contraceptives.
o-Announced that racially
selectlJ athletic teams will be
barred from Australia.
The Australian dollar was
revalued 7.05 per cent, and now
$1,000 Australian will buy $1,277
U.S. up from the $1,193 before
revaluation.
For the Australian farmer, the
revaluation means that his wool and
wheat will be more expensive for
foreign buyers and imports will cost
less for Australians.
The government also intervened
in an industrial commission case to
support a union claim for equal pay
for women who do the same job as
men. The union won the case.
There has been some criticism of
the speed with which all these
decisions were made without going
before Parliament or even a full
cabinet. Many were made just by
Whitlam and his deputy, Lance H.
Barnard.
But government supporters note
that the Labour Party announced
during the election campaign that
they would take these actions.


Eastern jumbo was


flying almost even


with ground at time

By A. P. Bothwell
MIAMI, FLA. (AP) The Jumbo Jet that crashed into the
Everglades leaving 97 dead was flying almost even with the
ground at about 200 m.p.h. when the left wing clipped
six-foot-high sawgrass and the plane splashed through 1,500 feet
of swampland, federal officials said Monday.


National transportation
safety board experts, analyzing
evidence in laboratories from
Washington, D.C., to Ontario,
Calif., say more details will be
provided by a computer system
that has been used only once
before, a spokesman said.
The automated radar
terminal service, first used in
the fatal crash of a United Air
Lines plane into Chicago
homes last month, can reveal
the exact altitude, speed and
heading of Eastern Air Lines
flight 401 from New York
when it went down 17 miles
northwest of Miami about
midnight Friday.
Ed Slattery, safety board
spokesman, said technicians
were studying the cockpit
voice record from the Florida
crash at a lab in Washington.
The flight data record was
being examined in California
and the air traffic control tapes
in Miami.
Eighty persons survived the
crash and authorities said one
body was still missing.
The voice record showed
first officer Albert J. Stockstill,
who joined Eastern as a flight
engineer in 1959 and later
became pilot and first officer,
was at the controls when the
Lockheed 101 1 crashed. The
plane was the first of the
so-called Jumbo Jets involved
in a fatal crash. Other planes in
the class include the Boeing
747 and the Douglas DC 10.
Stockstill's flying record was
"absolutely clean," said
Slattery, adding, "they only
pick exceptionally goodcrews
on this new equipment."
CAPTAIN DEAD
Stockstill, as well as the
flight captain and second
officer, were among the dead.
EAL officials said Eastern
first officer Warren Terry, who
was aboard the flight as an
observer, may have been in the
cockpit at the time of the
crash. But he was in serious
condition in a hospital and
unable to answer questions
about why the aircraft was
flying so low.
"The aircraft was gradually
disintegrating," Slattery said,
"along a 1,500-foot swath it
. cut through grass in water two
to three feet deep.
"As the plane was
decelerating, it was breaking up
and dragging on the ground.
The deceleration helped the
high rate of survivability."
Slattery said officials would
not know whether the flight
crew was watching the
altimeter prior to the crash
until a full study was made of
whether other instruments
were being used, precise
weather conditions at the time
and the crew's own policy.
"The plane was at belly level
attitude except for a slight left
bank," he said. "We estimate it
was going about 200 m.p.h. at
the time of impact."
The plane was carrying
holiday travellers from New
York to Miami, and had just
circled around Miami
International Airport after
reporting the landing gear
signal incorrectly indicated a
malfunction, when the crash
occurred.
"There was a flash fire less
than one second in duration,"


HORRORS

IN ULSTER


BELFAST (AP) A Roman1
Catholic bakery worker was killed
early today in a Protestant sector ft
Belfast just hours after Britisli
troops arrested 11 suspected
Cathelic terrorists.
Soldiers said they heard three
shots and discovered the bods of
Hugh Martin slumped over the
wheel of his idling car. Officers said
he was attacked while driving homne
after working the night shift.
Martin was the 681st confirmed
fatality in over thiee years ,I
sectarian violence in Northern
Ireland.
British troops killed a Imin
Friday after spotting him sneakini1g
across the border from the Irish
Republic near Londonderry.
Other troops arrested I I
suspected Irish Republican Armn
figures late Friday night. It \,s.i
claimed to be the largest such mass
arrest in five months.
Among those jailed were said ti
be the commander and key aides of
an IRA provisional company. These
surrendered when troops barged
into a home in the C'atholil
Andersonstown section of Bell'ast.
But a reputed IRA battalion
commander, James Brown, escaped
from British custody when seven
men burst into a hospital in Belf.it
and overpowered his guards.
Brown, 26. was recuperating from
an appendectomy.
A tunnel was discovered Irida
directed toward the Crumlin Ro.il
prison, and troops said thi\
thought work on it had beeni
underway about three months.
One officer called the tuniil.
only 50 yards short of the prismi,
"a beautifully constructed piece (o
work."
In Dublin, meanwhile, Irish
Republic police arrested Rory
O'Brady, president of Sinni Iein,
the IRA provisional branch's
political wing.
O'Brady, said to be one of the
IRA's more moderate figures, is thie
first to he held since the Irish I ail.
or Parliament, passed a totiigt)h
anti-terrorist law earlier this month.
Under it, lie must be released
within 48 hours if charges arc not
filed.
In other New Year horrors in
Ulster:
*-An engaged couple murdered
with bullets in their heads anId their
bodies left in a ditch, lying in the
form of a cross.
*-Four men travelling to work
ambushed, their car riddled with
bullets. One dies.
s-For the first time a woman is
imprisoned without trial. She is
young, pretty and a RKoman
Catholic, so trouble is expected.
e-A girl escapes death by inches
when a Soviet-made rocket slams
into her city office.
"1 could hardly think of a worse
wanton start to the New Year,"
sighed an inspector at Northern
Ireland's police headquarters
Tuesday.
LONGSHOREMEN ORDERED
TO STAY ON JOB
VANCOUVER. BRITISH
COLUMBIA, CANADA (Al')
British Columbia's 33,000
longshoremen have been ordered to
stay on the job by the executive
board of the International
Longshoremen's anti
Warehousemen 's Union,
temporarily averting a resumption
of last summer's dock strike.
ILWU area President Don Garcia
said Friday that bulletins were sent
out to dockers .dvising them "to
listen only to union officials and
ignore all rumours as they will be
S flying again as we near the crunch."


Second officer D. L. Repos.
was listed among the survivors,
but the p'ane's captain, Robert
veteran i. )se seniority was
50th out of 4,000 Eastern
pilots, and first officer A. J.
Stockstill. died.



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31st December, 1972.

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Slattery said, "and another
tiny one beside it in the centre
area of the plane."
NO WARNING
The fires, apparently doused
by swamp waters, were due to
"splitting open of the fuel
tanks, when the fuel practically
vaporized," the safety board
spokesman said.
He added that the nose of
the jumbo jet was undamaged.
The 50-foot tail structure was
the only other part left
relatively intact.
"All the survivors we talked
to Sunday," Slattery said.
"agreed they didn't have any
advance warning of any kind
whatsoever."
The morass surrounding the
downed jet is covered with
skin-slashing, five-foot-high
sawgrass standing in watery
muck, and the only access was
by helicopter or shallow-draft
airboats driven by aircraft
propellers.
Helicopters arriving to take
injured passengers to hospitals
gingerly picked landing sites
among the scattered bodies
that spilled from the
disintegrating plane as it cut a
quarter-mile long swath
through the swamp.
Michael Laurie, 32, a private
detective from Syosset, N.Y.,
lay on a hospital stretcher and
said: "It was completely dark
and cold and wet. Nothing was
left of the fuselage. We were in
10 inches to a foot of water. I
crawled as far as I could, a long
way, 300 yards or so."
"I could hear people
screaming. I yelled for them to
get away from the plane,"
Laurie said. "I was rescued by
a Coast Guard helicopter that
was unable to land because the
ground was wet. They hovered
and drug us up just like you see
in the movies."
SCREAMS
After the crash, the screams
of the injured and shocked
passengers mingled with the
sound of Christmas carols that
floated over the wilderness that
is home to the alligator, the
deer and a few Miccosukee
Indians.
Reports from various
hospitals indicated nine of the
plane's 10 stewardesses
survived the crash.


i


v

VI


I





Iht, rtbunt
NuuUs ADDICmUS JUABE IN VErWA MAGISTRa
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE IUPUCH, O.B.E.. K.C.S.G., D).Litt., I.Lt).
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCIH CARRON.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, January 2, 1973.


Mighty Vikings win top Junkanoo prize,


MASQUERADING in "Arms of the World", the Mighty Vikings, sponsored by City Market
surprised everyone yesterday when they topped the favourite P.I. Boys, the Valley Boys and the


F-


Blv ETINNE DUPUCII


Saxon% to win the S300 first prize in the New Years Day junkanoo


I he P I. B)s. sponsored bh fourth.
Sonesta Beach and rushing as Althouigh
"Wonderland ot Bahamiani their osluni
Fiesla". won second place, the fire. the P.I
Valley Boys with "I \xtUla Street by sl
Reincarnation'" won third pi/e hieartis ol th
and the Saxons with "All Baba were unhapl
and the 40 lhieves" came winning first


lthe\ lost some oll I
ites during a rccentt
I. Boys took Hast
ormn cIapturing the
e man\ tans who,
py ahout tlhel not
pl/ve


p


el
P
I,
d

tl
a
!


imported from thlh West Indies because. as lai as I can remember.
it was played only by police. I don't think it is played any more.
It was a game that originated in Africa hundreds of years auo. \
I saw when Jeff staggered up by the police station lie w;s \
using profane and indecent language.,
Two policemen were sitting in ront of the '-atiion plain i
"Worry". I spell it worryr" because that is Ihie 5was it soulndeLd. I1
might have a different spelling, as "woiii" night he a West
Indian dialect.
The policemen paid no attention to Je Iff aind so te turned
around and staggered y !the Station again.
Again tile police ignored him. And so lie put on a third and a
fourth performance with an occasional tumble in tlie street.
lie wasn't offending anyone because a:teti daik in those davs i
very lew people were seen oil the street. All habs weie closed at ')
o'clock and there was no night life in the island to keep people I
away from their homes. i
Finally Jeff got tired of being ignored. lie \walked up ito 1ie C
policemen without staggering.
"Atit yinna p'leecemen seen mile drunk and ain't \inna hear mie
cussing'",. he demanded.
The imen continued to play their game \\ without looking up.
"II yinna damn wUrlless p'leecelmen doall anest ilme I gonna
report yinna to da Commandant (Commissioner of Police)", lie
threatened.
The time had come for Jeff to go "home" anitd lie was
committing the kind tof offence that would bring hint another
short period in prison.

This idea of leniency for criminals spread. Judges goi the ide;:
that sentences should be short. And corporal punishment
(cat-o'-nine-tails) was no longer administered.
The science of psychology began to exercise a great deal of
influence on public thinking.
Books were written on on rime emphasizing the importance of
reform in place of punishilent.
And then the time came when psychologists dealt with the
punishment of children in the home.
The books of one man (Dr. Benjamin Spock) in America are
blamed for the present permissive age which the American nation
is experiencing today.
lie urged that children should not be repressed. They should be
allowed to do their "thing" .... express themselves without
restraint or punishment.

As the father of six children I can tell you that this is a
dangerous proposition. Every child is a different experience for a
parent. Some children are so well adjusted naturally that they
seldom need punishment, while others of a more aggressive nature
need it all the time.
I can tell you that I was raised on the end of a strap and I
thank my parents for giving tme the discipline that my unruly
nature needed to keep me on "the straight and narrow way".
A fact that must be recognized is tnat there can be no freedom
.... no well organized society .... without discipline. When a
person is not himself self-disciplined, it becomes necessary for the
State to restrain his lawless tendencies.
The big question is .... what is a fitting punishment for a crime'?

In this column recently I told a story to show that .... contrary
to the claim of some do-gooders .... capital punishment is a
deterrent to murder in some cases. The State has to determine
how far this punishment should be applied in cases of murder.
This is also true of crime at every other level.
Should sentences be long or short?
Should corporal punishment (whipping) be administered and
for what kind of crime?
Today life in Nassau is too complex for anyone to get a fail
appraisal of the situation. I can remember the time when serious
crimes were few and far between in the colony. A murder was a
iery rare thing. For example, when a murder was committed in
an island .... I think it was thie arbour Island district .... a couple
of years ago it was revealed that this was the first murder in tat
area for over 100 years.
When I was a young man in Nassau the female department of
the prison in East Street was almhnost always empty and the male
section was hardly ever more than half full.
There were about a dozen men who were confirmed criminals.
Crime started on the increase with bootleg prosperity and iutyl
now be traced to the great increase in the consumption of
alcoholic beverages which also helped to fill the hospitals and
mental institutions.
Every time the prison door was open to let these men out there
was an outbreak of crime .... principally stealing .... all over the
island.
Cyrus Arnnbrister was the greatest thief of them all. When
Cyrus was on the loose lie would move anything that wasn't
nailed down ... whether lie wanted it or not ... just to keep his
hand in practice. On one occasion he even stole the
Supreintendent of Prisons Christmas turkey and had a great feast
in a secluded spot in the prison grounds. Cyrus was a good
Looking black man with a pleasant face. lie never committed a
serious crime. Hie was a good nature likeable chap. All hIis
sentences were short. When he reached his century (100 prison
sentences) he came to Tihe Tribune lie felt that this was a great
achievement that was desening of a big story in the newspapers.

In my opinion any man who becomes a confirmed criminal
should always be given the maxiunnm sentence.
You may be sure that, as long as a confirmed criminal is in
prison, the life, limb and property of law-abiding citizens are
secure.
I think it is wrong to give too much freedom to anyone who is
bound to break the law as soon as hlie is released. It is a kindness.
both to the criminal and to the public, to keep him out of
"harm's way".

I have written all this to say that Mr. Justice Maxwell


EVER SINCE the beginning of organized society governments
have been trying to find a correct balance for the administration
of justice.
In its early stages it was thought that criminals could be
frightened by brutality.
A hungry man who stole a loaf of bread to feed his family
would be hanged in public as a warning to others "to keep their
hands from picking and stealing".
Hanging days became festive occasions. In Nassau, the Eastern
Parade was the setting for public executions as recently as a
century ago.

Debtors were sent to rot in vermin infested prisons until they
were able to discharge their obligations.
As society became more civilized the death penalty was
reduced to the single crime of murder and public hanging was
stopped.
I remember when murder was so seldom committed in the
Bahamas that a new gallows was erected in the Nassau Prison yaid
in East Street for every execution.
The condemned man in his cell could hear the sound of saw
and hammer as the gallows was being erected. lIe could hear the
"drop" as it was tested for weight the day before the execution.
Sand bags weighing the same as the prisoner were used in the test
to make sure the trap door would open when the lever was
pulled.
Representatives ot the press were admitted to executions in the
prison compound and boys used to climb tall trees overlooking
the grounds to see the "show".
My father always went to an execution. lie seemed to feel that
it was the duty of the press to be represented on these occasions,
even though it made him sick for weeks afterwards. It was a
horrible experience for him but he never dodged anything that he
felt was a duty.
I think it was during the Alan Burns, Colonial Secretary (later
Governor of the Gold Coast, now Ghana, and a G.C.M.G.) that a
gallows was installed in a room in the prison and no one except a
doctor, a minister and prison,officials attended an execution.
This was before my time as Editor of The Tribune and so I was
spared the ordeal. The gallows room was used as a storeroom
until it was cleared for an execution.

Gradually, all along the line, governments .... and judges ....
became more humane. In many places in the world the death
penalty was abolished.
This was true in many parts of the U.S.
Not long ago the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the death
penalty was unconstitutional. This decision was welcomed by
people who felt that murder was a crime that was so seldom
repeated that the mandatory death sentence was wicked.
In the elections held recently in the U.S. both Florida and
California made this question a public issue. Both states voted
overwhelmingly for the reintroduction of the death penalty in
certain cases. Already the Florida Legislature has passed a bill
providing for the death penalty as a punishment for murder.
In the Bahamas the mandatory death sentence is still
administered for murder but it has been a long time since anyone
has been executed in the Bahamas.
Not many years ago the Chief Justice fixed the date for
execution when he pronounced the death sentence.
This was changed to provide that the Chief Justice would
pronounce the death sentence but all the papers on the case
would be sent to the Governor for study so that he might decide
whether there were any grounds for him to exercise his
prerogative of mercy. The Governor then either reduced the
sentence or fixed the date of execution.
Nowadays the papers are sent to a committee appointed by the
Prime Minister. The Governor acts on the recommendation of this
committee.
n .**********
The time came when just about all the brutality was removed
from prisons. As far as possible they became places for reform
rather than of punishment. Conditions for prisoners became so
good that many men grew to regard the prison as their home. In
many cases they were better housed and fed in prison than they
could provide for themselves.
I remember the case of Jeff Hunter. lie bore the stigma of
being the executioner of Susan Tate. the only woman hanged in
my memory. She stabbed a woman to death in a quarrel in a
sponge clipping room.
The law provided that the Provost Marshal (Commissioner of
Police) was responsible for carrying out an execution but it was
always arranged for a prisoner to pull the lever and, as a reward,
lhe would be given a reduction in time. Because Hlunter had done
the job on a woman he was shunned and carried the label of
"Jack Catch" for the rest of his life. People were shocked by the
hanging of a woman.
I got to know Jeff in the army. He went overseas in the same
Bahamas War Contingent with me.
The men were afraid of him. He was really dangerous when he
got drunk. He walked around with a thin iron rod and Ihe
threatened .... and sometimes struck .... anyone who got in his
way.

S Jeff was an interesting character. He regarded prison as his
. home. He never committed any serious crimes and so his prison
sentences were short.
After each release he would have a fling with a woman .... he
would throw a couple of good drunks .... and then he was ready
to go home again.
One night I was walking utip Bay Street near the Eastern Parade
when Jeff put on a big show of being drunk and indecent.
In those days police on duty at the Eastern Police Station near
S the parade sat in shirt sleeves in front of the Station playing a
S game called ".Vorry". This game was very popular with the
police. I think it must have been introduced here by policemen


arade.
\\ ilnston hutr hill Rolle.
leader and codsi"nei ofi tlhe
.I I s e es ed
issaltsllaction at lht' method
11 judging 'I lhe PI BUs had
li' best iImLs'k costumes and
t 4 o'clock. w \ iecc n lile
o." saidl Rolle. explainnl. that
ite \'VikIS1 catu.eC intttl mLuch
water than thenm
\I \t)SI f AI\ I I)
"I \a,,s scared oti I 1( (). Biut
Ahen ll he\ t.oi l mi that ('It\
larketl adil son I ailitost
l dgiii tinii"sIt l C iid'st'd. he
il. it I lit t itinkja i pai.tdc is
ing in lh' inininittued.
R ilc. h ,litWCvr i s 111 110 way
, so il I inllh l .l limtll it

thliiHiwih the tolal ciost o the
ostliiuIts w\iaS atl tl S50() and
.,ci rot ml".j S 1 7S o second

"\\ spend a1 lt ti ltine on
lhl e s tl si itt es .ind \v' .illow
th;it tihe prices is not i!'h i bi ut
at l is l Itict y Lt o ilId hit, b lttr'
I rdgl it.' I h Ii s tiId lodincs
ShoIll l IhC picked L'1.1 n J1110111'
Ithosti whl know i, t a.i ot ul itil.
Ifuinc .litd hlrsto s le sa.l
thl u iiudges h11 llidin l ittils
to 0i piLld %ilti ,ilso Ihlic
tllt! i itAnailunit ol I sciItp i'.II s
weir c '\ iid'nti
I NR 't Y (' R()\V1)
Ile cnwdI in tihe closing
ioeicInts of the pail de iecaici
quite unruly when they moved
Irom In liehubaiers sepal acting
them rom tlhet patrders (o tBa
Strecl. This resulted in slolS
individual juvenile winners not
being presented with their
prices.
I agle Rock, P'lcadilly Boys,
International House of Music
and Pinewood (;ardenis won
consolation pr/es in the adult
section.
In tile adult individual
section, "Apollo" \%,on lirst
place. "Peace and Progress was
third, "Pegasu,," 'Za,;.i third and
"(ihentgis Khan" was fourth.
Ileastie's Lumber Yard took
first prize in the juvenile group
section wilh \Megon's
Muskateers second, the Village
Boys third and (Green Liquor
fou rt1h.
ILP 'Crusaders. Voodoo '73,


but judging criticized


SUSA












*
TRIBUNE STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Philip Symonette captures the variety of
junkanoo in this montage picture of New Year's Day junkanoo parade.


pI slta and DeC ils ir.illm Ali[
.iid (d ; iden till \\won
onsolalion p /r s t" ih li.
Ile0 dtemoiiI topped lieC
juvenile indl nld al witlh 1 id,,


and hits go-ta il Isoittn the
Peacock third and 1 i/a ont B;i\
Street tourltlh.
lihe policinani on Sot(i ter.
the I Nling Wollt, the Rootster,
thie Iorse Mother G(oose. the


Rattlesicnake, the Big Ben
Clock, ( tooiluhay Punch,
J unkalnoo Smash and the
Mouse al (won consolation
prices in the juvenile individual
section.


ALL TIME FAVOURITES, the P. I. Boys sponsored by Sonesta Beach, won second
prize in the adult group section with this presentation of the Wonderland of Bahamian
Fiesta.


Tuesday, January 2, 1973.


1 honmpson is to be commended for the sentence, hte hands out to
confirmed and vicious criminals.
I am not surprised that Mr. Thonmpson hands out stiff
sentences. Max Thompson is a "no nonsense" kind of judge ....
and I agree with him.
I think that his performance ton tthe bench is receiving the full
support of public opinion.

I want to make it clear that I don't believe in needlessly brutal
punishment, but I do feel that punishment should be sufficiently
severe to act as a possible deterrent to vicious crimes.
**** K*****
A THOUGIIT FOR TODAY
There can be no freedom without discipline.
DUPUCH


he b ri bunp









OhI tribunpe


Tuesday, Jnuary 2,1973.











NOW SHOWING*
AT 7:00 & 10:40

lco~mpn..


S MILLARD BETHEL is Star
I nsurances'Sales representative
of the Year" for District Four. L
He was promoted two weeks
ago to staff manager for Star
Insurance for all of Eleuthera, r C i |
including Spanish Wells andlWev eI
Harbour Island. Seen
congratulating him on this new TWI NTY-I (
h Jonour is J.E.P. Stuart, Star's of Star insurer
t president while Shervin W. w
Thompson, assistant general peris oh i
manager, reads the citation.


*.





















Insurance employees


awards at Xmas partly


OUR eiopli c'
ice ( (i I id i '
d awtv rd I 'l
g service !i ii


i 1, ,rs. anrd t our sales n ier
S T n riII t S it s
', [rc o!.]I I )t thie Yceir"
S t lri ,' rI c s e i iv I)Istri'ts
I l "* ; I ~l ll >'o s |i r k p lt a ,l t
S h in ] I n 's iIrn ihil
i l :i i pa tiel this y,ir
!i I ( .ll llH c R nill )I
i! t i i lit iI i i l t l l a > c l

\k 1k+%tisiitiit wh2 ttamios
1 i t ,.i ii'i i r rr i ii t h is Ilist iill
i l t I r)l i ent'ie itn all
Iip.i l tinhe aii.i ig'e iient ol
Ii i hert debit Winners for
aIre It )ls t ic I Clarence
RA ( i'I. *. D istrlet 2, Amos L.
lt '\heke. district 3, Donald
\MAtin. anid c )lsrict 4, Millard
%IeliR l
I,,I cl pI ins f, r long service
.ir ,it awArd'ed as follows: 15
%I -.itl. SIhervin W. IThoumpson
Vmnd Walter (Iant; 10 years,
R.ilph C. Itirnett, A. L.
i ra; i tit'li ,ntl Vetrnal Major; 5
S rus, (i eollrey W Ilallanm,
Iris. ,eincltia \cIl'hee. C'. K.
Suils. is Miss Florence
soittge. MNs,. l)elilah Smith,
sMrs I lir/aheth Moses, Mrs.
Vcirnll I wards, Mrs. Louise
NIc I) ,oinlttd, James L.
I hopson. l.ivingstone Parks,
( atuite W Cooper Sidney A.
I crgusii. ('Clairence W. C('oleby,
icnranin Iorbes, Irvin R.
Rlle. sIts Irene Griffin,.
Bluster S. Christie, Joseph A.
More and Mrs. Brenda
I lir awards were made by J.
'. P S w'ilI, p resident of Star
InsuIra nice (o. ltd. and
iina iminrig director iof the Argus
I ('ir) ol (Comipanies.
I lead(i iartlreld in Bermuda, the
- Argus ( iroip includes, in
.iddlon om I Star. similar
i in piniis illn Jamaica,
H.irbndts .aI I rinidad.


$60,000 GIFT TO
I ll BAIAMAS Hotel
Av, ciatilon will contribute
(iO.OO o()ver a three year
peiiud to the hotel training
sh.',l .t: the C.R. Walker
Ii aminig (Colleg,, Oakes Field.
I'his decision was made at the
Ass,;iation's directors meeting
on December 20 at King's Inn
& (oIllf Club. report.
I his hintel training school is
imptitant to all of Nassau,
FIleport and the Out Islands,"
N r ( 'harles Schlakman,
president ol the Bahamas Hotel
Association, said today.
A tripartite agreement was
signcdi on November 28
between the BahamasI lotel
I inployers Association, the
Minister of Education and
Culture and the Minister of
1 0iur 1 ir and National
Insurance.
Tlie agreement provides for
the establishment of an ad hoc


6 ZNS STAFF.

RECEIVE 15-YEAR


LONG SERVICE PIN
SIX S IAFF members of
Radio Biahimas Friday received
long-servi.c pins marking 15
$ears oI unbroken service to
tlie station tor each of them.
Making the presentations was
Minister of Transport and
ITelecommnunications the lion
Darrel I Rolle.
Pin recipients were Bahamas
Bro idcasting and Television
Commission secretary Walter
Wisdom, administrative officer
Pamela Granger. sales manager
louis llanchell, production
manager Carl Bethel. music
director Noel Ilanilton and
salesman Albert Adderley.
Mr. Wisdom, joined the then
1 e I e c o illn ill u n i C a t i o n s
department, of which radio
broadcasting was a part When
/ZNS was separated fromni trhe
depart ment in 1957 Mr.
SWisdom nioved out with the
station and worked Ii's way Vrip
to administrative assistant in
May, 1967. In May. 1970 lie
was appointed secretary to ihe
lroadcastin (rCominisiion
Mrs. Granger has worked her
way up from librarian through
acc iouints clerk., private
secretary, general manager and
administrative assistant to her
present post of administrative
assistant to her present post of'
administrative officer.
Mr. Hanchell was promoted
to sales manager this year after
co mpleting several


RADIO BAHAMAS ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER Mrs.
Pamela G--nger examines her 15-year long-service pin while
she is congratulated by Minister of Transport and
Telecommunications the Hon. Darrel E. Rolle. Looking on
are Radio Bahamas general manager Jack Dodge, right, and
other staff members.


ltmiliarisilson courses Hlie has
Worked in the traffic
depart mnt and as copy writer
atnd programme director.
Mr. Bethel joined Radio
tBihaulas ,as a receptionist andt
il(moved uip tilhe line to
production manager.
Mr. Hamilton started out as
an accounts clerk and in 1958
started a five-year stint as ani
riiannouncerC. In 1i963 he was
made a programmer, a position
lie held until his appointment


STAR INSURANCE LONG SERVICE AWARDS. Two
employees of Star Insurance Company Ltd. Walter Grant
and S. W. Thompson were last week awarded pins
signifying 15 years' service with the company.The
ceremony was a feature of Star's annual Christmas party,
held this year at the Halcyon Balmoral Beach Hotel. Shown
in the photograph (I. to r.) are Mr. Grant, J. E. P. Stewart,
president of Star Insurance, and Mr. Thompson.


HOTEL SCHOOL
body to be known as the
Bahamas (Interim) Hotel
Training Council. This Council
will appoint a hotel training
director.
The operating costs,
including salaries, the
administrative expenses of
running the office and the
school, will be met by the
council out of monies provided
by the Ministry of Education
and Culture, and the
Nassau/Paradise Island
Promotion Board. The sum is
not to exceed $140,000 per
annuLn.
The Bahamas Ilotel
Association directors are
George Myers, Leroy Bailey,
Ron Overend, Pete McNabb,
Ralph Tursi, Hans Rawe, Gene
Barrett, Joe Hlandrie, and
William Stowell.
Mr. Myers is the
Association's representative on
the Interim Council.


PHOTO: Philip Symonette.
as music director in 1970.
Mr. Adderley joined
broadcasting in the Bahamas in
1956 as a receptionist. Two
years later he became chiet
librarian, a post he held until
1970 when hlie became a
salesman.
On hand to congratulate the
pin-winners at Friday's
ceremonies were Commission
executive chairman Senator
Milo B. Butler, jr.. and Minister
o.f Agriculture and Fisheries
Anthony Roberts.


ABBEY

INTEMATION

FUND


... IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusable hut unwanted


items of


For Sale or Rent

Excellent office-
warehouse building in
excess of 20,000 sq.ft.
immediately available in
Oakes Field area. Ample
parking, air-conditioned,
standby generator etc.
Enquiries to: The
President, P.O. Box N
3005, Nassau.


IN THE SUPREME COURT NO 43
OF THE BAHAMAS
Equity side 1972

NOTICE

The Petition of ALMEDIA McMINNS, ROW!ENA
ROLLE, ALBERTHA THOMPSON, (LOPFIEHLIL)
AMBRISTER, AND GEORGE II. PRATT in
respect of:
ALL that piece parcel or tract of land being-
Allotments number 20 and 27 of the Malcolmi
Allotment Situate in the Southern District of
the Island of New Providence and bounded ont
the North by a Road Reservation 'n the South
by land granted to Michael Malcolm to the last
by Allotment number 28 of the Malcolm
Allotment and on the West by a Road
Reservation 20 feet Wide and Allotment number
19 of the Malcolm Allotments save and except
for A Public Road running through the
property.
The said Almedia McMinns Rowena Rolle
Albertha Thompson and Clophfield Ambrister and
George H. Pratt the Petitioners in this matter claim
to be the owners in fee simple absolute int
possession of the said two tracts of land and have
made application to the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas under the provisions of Section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have their Title to the
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof'
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted by the Supreme Court in accordance
with the provisions of the Act
Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places.
A. The Registry of the Supreme Court Bank
Lane in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
B. And apartment number E.205 of the
Hofferbuilding Situate on the South side of
Bay Street between Elizzabeth Avenue and
East Street in the City of Nassau, New
Providence.
Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the 26th January 1973 file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner a statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a Statement. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a Statement of his
claim on or before the said 26th day of January
A.D. 1973 will operate as bar to such claim.
GEORGE H. PRATT
Attorney by Deed of Power
of Attorney for the Petitioners.


your closets, garage, storeroom ..


all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to


ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


PG-
SU'(,Gt:STl:ID FOR
PARENTAL DIS
S Reservations not cla
on first come, fii



SWednesday thru Friday
Matinee continuous from 2
Evening 8:30

"THE
TODD KILLINGS" R.

Robert Lyons
Richard Thomas

PLUS

"COLOR ME DEAD" R.
Tom Tryon
Carolyn Jones
So One Under I 7 A admitted

*------


MA TURE
SCRETION
imed by 8:
rst served I



Wedi
Continue


IN
Sh


No 0


ne 21004, 2-1005

I
















A AUDIENCES.
ADVISED.
15 will be sold
basis.

II
nesday & Thursday
ious showings from 3
"DEATH BY
CITATION" R.
lelby Leverington
Aaron Phillips

PLUS

"THE VELVET
VAMPIRES" R.
Celeste Yarnall
Sherry Miles
'ne Under 17 Admitted.



;DAY
30-'Phone 3-4666



BLIWYOUAM T I


I


















i ,, A I iraL'AIf'L'


U


I.


clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc... clear out


JOIN THE

Emerald Beach

& Cabana Club

For further information
call CLUB SECRETARY

78001





4 4i


SHELL Shell Bahamas Ltd.




SALE-M.V. CAYA


Tenders are invited from interested persons
for the purchase of the M.V. Caya.

Copies of specifications and any other
particulars may be obtained from the Offices
of Shell Bahamas Ltd, Columbus House,
corner of Shirley and East Streets any week
day between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00
p.m.

Arrangements for inspection could be made
by telephoning 2-3252 or 2-2484 during the
sante hours.


Shell Bahamas Ltd reserves the right to
reject any or all tenders.


W









Tuesday, January 2, 1973.


She Zribunt


(JII E I*(j get the j(_)_de

ome by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352-6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to
Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to


REAL ESTATE


I I I -U I I I -- - I I. -.-.-.---------.---,,,~I


FOR SALE


NOlW


I I TRADE SERVICES |


C8284
HOUSE FOR SALE. Owner
leaving. Must sacrifice.
$35,000. Phone 2-8511 days
only.
C8306
REAL ESTATE
SACRIFICE gorgeous
beachfront lot, fashionable -
Green Turtle Cay. Terms.
Phone 5-7224 evenings.

C8282
LARGE HILLTOP and
waterfroai lots at East End.
SHilltop starting at ONLY
$14,000. Waterfront starting at
ONLY $20,000. Phone 2-3027
or 2T2680.
C8303
IN OUT ISLANDS
FURNISHED
On pink sand beach unique 5
room designer's- home, guest
cottage, fireplace, 212 baths,
patio, marvellous view,
swimming, fishing. H.H. Larkin
c/o Box 101, Harbour Island.


102
TER CHRISTMAS MESS?
'LL CLEAN IT UP CALL
CO TEL:51071-2-3-4.
281
V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
homes, apartments and
els. Sales and services. Call
uck Hall 5-8213, 2-2300
2-1662, WORLD OF
JSIC, Dewgard Plaza.



he big


switch

is on

to

iwhr ribunt
CLASSIFIED


I TRADE SERVICES


C 8279


C8279

Plader's Cleustoms

Brokerale Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P.O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELfVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEFL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796,
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434


-4- _ _


C8295
CHRISTMAS FLOWERS,
Ornaments and gifts at half
price for one week only.
NASSAU FLORIST, East
Shirley near Church Street
5-2598 and 2-4223.
C8301
1972 Toyota Corona MK 11-4
door. Like new. $2,600.
O.N.O.
Girl's Bicycle, also EIna Zig Zag
sewing machine both $140.
Phone 3-4631.

P-ETS FOR SALE
:8253
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS.
Price $145.00. Seven weeks
)old. See Alexander Virgil,
Durham Street off Mount
Royal Avenue.


WANTS TO SHARE
C8290
2 GIRLS (preferably teachers)
to share 3 bedroom house,
Norfolk Street, Shirlea.
Telephone 2-1531 (work).
Home 3-4186.

FOR RENT
C8297
2 BEDROOM unfurnished -
:Madeira Street opposite John
S. George. For information call
.23170.
C 7015
'NEWLY BUILT 3 bedroom/2
bath, situated Domingo
-Heights, East St., South.
Contact: Nassau 5-6234 or Mr.
;Pratt at Freeport 352-9007
'(collect) between 9-5.
C8304
'SECLUDED BEACH cottage,
fashionable Out Island Colony.
'$500 year. Phone 5-7224
evenings.

C8287
ONE GROUND FLOOR 2
BEDROOM APARTMENT, off
:East Bay Street, near Out
4 island Traders Building.
Vlephone 4-1543 after 5 p.m.

C8289
'OFFICE OR STORE SPACE -
'Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C8270
.IN TOWN furnished rooms,
efficiency apartment, also
town property for sale. Phone
2-2555.

C8286
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED
airconditioned one bedroom
apartments. Reasonable rental.
Day call 2-2152. Evenings
5-4926.
C8268
ONE EFFICIENCY apartment,
basically furnished, Victoria
Court Apartments, on
Elizabeth Avenue between Bay
and Shirley Streets. Facilities,
laundry, parking. Phone
5-4631. After five 3-2397.


C7014
Job Title: GENERAL
REPAIRMAN
Minimum Education: Good
basic education
Minimum Experience: 5-10
years
Dut ies/ Resp on sibilities:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Bahama Cement Company,
Personnel Department, P. 0.
Box F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C7011
One ARCHITECTURAL
DRAFTSMAN knowledge of
all phases in Drafting. 5 years
experience. Write: Gamma
Construction, P. 0. Box
F-2655, Freeport.


C7019
ONE FREEZER MAN able
to work in Freezer under
extreme temperatures, must
have knowledge of different
meats and fish products, also
able to sort and issue meats.
1-3 years experience in
Freezers.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 12
noon only, to King's Inn &
Golf Club, Personnel
Department.


C8293
NOTICE IS HEREBY given
that James Dodds of Nassau
City West District is applying
to the Governor for
naturalisation, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts to the Deputy
Governor, Bahamas.

CARD OF THANKS
C8302
THE HONOLiRABLE
CLIFFORD DARLING AND
MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY
of the late Mrs. Hazel Darling
extend their most sincere
thanks to all those who
extended words of sympathy,
cards and flowers during their
recent bereavement. We extend
special thanks to Dr. Hart and
staff of Princess Margaret
Hospital, The Right Reverend
Lord Bishop of the Bahamas,
Bishop Michael Eldon, Canon
Collingwood Cooper, members
of the Clergy and Bethel
Brothers Morticians.


I


PERSONAL
C8278
Drinking Problem?
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Invite you to our meetings.
Phone Helen 5-4889 or Nick
4-2009.

HELP WANTED
C8161
BOAT CAPTAIN.
Sportsfisherman, must have 5
years experience. Steady well
paying position for right man.
Reply to: Adv. C8161, c/o The
Tribune, P. 0. Box N3207,
Nassau.
C8191
WANTED COUPLE cooking
serving butler. Limited
household duties; exclusive
Miami Beach, Florida home
References required. Good
salary. Write: 70 Park Drive
Suite 4, Bal Harbour, Florida
33154.
C7014
HELP WANTED
Job Title: GENERAL
REPAIRMAN
Minimum Education: Good
basic education
Minimum Experience: 5-10
years
Duties/Responsibilities
Inspects, repairs, replaces
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in
cement manufacturing plant
Interested Applicant Contact
Bahama Cement Company
Personnel Department, P. 0
Box F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C8294
SALES GIRLS ages 18-3(
Experience not necessary
will train. Salary plu
commission. Apply in perso
to Mr. Fondas at Chris -
a.m. to 5 p.m.
C8310
WANTED
EXPERIENCED GARDENER
Contact Beryl Bain, B and
Grocery, McCullough Come
and Sandy Road.


C7012
One JOURNEYMAN/
PLUMBER -- for all phases of
Plumbing work, estimating,
warehouse servicing, on call at
night. Ten years experience.
Write: Grand Bahama
plumbing P. 0. Pox F-2655,
Freeport.


Which day

is best for

a Want Ad?

That's a question The
Tribune Classified
Department hears often. And
fortunately, there is no "best
day".
Each day there are people
with new wants and needs.
Each day brings new readers,
as well as old ones to the
Classified pages.
So start your ad when your
"want" arises, and cancel it
when it brings results.
Stop-by The Tribune office
to place yours. Every day is
the best day to advertise with
The Tribune Classified Ads.


Deo/ )A


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Relative questions


sister's child-rearing

By Abigail Van Buren
1973 a iCieaw TrtISm-N. Y. News synI., iMc.
DEAR ABBY: I am concerned about the relationship
between my sister and her 8-year-old son. To be frank, I
wonder if it could cause homosexual tendencies in the boy.
Altho she dresses him in male clothing, she selects such
babyish styles-minus zippers. His favorite pastime is
"playing house." And he doesn't appear to be at ease with
boys.
There seems to be an unusual physical attraction be-
tween the mother and son. He is not allowed to use the
men's restrooms. She always takes him into the ladies'
restrooms. He doesn't seem to be embarrassed by it either.
My sister is an intelligent, educated person. And her
husband is no dummy. I cannot understand why he doesn't
put his foot down.
Is it normal for the boy to accept his mother's way of
training him without protesting?
We don't feel that we can discuss this with her, but she
is an avid reader of your column, so perhaps she will s.se
this and recognize herself, and do something about a poten-
tial problem. CONCERNED
DEAR CONCERNED: Your sister's behavior toward ber
son is not normal, but his responses are Indeed what one
could expect. Yes, she could be sowing the seeds of home-
sexuality. Don't wait for her to "recoganie" herself. TELL
her what Is obvious to you and others.


I I


GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TEL 352-6608T


C7013
SOCIAL HOSTESS
REQUIRED: Must have at
least 112 years experience as
Social Hostess or Tour Escort.
Must be 21 or older. Mist be
neatly dressed, have pleasing
personality. Must be able to
work with large sums of
money. Typing experience is
preferred. References are
required along with Police
Certificate.
FRONT OFFICE WORKER:
Must have at least 1 year
experience in Front office
Work. Must be able to work
with NCR 4200 machine. Must
be able to handle large sums of
money. References are
required along with recent
Police Certificate.
Interested Persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL
AND COUNTRY CLUB,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, PERSONNEL
OFFICE BETWEEN THE
HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. AND
3:00 P.M., MONDAY
THROUGH FRIDAY.


C8307
MILLIONAIRES COUNTRY
ESTATE. $300 month
furnished no rentals are that
cheap but available lovely
,spacious stone colonial two
baths pool maids room,
laundry, phone western edge
town near beaches golf
completely equipped acres
flowers, trees. Phone 5-7224
evenings.
'C8285
.ONE BEDROOM and one two
'bedroom two bath, large living
and dining room, Bahama
room apartment. Basically
furnished on.,. beautiful
landscaped grounds. Third
'Terrace Centreville. Facilities,
laundry, phone, parking, fully
airconditioned. Phone 5-4631
.-after five 3-2397.
;C8267
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartmentt, Boyd Subdivision'
off Foster Street. For
Information call 3-6644.
C8264
?LOVE BEACH COLONY
:CLUB (Beach) and NASSAU
HILLCRESTT TOWERS (Third
'Terrace West Centreville) -
*Elegant, fully furnished and
'equipped 2-bedroom, 2 bath
Apartments, airconditioned,
swimmingg pool. Short or long
term. Phone 2-1841, 2-1842,
17-4116, 2-8224 or 2-8248.


-C8265
LARGE 1 BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
,$250 per month. Call: Chester
Thompson Real Estate
'-4777-8.


ANNOUNCEMENTS
7954
OR BETTER QUALITY'
PAINT AT LOWER PRICES,
CONTACT CARIBBEAN
PAINT MANUFACTURING
0. LTD., QUEEN'S
HIGHWAY. PHONE 352-6271.

7006
.ADIES AND GENTLE-
MEN!!!- get your newly
tyled Holiday garments made
by ABC Tailor Shop Pinders
Point (right near the Baptist
Church).

HELP WANTED
:7008
STEEL ERECTOR FOREMAN
FOR PRE-ENGINEERING
BUILDING, MINIMUM 5
YEARS EXPERIENCE.
PHONE 352-9328, IVAN
ALEXANDER CONSTRUC-
TION CO., LTD.


HELP WANTED
C7017
Fully experienced mechai
required for our Serv
Department, must ha
minimum of 3 years w
knowledge of General Moto
products. Full Compa
benefits with factory train
Bahamians need only app
Five Wheels (Grand Bahar
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.
C7016
Fully experienced body r
required, must be able to rep
all types of vehicles and ins
replacement parts
complete up to re-finish
stage.
Minimum 3 years experiei
full Company bene
Bahamians only need apply.
Five Wheels (Grand Baha
Ltd., Telephone 352-7001.


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES--1
C8239
DRY GOODS, Dress and Gift
Shop for sale. Ideal location
with parking. For large
investment, if interested, write:
Adv. C8239, c/o The Tribune,
P. 0. Box N-3207, Nassau.

C8240
THRIVING FOOD business for


sale, including wholesale
agency. Gross $15,000 per
month, net $2000 plus. Reply:
Adv. C8240, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

cARS FOR SALJ
C8162
1969 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
with radio. Owner must lea .-
colony. Contact: Rudolph
Ferguson telephone 22441.
C8261
1969 FIAT 124 Station wagon.
Lively. Cheap to run. $1000.
Owner leaving. Phone 41365.
C8272
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LIMITED
SUBSTANTIAL
END OF SEASON
REDUCTIONS
1970 Chevrolet
Impala 2 dr. A/C $2800
1970 Rover 2000
AI.Automatic $24)0
1971 Ford Escort
Automatic, Beige
4 dr. $1895
1968 Viva 2 Dr.
Automatic $850
1971 Morris 1300
S/W Automatic $1600
1969 Caprice A/C
Vinyl 4 Dr. H/T $2000
1968 Javelin A/C $1600
1970 Singer Gazelle
Auto. White $1295
1970 Wolsey 16/60
Auto Grey $1295
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8.

MARINE SUPPLIES
C8283
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.
C8288
35' BERTRAM SPORT-
FISHERMAN bought NEW
JUNE 1971 powered by
twin Cummins Diesels 210 HP
each 200 hours on each
engine, central airconditioning
7 KW Diesel generator fly
bridge and dual controls -
many other extras. Absolutely
AS NEW. Phone 3-4953 Nite -
2-1722-3-4-5 days.


C8238
22 FT. AQUA SPORT twin
55 horse power Johnson
Outboards in good condition
price $3,800.00. Call 35171
day 41632 after 5 p.m.

C5902
1969 Chris Craft Sedan sleer'
six; private bathroom wit;,
vanity, shower and head; stov'e,
refrigerator, sink, stereo
ship-to-shore' twin 230 h.p.
engines with less than 200
hours, other extras. Excellent
condition. Asking $22,000 or
nearest offer Phone 2-4267 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
C8269


PAUL SYLVESTRE a
Haitian National Refugee in
theBahamas sends Best Wishes
for 1973 to the Government
of the Bahamas, the
Immigration Department, the
U.S. Consulate, Sir Etienne
and Lady Dupuch, The
Tribune Staff and all
Bahamian and non-Bahamian
friends.


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C7018
1 PUBLICITY/PUBLIC
RELATIONS OFFICER to
plan and conduct public
relations, publicity and
advertising programmes,
arrange associated photography
and write associated news
releases. Must have a thorough
knowledge of the media both
on island and abroad and be
capable of selecting where
advertising and publicity
releases will create the most
favorable impression.
Applicant must also handle
own correspondence and type
his own news stories. Applicant
will be responsible for
entertaining visiting press
people, radio and television
representatives and other
publicity media representa-
tives. At least four years
experience required.
2 DINING ROOM
CAPTAINS: Experienced in
First Class Hotels, Restaurants
with French Services:
minimum of three years as a
Captain. Good references and
Police Certificate required.
Please apply to Personnel
Department: El Casino, P. 0.
Box F-787, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


d


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9



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B
er


C8308
BAHAMIAN HOUSEKEEPER
to live-in. Must be able to,
drive. Phone 5-1137.
C8251
SUPERVISOR-OPERATIONS
AND TRAINING
FREEPORT Eastern Airlines
has immediate opening for a
Supervisor of Airport
Operations and Training. This
position is responsible for
coordinating airport service
functions including ticketing,
ramp service operations and
cargo services, and training of
personnel involved in the above
functions. Minimum
qualifications are two years
university schooling and five
years experience in airline
operations or equivalent work
experience, with at least five
years of supervisory/man-
agement experience.
Candidates must be available
for location in Freeport. Send
resume to Postal Box 2583
Freeport, Bahamas.

TRADE SERVICES
C8299
WITH 14 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
CARTWRIGHT


Now offers Swimming Pool
Service at a very low price.
Plus:- acid wash, paint and
repairs. Call 3-4126 day or
night.


C8280
PATIO AWNINGS AND
CARPORTS
AWNINGS, SHUTTERS,
PANELS
John S. George & Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 2-8421.


il


Fish rain from the sky?


'We saw it happen'

By Abigail Van Buren
0 171 3 W Cicag Triine-M. Y. New SVIN., Ict.
DEAR ABBY: The man who told his wife he saw fish
ailing from the sky was not crazy; neither was he lying.
In the summer of 1926, I caddied at a local golf course.
There had been a long drought that summer and the fair-
ways were brown and dried up.
One afternoon while I was caddying, a sudden storm
came up and a terrific thundershower followed. Rain came
down in torrents, and with it came a shower of tiny frogs
about the size of nickels. They were alive and jumping all
over, thousands of them!
The golfers and I couldn't believe our eyes as we
watched thousands of frogs come right down with the rain
from the sky. We saw it happen.
WM. A. WALKER, EVANSVILLE, IND.

DEAR ABBY: Here I have gone all my 70 years without
writing a letter to a columnist, but now Dear Abby has
finally smoked me out. I can't sleep until I help out that
poor devil whose wife thinks he needs to see a shrink
because he said he saw it raining fish!
He may have. In some areas, summer storms are
preceded by twisters which are in reality tornados that
suck up an immense amount of water from a stream or
pond, and with it all the life that is in it. It's converted into
a "waterspout" and carried for miles before it's deposited
in a shower of rain.
If anyone doubts this, write to me, and I'll spin some
wonderful yarns about flying saucers.
F. C. MILLER, SAN DIEGO, CAL.



DEAR ABBY: I was raised on a farm in Minnesota,
and as a boy I remember a storm coming up. It looked
serious so we all ran to the cellar. In 40 minutes it was all
over.
Afterwards, we went outside and saw our chickens
going wild, eating tiny fish and frogs. We were inland at
least 10 miles, so the only explanation was that a tornado
had sucked them up out of a stream and had dumped them
on our farm. This is not a fish story. I saw it with my own
eyes. FLOYD J. McMANUS, LAGUNA BEACH, CAL.

DEAR ABBY: I lived on a farm three miles from
Ashland, Wis. A storm came up suddenly and afterwards I
saw little tiny fish in the cowtracks around our barn. I'm no
kid, Abby. I am 80 years old.
RICHARD HAGSTROM, ZIG ZAG, ORE.

DEAR ABBY: A friend of mine named Ed Brady heard
something strike the roof of his home during a severe
rainstorm, and the next day he found a big eel in his
rainbarrel. He lived half a mile from the river. This oc-
curred at Ouaquaga, N. Y. Ed Brady still lives there and
can verify It. H. D. JOHNSON, WALTON, N. Y.

DEAR ABBY: I personally drove thru a "rainstorm" of
tadpoles in western Missouri 14 years ago.
TADPOLES FALLING ON MY HEAD
IN DODGE CITY, KAS.

DEAR ABBY: I learned about how fish could be sucked
up by a funnel cloud and dropped miles inland when I was
a lad in public school in Holland, 55 years ago.
Y. Y. OUDSHOORN, VICTORIA, B. C., CANADA

DEAR ABBY: Of course it could have rained fish. It
rained HERRING in Scotland in March of 1817. The "her-
ring rain" lasted about an hour, and this Is no fish story.
KIM LONG, WHEELING, W. VA.

DEAR ABBY: About 35 years ago while I was driving
thru a thunderstorm near Hershey, Pa., dozens of tiny
frogs came down and pelted the hood of my automobile.
DAVID E. GARNER, BALTIMORE


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IN

NASSAU

CALL

2-1986

IN

FREEPORT

CALL

362-6608


The Tribune classified Ads
"bring results Fast To
'your Adv. Telephone 21986.


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Tuesday, January 2, 1973.


6 r(Tr (ribuntt


"Does the memo you signed forbidding ALL personal
calls include this personal call from your wife?"

Rupert and the Beanstalk-41


Have you found my mouse
yet?" The giant kneels
beside the hole to speak to
Rupert. Yes, your pet is
here," replies Rupert. But
there is something else-a
carved box." Trugg gives an
excited gasp. A box, did
you say ? Then perhaps it is
a secret hiding place."


Eagerly he starts to press the
panelling, hoping to find a
hidden spring. Meanwhile,
Rupert jumps down from the
box and, finding the mouse
still cleaning its whiskers,
gathers it in his arms and
waits tensely. All at once
there is a click and one of
the panels slides sideways.


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


'TmEN 7WEYRANOUTASASSESOR SCM N',AnWO
E AD TD DRINK OUT OF HER S W "

Brother Juniper


"You sing like a frog with a man in its throat."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 26. Engineering
degree
1. Swear 27. Tantalum
5. Suffice symbol
7. Zeus' son 29. 3.1416
11. Nucleus 30. Anguillae
12. Word of choice 32. Steep
13. Contend with 34. Plot
14. Skin 38. Boy's name
15. Comic strip 39. Osculate
17. Labor union 40. French article S
18. Dossier 41. Scottish
19. Saratoga historian
20. Complete 43. Carrie Chapman
22. Asian holiday 44. Oklahoma
23. Helot Indian
24. Sun god 45. And: Lat.


SOLUTION OF
46. Exchange
premium
47. Head: Fr.
48. About
49. Vault


YESTE


2 4
gy I. II



7" I3I 1



-I-- I-"ID I
sr 'eswursururs


ERDAY'S PUZZLE

DOWN
1. Bitter
2. Dress material
3. Rococo
4. Marry
5. Mild
6. Fanon
7. Behave
8. Perch
9. Epic poetry
10. Upper House
16. Comeback
18. Fussy
21. Uraeus
25. Lofty peak
27. Knitted fabric
28. Charge with
gas
30. Abyssinian
banana
31. Fodder
33. Playing card
35. Fuel ship
36. Nerve networks
37. Bar legally
42. Shelter
43. Wolframite


I OFICE HOUR


Winning

Bridge
Dae VICTOR MOLLO
Dealer South: EW Vul:
North
A 6
A Q? 4 3
5 4 3
4h 52

A K 10 8 6 2
K 8
J 10 4
South North
2 l32
3 3 40
West leads the &K, the
*A and the 46 which East ruffs.
The 4K comes back. How should
South proceed ?
Nine declarers out of ten will
draw trumps. The tenth, alive
to the risk of finding West with
all four missing trumps, will first
play the aQ, as f he were
anxious to discard a losing spade.
If East ruffs, all is welL If he
doesn't, the inference is that he
has no trump left and the finesse
is taken against West's )J.
A clever South. 'ut what if
East is clever, too ? He knows
thtt I.f outh lias :% trump loser,
he will go down a.yway. If he
hasn't, why di-esn't he draw
trumps flrtt? u Eart discards
a spade-uuid U'ves mrybe to win
the setting tick with his ?J.
Of course, e. clever South won't
bait that trap against a clever
East, but then not every East
is clever.
West Eat
9 8 KQ10732
61052
AK86 T
This hand Is based on an
example by Paul Lukacs.


Swords of
R R f to u r better.
4h 1i ure caIn
SI u nake
r 0 1 trll the
U *etert shown
It e re In
na k I ni a
wood. elach
T 0 V ."n** eiic
| Seller ilia y
lie used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter. and there must lie at


No. 7.012 . by TIM McKAV
Across
t. It grows on the Chilterns.
(5. 4)
O. O(d sailor. (4)
8. Fnilsh. (3)
II. Tasty morsel. (5. 4)
I1. Seduce. (5)


Chess
B5 LEONARD BARDEN












(9545)
This might-h a v e-been
poeatton from Kiholmov v.
jacobsen In last month's
lis.ovoask tournament is a
good test of your tactical
skllU. Black (to move) Is
threatened with immediate
mate, but has chances for
counterpWls against the
WMhite king. With best play,
what's the result ?
Par times: 30 seconds,
deue mautLr: 1 minute,
chess expert; 3 minutes.
county player; 7 minutes,
dc!ub standard; 12 minutes,
average: 20 mnrinutes. novice.
SOLUTION No 9545 -

Chess Solution
A draw. The critical
position occurs after the
forced sequence 1 .. R-Q8
ch; 2 'K-Kt2, B--88 ch;
3 K-B3, R--Q6 ch; 4 K-
Kt4, B-K' ci; 5 r-B3.
BxP ch; 6 .K-R3. Now if
6 ... B-Kt7 ch?; 7 K-RZI
wins for White, but 6. ..B-
Kt5 chl; 7 KxS, RxP clm; 8
Kx R, Q--K6 ch forces a
draw by perpetual check.


Ileat two eight-letter orqds in
the lbit. No plurals ; no toreign
utoUts; no paper names. TO-
u.D TA.tHUT : 22 words,
good,, 2t1 wuru. very good ; 32
iiurdUs. excellent. Solution to-
imiurrow.
I ESTEKDAY'VS SOLUTION :
Enter entire erne exert exit
expert expire inept inert IN-
aa'%IKTl inter next nitre peen
peer pent pern pert pier pine
preen rein rent repent repine
ripe ripen rite tern terne tier
tine fire tree trine tripe.


12. Lair. (3)
13. Iscilple. (8)
ll. Fish eggs. (3)
1 '. Paddles. (4)
18. liaubleN. (8)
1I. Required. (6)
C. ('levernes. t3)
. Throw. (4)
14. Titled ladles. (5)
Down
1. Stromnu-looking facade., 4, S5
S'rop .Journal ts. (7)
; For our letters. (9)
4. Speared. (9))
1. Yon. dear sir ((I)
G. (es In.
9. Toot t ( i n||j
s p ecia-
lists. (a)
14. 01 tides L "
45)
1.. H umor-
I. it. (3) I
tilo. it out. N
20. 1)orei
(a) s


54e Comi Pale_


CARROLL RIGHTWR'S



S from the Carroll Righter Intitute

\ GENERAL TENDENCIES: Happy New Year!
This is a perfect day to plan ways of expanding
activities and extending interests so as to enjoy the kind of life
you most wish in the days ahead Make new contacts with
those different from you
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Ideal day to communicate with
those out-of-town via letter or telephone to get the results you
want from them You can obtain that much needed data
which has been difficult to get before Keep busy
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Study your relationship with
others and see how to improve them Find the best way to
have more harmony with mate If you are in the wrong about
something, admit it Think
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You now understand the
ideas of associates and can make far better arrangements with
them Deepen your relationship with mate or bosom friend, if
you are not married. Avoid one who has strange ideas
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Plan what your
most important work and activities will be in the new year and
just how to make everything work out constructively for you
Also study how to have a more effective wardrobe Enjoy a
delightful day with family
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Take part in recreations and
activities that start the new year off on the right note and be
sure to drive with care Your creative abilities can be made to
work more effectively, too Avoid people who are a detriment
to you.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) You have to use tact and give
little criticism at home if you are to improve conditions there
as you wish Get rid of those drawbacks with kin that are a
pain in the neck Use a more practical approach
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Contact as many key persons
in your life as you can and figure out how to have more
successful and harmonious relationships Plan your future
activities very carefully, wisely Do something thoughtful for
mate
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) You know just what to do
now to add considerably to your present income prosperity,
so get busy early Consult with bankers, businessmen, etc
Start a new and better budget Taking it easy is wise in p m
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Keeping busy during
day at whatever you can do best is fine, but make
improvements to health and appearance tonight Afternoon is
good for seeing people you like or who can be helpful to you
in some way Drive with care
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Planning just how to add
to present income is a fine way to start this day, new year, but
don't confide in others Meet an adviser socially and get good
suggestions The evening can be ideal from the social
standpoint.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Use those gregarious
qualities you have to good purpose today and see as many key
persons as you can Friends can be most helpful to you Note
down personal aims so you will not forget them Make
resolutions you can keep
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Get together with bigwigs
socially today and state your aims, ambitions for the future,
and gain their support for them You can make a fine
impression on everyone today, tonight Be careful with diet,
especially the liquid kind
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who will be able to
express self in a most wonderful way and can be very positive
in expressing beliefs. There is much ability at organizing here
and the education should be slanted along such lines, since
there can be no project too big or too small which your
youngster will not tackle and bring to a successful fruition


I APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard |


Per time 26 min.


mammesmi


I-


men


R


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

NOT TOMORROW, WHAT TIME DOES THAT MISS GALE YOU DON'T UNDER- IT WILL BE A GREAT
RAFE / I'M TAKING ARRIVE --- THREE O'CLOCK? I'LL. SrAND, RAFE / YEAR ONY IF I
BELIEVE ME, KEN A COUPLE OF MEET HER PLANE / YOU GO MAKING A LOT OF FEEL THAT IN SOME
--I CAN GROSS OU DAYS OFF/ SHOOT THOSE TV COMMERCIALS / > MONEY ISNIT WAY I'VE CONTRIB-
A MILLION THI6 DToWHAT WILL UTED TO MAKIN&'4
YEAR--- BUT YOU'VE '' NO, 'M MEETING MAKE THIS A EVEN ONE PERSON
GOT TO CO- j THAT PLANE / GREAT YEAR/1 A LITTLE
OPERATE B HAPPIER











JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS!


II AGET


1-3J


AP Newsfeefur s


HI































"He wouldn't have been so mad if you had finished the
work he's waiting for a,.d THEN taken a nap."


Rupert and the Beanstalk-42


As the panel slides open
Giant Trugg roars with
pleasure and his great hands
seize the box. "'Tis so! You
have found my family's jewel
casket, small one! Many,
many years have I searched
for this!" In the gentlest
ALL RIGHTS


manner tie picks up the little
bear and puts him in the palm
of his hand. How can I thank
you?" he cries. "Not only
do you bring back my pet but
you bring me riches too."
"Aren't you glad your mouse
ran away?" laughs Rupert.
RESERVED


"I X LIUE TMe WAV-MIIR aIS S oTARN' OUT


Brother Juniper


"The one thing I don't DIG is shoveling snow."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Kind of music 32. Done by it
4. Coffee house 34. French season
8. Stocky horse 35. Reveal
11. Caucho 37. Boxing term
12. Hero 39. Cow
13. Gold in Spain 44. Digit
14. Retainer 46. And others:
15. Flavor abbr.
16. Mirthful 47. Food fish
17. Predetermine 48. Uri's father
20. Indian 49. Factory
mulberry 50. Halfway
21. Mission 51. Greek letter
24. Blunder 52. Defense
27. German city missiles
29. Reticule 53. English
30. Girl cathedral city


C^OI PERA E
RIN APTA
I LA R~i LED| AET
E 5 E E
N13 II EELS

CARS-YLLEE13,
OTOEB A9I
TETE L A r
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN

1. Pant
2. Not the real
spread
3. Equal


4.

5.
6.
7.


14 1i 16 18.
a---2a---- ^--


19.
17 1I 19 22.
A2 23.
Fo- 21 2 24

26
30 31 1 3 33 2134 28
31
S6 7 33.
4 1143 36

44 46 4i7--- 40
49q o o 941


43.
44.
1.4 45


Obsolete
dulcimer
Hebrew month
Most loving
English
composer
Kindred
Italian
daybreeze
Youth
Babylonian god
Choler
! Hickory
SWither
. Ratite bird
. Sought office
. Cote d'Azur
. National guard
. Lair
. Talents
, Things
. Hypothetical
force
. Limestone
. Pinnacle
. Drudgery
. Countercurrent
. Article
i. Not at home


IOFF lICI[E


Bridge Chess
*B VIOTO MOLLO By LEONARD GARDEN
CI-CAOO or 4-Deal Bridge,
virtually ualmown in Europe,
sIww dty more popular In
Anea ince ea Mbber is
cjnxaned to four deals and lasts
about twenty minutes, the game
finds special f a v our with
commuters.1
Vulneai lity is pre-determined A
-eilther side on the first deal, '
dealer's side on the next two,
both aides on the fourth and d
\ .. Though very similar to 4
ordtnaryl bridge, Oicago calls .
-for special taotacs. The reason .
ies In the advantage conferred
oy fulneJbility, (or as in
d the game and slam
bonuses are 500 and 750 respec- te51U
tively against 300 and 500. E,.dgames are h 1 g (h ly
Suppose that you an fourth geareLa sttltons where only
to spea a-on vulne rale, a samal eage can aut-ice lor
you palss, the haT asdet a win. In Utis position atrom
again n at he same vulnerab.liyt a tlusanan team event,
andl this time opponents may mnateital la equuai, tat Wanue a
have a game or slam. To tIulmps are mis aoolve xcing
deprive them of this potential anoa Lie zct'Oe aac LLCrjp.
advatiage, you should open How altd Wlate (to move)
even if you expect to go down, rorce a winning a aaaltage '?
Just tVo pass on o n toa ie xt deal. Pa tr inmes iu siec n is s
In the new edition of How to m e 2 e rnE
Win at COctract Bridge master. u seconds, cness
(IFwceti), Richaid L. Frey, one expert; 2 n. ntes, couiny
of Aimerlta's leading authorities, ,player; S inrnutes, cluo
advises openn 14 on (a) and svanaard; 8 mj n n u t es ,
34 on (b), orth hand, at average; 12 ninuces, novwie.
favourable vulnerability. .
(a) AQJxx Oxxx OQJ10 4xx -5.1tiVi\ vo a040 -
(b) 4QJl09xx QxxOAxxx x Ih e,,. I -
aBuLt pass on: c xx hess solution
I'you, tfit in a minor, 1 Q-85 ( nreatening 2
opponents will surely have one Q-Qs mare), (xQ; 2 PxQ.,
in a major and you may drive K-81; 3 K-Q4, K--KZ;
them Into an unbeatable, but 4 K-B5, K--Q2; 5 B--Kt3,
unbiddable anme--vulnerable. K-K3 (otherwise Wnite
plays 6 B x P ana wins easily
witn. his extra pawn); 6 P-
R6 ana unns because if 6
S. .PxP; 7 KxB.
In the game, Black tried
7 5 4 s 6 countering 1 Q---5 with
S I I - 1 . P--Q5 ch; but after 2
8 PxP (2 K (xP., I-Kt; s V-
SI R8 ch. B-.Kl is less clear),
QxQ; 3 PxQ, K--Bl; 4 B-
K4 Black had to resign
because after a bishop swap
the pawn ending is easy for
SWhite.


No. 7.011 hv TIM McKAV
Across%
I. Source ot bulhillrl ngmaterial.
(1-3)
5. C'orro lon. (4)
IL. I.elure, (4)
II. Clll oill. (9)
I2. Useful Instrument. (6)
14. Jell. (3)
1t. 'osy wear-or a blow. (8-6)
I1!. u. su o) (3)
*0. Pondk creature. (4)
Monkey. (6)
33. Part of a flower. (06)
t1. Steer near (anaE.). (9)
Down
I. (;os.l) route. (5-4)
:Nlrlt. (3)
3. 'they have ambllnllns. )
4. It a. he necessary it there
I- iladrlm. (5. 4)
Ii. Irlihilien. r)
Trl.l. (M4. 4)
1. lDescry. (3)
1:1. Sheep. (3)
IIH i aII1 n-
IW e IIs
I; C0 u nil- A A 1
Ie e n fill

S Pr i n. i
(4) [ WN.
21. Val le,
t 4) R K lI B
T.*. Worked l8 A l
as lM.P.
(3) ete'(jcril's 8u14llvll


*


athp s of
Su D I o r leiler.
iot n otre tai
to I 11 1I a lik
'r. ii I I I I htp
0E 0 tiers -iunor
Srh P r r I
SIII aI k i n r
I 1 word 1 i4 h
C U R !wit'r Slnc
lie ts. I Ute h
word must onnliiln the large
letter and there must he nt
Mlt' I il i'IulII-II. t'l ti irns III tlip
lit. N11 liirals.I; il foreilgn words;
ito jiroljer llullle. TlAY's
I'AH;E, : 3lt o0r ii. gd good
II words vern good : 40 words,
errel' 'lnt Sisotloln toinoirrow
SKItF'l'lAtl a n!LUI'1.%3 :
Note oler outer over overrun
overt (I)VlFTUKN rent return
rote route rove rover rune tenor
tern tone tore tourer trose
trover true tunne tuner turner
TURNOVER unvote vent vert
veto vole voter


4@n 4) CARROLL RIOHTER'S



from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES The early morning
brings something that pleases you very much.
Later in the day you have the chance to put in action some
unique plan you were thinking over as the new year entered
The evening is not good for anything critical or compromising
in its nature, so get a good rest
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) You get a pleasant letter that
makes you happy today then you can put that plan in
operation that is important to you Modernness is the keynote
now Get the right results quickly
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) You have projects in mind
that need to be carefully thought out before you put them in
operation, otherwise they may not be successful Hunches are
fine early in the day but not so good m p.m Think happy
thoughts
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Some new outlet can bring
you much needed recreation and you can reach a fine
understanding with an associate Don't bring up any debatable
points Some fascinating condition arises that requires quick
action
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Do those things
that make you look more attractive early and then put more
pep and zip into your work, activities. Being more willing to
cooperate with fellow workers is wise Think constructively
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) You are able to have a delightful
time with good friends and make arrangements for future
get-togethers also An associate has a fine project in mind.
Contact this person early and say you will go along with him
or her on it
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Study that situation well in
the outside world that will help you make more money with
the aid of kin Putting in more comforts at home is wise Make
it operate more efficiently in the future
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Study well that information
you need which will help you get ahead faster and make your
life much brighter Support ideas which good friends have that
are of a constructive nature Take it easy tonight
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) You have fine ideas for
adding to present income, but make sure you test them for
practicality before putting in operation A business expert can
give you shortcuts you had not thought about. Consult this
person
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec. 21) You are able to gain
personal aims better with aid of those who like you and
vice-versa now Get out to social gatherings and make new and
worthwhile friends Avoid some situation that could get you
into trouble later.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Make arrangements to
get ahead faster in your line of endeavor by adhering to your
finest philosophical principles Consult with one who is an
expert in your field of activity Add something comfortable to
your home.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) A day when your social
consciousness is very high and you can make big headway by
getting out to the right places, seeing the right people Confide
your aims to a good friend who can be helpful Avoid one who
has an eye on your assets
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) Fine results can come by
consulting with bigwigs you know in a m then later be sure to
carry through with the ideas they give you. Give more
attention to all of your activities and you get big results.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY' he or she will be
one of those young people who will be interested in every
subject imaginable, but will want to know early how others
have made big success in order to follow their example


/- z
I





?~~ ->


ar time 30 min.


AP NewsMotures


lWbr Irtbunt T


SREX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

SIKE I CAN TAKE Y E TH WAY, JUE TOLD ME /kEmN RON INVTEP WELL----OO
600 M N ON A CARLOAP OF I TO TELL YOU SHE'P BE HER THERE TO SEE / FOR HER /'SHE
OOO MORNING, 0CAT0 HOW ABOUT SEEING YOU IN A COUPLE SOME SHOWS- SURE WEEPD TO
MELISA' NOW LETTING ME OUT OF OF PAYS / SHE FLEW UP ET AWAY FROM
SU THIS CAGE TO NEW ORK THIS YOU, REXMORGAN













JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS
MOR OR NI I T ESN
V TNEW








//_ -,4, Or
-LT

















1.





APARTMENT 3-G ByP Ale NKotzkLyi




S TE CALL FOR AN& SEA I HEOPE 7 DOESNr
DRIVING GAA'ANAMBULLANCE .A SORACME SORT OF E FIRE!
EXCESSIVE SPEED A











TOUGH ONES YOUTIATE










EELL THEM THAi
THE1 EPEHER GET PO u
THEIR F TYMBENTS B'
CURRENT O P WE &MK N ADYME ud ,,r








STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


I I ..... . ....


rakgy -*












8 ITh eributih




Stingrays walk off after referee's t


decision


Tuesday, January 2, 1973.
-i 1 /


so Jets take Crawfish Bowl


DECISION OVER BEHAVIOUR TOMORROW

By IVAN JOHNSON
LATE IN THE THIRD QUARTER the Nassau Jets were handed the Crawfish Bowl on a platter when their
opponents, the Stingrays, decided to walk off the field of play following a decision by the referee at the Sports
Centre on Sunday evening. At the time of the controversial decision the Jets were leading 14-12.


This victory was the Jets'
tenth straight win this season


allowing them to finish the
season as undefeated League


Champions, and Champions of
the Bahamas. Throughout the


S .lk -. *:
LOOK OUT FELLAS I'M COMING THROUGH is what the expression on the face of
Jets running back Earl Bostwick portrays in Sunday's Crawfish Bowl game against the
Stingrays at the Sports Centre. Following in Bostwick's wake is Colin Blyden (No. 51).
The Jets were awarded the game when the Stingrays walked off the field in the third
quarter after Bostwick had been tackled by Melvin Burnside when he was out of bounds
ind the referee awarded a foul to the Jets. At the time of the incident the score stood at
14-12 to the Jets.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells



Liverpool increase their lead at top



of English soccer league table


By Noel Hughes
LONDON, DEC. 30 (AP)--Peter Cormack headed a brilliant goal t
1.0 win over Crystal Palace Saturday and pushed his team three
English soccer First Division.
Liverpool massed all out 0-0 draw at Stoke. Third
attacks, but had to wait until placed Leeds didn't play
the 67th minute before Saturday because six first team
C.irmack assured victory with a stars had influenza. They have
S.ck-header into the net from 33 points.
a qlick centre by Alec Arsenal's goalkeeper Bob
Lindsay. Wilson was in sparkling form
The win put Liverpool on 38 against Stoke and saved what
points with second placed looked like a certain goal from
Arsenal on 35 points after a Mike Pejic late in the seconA


LONDON, Dec. 30 (AP)--Results
;n the British soccer leagues
:aturday:
ENGLISH LEAGUE, Division
One:
Birmingham I Ipswich 2
Chelsea I Derby I
Leicester 2 West Ham I
Liverpool I Crystal Palace 0
Manchester United vs. Everton -
posetponed
Newcastle 4 Sheffield United I
Nlorwich I Manchester City I
Southampton 2 Coventry I
Stoke 0 Arsenal 0
West Bromwich vs. Leeds
postponed.
DIVISION TWO
Brighton I Blackpool 2
Bumley 2 Fulham 2
Huddersfleld I Aston Villa I
Middlesbrough I Oxford 0
Nottingham Forest vs Hull -
postponed
Orient vs Sunderland postponed
Preston 2 Luton 0
Sheffield Wed. 3 Queen's Park I
Swindon vs. Carlisle postponed
DIVISION THREE
Bolton 2 Notts County 2
Brentford I Oldham I
Bristol Rovers 4 Halifax I
Chesterfield I Bournemouth I
Rochdale 0 Blackburn I
Rotherham 2 Grimsby 0
Scunthorpe I Tranmere 5
Xhrewsbury 0 Chariton 2
Walsall vs. Swansea-postponed


CANADIAN LADIES
TEAM ARRIVES
THE UNIVERSITY of Western
Ontario's ladies volleyball team
commonly called Junos
Volleyball Club arrived in Nassau
yesterday to compete in the
Bahamas Third Invitational
Volleyball Tournament on
Saturday.
Headed by captain Marion
Munroe, Mary Chisholm and Judy
Alaskiewicz members of the
Canadian national volleyball team
the team will play a series of
t exhibition games the first
beginning tonight at the Eastern
Secondary School Gym at 8
o'clock.
Prior to this will be an exhibition
match between the Bahama
Islanders and the Bahamn u
Commonwealthers.
The Junos Volleyball Club won
the Canadian Inter-Collegian
volleyball tournament.

ALL BLACKS WIN
CARDIFF, WALES, DEC. 30
(AP)-The touring Now Zealand All


Watford vs. Wrexham postponed :
York 0 Port Vale 0
DIVISION FOUR
Bradford 4 Exeter 0
Cambridge I Barnsley I
Chester 0 Newport 2
Gillingham 2 Bury 2
Lincoln vs. Darlington postponed
Mansfield 0 Doncaster 0
Reading 0 Hereford I
Southport 2 Peterborough I
Torquay 0 Crewe 0
Workington 2 Aldershot I
SCOTTISH LEAGUE,
Division One:
Airdrie 2 Dundee United 2
Abroath 5 Falkirk I
Dumbarton 4 Partick Thistle 2
Dundee 2 Motherwell 0
Hibernian 3 Aberdeen 2
Kilmarnock vs Celtic postponed
Morton 3 East Fife I
Rangers 2 Ayre I
St. Johnstone 3 Hearts 2
DIVISION TWO
Berwick I Cowdenbeath 0
Brechin 3 St. Mirren 3
Clyde 2 Montrose 2
Dunfermline 6 Queen of South I
East Stirling 2 Queen's Park I
Hamilton 4 Forfar 0
Stranraer 2 Alloa 0
ENGLISH LEAGUE CUP,
Semifinal, second leg:
Tottenham 2 Wolverhampton 2
(after extra time). Tottenham win
4-3 on aggregate.


Blacks fumbled through a thick fog
to a 20-9 rugby victory over East
Gihmorgan Saturday.
Spectators could not see much of
the action through the swirling fog
and several of the scores were
announced over loudspeakers to the
fans.
Joe Karam was on form for the
visitors and kicked two penalty
goals and a conversion. Hales (2)
and Stevens, scored tries for the All
Blacks.
Half time score was 10-6.
WORLD CUP HOCKEY
COLORADO SPRINGS,
Colorado (AP)-Russia, making its
first appearance, downed
Czechoslovakia 6-3 Friday night to
deal the Czechs their first loss in
the World Cup Hockey tournament.
U.S. PRO HOCKEY TIE
VANCOUVER (AP)--The
Vancouver Canucks rallied for two
third period goals and a 4-4
National Hockey Leagre tie against
Philadelphia Friday night In a game
in which flyer players stormed into
the crowd, throwing punches and
wielding their sticks.


o give Liverpool a hard fought
points clear at the top of the

half. But a goal-less dray
seemed a fair result in a fas
flowing game.
OTHER MATCHES:


w
5t


BIRMINGHAM 1 IPSWICH
2: Birmingham never recovered
from a 5th minute setback
when David Johnson put
Ipswich in the lead and Bryan
Hamilton made it 2-0 with a
header in the 15th. minute.
Bob Hatton reduced the arrears
in the 67th minute.
CHELSEA 1 DERBY 1:
Peter Osgood turned sharply
and hit the ball into the net off
the post to snatch a 71st
minute equalizer for Chelsea
after Derby led with an eighth
minute goal scored by John
O'Hare.
LEICESTER 2 WEST HAM
1: A goal to each side within
three minutes of the start set
this game alight. John
Farrington scored for Leicester
in a minute and West Ham's
Trevor Brooking equalized
after a goal area mixup.
West Ham's usually lively
attack flagged in the deepening
fog and in the 70th minute
Frank Worthington forced
home the winning goal from a
cross. The win pushed
Leicester up to 17th place in
the table.
NEWCASTLE 4
SHEFFIELD UNITED I:
Newcastle's forwards were in
sparkling form, with John
Tudor and Irving Nattrass
giving them a 2-0 lead within
10 minutes.
Three minutes later
Sheffield hit back when Bill
Dearden scored from close in.
But more goals from Malcolm
MacDonald and Derek Craig in
the second half assured a home
victory.
NORWICH I MAN-
CHESTER CITY 1: A 25-yard
free kick by Graham Patton
whizzed straight into the net in
the 22nd minute to give
Norwich the lead. Manchester
City came back well and Tony
Towers equalized after the
home defense failed to clear a
corner.
SOUTHAMPTON 2
COVENTRY 1: Brian Alderson
put Coventry ahead after 42
minutes against an uncertain
Southampton, but luck was
with the home team who
equalized two minutes after
the interval when John
Gilchrist drove home from
eight yards. The winning goal
came in the 62nd minute when
Coventry defender Bob Parker
touched the ball into his own
net.


season they have played with
great enthusiasm and I'm sure
the majority of football fans
will agree that the Jets fully
deserve the top two honours
for the season.


It was indeed unfortunate
that the Crawfish Bowl game
should have been marred by
such unsportmanslike conduct
on the part of the Stingrays.
The game which was billed to
be the climax of the first
NPAFL season turned out to
be the biggest anti-climax of
the season.
WALKED OFF
When the Stingrays walked
off the field the game was
poised for a thrilling ending
with the Jets leading by the
narrow margin of 14-12, having
come from behind on two
occasions. Whatever the
Stingrays may say they are in
the wrong. The first thing any
4k sportsman must learn is that
the referee's decision is final
and if he can't accept this then
he should'nt take part in


sports.
The incident occurred when
Melvin Burnside tackled Earl
Bostwick who was out of
bounds and the referee
awarded a penalty to the Jets.
The Stingrays who had
threatened to leave the field
earlier on in the game when
Allen Ingraham had been sent
off for fighting, protested the
Burnside decision openly and
subsequently left the field and
refused to continue playing.
DISGUSTED
Geff Williams, NPFAL
president, who was
disappointed and disgusted by
the Stingrays' behaviour said
the referee's decisions were
perfectly fair, but "it appears
that the Stingrays fans have
more control over the team
than the Stingrays coach,
"because it was the fans who
persuaded the players to leave
the field.
An official from the
association said that the
NPFAL committee would be
meeting tomorrow to decide
what actions should be taken
against the Stingrays for their
appalling behaviour.
The game got off to a good
start when the Stingrays scored
early in the first quarter to
take a 6-0 lead but the Jets
soon settled down after
appearing a little nervous at the
start and shortly afterwards
they scored to make it 7-6 in
their favour.
Towards the end of the first
quarter the Stingrays took
possession of the ball following
a Jets fumble on the 42 yard
line. They then drove up to the
Jets 5 yard line where running
back Whitney Rolle ran a
sweep to the left side and into
the end zone for a touchdown
which gave the Stingrays a 12-7
lead.
HALFTIME LEAD
Throughout the second
quarter the Jets tried their
utmost to draw level but the
Stingrays held them at bay to
hold a 5 points lead at the
halftime interval.
Minky Isaacs, MVP of the
Boilfish Bowl game, robbed the
Jets of their only chance of
scoring in the second quarter
when he managed to get a hand
to a pass from Jesse Ferguson
which seemed destined to land
on the hands of Don Huyler
who was waiting eagerly in the
end zone.
The Jets went into the lead
early in the third quarter when
quarterback Ferguson on a first
play torpedoed a 32 yard pass
to Huyler who made his way to
the 6 yard line where Basil
'Barr' Davis illustrated the
theory that the shortest
distance between two points is
a straight line by blasting his
way through three Stingrays
defenders as though they were
mere skittles for a fine
touchdown. Bostwick ran for
the conversion to give the Jets
a 14-12 lead.
The Jets came desperately
close to scoring later in the
third period when they took
the ball to the 2 yard line but
fumbled as they tried to score.
This was the play which
brought about Ingraham's
ejection from the game when
he attacked Frankie Knowles
after Knowles had blocked
him.
Several plays later the game
came to halt when the
Stingrays players disputed the
controversial 'pile on' and
subsequently left the field.


CRAWFISH BOWL WINNERS The winners of the Crawfish Bowl, the Nassau Jets. The Jets were awarded the
Bowl after their opponents, the Stingrays, walked off the field and refused to continue playing with the score standing
at 14-12 to the Jets. STANDING Left to Right (BACK ROW) J. Ferguson, E. Smith, K. Albury, L. Rolle, C. Blyden,
M. Curtis, C. Ferguson, D. Brown, R. Knowles, P. Aliens, G. Adderley, F. Knowles, S. McKenzie.
KNEELING Left to Right (FRONT ROW) J. Leroda, A. Clark, I. Burrows, B. Davis, A. Roberts, D. Huyler, E.
Bostwick, M. Jenoure, C. Ferguson, A. Rahming.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


loss in 2 PITTSBURGH IS

STUNNED: LOSES


days as Lions take President's Cup CLEMENTE & TO

By IVAN JOHNSON MIAMI DOLPHINS


LEAGUE CHAMPIONS, CLAN McALPINE were beaten 3-1 by Red Lion in the President's Cup
at Clifford Park yesterday following their 2-1 loss against Tropigas on Sunday in a League game.


It was a bad weekend for the
defending League Champions
not only was Sunday's
defeat their first of the Season,
but they were deprived of the
services of three of their best
players as a result of Sunday's
game. Skipper Dick Wilson,
Mike Hlaywood and lan Lever
were all unable to turn out for
the President's Cup owing to
injuries received on Sunday.
McAlpine appeared a little
lost without the bustling Dick
Wilson in midfield but they
will have to get used to his
absence because it has since
been announced that he has
broken his leg in two places
which means that he will
almost certainly be out for the
rest of the season. Wilson's loss
could well put McAlpine's
chances of retaining the League
Championship in great
jeopardy.
However, full credit must go
to Red Lion who played good


attacking football with Colin
Knight and the 'nifty' Barry
Hynes turning in good
performances.
The Clan struck first when
Peter Stanham chipped over an
innocent looking free kick
which the Lions goalkeeper
ob'igingly punched into his
own net and put McAlpine 1-0
in the lead.
Twenty minutes later Red
Lion drew level through striker
Colin Knight. Barry Hynes
having taken the ball down the
right sent over a good cross and
Knight, amid the hectic
swirling around the goal, got
up splendidly to outjump the
goalkeeper and head the ball
home.
With the Clan resorting to
defense tactics, because of the
absence of the three players
previously mentioned, the
game developed into a bit of a
stalemate. The Clan had only
two players in attack, namely


Ray Simpson and young Mark
Turner.
Simpson played well but
with his team employing such
defensive tactics he received
next to no support at all and
several times he sent over
crosses which passed
tantalizingly across the whole
defence but there was never
any Clan player on hand to
bang the ball home.
With some 15 minutes
remaining the Clan lost Peter
Stanham when he pulled a
hamstring and shortly after this
the Lions went into the lead
when their captain Dave Allen
hit a beautifully timed volley
from a comer into the Clan's
net to make it 2-1.
Red Lion were now playing
coolly and methodically out of
defence and with three minutes
to go Colin Knight scored his
second goal of the match when
he received a through ball with
only the goal keeper to beat.


MIKE PARNELL (far right) shows great determination as he slides into tackle Richard
Baptiste (left) of McAlpine in the President's Cup played at Clifford Park yesterday. Red
Lion won the game 3-1 to inflict McAlpine's second loss this weekend following the
League Champion's 3-1 defeat by Tropigas on Sunday which was their first defeat of the
season.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells


MCC ON TOP;


INDIA LOSE

5 FOR 148
(AP)-India made 148 runs for the
loss of five wickets against the
touring M.C.C. cricket team
Saturday, the opening day of their
Second Test match.
England won the first round at
Delhi on Christmas Day by six
wickets.
India won Saturday's toss, chose
to bat first, and all went well for
the home team until 23-year-old
Chris Old made a superb catch off
Derek Underwood when the Indian
score stood at 29.
The Indian wickets fell rapidly
after lunch and by tea five wickets
had fallen for 100 runs.
England went on to the field
without their ace Paceman Geoff
Arnold who was in hospital with
stomach pains and a slight fever. He
was behind the wrecking of the
Indian batting side in the New
Delhi Test.
Old, the youngster who replaced
Arnold, justified the confidence
manager Donald Cart placed in him.
Old was responsible for getting
both the opening batsmen out. He
got Sunil Gavaskar out for only 18
runs when he caught him off Derek
Underwood. Old also bowled
Ramnath Solkar for 26, caught by
Alan Knott.
The two other wickets were
shared by Pat Pocock and Bob
Cottam.
The British fielding was superb
and drew repeated cheers from the
70,000-strong crowd.
The Indians played with caution
and defensively, with the weight of
their defeat at the First Test in
Delhi still fresh in their minds.
They made the first 50 runs in
115 minutes, the 100 runs In 211
minutes and the final 148 in 325
minutes.


The City of Pittsburgh was
stunned.
Some 18 years of thrills on
the baseball diamond were
gone. Roberto Clemente was
dead.
Clemente was killed late
Sunday when a twin-engine
plane carrying him and four
others crashed off the coast of
his native Puerto Rico. The
plane was en route to Managua
to help the victims of the
Nicaraguan earthquake.
"Is it true?" fans asked
Pittsburgh sports reporters who
never stopped answering the
telephone calls from those who
refused to believe it.
"Say it ain't so," one fan
cried out.
For him and for others
across the nation it was all
over. Clemente was dead at the
age of 38 an age when most
others had long ago hung up
their spikes. But Clemente was
still going strong.
Sunday's American Football
Conference championship
game was forgotten. The
Steelers' 21-17 loss to Miami
no longer mattered in
Pittsburgh. Roberto was dead.
"The tragic death of
Roberto Clemente has
saddened Pittsburgh and the
entire nation," mayor Peter
Flaherty said. "He died at the
height of a greater career in
performing a valuable service
for his fellow man."
IT'S TOUGH
"I don't know how you can
think of baseball in Pittsburgh
without Roberto Clemente,"
said Pirate Manager Bill
Virdon.
"I couldn't believe it,"
Virdon said. "It was like a
nightmare. It's a tough way to
start a new year.
"I don't think there's been
anyone better in baseball,"
Virdon said. "He could play
every phase of the game
excellently. I've never seen
anybody that could play the
game as he has during the last
three years. He was 38 last
season yet he could do more
things than a lot of
30-year-olds could do. I've
never seen an individual who
retained his physical abilities
for so long.
"He made it a point to go
entirely out of his way to help
others. He was a very warm,
friendly, happy and willing
person. Someone who always
was willing to help somebody
in need."
Virdon's reaction was
echoed by Danny Murtaugh,
the man who managed the
Pirates for 11 of Clemente's
brilliant years. He saw
Clemente lead the Pirates to
the World Championship in
1960 and 1971.
"I've often said he was the
greatest ballplayer I have ever
seen," Murtaugh said.
RECORD
Born Aug. 18, 1934,
Clemente had completed his
18th season with the Pirates. In
Sept. last season he became the
llth player in Major League
baseball to get 3,000 hits
during his career.
The pirates drafted
Clemente for $4,000 from the
Brooklyn Dodger farm team in
Montreal in 1954. He went on
to compile a lifetime batting
average of .318, be named the
National League's most
valuable player in 1966 and be
selected to the league's all-star
team 12 times.
In 1971, he was named the
World Series most valuable
player as the Pirates defeated
the Baltimore Orioles in seven
games.


MELBOURNE (AP)
Pakistan proved in the Second
Test match against Australia
Saturday that Australia has no
monopoly on big scoring.
Pakistan ran up 292 for the
loss of only one wicket and not
one Australian bowler took a
wicket.
Zaheer Abbas, the only
Pakistan batsman to lose hir
wicket was run out.
Dennis Lillee, the bowler
who struck terror in the hearts
of English batsmen earlier this
year, was among the Australian
bowlers to take punishment.
Thomson had 62 runs hit off
eleven overs without taking
one wicket.
Short, thickset Sadiq
Muhammad led the batting
onslaught against the
Australian attack with 125 not
out. It was his first century for
Pakistan. Batting with Sadiq is
Majid Khan 92 not out.
lan Chappell, as though
taking pity on Pakistan.
declared Australia's innings
closed at 441 for 5 when
Marsh, was out for 74.
Greg Chappell, 71 not out
overnight, carried on to make
116 not out. It was his fourth
Test century.
On the Pakistan innings
Saeed Ahmed had to retire
hurt after making 18, because
of a bruised knuckle when


struck by a rising ball from
Lillee. But he batted on
Monday.
Sadiq and Abbas then added
97 in 79 minutes before Abbas
was run out.
Abbas had shown
magnificent form with 51 in 72
minutes and five boundaries.
Khan took over and was missed
before scoring. He settled
down then to play out an
unfinished second wicket
partnership of 164 with Sadiq
who battled toward his
century, which finally took
four hours and included twelve
fours.
In their second innings
Australia has scored 416 for
eight. Paul Sheahan scored 127
and John Betrand 142.
SPURS THROUGH
TO SOCCER FINAL
LONDON, DEC. 30 (AP)--A
I 113th minute goal by striker Martin
Chivers gave Tottenham a 2-2 draw
against Wolverhampton Saturday
which put the London club in the
final of the English League Cup.
The result made Tottenham 4-3
aggregate winners after they won
the first leg of the semifinal 2-1.
Extra time was needed to resolve
the issue after Wolverhampton ace
John Richards had put his side 2-1
ahead In this leg with two minutes
remaining in normal time.
Wolverhampton scored first
through an own goal by Spurs'
defender Terry Naylor after 39
minutes. Martin Peters headed
Tottenham back into the game with
a 70th minute goal.


McAlpine suffer 2nd.


Au t. alia slam up 416 runs


for 8 in their 2nd. innings


4