<%BANNER%>
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03228
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 03-14-2012
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03228

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Police to probe DNAand PLP Volume: 108 No.86WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNYAND ASHOWER HIGH 82F LOW 71F By KHRISNA VIRGIL kvirgil@tribunemedia.net A SPECIAL unit has been c reated within the police force with the sole purpose of investigating the campaigning prac tices of the PLP and DNA,F ox Hill MP Fred Mitchell claimed yesterday. Mr Mitchell said according t o his information, several officers from other areas of the force have been reas s igned to this political police unit. There is great reason to b elieve that police officers have been reassigned to dabble in political matters on behalf of the government, s aid Mr Mitchell. There are consistent and persistent stories by back Mitc hell c laims special political unit formed TRY OUR DOUBLE M cFISH The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SPECIALSUPPLEMENTINSIDETODAY K K E E N N N N E E L L C C L L U U B B D D O O G G S S H H O O W W GUIDE TO WEEKEND EVENT ARTS E E X X U U M M A A S S H H E E R R I I T T A A G G E E F F E E S S T T I I V V A A L L SEEARTSSECTIONC N OW HELPUS TOREACH T O FIND OUT HOW Y OU C AN HELP OUR BREAST CANCER CAMPAIGN, TURN T O OUR CENTRE SPREAD WEVE RAISED $1M $205,000 P OLICE have stopped their search for a Millennium G ardens family of five who disappeared without a trace over the weekend. According to press liaison o fficer Insp Chrislyn Skip p ings, the missing mother and her four children have been i n contact with family members and are in good health. Marsha Hepburn Peters, 34, and her four children Joel,12, Shamar, 8, Charis, 6, and Zion, 2 became the subject of a widespread police search after they disappearedo n Sunday between 1am and 6am. Few details were available u p to press time Monday night, but senior officers said there was cause to worry fort he family who live on Lottie T ynes Boulevard in Millenni um Gardens. Calls were made to the father of the children for comment. He did not want to comment until first meetingw ith police. However, police have discontinued their missing bul letin for the five after receiv i ng word that the family is well. By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net SALARY negotiations between the Bahamas Telecommunications Company and the union representing its workers has reached an impasse, according to a statement released by the unions president yesterday. The Bahamas Communica tions and Public Officers Unions (BCPOU ment comes less than a week after union members warned of possible action if industrial agreement negotiations fail. The government privatised BTC last April with the sale of 51 per cent of its shares to Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC Since the privatization of BTC, a number of legacy issues have been resolved amicably and the union has successfully negotiated disen gagement packages for employees during the downBy SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net A PRISONER who jumped from a patrol car yesterday morning on his way to court is back behind bars, police have confirmed. Police said around 11.40am officers were driving 20-yearold Lynden Russell to Magistrates court on South Street By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter THE Bahamas Petroleum Company would not respond to claims it has already started exploring for oil in Bahamian waters, and could not say when it would be. Calls were placed to the company's Nassau office yesterday after Democratic National Alliance (DNA candidate Ben Albury repeated his allegation that the company is looking for oil despite the national moratorium on petroleum exploration. But an employee said no one was available for comment, and no one would be for the foreseeable future. At a press conference outside the Ministry of the Environment, Mr Albury claimed that according to his sources, GIRL, 1 5, SAVES FAMILY FROM HOUSE BLAZE FIREMENDOUSE the flames at the scene of a blaze off Mount Royal Avenue, where a 15-year-old girl came to the rescue of her four brothers and sisters, going into the flames to save them. For more, turn to page 2. Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff NO ANSWER ON OIL CLAIMS S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 DEADLOCK OVER SALARIES FAMILY SAFE AND WELL PRISONER RECAPTURED i m lovin it A M ANwas shot dead last night in the Pinewood Gardens area. E arly reports suggest that the man was killed at about 8.40pm in a shooting incident. The victim was thought to be a man in his late 20s who was standing outside a residence when he was approachd by another man and shot dead. The shooting occurred in St Johns Avenue, off Buttonwood Avenue. Police are investigating. MAN KILLED IN SHOOTING

PAGE 2

LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE A 15-YEAR-OLD saved h er brothers and sisters when a fire ripped through the storage unit where they were sleeping. T he fire broke out in the combined house and storage unit off Mount Royal Avenue yesterday afternoon at about 3pm. T he girl was at the oppos ite end of the house from where the fire broke out and went into the flames tor escue her four brothers and sisters, including a baby. Firefighters were called to the scene and extinguished t he blaze. A fire department source confirmed that the girl had gone to the rescue of her sib l ings. The cause of the fire was not confirmed at time of going to press. GIRL, 15, SAVES FAMILY FROM HOUSE BLAZE A FIREMAN d amps down the aftermath of a blaze that could have proven disastrous if it was not for the actions of a 15-year-old girl who dashed into the flames to rescue her four siblings. P hotos:Felip Major/Tribune Staff THESCENE of the blaze off Mount Royal Avenue yesterday.

PAGE 3

EDITOR, The Tribune. I WAS deeply troubled as I listened to former superintendent of police Keith Bell r idicule the Ingraham admini stration for its performance in fighting crime over the past four-plus years on a popular radio talk show in New Providence. T he former superintendent appeared on the Love 97.5FM talk show Issues of the Day with host Wendell Jones on February 29. He was particularly harsh in his criticism oft he Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest. Bell said that Turnquest has not performed well as minister of national security, and that P rime Minister Ingraham s hould have removed him f rom that important post. Bell is not the first person to criticise Turnquest. Many Bahamians have been calling for his head over the past seve ral years. U nfortunately for Turnq uest, his tenure as national security minister has witnessed four murder recordsi n the past five years: 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011. Bahami-a ns normally gauge the overa ll performance of a sitting g overnment, its minister of national security and the commissioner of police on how m any murders were committed during their time in office. If the murder count is high, then Bahamians would give t hem a poor grade. I think Prime Minister Ingraham should have neverp laced Turnquest in the ministry of national security. He should have made him min-i ster of finance instead. Turn quest had earned a degree in business from the University of Western Ontario BusinessS chool. He also worked at a banking institution for over a decade. Therefore, why was nt he placed at the ministry of finance? In all honesty, Turnquests performance asn ational security minister has b een mediocre at best. In fact, on a scale of one to 10, I give him a three plus. Sometimes Iw onder if the prime minister really expected Turnquest to succeed as minister of national security. That position is not suitable for him at all. If anything, I think the prime minister should have taken that ministry instead. After all, he has the reputation of being a no-nonsense leader. Nevertheless, despitei ts challenge during the past f our-plus years in office, the g overnment has implemented several initiatives to fight c rime. For instance, the ankle bracelet system was introduced by the Free National Movement (FNM m ent in order to monitor pers ons who are out on bail. The government has also pumped m illions into the Royal B ahamas Police Force (RBPF t he high crime wave in Nassau. Certainly the governments hould be commended for s ome of its initiatives. Bell, however, said that the policies of the Ingraham administration are responsib le for the high crime rate. U nless the former superintendent of police can produce i ronclad evidence which proves that the Ingraham administration has been supplying firearms to the thugs who are reeking havoc in Nass au, then I think he should keep his overly simplistic v iews to himself. The thugs w ho are committing the murders, rapes, drug-trafficking, auto thefts, house-break-insa nd armed robberies are our sons, nephews, cousins, uncles, friends and next door neighbours. Many of themh ave girlfriends who are benefiting from their criminal exploits. W e know who these crimi nals are. I know of a young man in high school whosem om used to give him cond oms in order to have sexual intercourse with girls at his school. I recently heard thath e was arraigned before the courts in Nassau on rape charges. His amoral parents h elped to sow the seeds of promiscuity in him while he was a teenager. They reared up a monster who views w omen only as sexual objects, not human beings who are created in the imago Dei. Of course, I do not know the final outcome of that particular case. But I wouldnt be surprised if he was found guilty. But lets suppose he w ere found guilty, who do y ou then blame for his heinous crime, Turnquest, or the young alleged rapist and his amoral parents? It is obviously the latter ones. But Is uppose the political opponents of Turnquest would also blame him for the crime. My point is this, I think it is unfair to place the blame solely at the doorsteps of Tom-m y Turnquest and the FNM administration for the crime crisis. Everyone of us, from the prime minister to the lazy bum on the street, is respons ible for the mess this country f inds itself in. Ours is a socie ty where the culture of criminality has been deeply rooted. How many of us play numbers at the web shops or online? How many of us have b een guilty of driving our v ehicles without insurance c overage or unlicensed? How many of us have disobeyed the traffic signals, or have dri-v en our cars 40 or 50 miles per hour on a30 miles perh our zone? We as Bahamians l ove to be dishonest and cut c orners. Yet we will be the very ones to ridicule the government for the crime crisis o n the radio talk shows or in the letters to the editor. Keith Bell, in my view, is an average, run-of-the-mill p olitician who only wants to preach partisan politics by blaming his political oppo-n ents for the high crime rate. This country doesnt need anymore politicians like him.B ell and other politicians of his ilk want to exonerate an undisciplined nation, but at the same time castigate ani nnocent minister who is try ing to get blood out of a stone. I dont care if the Pro gressive Liberal Party were to implement its much touted urban renewal 1.0 or 2.0, TheB ahamas will always be a s ociety where crime is endem ic so long as we Bahamians remain a disobedient, undis c iplined people. KEVIN EVANS Freeport, Grand Bahama March 3, 2012. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 T HE CROOKS are back again working t heir trade on the web. After a lull of seve ral months probably hoping that time will have erased memories they have r eturned to their old trick of pretending that prominent Bahamians are stranded in Europe and need special financial helpf rom their friends to get home. Some pers ons must fall into their trap. One would have thought that if they had not received a response from their pleas, they would have discontinued their dishonest game. B ut, no, here they are again. This time, according to the plea for help, M r Hugh G Sands, CMG, former Caribbean Director and Bahamas Man ager for Barclays Bank, from which he retired in 1995 after a distinguished career, is supposedly stranded in Madrid. Accordi ng to the message under the subject head: My terrible trip, Mr Sands, was out on a s ightseeing trip when he misplaced both his wallet and his cell phone. According to the plea for help the wallet c ontained all his valuables. It was also claimed that his passport was being held byt he hotel management against the payment of his hotel bill. He apologised to all his f riends that he had left the Bahamas without informing them of his impromptu trip. I am sorry if I am inconveniencing y ou, the e-mail continued, but I have only very few people to run to now. I will be indeed very grateful if I can get a loan of 1,550usd from you. This will enable me t o sort out hotel bills and get my sorry self back home. I promise to refund it in full as soon as I return. Let me know if youc an be of any assistance. Please let me k now soonest. Thanks so much. It was signed Hugh G Sands, CMG, fol l owed by his full Nassau address. The fact of the matter is that Mr Sands is still in Nassau. Yesterday morning he was busy going about his affairs, while hisw ife was at home, answering the phone and trying to assure their friends that his sorry self had never left Nassau. He was quite secure and did not need their help. Of course, Mr and Mrs Sands are embarrassed by the fraud. Mr Sands, at one time headmaster of G overnment High School and meticulous about both the written and spoken word, is probably mortified that such a poorly written and badly punctuated e-mailw ould go out over his name. It is hoped that no one fell for the attempted rip-off and that Bahamians will now be aware that the scam artists are back at work. If any of your friends are stranded anywhere without their wallet, check with t hem first before you try to help. You will q uickly find that you are being duped. What is the issue about B ahamas Hot Mix? This was the question asked by an online reader of Tribune242.com. Anys ensible person realizes that Bahamas Hot M ix is probably the best company in this country in regards to roads, even before Brent (Symonette us stop the stupidity and political folly, he w rote. And said another online reader: With r egards to Bahamas Hot Mix, I personally dont care who owns it as long as the Bahamian people are getting value for money at the best cost. It makes absolutely no sense to award a contract to a cont ractor who has to purchase the asphalt f rom Hot Mix anyway. Dont give it to t he small man if he has to take it to the big man anyway. There are whispers, wrote Rick Lowe i n a letter to T he Tribune that a conflict of interest arises for Mr Symonette,D eputy Prime Minister where Bahamas Hot Mix is concerned because his child ren own a small shareholding in trust. The controversy arises because Bahamas Hot Mix was one of several B ahamian companies awarded a contract for road works. As Mr Lowe concludes, as long as governments tender rules were followed, there is no room to claim conflict o f interest. And he asks other than Bahamas Hot Mix and Knowles Con struction (owned by the son of the late E rvin Knowles, a former PLP cabinet mini ster) how many road builders exist here that can construct asphalt paved highways t o internationally recognised standard? The hounding of Mr Symonette because members of his family have a small interest in a successful company, is enough to makes uccessful Bahamians shy away from offering as election candidates. This country needs more successful men and women in government. It is too bad if they fail to offer their services because they are hampered by their success. With such a myopic outlook even family members are penalised for being r elated to a successful parliamentarian. This is a small country, all hands are needed on deck, especially those who have the best navigational skills in fact they shouldb e the captains. As long as the rules of con flict of interest are scrupulously followed no company should be blocked from a gov ernment contract because a shareholder is a parliamentarian or related to one. This country deserves the best. We are all to blame for crime LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Beware of attempted email fraud VENICE BAY SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1 Block No. 25 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-family Residence and Six Apartment Complex PROPERTY SIZE: 10,066 sq. ft. GROSS FLOOR AREA: 4,745 sq. ft. LOCATION: Travelling on Carmichael Road, head south on Miller Road, pass the entrance to Bacardi. The property is situated outside the main security entrance to Venice Bay. APPRAISED VALUE: $697,000 F O R S A L E INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX SS-6263, NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM. SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY. PLEASE CALL 502-6132, 502-6107 OR 502-6109 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. EDITOR, The Tribune. MAY I respond to the letter signed under the name Ed Fields, We The People. Mr Fields should recognise, I hope, that this National Stadium could easily become the biggest white elephant, hole in the ocean any Bahamas Government has developed it could be this whole concept of the Sports Tourism Centre at Oakes Field could become an enormously costly millstone around every tax-pay ers necks. May I opine that the days of serious interest in Track and Field in The Bahamas have long gone with the old stadium, which has before we forget an IAFF certified track, over the past many years has been unable to attract even 10 per cent of its potential capacity imagine now? These stadia being devel oped cannot be developed in isolation that is cannot be developed at a considerable cost with little or no chance that they will ever be utilised to the capacity that will make them viable (will cover costs at the least). Yes a CARIFTA games will probably fill the Tommy Robinson Stadium but how many times will the Bahamas get the opportuni ty to host them over 10 years? Twice at the most so what do you do with the stadium over the empty years? The Peoples Republic of China gifted the $40m stadium. To put in place the initial infrastructure we the tax payers are expending a further $45 million .... How much will the Baseball Diamond Softball Pitch and the remaining roads cost? A further $60 million? A grand total of Bahamian tax payers monies will exceed $105 million at the least the sports authority will have to create a revenue from these facilities exceeding $15-20 million. I honestly say to all the past Ministers of Sports... you all collectively have made an enormous mistake. I hope I am wrong as we can ill afford having to maintain such facilities without revenues to meet the upkeep costs. Mr Fields who holds an executive position at Kerzner could play an important part to make this a success but ath letes dont drink alcohol and dont have the money to gamble and it will be them that have to make these facilities feasible. Will Atlantis discount rooms for the athletes to a price they can afford? On paper, the Oakes Field Sport Centre project looks great, but in reality, oh, my God, have we made the worst investment ever? B FERGUSON Nassau, March 3, 2012. Is national stadium the bigg est mistake yet?

PAGE 4

AFOXHILLman is in hospital after a shooting inci dent last night. The 28-year-old was shot at about 6pm last night. Preliminary reports indi cate that the victim was at Strachans Corner off EastStreet when he was approached by a male and was shot multiple times in the body. The victim was taken to hospital in a private vehicle where he is detained in seri ous condition. Police are following significant leads into the matter. THE Progressive Young Liberals accused the government yesterday of mismanaging the New Providence Infrastructure Improvement Project, and said the additional money allotted to the scheme could have been used to ben efit young Bahamians. At a press conference at the Ministry of Agricultures Gladstone Road site, Young Liberals Keenan Johnson, Phylicia Woods, and LaTore Mackey said there can be no acceptable excuse for why the project is now costing the public more than $200 million, with $93 million in cost overruns. This is the largest govern ment cost overrun in living memory. This $93 million in overruns equates to almost $4 million per mile of road this is unbelievable, Mr Johnson said. The president of the PLPs youth arm said $4 million per mile could have paid for 298 young men to attend the Youth Empowerment and Skills Training (YEAST programme, or 65 young people to attend the College of the Bahamas for four years. Mr Johnson said the money could also have created life lines for many who have lost everything in the recession. Many of the closed businesses were owned by young Bahamians who were brave enough to venture into entre preneurship. The Ranfurly Home, church outreach pro grammes and other charities whose budgets were cut by the FNM could have benefit ed from the $4 million in cost overruns of one mile. The FNM does not put Bahamians first. They would rather build things instead of people. It is not possible to build a nation by leaving the people behind, he said. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012, PAGE 5 By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net THE FNM is hiding behind the global recession, hoping B ahamians will not notice h ow theyve bungled the economy, PLP leader Perry Christie said. H e pointed to tax hikes, high unemployment, the increasing national debt, r ecord crime rates and cost o verruns on the ongoing road works, as issues that have been mismanaged by the g overnment. Speaking at the partys Carmichael constituencyl aunch on Monday night in s upport of PLP candidate Dr Daniel Johnson, Mr Christie told constituents he sees him s elf as the bridge between the late Sir Lynden Pindling and the new generation ofP LP leaders. He said: We all share a profound belief in the Bahamian people, in what B ahamians can accomplish and what Bahamians can achieve. M r Christie said the PLP pioneered successful, award-winning anti-crimep rogrammes, created 22,000 j obs, built a record number of homes and classrooms, gave $25 million to Bahami an entrepreneurs, and were the first to give new home-o wners a break on stamp duties. When I left office, B ahamian economic growth w as out-pacing US economic growth, and the Bahamas was a regional economic leader. N ow, the Bahamas is at the bottom of the region, he said. Dont let them get away w ith blaming the global recession if that was the full story, then our regional competitors w ould be in the same kind of trouble were in, and yet theyre outgrowing us ando utpacing us look where we a re with stopover tourists, Bahamians, and see how much better our regionalc ompetitors have fared... the FNM is hiding behind the global recession, hoping youw ont notice how badly theyve mismanaged the economy. Turning to the roadworks, M r Christie said in the middle of a recession the FNM hired foreigners instead of Bahamia ns again and again. The New Providence roadworks is approaching$ 100 million in cost overr uns. Who is making those millions? A foreign contractor. A foreign contractor hired for a major infrastructure pro-j ect while Bahamian contrac tors sat on the sidelines, he said. A road project which was s upposed to be a stimulus for the Bahamian economy was turned into a jobs killer. Thes ame roads dug up again and again and every time theyre dug up, more small businesse s close, more jobs are lost. B ahamians are getting poorer and poorer as they add to our national debt. Ingraham is asking Parliament to approve tens of millions in new borrowing for ap roject which was supposed t o be finished months ago. Yet this government turned away thousands of young peo p le from their Job Readiness Programme. He said the upcoming elect ion should be about big things such as fighting crime, building the economy, job creation, education and training. You dont want to wake up the day after the election and realise the FNM made t he election about little things when as a nation we really need to make big decisions,M r Christie said. Isnt it time for a govern ment which believes in Bahamians? The Bahamas own street philosopher By LAMECH JOHNSON Tribune Staff Reporter l johnson@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham last night said the Free National Movement is delivering Bahamians a bettern ew version of Urban R enewal than the upgrade t he opposition party is promising. The FNM leader made the remark at the partys constituency office opening forS t Annes before a large crowd of supporters. In response to the Progressive Liberal Partys vow of an ew and improved Urban Renewal 2.0, Mr Ingraham said: We are delivering an Urban Renewal 5.0. We are renewing and transforming the City of Nassau and the whole island of New Provi-d ence right before their very eyes. Theyre embarrassed because they claim to love the poor but it is us, the FNM, that are delivering better roads, sidewalks and clean piped water with good water pressure to Bain Town andG rants Town and Englerston. It is us, the FNM who are installing sidewalks along busy thoroughfares so that Bahamian students can walk more safely to and froms chool all over this island. The nations chief, after offering his full support to St Annes hopeful Hubert Chipman, outlined some of the newly-launched social intervention initiatives like Volunteer Bahamas and the Summer Institute for Boys,t o be launched this summer. And the straw vendors, hair braiders, taxi cab drivers and all those Bahamians who benefit from business coming out of these developments, would have been seriouslys hort-changed had it not been for the FNM, he said. Touching on the much debated crime rate, Mr Ingraham said this serious challenge, along with others, will all be dealt with as part of their National Security Strategy, one of the FNMs twom ain priorities for the next five years. We did not arrive at this state of crime in our country overnight he said. That took years. And it will take years to correct the situation.W e understand that. We have begun the important ground work. Mr Ingraham concluded his speech saying the country cannot afford to go backwards and embrace the reckless, do-nothing, scandal-ridden days of the weak-e st government in Bahamian history. We have the better record! We have the better team! We have the better vision! Vote F-N-M! he said. Mr Ingraham urged B ahamians who have not yet registered to do so immediately, as he is getting ready to reach for that bell. Pick up your voters card. Time draweth nigh, he said. Christie says FNMhiding over economy PM:FNM DELIVERING ON URBAN RENEWAL FROM LEFT, Phylicia Woods, Keenan Johnson and LaTore Mackey, at the Progressive Young Liberals press conference. Y OUNG LIBERALS ACCUSE GOVT OVER ROAD PROJECT MAN IN HOSPIT AL AFTER SHOO TING

PAGE 5

IT WAS not so long ago that women had few rights inw estern society. And even t oday, long after slavery was abolished in most of the world, many countries still treat women like chattel a term that refers to moveable property. Until 1882, a womans p roperty in England was considered to be owned by her husband. In France, it was not possible until 1965 for a married woman to work, open a bank account or dispose of her own property without herh usband's consent. It is only recently, with legal reforms and access to higher education that women have begun to break through the glass ceiling of male domin ation around the world. In t he Bahamas, this process began after the Second World W ar and accelerated in the 1950s as part of a general m ovement towards greater d emocracy. Last week, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Womans Suffrage Movement, the Coll ege of the Bahamas staged a symposium with presentations b y relatives of the women w ho led the movement and pushed for equal rights. It was o pened by Janet Bostwick, w ho in 1977 became the first w oman to be elected to the House of Assembly. She lamented the apparent d isinterest in the struggle for womens rights today. We have become complacent, m aterialistic and quiet. We h ave never been more educ ated, nor have we ever enjoyed greater levels of influe nce, yet this is hardly reflect ed in our involvement in seeking social justice and true e quality. It is shameful. A lice Musgrove Rolle is the daughter of Mary Ingraham, w ho in 1951 (together with Mabel Walker, an American) led the first petition drive for equal rights. I was eightw hen I sat on the wall in Hospital Lane asking passers-by to sign the petition, she r ecalled. We were motivated b ack then, but who will fill t hose shoes today? There are m any issues that still need to be addressed. Juliette Barnwell said her parents Dr Claudius Walker and his wife Mabel werei nstrumental in the fight for w omens rights. In the early 50s, she was present at regular meetings held at Dr Walkers Reinhart Hotel on Tin Shop Corner. My parents believed education was the key top olitical and social justice. W eve made tremendous progress over the years from teachers and nurses to the most influential jobs in thec ountry, but the fight is not d one. Wallis Carey, the daughter of Eugenia Lockhart, said herm other was always a champion of social justice. She believed that the majoritys hould not be led by the m inority, and it was easy for H M Taylor to persuade her to join the Progressive Liberal Party. As a secretarial student I helped to produce many documents for them ovement. It was enjoyable to fight for justice rather than a Mercedes-Benz. Andrew Dud Maynard is the son of Georgiana Symonette and brother of the late p olitician Sir Clement Mayn ard. He called on young people not to waste their lives. Our foremothers made greats acrifices with you in mind, and you have to make an effort to make something of yourselves. My mother was l ike a general she carried me everywhere she went so I could learn something instead o f getting into foolishness. Shirley Cooper said her sis ter, Dame Doris Johnson, brought militancy to the m ovement when she led a m arch on the House of A ssembly in 1959 and made a f iery speech demanding the right to vote and participate in civil affairs. She later became the first woman appointed to the Senate and the Cabinet. Iw ent on many marches and a ttended many meetings with Doris and the talk was always about getting the vote for women. After years of petitions, demonstrations, meetings andm arches, the voting rights act f or women was passed in February 1961 and came into effect four months later in time for the November 1962g eneral election. And a lthough she did not win the seat, in that election Doris Johnson became the firstw oman to run for the House of Assembly. In the United Kingdom, the s uffrage movement began in t he 1870s and all women over 21 won the right to vote in 1928. The United States passed a constitutional amendment to give women full voting rights in 1920. Andi n Jamaica women were able to vote in 1944. Those Tragic Conchy Joes The memories are foggy at b est, but back in the sweet s ummer of 1969 I took an English Lit exam that included questions about Shake-s peares famous tragedy, O thello the Moor of Venice which was written in 1603. My teacher for that exam w as the venerable Roger Kelty, who arrived here in the 1960s. He coincidentally sat a few seats away from me at last weeks performance in the Dundas Theatre of a stripped-down version of this t ale of racial prejudice, jealousy and betrayal, with the alternate title of Othello or t he Tragedy of the Conchy J oe In this twisted adaptation, the non-white character of Othello was played by a former white schoolmate of mine named Craig Pinder, while the malignant Iago was por-t rayed by a black halfBahamian actor named Moses Hardwick. And the brown Anglo-African Belinda Owusu played the white, upper class Desdemona. These three mixed-up chara cters (reduced from about a dozen in the original version) are isolated on a Bahamian fishing boat, with only a shipto-shore radio for communication with the rest of the p lay. But many of the most f amiliar passages are included, like... Who steals my purse steals t rash; t is something, nothing; T was mine, t is his, and has been slave to thousands; But he that filches from me my good name R obs me of that which not enriches him, A nd makes me poor indeed. This particular Shakes pearean tragedy is all about i nterracial love. Desdemona i s the daughter of a wealthy Italian senator who elopes with the Moorish general,O thello. Her father's objections to Othello all have to do with his race and colour, as t he relationship with his d aughter goes against all r ules of nature. Shakespeares portrayal of t he Moor could have been based on a celebrated Moroccan ambassador to the courto f Queen Elizabeth 1, who s pent six months in London a couple of years before the p lay was written. But it could just as easily have been based on West Africans, who first appeared in London in 1554a nd were considered undesirables by the early 1600s. It doesnt really matter. O thello is an African of one sort or another who has achieved prominence in Euro p ean society as a military l eader, but is never fully accepted. The plot is all about his envious assistant, Iago,s cheming to put Othello in his proper place. But the performance I saw l ast week sought to present a condensed photo-negative version of this story, with Oth-e llo as a conchy joe fisherman i n a black Bahamian society. It is not clear whether the analogy works, and without the superstructure of the original play it is not always easy to grasp, but it certainly had a novel appeal for Bahamiana udiences. So I turned to my old English teacher pal for help. Kelty told me that, as a political statement about race and minority groups, the message did not resonate, and perhapsw ould go undetected without reading the official programme. But if you were simply looking for a well-acted study in malicious gossip, sexual jealousy and murdero us consequences, it seemed t o me to have local relevance and entertainment value. T he adaptation performed at the Dundas distilled Shakes peares three-hour tragedy i nto about 75 minutes, which arguably made it easier to digest. As Pinder told me, With all the sub-plots and a dditional characters missing, the audience can really zone i n on the relationships that e xist between the protagonist and the other main charact ers, for a much more intense e motional journey. H owever, Roger Kelty who taught both myself and Pinder in high school didn ot consider it wise to tamper with the genius of Shakespeare, a man he regards as o ne of the most brilliant who e ver lived. He was lucky to have been born at a time when the Engl ish language was not restrict ed by laws of grammar or spelling (there were no dic-t ionaries until the 18th cent ury) and he was free to give full expression to his wonderf ully creative gifts in the use of words. Think of how many of the lines from his poems and plays have passed intoe veryday language. He is, unquestionably, the most quoted writer of all time. S hakespeares writing stays current, Kelty said, because it focuses on the human con d ition. His understanding of t he human psyche is absolute ly amazing; as seen in his realistic portrayal of sexual jeal o usy, ambition, revenge, and ingratitude in plays which could well be case histories ina modern psychology class. And most miraculous of all, it appears from studying thef olios of his plays that he w rote at speed without careful thought or revision. But enough about Shakespeare. Perhaps the more interesting story here is that this great drama was adapted an directed by a Bahamiana nd performed successfully by Bahamian actors at regional theatres in Britain before coming to Nassau, where it barely managed to break even with a lot of help from generous sponsors. It took a huge collective effort to bring this production to the Bahamas, according to Kim Aranha, the producer who saw the play in England and set about bringing it here. The total cost was $40,000, i ncluding six transatlantic airfares, but about half of this a mount had to be covered by sponsors, including myself. T he promotional costs alone m ake productions like this prohibitive without a lot of help. Nevertheless, about 750 p eople came to see the play over five performances last w eek. But Aranha was hugely d isappointed with the lack of interest from local schools, i ncluding the College of the B ahamas, which didnt even r espond to a request for a venue. Except for Tambealy, none of the schools we inviteds ent students, something which the cast couldnt understand. This is unfortunate. Craig P inder, for example, has mana ged to achieve some celebrit y on the British stage over the past few decades which h e attributes to his early par ticipation in local amateur productions under the tute-l age of his father, Bill Pinder, o f Blanco Bleach fame. A graduate of the Royal A cademy of Dramatic Arts, he played several characters in the long-running British musical Les Miserables in the 1 980s, and has racked up small TV parts in between his stage gigs. But theatrical prod uctions can draw only a small audience locally at the best of times. O thello or the Tragedy of t he Conchy Joe w as directed and adapted by freelance theatre director Robin Belfield,t he product of an English missionary father and a Bahami an mother, in collaboration w ith Pinder. In the plays production notes, Bellfield offered this rationale for their revision of Shakespeare. We created a compact, intense production suitable to tour the UK and make thel ong trip to the Bahamas, he said. Othello became a conchy joe the minority outsider and the military worldo f the original was replaced with a fishing-based environment. Historically, Shake speares Moor of Venice would have been seen as part of a despised and feared colo nial minority from the past. Aranha, who has some the atre background herself, col laborated with Bellfields Yellowtale Theatre of Sussex, and Nicolette Bethels Shakespeare in Paradise group to organise the Nassau production. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribune media.net or visit www. bahamapundit.com. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE Of women and Shakespeare

PAGE 6

BPC is using a Chinese submarine to explore theB ahamian seabed, and may b e partnering with 12 Chinese companies in its bid to drill for oil in the Bahamas. He said: Our number one industry is tourism, our num ber three industry is fishing, s o we have to very cautious how we proceed with this. Mr Albury has continued to insist for weeks that BPC has b een operating in violation of the moratorium and has hit out at Environment Minister E arl Deveaux, who he said failed to adequately answer his questions. Mr Deveaux hasr epeatedly said the moratorium remains in place. When a local BPC employ ee was asked if anyone was available to comment on MrA lburys press conference y esterday, she said no one was available. When asked when someo ne would be available, she said Not this week. When asked if next week would beb etter, she said No. Asked if the following week would be better, she said No. Asked if a representative of t he company would ever be available for comment, she said: I dont know. Y esterday, Mr Albury also placed blame on the PLP, which originally issued the licences to BPC to explore foro il. Those licenses expire next month, and Mr Albury the DNA is trying to gain public support to block their renew al. The party has already launched a petition and hasa round 150 signatures. H e said: What we dont understand is why the PLP has been so silent on this issuea s Bahamians everywhere are calling for answers. Why have they not stepped forward tod efend their decision to grant the original permits for oil exploration? Why have they not s tepped forward to defend Bahamas Petroleum Company who is represented by thef irm of Deputy Leader of the PLP, (Philip Does their silence reflect something that do not wantt o be made public? BPCs website lists Mr Davis law firm, Davis & Co, among its solicitors. s izing exercise, BCPOU president Bernard Evans said. The next major item on t he agenda was the negotia tion of a new Industrial A greement, which expired S eptember 30, 2010. Negotiat ions between Cable & Wireless and the BCPOU began in earnest in early November 2 011. Although we have been able to agree on most of the articles that will form the newa greement, we have reached a n impasse on the matter of salary increases in spite of our best effort to negotiate in good faith. He said the BCPOU finds it difficult to accept the man a gements reported claim that it cannot afford a reasonable salary increase because of the many cost-cutting and efficiency based initiatives t hat the BTC has undertake n in the past year. Mr Evans pointed to a Price Waterhouse Coopers r eport, reportedly undertaken by BTC which reviewed employees salaries. (The 9 0 per cent of BTCs line staff in our bargaining unit are underpaid based on 75th percentile compared with similar companies nationally and regionally, he said. M r Evans said CWC gained advantages upon the sale of BTC, including a two per cent fixed management fee of gross revenue, multiple contracts for foreign consultants and c ontractual workers, recognit ion of $6 million in bonus pay ments, and the control of about 70 per cent of the net profito ver the next two years. Last week, BTC CEO G eoff Houston reiterated the c ompanys ambition to shape an Industrial Agreement that is customer and performance d riven, and anchored by a market-leading employee proposition. H e said: The discussions w e have been having with our union partners have always been around these themes. So my hope is that while we may differ on the specifics of some parts of the agreement, we allm anage to keep in our sights these principles which are critical to succeed against agile and aggressive competition now and in the near future. The CEO noted that mana gement will continue to n egotiate in good faith and do all it can to keep the com munications open and up f ront. when he jumped from the vehicle in the Pitt Road area. Officers were unable to apprehend the handcuffed s uspect who ran in a northerl y direction. An island-wide s earch for Russell began and he was apprehended a few h ours later. Russell was on his way to be charged in connection with housebreaking. M eanwhile, police are still s earching for another prisoner who escaped custody while at the Princess Margaret Hospital last month. Frederick Green, alias Frederick Neely, 29, escapedw hile seeking medical attention under guard at the hospital on February 21. He a llegedly fled the hospital's chest ward through a window around 4am when the prison officer assigned to him left to u se the bathroom. After his escape, prison officials maintained that the officer secured Green in restraints before leaving to use the r estroom. Green had been r emanded to Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill, after being charged with the 2009 armedr obbery of 18 tourists at Earth Village. He is still awaiting trial. He was previously charged w ith the 2004 stabbing death of Dale Williams. However, h e was acquitted of the charge after claiming he was defending himself against an attempted rape by a gay, HIV positive man. T wo months before that, 28year-old Dorian Armbrister escaped from the Princess Margaret Hospital. Armbrister was serving a 27-month sentence for stealing from a shop. A lthough he was outfitted with leg restraints and on 24-hour guard, he escaped the health care facility by jumping t hrough a bathroom window. He was shot in the buttocks by prison officers on Dowdeswell S treet a short time later. c hannels of the use of the Special Branch for reasons which do not have to do with the security of the state, but with the politics of the gov-e rnment. While Carl Bethel, chairman o f the governing FNM, said Mr Mitchell's claims are false, a police officer told The Tribune last night he was recently assigned to the new unit. M r Mitchell said the creation of such a unit would support his partys long-held belief that the government, through the Ministry of National Security, has long used security information in the political arena. People have been calling us behind the scenes sayingt hat they have seen the deployment of police officers in areas that they should not b e, involved in matters that t hey should not be concerned about, said Mr Mitchell. G iven an out of control crime rate, Mr Mitchell said, it is alarming the government would use the police for unrelated matters. The criticism is d irected at the political directorate and that they should r esist using the police for t hings other than what they should be concerned about a nd that is fighting crime. The Police Staff Associat ion has also been working in w ays it should not be, according to Mr Mitchell. From time to time, the pres ident of the Police Staff Assoc iation has been intervening in m atters dealing with public poli cy and not matters dealing w ith policy in the police force. In early March, the Association's executive chairman Dwight Smith refuted claims by ex-superintendent Keith B ell that the force was too poorly equipped to tackle c rime or other challenges with w hich it has been confronted. Minister of National Secu rity Tommy Turnquest could n ot be reached for comment. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012, PAGE 9 By LAMECH JOHNSON Tribune Staff Reporter ljohnson@tribunemedia.net SUPERINTENDENT of Prisons Dr Elliston Rahmingw ill appear before three judges in two weeks to verifyi f his agency is at fault for the late arrival of prisoners to court. In yesterdays appellate court session, a senior policeo fficer in charge of receiving inmates for court said it wasn ot the polices official duty to transport prisoners to court, as they only offer assistance to the prison. Justice Anita Allen made a n order for the prison chief to be summoned on March 2 8. The Court of Appeal begins at 10am and prides i tself on being punctual. Howe ver, there have been occas ions where court started well afterwards, yesterday being a prime example. The appellate court president voiced her displeasurea t the tardiness. Her colleagues Justices ChristopherB lackman and Stanley John agreed. Justice Allen said: This is happening too frequently. We have to summon the Super-i ntendent of the prison to find out what is going on. This is the second or third occasion weve had this happen in some two weeks. Jerone Roberts, one of three attorneys waiting for hisc lient to arrive, gave the court additional insight into the m atter. He said a number of defence attorneys have f ormed a loose association a nd met on at least two occas ions with the Superintendent who said it is his responsibility to have the prisoners ready in the prison square to be transported. M r Roberts said, based on the discussions with Dr Rah-m ing, it is reportedly the responsibility of the Commissioner of Police to have them transported to court. Justice Allen then suggeste d: Perhaps it might be best to summon both. R oberts agreed and said it appeared to be a situation where persons were placing blame, but nobody is in charge to take care of the sit-u ation. Mr Roberts admitted he h as seen prisoners in the square sitting around the wall waiting to be brought to Bank L ane. T he court president stood t he court down for a 15minute break and ordered Franklyn Williams, deputy director of public prosecutions, to discover the nature ofy esterdays dilemma. The prisoners arrived shortly after. A ssistant Supt Cleophas Cooper, officer in charge of the Central Police Station, told the court the five inmates with appeals had to be walkedf rom Bank Lane to the Charlotte Street, ClaughtonH ouse, courtroom. In his explanation to Justice Blackman, ASP Cooper said the prison bus never arrived until after 10am. Because of the accident we had, were now limited w ith transportation. He also said the prisoners cannot be taken directly to c ourt without being checked i n first at Bank Lane. It e nsures persons on the list are checked out to appear for court, he added. Justice Allen, based on the explanation, suggested thep olice were to blame. ASP Cooper disagreed and s aid it was not the polices official duty to transport prisoners to court, as they only offer assistance to the prison. Once they get here, then w e take over and are responsible for getting them back. J ustice Blackman said the prison chief needed to be summoned in order to improve on the situation. The appellate court presid ent made the summoning order and Mr Roberts sugg ested for the Commissioner of Police to be on the order as well. J ustice Allen however said: Prison superintendent to explain late arrivals at court f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e POLICE TO PROBE DNA AND PLP PRISONER RECAPTURED DEADLOCK OVER SALARIES N O ANSWER ON OIL CLAIMS

PAGE 7

WASHINGTON A ssociated Press RICK SANTORUM seized the lead in the Alaba-m a primary Tuesday night and edged ahead of Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrichi n Mississippi, deeply conservative Southern crossroads in the struggle for the Republican presidential nomination. R omney, the faraway frontrunner in the delegate chase, bristled in the hours before the votes were counted, say ing Santorum was at the des perate end of his campaign. B ut it was Gingrich with t he most to lose as he strug gled for political survival in a part of the country he hopedw ould fuel one more come back in the unpredictable race to pick an opponent to Presi dent Barack Obama. There were 107 Republican National Convention delegates at stake, 47 in Alabama, 37 in Mississippi, 17 in Hawaii caucuses and six more in caucuses in American S amoa. In Alabama, with 29 percent of the precincts counted, Santorum was pulling 35 per c ent of the vote, Gingrich had 30 percent and Romney 28 percent. R eturns from 58 percent of Mississippis precincts showed Santorum with 33 percent, Gingrich 32 percent and R omney 30. Each of the three leading contenders faced a differentc hallenge in Alabama and Mississippi, where heavy tele vision advertising was evi d ence of the states unaccus tomed significance deep in the nominating campaign. Gingrich struggled for polit i cal survival, Romney sought a strong showing to silence his critics and Santorum h oped to emerge at last as the chief conservative rival to the front-runner. Rep Ron Paul, the fourth c ontender, made little effort in the states on the days bal lot. Evangelicals played an out sized role in both primary states, underscoring the challenge to Romney. In Mississippi and Alabama, roughly four in five voters surveyed as they left their polling places said they were born again or evangelical. Those voters have been reluctant to rally to Romneys side in the primaries and caucuses to date. He won 35 percent of their votes in Missis sippi, and 27 percent in Alabama, the polling day surveys indicated. His best pre vious showing in a heavily contested primary this year was 38 percent in Florida. More broadly, the exit polls showed an electorate that is conservative, determinedly Republican and profoundly unhappy about the govern ment. In Mississippi, more than eight in 10 voters said they were dissatisfied or angry with the federal government, while in Alabama, 80 percent said t hey would definitely vote for the Republican candidate against Obama next fall, no matter who he is. W hile Alabama and Mississippi are among the most conservative states in the c ountry and share a long bor der, the exit polls showed significant differences in the voters reaction to the candi d ates. In Mississippi, Romney had the support of 35 percent ofp rimary voters who earn under $50,000 a year, com pared with 27 percent in A labama. He drew the back ing of 38 percent of Mississippi primary voters with no college education, comparedw ith 26 percent in Alabama. Only about half of all voters in each state said they work f ulltime for pay, and they, too, voted differently one state from the other. Santorum outpolled Romn ey, 38 percent to 23 percent among that group in Alaba ma. But Romney prevailed in Mississippi, 35-28. As has been true in earlier primaries, the economy was the most important issue to voters, and an ability to defeat Obama the most important quality when it came time to pick a candidate. The exit polls were based on interviews with 1,552 voters as they left 30 randomly selected polling places around Alabama, and with 1,575 Mississippi voters from 30 sites. Each survey had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points. The Southern showdown came as new polling showed a decline in Obama's approval ratings a reversal amid escalating gasoline prices and turbulence in the Middle East. The day began with Rom ney leading the delegate com petition by far in The Associated Press count, with 454 of the 1,144 needed to win the nomination. Santorum had 217, Gingrich 107 and Paul 47. T hat gave the former Massachusetts governor more than his rivals combined. And while Santorum in particularc hallenges the mathematical projections, Romney is amassing delegates at a rate that p uts him on track to clinch control of nomination before the convention next summer. Romney, campaigning in M issouri, took exception to a television commercial airing in both Southern states ands aid Santorum is at the desperate end of his campaign. The commercial was backedb y a super PAC that supports the former senator, not by him. Santorums camp had ear l ier issued a memo that dis missed as fuzzy math Romneys claim that he is on track t o amass a delegate majority. Simply put, time is on our side, it said. Gingrichs aides issued a r ebuttal of their own with the polls still open in the primary states. It said the primaries were not yet half over, and the former House speaker is well positioned to win the GOP nomination. The large amount of television advertising was testi mony to the importance the contenders and their allies attached to the primaries in both Alabama and Mississippi. All three candidates as well as super PACs supporting each of them ran television commercials. As has been the case all year, Restore Our Future, which backs Romney, spent more than any of the others. The group put down $1.3 million for television ads in Alabama, another $900,000 in Mississippi and more for radio on Christian and other radio stations as well as thou sands of pieces of mail designed to help the former Massachusetts governor. It was only in recent days that Romney seemed to sense a chance in Alabama and Mississippi, and he responded b y increasing his television ad expenditures and his plans for campaigning in the states. Born in Michigan and a l ongtime resident of Massachusetts, he told one audience the two primaries were a bit o f an away game for him and drew laughs from another when he said he hoped to go hunting with an Alabama f riend who can actually show me which end of the rifle to shoot. H e generally steered away from criticising his Republi can rivals and aimed his r hetoric instead at Obama, whose prospects in both states are as dim next fall as anywhere in the country. S antorum campaigned against the president and Romney simultaneously as he s ought the support of conser vatives who have fueled his recent surge. In Biloxi, Miss, on Monday, h e ridiculed the science behind global warming. The dangers of carbon dioxide? Tell that to a plant, how dan gerous carbon dioxide is, he said. Gingrich spent part of his time pushing back against suggestions including from his own staff that he might drop out if he didnt notch a pair of Southern victories. His only two wins so far came in the South Carolina primary on Jan 21, and last week, when he won his political home state of Georgia. Initial polls showed the for mer House speaker in a strong position in both states, but he abruptly canceled a campaign trip to Kansas in advance of the state's caucus es late last week to remain in the South. He used a recorded telephone message from Chuck Norris, the actor and Karate champion, for a last-minute appeal to voters in Alabama. INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE F ORMER Honduran President Manuel Zelaya has registered a political party that w ill be able to compete in the countrys next elections in 2013. Honduras Electoral Tri b unal says Zelaya's party is called the Liberty and ReFoundation Party, known as L ibre. The tribunal said Tuesday that Zelaya turned in 62,000s ignatures supporting his part y, well above the 42,290 sig natures required. Zelaya said the partys pres i dential candidate in 2013 elections will be his wife, Xiomara Castro. Zelaya was deposed at gunpoint and taken out of the country in a 2009 coup, an act that isolated Honduras inter n ationally. He returned to Honduras after Colombia and Venezuela brokered a deal with Honduran authorities. A COSTA RICAN man arrested in last year's fatal shooting of Argentine folk singer Facundo Cabral was expelled to Guatemala on Tuesday for entering Colombia with false documents, authorities said. Guatemalan authorities want Alejandro Jimenez Gonzalez, 38, in the July killing of Cabral, and Costa Rica asked that he be sent directly to Guatemala. He was flown out of Bogota on a Colombian police plane Tues day afternoon, a police state ment said. He was arrested Saturday by counternarcotics police ina speedboat that Colombia's navy had tracked from Panama into Colombia's waters, said Colombia's national police chief, Gen. Oscar Naranjo. Colombia has no interest in filing charges, but simply to expel him, Costa Rican Attorney General Jorge Chavarria said. Our inten tion is that he be extradited directly to Guatemala. The Colombian police said in a communique that according to information gathered by Costa Rican security agen cies that Jimenez could be a link between the Sinaloa car tel headed by Mexican druglord Joaquin El Chapo Guzman and Colombian nar co brothers Luis Enrique and Javier Antonio Calle Serna. Naranjo said Colombian police believe Jimenez arranged to enter Colombia with the help of a pair of the brothers. Costa Rican authorities say Jimenez headed a criminal group that launders money in Central America, and they believe Cabral was the unintended victim of an attack related to a rift over stolen drug money. Drug cartels, some from Mexico, have established themselves in Central America and grow and ship drugs in the region. Costa Rican Security Minister Mario Zamora told RCN radio that Jimenezs arrest is important because he is someone who plays a major role in the leadership and direction of organised mafias in Central America. Zamora has said Jimenez is wanted in Costa Rica for money laun dering and drug trafficking. Cabral, 74, was gunned down in Guatemala in July after giving a concert in the city of Quetzaltenango, 200 kilometers (120 miles of Guatemala City. Authorities believe the attack was aimed at Cabrals promoter, Nicaraguan busi nessman Henry Farina, who was driving the singer to the airport. Farina was wounded when their car was ambushed. FORMER PRESIDENT FORMS PARTY Santorum mocks global w arming to win votes C OS T A RICAN MAN EXTRADICTED TO GUATEMALA REPUBLICAN presid ential candidate Rick Santorum visits supporters during a r ally on Monday in M ontgomery, Alabama. T HE SYRIAN army has r ecaptured most of the northe rn rebel stronghold of Idlib near the Turkish border, pushing hundreds of military defectors out of a major base theyhad held for months even as p ockets of resistance kept up t heir fight on Tuesday. The three-day operation to capture the city followed closely after a similar offensive to dislodge the opposi-tion from another key piece o f territory it had controlled, t he Baba Amr district in central Homs. The two victories gave President Bashar Assads regime unmistakable momentum as it tries to crush the armed opposition fighters. A pledge Tuesday from S yria's staunch ally Russia that Moscow will continue selling weapons to the regime was yet another boost. And a diplo-m atic bid by UN envoy Kofi A nnan to broker a cease-fire failed over the weekend. Still, international pressure i s more intense than ever, with the US considering military options. On Tuesday, theA rab League chief said the regimes killing of civilians amounts to crimes against humanity and he called for an international inquiry. A ctivists reported fresh violence in central province of H ama near Homs, the suburbs of Damascus and elsewhere, killing dozens. SYRIAN ARMY MOPS UP RESISTANCE

PAGE 8

LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE Rebuilding after the fire INDECEMBER, the Pompey Museum was badly damaged and nearby buildings gutted when a blaze broke o ut on Bay Street. Reconstruction work is under way now at the scene, as part of developments which will see the creation of a Pompey Park. Our photographer took a peep inside as the clear-up team sets about the hard work of reconstruction. Photos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff



PAGE 1

N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Police to probe DNAand PLPVolume: 108 No.86 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SUNNYAND ASHOWER HIGH 82F LOW 71F By KHRISNA VIRGIL kvirgil@tribunemedia.net A SPECIAL unit has been created within the police force with the sole purpose of investigating the campaigning prac tices of the PLP and DNA, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell claimed yesterday. Mr Mitchell said according to his information, several officers from other areas of the force have been reas signed to this political police unit. There is great reason to believe that police officers have been reassigned to dabble in political matters on behalf of the government, said Mr Mitchell. There are consistent and persistent stories by back Mitchell claims special political unit formed TRY OUR DOUBLE McFISH The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SPECIALSUPPLEMENTINSIDETODAYKKEENNNNEELLCCLLUUBBDDOOGGSSHHOOWWGUIDE TO WEEKEND EVENT ARTSEEXXUUMMAASS HHEERRIITTAAGGEEFFEESSTTIIVVAALLSEEARTSSECTIONC NOW HELPUS TOREACHTO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN HELP OUR BREAST CANCER CAMPAIGN, TURN TO OUR CENTRE SPREAD WEVE RAISED$1M $205,000 POLICE have stopped their search for a Millennium Gardens family of five who disappeared without a trace over the weekend. According to press liaison officer Insp Chrislyn Skip pings, the missing mother and her four children have been in contact with family members and are in good health. Marsha Hepburn Peters, 34, and her four children Joel,12, Shamar, 8, Charis, 6, and Zion, 2 became the subject of a widespread police search after they disappeared on Sunday between 1am and 6am. Few details were available up to press time Monday night, but senior officers said there was cause to worry for the family who live on Lottie Tynes Boulevard in Millenni um Gardens. Calls were made to the father of the children for comment. He did not want to comment until first meeting with police. However, police have discontinued their missing bul letin for the five after receiving word that the family is well. By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net SALARY negotiations between the Bahamas Telecommunications Company and the union representing its workers has reached an impasse, according to a statement released by the unions president yesterday. The Bahamas Communica tions and Public Officers Unions (BCPOU) new statement comes less than a week after union members warned of possible action if industrial agreement negotiations fail. The government privatised BTC last April with the sale of 51 per cent of its shares to Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC). Since the privatization of BTC, a number of legacy issues have been resolved amicably and the union has successfully negotiated disen gagement packages for employees during the downBy SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net A PRISONER who jumped from a patrol car yesterday morning on his way to court is back behind bars, police have confirmed. Police said around 11.40am officers were driving 20-yearold Lynden Russell to Magistrates court on South Street By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter THE Bahamas Petroleum Company would not respond to claims it has already started exploring for oil in Bahamian waters, and could not say when it would be. Calls were placed to the company's Nassau office yesterday after Democratic National Alliance (DNA) candidate Ben Albury repeated his allegation that the company is looking for oil despite the national moratorium on petroleum exploration. But an employee said no one was available for comment, and no one would be for the foreseeable future. At a press conference outside the Ministry of the Environment, Mr Albury claimed that according to his sources, GIRL, 15, SAVES FAMILY FROM HOUSE BLAZE FIREMENDOUSE the flames at the scene of a blaze off Mount Royal Avenue, where a 15-year-old girl came to the rescue of her four brothers and sisters, going into the flames to save them. For more, turn to page 2. Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff NO ANSWER ON OIL CLAIMS S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 DEADLOCK OVER SALARIES FAMILY SAFE AND WELL PRISONER RECAPTURED im lovin it A MANwas shot dead last night in the Pinewood Gardens area. Early reports suggest that the man was killed at about 8.40pm in a shooting incident. The victim was thought to be a man in his late 20s who was standing outside a residence when he was approachd by another man and shot dead. The shooting occurred in St Johns Avenue, off Buttonwood Avenue. Police are investigating. MANKILLED IN SHOOTING

PAGE 2

LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE A 15-YEAR-OLDsaved her brothers and sisters when a fire ripped through the storage unit where they were sleeping. The fire broke out in the combined house and storage unit off Mount Royal Avenue yesterday afternoon at about 3pm. The girl was at the opposite end of the house from where the fire broke out and went into the flames to rescue her four brothers and sisters, including a baby. Firefighters were called to the scene and extinguished the blaze. A fire department source confirmed that the girl had gone to the rescue of her siblings. The cause of the fire was not confirmed at time of going to press. GIRL, 15, SAVES FAMILY FROM HOUSE BLAZE AFIREMAN damps down the aftermath of a blaze that could have proven disastrous if it was not for the actions of a 15-year-old girl who dashed into the flames to rescue her four siblings. Photos: Felip Major/Tribune Staff THESCENE of the blaze off Mount Royal Avenue yesterday.

PAGE 3

EDITOR, The Tribune. I WAS deeply troubled as I listened to former superintendent of police Keith Bell ridicule the Ingraham administration for its performance in fighting crime over the past four-plus years on a popular radio talk show in New Providence. The former superintendent appeared on the Love 97.5FM talk show Issues of the Day with host Wendell Jones on February 29. He was particularly harsh in his criticism of the Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest. Bell said that Turnquest has not performed well as minister of national security, and that Prime Minister Ingraham should have removed him from that important post. Bell is not the first person to criticise Turnquest. Many Bahamians have been calling for his head over the past several years. Unfortunately for Turnquest, his tenure as national security minister has witnessed four murder records in the past five years: 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011. Bahamians normally gauge the overall performance of a sitting government, its minister of national security and the commissioner of police on how many murders were committed during their time in office. If the murder count is high, then Bahamians would give them a poor grade. I think Prime Minister Ingraham should have never placed Turnquest in the ministry of national security. He should have made him minister of finance instead. Turn quest had earned a degree in business from the University of Western Ontario Business School. He also worked at a banking institution for over a decade. Therefore, why wasnt he placed at the ministry of finance? In all honesty, Turnquests performance as national security minister has been mediocre at best. In fact, on a scale of one to 10, I give him a three plus. Sometimes I wonder if the prime minister really expected Turnquest to succeed as minister of national security. That position is not suitable for him at all. If anything, I think the prime minister should have taken that ministry instead. After all, he has the reputation of being a no-nonsense leader. Nevertheless, despite its challenge during the past four-plus years in office, the government has implemented several initiatives to fight crime. For instance, the ankle bracelet system was introduced by the Free National Movement (FNM) government in order to monitor persons who are out on bail. The government has also pumped millions into the Royal Bahamas Police Force (RBPF) in its effort to combat the high crime wave in Nassau. Certainly the government should be commended for some of its initiatives. Bell, however, said that the policies of the Ingraham administration are responsible for the high crime rate. Unless the former superintendent of police can produce ironclad evidence which proves that the Ingraham administration has been supplying firearms to the thugs who are reeking havoc in Nassau, then I think he should keep his overly simplistic views to himself. The thugs who are committing the murders, rapes, drug-trafficking, auto thefts, house-break-ins and armed robberies are our sons, nephews, cousins, uncles, friends and next door neighbours. Many of them have girlfriends who are benefiting from their criminal exploits. We know who these criminals are. I know of a young man in high school whose mom used to give him condoms in order to have sexual intercourse with girls at his school. I recently heard that he was arraigned before the courts in Nassau on rape charges. His amoral parents helped to sow the seeds of promiscuity in him while he was a teenager. They reared up a monster who views women only as sexual objects, not human beings who are created in the imago Dei. Of course, I do not know the final outcome of that particular case. But I wouldnt be surprised if he was found guilty. But lets suppose he were found guilty, who do you then blame for his heinous crime, Turnquest, or the young alleged rapist and his amoral parents? It is obviously the latter ones. But I suppose the political opponents of Turnquest would also blame him for the crime. My point is this, I think it is unfair to place the blame solely at the doorsteps of Tommy Turnquest and the FNM administration for the crime crisis. Everyone of us, from the prime minister to the lazy bum on the street, is responsible for the mess this country finds itself in. Ours is a society where the culture of criminality has been deeply rooted. How many of us play numbers at the web shops or online? How many of us have been guilty of driving our vehicles without insurance coverage or unlicensed? How many of us have disobeyed the traffic signals, or have driven our cars 40 or 50 miles per hour on a 30 miles per hour zone? We as Bahamians love to be dishonest and cut corners. Yet we will be the very ones to ridicule the government for the crime crisis on the radio talk shows or in the letters to the editor. Keith Bell, in my view, is an average, run-of-the-mill politician who only wants to preach partisan politics by blaming his political opponents for the high crime rate. This country doesnt need anymore politicians like him. Bell and other politicians of his ilk want to exonerate an undisciplined nation, but at the same time castigate an innocent minister who is trying to get blood out of a stone. I dont care if the Progressive Liberal Party were to implement its much touted urban renewal 1.0 or 2.0, The Bahamas will always be a society where crime is endem ic so long as we Bahamians remain a disobedient, undisciplined people. KEVIN EVANS Freeport, Grand Bahama March 3, 2012. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 Circulation Department (242) 502-2386 THE CROOKS are back again working their trade on the web. After a lull of several months probably hoping that time will have erased memories they have returned to their old trick of pretending that prominent Bahamians are stranded in Europe and need special financial help from their friends to get home. Some persons must fall into their trap. One would have thought that if they had not received a response from their pleas, they would have discontinued their dishonest game. But, no, here they are again. This time, according to the plea for help, Mr Hugh G Sands, CMG, former Caribbean Director and Bahamas Manager for Barclays Bank, from which he retired in 1995 after a distinguished career, is supposedly stranded in Madrid. According to the message under the subject head: My terrible trip, Mr Sands, was out on a sightseeing trip when he misplaced both his wallet and his cell phone. According to the plea for help the wallet contained all his valuables. It was also claimed that his passport was being held by the hotel management against the payment of his hotel bill. He apologised to all his friends that he had left the Bahamas without informing them of his impromptu trip. I am sorry if I am inconveniencing you, the e-mail continued, but I have only very few people to run to now. I will be indeed very grateful if I can get a loan of 1,550usd from you. This will enable me to sort out hotel bills and get my sorry self back home. I promise to refund it in full as soon as I return. Let me know if you can be of any assistance. Please let me know soonest. Thanks so much. It was signed Hugh G Sands, CMG, fol lowed by his full Nassau address. The fact of the matter is that Mr Sands is still in Nassau. Yesterday morning he was busy going about his affairs, while his wife was at home, answering the phone and trying to assure their friends that his sorry self had never left Nassau. He was quite secure and did not need their help. Of course, Mr and Mrs Sands are embarrassed by the fraud. Mr Sands, at one time headmaster of Government High School and meticulous about both the written and spoken word, is probably mortified that such a poorly written and badly punctuated e-mail would go out over his name. It is hoped that no one fell for the attempted rip-off and that Bahamians will now be aware that the scam artists are back at work. If any of your friends are stranded anywhere without their wallet, check with them first before you try to help. You will quickly find that you are being duped. What is the issue about Bahamas Hot Mix? This was the question asked by an online reader of Tribune242.com. Any sensible person realizes that Bahamas Hot Mix is probably the best company in this country in regards to roads, even before Brent (Symonette) was in the House. Let us stop the stupidity and political folly, he wrote. And said another online reader: With regards to Bahamas Hot Mix, I personally dont care who owns it as long as the Bahamian people are getting value for money at the best cost. It makes absolutely no sense to award a contract to a contractor who has to purchase the asphalt from Hot Mix anyway. Dont give it to the small man if he has to take it to the big man anyway. There are whispers, wrote Rick Lowe ina letter to The Tribune that a conflict of interest arises for Mr Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister where Bahamas Hot Mix is concerned because his children own a small shareholding in trust. The controversy arises because Bahamas Hot Mix was one of several Bahamian companies awarded a contract for road works. As Mr Lowe concludes, as long as governments tender rules were followed, there is no room to claim conflict of interest. And he asks other than Bahamas Hot Mix and Knowles Con struction (owned by the son of the late Ervin Knowles, a former PLP cabinet minister) how many road builders exist here that can construct asphalt paved highways to internationally recognised standard? The hounding of Mr Symonette because members of his family have a small interest in a successful company, is enough to make successful Bahamians shy away from offering as election candidates. This country needs more successful men and women in government. It is too bad if they fail to offer their services because they are hampered by their success. With such a myopic outlook even family members are penalised for being related to a successful parliamentarian. This is a small country, all hands are needed on deck, especially those who have the best navigational skills in fact they should be the captains. As long as the rules of con flict of interest are scrupulously followed no company should be blocked from a gov ernment contract because a shareholder is a parliamentarian or related to one. This country deserves the best. We are all to blame for crime LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Beware of attempted email fraud VENICE BAY SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1 Block No. 25 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-family Residence and Six Apartment Complex PROPERTY SIZE: 10,066 sq. ft. GROSS FLOOR AREA: 4,745 sq. ft. LOCATION: Travelling on Carmichael Road, head south on Miller Road, pass the entrance to Bacardi. The property is situated outside the main security entrance to Venice Bay. APPRAISED VALUE: $697,000 FOR SALE INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX SS-6263, NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM. SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY. PLEASE CALL 502-6132, 502-6107 OR 502-6109 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. EDITOR, The Tribune. MAY I respond to the letter signed under the name Ed Fields, We The People. Mr Fields should recognise, I hope, that this National Stadium could easily become the biggest white elephant, hole in the ocean any Bahamas Government has developed it could be this whole concept of the Sports Tourism Centre at Oakes Field could become an enormously costly millstone around every tax-payers necks. May I opine that the days of serious interest in Track and Field in The Bahamas have long gone with the old stadium, which has before we forget an IAFF certified track, over the past many years has been unable to attract even 10 per cent of its potential capacity imagine now? These stadia being devel oped cannot be developed in isolation that is cannot be developed at a considerable cost with little or no chance that they will ever be utilised to the capacity that will make them viable (will cover costs at the least). Yes a CARIFTA games will probably fill the Tommy Robinson Stadium but how many times will the Bahamas get the opportuni ty to host them over 10 years? Twice at the most so what do you do with the stadium over the empty years? The Peoples Republic of China gifted the $40m stadium. To put in place the initial infrastructure we the tax payers are expending a further $45 million .... How much will the Baseball Diamond Softball Pitch and the remaining roads cost? A further $60 million? A grand total of Bahamian tax payers monies will exceed $105 million at the least the sports authority will have to create a revenue from these facilities exceeding $15-20 million. I honestly say to all the past Ministers of Sports... you all collectively have made an enormous mistake. I hope I am wrong as we can ill afford having to maintain such facilities without revenues to meet the upkeep costs. Mr Fields who holds an executive position at Kerzner could play an important part to make this a success but ath letes dont drink alcohol and dont have the money to gamble and it will be them that have to make these facilities feasible. Will Atlantis discount rooms for the athletes to a price they can afford? On paper, the Oakes Field Sport Centre project looks great, but in reality, oh, my God, have we made the worst investment ever? B FERGUSON Nassau, March 3, 2012. Is national stadium the biggest mistake yet?

PAGE 4

AFOXHILLman is in hospital after a shooting inci dent last night. The 28-year-old was shot at about 6pm last night. Preliminary reports indi cate that the victim was at Strachans Corner off East Street when he was approached by a male and was shot multiple times in the body. The victim was taken to hospital in a private vehicle where he is detained in serious condition. Police are following significant leads into the matter. THE Progressive Young Liberals accused the government yesterday of mismanaging the New Providence Infrastructure Improvement Project, and said the additional money allotted to the scheme could have been used to ben efit young Bahamians. At a press conference at the Ministry of Agricultures Gladstone Road site, Young Liberals Keenan Johnson, Phylicia Woods, and LaTore Mackey said there can be no acceptable excuse for why the project is now costing the public more than $200 million, with $93 million in cost overruns. This is the largest govern ment cost overrun in living memory. This $93 million in overruns equates to almost $4 million per mile of road this is unbelievable, Mr Johnson said. The president of the PLPs youth arm said $4 million per mile could have paid for 298 young men to attend the Youth Empowerment and Skills Training (YEAST) programme, or 65 young people to attend the College of the Bahamas for four years. Mr Johnson said the money could also have created life lines for many who have lost everything in the recession. Many of the closed businesses were owned by young Bahamians who were brave enough to venture into entre preneurship. The Ranfurly Home, church outreach programmes and other charities whose budgets were cut by the FNM could have benefited from the $4 million in cost overruns of one mile. The FNM does not put Bahamians first. They would rather build things instead of people. It is not possible to build a nation by leaving the people behind, he said. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012, PAGE 5 By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net THE FNM is hiding behind the global recession, hoping Bahamians will not notice how theyve bungled the economy, PLP leader Perry Christie said. He pointed to tax hikes, high unemployment, the increasing national debt, record crime rates and cost overruns on the ongoing road works, as issues that have been mismanaged by the government. Speaking at the partys Carmichael constituency launch on Monday night in support of PLP candidate Dr Daniel Johnson, Mr Christie told constituents he sees him self as the bridge between the late Sir Lynden Pindling and the new generation of PLP leaders. He said: We all share a profound belief in the Bahamian people, in what Bahamians can accomplish and what Bahamians can achieve. Mr Christie said the PLP pioneered successful, award-winning anti-crime programmes, created 22,000 jobs, built a record number of homes and classrooms, gave $25 million to Bahami an entrepreneurs, and were the first to give new homeowners a break on stamp duties. When I left office, Bahamian economic growth was out-pacing US economic growth, and the Bahamas was a regional economic leader. Now, the Bahamas is at the bottom of the region, he said. Dont let them get away with blaming the global recession if that was the full story, then our regional competitors would be in the same kind of trouble were in, and yet theyre outgrowing us and outpacing us look where we are with stopover tourists, Bahamians, and see how much better our regional competitors have fared... the FNM is hiding behind the global recession, hoping you wont notice how badly theyve mismanaged the economy. Turning to the roadworks, Mr Christie said in the middle of a recession the FNM hired foreigners instead of Bahamiansagain and again. The New Providence roadworks is approaching $100 million in cost overruns. Who is making those millions? A foreign contractor. A foreign contractor hired for a major infrastructure project while Bahamian contrac tors sat on the sidelines, he said. A road project which was supposed to be a stimulus for the Bahamian economy was turned into a jobs killer. The same roads dug up again and again and every time theyre dug up, more small businesses close, more jobs are lost. Bahamians are getting poorer and poorer as they add to our national debt. Ingraham is asking Parliament to approve tens of millions in new borrowing for a project which was supposed to be finished months ago. Yet this government turned away thousands of young peo ple from their Job Readiness Programme. He said the upcoming election should be about big things such as fighting crime, building the economy, job creation, education and training. You dont want to wake up the day after the election and realise the FNM made the election about little things when as a nation we really need to make big decisions, Mr Christie said. Isnt it time for a government which believes in Bahamians? The Bahamas own street philosopher By LAMECH JOHNSON Tribune Staff Reporter ljohnson@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham last night said the Free National Movement is delivering Bahamians a better new version of Urban Renewal than the upgrade the opposition party is promising. The FNM leader made the remark at the partys constituency office opening for St Annes before a large crowd of supporters. In response to the Progressive Liberal Partys vow of a new and improved Urban Renewal 2.0, Mr Ingraham said: We are delivering an Urban Renewal 5.0. We are renewing and transforming the City of Nassau and the whole island of New Providence right before their very eyes. Theyre embarrassed because they claim to love the poor but it is us, the FNM, that are delivering better roads, sidewalks and clean piped water with good water pressure to Bain Town and Grants Town and Englerston. It is us, the FNM who are installing sidewalks along busy thoroughfares so that Bahamian students can walk more safely to and from school all over this island. The nations chief, after offering his full support to St Annes hopeful Hubert Chipman, outlined some of the newly-launched social intervention initiatives like Volunteer Bahamas and the Summer Institute for Boys, to be launched this summer. And the straw vendors, hair braiders, taxi cab drivers and all those Bahamians who benefit from business coming out of these developments, would have been seriously short-changed had it not been for the FNM, he said. Touching on the much debated crime rate, Mr Ingraham said this serious challenge, along with others, will all be dealt with as part of their National Security Strategy, one of the FNMs two main priorities for the next five years. We did not arrive at this state of crime in our country overnight he said. That took years. And it will take years to correct the situation. We understand that. We have begun the important ground work. Mr Ingraham concluded his speech saying the country cannot afford to go backwards and embrace the reckless, do-nothing, scandal-ridden days of the weakest government in Bahamian history. We have the better record! We have the better team! We have the better vision! Vote F-N-M! he said. Mr Ingraham urged Bahamians who have not yet registered to do so immediately, as he is getting ready to reach for that bell. Pick up your voters card. Time draweth nigh, he said. Christie says FNMhiding over economy PM:FNM DELIVERING ON URBAN RENEWAL FROM LEFT, Phylicia Woods, Keenan Johnson and LaTore Mackey, at the Progressive Young Liberals press conference. YOUNG LIBERALS ACCUSE GOVT OVER ROAD PROJECT MAN IN HOSPITAL AFTER SHOOTING

PAGE 5

IT WAS not so long ago that women had few rights in western society. And even today, long after slavery was abolished in most of the world, many countries still treat women like chattel a term that refers to moveable property. Until 1882, a womans property in England was considered to be owned by her husband. In France, it was not possible until 1965 for a married woman to work, open a bank account or dispose of her own property without her husband's consent. It is only recently, with legal reforms and access to higher education that women have begun to break through the glass ceiling of male domination around the world. In the Bahamas, this process began after the Second World Warand accelerated in the 1950s as part of a general movement towards greater democracy. Last week, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Womans Suffrage Movement, the College of the Bahamas staged a symposium with presentations by relatives of the women who led the movement and pushed for equal rights. It was opened by Janet Bostwick, who in 1977 became the first woman to be elected to the House of Assembly. She lamented the apparent disinterest in the struggle for womens rights today. We have become complacent, materialistic and quiet. We have never been more educated, nor have we ever enjoyed greater levels of influence, yet this is hardly reflect ed in our involvement in seeking social justice and true equality. It is shameful. Alice Musgrove Rolle is the daughter of Mary Ingraham, whoin 1951 (together with Mabel Walker, an American) led the first petition drive for equal rights. I was eight when I sat on the wall in Hospital Lane asking passers-by to sign the petition, she recalled. We were motivated back then, but who will fill those shoes today? There are many issues that still need to be addressed. Juliette Barnwell said her parents Dr Claudius Walker and his wife Mabel were instrumental in the fight for womens rights. In the early 50s, she was present at regular meetings held at Dr Walkers Reinhart Hotel on Tin Shop Corner. My parents believed education was the key to political and social justice. Weve made tremendous progress over the years from teachers and nurses to the most influential jobs in the country, but the fight is not done. Wallis Carey, the daughter of Eugenia Lockhart, said her mother was always a champion of social justice. She believed that the majority should not be led by the minority, and it was easy for HM Taylor to persuade her to join the Progressive Liberal Party. As a secretarial student I helped to produce many documents for the movement. It was enjoyable to fight for justice rather than a Mercedes-Benz. Andrew Dud Maynard is the son of Georgiana Symonette and brother of the late politician Sir Clement Maynard. He called on young people not to waste their lives. Our foremothers made great sacrifices with you in mind, and you have to make an effort to make something of yourselves. My mother was like a general she carried me everywhere she went so I could learn something instead of getting into foolishness. Shirley Cooper said her sis ter, Dame Doris Johnson, brought militancy to the movement when she led a march on the House of Assembly in 1959 and made a fiery speech demanding the right to vote and participate in civil affairs. She later became the first woman appointed to the Senate and the Cabinet. I went on many marches and attended many meetings with Doris and the talk was always about getting the vote for women. After years of petitions, demonstrations, meetings and marches, the voting rights act for women was passed in February 1961 and came into effect four months later in time for the November 1962 general election. And although she did not win the seat, in that election Doris Johnson became the first woman to run for the House of Assembly. In the United Kingdom, the suffrage movement began in the 1870s and all women over 21 won the right to vote in 1928. The United States passed a constitutional amendment to give women full voting rights in 1920. And in Jamaica women were able to vote in 1944. Those Tragic Conchy Joes The memories are foggy at best, but back in the sweet summer of 1969 I took an English Lit exam that included questions about Shakespeares famous tragedy, Othello the Moor of Venice which was written in 1603. My teacher for that exam was the venerable Roger Kelty, who arrived here in the 1960s. He coincidentally sat a few seats away from me at last weeks performance in the Dundas Theatre of a stripped-down version of this tale of racial prejudice, jealousy and betrayal, with the alternate title of Othello or the Tragedy of the Conchy Joe. In this twisted adaptation, the non-white character of Othello was played by a former white schoolmate of mine named Craig Pinder, while the malignant Iago was portrayed by a black halfBahamian actor named Moses Hardwick. And the brown Anglo-African Belinda Owusu played the white, upper class Desdemona. These three mixed-up characters (reduced from about a dozen in the original version) are isolated on a Bahamian fishing boat, with only a shipto-shore radio for communication with the rest of the play. But many of the most familiar passages are included, like... Who steals my purse steals trash; t is something, nothing; Twas mine, t is his, and has been slave to thousands; But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed. This particular Shakespearean tragedy is all about interracial love. Desdemona is the daughter of a wealthy Italian senator who elopes with the Moorish general, Othello. Her father's objections to Othello all have to do with his race and colour, as the relationship with his daughter goes against all rules of nature. Shakespeares portrayal of the Moor could have been based on a celebrated Moroccan ambassador to the court of Queen Elizabeth 1, who spent six months in London a couple of years before the play was written. But it could just as easily have been based on West Africans, who first appeared in London in 1554 and were considered undesirables by the early 1600s. It doesnt really matter. Othello is an African of one sort or another who has achieved prominence in Euro pean society as a military leader, but is never fully accepted. The plot is all about his envious assistant, Iago, scheming to put Othello in his proper place. But the performance I saw last week sought to present a condensed photo-negative version of this story, with Othello as a conchy joe fisherman ina black Bahamian society. It is not clear whether the analogy works, and without the superstructure of the original play it is not always easy to grasp, but it certainly had a novel appeal for Bahamian audiences. So I turned to my old English teacher pal for help. Kelty told me that, as a political statement about race and minority groups, the message did not resonate, and perhaps would go undetected without reading the official programme. But if you were simply looking for a well-acted study in malicious gossip, sexual jealousy and murderous consequences, it seemed tometo have local relevance and entertainment value. The adaptation performed at the Dundas distilled Shakespeares three-hour tragedy into about 75 minutes, which arguably made it easier to digest. As Pinder told me, With all the sub-plots and additional characters missing, the audience can really zone inon the relationships that exist between the protagonist and the other main characters, for a much more intense emotional journey. However, Roger Kelty who taught both myself and Pinder in high school did not consider it wise to tamper with the genius of Shakespeare, a man he regards as one of the most brilliant who ever lived. He was lucky to have been born at a time when the English language was not restrict ed by laws of grammar or spelling (there were no dictionaries until the 18th century) and he was free to give full expression to his wonderfully creative gifts in the use of words. Think of how many of the lines from his poems and plays have passed into everyday language. He is, unquestionably, the most quoted writer of all time. Shakespeares writing stays current, Kelty said, because it focuses on the human condition. His understanding of the human psyche is absolute ly amazing; as seen in his realistic portrayal of sexual jealousy, ambition, revenge, and ingratitude in plays which could well be case histories in a modern psychology class. And most miraculous of all, it appears from studying the folios of his plays that he wrote at speed without careful thought or revision. But enough about Shakespeare. Perhaps the more interesting story here is that this great drama was adapted an directed by a Bahamian and performed successfully by Bahamian actors at regional theatres in Britain before coming to Nassau, where it barely managed to break even with a lot of help from generous sponsors. It took a huge collective effort to bring this production to the Bahamas, according to Kim Aranha, the producer who saw the play in England and set about bringing it here. The total cost was $40,000, including six transatlantic airfares, but about half of this amount had to be covered by sponsors, including myself. The promotional costs alone make productions like this prohibitive without a lot of help. Nevertheless, about 750 people came to see the play over five performances last week. But Aranha was hugely disappointed with the lack of interest from local schools, including the College of the Bahamas, which didnt even respond to a request for a venue. Except for Tambealy, none of the schools we invited sent students, something which the cast couldnt understand. This is unfortunate. Craig Pinder, for example, has managed to achieve some celebrity on the British stage over the past few decades which he attributes to his early participation in local amateur productions under the tutelage of his father, Bill Pinder, of Blanco Bleach fame. A graduate of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, he played several characters in the long-running British musical Les Miserables in the 1980s, and has racked up small TV parts in between his stage gigs. But theatrical productions can draw only a small audience locally at the best of times. Othello or the Tragedy of the Conchy Joe was directed and adapted by freelance theatre director Robin Belfield, the product of an English missionary father and a Bahami an mother, in collaboration with Pinder. In the plays production notes, Bellfield offered this rationale for their revision of Shakespeare. We created a compact, intense production suitable to tour the UK and make the long trip to the Bahamas, he said. Othello became a conchy joe the minority outsider and the military world of the original was replaced with a fishing-based environment. Historically, Shake speares Moor of Venice would have been seen as part of a despised and feared colo nial minority from the past. Aranha, who has some the atre background herself, col laborated with Bellfields Yellowtale Theatre of Sussex, and Nicolette Bethels Shakespeare in Paradise group to organise the Nassau production. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribune media.net or visit www. bahamapundit.com. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE Of women and Shakespeare

PAGE 6

BPCis using a Chinese submarine to explore the Bahamian seabed, and may be partnering with 12 Chinese companies in its bid to drill for oil in the Bahamas. He said: Our number one industry is tourism, our num ber three industry is fishing, sowe have to very cautious how we proceed with this. Mr Albury has continued to insist for weeks that BPC has been operating in violation of the moratorium and has hit outat Environment Minister Earl Deveaux, who he said failed to adequately answer his questions. Mr Deveaux has repeatedly said the moratorium remains in place. When a local BPC employ ee was asked if anyone was available to comment on Mr Alburys press conference yesterday, she said no one was available. When asked when someone would be available, she said Not this week. When asked if next week would be better, she said No. Asked if the following week would be better, she said No. Asked if a representative of the company would ever be available for comment, she said: I dont know. Yesterday, Mr Albury also placed blame on the PLP, which originally issued the licences to BPC to explore for oil. Those licenses expire next month, and Mr Albury the DNA is trying to gain public support to block their renew al. The party has already launched a petition and has around 150 signatures. He said: What we dont understand is why the PLP has been so silent on this issue as Bahamians everywhere are calling for answers. Why have they not stepped forward to defend their decision to grant the original permits for oil exploration? Why have they not stepped forward to defend Bahamas Petroleum Company who is represented by the firm of Deputy Leader of the PLP, (Philip) Brave Davis? Does their silence reflect something that do not want to be made public? BPCs website lists Mr Davis law firm, Davis & Co, among its solicitors. sizing exercise, BCPOU president Bernard Evans said. The next major item on the agenda was the negotiation of a new Industrial Agreement, which expired September 30, 2010. Negotiations between Cable & Wireless and the BCPOU began in earnest in early November 2011. Although we have been able to agree on most of the articles that will form the new agreement, we have reached an impasse on the matter of salary increases in spite of our best effort to negotiate in good faith. He said the BCPOU finds it difficult to accept the man agements reported claim that it cannot afford a reasonable salary increase because of the many cost-cutting and efficiency based initiatives that the BTC has undertaken in the past year. Mr Evans pointed to a Price Waterhouse Coopers report, reportedly undertaken by BTC which reviewed employees salaries. (The) report revealed over 90 per cent of BTCs line staff in our bargaining unit are underpaid based on 75th percentile compared with similar companies nationally and regionally, he said. Mr Evans said CWC gained advantages upon the sale of BTC, including a two per cent fixed management fee of gross revenue, multiple contracts for foreign consultants and contractual workers, recognition of $6 million in bonus pay ments, and the control of about 70 per cent of the net profit over the next two years. Last week, BTC CEO Geoff Houston reiterated the companys ambition to shape an Industrial Agreement that is customer and performance driven, and anchored by a market-leading employee proposition. He said: The discussions we have been having with our union partners have always been around these themes. So my hope is that while we may differ on the specifics of some parts of the agreement, we all manage to keep in our sights these principles which are critical to succeed against agile and aggressive competition now and in the near future. The CEO noted that management will continue to negotiate in good faith and do all it can to keep the communications open and up front. when he jumped from the vehicle in the Pitt Road area. Officers were unable to apprehend the handcuffed suspect who ran in a northerly direction. An island-wide search for Russell began and he was apprehended a few hours later. Russell was on his way to be charged in connection with housebreaking. Meanwhile, police are still searching for another prisoner who escaped custody while at the Princess Margaret Hospital last month. Frederick Green, alias Frederick Neely, 29, escaped while seeking medical attention under guard at the hospital on February 21. He allegedly fled the hospital's chest ward through a window around 4am when the prison officer assigned to him left to use the bathroom. After his escape, prison officials maintained that the officer secured Green in restraints before leaving to use the restroom. Green had been remanded to Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill, after being charged with the 2009 armed robbery of 18 tourists at Earth Village. He is still awaiting trial. He was previously charged with the 2004 stabbing death of Dale Williams. However, he was acquitted of the charge after claiming he was defending himself against an attempted rape by a gay, HIV positive man. Two months before that, 28year-old Dorian Armbrister escaped from the Princess Margaret Hospital. Armbrister was serving a 27-month sentence for stealing from a shop. Although he was outfitted with leg restraints and on 24-hour guard, he escaped the healthcare facility by jumping through a bathroom window. He was shot in the buttocks by prison officers on Dowdeswell Street a short time later. channels of the use of the Special Branch for reasons which do not have to do with the security of the state, but with the politics of the government. While Carl Bethel, chairman of the governing FNM, said Mr Mitchell's claims are false, a police officer told The Tribune last night he was recently assigned to the new unit. Mr Mitchell said the creation of such a unit would support his partys long-held belief that the government, through the Ministry of National Security, has long used security information in the political arena. People have been calling us behind the scenes saying that they have seen the deployment of police officers in areas that they should not be, involved in matters that they should not be concerned about, said Mr Mitchell. Given an out of control crime rate, Mr Mitchell said, it is alarming the government would use the police for unrelated matters. The criticism is directed at the political directorate and that they should resist using the police for things other than what they should be concerned about and that is fighting crime. The Police Staff Association has also been working in ways it should not be, according to Mr Mitchell. From time to time, the pres ident of the Police Staff Association has been intervening in matters dealing with public policy and not matters dealing with policy in the police force. In early March, the Association's executive chairman Dwight Smith refuted claims by ex-superintendent Keith Bell that the force was too poorly equipped to tackle crime or other challenges with which it has been confronted. Minister of National Secu rity Tommy Turnquest could not be reached for comment. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012, PAGE 9 By LAMECH JOHNSON Tribune Staff Reporter ljohnson@tribunemedia.net SUPERINTENDENT of Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming will appear before three judges in two weeks to verify if his agency is at fault for the late arrival of prisoners to court. In yesterdays appellate court session, a senior police officer in charge of receiving inmates for court said it was not the polices official duty to transport prisoners to court, as they only offer assistance to the prison. Justice Anita Allen made an order for the prison chief to be summoned on March 28. The Court of Appeal begins at 10am and prides itself on being punctual. However, there have been occasions where court started well afterwards, yesterday being a prime example. The appellate court president voiced her displeasure at the tardiness. Her colleagues Justices Christopher Blackman and Stanley John agreed. Justice Allen said: This is happening too frequently. We have to summon the Superintendent of the prison to find out what is going on. This is the second or third occasion weve had this happen in some two weeks. Jerone Roberts, one of three attorneys waiting for his client to arrive, gave the court additional insight into the matter. He said a number of defence attorneys have formed a loose association and met on at least two occasions with the Superintendent who said it is his responsibility to have the prisoners ready in the prison square to be transported. Mr Roberts said, based on the discussions with Dr Rahming, it is reportedly the responsibility of the Commissioner of Police to have them transported to court. Justice Allen then suggested: Perhaps it might be best to summon both. Roberts agreed and said it appeared to be a situation where persons were placing blame, but nobody is in charge to take care of the situation. Mr Roberts admitted he has seen prisoners in the square sitting around the wall waiting to be brought to Bank Lane. The court president stood the court down for a 15minute break and ordered Franklyn Williams, deputy director of public prosecutions, to discover the nature of yesterdays dilemma. The prisoners arrived shortly after. Assistant Supt Cleophas Cooper, officer in charge of the Central Police Station, told the court the five inmates with appeals had to be walked from Bank Lane to the Charlotte Street, Claughton House, courtroom. In his explanation to Justice Blackman, ASP Cooper said the prison bus never arrived until after 10am. Because of the accident we had, were now limited with transportation. He also said the prisoners cannot be taken directly to court without being checked in first at Bank Lane. It ensures persons on the list are checked out to appear for court, he added. Justice Allen, based on the explanation, suggested the police were to blame. ASP Cooper disagreed and said it was not the polices official duty to transport prisoners to court, as they only offer assistance to the prison. Once they get here, then we take over and are responsible for getting them back. Justice Blackman said the prison chief needed to be summoned in order to improve on the situation. The appellate court president made the summoning order and Mr Roberts suggested for the Commissioner of Police to be on the order as well. Justice Allen however said: Prison superintendent to explain late arrivals at court f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e POLICE TO PROBE DNA AND PLP PRISONER RECAPTURED DEADLOCK OVER SALARIES NO ANSWER ON OIL CLAIMS

PAGE 7

WASHINGTON Associated Press RICK SANTORUM seized the lead in the Alabama primary Tuesday night and edged ahead of Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich in Mississippi, deeply conservative Southern crossroads in the struggle for the Republican presidential nomination. Romney, the faraway frontrunner in the delegate chase, bristled in the hours before the votes were counted, saying Santorum was at the des perate end of his campaign. But it was Gingrich with the most to lose as he struggled for political survival in a part of the country he hoped would fuel one more come back in the unpredictable race to pick an opponent to President Barack Obama. There were 107 Republican National Convention delegates at stake, 47 in Alabama, 37 in Mississippi, 17 in Hawaii caucuses and six more in caucuses in American Samoa. In Alabama, with 29 percent of the precincts counted, Santorum was pulling 35 per cent of the vote, Gingrich had 30 percent and Romney 28 percent. Returns from 58 percent of Mississippis precincts showed Santorum with 33 percent, Gingrich 32 percent and Romney 30. Each of the three leading contenders faced a different challenge in Alabama and Mississippi, where heavy tele vision advertising was evi dence of the states unaccustomed significance deep in the nominating campaign. Gingrich struggled for polit ical survival, Romney sought a strong showing to silence his critics and Santorum hoped to emerge at last as the chief conservative rival to the front-runner. Rep Ron Paul, the fourth contender, made little effort in the states on the days ballot. Evangelicals played an out sized role in both primary states, underscoring the challenge to Romney. In Mississippi and Alabama, roughly four in five voters surveyed as they left their polling places said they were born again or evangelical. Those voters have been reluctant to rally to Romneys side in the primaries and caucuses to date. He won 35 percent of their votes in Mississippi, and 27 percent in Alabama, the polling day surveys indicated. His best previous showing in a heavily contested primary this year was 38 percent in Florida. More broadly, the exit polls showed an electorate that is conservative, determinedly Republican and profoundly unhappy about the govern ment. In Mississippi, more than eight in 10 voters said they were dissatisfied or angry with the federal government, while in Alabama, 80 percent said they would definitely vote for the Republican candidate against Obama next fall, no matter who he is. While Alabama and Mississippi are among the most conservative states in the country and share a long bor der, the exit polls showed significant differences in the voters reaction to the candi dates. In Mississippi, Romney had the support of 35 percent of primary voters who earn under $50,000 a year, com pared with 27 percent in Alabama. He drew the backing of 38 percent of Mississippi primary voters with no college education, compared with 26 percent in Alabama. Only about half of all voters in each state said they work fulltime for pay, and they, too, voted differently one state from the other. Santorum outpolled Romney, 38 percent to 23 percent among that group in Alabama. But Romney prevailed in Mississippi, 35-28. As has been true in earlier primaries, the economy was the most important issue to voters, and an ability to defeat Obama the most important quality when it came time to pick a candidate. The exit polls were based on interviews with 1,552 voters as they left 30 randomly selected polling places around Alabama, and with 1,575 Mississippi voters from 30 sites. Each survey had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points. The Southern showdown came as new polling showed a decline in Obama's approval ratings a reversal amid escalating gasoline prices and turbulence in the Middle East. The day began with Romney leading the delegate com petition by far in The Associated Press count, with 454 of the 1,144 needed to win the nomination. Santorum had 217, Gingrich 107 and Paul 47. That gave the former Massachusetts governor more than his rivals combined. And while Santorum in particular challenges the mathematical projections, Romney is amassing delegates at a rate that puts him on track to clinch control of nomination before the convention next summer. Romney, campaigning in Missouri, took exception to a television commercial airing in both Southern states and said Santorum is at the desperate end of his campaign. The commercial was backed bya super PAC that supports the former senator, not by him. Santorums camp had earlier issued a memo that dis missed as fuzzy math Romneys claim that he is on track to amass a delegate majority. Simply put, time is on our side, it said. Gingrichs aides issued a rebuttal of their own with the polls still open in the primary states. It said the primaries were not yet half over, and the former House speaker is well positioned to win the GOP nomination. The large amount of television advertising was testi mony to the importance the contenders and their allies attached to the primaries in both Alabama and Mississippi. All three candidates as well as super PACs supporting each of them ran television commercials. As has been the case all year, Restore Our Future, which backs Romney, spent more than any of the others. The group put down $1.3 million for television ads in Alabama, another $900,000 in Mississippi and more for radio on Christian and other radio stations as well as thou sands of pieces of mail designed to help the former Massachusetts governor. It was only in recent days that Romney seemed to sense a chance in Alabama and Mississippi, and he responded by increasing his television ad expenditures and his plans for campaigning in the states. Born in Michigan and a longtime resident of Massachusetts, he told one audience the two primaries were a bit of an away game for him and drew laughs from another when he said he hoped to go hunting with an Alabama friend who can actually show me which end of the rifle to shoot. He generally steered away from criticising his Republi can rivals and aimed his rhetoric instead at Obama, whose prospects in both states are as dim next fall as anywhere in the country. Santorum campaigned against the president and Romney simultaneously as he sought the support of conser vatives who have fueled his recent surge. In Biloxi, Miss, on Monday, he ridiculed the science behind global warming. The dangers of carbon dioxide? Tell that to a plant, how dangerous carbon dioxide is, he said. Gingrich spent part of his time pushing back against suggestions including from his own staff that he might drop out if he didnt notch a pair of Southern victories. His only two wins so far came in the South Carolina primary on Jan 21, and last week, when he won his political home state of Georgia. Initial polls showed the for mer House speaker in a strong position in both states, but he abruptly canceled a campaign trip to Kansas in advance of the state's caucus es late last week to remain in the South. He used a recorded telephone message from Chuck Norris, the actor and Karate champion, for a last-minute appeal to voters in Alabama. INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE FORMER Honduran President Manuel Zelaya has registered a political party that will be able to compete in the countrys next elections in 2013. Honduras Electoral Tri bunal says Zelaya's party is called the Liberty and ReFoundation Party, known as Libre. The tribunal said Tuesday that Zelaya turned in 62,000 signatures supporting his party, well above the 42,290 signatures required. Zelaya said the partys pres idential candidate in 2013 elections will be his wife, Xiomara Castro. Zelaya was deposed at gunpoint and taken out of the country in a 2009 coup, an act that isolated Honduras inter nationally. He returned to Honduras after Colombia and Venezuela brokered a deal with Honduran authorities. A COSTA RICAN man arrested in last year's fatal shooting of Argentine folk singer Facundo Cabral was expelled to Guatemala on Tuesday for entering Colombia with false documents, authorities said. Guatemalan authorities want Alejandro Jimenez Gonzalez, 38, in the July killing of Cabral, and Costa Rica asked that he be sent directly to Guatemala. He was flown out of Bogota on a Colombian police plane Tues day afternoon, a police state ment said. He was arrested Saturday by counternarcotics police in a speedboat that Colombia's navy had tracked from Panama into Colombia's waters, said Colombia's national police chief, Gen. Oscar Naranjo. Colombia has no interest in filing charges, but simply to expel him, Costa Rican Attorney General Jorge Chavarria said. Our inten tion is that he be extradited directly to Guatemala. The Colombian police said in a communique that according to information gathered by Costa Rican security agen cies that Jimenez could be a link between the Sinaloa car tel headed by Mexican druglord Joaquin El Chapo Guzman and Colombian nar co brothers Luis Enrique and Javier Antonio Calle Serna. Naranjo said Colombian police believe Jimenez arranged to enter Colombia with the help of a pair of the brothers. Costa Rican authorities say Jimenez headed a criminal group that launders money in Central America, and they believe Cabral was the unintended victim of an attack related to a rift over stolen drug money. Drug cartels, some from Mexico, have established themselves in Central America and grow and ship drugs in the region. Costa Rican Security Minister Mario Zamora told RCN radio that Jimenezs arrest is important because he is someone who plays a major role in the leadership and direction of organised mafias in Central America. Zamora has said Jimenez is wanted in Costa Rica for money laun dering and drug trafficking. Cabral, 74, was gunned down in Guatemala in July after giving a concert in the city of Quetzaltenango, 200 kilometers (120 miles) west of Guatemala City. Authorities believe the attack was aimed at Cabrals promoter, Nicaraguan busi nessman Henry Farina, who was driving the singer to the airport. Farina was wounded when their car was ambushed. FORMER PRESIDENT FORMS PARTY Santorum mocks global warming to win votes COSTARICAN MAN EXTRADICTED TO GUATEMALA REPUBLICAN presidential candidate Rick Santorum visits supporters during a rally on Monday in Montgomery, Alabama. THE SYRIAN army has recaptured most of the northern rebel stronghold of Idlib near the Turkish border, pushing hundreds of military defectors out of a major base they had held for months even as pockets of resistance kept up their fight on Tuesday. The three-day operation to capturethe city followed closely after a similar offensive to dislodge the opposition from another key piece of territory it had controlled, theBaba Amr district in central Homs. The two victories gave President Bashar Assads regime unmistakable momentumasit tries to crush the armed opposition fighters. A pledge Tuesday from Syria's staunch ally Russia that Moscow will continue selling weapons to the regime was yet another boost. And a diplomatic bid by UN envoy Kofi Annan to broker a cease-fire failed over the weekend. Still, international pressure is more intense than ever, with the US considering military options. On Tuesday, the Arab League chief said the regimes killing of civilians amounts to crimes against humanity and he called for an international inquiry. Activists reported fresh violence in central province of Hama near Homs, the suburbs of Damascus and elsewhere, killing dozens. SYRIAN ARMY MOPS UP RESISTANCE

PAGE 8

LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012 THE TRIBUNE Rebuilding after the fire INDECEMBER, the Pompey Museum was badly damaged and nearby buildings gutted when a blaze broke out on Bay Street. Reconstruction work is under way now at the scene, as part of developments which will see the creation of a Pompey Park. Our photographer took a peep inside as the clear-up team sets about the hard work of reconstruction. Photos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff