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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03201
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 01-27-2012
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03201

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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER PLPaccused of bribes for votes Volume: 108 No.53FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS ANDSUN HIGH 83F LOW 69F By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter c nixon@tribunemedia.net THREE men have come forward claiming a bribe was offered by political opera tives of the PLP trying to drum up support for their par-t y ahead of the upcoming gen eral elections, a heated House of Assembly session was told yesterday. Education Minister Desmond Bannister claimed these individuals have sworn in affidavits that cash was offered by campaigning members of the opposition in return for political support. Mr Bannister agreed to withdraw the comments, but warned it was not the last that Parliament would hear of the matter. Asked if he could prove the claims, Mr Bannister said: I am fully able, in fact the infor mation has been put into affidavits, I have three of them to date. I know the people that have been offered and I know the people that offered it and at the appropriate time I will deal with this. The allegations came during Mr Bannisters contribu t ion to amendments to the Parliamentary Elections Act debate yesterday, in response to claims that the Prime Min ister told FNM supporters to accept the oppositions bribesa nd then vote FNM anyway. Mr Bannister said he was recently informed by an FNM supporter that while the PLP was campaigning in Staniel Creek, Andros, they got into a disagreement with one of Mr Bannisters supporters and were asked to leave. Mr Bannister said he was told they returned the next day and offered his supporters $1,000. Dr Bernard Nottage even tually rose to ask if Mr Ban nister could produce any proof. If he could not, the Bain and Grants Town MP said, the comments should be with drawn. Speaker of the House Alvin Smith ordered Mr Bannister to withdraw his claims unless House in uproar after ministermak es claims TRY OUR CRANBERRY & RAISIN O ATMEAL The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PARENTS Osee and Chantal Joseph at a press conference yesterday at Princess Margaret Hospital, where it was announced that doctors had successfully separated an underdeveloped conjoined twin from the couples baby daughter, Shakera. Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff TOMORROW, DONTMISSTHETRIBUNESBIGTFOR . FOOD COUPONS AND SPECIALS NEWS SPORTS FASHION FOOD TRAVEL MOVIES MUSIC TV NYTIMES By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net A PARASITIC twin was successfully removed from the back of a three-week-old baby girl on Wednesday evening, marking an historic milestone in Bahamian medicine. Doctors and nurses from the obstetrical, neonatal, and neurological units at Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH were joined by the babys parents to announce the success, noting it was the first time in the country that such a surgery had been performed. Baby Shakera was born at PMH to Chantal and Osee Joseph on January 3, with a parasitic twin attached to her back. The partially-formed mass had a small leg with some toes and was completely binded with Shakeras spine. Neurosurgeon Dr Magnus Ekedede, who led the operation to separate Shakera from the underdeveloped twin, said he had tremendous stress at first because he didnt believe we could do it in the Bahamas. But, he felt more at ease following prayer, careful surgery planning, and excel lent support from his team. Everybody did everything right, Dr Ekedede said, thanking the doctors and nurses who assisted in the surgery. Its not about me ... I thank everybody that has to do with this. He continued: The Bahamas should be happy that we could accomplish this here. Every Bahamian should be happy because if you read through texts book and google this its not easy. From my records, nothing like that has been done in the Caribbean. Ms Joseph called her child a miracle baby and thanked PMHs doctors and nurses profusely. Thank you to all the docPRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham said he is encouraged by the diversity of those awarded grants to sup port their enterprising business ideas under the new Jump-Start programme. The 72 recipients are men and women young and old Mr Ingraham said at the offi cial launch of the initiative, which aims at helping fledgling entrepreneurs get their dreams off the ground. F OREIGN Affairs Minis ter Brent Symonette was yesterday called on in Parliament to produce a list of everyone g ranted citizenship during the FNM administration. On the final day of debate on amendments to the Parliamentary Elections Act, Bain and Grants Town MP Dr Bernard Nottage said that in a country like the Bahamas, where people move in and out, individuals who are not entitled to vote in an election can sometimes end up becoming registered. He said any issues of this kind would be avoided if a list of persons who were granted citizenship was made public. B y LAMECH JOHNSON Staff reporter l johnson@tribunemedia.net THECourt of Appeal rejected the bail appeal by Bishop Randy Fraser because he failed to show any except ional circumstances to justify b eing released on bond. The Court released its detailed ruling yesterday ont he rejection of bail to the conv icted sex offender, who returns to the court in a month to appeal his conviction. A t the time of the hearing last December, appellate court president Justice Anita A llen said the reasons for the bail rejection would be released at a later date. Yesterday, Justice Allen i nformed defence attorney Jiaram Mangra and Fraser they would be presented witha printed copy of their ruling. S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 BISHOP APPEAL RULING REVEALED im lovin it BABY TWIN HEALTHY AFTER LANDMARK OPERATION S YMONETTE SAYS NO OVER CITIZENSHIP LIS T PM PLEASED BY BUSINESS IDEAS

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By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT The battle is now on for the five seats on Grand Bahama as some 17 candidates prepare to launch their campaign in the respective constituencies here on thei sland. A total of 15 candidates have been officially ratified and named by the FNM, PLP, and DNA parties, and two persons have entered the race as independent candidates. T he candidates contesting i n West Grand Bahama are ZNS Freeport anchorwoman Pakesia Edgecombe (FNM businessman Roger Rolle (DNA Obie Wilchcombe. M r Wilchcombe, a veteran p olitician, will face off with newcomers Edgecombe and Rolle, who are both young and offer a fresh perspective for voters. Interestingly, Rollea nd Edgecombe are also seco nd cousins. E dgecombe was born in West End. She grew up in Deadmans Reef and attended the Holmes Rock Primary and Eight Mile Rock Highs chools. She completed her t ertiary education abroad in 1996.Edgecombe is married and has two children. Roger Rolle is owner of R ags to Riches Consultants. H e is a successful businessman. Obie Wilchcombe has served in parliament for 10 years as MP for West Enda nd Bimini, having been electe d as the representative in 2002 and 2007. Contesting the new Central Grand Bahama seat are businessman Neko Grant (FNM accountant Julian Russell ( PLP); and Howard Grant Jr ( DNA). Veteran politician Neko Grant is also going up against newcomers Russell and Howard Grant Jr, the son ofF NM Eight Mile Rock MP V ernae Grant. G rant, 30, is the youngest of the three candidates. The youth leader says his entire family, including his mother and father, supports his deci-s ion to join the DNA. I knowthere are many persons saying how Vernae Grants son could do that. I am her son. She loves me and s he knows I am a passionate p erson and I go hard after what I believe in. I believe in the DNA; it is here to revive our people. Her affiliation with the FNM is an affiliationI cant say anything about. She supports me; my entire family supports me; we have been through hell and high water with the FNM personally. I know you heard her speech in the House and it r uns very deep. R ussell, an accountant, is a native of Eight Mile Rock. He is the son of Rev Ralph Russell. In Marco City, the candid ates are Educator Norris B ain (FNM g ory Moss (PLP student Tolonus Sands (DNA activist Troy Garvey (Independent). T he race is expected to heat u p in Marco City as the four men vie for one of the most coveted and historic seats on Grand Bahama. It was once h eld by the FNMs founder t he late Sir Cecil WallaceWhitfield. The seat is currently held by Zhivargo Laing of the FNM who will contest the Fort Charlotte seat. I n Pineridge, the candidates a re lawyer Kwasi Thompson (FNM (PLP Johnson (DNA In East Grand Bahama, the candidates are businessman P eter Turnquest (FNM a ttorney Tanisha Tynes (PLP Thomas (DNA pendent candidate Philip Thomas. V oter registration on G rand Bahama continues at a s teady pace. Last week, over 21,000 persons had registered on the island. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said he expects thatt here would be some 25,000 r egistered voters in Grand Bahama. Although New Providence has the majority of seats, the t hree parties believe Grand B ahama will play an important part in these elections. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 THE TRIBUNE For more informationvisit www.nassaucontainerport.com or call 242.323.7066 or 242.323.7064 NOTICEfamilyisland residentsApplicationformsforsharesoftheArawakPortDevelopment Initial Public Offering are now available at RBC Royal Bank branches in Long Island, Governos Harbour, Spanish Wells and Harbour Island. CompletedformsfortheAPDofferingmaybereturnedto the aforementioned RBC Royal Bank branches in Long Island, GovernorsHarbour,SpanishWellsandHarbourIslandbefore5 p.m.January31st,2012.RBCRoyalBankisnotresponsibleforany incomplete applications and will not accept any applications after 5:00 p.m. on January 31st, 2012. Potential APD investors may also drop off completed application formsandchequestobranchesofColinaInsurance,BankofThe Bahamas International, CFAL and Providence Advisors Ltd. Applicationformsmustbecompletedintheirentiretyandcheques shouldbemadepayabletoProvidenceAdvisorsorCFAL.Only Election battle begins in Grand Bahama POLICEWOMAN HURT IN ACCIDENT P OLICE OFFICERS l ost control of their vehicle on the road leading to the domestic section of the airport yesterday. A female officer was taken to hospital to be treated for minor injuries. Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff

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A GRICULTURE minister Larry Cartwright announced the details of the 2012 Agribusiness Expos yesterday. A t a press conference at the Ministry of Agriculture on Bay Street, Mr Cartwright s aid the expos will showcase the products, skills and exper tise of the farming and fisheries industries. He said: An i mportant aspect of these events is the opportunity each individual Family Island ord istrict is provided to show off its unique character. Because of different geography and geology, each Fam i ly Island offers comparative differences and distinctions. This years theme will be: P rogressing Towards Food Security. It will be a reminder of our needs as well as our progress and determination to improve and grow the sector, he said. According to Mr Cartwright, the ministry has been working constantly to ensure that its programmes and policies are consistent with the theme. He said achievements of note include: the creation of marine protected areas; the institution of closed fishing seasons; the launch of a livestock embryo transfer programme; the enactment of the Ani mal Control and Protection Act. The expos will begin in Nassau on March 1 and end on March 3. In addition to New Providence, expos will be held in Eleuthera, North Andros, Long Island, Grand Bahamaand San Salvador. This year, organisers expect more than 20,000 people to visit the various sites. Last year, there were 15,000 visitors. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012, PAGE 3 BGCSEREVISION SESSIONSINSTITUTE OF BUSINESS and COMMERCETEL: 324-4625 Scotiabank (Bahamasis seeking the services of a Director, Retail Banking Position Summary:The Director, Retail Banking is responsible for the proable development and maintenance of banking business for a network of branches in a designated market area, and for the quality of the loan portfolio, ensuring adequate controls and procedures are in place to safeguard the Banks assets. He/she is required to provide direction and support to assist Branch Managers and their teams in the execution of their functions, including management and development of people, and management of all aspects o f banking operations. The incumbent is responsible for all aspects of planning, organizing, stafng and providing direction within the designated market area to maximize the proable growth of the portfolio while maintaining a high prole in the community and demonstrating a personal commitment to employee development and customer service, consistent with Scotiabanks core values and standards. The incumbent is required to frequently travel to branches in the designated market area, including the Family Islands.Key Accountabilities for this Role: potential, and developing objectives and plans to proably grow the market area in support of Country and Regional goals; are in place to mitigate risks and safeguard the Banks assets; business objectives; potential and ensure that corrective action is taken when required; the community by participating in the social and professional life of the community served; market area.Educational Requirements: professional designation.Functional Competencies: knowledge of the market areas, customers segments, and competitive positioning within the Retail and Small Business Banking segment; talent; in building relationships and partnering with and supporting diverse stakeholders; The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all interested be contacted. Scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com on or before February 3, 2012. M INISTER OF ARGRICULTURE L arry Cartwright briefs members of the media on the upcoming 2012 Agri-business Expos. Photos: Tim Clarke /Tribune Staff Agriculture Expos to showcase nation M ANUELMESSINA, I ICA InterAmerican Institute for Coopera tion on Agriculture representative, speaking yesterday. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 3221986 and share your story.

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EDITOR, The Tribune H ERE we go again. The debate about debates has begun with all of the usual posturing and promotion of s elf-interests. Some have cast debates between party leaders in overwrought moral tones.T his is nonsense. It is curious that the PLP supporters, who are moralizing on the need for debates now that they areo ut of government, were not so bullish when they were in office. How come they have now conveniently found religion? We all know why, this serves their political interests; interests they are dressing up as being in the public interest. This is what Branville McCartney is all about, no matter how much he feigns the public interest. We have national debates year round in Parliament. In those debates Prime MinisterI ngraham is always prepared. Perry Christie and Branville McCartney are typically unprepared and rambling. W hat these latter gentlemen seem to want is a manufactured debate formatg eared towards performance, sound bites and one-liners. What they should have been doing in Parliament is engag-i ng in substantive debates. We do not need the sort of staged performances we are seeing in the debates in the Republican primary process where Newt Gingrich attacks journalists and plays to the crowd. Those debates may have excited partisans, but there is little of substance. We mostly see events geared towards entertainment that degenerate into a trading of attacklines on touch-button issues. We need to grow up and s top trying to copycat everything the Americans do. Thankfully, in our parliamen tary system Bahamians get to s ee more than the theatrics of politics when it comes to those who may serve as primem inister. We get to see live the thrust and parry on issues of public policy and gover nance. I f we are serious, we would be promoting roundtables where substance is discussed, not the sort of US-styled debates, where substance is usually a casualty. Lets see how much policy detail a person has, not just whether they can play to the cameras, flash a broad smile and deliver rehearsed lines. If we are to have such roundtables, they would need to be hosted by an independent and credible group like the Catholic Church. Few of the media houses have the credibility with the public or political leaders to host such an event. The moderator for such an event would need to be an adept individual, nonpartisan and highly credible who would not let any debate participant get away with non sense. Let us raise the bar on the debate about debates. We deserve more than staged events. Lets have some roundtables that are like the classic debates of old where substance is the star and not personalities. Let us have real conversations instead of shouting matches. The current silly talk about debates is not encouraging. It appears to have more to do with partisan concerns than the public interest. To advance the genuine public interest, we might look to the famous Lincoln-Dou glas Debates of 1858 in the US instead of the RomneyGingrich-Santorum-Paul sil ly-season. After all, we are choosing a governing party and prime minister, not an entertainerin-chief. BLS Nassau, January 24, 2012. EDITOR, The Tribune. THEY say that they are for the small man or the ordi-n ary worker in this country. T he PLP has made that claim for years and years, but is it really so? The reality is that the PLP, prior to Majority Rule in 1 967, had as part of its platf orm, a major plank regarding the implementation of minim um wage. But in 25 years they did nothing about it. It was the FNM government,l ed by the Rt Hon Hubert A Ingraham, that made minimum wage a reality, most i mportantly for the small m an. The FNM, not only created minimum wage, which overt he years has caused many workers wages to be increased, but it did so pri-m arily for the most challenged in our society: those at the bottom of the totem pole, who, over the years were most in need of their governments action in this regard. L est we forget, the Pindling-led PLP was in govern ment from 1967 to 1972, 1972 to 1977, 1977 to 1982, 1982 to 1987, 1987 to 1992. That is 25 years consecutively and it did n ot find minimum wage suffic iently important to pass the necessary legislation to make it a reality. What a cryings hame. And the PLP has the audacity to claim that they are for the small man. Minimum wage is only the b eginning of the 25 years of shameful and scandalous lack of caring and compassion by t he PLP government. The FNM also ushered in the 40hour work week. Can youi magine? Prior to that, e mployees were required to work 48 hours a week, before one cent of overtime was paid to them. And that was at a time when most of the world had long moved to the 40h our work week. B ut that is not all, in fact, the FNM government also ushered in employment pro-t ection for pregnant women in the workplace. Today, as a r esult of the FNMs groundbreaking employment legislation, passed by a caring, compassionate and progressive FNM government,w omen who are pregnant, on maternity leave or soon after giving birth, cannot legally bet erminated by their employer. Unfortunately, we lived ( less so today) in a time when e mployers, all too often, saw w omen who became pregnant a s a burden. Clearly, these were discriminatory practices and some of the worst kind. But, that has ended for the most part, and where andw hen it rears its ugly head today, because of a caring, compassionate and progressive FNM government, women can seek legal redress and be compensated. B ut it does not end there. I n fact, the FNM government created a legislative right not to be fired without cause. Thee mployer, in other words, is now required by law to have cause to terminate youre mployment. They cant legally, simply just let you go as we say. This is important because if you are a goodw orker, you should have some expectation of contin ued employment. Today, if an employer terminates your employment unfairly, apart from unlawfully, you can seek legalr edress and be compensated b ecause of a caring, compassionate and progressive FNM government. It still does not end there. In fact, the FNM government i n this term made unemploym ent compensation a reality, as it exists in most, if not all, d eveloped countries. Just imagine, for the first time ever in our nation, employees whol ose their jobs could seek unemployment benefits. In other words, they can be p aid for a period until they f ind other employment. It was long overdue and needed for a very long time but it was m ade a reality under this caring, compassionate and progressive FNM government. A fter 25 long years in government, the PLP did not do any of the above to aid the small man or the ordinary worker (women in particular, a lot of them being the sole breadwinner), to help thoseo f little and challenged means, but they would like us to buy their story and one they tell often, as if we are expected to believe it because they say it so often that they are for t he small man. But we k now better. As the saying goes, because you say it often, it does not make it so. T he small man knows who is for him and that is the Rt Hon Hubert A Ingraham and the Free National Move-m ent. MICHAEL A FOULKES Secretary General FNM N assau, J anuary 22, 2012. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 C HINESE investment abroad is drawi ng scrutiny as global leaders increasingly look to China to prop up the world economy, even though some remain wary of t he countrys dominance. T he head of one of Chinas biggest private equity firms said at the World Eco nomic Forum on Thursday that foreign p rejudice about Chinese investment is unfair and that Chinese investors are still learning a game that much of the world h as been playing for decades. With Chinas state capitalism booming a nd Western economies lagging, business and political leaders also discussed the prospects for democracy worldwide, at an Associated Press debate. Attention at the invitation-only gather i ng in the Swiss Alps turned Thursday to China, and how and whether it could help developed economies in Europe and theU nited States avoid a new recession. Chinese companies and government funds have been using vast reserves of c ash to buy up foreign companies and i nvest in foreign government bonds in recent years. But with billions of dollars in Chinese investments pouring into theirc ountries, some governments have accused China of seeking to exploit the economic weakness of others to grab valuable nat u ral and technological resources at rock bottom prices. President Barack Obamas administrat ion also has repeatedly accused China of b reaking global trade rules by giving unfair protection to its companies and domestic workers. The vast majority of Chinese companies are trying to follow the rules as they understand it, said John Zhao, CEO ofH ony Capital. But many Chinese com panies are still trying to learn the rules. His company controls PC maker Lenovo, which bought IBMs computer division in 2 005. The director general of the World Trade Organisation, Pascal Lamy, said China w ill continue to face public perception problems from its investments abroad. We will see in the years to come, as C hinas investments grow and grow. ... We w ill have the same sort of political turbulences as we have had on trade for the last 10 years, he said. O ne way for China to ease the rest of the worlds fears about its extravagant cor porate shopping sprees is be more open a bout its vast poverty problem at home, said Lamy. In order for this to result in a win-win game, a number of public perception issues have to be addressed, he said. Nasdaq CEO Robert Greifeld reminded listeners that Chinas companies arent the only ones with a reputation problem. We in the Western world have had a long tradition of corporate misdeeds, he said, citing Enron in the United States and P armalat of Italy both of which coll apsed after years of hiding massive holes in their accounts. Yale President Richard C Levin sugg ested the rest of the world could be gratef ul for Chinas investment interest, as eventually the country of more than 1 billion people will have to start spending more ofi ts cash on problems at home, including the lack of proper social security for an aging population. Some fraction of these trillions could be used domestically, he said. T he head of the Asian Development Bank said Asia already has been affected by the ongoing European financial crisis in two ways through the withdrawal of credit in Asia by many European banksa nd financial institutions, and a drop in trade, which will impact China because Europe is its largest export market. I really hope that the European financial crisis can be overcome, Haruhiko Kuroda told the AP. B ritish Prime Minister David Cameron, w hose country doesnt use the troubled euro, urged the eurozone to impose fiscal discipline and integrate its budget poli c ies more, and expressed support for jointly issued eurobonds. Cameron defended genuine market c apitalism against those who favour state capitalism such as that practised in China or Russia. He said free-market countriesw ith rule of law where governments can be s uccessfully challenged in court have got to stand up and shout about their values. ... I dont think we should give up in this batt le at all. Cameron also joined Germanys Chan cellor Angela Merkel in backing the idea o f a free-trade deal between the Euro pean Union and the US, claiming that a trans-Atlantic pact could deliver a muchneeded boost to global commerce. T he annual Davos forum is under grow ing criticism by those who feel its too removed from the real world. Activists f rom Occupy Davos are camping out in igloos and yurts to call attention to income inequality. This is a man-made crisis and the peop le who have caused the crisis, many of whom are in Davos, should be held to account, Salil Shetty, the secretary gen e ral of Amnesty International, told AP. At the democracy debate, a range of leaders agreed that Western-style democ-r acy is still a valid model for the world, as long as it draws in all segments of society and takes social equality as a central tenet. US Rep David Dreier, a Republican from California, said activism such as the Occupy movements needs to be a part of the democratic process. We cant say to people be patient. We need to figure out how to address this, he said. This article is by Frank Jordans, of the Associated Press. Is the PLP for the small man? LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Leaders look to Chinas investments abroad The debate about debates

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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER PLPaccused of bribes for votes Volume: 108 No.53FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS ANDSUN HIGH 83F LOW 69F By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter c nixon@tribunemedia.net THREE men have come forward claiming a bribe was offered by political opera tives of the PLP trying to drum up support for their par-t y ahead of the upcoming gen eral elections, a heated House of Assembly session was told yesterday. Education Minister Desmond Bannister claimed these individuals have sworn in affidavits that cash was offered by campaigning members of the opposition in return for political support. Mr Bannister agreed to withdraw the comments, but warned it was not the last that Parliament would hear of the matter. Asked if he could prove the claims, Mr Bannister said: I am fully able, in fact the infor mation has been put into affidavits, I have three of them to date. I know the people that have been offered and I know the people that offered it and at the appropriate time I will deal with this. The allegations came during Mr Bannisters contribu t ion to amendments to the Parliamentary Elections Act debate yesterday, in response to claims that the Prime Min ister told FNM supporters to accept the oppositions bribesa nd then vote FNM anyway. Mr Bannister said he was recently informed by an FNM supporter that while the PLP was campaigning in Staniel Creek, Andros, they got into a disagreement with one of Mr Bannisters supporters and were asked to leave. Mr Bannister said he was told they returned the next day and offered his supporters $1,000. Dr Bernard Nottage even tually rose to ask if Mr Ban nister could produce any proof. If he could not, the Bain and Grants Town MP said, the comments should be with drawn. Speaker of the House Alvin Smith ordered Mr Bannister to withdraw his claims unless House in uproar after ministermak es claims TRY OUR CRANBERRY & RAISIN O ATMEAL The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PARENTS Osee and Chantal Joseph at a press conference yesterday at Princess Margaret Hospital, where it was announced that doctors had successfully separated an underdeveloped conjoined twin from the couples baby daughter, Shakera. Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff TOMORROW, DONTMISSTHETRIBUNESBIGTFOR . FOOD COUPONS AND SPECIALS NEWS SPORTS FASHION FOOD TRAVEL MOVIES MUSIC TV NYTIMES By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net A PARASITIC twin was successfully removed from the back of a three-week-old baby girl on Wednesday evening, marking an historic milestone in Bahamian medicine. Doctors and nurses from the obstetrical, neonatal, and neurological units at Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH were joined by the babys parents to announce the success, noting it was the first time in the country that such a surgery had been performed. Baby Shakera was born at PMH to Chantal and Osee Joseph on January 3, with a parasitic twin attached to her back. The partially-formed mass had a small leg with some toes and was completely binded with Shakeras spine. Neurosurgeon Dr Magnus Ekedede, who led the operation to separate Shakera from the underdeveloped twin, said he had tremendous stress at first because he didnt believe we could do it in the Bahamas. But, he felt more at ease following prayer, careful surgery planning, and excel lent support from his team. Everybody did everything right, Dr Ekedede said, thanking the doctors and nurses who assisted in the surgery. Its not about me ... I thank everybody that has to do with this. He continued: The Bahamas should be happy that we could accomplish this here. Every Bahamian should be happy because if you read through texts book and google this its not easy. From my records, nothing like that has been done in the Caribbean. Ms Joseph called her child a miracle baby and thanked PMHs doctors and nurses profusely. Thank you to all the docPRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham said he is encouraged by the diversity of those awarded grants to sup port their enterprising business ideas under the new Jump-Start programme. The 72 recipients are men and women young and old Mr Ingraham said at the offi cial launch of the initiative, which aims at helping fledgling entrepreneurs get their dreams off the ground. F OREIGN Affairs Minis ter Brent Symonette was yesterday called on in Parliament to produce a list of everyone g ranted citizenship during the FNM administration. On the final day of debate on amendments to the Parliamentary Elections Act, Bain and Grants Town MP Dr Bernard Nottage said that in a country like the Bahamas, where people move in and out, individuals who are not entitled to vote in an election can sometimes end up becoming registered. He said any issues of this kind would be avoided if a list of persons who were granted citizenship was made public. B y LAMECH JOHNSON Staff reporter l johnson@tribunemedia.net THECourt of Appeal rejected the bail appeal by Bishop Randy Fraser because he failed to show any except ional circumstances to justify b eing released on bond. The Court released its detailed ruling yesterday ont he rejection of bail to the conv icted sex offender, who returns to the court in a month to appeal his conviction. A t the time of the hearing last December, appellate court president Justice Anita A llen said the reasons for the bail rejection would be released at a later date. Yesterday, Justice Allen i nformed defence attorney Jiaram Mangra and Fraser they would be presented witha printed copy of their ruling. S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 BISHOP APPEAL RULING REVEALED im lovin it BABY TWIN HEALTHY AFTER LANDMARK OPERATION S YMONETTE SAYS NO OVER CITIZENSHIP LIS T PM PLEASED BY BUSINESS IDEAS

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By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net MAGISTRATE Carolyn Vogt Evans sent the punishm ent of a convicted child r apist, who pleaded guilty to a robbery last November, back to the Supreme Court as she had initially done last year. Andrew Bridgewater, 38, had been arraigned before Magistrate Vogt-Evans on Novem-b er 22 when he pleaded guilty to robbing a 52-year-old woman of a handbag containing $100 worth of personal items. The magistrate, after listening and watching the unremorseful attitude and conducto f the accused, told Bridgewater that she would refer the matter to the Supreme Court for sentencing. She said because of his attitude and hisp revious convictions, he deserved more time in prison t han she was allowed to give. However, when the matter w as being heard before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs on Monday J anuary 16, Magistrate Isaacs once more sent the case back to the magistrate's court, this t ime for a technical error to b e corrected. B ecause the Court Six magistrate was not the one who h ad originally convicted B ridgewater, but only accepted his guilty plea, Senior Jus t ice Isaacs said that as regards the law, he could do nothing. According to the Criminal Procedure Code, a Magistrate referring a matter to the S upreme Court for sentencing must have all precondit ions met, which includes conv iction of the accused. However, before remitting Bridgewater back to the higher court to be dealt with, the C ourt Six, Nassau Street Magi strate, who was on circuit in the family islands recently, m ade it clear that she made no error in November. Addressing Bridgewater, she said: I understand that some exciting things have been hap-p ening in my absence and u nfortunately or fortunately for you, you have been remitted to this court for conviction. I am of the view, she said, that my conviction of the defendant was in order with the guidelines set out in theM agistrates Act. Nevertheless, she emphasised that he was convicted and said that you are to be remitted to the Supreme Court for sentencing. If you did not get it the f irst time, let me repeat it again; Convicted! Convicted! Convicted! Prosecutor Kevin Farrington requested a copy of yes-t erdays transcripts. She said she would check the trans cripts to make certain her signature was on them compared t o the previous one which had been given away without her s ignature or permission. Would you like a copy of my minutes, she asked thep rosecutor. Mr Farrington s miled and replied, Yes your w orship. Bridgewater, who, when a sked by the magistrate, said h e was fine, was remanded to prison until he reappears b efore Senior Justice Isaacs. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012, PAGE 7 OFFICE SPACE $800.00457-4911 Convicted! Convicted! Convicted!

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tors, thank you so much e specially to the nurses, she s aid. From when my baby w as born, they help my baby, so I say thank you so much. Mr Joseph said waiting to hear news about his daughter during the surgery was veryd ifficult. I was nervous and shocked b ecause I didnt know that it was going to be the way it is today, Mr Joseph said. When they told me that they already took off the other parta nd they only closing, I start to get happy excited. But at first it was very hard for me a nd I was really nervous. According to Dr Geoffrey Pennerman, medical chief ofs taff at PMH, the surgery was performed in record time and without complications. Thes urgery only took eight hours r ather than the planned 15. Our patient is comfortable and recovering in our neonatal intensive care unit, Dr Pennerman said. At this very early stage in her recoveryt here are no indications of complications as a result of the surgery. Baby Shakera is presently on a ventilator at PMH and doctors are confident she will continue to do well. D r Gwen McDeigan, director of PMHs neonatal intensive care unit, echoed Dr Pen-n ermans comments and also spoke on whats to be expected in the immediate post o perative period. The surgery was a very prolonged surgery, very ardu o us... but an uncomplicated surgery so the baby came back without any post-operative complications and Im happyt o report that the baby had, r emarkably, a very stable course of a night, she said. But were still early yet, its a lways the first 96 hours after s urgery that can be a very complicated time, but Im reall y pleased to see that so far t his baby has done very well. According to Dr McDeigan, what remains to b e seen is the function of s ome of the organs followi ng the surgery and baby Shakera being weaned off t he ventilator. We anticipate that once we get her out of the immedia te post operative period, r emember shes being sedated a nd getting pain medication, she may not make the best respiratory effort on her own, Dr McDeigan said. So were not trying to be a ggressive in getting her off the ventilator not right yet. Were trying to get her past this post operative period. O nce she is past this period, doctors will be able to start withdrawing her pain medications so she can wake upa nd begin further tests. Theres still much of the story to be told, Dr McDeigan said. We are e ncouraged and very positive i n our outlook that when we get to each of those bridges t o cross, that we will cross that b ridge, even with difficulty, we will get to the other side. Dr Ekedede said he doesnt a nticipate baby Shakera will h ave any major deficits foll owing the surgery. I do anticipate this baby t o do well, he said. There are things that would of told me, or told us, that therew ould be a problem. Now t here are things we may not k now time will say... The first important thing is to make sure she comes out of the ventilator which I think will be very soon. I t was during a routine ultrasound that baby Shakera was diagnosed by doctors with an abnormality. She was 30 weeks in utero. According to chief obstet rician, Dr Mildred Hall-Watson, the ultrasound had to be repeated so that she, along with her team, could confirm what we were dealing with. It was after repeated ultrasounds and several consult ations with the parents, that t hey realized they needed assistance from other PMH departments. We looked at what our possibilities were, Dr Hall-Watson said. One of the important things that we try to pay a ttention to when we manage patients is inter-department consultation and so we immediately went to the neo-natol-o gist (and we realized that we were going t o have to have consultation with the neurosurgical team. Together, this team of doctors from the various PMH departments carefullyp lanned the delivery of the baby and the appropriate time for a surgery to remove the abnormality that was attached to Shakeras back. The delivery itself, needl ess to say, was challenging, D r Hall-Watson said. Imagi ne trying to get out say a baby who weighs maybe 11 o r 12 pounds not easy... but a baby who also has another extensive attached parasitict win on its back, that was even m ore challenging. Shakera was born by cesarean section surrounded by obstetricians, paediatricians, and neurosurgeons, before being immediatelyp laced in PMHs neonatal intensive care unit. Dr McDeigan said Shakera w as very stable following her birth, but paediatricians still classified it as a very challenging case as they had to maintain the integrity of the parasitic twin. Any loss of integrity any i nfection in the parasitic twin c ould have led to the demise of this baby, she said. It is really with due credit to our nurses who are at the bedside of the baby, 24 hours a day, and our doctors who are on call monitoring the baby, that t his baby was able to survive and make it to surgery. Now that the surgery has been successfully completed,D r Ekedede believes baby Shakera could make it home i n as little as two to three weeks. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 THE TRIBUNE he could prove them to be true. M r Bannister said: On y our advice Mr Speaker, I will w ithdraw the statement but everything I have said in this House is true. Following the House session last night, an FNMs ource claimed PLP operatives are engaging in a number of underhanded election tactics. In some Family Islands, he said, voters are being offered money and asked to turn their votersc ard over to the partys campaign generals. Thats a very serious thing, especially since international entities have been asked to come to monitor the elections, the source said. A mendments to the Parliam entary Elections Act, which were passed yesterday in the House of Assembly, aim to clarify the process of overseas voting and permit the elections to be scrutinised by foreign observers. P LPACCUSEDOF BRIBESFORVOTES f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e Baby twin healthy after landmark operation Osee and chantal Joseph speks to the press B ABY S hakeras parents, Osse and Chantal, pictured yesterday.

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According to the ruling by Justice Allen, Justices Stanley John and Abdulai Conteh, the court was not convinced Fraser and Jiaram Mangra presented any exceptional circumstances to justify the 54-year-old being granted bail, despite being satisfied by other arguments presented. I t read: While we were sati sfied that the applicant was of p reviously good character, that the offence of which he was convicted, although serious, was not such as would providea powerful incentive to abscond, and that it wasi mprobable that he would a bscond given his connections to The Bahamas and the fulfilment of all his obligations under his previous grant of bail, we could not find any exceptional circumstances which dri-v e us to the conclusion that the j ustice of the case required that t he applicant be granted bail p ending his appeal. T he document continued o n to say that indeed, in the a bsence of the applicant showing the decision of the m agistrates court was obvio usly in error, it must be t reated by us as correct unless a nd until we find it to be wrong on appeal. Further, we felt justice could be achieve by expediting the hearing of the appeal rather t han by the granting of bail. This ruling came six weeks a fter announcing their decis ion at the end of Frasers bail hearing. The senior pastor of Pilgrim Temple Baptist Church appeared before the a ppellate court on December 1 6 seeking to be granted bail pending the outcome of his a ppeal, which will be heard on February 27. I n November, he was con victed in Magistrates Court of having sex with a minor between July 2005 and Feb r uary 2006. Prosecutors argued that he abused his position of trust by having sex with a girl he h ad agreed to counsel. He was originally charged in the summer of 2006, but freed a year later after a mistrial. His retrial started in 2008. After several delays, D eputy Chief Magistrate Caro lita Bethell handed down the guilty verdict and sentenced Fraser to serve three years at Her Majesty's Prison. At the bail hearing, Mangra was unable to persuadet he justices that his client d eserved to be freed pending the outcome of his appeal. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012, PAGE 9 BISHOP APPEAL RULING REVEALED f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e

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L OCAL NEWS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 THE TRIBUNE Scotiabank (Bahamasis seeking the services of a Senior Manager, Client Relationships for its Corporate & Commercial Banking Centre. Position Summary:The Senior Manager, Client Relationships must possess a broad knowledge of Corporate & Commercial nancial products and services, and a strong focus on the cross-sell, up-sell, and retention of existing commercial customers. He/she is responsible for identifying prospects int arget markets, developing prospect acquisition strategies, maintaining prospect relationships, maintaining a sustainable prospect sales pipeline, conducting prospect sales calls, qualication of opportunities based on customer information and due diligence. The incumbent is on the coverage team with the Credit Solutions Group with responsibility for deal structuring, nancial modeling,n egotiation and pricing for new and existing corporate and large commercial customers.Key Accountabilities for this Role: assigned market area. according to agreed upon growth objectives. external contacts. maintain, improve, grow and retain the relationship. Educational Requirements: Functional Competencies: Strong knowledge of the corporate and commercial banking marketplace and a detailed positioning within the assigned market area. experience. objectives, strategies, structure, as well as its lending and deposit products and services. in the market and all commercial systems and platforms. The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all an interview will be contacted. Resources at scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com on or before February 03, 2012. H e said: I would like the Minister of Foreign Affairs to disclose those persons whoh ave received citizenship up to now, disclose them to the public, so that when we check the register we know who is a citizen and entitled to be registered. However, Mr Symonette r efused to name new citizens, saying he has already told the press how many persons were regularised under the FNM. He said the protocol for registering has been clear sinceI ndependence an applicant gets a certificate of citizenship, which he submits in order to get a passport and then usest he passport to register. Dr Nottage also claimed people have said they are hav ing difficulties registering to v ote, often because of inconsistencies in what is accepted as correct documentation. A s a way to fix this and othe r problems, Dr Nottage said, he supports the idea of a per manent register. H e said: Unless they can show cause why persons who have voted before ought noth ave voted before, there s hould not be an impediment to that person registering again. That is one of the reasons I favour a permanent regis ter. If you go through the process for the very first time have all the necessary docu ments, they should not have to go through the process over and over again. D r Nottage said he has no issue with the amendments to the Act, but believes they do not go far enough. A resolution was also passed yesterday, authorising the Ministry of Finance to a ccept a $41 million loan from E XIM Bank of China to provide funding for the North Abaco Port Project and LittleA baco Bridge Project. The design and construction of the Little AbacoB ridge will cost $6.5 million a nd the North Abaco Port is estimated to cost upwards of $33m. E nvironment Minister Earl Deveaux said the project will provide economic opportuni t y and growth for Abaco, lead t o environmental restoration and wetland preservation, and improve international rela-t ions. The new bridge will be constructed on the north side of the existing causeway. He noted that 47 are from New Providence and 25 from Grand Bahama. They were funded to a total of $530,000, representing one third of the$ 1.5 million the government h as allocated for Jump Start for this fiscal year. Your applications have been approved to provide funding for tourism-relatedb usinesses engaged in a wide v ariety of activities: manufact urers of straw goods handbags, hats, floor mats, place mats, etcetera, operators of sports fishing tours, rentals of fishing gear and of yachts, pro-d ucers of sea-shell craft, manu facturers of jewellery and other accessories, producers of fruit juices and operators of fruit and cocktail juice stands, persons engaged in the sale of souvenirs, the rental ofs norkel gear and beach towels and including musicians engaged at resorts and other places of entertainment, Mr I ngraham said. He said awards will soon b e made to Family Island applicants as well. The programme, open to i ndividuals over 30, is meant to encourage aspiration and help facilitate the dreams flowing from the imaginations o f Bahamians desiring to go into business but who lack the necessary capital funding to do so, Mr Ingraham said. He said other programmes introduced by his government include the Self-Starter pro-g ramme, which targets budding entrepreneurs between the ages of 18 and 29; and the National Job-Readiness and Skills (NJRST Mr Ingraham told of his meeting with a young busi-n ess owner who got his start through Self-Starter, and who was recently subcontracted to do electrical work on the new Office of the Prime Minister. He told me how grateful he was for the assistance prov ided to him through the SelfStarter Programme. He said that the funding made available to him made the difference between his being able to open his own business ande mploy others and remaining an employee of somebody else. Self Starter made him a s uccessful businessman, the prime minister said. H e also noted that the N JRST has provided employment and skills training to 3 ,000 Bahamians who were p reviously unemployed. Without this programme many of these persons would have been on the blocks or o therwise idle, out of work and in financial difficulties. Through these two initiatives, even in these very trying times, thousands of Bahamians are being provided with employment, skills training anda lso opportunities to become business-owners and employers of additional Bahamians, Mr Ingraham said. He said Jump-Start is another bold step in the governments efforts to foster greatere ntrepreneurship, private sector business development and Bahamian ownership of small businesses providing valuable services to the economy. E ach hopeful can apply for a grant of up to $7,500, to m ake payments on current invoices for goods and supplies required for their approved business enterprise. Mr Ingraham said: Every approved applicant would notn eed $7,500. We will only pay up to what is justifiably required for your business. T he monies may only be used in respect of the approved b usiness; you cannot pay othe r bills unconnected to the approved business with m onies from this prog ramme. He said that, eventually, 200 applicants will be approved to participate. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e SYMONETTE SAYS NO OVER CITIZENSHIP LIST PMPLEASED BY BUSINESS IDEAS

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012, PAGE 11 For more informationvisit www.nassaucontainerport.com or call 242.323.7066 or 242.323.7064 NOTICEpublic servants subscription processPublic Servants taking advantage of Government Loans for the Arawak Port Development Initial Public Share offering are reminded that separateapplication forms must be submitted to APDs placement agents in order to obtain shares in the port. If you have already applied for a Government loan with salary deductions through your Payroll Department,you will not be considered for shares unless you have also submitted an APD share subscription form to CFAL or Providence Advisors Ltd. before 5 p.m. on January 31st. Public Servants may also drop off completed subscription forms to branches of Colina Insurance,Bank of The Bahamas International and,in selected Family Islands,to branches of RBC Royal Bank. Forms must include applicants Passport and National Insurance numbers. THEPUBLIC TOILETS at Centreville park pictured yesterday in a disgusting, run-down state, filled with rubbish, covered in graffiti and even with the electric meter ripped out. Photos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff If you go down to the park today... youre in for a Horrible surprise