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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03175
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 12-15-2011
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03175

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Fishermen alive after 5 days adrift Volume: 108 No.21THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND BREEZY HIGH 81F LOW 70F By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net FOUR missing Andros fishermen have been rescued and returned to their families after being adrift at sea for five days. The men Prince Jolly, Allan Wright, Roger Miller and another man known as KK were airlifted to Nas sau by the US Coast Guard at about 5pm yesterday. They were then taken to the Princess Margaret Hospital for treatment. Lieutenant Commander Nedly Martinborough, of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, said the men were discovered around 1pm drifting in waters near Andros. He said: They were found by US Coast Guard aircraft about 32 miles south of Andros. All four of them were in one boat. Two of them are very sick and need medical attention. You have to understand these men have not eaten since Sat urday. When they were first discovered, the Coast Guard gave them a radio and remained on the scene until the helicopter from Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos (OPBAT rescue them. They all appeared to be in good health although they were obviously exhausted from the entire ordeal. They were dehydrated and there fore for health reasons they were flown to Nassau for medical attention. They do not appear to be injured and will be fine after a couple days of rest. A friend of the fishermen, said the entire Andros community is grateful to the Defence Force and the U S Coast Guard for their assistance. The whole community, he said, is elated and thank ful and grateful. USCoast Guard airlifts menbac k to Nassau TRY OUR DOVE RASPBERRY McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST L ATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WHY BUY ANYWHERE ELSE ?!?!Most extensive line in the Bahamas of Windows and Entrance External & NOW Internal Doors Call STORM FRAME WINDOWS for your free estimate today325-6633 I NSIDETODAY Y Y O O U U R R S S O O U U R R C C E E F F O O R R O O B B I I T T U U A A R R I I E E S S NOBODYBEATSTHETRIBUNE NEWS SPORT FASHION MOVIES TV MUSIC COUPONSCOUPONSCOUPONS E E V V E E R R Y Y W W E E E E K K E E N N D D , S S A A V V E E S S A A V V E E S S A A V V E E . . . By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net DISMISSING claims that the FNM interfered with a housing investigation, Minister of Security Tommy Turnquest claimed that former lead investigator Keith Bell is and always has been a political operative for the PLP. Mr Turnquest spoke out against Mr Bells accusation that the investigation into allegations of corruption in the Ministry of Housing were subject to political interfer ence, claiming the statement was opportunistic. He said: His comments were most inappropriate this morning. He is a political operative, he was a political operative while he was a part of the police force and I take anything he says with a grain of salt. An investigation was launched in November 2006 as a result of claims made by contractors and inconsistencies in housing documents uncovered by The Tribune By mid-2007, the investiga tion had stalled for the lack of evidence. In 2008, police said the case was still active and more charges were to be expected. This week, former Housing Minister Kenneth Russell confirmed the long-awaited probe had been completed, but never made public and at least six more people were By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net CUSTOMS and Immigration Officers at the Lynden Pindling International Airport walked off the job yesterday morning, after a foul odour from raw sewerage became unbearable, union officials confirmed. The walkout occurred around 8.30am and caused operations in the customs and immigration department to stop working for a little more than an hour. Sloane Smith, of the Bahamas Customs Immigration and Allied Workers Union (BCIAWU), said the officers have been complaining of the smell for quite some time. The officers in the customs and immigration reported the odour to management a few months ago and nothing happened, he said. What is happening is there is a pipe which By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net ANOTHER piece of the Baha Mar puzzle fell into place yesterday as the government opened the new Cable Beach Police Station. A number of cabinet ministers and opposition MPs were present yesterday for the buildings ribbon-cutting ceremony and blessing. Security Minister Tommy Turnquest said a new police station was necessary to accom modate the expanding Cable Beach community and to continue the governments battle against crime. He said: We are here today to witness the opening of a state-of-the-art police station with provisions of emergency management services. The government is taking the lead in the fight against crime implementing many ini By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net A MAN and his son were remanded to Fox Hill Prison yesterday after being arraigned at Magistrate's Court for weapon and drug charges. Haitian-born Dieudonne Jean Pierre, 53, and his Bahamian son Donald Jean Pierre, 25, both of Freeport, Grand Bahama, were charged before Magistrate Joyanne Ferguson Pratt. The prosecution claimed that on Saturday, December 10, a team of police officers entered a residence at Forest View Apartments on Outlaw Lane with a search warrant for dangerous drugs and unlicensed firearms. CHOIR WELCOMES IN CHRISTMAS MINISTER ACCUSES BELL OF PLP LINK B AILDENIED FOR HAITIAN ON DRUG CHARGES CUSTOMS STAFF S T A GE W ALK OUT CABLE BEACH POLICE S TATION OPENED MEMBERS of the Bahamas National Youth Choir perform during their third annual Christmas concert on Tuesday night at the Trinity Methodist Church. The choir was directed by Cleophus Adderley. For more pictures, see page 9. Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 7 7 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 5 5 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 7 7 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 6 6 im lovin it

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THE Bahamas Handbook 2012 is now in stores, offering readers fascinating and little known facts about the Bahamas, its people, culture, economy and history. In its 626 pages, the handbook is filled with insightful features on the Bahamas, beautiful four colour photographs and rich illustrations that bring the stories to life. The handbook reveals previously unknown details about the second world war, the general strike of 1957, and the first ever distribution of weapons in the Bahamas. Readers can discover how German and Italian U-boats stalked and torpedoed Allied freighter in Bahamian waters during the second world war, trying to prevent them from carrying war materials to Britain, and how islanders of high and low station helped to rescue and care for the sur vivors. Relive the anger and resentment that led to the General Strike of 1957 and how he Bahamian police force was issued with weapons for the first time in history as seen through the eyes of a gazetted police officer of the day. Also in this years publication, readers will find that despite decades of heat, humidity and hurricanes on San Salvador, a plantation owners meticulous diary somehow survived to the present day, giving Handbook readers an unvarnished picture of the high emotions that prevailed among slaves in the earlier 19th century, on the eve of emancipation. Ever wonder how Wallace Groves was able to build an entire industrial city in the pine and barrens of Grand Bahama in less than 10 years?A Handbook story clears up some of the mystery and explores the techniques he used to build Freeport, as recalled by his contemporaries and closest associates. For more information, pro motional copies or to send press releases to the publish er, please contact the Editorial Department at 242-3235665 or email info@ dupuch.com. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TREASURESWITHIN THEPAGESOFNEW HANDBOOKEDITION THESTORY of U-Boats that stalked the Atlantic feature in the latest edition of the Bahamas Handbook. THEHISTORY of horse racing in the Bahamas features in the new Handbook. D ISCOVER C lark Gables connections to the Bahamas.

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 3 n tb bnbrnnbr n tbnnrf By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT With the Free National Movement in search of new blood to run in the next general election, senators Michael Pintard and Frederick McAlpine could be on the list of new candidatesf or Grand Bahama. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the party is always in search of new talent and in the coming weeks, will unveil its line-up of candidates. Sources say Kay Smith, a former FNM senator, could also be on the list. While in Grand Bahama this week, Mr Ingraham confirmed that some current MPs will not be running again. We want for this election to put forward the best team that we can. In order to do that, some of our membersw ho are now in the House are going to retire, he said. Senator McAlpine said the FNM has always been renewing and reviving itself. Whether it is with women or young people, they have always sought to give people an opportunity, and that is one of the things I was always fascinated with when it comes to our party, he said. Rev McAlpine, a native of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, was appointed to the Senate in 2007. He is president of Frederick McAlpine Evangelistic Min-i stries and a senior minister at Freeport Fellowship Centre. Senator Michael Pintard was appointed in March to fill a vacant seat in the Senate. Mr Pintard is a well-known entrepreneur, human resources development consultant, poet, lecturer and writer. He said the FNM is looking to transform the lives of people in Grand Bahama, offer a new vision, generate jobs and increase Bahamian home ownership. Following the recent firing of former Housing MinisterK enneth Russell, Mr Pintard said persons expecting a division in the party are going to be disappointed. We are going to pull together at the correct time; all is at stake, he said. By KHRISNA VIRGIL kvirgil@tribunemedia.net THE government signed contracts worth almost $4 million for the repair of badly damaged roads in Andros and Harbour Island yesterday. Works, Transport, and Housing Minister Neko Grant travelled to Stanyard Creek, Andros where residents have reportedly lost vehicles to roads that have become almost unusable. Charmain Lubin, a preschool teacher on the island, said she lost two vehicles because of the deplorable roads. She said: Ive been back here 10 years and I have changed two vehicles since I came back here front end gone. Thats how bad the roads are, especially the inner communities, thats in Stanyard Creek, Blanket Sound, and Stafford Creek. We prefer to ride bicycles and walk because we cannot afford to ride our cars on the roads. Mr Grant and other officials signed a $2,523,280 contract to repair 5.3 miles of road inStanyard Creek. He said: Just over a month ago I executed contracts for some $3.5 million on infrastructure works in Andros and today I will execute a contract for some $2.5 million. Never in the history of this island has $6 million in contracts for infrastructure work been executed in such a short period. The contract, awarded to Mr Basil Neymour, the father of Phenton Neymour, will be completed in phases, with plans for the f irst phase to be completed in six months. B asil Neymour, who built 78 miles of road in Long Island, and 51 miles of road in Cat Island more than 40 years ago, said he is the best man for the job. You should have seen my product, I am one of the best and I have proven that, he said. Another contract was signed in Harbour Island where residents have complained for months about the poor roads. Nu View Construction Company will spearhead the $1,285,208 project. Earlier in the year, the government signed a contract to repair the islands roads, however, preexisting water problems prevented the work from being carried out. The minister responsible for the Water and Sewage Corporation, Earl Deveaux, said the government had to make some important decisions before the road works could continue at that point. When we were here to do the roads, we signed a contract and the infrastructure for your water was so bad and so advanced in corrosion that we were stuck and we were asked not to pave the road until we restored and rehabilitated the water mains, he said. Unfortunately it took a long time to fix. Quinten Kemp, the lead contractor for this project, hopes to begin the road work on Friday. The project is expected to take six months. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Old B ahama Bay resort in West End will reportedly close by the end o f the week, leaving more than a dozen persons out of a job. According to a source, the resort is expected to close on Friday when all employees, i ncluding the management, will be terminated. O nly a small skeleton crew will remain to oversee the prope rty, the source said. The resorts financial con troller Paul Hansen and project manager Derek Gape could not be reached for comment. According to an article pub lished in Tribune Business last m onth, Lubert Adler, the main financier for the stalled $4.9 bil l ion Ginn sur Mer project, has control of the Old Bahama Bay p roperty and 225 surrounding acres, plus another 294-acre par cel that contains the golf course. OLD B AHAMA B A Y T O CLOSE $4m deal to fix roads PINTARDANDMCALPINE COULD BE CANDIDATES BATTEREDROADS on Andros

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EDITOR, The Tribune. THE precedent that has been set with the straw vendors as it relates to the relax ing of the various outstanding monies that is normally collected by other business persons cannot be right. There is a joke being played on the public purse. I am not satisfied that this practice of allowing the vendors who make enough mon ey, to be responsible for living up to the obligations that every other business person is expected to pay. Vendors are bragging how they outsmarted the government. If an ordinary business person cannot give an account of their business activities for a number of years, they would have a problem renewing their busi ness license. How come the straw market is different? If an ordinary business is found wanting, as it relates to unpaid National Insurance contributions, they would have a major difficulty with government. Why are the vendors different? How comea group of vendors who brag about being able to throw two and three hands in a $200 per day asue are given a free pass? No one believes that they cannot afford to pay National Insurance and the outstanding business license fees. Whats up with this? This precedent is not going to bear good fruit. What cause the authorities to be so l enient? This cannot be for political purposes because the market is the market. I am flabbergasted to know that vendors who missed tens of years of National Insurance and Business License fees would be exempted from paying all of the arrears. What happens if every other business does the same? Where will the line be drawn? This is unfair and should not be continued. If no other business is allowed to ignore their obligations to the state then the vendors must be treated the same. Imagine this, the US IRS finds out that a business has not paid their taxes for 10 years, do you think that they would be given an opportu nity to play these kind of games. I think not! The US Government has imprisoned the highest ranking officials, actors, athletes, congressmen, the wealthiest and others for these same kinds of things. There are no exceptions or excuses accepted. We gave the vendors a free brand new facility funded by our money, and then they refuse to contribute to Nation al Insurance, and refuse to pay Business License Fees. This cannot be right and therefore should be revisited, otherwise, level the playing field so other business could enjoy the same privileges. The Bahamian people should not be left to pay the vendors bill. This is not settling well with many Bahamians who are simply too chicken to voice their opinion. The intentions to help the vendors relocate are just, but they must pay their own way, not the public who does not benefit from it. IVOINE W INGRAHAM Nassau, December 9, 2011. EDITOR, The Tribune. SOMETIME ago, Bishop Simeon Hall released an article in which he pointed to a need for the major political parties in the Bahamas to begin a process of succession planning. The comments caused me to undertake a little bit of research on the subject. However, I soon became distracted and discontinued the effort. I resumed my research sometime after conventions by both the PLP and FNM at which time they both placed significant emphasis on the need for the involvement of youth, with special focus on a commitment to the youth of our nation. I once again b ecame distracted and disc ontinued my research. R ecent comments by Prime Minister Ingraham regarding the FNMs intention to seek to offer fresh, new, young faces among its group of candidates for the upcoming General Elections have caused me to resume the effort I have twice put aside, with a determination to identify whether what the Prime Minister is now saying is mere political expediency or whether it is supported by previous actions on his and his partys part. My intention, when I ini tially commenced my effort several years ago, was for the research to have a three-fold focus. The initial focus would be on identifying former Young Liberals, the youth arm of the PLP, and former Torchbearers, the youth arm of the FNM, who are present sitting members of Parliament or who may have previously been elected to Parliament. Secondly, the focus would be expanded to identify members of both political youth arms who had previously received the nomination of their party to contest an election. Finally, I thought to look to identify members of Parliament from both political parties who may have been born subsequent to the PLP attaining a majority of the seats in the House of Assembly, an era some refer to as majority rule, a terminology I detest as I find it divisive to our peoples. Majority Rule, by name and by inference, emphasises the ascendancy of one group of persons and the defeat of another, the rule by persons of one hue and the subjugation of persons of a differing hue. I know of no other country in the region, all of whom have a similar political back ground to ours, that have slav ishly clung to such a notion. But thats another topic for another day. My political succession planning research was aborted without me ever getting beyond first base upon discovery that there are present ly four elected members of parliament Tommy Turnquest, Carl Bethel, Zhivargo Laing and Kwasi Thompson all who have ascended from the youth arm of the Free National Movement. All four have emerged from the Torchbearers. Additionally, Labour Minister, Senator Dion Foulkes, a former Torchbearer, is a former elected parliamentarian on an FNM ticket. I was, however, unable to identify a single present or former member of the Progressive Liberal Party's youth arm elected to Parliament on a PLP ticket. I was, nevertheless, successful in identifying a former Young Liberal who had been elected to serve in Parliament in the person of David Wallace. Mind you, my research did reveal that while David W allace served as a former Y oung Liberal, his election to P arliament was on an FNM ticket. In my view, my research, though limited in scope, is conclusive. The recent pronouncements by Prime Minister Ingraham regarding the need for the FNM to introduce fresh, new, young faces among the FNM's slate of candidates is clearly not mere political rhetoric, but born out by historical fact. Failure on the part of any organisation to renew, to regenerate itself, will surely lead to its decay. The limited research outlined above clearly portrays the PLP as an organisation in decay while the FNM is portrayed as an organisation in ascendancy. MICHAEL R MOSS Freeport, Bahamas, December 11, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited N ULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 C ontributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972P ublished Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 WHILE the Bahamas government, in an attempt to crack down on crime, this year made life sentences for murder mean just that the remaining years of a convicted persons life there was an uproar in England when it was suggested that mandatory sentences should end. On December 7, an article in the Sun by Anthony France reported that legal experts in England who recommended the ending of mandatory life terms for murder were ridiculed as diabolical dogooders by victims families. The Homicide Review Advisory Group wants judges to decide the length of sentences based on each individual case, France reported. It argued that the current system where mercy killings and serial murders both carry a minimum sentence of 15 years is unjust. The Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge wants MPs to consider reform of the mandatory sentence law. A parent, whose 10-year-old son was killed by thugs, warned that criminals will continue laughing at the law if mandatory sentences for murder are abol ished. The suggestion that mandatory life sentences no longer be mandatory, but left to the discretion of judges, opened a new debate the return of the death penalty in England for murder. We need the return of the death penalty, not a watering down of life sentences, said a mother whose daughter was stabbed to death in London. Yes, mandatory life sentences should be abolished, commented another British citizen, and replaced with the death penalty. In amending the Bahamas Penal Code, Prime Minister Ingraham pointed out that the courts in fact the Privy Council have determined that the death penalty is not a mandatory punishment for murder. They have also decided that the death penalty may only be used in the worst of the worst cases. A lthough many Bahamians believed t hat the case from the Bahamas on which this decision was made was indeed the worst of the worst, the Privy Council did not agree. Based on that judgment mandatory capital punishment in the Bahamas was effectively abolished. However, in its amended legislation, the Bahamas government listed what it con sidered the worst of the worst cases when the mandatory sentence would be either the death penalty or life in prison for various crimes. The death penalty was to remain an option for the murder of a police officer or other law enforcement officials, persons critical to the judicial system, such as the killing of witnesses, jurors, judicial officials, prosecutors, a murder in the furtherance of robbery, rape, kidnapping, terrorism or other felony, multiple murders and contract killings. So what was seemingly taken away by the Privy Council was given back by an amended act of parliament. Other murders are punishable in a range of from 30 to 60 years. The only exception would be the conviction of a minor that is a person under 18 years of age. A minor would be sentenced to a minimum of 20 years in prison after which his continued confinement will be reviewed by the court every five years. With the mandatory death penalty removed for murder, government decided that some way had to be found to deter our criminal element, which under the protection of the various Privy Council rulings, was indeed laughing at the law. Therefore, the heinous crimes that did not measure up to the Privy Councils worst of the worst were to get mandatory life sentences. Life no longer means 25 years with more time shaved off for good behaviour. Life for murder means just that years of waiting for the undertaker to remove the dead body from the prison cell. In England, Prime Minister David Cameron stepped in to calm tempers. He assured citizens that his government had no plans to do away with mandatory terms. The most serious crimes deserve the most serious sentences, a spokesman added. The same sentiments were expressed by the Ingraham government. Its a joy to now report the daily chirping of magistrates reminding lawyers that under the law they can no longer grant bail to repeato ffenders and persons accused of heinous c rimes. This must be music to the ears of law-abiding citizens, who have had to waita long time to read such words in court reports. As for the criminal who might think he is being treated unfairly, he has only one alternative and that is to turn his back on his life of crime, reform his life and start making a worthwhile contribution to society. Political succession planning LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Britons cry for return of death penalty Vendors should pay in full like everyone else

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police have launched an intensive initiative to combat crime during the Christmas season. Assistant Commissioner Emrick Seymour said Operation Winter Storm will involve heightened police visibility on the streets and in residential and business communities throughout Grand Bahama. Mr Seymour was speaking at the Royal Bahamas Police Forces annual Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony at the Gerald Bartlette Police Headquarters Complex on the Mall. A number of students and parents attended the event. The Police Youth Band provided music and prayers were offered up for the police force and the nation. Santa Claus also rode in on a police motorcycle and handed out candy to the youngsters, but the highlight of the evening was the lighting of the Christmas tree by Mr Seymour and his children, Emrick Jr and Emrinique. Mr Seymour said Christmas is a time of reflection and fellowship. As people prepare to purchase gifts, dine and socialise,I want to remind you to remember the true meaning of the season which is tor eflect and celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ who was born into this world to redeem us of our sins, he said. He also stated that the police are committed to ensuring that everyone has a safe holiday season. One of the things we are doing is increasing police presence on the streets and trying to sensitize members of the public of what they can do to protect themselves for the season. ACP Seymour said a team of officers have been specifically assigned to Operation Winter Storm, which will cover businesses in the downtown area, the International Bazaar, and Port Lucaya, as well as residential areas. He also noted that the police have conducted various walkabouts and met with residents to speak about crime prevention. Officers have also distributed safety tip brochures in the community. We have seen some success already and have had some arrests and taken some illegal weapons off the streets, Mr Seymour reported. Mr Seymour said residents should continue to be vigilant going into the holiday season. He said persons should always be aware of their surroundings. He stressed that persons should always remember to buckle up when driving. Mr Seymour noted that shoppers should make certain that purchased items and valuables are in the back trunk of the vehicle. While shopping, he said persons should carry small amounts of cash, and businesses should make regular deposits. We also want to urge indi viduals to observe persons coming into their business establishment and lurking around their shops, he said. If anything looks suspicious g o with your gut and call the police at 911 and let us check it out. We want every memberof the community to have a safe Christmas holiday. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 5 f nt rrt Police clamp down on crime ASSISTANTCOMMISSIONER Emrick Seymour

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE b f b A Major Hotel has a vacancy for aHousekeeping ManagerResponsibilities includes: of up to 600 guest accommodations, public and employee areas housekeeping and laundry staff p laints concerning laundry and house keeping services The ideal candidate must possess the managerial level in an established hotel equivalent chemicals Interested candidates should send resumes to: hrvacancyhotel@gmail.com No later than Friday, 16th December, 2011 DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER Brent Symonette holds the ribbon as Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security, cuts it, with Commissioner Ellison Greenslade looks on. Photos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff PERRY CHRISTIE, leader of the PLP,signs the photograph of the new police station. tiatives and new legislation that together with the work of police officers, we expect positive results. For those who reside, work and visit the western area, Mr Turnquest said they can be a ssured the best of policing. By placing this new police facility in the centre of a new commercial village, Mr Turnquest said protected services should rival or surpass any other area of the Bahamas. He added, however, that the facility is not unique to Cable Beach. The government has invested considerable resources to provide for the safety and security of resid ents and visitors alike, said M r Turnquest. H e said this year alone, the government has spent some $14.5 million on new equipment, technology and crime fighting tools for the Royal Bahamas Police Force. These assets are to make it easier for police officers to do their job more effectively and additionally it is incumbent on them to take care of these assets, he said. Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade said the new facility is perfectly positioned to serve the communities of western New Providence and the Baha Mar development. He said: This new station is purpose built and will pro vide comfort and amenities like nothing that exists on the force today. Cable Beach police station opened f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e ATOUR of the cell block for visitors to the new station. COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade, along with Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard and the Minister of Nation al Security Tommy Turnquest is s hown the new station by Supt Elaine Sands OC, of Cable Beach. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. TOMMY TURNQUEST, Minister of National Security unveils a plaque at the Cable Beach Police and Fire Station yesterday.

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 7 B y DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net RESPONDING to media reports that nearly all of the PLP incumbents have been ratified, former MP George Smith has criticised one alleged choice. The decision in respect of Exuma was based on an inadequate and unfair assessment, which was obviously biased and laced with disregard for the facts and for many who are affected by the outcome, Mr Smith said. His comment is in reference to allegations that current Exuma MP Anthony Moss is likely to be ratified to run again for the constituency. A decision Mr Smith has firmly opposed in recent weeks. An accurate review and investigation throughout Exuma may have resulted ina different conclusion and wider acceptance, Mr Smith said. Last month, he went on record opposing the nomination of Mr Moss to once again run in Exuma under the PLP. Mr Smith said while it is not personal, Mr Moss has not met the standard to be able to represent the people of Exuma. In a recent statement, Mr Smith stated: The Bahamas deserves the best talent; there should be no room for mediocrity or second-rate performance. PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts refused to confirm if Anthony Moss has been ratified. The PLP will make an announcement if and when that occurs, Mr Roberts said. Former MP criticises selection of Moss ANTHONYMOSSMP The Bahamas deserves the best talent; there should be no room for mediocrity or second-rate p erformance. George Smith By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Features Editor nnicolls@tribunemedia.net ONE year after $50,000 worth of Junkanoo supplies disappeared, the owners of the merchanise say the matter has yet to be resolved. Last year, a major shipment o f Junkanoo supplies, predominantly feathers on special order for three major Junkanoo groups, was lost in transit. The products were shipped through the multinationalc ourier DHL by the J unkanoo Shack, a popular East Street Junkanoo supplies store. When the shipment arrived, it was short $50,000 worth of goods, said James Miller, owner of the Junkanoo Shack. He said no acceptable explanation has been put forward for why the shipment was short when the incident occurred last year. One year later, he said the status remains the same. After one year of inquiries and questions, no one in the company can say to me, your items were found in Hong Kong, Jamaica, or where, he said. A spokesperson for DHL said last year the goods were simply late. During the holiday season, the spokesperson said, that is the norm. The company claims any suggestion otherwise is false propaganda. According to Mr Miller, a truck-load of goods, believed to have been the contents of the missing shipment, was destined for the black market but was intercepted by private investigators working with police. The goods were identifiable based on a customer number issued by the Junkanoo Shacks Asian suppliers, he said. Because of the incident, Mr Miller said the Junkanoo Shack has had to adopt a new business model that has made business a lot more risky. We lost a lot of our customers based on that event. They were unsure, because it is still not proven today what was the problem. What we had to do was go out and purchase supplies from January. In Junkanoo, you would want to know what is the colour code the groups are using. Sometimes you only have sufficient funds to order items to cover the groups, but because of what happened, we had to order early and purchase practically every colour, said Mr Miller. Now we have to order anticipating what the groups might wear and hope that someone uses the colour we have. That is a risk, because we d ont know if they will like t he style of feathers or the colours we have, he said. The Junkanoo Shack has returned to using Tropical Shipping, its regular shipping company for 10 years. Mr Miller said the company decided to use DHL last year because they had a last minute order that was more suited to a multinational courier capable of delivering on a three-day deadline, as opposed to the standard three-week shipping schedule. All hope is not lost, accord ing to Mr Miller. He said the Commercial Crimes Unit of the Royal Bahamas Police Force is still working the case, and is expected to bring closure shortly. ONE YEAR ON, JUNKANOO LOSS REMAINS A MYSTERY By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas will reportedly be visited by a member of the British royal family next year. According to media reports, as part of the Queens Diamond Jubilee celebrations, the entire family will visit Commonwealth countries and other nations where the queen is head of state or which have ties to the United Kingdom. Prince Harry will reportedly be visiting the Bahamas on behalf of the queen. The exact date of the visit and what he will do while in the Bahamas is yet to be announced. However, according to the Daily Mails website, Prince Harry may use his visit to stage a fundraising polo match on behalf of his Sentebale charity. In addition to the Bahamas, Prince Harry will reportedly be visiting Jamaica and Belize. Other Caribbean countries on the tour will be visited by the Earl and Countess of Wes sex. These include: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Grenada, Montserrat, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago. The Duke of Gloucester will visit the British Virgin Islands and Malta. The recently married Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will visit Tuvalu, the Soloman Islands, Malaysia and Singapore, reports say. Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall will travel to Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea, and Prince Charles will visit the Channel Islands and Isle of Man alone. The Duke of York will visit Mozambique, Zambia, and India while the Duke of Kent will visit the Falkland Islands and Uganda. ROYAL VISIT TO BAHAMAS

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FREEPORT As the Downtown Revitalisation Project nears completion, the Grand Bahama Port Authority has announced it will introduce kiosks for the sale of indigenous Bahamian products as an added attraction to the newly refurbished Churchill Square. This complementary feature is intended to enhance the downtown experience for tourists and locals alike. The first of the Making it happen initiatives launched in 2009 and the brainchild of GBPA President Ian Rolle,t he three-phase project has now begun breathing new life into the centre of Freeport. Chairperson for the DTP Nakira Wilchcombe said: We are seeing the fruits of everyones hard work and commitment to the project. More and more of the building and shop owners have come onboard to support what is being done. More importantly, this past summer with major events like Rush for Peace and the Downtown International Food and Cultural Festival, weve proven that downtown is an ideal location for such cultural events. As Churchill Square is just about ready, GBPA officialsh ope to make the downtown centre a regular stop for tour bus passengers and other groups. The kiosks were introduced to add cultural flair and break up the monotony of the general retail stores in the area. A public notice by GBPAs Business Development Department invited local artisans interested in obtaining one of four kiosks planned for phase one to submit their business ideas. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Kiosks to be added to Churchill Square THE CROWNING glory of the Downtown Revitalisation Project, the newly refurbished Churchill Square featuring the bust of Sir Winston Churchill.

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 9 f b nt n rrt The Mercedes-Benz C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.The Mercedes-Benz C-Class is a pleasure tobehold offering a new interpretation of driving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible r esponse is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. CHOIR WELCOMES IN CHRISTMAS B AHAMAS NATIONALYOUTHCHOIRCHRISTMAS C ONCERT PICTURESPECIALBYFELIPE MAJOR

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THE Chinese Ambassador of the Peoples Republic of China Hu Shan presented Minister of Education Desmond Bannister with a cheque for $10,000 to assist in the rebuilding of the Crooked Island High School, which suffered severe damage during Hurricane Irene in August. In making the presentation at the Ministry of Education on Monday, Ambassador Shan told Education officials that when the hurricane struck, the Chinese people felt as if it were their own tragedy and Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao sent a letter of sympathy to Prime Minister Ingraham. Shortly after, the Chinese government donated $300,000 to assist with the hurricane relief efforts. The ambassador said when he learned from Minister Bannister and the Education Permanent Secretary Elma Garraway about the damage at the Crooked Island High School, he decided to provide the school with $10,000 as a token of regard of the Chinese Embassy and also an expression of our esteem for education. He said: Like the Bahamas, China attaches great importance to education, which is reflected by a popular saying in China, which literally reads, In a hundred-year strategy, education is the base, and the d eep meaning is that educat ion is of fundamental import ance to the fulfillment of a nations long range mission. Thanking the ambassador, Minister Bannister said: It is important for us to rebuild this school because it is the birthplace of secondary education in the Family Islands. It was the first central secondary school to be established in the Bahamas, he said. He said the government is determined to rebuild the s chool, not only for its historical legacy, but more importantly, to meet the needs of the students of Crooked Island. Mr Bannister also lauded a mbassador for his recent d onation of laptops and printe rs to the CI Gibson Senior High Schools technology programme. The Chinese Embassy has also been instrumental in the establishment of the Performing Arts Programme at the Government High School and has donated thousands of books to public libraries throughout the Bahamas. Acting Principal of Crooked Island High, Jerome F orbes, thanked the ambassador, explaining that the school needs to be rebuilt for the students as well as the adults in the community, who also take classes there. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE NOW OPENLocks of Hair Great quality at reasonable prices We offer: V irgin Remy Indian and Brazilian Hair Straight & Wavy Textures Lengths 12-18 Available in Brown/Off-Black colors I nquire today at 323.2224/ 454.1343 Or E-mail us at info@locks-of-hair.com FROM LEFT ARE Director of Education Lionel Sands, Counsellor and DCM of the Embassy of the People's Republic of China Zhai Xingfu; Education Permanent Secretary Elma Garraway; Crooked Island High School head boy Laquinton Armbrister; Minister Bannister; Ambassador Hu Shan; Acklins High School head boy Douglas Collie; Crooked Island High acting principal Jerome Forbes and NEMA direc tor Captain Stephen Russell. Schools gift from China It is important for us to rebuild this school because it is the birthplace of secondary education in the Family Islands. M M i i n n i i s s t t e e r r o o f f E E d d u u c c a a t t i i o o n n D D e e s s m m o o n n d d B B a a n n n n i i s s t t e e r r

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 11 f b n tt rrt By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The first annual Maritime Symposium will take place on Grand Bahama on Monday, December 19, at the Lucayan Harbour. Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest is expected to deliver the keynote address at the opening. Commodore Roderick Bowe of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force is also expected to attend. The symposium is being organised jointly by the Roy-al Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF ment, and the Department of Marine Resources. Sub Lieutenant Glenn McPhee, officer in charge of RBDF Northern Command, said the purpose of the symposium is to initiate dialogue between Grand Bahama fishermen and industry partners. The Commander of the Defence Force, Commodore Roderick Bowe, would like to ensure that the RBDF fulfills its role as an active community partner, he said. He noted that some of the other industry partners include the Port Department, the Department of Marine Resources, Bahamas Customs, the Royal Bahamas Police Force Marine Division, the Bahamas Air Sea Rescue Association, and the US Coast Guard. Sub Lt McPhee said the Defence Force also wants to promote a greater awareness of maritime legislation; promote maritime safety and enforcement among fishermen; identify challenges experienced by fishermen, and resolve them through collaborative action. The symposium will include sessions on boat safety requirements, and Assistant Port Controller Shannandor Evans will give a presentation on water-skiing regulations and the Motor Boat Act. A representative from the Department of Marine Resources will give a presentation on the rules and regulation governing fishing in Bahamian waters. Maritime event to forge partnerships FASHION Hall threw a Christmas party for The Bilney Lane Childrens Home on Dec 9 and donated a computer set and printer. The Fashion Hall employees got together and bought gifts for the children, to be delivered early next week. FROM LEFT, Amanda Riley, inventory manager at Fashion Hall, Olivia Major, assistant administrator for Bilney Lane Childrens Home and Abigail Minns, director of sales and marketing for Fashion Hall. GIFTSFORCHILDREN

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE THE Cape Eleuthera Island School, an internationally recognised leader in education focused on sustainability, has announced a new head of school starting in the 2012-13 school year. After an extensive 18month search, John Schatz has been hired to fill the position. He has a long history with the Island School semester programme. Mr Schatz joined a pioneer teaching team in 2001 as a mathematics teacher. Outside the classroom, he was head of the boys dormitory, sea kayaking guide, research advisor for a number of different projects and in his final year he ran the daily programme as dean of the school. John is remembered well as the teacher/mentor who was always there to challenge and at the same time support the community, said the Island School in a statement. After four years of committed service to the Island School, John went on to receive his masters in education from Columbia Teacher's College and taught at several private schools. This past summer, John returned to help run the new Island School summer term; he realised that there was an opportunity to come back and help raise the bar for the semester journey. John brings a wealth of experience with Eleuthera and the Island School journey; he shares the schools vision to inspire the next generation of leaders to know they have the ability to effect positive change in the world. Although the school is already very successful, the statement said Mr Schatz is not being hired to maintain the status quo, but rather is committed to enhancing opportunities for faculty and students across all programmes. The Island School jour ney will experience signifi cant growth under Johns leadership. Johns new leadership role will give Chris Maxey the chance to help support the larger mission of the organisation that includes sharing solutions through the Deep Creek Middle School and Cape Eleuthera Institute. Chris is also looking for ward to doing more teaching and spending more time out on expedition with future Island School classes, the statement said. Island School recruits Schatz for next school year JOHNSCHATZ, who has a long history with the Island School semester programme, will be taking over as head of school in the 2012-13 school year.

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THE Ministry of Tourism has eliminated its director of product development post in a n effort to better focus on t he most important element of tourism the visitor experience. Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told hundredsof taxi drivers, jet ski operators, airport workers and other new graduates of the BahamaHost programme that the old post with replaced with a director of visitor experience position. This, he said, took the focus off buildings and physical attributes and put it on the human perspective. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said that for a long time, tourism and hospitality experts convinced themselves that marketing was largely about advertising. But at the end of the day, the most powerful part of marketing, we all know, is word of mouth, he said. Where does word of mouth come from? It comes from the experience that the visitor has in the Bahamas. It is the most powerful form of marketing. What the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation has done in terms of improving visitor experience is remarkable, though largely unpublicised, the minister said. We have spent more money than ever before in history making sure we get the visi-tors experience right as opposed to spending money overseas (on advertising keep talking about the whole thing over and over again, he said. Because in todays world, you cant fool people anymore. There is something that happened that made word of mouth more powerful and more important than ever before. Do you know what that thing is? It is the internet. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace pointed out that marketing professionals have coined the term digital word of mouth to describe a powerful form of internet marketing. The term refers to the comments people post online about their experiences with a product or service. People often post such comments after a vacation. The problem now in our day is that when someone goes to the computer and puts that phrase or that feeling in about their experience in the Bahamas, it is there permanently, he said. So it is more important than ever before, and that is why you see us investing so much more and making sure the experience is right. Im delighted to tell you that it has been getting better. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace lauded two long-standing Ministry of Tourism programmes for their impact on visitor experience BahamaHost and People to People. He pointed out that these programmes which he was involved with from the begin ning are particularly valuable because of the focus they bring to improving how guests experienced the country. The minister reported that since 2005, visitor surveys have been reaping more positive results. It was people like the BahamaHost graduates who made all the differencebecause they engaged guests on a personal level, he said. The most important people in the Bahamas tourism sector are the people who touch the visitor directly, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said. We dont seem to understand that many times. He said the ministry has adopted a purpose statement that calls for all staff to identify and attract visitors who c an significantly enrich the p eople and economy of the Bahamas and then deliver the kinds of experiences that compel them to tell their f riends and relatives that it is b etter in the Bahamas. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 13 MINISTER OF TOURISM and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, supported by his industry training team, addresses BahamaHost graduates. Targeting the tourist

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THE school pick-up traffic jam on East Bay Street took a jolly turn last week as Santa Claus Ho Ho Ho-ed to all the passing children. Santa was assisting with the launch of the Bahamas Realty Holiday Home Showcase featuring with thousands of dollars in prizes, the companys Christmas Gift to the island. The competition began last Friday, when the Christmas lights went on at Bahamas Realty. Entry forms are available at Bahamas Realty on East Bay Street; on Bahamas Realtys Facebook page; at Builders Mall stores on Wulff Road; Jolly Roger Paint Suppliers on Shirley Street; and AG Electric on Jerome Avenue. Entries close on December 19 at 4pm. Santa is also making guest appearances on Bahamas Realty Now on Mondays and Thursdays in December, according to show host Sara Parker, a broker at Bahamas Realty. Photo: Andrea Brownrigg LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE SANTABRINGS SMILESTOTHE SCHOOLRUN Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, c ampaigning for improvements in the area or h ave won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story.

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According to police, during their search they uncovered seven pounds of suspected marijuana and an unlicensed Desert Eagle .44 magnum pistol with six rounds of .44 ammunition. Prosecution also told the court of a large quantity of US currency that was found during the search, which they believe are proceeds from criminal conduct. On December 12, Donald was arrested for questioning by Grand Bahama police. The prosecution claims that during questioning, he admitted to living in the residence where the weapons, drugs, and money were allegedly found. His father, Dieudonne, was later found and also arrested in connection with the incident. The pair were charged with possession of an unlicensed firearm, possession of ammunition without proper certification, and possession of drugs with intent to supply. Dieudonne pleaded guilty to all counts while Magistrate Pratt allowed a short recess in order for Donald to properly consult with his attorney. After the break, Donald pleaded not guilty to all counts. The court will meet again, today, at 1.30pm for sentencing, after Magistrate Pratt allowed more time for prosecution to do proper criminal checks of pending matters. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 15 Bail denied for Haitian f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e

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runs through that area which carries waste, and the smellis horrible. It is really strong in the customs area and it flows over into immigration. So from what I know, the men arrived to work and the smell was so overbearing they walked outside to catch themselves. They were out there for a little over an hour before a representative, Im assuming from the Nassau Airport D evelopment Company, c ame in and directed the pipeline outside the building. When the problem was fixed, the men returned to work. Itsa health issue, so they acted in a way that was constitutional and sanitary. They did what any responsible person would h ave. S honalee Johnson, spokesman for NAD, said as far as she is aware there was no issue with customs yesterday. Ms Johnson said the area was temporarily closed for maintenance. The area shut down a round 8.31am for mainten ance and everyone was back at their posts by 9.20am. There was no impact on flights or anything because the first flight was scheduled for 9.30 and by then things were up and running, she said. This latest incident is just o ne of many customs and i mmigration officers have had w ith management in the last few months. Last month, 200 staff staged a protest outside their administrative complex on Thompson Boulevard after they claimed their concerns were not being heard. Among those concerns were: staff members not being paid hazard allowances where workers suffer from dusty substances; staff not being confirmed after years of work without any credible or legal reason; persons being disciplined for lateness while they should not be as it is defined as more than four times per c alendar month. Such action h as resulted in employees not b eing confirmed or promoted; employees shift premiums, call allowances or overtime not paid appropriately; reimbursements for courses of study outstanding. Mr Smith said he believes the government has a personal vendetta with customs and immigration because they refuse to give them basic necessities. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Customs staff stage walkout f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e T he officers in the customs and immigration reported the odour to management a few months ago and nothing happened. Sloane Smith, Bahamas Customs Immig ration and Allied Workers Union

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 17 The men seemed to be fine. They were dehydrated, but I was told they were given food and water. The familiesare thankful to the Bahamas for all the prayers and efforts. They feel relieved because these past few nights havebeen terrible for them. They can rest their heads now knowing their loved ones are safe. The fishermen, who all live in Mangrove Cay, Andros, were reported missing by rel atives on Saturday at 11.20am. According to family mem bers, the men were aboard the Tropic Explorer. The vessel was left near the Fish Cays when the four men boarded two dinghies two in each dinghy and headed in a west southwest direction. However, when they were discovered all four were in one dinghy. It is not certain what hap pened to them nor why they did not return to the Tropic Explorer. expected to face charges as a r esult of the police investigat ion into allegations of corr uption. On Tuesday, Mr Bell urged the government to give a full account of the police investigation into the allegations made against the Ministry of Housing, and any further findings. There is obviously political interference and political influence going on with this administration. There is no question about it, Mr Bell said. He added: I dont know of no case in the history of the Bahamas where it took a whole team of officers five years to investigate not even Sir Harry Oakes murder. Earlier this week, Mr Bell confirmed he has offered himself up for candidacy in the next general election. However, he said the PLP has not yet made a decision. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e MINISTER ACCUSES BELL OF PLP LINK FISHERMEN ALIVE AFTER FIVE DAYS ADRIFT MINISTER for National Security Tommy Turnquest says that former investigator Keith Bell is and always has been a political operative for the PLP

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B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B AHAMIAN exports to the US declined by 6.4 per cent year-over-yeart o $691.3 million in 2010, falling from $738.3 million the year before, a US Congressional report saying Freeportbased Polymers Internationals products generated the second-highestg ain in consumer welfare. The latest document from the US I nternational Trade Commission on the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA decline in the value of Bahamiane xports to the US last year on falls in the value of refined petroleum products. And, not surprisingly, Bahamian imports from the US increased in dollar value by some 31.5 per cent during 2010t o $3.2 billion, growth again driven by increased exports [meaning Bahamasi mports] of refined petroleum products. The Bahamas, in seeing its US imports increase from $2.4 billion in 2009 to $3.16 billion last year, account-e d for 17.1 per cent of all American exports to CBERA countries. This latt er percentage grew by 0.5 percentage points year-over-year, from 16.6 per cent in 2009, leaving the Bahamas as the second biggest US importer behindP anama. The US report said the impact of trade preferences was negligible for the US economy, and more beneficial for BAHAMAS EXPORTS TO US DECLINE 6.4% But Polymers Internationals $95m exports generate second highest gain in consumer welfare from Caribbean FDI into Bahamas fell 25% year-over-year in 2010, says US congress report Bahamas imports from US grow 31.5% to $3.16bn B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HEWater & Sewerage Corporations operating cost recovery rate is projected tof urther decline to the high 60 per cents range for 2011, its chief financial officer yes terday saying the impending p roject to overhaul its operations would generate a huge $233 million saving f or Bahamian taxpayers. Sandra Edgecombe effectively told Tribune Business that the $81 million Inter-Amer i can Development Bank (IDB S ewerage Corporations operations, and New Providences water and sewerage infrastructure, paled into insignificance when compared to the potential multi-million dollar savings fort he Government and taxpayer a net $152 million. And she added that the phasing-out of water barging from Andros had generated further considerable savings for theW ater & Sewerage Corporation, as water produced by BISXWATER CORP COST RECOVERY TO FALL TO HIGH 60%S IDB project to generate huge $233m subsidy savings for Govt and taxpayer Subsidies projected to fall from $414m to $181m over 10 years Barging end saves $2.80 per 1,000 gallons By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net CRUISE passenger spend up to the 2011 third quarter is estimated at $137 million, a Ministry of Tourism official telling Tribune Business yesterday that things were looking positive headingto the Christmas/New Year peak. Carla Stuart, director of cruise development at the Ministry of Tourism, told Tri bune Business yesterday that up to the third quarter of this year the Bahamas received 3,320,720 cruise passengers. She estimated a head tax total up, to the third quarter $5.19 $4.97 $5.02 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 CHRONOMAT BREITLING.COM CH RO N O MA T PURE PERFORMANCE PURE BREITLING B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor BANKof the Bahamas International yesterday said it was building a n ew business model focusing on high transaction volume areas, its managing director describing this as best suitedt o counter reduced earnings from lending activities. Emphasising that the BISX-listed By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ROBINHoods principal yesterday pledged that the retailer would do our bestto recover, following a bitter b ust-up between himself and a n investor who, just five m onths ago, had agreed to recapitalise the business. S andy Schaefer confirmed to Tribune Business that he and Bahamian businessman, H ubert Pinder, had parted company over the latters alleged failure to provide promised equity capital in the millions of dollars to recapitalise Robin Hood. R eluctant to say much, Mr Schaefer said their parting was likely to result in legal action, although he declined to commentf urther. Tribune Business attempted to reach Mr Pinder for c omment prior to press deadline, but the number it had for him j ust rang out. We are no longer involved together, Mr Schaefer told this newspaper yesterday about his relationship with Mr Pinder. There are issues we are turning over to the courts and our attorney. Its such a sticky wicket right now. I cant comment, other t han to say our deal was never consummated, because the BANK BUILDS NEW BUSINESS MODEL SEE page 8B SEE page 10B SEE page 9B SEE page 6B SEE page 6B Private label credit cards in the w orks at Bank of Bahamas Marios Bowling and three other locations targeted for o ff-site ABMs Looking to redesign liabilities, plus alter equity composition in next 24 months Paul McWeeney ROBIN HOOD INVESTOR WOE Retailers principal p ledges to do our best to recover following split with Hubert Pinder Alleges proposed recapitalisation funding never materialised CR UISE VISITOR SPEND UP TO $137M TO Q3

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BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE By DEIDRE M. BASTIAN IMAGINEyourself as a consumer. What is the first thing that attracts you to a product: Expiration date,p rice or packaging? If you a nswered packaging you are a bsolutely correct. Design Packaging has to grab the consumers in seconds to create an emotional connection, says Jason Kempen, an inter-n ational creative director. W ould you agree that a shopper has to observe your product before it can be dropped into their cart? Your product must engage the shopper, as they will scan the s helf for three seconds and, if y our product is not appealing, it is unlikely they will see it. Remember, books are judged by their cover. What is more, most of what we purchase comes in a package. For example, toothpaste,t ide, beauty supplies, pharmaceuticals and software covers are all around us, especially in magazines, advertisements, the Internet and n ewspapers, etc. Great design is innovative and does not copy existing o nes, but improves upon them. I especially like the view of a designer who said: People see the past, artists see the present, but designers see the future. There is nothing new under the sun; we need only the humility and w isdom to correctly reinvent what came before us. H ave you ever wondered what Product Packaging Design does for your produ ct? It identifies your brand, communicates with consumers and distinguishes yourp roduct from your competit ors. Packaging refers to the process of design, preservation, evaluation, logistics and p roduction of packages. It is also the science, art and technology of marketing, storage,s ale and end use. Bear in mind that the greater percentage of all purchasing decisions are made i n-store, and packaging design must take priority and make all the difference at the point o f sale, as this is where the product either dies or lives by making it into the shoppingc art. Throughout the years, design packaging has evolved from an information tool to an identifying tool, and is a specialised area for graphic designers. It involves the visual elements of design, andt akes into account how people t hink and act when shopping. It also helps businesses to open doors that weren't open before. I f designers aim to be successful when launching packa ging ideas, it is essential for t hem to keep abreast of evolving trends. It is also n oteworthy that industry specialists have moved towardsp ackaging designs that are u nambiguous, concise and timeless. I n every product category, from elegant wine and spirits t o perfumes and apparel, p ackaging is truly an emotional experience as opposed t o a functional one. I know this because, if the product packaging doesnt reach out and instantly connect with the consumer, you know whath appens? Yes, check mate; the game is over. S ounds crazy, but it is true. When facing the task of creating new packages, it is important to consider how thec onsumers mind manages the intense overload while brows ing the aisles. Here is a snap shot: The mind filters with a mazing speed. Then somet hing catches it, holding it l ong enough for the brain to register and connect with the heart. This is time packaging has to make a sale, and win on the shelves. I t is important to unders tand the lingo of packaging d esign, as marketing is where everything begins. A month ago, I was asked during an interview what my true passion was. I could only confesst hat marketing was my first l ove, followed by graphic design. Drawing on both was advantageous and got me off to a great start. I was privileged to amalgamate both p erspectives (marketing and g raphics) and methodically analyse designs. More significantly, you must exploit and use passion, and infuse your language to speak to subscribers. To do this, be brutally hone st with your approach, as a handful of words with an attractive design can possibly double sales. Also, if you are brave enough to ask, I might t ell you that fire is what customers follow, and lucid packaging is one of the things that w ill help a successful business. I particularly love artistic labels, but packaging is inef-f ective if all you are selling is beauty. Design packaging is really about communications and building a relationship with your consumers. Images s uch as cartoons or pictures can be included on the packa ging designs as well. To avoid confusion, try not to paste an image of a dog if y ou are making a packaging design for hot dogs. This might mislead consumers intob elieving it is dog food, or the h ot dog is made of dog meat. Designs should be honest and transparent, easily unders tood and not hide defects or weaknesses. Clearly, an honest label does not claim fea-t ures it does not have. I recall sometime ago designing a line of labels for a client who ran out of promotional and per f ormance ideas for their labels, and shamelessly I was asked to be inventive. (Be c areful of labels). To this end, ask yourself if HOW TO ACHIEVE A COMPLETE PACKAGE T HE A RTOF G RAPHIX BY DEIDRE M BASTIAN SEE page 10B

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BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 3B n ttt r trf b#fn nnbr nr nnntr nb nt b r CHELA-TECH MEDICAL LABDNA PATERNITYTESTINGONLY $300CALL US 322-5071/328-1650 BUYING HMS SCRAP 80/20 DELIVER TO PORT OF NASSAU OR FREEPORT. USD $300+ PER METRIC TON CONTACT ORIENTAL SUPREME (HKTD VIJAY NAHATA ( 1)-516-625-1735 By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A TLANTIS is running at 90 per cent o ccupancy levels for Christmas and into the New Year a Kerzner International e xecutive said yesterday, telling Tribune Business that occupancy levels for the winter season were up 7 to 8 per cent overl ast year. The resort is also projecting significant growth in group business in 2012, Kerzner International spokesman Ed Fields said. He told Tribune Business: Christmas and New Year travel is strong again this y ear, and we will run approximately 90 per c ent for the total resort. Certain towers like Cove and Reef have been full for months. Next Year we expect growth again, with stronger group business up 10 to 15 per cent. A tlantis executives said earlier this m onth that the resort expected to finish the year up 33 per cent over 2010 in terms o f group business. Group travel is an integ ral part of Atlantis success, with groups a nd conventions accounting for a signific ant percentage of the resorts total business. Mr Fields also told Tribune Business: Our winter season looks good with occup ancies up 7 to 8 per cent over the previo us year. In late October, Atlantis launched its Winter Mega Sale' promotion to help boost occupancy levels during the winter months. The resort advertised room rates at all five towers within the Atlantis resort by a discount of as much as 60 per cent. Winter season projected up 7 -8% over 2010 Projecting 2012 group business u p 10-15% ATLANTIS TARGETS 90% CHRISTMAS OCCUPANCY LEVEL

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BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE R OYAL Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO h ave held their customer appreciation night in Grand Bahama at the Grand Lucayan Resort. Our employees continue to set Royal Bank apart by putting our clients first, and by demonstrating integrity in their actions every d ay. Our ability to do the right things for our clients, our communities and each other will c ontinue to drive our success, said Nathaniel B eneby, RBC Royal Banks market head. Our commitment to our clients has been the cornerstone of our success. We pledge our continued support as you create the lives and c ommunity you wish for in Grand Bahama. J oining Mr Beneby was a strong contingent of RBC and FINCO management including G eorge Roache, market head, business banking; Tanya McCartney, area vice-president, R BC Finco; Michael Munnings, area vice-pres ident, New Providence; Brian Knowles, senior account manager, business banking; and Jan Knowles, manager, public relations and com m unications. An RBC client, Sarah Rolle, co-owner of Ocean Motion Water sports, said:My husband and I have banked with RBC for many y ears, but recently we have had more com munications and support from them. Brian K nowles, RBC senior account manager in b usiness banking, has been wonderful to work with. He discusses with us areas that they can help us with and understands the rises and falls of our business flow. I look forward to meeting him tonight and thanking him for his a ssistance. First-time visitor to the island, David Hack e tt, regional president of business banking for C aribbean banking at RBC, was the main guest. He said: Our Mission to put our strength to work for you is not an empty statement. We c ome prepared to meet the future with our f ocus on delivering exceptional service at every opportunity. M r Hackett described Grand Bahama as one of our largest markets in the Bahamas, a nd plays a pivotal role in RBCs strategic plans for the Northern Caribbean. With its first class infrastructure, extensive deep water harbour, one of the longest airstripsi n the Western Hemisphere, excellent telecom munications and technology, along with an abundance of skilled professionals in a variety of fields, it stands to reason that Grand B ahama is a very important market to RBC in terms of future growth potential. ROYAL BANK PLEDGES TO STAY CLIENT COURSE W ELCOMING g uests at the Royal Bank of Canada Annual Customer Appreciation event in Grand B ahama were (left to right for RBC Royal Bank Market Head; Tanya McCartney, Area Vice President, RBC Finco; guest Sir Albert Miller and first time visitor to the island David Hackett, Regional President of Business Banking for Caribbean Banking RBC, who was also the special guest at the event. L OCAL G rand Bahama business men and women enjoyed a sumptuous buffet while listening to classic Christmas songs by Shelly Carey and Tru Music at the annual RBC Client Appreciation event. E R I K J R U S S E L L / B a r e f o o t M a r k e t i n g P h o t o s

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NEW YORK Associated Press A GROWINGsense that Europe's leaders have failedto contain that region's debt crisis swept through financial markets Wednesday. It started with the euro dropping below $1.30 for the first time since January and a jump in borrowing costs for Italian government debt. By the end of the trading day theDow had lost 131 points, European stock indexes fell as much as 3 percent and gold dropped $76, ending below $1,600 an ounce for the first time in more than two months. Investors dumped assets that might be seen as risky and piled into the most conservative ones around: the dollar and U.S. government debt. T he market appears to be i n "sell now and ask questions later mode," said John Canally, investment strategist at LPL Financial. Since European leaders reached an agreement to rein in future government budget deficits last week, investors and credit rating agencies have criticized the deal for failing t o address current problems. Markets are impatient," Canally said. "They still can't see how all these efforts will get this situation stabilized." Italy had to pay higher borrowing rates in its last bond auction of the year Wednesday. The euro zone's thirdlargest economy paid 6.47 percent interest to borrow euro3b illion ($3.95 billion years, up from 6.30 percent just a month ago. The higher rates make it more expensive for Italy to borrow money and r eflect rising doubts that the country will be able to repay its debts. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 131.46 points, or 1.1 percent, to close at 11,823.48. Caterpillar Inc. fell4.4 percent, the worst drop among the 30 stocks in the Dow. Canally said the fear that another bank failure will lead to a financial crisis like Lehman Brothers did in 2008 overshadows everything else, he said. Markets are so jittery now that traders see a slight drop in the euro or a small rise in Italian government bond yields as a step toward a wider collapse. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 13.91 points, or 1.1 percent, to 1,211.82. The Nas-daq fell 39.96, or 1.6 percent to 2,539.31. Gold dropped 4.6 percent to settle at $1,586, the lowest closing price since July. Comm odity prices tend to fall when the dollar gains strength, since a stronger dollar makes it more expensive for investors using other currencies to buy commodities, which are priced in dollars. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note dropped to 1.91 percent from 1.96 percent lateT uesday as demand increased for ultrasafe assets. High d emand for U.S. government debt helped the government sell $13 billion in 30-year bonds at a record low rate of 2.92 percent. In a note to clients, strategists at Nomura said "the insatiable appetite" for Treasurys at such low yields implies that bond buyers a re readying themselves for "the end-of-the-euro-trade." CROSS & Mosko Real Estate and Development C ompany (Cross & Mosko h as been formed as a real estate sales, appraisals and development business. The principals, Jim Mosko and Kevin Cross, have known each other for 20 years and decided to work together in partnership. Mr Mosko, president of the Mosko Group of Companies, has been involved in real estate transactions for more than 20 years. As al icensed broker, his primary role in Cross & Mosko will b e to identify and execute upmarket real estate sales a nd development transactions. Mr. Mosko said: Im p leased to be moving forw ard with this new venture with Kevin at the helm. Ive known and trusted him for years, and this adds a real estate company to the range of businesses we now have in the Mosko family of companies. Mr Cross has been involved in real estate for 20 years, and served on the board of the Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREAf or three years. He is a BREA licensed broker and appraiser, specialising in high value property sales, particu larly in private islands and o ften in conjunction with his exclusive affiliate, Private Islands Inc. Mr Cross also has a professional appraisal practice, serving leading banks, insurance companies, attorneys and other clients in the Bahamas and elsewhere. He qualified as an appraiser in 1997. Mr. Cross said: Jim and I have worked together in thep ast, and I have always enjoyed his honest and no nonsense way of doing business. I gained a lot of valua ble experience in the last 10 y ears with Bahamas Realty, but the chance of working as an equal partner with someone of Jims stature, backed by the business infrastructure of the Mosko Group, was an opportunity too good to miss. Cross & Mosko is exclusively affiliated with the Mosko Group and with Private Islands Online. It is located at Lyford Cay Houseo n Western Road just outside Lyford Cay. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 5B Mosko forms real estate partnership STOCKS, EURO SLIDE AS WORRIES ABOUT EUROPE PERSIST

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listed Consolidated Waters Blue Hills reverse osmosisp lant was some $2.80 cheaper p er 1,000 gallons. The urgent need to stem the bleeding at the Water & Sewerage Corporation, which manifests itself in annual taxpayer subsidies of $20-$30 mil-l ion, was further highlighted b y the fact its operating cost recovery rate is projected to fall further than last years unacceptably low 79 per cent in 2011. Its projected to decline f urther for 2o11, Ms Edgec ombe told Tribune Business, saying it its projected to be in the high 60s. Given that this ratio measures how much of the Water & Sewerage Corporations costs are covered by its revenues, the projection i ndicates that almost one-third o f its 2011 expenses will not be met by income streams. Asked about the likely impact of the proposed IDB financing for the Water &S ewerage Corporations f uture financial health and sust ainability, Ms Edgecombe said simply: Huge. I think the best illustration of that is we project that, if nothing is done over the next 10 years, theG overnment will be called u pon to provide subsidies in t he order of $414 million. If something is done with non-revenue water reduction, the tariff calculation occurring under an economic regulator, and also with the organisational restructuring and purc hase of some additional techn ology, we expect that amount to be $181 million over the next 10 years. In exchange for $81 million, we will see savings in thea mount of $233 million, in t erms of the amount the Gove rnment has to pitch in. Its huge for us, and huge for the Government and the taxpayer. Weve known for some time that we need to finds ome form of financing to a ddress these issues. F urther savings, the Water & Sewerage Corporation chief financial officer said, would come via the end of barging from Andros and the simul-t aneous expansion of the Blue H ills reverse osmosis plant. The barging costs us more in the order of $9 per 1,000 gallons, and with the Blue H ills reverse osmosis expans ion, the average cost is $6.20 per 1,000 gallons, so thats a considerable savings on threem illion gallons per day, Ms Edgecombe told Tribune Business. T he structure of the cont ract to slash the Water & Sewerage Corporations nonrevenue water losses by a round 50 per cent, coupled with mains improvements carried out as part of the NewP rovidence Road Improvement Project and Airport Gateway project, should leave New Providences water and sewerage infrastructure in good shape for years to c ome, Ms Edgecombe added. Once the non-revenue water has been brought under control, and reduced by 2.5 million gallons per day, that has to be maintained for fivey ears, she explained, duri ng which time capital investm ent will be made by the contractor to maintain that level. Then there will be the handover to the Corporation, and the infrastructure should bei n good shape. T ogether with the improvem ents related to other projects, Ms Edgecombe added: All of these things are going a long way to improving carrying capacity, and increasingc ustomer satisfaction because t hey have more and better quality water. All these things pave the way for a customer win back, v ery much so. We do hope t hat beginning in 2012, going into 2013, we will see some improvement in operations.W e look forward to starting in the New Year. While unable to specify how m any Water & Sewerage Corp oration customers are currently disconnected, Ms Edgecombe said accounts receiva bles were having to be managed very carefully, and that customer non-payment had been a bit of struggle since 2008. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE KINGSWAYACADEMY ELEMENTARY ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONSEntrance Examinations for all Elementary grade levels:K3 January 14, 2012 @ 10:00 a.m.(must be 3 years old by October 31, 2012K4 February 3 & 17, 2012 times are scheduled throughout the day(must be 4 years old by December 31, 2012K5 March 3, 2012 times are scheduled throughout the day (must be 5 years old by December 31, 2012Grades 1 to Grade 6 Saturday, March 3, 2012. 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon Parents are asked to collect application forms between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. daily from the Elementary Desk in the Herbert L. Treco Administration Building on the schools BernardRoad campus, before the testing date. Application forms may also be accessed from the schools website www.kingswayacademy.com. APPLY NOWFor further information, kindly contact the school at telephone numbers:324 5049 or 324 2158 of this year, at $59.773 million, and spend at $137.053 million. Ms Stuart told Tribune Business that tourism officials were extremely pleased with cruise arrivals in Grand Bahama,w hich recorded as much as a 41.6 per cent growth in the first q uarter. One of the things we are pretty pleased with is the growth in Grand Bahama. Grand Bahama has experienced tremendous growth with regards to their cruise calls, and that bodes well for the people in Grand Bahama, Ms Stuart said. Carnival increased the number of calls to Grand Bahamas s ignificantly, and also there was the injection of Bahamas C elebration, which sails there on a regular basis at least t hree times a week. We have seen growth in the first quarter of as much as 41.6 per cent. During the second quarter and the third quarter things levelled out, but during the first quarter they saw tremendous growth in Grand Bahama. M s Stuart said the Bahamas recorded increases in cruise passenger arrivals this year. She told Tribune Business: Based on statistics I have, which is up to October, cruise arrivals have been up. In the first quarter of 2011 versus 2010, it increased by 15.3 per cent. In the second quarter we saw an overall increase of 6 per cent. During the third quarter we saw just a 1.8 per cent increase. At the end of August and into September we had some c hallenges with the weather, which caused a lot of vessels to b e diverted. Usually in most instances the ships are diverted towards us, but there were some close calls for us with hurricanes at the end of August and September, so ships were d iverted away from us. Despite that our numbers are still extremely positive. Thus far for the third quarter, October already showed a 2 per cent growth. December is usually ap eak for us so we expect that to be pretty positive. WATER CORP COST RECOVERY TO FALL TO HIGH 60%S FROM page 1B CRUISE VISITOR SPEND UP TO $137M TO Q3 FROM page 1B

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institutions development of e lectronic banking and credi t card processing centre were integral to this strategy, Paul McWeeney told Tribune Business the latter was already working with several Bahamian companies on the development of private label credit cards. Bank of the Bahamas International, he said, was shifting away from the traditional focus on bricks and mortar branches to the pro-v ision of off-site electronic b anking, an Automatic T eller Machine (ATM being installed at Marios Bowling & Entertainment Centre the latest example of such a strategy. D isclosing that the bank would start to outfit its Carmichael Road branch this month, with the facilitys et to open in four-five months time, Mr M cWeeney also told Tribune Business that Bank of t he Bahamas International a lso planned to exploit the h igh liquidity in the commercial banking system to redesign its liabilities, s trengthening the balance s heet by reducing costs. And, in preparations for Basle IIIs enhanced capital requirements, Mr McWeeney said that while well fortified, Bank of the Bahamas Internationalw ould move in the next 24 m onths to adjust the comp osition of its $117.187 million in net equity as at September 30, 2011. Speaking in the wake of B ank of the Bahamas Intern ational unveiling a $1.09 million profit for the three months to that date, Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business that too much emphasis was being placed on the fact that a $1.231 mill ion preference share dividend payment left ordinary shareholders with a small loss for the quarter. He explained that the dividend payment, which wasn ot made in the first quart er of the banks previous f inancial year, was a timi ng issue related to when the Central Bank of the Bahamas, under the regulat ors new rules, approved the d ividend payment. T he Central Bank now has to pre-approve dividend payments or any other changes to a banks capital base, and Mr McWeeney said: Its just a matter of when we submit the requesta nd get that approved. Even i f we send it in prior to the d ue date, were at the mercy of the Central Bank. We did make a good profit. It just happened that a s the timing was different, i t went to the preference shareholders who take on more risk. At the end of 12 months, the distribution of earnings will always be equitable, as it has been for 19 years. M r McWeeney said Bank of the Bahamas Internationals major first quarter achievement lay in producing a profit despite suffering a 75 basis point margins queeze on interest income ( spreads) as a result of the B ahamian Prime rate cut e arlier this year. Unlike other banks, we have the customer the benefit immediately of the reduction in the Prime rate, he explained. That is a 75b asis point spread cut off a $600 million-plus loan book. M ost of our loans are tied t o Prime, as we have very few consumer loans, and itt akes at least six months to recalibrate deposit rates. Given that relatively high n on-performing loan levels and increased provisioning were likely to be with the Bahamian commercial banking industry for some t ime, Bank of the Bahamas International is continuing moves to diversify its revenue streams. Were focusing a lot on electronic banking and credit card processing over the next few years, the heavy volume transaction-type b usinesses, not to mention Automated Banking Machines (ABMs The ABMs, being rolled out under the BOB Express moniker, are multilingual, being especially tailored for areas such as Carmichael with large populations and different cultures. Through enhanced functions and being more consumer friendly, Mr McWeeney said these A BMs would help to extend the banking market and provide yearr ound, 24/7 service. Some of the new offsite l ocations are pretty stando ut and competitive, Mr McWeeney said of the off-s ite ABM spots. Apart from locations at Phils Food Ser vices, the Lynden Pindling International Airport( LPIA) and Marios Bowling, Bank of the Bahamas International had identif ied three other off-site locat ions were moving on very aggressively at this time. Were shying away from b ricks and mortar, and putting more emphasis on electronic banking destinations, being a lot more lean, flexible and accessible, the managing director added. B ank of the Bahamas I nternational is also moving on its credit card processing platform. Were meeting with the people from Visa, w ho are in town right now, looking at how were going to roll-out new products in the New Year, Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business. Weve tied down partnerships throughout the world as to how we move f orward with that....... Were one of the few banks in the region, possibly theres only one other, that has its own credit card processing facility. Were working with several local companies to support the issuance of private label credit cards. We can start doing private label credit cards for customers. Were going to roll-out a whole candy shop of produ cts for customers. Credit is down. We know were going to be in this s tate for several years, but a re going to concentrate on b uilding a new business m odel. Mr McWeeney explained B ank of the Bahamas Internationals new philosophy and business model in the context of the global reces-s ion, and its likely mediumterm impact on the Bahamian banking market and e conomy. Things will never be as they were, he told Tribune Business. We keep lookingt o the past for the future, but we need to create the future. Here we understand whats not going to happen, and what will happen, and based on that thinking wec an create a new business m odel for the bank, which we are confident is best suited to the evolving financial markets and economies. B ank of the Bahamas International is alsso moving to strengthen its balance sheet through capital and liability adjustments. We have some plans I dont want to disclose at this point in time, but with the heightened liquidity we may l ook at redesigning some of the liability elements of the balance sheet to assist in reducing costs, Mr McWeeney said. At the same time, the important thing is to make provisions where appropriate. Thats the first line of defence against losses, and were exceptionally well provisioned. On the capital front, Mr McWeeney said Bank of the B ahamas Internationals c ombined regulatory capital was over 23 per cent, well a head of the regulatory r egime. Were well fortified t here, he added. With Basle III, we have to meett hat standard. We know we have to revisit the composi tion of the equity in the near term, but thats somethingw e will work on over the next 24 months. Mr McWeeney added that t he expansion and upgrades t o Bank of the Bahamas Internationals Village Road branch were almost com-p leted, with the final elements the three self-service stations set to go in by months end. Village Road will be used as the model for upgrades to Bank of theB ahamas Internationals e ntire branch network. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE is hereby given that RACHELJOSEPH of P.O.Box SP-61625, East Street South and Juans Drive, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization shouldnot be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 15th day of December, 2011 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF B EAUTIFUL STEF LTD. Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above company commenced on the 9th day of D ecember, 2011. Octagon Management Limited o f Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charl otte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company. ______________________________________ Octagon Management Limited Liquidator BANK BUILDS NEW BUSINESS MODEL FROM page 1B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people w ho are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and s hare your story.

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funding never came through. Were in a fight, and God knows Im a fighter. Tribune Business understands that the relationshipb etween Mr Pinder and Mr Schaefer effectively broke down last week. That represents a remarkable about-turn in just five months, as MrS chaefer as recently as July 1 8 this year was extolling t he virtues of Mr Pinder and his group of Bahamian investors, who had agreed to buy into the then-struggling retailer. Confirming that Mr Pind ers group was buying a 48 p er cent stake in Robin Hood, and taking out his former Miami-based partner, Suresh Khilnani, Mr Schaefer said then: It's an all-Bahamian group that is buying. We'ves igned the agreement for 48 p er cent, and I'm waiting for t he money. They're substantial i nvestors in the Bahamas. Suff ice it to say, if there's one g ood thing coming out of this in the eyes and minds of m any, it's that a substantial p art of this retailer is coming b ack to the Bahamas." I t is unclear what impact the break-up with Mr Pinder will have on Robin Hood and its 100-plus employees, especially as they head into the a ll-important Christmas season for retailers, but Mr S chaefer said there were othe r investors interested in buy ing into the Tonique Williams Darling Highway-based retailer. Clearly, it has a deleterio us affect on any business when youre in negotiations f or 15 months, and funds are promised and promised, but n ever materialise, he told Tribune Business. This break-up has hap pened and we are no longer t ogether, but I am encouraged to find there are other people interested in investing in Robin Hood. Im confident well be able to raise capital to rebuild thec ompany in the vision of what w e wanted. But its a terribly sad experience. Ever the optimist, Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood was still looking to re-open its second store on PrinceC harles Drive, which was c losed months after it opened, once the roadworks stemming from the New Providence Road Improvement project came to fruition. Were going to do our best t o recover, he promised. Weve got some meetings with some good people in the next week. Were hopeful well be able to open Robin Hood 2 in a couple of months,o nce the roadworks are d one. Research by Tribune Business has revealed that Mr Pinder is the chief financial officer of a Nevada-incorporat-e d company called the Prospero Group, which is listed on the US pink sheets overthe-counter market. The US Securities & E xchange Commission (SEC i nitiated administrative proceedings against the Prospero Group in October 2010 for failing to meet its obligations to file timely annual reports since December 15, 2009 (itsf inancial year end being in M arch). In describing the Prospero Group, the SEC said it was supposed to have its main executive offices in New Y ork, but appears to have i ts primary place of business i n Nassau, the Bahamas. Prospero purports to be an oil and gas company, and/or multi-faceted business operation with investments inr esort development, malaria t reatments and water purification. The Prospero Group, though, did file its annual report for 2010, with the state-m ents signed off by Mr Pind er. The company made a $571,182 net loss for the year t o March 31, 2010, compared to a $46,660 net loss the year before. From its incorporation in July 2002, the Prospero Group has lost a collect ive $4.446 million. The financial statements a lso refer to a company called Cavitation Concepts. Mr Pinder and this latter entity swam into Tribune Businesss radar view in 2003, when they were f orced by the Securities Commission to withdraw an investm ent offering seeking to raise $2 million because, by holding a press conference to publicise it, they had made it a public offering. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 9B ROBIN HOOD INVESTOR WOE FROM page 1B

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the Bahamas. The future effects of i ncreases in imports under C BERA from the Bahamas on the US economy are likely to be minimal, largely because the Bahamas is, and is likely to remain in the near term, av ery small supplier to the US m arket, the report said. Foreign direct investment in the Bahamas has largely been directed into the countrys tourism and financial services sectors. Foreignd irect investment in the B ahamas was $499 million in 2 010, down from $839 million in 2008. Little of that was reported to have been directed to the production of CBERA-eligible goods. F oreign direct investment i nto the Bahamas in 2010 was almost 25 per cent down on the $664 received during 2009, and 40.5 per cent b ehind 2008 levels. That, t hough, should pick up for 2011 due to the $2.6 billion Baha Mar project. W hen it came to Polymers Internationals polystyrene products, the US report saidt hey saw an increase in Cust oms value of 1.6 per cent year-over-year in 2010, compared to a 30.7 per cent fall in 2 009. The quantity of US imports of Polymers Gsrand Bahama-made products dropped by 2.5 per cent, a reduced rate from 2009s 12.5 per cent decline, but theiru nit value staged a 4.1 per cent recovery last year. In 2009, the unit value of Polymers exports fell 20.8 per cent. In 2010, US imports under CBERA of expandable polys tyrene in primary forms accounted for 59.4 per cent of total US imports of other mining and manufacturing products under CBERA, the US report added. The Bahamas was the only source of US imports of t his product. US imports of expandable polystyrene in primary form increased 1.6 per cent in 2010 to $95.4 million, after a 30.7 per centd ecline in 2009. The decrease in these imports in 2009 to $93.9 million involved declines in unit value, which fell 20.9 per cent, and volume, which fell 12.5 per cent. A nd it added: Polystyrene from the Bahamas provided t he second-largest gain in c onsumer surplus ($5.4-$5.7 million). Without CBERA, t he import price of polystyrene would have been as much as 6 per cent higher. As a percentage of total Caribbean exports to the US under the CBERA, the Bahamas share fell by onep ercentage point, from 7.8 per cent to 6.8 per cent. The Bahamas accounted for 6.8 per cent of the value of US imports from CBERA countries. About one-half of these imports consisted of r efined petroleum products, the US report said. US imports from the Bahamas increased by 23.9 per cent in 2009 to $738 million, and decreased 6.4 per cent to $691 million in 2010, almost exclusively because of t he changes in the value of imports of refined petroleum products. Bahamian exports for US consumption, likely crawfish,r ose by 2.5 per cent yearover-year in 2010, hitting $99 million compared to $96.5 million the year before. Bahamian exports for consumption accounted for 3.4p er cent of the total exported by Caribbean countries under t he CBERA, a 0.7 percenta ge point fall compared to 2009s 4.1 per cent. y our packaging is just a chunk of colourful noise or otherwise. Take the time to learn about your ideal target andthen communicate effectively. G etting your concept right is t he most important part of the process, and will help your sales. If the sales of your product are important to your profits, you should not "compromise" on your design, as it is notg ood business sense to invest in packaging if it is evident it would not be competitive. Take the time to make a good choice and do it right. So until we meet again, have fun, enjoy life and stay on top ofy our game. NB: The columnist welcomes feedback at deedee2111@hotmail.com A bout the Columnist: Ms B astian is an extensively t rained graphic designer who has qualifications of M.Sc., B.Sc., A.Sc. She has trained at institutions such as: Miami Lakes Technical Centre, Suc-c ess Training College, College of the Bahamas, Nova Southeastern University, Learning Tree International, Langevine International and Synergy Bahamas. READER FEEDBACK Hi Ms Bastian: I really appreciate the advice you render to us younga nd up-coming business indiv iduals. The informative articles are always invaluable, a nd I loved the article you posted in The Tribune in reference to personalities, O riginality comes with Personality To me it gave us readers a new way to put our business p lans/outlook in perspective. I t helps us to figure out: "What impressions we want to give our customers?", and offers more detail to the approach of our customersa nd whether we wish to remain lazy, brainy, a show-o ff, enduring, or ingenious, etc. But like your signature line says at the end of every article: Until we meet again,h ave fun, enjoy life and stay on top of your game." Youm ake it so much easier for us to do all of that. Again, thanks for your invaluable graphic and business advice because evidently it keeps uso n top of our game! Ms. Shoron Miller C.O.B Student Nassau, Bahamas H i Dee: I like the article (Designers Personalities), very inter-e sting. Good job Dee! Regards, J aymes Jay Darling N assau, Bahamas BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS 2010 IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 376 Equity Side IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHATpieceparcel or lot of land containing 7,467 sq. ft. situate on the northern side of Northeast side by land s aid to be Jeffrey Russell and on the Southeast by Jumbay Street and about 92 ft west of Windsor Place Drive and on the Southwest by land s aid to be Roy Burrows and on the Northwest by land said to be the estate of Ben Darville in Nassau Village in the Eastern District of the I sland of New Providence in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Daniel Ritchie, Jr. NOTICE The Petition of Daniel Ritchie Jr. in respect of ALLTHATpiece parcel of lot of land containing 7,467 sq. ft. situate on the northern side of Jumbay Street and being about 92 feet west of Windsor Place Drive in the subdivision of Nassau Village in the Eastern District of the island of New Providence in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land is bounded on the NORTHWESTjointly by Lots Numbers 32 and 33 of Windsor Place and running thereon b y land the property of one Jeffrey Russell and running thereon One t he SOUTHEASTby Jumbay Street and running thereon Fifty-six and the property of one Roy Burrows and running thereon One Hundred parcel or lot of land has a duplex apartment building and a store room thereon which said piece parcel or lot of land is more particularly de5247 N.P. and thereon coloured Pink. owner of the fee simple estate in possession of ALLTHATpiece parcel o r lot of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioner has made app lication to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas u nder Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have its title to d uring normal working hour at:can Building, Marlborough Street, Nassau, N.P. Bahamas; or Building, Bay Street and Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas. NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that any person having dower or right to dower or any adverse claim or claim not recognized in the Petition in the Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such claim in the prescribed form and veriJ HALL & ASSOCIATES, Chambers, Malcolm Building, Bay Street & Victoria Ave., Nassau, Bahamas. Attorneys for the Petitioner Job OpportunityH otel Chief Maintenance Engineer T he Chief Maintenance Engineer is responsible for maintaining the overall operation of the maintenance department a nd the appearance and working order of the hotel. The successful candidate must be able t o work independently, as well as, with o thers. Responsibilities include but limited to: maintaining the exterior of the b uilding, parking lot, and common areas, maintaining all equipment in guest rooms, c onducting daily, weekly and monthly safety inspections and training the staff on safety and emergency procedures, a nd working with vendors. The Chief Maintenance Engineer must be willing to respond to emergencies, even if after hours, and work with corporate maintenance on special remodeling projects or capital expenditure needs. This positionrequires overall maintenance knowledge and troubleshooting ability with skills in painting, HVAC, carpentry, equipment, and tool usage. Aminimum of chiefmaintenancemanager@gmail.com Our people are our competitive advantage.At Butterfield, we pride ourselves on being approachable, disciplined and proactive. If you embody these qualities and have the necessary experience, you may be the one were looking for.THE BAHAMAS | BARBADOS | BERMUDA | CAYMAN ISLANDS | GUERNSEY | SWITZERLAND | UNITED KINGDOM 4RUST/FlCERAn exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Fiduciary team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Vice President & Head of Trust & Fiduciary Services. Please apply by 16 December 2011 to: Debbie Higgs, Head of Human Resources, Butterfield Bank (Bahamas Montague Sterling Centre, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3242, Nassau, BahamasTel (242 debbie.higgs@bs.butterfieldgroup.comwww.butterfieldgroup.com#OREESPONSIBILITIESr 0DQDJHDODUJHSRUWIROLRRIFOLHQWUHODWLRQVKLSV r 3URYLGHILQDQFLDOLQIRUPDWLRQWRFOLHQWVDVUHTXHVWHG r$FWRQFOLHQWVoEHKDOILQPDWWHUVGHDOLQJZLWKODZ\HUVEHQHILFLDULHVHWF r ([WHQVLYHH[SHULHQFHZLWKDOODVSHFWVRIWUXVWDGPLQLVWUDWLRQ$ESIREDUALIlCATIONSr %DFKHORUoV'HJUHHLQ%XVLQHVVRUUHODWHGGLVFLSOLQHIURPDZHOO recognized university r )LYHWRVHYHQ\HDUVSURJUHVVLYH)LGXFLDU\([SHULHQFHLQWKH)LQDQFLDO Service Industry r 7(3'HVLJQDWLRQRURWKHUVXLWDEOHTXDOLILFDWLRQVZLOOEHDGYDQWDJHRXV r 3URILFLHQWLQ0LFURVRIW2IILFH6XLWHVRI3URGXFWV r 6WURQJLQWHUSHUVRQDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQSUREOHPVROYLQJSURMHFW management and customer service skills. HOW TO ACHIEVE A COMPLETE PACKAGE F ROM page 2B BAHAMAS EXPORTS TO US DECLINE 6.4% FROM page 1B



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N ASSA U AND B AHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSP APER Fishermen alive after 5 days adriftVolume: 108 No.21 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SUNNY AND BREEZY HIGH 81F LOW 70F By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net FOUR missing Andros fishermen have been rescued and returned to their families after being adrift at sea for five days. The men Prince Jolly, Allan Wright, Roger Miller and another man known as KK were airlifted to Nas sau by the US Coast Guard at about 5pm yesterday. They were then taken to the Princess Margaret Hospital for treatment. Lieutenant Commander Nedly Martinborough, of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, said the men were discovered around 1pm drifting in waters near Andros. He said: They were found by US Coast Guard aircraft about 32 miles south of Andros. All four of them were in one boat. Two of them are very sick and need medical attention. You have to understand these men have not eaten since Sat urday. When they were first discovered, the Coast Guard gave them a radio and remained on the scene until the helicopter from Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) arrived to rescue them. They all appeared to be in good health although they were obviously exhausted from the entire ordeal. They were dehydrated and there fore for health reasons they were flown to Nassau for medical attention. They do not appear to be injured and will be fine after a couple days of rest. A friend of the fishermen, said the entire Andros community is grateful to the Defence Force and the U S Coast Guard for their assistance. The whole community, he said, is elated and thankful and grateful. USCoast Guard airlifts men bac k to Nassau TRY OUR DOVE RASPBERRY McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WHY BUY ANYWHERE ELSE ?!?!Most extensive line in the Bahamas of Windows and Entrance, External & NOW Internal Doors Call STORM FRAME WINDOWS for your free estimate today325-6633 INSIDETODAYYYOOUURRSSOOUURRCCEE FFOORROOBBIITTUUAARRIIEESSNOBODYBEATSTHETRIBUNENEWS SPORT FASHION MOVIES TVMUSIC COUPONSCOUPONSCOUPONSEEVVEERRYYWWEEEEKKEENNDD,,SSAAVVEESSAAVVEESSAAVVEE...... By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net DISMISSING claims that the FNM interfered with a housing investigation, Minister of Security Tommy Turnquest claimed that former lead investigator Keith Bell is and always has been a political operative for the PLP. Mr Turnquest spoke out against Mr Bells accusation that the investigation into allegations of corruption in the Ministry of Housing were subject to political interfer ence, claiming the statement was opportunistic. He said: His comments were most inappropriate this morning. He is a political operative, he was a political operative while he was a part of the police force and I take anything he says with a grain of salt. An investigation was launched in November 2006 as a result of claims made by contractors and inconsistencies in housing documents uncovered by The Tribune By mid-2007, the investiga tion had stalled for the lack of evidence. In 2008, police said the case was still active and more charges were to be expected. This week, former Housing Minister Kenneth Russell confirmed the long-awaited probe had been completed, but never made public and at least six more people were By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net CUSTOMS and Immigration Officers at the Lynden Pindling International Airport walked off the job yesterday morning, after a foul odour from raw sewerage became unbearable, union officials confirmed. The walkout occurred around 8.30am and caused operations in the customs and immigration department to stop working for a little more than an hour. Sloane Smith, of the Bahamas Customs Immigration and Allied Workers Union (BCIAWU), said the officers have been complaining of the smell for quite some time. The officers in the customs and immigration reported the odour to management a few months ago and nothing happened, he said. What is happening is there is a pipe which By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net ANOTHER piece of the Baha Mar puzzle fell into place yesterday as the government opened the new Cable Beach Police Station. A number of cabinet ministers and opposition MPs were present yesterday for the buildings ribbon-cutting ceremony and blessing. Security Minister Tommy Turnquest said a new police station was necessary to accommodate the expanding Cable Beach community and to continue the governments battle against crime. He said: We are here today to witness the opening of a state-of-the-art police station with provisions of emergency management services. The government is taking the lead in the fight against crime implementing many iniBy DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net A MAN and his son were remanded to Fox Hill Prison yesterday after being arraigned at Magistrate's Court for weapon and drug charges. Haitian-born Dieudonne Jean Pierre, 53, and his Bahamian son Donald Jean Pierre, 25, both of Freeport, Grand Bahama, were charged before Magistrate Joyanne Ferguson Pratt. The prosecution claimed that on Saturday, December 10, a team of police officers entered a residence at Forest View Apartments on Outlaw Lane with a search warrant for dangerous drugs and unlicensed firearms. CHOIR WELCOMES IN CHRISTMAS MINISTER ACCUSES BELL OF PLP LINK BAILDENIED FOR HAITIAN ON DRUG CHARGES CUSTOMS STAFF STAGE WALKOUT CABLE BEACH POLICE STATION OPENED MEMBERS of the Bahamas National Youth Choir perform during their third annual Christmas concert on Tuesday night at the Trinity Methodist Church. The choir was directed by Cleophus Adderley. For more pictures, see page 9. Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 7 7 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 5 5 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 7 7 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 6 6 im lovin it

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THE Bahamas Handbook 2012 is now in stores, offering readers fascinating and little known facts about the Bahamas, its people, culture, economy and history. In its 626 pages, the handbook is filled with insightful features on the Bahamas, beautiful four colour photographs and rich illustrations that bring the stories to life. The handbook reveals previously unknown details about the second world war, the general strike of 1957, and the first ever distribution of weapons in the Bahamas. Readers can discover how German and Italian U-boats stalked and torpedoed Allied freighter in Bahamian waters during the second world war, trying to prevent them from carrying war materials to Britain, and how islanders of high and low station helped to rescue and care for the sur vivors. Relive the anger and resentment that led to the General Strike of 1957 and how he Bahamian police force was issued with weapons for the first time in history as seen through the eyes of a gazetted police officer of the day. Also in this years publication, readers will find that despite decades of heat, humidity and hurricanes on San Salvador, a plantation owners meticulous diary somehow survived to the present day, giving Handbook readers an unvarnished picture of the high emotions that prevailed among slaves in the earlier 19th century, on the eve of emancipation. Ever wonder how Wallace Groves was able to build an entire industrial city in the pine and barrens of Grand Bahama in less than 10 years? A Handbook story clears up some of the mystery and explores the techniques he used to build Freeport, as recalled by his contemporaries and closest associates. For more information, pro motional copies or to send press releases to the publisher, please contact the Editorial Department at 242-3235665 or email info@ dupuch.com. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TREASURESWITHIN THEPAGESOFNEW HANDBOOKEDITION THESTORY of U-Boats that stalked the Atlantic feature in the latest edition of the Bahamas Handbook. THEHISTORY of horse racing in the Bahamas features in the new Handbook. DISCOVER Clark Gables connections to the Bahamas.

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-1.403 -0.826 -2.681 -2.229 -2.853 c -3.633 -3.025 -4.91 -2.028 -5.082 -0.624 c -5.254 0.779 -4.256 2.056 -2.853 2.229 c -1.45 2.401 -0.173 1.403 0 0 c f Q Q Q BT /T1_4 1 Tf 0.03 Tc 22.1958 0 0 22.0132 435.7555 614.5087 Tm [(ft)Tj -0.016 Tc 43.3827 0 0 55.9325 692.7133 355.4774 Tm ( tnf nr tb bb rb bbbrtfnnbtnnbnnfftfrrr)111(ffbfttnnnfbrftn tf\007bn tbnnrfbb"! \000\000fr\016\000\004 By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT With the Free National Movement in search of new blood to run in the next general election, senators Michael Pintard and Frederick McAlpine could be on the list of new candidates for Grand Bahama. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the party is always in search of new talent and in the coming weeks, will unveil its line-up of candidates. Sources say Kay Smith, a former FNM senator, could also be on the list. While in Grand Bahama this week, Mr Ingraham confirmed that some current MPs will not be running again. We want for this election to put forward the best team that we can. In order to do that, some of our members who are now in the House are going to retire, he said. Senator McAlpine said the FNM has always been renewing and reviving itself. Whether it is with women or young people, they have always sought to give people an opportunity, and that is one of the things I was always fascinated with when it comes to our party, he said. Rev McAlpine, a native of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, was appointed to the Senate in 2007. He is president of Frederick McAlpine Evangelistic Ministries and a senior minister at Freeport Fellowship Centre. Senator Michael Pintard was appointed in March to fill a vacant seat in the Senate. Mr Pintard is a well-known entrepreneur, human resources development consultant, poet, lecturer and writer. He said the FNM is looking to transform the lives of people in Grand Bahama, offer a new vision, generate jobs and increase Bahamian home ownership. Following the recent firing of former Housing Minister Kenneth Russell, Mr Pintard said persons expecting a division in the party are going to be disappointed. We are going to pull together at the correct time; all is at stake, he said. By KHRISNA VIRGIL kvirgil@tribunemedia.net THE government signed contracts worth almost $4 million for the repair of badly damaged roads in Andros and Harbour Island yesterday. Works, Transport, and Housing Minister Neko Grant travelled to Stanyard Creek, Andros where residents have reportedly lost vehicles to roads that have become almost unusable. Charmain Lubin, a preschool teacher on the island, said she lost two vehicles because of the deplorable roads. She said: Ive been back here 10 years and I have changed two vehicles since I came back here front end gone. Thats how bad the roads are, especially the inner communities, thats in Stanyard Creek, Blanket Sound, and Stafford Creek. We prefer to ride bicycles and walk because we cannot afford to ride our cars on the roads. Mr Grant and other officials signed a $2,523,280 contract to repair 5.3 miles of road in Stanyard Creek. He said: Just over a month ago I executed contracts for some $3.5 million on infrastructure works in Andros and today I will execute a contract for some $2.5 million. Never in the history of this island has $6 million in contracts for infrastructure work been executed in such a short period. The contract, awarded to Mr Basil Neymour, the father of Phenton Neymour, will be completed in phases, with plans for the first phase to be completed in six months. Basil Neymour, who built 78 miles of road in Long Island, and 51 miles of road in Cat Island more than 40 years ago, said he is the best man for the job. You should have seen my product, I am one of the best and I have proven that, he said. Another contract was signed in Harbour Island where residents have complained for months about the poor roads. Nu View Construction Company will spearhead the $1,285,208 project. Earlier in the year, the government signed a contract to repair the islands roads, however, preexisting water problems prevented the work from being carried out. The minister responsible for the Water and Sewage Corporation, Earl Deveaux, said the government had to make some important decisions before the road works could continue at that point. When we were here to do the roads, we signed a contract and the infrastructure for your water was so bad and so advanced in corrosion that we were stuck and we were asked not to pave the road until we restored and rehabilitated the water mains, he said. Unfortunately it took a long time to fix. Quinten Kemp, the lead contractor for this project, hopes to begin the road work on Friday. The project is expected to take six months. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Old Bahama Bay resort in West End will reportedly close by the end of the week, leaving more than a dozen persons out of a job. According to a source, the resort is expected to close on Friday when all employees, including the management, will be terminated. Only a small skeleton crew will remain to oversee the property, the source said. The resorts financial con troller Paul Hansen and project manager Derek Gape could not be reached for comment. According to an article pub lished in Tribune Business last month, Lubert Adler, the main financier for the stalled $4.9 bil lion Ginn sur Mer project, has control of the Old Bahama Bay property and 225 surrounding acres, plus another 294-acre par cel that contains the golf course. OLD BAHAMA B A Y TO CLOSE $4m deal to fix roads PINTARDANDMCALPINE COULD BE CANDIDATES BATTEREDROADS on Andros

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EDITOR, The Tribune. THE precedent that has been set with the straw vendors as it relates to the relaxing of the various outstanding monies that is normally collected by other business persons cannot be right. There is a joke being played on the public purse. I am not satisfied that this practice of allowing the vendors who make enough mon ey, to be responsible for living up to the obligations that every other business person is expected to pay. Vendors are bragging how they outsmarted the government. If an ordinary business person cannot give an account of their business activities for a number of years, they would have a problem renewing their busi ness license. How come the straw market is different? If an ordinary business is found wanting, as it relates to unpaid National Insurance contributions, they would have a major difficulty with government. Why are the vendors different? How come a group of vendors who brag about being able to throw two and three hands in a $200 per day asue are given a free pass? No one believes that they cannot afford to pay National Insurance and the outstanding business license fees. Whats up with this? This precedent is not going to bear good fruit. What cause the authorities to be so lenient? This cannot be for political purposes because the market is the market. I am flabbergasted to know that vendors who missed tens of years of National Insurance and Business License fees would be exempted from paying all of the arrears. What happens if every other business does the same? Where will the line be drawn? This is unfair and should not be continued. If no other business is allowed to ignore their obligations to the state then the vendors must be treated the same. Imagine this, the US IRS finds out that a business has not paid their taxes for 10 years, do you think that they would be given an opportu nity to play these kind of games. I think not! The US Government has imprisoned the highest ranking officials, actors, athletes, congressmen, the wealthiest and others for these same kinds of things. There are no exceptions or excuses accepted. We gave the vendors a free brand new facility funded by our money, and then they refuse to contribute to Nation al Insurance, and refuse to pay Business License Fees. This cannot be right and therefore should be revisited, otherwise, level the playing field so other business could enjoy the same privileges. The Bahamian people should not be left to pay the vendors bill. This is not settling well with many Bahamians who are simply too chicken to voice their opinion. The intentions to help the vendors relocate are just, but they must pay their own way, not the public who does not benefit from it. IVOINE W INGRAHAM Nassau, December 9, 2011. EDITOR, The Tribune. SOMETIME ago, Bishop Simeon Hall released an article in which he pointed to a need for the major political parties in the Bahamas to begin a process of succession planning. The comments caused me to undertake a little bit of research on the subject. However, I soon became distracted and discontinued the effort. I resumed my research sometime after conventions by both the PLP and FNM at which time they both placed significant emphasis on the need for the involvement of youth, with special focus on a commitment to the youth of our nation. I once again became distracted and discontinued my research. Recent comments by Prime Minister Ingraham regarding the FNMs intention to seek to offer fresh, new, young faces among its group of candidates for the upcoming General Elections have caused me to resume the effort I have twice put aside, with a determination to identify whether what the Prime Minister is now saying is mere political expediency or whether it is supported by previous actions on his and his partys part. My intention, when I ini tially commenced my effort several years ago, was for the research to have a three-fold focus. The initial focus would be on identifying former Young Liberals, the youth arm of the PLP, and former Torchbearers, the youth arm of the FNM, who are present sitting members of Parliament or who may have previously been elected to Parliament. Secondly, the focus would be expanded to identify members of both political youth arms who had previously received the nomination of their party to contest an election. Finally, I thought to look to identify members of Parliament from both political parties who may have been born subsequent to the PLP attaining a majority of the seats in the House of Assembly, an era some refer to as majority rule, a terminology I detest as I find it divisive to our peoples. Majority Rule, by name and by inference, emphasises the ascendancy of one group of persons and the defeat of another, the rule by persons of one hue and the subjugation of persons of a differing hue. I know of no other country in the region, all of whom have a similar political background to ours, that have slav ishly clung to such a notion. But thats another topic for another day. My political succession planning research was aborted without me ever getting beyond first base upon discovery that there are present ly four elected members of parliament Tommy Turnquest, Carl Bethel, Zhivargo Laing and Kwasi Thompson all who have ascended from the youth arm of the Free National Movement. All four have emerged from the Torchbearers. Additionally, Labour Minister, Senator Dion Foulkes, a former Torchbearer, is a former elected parliamentarian on an FNM ticket. I was, however, unable to identify a single present or former member of the Progressive Liberal Party's youth arm elected to Parliament on a PLP ticket. I was, nevertheless, successful in identifying a former Young Liberal who had been elected to serve in Parliament in the person of David Wallace. Mind you, my research did reveal that while David Wallace served as a former Young Liberal, his election to Parliament was on an FNM ticket. In my view, my research, though limited in scope, is conclusive. The recent pronouncements by Prime Minister Ingraham regarding the need for the FNM to introduce fresh, new, young faces among the FNM's slate of candidates is clearly not mere political rhetoric, but born out by historical fact. Failure on the part of any organisation to renew, to regenerate itself, will surely lead to its decay. The limited research outlined above clearly portrays the PLP as an organisation in decay while the FNM is portrayed as an organisation in ascendancy. MICHAEL R MOSS Freeport, Bahamas, December 11, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 Circulation Department (242) 502-2386 Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608 Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 WHILE the Bahamas government, in an attempt to crack down on crime, this year made life sentences for murder mean just that the remaining years of a convicted persons life there was an uproar in England when it was suggested that mandatory sentences should end. On December 7, an article in the Sun by Anthony France reported that legal experts in England who recommended the ending of mandatory life terms for murder were ridiculed as diabolical dogooders by victims families. The Homicide Review Advisory Group wants judges to decide the length of sentences based on each individual case, France reported. It argued that the current system where mercy killings and serial murders both carry a minimum sentence of 15 years is unjust. The Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge wants MPs to consider reform of the mandatory sentence law. A parent, whose 10-year-old son was killed by thugs, warned that criminals will continue laughing at the law if mandatory sentences for murder are abol ished. The suggestion that mandatory life sentences no longer be mandatory, but left to the discretion of judges, opened a new debate the return of the death penalty in England for murder. We need the return of the death penalty, not a watering down of life sentences, said a mother whose daughter was stabbed to death in London. Yes, mandatory life sentences should be abolished, commented another British citizen, and replaced with the death penalty. In amending the Bahamas Penal Code, Prime Minister Ingraham pointed out that the courts in fact the Privy Council have determined that the death penalty is not a mandatory punishment for murder. They have also decided that the death penalty may only be used in the worst of the worst cases. Although many Bahamians believed that the case from the Bahamas on which this decision was made was indeed the worst of the worst, the Privy Council did not agree. Based on that judgment mandatory capital punishment in the Bahamas was effectively abolished. However, in its amended legislation, the Bahamas government listed what it con sidered the worst of the worst cases when the mandatory sentence would be either the death penalty or life in prison for various crimes. The death penalty was to remain an option for the murder of a police officer or other law enforcement officials, persons critical to the judicial system, such as the killing of witnesses, jurors, judicial officials, prosecutors, a murder in the furtherance of robbery, rape, kidnapping, terrorism or other felony, multiple murders and contract killings. So what was seemingly taken away by the Privy Council was given back by an amended act of parliament. Other murders are punishable in a range of from 30 to 60 years. The only exception would be the conviction of a minor that is a person under 18 years of age. A minor would be sentenced to a minimum of 20 years in prison after which his continued confinement will be reviewed by the court every five years. With the mandatory death penalty removed for murder, government decided that some way had to be found to deter our criminal element, which under the protection of the various Privy Council rulings, was indeed laughing at the law. Therefore, the heinous crimes that did not measure up to the Privy Councils worst of the worst were to get mandatory life sentences. Life no longer means 25 years with more time shaved off for good behaviour. Life for murder means just that years of waiting for the undertaker to remove the dead body from the prison cell. In England, Prime Minister David Cameron stepped in to calm tempers. He assured citizens that his government had no plans to do away with mandatory terms. The most serious crimes deserve the most serious sentences, a spokesman added. The same sentiments were expressed by the Ingraham government. Its a joy to now report the daily chirping of magistrates reminding lawyers that under the law they can no longer grant bail to repeat offenders and persons accused of heinous crimes. This must be music to the ears of law-abiding citizens, who have had to wait a long time to read such words in court reports. As for the criminal who might think he is being treated unfairly, he has only one alternative and that is to turn his back on his life of crime, reform his life and start making a worthwhile contribution to society. Political succession planning LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Britons cry for return of death penalty Vendors should pay in full like everyone else

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police have launched an intensive initiative to combat crime during the Christmas season. Assistant Commissioner Emrick Seymour said Operation Winter Storm will involve heightened police visibility on the streets and in residential and business communities throughout Grand Bahama. Mr Seymour was speaking at the Royal Bahamas Police Forces annual Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony at the Gerald Bartlette Police Headquarters Complex on the Mall. A number of students and parents attended the event. The Police Youth Band provided music and prayers were offered up for the police force and the nation. Santa Claus also rode in on a police motorcycle and handed out candy to the youngsters, but the highlight of the evening was the lighting of the Christmas tree by Mr Seymour and his children, Emrick Jr and Emrinique. Mr Seymour said Christmas is a time of reflection and fellowship. As people prepare to purchase gifts, dine and socialise, I want to remind you to remember the true meaning of the season which is to reflect and celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ who was born into this world to redeem us of our sins, he said. He also stated that the police are committed to ensuring that everyone has a safe holiday season. One of the things we are doing is increasing police presence on the streets and trying to sensitize members of the public of what they can do to protect themselves for the season. ACP Seymour said a team of officers have been specifically assigned to Operation Winter Storm, which will cover businesses in the downtown area, the International Bazaar, and Port Lucaya, as well as residential areas. He also noted that the police have conducted various walkabouts and met with residents to speak about crime prevention. Officers have also distributed safety tip brochures in the community. We have seen some success already and have had some arrests and taken some illegal weapons off the streets, Mr Seymour reported. Mr Seymour said residents should continue to be vigilant going into the holiday season. He said persons should always be aware of their surroundings. He stressed that persons should always remember to buckle up when driving. Mr Seymour noted that shoppers should make certain that purchased items and valuables are in the back trunk of the vehicle. While shopping, he said persons should carry small amounts of cash, and businesses should make regular deposits. We also want to urge indi viduals to observe persons coming into their business establishment and lurking around their shops, he said. If anything looks suspicious go with your gut and call the police at 911 and let us check it out. We want every member of the community to have a safe Christmas holiday. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 5 nn fff bnrf ntt nb \002 )Tj -0.016 Tc 16.5706 0 0 21.6994 85.7377 1142.8314 Tm ( frrt Police clamp down on crime ASSISTANTCOMMISSIONER Emrick Seymour

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0.641 -0.045 0.375 0 0 c f Q q 1 0 0 1 93.998 1509.3411 cm 0 0 m 0.043 -0.356 -0.205 -0.679 -0.552 -0.723 c -0.9 -0.767 -1.217 -0.514 -1.26 -0.158 c -1.303 0.198 -1.056 0.522 -0.708 0.566 c -0.36 0.61 -0.043 0.356 0 0 c f Q q 1 0 0 1 96.3483 1509.1134 cm 0 0 m 0.045 -0.375 -0.216 -0.715 -0.581 -0.762 c -0.948 -0.808 -1.281 -0.541 -1.326 -0.166 c -1.37 0.208 -1.11 0.549 -0.744 0.595 c -0.378 0.641 -0.045 0.375 0 0 c f Q q 1 0 0 1 93.9251 1511.8096 cm 0 0 m 0.057 -0.48 -0.276 -0.916 -0.744 -0.975 c -1.213 -1.034 -1.64 -0.692 -1.697 -0.213 c -1.754 0.266 -1.421 0.703 -0.952 0.762 c -0.484 0.82 -0.057 0.48 0 0 c f Q q 1 0 0 1 97.0773 1512.4828 cm 0 0 m 0.057 -0.48 -0.276 -0.916 -0.745 -0.975 c -1.213 -1.034 -1.64 -0.693 -1.697 -0.214 c -1.754 0.266 -1.422 0.702 -0.953 0.762 c -0.484 0.82 -0.057 0.479 0 0 c f Q Q Q BT /T1_2 1 Tf 0 Tc 6.8079 0 0 6.9655 17.2635 1249.7407 Tm ( tff b tb nftt fbr b\002 t nf nrtb bb rb b)Tj -0.016 Tc 17.1918 0 0 22.8665 82.0492 1346.8489 Tm ( AMajor Hotel has a vacancy for aHousekeeping ManagerResponsibilities includes: ofupto 600 guest accommodations, public and employee areas housekeeping and laundry staff plaints concerning laundry and house keeping services The ideal candidate must possess the managerial level in an established hotel equivalent chemicals Interested candidates should send resumes to: hrvacancyhotel@gmail.com No later than Friday, 16th December, 2011 DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER Brent Symonette holds the ribbon as Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security, cuts it, with Commissioner Ellison Greenslade looks on. Photos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff PERRY CHRISTIE, leader of the PLP,signs the photograph of the new police station. tiatives and new legislation that together with the work of police officers, we expect positive results. For those who reside, work and visit the western area, Mr Turnquest said they can be assured the best of policing. By placing this new police facility in the centre of a new commercial village, Mr Turnquest said protected services should rival or surpass any other area of the Bahamas. He added, however, that the facility is not unique to Cable Beach. The government has invested considerable resources to provide for the safety and security of residents and visitors alike, said Mr Turnquest. He said this year alone, the government has spent some $14.5 million on new equipment, technology and crime fighting tools for the Royal Bahamas Police Force. These assets are to make it easier for police officers to do their job more effectively and additionally it is incumbent on them to take care of these assets, he said. Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade said the new facility is perfectly positioned to serve the communities of western New Providence and the Baha Mar development. He said: This new station is purpose built and will provide comfort and amenities like nothing that exists on the force today. Cable Beach police station opened f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e ATOUR of the cell block for visitors to the new station. COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade, along with Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard and the Minister of Nation al Security Tommy Turnquest is shown the new station by Supt Elaine Sands OC, of Cable Beach. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. TOMMY TURNQUEST, Minister of National Security unveils a plaque at the Cable Beach Police and Fire Station yesterday.

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 7 By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net RESPONDING to media reports that nearly all of the PLP incumbents have been ratified, former MP George Smith has criticised one alleged choice. The decision in respect of Exuma was based on an inadequate and unfair assessment, which was obviously biased and laced with disregard for the facts and for many who are affected by the outcome, Mr Smith said. His comment is in reference to allegations that current Exuma MP Anthony Moss is likely to be ratified to run again for the constituency. A decision Mr Smith has firmly opposed in recent weeks. An accurate review and investigation throughout Exuma may have resulted in a different conclusion and wider acceptance, Mr Smith said. Last month, he went on record opposing the nomination of Mr Moss to once again run in Exuma under the PLP. Mr Smith said while it is not personal, Mr Moss has not met the standard to be able to represent the people of Exuma. In a recent statement, Mr Smith stated: The Bahamas deserves the best talent; there should be no room for mediocrity or second-rate performance. PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts refused to confirm if Anthony Moss has been ratified. The PLP will make an announcement if and when that occurs, Mr Roberts said. Former MP criticises selection of Moss ANTHONYMOSSMP The Bahamas deserves the best talent; there should be no room for mediocrity or second-rate performance. George Smith By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Features Editor nnicolls@tribunemedia.net ONE year after $50,000 worth of Junkanoo supplies disappeared, the owners of the merchanise say the matter has yet to be resolved. Last year, a major shipment of Junkanoo supplies, predominantly feathers on special order for three major Junkanoo groups, was lost in transit. The products were shipped through the multinational courier DHL by the Junkanoo Shack, a popular East Street Junkanoo supplies store. When the shipment arrived, it was short $50,000 worth of goods, said James Miller, owner of the Junkanoo Shack. He said no acceptable explanation has been put forward for why the shipment was short when the incident occurred last year. One year later, he said the status remains the same. After one year of inquiries and questions, no one in the company can say to me, your items were found in Hong Kong, Jamaica, or where, he said. A spokesperson for DHL said last year the goods were simply late. During the holiday season, the spokesperson said, that is the norm. The company claims any suggestion otherwise is false propaganda. According to Mr Miller, a truck-load of goods, believed to have been the contents of the missing shipment, was destined for the black market but was intercepted by private investigators working with police. The goods were identifiable based on a customer number issued by the Junkanoo Shacks Asian suppliers, he said. Because of the incident, Mr Miller said the Junkanoo Shack has had to adopt a new business model that has made business a lot more risky. We lost a lot of our customers based on that event. They were unsure, because it is still not proven today what was the problem. What we had to do was go out and purchase supplies from January. In Junkanoo, you would want to know what is the colour code the groups are using. Sometimes you only have sufficient funds to order items to cover the groups, but because of what happened, we had to order early and purchase practically every colour, said Mr Miller. Now we have to order anticipating what the groups might wear and hope that someone uses the colour we have. That is a risk, because we dont know if they will like the style of feathers or the colours we have, he said. The Junkanoo Shack has returned to using Tropical Shipping, its regular shipping company for 10 years. Mr Miller said the company decided to use DHL last year because they had a last minute order that was more suited to a multinational courier capable of delivering on a three-day deadline, as opposed to the standard three-week shipping schedule. All hope is not lost, accord ing to Mr Miller. He said the Commercial Crimes Unit of the Royal Bahamas Police Force is still working the case, and is expected to bring closure shortly. ONE YEAR ON, JUNKANOO LOSS REMAINS A MYSTERY By DANA SMITH dsmith@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas will reportedly be visited by a member of the British royal family next year. According to media reports, as part of the Queens Diamond Jubilee celebrations, the entire family will visit Commonwealth countries and other nations where the queen is head of state or which have ties to the United Kingdom. Prince Harry will reportedly be visiting the Bahamas on behalf of the queen. The exact date of the visit and what he will do while in the Bahamas is yet to be announced. However, according to the Daily Mails website, Prince Harry may use his visit to stage a fundraising polo match on behalf of his Sentebale charity. In addition to the Bahamas, Prince Harry will reportedly be visiting Jamaica and Belize. Other Caribbean countries on the tour will be visited by the Earl and Countess of Wes sex. These include: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Grenada, Montserrat, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago. The Duke of Gloucester will visit the British Virgin Islands and Malta. The recently married Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will visit Tuvalu, the Soloman Islands, Malaysia and Singapore, reports say. Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall will travel to Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea, and Prince Charles will visit the Channel Islands and Isle of Man alone. The Duke of York will visit Mozambique, Zambia, and India while the Duke of Kent will visit the Falkland Islands and Uganda. ROYAL VISIT TO BAHAMAS

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FREEPORT As the Downtown Revitalisation Project nears completion, the Grand Bahama Port Authority has announced it will introduce kiosks for the sale of indigenous Bahamian products as an added attraction to the newly refurbished Churchill Square. This complementary feature is intended to enhance the downtown experience for tourists and locals alike. The first of the Making it happen initiatives launched in 2009 and the brainchild of GBPA President Ian Rolle, the three-phase project has now begun breathing new life into the centre of Freeport. Chairperson for the DTP Nakira Wilchcombe said: We are seeing the fruits of everyones hard work and commitment to the project. More and more of the building and shop owners have come onboard to support what is being done. More importantly, this past summer with major events like Rush for Peace and the Downtown International Food and Cultural Festival, weve proven that downtown is an ideal location for such cultural events. As Churchill Square is just about ready, GBPA officials hope to make the downtown centre a regular stop for tour bus passengers and other groups. The kiosks were introduced to add cultural flair and break up the monotony of the general retail stores in the area. A public notice by GBPAs Business Development Department invited local artisans interested in obtaining one of four kiosks planned for phase one to submit their business ideas. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Kiosks to be added to Churchill Square THE CROWNING glory of the Downtown Revitalisation Project, the newly refurbished Churchill Square featuring the bust of Sir Winston Churchill.

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 9 nn fff b nrf ntt nb \002 )Tj -0.016 Tc 16.7463 0 0 22.5867 751.3368 1259.5209 Tm ( frrt The Mercedes-Benz C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.The Mercedes-Benz C-Class is a pleasure tobehold offering a new interpretation of driving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible response is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. CHOIR WELCOMES IN CHRISTMAS BAHAMAS NATIONALYOUTHCHOIRCHRISTMAS CONCERT PICTURESPECIALBYFELIPE MAJOR

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THE Chinese Ambassador of the Peoples Republic of China Hu Shan presented Minister of Education Desmond Bannister with a cheque for $10,000 to assist in the rebuilding of the Crooked Island High School, which suffered severe damage during Hurricane Irene in August. In making the presentation at the Ministry of Education on Monday, Ambassador Shan told Education officials that when the hurricane struck, the Chinese people felt as if it were their own tragedy and Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao sent a letter of sympathy to Prime Minister Ingraham. Shortly after, the Chinese government donated $300,000 to assist with the hurricane relief efforts. The ambassador said when he learned from Minister Bannister and the Education Permanent Secretary Elma Garraway about the damage at the Crooked Island High School, he decided to provide the school with $10,000 as a token of regard of the Chinese Embassy and also an expression of our esteem for education. He said: Like the Bahamas, China attaches great importance to education, which is reflected by a popular saying in China, which literally reads, In a hundred-year strategy, education is the base, and the deep meaning is that education is of fundamental importance to the fulfillment of a nations long range mission. Thanking the ambassador, Minister Bannister said: It is important for us to rebuild this school because it is the birthplace of secondary education in the Family Islands. It was the first central secondary school to be established in the Bahamas, he said. He said the government is determined to rebuild the school, not only for its historical legacy, but more importantly, to meet the needs of the students of Crooked Island. Mr Bannister also lauded ambassador for his recent donation of laptops and printers to the CI Gibson Senior High Schools technology programme. The Chinese Embassy has also been instrumental in the establishment of the Performing Arts Programme at the Government High School and has donated thousands of books to public libraries throughout the Bahamas. Acting Principal of Crooked Island High, Jerome Forbes, thanked the ambassador, explaining that the school needs to be rebuilt for the students as well as the adults in the community, who also take classes there. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE NOW OPENLocks of HairGreat quality at reasonable prices We offer: Virgin Remy Indian and Brazilian Hair Straight & Wavy Textures Lengths 12-18 Available in Brown/Off-Black colors Inquire today at 323.2224/454.1343 Or E-mail us at info@locks-of-hair.com FROM LEFT ARE Director of Education Lionel Sands, Counsellor and DCM of the Embassy of the People's Republic of China Zhai Xingfu; Education Permanent Secretary Elma Garraway; Crooked Island High School head boy Laquinton Armbrister; Minister Bannister; Ambassador Hu Shan; Acklins High School head boy Douglas Collie; Crooked Island High acting principal Jerome Forbes and NEMA direc tor Captain Stephen Russell. Schools gift from China It is important for us to rebuild this school because it is the birthplace of secondary education in the Family Islands. M M i i n n i is s t t e e r r o o f f E E d d u uc c a a t t i io o n n D D e e s s m m o o n n d d B Ba a n n n n i i s s t t e e r r

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 11 nn fff b nrf ntt nb\002 )Tj -0.016 Tc 16.405 0 0 21.9586 351.5791 956.5229 Tm ( frrt By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The first annual Maritime Symposium will take place on Grand Bahama on Monday, December 19, at the Lucayan Harbour. Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest is expected to deliver the keynote address at the opening. Commodore Roderick Bowe of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force is also expected to attend. The symposium is being organised jointly by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF), the Port Department, and the Department of Marine Resources. Sub Lieutenant Glenn McPhee, officer in charge of RBDF Northern Command, said the purpose of the symposium is to initiate dialogue between Grand Bahama fishermen and industry partners. The Commander of the Defence Force, Commodore Roderick Bowe, would like to ensure that the RBDF fulfills its role as an active community partner, he said. He noted that some of the other industry partners include the Port Department, the Department of Marine Resources, Bahamas Customs, the Royal Bahamas Police Force Marine Division, the Bahamas Air Sea Rescue Association, and the US Coast Guard. Sub Lt McPhee said the Defence Force also wants to promote a greater awareness of maritime legislation; promote maritime safety and enforcement among fishermen; identify challenges experienced by fishermen, and resolve them through collaborative action. The symposium will include sessions on boat safety requirements, and Assistant Port Controller Shannandor Evans will give a presentation on water-skiing regulations and the Motor Boat Act. A representative from the Department of Marine Resources will give a presentation on the rules and regulation governing fishing in Bahamian waters. Maritime event to forge partnerships FASHION Hall threw a Christmas party for The Bilney Lane Childrens Home on Dec 9 and donated a computer set and printer. The Fashion Hall employees got together and bought gifts for the children, to be delivered early next week. FROM LEFT, Amanda Riley, inventory manager at Fashion Hall, Olivia Major, assistant administrator for Bilney Lane Childrens Home and Abigail Minns, director of sales and marketing for Fashion Hall. GIFTSFORCHILDREN

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE THE Cape Eleuthera Island School, an internationally recognised leader in education focused on sustainability, has announced a new head of school starting in the 2012-13 school year. After an extensive 18month search, John Schatz has been hired to fill the position. He has a long history with the Island School semester programme. Mr Schatz joined a pioneer teaching team in 2001 as a mathematics teacher. Outside the classroom, he was head of the boys dormitory, sea kayaking guide, research advisor for a number of different projects and in his final year he ran the daily programme as dean of the school. John is remembered well as the teacher/mentor who was always there to challenge and at the same time support the community, said the Island School in a statement. After four years of committed service to the Island School, John went on to receive his masters in education from Columbia Teacher's College and taught at several private schools. This past summer, John returned to help run the new Island School summer term; he realised that there was an opportunity to come back and help raise the bar for the semester journey. John brings a wealth of experience with Eleuthera and the Island School journey; he shares the schools vision to inspire the next generation of leaders to know they have the ability to effect positive change in the world. Although the school is already very successful, the statement said Mr Schatz is not being hired to maintain the status quo, but rather is committed to enhancing opportunities for faculty and students across all programmes. The Island School jour ney will experience signifi cant growth under Johns leadership. Johns new leadership role will give Chris Maxey the chance to help support the larger mission of the organisation that includes sharing solutions through the Deep Creek Middle School and Cape Eleuthera Institute. Chris is also looking forward to doing more teaching and spending more time out on expedition with future Island School classes, the statement said. Island School recruits Schatz for next school year JOHNSCHATZ, who has a long history with the Island School semester programme, will be taking over as head of school in the 2012-13 school year.

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THE Ministry of Tourism has eliminated its director of product development post in an effort to better focus on the most important element of tourism the visitor experience. Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told hundreds of taxi drivers, jet ski operators, airport workers and other new graduates of the BahamaHost programme that the old post with replaced with a director of visitor experience position. This, he said, took the focus off buildings and physical attributes and put it on the human perspective. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said that for a long time, tourism and hospitality experts convinced themselves that marketing was largely about advertising. But at the end of the day, the most powerful part of marketing, we all know, is word of mouth, he said. Where does word of mouth come from? It comes from the experience that the visitor has in the Bahamas. It is the most powerful form of marketing. What the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation has done in terms of improving visitor experience is remarkable, though largely unpublicised, the minister said. We have spent more money than ever before in history making sure we get the visitors experience right as opposed to spending money overseas (on advertising) to keep talking about the whole thing over and over again, he said. Because in todays world, you cant fool people anymore. There is something that happened that made word of mouth more powerful and more important than ever before. Do you know what that thing is? It is the internet. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace pointed out that marketing professionals have coined the term digital word of mouth to describe a powerful form of internet marketing. The term refers to the comments people post online about their experiences with a product or service. People often post such comments after a vacation. The problem now in our day is that when someone goes to the computer and puts that phrase or that feeling in about their experience in the Bahamas, it is there permanently, he said. So it is more important than ever before, and that is why you see us investing so much more and making sure the experience is right. Im delighted to tell you that it has been getting better. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace lauded two long-standing Ministry of Tourism programmes for their impact on visitor experience BahamaHost and People to People. He pointed out that these programmes which he was involved with from the begin ning are particularly valuable because of the focus they bring to improving how guests experienced the country. The minister reported that since 2005, visitor surveys havebeen reaping more positive results. It was people like the BahamaHost graduates who made all the difference becausethey engaged guests on a personal level, he said. The most important people in the Bahamas tourism sector are the people who touch the visitor directly, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said. We dont seem to understand that many times. He said the ministry has adopted a purpose statement that calls for all staff to identify and attract visitors who can significantly enrich the people and economy of the Bahamas and then deliver the kinds of experiences that compel them to tell their friends and relatives that it is better in the Bahamas. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 13 MINISTER OF TOURISM and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, supported by his industry training team, addresses BahamaHost graduates. Targeting the tourist

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THE school pick-up traffic jam on East Bay Street took a jolly turn last week as Santa Claus Ho Ho Ho-ed to all the passing children. Santa was assisting with the launch of the Bahamas Realty Holiday Home Showcase featuring with thousands of dollars in prizes, the companys Christmas Gift to the island. The competition began last Friday, when the Christmas lights went on at Bahamas Realty. Entry forms are available at Bahamas Realty on East Bay Street; on Bahamas Realtys Facebook page; at Builders Mall stores on Wulff Road; Jolly Roger Paint Suppliers on Shirley Street; and AG Electric on Jerome Avenue. Entries close on December 19 at 4pm. Santa is also making guest appearances on Bahamas Realty Now on Mondays and Thursdays in December, according to show host Sara Parker, a broker at Bahamas Realty. Photo: Andrea Brownrigg LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE SANTABRINGS SMILESTOTHE SCHOOLRUN Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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According to police, during their search they uncovered seven pounds of suspected marijuana and an unlicensed Desert Eagle .44 magnum pistol with six rounds of .44 ammunition. Prosecution also told the court of a large quantity of US currency that was found during the search, which they believe are proceeds from criminal conduct. On December 12, Donald was arrested for questioning by Grand Bahama police. The prosecution claims that during questioning, he admitted to living in the residence where the weapons, drugs, and money were allegedly found. His father, Dieudonne, was later found and also arrested in connection with the incident. The pair were charged with possession of an unlicensed firearm, possession of ammunition without proper certification, and possession of drugs with intent to supply. Dieudonne pleaded guilty to all counts while Magistrate Pratt allowed a short recess in order for Donald to properly consult with his attorney. After the break, Donald pleaded not guilty to all counts. The court will meet again, today, at 1.30pm for sentencing, after Magistrate Pratt allowed more time for prosecution to do proper criminal checks of pending matters. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 15 Bail denied for Haitian f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e

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runs through that area which carries waste, and the smell is horrible. It is really strong in the customs area and it flows over into immigration. So from what I know, the men arrived to work and the smell was so overbearing they walked outside to catch themselves. They were out there for a little over an hour before a representative, Im assuming from the Nassau Airport Development Company, came in and directed the pipeline outside the building. When the problem was fixed, the men returned to work. Its a health issue, so they acted in a way that was constitutional and sanitary. They did what any responsible person would have. Shonalee Johnson, spokesman for NAD, said as far as she is aware there was no issue with customs yesterday. Ms Johnson said the area was temporarily closed for maintenance. The area shut down around 8.31am for maintenance and everyone was back at their posts by 9.20am. There was no impact on flights or anything because the first flight was scheduled for 9.30 and by then things were up and running, she said. This latest incident is just one of many customs and immigration officers have had with management in the last few months. Last month, 200 staff staged a protest outside their administrative complex on Thompson Boulevard after they claimed their concerns were not being heard. Among those concerns were: staff members not being paid hazard allowances where workers suffer from dusty substances; staff not being confirmed after years of work without any credible or legal reason; persons being disciplined for lateness while they should not be as it is defined as more than four times per calendar month. Such action has resulted in employees not being confirmed or promoted; employees shift premiums, call allowances or overtime not paid appropriately; reimbursements for courses of study outstanding. Mr Smith said he believes the government has a personal vendetta with customs and immigration because they refuse to give them basic necessities. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Customs staff stage walkout f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e The officers in the customs and immigration reported the odour to management a few months ago and nothing happened.Sloane Smith, Bahamas Customs Immigration and Allied Workers Union

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 17 The men seemed to be fine. They were dehydrated, but I was told they were given food and water. The families are thankful to the Bahamas for all the prayers and efforts. They feel relieved because these past few nights have been terrible for them. They can rest their heads now knowing their loved ones are safe. The fishermen, who all live in Mangrove Cay, Andros, were reported missing by relatives on Saturday at 11.20am. According to family members, the men were aboard the Tropic Explorer. The vessel was left near the Fish Cays when the four men boarded two dinghies two in each dinghy and headed in a west southwest direction. However, when they were discovered all four were in one dinghy. It is not certain what happened to them nor why they did not return to the Tropic Explorer. expected to face charges as a result of the police investigation into allegations of corruption. On Tuesday, Mr Bell urged the government to give a full account of the police investigation into the allegations made against the Ministry of Housing, and any further findings. There is obviously political interference and political influence going on with this administration. There is no question about it, Mr Bell said. He added: I dont know of no case in the history of the Bahamas where it took a whole team of officers five years to investigate not even Sir Harry Oakes murder. Earlier this week, Mr Bell confirmed he has offered himself up for candidacy in the next general election. However, he said the PLP has not yet made a decision. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e MINISTER ACCUSES BELL OF PLP LINK FISHERMEN ALIVE AFTER FIVE DAYS ADRIFT MINISTER for National Security Tommy Turnquest says that former investigator Keith Bell is and always has been a political operative for the PLP

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN exports to the US declined by 6.4 per cent year-over-year to $691.3 million in 2010, falling from $738.3 million the year before, a US Congressional report saying Freeportbased Polymers Internationals products generated the second-highest gain in consumer welfare. The latest document from the US International Trade Commission on the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) largely blamed the decline in the value of Bahamian exports to the US last year on falls in the value of refined petroleum products. And, not surprisingly, Bahamian imports from the US increased in dollar value by some 31.5 per cent during 2010 to $3.2 billion, growth again driven by increased exports [meaning Bahamas imports] of refined petroleum products. The Bahamas, in seeing its US imports increase from $2.4 billion in 2009 to $3.16 billion last year, accounted for 17.1 per cent of all American exports to CBERA countries. This latter percentage grew by 0.5 percentage points year-over-year, from 16.6 per cent in 2009, leaving the Bahamas as the second biggest US importer behind Panama. The US report said the impact of trade preferences was negligible for the US economy, and more beneficial forBAHAMAS EXPORTS TO US DECLINE 6.4% *But Polymers Internationals $95m exports generate second highest gain in consumer welfare from Caribbean *FDI into Bahamas fell 25% year-over-year in 2010, says US congress report *Bahamas imports from US grow 31.5% to $3.16bnBy NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THEWater & Sewerage Corporations operating cost recovery rate is projected to further decline to the high 60 per cents range for 2011, its chief financial officer yesterday saying the impending project to overhaul its operations would generate a huge $233 million saving for Bahamian taxpayers. Sandra Edgecombe effectively told Tribune Business that the $81 million Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) loan to overhaul the Water & Sewerage Corporations operations, and New Providences water and sewerage infrastructure, paled into insignificance when compared to the potential multi-million dollar savings for the Government and taxpayer a net $152 million. And she added that the phasing-out of water barging from Andros had generated further considerable savings for the Water& Sewerage Corporation, as water produced by BISX-WATER CORP COST RECOVERY TO FALL TO HIGH 60%S IDB project to generate huge $233m subsidy savings for Govt and taxpayer *Subsidies projected to fall from $414m to $181m over 10 years *Barging end saves $2.80 per 1,000 gallons By NATARIO McKENZIETribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net CRUISE passenger spend up to the 2011 third quarter is estimated at $137 million, a Ministry of Tourism official telling Tribune Business yesterday that things were looking positive heading to the Christmas/New Year peak. Carla Stuart, director of cruise development at the Ministry of Tourism, told Tri bune Business yesterday that up to the third quarter of this year the Bahamas received 3,320,720 cruise passengers. She estimated a head tax total up, to the third quarter $5.19 $4.97 $5.02 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 CHRONOMAT BREITLING.COM CH RO N O MA T PURE PERFORMANCE PUREBREITLING By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BANKof the Bahamas International yesterday said it was building a new business model focusing on high transaction volume areas, its managing director describing this as best suited to counter reduced earnings from lending activities. Emphasising that the BISX-listedBy NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ROBINHoods principal yesterday pledged that the retailer would do our best to recover, following a bitter bust-up between himself and an investor who, just five months ago, had agreed to recapitalise the business. Sandy Schaefer confirmed to Tribune Business that he and Bahamian businessman, Hubert Pinder, had parted company over the latters alleged failure to provide promised equity capital in the millions of dollars to recapitalise Robin Hood. Reluctant to say much, Mr Schaefer said their parting was likely to result in legal action, although he declined to comment further. Tribune Business attempted to reach Mr Pinder for comment prior to press deadline, but the number it had for him just rang out. We are no longer involved together, Mr Schaefer told this newspaper yesterday about his relationship with Mr Pinder. There are issues we are turning over to the courts and our attorney. Its such a sticky wicket right now. I cant comment, other thanto say our deal was never consummated, because the BANK BUILDS NEW BUSINESS MODELSEE page 8B SEE page 10B SEE page 9B SEE page 6B SEE page 6B *Private label credit cards in the works at Bank of Bahamas *Marios Bowling and three other locations targeted for off-site ABMs *Looking to redesign liabilities, plus alter equity composition in next 24 months Paul McWeeneyROBIN HOOD INVESTOR WOE *Retailers principal pledges to do our best to recover following split with Hubert Pinder *Alleges proposed recapitalisation funding never materialised CRUISE VISITOR SPEND UP TO $137M TO Q3

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BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE By DEIDRE M. BASTIAN IMAGINEyourself as a consumer. What is the first thing that attracts you to a product: Expiration date, price or packaging? If you answered packaging you are absolutely correct. Design Packaging has to grab the consumers in seconds to create an emotional connection, says Jason Kempen, an international creative director. Would you agree that a shopper has to observe your product before it can be dropped into their cart? Your product must engage the shopper, as they will scan the shelf for three seconds and, if your product is not appealing, it is unlikely they will see it. Remember, books are judged by their cover. What is more, most of what we purchase comes in a package. For example, toothpaste, tide, beauty supplies, pharmaceuticals and software covers are all around us, especially in magazines, advertisements, the Internet and newspapers, etc. Great design is innovative and does not copy existing ones, but improves upon them. I especially like the view of a designer who said: People see the past, artists see the present, but designers see the future. There is nothing new under the sun; we need only the humility and wisdom to correctly reinvent what came before us. Have you ever wondered what Product Packaging Design does for your product? It identifies your brand, communicates with consumers and distinguishes your product from your competitors. Packaging refers to the process of design, preservation, evaluation, logistics and production of packages. It is also the science, art and technology of marketing, storage, sale and end use. Bear in mind that the greater percentage of all purchasing decisions are made in-store, and packaging design must take priority and make all the difference at the point of sale, as this is where the product either dies or lives by making it into the shopping cart. Throughout the years, design packaging has evolved from an information tool to an identifying tool, and is a specialised area for graphic designers. It involves the visual elements of design, and takes into account how people think and act when shopping. It also helps businesses to open doors that weren't open before. If designers aim to be successful when launching packaging ideas, it is essential for them to keep abreast of evolving trends. It is also noteworthy that industry specialists have moved towards packaging designs that are unambiguous, concise and timeless. In every product category, from elegant wine and spirits to perfumes and apparel, packaging is truly an emotional experience as opposed toa functional one. I know this because, if the product packaging doesnt reach out and instantly connect with the consumer, you know what happens? Yes, check mate; the game is over. Sounds crazy, but it is true. When facing the task of creating new packages, it is important to consider how the consumers mind manages the intense overload while brows ing the aisles. Here is a snapshot: The mind filters with amazing speed. Then something catches it, holding it long enough for the brain to register and connect with the heart. This is time packaging has to make a sale, and win on the shelves. It is important to understand the lingo of packaging design, as marketing is where everything begins. A month ago, I was asked during an interview what my true passion was. I could only confess that marketing was my first love, followed by graphic design. Drawing on both was advantageous and got me off to a great start. I was privileged to amalgamate both perspectives (marketing and graphics) and methodically analyse designs. More significantly, you must exploit and use passion, and infuse your language to speak to subscribers. To do this, be brutally honest with your approach, as a handful of words with an attractive design can possibly double sales. Also, if you are brave enough to ask, I might tell you that fire is what customers follow, and lucid packaging is one of the things that will help a successful business. I particularly love artistic labels, but packaging is ineffective if all you are selling is beauty. Design packaging is really about communications and building a relationship with your consumers. Images such as cartoons or pictures can be included on the packaging designs as well. To avoid confusion, try not to paste an image of a dog if you are making a packaging design for hot dogs. This might mislead consumers into believing it is dog food, or the hot dog is made of dog meat. Designs should be honest and transparent, easily understood and not hide defects or weaknesses. Clearly, an honest label does not claim features it does not have. I recall sometime ago designing a line of labels for a client who ran out of promotional and performance ideas for their labels, and shamelessly I was asked to be inventive. (Be careful of labels). To this end, ask yourself if HOW TO ACHIEVE A COMPLETE PACKAGE THEARTOFGRAPHIXBY DEIDRE M BASTIAN SEE page 10B

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 3B bn bn ttbttbnnrt\020r bbbrbbr\020n \nt\fnbntbbrtttb rr###tb f\026$!f bb#fr\bbbn""!"!)Tj -0.016 Tc 30.2276 0 0 39.5622 719.2536 932.3263 Tm ( nnnfbrftn tf\007bnnnnrnftbrnfbrf rnnntrnbtrrntt fr nrrb rt ntt tt fbtt rnrtrbn\000frf\016\000\004 CHELA-TECH MEDICAL LABDNA PATERNITYTESTINGONLY $300CALL US 322-5071/328-1650 BUYING HMS SCRAP 80/20 DELIVER TO PORT OF NASSAU OR FREEPORT. USD $300+ PER METRIC TON CONTACT ORIENTAL SUPREME (HK) LTD VIJAY NAHATA (1)-516-625-1735 By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net ATLANTIS is running at 90 per cent occupancy levels for Christmas and into the New Year a Kerzner International executive said yesterday, telling Tribune Business that occupancy levels for the winter season were up 7 to 8 per cent over last year. The resort is also projecting significant growth in group business in 2012, Kerzner International spokesman Ed Fields said. He told Tribune Business: Christmas and New Year travel is strong again this year, and we will run approximately 90 per cent for the total resort. Certain towers like Cove and Reef have been full for months. Next Year we expect growth again, with stronger group business up 10 to 15 per cent. Atlantis executives said earlier this month that the resort expected to finish the year up 33 per cent over 2010 in terms of group business. Group travel is an integral part of Atlantis success, with groups and conventions accounting for a significant percentage of the resorts total business. Mr Fields also told Tribune Business: Our winter season looks good with occupancies up 7 to 8 per cent over the previous year. In late October, Atlantis launched its 'Winter Mega Sale' promotion to help boost occupancy levels during the winter months. The resort advertised room rates at all five towers within the Atlantis resort by a discount of as much as 60 per cent. Winter season projected up 7-8% over 2010 Projecting 2012 group business up 10-15% ATLANTIS TARGETS 90% CHRISTMAS OCCUPANCY LEVEL

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BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ROYAL Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO have held their customer appreciation night in Grand Bahama at the Grand Lucayan Resort. Our employees continue to set Royal Bank apart by putting our clients first, and by demonstrating integrity in their actions every day. Our ability to do the right things for our clients, our communities and each other will continue to drive our success, said Nathaniel Beneby, RBC Royal Banks market head. Our commitment to our clients has been the cornerstone of our success. We pledge our continued support as you create the lives and community you wish for in Grand Bahama. Joining Mr Beneby was a strong contingent of RBC and FINCO management including George Roache, market head, business banking; Tanya McCartney, area vice-president, RBC Finco; Michael Munnings, area vice-pres ident, New Providence; Brian Knowles, senior account manager, business banking; and Jan Knowles, manager, public relations and communications. An RBC client, Sarah Rolle, co-owner of Ocean Motion Water sports, said:My husband and I have banked with RBC for many years, but recently we have had more com munications and support from them. Brian Knowles, RBC senior account manager in business banking, has been wonderful to work with. He discusses with us areas that they can help us with and understands the rises and falls of our business flow. I look forward to meeting him tonight and thanking him for his assistance. First-time visitor to the island, David Hack ett, regional president of business banking for Caribbean banking at RBC, was the main guest. He said: Our Mission to put our strength to work for you is not an empty statement. We come prepared to meet the future with our focus on delivering exceptional service at every opportunity. Mr Hackett described Grand Bahama as one of our largest markets in the Bahamas, and plays a pivotal role in RBCs strategic plans for the Northern Caribbean. With its first class infrastructure, extensive deep water harbour, one of the longest airstrips in the Western Hemisphere, excellent telecom munications and technology, along with an abundance of skilled professionals in a variety of fields, it stands to reason that Grand Bahama is a very important market to RBC in terms of future growth potential.ROYAL BANK PLEDGES TO STAY CLIENT COURSE WELCOMING guests at the Royal Bank of Canada Annual Customer Appreciation event in Grand Bahama were (left to right) George Roache, RBC and Finco Management; Nathaniel Beneby, Market Head for RBC Royal Bank Market Head; Tanya McCartney, Area Vice President, RBC Finco; guest Sir Albert Miller and first time visitor to the island David Hackett, Regional President of Business Banking for Caribbean Banking RBC, who was also the special guest at the event. LOCAL Grand Bahama business men and women enjoyed a sumptuous buffet while listening to classic Christmas songs by Shelly Carey and Tru Music at the annual RBC Client Appreciation event.ERIKJ.RUSSELL/ BarefootMarketingPhotos

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NEW YORK Associated Press A GROWINGsense that Europe's leaders have failed to contain that region's debt crisis swept through financial markets Wednesday. It started with the euro dropping below $1.30 for the first time since January and a jump in borrowing costs for Italian government debt. By the end of the trading day the Dowhad lost 131 points, European stock indexes fell as much as 3 percent and gold dropped $76, ending below $1,600 an ounce for the first time in more than two months. Investors dumped assets that might be seen as risky and piled into the most conservative ones around: the dollar and U.S. government debt. The market appears to be in "sell now and ask questions later mode," said John Canally, investment strategist at LPL Financial. Since European leaders reached an agreement to rein in future government budget deficits last week, investors and credit rating agencies have criticized the deal for failing to address current problems. "Markets are impatient," Canally said. "They still can't see how all these efforts will get this situation stabilized." Italy had to pay higher borrowing rates in its last bond auction of the year Wednesday. The euro zone's thirdlargest economy paid 6.47 percent interest to borrow euro3 billion ($3.95 billion) for five years, up from 6.30 percent just a month ago. The higher rates make it more expensive for Italy to borrow money and reflect rising doubts that the country will be able to repay its debts. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 131.46 points, or 1.1 percent, to close at 11,823.48. Caterpillar Inc. fell 4.4 percent, the worst drop among the 30 stocks in the Dow. Canally said the fear that another bank failure will lead to a financial crisis like Lehman Brothers did in 2008 overshadows everything else, he said. Markets are so jittery now that traders see a slight drop in the euro or a small rise in Italian government bond yields as a step toward a wider collapse. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 13.91 points, or 1.1 percent, to 1,211.82. The Nasdaq fell 39.96, or 1.6 percent to 2,539.31. Gold dropped 4.6 percent to settle at $1,586, the lowest closing price since July. Commodity prices tend to fall when the dollar gains strength, since a stronger dollar makes it more expensive for investors using other currencies to buy commodities, which are priced in dollars. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note dropped to 1.91 percent from 1.96 percent late Tuesday as demand increased for ultrasafe assets. High demand for U.S. government debt helped the government sell $13 billion in 30-year bonds at a record low rate of 2.92 percent. In a note to clients, strategists at Nomura said "the insatiable appetite" for Treasurys at such low yields implies that bond buyers are readying themselves for "the end-of-the-euro-trade."CROSS & Mosko Real Estate and Development Company (Cross & Mosko) has been formed as a real estate sales, appraisals and development business. The principals, Jim Mosko and Kevin Cross, have known each other for 20 years and decided to work together in partnership. Mr Mosko, president of the Mosko Group of Companies, has been involved in real estate transactions for more than 20 years. As a licensed broker, his primary role in Cross & Mosko will be to identify and execute upmarket real estate sales and development transactions. Mr. Mosko said: Im pleased to be moving forward with this new venture with Kevin at the helm. Ive known and trusted him for years, and this adds a real estate company to the range of businesses we now have in the Mosko family of companies. Mr Cross has been involved in real estate for 20 years, and served on the board of the Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA) for three years. He is a BREA licensed broker and appraiser, specialising in high value property sales, particularly in private islands and often in conjunction with his exclusive affiliate, Private Islands Inc. Mr Cross also has a professional appraisal practice, serving leading banks, insurance companies, attorneys and other clients in the Bahamas and elsewhere. He qualified as an appraiser in 1997. Mr. Cross said: Jim and I have worked together in the past, and I have always enjoyed his honest and no nonsense way of doing business. I gained a lot of valuable experience in the last 10 years with Bahamas Realty, but the chance of working as an equal partner with someone of Jims stature, backed by the business infrastructure of the Mosko Group, was an opportunity too good to miss. Cross & Mosko is exclusively affiliated with the Mosko Group and with Private Islands Online. It is located at Lyford Cay House on Western Road just outside Lyford Cay. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 5B Mosko forms real estate partnership STOCKS, EURO SLIDE AS WORRIES ABOUT EUROPE PERSIST

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listed Consolidated Waters Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant was some $2.80 cheaper per 1,000 gallons. The urgent need to stem the bleeding at the Water & Sewerage Corporation, which manifests itself in annual taxpayer subsidies of $20-$30 million, was further highlighted by the fact its operating cost recovery rate is projected to fall further than last years unacceptably low 79 per cent in 2011. Its projected to decline further for 2o11, Ms Edgecombe told Tribune Business, saying it its projected to be in the high 60s. Given that this ratio measures how much of the Water & Sewerage Corporations costs are covered by its revenues, the projection indicates that almost one-third of its 2011 expenses will not be met by income streams. Asked about the likely impact of the proposed IDB financing for the Water & Sewerage Corporations future financial health and sustainability, Ms Edgecombe said simply: Huge. I think the best illustration of that is we project that, if nothing is done over the next 10 years, the Government will be called upon to provide subsidies in the order of $414 million. If something is done with non-revenue water reduction, the tariff calculation occurring under an economic regulator, and also with the organisational restructuring and purchase of some additional technology, we expect that amount to be $181 million over the next 10 years. In exchange for $81 million, we will see savings in the amount of $233 million, in terms of the amount the Government has to pitch in. Its huge for us, and huge for the Government and the taxpayer. Weve known for some time that we need to find some form of financing to address these issues. Further savings, the Water & Sewerage Corporation chief financial officer said, would come via the end of barging from Andros and the simultaneous expansion of the Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant. The barging costs us more in the order of $9 per 1,000 gallons, and with the Blue Hills reverse osmosis expansion, the average cost is $6.20 per 1,000 gallons, so thats a considerable savings on three million gallons per day, Ms Edgecombe told Tribune Business. The structure of the contract to slash the Water & Sewerage Corporations nonrevenue water losses by around 50 per cent, coupled with mains improvements carried out as part of the New Providence Road Improvement Project and Airport Gateway project, should leave New Providences water and sewerage infrastructure in good shape for years to come, Ms Edgecombe added. Once the non-revenue water has been brought under control, and reduced by 2.5 million gallons per day, that has to be maintained for five years, she explained, during which time capital investment will be made by the contractor to maintain that level. Then there will be the handover to the Corporation, and the infrastructure should be in good shape. Together with the improvements related to other projects, Ms Edgecombe added: All of these things are going a long way to improving carrying capacity, and increasing customer satisfaction because they have more and better quality water. All these things pave the way for a customer win back, very much so. We do hope that beginning in 2012, going into 2013, we will see some improvement in operations. We look forward to starting in the New Year. While unable to specify how many Water & Sewerage Corporation customers are currently disconnected, Ms Edgecombe said accounts receivables were having to be managed very carefully, and that customer non-payment had been a bit of struggle since 2008. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE KINGSWAYACADEMY ELEMENTARY ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONSEntrance Examinations for all Elementary grade levels:K3 January 14, 2012 @ 10:00 a.m.(must be 3 years old by October 31, 2012)K4 February 3 & 17, 2012 times are scheduled throughout the day(must be 4 years old by December 31, 2012)K5 March 3, 2012 times are scheduled throughout the day (must be 5 years old by December 31, 2012)Grades 1 to Grade 6 Saturday, March 3, 2012. 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon Parents are asked to collect application forms between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. daily from the Elementary Desk in the Herbert L. Treco Administration Building on the schools BernardRoad campus, before the testing date. Application forms may also be accessed from the schools website www.kingswayacademy.com. APPLY NOWFor further information, kindly contact the school at telephone numbers:324 5049 or 324 2158 of this year, at $59.773 million, and spend at $137.053 million. Ms Stuart told Tribune Business that tourism officials were extremely pleased with cruise arrivals in Grand Bahama, which recorded as much as a 41.6 per cent growth in the first quarter. One of the things we are pretty pleased with is the growth in Grand Bahama. Grand Bahama has experienced tremendous growth with regards to their cruise calls, and that bodes well for the people in Grand Bahama, Ms Stuart said. Carnival increased the number of calls to Grand Bahamas significantly, and also there was the injection of Bahamas Celebration, which sails there on a regular basis at least three times a week. We have seen growth in the first quarter of as much as 41.6 per cent. During the second quarter and the third quarter things levelled out, but during the first quarter they saw tremendous growth in Grand Bahama. Ms Stuart said the Bahamas recorded increases in cruise passenger arrivals this year. She told Tribune Business: Based on statistics I have, which is up to October, cruise arrivals have been up. In the first quarter of 2011 versus 2010, it increased by 15.3 per cent. In the second quarter we saw an overall increase of 6 per cent. During the third quarter we saw just a 1.8 per cent increase. At the end of August and into September we had some challenges with the weather, which caused a lot of vessels to be diverted. Usually in most instances the ships are diverted towards us, but there were some close calls for us with hurricanes at the end of August and September, so ships were diverted away from us. Despite that our numbers are still extremely positive. Thus far for the third quarter, October already showed a 2 per cent growth. December is usually a peak for us so we expect that to be pretty positive. W A TER C ORP C OS T REC OVER Y T O F ALL T O HIGH 60%SFROM page 1BCR UISE VISIT OR SPEND UP T O $1 3 7M T O Q3FROM page 1B

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institutions development of electronic banking and credit card processing centre were integral to this strategy, Paul McWeeney told Tribune Business the latter was already working with several Bahamian companies on the development of private label credit cards. Bank of the Bahamas International, he said, was shifting away from the traditional focus on bricks and mortar branches to the provision of off-site electronic banking, an Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) being installed at Marios Bowling & Entertainment Centre the latest example of such a strategy. Disclosing that the bank would start to outfit its Carmichael Road branch this month, with the facility set to open in four-five months time, Mr McWeeney also told Tribune Business that Bank of the Bahamas International also planned to exploit the high liquidity in the commercial banking system to redesign its liabilities, strengthening the balance sheet by reducing costs. And, in preparations for Basle IIIs enhanced capital requirements, Mr McWeeney said that while well fortified, Bank of the Bahamas International would move in the next 24 months to adjust the composition of its $117.187 million in net equity as at September 30, 2011. Speaking in the wake of Bank of the Bahamas International unveiling a $1.09 million profit for the three months to that date, Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business that too much emphasis was being placed on the fact that a $1.231 million preference share dividend payment left ordinary shareholders with a small loss for the quarter. He explained that the dividend payment, which was not made in the first quarter of the banks previous financial year, was a timing issue related to when the Central Bank of the Bahamas, under the regulators new rules, approved the dividend payment. The Central Bank now has to pre-approve dividend payments or any other changes to a banks capital base, and Mr McWeeney said: Its just a matter of when we submit the request and get that approved. Even if we send it in prior to the due date, were at the mercy of the Central Bank. We did make a good profit. It just happened that as the timing was different, it went to the preference shareholders who take on more risk. At the end of 12 months, the distribution of earnings will always be equitable, as it has been for 19 years. Mr McWeeney said Bank of the Bahamas Internationals major first quarter achievement lay in producing a profit despite suffering a 75 basis point margin squeeze on interest income (spreads) as a result of the Bahamian Prime rate cut earlier this year. Unlike other banks, we have the customer the benefit immediately of the reduction in the Prime rate, he explained. That is a 75 basis point spread cut off a $600 million-plus loan book. Most of our loans are tied to Prime, as we have very few consumer loans, and it takes at least six months to recalibrate deposit rates. Given that relatively high non-performing loan levels and increased provisioning were likely to be with the Bahamian commercial banking industry for some time, Bank of the Bahamas International is continuing moves to diversify its revenue streams. Were focusing a lot on electronic banking and credit card processing over the next few years, the heavy volume transaction-type businesses, not to mention Automated Banking Machines (ABMs). The ABMs, being rolled out under the BOB Express moniker, are multilingual, being especially tailored for areas such as Carmichael with large populations and different cultures. Through enhanced functions and being more consumer friendly, Mr McWeeney said these ABMs would help to extend the banking market and provide yearround, 24/7 service. Some of the new offsite locations are pretty standout and competitive, Mr McWeeney said of the offsite ABM spots. Apart from locations at Phils Food Ser vices, the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA) and Marios Bowling, Bank of the Bahamas International had identified three other off-site locations were moving on very aggressively at this time. Were shying away from bricks and mortar, and putting more emphasis on electronic banking destinations, being a lot more lean, flexible and accessible, the managing director added. Bank of the Bahamas International is also moving on its credit card processing platform. Were meeting with the people from Visa, who are in town right now, looking at how were going to roll-out new products in the New Year, Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business. Weve tied down partnerships throughout the world as to how we move forward with that....... Were one of the few banks in the region, possibly theres only one other, that has its own credit card processing facility. Were working with several local companies to support the issuance of private label credit cards. We can start doing private label credit cards for customers. Were going to roll-out a whole candy shop of products for customers. Credit is down. We know were going to be in this state for several years, but are going to concentrate on building a new business model. Mr McWeeney explained Bank of the Bahamas Internationals new philosophy and business model in the context of the global recession, and its likely mediumterm impact on the Bahamian banking market and economy. Things will never be as they were, he told Tribune Business. We keep looking to the past for the future, but we need to create the future. Here we understand whats not going to happen, and what will happen, and based on that thinking we can create a new business model for the bank, which we are confident is best suited to the evolving financial markets and economies. Bank of the Bahamas International is alsso moving to strengthen its balance sheet through capital and liability adjustments. We have some plans I dont want to disclose at this point in time, but with the heightened liquidity we may look at redesigning some of the liability elements of the balance sheet to assist in reducing costs, Mr McWeeney said. At the same time, the important thing is to make provisions where appropriate. Thats the first line of defence against losses, and were exceptionally well provisioned. On the capital front, Mr McWeeney said Bank of the Bahamas Internationals combined regulatory capital was over 23 per cent, well ahead of the regulatory regime. Were well fortified there, he added. With Basle III, we have to meet that standard. We know we have to revisit the composi tion of the equity in the near term, but thats something we will work on over the next 24 months. Mr McWeeney added that the expansion and upgrades to Bank of the Bahamas Internationals Village Road branch were almost completed, with the final elements the three self-service stations set to go in by months end. Village Road will be used as the model for upgrades to Bank of the Bahamas Internationals entire branch network. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE is hereby given that RACHELJOSEPH of P.O.Box SP-61625, East Street South and Juans Drive, Nassau, Bahamas ,is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization shouldnot be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 15th day of December, 2011 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF BEAUTIFUL STEF LTD. Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above company commenced on the 9th day of December, 2011. Octagon Management Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company. ______________________________________ Octagon Management Limited Liquidator BANK BUILDS NEW BUSINESS MODELFROM page 1B Share your newsThe Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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funding never came through. Were in a fight, and God knows Im a fighter. Tribune Business understands that the relationship between Mr Pinder and Mr Schaefer effectively broke down last week. That represents a remarkable about-turn in just five months, as Mr Schaefer as recently as July 18this year was extolling the virtues of Mr Pinder and his group of Bahamian investors, who had agreed to buy into the then-struggling retailer. Confirming that Mr Pinders group was buying a 48 percent stake in Robin Hood, and taking out his former Miami-based partner, Suresh Khilnani, Mr Schaefer said then: It's an all-Bahamian group that is buying. We've signed the agreement for 48 per cent, and I'm waiting for the money. They're substantial investors in the Bahamas. Suffice it to say, if there's one good thing coming out of this in the eyes and minds of many, it's that a substantial part of this retailer is coming back to the Bahamas." It is unclear what impact the break-up with Mr Pinder will have on Robin Hood and its 100-plus employees, especially as they head into the all-important Christmas season for retailers, but Mr Schaefer said there were other investors interested in buy ing into the Tonique Williams Darling Highway-based retailer. Clearly, it has a deleterious affect on any business when youre in negotiations for 15 months, and funds are promised and promised, but never materialise, he told Tribune Business. This break-up has hap pened and we are no longer together, but I am encouraged to find there are other people interested in investing in Robin Hood. Im confident well be able to raise capital to rebuild the company in the vision of what we wanted. But its a terribly sad experience. Ever the optimist, Mr Schaefer said Robin Hood was still looking to re-open its second store on Prince Charles Drive, which was closed months after it opened, once the roadworks stemming from the New Providence Road Improvement project came to fruition. Were going to do our best to recover, he promised. Weve got some meetings with some good people in the next week. Were hopeful well be able to open Robin Hood 2 in a couple of months, once the roadworks are done. Research by Tribune Business has revealed that Mr Pinder is the chief financial officer of a Nevada-incorporated company called the Prospero Group, which is listed on the US pink sheets overthe-counter market. The US Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) initiated administrative proceedings against the Prospero Group in October 2010 for failing to meet its obligations to file timely annual reports since December 15, 2009 (its financial year end being in March). In describing the Prospero Group, the SEC said it was supposed to have its main executive offices in New York, but appears to have its primary place of business in Nassau, the Bahamas. Prospero purports to be an oil and gas company, and/or multi-faceted business operation with investments in resort development, malaria treatments and water purification. The Prospero Group, though, did file its annual report for 2010, with the statements signed off by Mr Pinder. The company made a $571,182 net loss for the year to March 31, 2010, compared to a $46,660 net loss the year before. From its incorporation in July 2002, the Prospero Group has lost a collective $4.446 million. The financial statements also refer to a company called Cavitation Concepts. Mr Pinder and this latter entity swam into Tribune Businesss radar view in 2003, when they were forced by the Securities Commission to withdraw an investment offering seeking to raise $2 million because, by holding a press conference to publicise it, they had made it a public offering. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, DECEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 9B ROBIN HOOD INVESTOR WOEFROM page 1B

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the Bahamas. The future effects of increases in imports under CBERA from the Bahamas on the US economy are likely to be minimal, largely because the Bahamas is, and is likely to remain in the near term, a very small supplier to the US market, the report said. Foreign direct investment in the Bahamas has largely been directed into the countrys tourism and financial services sectors. Foreign direct investment in the Bahamas was $499 million in 2010, down from $839 million in 2008. Little of that was reported to have been directed to the production of CBERA-eligible goods. Foreign direct investment into the Bahamas in 2010 was almost 25 per cent down on the $664 received during 2009, and 40.5 per cent behind 2008 levels. That, though, should pick up for 2011 due to the $2.6 billion Baha Mar project. When it came to Polymers Internationals polystyrene products, the US report said they saw an increase in Customs value of 1.6 per cent year-over-year in 2010, compared to a 30.7 per cent fall in 2009. The quantity of US imports of Polymers Gsrand Bahama-made products dropped by 2.5 per cent, a reduced rate from 2009s 12.5 per cent decline, but their unit value staged a 4.1 per cent recovery last year. In 2009, the unit value of Polymers exports fell 20.8 per cent. In 2010, US imports under CBERA of expandable polystyrene in primary forms accounted for 59.4 per cent of total US imports of other mining and manufacturing products under CBERA, the US report added. The Bahamas was the only source of US imports of this product. US imports of expandable polystyrene in primary form increased 1.6 per cent in 2010 to $95.4 million, after a 30.7 per cent decline in 2009. The decrease in these imports in 2009 to $93.9 million involved declines in unit value, which fell 20.9 per cent, and volume, which fell 12.5 per cent. And it added: Polystyrene from the Bahamas provided the second-largest gain in consumer surplus ($5.4-$5.7 million). Without CBERA, the import price of polystyrene would have been as much as 6 per cent higher. As a percentage of total Caribbean exports to the US under the CBERA, the Bahamas share fell by one percentage point, from 7.8 per cent to 6.8 per cent. The Bahamas accounted for 6.8 per cent of the value of US imports from CBERA countries. About one-half of these imports consisted of refined petroleum products, the US report said. US imports from the Bahamas increased by 23.9 per cent in 2009 to $738 million, and decreased 6.4 per cent to $691 million in 2010, almost exclusively because of the changes in the value of imports of refined petroleum products. Bahamian exports for US consumption, likely crawfish, rose by 2.5 per cent yearover-year in 2010, hitting $99 million compared to $96.5 million the year before. Bahamian exports for consumption accounted for 3.4 per cent of the total exported by Caribbean countries under the CBERA, a 0.7 percentage point fall compared to 2009s 4.1 per cent. your packaging is just a chunk of colourful noise or otherwise. Take the time to learn about your ideal target and then communicate effectively. Getting your concept right is the most important part of the process, and will help your sales. If the sales of your product are important to your profits, you should not "compromise" on your design, as it is not good business sense to invest in packaging if it is evident it would not be competitive. Take the time to make a good choice and do it right. So until we meet again, have fun, enjoy life and stay on top of your game. NB: The columnist welcomes feedback at deedee2111@hotmail.com About the Columnist: Ms Bastian is an extensively trained graphic designer who has qualifications of M.Sc., B.Sc., A.Sc. She has trained at institutions such as: Miami Lakes Technical Centre, Success Training College, College of the Bahamas, Nova Southeastern University, Learning Tree International, Langevine International and Synergy Bahamas.READER FEEDBACKHi Ms Bastian: I really appreciate the advice you render to us young and up-coming business individuals. The informative articles are always invaluable, and I loved the article you posted in The Tribune in reference to personalities, O riginality comes with Personality To me it gave us readers a new way to put our business plans/outlook in perspective. It helps us to figure out: "What impressions we want to give our customers?", and offers more detail to the approach of our customers and whether we wish to remain lazy, brainy, a showoff, enduring, or ingenious, etc. But like your signature line says at the end of every article: Until we meet again, have fun, enjoy life and stay on top of your game." You make it so much easier for us to do all of that. Again, thanks for your invaluable graphic and business advice because evidently it keeps us on top of our game! Ms. Shoron Miller C.O.B Student Nassau, Bahamas Hi Dee: I like the article (Designers Personalities), very interesting. Good job Dee! Regards, Jaymes Jay Darling Nassau, Bahamas BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS 2010 IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 376 Equity Side IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHATpieceparcel or lot of land containing 7,467 sq. ft. situate on the northern side of Northeast side by land said to be Jeffrey Russell and on the Southeast by Jumbay Street and about 92 ft west of Windsor Place Drive and on the Southwest by land said to be Roy Burrows and on the Northwest by land said to be the estate of Ben Darville in Nassau Village in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas AND IN THE MATTER ofthe Quieting Titles Act, 1959 AND IN THE MATTER ofthe Petition of Daniel Ritchie, Jr. NOTICE The Petition of Daniel Ritchie Jr. in respect of ALLTHATpiece parcel of lot of land containing 7,467 sq. ft. situate on the northern side of Jumbay Street and being about 92 feet west of Windsor Place Drive in the subdivision of Nassau Village in the Eastern District of the island of New Providence in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of land is bounded on the NORTHWESTjointly by Lots Numbers 32 and 33 of Windsor Place and running thereon by land the property of one Jeffrey Russell and running thereon One the SOUTHEASTby Jumbay Street and running thereon Fifty-six and the property of one Roy Burrows and running thereon One Hundred parcel or lot of land has a duplex apartment building and a store room thereon which said piece parcel or lot of land is more particularly de5247N.P. and thereon coloured Pink. owner of the fee simple estate in possession of ALLTHATpiece parcel or lot of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have its title to during normal working hour at:can Building, Marlborough Street, Nassau, N.P. Bahamas; or Building, Bay Street and Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas. NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that any person having dower or right to dower or any adverse claim or claim not recognized in the Petition in the Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such claim in the prescribed form and veriJHALL & ASSOCIATES, Chambers, Malcolm Building, Bay Street & Victoria Ave., Nassau, Bahamas. Attorneys for the Petitioner Job OpportunityHotel Chief Maintenance Engineer The Chief Maintenance Engineer is responsible for maintaining the overall operation of the maintenance department and the appearance and working order of the hotel. The successful candidate must be able to work independently, as well as, with others. Responsibilities include but limited to: maintaining the exterior of the building, parking lot, and common areas, maintaining all equipment in guest rooms, conducting daily, weekly and monthly safety inspections and training the staff on safety and emergency procedures, and working with vendors. The Chief Maintenance Engineer must be willing to respond to emergencies, even if after hours, and work with corporate maintenance on special remodeling projects or capital expenditure needs. This positionrequires overall maintenance knowledge and troubleshooting ability with skills in painting, HVAC, carpentry, equipment, and tool usage. Aminimum of chiefmaintenancemanager@gmail.com Our people are our competitive advantage.At Butterfield, we pride ourselves on being approachable, disciplined and proactive. If you embody these qualities and have the necessary experience, you may be the one were looking for.THE BAHAMAS | BARBADOS | BERMUDA | CAYMAN ISLANDS | GUERNSEY | SWITZERLAND | UNITED KINGDOM 4RUST/FlCERAn exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Fiduciary team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Vice President & Head of Trust & Fiduciary Services. Please apply by 16 December 2011 to: Debbie Higgs, Head of Human Resources, Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited Montague Sterling Centre, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3242, Nassau, Bahamas Tel(242) 393 8622 debbie.higgs@bs.butterfieldgroup.comwww.butterfieldgroup.com#OREESPONSIBILITIESr0DQDJHDODUJHSRUWIROLRRIFOLHQWUHODWLRQVKLSV r3URYLGHILQDQFLDOLQIRUPDWLRQWRFOLHQWVDVUHTXHVWHG r$FWRQFOLHQWVoEHKDOILQPDWWHUVGHDOLQJZLWKODZ\HUVEHQHILFLDULHVHWF r([WHQVLYHH[SHULHQFHZLWKDOODVSHFWVRIWUXVWDGPLQLVWUDWLRQ$ESIREDUALIlCATIONSr%DFKHORUoV'HJUHHLQ%XVLQHVVRUUHODWHGGLVFLSOLQHIURPDZHOO recognized university r)LYHWRVHYHQ\HDUVSURJUHVVLYH)LGXFLDU\([SHULHQFHLQWKH)LQDQFLDO Service Industry r7(3'HVLJQDWLRQRURWKHUVXLWDEOHTXDOLILFDWLRQVZLOOEHDGYDQWDJHRXV r3URILFLHQWLQ0LFURVRIW2IILFH6XLWHVRI3URGXFWV r6WURQJLQWHUSHUVRQDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQSUREOHPVROYLQJSURMHFW management and customer service skills. HOW TO ACHIEVE A COMPLETE PACKAGEFROMpage 2B BAHAMAS EXPORTS TO US DECLINE 6.4%FROM page 1B