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The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03136
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Creation Date: December 4, 2006
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03136

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WBy KARIN HERIG
and ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporters
FOLLOWING yet another
bed shortage at Princes~s Mar-
- garet Ht~ospital, hospital staff
want to know how th,- facility
will be able to cope with the
increasing number of patients
governen's NationatHealth
fInsurance plan is expected to
bring. .
Nurses working at PMH
contacted The Tribune, urg-
ing government to rethink the
implementation of the pro-


Pe~et files defamation
wri Qgglifg Ins 881
and, radio station
F"NM leader Huert Ingraham.
and Love97 radio have reported-
ly been named in at defamation
cen"A"t Fe t
I ttethent released yester-

raly wic was broadcast over
"I have been involvedifn rot-
line politics for almost 25 years," .
Mr Peet is quoted as saying. "I
cherish my reputation and I owe a
duty to my family, my con-
stituents and myself to vigorous-
ly defend it.
thle hecout will now deal with


posed NHI scheme, stating
that it will "wreak havroc" if
extensive, infrastructuiral
upgrades are not seen to done
before the launch of such a
plan.
According to reports by sev-
erall nurses, -the emrgency
room at PMHI on Friday; exupe-
rienced a serious shortage of
beds, forcing staff to place
patients on army cots on the
ground.
Former registered nurse at
PMH, Jean Sands was visiting
the emergency room on Fri-
SEE page 12







A YOUNG boy was left
in what spearaed t b an
hit-an -un inckkant nea
11am yesterday, according
to unconfirmed reports*
Though police were
aware of the incident, they
could not provide any fur-
ther details, and up until
press time yesterday no
confirmation of the boy's
medical condition could be
ascertained.


13
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Vo ume: 103 No.12


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


A LARGE group of illegal
immigrants apprehended in
Balhamian waters over the: wreek-
end brings the number of
Hainans captured by Defence
Force officials to 1,000l for the
yreci so far.
A mrup o udcumened

pr emede i ttB sul en
eaha~mna hin eaedo areffori
the US Coast Guard.
On Saturday morning, shortly
after 6am, the US Coast Guard's
cutter ~Reliant spotted a small
sloop carrying 96 Haitian
migrants in the waters off the
southern tip of Long Island.
The US Coast Guard imme-
diately alerted the Defence Force
toothed presence of llse oer-
The Defence Vessel HMS
Bahamzas, on routine patrol in
the area, was diverted to the
smaller aad wa suce ssful in
Because of the unsanitary con-
dition of the sloop, the Haitians
---79 men, 14 women~and' three
children were transferred from
the sloop on to the Defence
Force craft.

.mng.
According to reports, the 96
migrants were all in good health
at the tune of their apprehension
The group is now waiting to
be processed while the sloop they
arrived on was destroyed by the
Defence Force.


FNM Haines its
candidates for
Grand Bahama
SBy DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREPORT After official-
ly announcing the six FNM can-
gna al ecio noun Grn
Bahama, FNM Leader Hubert
pnram icr e$ ai FdNM
--man their battle stations and
get ready to do battle with the
P]LP "
Mr Ingrahamn told support-
ers on Sunday at the ]FNM
Headquarters that he expects
the elections to take place ear-
ly in the New Year as he
announced plans for a mass ral"
ly in Freeport on Friday,
Dea br nnu i
for Eight Mile Rock; Kwasi
Thompson as the candidate for
Pineridge, Zhivargo Laing for
Marco City, and David Wallace
for W~est End and Bimini.
Mr Ingrahame said MPss Neko
SEE page five


MilliSter callS 0fo Portt
Autilority dispute to be
resolved exipedienly
-yIAIN HER O
Br bun Staff R ~rter ~
WFITH the case of Hannes
Babak's re al from~l H a
aeisl oremiovsa t a Gma d
BaeaaPr utsha rity expect-
ed to be heard before the
Supr me Cut oay b uis
urging all parties involved to
resolve matters expediently
before investors are given the
impression of an unstable,
divided Freeport. .
In an toterview with The Ti-
bune last night, Minister Wilch-
combe, MP for West End,
Grand Bahama, said that he is
"deeply concerned"' that the


nal of instability could be sent
to the world."
However, although the dis-
pute surrounding the owner-
ship of the Port Authority has
been ongoing since the death
SEE page 12


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The


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HP


SP S 0


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SPMH staff


speak out after

bed shortage


S2,000 signatures
collected to protest

proposed' ING plant
M By ALISON LOWEC
Tribune Staff Reporter
MORE than 2,000 signa-
tures were collected Saturay
night to protest the proposed
Lquefied Natural Gas plant
at Ocean Cay, near Bmm, at
an awareness-raising concert
These 2,000 si natures will
now be added to ot hers
already collected to make up
Sa total of well over 5,000 sig-
natures on a petition against
the controversial facility, said
Mrs Sam Duncombe, presi-
SdentofreEarth,the environ-
maintal organisation that
planned the event.

very happy," said Mrs Dun-
combe yesterday.
"Ejven when we were
putting up flyers and posters,
people were not aware of
what LNG was...and so this is
SIEE, page two












2000 signatures collected to protest proposed LNG plant


;r' ,


PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page one
one of the reasons why we did
the concert in the first place,"
she said.
"(It was) for people who
aren't necessarily looking at the
paper or listening to the radio
shows so they will get the infor-
mation it's important. People
have to have that venue so that
they understand what is being
proposed for the country," she
added.
During the concert which
saw performances by a number
of Bahamian artists a power
point presentation was project-
ed continuously, and spoken
announcements about LNG
were made twice during the
evening's events.
Now M1rs Duncom be is
increasingly optimistic that gov-
ernment, which has been lam-
basted by a number of frustrat-
ed corporations in the last year
for their indecisiono" over LNG
in the Bahamas, may move
a ainst the poect -
"I think% th we have over-
whelmingly shown that when
peo le understand what t his
issue is about they do not want
it here and I think that's very
plain
"The thing that people need
to remember is, when we were
fighting Clifton (Cay develop-
ment), Perry Christie was then
the opposition leader and he
stepped in at 3,500 signatures
and basically~ said if the govern-
ment gave t he Clift on Ca y
developers the go-ahead that
when the PLP became the gol-
ernment they would rescind all
of the contracts that would hale
allowed that project to pro-
ceed," she said.
"I don't want to say that
3,500 is the magic number or
anything but you know the
point is, he came in and rescued
us from Clifton Cay develop-
ment at 3,500 signatures...
The LNG project proposed


MIA STALL taking signatures at the
awareness-raising concert at Arawak Cay,
by US company AES corps is assessments had determined the
currently bemng considered by project to be safe and in light of
government, which has down- this that he anticipated the pro-
played the safety and environ- ject to be given the "go-ahead"
mental implications, and m nthe "very near future."
claimed that it will boost and Howevrer, opponents have
diversify the Bahamas' econo- questioned why the Bahamas
Iny, creating 400 Bahargian should allow such a project to
jobs, according to the minister go ahead in their territory when
responsible for LNG, Leslie Floridians have chosen not to
Miller. do so.
It will involve the storage of "People have a problem that
LNG at the inan-made Ocean Florida or a US company wants
Cay island near Bimini, which to dump their dirty energy in
will then be transported to our backyard," said Mrs Dun-
Florida through a 100-mile long combe. "If you need the energy
pipeline, providing a cheap then build the plant mn your own
energy source for that stateP. backyard, or better still, how
.In December 2005, Prime about going with some alterna-
Mmnister Perry Christie referred tives and stop going down the
to some misgivings he had same old route that causes wars
about the project irlight of the and causes stress and strife for
Bahamas as a tourist destmna- the planet and for the people,
tion. said rl~rs Duncombe.
"I had a particular difficul- She added that the next step
ty...with the perception of what for reEarth mn its movement to
the Bahamas actually is and that inform the public about LNG
there is an incredible amount and articulate public o position
of money, I mean billions of to the plan is to create a one-
dollars I suppose now we spend hour documentary, to be
marketing 'It's better in The accompanied by a telethon,
Bahamas' or 'It just keeps get- which they anticipate will be
ting better', he told T'he aired on ZNS and Cable 12.
Bahama Journal. W ~~e'll basically be doing a
"I wasn't sure when ypou jux- telethon so people who, for
tapose an LNG plant with that some reason didn't come to the
perception that causes people concert, will continue to have
to come here and that really an opportunity to understand
reinforces what saves us the what the issue is about and if
cash flow into the country based they want to sign the petition
on tourism receipts. I wasn't we'll give- them another oppor-
sure that LNG plants in The tunity to sign the petition," said
Bahamas were consistent with Mrs Duncombe,
that." "I think the more wre can
~Howevetr, M1r Christie dd s;ui.inf inor people the mnore ilgna-
later that e n\ironme ntal impact t' ures we will get," she added.


(
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Tunistas ne1:20 3:o NIA 5:15 8:40 10:50
OEA U T 1:00 3:25 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:45
OEKTHE HALLS B 1:15 3:40 N/A 5:15 8:35 10:55
THE FOUNTAIN T 1:10 3:35 NA 6:10 8:20 10:50
CAIN RYAEC :0 NI 9 4 :0 7:0 NA 0
CASING ROYALE C 1:40~ N/A 5:00 NIA 8:40 N/A
HAPPY FEET A 1:05 3:45 N/A 6:00 8:15 10:35
BORAT C 1:25 3:50 N/A 6:20 8:35 10:55
FLUSHED AWAY A 1:15 3:45 HA 5:20 8:30 10:30
THE SANTA CLAUSE 3 A 1:18 3:30 N/A 6:05 8:25 10:45


* In brief

Rest ura nt


shot during
robbe y

AN employee of a local
restaurant was shot in the hand
during a robbery that went
wrong.
According to Inspector Wal-
ter Evans, Police Press Liaison,
two males robbers entered the
Grand Oriental Express
Restaurant located on Madeira
Street around 8pm last Wednes-
day while customers and
employees were present and
robbed the eatery of a "small
amount of cash*
One of the perpetrators, car-
rying a handgun, shot an
employee in the right arm.
The robbers escaped heading
twarids St T omas More
Scoo :
The mljury to the employee,
who is mn his mid-fifties, is "not
life threatening."

Two are

accused of

robbery at

g un point
TWO~ men were remanded to
jail Friday after being arraigned
in magistrate's court on armed
robbery charges.
33 ofe Vc oa nBolvr a
1ila mMeorrs d of Tmaalosr
trate Susan Sylvester at Court
11, Nassau Street Friday. It is
alleged that the two on Tues-
day, November 29, while armed
with a handg un robbed
Kendrick Deveaux of $330 in
cash. It is further alleged that
the two at the same time robbed
Shavago James of $20. The inci-
dent reportedly took place at
Cambridge Street.
The men were not required
to plead to the charges and
were remanded to prison. A
preliminary inquiry has been set
for March 16, 2007.

Man fa ces

charge of
ItSa 98lI
from church

A 20-YEAR-OLD man of
Marshall Road was arraigned
in magistrate's court on shop-
breaking and stealing charges.
It is alleged that Anthony
Meadows sometime around
12.30 aim on Monday, Novem-
ber 27, broke into Mt Nebo
Baptist Church on Marshall
Road. It is alleged that he, being
concerned with others, stole a
replica church bris with cash in
the amount of $4,000, a 13-inch
television set along with an
assortment of food items, alto-
gether valued at $4,250.
Meadows, who was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel Friday pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
was granted $3,500 bail. The
matter was adjourned to April
5, 2007.












MON DAY,
DECEMBER 4TH
6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
12:05 Immediate Response cont'd
1:00 Caribbean News In Review
1:30 The Trolls & The Christmas
Express
2:00 Joy To The World
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Little Robots
4:30 Carmen San Diego
50 oa~ne' aif Thristmas


5:30 The Book: The Gift
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13 Freeport
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Tourism Today
9:00 Legends: Eliza Taylor
9:30 Island Life Destinations
10:00 Caribbean Newsline

11'30 Lm dRe~pons
1oon CocmmmiPagel1AM0


TURISTAS NEW 1 :00 3:30 N/A 6:20 8:35 10:40
OEJA VU T 1:10 3:40 N/A 5:00 18:20 10:40
OECK THE HALLS B 1:30 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:30 10:25
CASINO ROYALE C 1:00 N/A 4:00 7:00 N/A 10:00
HAPPY FEET A 1:20 3:35 N/A 6:00 8:25 10:35


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


ABy ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Tribune has now
passed on the contact details of
contractors who have given
this newspaper permission to .
release their names to the
police so that they can help
them in their investigation into
allegations of corruption in the
Ministry of Housing. Housing
Minister Neville Wisdom
announced on Wednesday,
November 8th, that the alle-
gations would be investigated
by the police.
Several other contractors,
who did not wish to be named,
have expressed their intentlion


to go to the police in the com-
ing week to lay out their
claims.
These include allegations,
initially brought to light at the
beginning of November, that
there is a group of corrupt
individuals in the ministry who
are extorting money from con-
tractors, and pocketing hous-
ing funds ultimately at the
expense of working class
Bahamian home buyers, who
have been left paying over-the-
odds for substandard work, it
is alleged.
The exchange of details fol-
lows an approach made by
Superintendent Keith Bell and
Detective Serge~ant Harris


Cash to The Tribune on Thurs-
day, November 16th, to
request any information that
reporters might have that
would help their investigation.
While Tribune reporters
cannot give this information
to the police, because it was
given to them in confidence,
they went to their informants
for permission to release their
names.
While at The Triburne office,
the two senior officers request-
ed that any other contractors
with any information that can
help police as they investigate
the Ministry of Housing con-
tact them on either 302-8158
(Bell) or 302-8073 (C'ash).


SHOUSING Minister Neville Wisdom has promised an
investigation into allegations of corruption


THE Bahamas may see a
significant increase in cruise
ship passengers next year as
several of the major cruise line
companies have announced
the launching of new vessels.
The Norwegian Cruise Line
will be launching yet another
addition to its fleet at the end
of next year.


The 2,430-passenger Nor-
wegian Gem is scheduled to
begin its service in October,
2007. The ship will be home-
ported year-round in New
York and will feature itiner-
aries to the Bahamas, Florida
and the southern Caribbean.
Meanwhile, the Royal
Caribbean cruise line is sched-


uled to add another mega-liner
to its fleet, just months after
the successful launch of the
Freedom of the Seas, the
world'sla~rgest passenger vessel-
Liberty of the Seas, a
160,000-tonne vessel with a
3,634-passenger capacity,
begins sailing from Miami in
May, 2007.



;.


NEW 1 :15


COntractors' details




passed on to pokiee


investigation


to


MajOr CTUiSC 11HCS RHHOUnCC

expansion of their fleets


THE NATIVITE


3:50 IN/A i:1











I*)~m:lr~113l~trCIl~1llll~mrm


Publisher/Editor 1 91 9-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M. G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
PublisFher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News,` Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Gr'and Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608


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SWilling to be trained
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Positive attitude and c~an work well under

pressure


PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


EDFITOR, The Tribune.

IN A letter to the editor pub-
lished on www.Bahamasuncen-
sored.com, Senator Philip Galanis
criticised an article written by
myself, claiming it misrepresented
the international coverage of the
Anna Nicole Smith issue. My arti-
cle explained that the issue has
been portrayed by more than 130
news organizations around the
world as a political liability for
the PLP.
dMr GlNiswo b O eM n
bune's journalists have done their
very best once more to mislead
and misinform the Bahamian
sublic." Heasks ho haerep rte ,
journalists that are bemng so well-
tramned by the eminent Mr Mar-
quis" can "attempt to mislead his
readers so blatantly by headlining
a story 'international media'".
In what is becoming a recur~
rent theme in his public com-
ments ori journalism, ~Mr Galais
seems to have confused his terms
and missed the point entirely.
There are, in fact, a number of
curious aspects to Mr Galanis'
letter leaving aside the many
grammatical oddities, two exam-
ples of which are offered mn the
pa ha ns' cmplaint seems ~
to be that the stories published
by international media organisa-
tions referring to Anna Nicole
Smith as a political handicap for
his party had their origins in the
work of a few local stringers. He
says; "The fact that the story is
running in, as the article says,
'Canada, Europe, Australia, Chi-
na and the US', does not mean
that there are Canadian, Euro-
pean, Australian, Chinese and
American journalists camped out
here, each writing stories that
reflect negatively on our nation
and our government.
The short answer to this is: of
counse this is not wha iit m an
claimed or even suggested that
the stories were the work of for-
eign journalists. Anyone
acquainted with the modus
operandi of international media
organizations would wonder
where the senator got such an
idea.
In yet another of his interesting
grammatical constructions, Mr
Galamis asserts: "The truth is, if
this reporter were to be honest,
that these stories he refers to are
actually written by local reporters
who are 'stringers' for these news
oranisationsd like Reuters and
Abs ltly corr ct ...and?
One stru gles to see I is point
The fact ofthe matter is that the
story WAS published in Cana-
da, Europe, Australia, the US and
China.
Surely even someone as blind-
ed by partisan fervor as Mr Gala-
nis can appreciate that what mat-
ters is not who wrote a story that
portrays the Bahamas in a nega-
tive light, but how many people
read it internationally.


ve e~er aodsd ooue niona
its contents. I would refer him to
any textbook definition of jour-
nalism or indeed parliamentary
democracy to ascertain which of
us is correct.
The senator goes on to ques-
tion whether The Tribune has
"the journalistic integrity they
profess to possess"
I do not expect any politician to
appreciate the truism that there is
no integrity without honesty. And
tdu to tte mo'e thesna to f
the Bahamian people" means
putting a positive spin on things
regardless of the facts. But if the
senator were to o ercome his

books, he might learn that behav-
ing with integrity is the antithesis
of blindly catering to interests,
and that ultimately, the best ser-
vice a journalist can render his
country is to "let justice be done,
though the heavens fall" as the
Romans used to say.
Of late, Tribune journalists who
have spoken out against corrup-
tion or hypocrisy have been
accused of acting as conduits for
the opinions of our superiors.
Lest the senator be tempted to
make the same error, I mnvite him
roctct e p aonfll to iuge
ions expressed above.
PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor
Nassau,
December 4, 2006










EDITOR, The Tribune.
I AM writing to add my name
to the list of those w ho have
been mistreated, ignored, done
wrong by Immigration here in
-Nassau. I have been married 8
1/2 years to a Bahamian. I have
three Bahamian children who
were born here in Nassau. I
have been technically a tourist
for the last 3 1/2 years. I have
applied for the permanent resi-
dency (4 1/2 years ago) and the
yearly residency permits (ear-
lier this year) and still have
nothing. I refuse to pay for a
general work permit to be my
husband's maid. I refuse to pay
anyone under the table to get
something that is my right. I
refuse to fork out loads of mon-
ey to get a lawyer push this
along quicker. However, I do
want my right to live here, to
work if I wish, to come and go
without being hassled every
time about my status. Help me!

P HIGGS
Nassau,
November 30, 2006.


Is he s testing that the rd-
ership of more than 100 eaws
houses from Washington to Bei-
jing did NOT read the story? Is
b hau d etdsatof tos nods aid
haps millions of potential tourists
and investors doesn't matter
unless it is written by a journalist
bnis etdhewchounr w erteot i
Bahamas in order to report back?
In that case, a good portion of aH
modern journalism may as well
The senator seems to have
becm etnled inmsocp
tien enabtnthe man ng oonthpe
term ."international media"
assuming for some reason that i'
applies to the individual writing
the news, rather than the body
which publishes it. This would be
easily remedied were Mr Gala-
nis to look up "international" and
"media" in any dictionary.
But perhaps the best way for
him to avoid becoming confused
in the future is not to speak about
journalism, a subject of which he
clearly has little understanding.
For his information, news organ-
isations that subscribe to interna-
tional wires like the Associated
Press and Reuters select only a
few from a multitude of stories
every d and hold thersransd Tf
accountabil .o.Under these cir-
cumstances, would one not con-
sider it quite significant that so
many news organizations chose
to publish~a story embarrassing
the PLP over thousands of other
options sent in from around the
world that day?
Mr Galanis' argument is irrel-
evant in any case. Had his atten-
tion span held to the end of my
article, he would have found it
clearly explained that all the sto-
ries about Anna Nicole Smith I
referred to originated in a single
Associated Press article.
flowever th re is another,
muc more to ling sentiment

ments r Gal nis aks: shy
are these 'stringers' or reporter
in the employ. of foreign news
agencies so determined to under-
mine the place they call home and
attempt to destroy what so many
have worked so hard to build
up?"
The answer, of course, is that
the truth cannot undermine or
destroy anything worth presery-
ing. If the stringer's story is not
the truth, I mnvite Mr Galamis to
outline the positive version of the
Anna Nicole Smith debacle for
the public.
Journalists understand that a

edmr ittlksso ie poer we co
stantly subjected to the most
intense scrutiny and made to earn
any re pect they enjy
Buts t seems nC Galanis
believes that rather than tell the
truth, our job is to erect a glossy


IN DEBATING government's proposed
National Health Insurance Bil now before
the House, St Miargaret MP Pierre Dupuch
wanted to know if the many Haitians without
status in the country had been factored into
the estimated $250 million annual cost of the
insurance.
He said he understood that there were
from 40,000 to 100,000 illegal Haitians in the
country. He wanted to know who would take
care of their medical needs under the plan. He
believed that if they were included in gov-
ernment's calculations the proposal "would-
n't look too' good then."
The illegal immigrant population not
only Haitians, but those of other nationali-
ties-- will have to receive meia care when-
ever they go to the clinics or the hospitals.
Recently Dr Marcus Bethel, rightly
refused the suggestion of those who wanted
the hospital to give government the names
of all illegal persons seeking medical help so
that the immigration department could deport
them. Not only can a medical facility not
refuse assistance, but if a sick person is afraid
to seek help in his illness, that untreated illness
could start an epidemic in the community.
So, if only for purely selfish reasons, no ill `
person should be frightened into going under-
ground with his sickness.
Nor should the Haitians be blamed for the
dilemma now facing the country we are
all to blame.
Those of us who lived through the early
forties should vividly remember what hap-
pens when a group of people in a society are
sidelined. We remember how - from the most brilliant to the poorest -
were blamed for all of Germany's economic
and social his after the First World War.
Everything that went wrong in~ Germany was
the fault of the Jew. Hitler ranted and raved
abolit these Germans, reducing them to an
object of scorn, stripping them of their~ human-
ity. And so the Jew was ostracised. Then he
was attacked and arrested. And then he was
gassed. The word Holocaust should mean
something to all of us, whether it was part of
our times, or whether we have only read about
it. The horrors of the Holocaust should be a
lesson we should all learn well. -
*Every time we hear Haitians being scorned
and blamed for all of this country's problems,
we think of the hapless iew.
The Haitian problem is a Bahamian prob-
lem, encouraged by Bahannans from way
back.
Bahamians were happy to welcome Haitian


labour when Haitians arrived in small num-
bers and were absorbed by society. Today
these "old" Haitians resent the newcomers
as much as do Bahamians. Because Haitian
immigrants now arrive by the boatload, upset.
ting the social order, the spotlight on them
now includes those who consider the Bahamas
their home. We know "Bahamians" who came
from Haiti as small children, who live in fear
that the Haitian skeleton in their closet will be
"outed." They have no reason to be ashamed
Sof their Haitian roots, but they are.
As a child we always thought of Haitians as
a well educated, cultured people far more
educated and cultured than the-Bahamian,
That was because those were the only
Haitians we met in those days.
Today that perception has changed not
because the high class Haitian is any legs cul-
tured, but because all we now see are H~aiti's
poor being disgorged on our shores.
And so we have a problem. ~We have a
problem because we have jobs to do that
Bahamians refuse to do. We know of families
who would rather their young sons sit idly at
home rather than get a summer job to help
support the family doing what they consider
"Haitian work." And so these, the very per-
sons who complain the loudest about the
Haitians, create the need for them to be here
-because of their attitude towards jobs that
have been reserved for Haitians.
But government should get most of the
blame.
If Haitians with jobs in this country were
regularised, then they would be contributing
to National Insurance and whatever insur-
ance would be introduced and would, there-
fore, be supporting themselves. Those who
do not have jobs, would not be needed, and
should be repatriated.
There are many Haitians today who have
jobs, but do not pay National Insurance,
because not given a work permit by govern-
Sment, they are afraid of being detected by
going to National Insurance. Government
ministers have Haitian gardeners, obviously
because there is no Bahamian to tend their
gardens. On what grounds can they then jus-
tify rejecting applications for a Haitian from
Bahamrian -employers?
A Bahamian on a recent radio talk show
revealed that Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson himself had a Haitian employee. So
how can Mr Gibson deny others?
Don't blame the poor Haitian, rather
blame a confused government for our prob-
lems.


THE TRIBUNE


C H11015m OI artil 01


The Tribune Lirmited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, KH., OB.LE,DK.M.L K C.S.G.,





I


mul


o Iln brief

Man faces


::*:*,wion..


handgun
A 28-YEAR-OLD Sunlight
Village man was taken into
police custody Friday after
allegedly being found in pos-
session of a loaded pistol.
The manl was reportedly spot-
ted by officers from the mobile
division, who thought he was
acting suspiciously in the'Sun
light Village area Friday night,
according to police press liai-
son officer Walter Evans
Officers gave chase and in the
process saw the man pull an
object from his waist and throw
it to the ground
The object was a loaded pis-
tol with five live rounds of
ammunition

WNoman
admits
stealing from
workplace
A 34-YEAR-OLD woman of
Mount Royal Avenue pleaded
guilty in magistrate's court Fri-
day to stealing from her place of
employment.
Court dockets stated that
Garnell Arnett on Wednesday,
November 22, stole $255 from
the Gucci store' on Bay Street.
Arnet, who appeared before
Magistrate Susan Sylvester, was
fined $750.







Call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.


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__ __. ___ _..1


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


ship by Government...who will
study the details; engage all
stakeholders...then oversee
and push the government
bureaucracy to make sure our
people get what they are
promised and what they
deserve.
"Based on its record, we do
not believe that the PLP can
offer this leadership," said the
party.
The party is critical of Prime
Minister.Christie for, it claims,
delegating the task of moving
the project forward to the min-
ister for health, Dr Bernard
Nottage.
"When it came time to
address the nation on this crit-
ical matter it was the Minister
of Health, not the Prime Min-
ister, who took to the air-
waves," said the party. -


The statement further sug-
gested that the PLP are dleliv-
ermng promises to the people
which they will not be able to
follow through on, which, they
claim, is worse than making no
promises at all.
"The same administration
which often runs out of basic
medicines in hospitals and clin-
ics now tells us that they are
ready to overhaul the health
care system. That's hard to
believe.
"The same administration
which cannot collect garbage
on time, keep our islands clean,
Sor open schools on tiine an~d in
good repair, now tells us that
they have figured oiit the details
of how to bring urgent help to
r the uninspired, the sick, the
elderly and outpooter~citizens.
We do not believe them," said


SBy ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE opposition has ques-
tioned how government can
get National Health Insurance
right when it cannot "get the
small things right" and has sug-
gested that the current leader-
ship's record is proof that it
will not be able to deliver the
programme.
Meanwhile, the party
claimed that a successful pro-
gramme "must be built on the
twin pillars of compassion and
competence" if it is to "bring
genuine hope and help to our
people."
"Such a system must not be
allowed to go bankrupt quick-
ly because it was badly
designed by a Government
desperate for a perceived


accomplishment on the eve of
a general election," the party
said in a statement yesterday.
The FNM declared that it
does not disagree with the
" urgent need for a critical
response to the health care
needs of the Bahamian peo-
ple" but only with the ability of
the current government to cre-
ate and implement such a
response.
"While most Bahamians
enthusiastic ally support the
development of universal
health coverage, they know
that the leadership of a com-
petent Prime Minister is essen-
tial to make such momentous
progress' take place in a timely
and effective tannerr" said the
party.
Comprehensive health
reform requires strong leader-


the party.
The statement criticised the
government "which loudly
proclaimed its intention to con-
sult" for allegedly failing to
do so with regards to the NHI
initiative.
"If you had a serious illness
and your doctor went ahead
and decided on treatment plan
for you and your family with-
out consulting you or other doc-
tors, what would you think?
Well that is what the PLP wants
to do with your health care.
"They propose a plan for you
without consulting you on all
the details. We all agree on-
comprehensivre health care.
"But, let's get it right together,"
said the party.
Mr Ingraham is expected to
address the issue in the House
of Assembly on Wednesday.


election campaigns in Grand
Bahama and Abaco.
"He has served in parlia-
ment for 12 years...and is
someone in whom I have great
confidence, and I am assigming
him responsibility for coordi-
nation of the election campaign
for Grand Bahama and Abaco,
which will mean responsibili-
ty for 20 per cent of the seats in
parliament," he said.
The PLP government, said
'Mr Ingraham, has provided
ineffective .governance during
its tenure in office.
Mr Ingraham believes that
the handling of the Royal
Oasis situation is "only sys-
tematic of how the PLP has
misgoverned the Bahaimas."
"The different announce-
ments, I have never known of a
time when more announce-
ments were made. And, this
pudding people can't get any to
ea~t they hear abolit it all the
time. The last word I heard was
that a sale would come by the
end of this month. I will...
Scomrment on this when I speak
ii1 Grand Bihama~ ork Fridity
.night," he said.'' !


FROM page one -a-...
Grant and Kenneth Russell
will return as the candidates :
for Lucaya and High Rock,
respectively.
During his announcement of .
candidates, thunderous
applause and cheers rang out
from among supporters gath-
ered at the party's headquar-
ters on West Atlantic Drive I '
around 3pm on Sunday.
Mr Ingraham said a number
of people sought nomination HUBERT Ingraham
for the seats in Grand Bahama.
He said after mature and care- government of the Bahamas
ful consideration the party set- once agamn to brmng good gov-
tied on the six persons named. ernance back to Grand
Mrs Grant, a business- Bahama, and the Bahamas.
woman, and lawyer Kwasi "I want to thank all those
Thompson, are entering the who fought to become candi-
political arena for the first time. dates for us in Grand Bahama
"In a political family, like in and who were not successful.
any family, there will always The decision has now been
be some differences of opin- taken, and all FNMs and sup-
ion. What we do not have in porters should man their battle
the FNM is division; we have stations and get ready to do
many people with many battle with the PLP," he said.
views," he said. According to Mr Ingraham,
.,,? ,Mr.Jagrahamq said sthe.FNM .former MP and cabinet minis-
;. and its supporters are united in ter Diiiid Thonip~soiY~ff~fbeen
their resolve to recaptuyre the; tyipointed to boordi fie the


Government will not be able




to deliver on NHI, claim FNM


FNM names- candidates for Grand Bahama .
& HME


I -. ---"_ T1 I


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PM asked to step in to union talks


Frustration over stalled negotiations


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SBy DENISE MAY("OCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT CEWU exec-
.::utivres are accusing mianagenient
at the Grand Bahama Power
Company of engaging in "union


SVILLAGIE ROAD NEAR




MOTORSS LIMITED a tma~


I
1 r


PAGE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


ABy DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie is being called
on to step in as an arbitrator to
bring resolution to the stalled
contract negotiations between
the Grand Bahama Power
Company and the union in
Freeport.
Pedro Edwards, president of
the Bahamas Industrial Engi-
neers Management Supervisory
Union, arid Keith Knowles,
president of the Common-
wealth Electrical Workers
Union, expressed their frustra-
tion over the lingering state of
negotiations.
They said the situation has
dragged on for over year, and
no progress has been~ made
since the matter was referred
by the government to the Indus-
trial Tribumal.
Mr Edwards was concerned
that the plight of workers in
Freeport is being ignored aind
overshadowed in wake of the
controversy' embroiling the
ty ad Bhaeh na Nioe 1 i
matter in New Prqvidence.
"We need the Primne Minis-
ter and (Minister of Labour)
'hnee Gson to ste tyrrared'
are supposed to be in this tri-
pariw'edamrargement," said Mr
Edars. i
Negotiations on a new indus-
trial agreement began in April
2004. The Power Company
employs about 180 Bahamians.
The CEWU represents 135 of
those workers.
The union had- initiated
industrial action in September
by calling its members out on,
strike when negotiations stalled
in August. However, govern-
rmen red dhnte mene a d


SEXECUTIVES of the Bahamnas Industrial Engineers Management Supervisory Union are.call-
ing on Perry Christie to step in to resolve their dispute


IndustrialTribunal, and ordered '
the union to' call. off the strike.
Mr Bdwards said it appears
that the government is aiding
with. the company.
"This whole fiasco, we
believe, was created by the gov-
ernmedit...because it is absolute-
ly'mind-boggling for govern-
ment to refer negotiations
between the union and the
Power Company to the TIri- .
burial, or to any court of this
land.
."The union has the right to
wage industrial action based on -
the laws of this country. And if
the government is going to be
referring things that are non-


referable, it is saying to the peo-
ple that theylare siding with the
company. I want to remind the
government that the election is
near and these people will keep
this in mind," he said.
Mirant Corporation, which is
based in Atlanta, owns 50 per
cent shares in the Power Com-
pany. Mirant executive Dave
Dunbar, former CEO of the
Power Company, in August,
had accused the union of being
unreasonable and stalling nego-
tiations. .
Although a new CEO has
been appointed to replace Mr
Dunbar, Mr Knowles said noth-
ing has changed and that man-,


agement continues to stall the
negotiations.
"The bottom-line is that
Mirant Corporation wants to
sell its shares, and the workers
want their money,"! said Mr
Knowles.
The union executives claim
that Port Authority officials and
directors of ICD will get rich
off profits earned during the
Christmas, while the workers'
morale continues to decline.
"The PM and Shane Gibson
must step in...we have had
enough' of the Anna Nicole-
Smith thing. It is time to focus
on the plight of Bahamian
workers," he said.


busting tactics" by hiring local
contractors to complete work
initially started by linesmen in
the bargaining unit.
Keith Know~les, president of
the Commonwealth Electrical
Workers Unioil, said that the
first of B three phase extension
of the well ~field project for
Grandi Bahama ~Utility' Compa-
ny was started axid completed
over six months ago by lines-
men.
Mr Knowles said that a con- ~
tractor wias hired last Monday.
He said that neither the"
uni~on, nor the workers were
notified by management.
He said the action taken by
management undermines, and
demonstrates disrespect for the
workers, who worked dlligently
during the first phasg before the .
work was put oil hold.' t
"This is the very thing that
contributes to the low mhoraile
at the work place :as the
employees' `frustration contin-
ues to increase due to the hid-


den agendas and unfair treat-
ment. This is only one of the
'many hidden agendas why the
pinion and the employees ~don't
trust this company," Mr
Knowles said.
Mr Knowles said that hiring
of a' contractor will be ~more
costly for the company. He not-
,ed that the contractors are not
adequately equipped to, carry
out the work.
"'For some mysterious reason
Sthe work was put on hold. And,
~~despite inquiries made by work-
ing foreman Chris1;1y Smith,
who oversees the project, no
answer as to why work was
stopped or when the work
would resume was' given," said
SMr Knowles
S.The union executive claims
'that contractors do not have
Sthe necessary equipment to do
..the work, such as a drill rig
truck to drill the holes for the
poles, or a derrick truck to step
sthe poles.
Union shop steward Christly


Smith said that no one is over-
seeing the project being carried
out by the contractors.
He believe's that outsourcing
of work is being carried out by
someone in the company "who'
has special interest" in givmng
projects to certain contractors.
Mr Knowles said he me; ~th
the director of Home;n
Resources, and~the Plan. arg
and Protection manager, to dL -
cuss the matter, but both offi-
cials were unaware that a con-
tractor had been hired.
He said that director of Envi-
ronment, Health, Safety and
Security was also not aware that
contractors had been hired to
carry out the work.
Mr Knowles said union bust-
ing is against the law. He said
the union has repeatedly told
the company that workers are
willing to work with them once
there is healthy communica-
tions and honesty between
management, workers and the
union.


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Wif rnarne & nurnber wrltten
,in back in entry boxes


ENTRY BOX LOCATIONS S
Universa Hair &r Beauty Supplices Hast lhulh
Tropic Mart/Bargain City Carrlndicha Rdl.
Y Cares Fashion Centre East St. South
Esso Bargain Mart Carmicha Rd,.,
Lucky Food Fair Camrmol~jgian .f
MVP BuperrtarkietJ 'ela~ofo@ei~
Electronic Dwotr Eadf ~tBC.rlli
Let's Talk Wireless Marathon
Perhame Gallery Madlera St.
Central Food Fair ast St.
Midens East St. Sou~#*i' j::?~~
QBC Marathon Mail:;?llf; 5i%~g6:
Tripont Market St.


Grand Bahama Power Company


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SCROWDS turned out to enjoy the carnival Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre at the weekend. The carnival is to run into the






NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the statutory meeting of
the above Company required to be held by Section 70(2) of the
Companies Act 1992 will be held at the Teachers and Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Headquarters building located
on East Street and Independence Drive on Friday December 8,
2006 at 6:00p.m. when the following business will be
transacted, viz:
1. To receive and consider the accounts and balance sheet, the report
of the Directors and Auditors, and any other documents required by
law to be attached or annexed to the balance sheets.
2. Election of Directors.
3. Appointment of Auditors of the of the Company and to authorize
the Directors to fix their remuneration.
4. To consider and approve a resolution to ratify and confirm the acts,
transaction and proceedings of the Directors and Officers of the
Company during the year ended the 31Ist day of December A.D.,
2005
S. Any other business whii'h may properly be brought before the
meeting.
By order of the Board of Directors:
Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary
Dated the 27th day of October A.D.2006


SPStc et at I 17 is
Professional Office has an immediate Opening for a Secretary / Typist.
The ideal candidate must possess exceptional telephone etiquette, good
attitude, ability to work independently or as team; with a minimum type
writing skills of 50 wpm; and about Three Year Office experience
w/excellent communications and Computer Skills; and be proficient in
use of Windows XP or 2000 environment; particularly w/ software such
as M.S. Word, Excel and Quickbooks.

Bahamians and/or any Nationality are invited to apply

Please Fax Resume; to 394-4458
Or e-mail: llehteb @coralwave.com


k~Public Utilitles Commission





PUBLIC CONSULTATION
Terlecommunications Market Information and Data Collection

The Public Utilities Commission hereby invites comments from '
licensees and other interested parties on its consultation document
on Telecommunications Market Information and Data Collection.

The goals of this consultation are to:
a) inform licensees and other stakeholders of the PUC's
intention to regularly collect information from the
telecommunications sector;
b) indicate how the PUC intends to use and analyze the
information and data collected; and
c) invite comments from licensees and other stakeholders.

Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 requires the PUC
to act in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory
manner and consistent with the objectives of the Act. While section
6(5) of the Act requires the CommisSion to publish its proposals on
any general instruction intended to be issued under any part of the
Act.

Copies of this document can be obtained from the PUC's office
located in the Agape House at 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue or
downloaded from the PUC's website at www.puchahamas.gov. bs.
Written comments should be subminted by February 2, 2007 via
post, hand delivery, facsimile or e-mail to:

Executtive Direster, Pubile Utilties Commlission~
P. O. Bax 14860, Fearth Terrace Est, Cellins Avenue
Massae, The Bahamas1
Faxr: (242)323-72881
E-mail: lafe9peobabamas.gov. bs


Have seaside properties on Family Island?
Let them work for you and your
children's children.


Let's develop them. Government is begging
Bahamian involvement in the economy.

Call M.E. Lockhart at Tel: 394-3565


Exciting, exciting money making opportunities


II_ _ __


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 7


------ ~~sa~L -IIBt ~ I I


We-: a---


The etVa

of things we
think, say or clo
1. Is it the TRUTH?
2. Is it FAIR to all
concerned?
3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?
4. Will it be .
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


Junkanoo parade



details released



The routes have been announced for this year's

junkanoo parades. Here we list the routes,

planned road closures and parking restrictions*





Annual Boxing Day Junkanoo parade on 'Tuesday 26th D~ecember will be held between the
hou~rrs of lam7 and 8am
The routes of the parade are as follows F~rederick Street to Bay Str-eet, east along Bay
Street to Elizabeth Avenue, South along Elizabeth Avenue to Shir-ley Str~eet, west along
Shirley Street to Frederick Street


eit m to htohuers b fore mid until after th parad a vehicles will be allowedc to park on


No Parking
From 1pm until the completion of the parade no vehicles will be permitted to park on the
following streets
a) Bay Street between Navy Lion road and e) Charlotte Street between Woodes Rodgers
East Street Walk and Shirley Street
b) East Street between Bay and Shirley Street f) Frederick Street between Shirley Street
c) Bank Lane between Bay Street and Shirley and Woodes Rodgers Walk
Street g) Woodes Rodgers Walk between Navy
d) Parliament Street between Woodes Lion Road and East Street
Rodgers Walk and Shirley Street
Traffic diversion
Vehicular traffic travelling north along Navy Lion Road will be diverted east along Woodes
Rodgers Walk to East Street, south on East Street to Bay Street and continue east on Bay Street.



The Annual New Year's Day Junkanoo will be held on Monday 1st January, 2007 between
the hours of lam and 8am.
The route of the parade is as follows: Frederick Street To Bay Street, east along Bay Street
to Elizabeth Avenue, South along Elizabeth Avenue to Shirley Street, west along Shirley
Street to Frederick Street.

No parking
From two hours before and until after the parade no vehicles will be allowed to park on
either side on the following streets


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Annual Junior Junkanoo parade will be held on Thursday 14th December, 2006, beginning
at 6pm on Bay Street between East Street and Frederick Street
Participants of parade will travel from Frederick Street east along Bay Street to East Street.
Road Closure
From 3pm until the completion parade the following streets will be closed to vehicular traffic:


a) Bay Street between Navy Lion Road and
East Street
ShreEaSt e reet between Bay Street and
c) Bank Lane between Bay and Shirley
Street


d) Parliament Street between Woodes
Rodgers Walk and Shirley Street
R gCha la te dSt~reeteybetr ten Woodes
f) Frederick Street between Shirley street
and Woodes Rodgers Walk


a) Bay Street between Nilvy Lion Road
and Victoria Avenue
b) Navy Lion Road
c) Shirley Street between Frederick Street
:-adc Collins Avenue
dt) F'rederick Street between Shirley Stret
;1dt Woodles Rodgers Walk
ce) C'harlotte Street between Woodes
Rodge~rs Walk and Shirley Street
f) Woodes Rodgers Walk
g) Elizab~eth Avenue


h) East Streel betw~een Sanods Lane and
Woodes Rodger-s Walk
i) Parliamentl Street bectween Woodes
Rodger-s Wallk andl East Hlill Street
j) Market Street betlween Bay Street and
Duke Street
k) Trinity Place
1) King Street
m) Cumberlandl Street between Duke
Street aund Mlarlborough Stre~t


~c ~-;one oC Cour






gi~veaw~ay
I~a all ~~dste lociations
Startin9 Dec.1 3th Entry deadline Dec.2


a) Bay Street between Navy Lion Road
and Victoria Avenue
b) Navy Lion Road
c) Shirley Street between Frederick Street
and Collins Avenue
d) Frederick Street between Shirley Street
and Woodes Rodgers Walk
e) Charlotte Street between Woodes
Rodgers Walk and Shirley Street
f) Woodes Rodgers Walk
g) Elizabeth Avenue


h) East Street between Sands Lane and
Woodes Rodgers Walk
i) Parliament Street between Woodes
Rodgers Walk and East Hill Street
j) Market Street between Bay Street and
Duke Street
k) Trinity Place
1) King Street
m) Cumberland Street between Duke
Street and M'arlborough Street


Closure of streets
From 5-30pm on Monday 25th December until after the palradce the following streets will be
closed to vehicular traffic


a) Bay Street between Navy Lion road a~d
!Ilizabeth Averiue '
h,) Shirley Street between Frederick street
~ild Collins avenue
c) Parliament street between East Hill
street and Bay Street
d) FrederickS street between East Hill


Street andl Bay Street
e) Charlotte street between Woodes
Rodger-s Wa~lk a~nd Shirley Street
f) East Street between Shirley Street anld
Bay Street
g) Elizabeth Avenue betwen Bay street
and Shirley Street


Closure of streets
From 5:30pm on Sunday 31st December until after the parade the following streets will be
closed to vehicular traffic
a) Bay Street between Navy Lion road and street and Bay Street
Elizabeth Avenue e) Charlotte street between Woodes
b) Shirley Street between Frederick street Rodgers Walk and Shirley Street
sca~ nd.llies avenue .,.,, ..; ( ; f) Eas~t Stre~et between Shirley Strfet and
c) Parliament street between East Hill Bay Street
street and Bay Street .. g) Elizabeth Avenue between Bay street and
d) Frederick street between East Hill Shirley Street'

Diversion of traffic


Diversion of traffic


Vehicular traffic travelling north on Blue
Hill R~oad will be diverted west on
Marlborough `Street
Vehicular traffic travelling north on
Nassau Street will be diverted west along
West Bay Street


Vehicular traffic travelling west on Shirley
Street will be diverted south onto Collins
Avenue
Vehicular traffic travelling east on
MIarlborough Street will be diverted south on
Blue H~ill Road


I
BI )

B~
-01
;iidP"


Vehicular traffic travelling west on Shirley
Street will be diverted south onto Collins
Avenue
Vehicular traffic travelling east on
Marlborough Street will be diverted south
on Blue Hill Road


Vehictilar traffic travelling north on Blue
Hill Road will be diverted west on
Marlborough street
Vehicular traffic travelling north on
Nassau Street will be diverted west along
West Bay Street


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Today, the fact that there is a
broad consensus that such sys-
tems are no longer worth the
burden they have always been.is
evidence not of failure, but of
their splendid success in achiev-
ing that aim.
Through bureaucratic, uneco-
nomic, but universal health sys-
tems, countries like Britain and
Canada (not to mention villain-
ous old Cuba) have achieved
infant mortality rates that put
the richer US toshame. Togeth-
er with France, Sweden and the
like, they routinely top the
world's Human Development
Index. It is little wonder, in that
context, that political priorities
are not what they were in 1945,
and have now shifted away
from primary health concerns.

course the search for
a third way, a health
care system that achieves both
universal access and efficiency is
both a noble aim and one that
we should follow, if we can, so


Th
inOSC able
fact IS that for
there to be
genu nel
uRivCTSSI
COVerate,
there must be
a distortion in
One Of Other
SectOf Of the
eCOnO1By.

as to avoid making all the mis-
takes of the old welfare states.
But it is a search that is by no
means over.
The' difficulty is that, when-
ever insurers and private health-
care providers are faced with
either compulsion or govern-
ment funded competition, there
will be some distortion~ in the
market. This has happened
wherever government has pro-
vided direct public care or reg-
ulated pricing in the private sec-
tor (as in most of Europe).
On the other hand, in coun-
tries like Chile (and possibly
The Bahamas, if the present
proposals are adopted) non-
socialist alternatives like pub-
lic insurance and mandatory pri-
vate insurance have been
accused of constituting a tax (a
bad word to some people) by
employers and wage earners,
who share the burden.
The inescapable fact is that
for there to be genuinely uni-
versal coverage, there must be a
distortion in one or other sector


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 9


TRIBUNE


location and political charac-
teristics) will never have a prob-
lem being, and staying, arela-
tively wealthy country.
A troop of macaque monkeys
in our position would have no
problem being in the top three
in our hemisphere in terms of
income per capital, and, if they
managed to steer clear of some
of our silly mistakes, would
probably be in the top two.
So instead of jockeying to
take credit for every miraculous
new investment and stopover
statistic, politicians should admit
this simple, overriding fact and
then move on to explain how
they propose to translate The
Bahamas' virtually natural eco-
nomic success into higher
human development for all its
citizens.
Yet in the iaw cases that this
question has come into focus,
once-dormant voices have
sprung forth to w~arn that we
are putting our economic
prospects in dire risk by merely
thinking such things aloud.
And so it has been with the
NHI debate. Though there have
been many sound, genuine and
articulate voices opposing this
specific plan on account of its
specific faults, hidden among
them are many who seem to
genumnely favour the status quo
and to oppose any timely move
to unplement universal cover-
age. Their arguments follow two
strands:-
1) Universal health care is a
good objective, But we simply
cannot afford it yet.
2) Since socialised healthcare
experiments in places like
Britamn have ended n "failure",
any genuinely universal health-
care plan is doomed to fail. So
the status cluo is the default ~
olition.

The first point is simply
Ttoo dim to engage. If
you compare the relative '
incomes of the Bahamas and
many of the countries that have
universal health coverage and
which now (embarrassingly)
outpat'e us in terms of Human
Development, you will instant-
ly note the value of such argu-
ments. Eureka!
The second point appears on
its face to carry some merit, But
it is based upon a highly pre-
Ssumptive premise.
Anyone who suggests that
Britain's National Health Ser-
vice has been a "failure" is
either unacquainted with its
original aims or is (like many
modern British politicians) sim-
ply expressing a difference of
values masked as a factual crit-
icism-
You see, it never was the aim
of any universal health care sys-
tem to make money, or even to
function without burdening the
state. The designers of Extrope's
social safety net were motivated
by a desire to bring human
development levels mnto line
with the economic development
of their countries. They thought
that aim justified a burden to
the state and, to some extent,
the economy.


LLEN


THE C-CLASS SALOONS




191ee-Bn


of the economy. That is
because, in a free market envi-
ronment, coverage levels gen-
erally hover around 40 per cent
to 60 per cent in wealthy coun-
tries and far lower in poor ones.
Our 51 per cent is about as high
as can be reasonably expected
without some form of interven-
tion.

ut the fact is that not
Only can we afford
such a minimal distortion when
it comes, but we can hardly
afford otherwise in the long run.
Universal coverage for Bahami-
ans is not some kind of charity
or act of populism. It is giving to
Bahamians what is theirs as of
right: a country that guarantees
a safety net in line with the lev-
els of wealth generated within it.
Against this there is simply no
legitimate argument.
The PLP has lain bare its
NHI plan, warts and all. This
column is not an endorsement
of it. Thinking Bahamians will
reserve judgment at least until
those on the front line of the
industry have had their oppor-
tunity to expose the warts to
scrutiny. Judged by the evolving
headlines, it seems the process is
not complete.
But it is to be hoped that,
along with the helpful criticism,
opponents of the NHI present
to the country some alternative
plan that also promises to
achieve genuinely universal
healthcare for Bahamians.


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, DECEIMfBER 4, 2006


THE T


Stop AIDS: The Promise of Partnerships

US Ambassador John Rood writes about tackling the 'li

Stigma of HIV and the importance of getting tested


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SBy US Ambassador
John Rood
THREE years have now
passed since President Bush
first announced his initiative to


fight HIV/AIDS around the
world. The U.S. commitment of
$15 billion is the largest mone-
tary commitment to battle a sin-
gle disease in history. It demon-
strates the profound depth of


commitment by the President
and the American people to
fight HIV and AIDS around the
world. Dealing with HIV/AIDS
is something that all nations
must do--it is everyone's prob-
lem. Only by working together
can we hope to defeat the
scourge of HIV/AIDS. That is
why the United States is com-
mitted to supporting partner-
ships of committed nations,
NGOs, and communities to
build prevention and treatment
capabilities worldwide that will
allow us to defeat this scourge.
Here in The Bahamas, the
United States Embassy has
partnered with the Government
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas as well as several
prominent local organizations
in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
We are all working to fight the
stigma of HIV/AIDS and to
promote testing.
On November 21st we
unveiled the Junkanoo AIDS
Quilt. This quilt is a wonderful
example of the right response to
fight the stigma of AIDS. The
quilt does three things: it com-
memorates those Bahamians who
have died from AIDS, it moves us
to think of those Bahamians living
with HIV/AIDS, and it reminds


1pr ag .
SLOCAL business employees, government agencies and others marked World AIDS Day last
Friday by staging the formation of a Human AIDS Awareness Ribbon in Parliament Square
(Photo: TCL/Wendell Cleare )


us that the fight is still on against
HIV and AIDS.
The global statistics sur-
rounding HIV are staggering.
Approximately 40 million peo-
ple are living with HIV. An esti-
mated 15 million children have
lost one or both parents to
AIDS. Of the 3.1 million people
that die from AIDS every year,
570,000 of those are children
under the age of 15. That is one
child per minute. .
Of the 40 million people liv-
ing with HIV, only 25 per cent
of those are aware they even
have it. Getting tested for HIV
can be a frightening thing, espe-


cially in an environment of fear
and ignorance of the disease.
However, knowing your status is
a personal responsibility -- a
responsibility to yourself, your
family, and your community. To
emphasize the importance of
knowing your status, I was pub-
licly tested for HIV onFriday at
the HIV/AIDS Centre in Royal
Victoria's Garden. I hope my
example will inspire others to
overcome their fear of the stig-
ma of HIV and get tested.
Local efforts cannot be
overemphasized. The Ministry
of Health offers confidential
testing and, if the test is posi-
tive, there are medications to
combat the virus.
The National HIV/AIDS
Centre has built a strong part-
nership with the AIDS Founda-
tion on several initiatives. One
of the most effective of those
initiatives is the availability of
anti-retroviral medications to
HIV-positive pregnant women.
The success of that partnership
is reflected in the Mother-To-
Child-Transmission-Rate drop-
ping to below 2 per cent. The


fastest growing population of
HIV infections is those ages 15-
24. Estimates show that HIV
prevention reaches only one out
of 10 of those at risk. These
young people are our future.
Because the human impact
of HIV is so devastating, the
economic impact is often over-
looked. Businesses and govern-
ments have a vital interesting
getting actively involved 'in
awareness and prevention of
HIV. Their future workforces
and the prosperity of their coun-
tries are at stpke.
The Bahamas government
and local institutions have done
an exceptional job in creating
a climate of prevention, care
and treatment. But there is iln
urgent need to build on the
work they've done.
Local people around the
world, in partnership with the
American people, are turning
'the tide against HIV and AIDS
in their own nations and com-
munities.` The American peo-
ple are committed to standing
with the Bahamian people,as
partners until this fight is won.


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NU ~~,~ AY, DECiVFi~iBER 4, 2006, PAGE 11


brCe


THE TRIBUNE


oYe Mktanrla Su as~e~




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Wor dAI
SARTISTS of all ages and dif-
r~erent mediums have joined
: oeheA toD commeinoi t
"Remember" a one day concert
and memorial held Friday at
hew Providence Community
Tentre on Blake Road and JFK
qDrive.
More than 70 studlelits from
~Adelaide Primary School, Gam-
*Lier Primary School and the
:Lyford Cay Schoot recently .
completed a large, eight panel
mural in preparartiestof World -
AIDS Day thatt dlepi>dts their
Emotions and messages of hope
regarding AIDS. The students
have been meeting at Alew
SProvidence Community Glenttre~;
for several weeks to learn anote
I-nbout the illness, participate in L S IZti'I'Sf Iom Adeclaide I
' the mural which was on display panel AIDS maral they painted
d-:uring the "Remember"' con-~ diggley for"Recmember" la co
e cert on Friday. The young: Coiniipadeiffete I~idy, toc
'rtists made new friends and
gained a greater appreciationi
I'for those who live wi~thii-
'IHIV/AIDS. because of HIV and AIDS.
"We all came together. Kids Fathdin lfor the quilts spear-
o~f different ages, different fl'.eadeEtn, t:S Founda-
-~schools, black and white to t~oiod~j.:' ~~~~ a re made
learn about AIDS and to paint a vifft- through' a special
this mural," sarid Natascha Caaibbeikf Ambassadors Fund
V~azquez, a grade 11 studed~t for IEVIlAID)S to hep support
from the Lyford Cay School. local iforts o prevent and
'"And everyone shoulder doing respond to HIV/AIDS..
'Ithat getting together to cvom- Also on display at the con-
Sbat this illness."- cert was a' community canvas
Grade six student artist wh~enithe public was invited to
'kamus Brown of Adelaide fji express their emotions and cre-
-mary School wanted one of the activity. Apokea. word artists
:messages from the tnural to bb Antiu anid Liah~nefas and oth-
C'heard. "I hope that the mtirial ers performed for thibse attend-
-makes people who have AIDS mng.
feel better and that people 'iho, Tllree thousand, five-hundred
tido not have AIDS learil:inv how individual. rd flags, one for
5tnot to get it." each Bh~hamian who has died
"Other artwork featured at froin HIV/A.IDS, lined the
"Re'member" was the AIDS entrance to the concert and
~quilt". The colourful collage were lit by candlelight as a trib-
Cof hand painted tiles muscihted~~ ute. Those attending were
: four dimensiosial~shapes an.d encouraged to bring flowers,
!,izes was created by~ 200O chil- ca'ndles, photos or other per-
rabamian artist Lillian Blades.` h omage to friends and loved
'cyChe pieces make up a ~qui~lt, ones ~
egndto build unders~tand- Muiin nrwJnsad
gfor those who have suffered~:. hi ~thad ii osewe


Primary School, Gambler
Cay school pose with the eight
I.The moural with other art was on
cert held at New Providence
commemorate World AIDS Day.

known for their hits "Can't
Hurry Love" and "Billy Goat
I Drink Glear Water"; along with
other artists, Vision, Mizpah
Bethel, Christian McCabe and
Clergy, performed.
Sponsored by the US Ambas-
so lr's HIV/AIDS Fund and the
New Providence Community
Centre, the concert and memor-
ialis open to the public (all ages
welcome) and will benefit the
Bahamas National Network for
Positive Living (BNN+), a net-
work and support group for
Bahamians living with and
affected by HIV/AIDS.
US Ambassador John D
Itoodl recently presented the
IIIVIAIDS-Foundation of The
Bahamas with $15,000 and most
of the funds have been allocat-
ed to help underwrite the con-
cert in an effort to promote
awareness and education about
HIV/AIDS in The Bahamas.
Those who could not
attend the concert were invit-
ed to go to the website at
bttp://bahmas.redirectme.netico
neert."


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PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


Another nurse, speaking
on terms of anonymity said
that it was a "disgrace" to
see how the patients had to
make do with cots as there
were no more beds to be
had.
A further PMH staff mem-
ber claimed that Friday's bed
shortage is a common occur-
rence at the hospital.
Mrs Sands, a former nurse
at PMH and now working in
the pharmaceutical industry,
said that introducing the
NHI plan at this point in
time would have disastrous
consequences "on an already
ill-managed health system."
"They can barely deal with
what they have now, I feel
the public needs to know


what's going on in PMH.
How do you introduce a bill
of such magnitude and you
cannot deal adequately with
the load you have now?" she
asked.
The Blue Ribbon Com-
mission in its assessment esti-
mated that the NHI plan will
lead to a 20 per cent increase
of utilisation of the health
care system by the popula-
tion.
While the Commission's
consultants say that this esti-
mate is generouS, opponents
of the NHI plan in its cur-
rent form are projecting that
the country's health care sys-
tem could see up to a 100 per
cent increase in utilisation by
the Bahamian people.


Mrs Sands yesterday told
The Tribune she agrees with
government that Bahamians
need to carry more of the
cost for health care so that
all members of the popula-
tion can have access to treat-
ment, but in her opinion gov-
ernment is going about it the
wrong way.
"And it's not unpatriotic
to disagree with national
health insurance, it should-
n't be like in the United
States with Republicans and
Democrats, where it's 'if
you're not for us, you're
against us.' People should
voice their concerns the
former nurse said. *
Mrs Sands said she felt it
her duty as a citizen and as a
former registered nurse com-
ing out of the system to
speak out against the man-
ner in which the NHI scheme
is being implemented and
urged other nurses to do the
same.
"Implementing the nation-
al health insurance is like
having children. Children are
the most wonderful thing on
Earth, but you have to be
ready to have them, certain
things liave to be in place
first. It's the same with the
national health insurance,
certain things have to be car-
ried out first," she said.
Mrs Sands also strongly
criticised the government for
"disguising" the problems at
PMH.
She said that instead of
coming up with ways to
knmprove the facilt es and
infrastructure of PMH, large
amounts of money is being
spetit on decorating the hos-
pital for Christmas instead.
"The hospital is~ being
beautifully, and very expen-
sively decorated for the hol-
idays, but it's like stuffing a
rotten turkey. The core is no
good," she said.
On Sunday The Tribune
was not able to contact any
members of PMH's admin-
istration for a comment on
Friday's reported bed
agi~Qn the emergency


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. WITH no major criminal
cindents to report between Fi-
day and Sunday, the police, on
behalf of Commissioner of
Police Paul Farquharson,
thanked~the public for its "good
behaviour'' over the weekend.
Expressing his ~pleasurii at ~


the uneventful weekend, police
press hiatson officer Walter
Evans speculated that perhaps
the "spirit of Christmas" had
prevailed, and asked, on behalf
of Mr Farquharson, that The
Tribune request that the pub-
lic "let it remain" so.


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FROM page one
of former chairman Edward
St George in December, 2005
- with matters heating up in
the past six months with the
ap oinatmet o Hne Babbk
said he does not think that any
investors have been frightened
off as yet.
"I've spoken to people,
investors, and no, they have
not been scared off. They still
have faith in Grand Bahama
and Freeport. In its 51-year
history there htas been no evi-
ha enoingai the past. These
things occur sometimes when MINISTER of Tonrism
you are dealing with business Obie Wilchcombe
entities," he said.
Mr Wilchcombe said he hopes all parties will remember that the
relationship between the former business partners, the late Edward
St George and Sir Jack Hayward, was one of "trust and respect" -
an example that should be followed.
"I hope the St George family and Sir Jack realise that this is not
what Edward St George would have wanted. He would have want-
ed everyone to concentrate, to focus on rebuilding Grand Bahama,"
he said.
Attorneys for the St George family hope that their motion to
have Mr Babak committed to Her Majesty's Prison for being in
contempt of court will be heard today when Justice Anita Allen
hears Sir Jack's summons to have the order of Mr Babak's sus-
pension set aside.
A possible committal order by the Supreme Court could lead to
extradition back to the Bahamas of Mr Babak, who is reportedly
in Miami, Florida.
One of the lawyers for the St George family, former senator
Damian Gomez, told The Tribune that Mr Babak has failed to com-
ply with Justice John Lyons' order from November 2 to hand over
documentation regarding the operations and business dealings of
the Port Authority and its affiliates to the law firm of Callenders
and Co.
The documents, he said, are needed in the various lawsuits
against Sir Jack, Mr Babak, and the Port Authority.
Last Sunday might Justice Thompson, in an emergency hearing,
ordered Mr Babak be placed under an injunction, restraining him
from acting as chairman or participating in the management of the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd.
Justice Thompson granted an order appointing joint receivers
and managers of the Port Group Ltd and the GBPA in the persons
of Clifford Culmer and Miles Culmer of the chartered accountant
firm BDO Mann Judd.


POlice praise for public


FIROM page one
day and claimed she had wit-
nessed one doctor refusing to
real a patient lying on a cot
be~causet he could not bend
dlown that far.
She also claimed that the
car-diac~ ward in the emer-
ge~ncy are~a had to be moved
ou make room for the
"female medical unit", leav-
ing hardly any space for
those persons needmng emer-
gency treatment for their
heart conditions.
"There is an overflow from
all medical areas, wards have
to be converted, they have
no room to house that many
patients,"? Mrs Sands said.


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questions about whether the ail-
ing leader will ever return to
power as his public absence
begins taking on a tone of per-
nmanence, according to Associ-
ated Press.
Many Cubans had hoped for
at least a glimpse of the ailing
leader at' Saturday's parade,
where scores of olive-camou-
flaged tanks rumbled through


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


I



D


1

,1
if


I


,n
: ~c;


Havana's Plaza of the Revolu-
tion and jet fighters soared
above.
But it was Defence Minis-
ter Raul Castro, who Fidel
Castro ceded his powers to
four months ago, standing at
the mahogany lectern review-
ing troops on the 50th anniver-
sary of Cuba's Revolutionary
Armed Forces. The elder Cas-
tro's absence came after he
made no appearances all week
during celebrations that
he himself postponed from
his actual birthday on August
13 to allow time to recover


.


from intestinal surgery.
SReading a half-hour speech
that lacked his brother's rhetor-
ical flourishes, the uniformed
Raul Castro reached out for
dialogue with the US govern-
ment in the latest sign he has
consolidated his leadership dur-
ing his brother's absence.
"We take this opportunity to
.once again state that we a-re
Swilling to resolve at the negoti
ating table the long-standing ~
dispute between the United
SStates and Cuba," as long as the
US respects Cuba's sovereignty,
said Raul Castro, who turned
75 in June.
"After almost half a century,
we are willing to wait patiently
until the moment when com-
mon sense prevails in Washing-
ton power circles," he added.
Meanwhile, the defence min-
ister said, the Cuban people
shalll continue to consolidate
our nation's military invulnera-
bility" based on the island's
"War of All the Pe ple" doc-
t ene 1Hllngaon aH ablze-bod e
Seventh of a foreign invasion.
US State Department spokes-
woman Janelle Hironimus said
it is incumbent on the Cuban
government to take democratic
steps first.
"The dialogue that needs to
take place is one between the
Cuban regime and the. Cuban
People about the democratic
future of the island," Hironimus
said on Saturday. "Any deep-
ening of our engagement with
Cuba depends on that dialogue
and the Cuban regime's will-
ingness to take concrete steps
toward a political opening and a
transition to democracy."
Since breaking diplomatic
relations in 1961, the US has
Maintained a policy .to under-
mine Cuba's one-party author-
itarian rule through a trade
'embargo and restrictions on
American travel ~to the
Caribbean country~. .
SRaul Castro's statements
Sechqed those he made less than
three .weeks after liis brother
made him acting president on


MCUBA'S: acting president Raul Castro, brother of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, left, chats with
Colombian writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez during a military parade along the Revolution Square
in Havana, Cuba on Saturday
(AP Photo/ Javier Galeano)


July 31, telling the Communist Fidel Castro's medical condi- Colomb
Pafty daily Granma that Cuba is tion is a state secret. Cuban offi- Gabriel
open to normalised relations cials insisted he is recovering, attended
with the US as long as there are but US officials say they believe hundred
no threats, or pressure. he suffers from some kind of combat
L Many longtime Cuba watch- inoperable cancer and won't lutionar!
er~s consider Raul the more live through the end of 2007. podium.
pragmatic of the Castros, and On th
likely to communicate better COlidcition marchin
with the US government. parade,
"The military is Cuba's most ca of an
effective interlocutor with the Some US doctors have spec- the Gra
United States," Cuba military ulated he could have diverticu- brothers
expert Hal Klepak of the Royal. losis, a condition relatively com- piloted ~
'Military College of Canada said mon among older people that to launch
on the &ve of the parade. "Thejr is caused when weak spots form Revolut
have prestige with the Penta- along the colon and intersect traces it
gon, and they are already in with an artery. Decemb
contact- with the US on issues The elder Castro has The C
including (the US naval base appeared thin and pale in offi- among f
at) Guantanamo, oni weather, cial photographs and videos rebels w
migration, drug interdiction." released since he fell ill. Jvith the:
The event culminatedfi I'e n town for the birthday bash, Batista's
,-' da v Boli ntasioa~ii ~n EvoT :..ing. Fro~
Cas'sp nns r aitia dent: launch
in pu t-elect Djtl 1959.


,ian Nobel laureate
Garcia Marquez also .,
d the parade, where
ds of elderly former
Hints from Cuba's revo-
y struggle sat near the
re field, thousands of
g troops launched the
which included a repli-
American yacht called
nma that the Castro
s and 80 other rebels
from Mexico to Cuba
h their revolution. The
ionary Armed Forces
s roots to the yacht's
er 2, 1956 landing.
:astro brothers were
iewer than two dozen
rho survived a battle
n-President Fulgencio
;troops after the land-
m the mountains, they
ed a guerrilla war,
:itimphed on January


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SHABIT
Jaomel
HAITIIAN-BORN hip-hop
star Wyclef Jean called on his
countrymen to reject violence
and work~for a stable future
during a free concert aimed at
promoting development in the
impoverished nation, according
to Associated Press.
"It's time to build a new Haiti,"
the Grammy-winning artist told
more thap 20,000 cheering fans
Friday night at the waterfront
pier of this resort town.


II -


__ ~I ~


of #17 Carib Road and t
formerly .of Steventon,
Exuma will be held on Monday 7:30pmn at The
Church -of God -of Prophecy, Blue Hill Road.
His survivors include, pife, Chynella Scavalla-
Ferguson; son, Maurice J. Ferguson; daughters,
;Amber Ferguson and Ghandesia Black; mother,
Willam~ae Ferguson; sister, Ghandi Knowles; mother-
in-law, Dorene White; adopted mothers, Eunice
Ferguson, Idell Newbold and Gentta Dean; nieces,
Kgaralee, Roxanna, Macarl'a, Tiffany, Malika,
Derishia;, Teashanay and TFeashaink; nephew,
Hanson, Tioh and Pietro; aunts, Cora McKenzie,
Esther McCoy, Pandora and Yvonne Bannister,
Anilee M~oncur and Lue Fergusonl, Louise Young,
Janet King, Weathy, Janet and Jennifer Bannister
and Sharon Ferguson; uncles, Nesbitt Ferguso~n,
Edward, George Shannon and Anthony Bannister,
RZev. A. A. McKenlzie, Chief Officer Mic~hael Young
and Philip King; numerous relatives and friends
including, Yen, Josey, Kevin,' Mario, Cleo, Shanae,
Sherry, Anastascia, Aunt Ruble, Felicia, Shavanne,
Deane, James, Clelia, Donnie, Cleopatra, Deon,
Levardo, Brian, Rickey, Shane, Philip Jr, Craig,
]Edena, Dereck, Jenny~ Kiita, Sharinda, K~evin,
Johnson, ,Kelcie Bridgewater, Officers Burrws and
Brown, Levin Wilson, Shian Rolle and Steve,
Bradley, Utah and Percie Tayor, Bishop Franklynl
Ferguson and family, Bishop Hulan Hanna and
family, Bishop ]Evans and family, Bishop Bowe and1
family, Pastor Beneby and family, Pastor Maycock
and family, Pastor Simmons and family, Pastor
Timothy Johnson, William Pract and family, Pastor
Wesley Ferguson and family, Pastor- Clrilstopher
Ferguson and family, Garren Ferguson and family.
Evangelist Clarence Armbrister and family, The
Hart, ~Nixon, Curry, Gibson, Roach, LLoyd, Hilton.
Mr. and Mrs. Shuttleworth, Peter and Kim Anderson,
Sasha, the Woodside and the Bowleg families,
Lanford Cox and family, Pastor Alexander Taylor
and family and Elizabeth Curtis andi family.
ORGANISATIONS: TIhe Church of God of
Prophecy, Blue Hill Road, especially the Youth
MlInistry, COGOP membership North Andros and
Exuma, the Royal Bahamas Police Force especially
Mobile Division, RBC and Bank of The Bahamas,
American Ribbon, The Bikers Association, The
Principal and Staff of the Rolleville Primary School,
Phat Groves, Staff of UJltimate Production and
Ultimate Suppies, Bahamas Offfice and School
Supplies and may others too numerous to mention.
Friends may pay their las~txeps at Bethel Brothers
Morticians #44 Nassau Street on Saturday from
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p~m., on Monday from. 10:00
a.m.. to 6:00 p.m?. and on Tuesday at the church
from 10:00 atm. uni service time.


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


Mlp-hop musician
Wyclot Jean pefors
with a Halden girl
during his concert la
Jaemelo a sal
southwestern port city
110 mie from
Portur Th"'""" Ha
concert caps a
weeklong arts esiva

which promotes
rmusic and the artsr As
fo de to ment tz 4
`Caribbean nation,
It was his firt
pelrtmana in Haiti

Custulos>



WyclefJean calls for 'new Haiti'.


of #39 SeaviewN Drive, Vista
2 Marina and formerly of St.
Ann's', TJamaica will be held
on Wednesday at 1.1 :00 a.m.
at Epiphany Anglican
Church, Prince Charles Drivre. The Rev 'd Canon
Delano Archer will officiate. -Interment will be
made in the Lakeview Gardens, J.F.K(. Drive.

She is surived byr he~r daughters, Pauline "Cherry"
Illdge, Earh a" inl H~a so id2lwDe
and Lenise Flowers, La~vatighn Roberts, Larry
Clarke, Joseph Illidg~e, Taimoon Jones, Irvin, N~infa
and Dewitt Jr.; ;granddaughters-in-law, Elois~e
Flowers and Giail Clarke; grandson-in-law, David
Jones. (12) twelve g$reat-grandchildren, Basil,
As ley, Ermn, Destmny, revon, Kya, Lau' ai,
Alethea, Lauren, Lydia, Joshua and Dante'; one
great-great-gr~andchild, Antoine; special friend,
Larry Forbes, her loyal and dedicated caretakers,
'Mrs. Davris Espm'oza and, Patrice Lawes; A host
of other relatives and friends including, .Cecil
Flowers, Dr. Gertude Holder, Andrew Conliffe,
Constance Conliffe, Remnelda Davis and family
Judy Williams and fanuly, Th Rev. Canon Delano
Archer and M~rs. Archer, The Vrenerable E. Etienne
E. Bowleg, Fr. John Kabiga, Uina Hann and family,
Mrs. Allelia Adderley, ~Mary Wihylly, Samantha
Bain, Pam and Ernest Fisher, Kennet and Leleith
Hyde of New York and the Walker family of New
York(.

Friends may pay their lat respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians #44 Nassau 'Street on Tuesday from.
10:00 am to 6:00 pm and at the church from- 10:00
am until service time..


in the Western Hemisphere and
most of its 8 million people live
on less than UjS$2 per day. The
Caribbean country is struggling
to recover from a bloody 2,004
revolt that toppled former plres-
ident Jean-Bertrand Aristlde.
Jean, a Haitian citizen who
lives in the Unitetd,States, con-
demned the: ongoing street vio-
lence that has followed the
revolt, especially a wave of kid-
nappings for ransom that have
plagued the Capital, Port-au-
Prmnee.
"If we don't stop k~idnap-


Spins, the country can't devel-
.op," Jean said,
;:iAlso Friday, Jean held an
HIVIAID)S awareness seminar
to mark World AIDS Day. Ear-
Slier this week, he donned a San.
to Claus outfit and passed out
plresents to 600 children in Port-
au-Prince a'nd led a street
'pairade through Jacmel, on
Hraiti's south coast,
Jean was born in Haiti but
left for the United States with
bis family at age nine. He later
achieved world fame through
hbis hip-hop band, The Fugees.


Giving his first concert in
Haiti in eigh years, Jean strode
onstage atop a white horse and
thrilled the crowd with a three-
hour set that included a fire-
works display, acrobatic dancers
and performances by several
top Haitian artists. .
The concert capped off a
weeklong film and culture fes-
tival organised by Jean's Yele
Haiti charity, which promotes
music and the arts as a way to
reduce pove rty, create jobs and
improve Haiti's image.
Haiti is the poorest country


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Pope calls trip to Thrkey 'unforgettable',


hopes it leads to dialogue with Muslims I1


5 VATICAN CITY
POPE Benedict XVI said Sun.
day that his recent trip to Turkey
was an "unforgettable" experience
that will hopefully lead to useful
dialogue with Muslimns. However,
some Islamic leaders said the pope
had not sufficiently made amends
for his September remarks on
Islam and violence, according to
Associated Press.
The pontff who returned Fri-
day fro the four-day visit, made a
special mention of Turkey's
Catholic county durn his tra-
ditional blessing from ~his window
in St. Peter's Square that also
marked the beginning of Advent,
which strt four Sundays before
Christmas and is the beginig of
the ecclesiastical year.
Benedict said his trip was "an
unforgettable spiritual and pastoral
experience, which I hope will pro-
duce the fruits for an increasingly
sincere cooperation between all of
Christ's disciples, and a usefuldia.


Its more than a show...It's an authentic experience


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


man," particularly "his command
to spread by the sword the faith."
The impe sought to remake his
battered image among Muslins
durig four days of speeches, ser-
mons ,nd a moment of silent
prayer in a mosque while facing
Mecca.
Benedict's visit to a mosque was
only the second in papal history.
His predecessor Pope John Paul II
made a groundbreaking visit to the
Ummayad Mosque in Damascus,
Syria in May 2001.
Still, many religious leaders in
the Arab world said Sunday that
Benedict had yet to make amends
for his remarks before relations
could fully be restored.
A spokesman for Jordan's inl-
ential Muslim Brotherhood chapter
labeled the pope's visit to Tuky
as "futile," saying the Roman
Catholic pontiff had yet to apolo-
gize completely to Muslimns.
In Kuwait, Shiite cleric Abdu-
Hussein Qazwini said he believed
the pope's visit would have been


more meaningful "if had it been
made to a Muslimn country such as
Saudi Arabia or Ira," rather than
to Turkey, Benedict's first visit
to a predominanl Muslim coun-
try.
Qazwini called Tuke "a secular
country, and said that the pope's
visit there "had no effect on any-
thing. "
Durig his trip, the pope also
made some sensitive demands:
wider protection and rights for
Chrstan minorities in the Muslim
world, including Turkey's tiny com-
munties whose roots go back to
the apostles.
On Friday, he celebrated a Mass
for members of Turkey's Roman
Catholic community, which num-
bers no more than 30,000.
"I was able to meet and cele-
brate H~oly Mass with these broth-
ers and sisters of ours, who live in
conditions that often aren't easy,"
Benedict said Sunday. "It is truly a
tiny, varied flock, rich with enthu-
siasm and faith."


logue with Muslims."
"I would especially like to
remember with affection the dear
Catholic commuit that lives on
Turih land," the pope added. "I
was able to celebrate Holy Mass
with our brothers and sisters, who
often find themselves in situations
that are not easy."
Benedict's trip was originally
envisioned as pilgrimage to rein-
force Christian bonds and reach
out to Turkey's remaining Chris-
tians, including Catholics estimated
to number between 20,000 and
30,000.
But after the pope gave a speech
in September that angered many
Muslims, it became a test of the
Vatican's ability to mend ties with
the Islami world.
Muslims throughout the world
reacted angrily -and in some cases
violently - to the speech, in which
Benedict quoted a Byzantine
emperor who characterized some
of the teachings of the Prophet
Muhammad as "evil and inhui-


-I
hi POPE Benedict XVI gestui~es from his study window over
looking St. Peter's Square, during the Angelus address at the Vat-
ican, Sunday Dec. 3, 2006.
(AP Photo/Plinto Lepri)


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


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SLUXOR, Egypt
AFTER six decades of
wrangling; EgyptianS living in
the hills near Luxor have
agreed to move out and give
tourists and archaeologists
access to nearly 1,000
Pharaonic tombs that lie
beneath their homes, the gov-
ernment said Saturday,
according to Associated Press.
Officials said most of 3,200
families in the brightly paint-
ed, mud-brick houses have
agreed to pack up and move to
a $32 million residential com-
plex being built three miles
away. No deadline for moving
has been set and there is no
target date for finishing the
complex.
"Most of them want to leave
and they demand to leave,"
said Rania Yusuf, a spokes-
woman for Egypt's Supreme
Council for Antiquities in Lux-
or.
Only a few families continue
to resist, "and they will leave,
believe me," Yusuf said.
The government began try-
ing to get the families to leave
after World War II, but talks
repeated ly bo gged do wn.
Many residents, who depend
on Luxor's tourist business to
earri livings, argued that new
homes being offered were too
small and didn't come with
new jobs.
Over time, though, many
grew tired of the standoff.
In an effort to preserve the
ancient tombs, authorities pro-
hibited the homeowners from
adding to their residences or
installing modern plumbing,
which forced people to bring
water uphill using donkeys.
Many people expressed hap-
piness with the government's
latest offer, which includes giv-
ing residents either new homes
or plots of land in the com-
plex that will include a mar-
ket, police station, cidtural
center and schools.


GN 443







MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT,1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 2002

The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for Lead Free
gasoline and Diesel Oil by E SO wWl become effective on Monday, December
4, 2006.

SCHEDULE

MuwnAXIMM WHOLESALE SELLING MAXIMUM
PRtCE PER ~U.S. ALLON RETAIL
SELLINGPRICEi
PACE ARTICLE MAXIMUM MAXIMUM PER U.S.
SUPPLIERS' D]ISTRIBUTORS' GALLON
PRICE PRICE

NEW INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
PROV1DENCE
SESSO STANDARD
04L LEAD FREE 3.36 3.36 3.30
DIESEL OIL 2.51 2.81 3.00

GRAND BARAMA I NC LU D I NG SEA F R EIXGH T

ESSO STANDARD
OIL LEAD FREE 3,26 3.44 3.86
DIESEL OIL 2.69 2.85 3.04
PARID
ABIACO, ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEF"IIERA
ESSO STANDARD


ALLOC.. ER NOT INCLUDING SEA PREIGHT

IESSO STANDARD
OIL LEAD PREE 3.37 3.61 4.01
DIESEL OR 2.83 2.98 3.18




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PAGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


MTHE Ramesseum and nearby Qurna village are seen beyond a hot air ballon taking tourists for
an early morning flight over the Valley of the Kings near Luxor in Egypt Saturday, Dec.2, 2006. After
several years of planning, Egyptian authorities have begun to carry out plans to relocate the residents:
of Qurna to new houses or plots of land in a recently constructed multi-million dollar complex locat-
ed less than 5 kilometers away from the old town giving archeologists full access to the expected loca-
tion of many tombs beneath the village.


LPPhoto/Mohammed Al-Sehety)

they know that most of Egypt
doesn't live like that and the
world has moved on," said'
Caroline Simpson, a formei
archaeologist who coordinates
a small cultural exhibition on
the hillside.
Despite the agreement,
some people are bittersweet
about givmng up their hillside
homes, no matter that
their I~vang conditions are
poor.
"For me, I don't want to
even imagine what it would
l ook like. Without houses, it's
;9 de d plac e "' sadid A1980
O~Sman Darabirili.':


"We are happy, but at the
same time we are not happy,
because we leave the best
place here," said Nadia
Mohammad Qassem, who is
unsure of when she and her
family will move. .
The area being vacated is
near the Valley of the Kings
and its famous collection of
well-preserved tombs that
draw thousands of tourists dai-
ly to Luxor. Egyptians moved
into the Theban hills after the
arrival of European antiquity
itigJgprssin the lfae 18thi and
early 19th centunles, offeing
jobi to hellp exldgfte -- and


loot artifacts..
Elina Paulin-Grothe, an
archaeologist involved in tomb
excavation, said the best way
to preserve the artifacts below
is to move the residents.
"This cannot continue and
the population is growing too
fast," she said.
Advocates for the residents
said many resisted moving
over the decades not because
they didn't want to live in
more modern homes but
because they wanted to move
dii thyr own terms.
"Lm:'i;ean, nob~odyv ;ants to
'livd' it thesS& 6iaitions ~when


THE TRIBUNE


': ~78~





a~.~8~4C:













Red Cross fears ..


more than 1,000 ~:I



may have died in


Philippine typhoon iJ


SDARAGA, Philippines

PRESIDENT Gloria
:':Macapa'gal Arroyo declared
.~a state of national calamity
;Sunday as the top Red Cross
:official estimated more than
1,000 people have been
killed after a massive
typhoon unleashed walls of
Black mud on entire villages,
according to Associated
Press.
We're estimating the
casualties cotild reach 1,000,
perhaps more," Sen. Richard
SGordon, who heads the local
IRed Cross, told Radio
DZBB.-
rGordon said at present the
~Red Cross has recorded a
death toll of at least 406, with
398 othiers, missing, based on
~figures provided by mayors
of devastated~ towns in the
eas'tern Ph~ilippines, vvbere
: Typhoon Durian hit with of
.~~up to 265 kph (165 mph) and
torrential rains on Thursday.
Government figures placed :
:the number of dead, at 324,
'with 302 missing and 438
injured.
Arroyo declared a state of
national calantiity, allowing
the government to more
S:.rapidly release funds need-
,ed to bolster search and res-
cue efforts. She was sched-
Suled to fly for a second time
t6~ worst-hit Albay province
:-on Tuesday, spokesman
Ignacio Bunye said.
Typhoon Durian was the
Fourth major storm to hit the
`Philippines in four inonths.
'It buffeted the Mayon vol-
:cano with so much wind and
.rain that ash and bopldbrs
pa~s~c~aded down, in walls, of
~~:~~! ~ i swaki d w8.~d
,l~te~~ge, s,-a scenie0r-
'on' descr' pl~ as a "g~ar
zone."
",Th (4e are many unidenti-
Sfied bodies. There could be a
lodt more hidden below.
:Whole famili~es- may have
Been wiped -out, Gordon
r told The Associated Press by
telephone
No survivors are known,to
ShbIldfave been pule fom, arm-
Slands buried by volcanic
Smud, debris and boulders.
and hopes for. finding any
*: have virtually vanished.
:: After surveying the bla'ck-
. ened wasteland, Spanish res-
'cue volunteer David Quin-
.:tana was pessimistic. "If it
~would be like this, chances
rare zero because you cannot
~breathe, there is no air," -he
said.
The first funerals took
'place Saturday evening and
i several more bodies were
.buried in mass graves Sun-
:day as bodies rapidly decom-
posed in the tropical heat.
All but two dozen of the
deaths occurred in Albay,
:with 165 in the town of


_


Guinobatan, swamped by
floodwaters in the foothills
of Mayon volcano southeast
of the capital, Manila.
Four other provinces
reported fatalities, but accu-
rate casualty figures were
hard to come by because
power lines and phone ser-
.vices were down.
In some places, searchers
found only body parts.
In Albay's battered capi-
tal of Legazpi City, residents
lined up to buyi drinking
water, gasoline and food.
Panic gripped one commu-
nity due to rumors of an
unpendi~ng tsunami, but offi-
cials quickly reassured peo-
ple that no tsunami-trigger-
ing earthquake had occurred.
Glen Rabonza, an official
helping oversee disaster-
response efforts, said army~
troops and miners were help-
ing search for missing vil-.
lagers in Albay, where 52
to~ns of relief goods, medi-
cmne, body bags and other aid
have been flown in by air
force C-130 cargo planes.
Houses along the Yawa
River in Padang, about 10
kilometers (7 miles) from
Legazpi, were buried under 1
1/2 meters (5- feet) of mud,
with only roofs .protruding.
Some' of the bodies had been
washed out to sea, then
swept by currents to
the shores of an, adjacent
town.
SGlenn Lorica, 22, said~ his
family's house in Albay's .
Darzagetown pwas wiped out
by a torrent ~of mu~d, uproot-
ed trees, rocks. and debris,
sweeping him and loved ones
avra~y.
Ly~iihg badly bruised on a
ILegazpi.110spita h }, ~'lie
!:scalled,:lky nightmapi4h I:
ordeal, that only he and a
younger sister survived. Sev- '
en other members ot his'am''
ily are still missing.
I"'I told myself that if ,I
would die, ~so be; it," Lorica
said, recalling how he strug-
gled to stay afloat in the ram-
paging mud flow by grabbing
hold of trees while bein bat-
tere~ by rocks and other
debris.
He said he struggled to
remove his clothes, appar-
ently to avoid being entan-
gled in floating trees.
~"In our family, only: me
and my sister survived," he
told The AP. His father,
mother, two sisters, an aunt,
uncle and a niece remained
missing.
Australia conveyed its con-
dolences through Ambas-
saidor~ Tony Hely, and made
an initial~ pledge of
US$780,000 in.intmediate
humanitarian relief. Canada
earlier donated US$876,000,
while Japali said it would
send US$173,000).


Il~H[IE-1HIO M ~1[ E ST1RU E

Cordially invites you to come and see all of its
NEW ARRIVALS


Wllonderfl gift ideas and cooking supplies for
the holidays.


Eeykitchen gadget you could possibly want.
Zesters, mandolins, coffee makers,
slow cookers,warming trays, ice rusher,
immersion. blenders, food processors,
ramaekins.......


So come in and enojoy




Salidyport Mall

Monday thru Saturday

10:00a~m. 5:00pn.m
or call us at 327-1132


~I
L~,~~


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 21


WA MAN shifts through the rubble of his house as it was toppled by strong winds from Typhoon Durian in Catanduanes province ~
eastern Philippines on. Sunday Dec.3, 2006. PhililPpine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo declares state of national calamity amid nas
sive typhoon devastation in eastern Philippines where death tolls could exceed 1,000.
( APPhoto/Aamon Fatl~a)


The Reception for the Rliaunch of Gillette was held
at the Nassa~u Yacht Club on Tuesday, November
(1st. Over 80 supermarket, convenience and
pharmacy store owners, managers and employees
attended aidng with lilwyers, dentists and Lowe's .
Wholesale employees. .
Gillette. FsiorY and Fusion Power Razors for
me were among new products now available to
Bahamians. Also included were the Gillette Venus
Divine Razor for women, and Gillette Satin Care
shave gels for women in Melon Splash and Vanilla.
Having the entire Oral-B line available is also a first
for The Bahamas. .
Bahamian merchants and consumers will .
benefit from this product line expansion because
now more options are in the market for these leading
brands. Store owners and~ managers were pleased
with the neiir products offered to them. .


Consumers wFho shop at Super jalue, City
Market, Solomon's Super Ce~nter and Lowe's
Pharmacies have the 'opportunity t~o participate in t~e
"Light~up Your Holidays with Duracell" and.the 'Only
Santa should be unshaved" promotions from now
until December 20th 2006.. .
Lowe's Wholesale thanks Designs by Greg for
decorating the venue, the Nassau Yacht Club for
providing refreshments and Jambalaya Modeling for
their creative production,
About Proctor aind Gamble
Three3 billion times a day,. P&G brands touch the lives
of people around the world. The cornpany has one of
the strongest portfolios of trusted, quality,
leadership brands, including Pampers, Tide*, Arler, .
Always*, Whispef", Pantene", Mach3*, BountP,
Dawn', Pringles*, Folgers*, Charminf, Downy",


Lenof, lams*, Crest, OraHYq;ActoneP, Duracell*,
Olaf, Head & Shoulderf, Wella, Gillette*, and Braun.
The P&G community consists of over 135,000
emp~oryees working iri over 80 countries worldwide.
Plas visit http:/www.pg.com/ for the latest news .
ansd irnepthi information about-P&G and its bran~s.
;Abou Lowreb Whohleadla e .
tow~e'SWholesale Ikug Agencies Limited is a major
distributor for Pharmaceuticals and Hea~lth and
'Beauty Aids for the entire! Bahamas. In addition, and
.as a convenience for retail stores and smaller
customers, Lowe's also whojlesales all other major
products in the above categories. Lowe's supply to
customers in ali the Bahiamian islands, and our sales
representatives regularly cover all major Dopulated
.areas. Lowe's Wholesale Drug Agencies also
'incorporartes~ a harmiceutical Division.


r i*
~
n
(I(


THE TRIBUNE


Lowei's Wholes~ale ~Re-Launches~ Ollklk11 to Bahamian Market.












I~I~BI~l~lt~cl I


~.?~$;- ;~;


South dealer. declarer to finesse the queen,
North-South vulnerable. because if he doesn't, he is apt to lose
NORTH a spade trick and go down one.
~4Q1072' There is theoretically an even
VA Q 54 chance that West has the king of
A Q 10 8 hearts (assuming we disregard the
4 Q 3 fact that West would be unlikely to
WEST EAST lead a heart from the king against a
+ J 8 64 +K 93 grand slam).
VJ 10 9 7 K 83 2 But even if we assume there's a 50
6 2 + 7 53 percent chance that West has the
+8 54 +9 6 2 kmng, the fact remains that there is
SOUTH another method of play that offers a
SA 5 much greater chance of success. It
V 6 depends essentially on the trumps
AK J 94 being divided 3-2, a 68 percent
+A K J 10 7 proposition.
The bidding: Accordingly, declarer should win
South West North East' the heart lead with the ace, ruff a
1 Pass 1 Pass heart high, lead the four of trumps to
3 4 Pass 4 4 Pass the eight and ruff another heart high.
4 NT Pass 5 Pass The nine of trumps is then led to the
7 4 ten, and dummy's last heart is ruffed
Opening lead jack of hearts. with South's last trump.
A low club to the queen now
When declarer has to choose allows declarer to cash the queen of
between two different methods of trumps drawing the last opposing
play, either of which might succeed trump while at the same time dis-
or fail depending on how the missing posing of his spade loser. It is a little
cards are divided, he usually does difficult to visualize at the beginning
best by making the so-called percent- of play that South's spade loser will
age ~plai e.ucc Wl eventually bs discarded on dummy ..
e#"this ~ ~ ` defihr etqueen~ of dliamonds :but that's the
l?,"A ba elir celiimibds of y e n dgusuall g ~aQ~dmn







EIRE T t
users *
the main as
21sterbe .5
EICT centu, a

editihn) O~ 9
HOW many words of four
sh Im t e ltes sownuh ?eln go
making a word, each letter may Il aU g 0
be used once only. Each must *
contain the centre letter and
nht -lemuesr wrd. plo as.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 14; very good 21;
excellent 28 (or more).
solution tomorrow.


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


1 12 s 4 s a 7

101 1 11 1 112
is1 1 141 i I 1

161 1 171 1 181 119

20 21223

24

30311 1 321 1 33




391 401 41 4


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111~11~


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I


PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


ANlYONE vyOULD SA9Y
THe JUDOR IS
-tORA\Ce*S CRONY/


9


$P'

-------


VHAT/S PUT YOU IN SUCH 1
A 6000410009


ONLY REDHEADS OFA
VERY PARTICULAR


"ItL HELP YOU WIN YOUR ThaT AND EAT
THOSE COOKIES F'oR YOU."


.


MONDAY,
DECEMBER 4

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
A rash move in the financial sector
leaves you with less cash than you
hoped, Aries and all in time.for
your birthday. Watch purchases for
the next couple of days.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
Don't think( about heading out of
town for a while, Taurus. There's
too much going on in your life at this
time for you to be away from the
homefront.
GEMINI Mla 22/Jun 21
Tohilso dek,nofe eor copi m 1l
viewed as unlikable, Gemini..*A
friend welcomes your advice .6n
Wednesday.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
It's been an interesting year so far,
Cancer, and it's bound to get that
much more exciting. There's notli-
mn bta ood news) coming in the
imedae uursoejoy i.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 .
If you can't be~a hz~i.lhem asj
i~eold adage. Taketiti advic6.when
jiir famiyrn psyl no bl

fun and let your hair down.
VIRGO Au~g 24Sept 22
Stop pushing people away, Virgo.
Being alone isn't always good for the
spirit. Surround yourself with those
who care and make a concerted effort
to socialize that much more.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
A fight with your romantic partner
leaves you at odds for a while, Libra.
Don't worry, this isn't the end of the
relationship, just a chance to make it
even stronger.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Your emotions are running wild,
Scorpio, which is not your nornibl
mode of operation. Don't try to sup
prs t oem sCthers will just have at
adpt t h ange ofpae
SAGITI'ARIUS No 23/Dec 21
A disagreement at work leaves youlas
the odd person out, Sagittarius. Be'h
diplomat and don't let it get to you.
Things will smooth over and return to
normal by the weekend.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
It's good to budget purchases,
Capricorn, but lately you've ta in
Being thrifty to an extreme. Leamn to
indulge once in a while it wiill be
frivolous and fun.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18,
Lashing out at a loved one when he
Or She expresses an opinion will lead
to trouble, Aquarius. Rather, listeh
with an open mind, and chose your
TOSponse carefully.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
It's been an uphill struggle with a
poblem that has been plguing yu

has finally arrived.


NON SEQIUITUR

WE6LL,R A~T U. tPit? YYIA' H41LLE~~ 5014TG
fthKG6 ISPhETo IEI.II (GR To imtr, F tGT
~TRAc

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seemenents..r4,,
TIGER


jRI
"iF



U


E


DOWN
1 Respectyou, when you keep your
promlsee(6)
2 Attenigettransportback.Hegaa
stickler(8)
3 OKso fr as itgoes but badnews fr
doctors(3,4,4)
4 Crafty later creeps int0
theplant (5,4)
5 Mn is composselonte ()

the vessel (5,5)
71 She was raised, having been takenin

10 Obln~uct se ua$y (6)
11 Birdthatpeckedal
another bird ()
12 Not blue when you bandon (6)
19 Gives the news unexpectedlyIn

21 Cmlhabout, when
one leaves (4,3)
24 Whatever you want wihan
exception? NotalatII (8,3)
28 Being one'sowunmaster?(4-6)
28 Are moved by the sad break-up and
show their sorrow (4,1,4)
29 Dont haven melody 7)
30 .Stakf s cose (6)
32 To provide the noshingg touch, great
pupil (3,2,3)
33 The lady withthe balered
hat case (6)
34 Tyheyand themone outto the
snliches O)
38 Atlash bedt (6)
40 Chan~e when rou oto America (4)


ACROSS
8 Fmamos,~unie the seamn (7)
9 Thebseason,soonover,wllntcome
uptosuecations(4,5)
IS Wealifulwthhefitshwoklettrs
delted(5)
4 Speaktothedeputy
abou a vacancy (5)

18 Are ntroulblewhen caught by Mr
17 No asrew to hod -a large nei (5)
18It a rope, seacha e octc naimal

30 Ruyou'It~thbgle hig prdb5
freezeup (6)
23 Plartne isneeldy llrewittenfr the

25 Least psetbyon the exterior,

27 ri Mums, "can u~,%a

g Showifng r, rback theflm~s (6)

wnquk wamg (g
32 Cours fr, hle one reconnoitres (5)
35 Not uiabe, beingin poor
conditin (5)
as A wine earlier vinege (5)
37 Ihan gone out ofstyle;i's an
insurmounaleb dlflicully (7)
30 A lud "he very one. It'strue"(?)
41 Conrivace one ha a phobia
aboul? (5)
42 Understood lineseewouldget one
through (5)
43 Does hego overboard toensure
progremmes den't ddit (9)
44 Cost M netbe tuned up by


David Howell v Daniel King.
Guildford-ADC2 v Guildfod
ADC1, UK 4NCL league 2006.


grandmaster title, so reaching
thisstrong posion againstone
of the national league's top
scorers further boosted his
chances. White (to move) is a
pawn ahead while his queen,
rook and bishop control useful
entry routes into the black
camp. A second pawn would
virtually dinch victory for White,
while keeping the deficit at one
pawn would enable
grandmaster King to reist The
teenager's choice provoked an
error and Black resigned two
moves on from the diagram. Can
you spot the finish?


8254




&I I I I~


^lII I 1 I


Wt*

>..
(1)
LA1


ACROSS
8 Booze (7)
9 Give oneself up (0)
13 tR asoned

16 Fa eelretn(7)
17Schoolt ss~
sore (5)
20 One giving blood (5)
el Del caea
2 Pays fo~rne (6)
25 Corsales (
3 r athe 6l()
31 ti ~ynedary

36StI (5)
3 ollanguage ()
er ,2) e

43S r5 iceark (9)
44 Afilm(7)


DOWN
1 Se@ ic(6)
2 zar or
rne clan 8)
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VESTRDAY'S EAST SOLUTIONS

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13, Adhered 15, One 17, Lees 18,


31,Tels
OWNc: 2, Reside 3, Scoes 4, Sot 5,


Bel 2,tas 2,rate 23
Damsel 25, Orler 26, Sale 28, Pet


YEmW)rRDYS CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS
ACROSS: 1, Which 6, J-ifly 9, Hole-
WIou-t 10, Unlit 11, Scale 12, Death 13'


eakers 15, H-ab 16,Metra 18, Scpe-
Ed 19, Staypu 21, Riss L.ing 22, Maom
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lost, host, hoot HOOK


THE TRIBUNE


Dennis


114 I)0RE Wrril 14

HaNoI i


APARTMENT 3-G


Contract Bridge

ey stev~e Becker


It's Almost Magic


MARVIN












Pinochet suff rs life threatening



Heart attack, receives last rites


( _r__ __


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE


ruled from 1973 until 1990,
uses a pacemaker and was
diagnosed with mild demen-
tia caused by several strokes.
HIe also suffers from diabetes
and arthritis.
His failing health has
helped him escape punish-
ment for human rights abus-
es committed during his
regime, with courts ruling his
condition prevented from
standing trial at least twice
in recent years.

Indicted



Marxiast presieknt who w

The indictment came afteredt
Pioc het' 91sctbirtda on w
Nov. 25, whchhe marke~eled b
Mrissigastatremient fhor the
firs tvime taingce full polit-

abuse 25 hcmhemitted byhi
isun ay s hdatnt or t
anhyrodyim thatigfl etulat
I take poiia responsibility -


for everything that was done
which had no other goal than
making Chile greater and
avoiding its disintegration,"
he said at the time.
SThe recent house arrest is
the fifth such action taken
against Pinochet on charges
stemming from human rights
violations during his dicta-
torship.
TIhe indictment alleges kid-


napping and homicide in
connection with the, deaths
of two Allende bodyguards
who were arrested the day
of the coup, Sept. 11, 1973.
Both were executed by fir-
ing squad four weeks later,
the military regime
announced at the time.
Pinochet faces two other
indictments another in
.connection to human rights


' abuses and one on tax
charges.
According to an official
report prepared by an. inde-
pendent commission
appointed by the first civilian
government after Pinochet's
rule, 3,197 people werekiled
for political reasons during
his regime and more
than 1,000 of them "disap-
peared."


WSANTIAGO, Chile
GEN AU GUSTO
PINOCHET, the Chilean
dictator whose regime was
responsible for widespread
killings and other abuses,
sufferedd a heart attack Sun-
dlay and underwent an emer-
gency angioplasty that his
son said "virtually rescued
1)im from death", according
to Associated Press.
SA spokesman for Pinochet
said he received last rites,
and a doctor treating him
described the 91-year-old's



charge wit humal gright o
SPi ochet's ypouger son ma~
Maromn Antoiod saidth his
fiathsoer haldben "virtually
rescuedth frome dueath wiho the
loctor untr oduce a cateste a
p enarged vit, thusa rehstrg

My father is m vnery ba on-
oMro Atono s~rsoAlneton
ahospital. ben"ita


in this Aug. 30, 2000file photo.
Santiago Llanqun FIE
Dr. Juan Ignacio `Vergara,
a member of the team
attending Pinochet, said the
angioplasty was successful,
but that he remained in seri-

threatening," especially
be aus o Pino hts age6
Garin, said the former ruler
waes administered the last
The former dictator, who


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PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECIEMB3ER 4, 2006


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THE TRIBUNE


Bi s


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I "


Q. Whtr Asa callasanta wrrnr oua Twxr ruRs or sERVICE;
WnAT MrltVATBD 'YOU TO COMB AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 30
Ys~rasanot
A.u Being a recent graduate of the College of The Bahamas in the
eniern field, I was looking for a challenging career working
I~n the inulstrial environmental. I must admit that the choices were
limited to B.E.C., the hotel industry or light manufacturing. Then
an opportunity presented itsal~f to learn something new; they were
buildr'ng a brewey and looking for technlearl perrsonnel. This was
what I was looking at as an duenue to break awuay from the status
quo, to step into new industry as far as The b~aamlas was
concerned. And as the saying goes "the rest is history."

Q. WHT HAS1 BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEA APTER YEAR? 3
A. The question for meL can be answered very simply; it is the
constant change in technology which leads to the change and
upgrade of equipment. I find the training, installing and repairing
these nero equipments challenging anrd rewarding.

Q. CouMlonwnALTHS BREWERY HA5 GROWVN OVER THE YEARS, Do
you pant TWAT YoU WE~RB APPORDED1t1 THE OPPORTUNITY TO .
GROW WI'TH THE COMPANY IF YES, IN WHlICH WrA~YS
A. F~or me this answer~r has to be yes.1/~oineld CBL as a jr*
Electrician and today I am thre Engineering Manager. This is quite
an opportunity to grow*

p. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH MANY
MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. IUHAT H~AS BEEN
YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WIlTH THE DIFFERENT CULTUREs
AND PERBiNA'LTIES THAT HAVE BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE
PAST 2.0 Y fItj ? AT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERI-
eNuCE?
A. My experience is you have to be flexible not ridged. Open
minded and willing to see things in a dilfferent or should I say
non-comestrional way is key.

Q, WaPrU W~si BBN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT CBL? DETAIL
YOUs Itqunant.
A;c~i~e i p ar;foughsh recruited directlyl from the ;. ,


Q. WfKHAT HAVE YOUt ENJOYED MOST OVERl TH YEARS)
'A. What I have enjoyed was the opportunity to travel fromr
Atlanta, California, Holland, Indiana, St. Lucia and Vietnam. The
main purpose for these trips was fore training; however, It gave me
the opportunity to experience differettl cultures which most
certainly was an enjoyable experience.

Q. WOULD YOU RECOMMEND COMMONWEALTH BREWERY TO UP
ANn) cOMING HIGH POTENTIALS FOR EMPLOY MENT OPPORTUNITY
WPAr Is CBL's STRONGEST SELLING POINT FROM YOUR PERSPEC*
TIVEi'
A. Yes I would. CBL is the type of company that if you are willing,
dedicated and have a level of flexibility you can experience grear
opportunities.

Q. HERE fiO YOUf ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN THE YEARS
THAT LIE AHEADI
A. I envision the company being run entirely bry Bahamnians,
malintaining world class brewing standards. In addition to taking its
products not only to a few U.S. states, but to all and to all the
islands in the Catribtbean.

Q. WHIAT ADVtICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOURt COLLEAGUES THAT
WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL EXPERIENCE?
A. Like 11fe, you get out wrhat you put inl; I S% in 15% out. 80% in
80% out, need I say more.

Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 10/10, WOULD YOU D)O IT ALL. OVER AGAIN?
A. Life is never perfect and of courrse if I had the opportunity to do
it again I would change a fewv things...but thent again perhaps not.
OK, it was not all perfect burt the imperfection is what has made my
experience unfique, I w~ouldn't change anything, and I wvould do it -!i
all ov~er again. *


. .


~


Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WVITH YOU TWkENTY YBAR5 OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TOY COME AND JOIN
THE! 081 TEAM 2.0 YEARS AGOZ
A. The newI technology that wuas going to be a part of the Brewrny and the opportunity to work with people
of different cultures and personalities.

Q. WHAT HAS BEEBN YOUR MOTIVATIlON YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A. My motivation year ftier year has been the challenging projects, new machinery and a lov/e for my
profession.

Q.' COMMONWErALTH BRAEWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOI FEELt THAT YOUl WERE AFFORDED THEf
O)PPORTUNITY TO GROW 'WITH THE COMPANY fF YES, ItN WHICH~~i~~ WAYS)
A, Yes because Il have had the opponrtuity to travl abmroa fdir training and also receive training on the job.


y o male orrlur


Q. W9HERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOINGO IN THEl
YBARES THAT LIE AHEAD~
A. Beiingp the early Brewuery in the Blahanrna at this time, I thirsk
Conionortiealth Bvewery Wlll eXperienge some competition 191
the years thdt fle Whead. COnffetitfoet is the ####e a the game
Otaddy, and competitors are rising up.

Q. WHAT~r ADVICE wohoL YOU GIVE TO YOUR COLLEAGUES
THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CEL EXPERIENCE?
A. To further enhance my colleagues experience. I w.ourld
advise them to really~ have a love for his/her job: get facts in
order to execute a task rather thanr relying on assumptions and
to alwa'Lys be to work on timne.

Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 2.0/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL OVER
AGAINE
A. Yes I would because my experience has been anrd continues
to be a good one.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCEi,
FORTIrTUDB, FORTHRICHTNB55 AND A POSITIVE ATI"ITUDE 1IN 4.

KnEP naAcHING POR THE STARGI JOB WEL.DOL tOtO E A B j


c
C


., COMMONWEALTHI BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH MANY
MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. gHA1T HAS BEEN
YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALINO'WITH rTHE DIFFERENT CULTURE%
AND PsaCsoNAtLTIES THAT MAVB B)EEN REPRESENTED OVER THE
PAST to YEARS) WHfAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE
EXPERIENC E3 ,];.
A. ,The days when G;M- Mr.~ ieersteg used to havre staff G~eneral
Meetings at Southr Ocean because in those days we did ntot have
a meeting facility Our GMs always did what was necessary to
make oulr lives comfortable, they still do to~day.

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PAT1 WHILE AT. CBLP DETAIL
YOUR JOURNEY.
A. [Indurstrial Mechranic] My career path journey at CBL, has
been challenging as an Industrial Mechanic, anrd now Mechanic
Supervisor; throughout the years, I decided to try my best to deal
with and oveorcoe those challenges, by keeping my head to the
ground and moving.

Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVBA THE YEARS?
A. Over the years. have es/loyed the challenges thdt come
along with training and the opportunty to woark for a Brewery.


~ ~krwt~s Yotl.~na~klM~t~t, td~uno#rurut~n! flluiu~u n, VP
pon ~n~tMr#sr ~t~prorru-
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PAG41E 28, MONDAY, DECEtWER 4, 2006


IHIE TRIBUNE









_ _


sr _1 _II r -CI II 'I Lit "3~sr~e~a I --~ ~ ~r ~


I ~~Q, WE AREa cELBBRATIN rInTH YOU TWENTY~ YEARS OF: SERVICE; rHLAT MOTIVATED YOUt TO
COME, AND JOIN rTHE CEL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?
A. My dear departetd father put me in hisF place here and I (ry myv best to walk in his
footsteps and~ learnr di~fferent things from CBL everyday.c

Q. WPHAT~u ASBEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFT'ER YEAR
A. My motivationt year after year was intferacing wuith~ newL team members andJ manalgers.
It wras a joy meeting dif'ferentf people and learning different thintgs.


I I Q. CounoNwneht.tn BREWERY ~HAS GROWN OVER THE~ YEARS, DO YOU IEEBL THAT YOUV W1:RE
APPORDED131 THE OPPORTUNITY TO3 GROW WITH THE: COMPANY? IP YES, IN WHICH WAYS)
A. Yes, m1Y timeZ was well sPent w~ith the company. I learned and grew very stlrongy withrin
my department.


Q. WPHERE6 DO YOU ENVISION THElf COMPANY GOING IN
THE YtARS THAT MElt AHEAD
A. Diversifying its product line to include soft drinks
comtplemrentinrg Vitamalt anrd Vitamair Plus.


Q. WEB ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YBARIS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO
COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM to YEARS AGO)
A. The new technology that the BreweIY was laringing to The Baahamas.

Q. WHI~AT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTPR YEAR
A. The mindset of improving myself along with the technological changes of be~tter equipment.

Q. CounoNW&AtTa BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE3 YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE
APPORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? 19 YES, IN WHICH WAYS)
A, Yes. The training to enhance my mechtanical and welding stkills in order to perform at a
professional stand~ard.


Q. COMMONWEALT BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH
MANY MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS.
WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEAtLNG WriT THE
DIFFERENT CULTURCES AND PERSONALITIES THfAT HAVE
BEEN REP~RESENTED OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS WHtAT HAS
BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERIENCE[
A. In general, my experience has been good in interact.
ing with the different cultural personalities. My most
favorable experience was being f~fo~rded the opportunity
to traint at the G.T.1tWelding Planrt in The Ne~therlands.

~ WtIAT HAS BE6EN YOUR CAREER PAT WHILE AT CBLP
DIETAIL YOUR JOURNEY.
A. Semsr-skilled Welder to Welder; Mechanical ~Fitter,
Pipe Ftitter; Fabricaltor, Certified 'Tig We~ld'ngl, Statinless
Steel Specialist, J.C.C Representative and nrow Union
Shtop Steward. ,

Q. WHATr HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARSp
A. The opportunities to grow to your fullest potential.
The challenges ofnewu [Engin~eering projctts. My fellow
colleagues and the benefits thatl CBL of~fers.

Q. OULvD YOU RECOMMEND COMMONWEALTH BREW*
887 Ui tP AND COMItNG HIGH POTENTIALS POR BMPLOY-
A;rim pr-P~ORar~t)Nad WPAr 1s GBL.s sTnoncast
UR~on PERSPECTIVE)
it;&old he wovrkingfor
,aeny :,


Q. WOHATC ADVICE WOULD YOU Gf IVE TO YOUR
COLLEAGUES THAYT WOOULD PURTHIER ENHANCEB THEIR
CPII ExPERIENCE)
A. rtb appreciate the nowt CBL experiencee; embrace the
challenges that promoter growth; develop a posi~tive
mental attitude towardl yourP wot;rke whatevert your
hands find to do, do it as unto thre Lord.

Q. HI'NDSIGHtT BBING 10/10, WOOULD YOU DO IT AtL
ovan Austs?
A, Yes I would.


CONGRAUI.ATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANC~E
PORTITUDB, FORTHRIGHTNE55 AND) A POSItTtIV
ATI'TUDBI IN 2.0 YBiARS AT CH1..
KnaP assemus roa rns stanst Jon wa~to DNow


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+-


Q. CoMMonwnALTH~ BatWERY HfAS GOCNE nTROUGH
MANY MANAGEMENT TEA CHtANGES OSVER THEt YRARS.
WHAT HAS' BEttN YOUR ESXPERIENCEl IN DE&ALNG WITH Tm i
DIFFERENT CULTURES AND PERlSONALITIESS THAT HAVE ~BEEN
** REPRESENTED OVErlR THE PAST 2,o YEtARs) WHAT HAS BEE\N
YOUR MOST FtAVORCABLE EXPERIENCB2
A, My mtost favorable expertienzce was learning woe are all
different people! and wre came to learn and respect each
others cultures and personalities.

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT CBLE
DETAIL YOUR JOURNEY.
A. I have always wuanted tol become anI Engpineer anrd I
hope to become Chief Engmneer onte day at CBL. I ant
presently and havle been a line techmrcial.

Q. WHAT HAVE YOU EINJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?
A. Over the years I enjoyed the seminacrs, the events and
the hard wuork. I enjioy meeting newu members of staff and I
enjoy working here at CBL for 20 years.

.7 09 ~1dJ iU RECOQMMENrD COMMONWErALTH BREWERY
MAII) Gr TigC20ItIAL POR EMPLOYMENT
al. QrMGEs~Srt saLNG; PIr~NT


Q, HVYERB DO YOILENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN
TN[B YBARS; THAr't lI aHEAD~
"A, I[Malac~hi Reckleyl ewision this com)pany in the
years thalt lie ahead wuith even~c more succerss

Q, HU~AT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVEi TO YOUR
COLLEAGUES THATI WOULtD FUR.THER ENHANCEi THEIR CEL
axantuacal~r
A. My advice, would be to learn and take advauntage of
everyth~ing~ that you can letarn and achieve! at CBJL. Hard
wuork here Pays off in theL endi for you and your famrily.

Q. HINostCur nameC olaO/, WOULD) YOU DO IT ALL
OVER AGAIN!
A. Yes I wuouldi and I wuoukldn' chage anythingl because
it wuas a blessingR being here.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE,
FORTITPUDEr, FORTHRZ~IGHTNE55 AND A POSITIVE ATflTUDE
IN Zo YEARS AT CB1. .
KEBP REACHING FOR THE STAR51,fOB WELL DONE. ,P


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECIEMBER\ 4. 2006, PAGQE 27'





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____I___


PAGE 28, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


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THE TRIBUNE


)^1301/Ol MY C I' lId ~ee n o th~e

lCtap t 3OurI at ~hc olald's in

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::MONdAY, DE~EMBER 4 2006


:Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


,SEC-TI ON






:'businessetribunemedia.net


I I


:1 1By NEIL HARTNELL
Trlbune Business Editor
B Labam ianne ;'rtco m capa-
n-iest are. increas-
ingly connecting
Voice ovrer Inter-

(VolTP) phone to their Internet
Services to bypass the Bahamas
STelecommunications Company's
(BTC) expensive long-distance
Prices, a move encouraged by
Sthe fact that this nation's Internet
Prices equal those found in
N Forth America. i
SA report prepared for the
CARICOM Regional Negotiat-
Sing Machinery (CRNM) on the
region's telecommunications
industry said VolP providers,
such as Skype and Vonage, were
becoming increasingly popular
in the Bahamas, due to the evall-
bbity of Internet access at com-
p~etitive prices.
The report, authored by Peter
I Stern, found: "VolP such as
Skype and Vonage presents a


I .



Bahamas leads :region


on costof Internet


THE& flshamas is one of only -
two Caribbean nations that has
Intterne prices comparable to
those charged in Nuorth America
and Europe, a study of this
region's telecoms market has
found.
Noting that the cost df high
speed Internet access was a key
.factor for small and mid-sized
businesses, especially as an entry
cost and cost of doing btusiness, a
research report by Peter Stern
on tbertlecmuicationa series
ila the Caribrbeani praised the
pr~ice competitiveness of. Cable
Bahamas' Internet services.
He wrote: "In the Caribbieai,
only in Barbados and the
Baham~as can onte find prices
which are comparable with those
4:harged in North America,
Europe and other competitive
markets,
*; "In the Bahamas, Coralwave,


Y L nQ1 rPlnm r!


way to subsidise frke: local calls.
T~his had bjeen its main source of
revenue, but due to a dramatic
loss of long distance market
share to the likes of VolP and
callback, Hnad the entry of legal
comtpetitor Indi~io Networaks,
the state-owned carrier has been
forced to cut these rates drasti-
c6ally.
BTC has now evolved into an
operator now reliant on its cel-
lular monopoly, as opposed to
long-distance revenues, to keep it
going. Yet It has not been forced
to launch its own VolP product.
VIBE, with unlimited calls to
Canada or the US costing $19.99
per month, and service to both
countries to costing $24.99 per
month.
BTC has reduced its long dis-
tance rates by up to 75 per cent
internationally. and up to 50 per
cent on inter-island calls.
in his analysis, Mr Stern found
that despite reducing its cost per
minute to call other states in the
Caribbean from $2.25 to 50.70
for Anguilla, St Lucia and
Trinidad &r Tobago. and to 50.60
'for Jamaica, BTC's prices were
still about the most expensive
for calls in the region, apart from
the peak prices offered by the
m~icumbent in Belize.
The costs to call the U K,
Brazil and France from the
Bahamas had been reduced from,
$2.75 to $0.89 by BTC, but these
remained relatively high in com-
parisorf with other Caribbean
and first world states. as were
the prices for calls made to the


particularly attractive alternathie
t'o long distance and Internation-
al calling, especially where prices
on the public switched network
continue to be high, anid where
access to high speed Internet at
reasonable prices is becoming
more readily available.
."This is the case in the
Bahamas. where: the incumbent's
(Bahamas Tedleco~mmunications
Company] rates are still very
high even after substantial dis-
counts, and where competition
in high speed Internet access is
available to most bomes at prices
which are equal to those in Notth
America.
"Thbe cable TV- operator in the
Bahamas [Cable Bahamas] is not
allowed to offer voice services;
however, this does not prevent
its Internet alstomers from dcm
necting bard and/or soft VolP
telephones to bypas:4the expen-
elve sehrvces of the Incumbent."
BTC had long kept its inters
national and inter-island long dis-
tance rates artificially high as a


US and Canada. This was despite
their reduction from $0.99 for
the US and $1.25 for Canada to
$0.51 and 50.54 respectively.
"Iln the Bahames, calls to subi-
scribers on the same island are
free,"' M~r Stern wrote. "Howev=
er, inter-island charges are quite
high even after BTC's reduced
rates are taken into account
"It is cheaper for a subscriber
mn Nassau to use Skype (USSO.09
per minute) and Vonage
(USSO. 10 per minute) to make a
call to someone in Grand
Bahama or Abaco."
nir Stern said high telecome s
prices in the Bahamas had acted
as a barrier to growth and Invest-
ment in the industry, prevented
the development of an Informl-
lion-literate society and impact-
ed the cost of doing business for
this nation's key industries,
tourism and financial services*
Out of all the region's major-
international financial centres.
the Bahamas is the only nation
with a monopoly on cellular prd
vision in BTC, putting it along-
side the likes of Montserrat. Suri-
name and Turks & Caicos.
And only in the Bahamnas,
Haiti and Suriname are telecom*
munications operators still 100
per cent owned by the Govern-
mnent. In 2004, the Bahamas had
43.9 fixed telephone lines and
58.4 cell phones per 100 people,
ranking this country favourarbly
with its Caribbean contempo-
taries in this respect, and with
31.9 Internet users per 100 p~eo-
ple.


said its Isle-Our Lucaya opera-
tionb had sustained an adjusted
operating loss of $4.124 million
compared to 51.003 maillionl in
income the previous year, when
it was boosted by insurance
recoveries relating to the 2004
hurricane season.
For the first half of fiscal 2007,
Isle-Our Lucaya's net revenues
fell by 37.1 per cent to $7.251
million, compared to $11.527 mil-
lion. Indeed, the operating loss
for the second quarter was $1.359
million, but a positive $79,000
charge relating to depreciation
and amortisation took the net
operating loss to $1.28 million.
And for the first six months .
of fiscal 2007. a positive $159,000
charge relating to depreciation
and amortisation took the oper-
ating loss from 54.283 million to
a net $4.124 million.
Isle of Capri, before announc-
ing its pull-out decision, had been
seeking further investments incen-
tives from the Government,-
chiefly a reduction in the casino
tax rate levied upon it from 17
per cent to 9 per cent, and an
increase in marketing support.
Grand Bahama's tourism
industry has been hit hard by the
Royal Oasis closure, taking out
about third of the,1sland's room
inventory, and leaving the island
lacking critical tourist mass. This
bas reduced the attractiveness of
facilities such as the Isle of Capri
casino, with fewer patrons walk-
ing through its doors.


8 ByCALIRA BRNNE*
Tribunel Buslness
Reporter
THE Royal Bahamas Polite
Force is targeting large suppli-
ers and wholesalers who supply
counterfeit goods to retailers
and straw vendors, in the hope
this will deter others from sell-
ing 'knock-off' designer goods.
Last week's raid of a ware-
house filled with counterfeit
designer items was designed to
place small businesses on alert
that the Royal Bahamas Police
Force will not tolerate the sale
of such Items. -
Assistant Superintendint
Drexel Cartwfuright, who heads
the Comimercial Crime Unit.


said the sale of counterfeit
items was widespread in the
Ba~hamas, and has been a prob
lem for some thbte,
He said that in addition to
being illegal, such transactions
take away from the profits of
legitimate companies and
brands.
"Alsp, if you buy a leg t i-
mate product, tben if some-
thing happens, you can take it
back to the store and have it
repaired or replaced," he
added. But with counterfeit or
.fake products,. consumers do
not have such recourse.
Assistant Superintendent
Cartwvright said the police are

SEE page 6B


the subsidiary of Cable liahamas.
the cable TV. operator, offers its'
Jazz service with download
speeds ofpf up~ to onlemegabyte~~
~month "
The reottlt)t also pointed out
that the absence of a harmonized
enribbeen a~tpprn~oac toegula-
tion anid telecoms poliCies was
also6 hoding back the investmentl
plans of Columbus Communica-.
tions. the largest sole shar~ehold-
er in Cable Bahamas with a3(),
per cent stake.
Mr' Stern said: "If laws, regu-
lationis, procedures and condi-
tions Were harmonised in the
region. and if there were good
co-oirdination aniotng authorities
111ithe different countries and teri-
ritories to grant authorisation for
sbuchi a Ontibbean-wide system,
their business decisions would
be greatly simplified. their trans-
action dosts reduced and the
chances of their projects being
successful would be increased."


Inere~t costs spark




SoP uwse m :i BahamaS s


casino's l0ss




quadrules 6



Sto $1.28m


11 By Nlil I ARTNELL .
Tribune Business Editor
ISLB of Capri's Grand
Bahama casino saw its adjusted
operating loss more than quadru-
ple to 51.28 million in the siec-
and quarter of its current finan-
cial year, up from a $309,000 loss.
sustained in the same period last
year.
Unveiling its financial results
for the three months to October
29, 2006. lele of Capri said net
revenues earned by its Isle-Our
Lucaya operation plungedby
43.3 per cent to $2.591 million,
compared to $4.572 million a
year earlier.
For the current period, the
lele-Our Lucaya saw its net oper-
ating lose margin increase to 49.4
per cent, compared to 6.8 per
cent the year before.
Isle of Capti's results
announcement made no mention
of the fate of its Ornod Bahama
operation, which the I.S-based
gaming operator latends to with-
draw from by June 2007.
The Government had recently
hinted that Isle of Capri might
be reconsidering its pull-out, but
there has been no announcement
from the cornpany to that effect.
It has been talk ng with other
casino operators to find a
replacement, as the company's
departure could impact some 270
jobs.
For the six months ended on
October 29, 2006, Isle of Capri


; Policde tagtn

/:laCO 111nt flat


i::~~~~ ~o ~le










~1II~IE~ c
)i,
:5
~+' ~~*n~--~. ~,pir"


The Bahamian Stock Market


DIVIDENDIAGM NOTES:
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a special div-
idend of $0.08 per share, payable on November 30, 2006, to all
shareholders of record date November 15, 2006.
FOCOLt has declared a special dividend of $0.06 put
shate, payable on December 12. 2006, to all shareholders of
record date November 30. 2006.
FINCO has declared dividends of 50.13 per share, payable
on December 12, 2006, to all shareholders of record date
December 5, 2006.
FINCO has declared a special dividend of $0.05 per share,
payable on December 12, 2006, to all shareholders of record
date December 5, 2006.
*CWCO has declared dividends of 50.012 per BDR,
payable on February 7, 2007, to all shareholders of record date
December 31, 2006.
Bank of the Bahaman will hold its Annual General Meet
Ing on D~eember 22, 2006. at 6pmt at the British C~olonial
Hiltonl Hotel, Bay Street, Nassaul, Baharnas.


In~mternadna Markets



CAID$ 1,1446 0.80
GBP 1.;9796 2.49
EUR 1.3334 ~ 183

Commodities .
Weekfly %O~hange
Cruide ()l $63 '7.22
Gotld $657 .g66

International Stock Mlarket Indexes: e
Weekly % SChange
DII3A 12,194.13 -0.40
g & fP 500 :1,396.72 -0.30
NASDAQ 2,413.21 -.1.91
N~ikke 16,321.78 3.73



BENCHtMARK (BAHAIMAS)
LTD.ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL
DIVIDENDS) FOR THE SECOND)
HAF OF 2006


The Bfoardl of Directors oif~ Benchmark
(Bfahamas) Lftd at. its Board Meeting 1st
December declared a special dividend of
one cent net share based on the continued
positive performance of the
company year to~ date.


Payment ofl the spetCrial dividend will be made
on 15th December 2006 tor shareholders of
record 11th. December 2006


September 30), 2006.1

1Bahana Paoperty
Fund (BPF) -
FOR the nine months end-
ing September 30l, 2006, BPF
posted net income of $1.9 mlil
liotnrepresenting ani increase
of $290,000 or 17.02 per cent.
Total Iincome increased
by$30,800 or 0.98 petr cent to
total $3.1 million, while oper-
ating expenses de~clile~d by
$178,000 or 13.95S per cent to
Fo~tr the period, funds from
operations stootd at $2 million
or $0.86 per share versus $1.8i
million oar $0,'78 per share for
the equivalent t period in 2?005.
At its present share3 price of
$11, BPF is trading at a dis-
count of $0.78 or 7.09 per cent
to its nert asset value! (NIAV)
of $11,78,









SBhare




The Tribune wants to hear
from people wtho are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are ratsmng funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for Improvements in the
area or have won an
arward.
If so, call us onl 322-1986
and share your story.


_ __ ._....._____ I


_~~__ I


THIE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


SBy Fidelity Capital
Market
A MODERATE level of
trading activity took place in
the Bahamian market this
week, as 43,710 shares changed
hands. The market saw 12 out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which four advanced, five
declined and three remained
unchanged'
Volume leader for the week
was Cable Bahamas (CAB)
with 8,110 shares changing
hands, and accounting for
18.55 per cent of the total
shares traded. The big
advancer for the week was
FamgUard Corpioration
(FAM), up $0,25 to end the
'week at $5,79. On the down
side, ICD Uftilities (ICD)
dropped significantly by $0.80
to close at its new 52-wueek low
of $1.20.
The FINDEX declined 0,93
points-for the week, to close
at 728,39.

COMlPANY~ NEWS
Cable Bah~amas (ABl) -
CAB produced another
quarter of solid perfor-
mance. For the 200~6 third
qureCAB recorded net
inoeof $4.6 million, repre-
senting anincrease of$1.1 mil-
lion or 31.47 per cent over
2005.
Revenues rose by 1$2,3 mil
lion or 16.43 per cent to total
`$16,6 million, while interest
expenses increased by $150O,000W
or 43.99 per cent toj total
$491,000. .
Operating income for the
2006 third quarter was $8.3
million compared to $6.. mil-
lion in the 2^005 third quarter,
while earnings per share rose
.by $0.05 to total $0.23 as at


FINDEX 728.9 -
BISK CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


'kTD) 31.99
CHANGE VOLUME


YT PRICE
CHANGE
-10.96%
18.18%
0.00%
12.57%
5.77%
14.$41%
30.95%
3.56%
35.02%
15.85%
29.96%
-1.25%
22.12%
-4.30%
-56.52%
15.92%
10.09%
-27.64%
-4.97%
0.00%/


AML&'
B3AB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL -
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DH5
FAM
FCC
PCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


50.65
$1.30
$0.70
$7.88
$11.00
$14.60
$1.65
$9.89
$12.30
$1.90
$ 14.14 .14
$2.65
$5.79
$0.50
$ 11.65 20
$7.20
$8.60
$10.00


-$0.)7
50.09
-50.10
;-

$0.04

$-
-$0.06
5-
$0.25
-$0.50
$-
$-
-50.80
-$0.10
$-


1,000
1,000
5,000
550
0
0
0
8,110
1,000
4,750
0
0
3,000
2,600
8,000
O
0
1,700
7,000
O


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Florld8 Stock Re ady for Immediate Shipment


~RICUJS~
Jaanseehcls.o


+1-1954-880-0781
Call Now Ask for Ana, Dark, or Humbeate -
SFaxr +1-954-880-0785 Emaiil usa@japaneseiveyc~lesacom


FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT (the")FIU")



PUBLIC NOTICE


may be obtained from the HIU, Third Floor,
Norfolk House, Frederick Street, P.O.Box' SB-50086,
Nassau, Bfhalmas,Telephone Numbers: 356-6327;
;356-9808; or 326-3814.


Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O.Box SB-50086

Nassau, Bahamas


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


exceeds $500,000 is hereby
required to submit financial
statements audited in accor-
dance with International
Accounting Standards to the
Commission within 120 days
after the end of the licencee's
financial year."
The 120-day deadline, not to
mention those for submitting
quarterly financial and opera-
tional reports to the PUC, is
likely to be problematic for
BTC, given its track record,
which has usually involved pro-
viding its annual financial state-
ments more than a year after
the year-end.
In addition, several sources
suggested that the PUC's
requirements on submission of
annual and quarterly financial
statements could conflict with
the stipulation that BTC's
accounts be tabled in the House
of Assembly ~first.
The PUC said that under the
Telecommunications Act 1999,
it had the power to set licence
fees to recover from licencees
funds necessary to finance its
regulation of the telecommu-
nications industry.
A licencee's annual revenues
were a key factor in determin-
ing their licence fee, and the
PUC said: "A simple statement,
by the licencees, of the amount
of revenue earned in a speci-
fi'ed period will not suffice in
most cases. The PUC must be
in a position to directly verify
the figures submitted or request
the submission of audited finan-
cial statements.
"Additionally, the PUC must
be able to compile and publish
information as necessary on
revenue and investment in dif-
ferent segments of the telecom-


munications sector."
Explaining the rationale
behind its information gather-
ing drive, the PUC sMaid it would
also help the regulator "deter-
mine if licencees are supplying
the services specified in their
licences". .
"Concerning the adequacy of
the licencee's information gath-
erin~g tools and record keeping
systems, the PUC does not con-
sider the requirements as stated
herein to be onerous," the reg-
ulator added. "In fact, the infor-
mation requested is considered
to be basic information that
should be produced by any
licencee that is desirous of
maintaining or improving its
position in any given telecom-
munications market.
"The PUC will also publish
data and information on
licencees'quality of service per-
formance and on their compli-
ance with their own published
terms and conditions of service
in a way that allows comparison
among all relevant licencees,
and with the quality of service
standards established by the
Commission and/or the licensee
concernedd"
The PUC said the informa-
tion sought included prices,
quantity of supply, revenues
earned and the quality of ser-
vices provided.
Among thre areas it is
focusing on are*
*Fixed access, including
installation and the monthly
rental of phones lines for busi-
ness and residential customers.
*Fixed service, including
calls originating from fixedlines
and public pay phones.


*Inter-island service, for
both fixed-line and cellular ser-
vices.
International services
Cellular services
Internet services
Paging services
Trunking services
Directory inquiries
Operator assisted services
The PUC added that it was
proposing to publish reports on
the information it collected
from its licencees at half yearly
intervals June and December
- some 90 days after the report-
ing deadlines.
It said the data would be
published iri aggregate form,
and information considered
confidential by a licencee would
only be published publicly if
the request for privacy could
not be supported, or if the pub-
lic interest was deemed to out-
weigh the need to maintain
confidentiality".
However, the PUC pointed
out that in product areas where
there was a monopoly or dom-
inant service provider, such as
BTC, it would not be possible
to publish information in an
aggregate form.


WBy NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Public Utilities Com-
mission (PUC) is proposing
that all telecoms licencees sub-
mit quarterly reports on their
operations and full financial
statements within 120 days of
their fiscal year end, as part of
an exercise to help the regula-
tor "assess the extent to which
licensees are fulfilling their
licensing requirements".
The PUC's draft guidelines
on the collection of telecom-
munications market informa-
tion and data, which have been
issued for consultation, propose
requiring all Bahamas-based
licensed telecoms operators to
provide it with "all financial
and operational reports" at the
end of each calendar quarter -
March, June, May and Decem-
ber.
These reports, the PUC is
proposing, are to be submitted
six weeks after the end of each
calendar quarter, on or around
May 15, August 15, November
15, and February 15 respec-
tively.
As for financial statements,
the PUC is requiring that all its
telcoms licencees the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC), Cable
Bahamas and IndiGo Networks
being the main three, along
with a number of smaller Inter-
Snet Servlice Providers (ISPs) -
submit income statements, bal-
ance sheets, cash flow state-
ments and notes to their annu-
al financial statements.
The telecoms sector regulator
':added: "Until the PUC has
decided otherwise, each
licencee whose annual revenue


I~~l~~llll~~rl ~


**** ,I' 1
--


to Section


of The Financial


Pursuant


Intelligence Unit Act, 2000, the Public is hereby
notified that the FIU intends to issue its Revised

Suspicious Transaction Guidelines Relating to
the Prevention of Money Laundering and the
Financing of Terrorism.


institutions,


industry


organizations ,


that


Financial


are representative of those financial institutions and
interested parties, that are likely to be affected by

the proposed Guidelinies, are invited to express their


interest in being consulted in the


course of the


Guidelines


Copies


of the draft proposed


PUC see s data to





iu ge w et er lcencees




meet all o 'igations


16(1)(b)


development of the Guidelines to the HIU no later
than 31st January, 2007








LI II11

,,,,


I .. .. ilLtV L ORn-~ -

i";'" ~;7~e ~


IRIBIIIIE IllSINESS IPINIM


able to safeguard the assets and
ensure the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd continue to run as
normal while the shareholder
dispute plays out. A strong man-
agement team is in place to help
them, and hopefully those exec-
utives will now be able to con-
centrate on their jobs and keep
things ticking over without wor-
rying about being dragged into
the mess.
For those sitting outside the
fray, namely the residents,
licencees and businesses of
Freeport, and the Government,
these are troubling and puzzling
times. The shareholder dispute
at the Port erupted with amazing
speed, and the two sides between
them have been able to unravel
the GBPA set-up less than six
months after Julian Francis, and
fellow executives Willie Moss
and Barry Malcolm were oust-
ed. Truly, it happened with
astonishing speed, unleashing a
destructive power that only
George W. Bush and his neo-
conservative backers have shown
the ability to match in Iraq.
That may be a little harsh, but
there is no denying things can-
not go back to the way they were


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

KEDMA OVERSEAS CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sectionl38 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of KEDMA OVERSEAS CORP. has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissoh~ition has been issued and the
company has therefore been struck off the Registrar. The date
of the completion of the dissolution was November 23, 2006.






F: Continenal~l quidators Inc.
Liquidator






Operatiorial Risk Management
A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self: starter with
a record of' professional achievements .to Joln a dynamic Operational Risk
T'eam. 'The successful candidate will report directly to the Assistant Manager,
operational Risit Management.


Core Responsibilities

Assist with~ te development and Implementation of the Risk
Management Framework within the bank and to deputize? for the
Assistant Manager, Operational Risk Management in her absence.
* Assist with the monitoring of the company's adherence to the group's
ORIM policies and procedures by providing senrvce and support to all
business I~nes.
* Assist with identification of risk and completion of risk rating analysis
within thle unit.
* Assist In the creation of the bank's risk database using Methodware
software
Manage the timely recording and review of incident reports and ensuring
timely resolution and reporting.
Assist in the preparation of training sessions and briefings relating to any
Group wide Operational Risk Procedure roll-outs.

Desired Qualifications

Bachelor s Degree In Accounting, Finance or related discipline from a
well recognized university.
A minimum of five years experience In the Financial Services Industry.
The ability to learn new software programs speedily.
* Advanced skills In Microsoft Office (Excel, Word & Power Point)
The ability to work with minimal supervision and to work accurately and
erffctively under pressure.
Excellent interpersonal, communication, time management and problem
solving skills.


Closing Date: December 10, 2006

Contact
Human Resources
Bultterfeld Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas

iE- ai: lecrl Ir~ntei bu~ttreldbank.bs
www.butterfieldbank.bs '


Beautifully landscaped and situated on the canal
with a breathtaking view, is a 3 bed, two bath home.
It has an additional bedroom and bath in the garage
for a live in maid. Other amenities include 100 foot
concrete dock; 28k generator with an automatic
transfer switch`; a 250 gallon water tank; autoniatit6 c
gate laundry facilities and more.... A must see ~! !,i
Asking $495,000 gross furnished .

Call 356-3189 and ask for Carolyn.







Information Technology
A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices r
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide ninge of services to local and
Internstional dients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Information
Technology team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of
Information Technology.


Core Responsibilities

* Develop, makhtain, support and optimize the organization 's network
Infrastructure, server infrastructure, data communications, and
telecommunications systems.
Ensure hardware and software is maintained and data Is secured through
proper back-ups and staff training.
* Prepare and maintain technical specifications and related documentation
to secure procedures and prevent system failure. This Includes IT Disaster
Recovery / Business Continuity planning.
a Provide management and direction for end-user support function in
support of business operations, inclusive of management of the H-elp-
Desk function.
a Manage a~nd dir software, hardware, network, telecommunicationso
the bank's business objectives.

Desired Qualifications

* Bachelor's Degree in Computing or related discipline from a well
recognized university.
. A minimum of five years progressive professional IT experience preferably
In the Finandial Services Industry.
. IT based training or qualifications (MCSE, CISSP and CCNA) from
accredited institutions widli be advantageous.
a Proficient in computer systems and network management, LANs, WANs;
telecommunications, Web-based appilcations, client-server applications,
and PC-based software applications.
a Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows Servers, Microsoft Windows
XP, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Offce and Microsoft Exchange
Server systems.
* Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project
management and customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 10. 2006

Contact
Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau,Bams
II: 24r2 1)utredakb
www.butterfielbankc.bs


l~i__II~_


10 11 I Ml3ER 4, 2006


ED i- CI~f N PRINTING
i OR ON~,tirr~ L A


at the GBPA. The two sides are
largely perceived as acting like
schoolchildren squabbling over
the sweets in the candy store,
engaged in a selfish all-for-me
fight regardless of the conse-
quences and harm it is doing to
Freeport and the wider
Bahamas.
The legal guerrilla warfare
over Sir Jack's ownership claim is
likely to take some time to
resolve, but it would be a mis-
take for both himself and the St
George estate to become so
bogged down in the courts to the
point of ignoring all other
options.
For now is the time for some-
onie to get the cheque book
ready, assemble an army of equi-
ty investors, get the financing in
order and offer an irresistible
price to the other side to buy
them out. Failing that, either Sir
Jack or the St George estate
could find a third party, accept-
able to both the other side, the
Government and Freeport, to be
the buyer.
Encouragingly, Tribune Busi-
ness has heard that both sides
would like to do this. The prob-
lem is that both sides are under-
stood to want to play the role of
purchaser, neither wanting to be
seen as the one to back down
and accept an exit with grace.
Setting aside the buyout
option, it is also clear that Mr
Babak's position as regards the
GBPA chairmanship is current-
ly pretty untenable. Reduced to
the outside looking in, and with
the St George estate attempting
to have him committed to prison


and doubtless looking to mount
more attacks on him, he would
probably be best advised to
resign and safeguard his reputa-
tion.
Yet the man is said by col-
leagues and associates not to be
a quitter, and he is likely to hold
on to the bitter end when many
might regard it as hopeless.
As to the view from Nassau,
both the Government and the
FNM Opposition are understood
to be playing a game of hunt the
7.5 per cent stake. The GBPA,
Sir Jack and Mr Babak are con-
vinced the Government still
holds that amount of shares in
the Port Authority, although the
Prime Minister says he is not
sure and is having the Attorney
General and Minister of Finance
look into it.
That stake could be very valu-
able if the courts ever decide that
the GBPA's majority ownership
is split 50/50 between Sir Jack
and the St George estate, as it
would give government the con-
trolling power to back one: side
or the other.
And, even more interestingly,
the 1970 Royal Commission of
Inquiry report on Freeport states
that a condition attached when
Sir Jack's father, Sir Charles,
bought into the Port Authority,
was that the Government would
have a 90-day option of first
refusal if he ever decided to sell
his shares.
Does the same stipulation still
apply to Sir Jack's stake? It
might not be the two parties to
the litigation who ultimately
reach for the cheque book.


ALL may be calm for the
moment, but for Freeport and
the Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity (GBPA), all is not bright as
we head towards the festive sea-
son. The island's economy is still
strugglirig, and attention this
morning will focus on the
11.30am hearing before Supreme
-Court Justice Anita Allen, at
which Sir Jack Hayward will
attempt to overturn the receiver-
ship of the GBPA and Port
Groulp Ltd, and have his man,
Hannes Babak, reinstated as
chairman. Yet to focus solely on
the court proceedings would be a
mistake, and that goes for both
parties concerned.
To be sure, the appointment
,of receivers Clifford and Myles
Culmer is probably the best thing
for all concerned in the short-
tenn. It removes the thorny issue
of Mr Babak's chairmanship
from the equation, leaving Sir
Jack and the late Edward St
George's estate free to dispute
Sir Jack's claim to 75 per cent
ownership of GBPA and Port
Group Ltd without having to
come to blows over the hapless
Austrian's role, now he has for
the minute been barred from
participating in any managerial
or executive role.
The Culmers, probably the
best people for the job, will be


b;(6 li~ ~ 9 DEL!1PIBERG
trl;ti :I!!It-i, I experience)








r !.''' ':\I-: '~~'(OM~ PANIES ACT. 2~000
)@ , .9B


"'I ~ ~ AN FIV :: . Jl/.'lT


I~;: !luc:1: e w\ith Sectionl38 (8)
-i:l;qiu( s ,\ct, No. 45 of` 2000 '
;i ';I. NIe)IBRE AND FIVE
;i~~~~~~ ha~': '.i!1~1 I:s been completed, a


ai- isul:i th company


.I

;ii'~!. r


'r~~r,;0 of ~! ll \1 1TIFhe ,Late Sarah

r :r~ Ii!( !r!! panrd Tl:he Late

II!~-~ r:,I :air!,. e both formerly of

;10i.' ii !ni.(, Gr!eat Exuma,

b lan!d asked;l~:.:6 to please contact
nlituary n urali le Cletire of Harry B.

Sand~i: Iobos.c~ky & Company, at
:a:)l. tw~ or !I z before the close of

8 e.'l'.'. n v~.~ gj th Decem-ber 2006.


: no Hquatur ed in hiniuda, with offices in
or and Gucinwy, Switzerland and the
t ena rd wi vices to local and


on no ita Nr 101 ma lits oliented self Staller Will
an set & 0.001 munb to 6 in a dynamic Tru:A & Corporate
will report on.ny to the Senior




15

a man intiuding (lust estates


y, ,001
0 ?!01 IPVyns, beneticiaries, 010.
d if u:1 11nlinutation.




1 101 a us. ip line tr ain a we!l ... ugni d

int.H vpalente in the Iinancial


9 in:A 10al I will be advantageous.
pidi m


i i


i


_ i


; ~ ~Jtri~~ ~


THE TRIBUNE


LOOk for the cheque books,





not just courts, in Port fight








I


NOTICE is hereb givnta RAYM0 CHARLES OF
MILTON STREET, P.O. BOX CB-13015, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2006 to the- Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







Head Equipment Technician/Mechanic required to work on
a full time basis for a golf company. The ideal candidate would
possess the following attributes:
SUMMARY

Responsible for all equipment maintenance and repairs of all
golf course and all non-guest carrying vehicles. Responsible
for making major and minor repairs on a variety of gasoline,
diesel and electric powered equipment.
Essential Duties and Responsibilities include the following:
Coordinate and schedule all equipment for repairs and/or
maintenance.

Inspect, diagnose and repair mechanical defects in golf
Course maintenance and construction equipment. Grind,
backlap, set and adjust mowers.
Overhaul and repair automotive and other powered
equipment including engines, brakes, transmissions,
differentials, springs, and mufflers; secure and replace
tools and parts.
Assist Superintendent by making recommendations for
capital equipment purchase.
Maintain shop in orderly condition, cleaning working
areas after repairs are completed.
Education and/or Experience:

High school degree or equivalent required. Minimum two
years experience as head mechanic or shop manager of golf
course operation. Additional two years minimum for general
maintenance equipment, engines, diesel and gas cycle engines.
General understanding of golf course maintenance operation.
Working knowledge of general operation of gasoline, diesel
and electric equipment; knowledge of proper methods of
servicing golf course equipment; knowledge of the repair and
adjustment of power mowing equipment. Computer and office
administrative duties, must have valid driver's license.
Coa i itcea ust allso have excellent oral and written

Please send Resume to: Fax 326-2767 / P.O. Box N-8191 /
Email: gogolfnassau@hotmail.com Attn: Human Resources


SBy CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Cabinet is now reviewing
the report on the country's ener-
gy usage compiled bjl the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB), a document viewed as a
key stepping-stone towards
devising a national energy policy
for the Bahamas.
Speaking with The Tribune,
Gilles Deal, an energy analyst at
the Ministry of Energy and the
Environment, said IDB consul-
tant Herbert Philip had com-
pleted his research and submit-
ted his findings to Cabinet for
their deliberations.
Mr Deal said the report is
quite extensive, and gives a com-
prehensive overview of the coun-
try's energy usage as well as Mr
Philip's recommendations.
"He assisted us in starting the


Exclusive Boutique

Re sort & Spa




Passionate, Personable and Honest


Individuals who have at least 3 years experience in
the Hospitality Industry to fill the following
positions

Executive Chef .
Food and Beverage Manager
Boutique Manager
Room Division Manager
Spa Manager
Spa Therapist
Maintenance Supervisor
Entertainment Coordinator
Concierge
Receptionist
Maitre D
Bartenders
Waiters .
Housekeepmng
Bellman
Security Personnel
BeachlPool Attendant

All applications are appreciated but omly qualified
individuals will be considered. Apphications must
be received before December 22, 2006. Our email
address is steplimresort@yahoo.coln or you can
mail it to AP-59223 Slot 440, Nassau, Bahamas.


Qualifications & Experience

* Minimum of at least five BGCSE including English
Language and Mathematics; and at least five (5) years
experience

*An Associate Degree in Human Resource or Business
Administration and at least three (3) years experience.


Application Deadline

Applications should be submitted no
later than December 15, 2006 email to
Quichaw @gmail.com
or by post to P.O. Box CB 12707 .


FUND R;AISERsaysTHANK YOU


On behalf of the Santa Claus Committee, we would like to thank all those who contributed in making the 2006 Fund Raiser a success.
We gave presents and meals to under privileged children from all areas of New Providence and the Family Islands. Although the list of
volunteers is too long to mention, we owe a great deal of gratitude to everyone who helped out at the fund raiser.

I o these and all who helped we could not have done it without you and we look forward to receiving your help for our 2006 Santa Claus
Christmas party.


.s Irlll~Fl
-k~_~-L~ I h
t


iliT~1S~nl )~~ri



~i~T ~'~llilLL~l~rlc

LIL~~~I~I'I III~L~CI~I~
~~1111(
I~(~IL~IL~~lllfl ?LLLL?

li~~l~ll~
:11111(

- Irs~l"f fiY "F~;"-~~~IT~T~.~TEr~~'"T7r~~ ~7~ Ip -- 11 I ~aarr a


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


fuels in the country," Mr Deal
said.
He added that he could not


say when the report's content
would be released by Cabinet,
or when it would be made public.


path and strategy for an energy
policy," said Mr Deal.
He added that once Cabinet
has finished reviewing terpr
and signed off on it, it will be
sent back to the ministry for
implementation.
In particular, the report focus-
es on fuel usage by the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC),
and the impact electricity prices
have on homes and businesses. It
also examines the conservation
and efficiency of gasoline, tak-
ing a look at the Bahamas' entire
transportation system.
This includes recommenda-
tions on how the country can
reduce pollution and focuses on
renewable energy sources such
as solar power, wind and hydro
power.
"He also looked at the diver-
sification and security of the
country's supply, as well as look-
ing at the pricing methods of


Cabinet reviews






enePg reOTH 0





Qualifications & Experience

* Minimum of at least five BGCSE including En~glish
Language and Mathematics, and at least five (5) years


* An Associate Degree in Human Resource or Business
Administration and at least three (3) years experience.

Knowledge & Abiltles

* Basic human resources functions and procedures
* Communication skills, oral and written
* Business correspondence
* Researching files and the internet
* Basic report preparation and writing
* Proofreading and editing correspondence and reports '
* Modern office procedures, Methods and equipment
* Computer applications such Microsoft Word, Excel
and Powerpoint
* Record keeping and filing
* Requisitioning and distributing supplies

App location Deadline

Applications should be submitted no later than
December 151 2006 email to Quichaw@gmail.com
or by post to P.O. Box CB 12707


BA A ABH S HOMHT MIIX
I : Asphalt' Products Manufacturer
11~11 1Civil Engineering Contractor




Now Hiring For Absaco Projects
NB: Personnel To Be Hired In AbacO


sa pTruct .~river*s ~


Excavator Operators

Dozer Operators
General Labhourers


Job Description:
The Chief Engineer is a member of the hotels Executive Committee. Previous experience in managing capital
projects is required. The ideal candidate will have outstanding communication, organizational and planning skills,
and the ability to establish positive working relationships with vendors, and the other departments within the hoteL,
- Position will be responsible for supervisingloverseeing Maintenance Engineering and Landscaping.
- Requires Hotel Engineering supervisory experience~.
- Requires a minimum of 5 y~tai(s) of supervisory experience and a minimum of 5 years) of hotel maintenance
engineering experience.
- Must have experience at properties of similar size and quality.
- Position will be required to work a varied schedule that may include evenings, nights, and weekends.
Technical Requirements
- Create and implement preventive maintenance program.
- Strong technical skills in HVAC, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, carpentry, etc.
- Familiar with chillers, cooling towers, chemical treatments, pneumatics, control systems, water systems, boilers,
- refrigeration, compressors, etc.
- Pool chemical testing must be completed and recorded once a day.
- Create and up keep civil, mechanical and structural as built drawings.
Managerial Requirements
- Ability to clearly and concisely present technical subjects.
- Demonstrate team building experience.
- Exeines ocommniang tm anig ,bd managing multi-lingual staffs.
- Experience~in training and cross-training employees.
- Experience in training and developing employees with limited educationlexperience.
Business Skills

- Strong technical skills
- Excellent time management skills.
- Strong organizational skills.
- Good knowledge of computers.
- Exceptional detail in follow-up.
- Solid scheduling experience.
Seriousingsides onlyneed apply. Send Resumes to:
The Manager,
P.O. Box N-4829
Nassau, Bahamas


VISA & MASTERCARD ACCBFTED


esb.co ultants limited


Responsibilities include:

1., The drafting and creation of construction. documents.
2. Assisi ; Engineers on site with supervision and management duties.

Candidates should be hard working and be able to handle a number of
projects simultaneously. csb consultants limited is a team orientated
company, and potential employees should be capable of adlapting to this
philosophy,

All interested candidates should email there resumes to:

mark(8,csbconsultantslimited.com
OR fax to: (242) 325-7209 ATTNF: Mr. Mark Williams


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


Cartwright added that the sale
of counterfeit items damaged the
Bahamas' reputation interna-
tionally.
This would particularly be the
case if tourists acquired these
items and they either failed to
work, or broke, soon afterwards.
Apart from taking away from
the profits of vendors who sell
legitimate luxury goods and
designer brands, counterfeiting
and fake products also under-
mines the value of these labels.
Counterfeiting has, in the past,
been used extensively by organ-
ised crime and drug trafficking
gangs as a means to earn illegal
profits and launder funds. In
addition, terror groups, such as
the first World Trade Centre.
bombers in 1993, sold counterfeit
designer labels to fund their
activities.
The Bahamas has in the past
come under heavy pressure, par-
ticularly from the US govern-
ment and organizations such as
the International Intellectual
Property Alliance (IIPA), to
tighten its copyright laws and
enforcement. The US has regu-


larly placed the Bahamas on its
Special 301 watch list, at one
time placing it on the 'priority'
copyright watchlist.
They have focused chiefly on
the protection of television and
movie rights holders, who are
harmed by the selling of prod-
ucts such as pirated CDs and
DVDs.

S Ilin
Yet the selling of fake design-
er and htxury goods again has
the potential to focus unwanted
attention on the Bahamas.
June Hall, manager at the Fen-
di boutique in downtown Nas-
sau, told The Tribune she was
delighted by last week's raid on
an East Street south warehouse.
"It is illegal, the same way it's
illegal to sell movie and music
copies, and we aren't allowed to
do that, so why should they be
allowed to do that," Ms Hall
said,
She added that persons who
truly wanted the quality of the
Fendi product will purchase it
from a reputable dealer to


ensure it is authentic, but added
that the sale of fake goods, par-
ticularly of bad quality, was dis-
couraging.
"This is a good thing that cus-
toms and the police are doing,"
Ms Hall said.
"Vast amounts" of counterfeit
items were seized in a joint Cus-
toms/police raid on a warehouse
in East Street South on Thursday
morning.
A number of fake designer
items, including Fendi, Coach
and Gucci bags, even fake
Michael Jordan tennis shoes,
were confiscated from Shan Ma,
owner and operator of the ware-
house.'
In the presence of police and
Customs officials, Mr Ma said he
had no idea the items were coun-
terfeit.
"I didn't know that was coun-
terfeit, but they find now that it's
counterfeit. But I really don't
know that. Because I just get
them on the Internet and they
telling me that what I buy from
that they are real," he said.
When asked if he thought it
v4as possible to buy a Fendi or
Gucci bag for $15, Mr Ma said he
had no idea.
"I don't know because I'm not
into this business not too long~
you see. I don't know what the.
real price is," he said.
Police said it was possible that
fr nM~a cu faceonin~e0 rngin
up to fiv yasdin p ion.1dMoree
penalties from Customs if
breeches are discovered.
Inspector Michael Moxey said
the fake products will be
destroyed.


Physiotherapy ~
Hand Therapy


Massage Therapy


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s~a-olal.


Nassau Office
Airport Industrial Park
Po Box Cb 10990
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 377-6351
Fax: (242) 377-2193


SAbaco Office
Airport Roundabout
P.O. Box AB-20184
Marsh Harbour, Absico, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 367-3956
Fax: (242) 367-3959


LOCATION:
Suite 57, Grosvenor Close West
Off Shirley Street between
Doctor's Hospital & PMH


HOURS OF OPERATION:
Mon to Fri: 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Sat: 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


construction


Presently osiengapplications for

FULL-TIME

ENGINE NG TECHNICIANS

Looking for candidates with:l

1. Some experience withdcmns c~fling and the creation of

2. Working knowledge of the AutoCAD software.
3. Autodesk Land Desktop experience is a plus.


THE TRIBUNE


Police tar getting







lar ge counterfeit





gods slier


FROM page 1B


aware that there are persons who
want the look of a designer bag
or other item, but simply cannot
afford it, who see buying a coun-
terfeit as their only alternative.
"However, we are engaging in
a massive public relations cam-
paign to inform persons that this
is wrong and illegal," he added.
In doing this, Assistant Super
intendent Cartwright said the
police had to be sensitive, which
is why they were trying to edu-
cate persons, particularly straw
vendors, before they conduct
large-scale swoops.
He said police were targeting
the larger supplies who served
smaller companies first, in the
hope everyone got the message.
Assistant Superintendent





Nassau Airport Development

Company Limited

The Nassau Airport Development Co. Ltd. (NAD) has recently been
incorporate to manage, operate, maintain and develop the
Lynden Pindling International Airport.

NAD is transitioning to take over most airport operations in January
2007, and we invite qualified Bahamians to apply for the following
mana ement positions:

Controller

The responsibilities of this position include management of the
accounting department, preparation of financial statements and budgets
and forecasts. The successful applicant must possess a Bachelor's Degree
in business or commerce with an accounting designation and at least three
years experience in a similar position.

Manager. Retail Services

The successful candidate will have proven skills in negotiating retail lease
and concession agreements and amendments. You will exhibit creativity
and innovation when working with concessionaires to develop strategies
and programs to maximize revenue. A Bachelor's Degree in ~business or
equivalent and five years management or supervisory experience in a
retail mall or shopping centre environment would be a definite asset.


Manager. Parking and Ground 'lkansportation

This position will actively manage the airport's customer and employee
car parking facilities and the ground transportation services with a goal
to increase customer service and maximize efficiency. At least five years
management or supervisory experience in the Parking and/or the Ground
Transportation industry would be a definite asset. The successful candi-
date should possess a Bachelor's Degree in business or a combination of
related experience and education.

Please drop off a resume to the Airport Authority Executive Offices,
Concourse 2. Lynden Pindling International Airport, no later than
December 15, 2006, attention:


MS. Lori Chambers

Vice President Operations
Nassau Airport Development Co. Ltd.
;i,,,. rn4 I



BakOf The Bahamas

IN T E RNEA T IONS3AL



GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED

EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Education Guaranteed Fund Loan Program of the
Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is pleased to advise
that the cheque disbursement for ALL students in the Loan Program will take
place at Holy 'Ikinity Activity Centre, Stapledon Gardens, beginning December
4 to December 8, 2006, from 9:00am to 3:00pm as follows:



NEW AND RETURNING STUDENTS






A F Monday, December 4, 2006
G K Thesday, December 5, 2006
L O Wednesday, December 6, 2006
P -U Thursday, December 7, 2006
V -Z Friday, December 8, 2006


)~~ Y )


International Offshore Bank is seeking an
OPERATIONS ASSISTANT.
Familiar with general office duties, loan
documentation, filing. Applicant must be
fluent in SPANISH, writterf~ and spoken.
Proven knowledge of MS Office products.


Please submit your resume to
HR Manager
P.O. Box N-4444 Nassau, NP.


BUSh may lift drilling ban


~THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 78


MBy JOHN HEILPRIN
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -
President Bush is deciding
whether to lift a banl on oil and
gas drilling in federal waters off
Alaska's Bristol Bay, home to
endangered whales and sea
lions and the world's largest
sockeye salmon run.
Leasing in a portion of the
are~a rich in oil and natural gas
ended nearly two decades ago
while Bissh's father was pres
ident in the outcry after the
Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989.
But with natural gas prices
higher, the Interior Depart-
ment's Mmnerals Management
Service proposed reopening up
the North Aleutian Busin. Thlat
mecludes Bristol Bay and part
';of southeastern Bering Sea.
White House spokesman
Scott Stanzel confirmed Satur-
day the president was colnsid-
Sering taking that step.
Environmentalists oppose
drilling there because of the
potential for oil spills and harm
to wildlife. They have speculat-
ed in recent dlays that Bush
''might allow such firilling before
Democrats regain control of
Congress in January.
"If the E bh administration
decides to a.. w drilling inl Bris-
tol Bay, it wal1 simply illustrate
the level to which they will sink
to satisfy Big Oil," Carl Pope,
Sthe Sierra Club's executive
director, said Saturday. "They
are willing to risk a valuable,
renew ble resource eie Brilytol

Sited, shortsighted drilling plans."
Rsep. edn rd earkey t
,House Resources Committee,
i'said opening up Bristol Bay and
expanding drilling off Florida's
Coast -- a goal of House
''Repubhicans before losing pow-
er to Democrats would
annunt b' a lastdmnunsu gi
SChristmas present to the big oil
companies."
The M nrls Mngm t
Service sai de its ana setme'"
posal that reopening energy
development in the basmr's fed-
eral waters, extending between
three miles and 200 miles off-
Sshore, could produce. $7.7 bil-.
lion in oil and gas production
and up to 11,500 jobs.
Some 200 million barrels of
crude oil, about what the U.S.
imports every 16 days, are


gas a quarter of all Ur.S.
i annual production.
Fourteen companies are said


to, he intecrestedl. The agecncy cit-
ed supports among more th~an a
dozen local and tribal govern-
ments nearby who believe the
drilling would boost their econ-
comy. Lease payments go to the
government.
Despite its fame among fish-
ermien for its rich stocks of
salmon, king crab and other
seafoodl, the Bristol Bay fishing
region has lost hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars over the past
decade because of competition
from less expensive farmed
salmon.
Alaska Native villages also
depend on the annual sockeye
and chinook salmon runs for
protein in their diet.
TIhe commercial fishing
inldustry has plunged into a
depression, giving more support
to Royal Dutch Shell PLC and
other oil companies that have
lobbied thei White House to lift
the offshore drilling ban.
Environmentalists worry
about the large populations of
migratory seabirds and crab, the
imperiled Steller's sea lions and
northern sea otters, or the
North Pacific right whales a
population so decimated only
about 100 are thought to still
exist.
The Mmnerals Management
Service said accidental spills
could foul coastal water quality,
and the noise and pollution
from more ship traffic could dis-
turb or kill seagoing creatures.
it said even a large spill proba-
bly would harm only a small
potio il3 te eis pulto
to marine mammals.


T'he Bering Seai Fishermen's
Association ralsed allarms about
protecting the region, as did the
Yukon River Drainage Fish-
eries Association, which said
the drilling would threaten the
salmon runs.
On Friday, more than 30 peo-
ple representing fishermen,
native Alaskans and conserva-
tionists wrote Bush urging him
not to lift the ban.
"These protections have been
in place because of the great
risk to Bristol Bay posed by oil
and gas development," wrote
representatives of the Alaska
Longline Fishermen's Associa-
tion, Alaska Wilderness
League, Sierra Club, World
Wildlife Fund and others. "The
presidential withdrawal now
stands as the last line of defense
for this irreplaceable resource."
The southwest segment of
Bristol Bay was last open for
lease sales idi 1988 when the fed-
eral government collected more
than $95 million. The govern-
ment bought back the leases
after the Exxon Valdez coated
Prince William Sound and the
waters of south-central Alaska
with 11 million gallons of crude.
Congressional protections put
on the area in 1989 were lifted
mn 2003 at the behest of Sen.
Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, who
said he had been acting at the
request of constituents in the
region.
Environmental groups said
they are confident the new
Democratic-controlled Con-
grssr iol ao to trestre
Bristol Bay.


$ I


* Returning Students and/or Guarantors should be present and must
bring relevant identification, (valid Passport and National Insurance
Card) .
* New Students and Guarantors should be present and bring relevant
identification, (valid Passport, National Insurance Card, current
job letter and copy of a utility bill).
* Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation
has been completed.


TIM/E: 9:00AM 3:00PM.

PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre

Stapledon Gardens
















Crot ers appointed. to






Cana a ban 's Board


INVESTMENT


ADVISOR

Our Investment Advisors actively advise clients on their
investment portfolios and often provide other wealth
m naoren tserov edi mconoduncto et gour Irok
experience, education and training in international
equity, fixed income, derivatives and alternative
investments is essential.

Our Investment Advisors are responsible for developing
their client base. Therefore, the successful candidate
will have prior success in developing a silbstantial book
of securities business. The ability to succeed at this
task requires an existing network of relevant contacts
and proven business development strategies. Equally
important is experience formulating detailed and complex
business plans and a proven ability to execute.

In addition, the position requires:
* 5 -10 years of Investment Industry experience in a
senior position
* The Canadian Securities Course, Series 7 or equivalent
* Strong organizational and administrative skills
* Effective communications skills -
* Experience executing large, complex financial
transactions under strict time constraints and .
Othiei-wise performing in a high stress environment
* Computer literacy and ability to learn proprietary
computer systems
* The ability to speak a second language would be a
benefit
* Experience with issues unique to providing wealth
management services from a global platform
* Willingness to meet continuing education -
requirements

During the recruiting process, c ndidates should be
prepared to demonstrate the ability to succeed in a
simia ro1e arn the ability to meet the requirements


Remuneration is comprised entirely of variable
performance-based commission and includes a complete
benefits package. Interim salary assistance may be
negotiated based on the candidate's ability to meet the
requirements stated herein. Once established and
depending on individual performance, annual
compensation in the USD six figure range is achievable.

Please apply in writing only to:
The Managing Principal,
RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Limited,
P O Box N-3234, Nassau, Bahamas
or by fax to 362-6744.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

~The Public is hereby advised that I, KILIA JOEL
JEANNIE BAIN of Sunset Park, R.O. Box N-4770,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
KILIA JOWL JEANNIE STRACHIAN. If there are any
objections to this~ change of name byiDeed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
R.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.














WE ARE SEEKING vibrant, vivacious
and enthusiastic persons to employ in
Our hospitality department of Bimini
Sands. The positions available ar~e
bartenders, waiters, bus boys, cooks,
Office personnel and entertainment co-
Ordinator.


Persoins -interested- must be able' to.




All interested~ persons please respond
via email to: bimini~bim inisands.com
Or 242-347-3500.




CONEWONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005/CLEIGEN/01227

IN THE SUPREME COURT

BETWEEN

MARY MICHELLE MAJOR
JUDY ATHENE KEMP-HIGGS
Plaitiffs
`AND
KAIVON ELDON
Defendant

NOTICE


To: Kaivon Eldon

Nassau, Bahamas



M.TAKE NOTI E that bM an Order of i

chambers made on the 9th October 2006

IT WAS ORDERED that you do forthwith
remOve and null down the building shown
On the plan attached to the said Order and
marked "1 Storey Concrete" situate between
the P81Intliffs l0ts on Wulff Road, Nassau,
BallamaS which lots are coloured Yellow

On the said plan AND TAKE NOTICE
that by further Order of Mr. Justice Eaizool
MOhammed made on the 9th November 2006
it was ordered that service of the said Order

dated 9th October 2006 by the publication
Of an advertisement in this form on three

occasions be deemed good service of said
Order uon you and that should you fail to
remOVe the building within 14 days of last
Such publication the same may be done by the
PlalntliffS at your cost.


ALEXIOU, K(NOWLES & CO.
Attorneys for the Plantiffs
Chambers
Frederick Street Step


WE ARE LOOKING FOR '







That is:

*Experienced in the Retail Business

*Analytical and Energetic

*Creative~ and willing to Travel

*An excellent commur~lcsti --!

*Proficient in Excel & Word Suites


We offer Great Benefits:

*Growth & Advancement within theoraiton

*A salary that will commensurate with
experience

*Group Medical & Pension Plans

*Employee Discounts .

*Profit Sharing

*A Supportive team environment



Send resumes via e-;mail to:
cshumanresources@aol.com


B/ll IP L
PcngInformation As Of:
Tusa, 30 November 200 6

52w-HI 52k-Lw ScuityPreios CoseToay' Clse Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.85 0.59 Abaco Markets O.65 0.65 0.00 -0.109 0.000 N/M 00%
2.0 16 205 B kmmasaPmopedty Fund 11ro 0 Io 0.O 0. 68 0. O 96.9 3.
0.850.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.265 0.020 2.62.6
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.65 1.65 0.00 0.168 0.060 9.8 36%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.30 1.30 .0.00 0.188 0.050 6.93.5
9.959.05 Cable Bahamas 9.81 9.81 0.00 50 0.659 0.240 14.9 2.4%
2.201.40 Colina Holdings 1.90 1.90 0.00 0.046 0.000 41.3 0.0
12.30 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 12.30 12.30 0.00 0.943 0.660 12.3 53%
6.264.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.81 4.75 -0.06 0.134 0.045 35.8 094
2.882.10 Doctors Hospital 2.65 2.65 0.00 0.295 0.000 9.0 00%
6.21 4.35 Famguard 6.09 6.09 0.00 0.428 0.240 14.2 39%
1200 10.60 Finco 12.00 12.00 0.00 0.779 0.560 15.4467
1.14 10.00 FirstCaribbean 14.14 14.14 0.00 0.927 0.550 15.1 3.9%
11.65 10.00 Focol 11.65 11.65 0.00 0.885 0.500 13.2 429
115 0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 00%
1.20 7.20 ICD Utilities 8.00 7.20 -0.80 1,700 0.532 0.270 13.53.%
9.10 8.52 J. S. Johnson 8.52 8.60 0.08 5,350 0.527 0.560 .16.3 6.51%
1.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.269 0.195 7.9 19%
52wk-I 52k-Lo SmbolB~d Ask$ Las Prie Wekly ol. PS $ Div P/E Yed
14.3012.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.923 1.320 819.04
1014 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.8%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.00 0.021 0.000 264 .00
40028.00 A~BDAB ~-~~~~-41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.0
14.5014.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.580 1.320 8.9 9.4%
0.600.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00
2wHI 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3149 1.2626 Colina Money Market Fund 1.314929*
3.07 2.5197 Fidelity Bahamas G &I Fund 3.0017-*
2.48292.2754 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.482888"
1.2037 1.1406 Colina Bond Fund 1.203719*"
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by cloalng price NUL
52wk-MI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 62 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 17 November 2000
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 October 20
change change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's, reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value "* 31 October 2000
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1,19984 = 100 "" 31 Octoer 2006


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


vide investors with access to
private equity and other alter-
native investments, targeting
high net worth and institu-
tional clients.
It chiefly targets invest-
ments in the industrials, real
estate, infrastructure and
financial services sectors.


FRANK Crothers, the vice-
chairman of Abaco Markets
and IndiGo Networks, has
been appointed to the Board
of Directors at a Canadian
investment bank, C. A. Ban-
corp.
Mr Crothers, who is chair-


man and chief executive of
Island Corporate Holdings,
his private Bahamian-domi-
ciled investment vehicle, is
also a director of Templeton
Funds, Caribbean Utilities
Company and Fidelity Mer-
chant Bank & Trust (Cay-


man).
He is a former vice-chair-
man of Boschendal Wine
Estates, and served a three-
year term as chairman of
CARILEC, the Caribbean
Association of Electrical Util-
ities.
C. A. Bancorp aims to pro-


Would You Like to Sell a Piece of the Atlantis?

The Atlantis Vacation Club is Recruiting Sales &
Marketing Executives!

Key competencies include:


Customer service orientation~


Bu dkn bu nss partnerships
Positive disposition
Openness to difference
Patience
Sales abilitylexperience
College education a plus


O
0
0
0


Please respond to
The Recruiter,
Harborside Resort
at Atlantis on or
before D~ec 15th,
06, by:



gy agrO D


Fax: 363-68'22
hrarecruitment @starwoodvo.com
Or' Deliver the resume to:
Human Resources Department
Marine One Building .
Marina One Drive
Paradise Island


s~heraton


SfR IS
4,.,ngsr ~


sub R


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All applications will be treated
with the strictest confidence.







I



30-Sep-06 31-Dec-05

ASSETS
Cash on hand and at banks 17,647,284 10,098,542
Investment in securities 19,181,685 22,128,439
Mortgages, consumer and other loans 106,608,258 101,766,790
Property, plant and equipment 6,774,156 7,05 1,337
Other assets 5,387,699 1,092,719
$155,599,082 $142,137,828

LIABILITIES
Customer deposits 121,767,189 109,774,426
Mortgage-backed bonds .--
Long-term loans 366,202 500,000
Other liabilities and accrued expenses 1,027,398 3,990,087
$123,160,789 $114,264,513

EQUITY
Capital and reserve attributable to the
Bank's equity holders:
Share capital ordinary shares 20,000,001 5,000,001
Share capital preference shares -10,000,000
Revaluation surplus 1,664,869 1,695,320
Retained earnings 10,773,423 10,289,639
32,438,293 26,984,960
Minority interest -888,355
32,438,293 27,873,315
$155,599,082 $142,137,828


9 Months Ending
30-Sep-06 30-Sep-05


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Charnges in Equity (Unaudited)
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

Share Capital Share Capital
Ordinary Preference Revaluation Retained
Shares Shares Surplus Earnings Total

As at 1 January 2005 5,000,001 '10,000,000 1,735,925 7,996,358 24,732,284

Property, plant and equipment revaluation -- (40,605) 40,605-
Net Income --- 3,669,343 3,669,343
Dividends paid ordinary shares --- (666,667) (666,667)
.Divtidends. paid~/ppyably p~:~freferec shares -L (750,000) (750,000)
As at 31 December:2005 ; $5,000,001 $10,000,000 $1,695,320 $10,289,639 $26,90,960

As at 1 January 2006 5,000,001 10,000,000 11,695,320 10,289,639 26,984,960

Issuance of ordinary shares 15,000,000 15,000,000
Redemption of preference shares (10,000,000) (10,000,000)
Property, plant and equipment revaluation -- (30,451) 30,451
Net Inicome --- 1,453,332 1,453,332
Dividends paid ordinary shares --- (500,000) (500,000)
Dividends paid/payable preference shares (500,000) (500,000)
As at 30 September 2006 $20,000,001 $ -$1,664,870 $10,773,422 $32,438,293

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

For the For the
nine months ended nine months ended
30-Sep-06 30-Sep-05
Cash flow from operating activities
Net income (before minority interest) $1,484,680 1,610,618
Adjustments for:
Net change in provision for credit losses (95,894) (412,876)
Depreciation 364,390 357,304
Net change in unrealized appreciation in financial assets at fair value through profit or loss 217,947-
Realized gains on sale of financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (232,251)-
Operating income before changes in operating
assets and liabilities 1,738,872 1,555,046

Increase in mortgages, consumer and other loans (4,745,574) (6,453,495)
Increase in other assets (4,294,980) (158,031)
Increase in customer deposits 11,992,763 8,610,670
Decrease in other liabilities and acrrued expenses (2,962,689) (1,332,'826)
Net cash flows provided by operating activities 1,728,392 2,221,364

Cash flows from investing activities
Investment in Subsidiary (919,700)
Purchase of government securities (381,800) (1,786,300)
Purchase of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss (65,822)
Sale of government securities 1,758,800
Sale of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss 1,649,879-
Purchases of property, plant & equipment (87,209) (380,858)

Net cash flows provided by (used in) investing actitivies 1,954,148 (2,167,158)

Cash flows frbm financing activities
Maturity of mortgage-backed bonds -(58)
Ordinary dividends paid (500,000) (333,333)
Preference dividends paid (500,000) (562,500)
Repayment of long-term loans (133,798) (100,000)
Issuance of ordinary shares 15,000,000
Redemption of preference shares (10,000,000)-
Net cash flows provided by (used In) financing actitivies 3,866,202 (995,891)

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 7,548,742 (941,685)
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year 10,098,542 15,689,298
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period $17,647,284 $14,747,613


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 9B


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consolidated Barlance Sheet (Unaudited)
As of September 30, 2006
(Expressed in Barhamian dollars)


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Income (Unaudited)
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


INCOME
Interest income
Interest expense ,
Net Interest Income

Non-Interest Income
Total Income

EXPENSES
Salary and staff benefits
General and administrative
Depreciation
Total Non-Interest expense
Provision for credit losses
Total Expenses
Net income before minority interest

ATTRIBUTABLE TO:
Equity holders of the bank
Minority interest
Net income

Weighted average number of
common shares outstanding

Earnings per share


$7,613,600
2,783,492
4,830,107

2,825,295
7,655,402


2,976,076
2,510,463
364,390
5,850,929
319,794
6,170,723
$1,484,680


1,453,332
31,347
$1,484,680


$7,687,528
2,814,541
4,872,987

2,119,054
6,992,041


2,595,867
2,i33,480
357,304
5,186,651
194,772
5,381,423
$1,610,618


1,581,223
29,395
$1,610,618


17,666,670 16,666,670


$0.08


$0.10


















Howard helps Everton to beat






West Ham 2-0 in Premier League


... e .. o-u. d~mail usa@j apanesevehicles.com )


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


WEST HAM United's
Carlos Tevez, left, turns away
from Andy van der Meyde of
Everton during their English
Premier League soccer match
at Goodison Park Stadium, Liv-
erpool, England, Sunday Dec. 3,
2006.
(AP Photo/
Dave Thomtpson)

Luis Garcia added the winner in <
80th off a crowds from Ivan de la *
Pena.

SBERLIN Schalke failed
to regain the lead in the Bun-
desliga when it was held to a 0-0
tie at FC Nuremberg.
Schalke, which had been in
first place for two weeks, fell .
behind Werder Bremen on goal
difference after its four-game
winning streak ended. Bremen
beat Hertha Berlin 3-1 Saturday.:
Naohiro Takahara produced
the first Bundesliga.hat trick of
the season as Eintracht Frank-
furt edged Alemannia Aachen 3-
2. Takahara beat defenders in the
14th and 62nd minutes and
chipped over the goalkeeper in
the 43rd.
The Japan international had
drawn criticism for wasting
numerous chances in a 0-0'
UEFA Cup tie against Newcastle '
three days ago.
"Thursday, I had all those
chances," Takahara said. "Today
I had to show how I could play."

SAMSTERDAM, Nether- '
lands Ajax and AZ Alkmaar
each won in the Dutch league to
stay close to leader PSV Eind-
hoven.
Third-place Ajax beat Willem
II Tilburg 6-0, with Klaas Jan
Huntelaar scoring two goals.
Tom de Mul scored another and
set up the first three.
AZ Alkmaar stayed in second
place after beating Excelsior Rot-
terdam 5-0. Danny Koevermans
and Shota Arveladze scored two.
goals each.
PSV, which beat Vitesse Arn-
hem 1-0 Saturday, leads the
league with 40 points, five more -
than AZ and six more than Ajax.
Feyenoord, with 29 points, beat
SC Heerenveen 4-3.

SFALK~IPA, Scotland -
Rangettibit 'fto Falkirk 1-0 on
Mark Twadd'le's 26th-minute
goal, allowing Celtic to open a
16-point lead at the top of the
Scottish Premier League.
Rangers stayed in second place
with 28 points. Celtic leads with)4
44. ?
3C r


SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

U.S. GOALKEEPER Tim
Howard made two saves on shots
from Carlos Tevez, and Everton
went on to beat West Ham 2-0
Sunday in the English Premier
League.
Howard, on loan from Man-
chester United, made both saves
on Tevez in the first half. The
Argentina international has yet
to score for West Ham since
arriving from Brazil.
"You can't fault the applica-
tion or effort, but when you don't
get anything away it puts pres-
sure on at home," West Ham
manager Alan Pardew said.
Tevez also set up attempts for
Lee Bowyer and Hayden
Mullins. -
Leon Osman gave Everton the
lead in the 51st minute after
intercepting a headed clearance
from American defender
Jonathan Spector. James Vaugh-
an made it 2-0 in injury time.
"For us, that is an unbeliev-
able result," Everton manager
David Moyes said. "Big credit to
all the lads. We had people play-
ing out of position and that epit-
omizes the spirit we have here."
Everton moved up two places
to seventh and has 24 poihts.
West Ham remains without an
away win and is 17th with 14
points, two points clear of the
relegation zone.
P OME Palermo was held
to a 0-0 tie at Parma in the Italian
league, dropping the Sicilian
team further behind leaders Inter
M'ilan and AS Roma.
Faler~mo hasn't won in five
games in any competition. Inter
leads the league with 36 points,
followed by Roma with 32 and
Palermo with 28.
Injury-depleted AC Milan
struggled again, tying 2-2 at
Cagliari. Milan played the last 15
Minutes with, 10,men~after
Andrea Pirlo received acstraight
)red card for taking dowithivid ~i
Suazo from behind.
Cagliari dominated the first


half, but Milan went ahead three Kaka and eight other injured
minutes into the second half with players, is in 15th place with 12
a header from Alberto Gilardino. points. The team started the sea-
Suazo tied the score in the 53rd son with an eight-point penalty
with a penalty kick, and Andrea for its role in the Italian match-
C ale made it 2-1 foJ..C~agliari ~ fixing scandal.
in .e~ 65th before Marco Bor- Fiorentina beat Lazio 1-0 on
ri Ito scored for hl thin In the Eu-~ica Toni's 15th-minute goal in a
70th. mlatchup of two teams also penal-
Milan, which playc 2 ith~~out' ized in the scandal.


Inter beat Siena 2-0 Saturday,
matching a 97-year-old team
record with its 11th consecutive
win in all competitions. Sebond-
place AS Ronia beat Atalanta 2-
1 for its sixth straight league win.

SMADRID, Spain Brazil-
ian stars Ronaldo and Roberto
Carlos scored a goal each to give
Real Madrid a 2-1 win over Ath-
letic Bilbao in the Spanish league.
Ronaldo raced through the
opposing defense in the 65th
minute and scored with a great
solo effort to make it-'2t T:he
Brazil striker also had three oth-
er solid chances to score. Rober-
to Carlos the scored the winning.
goal in the 82nd minute with a
carefully placed shot off a back-
pass from Michel Salgado.
Bilbao took the lead in the
35th off a free kick by defender


Luis Prieto, though replays
showed the last player to touch
the ball was midfielder Igor
Gabilondo.
Ronaldo and David Beckham
came on as second-half substi-
tutes for Madrid, and Ruud van
Nistelrooy nearly scored off a
long header from Beckham in the
55th. The Dutchman later had a
goal disallowed for offsides,
The win was Madrid's fourth
straight and put the team in sec-
ond place with 29 points, one less
than Barcelona. Sevilla, which
lost to Espanyol 2-f'but could
have taken over first place with a
win, is next with 28 points.
Raul Tamu~do and Luis Gar-
cia scored a goal for Espanyol
each after Frederic Kandute had
given Sevilla the lead in the 27th
minute on a' penalty kick. Tamix-
do tied the score in the 68th, and


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1. Online Order


SREAL MADRID player Roberto Calrlos, second right, celebrates hds goal wrHh Lh terammates:
David Beckham, right, Alvaro Mejia, second left, and Michel Salgado left, agatest Athletic Blano dw- '
ing his Spanish league soccer match at the Santi~ago Bernaben Stadium in Ma~dM, Semisy, ec 2006<
Real Madrid won the match with 2-1.
(AP Phefaffaqrper Julnen,)


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006, PAGE 11B3


TRIBUNE SPORTS


me discipline and improves
my level of commitment. Yes
there has been a steady
inrease in numbers and I will
encourage more persons to
come out and partake in mar-
tial arts.
"We are supposed to be
hosting the World Cup, some-
time in August of next year.
This is going to be an event
that is highly~ anticipated by
all martial artists here in New
Providence. WV~e train daily,
this is a way of life for many of
us who strongly believe in the
art. We do a lot of stretches
and exercise so we can do
kata, which is the lif of the
art
"While doing kata you want
to concentrate so you can sus-
tainr the art's life more than
anything else, Fighting is
enjovable to but for me I do
more kata than anything else."
II Also being honoured were:
Cedric Miller, Master -
6th degree
Nick Jones, junior master -
5th degree
L~eonard MIajor.
junrior master 5th degree
Lynden French,
schiefr instructor -
3rd degree
B~ip Taylot, instructor -
3rd degree
Adant Bowling,
junior instructor -
2nd degree
Ojlym la Ferguson.
Dai Mui- 1 st degree
Anton Loon, IDai Got -
1st degree


Artists moved, how they con-
Slot of discipline involved in
Martial arts. Martial arts trains
in more than one aspect, but
,what really capFtured my atten-
.tiontwas the forms,
"Kung Fu is not as popular
as karate is, it varies a whole
rot. The styles are the main
difference. While Kung F~it
pses animal styles karate does-
ix't. Persons involved in Kung
Pu can use any! style from the
tiger, monkey, dragon, and
leopard. These are jaist a few
hnimnals because the style is
t aken friom nature.

Founder
"The recentiv held weekend
tournament was held under
oi r leader Si Fu Kenneth
Lewlis, he is the founder and
the' creator of Four Winds
It'er attioonal Martial Arts
\'-e is a Biahamitan and the
styles we use are all Bahrami-
anS and so whe are recognized
by\ the World Independent
Ch'inese Martial Arts Associ-
ation, as being an authentic
styl!e."
E(ven though the nine mtem-
her were all black belts, there
wete some improvements to
their' ranks. Although martial
art ists have earned their; black
belfs, it can range hi different
degrees. from one, to 10.
Miller, who has earned his
first degree, a Dlai Gor, said:
"'Wyll it is an honour for me to
move up; the ranks like this. I
enjdy martial arts, it teaches


WKARATE
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
N~INE enthused martial
artists traiig under the Four
'Minds International Martial
Arts Association, also known
as the Bai Sung Institution,
showed they have all the right
moves recently.
In a tournament in Freeport
Grand 'Bahama, which
brought sole of the country's
top martial artists together,
nine prevailed with to hon-
ours, advancing to th next
degree level. Among the nine
were two martial artists that
competed in the divisional sec-
tion only.
Receiving top honours in
the Black Belt division at the
competition were Julian Sey-
mour, Gino Bowe and Kermt
Miller. In the junior black belt
division Anton Loon and
Olympia Ferguson were hon-
oured.

H~onours
While Seymnour` took first
place in the ktumite (sparring)
category, Bowe was reward-
ed top honours in the kata,
pre-arranged forms, and
Miller in weapons.
Loon walked away with
both the kuie and kata hon-
ours while Ferguson, top
female, took homne the kata
and weapons top honoulrs.
Miller said: "Ib-ecamne inter-
ested in martial arts because
'of the forms, the movement. I
always liked the way martial


I ]KIERMFIT MILLER in action


II JULIAN SEYMOUR, Leonard Major and Kermit Miller



















11111- )1 -:I____- i -----i. '-


YLlrQ1YqlJ~1~E


MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006


Fax '(242) 328-2398
E-Ma8: sports@100jams.om


I


II BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
JERMAINE 'Chioo Choob'
Mackey waited for the perfect
time to unleash a Qlurry of punch-
es that forced Jamaican Anthony
'the Destroyer' Osbourne to call
it puits in the sixth round.
fna Baharmas versus Jamaca
super middleweight showdown
o~n Saturday night at Nirvana
Beach, Mackey was able to
redeem. hiself with an impgres-
sive showing afterlosing a untan-
imous decision two weeks ago in
Canada.
"Ift waS excellent, This has Put
me at a~tnext evel in boxing."
said Mlackey, algout his perfor-
manle against a veterali com-
petitor, who doubled up on the
amount of fights and victories
that he posted.
Fighting in the main event of
First Class Promotions' flinalprr-
f~essional boxing show for the
year, ~Mackey took the fight to
O~sbourne and made him pay
dearly for it as he used height to
out-jab his ospponent;
"l knew he was a tough fighter,
having fought some 25 fights,"
said Mackey, who improved to
lial. "I just decided to go after
him, make him mliss an just be
poised and wait on my otpportu-
nity." Throughout the early


rounds, Mackey felt he had
Osbourne beaten, but the
Jamaican just stood therd,
absorbed the blowus and beck-
olied the Bahamian *to bring t
on as he smiled occasionally as f
he wasn't httrt at al. I
"Hre really was playing a chess
game in there because I knowu i
was hurting him," Mackgy
stressed. "Hje tried to force me
into a slug-fest, but' Ijust stayed
in there comiposed." .
M~ackey said the loss in Cana-
da was a "wake up call" for him
because he came into the fight
against Ojsbourne as a comple~te-
ly different lighter and it showed
inhis performance.
Not only did he uise his jab
but Mackey miissed it up with a
series of right books that sort of
deflated OsBbourne, forcing lum
to settle down and fight fala-foot-
ed, as opposed to just sticking
and jabbmg.
"Although Ilosbzt, I know the
unanimous decision helped me
a whole lot," he proclaimed. "I
now know where it is I want to
go and whoever steps in the ring
with me, they better come pre-
p~ared because P'm going to be
110 per cent prepared to fight."
Osbourne, one of three
Jaaicanstr to appear on the card,
admitted that he wasn't as pre-
pareud for the fight as he: should .
have been. B3ut h~e said that wvas-


n't aniy excuse ieclanite Mackey
was that matich better inl thic
fight.
"If fought out of mly wceightl.
P'm not aI super middlewreight,"'
said O~sbourne, wkho noted that
he only fought for the title
because it was vacant. "But
becru~se Iwon the title, they hadl
this set up as a Caribbean elimi-
nation bout, sot I was obligated to
fight.
"But normally P'm 154 and 1
didti't: get to do as much train:-
ing as I shoulld for this fight."
Osbourne also indicated thrat
he wasn't expecting Macke to
be siuch an explosive southpaw.
Had he known, he said be would.
hiave gotten some sparing 14l
li-elp him counter-attack Mack;
ey. Despite the loss, Osbourne
gave a good account of himself as
he "adjusted" his style during the;
fight. He went toe-to-toe with
Mackey on numerous occasions
and he had the fans cheering for
both competitors for the first five:
rounds.
13t it I the sixtth, Mackey
unleashed a series of blorws to
the body andi the head of
Osboturne anrd his only defence
as he was pinned in he scorer .g
the ropes was to kneel down.
That forced referee Matthew
Rolle to elep in and call an elifto
the right with one minute and 40
seconds left on the clock.


II WEEKEND; VICTORY: Jermaine 'Choo Choo' Macikey


Victory sets up Saunders fr




possible clash wit Smit


:'Mashed ruled that he couldn't because
of the constant blood pouring from~ his
hose and mouth.
,"It was a tough opponent because'
when we were out of the ring, he was
looking at me like he was going to kill
me," Strachan said.
"~But when we got in the ring, saw
the fear in his eyes, so i just decided to
give the fans something that I thought
tIhey would like."'
Ryan 'Big Youth' McKenzie, now 3-: :
stopped Ricardo 'One Shot' Bethel-
1;:39 in the fourth. Dr. Rashad had to.-'
c~fheck ~on Bethel's puffed-up face twice-
- the last coming in the fourth when he
called it off. "The fight was great, i
fought how I wanted to," he said. "I
tried to keep him off me because he's a
little shorter. So I just stick the jabs
and tried to keep him out with the rigt.
f'm lot surprised at the outcome."
A ;nd in the other fight on the night.
Anthony 'Kid' Durrent, battling the _-~
case of the flu, managed to out-slug
Drexel'1Hard Mouth' Mcintosh for four
pounds for the victory. "Thank God`
first of all, my people who were there
backing me, mny family and my coach
Steve Larrimiore," he s6aid. "I~ could
have done better.
"He gave me a good fight, but I sill
managed to win."


enough for me to win."' Saunders, who
improved to 5-2-1 with the win, con-
trolled the fight for' the first five rounds.
Bu1t hie go~t a little careless in the sixth
and Mil~ler dropped him to the canvas
for a standing eight court fromi ~referee i
Gregory Storr.

Strong
"He caught me while Il was slippingg.
but it was still ruled as a knockdown,'
Saunders pointed ojut, However, he
managed to come right back a nd
redeem himself when he floored Miller
with a right hook. "He was, a good light-
er. He's very strong," said Saunders, .
who had a difficult time trying to get '
past MCiller, who refused to give up.
"I was able to stand utp to him and
give it me best, move around and staH
time.' .
1Liller, oine of four Jamaicans fEightng
on the card, said he was pleased with his
performance because t is was his first
one in three years.
"Everytime I tried to get a fight, there
was no opponent," said Miller, who
decided to concentrate on his job as a
crane operator in Jamaica. "But when
they fight came up, I decided to go for
it." Miller said he would like to come


back to the Bahamas and fight again.
On~t the undercard, Alpachino
'Benger' Allen made it 2-0 in his young
pro career as he stopped Jamaican
Lloyd 'Hanger' Smith 59 seconds into
the second round. "I trained excellent,
but I'm a honest guy, I wasn't 100 per
cent in shape," Allen said.
"I just had the experience in the ring
and I just put it all together to represent
my country."
After he cut Smith's nose in the first .
round, Allen said he saw the fear in his
op onent's face and he knew it was
rt y going to be a matter of time ~before-
he nut him out of his misery.
"'t could have taken himl out in the
first round, but I'm an experienced -
fighter, so I just waited for him in the
second round," Allen stressed.
In the other- Bahamian vers us
Jamaica showdown, Shimon 'Tdoo
Sweet'.Bain was on his way to polishing
off Rudo~lf 'Cutting Hedge.' Hedge
when the f'ight-was stopped 1:55 in the
third. Bain was the victim of a ~head
butt. The fight was, ruled a technical
draw.
Hensly 'Bruser' Strachan toyed
around with a relentless Derrick 'Ca~-
tor' Sawyer and was awarded an unan-
imous decision. Sawyer refused to give
up, even when ring doctor Munir


I~:AY I 1,1


SECTION


MIAMI HERALD :SPORTS


e


Sunshine

Auto shine

against the

Wreckers
II BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THIE Bahamas Basketball
Federation (BBF) affiliated
league, the New Providenlce
Basketball Association
(NPBA), got things started on
Saturday night at the Sir
K~endal Isaacs gymnasium.
The season premiered with
'top teams the Sunshine Auto
taking on the Yfi-Care Wreck.
ers.
~Even though the game
'started off close in the first
ttwo quarters, wlhen the final
whistle was brllown it was the
Sunshine Auto's W'ho
destroyed the Wreckers 104-42.
It was an easy win for the
:team, who finished up with ~
~three meri in double fl res
William Rtussell, Cordero Sey-
;mour and Kevmn Smith. Rus-
sell led all players with 18
points while teammates Sey'
mour and Smith chipped in
with 14 points each. Top, scor-
er for the Wreckers was big
man lan 'Wire' Pinlder with 14
points.
SThere was a good turnobt
for the league, whic joined
hands with the New Provi-
dence Women's Basketball
Association (NPWBA) When
they hosted their annual All.
Star game.
Although the NPBA hras
lost som of its teams to the .
semi-professiona league, pus
lic relations officer Mario
Bowleg is confident the level
of lay and commitment by all
involved will not drop. -
An optimistic Bowleg is
already calling the league a
success, revealing that league
will produces better games
especially as the vision rom
the executive board hias
changed.
SHe said: "Tonight we are
proud to host this game, We
were getting a lot of talk com
egue has stae bu e ar
showing and level of pla by
the players and coaches
involved is still there,


Sunshine Auto outmatched
and played the Wreckers in
the last half.
"But you could see that the
players were! giving it their ill
mn the game and that both
teams came with the mind
frame to win*
"They both played hard on
defence, but Sunshine Auto
were able to outmatch the
Wreckers who onlly had one .
big guy scoring for them. Sun*
shine had a combination that
the Wreckers were unable to
stop."
R Tussell, Seymour and Smidth
had dominated the game up
until the final point-
They had ta~kenl control of '
the game on both the offen-
sive and defensive ends, while
the Wreckers depended rn
PFinder.
Even though Pinder was
giving the much needed sec
and shot opportunities, it was
Sunshmne Auto's defence that
gave them the upper hand*
With Pinder in ai shooting
slump, and the guards from
the Sunshmne Auto tracking
the ball, the! close game the
:1Wreckers were hoping to hold
onto slowly faded away*


-str


h


A BOIXING
By BIRENT STUIBBS
8 Snior S~ports Reporter
IT WAS the type of fight that Elkann
'the Punisher' Saunders wanted ris he
looks ahead to a possible showdown
with'Marvelous' Metrvin Smith for the t
Bahamas light-heavyweight title.
Fighting In the domain event of First
Class Promotions' final professional
boxing show for the year, Saunders
scored enough points to win his Nau-
tilus Water sponsored fight on Saturday
night at NVirvana Beac~h.
*'1 went to let Marvin Smith know
that he better be training because T'm
coming after him so we can fought for
the lig t-heavyweight belt,"' Saunders
said. "Flm going to be sure that I punish
Marvin as go for the light-heavyweight
belt."
As for the sixth round decbiotio over
jamaican Paatrick 'C~utlass' Miller, Saun-
ders said he wasn't as siar als he would
have liked to be and it showed in his
performance,
"It was more than it expected. I[ was
working on my jab in the ring, but it
wasn't effective enough," he stated.
"Unfortunately, due to the sand in
the rinrt r wasn't able to plant my feet
that wen in the ringr, but it was still good


Bahamas Heart Assocladon's 5th Annual
Subway* Fun Run/lWalk February 28th, 2004