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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03119
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 10-17-2011
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03119

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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER TWO BABIES DEAD Volume: 107 No.2MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2009 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 87F LOW 78F Police investigate after bos body found in trashcan TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Residential Property LoansYour dream home begins with land you can build on. Let RBC Royal Bank help make your dreams come true! Talk with one of our personal financial specialists today.Competitive interest rates and flexible payment terms available. Offer ends October 31, 2011.www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net A 31-year-old mother is calling for justice after she claims her husband and son were brutalised by police officers last week. Sherice Darling said it was a typical Wednesday night for her and her family. She and her husband, Samuel Darling, had just finished a 30-minute Bible study lesson with their eight-year-old son when her husband went outside to get something from his car. A few minutes later she said she heard her dog barking. When she looked out of the window, Mrs Darling said she stood in horror as she saw her husband being attacked by an unknown man, who she later identified as a police officer. I saw the man punch my husband. I didnt know who he was. He was not in a uni form. He punched him again By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net NEARLY 100 people have been charged with defrauding the Bahamas government as police con tinue their probe into a longstanding vehicle licensing scam. To date, police have not charged any Road Traffic employees in connection with the scam, Paul Rolle, head of the Central Detec tive Unit (CDU There are still one or two persons that have been evading us but the investigation is still ongoing. None of those (charged employees from Road Traffic. Mr Rolle said: We have interviewed a number of persons from Road Traffic and the decision was made, at that time, not to press charges because sufficient By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A police drug bust has resulted in the seizure of over 200 pounds of marijuana and the arrest of a male teacher from Jack Hayward High and another man on Grand Bahama. The 49-year-old male teacher, a resident of Fortune Point, and a 34-year-old male resident of Holmes Rock are currently in police custody and are expected to be for mally arraigned today. Assistant Superintendent Loretta Mackey, press liaison officer, reported that around 9.30pm on Wednesday, October 12, DEU officers were on mobile patrol when they saw a grey-coloured car travelling east on Queens Cove Road. She said the driver was acting in a suspicious manner By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net POLICE have focused their strike force on illegal firearms to include two more New Providence communities as they claim turf wars in Fox Hill have subsided. Despite a sharp escalation in crime this year, Paul Rolle, head of Central Detective Unit, last week main tained that his department was not stretched by the record number of homicides. Mr Rolle said: We have seen a sharp escalation in crime this year. We are not stretched, we have expanded the homicide team and those investigations are ongoing. Every bit of information that we got pertaining to all of those homicides we have (investigated Of the 104 murders occurring this year, police have charged suspects in 55 cases. Mr Rolle explained that each case is reviewed by more than one team at numerous stages of the investigation to ensure that all possible leads are explored. In some of those matters, we know the persons who may be responsible are dead, Mr Rolle said, and at some point when the final report is released that will all be reflected. But as we go from day to day we dont want to start talking about that because we want to be satisfied before we report that we get sufficient evidence to substantiate it. Based on police findings, shooting conflicts in the Fox Hill community stemmed from a turf war between three emerging factions, who were By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net POLICE are investigating the deaths of two babies, ab oy who was found partially decomposed in a trash can and a girl who died shortly after being admitted to hos-p ital. P olice say the first baby was found dead inside a home at McQuay Street offN assau Street shortly before noon Friday. Information surrounding the incident is still sketchy,h owever The Tribune has learned that the mother of the infant is in hospital and has not yet been questionedb y police. Superintendent Stephen Dean said: We are waiting to question the mother to find out what is what. We d ont know if it was a homic ide, a still birth or anything. We wont know anythinge lse until we speak to the m other sometime today. The baby was discovered by a relative of the mother, according to sources. Theu nidentified woman called the police after she went to the home and noticed a foul odour coming from the bed room. After searching the room, she found the decomposing baby boy in the trashc an. L ast night, the mother was under police guard in the hospital after undergoing surgery Saturday morning. A few hours later, around 7pm, officers received reports that a nine-month-o ld baby girl died in hospital shortly after being admitted. S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 POLICEARE investigating the deaths of two babies one of which was found in a trash can in this areaPhoto: Felip Major /Tribune Staff PAN AMERICAN GAMES S S E E V V E E N N T T H H S S P P O O T T F F O O R R F F A A N N T T A A S S T T I I C C F F O O U U R R SEESPORTSSECTIONE FREEDOMOFINFORMATION P P U U B B L L I I C C M M U U S S T T D D E E F F E E N N D D R R I I G G H H T T T T O O K K N N O O W W SEEINSIGHTSECTIONB MARIJU AN A SEIZED IN DRUG BUST F OX HILL TURF WARS SUBSIDE, POLICE TO EXP AND GUN SEAR CH WOMAN CLAIMS POLICE BR UT ALITY OVER INCIDENT 100 CHARGED OVER VEHICLE LICEN CE SCAM im lovin it

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POLICE are requesting the publics assistance in locating a man responsible f or an armed robbery at T exaco Service Station, Old T own Marina, Sandyport, during the weekend. The incident occurred around 2.45 pm on Saturd ay. A ccording to police r eports, a masked man entered the service station armed with a handgun and demanded cash from the staff. The culprit robbed the Texaco station of an undisc losed amount of cash and then fled the area in an unknown direction. Police are investigating a nd are appealing to m embers of the public w ho might have some information about this incident to contact the police at 911 919 3223333 Central Detective Unit at 502-9991 502-9910 or Crime Stoppers at 328T IPS LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ARMED ROBBER HOLDS UP GAS STATION and officers stopped the vehicle. While conducting a search, DEU officers discovered a white crocus sack con-t aining 176 pounds of what w as suspected to be marijuana, with an estimated street value of $176,000. Ms Mackey said the driver was arrested and taken into custody. A s a result of further i nvestigations, police went to a residence at Holmes Rock around 3.30pm on Thursday where a team of officers executed a search warrant. While searching the resi-d ence, police discovered 27 pounds of suspected marijuana, with an estimated street value of $27,000. They also recovered a .45mm pis-t ol with 13 live rounds of a mmunition, as well as an a dditional 40 rounds of ammunition in the home. A 34-year-old male resident was arrested as a result. Investigations are continuing. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e M ARIJUANA SEIZED IN DRUG BUST

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By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net AN EX-POLICE officer was arraigned in Magis-t rates Court Friday after noon in connection with a car theft in February of this year. Former Constable Lorene Mortimer, who was discharged from the Royal Bahamas Police Force hours before her arraignment, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane. Prosecutors allege that she and 36-year-old Charmaine Wright stole a 2005 silver Toyota Forerunner, the property of Cameron Symonette, between Sunday, February 6 and Monday, Febru ary 7. S ymonettes car licence plate number 148816 is valued at $22,000 according toc ourt dockets. Mortimer, an Obediah Avenue resident, and her alleged accomplice who lives on Talbot Street, were also charged with receiving the vehicle. Both women were represented by Keith Seymour and pleaded not guilty to the charges. The prosecution offered no objection to the accused receiving bail, and the judge granted them each $5,000 bail with one surety. The matter was adjourned to Friday, October 21. B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net BISHOP Simeon Hall a ppealed to all persons in possession of an unlicensedf irearm yesterday to turn t hem in to the authorities duri ng the governments onemonth amnesty period. According to the Minister of National Security, Tommy T urnquest, this firearm amnesty period, which began o n October 5 comes to an end on November 4. Persons who have illegal firearms can hand them over to authorities without fear of p rosecution to police stations i n New Providence, Grand B ahama or any administrator's office or police station on the Family Islands. H owever, the amnesty peri od does not apply to persons who are arrested and found in possession of an illegal gun,M r Turnquest said. In a press statement sent to the media yesterday, the s enior pastor of the New Covenant Baptist Church encouraged young men tou tilise this amnesty period b efore they might face the stiffer penalties that the government is seeking toi mplement. The new gun laws, which are currently being debatedi n the House of Assembly will impose a minimum sentence of four years in prison if a per son is found and convicted of unlawfully being in possession of an unlicensed firearm or ammunition. The power of magistrates t o impose sentences is also b eing increased from five to seven years and that convic tion on drug and gun related o ffences may attract the maximum sentence of seven years. B ishop Hall said: Too m any young black men treat o ur laws with impunity and should be reminded that prison time, of up to seven y ears, robs families, especial ly children, of their fathers presence and protection. Some in possession of ille g al firearms might be afraid to turn them in, but encourage them to find a pastor will-i ng to accompany them to the police, he said. At the end of this one m onth amnesty, Bishop Hall said that he would appeal to judges and magistrates to not hesitate in passing the maxi m um sentence on those found in possession of illegal firearms. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 3 FREEPORT The Court of Appeal overturned the murder conviction and sentence of Renaldo Bonaby and Renaldo Armbrister who were found guilty of the murder of Philip Gaitor Jr. In September, the justices ordered a retrial as a result of material irregularity during the trial in December 2009. Appeals justices found the men did not get a fair trial when Justice Neville Adderley told the jury the confessions of the accused men were admissible and voluntarily made. Philip Gaitor Jr, 24, was found burned to death in his car on December, 2006. Armbrister and Bonaby were charged with his murder, kidnapping, and the attempted extortion of $100,000 from the Gaitor family. Armbrister was sentenced to life and Bonaby was sentenced to death. The men appealed their conviction. Armbrister has beenr eleased on bail. The family of Philip Gaitor Jr and Families for Justice are outraged over his release. APPEAL COURT ORDERS RETRIAL By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Police are investigating a shooting that has lefta teenager with serious i njuries in hospital. A ssistant Superintendent L oretta Mackey, reported that an 18-year-old male resident of Eight Mile Rock sustained a serious gunshot injury to the ankle follow-i ng a shooting early Thursday morning at Garden Villas. According to initial reports, the victim went to the area around 2am and was attempting to locate a femalef riend. He told police that while in the area of the basketball court he heard gunshots and ran. A fter realising that he had been shot in the right ankle, the victim went to the Rand Memorial Hospital to seek medical assistance. ASP Mackey said doctors described the victims injuriesa s serious. Investigations are continuing into the matter and officers at the Central Detective Unit are appealing toa nyone with information that can assist them to call 350-3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911. Last Wednesday a day before the shooting police conducted a walkabout in theG arden Villas area. Acting Assistant Commissioner of Police Emrick Seymour and a number of officers met with residents in theh igh crime area. Garden Villas is a known hot spot for criminal activities, including drug pushing, gambling, and illegal selling of goods. Four of the seven murders t his year have occurred there. TEENAGER SERIOUSLY INJURED FOLLOWING SHOOTING OWNERS OF HANDGUNS URGED BY BISHOP TO HAND THEM TO POLICE Bishop Simeon Hall has called on people to make use of the firearms amnesty, before they face stiffer penalties the government aims toi ntroduce T T o o o o m m a a n n y y y y o o u u n n g g b b l l a a c c k k m m e e n n t t r r e e a a t t o o u u r r l l a a w w s s w w i i t t h h i i m m p p u u n n i i t t y y a a n n d d s s h h o o u u l l d d b b e e r r e e m m i i n n d d e e d d t t h h a a t t p p r r i i s s o o n n t t i i m m e e , o o f f u u p p t t o o s s e e v v e e n n y y e e a a r r s s , r r o o b b s s f f a a m m i i l l i i e e s s , e e s s p p e e c c i i a a l l l l y y c c h h i i l l d d r r e e n n , o o f f t t h h e e i i r r f f a a t t h h e e r r s s p p r r e e s s e e n n c c e e a a n n d d p p r r o o t t e e c c t t i i o o n n . B B i i s s h h o o p p S S i i m m e e o o n n H H a a l l l l CAR THEFT CHARGE FOR EX-POLICE OFFICER PICTURED ARE former police officer Lorene Mortimer, 38, left, and Charmaine Wright, 36, as they hide their faces after leaving court.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. In the wake of Marco Archers murder we now see that a man has been charged with having sex with two preteen boys. Additionally, the Prime Minister of The Bahamas, The Right Hon Hubert Ingraham addressed the nation on crime, promising sweeping changes in his administrations approach to crime. My response to both subsequent events is this is really too late and honestly not enough. First of all, barbaric actions against children, like kidnapping them, raping them, and murdering them belong in its own category of crimes. This nation does not properly acknowledge paedophile as the special crime that it is, but lumps it with other crimes. There is nothing worse than preying on children sexually, abusing them physically, and making them feel confused, unsafe and ashamed. This nation needs to know that child predators exist and in more forms than a stranger who from time to time snatches a child walking home from school. Paedophiles can sometimes be teachers, doctors, church leaders, uncles, fathers, cousins and mummys boyfriend. Sometimes, paedophiles are women! What are we doing to educate children on this partic ular predator who targets them? What is the nation really doing about addressing incest that exists and victimises children, especially in the family islands? Our legal system does not seem to see raping a child as any dif ferent from other crimes related to stealing. Actually, between 2009 and 2011, there were two cases printed in the newspaper in which two men accused at different times of raping a child received bail for less than two men accused at different times of stealing a car. What is our legal system really telling us about who and what is more important? Why are we not using words like Paedophile and Child Predator to describe an adult who rapes a child? Why are we not referring to the act of an adult having sex with a child as rape? Even if the child has been persuaded to participate, it is still rape! The nation must be able to see paedophile as the abusive, sick, and unnatural crime that it is against children. What is needed to curtail paedophile and child predators in The Bahamas is constant awareness campaigning in schools, churches, hospitals, clinics, and in the media throughout the archipelago. We need a legal system, edu cational system, churches, and families who are aware of this crime against children in all the forms that it can manifest and would do everything possible to protect our children. Further, we need a legal system that can put measures in place to protect our children and severely punish the paedophile as well as those who enable him/her. Some measures that can help to drastically curb this societal problem are: Training police officers to recognise the forms in which paediophiliae xist, including incest; establishing a special unit to handle paed ophilia cases; responding to missing children cases immediately instead of waiting for fortyeight hours to pass; and inform ing the public of child predators who are in the society. Rehabilitating paedophiles in my opinion cannot be accomplished easily. Good behaviour in prison by a person who sexually assaulted a child does not mean that she/he is rehabilitated. There are no children in prison to who they would be attracted. Paedophilia tendencies can be suppressed, but will probably always resurface, so what should the society do to rid itself of paedophiles? We need leaders who are realistic about this crime and would put the well-being of the nations children first. It is clear to me what needs to be done about paedophiles and it would be good if we could even vote on this as Bahamians. SYRETA ROBERTSBOURNAS Nassau, October 6, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama SPEAKING in the House of Assembly last week Cat Island MP Philip Brave Davis criticised Governments p roposed crime Bills as falling short of what is needed to eliminate violent crime. He wondered if any thought had been given to the rate of recidivism and what would be the average length of time to rehabilitate an offender when defining life imprisonment. There is jurisprudence, he said, to suggest natural life without an opportunity to review with a view of release is crue l and unusual punishment. O ne never hears of the cruel and u nusual punishment suffered by a vict ims family a victim who has not had a s econd chance at life. And a family that h as lost their main breadwinner. W ith capital punishment virtually r emoved from the scene, there has to be a p enalty, not only to punish, but to deter. T rue, there are degrees of murder the p lanned, vicious murders spawned from a p sychotic brain, and the impulsive anger, where death was not intended, but was the result. There might be some hope of rehabilitating the latter, but none for the former. The societys complaint today is that t he laws are too soft, so soft that the crim inal is making a fool of our judicial system. It is felt that with automatic hangingr emoved, the criminal is willing to play Russian roulette with his life, knowing that he can commit his crime and in all probability avoid the hangmans noose. It might give him second thoughts if he had to contemplate a lifetime in prison w hen he and the undertaker leave togeth er. H owever, if he knows that he can a gain trick his way out by good behaviour, where is the deterrent to his crime? A police officer told us that what many of them do is get religion while in prison t o impress their jailers. Some, released for good behaviour before completing their sentence, turn their collars backwards and quietly continue their misdeeds, while others shed their religion and open ly revert to type. If we are going to be serious about deterring crime particularly murders then we cant get soft on punishment. A lready this timidity in enforcing the law has broken down law and order on every level in this country. Mr Davis said that legislators have to think of the cost of housing a convict for the rest of his natural life particularly if the offender has youth on his side. They also have to think of the increased burden on taxpayers. Mr Davis told House members that it costs $14,000 a year to house a prisoner. He said that if a person were sentenced to life at the age of 30 life expectancy for t he average Bahamian male being 70 years the state would have to support him for at least 40 years. Do the math, he told legislators, there are at least 400 persons to be tried millions of dollars it will be costing taxpayers! T hese convicts become burdens only if the government lacks the imagination to put them to good use and make them pay t heir way by their daily labour. A lready in this column we have sugg ested setting aside a large acreage of C rown land for cultivation. These priso ners composed of lifers and those w ith shorter sentences could feed the n ation. O f course, for those with a life sentence t his would be a life time job. At least they c an turn a misspent life into a useful one a nd remember if the laws had not been c hanged they could have been hanged, buried and forgotten about, instead of breathing Gods fresh air, and growing a field of tomatoes. This production could be a tremendous savings to government by reducing the c ost of imports. If done on a large enough scale and managed like a business, it could even increase our foreign reserves throughe xports. In the woodwork department, men with this ability could be taught to turn out first class cabinetry that could be sold from various furniture stores. Again if it were handled as a proper business, the p rison could open its own furniture store and attract a market. They could even go i nto the business of making toys for child ren. With a little imagination, these men need not become as heavy a burden as some predict. What must be remembered is that outside of prison walls they will be a constant menace. Society has to decide whether they pre fer to pay for their upkeep knowing that they can have a good nights sleep in the safety of their homes, or save the expense and sleep with one eye open, and an ear cocked listening for the thief at the window. However, these prisoners could possibly e arn enough that restitution also could be made to some of the victims of their evil deeds. Who knows but that it might encourage pride in some of these men in the knowl edge that in the end their lives were not a complete waste. But with the criminal playing hardball with society, society cannot now go soft on punishment. We must protect our children LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Considering crime and punishment Then the sixth angel poured out his bowl on the great river Euphrates, and its water was dried up, so that the way of the kings from the east might be prepared. And I saw three unclean spirits like frogs coming out of the mouth of the dragon, out of the mouth of the beast, and out of the mouth of the false prophet. For they are spirits of demons, performing signs, which go out to the kings of the earth and of the whole world, to gather them to the battle of that great day of God Almighty. ehold, I am coming as a thief. Blessed is he who watches, and keeps his garments, lest he walk naked and they see his shame.And they gathered them together to the place called in Hebrew, Armageddon.Revelation Chpt. 16 v. 12-16SixthBowl: Euphrates Dried Up EDITOR, The Tribune ONCE again it appears that few people learn from their mistakes. On Monday afternoon, I was listening to 97.5 FM and I was shocked to hear what I thought was the voice of Mr Fitzgerald on the Steve McKinney show and he was on another mis sion carrying on about Bell Island. It appears that he learnt nothing from the mistakes and tirades that he carried on about Saunders Beach which blew up in his face. I have yet to see or hear any admission by Fitzger ald or any of the others who joined him during this period that they were wrong and that Saunders Beach is better now than it ever was in any of their lifetimes. I know it takes a real man to admit when he is wrong, but it gives any man credibility in the eyes of the Public when you can do this. As with Saun ders Beach 6 to 9 months after the work around Bell Island is finished life around there will be back to normal and very soon thereafter no one will ever know the work went on just like Saunders Beach. I do not know what makes McKinney or Fitzgerald an authority on the Environment or the waters surrounding Bell Island because I do not believe either of these gentlemen have ever spent very much time in, on or around the waters of the Bahamas. It appears to me that for the past 40 years or more they go on vacation out of the Bahamas for the full length of the winter when we have cold fronts and northwesters because if they lived here then they would realise that when we in the Bahamas have winters the sand and silt get stirred up and stays that way for 10 to 14 days at a time and it does not hurt conch, fish, turtle or any other marine life that God gave the ability to move around. Nature has its own way of dealing with these matters. I spent 12 to 15 years fishing in and around the Exuma Islands (not in the Park know that the Park is a won derful place for conservation so that breeding can take place but whatever is bred in there moves out as it grows up and that is why the fishing is so good north and south of the Park. I am an environmentalist, but not a fanatic and I have spent more than 2/3 of my life in, on or around the water and I know from personal experience what I am talking about because I have seen and lived through these things and it would be wonderful if all of these people with High Falutin Degrees would spend enough time throughout the Bahamas to get some first hand practical expe rience to realize that what applies to Canada or the USA does not mean the same here in the Bahamas where we have 700 islands that are all separat ed by water and we have such a tidal movement that it keeps our islands and cays fully sup plied with fresh salt water. Also I am not a politician trying to impress anyone for a campaign. I am just trying to state the facts of life here in the Bahamas. ABNER PINDER Spanish Wells, Bahamas, October 13, 2011. Bell Island lessons

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 5

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By KHRISNA VIRGIL THE Opposition is calling the Anti-Crime Bill now being tabled in the House of Assembly just another election day ploy by the government. In his address to parliamentarians, the oppositions key speaker MICAL MP V Alfred Gray made his predictions as to who will win election 2012. Mr Gray said: This government is going to get kicked to the curb. A one man band cannot solve this problem. It takes everyone of us. Thats why the suggestion that a committee made of both sides of this House should put their collective minds together, and come up with some suggestions for solving this problem is a good idea. Moving forward, Mr Gray pinpointed major short comings of the Bill, which does not grant fairness to Bahamians who might have run-ins with the law. Speaking of the new clause that will change the in custody before charge from 48 hours to 72 hours, Mr Gray said the door will be opened to abusive situations. He believes such a change does not encourage accountability on the part of officers. When you give powers to the powerful, there is always that possibility of abuse, Mr Gray said. He added that such an extenuation should make provisions for the person being held to see a magistrate during that time period. Mr Gray also suggested that executives stay clear of judicial affairs and sufficient manpower should be given to the Attorney Generals office to keep the process of handling criminal cases moving. He believes that the Bill is also a selective one: Im concerned when a Bill singles out categories of people for whom the death penalty will apply. Every life is as important as every other life, so when you categorize who you will hang the criminals for it makes the rest of us feel like our lives are not as important as theirs. Mr Gray is calling for a revision to the Bill that will be sensitive to the nature of the crime and not the person killed. In his rebuttal, Golden Isles MP Charles Maynard reminded the Opposition that for more than four years the judicial system has been a focus of improvement. As examples of the continuing upgrading of the judicial system, Mr Maynard alluded to the revitalization of the Parliament building for use by the courts and to ongoing construction of the new magistrates court complex Nassau Street. All according to Mr Maynard, signs of continued upgrading. He views the upgrading as the governments move to stay consistent with the evolving Bahamian society that continues to have challenges facing crime. Responding to MICAL MPs reservations on the Bill prioritising certain persons lives above others, Mr Maynard did acknowledge that while the Bill does give some persons priority, it pays some attention to circumstances. Any person who wilfully and knows that a police officer is trying to arrest him and he takes out a gun and kills that police officer is a different type of person from somebody who kills a stranger for a different reason. Thats a mind set. Anybody who wilfully goes and kills a judge who may be presiding over a particular case that he has interest in is a different type of person, he said. Thats a dangerous type of person and a dangerous precedent for us to allow in our society. We wanted to make it clear that we consider that type of murderer as the worst of the worst. Mr Maynard believes that the new Anti-Crime bill will usher in serious changes to a judicial system that has been for many years hindered by loopholes used to the advantages of criminal attorneys. Bill discussions continue today. THERE is a special mind set associated with "staging" your home to sell in a soft market. Staging refers sim-p ly to the act of improving your home's appearance in order to appeal to the widest segment of potential buyers. The approach you must adopt is to see your home with an objective eye. This could be easier said t han done! Stop looking at your home as your "home" and start visualising it as the "product" it becomes when it enters the market. Your BREA agent can help to market your product suc-c essfully by explaining how t o highlight positive features and downplaying less attractive aspects. You can also h ire an interior decorator. S ince you may have a strong emotional attach m ent to your home, you m ay not fully appreciate hearing about a better way to show your offering, but try to recognize that the way y ou decorate to SELL may be quite different from the way you decorate to dwell.T he appearance of a space often trumps its functionality when impressing buyers. Y our goal is to sell quickly a t a fair price. A survey by a l arge national real estate brokerage in the U.S. showed t hat staged homes sell in half the time, and another survey of realtors showed that a$ 500 "staging" investment r ecouped 343% of that cost. It's fair to say the same a pplies here at home. So be p repared to swallow a little pride, move some furniture and field better offers on ther oad to your successful sale. Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell Banker L ightbourn Realty LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The philosophy of time is---Do you what you can now, because tomorrow may be late!~ Betty Taylor ~ PLP SAYS ANTI-CRIME BILL IS JUST ANOTHER ELECTION PLOY THE DIFFERENCE B ETWEEN SELLING AND DWELLING COLUMN by Mike Lightbourn

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 7 ONE OF the competitors stays focussed on the task THE EVENTUAL winner, Euston Smith, concentrates during the contestPhotos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff O WNERS NICK DEAN a nd Michael Turnquest holds up the hand of Euston Smith, the winner of the Wing Zone first annual eating competition, held on Saturday at Wing Zone in the Circle Palm mall READY, STEADY, EAT was the order of the day at the Wing Z one in the Circle Palm mall in Nassau o n Saturday. F or the restaurant staged the first of what it expects to be a n annual eating competition, with eager participants seeking to do battle. S houlder to shoulder, they crammed in to see who could d emolish the trays of food in front of them the fastest. I n the end, the w inner was Euston Smith, whose arms were raised aloft -b oxing-style fashion by the owners of the Wing Zone, N ick Dean and Michael Turnquest. BATTLING IT OUT TO BE KING OF THE WING

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS ON October 12th as a m ember of the Eminent Persons Group (EPG lished by Commonwealth H eads of Government to advise them on reform oft he Commonwealth, I delive red a keynote address in the British House of Parliam ent at a conference a rranged by the several Commonwealth organisat ions. This article is a very much s hortened version of that address which reflected on the challenge that Commonw ealth Heads of Government will face when they meet from 28 to 30 October in Perth, Australia. There is no doubt that the Heads of Government meeting will be a defining occasion for the Commonwealth. As a result of their decisions, the Commonwealth will either go forward, rei nvigorated and resolute as a values-based organization intent on making a differe nce to its people and the wider international community; or it will limp along as a m uch devalued grouping to a future of disregard, deterio ration, and disappearance. I f the Commonwealth continues with its business a s usual, it will lose its moral a uthority and international respect, providing little bene fit to its member states, particularly the small ones. I t is in that context that the Group made 106 recommendations for reform covering t he full range of Commonwealth activities. Uppermost in our minds was a determination to draw a map for the consideration of Heads of Government that, in a practical and realistic fashion, could lead the Commonwealth from the cross-roads at which it is presently marking time, to a p ath that allows it to march forward to renewed significance for its people, and i mportance in the global community. In recent years, a few C ommonwealth countries have strayed away from thec ollective values of the assoc iation, and, except for the unconstitutional overthrows o f governments, the Comm onwealth has not spoken out, as a body, or acted j ointly to bring errant countries into compliance. A t the heart of this problem has been an absence of reliable and verifiable inform ation in a timely manner that could allow both the Commonwealth SecretaryGeneral and CMAG to engage a government before its violation of the Commonwealths values becomes serious or persistent. The EPG has recommended the appointment of a Commissioner for Democracy the Rule of Law and H uman Rights. The post has been set at the level of Commissioner not because the office-holder would be a policeman armed with punitive powe rs, but precisely because it is envisaged that the occupant would be a person of sufficient standing, and poss essed of significant diplomatic skill and sensitivity, as t o be able to engage any government in a respectful and beneficial manner. It will not be within the C ommissioners remit to r ecommend the suspension or expulsion of a country; t his responsibility remains w ith CMAG or Heads of Government themselves. The post of Commissioner should be embraced by all C ommonwealth governments precisely because the Commissioner will be a very s enior officer with the capacity to gather reliable information in a way that directly involves govern-m ents facing difficult circ umstances. Further, for the Common wealth to continue to advo cate for development fund ing, for money to militate against Climate Change, for reform of the criteria underw hich small states are unfairly graduated from concessionary financing, it has to be credible in relationt o democracy. On the recommendation o f a Charter for the Com monwealth, there appears to be a belief that this idea was imposed on the EP by t he governments of Aus tralia, Canada and Britain. Nothing could be further from the truth; the idea originated with the EPG Chairman, Tun Abdullah Badawi the former Prime Minister of Malaysia w hose country had pio neered work on a Charter for ASEAN. T he further incorrect n otion that seems to have arisen is that the Charter will become a binding constitution for the Commonwealth. This is also a fallacy. We should all recall that the Commonwealth is not a treaty organization. Its m embers have not signed up to legally-binding rules and obligations. It is an association of sovereign states that voluntarily work together in their common i nterest and for their common good. The EPGs recommendation of a Charter is to do n o more than weave the many declarations into one d ocument, and then only after consultation with the people of the Commonwealth through publicm eetings across the Comm onwealth with the involvement of civil society o rganisations. O ver the years of its existence, the Commonwealth has expressed its shared values in several declarations. T he Charter would have no greater legal force than the many declarations now h ave, nor will it bind any member government in any greater way than now exists. Heads of Governmentt hemselves have decided t hat these values are the measure by which a govern ment can maintain member ship of the Commonwealth. When governments violate these values in a serious or persistent manner, they cann o longer enjoy the badge of honour that membership of the Commonwealth repre sents. T he matter of funding the EPGs recommendations h as also been raised. Figures in excess of million have been suggested as the cost of implementa t ion. But those figures are not the EPGs. Throughout its work, the Group was acutely aware that this is not the time to ask governments to put up huge sums of money to implement all the recom-m endations in its report. For this very good reason, while the Group fulfilled its m andate to recommend u rgent reforms that would make the Commonwealth relevant to its times and its people, as it was requested to do, we called for the retirement of some pro grammes in which the Commonwealth has no comparative advantage, which are duplicative of the work of other agencies, and which have displayed no particular benefit. The re-allocated funds will pay for the neces sary reforms. The bottom line is simply this: without these reforms the Commonwealth will decline as an instrument of value to its member states and as an influence for better in the international com munity. The greatest priority was placed on the urgent issue of the damaging effects of climate change on small island s tates and coastal states. T he EPG has also made firm recommendations on h elping developing countries t o deal with burdensome debt created, in part, by the overwhelming financial crisis in whose creation they p layed no part, but of which they are now among the worst victims. W e also recommended strong advocacy by the Commonwealth collectivelyt o reform processes in the World Bank that wrongly graduate small states from concessional financing on t he basis of their per capita income only. We proposed practical methods to fund entrepreneurial schemes for youth and to tackle youth unemployment; and we suggested ways in which inter-Commonwealth investment could b e promoted, trade i ncreased and jobs created. Some observers are already saying that the meeting will be characterized by a North-South d ivide; that there is tension if not animosity between those who favour greater attention to democracy and the rule of law, and those who reject it, arguing instead for more resources for developmen-t al issues. In reality, the EPG has argued for far more resources human, financial, inter-governmental, and civil society supported to be put into ensuring devel o pment than into maintain ing democracy. In an era of changing economic circumstances and uncertainty, new trade and economic patterns, unprecedented threats to peace and security, and a surge of popular demands for democracy, human rights and broadened economic opportuni ties, the potential of the Commonwealth as a compelling force for good and as an effective network for cooperation and for promoting development is unparalleled. But, for that potential to be achieved giving economic, social and political benefit to its 2.1 billion people, urgent reform is imperative. The challenge at Perth is for Heads of Government, collectively, to seize the moment and to authorize the proposed reforms. The entire address can be read at: www.sirronald sanders.com. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE www.jsjohnson.com Nassau Collins Ave 397 2100 Thompson Blvd676 6300Soldier Rd North 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420 W W O O R R L L D D V V I I E E W W REFORM OR DIMINISH: THE CHALLENGE THAT IS FACED BY THE COMMONWEALTH

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TIPS ON HOW TO AVOID CRIME THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 9 Break away from the ordinary and discover how to experience life to the fullest. The Isuzu D-MAX is the ultimate multi-purpose pick-up truck which enables you to drive through tough roadsand load a variety of cargoes. It is specially designed to be powerful, stylish and highly functional. The Isuzu D-MAX is one toughvehicle that willnever let you down!T H E I S U Z U D M A XPOWERFUL COMFORTABLE VERSATILE T YREFLEX S T AR MO TORSCall us today for your new IsuzuD-MAX Pick-UpTruck at 325.4961Wulff Road, P.O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 By CONSTABLE 3011 M AKELLE PINDER STATISTICS prove that vehicles are stolen nationallye very day. In fact, twenty percent of all auto thefts are as a resulto f either keys being left in the car or unlocked doors. Most recently, reports indicate that professional car t hieves have entered the field in increasing numbers; however, most cars are still taken by amateurs who can be stopped fairly easily. You can greatly increase your protection against auto theft crime by taking the following precautions. Immediately report suspicious activity in your neighb ourhood to the Police. Never leave your car door, window or sunroof unlocked, even if you are just g oing into a shop for a moment or two, or even w hen parked in your own dri v eway. Park in well-lit areas of parking lots and utilise motion-activated spotlights in your driveway. Remove the ignition key a nd engage the steering lock, even when parking on your own property. If you have an alarm, turn i t on every time you park. Security mark your stereo o r satellite radio and, if it is a removable type, always take it with you. Make a note of the serial numbers on your radios, comp uters, etc. Do not leave purses, backpacks, or wallets yourv ehicle. If you must leave valua bles in your car, dont put t hem in the trunk while a thief could be watching (do it before you get to your desti n ation). Never leavecredit cards o r check books in your vehic le. Never leave money (cash or coins) or jewellery in your vehicle. If you have a garage or a ccess to a garage, use it. Then lock it. Provide local authorities w ith the make/model/license plate and Vehicle ID number. Try to avoid touching the vehicle until after the responding Police Officer/s h as an opportunity to inspect t he vehicle for any evidence left behind by the thief. Should you need more information on Vehicle Safety or if you have informationp ertaining to any crime, please do not hesitate to con t act the police at or C rime Stoppers at 328-tips (New Providence Family Island Dont become a victim! Royal Bahamas Police Force National Crime Prevention Office AVOID BECOMING A VICTIM OF VEHICLE CRIME CONSTABLE 3011 Makelle Pinder offers advice for readers on ways to avoid vehicle crime

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a nd started to drag him out of the car by his feet. At that point I ran outside to see whatwas going on, she said. Thats when I saw about seven other men on top of him beating him and choking h im. I ran to him and told them to let him go. At that point I saw one of the men in a khaki uniform and another one in a blue uniform with a vest. I then figured out they were police. My husband was handcuffed, hec ouldnt fight back so I dont u nderstand why they were hitting him. Mrs Darling said the officers pushed her, cursed at her and told her to go back inside. I didnt move. I wanted to k now who they were and why they were arresting my husband. They never identified themselves. They never said why they were there. They dragged my husband, threwh im in the back of te bus and p ulled off. Mrs Darling said she immediately got her son and her nieces and drove to the nearest police station, East Street South. When I got inside I saw t he officers and asked them where my husband was. They verbally assaulted me, grabbed me and arrested me in front of my son and my nieces. They told the kids to get the hell out the sta-t ion. My son refused to leave so one of the officers grabbed him, took him in a back cell and slapped him. He is eight.I screamed to one of the other officers to get him and theyd id. A ccording to Mrs Darling, police held her and her husband until 1 pm on Thursday. They were charged with disorderly behaviour and obstruction. H owever, she said, she s till does not know why her husband was initially arrested. We just want justice. I have the utmost respect for the law and for police, butn ow I dont feel safe in my o wn home. Something needs to be done. I dont have a record and neither does my husband. We filed a complaint with the complaints unit and now we are just waiting to see if any-t hing happens. C alls to police at East Street South police station were unanswered up to press time. Amnesty International has issued reports for severaly ears criticising police brutali ty in the Bahamas. There have also been numerous calls for an independent body to investigate police brutality claims. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Paul Rolle, Officer in charge of the Central Detec t ive Unit, said a 21-year-old woman of Step Street, Fox Hill, took the baby to the Accident and Emergency department after she was found unresponsive. The woman said the baby had been vomiting all day. We have to wait on the autopsy to determine the exact cause of death. Right now we cannot say conclu sively. The baby could have been sick or could have died from dehydration from all the vomiting. We do not suspect foul play at this time, he said. Active police investigations into both of these mat ters continue. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e WOMAN CLAIMS POLICE BRUTALITY OVER INCIDENT P OLICEARE i nvestigating the deaths of two babies one of which was found in a trash can in this areaPhoto: Felip Major /Tribune Staff P olice investigate after bo s body f ound in trashcan T T h h e e b b a a b b y y c c o o u u l l d d h h a a v v e e b b e e e e n n s s i i c c k k o o r r c c o o u u l l d d h h a a v v e e d d i i e e d d f f r r o o m m d d e e h h y y d d r r a a t t i i o o n n f f r r o o m m a a l l l l t t h h e e v v o o m m i i t t i i n n g g . W W e e d d o o n n o o t t s s u u s s p p e e c c t t f f o o u u l l p p l l a a y y a a t t t t h h i i s s t t i i m m e e P P a a u u l l R R o o l l l l e e , o o f f f f i i c c e e r r i i n n c c h h a a r r g g e e

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 11 battling for the illicit drug trade in the area. Illegal firearms recovered in Fox Hill account for nearly 10 per cent of the total guns seized in the country t his year, according to police, with illegal ammunition at 35 per cent. We had regular reports of gunshots in the Fox Hill community and that was a great concern to us, thes ame thing was happening in the N assau Village, Pinewood Gardens c ommunity and so these are the areas where we sought mainly to concentrate on, said Mr Rolle. Police have recovered 34 illegal firearms, and one rifle, in Fox Hills ince the launch of their special taskf orce in June. The teams are comp rised of divisional officers, and officers from CDU, the Drug Enforcement Unit, Criminal Records office, and Central Intelligence Bureau. A ttributing the operations success to the consistency of participat ing officers, Mr Rolle said there has b een a significant reduction in the number of shooting reports from the area. There were at least three fact ions that we have identified trying to establish themselves in these turf wars and we cant have this, Mr Rolle said. This conflict resulted in a number of individuals being shot and a few persons being killed. Weh ave brought these men together and have spoken with them in a view to lessen the tension within the Fox Hill community. He added: We have placed considerable resources in that commu-n ity in order to arrest the conflict and prevent as far as possible further carnage. Twelve people have been put before the courts charged with possession of firearms and ammunition as a result of the operation. Howev-e r, said Mr Rolle, there have also been four deaths. Operations in Pinewood Gardens and Nassau Village were launched October 1 and Mr Rolle said that o fficers will continue to monitor the F ox Hill community. We continue to monitor the sit u ation in Fox Hill and wish to e ncourage the young men to engage in positive activities and lead productive lives. We will help, but we will also warn any person thinking t o re-establish a turf in Fox Hill that w e will not tolerate it. evidence was not there. In June, police arrested 10 R oad Traffic employees after a six-month fraud investigation. It was estimated that millions of dollars had passed through the hands of employees at the Road Traf fic Department involved int he vehicle licensing scam, which was believed to have been in operation for aboutt wo years. A rrested employees were said to include a 52-year-old woman, who had been 18 years on the job, and a male employee who was found in possession of licensing para p hernalia and an assortment of inspection stickers and decals. In an press briefing last week, Mr Rolle added: If you have possession of fraud ulent disks with a genuine d ecal, that would suggest that some persons are involved, b ut we still dont have that c orroborating evidence, sufficient. Officers are also investigating alleged links between cor r upt officials at the Road T raffic Department and second-hand car lots who they believe could have assisted in t he resale of stolen vehicles o n the island of New Provi dence. According to sources w ithin the CDU, there is the p ossibility any number of v ehicles illegally licensed in t he exposed Road Traffic scam could have been stolenc ars that have been repeate dly sold to unsuspecting p ersons. Mr Rolle said drivers who have licensed vehicles through this unauthorised s cheme are asked to bring their vehicles into CDU before officers are forced to "come and get you." f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e 1 00 CHARGED AFTER VEHICLE LICENCE SCAM INVESTIGATION FREEPORT A one-day workshop for beginner and intermediate underwater videographers will take place on October 28 as part of the Fort Lauderdale International Film Fest ival. This year, the festival will hold an extension programme known as FLIFF on-location: G rand Bahama, of which the underwater film c ourse will be a part. B eginning at 9am, workshop discussions will include underwater camera techniques and the importance of production planning. At 2pm, after a lunch-break, participants will check inw ith the Underwater Explorers Society ( UNEXSO) to film UNEXSOs legendary shark dive. They will be challenged with producing a short video of the experience. A n afternoon post dive session will involve v ideo screenings and discussions. In a career spanning more than 35 years, Paul Mockler, IATSE local 667 director of photography associate member: Canadian s ociety of Cinematographers, has worked on hundreds of commercial, documentary and d ramatic films. Sponsors of FLIFF on Location include the P elican Bay Hotel, TheBahamasweekly.com, Bahamas Celebration Cruises, and SkyBah amas Airlines. For more information on the film festival visit: www.fliff.com Participants must provide their own underw ater video equipment. FOX HILL TURF WARS SUBSIDE, POLICE TO EXPAND GUN SEARCH A WARD-WINNING c inematographer Paul Mockler will instruct an underwater film workshop as part of FLIFF on Location: Grand Bahama Island, an extension of Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival in Freeport on Thursday, October 28. LEARN TO CAPTURE THE BLUE KINGDOM

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LOCALNEWS PAGE 12, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force Band played for the opening BAHAMIAN-MADE products and fruits and vegetables were on display on Saturday at the opening of the World Food Day ceremony held at the Gladstone Road Agriculture Center Photos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff FOOD, GLORIOUS FOOD V ISITORS ENJOY t he World Food Day event FRESH PRODUCE on offer at the World Food Day event CONCH FRITTERS are cooked at the event ASTALLHOLDER with her selection of produce BOTTLES GALORE a ttract the eye of some of the visitors O N Saturday, Gladstone R oad was the venue for a mini fair to celebrate World Food Day. T he eight-hour event at the Research Centre on Gladstone Road included af armers market, and live music provided by the Royal Bahamas Police Force Band. T he day was identified by t he United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO m ankinds efforts to produce enough food to feed the world. F AOs theme for World Food Day 2011 is Food Prices From Crisis to Stability.

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 13 P ARIS Associated Press FORMER French Socialist Party chief Francois Hollande declared victory Sund ay in the partys presidential p rimary, urging the left to unite around his bid to unseat embattled conservative Nico-l as Sarkozy in elections next year. H ollande, a 57-year-old m oderate leftist known more a s a behind-the-scenes consensus-builder than a visionary, is seen by many as a welc ome contrast to the toughtalking, hard-driving Sarkozy. Sundays vote for the main opposition party's presiden t ial nominee comes at a time when many French citizens are worried about high state d ebt, cuts to education spend ing, anemic economic growth and lingering unemployment. W ith 2.2 million votes counted after Sunday's runo ff voting, the Socialist Party said 56 percent of the ballots were for Hollande and 44 percent for his challenger Martine Aubry, who had succeeded Hollande as Socialist P arty leader. T he party estimates that more than 2.7 million people voted in Sunday's run-off. I note with pride and responsibility the vote tonight,w hich with more than 55 perc ent of the vote gives me the l arge majority I had sought, Hollande told supporters in party headquarters as results r olled in. He said the victory gives him strength and legimitacy to take on Sarkozy, who is w idely expected to seek a sec ond five-year term in elections in April and May. Holl ande pledged to reverse Sarkozy-era cuts in education funding and defend the val u es of the left. Aubry quickly conceded d efeat. She had sought to be France's first female president. I warmly congratulate Francois Hollande, who is clearly ahead. His victory is u nquestionable, said Aubry, f amed for authoring France's 35-hour workweek law. The bespectacled Hollande w as the longtime partner of the Socialists last presiden-t ial candidate, Segolene Roya l. The two split after Royals 2 007 presidential defeat to Sarkozy but stood side-byside during Hollande's victory s peech Sunday. Recent polls suggest Hollande could easily beat Sarkozy in the presidential e lection next spring. The incumbents favorability ratings have hovered near t he 30-percent level for months, but he is a strong campaigner and senses ar ightward-majority tilt in the French electorate. HOLLANDE TO TAKE ON SARKOZY IN FRENCH VOTE FRANCOIS HOLLANDE, winner of the Socialist Party primary vote for France's 2012 presidential, left, celebrates with rival candidate Martine Aubry at the party's headquarters after the second round of the vote.H ollande urged the French left to unite behind his bid for the presidency in elections next year

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$5.32 $4.94 $5.50 THE TRIBUNE SECTION B business@tr ibunemedia.net MOND A Y OCT OBER 17, 2011 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B A N K o f t h e B a h a m a s I n t e rn a ti o n a l w i l l i n v e s t c l o s e to $6 million" over the next 2 4 month s in upg radin g its 1 2 b ra nc h es, in c lu di ng an ex p an sio n of t he C armi cha el Roa d loc ation, following a ye ar in w hic h it w ould hav e mat che d 2 0 1 0 s b o t t o m l i n e d e s p i t e $ 9 1 3 2 m i l l i o n i n l o a n l o ss pr o v i s i o n s w e r e i t n o t f o r B AN K T O INVES T $ 6M I N UPGR ADE By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net T H E N a s s a u A i r p o r t D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y ( NA D ) h as r ai s e d it s av ai l a b l e l i n e o f c r e d i t t o $ 5 8 2 m il lio n t hr ou gh it s fi nanci ng e f f o r t s i t s v ic ep r e s i d en t o f m a r k e t i n g t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s S p ea ki n g a t a m e et i n g o f t h e R o t ar y C l ub of Na s s a u S u n r i s e V e r n i c e W a l k i n e s ai d : T h e t o t a l b u d ge t f o r t h e p r oj ect is $ 409 .5 mi ll io n. I t i s t h e s i ng l e l ar ge s t in f r a s t r u c t u r a l p r o j e c t e v e r u n d er t ak en b y t h e G o ve r n m e n t W e v e r a i s e d $ 5 8 2 m i l l i o n t o d a y i n f o u r t r a n s a c t i o n s T h a t s t h e m o n i e s w e v e b e e n a b l e t o r a i s e N AD R AISE S $582 M IN A V AIL ABL E CREDI T By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AN EASTE RN New P roviden ce rea l est a t e dev el o pmen t could c r ea t e m o r e t h an 10 0 f ul l t i m e j o bs w h en c om pl et e d, i t s ne w l y ap po i nt ed chief executive telling Tribune Business he was "very confident" that the 350-400 unit project would be sold out within the next four years. R ichard Brow n i ng said Pa l m Cay' s UKb as ed i nv es tors had "committed to continue to invest" to make the project a success, having spent "jus t shy of $40 mi ll i on t o get us wher e we ar e" a posi ti on that is no w allo wing th e de velo pm en t to sta rt ma rk etin g to Ba ha mas based buyers in earnest. Emphasising that Palm Cay wanted to first build "a local commu Palm Cay chief very confident' 350-400 unit development sold out in four years' time 200-300 construction workers, eight contractors, on site UK investors spend $40m to date; looking at other Bahamas projects in future SEE page six SEE page five SEE page seven Far more than $409.5m LPIA redevelopment cost By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A LE A DI NG l i b e r t a r i a n h a s b a c k e d t h e B a h a m a s c u r r e n t t a x a t i o n s y s t e m b e c a u s e i t p l a c e s s e v e r e r e s t r i c t i o n s o n t h e G o v er n men t 's ab ilit y "to t ax and s p e n d as if t her e's n o t o mo rr o w", u r gin g t h at an y r ef o r m f o cu s o n co n su mp tio n -b as e d t a x es ra ther tha n an i n c ome t a x Rick Lowe, vice-p resid ent an d tre as ure r of the Na s sa u I n s t i t u t e t h i n k t a n k t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t be ca use ta x i nc re a se s w e re so v i si bl e to cons ume rs an d b u sin ess es u n der th e cu rr ent i m po rt -d ut y ba se d s y st e m go ve rn me nts w e re ke pt i nche c k on thi s is sue be c au se o f t h e o b v i o u s r e s u l t i n g pol iti c al fa ll out. On e o f t h e s p eak er s at l ast w e e k s C o l l e g e o f t h e Ba ha m as (C O B ) de ba te o n wh eth er thi s na tio n sh oul d swi tch to a n inc ome t a x sy stem Mr Lo we a g a in re i ter ate d his be l ie f th at go ve r nme nt spe ndi ng r a ther tha n r eve nu e, was t he m ain f ac t o r b e h i n d p e r s i s t e n t f i s c a l T A X A TIO N SYS T EM RESTR ICT S GO V'T T AX A N D S PEN D' T h in k-t ank exec ut iv e rej ec ts i nc om e tax as sti fli ng pr oduc ti vi ty an d i nv estm ent By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C I T Y M a r k e t s h a s r e o p e n e d i t s S e a g r a p e s s t o r e l o c a t i o n T r i b u n e B u si n e ss c a n c on f i rm c u tt i n g i ts h o u rs fr o m 7 a m t o 1 1 pm C a l l s t o M a r k F i n l a y s o n Cit y M ar k et s p r in cip al and h e a d of i ts 7 8 p er c e n t m a j ori ty sh a r eholder, Tr a n s-I sland T r a d er s we r e n o t r e t u r n ed CIT Y MARKET S I N SE A GRAP E S S T O RE R E-OP E N SEE page five SEE page five BoB branc h es t o be rem odelled in next 24 mo nt hs $ 9m p rovi sion s, plus o perat in g co st rise behi nd 24 .5 % pro fi t drop in 2011 But MD s ay s sh are pri c e up 45 % in last 3 m ont h s

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net C O N S UM E R S w i l l st il l s e e a $0 .34 t o $ 0. 47 c e nt dec rea se in the cost of fuel despite the G o v e r n m e n t s d e c i s i o n t o i n c r e a s e t h e m a r g i n s f o r petroleum retailers, the min is t e r o f s ta t e f o r p ub l i c u t i l i ti e s has told Tribune Business. T h e G o v e r n m e n t a nnoun ced las t week that it w ou l d i ncr e as e t h e m ar g in s on ga s oline and diesel, previous ly fix ed at $ 0.4 4 a nd $0.1 9 p e r g a l l o n r e s p e c t i v e l y t o $0.54 and $0.34 cents. But, in late August, Prime M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m said no to a margin increase r e q u e s t e d b y t h e B a h a m a s P etroleum Retailer s As sociat i o n (B P R A ), a r g u in g a t th a t ti m e th a t t h e pr i c e o f g a s w a s al r e a dy to o hi g h a n d th e Go v e r n m e n t i s n o t w i l l i n g t o i mpos e a fur t her b urd en on the public." E x p la i n in g th e r at i on a l e f or th e Go v e r nm e n t m o v i ng n o w Phen ton N ey mou r sai d: T h e Gov e rnm en t did n ot c on sid er t h a t a n a p p r o p r i a t e t i m e bec a use the co st o f g as w as in the region of $5.60. "The Government indicat e d t h a t w e r e c o g n i s e d t h e ch all eng es the y [the re tai lers] wer e f acing, and was of t he vi e w th a t t he re w a s n ee d fo r a margin in crea s e b ut w e co uld n o t acco m mo d at e i t at t ha t t i me be caus e we d id n' t f eel that the Bahamian economy a n d t h e B a h a m i a n p e o p l e c o u l d a c c e p t a n a d d i t i o n a l $0.30 on to that $5.60." Mr Neymour added: "The p ri ce of oi l has s ignif ican tly decreased. We're now begin ni ng to f ee l t he ef fe c ts o f th at a n d s o w i t h t h e r e b e i n g a decrease in the cost of gaso G A S P R I C E S TO D E C L I N E D E S P I T E M A R G I N R I S E BUSINESS P AGE 2B, MONDA Y OCTOBER 17, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE Phenton Neymour SEE page 11

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HUGH SANDS ha s be en s e l e c t e d t o r e c e i v e t h e B a ham as F in ancia l Ser vi ces B o a r d s ( B F S B ) L i f e t i m e A c h i e v e m e n t A w a r d i n reco gni ti on o f hi s o ut s tan di ng con tr ib ution to the industry. Mr S an ds, a b ank in g ind ust r y v e t e r a n i s t h e f o r m e r C a r i b b e a n d i r e c t o r a n d Bah a m as m a na ge r f o r Ba r cl ay s B a n k f r o m w h i c h h e retired in 1995 after a career that began in 1973. He started at Barclays as a s ta ff m an a ge r in th e B a ha ma s h e a d o f f i c e a n d p r i o r t o b ec o min g B ah am as ma na ge r, a l s o s e r v e d a s m a n a g e r o f Barclays' Bay Street branch. As Caribbean director his duties included r espo nsib ility for t he bank's o peratio ns in t h e Ba h am as T u r k s an d C a i co s Isla nd s, a nd p rofi t an d p erfo rma nc e pla nni ng fo r th e b ank 's o pera tion s in the C a yman Islands and Belize. A f t e r r e t i r i n g f r o m B a r clays, Mr Sands was appoint e d chairman of t he Bank of th e Ba ha ma s a p o s it i on he h e l d u n t i l r e t i r i n g i n e a r l y 2 0 05 In 1 9 98 he w a s aw a rde d the Companion of the Mo st Distinguished Order of Saint M i c h a e l a n d S a i n t G e o r g e (CMG), in recognition of his s ig ni fic a nt c on tri but io n to th e Bahamas. Three years prior, he became an Honorary Fel low of the Bahamas Institute o f B an k e rs, n ow t he B a h a ma s Financial Services Institute. C u r r e n t l y h e r e m a i n s a tru ste e o f th e R oy a l B a ha m as P o l i c e D e p e n d a n t s T r u s t F u n d a n d c h a i r m a n o f t h e B o a r d o f T r u s t e e s o f t h e B a h a m a s H o t e l a n d A l l i e d I ndus tries P ension fund. He s e r v e s a s a d i r e ct o r o f T h e P r i v a t e T r u s t C o r p o r a t i o n T r i b u n e R a d i o H o l d i n g s Prov i de nc e Adv i sors, F id el it y B a n k a n d T r u s t A n d b a n c ( Bahamas ), CBH C o mpagnie Bancaire Helvetique SA ( f o r m e r l y B a n q u e S C S Alliance (Nassau ) Limited). Pr e v io u sl y he se r v e d a s c h a i rman of J.S. Johnson & Com pa ny a n d the Insu ra nc e C o mpany of the Bahamas. M r m S a n d s c o n c l u d e d a f o u r y e a r a p p o i n t m e n t a s Chairman of the Public Ser v i ce Co m mi s s io n o n t h e 31 BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y OCTOBER 17, 201 1, P AGE 3B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T H E C O M M U N I C A T I O N S r egu lat or ha s b owed to pre s su r e from its tw o l ea di n g l i c e n s e e s o v e r t h e p r o po s ed ma r ke t s har e t hr e s holds fo r determi ning Significant M ar ket Po wer ( SM P ), a g r e e i n g t o a l t e r t h i s f r o m bet ween 2575 pe r cen t t o a 4 0 p e r c e n t b e n c h m a r k i n s t e a d I n i ts s ta tem ent of r es ult s o n t h e m e t h o d s f o r d e t e r m in in g SMP in th e B a ha m ia n c o mmu nicat ions mar ket the Uti lit ies Regulat io n & Compet it io n A ut ho ri ty ( URCA ) s a i d i t w a s p r u d e n t t o cha nge t he in it ia l t h r es ho ld it h ad gi ven, wh ich was th at car ri er s wi th bet ween 2 5-75 pe r ce nt ma r ke t share shou ld be pr es ume d t o have SM P T hi s was o pp os ed by bo th C a ble Ba ha mas a nd the new l y p r i v a t i s e d B a h a m a s T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m p a n y ( B T C ) w h i c h h a d a r g u e d t h a t t h i s t h r e s h o l d was inco ns is t ent wit h Eu r op ea n U nio n's (E U) prac tic e s. T h e S M P r e l a t e d p r o v i si on s of t he Ba ham as Co mm u n i c a t i o n s A c t 2 0 0 9 a r e l a r g e l y b a s e d o n t h e E U s e l e c t r o n i c c o m m u n i ca t i o n s s e c t o r d i r e c t i v e s a n d b o t h C a b l e B a h a m a s a n d B T C agr eed th at li cencee s wit h a mar ke t sh ar e of l es s t han 25 pe r c ent s hould be p resumed as no nSM P. H o w e v e r b o t h o p p o s e U RCA's in itial proposal that c o m m u n i c a t i o n s l i c e n c e e s w i t h a m a r k e t s h a r e o f b e t w e e n 2 5 7 5 p e r c e n t sh ou ld be pr es ume d t o have SM P, an d al so had s om e dif fi c u lt ies wi th t he r eg ula to r' s p o s i t i o n t h a t f i r m s wi t h 7 5 p e r c e n t o r m o r e m a r k e t sh ar e wo ul d b e a ut omat ica lly det er mi ned t o h ave SM P p o w e r N o t i n g t h e s e c o n c e r n s U R C A s ai d it ha d c on si de re d th e fee dbac k from both c ompan ies and ad ded : "U RCA re co gnise s that it c anno t c onclus iv ely s ay t ha t a li cens ee w i t h l e s s t h a n 2 5 p e r c e n t m a r k e t s h a r e w i l l b e p r e s u m e d t o b e a n o n S M P l i c e n s e e "H owever a ft er cons i der i n g a ll s ub mi s s i on s r e vie wing international expe r ie nces a nd co ns id er ing f act or s and char acter ist ic s sp ec if ic to the B a h a m a s ( t h e e m b r y o n i c s t age of t he elect r on ic co mm u n i c a t i o n s m a r k e t s ) U RCA co ns ide rs it p r ude nt t o increase the thr e s hold leve l f r om 25 p er cent t o 40 p er c e n t "U RCA wo ul d no t li ke ly consider a lic ensee w ith mark et s ha re of les s t han 40 p er ce nt t o b e an SM P li cens ee u n l e s s c om p e ll i n g ev i d en ce i s p r o v i d e d t o U R C A d e m onstr ating other w is e. A s a r e s u l t o f t h i s c h a n g e U RCA wil l amen d i ts st at em e n t t o r e a d : A l i c e n s e e w i t h l e s s t h a n 4 0 p e r c e n t m ar ket sh ar e w i ll n ot ge ner a l l y b e p r e s u m e d t o h a v e S M P I n i t s e a r l i e r r e s p o n s e t o U RCA 's in it ial cons u lt ati on on S MP de term ina tion me tho d s Cab l e Ba h am as s a id i t agr ee d with t he pr esum ption o f n o S M P f o r a n o p er a t o r w i t h l e s s t h a n 2 5 p e r c e n t m ar ket s ha re "How ever, w hen c ons ideri ng a ma rk et s har e a bov e 25 p er c e n t a p r e s u m p t i o n o f d o m i n an c e i s u nr ea s o n a bl e a nd in de ed a pr e s um pt i on o f d omi nan ce bel ow a mar ket sha re of 4 0 pe r c ent is n ot co ns is tent with i nte rn atio nal pr ec edents," C able B ahamas h ad ar gued No t in g th at th i s was s up p o r t e d b y t h e E u r o p e a n C o m m i s s i o n i n t h e E U s S M P g u i d e l i n e s C a b l e B a ha m as a dd e d : "I t i s a l s o u n j u s t i f i e d t o i m p o s e w h a t a p p e a r s t o b e a c o n c l u s i v e deter mina t ion of SM P a bove a 75 p er c e n t t h r e s h o l d a s U RCA app ear s t o p ro po se "Hi gh ma rk et s har e alo ne i s n o t co n s i d e r e d s u f f i ci e n t t o e s t a b l i s h d o m i n a n c e i n S M P. T h us al th ou gh a p r es u mpt io n o f SM P may app ly i n t he ca se of ver y hi gh mar k et s ha re s, t he p r es ump ti on s h oul d not be concl us iv e o r ir refut a b le T his is consis tent w i t h i n t e r n a t i o n a l p r e c e d e n t s i n w h i c h t h e r e h a v e b e en f in d in gs of n o nd o mi n an ce n o twi t hs t an di ng ver y h i g h m a r k e t s h a r e s ( i e a bov e 75 per ce nt ). A s a r e s u l t C a b l e Ba ha mas c on cl ude d th at p res u m p ti o ns o f ma r k et d o mi n a n c e ( S M P ) s h o u l d o n l y a ppl y t o f ir m' s wit h a 40 pe r cent market share o r g r e ater, and that marke t sha re sho uld R E G U L A T O R A DJ U S T S M A R K E T P O W E R T H R E S H O L D T O 4 0 % URCA bows to feedback from BTC and Cable Bahamas SEE page eight SEE page nine Hugh Sands to receive BFSB's Lifetime award HUGH SANDS

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INCREA SI N G number s of h igh s ch oo l stu de nts a re pa r tici p a t i n g i n t o u r i s m i n d u s t r y related certification programs, which are being piloted in sev eral schools as spart of an ini tiative by the Ministry of Edu cation and the Bahamas Hotel Association. T h ir t y -n in e s tu d e n t s fr o m t he Government High School and Anatole Rodgers High School w er e t h e fi r s t to e nr o ll i n a ne w p ro gr am lau nc hed this w eek to p r e p a r e t h e m f o r j o b s a n d careers in the safety and secu rity field in the nation's hotels. T h e o p p o rt u n i t i es i n t h i s p ar t of o ur ind us try ar e co ns iderable, growing and projected to c on ti n u e to gr o w, pa r ticu lar ly w it h t he n ew resort s b eing developed in New Providence. Rou ghl y 4 per cent of pe ople e m p l oy ed in the ho t el indus t r y a re wor ki n g i n the s af e t y an d s ec ur i ty f ield," sa i d BHA p re sident Stuart Bowe. We a r e e x c it e d t o h a v e b e e n a b l e t o f o r g e a p a r t n e r s h i p b etwee n membe rs of the BHA To u ri sm S a f e t y an d Se c ur i t y Ne t wor k (TS SN) an d t h e principles of Anatole Rodgers, the Gov ern m e nt H igh Scho ol an d A q u i n as C o l l e g e t o cr e a t e a t h r e e -y e a r c e r ti fic a ti o n p r o g r a m w h i c h w i l l b e t a u g h t a f t e r s c h o o l t w i c e a w e e k b y t h e l ead i ng sec uri t y p erso nn el i n our industry." S t u d e n t s w h o s u c c e s s f u l l y c o mplete the High Sc ho ol Ce rtified S afe t y & S ec ur ity Of fic er P ro g ra m ( S S O P ) w i l l f i n d i t much easier to secure employ ment in this part of the indus try. A cc o r d i n g t o T S S N c h ai r m an D ou g l a s H a nn a w h o i s al so sen io r vi cepre si dent f o r se c u r i t y a t K e r z n e r In t e r n a ti onal th e cur ri cul um i s bui l t a r o u n d a t e x t b o o k f o r t h e i nd u st r y g l o ba l l y ca l l e d T he Pro f es si o na l Pr ot e ct i o n O f f i cer'. "It covers a broad range of topics aimed at helping ensure t he s u c c es s o f th e y ou n g pe o pl e as t hey ent er our i ndustry. A v a rie ty o f tea c hin g to ols will b e u s e d to e n g a g e t h e s tu d e n ts a n d h elp t h em und er s t a nd the cr it ic a l r o l e t h e y w o u l d p l a y i n e ns ur ing our gu es ts h av e a sa fe an d m e m ora bl e e xp eri e n ce, Mr Hanna added. The pr ogram's detai ls wer e s h ared recent l y duri ng a p arent s m eet i ng a t th e G overn men t High S ch oo l wh en pr in cipal Collin Johnson was joined b y A n a t o l e R o d g e r s H i g h S c h o o l p r i n c i p a l M y r t l e M cP hee an d rep re sen t at i ve s f ro m BHA and t he TSSN. Th e certification program is tied to t he gl oball yr ecogni s ed Int ern at i on al Fo und at i on f o r Pro tection Officers. T h e B H A i s a l s o w o r k i n g wi th the Ministry of Educ ati o n t o d e v el o p ce r t i f i c at i o n p r o grams in several other areas of th e i n d u s tr y i n p a r t n e r s h ip w it h t he Am er i c an H otel & Lodging E du c a tio n I ns titu te ; F lo r id a N u rsery G row ers and La nd s c a p i n g A ss o c i a t i o n a n d t h e Bahamas Landscaping Associ atio n; the Co te r ie o f Ca r ib be a n Butlers; and the Dermal Insti tute. W h e n a y o u n g g r a d u a t e w it h l it t le or no wo r k experi enc e co mes to in du str y s ee kin g employment after high school, i t i s cert i f i c at e p rog ram s l i ke t hes e which gives t he m a legup or a competitive advantage a nd h el p s t h em t o l an d t h ei r fir st job T he ir c ha n c es o f tr a nsi ti oning f r om s chool -t o-w or k an d b ec o min g a pr o d u cti ve a n d valued part of our industry are e nha nced con sid erab l y, sai d Mr Bowe. Photo Caption L to R: Myr t le M c Phee, principal A n at ol Ro d g e r s J r /S r H i g h S c h o o l; S tu a r t B o w e p r e s i d e n t t h e B a h a m a s H ot e l A s s oc i a t i o n ; Co llin J o hn s o n, p r inc ip a l, Go ve r n me n t H ig h S c h o ol ; H K e v in Br o w n, c h a ir p e r s o n s a fe ty a n d security credentialing commit te e a n d me mb e r o f th e T o ur is m S a f e t y & S e c u r i t y N e t w o r k ; Bridget Murray, credentialing com mi tt ee ce m ber a nd workf o rc e d e ve l o p m e nt m an a g er t he B ah a m as H ot el A ss oc i a tion; Lavern Dean, credential i n g c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r a n d m e m b er o f the Tou rism Safety & S e c u r i t y N e t w o r k ; P h i l i p J o h n s o n c r e d e n t i a l i n g c o m mittee me mbe r a nd me mbe r of the Tourism Safety & Security N e t w o r k ( N o t i n p h o t o i s S h o n a K n o w l e s p r i n c i p a l Aquinas College) BUSINESS P AGE 4B, MONDA Y OCTOBER 17, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE BHA F O R GE S SEC UR IT Y T R AIN ING SC H O OL L I NK LE F T T O RI G HT M r s M y r tl e M c P h e e M r. St u a r t B o we M r. Co l l i n J o h n s o n M r H K e v i n Br o wn M s B ri d get Murray, Ms. Lavern Dean and Mr. Philip Johnson.



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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER TWO BABIES DEADVolume: 107 No.2 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2009 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 87F LOW 78F Police investigate after boys body found in trashcan TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Residential Property LoansYour dream home begins with land you can build on. Let RBC Royal Bank help make your dreams come true! Talk with one of our personal financial specialists today.Competitive interest rates and flexible payment terms available. Offer ends October 31, 2011.www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net A 31-year-old mother is calling for justice after she claims her husband and son were brutalised by police officers last week. Sherice Darling said it was a typical Wednesday night for her and her family. She and her husband, Samuel Darling, had just finished a 30-minute Bible study lesson with their eight-year-old son when her husband went outside to get something from his car. A few minutes later she said she heard her dog barking. When she looked out of the window, Mrs Darling said she stood in horror as she saw her husband being attacked by an unknown man, who she later identified as a police officer. I saw the man punch my husband. I didnt know who he was. He was not in a uniform. He punched him again By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net NEARLY 100 people have been charged with defrauding the Bahamas government as police con tinue their probe into a longstanding vehicle licensing scam. To date, police have not charged any Road Traffic employees in connection with the scam, Paul Rolle, head of the Central Detective Unit (CDU) said. There are still one or two persons that have been evading us but the investigation is still ongoing. None of those (charged) were employees from Road Traffic. Mr Rolle said: We have interviewed a number of persons from Road Traffic and the decision was made, at that time, not to press charges because sufficient By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A police drug bust has resulted in the seizure of over 200 pounds of marijuana and the arrest of a male teacher from Jack Hayward High and another man on Grand Bahama. The 49-year-old male teacher, a resident of Fortune Point, and a 34-year-old male resident of Holmes Rock are currently in police custody and are expected to be for mally arraigned today. Assistant Superintendent Loretta Mackey, press liaison officer, reported that around 9.30pm on Wednesday, October 12, DEU officers were on mobile patrol when they saw a grey-coloured car travelling east on Queens Cove Road. She said the driver was acting in a suspicious manner By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net POLICE have focused their strike force on illegal firearms to include two more New Providence communities as they claim turf wars in Fox Hill have subsided. Despite a sharp escalation in crime this year, Paul Rolle, head of Central Detective Unit, last week maintained that his department was not stretched by the record number of homicides. Mr Rolle said: We have seen a sharp escalation in crime this year. We are not stretched, we have expanded the homicide team and those investigations are ongoing. Every bit of information that we got pertaining to all of those homicides we have (investigated). Of the 104 murders occurring this year, police have charged suspects in 55 cases. Mr Rolle explained that each case is reviewed by more than one team at numerous stages of the investigation to ensure that all possible leads are explored. In some of those matters, we know the persons who may be responsible are dead, Mr Rolle said, and at some point when the final report is released that will all be reflected. But as we go from day to day we dont want to start talking about that because we want to be satisfied before we report that we get sufficient evidence to substantiate it. Based on police findings, shooting conflicts in the Fox Hill community stemmed from a turf war between three emerging factions, who were By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter sbrown@tribunemedia.net POLICE are investigating the deaths of two babies, a boy who was found partially decomposed in a trash can and a girl who died shortly after being admitted to hospital. Police say the first baby was found dead inside a home at McQuay Street off Nassau Street shortly before noon Friday. Information surrounding the incident is still sketchy, however The Tribune has learned that the mother of the infant is in hospital and has not yet been questioned by police. Superintendent Stephen Dean said: We are waiting to question the mother to find out what is what. We dont know if it was a homicide, a still birth or anything. We wont know anything else until we speak to the mother sometime today. The baby was discovered by a relative of the mother, according to sources. The unidentified woman called the police after she went to the home and noticed a foul odour coming from the bed room. After searching the room, she found the decomposing baby boy in the trash can. Last night, the mother was under police guard in the hospital after undergoing surgery Saturday morning. A few hours later, around 7pm, officers received reports that a nine-monthold baby girl died in hospital shortly after being admitted. S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 POLICEARE investigating the deaths of two babies one of which was found in a trash can in this areaPhoto: Felip Major /Tribune Staff PAN AMERICAN GAMESSSEEVVEENNTTHH SSPPOOTT FFOORRFFAANNTTAASSTTIICC FFOOUURRSEESPORTSSECTIONE FREEDOMOFINFORMATIONPPUUBBLLIICC MMUUSSTT DDEEFFEENNDDRRIIGGHHTT TTOO KKNNOOWWSEEINSIGHTSECTIONB MARIJUAN A SEIZED IN DRUG BUST FOX HILL TURF WARS SUBSIDE, POLICE TO EXPAND GUN SEARCH WOMAN CLAIMS POLICE BR UTALITY OVER INCIDENT 100 CHARGED OVER VEHICLE LICENCE SCAM im lovin it

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POLICE are requesting the publics assistance in locating a man responsible for an armed robbery at Texaco Service Station, Old Town Marina, Sandyport, during the weekend. The incident occurred around 2.45 pm on Saturday. According to police reports, a masked man entered the service station armed with a handgun and demanded cash from the staff. The culprit robbed the Texaco station of an undisclosed amount of cash and then fled the area in an unknown direction. Police are investigating and are appealing to members of the public who might have some information about this incident to contact the police at 911 919 3223333 Central Detective Unit at 502-9991, 502-9910 or Crime Stoppers at 328TIPS. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ARMED ROBBER HOLDS UP GAS STATION and officers stopped the vehicle. While conducting a search, DEU officers discovered a white crocus sack containing 176 pounds of what was suspected to be marijuana, with an estimated street value of $176,000. Ms Mackey said the driver was arrested and taken into custody. Asa result of further investigations, police went to a residence at Holmes Rock around 3.30pm on Thursday where a team of officers executed a search warrant. While searching the residence, police discovered 27 pounds of suspected marijuana, with an estimated street value of $27,000. They also recovered a .45mm pistol with 13 live rounds of ammunition, as well as an additional 40 rounds of ammunition in the home. A 34-year-old male resident was arrested as a result. Investigations are continuing. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e MARIJUANA SEIZED IN DRUG BUST

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By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net AN EX-POLICE officer was arraigned in Magistrates Court Friday after noon in connection with a car theft in February of this year. Former Constable Lorene Mortimer, who was discharged from the Royal Bahamas Police Force hours before her arraignment, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane. Prosecutors allege that she and 36-year-old Charmaine Wright stole a 2005 silver Toyota Forerunner, the property of Cameron Symonette, between Sunday, February 6 and Monday, Febru ary 7. Symonettes car licence plate number 148816 is valued at $22,000 according to court dockets. Mortimer, an Obediah Avenue resident, and her alleged accomplice who lives on Talbot Street, were also charged with receiving the vehicle. Both women were represented by Keith Seymour and pleaded not guilty to the charges. The prosecution offered no objection to the accused receiving bail, and the judge granted them each $5,000 bail with one surety. The matter was adjourned to Friday, October 21. By PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net BISHOP Simeon Hall appealed to all persons in possession of an unlicensed firearm yesterday to turn them in to the authorities during the governments onemonth amnesty period. According to the Minister of National Security, Tommy Turnquest, this firearm amnesty period, which began on October 5 comes to an end on November 4. Persons who have illegal firearms can hand them over to authorities without fear of prosecution to police stations in New Providence, Grand Bahama or any administrator's office or police station on the Family Islands. However, the amnesty peri od does not apply to persons who are arrested and found in possession of an illegal gun, Mr Turnquest said. In a press statement sent to the media yesterday, the senior pastor of the New Covenant Baptist Church encouraged young men to utilise this amnesty period before they might face the stiffer penalties that the government is seeking to implement. The new gun laws, which are currently being debated in the House of Assembly will impose a minimum sentence of four years in prison if a per son is found and convicted of unlawfully being in possession of an unlicensed firearm or ammunition. The power of magistrates to impose sentences is also being increased from five to seven years and that conviction on drug and gun related offences may attract the maximum sentence of seven years. Bishop Hall said: Too many young black men treat our laws with impunity and should be reminded that prison time, of up to seven years, robs families, especial ly children, of their fathers presence and protection. Some in possession of ille gal firearms might be afraid to turn them in, but encourage them to find a pastor willing to accompany them to the police, he said. At the end of this one month amnesty, Bishop Hall said that he would appeal to judges and magistrates to not hesitate in passing the maxi mum sentence on those found in possession of illegal firearms. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 3 FREEPORT The Court of Appeal overturned the murder conviction and sentence of Renaldo Bonaby and Renaldo Armbrister who were found guilty of the murder of Philip Gaitor Jr. In September, the justices ordered a retrial as a result of material irregularity during the trial in December 2009. Appeals justices found the men did not get a fair trial when Justice Neville Adderley told the jury the confessions of the accused men were admissible and voluntarily made. Philip Gaitor Jr, 24, was found burned to death in his car on December, 2006. Armbrister and Bonaby were charged with his murder, kidnapping, and the attempted extortion of $100,000 from the Gaitor family. Armbrister was sentenced to life and Bonaby was sentenced to death. The men appealed their conviction. Armbrister has been released on bail. The family of Philip Gaitor Jr and Families for Justice are outraged over his release. APPEAL COURT ORDERS RETRIAL By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Police are investigating a shooting that has left a teenager with serious injuries in hospital. Assistant Superintendent Loretta Mackey, reported that an 18-year-old male resident of Eight Mile Rock sustained a serious gunshot injury to the ankle following a shooting early Thursday morning at Garden Villas. According to initial reports, the victim went to the area around 2am and was attempting to locate a female friend. He told police that while in the area of the basketball court he heard gunshots and ran. After realising that he had been shot in the right ankle, the victim went to the Rand Memorial Hospital to seek medical assistance. ASP Mackey said doctors described the victims injuries as serious. Investigations are continuing into the matter and officers at the Central Detective Unit are appealing to anyone with information that can assist them to call 350-3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911. Last Wednesday a day before the shooting police conducted a walkabout in the Garden Villas area. Acting Assistant Commissioner of Police Emrick Seymour and a number of officers met with residents in the high crime area. Garden Villas is a known hot spot for criminal activities, including drug pushing, gambling, and illegal selling of goods. Four of the seven murders this year have occurred there. TEENAGER SERIOUSLY INJURED FOLLOWING SHOOTING OWNERS OF HANDGUNS URGED BY BISHOP TO HAND THEM TO POLICE Bishop Simeon Hall has called on people to make use of the firearms amnesty, before they face stiffer penalties the government aims to introduce T T o o o o m m a a n n y y y y o o u u n n g g b b l l a a c c k k m m e e n n t t r r e e a a t t o o u u r r l l a a w w s s w w i i t t h h i i m m p p u u n n i i t t y y a a n n d d s s h h o o u u l l d d b b e e r r e e m m i i n n d d e e d d t t h h a a t t p p r r i i s s o o n n t t i i m m e e , o o f f u u p p t t o o s s e e v v e e n n y y e e a a r r s s , r r o o b b s s f f a a m m i i l l i i e e s s , e e s s p p e e c c i i a a l l l l y y c c h h i i l l d d r r e e n n , o o f f t t h h e e i i r r f f a a t t h h e e r r s s p p r r e e s s e e n n c c e e a a n n d d p p r r o o t t e e c c t t i i o o n n . B B i i s s h h o o p p S S i i m m e e o o n n H H a a l l l l CAR THEFT CHARGE FOR EX-POLICE OFFICER PICTURED ARE former police officer Lorene Mortimer, 38, left, and Charmaine Wright, 36, as they hide their faces after leaving court.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. In the wake of Marco Archers murder we now see that a man has been charged with having sex with two preteen boys. Additionally, the Prime Minister of The Bahamas, The Right Hon Hubert Ingraham addressed the nation on crime, promising sweeping changes in his administrations approach to crime. My response to both subsequent events is this is really too late and honestly not enough. First of all, barbaric actions against children, like kidnapping them, raping them, and murdering them belong in its own category of crimes. This nation does not properly acknowledge paedophile as the special crime that it is, but lumps it with other crimes. There is nothing worse than preying on children sexually, abusing them physically, and making them feel confused, unsafe and ashamed. This nation needs to know that child predators exist and in more forms than a stranger who from time to time snatches a child walking home from school. Paedophiles can sometimes be teachers, doctors, church leaders, uncles, fathers, cousins and mummys boyfriend. Sometimes, paedophiles are women! What are we doing to educate children on this partic ular predator who targets them? What is the nation really doing about addressing incest that exists and victimises children, especially in the family islands? Our legal system does not seem to see raping a child as any dif ferent from other crimes related to stealing. Actually, between 2009 and 2011, there were two cases printed in the newspaper in which two men accused at different times of raping a child received bail for less than two men accused at different times of stealing a car. What is our legal system really telling us about who and what is more important? Why are we not using words like Paedophile and Child Predator to describe an adult who rapes a child? Why are we not referring to the act of an adult having sex with a child as rape? Even if the child has been persuaded to participate, it is still rape! The nation must be able to see paedophile as the abusive, sick, and unnatural crime that it is against children. What is needed to curtail paedophile and child predators in The Bahamas is constant awareness campaigning in schools, churches, hospitals, clinics, and in the media throughout the archipelago. We need a legal system, edu cational system, churches, and families who are aware of this crime against children in all the forms that it can manifest and would do everything possible to protect our children. Further, we need a legal system that can put measures in place to protect our children and severely punish the paedophile as well as those who enable him/her. Some measures that can help to drastically curb this societal problem are: Training police officers to recognise the forms in which paediophilia exist, including incest; establishing a special unit to handle paedophilia cases; responding to missing children cases immediately instead of waiting for fortyeight hours to pass; and inform ing the public of child predators who are in the society. Rehabilitating paedophiles in my opinion cannot be accomplished easily. Good behaviour in prison by a person who sexually assaulted a child does not mean that she/he is rehabilitated. There are no children in prison to who they would be attracted. Paedophilia tendencies can be suppressed, but will probably always resurface, so what should the society do to rid itself of paedophiles? We need leaders who are realistic about this crime and would put the well-being of the nations children first. It is clear to me what needs to be done about paedophiles and it would be good if we could even vote on this as Bahamians. SYRETA ROBERTSBOURNAS Nassau, October 6, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama SPEAKING in the House of Assembly last week Cat Island MP Philip Brave Davis criticised Governments proposed crime Bills as falling short of what is needed to eliminate violent crime. He wondered if any thought had been given to the rate of recidivism and what would be the average length of time to rehabilitate an offender when defining life imprisonment. There is jurisprudence, he said, to suggest natural life without an opportunity to review with a view of release is cruel and unusual punishment. One never hears of the cruel and unusual punishment suffered by a victims family a victim who has not had a second chance at life. And a family that has lost their main breadwinner. With capital punishment virtually removed from the scene, there has to be a penalty, not only to punish, but to deter. True, there are degrees of murder the planned, vicious murders spawned from a psychotic brain, and the impulsive anger, where death was not intended, but was the result. There might be some hope of rehabilitating the latter, but none for the former. The societys complaint today is that the laws are too soft, so soft that the crim inal is making a fool of our judicial system. It is felt that with automatic hanging removed, the criminal is willing to play Russian roulette with his life, knowing that he can commit his crime and in all probability avoid the hangmans noose. It might give him second thoughts if he had to contemplate a lifetime in prison when he and the undertaker leave togeth er. However, if he knows that he can again trick his way out by good behaviour, where is the deterrent to his crime? A police officer told us that what many of them do is get religion while in prison to impress their jailers. Some, released for good behaviour before completing their sentence, turn their collars backwards and quietly continue their misdeeds, while others shed their religion and open ly revert to type. If we are going to be serious about deterring crime particularly murders then we cant get soft on punishment. Already this timidity in enforcing the law has broken down law and order on every level in this country. Mr Davis said that legislators have to think of the cost of housing a convict for the rest of his natural life particularly if the offender has youth on his side. They also have to think of the increased burden on taxpayers. Mr Davis told House members that it costs $14,000 a year to house a prisoner. He said that if a person were sentenced to life at the age of 30 life expectancy for the average Bahamian male being 70 years the state would have to support him for at least 40 years. Do the math, he told legislators, there are at least 400 persons to be tried millions of dollars it will be costing taxpayers! These convicts become burdens only if the government lacks the imagination to put them to good use and make them pay their way by their daily labour. Already in this column we have suggested setting aside a large acreage of Crown land for cultivation. These prisoners composed of lifers and those with shorter sentences could feed the nation. Of course, for those with a life sentence this would be a life time job. At least they can turn a misspent life into a useful one and remember if the laws had not been changed they could have been hanged, buried and forgotten about, instead of breathing Gods fresh air, and growing a field of tomatoes. This production could be a tremendous savings to government by reducing the cost of imports. If done on a large enough scale and managed like a business, it could even increase our foreign reserves through exports. In the woodwork department, men with this ability could be taught to turn out first class cabinetry that could be sold from various furniture stores. Again if it were handled as a proper business, the prison could open its own furniture store and attract a market. They could even go into the business of making toys for children. With a little imagination, these men need not become as heavy a burden as some predict. What must be remembered is that outside of prison walls they will be a constant menace. Society has to decide whether they pre fer to pay for their upkeep knowing that they can have a good nights sleep in the safety of their homes, or save the expense and sleep with one eye open, and an ear cocked listening for the thief at the window. However, these prisoners could possibly earn enough that restitution also could be made to some of the victims of their evil deeds. Who knows but that it might encourage pride in some of these men in the knowledge that in the end their lives were not a complete waste. But with the criminal playing hardball with society, society cannot now go soft on punishment. We must protect our children LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Considering crime and punishment Then the sixth angel poured out his bowl on the great river Euphrates, and its water was dried up, so that the way of the kings from the east might be prepared. And I saw three unclean spirits like frogs coming out of the mouth of the dragon, out of the mouth of the beast, and out of the mouth of the false prophet. For they are spirits of demons, performing signs, which go out to the kings of the earth and of the whole world, to gather them to the battle of that great day of God Almighty. Behold, I am coming as a thief. Blessed is he who watches, and keeps his garments, lest he walk naked and they see his shame. And they gathered them together to the place called in Hebrew, Armageddon.Revelation Chpt. 16 v. 12-16SixthBowl: Euphrates Dried Up EDITOR, The Tribune ONCE again it appears that few people learn from their mistakes. On Monday afternoon, I was listening to 97.5 FM and I was shocked to hear what I thought was the voice of Mr Fitzgerald on the Steve McKinney show and he was on another mis sion carrying on about Bell Island. It appears that he learnt nothing from the mistakes and tirades that he carried on about Saunders Beach which blew up in his face. I have yet to see or hear any admission by Fitzger ald or any of the others who joined him during this period that they were wrong and that Saunders Beach is better now than it ever was in any of their lifetimes. I know it takes a real man to admit when he is wrong, but it gives any man credibility in the eyes of the Public when you can do this. As with Saunders Beach 6 to 9 months after the work around Bell Island is finished life around there will be back to normal and very soon thereafter no one will ever know the work went on just like Saunders Beach. I do not know what makes McKinney or Fitzgerald an authority on the Environment or the waters surrounding Bell Island because I do not believe either of these gentlemen have ever spent very much time in, on or around the waters of the Bahamas. It appears to me that for the past 40 years or more they go on vacation out of the Bahamas for the full length of the winter when we have cold fronts and northwesters because if they lived here then they would realise that when we in the Bahamas have winters the sand and silt get stirred up and stays that way for 10 to 14 days at a time and it does not hurt conch, fish, turtle or any other marine life that God gave the ability to move around. Nature has its own way of dealing with these matters. I spent 12 to 15 years fishing in and around the Exuma Islands (not in the Park) and I know that the Park is a won derful place for conservation so that breeding can take place but whatever is bred in there moves out as it grows up and that is why the fishing is so good north and south of the Park. I am an environmentalist, but not a fanatic and I have spent more than 2/3 of my life in, on or around the water and I know from personal experience what I am talking about because I have seen and lived through these things and it would be wonderful if all of these people with High Falutin Degrees would spend enough time throughout the Bahamas to get some first hand practical experience to realize that what applies to Canada or the USA does not mean the same here in the Bahamas where we have 700 islands that are all separat ed by water and we have such a tidal movement that it keeps our islands and cays fully supplied with fresh salt water. Also I am not a politician trying to impress anyone for a campaign. I am just trying to state the facts of life here in the Bahamas. ABNER PINDER Spanish Wells, Bahamas, October 13, 2011. Bell Island lessons

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 5

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By KHRISNA VIRGIL THE Opposition is calling the Anti-Crime Bill now being tabled in the House of Assembly just another election day ploy by the government. In his address to parliamentarians, the oppositions key speaker MICAL MP V Alfred Gray made his predictions as to who will win election 2012. Mr Gray said: This government is going to get kicked to the curb. A one man band cannot solve this problem. It takes everyone of us. Thats why the suggestion that a committee made of both sides of this House should put their collective minds together, and come up with some suggestions for solving this problem is a good idea. Moving forward, Mr Gray pinpointed major short comings of the Bill, which does not grant fairness to Bahamians who might have run-ins with the law. Speaking of the new clause that will change the in custody before charge from 48 hours to 72 hours, Mr Gray said the door will be opened to abusive situations. He believes such a change does not encourage accountability on the part of officers. When you give powers to the powerful, there is always that possibility of abuse, Mr Gray said. He added that such an extenuation should make provisions for the person being held to see a magistrate during that time period. Mr Gray also suggested that executives stay clear of judicial affairs and sufficient manpower should be given to the Attorney Generals office to keep the process of handling criminal cases moving. He believes that the Bill is also a selective one: Im concerned when a Bill singles out categories of people for whom the death penalty will apply. Every life is as important as every other life, so when you categorize who you will hang the criminals for it makes the rest of us feel like our lives are not as important as theirs. Mr Gray is calling for a revision to the Bill that will be sensitive to the nature of the crime and not the person killed. In his rebuttal, Golden Isles MP Charles Maynard reminded the Opposition that for more than four years the judicial system has been a focus of improvement. As examples of the continuing upgrading of the judicial system, Mr Maynard alluded to the revitalization of the Parliament building for use by the courts and to ongoing construction of the new magistrates court complex Nassau Street. All according to Mr Maynard, signs of continued upgrading. He views the upgrading as the governments move to stay consistent with the evolving Bahamian society that continues to have challenges facing crime. Responding to MICAL MPs reservations on the Bill prioritising certain persons lives above others, Mr Maynard did acknowledge that while the Bill does give some persons priority, it pays some attention to circumstances. Any person who wilfully and knows that a police officer is trying to arrest him and he takes out a gun and kills that police officer is a different type of person from somebody who kills a stranger for a different reason. Thats a mind set. Anybody who wilfully goes and kills a judge who may be presiding over a particular case that he has interest in is a different type of person, he said. Thats a dangerous type of person and a dangerous precedent for us to allow in our society. We wanted to make it clear that we consider that type of murderer as the worst of the worst. Mr Maynard believes that the new Anti-Crime bill will usher in serious changes to a judicial system that has been for many years hindered by loopholes used to the advantages of criminal attorneys. Bill discussions continue today. THERE is a special mind set associated with "staging" your home to sell in a soft market. Staging refers simply to the act of improving your home's appearance in order to appeal to the widest segment of potential buyers. The approach you must adopt is to see your home with an objective eye. This could be easier said than done! Stop looking at your home as your "home" and start visualising it as the "product" it becomes when it enters the market. Your BREA agent can help to market your product successfully by explaining how to highlight positive features and downplaying less attractive aspects. You can also hire an interior decorator. Since you may have a strong emotional attach ment to your home, you may not fully appreciate hearing about a better way to show your offering, but try to recognize that the way you decorate to SELL may be quite different from the way you decorate to dwell. The appearance of a space often trumps its functionality when impressing buyers. Your goal is to sell quickly ata fair price. A survey by a large national real estate brokerage in the U.S. showed that staged homes sell in half the time, and another survey of realtors showed that a $500 "staging" investment recouped 343% of that cost. It's fair to say the same applies here at home. So be prepared to swallow a little pride, move some furniture and field better offers on the road to your successful sale. Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE rfnrtrfbb The philosophy of time is---Do you what you can now, because tomorrow may be late!~ Betty Taylor ~ PLP SAYS ANTI-CRIME BILL IS JUST ANOTHER ELECTION PLOY THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SELLING AND DWELLING COLUMN by Mike Lightbourn

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 7 ONE OF the competitors stays focussed on the task THE EVENTUAL winner, Euston Smith, concentrates during the contestPhotos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff OWNERS NICK DEAN and Michael Turnquest holds up the hand of Euston Smith, the winner of the Wing Zone first annual eating competition, held on Saturday at Wing Zone in the Circle Palm mall READY, STEADY, EAT was the order of the day at the Wing Zone in the Circle Palm mall in Nassau on Saturday. For the restaurant staged the first of what it expects to be an annual eating competition, with eager participants seeking to do battle. Shoulder to shoulder, they crammed in to see who could demolish the trays of food in front of them the fastest. In the end, the winner was Euston Smith, whose arms were raised aloft boxing-style fashion by the owners of the Wing Zone, Nick Dean and Michael Turnquest. BATTLING IT OUT TO BE KING OF THE WING

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS ON October 12th as a member of the Eminent Persons Group (EPG) established by Commonwealth Heads of Government to advise them on reform of the Commonwealth, I delivered a keynote address in the British House of Parliament at a conference arranged by the several Commonwealth organisations. This article is a very much shortened version of that address which reflected on the challenge that Commonwealth Heads of Government will face when they meet from 28 to 30 October in Perth, Australia. There is no doubt that the Heads of Government meeting will be a defining occasion for the Commonwealth. Asa result of their decisions, the Commonwealth will either go forward, reinvigorated and resolute as a values-based organization intent on making a difference to its people and the wider international community; or it will limp along as a much devalued grouping to a future of disregard, deterioration, and disappearance. If the Commonwealth continues with its business as usual, it will lose its moral authority and international respect, providing little benefit to its member states, particularly the small ones. It is in that context that the Group made 106 recommendations for reform covering the full range of Commonwealth activities. Uppermost in our minds was a determination to draw a map for the consideration of Heads of Government that, in a practical and realistic fashion, could lead the Commonwealth from the cross-roads at which it is presently marking time, to a path that allows it to march forward to renewed significance for its people, and importance in the global community. In recent years, a few Commonwealth countries have strayed away from the collective values of the association, and, except for the unconstitutional overthrows of governments, the Commonwealth has not spoken out, as a body, or acted jointly to bring errant countries into compliance. At the heart of this problem has been an absence of reliable and verifiable information in a timely manner that could allow both the Commonwealth SecretaryGeneral and CMAG to engage a government before its violation of the Commonwealths values becomes serious or persistent. The EPG has recommended the appointment of a Commissioner for Democracy the Rule of Law and Human Rights. The post has been set at the level of Commissioner not because the office-holder would be a policeman armed with punitive powers, but precisely because it is envisaged that the occupant would be a person of sufficient standing, and possessed of significant diplomatic skill and sensitivity, as to be able to engage any government in a respectful and beneficial manner. It will not be within the Commissioners remit to recommend the suspension or expulsion of a country; this responsibility remains with CMAG or Heads of Government themselves. The post of Commissioner should be embraced by all Commonwealth governments precisely because the Commissioner will be a very senior officer with the capacity to gather reliable information in a way that directly involves governments facing difficult circumstances. Further, for the Commonwealth to continue to advocate for development funding, for money to militate against Climate Change, for reform of the criteria under which small states are unfairly graduated from concessionary financing, it has to be credible in relation to democracy. On the recommendation ofa Charter for the Com monwealth, there appears to be a belief that this idea was imposed on the EP by the governments of Aus tralia, Canada and Britain. Nothing could be further from the truth; the idea originated with the EPG Chairman, Tun Abdullah Badawi the former Prime Minister of Malaysia whose country had pio neered work on a Charter for ASEAN. The further incorrect notion that seems to have arisen is that the Charter will become a binding constitution for the Commonwealth. This is also a fallacy. We should all recall that the Commonwealth is not a treaty organization. Its members have not signed up to legally-binding rules and obligations. It is an association of sovereign states that voluntarily work together in their common interest and for their common good. The EPGs recommendation of a Charter is to do no more than weave the many declarations into one document, and then only after consultation with the people of the Commonwealth through public meetings across the Commonwealth with the involvement of civil society organisations. Over the years of its existence, the Commonwealth has expressed its shared values in several declarations. The Charter would have no greater legal force than the many declarations now have, nor will it bind any member government in any greater way than now exists. Heads of Government themselves have decided that these values are the measure by which a government can maintain membership of the Commonwealth. When governments violate these values in a serious or persistent manner, they can no longer enjoy the badge of honour that membership of the Commonwealth represents. The matter of funding the EPGs recommendations has also been raised. Figures in excess of million have been suggested as the cost of implementation. But those figures are not the EPGs. Throughout its work, the Group was acutely aware that this is not the time to ask governments to put up huge sums of money to implement all the recommendations in its report. For this very good reason, while the Group fulfilled its mandate to recommend urgent reforms that would make the Commonwealth relevant to its times and its people, as it was requested to do, we called for the retirement of some programmes in which the Commonwealth has no comparative advantage, which are duplicative of the work of other agencies, and which have displayed no particular benefit. The re-allocated funds will pay for the necessary reforms. The bottom line is simply this: without these reforms the Commonwealth will decline as an instrument of value to its member states and as an influence for better in the international community. The greatest priority was placed on the urgent issue of the damaging effects of climate change on small island states and coastal states. The EPG has also made firm recommendations on helping developing countries to deal with burdensome debt created, in part, by the overwhelming financial crisis in whose creation they played no part, but of which they are now among the worst victims. We also recommended strong advocacy by the Commonwealth collectively to reform processes in the World Bank that wrongly graduate small states from concessional financing on the basis of their per capita income only. We proposed practical methods to fund entrepreneurial schemes for youth and to tackle youth unemployment; and we suggested ways in which inter-Commonwealth investment could be promoted, trade increased and jobs created. Some observers are already saying that the meeting will be characterized by a North-South divide; that there is tension if not animosity between those who favour greater attention to democracy and the rule of law, and those who reject it, arguing instead for more resources for developmental issues. In reality, the EPG has argued for far more resources human, financial, inter-governmental, and civil society supported to be put into ensuring development than into maintaining democracy. In an era of changing economic circumstances and uncertainty, new trade and economic patterns, unprecedented threats to peace and security, and a surge of popular demands for democracy, human rights and broadened economic opportunities, the potential of the Commonwealth as a compelling force for good and as an effective network for cooperation and for promoting development is unparalleled. But, for that potential to be achieved giving economic, social and political benefit to its 2.1 billion people, urgent reform is imperative. The challenge at Perth is for Heads of Government, collectively, to seize the moment and to authorize the proposed reforms. The entire address can be read at: www.sirronaldsanders.com. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE www.jsjohnson.com Nassau Collins Ave 397 2100 Thompson Blvd676 6300Soldier Rd North 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420 WWOORRLLDDVVIIEEWW REFORM OR DIMINISH: THE CHALLENGE THAT IS FACED BY THE COMMONWEALTH

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TIPS ON HOW T O A VOID CRIME THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 9 Break away from the ordinary and discover how to experience life to the fullest. The Isuzu D-MAX is the ultimate multi-purpose pick-up truck which enables you to drive through tough roadsand load a variety of cargoes. It is specially designed to be powerful, stylish and highly functional. The Isuzu D-MAX is one toughvehicle that willnever let you down!T HEISUZUD-MAXPOWERFUL COMFORTABLE VERSATILE T YREFLEX S T AR MO TORSCall us todayfor your new IsuzuD-MAX Pick-UpTruck at 325.4961WulffRoad, P.O. BoxN9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 By CONSTABLE 3011 MAKELLE PINDER STATISTICS prove that vehicles are stolen nationally every day. In fact, twenty percent of all auto thefts are as a result of either keys being left in the car or unlocked doors. Most recently, reports indicate that professional car thieves have entered the field in increasing numbers; however, most cars are still taken by amateurs who can be stopped fairly easily. You can greatly increase your protection against auto theft crime by taking the following precautions. Immediately report suspicious activity in your neighbourhood to the Police. Never leave your car door, window or sunroof unlocked, even if you are just going into a shop for a moment or two, or even when parked in your own dri veway. Park in well-lit areas of parking lots and utilise motion-activated spotlights in your driveway. Remove the ignition key and engage the steering lock, even when parking on your own property. Ifyou have an alarm, turn iton every time you park. Security mark your stereo or satellite radio and, if it is a removable type, always take it with you. Make a note of the serial numbers on your radios, computers, etc. Do not leave purses, backpacks, or wallets your vehicle. If you must leave valuables in your car, dont put them in the trunk while a thief could be watching (do it before you get to your destination). Never leave credit cards or check books in your vehicle. Never leave money (cash or coins) or jewellery in your vehicle. If you have a garage or access to a garage, use it. Then lock it. Provide local authorities with the make/model/license plate and Vehicle ID number. Try to avoid touching the vehicle until after the responding Police Officer/s has an opportunity to inspect the vehicle for any evidence left behind by the thief. Should you need more information on Vehicle Safety or if you have information pertaining to any crime, please do not hesitate to con tact the police at or Crime Stoppers at 328-tips (New Providence), 1-300-8476 Family Island Dont become a victim! Royal Bahamas Police Force National Crime Prevention Office AVOID BECOMING A VICTIM OF VEHICLE CRIME CONSTABLE 3011 Makelle Pinder offers advice for readers on ways to avoid vehicle crime

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and started to drag him out ofthe car by his feet. At that point I ran outside to see what was going on, she said. Thats when I saw about seven other men on top of him beating him and choking him. I ran to him and told them to let him go. At that point I saw one of the men in a khaki uniform and another one in a blue uniform with a vest. I then figured out they were police. My husband was handcuffed, he couldnt fight back so I dont understand why they were hitting him. Mrs Darling said the officers pushed her, cursed at her and told her to go back inside. I didnt move. I wanted to know who they were and why they were arresting my husband. They never identified themselves. They never said why they were there. They dragged my husband, threw him in the back of te bus and pulled off. Mrs Darling said she immediately got her son and her nieces and drove to the nearest police station, East Street South. When I got inside I saw the officers and asked them where my husband was. They verbally assaulted me, grabbed me and arrested me in front of my son and my nieces. They told the kids to get the hell out the station. My son refused to leave so one of the officers grabbed him, took him in a back cell and slapped him. He is eight. I screamed to one of the other officers to get him and they did. According to Mrs Darling, police held her and her husband until 1 pm on Thursday. They were charged with disorderly behaviour and obstruction. However, she said, she still does not know why her husband was initially arrested. We just want justice. I have the utmost respect for the law and for police, but now I dont feel safe in my own home. Something needs to be done. I dont have a record and neither does my husband. We filed a complaint with the complaints unit and now we are just waiting to see if anything happens. Calls to police at East Street South police station were unanswered up to press time. Amnesty International has issued reports for several years criticising police brutality in the Bahamas. There have also been numerous calls for an independent body to investigate police brutality claims. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Paul Rolle, Officer in charge of the Central Detec tive Unit, said a 21-year-old woman of Step Street, Fox Hill, took the baby to the Accident and Emergency department after she was found unresponsive. The woman said the baby had been vomiting all day. We have to wait on the autopsy to determine the exact cause of death. Right now we cannot say conclusively. The baby could have been sick or could have died from dehydration from all the vomiting. We do not suspect foul play at this time, he said. Active police investigations into both of these mat ters continue. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e WOMAN CLAIMS POLICE BRUTALITY OVER INCIDENT POLICEARE investigating the deaths of two babies one of which was found in a trash can in this area Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff Police investigate after boys body f ound in trashcan T T h h e e b b a a b b y y c c o o u u l l d d h h a a v v e e b b e e e e n n s s i i c c k k o o r r c c o o u u l l d d h h a a v v e e d d i i e e d d f f r r o o m m d d e e h h y y d d r r a a t t i i o o n n f f r r o o m m a a l l l l t t h h e e v v o o m m i i t t i i n n g g . W W e e d d o o n n o o t t s s u u s s p p e e c c t t f f o o u u l l p p l l a a y y a a t t t t h h i i s s t t i i m m e e P P a a u u l l R R o o l l l l e e , o o f f f f i i c c e e r r i i n n c c h h a a r r g g e e

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 11 battling for the illicit drug trade in the area. Illegal firearms recovered in Fox Hill account for nearly 10 per cent of the total guns seized in the country this year, according to police, with illegal ammunition at 35 per cent. We had regular reports of gunshots in the Fox Hill community and that was a great concern to us, the same thing was happening in the Nassau Village, Pinewood Gardens community and so these are the areas where we sought mainly to concentrate on, said Mr Rolle. Police have recovered 34 illegal firearms, and one rifle, in Fox Hill since the launch of their special taskforce in June. The teams are comprised of divisional officers, and officers from CDU, the Drug Enforcement Unit, Criminal Records office, and Central Intelligence Bureau. Attributing the operations success to the consistency of participat ing officers, Mr Rolle said there has been a significant reduction in the number of shooting reports from the area. There were at least three factions that we have identified trying to establish themselves in these turf wars and we cant have this, Mr Rolle said. This conflict resulted in a number of individuals being shot and a few persons being killed. We have brought these men together and have spoken with them in a view to lessen the tension within the Fox Hill community. He added: We have placed considerable resources in that community in order to arrest the conflict and prevent as far as possible further carnage. Twelve people have been put before the courts charged with possession of firearms and ammunition as a result of the operation. However, said Mr Rolle, there have also been four deaths. Operations in Pinewood Gardens and Nassau Village were launched October 1 and Mr Rolle said that officers will continue to monitor the Fox Hill community. We continue to monitor the situation in Fox Hill and wish to encourage the young men to engage in positive activities and lead productive lives. We will help, but we will also warn any person thinking to re-establish a turf in Fox Hill that we will not tolerate it. evidence was not there. In June, police arrested 10 Road Traffic employees after a six-month fraud investigation. It was estimated that millions of dollars had passed through the hands of employees at the Road Traf fic Department involved in the vehicle licensing scam, which was believed to have been in operation for about two years. Arrested employees were said to include a 52-year-old woman, who had been 18 years on the job, and a male employee who was found in possession of licensing para phernalia and an assortment of inspection stickers and decals. In an press briefing last week, Mr Rolle added: If you have possession of fraud ulent disks with a genuine decal, that would suggest that some persons are involved, but we still dont have that corroborating evidence, sufficient. Officers are also investigating alleged links between cor rupt officials at the Road Traffic Department and second-hand car lots who they believe could have assisted in the resale of stolen vehicles on the island of New Provi dence. According to sources within the CDU, there is the possibility any number of vehicles illegally licensed in the exposed Road Traffic scam could have been stolen cars that have been repeatedly sold to unsuspecting persons. Mr Rolle said drivers who have licensed vehicles through this unauthorised scheme are asked to bring their vehicles into CDU before officers are forced to "come and get you." f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e 100 CHARGED AFTER VEHICLE LICENCE SCAM INVESTIGATION FREEPORT A one-day workshop for beginner and intermediate underwater videographers will take place on October 28 as part of the Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival. This year, the festival will hold an extension programme known as FLIFF on-location: Grand Bahama, of which the underwater film course will be a part. Beginning at 9am, workshop discussions will include underwater camera techniques and the importance of production planning. At 2pm, after a lunch-break, participants will check in with the Underwater Explorers Society (UNEXSO) to film UNEXSOs legendary shark dive. They will be challenged with producing a short video of the experience. An afternoon post dive session will involve video screenings and discussions. In a career spanning more than 35 years, Paul Mockler, IATSE local 667 director of photography associate member: Canadian society of Cinematographers, has worked on hundreds of commercial, documentary and dramatic films. Sponsors of FLIFF on Location include the Pelican Bay Hotel, TheBahamasweekly.com, Bahamas Celebration Cruises, and SkyBahamas Airlines. For more information on the film festival visit: www.fliff.com Participants must provide their own underwater video equipment. FOX HILL TURF WARS SUBSIDE, POLICE TO EXPAND GUN SEARCH AWARD-WINNING cinematographer Paul Mockler will instruct an underwater film workshop as part of FLIFF on Location: Grand Bahama Island, an extension of Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival in Freeport on Thursday, October 28. LEARN TO CAPTURE THE BLUE KINGDOM

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LOCALNEWS PAGE 12, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force Band played for the opening BAHAMIAN-MADE products and fruits and vegetables were on display on Saturday at the opening of the World Food Day ceremony held at the Gladstone Road Agriculture Center Photos: Felip Major /Tribune Staff FOOD, GLORIOUS FOOD VISITORS ENJOY the World Food Day event FRESHPRODUCE on offer at the World Food Day event CONCHFRITTERS are cooked at the event ASTALLHOLDER with her selection of produce BOTTLES GALORE attract the eye of some of the visitors ON Saturday, Gladstone Road was the venue for a mini fair to celebrate World Food Day. The eight-hour event at the Research Centre on Gladstone Road included a farmers market, and live music provided by the Royal Bahamas Police Force Band. The day was identified by the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) to celebrate mankinds efforts to produce enough food to feed the world. FAOs theme for World Food Day 2011 is Food Prices From Crisis to Stability.

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INTERNA TIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y, OCTOBER 17, 2011, PAGE 13 PARIS Associated Press FORMER French Socialist Party chief Francois Hollande declared victory Sunday in the partys presidential primary, urging the left to unite around his bid to unseat embattled conservative Nicolas Sarkozy in elections next year. Hollande, a 57-year-old moderate leftist known more asa behind-the-scenes consensus-builder than a visionary, is seen by many as a welcome contrast to the toughtalking, hard-driving Sarkozy. Sundays vote for the main opposition party's presiden tial nominee comes at a time when many French citizens are worried about high state debt, cuts to education spend ing, anemic economic growth and lingering unemployment. With 2.2 million votes counted after Sunday's runoff voting, the Socialist Party said 56 percent of the ballots were for Hollande and 44 percent for his challenger Martine Aubry, who had succeeded Hollande as Socialist Party leader. The party estimates that more than 2.7 million people voted in Sunday's run-off. I note with pride and responsibility the vote tonight, which with more than 55 percent of the vote gives me the large majority I had sought, Hollande told supporters in party headquarters as results rolled in. He said the victory gives him strength and legimitacy to take on Sarkozy, who is widely expected to seek a sec ond five-year term in elections in April and May. Hollande pledged to reverse Sarkozy-era cuts in education funding and defend the val ues of the left. Aubry quickly conceded defeat. She had sought to be France's first female president. I warmly congratulate Francois Hollande, who is clearly ahead. His victory is unquestionable, said Aubry, famed for authoring France's 35-hour workweek law. The bespectacled Hollande was the longtime partner of the Socialists last presidential candidate, Segolene Royal. The two split after Royals 2007 presidential defeat to Sarkozy but stood side-byside during Hollande's victory speech Sunday. Recent polls suggest Hollande could easily beat Sarkozy in the presidential election next spring. The incumbents favorability ratings have hovered near the 30-percent level for months, but he is a strong campaigner and senses a rightward-majority tilt in the French electorate. HOLLANDE TO TAKE ON SARKOZY IN FRENCH VOTE FRANCOIS HOLLANDE, winner of the Socialist Party primary vote for France's 2012 presidential, left, celebrates with rival candidate Martine Aubry at the party's headquarters after the second round of the vote. Hollande urged the French left to unite behind his bid for the presidency in elections next year

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$5.32 $4.94 $5.50 THE TRIBUNE SECTION B business@tr ibunemedia.net MOND A Y OCT OBER 17, 2011 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B A N K o f t h e B a h a m a s I n t e rn a ti o n a l w i l l i n v e s t c l o s e to $6 million over the next 2 4 month s in upg radin g its 1 2 b ra nc h es, in c lu di ng an ex p an sio n of t he C armi cha el Roa d loc ation, following a ye ar in w hic h it w ould hav e mat che d 2 0 1 0 s b o t t o m l i n e d e s p i t e $ 9 1 3 2 m i l l i o n i n l o a n l o ss pr o v i s i o n s w e r e i t n o t f o rB AN K T O INVES T $ 6M I N UPGR ADE By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net T H E N a s s a u A i r p o r t D e v e l o p m e n t C o m p a n y ( NA D ) h as r ai s e d it s av ai l a b l e l i n e o f c r e d i t t o $ 5 8 2 m il lio n t hr ou gh it s fi nanci ng e f f o r t s i t s v ic ep r e s i d en t o f m a r k e t i n g t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s S p ea ki n g a t a m e et i n g o f t h e R o t ar y C l ub of Na s s a u S u n r i s e V e r n i c e W a l k i n e s ai d : T h e t o t a l b u d ge t f o r t h e p r oj ect is $ 409 .5 mi ll io n. I t i s t h e s i ng l e l ar ge s t in f r a s t r u c t u r a l p r o j e c t e v e r u n d er t ak en b y t h e G o ve r n m e n t W e v e r a i s e d $ 5 8 2 m i l l i o n t o d a y i n f o u r t r a n s a c t i o n s T h a t s t h e m o n i e s w e v e b e e n a b l e t o r a i s e N AD R AISE S $582M IN A V AIL ABL E CREDI T By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AN EASTE RN New P roviden ce rea l est a t e dev el o pmen t could c r ea t e m o r e t h an 10 0 f ul l t i m e j o bs w h en c om pl et e d, i t s ne w l y ap po i nt ed chief executive telling Tribune Business he was very confident that the 350-400 unit project would be sold out within the next four years. R ichard Brow n i ng said Pa l m Cay s UKb as ed i nv es tors had committed to continue to invest to make the project a success, having spent jus t shy of $40 mi ll i on t o get us wher e we ar e a posi ti on that is no w allo wing th e de velo pm en t to sta rt ma rk etin g to Ba ha mas based buyers in earnest. Emphasising that Palm Cay wanted to first build a local commu* Palm Cay chief very confident 350-400 unit development sold out in four years time 200-300 construction workers, eight contractors, on site UK investors spend $40m to date; looking at other Bahamas projects in future SEE page six SEE page five SEE page seven Far more than $409.5m LPIA redevelopment cost By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A LE A DI NG l i b e r t a r i a n h a s b a c k e d t h e B a h a m a s c u r r e n t t a x a t i o n s y s t e m b e c a u s e i t p l a c e s s e v e r e r e s t r i c t i o n s o n t h e G o v er n men t s ab ilit y to t ax and s p e n d as if t her es n o t o mo rr o w, u r gin g t h at an y r ef o r m f o cu s o n co n su mp tio n -b as e d t a x es ra ther tha n an i n c ome t a x Rick Lowe, vice-p resid ent an d tre as ure r of the Na s sa u I n s t i t u t e t h i n k t a n k t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t be ca use ta x i nc re a se s w e re so v i si bl e to cons ume rs an d b u sin ess es u n der th e cu rr ent i m po rt -d ut y ba se d s y st e m go ve rn me nts w e re ke pt i nche c k on thi s is sue be c au se o f t h e o b v i o u s r e s u l t i n g pol iti c al fa ll out. On e o f t h e s p eak er s at l ast w e e k s C o l l e g e o f t h e Ba ha m as (C O B ) de ba te o n wh eth er thi s na tio n sh oul d swi tch to a n inc ome t a x sy stem Mr Lo we a g a in re i ter ate d his be l ie f th at go ve r nme nt spe ndi ng r a ther tha n r eve nu e, was t he m ain f ac t o r b e h i n d p e r s i s t e n t f i s c a l T A X A TIO N SYS T EM RESTR ICT S GO VT T AX A N D S PEN D T h in k-t ank exec ut iv e rej ec ts i nc om e tax as sti fli ng pr oduc ti vi ty an d i nv estm ent By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C I T Y M a r k e t s h a s r e o p e n e d i t s S e a g r a p e s s t o r e l o c a t i o n T r i b u n e B u si n e ss c a n c on f i rm c u tt i n g i ts h o u rs fr o m 7 a m t o 1 1 pm C a l l s t o M a r k F i n l a y s o n Cit y M ar k et s p r in cip al and h e a d of i ts 7 8 p er c e n t m a j ori ty sh a r eholder, Tr a n s-I sland T r a d er s we r e n o t r e t u r n ed CIT Y MARKET S I N SE A GRAP E S S T O RE R E-OP E N SEE page five SEE page five BoB branc h es t o be rem odelled in next 24 mo nt hs $ 9m p rovi sion s, plus o perat in g co st rise behi nd 24 .5 % pro fi t drop in 2011 But MD s ay s sh are pri c e up 45 % in last 3 m ont h s

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net C O N S UM E R S w i l l st il l s e e a $0 .34 t o $ 0. 47 c e nt dec rea se in the cost of fuel despite the G o v e r n m e n t s d e c i s i o n t o i n c r e a s e t h e m a r g i n s f o r petroleum retailers, the min is t e r o f s ta t e f o r p ub l i c u t i l i ti e s has told Tribune Business. T h e G o v e r n m e n t a nnoun ced las t week that it w ou l d i ncr e as e t h e m ar g in s on ga s oline and diesel, previous ly fix ed at $ 0.4 4 a nd $0.1 9 p e r g a l l o n r e s p e c t i v e l y t o $0.54 and $0.34 cents. But, in late August, Prime M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m said no to a margin increase r e q u e s t e d b y t h e B a h a m a s P etroleum Retailer s As sociat i o n (B P R A ), a r g u in g a t th a t ti m e th a t t h e pr i c e o f g a s w a s al r e a dy to o hi g h a n d th e Go v e r n m e n t i s n o t w i l l i n g t o i mpos e a fur t her b urd en on the public. E x p la i n in g th e r at i on a l e f or th e Go v e r nm e n t m o v i ng n o w Phen ton N ey mou r sai d: T h e Gov e rnm en t did n ot c on sid er t h a t a n a p p r o p r i a t e t i m e bec a use the co st o f g as w as in the region of $5.60. The Government indicate d t h a t w e r e c o g n i s e d t h e ch all eng es the y [the re tai lers] wer e f acing, and was of t he vi e w th a t t he re w a s n ee d fo r a margin in crea s e b ut w e co uld n o t acco m mo d at e i t at t ha t t i me be caus e we d id n t f eel that the Bahamian economy a n d t h e B a h a m i a n p e o p l e c o u l d a c c e p t a n a d d i t i o n a l $0.30 on to that $5.60. Mr Neymour added: The p ri ce of oi l has s ignif ican tly decreased. Were now begin ni ng to f ee l t he ef fe c ts o f th at a n d s o w i t h t h e r e b e i n g a decrease in the cost of gaso G A S P R I C E S TO D E C L I N E D E S P I T E M A R G I N R I S E BUSINESS P AGE 2B, MONDA Y OCTOBER 17, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE Phenton NeymourSEE page 11

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HUGH SANDS ha s be en s e l e c t e d t o r e c e i v e t h e B a ham as F in ancia l Ser vi ces B o a r d s ( B F S B ) L i f e t i m e A c h i e v e m e n t A w a r d i n reco gni ti on o f hi s o ut s tan di ng con tr ib ution to the industry. Mr S an ds, a b ank in g ind ust r y v e t e r a n i s t h e f o r m e r C a r i b b e a n d i r e c t o r a n d Bah a m as m a na ge r f o r Ba r cl ay s B a n k f r o m w h i c h h e retired in 1995 after a career that began in 1973. He started at Barclays as a s ta ff m an a ge r in th e B a ha ma s h e a d o f f i c e a n d p r i o r t o b ec o min g B ah am as ma na ge r, a l s o s e r v e d a s m a n a g e r o f Barclays Bay Street branch. As Caribbean director his duties included r espo nsib ility for t he banks o peratio ns in t h e Ba h am as T u r k s an d C a i co s Isla nd s, a nd p rofi t an d p erfo rma nc e pla nni ng fo r th e b ank 's o pera tion s in the C a yman Islands and Belize. A f t e r r e t i r i n g f r o m B a r clays, Mr Sands was appoint e d chairman of t he Bank of th e Ba ha ma s a p o s it i on he h e l d u n t i l r e t i r i n g i n e a r l y 2 0 05 In 1 9 98 he w a s aw a rde d the Companion of the Mo st Distinguished Order of Saint M i c h a e l a n d S a i n t G e o r g e (CMG), in recognition of his s ig ni fic a nt c on tri but io n to th e Bahamas. Three years prior, he became an Honorary Fellow of the Bahamas Institute o f B an k e rs, n ow t he B a h a ma s Financial Services Institute. C u r r e n t l y h e r e m a i n s a tru ste e o f th e R oy a l B a ha m as P o l i c e D e p e n d a n t s T r u s t F u n d a n d c h a i r m a n o f t h e B o a r d o f T r u s t e e s o f t h e B a h a m a s H o t e l a n d A l l i e d I ndus tries P ension fund. He s e r v e s a s a d i r e ct o r o f T h e P r i v a t e T r u s t C o r p o r a t i o n T r i b u n e R a d i o H o l d i n g s Prov i de nc e Adv i sors, F id el it y B a n k a n d T r u s t A n d b a n c ( Bahamas ), CBH C o mpagnie Bancaire Helvetique SA ( f o r m e r l y B a n q u e S C S Alliance (Nassau ) Limited). Pr e v io u sl y he se r v e d a s c h a i rman of J.S. Johnson & Com pa ny a n d the Insu ra nc e C o mpany of the Bahamas. M r m S a n d s c o n c l u d e d a f o u r y e a r a p p o i n t m e n t a s Chairman of the Public Ser v i ce Co m mi s s io n o n t h e 31 BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDA Y OCTOBER 17, 201 1, P AGE 3B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T H E C O M M U N I C A T I O N S r egu lat or ha s b owed to pre s su r e from its tw o l ea di n g l i c e n s e e s o v e r t h e p r o po s ed ma r ke t s har e t hr e s holds fo r determi ning Significant M ar ket Po wer ( SM P ), a g r e e i n g t o a l t e r t h i s f r o m bet ween 2575 pe r cen t t o a 4 0 p e r c e n t b e n c h m a r k i n s t e a d I n i ts s ta tem ent of r es ult s o n t h e m e t h o d s f o r d e t e r m in in g SMP in th e B a ha m ia n c o mmu nicat ions mar ket the Uti lit ies Regulat io n & Compet it io n A ut ho ri ty ( URCA ) s a i d i t w a s p r u d e n t t o cha nge t he in it ia l t h r es ho ld it h ad gi ven, wh ich was th at car ri er s wi th bet ween 2 5-75 pe r ce nt ma r ke t share shou ld be pr es ume d t o have SM P T hi s was o pp os ed by bo th C a ble Ba ha mas a nd the new l y p r i v a t i s e d B a h a m a s T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m p a n y ( B T C ) w h i c h h a d a r g u e d t h a t t h i s t h r e s h o l d was inco ns is t ent wit h Eu r op ea n U nio n's (E U) prac tic e s. T h e S M P r e l a t e d p r o v i si on s of t he Ba ham as Co mm u n i c a t i o n s A c t 2 0 0 9 a r e l a r g e l y b a s e d o n t h e E U s e l e c t r o n i c c o m m u n i ca t i o n s s e c t o r d i r e c t i v e s a n d b o t h C a b l e B a h a m a s a n d B T C agr eed th at li cencee s wit h a mar ke t sh ar e of l es s t han 25 pe r c ent s hould be p resumed as no nSM P. H o w e v e r b o t h o p p o s e U RCA's in itial proposal that c o m m u n i c a t i o n s l i c e n c e e s w i t h a m a r k e t s h a r e o f b e t w e e n 2 5 7 5 p e r c e n t sh ou ld be pr es ume d t o have SM P, an d al so had s om e dif fi c u lt ies wi th t he r eg ula to r' s p o s i t i o n t h a t f i r m s wi t h 7 5 p e r c e n t o r m o r e m a r k e t sh ar e wo ul d b e a ut omat ica lly det er mi ned t o h ave SM P p o w e r N o t i n g t h e s e c o n c e r n s U R C A s ai d it ha d c on si de re d th e fee dbac k from both c ompan ies and ad ded : U RCA re co gnise s that it c anno t c onclus iv ely s ay t ha t a li cens ee w i t h l e s s t h a n 2 5 p e r c e n t m a r k e t s h a r e w i l l b e p r e s u m e d t o b e a n o n S M P l i c e n s e e H owever a ft er cons i der i n g a ll s ub mi s s i on s r e vie wing international expe r ie nces a nd co ns id er ing f act or s and char acter ist ic s sp ec if ic to the B a h a m a s ( t h e e m b r y o n i c s t age of t he elect r on ic co mm u n i c a t i o n s m a r k e t s ) U RCA co ns ide rs it p r ude nt t o increase the thr e s hold leve l f r om 25 p er cent t o 40 p er c e n t U RCA wo ul d no t li ke ly consider a lic ensee w ith mark et s ha re of les s t han 40 p er ce nt t o b e an SM P li cens ee u n l e s s c om p e ll i n g ev i d en ce i s p r o v i d e d t o U R C A d e m onstr ating other w is e. A s a r e s u l t o f t h i s c h a n g e U RCA wil l amen d i ts st at em e n t t o r e a d : A l i c e n s e e w i t h l e s s t h a n 4 0 p e r c e n t m ar ket sh ar e w i ll n ot ge ner a l l y b e p r e s u m e d t o h a v e S M P I n i t s e a r l i e r r e s p o n s e t o U RCA s in it ial cons u lt ati on on S MP de term ina tion me tho d s Cab l e Ba h am as s a id i t agr ee d with t he pr esum ption o f n o S M P f o r a n o p er a t o r w i t h l e s s t h a n 2 5 p e r c e n t m ar ket s ha re How ever, w hen c ons ideri ng a ma rk et s har e a bov e 25 p er c e n t a p r e s u m p t i o n o f d o m i n an c e i s u nr ea s o n a bl e a nd in de ed a pr e s um pt i on o f d omi nan ce bel ow a mar ket sha re of 4 0 pe r c ent is n ot co ns is tent with i nte rn atio nal pr ec edents, C able B ahamas h ad ar gued No t in g th at th i s was s up p o r t e d b y t h e E u r o p e a n C o m m i s s i o n i n t h e E U s S M P g u i d e l i n e s C a b l e B a ha m as a dd e d : "I t i s a l s o u n j u s t i f i e d t o i m p o s e w h a t a p p e a r s t o b e a c o n c l u s i v e deter mina t ion of SM P a bove a 75 p er c e n t t h r e s h o l d a s U RCA app ear s t o p ro po se "Hi gh ma rk et s har e alo ne i s n o t co n s i d e r e d s u f f i ci e n t t o e s t a b l i s h d o m i n a n c e i n S M P. T h us al th ou gh a p r es u mpt io n o f SM P may app ly i n t he ca se of ver y hi gh mar k et s ha re s, t he p r es ump ti on s h oul d not be concl us iv e o r ir refut a b le T his is consis tent w i t h i n t e r n a t i o n a l p r e c e d e n t s i n w h i c h t h e r e h a v e b e en f in d in gs of n o nd o mi n an ce n o twi t hs t an di ng ver y h i g h m a r k e t s h a r e s ( i e a bov e 75 per ce nt ). A s a r e s u l t C a b l e Ba ha mas c on cl ude d th at p res u m p ti o ns o f ma r k et d o mi n a n c e ( S M P ) s h o u l d o n l y a ppl y t o f ir m' s wit h a 40 pe r cent market share o r g r e ater, and that marke t sha re sho uld R E G U L A T O R A DJ U S T S M A R K E T P O W E R T H R E S H O L D T O 4 0 % URCA bows to feedback from BTC and Cable BahamasSEE page eight SEE page nine Hugh Sands to receive BFSBs Lifetime award HUGH SANDS

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INCREA SI N G numbers of h igh s ch oo l stu de nts a re pa r tici p a t i n g i n t o u r i s m i n d u s t r y related certification programs, which are being piloted in several schools as spart of an initiative by the Ministry of Education and the Bahamas Hotel Association. T h ir t y -n in e s tu d e n t s fr o m t he Government High School and Anatole Rodgers High School w er e t h e fi r s t to e nr o ll i n a ne w p ro gr am lau nc hed this w eek to p r e p a r e t h e m f o r j o b s a n d careers in the safety and security field in the nations hotels. T h e o p p o rt u n i t i es i n t h i s p ar t of o ur ind us try ar e co ns iderable, growing and projected to c on ti n u e to gr o w, pa r ticu lar ly w it h t he n ew resort s b eing developed in New Providence. Rou ghl y 4 per cent of pe ople e m p l oy ed in the ho t el indus t r y a re wor ki n g i n the s af e t y an d s ec ur i ty f ield, sa i d BHA p re sident Stuart Bowe. We a r e e x c it e d t o h a v e b e e n a b l e t o f o r g e a p a r t n e r s h i p b etwee n membe rs of the BHA To u ri sm S a f e t y an d Se c ur i t y Ne t wor k (TS SN) an d t h e principles of Anatole Rodgers, the Gov ern m e nt H igh Scho ol an d A q u i n as C o l l e g e t o cr e a t e a t h r e e -y e a r c e r ti fic a ti o n p r o g r a m w h i c h w i l l b e t a u g h t a f t e r s c h o o l t w i c e a w e e k b y t h e l ead i ng sec uri t y p erso nn el i n our industry. S t u d e n t s w h o s u c c e s s f u l l y c o mplete the High Sc ho ol Ce rtified S afe t y & S ec ur ity Of fic er P ro g ra m ( S S O P ) w i l l f i n d i t much easier to secure employment in this part of the industry. A cc o r d i n g t o T S S N c h ai r m an D ou g l a s H a nn a w h o i s al so sen io r vi cepre si dent f o r se c u r i t y a t K e r z n e r In t e r n a ti onal th e cur ri cul um i s bui l t a r o u n d a t e x t b o o k f o r t h e i nd u st r y g l o ba l l y ca l l e d T he Pro f es si o na l Pr ot e ct i o n O f f i cer. It covers a broad range of topics aimed at helping ensure t he s u c c es s o f th e y ou n g pe o pl e as t hey ent er our i ndustry. A v a rie ty o f tea c hin g to ols will b e u s e d to e n g a g e t h e s tu d e n ts a n d h elp t h em und er s t a nd the cr it ic a l r o l e t h e y w o u l d p l a y i n e ns ur ing our gu es ts h av e a sa fe an d m e m ora bl e e xp eri e n ce, Mr Hanna added. The pr ograms detai ls wer e s h ared recent l y duri ng a p arent s m eet i ng a t th e G overn men t High S ch oo l wh en pr in cipal Collin Johnson was joined b y A n a t o l e R o d g e r s H i g h S c h o o l p r i n c i p a l M y r t l e M cP hee an d rep re sen t at i ve s f ro m BHA and t he TSSN. Th e certification program is tied to t he gl oball yr ecogni s ed Int ern at i on al Fo und at i on f o r Pro tection Officers. T h e B H A i s a l s o w o r k i n g wi th the Ministry of Educ ati o n t o d e v el o p ce r t i f i c at i o n p r o grams in several other areas of th e i n d u s tr y i n p a r t n e r s h ip w it h t he Am er i c an H otel & Lodging E du c a tio n I ns titu te ; F lo r id a N u rsery G row ers and La nd s c a p i n g A ss o c i a t i o n a n d t h e Bahamas Landscaping Associ atio n; the Co te r ie o f Ca r ib be a n Butlers; and the Dermal Insti tute. W h e n a y o u n g g r a d u a t e w it h l it t le or no wo r k experi enc e co mes to in du str y s ee kin g employment after high school, i t i s cert i f i c at e p rog ram s l i ke t hes e which gives t he m a legup or a competitive advantage a nd h el p s t h em t o l an d t h ei r fir st job T he ir c ha n c es o f tr a nsi ti oning f r om s chool -t o-w or k an d b ec o min g a pr o d u cti ve a n d valued part of our industry are e nha nced con sid erab l y, sai d Mr Bowe. Photo Caption L to R: Myr t le M c Phee, principal A n at ol Ro d g e r s J r /S r H i g h S c h o o l; S tu a r t B o w e p r e s i d e n t t h e B a h a m a s H ot e l A s s oc i a t i o n ; Co llin J o hn s o n, p r inc ip a l, Go ve r n me n t H ig h S c h o ol ; H K e v in Br o w n, c h a ir p e r s o n s a fe ty a n d security credentialing commit te e a n d me mb e r o f th e T o ur is m S a f e t y & S e c u r i t y N e t w o r k ; Bridget Murray, credentialing com mi tt ee ce m ber a nd workf o rc e d e ve l o p m e nt m an a g er t he B ah a m as H ot el A ss oc i a tion; Lavern Dean, credential i n g c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r a n d m e m b er o f the Tou rism Safety & S e c u r i t y N e t w o r k ; P h i l i p J o h n s o n c r e d e n t i a l i n g c o m mittee me mbe r a nd me mbe r of the Tourism Safety & Security N e t w o r k ( N o t i n p h o t o i s S h o n a K n o w l e s p r i n c i p a l Aquinas College) BUSINESS P AGE 4B, MONDA Y OCTOBER 17, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE BHA F O R GE S SEC UR IT Y T R AIN ING SC H O OL L I NK LE F T T O RI G HT M r s M y r tl e M c P h e e M r. St u a r t B o we M r. Co l l i n J o h n s o n M r H K e v i n Br o wn M s B ri d get Murray, Ms. Lavern Dean and Mr. Philip Johnson.