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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03116
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 10-11-2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03116

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PAGE 1

N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Straw vendors warned to pay up Volume: 107 No.301TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SOMESUN, T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 79F B y TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net LESS than half of the 462 registered straw vendors wereu p to date with National Insurance and business licence payments up to the end of September, said WorksM inister Neko Grant. He said that while no disci plinary action was taken, the vendors were warned over the l ast 24 months to make their payments current so they would be able to move into the new market on Bay Street. His comments came after he opened the debate on proposed regulations that will govern the new market. Under the suggested rules registered occupants of the market must ensure that their National Insurance Board contributions, and those of their helpers are up to date, in order to get their business and operation licenses renewed. Mr Grant also shot down outright lies that the new straw market cost the gov e rnment $5 million more than t he building proposed by for mer Prime Minister Perry Christie. The Lucaya MP said the work has come in on schedule and within budget and ise xpected to cost Government $15 million, inclusive of construction costs and settlement fees. He said this is seven mill ion less than the cost of the proposed PLP straw market that was never built. It is wrong, it is a lie, it is misleadiang for the leader of the PLP to say that the final cost is $5 million more than the amount proposed by them, Mr Grant told Parlia ment yesterday. He was referring to statements Mr Christie made last week as he toured the unopened market with other PLP MPs. The work has been com pleted on schedule and well within budget. The anticipatLess than half are up to date with pa yments TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Debt $AVER LoanFidelity Bank Debt $AVER LoanBorrow & Save with Debt$AVER Fidelity-Bank-Bahamas-LtdFindUsOnFaceBook www.fidelitygroup.com *Offer applies to government workers only im lovin it POLICE SEARCH visitors at a cash for gold shop on Bay Street yesterday as part of a crackdown on scrap metal dealing. See full story on page 5 Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Dr Jean Turnquest, chief psychiatrist at Grand Bahama Health Services, said marijuana use is linked to the high incidence of mental illness and psychiatric admissions at the institution. She noted that marijuana is more potent today than in times past, and should not be taken lightly because it is a very addictive drug that can have a devastating impact on an individuals mental health. In observance of World Mental Health Day observed on October 10, the Grand Bahama Health Services hosted a workshop for high school stu dents at the Foster Pestaina Hall on Monday, under the theme, The Great Push: B y TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham hinted at a possi b le decrease in the number of constituencies yesterday telling Parliament that the Constitution only mandatesa minimum of 38 seats in the House of Assembly. He added that the Cons tituencies (Boundaries Commission is expected to make its recommendations toP arliament by the end of this y ear and voters' cards should be issued by the start of 2012. The Constitution pro vides that the minimum number of seats in the House of Assembly shall be 38, said Mr Ingraham. T here are currently 41 members of Parliament sitting in the House of Assembly. By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter Sbrown@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS Telecommunications Com pany will begin job recruit ment exercises in about three to four weeks, BTC officials said yesterday. Marlon Johnson, vice pres ident of sales and marketing, said the company is expected FASHION F F A A M M I I L L Y Y T T I I E E S S B B E E H H I I N N D D M M E E L L I I S S S S A A S S E E A A R R S S SEEWOMAN SECTION 12B ATHLETICS B B A A R R R R Y Y H H O O P P E E S S P P M M W W I I L L L L K K E E E E P P P P R R O O M M I I S S E E SEESPORTSSECTIONE POLICE LAUNCH CRACKDOWN ON SCRAP METAL SALES CUT S AHEAD IN C ONSTITUENCIES? MARIJUANA LINK TO MENTAL ILLNESS BTC T O START RECRUITING SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF STAFF S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8

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By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter Sbrown@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS T elecommunications company expects to increase EZ T op Up retailers by over 160 per cent by the end of 2012, B TC officials said yesterday. While speaking to reporters, CEO Geoff Hous t on said while the initial public reaction to EZ Top Up was not good, it seems things have turned around for the b etter. The interesting thing is when we made the transition it was reported that the whole channel disappeared but if you go on the streets today you will find a lot of the pers ons who initially vacated the m arket are back. Not in the numbers we saw before but they are there. am pleased to say the market has come back evenat the street level. M arlon Johnson, vice pres i dent of sales and marketing, said EZ TOP is doing so well that more than 150 businesses h ave now subscribed to the service. We have over 150 active l ocations. Some places are doing one or two transactions a day but we dont count them as active. Our goal is to have over 400 business minimum over the next 12 months. Right now 10 per c ent of all our transactions are electronic, we hope to increase that number, he s aid. Initial feedback has been good. Bahamians love to be able to put $2.17 on theirp hone. We are far ahead of what we projected and we are w orking very closely with our p artners to empower them a nd grow their market. B TC is moving toward completely eliminating phone cards by 2014, in a move the company says will increase efficiency and place them in line with international practices. T he corporation has said it w ill spend $1 million in mar keting support over the next 12 months to support distrib ution of its prepaid EZTop-U p cell phone minutes. Mr Johnson said they hope that by 2014, at least 80 perc ent of the market will be cardless. In the coming months, BTC p lans to introduce a number of services, including the 4G network by December in New P rovidence and Grand Bahama. He said the company has invested .28 million. B TC also plans to launch the Next Generation Network ( NGN) by the end of the year a t a cost of $53 million. The network will cover the entire Bahamas and will take about three years to officially be rolled out. T hey are currently testing NGN in Coral Harbour. The corporation has said it w ill spend $1 million in mar keting support over the next 1 2 months to support distribu tion of its prepaid EZTopUp cell phone minutes. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 3 By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net THE Court of Appeal yes terday dismissed a bid to overturn the sentence of a man found guilty of attacking his girlfriend stating that the ruling delivered in Magis trates Court was a suitable lesson for the applicant. And, the appellate court said, granting the appeal would have sent a bad message to the public about violence against women and the need for young men to con trol their anger. Court of Appeal president Anita Allen and justices Stan-ley John and Abdulai Conteh were satisfied that the two year, six month prison sentence handed down to 23year-old Travis Crossgill was more than fair given the extent of the injuries sus tained by his girlfriend. The injuries to her face, which were described as seri ous, included a broken nose, bruises and broken bones. On January 30, 2010, Crossgill was found guilty of caus ing grievous harm to his girl friend and causing harm to the virtual complainants friend. He was sentenced to serve two years in prison on the first charge and six months on the second. His lawyer Krysta Smith argued that the sentence of a judge in the lower court was not appropriate as there wasmore than one way to give punishment. She also said the probation report, which discloses that the appellant had a troubled childhood was not taken into consideration. She said her client, who had no previous convictions, was remorseful about what he had done and had sought counselling on his own, in an attempt to get help that will not be available in prison. In response, Justice John said: I think prison would be a lesson to him that you can not disrespect a woman in that fashion and that you cannot assault a woman. You have to send a message not only to him but oth er criminals out there. He said a significant proportion of the crime in the Bahamas is caused by young men who must learn that they have to contain their anger. Ms Smith said love often causes young people to do things, and cited the troubled relationship between her client and the virtual complainant. She claimed Crossgill was assaulted by his girlfriend on a number of occasions, but never hit back until the one time he lost control. Justice Allens response was: Love is not destructive. Love is not violent. Justice John added that there was absolutely no justification for this appellant acting in that matter towards that young lady and as I indi cated earlier, the medical report speaks for itself. Ms Smith then asked if the court was minded to grant a non-custodial sentence. Justice Conteh answered, nothing that her client faced six years on those counts and received less than half. Justice Allen added that there are consequences for everything we do in life. B TC CEO GEOFF HUSTON looks on as Vice-President of Marketing MarlinJ ohnson answers questions from the media. P hoto: T im Clarke / Tribune Staff SENTENCE SENDS A MESSAGE OVER VIOLEN CE A GAINS T W OMEN BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY TO INCREASE RETAILERS BY MORE THAN 160% S S E E E E b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s s s e e c c t t i i o o n n f f o o r r m m o o r r e e o o n n B B T T C C t o hire new employees by January. We do not know the exact number of people we will be hiring right now, but we do know that we will start recruiting new people soon. More than 300 people have already accepted the voluntary severance packages (VSEP er 100 to leave before the year is out. When that process is done we will bring new people in, he said. BTC employees began a ccepting VSEPs in late July. T he programme is a voluntary exercise where staff members can elect to separate or take early retirement from the company while benefiting from an incentive payment. Mr Johnson said: We will not be hiring 400 employees b ut it will be a significant n umber. We will place them mostly in customer service and in our new retail shops. He said BTC retail shops will be a shopping experience like never before offering Bahamians top notch customer service. Our objective is to deliver s ales growth through a highly m otivated workforce, providing exceptional customer service and operational excellence in a unique shopping environment, he said. We expect to have 50 retail stores covering the Bahamas in the next two years. Of that 50 at least 16 o f them will be owned by e ntrepreneurs. How much they end up with is determined by the demand. But our goal is to empower young B ahamians and do as much as we can to prepare them for c ompetition. BTC will also introduce full service flagships, mini-flagship stores, stand alone dealer owner stores and shop-in-s hop stores. T hese new branches will a llow customers to experience a wider selection of products and simplify and increase the convenience of bill payment. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e BTC TO START RECRUITING SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF STAFF

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E DITOR, The Tribune. THE UNITED STATES Republican Party has adopted a plan that everything Barack Obama puts forward, regard-l ess how much sense it makes o r how many people it benefits, they are going to object to it. This plan has now exposed many to be complete fools, because many of the new init iatives are what America desperately needs if they are to realize job growth, stimulate the economy and leveling of the playing field. The PLP, being the copyc ats that they are without really checking, has now gone d own the same path as the R epublican Party. They have d evised a plan to demonise Rt Hon. Hubert Alexander Ingraham, and have been successful in causing the not so well intentioned to gravitate to their negative rhetoric. T he plan by the PLP to say no to everything must be t he most asinine game plan known to man. They objected to Prescription Drugs and to t he Youth Empowerment Programme and now they are objecting to the latest crime initiatives. Remember they a lso said no to the people in Yamacraw Elizabeth, St A nns and Fox Hill for wanting good clean potable water too. T he PLP has now rebrande d themselves as the Party o f No! They are so paranoid that when the FNM win this time that they would have sunken to third place, which I am sure would cause the party to disband. The veryt hought of this being Custers last stand must not b e settling well. The slaughtering of each others charac-t er in plain view is so disgusting, that my PLP friends, off camera, are very disturbed Pitting one in leadership a gainst the other has comb ined their problems; the people who are telling them one thing are telling others whoa re not in their party another t hing. They have taken backstabbing to another level. The over zealousness of a wanna-be-leader has not only poisoned some of their most ardent supporters but has caused many to become so disgusted that many aret hreatening to stay home, r ather than vote FNM. The PLP has now found them in a state of flux. The plan to sell, vitriol and venom to a still peaceful society w ill not bear fruit. Not all Bahamians thrive on hearing negative all of the t ime. Not all Bahamians could stomach having anyone speaking ill about a man who h as contributed much and w ho has turned this country around. Many of us would quickly agree that whatever is good for the country is bad for theP LP. T he idea to sell no must have come from a selfish, greedy all for me baby or nothing mentality. Does anyone in the PLP have any s ense at all? Do they think that right thinking Bahamians cannot see for themselves? Does the PLP want to risk playing games this time. If they do, they do so at their o wn peril. Mr Christie will not be too p leased to know that there a re plans to force him out of o ffice before the election, or do precious little so the PLP could lose so that there would be another outcry for him to vacate the seat. The wannabe leaders will s top at nothing to have their s ay, one way or the other. But t he plan to disagree with everything, especially things that Bahamians are now bragg ing about will only expedite the inevitable, when all PLP will sing so solemnly When I come the last mile of the w Still fear Jesus Christ only, a ll others are powder puff. IVOINE W. INGRAHAM N assau, O ctober 5, 2011 EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 F reeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm J AMAICA, which has been working h ard to get its crime under control, seems to have taken a long slide backwards in recent months. Even more worrying is the corruption that Justice Minister Delroy Chuck in an address on Saturday to graduates of the Norman Manley L aw School says has reached a formidable level in Jamaicas legal system. H e told graduates, entering a syst em threatened by corruption, that one o f his ministrys priorities under the Justice Reform Programme was to build trust and confidence in the jus-t ice system. There is corruption within the court and the justice system, where the policeh ave been paid to say they cannot find a w itness, or persons have been paid to have documents destroyed amongst many other things, he told the graduates. Cases languish on the books for years with very little progress, clients become frustrated and cannot move onw ith their lives, sometimes they appease their grievances by taking justice into their own hands, Mondays Daily Gleaner quoted Justice Minister Chucka s saying. R eported the Gleaner: He noted that developments in the system leave lawyers with a bad reputation as beingo f no help while the justice system gets a bad reputation of being of no use. Our judges are known for their integrity and fair play but so much morei s required of them, Justice Chuck told the graduates, who he urged not to contribute to the problems when they go into practice. They (the judges removing any taint of corruption, vulgarity or malpractice that may exist and they must help us to strengthen public trust and confidence in the justice system. He said hundreds of thousands of cases had been in the court system f or eight months some even for y ears. Last year, said the justice minister, there were almost 460,000 cases before the courts with more than half being a backlog. He said that stemming the backlog was everybodys business as it posed a r eal threat to the nations economy. Many years ago, Sir Etienne Dupuch sounded like a broken record as he cons tantly urged, through this same colu mn, that Bahamians get a handle on c rime which at that time was nothing to what it is today. He warned that the Bahamas was foll owing down the same dead-end path as Jamaica. According to the US International S afety and Travel alert violence and s hootings occur regularly in certain areas of Kingston and Montego Bay. As for the Bahamas: The Bahamas has a high crime rate. New ProvidenceI sland in particular has experienced a spike in crime that has adversely affected the travelling public The Bahamash as the highest incidence of rape in the Caribbean according to a 2007 United Nations report on crime, violence, and development trends. I n Jamaica recently, gangs not only k ill, but behead their adversaries. They then hide the head, obviously to make identification more difficult. T he Daily Gleaner reported a Jamaican police officer moaning: This haffi stop, it has to. But the justice system not working for us (policeh old a man for murder, him go jail, and him get bail and is back on the road again. It cant work! Sound familiar? No, it cant work and it wont work. This is the very matter that will be discussed in the House of Assembly in this session as government prepares to crack down on criminals by amending the Criminal Procedure Code. The Bahamas cannot continue to follow in Jamaicas criminal shadow. PLP:the party that says no to everything LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Criminals Jamaica and Bahamas problems RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE CLERKResponsibilities include, but not limited to: Must have a pleasant telephone voice with a good command of the English Language and be customer service oriented. Good working knowledge of general oce procedures. Computer literate, knowledge of Accpac software working with A/Cs Receivable an asset. Scheduling customer work. Typing customer proposals and letters on Microsoft Oe. Filling new quotes and work completed. Credit stop lists and collections. Updating customer data base.ONLY APPLICANTS AGE 35 YEARS AND OLDER NEED APPLY.Please send resume to the following: Fax: 322-3969 or email jholm_tropex@coralwave.com P.O.Box N-1388, Nassau, Bahamas 127,&( 1HZWRUHKRXUVIRU 67$5'867'58*6 %OXH+LOOG HIIHFWLYH E DITOR, The Tribune. Happy Discovery Month, B ahamas! Another October month is upon us, the five hundred and nineteenth (519th b rated Discovery for the Europeans through the lead sea captain and explorer, C hristopher Columbus, was a new awareness to the Europeans, which established an ew trading route and link b etween the old world and a new hemisphere, the Americas. This new worldw as always there, however, it was a discovery to the Europeans who acquired for thef irst time the knowledge of its e xistence. Discovery is the attainment of knowledge or awareness of things not known of before. People are discovering every day. S ince fate has had it that one of the most significant discoveries in recent humanh istory occurred in The Bahamas when Mr Columbus set foot for the first time in the new world on the island o f Guanihani, which was renamed San Salvador, we in The Bahamas should make t his whole month as a cele bration of Discovery. Not only commemorating t he fateful day, October 12th, b ut using the month to redis cover who we are as a peo ple; reflecting on where we h ave come from; analysing where we are; and determining where we want to go orb e in the future. Lets do it f or us. Columbus act was an act of internationalism, it causeda new hemisphere to be widely known, the Americas, the most progressive part of the w orld today. The Bahamas was the start place for the new dispensation of globalisationa nd it continues to be a part of it. Bahamians today are mostly descendants of old world p eople, Africans and Europeans, who are the inhabitants who own and govern this new world state. There is a lot to be reflected on and to be resolved in our nationt oday, we can do a better job o f coming up with solutions organising under the umbrel la of the oneness of Bahami a ns. Let us take this most significant month to us and the world to focus on building ab etter Bahamian and i mproved Bahamas, official ly. H RUDY SAWYER Freeport, Grand Bahama, October 5, 2011. Disco ver a better Bahamas

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By DANA SMITH POLICE are warning that m etal thieves pose a threat to t he water supply of entire communities. This comes after repeated attempts to make off with copper pipes worth $200 each from the New Providence well fields. P olice believe the incidents are part of the lucrative scrap metal racket that continues to grow despite legislative attempts to curb it. A ddressing the press at the National Crime Prevention Office at Police Headquartersy esterday, Superintendent Stephen Dean said metal theft is a matter that police deem o f paramount importance. We are astonished and appalled by the level thats ome people in our country w ould go to for personal gain and self-interest without concern for the wider public, he s aid. He said the theft of water pipes can cause supply to bec ut to homes, businesses and e ven whole neighbourhoods. When you go into the well fields in particular and steal the pipes, that can shut down major communities, Mr Dean said. Early this year we had an i ncident where persons went into the well fields and it shut down a section of New Providence. Earlier this year, the theft of pipes from the well fieldsr esulted in supply being cut t o Coral Harbour and other western New Providence areas. Not only the Water and Sewerage Corporation has been affected, Mr Dean said. We have had the Broadcasti ng Corporation of the B ahamas and other news m edia companies (robbed of c opper wire) these are essential services. There is a cost involved in this. When we steal from t hese places, the burden and t he brunt of it goes on the customer and the wider Bahamia n public. Also this year, the Grand Bahama Power Company reported the theft of several feet of copper wire, whichc aused power-outages and more than $250,000 in replacement costs. ZNS has suffered a string of copper wire thefts, one of which caused 1540AM radio t o go off the air for three m onths. We want to talk directly to those persons out therew ho are going into these areas for personal gain, stealing copper, stealing metal, Mr D ean said. We say to you, persons of the criminal mind, please be aware the police willb e targeting you. The police will remain vig ilant, the police are going to take a zero tolerancea pproach to these persons. We will spare no efforts to make sure that they area rrested, he said. Mr Dean said surveillance will be intensified in areas where essential services are l ocated, such as Water and Sewerage Corporation properties and media companies. H e added: Anyone found receiving these products, they too will be arrested. It is just as bad to receive as it is to steal. We send particularly a warning to these businessest hat operate the scrap metals. You have an awesome responsibility, you cannot just look at the monetary gain from these items. If we find that you have t hese (illegal metals p remises, you too will be arrested. Mr Dean allowed that in s ome cases, scrap metal dealers cannot know that what is being sold to them is illegal. Its very difficult, we know, in some cases for them, because when these persons steal they dismantle it, they b reak it down. But if they see a large number of pieces of scrapm etal coming in, they need to call the police to be sure, he said. In July, government issued a 90-day ban on copper and other scrap metal exports, and the Pawnbrokers and Sec o ndhand Dealers Bill, which aims to tackle unregulated cash for gold and scrap metal businesses was tabled in parliament last week. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 5 COPPER THIEVES THREATENING WATER SUPPLY Sergeant Skipping along with Superintendent Stephen Dean address t he media yesterdayPhotos: F lipe Major / Tribune Staff Superintendent Stephen Dean s ays metal theft is a matter that p olice deem of paramount importance Police inspect visitors to a cash for gold shop in downtown Nassau

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LAST week's published list of guidelines for vendors of the new straw market has led a number of opposition members to call for serious revision of the bill to establish a straw market authority. While, the opposition agrees that a number of the outlined clauses do benefit straw market vendors, they say the overall tone of the bill ridicules, disrespects and degrades vendors. T he child of a straw vend or, the Oppositions lead speaker, Melanie Griffin, w as a major advocate in the d iscussion for just treatment a nd fair guidelines for straw vendors in the House of Assembly yesterday. D espite the belief of many who think that straw market vendors have never been governed by guidelines and rules, Mrs Griffin said regulation is not new to them as they came internally. She s trongly suggested that all v endors be given a hand b ook. M rs Griffin noted that s traw vendors worked close l y with the Ministry of Works on developing guidelines, but had no prior knowledge that it would be used for the legislation of the Bill nor that it would be published in the media. S peaking on behalf of straw vendors, Mrs Griffin said: No wonder they hadt o get in arms, no wonder t hey had to get concerned. If you are being impacted so greatly by a piece of legislation being put in place,d ont you think it is only fair that you know about it? She also zeroed in on the c larity of the seemingly unknown authority that is referred to many times in the Bill. She questionede xactly who the authority is, h ow many persons would comprise the authority and how decisions would bem ade regarding vendors. Calling other stipulations harsh, the member of parliament expressed concernt hat failure to pay weekly rental fees would result in a $1,000 fine. If you can't pay a rental fee, how can you pay $1,000? she asked. Apart from harsh fines, she accused the government of stifling Bahamian culture a nd entrepreneurship by b anning the sale of guineps and peanuts. Calling the vendors heroes and heroines, she praised them for major contributions to this country. In the midst of Bill disc ussions, St Cecelia MP C ynthia Pratt agreed that vendors could benefit from t he Straw Market Authority A ct, but urged the govern m ent to look at and refer to vendors with high acclaim. We don't seem to speak about straw vendors as we would lawyers, doctors, engineers or teachers. Wet end to speak down as though they are less than the others, she said. Mrs Pratt, who also grew u p in the straw market and c ould relate to many ven dors who have the challenge of meeting monthly bills, urged the government to understand why vendors go to great lengths to stand apart from their colleagues. M rs Pratt said: When y ou have 15-20 vendors in one area and all selling the same thing you have to be creative, because I have to try and get a product that I believe can be sold so I can make a couple dollars andI 'm the only one who has that product. Mrs Pratt called for adopti ng programmes in schools t hat teach straw work and agriculture to promote anything Bahamian. M rs Pratt defended Bahamians who are married to foreigners and own stalls being allowed to let theirh usbands operate their stall f or them should they fall ill or are otherwise unable to do so for themselves. She believes this aspect should be considered a must, as in many cases a spouse taking over the business is the onlyw ay for survival. As a way forward for vendors, she suggested the establishment of a creditu nion and scholarship fund for children interested in straw work. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Under The Patronage Of The Governor General His Excellency Sir Arthur A. Foulkes Dr. Myles Munroe & p r e s e n t a OCT OBER 9th-11th Reaching,Restoring&EmpoweringMenForPositiveActionMr. Ethan MossPresident Real Men Min. Event Coordinator SCHEDULEOFEVENTS SUNDAY, 9th OCTOBER 4:00PM 1) MARCH from Southern Recreational Grounds to Rawson Square for MISSION OUTREACH & RALLY 2) NATIONALADDRESS byGovernment,Church,Police&CivicLeaders in Rawson Square MEN ONLYADVANCEMENTEVENTS@ The Diplomat Ct., Carmichael RoadMONDAY, 10thOCTOBER 9:00am-11:30am Young Men & Boys Empowerment Session 7:30pm9:30pm MEN ONLY Advancement & Action Event TUESDAY, 11thOCTOBER 9:00am-11:30am Men In Crisis Empowerment Session 7:30pm9:30pm MEN ONLY Advancement & Action Event Tel.461-6442/5or461-6471Fax341-6936Email:bfmadmin@bfmmm.com OPPONENTS SPEAK OUT ON BEHALF OF VENDORS M ELANIE GRIFFIN, t he child of a straw vendor, is one of a number of voices to have spoken out about the list of guidelines for straw mark et vendors published last week N N o o w w o o n n d d e e r r t t h h e e y y h h a a d d t t o o g g e e t t i i n n a a r r m m s s , n n o o w w o o n n d d e e r r t t h h e e y y h h a a d d t t o o g g e e t t c c o o n n c c e e r r n n e e d d . I I f f y y o o u u a a r r e e b b e e i i n n g g i i m m p p a a c c t t e e d d s s o o g g r r e e a a t t l l y y b b y y a a p p i i e e c c e e o o f f l l e e g g i i s s l l a a t t i i o o n n b b e e i i n n g g p p u u t t i i n n p p l l a a c c e e , d d o o n n t t y y o o u u t t h h i i n n k k i i t t i i s s o o n n l l y y f f a a i i r r t t h h a a t t y y o o u u k k n n o o w w a a b b o o u u t t i i t t ? ? M M e e l l a a n n i i e e G G r r i i f f f f i i n n THENEW Straw Market in downtown Nassau

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 7 B y LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net T HE Court of Appeal hearing of convicted paedophile Andre Birbal was delayed yes-t erday due to the applicant not having an attorney. Birbal, who was convicted in t he Supreme Court earlier this year of having unnatural sex with two underage boys, told JusticesA nita Allen, Abdulai Conteh and Stanley John that he was unable to afford an attorney. I wish to be appointed an attorney. I am unable to afford one as Ive been incarcerated for almost three years, he said. T he former teacher, who was sentenced to 35 years in prison by Justice HartmanL ongley, told appellate court president Justice Allen that he intends to appeal against c onviction and sentence. Birbal was accused of having sexual intercourse with twof ormer students. The incidents were alleged to have occurred b etween January 2002 to June 2007 with one boy, and from September 2002 to June 2005w ith the second boy. On Wednesday, January 26, a jury of seven men andt wo women delivered guilty verdicts in six of the eight charges against the former art t eacher. His sentencing was handed down six days later. Justice Allen acknowle dged Birbals request for an attorney and noted that provisions would be made for ana ttorney to be appointed. The matter was adjourned to Thursday, October 27. LACK OF ATTORNEY DELAYS APPEAL

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His comments came after h e confirmed the appoint ments to the Constituencies Commission. T he Commission consists of Brent Symonette, MP for St Anne's, and Tommy Turnquest, Mount Moriah MP who have been selected to represent the government a nd Philip Davis, MP for Cat Island who will represent the Opposition. Speaker of the H ouse Alvin Smith chairs the body while Supreme Court Justice Stephen Isaacs serves a s deputy chairman. It is my hope that we con clude all matters relating to t he work of the Commission, including approval by Parlia ment, during the course oft his year so as to permit the Parliamentary Registration Department to begin the distribution of voters cards the f irst week of January, 2012. Mr Ingraham told Parliament. The last time the Commission made its report to the Governor-general was onM arch 13, 2007. A new Commission meets every five years to study the n umber of registered voters in constituencies and make adjustments where consideredn ecessary. In densely populated areas it takes into account the number of persons in each constituency and tries to create a population balance and in less populated areas the geo graphical makeup and expanse of the area would be taken into consideration. As of October 7, there were approximately 134,000 registered voters in the country with the majority of them residing in the constituency of Blue Hills in New Providence. The prime minister also gave the following breakdown of Registered Voters in New Providence: Bain and Grants Town, 2,869; St Cecilia 3,105; Ft Charlotte 3,157; Farm Road & Centreville 3,218; Golden Isles 4,790; Sea Breeze 4,390; Elizabeth 4,290; and Blue Hills 5,085. In Grand Bahama and the Family Islands: West End & Bimini 2,619; High Rock 3,562; MICAL 1,160 and North Abaco 3,414. There are currently 41 constituencies in the country: 26 in New Providence; six in Grand Bahama and Bimini; two in Abaco; two in Eleuthera; two in Andros and the Berry Islands; one in the Exuma Cays; one in Long Island and Ragged Island; one in Cat Island and San Sal vador; and one in Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked Island, Ack lins and Long Cay. The prime minister urged eligible voters who have not yet registered to do so. In New Providence voter registration occurs between 10am and 4pm at the Marathon and Town Centre Malls, the General Post Office, the National Insurance Board headquarters, Princess Mar garet Hospital, College of the Bahamas and other locations. Between 5 and 7 pm, registration continues at the Mall at Marathon and the Parliamen tary Commissioners Office. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ed final account is approximately $12 million, includinga n estimated $600,000 in c hange orders," Mr Grant s aid. "It has been erroneously reported that the stop, review and improve action taken by this government has incurred a cost of $11 million. He added that the maximum the government will end up spending for the new market will total $15 million inclusive of construction costs and settlement fees and is $ 7.5 million less than the PLP's $22.5 proposed straw market. The Lucaya MP also said the regulations will crackdown on the area's current "flea market" appearance by outlawing "knock-off" products and souvenirs produced in other countries while encouraging the creation of Bahamian made products. A ny vendor caught selling unapproved products may have their licenses revoked. Mr Grant said while it has a lways been public policy that o nly Bahamians, who are at least 18 years old be allowed to operate stalls in the market, over the years there have been incidents to the contrary. Section 3 of the regulations affirms current policy andm andates that only Bahamia ns over 18 can operate a stall while section 5 of the Bill mandates that every vendor and helper must wear an identification card while in the market. Another section of the legislation prohibits sub-leasing of stalls and any licensed vendor who hires an ineligible w orker may have their licence suspended or cancelled. These regulations will be enforced by the MarketA uthority. T he new market will require an estimated $1.2 million a year to operate. Government has set a lease rate of $5 per day or $35 per week for vendors for two years. T he Ingraham administrat ion has also approved $750,000 to be allocated to the market for start-up capital and training classes for vendors. The market is 34,000 sq ft at ground level with a 4,500 sq ft enclosed mezzanine accessible by elevator. The new market has space f or 500 stalls for vendors, including 31 specialty stalls and 14 spaces for wood carvers. O n the upper level there is a lso space for after-school care for the vendors' children, a kitchen and a multi-purpose room that can be used for meetings or training sessions. The new market will also have infrastructure to acceptc redit card payments if the v endors choose to use the service. Investing in Mental Health. In her presentation on Drugs and Addiction, Dr Turnq uest noted that peer pressure and dealing with the stresses of school and home and family life are some reasons why students experiment with drugs. She said marijuana and prescription drugs are more commonly usedby teens to get high. Dr Turnquest stated that m arijuana has many street names, such as weed, grass, herb, chronic, and Mary Jane. She said smoking marijuana can cause mental problems such as confusion, anger, tiredness and suicidal thoughts. When I graduated some years agowe never saw peop le coming to the mental institution who had been smoking marijuana, but now there are much higher incidents of mental illness and psychiatric admissions connected with marijuana use, so we are talking about a major problem, Dr Turnquest stressed. She also warned that marijuana use can cause infertility problems in men and women. Dr Turnquest said the use of prescription drugs is a growing trend among teenagers because it is easily accessible. She noted that cough and cold syrups that can be found in most homes is now being used to get high. The syrup is mixed with soda or alcohol or jolly rancher candy. The mixture is associated with Hip-Hop rappers such as Lil Wayne, and it is referred to as syrup, sizzurp, juice, purple drank, purple and Texas tea. Dr Turnquest said it is a deadly mixture that can cause a heart attack. Some of the common side effects are confusion, dizziness and high blood pressure. She also pointed out that alcohol use contributes to half of all murders, suicides and accidents. Dr Turnquest said that inhalants are also dangerous and can result in death.Huffing is highly addictive and slows body functions and can cause loss of consciousness and brain damage. She also noted that cocaine also referred to as white lady, coke, Aunt Nora, big C, and candy cane causes mental depression. Persons can also contract HIV by sharing needles, she added. Dr Turnquest noted the success rate of helping drug addicts is not good, and encouraged students to stay away from drugs. She said students should seek help from teachers, guidance counsellors, social workers, psychologist and psychiatrists. Also speaking at the workshop was guest speaker Rev Dr Elvis Burrows of Central Zion Baptist Church, who commended the 20 nurses for completing mental health training. CUTS AHEAD IN CONSTITUENCIES? f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e By AVA TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE public should not h ave to bear the cost of politically motivated contract cancellations, the deputy leader of the Opposition said. Brave Davis, MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay, and San Salvador, said the resulting p enalty fees should be paid by the individual who makes t he determination to break a contract. The Cat Island MP criti cized the cancellation of the former project contracted by the Christie administration d uring his contribution to pro p osed regulations for the new straw market in the House of A ssembly yesterday. He added that the straw market project was not the only example of the public bearing the cost of projects that are cancelled as a result of p olitical decisions. We talk about making decisions, the decisions have t o be rational, thought out, and the consequences under stood, Mr Davis said. That w as not done in this case and it is costing the Bahamianp eople. He added: I call on this p arliament to consider how do we protect ourselves and ordinary Bahamians from h aving to pay for the silly decisions, hasty decisions, made on behalf of our people. The Christie administration a warded a $21,472,374.13 con tract to Woslee Dominion to construct a new straw market i n 2007. In his debate contribution yesterday, Lucaya MP Neko Grant said that the contract i ncluded a client contingency o f $1,073,618.71. Mr Grant said that the init ial construction budget was $10 million. It must be recorded that this contract was executed without completed plans, Mr Davis said. Among the items not p riced were stalls or booths. C ontract for a straw market and not include stalls? M r Grant said the Ingraham administration made the decision to cancel the projecta fter an in-depth review of the contract. The most n otable reason, he said, was the cost and its percentage of the governments capital budg et. Mr Davis said: This gove rnment terminated the con t ract with Woslee Dominion, and decided that all reasonable contractual obligationst o the contractor, architect, a nd other concerned with the project would be settled by the government. A ccording to published r eports, there is an unresolved l egal dispute between the gov ernment, the architect, and contractor over the cancelled contract. PUBLIC SHOULD NOT BEAR COST OF PENALTY FEES M ARIJUANA LINK TO MENTAL ILLNESS STRAW VENDORS WARNED TO PAY UP B RAVE DAVIS h as hit out at the penalty fee payments for the Straw

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By JOHN HEDDEN IN MY last article, I touched upon the use of technology in Bahamian agriculture; where its application has been most successful (Andros (education It is natural to follow on with a discussion of the advantages of a strong infrastructure both physical and logistical. First, I will deal with the physical side. This must include access to land, roads, transport and communications, utilities and energy, and equipment. Access to land is obvious and essential. Access to private land is usually not feasible unless the farmer uses or rents land, in which case the competition from real estate sales will be a factor. An example can be seen next to us in Florida, where the Homestead area has been changing from an agricultural community to a residential/ commercial area. Why? Simply because land owners can earn more money from selling real estate than using the land for farming. Here in the Bahamas, that pressure is possibly even greater. So, that leaves other types of land. In the southern coppice i slands, generation and commonage properties allow indigenous people access to and use of the land, but never outright title. This in itself is restrictive because of competition for land from other members of the community. Again, these islands have little Crown land of agricultural value to offer for lease. In the northern islands, many thousands of acres of pine and previously forested land are available for farming, and fortunately most of this is public (Crown acres of previously cleared and farmed land are available on Andros, Abaco, and Grand Bahama; where ample fresh water is easily accessible for irrigation. So why has all this land not been taken up by farming enterprises? The first hurdle comes with the lease of the land from the government through the Min istry of Agriculture. There is apparently no sys tem in place for proper legal leases to be prepared and issued to farmers; and farmers are reluctant to invest in an agricultural enterprise without the relevant documentation in hand. Of those that do farm the land, fewer still are prepared to build and live on the farm without that essential piece of paper. This means that travel between the settlement and the farm can be time consuming, expensive in terms of fuel costs, and can leave the property open to the two legged critters comeh arvest time. In addition, wild hogs, cattle and horses become pests in some farming areas. So the end result is little investment is made, and farmers try to implement the inherited and traditional slash-andburn system of subsistence production on a 25 acre block of previously cleared land leased f rom the Crown. This is much, much larger than the traditional task or quarter acre used in previous times. It does not, and cannot work. A more technologically advanced system demands more efficient communication and access to information and physical inputs. Again, these are sorely lacking and unavailable to the small farmer. Farm roads are mostly in very poor condition and subject to the vagaries of the poli tics of the day. Inter-island shipping through the contracted mail carriers is inefficient and unable to deliver any volume of perishable farm goods to the other end in good condition. The ministry runs outlets such as the produce exchange and fish and farm store, both on Potters Cay, and sadly neither operate in any way close to their intended purpose. Why? No real alternatives are presented, and the island packing house system has never functioned properly. For livestock production and processing, the situation is even more miser able. It doesnt even exist. The abattoir is exactly what its name implies, a place where slaughter and processing are prehistoric and often considered barbaric. No institution exists in any of the Out Islands to even remotely accommodate animal husbandry no veteri nary services, no extension ser vices, no slaughter and processing facilities, and no storage or marketing services Access to utilities and energy is mostly absent in the designated farming areas. This naturally raises farm operation costs and limits access to timely infor mation. One example would be the need for on-farm power to access the internet for market prices and accessibility. As for energy, the cost of fuel is exorbitant for farmers using diesel for farm mechanisation, and gasoline for transportation. These factors, along with poor road conditions, put more stress on potential farm prices due to operating and maintenance costs. The use of equipment for farming is severely limited by the operators lack of financial c apabilities. No land title means no collateral; means no financing; means no investment; means little income; means Big Problem. The co-operative system and government guaranteed loans have failed to help solve this because neither institution has been innovative in terms of agricultural enterprise. Both could have provided much of the logistical and physical infrastructure needed. On the logistical side of infra structure, farmer education and extension services are critical for advances in farming systems. Unfortunately, neither have been addressed and information on basic physical inputs such as crop irrigation and fertility regimes are not available to farmers. Many islands including Abaco do not even have a proper extension officer. At the other end, the farmer must actively seek out markets, which are often on another island where a population cen tre exists. This involves further expense with travel, accommodation and eventually shipping costs. Again, no information is available concerning market demands, prices, seasonality due to consumer numbers, and changes in product preference according to the time of year. For example, Bahamians do not eat many vegetables, but foreign visitors usually do. And, by the way, macaroni and cheese is not a vegetable dish. So these are some of the prob lems presented to the Bahamian with farming in the blood. It is not therefore surprising to find minimal small farm pro duction in the islands even though there are several thou sand registered farmers in the country. The obstacles to being suc cessful as a farmer are immense and daunting. In addition, the lack of departmental support amplifies the difficulties. This merry go round results in a vicious circle of negatives which actively prevent the establishment of any genuine homegrown small farming sector, even though the potential is there. Dont the politicians keep on pointing out to us that there is a $500,000,000 a year market out there, and we need to do more about it? Talk of self-sufficiency, food security, jobs, pride of production and endless platitudes abound, but prove to be little more than hot air. But my question remains: Where is the development of the infrastructural support systems for the agricultural industry? This can only come from the government, and it won't. We see periodic plans, as with the latest five-year plan from the Ministry of Agriculture now going into its second year. But nothing can be seen of this at ground level where most of us live. The only real impetus is coming from the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC streamline itself under the direction of its chairman, himself a successful agricultural businessman. Andros is leading in this respect, and hopefully other islands will follow. As a final word in this article, I will say that the political rhetoric and the lip service paid to farming is huge, but unfortunately this does not translate to active input or support for the sector. Rather, our politicians would seem to encourage the foreign investor with the big agribusiness programmes, where Bahamians may be employed as with the mega resort projects still being promoted throughout the country. We havent lost that plantation mentality. Big agribusiness has not yet proved to be permanent, good for sustainable production, or even beneficial for the local entrepreneur. We still haven't cottoned on to the idea that small business enterprises, including agriculture, are the lifeblood of any economy. In my next article I will present arguments for and against the development of a viable agricultural sector including land usage (our one remaining untapped resource) and the deleterious effects of poorly managed and monitored agriculture on land and ecological systems. AGRICULTURE SERIES PART 3 INFRASTRUCTURE THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 9 )25(1725/($6( &ROOLQV$YH 6WRUHIURQW ,QUHDURI 0XOWL$XWRDUWV )W0H]]DQLQH )RULQIRUPDWLRQFDOO G N-1313Cabinet Of fice THE BATTLE OF AGRICULTURE VERSUS REAL ESTATE The writer is a former horticulturist with botany degrees from UWI Mona campus and the University of Reading in the UK. Mr Hedden has worked for the Bahamas Ministry of Agriculture and on the USAID project, BARTAD Andros. He is now establishing a modern demonstration fruit and vegetable farm on 10 acres of Crown land in Abaco, where he has worked with farmers for the past 25 years. A TEAM f rom the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation admires healthy tomato plants, the product of the new drip irrigation and fertigation systems employed by North Andros farmer Caleb Evans. But farming in the Bahamas faces a key pressure the value of land for real estate versus the value of land for farming

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B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANYS (BTC c hief executive yesterday said he was very confident its would meet the $60-$80 million operating income target s et by its London-based par ent, having achieved a com petition milestone by conc luding an interconnection agreement with its main rival, Cable Bahamas. P ledging that Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC absolute best in technologya nd communications services to the Bahamas, Geoff Houston said BTCs $42.8 millioni nvestment in its 4G (fourth generation) network, set to be rolled out over the next two years, would ultimatelyg ive Bahamians the same Internet connectivity speed on their cell phones as they enjoyed at home. Adding that a 7 per cent increase in traffic on its existing 2G cellular network indicated that BTC was getting to grips with the dropped calls and other service issues plaguing it, Mr Houston said BTC still had a long track to go in its efforts to restructure and reshape its business, $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $4.94 $5.50 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A GRAND BAHAMAB ASED employer is today set to have make or break talks with the islands monopoly power supplier in a last-ditch bid to save 60 j obs, telling Tribune Busin ess it could not see how Freeport can ever recover f rom this disaster as it r elates to power costs. Stephen Howes, the major shareholder in Q ueens Highway-based F enestration and Glass serv ices, in an e-mail sent to this newspaper said the c ompany had slimmed its workforce considerably since its 300-strong maxim um. P ointing out that Gregory M oss, the attorney and PLP candidate for Marco City w as incorrect in stating that Fenestration had completely shut down and left Grand B ahama, Mr Howes said: We have in fact reduced our operation considerably, but as yet have not left Grand Bahama. Most of the problems we have experienced over thel ast four years are due to Grand Bahama Power Company and its inability t o supply a quality product that doesn't destroy our equipment, and at a pricet hat we can produce our p roduct and remain com petitive. He added: We have a T uesday, October 11, after noon meeting with Sarah MacDonald at GrandB ahama Power Company to see what their intentions are, and to see if we can work our problems out. If we can not, then we will have to leave Grand By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THENational Insurance Board (NIB per cent increase in year-over-year contribution income to $190 million,i ts director said yesterday, adding that its reserve fund remains strong for the medium and long-term. Emphasising that implementation of virtually all recommendations contained in NIBs last two actuarial reviews, plus the 2005 Social SecurityR eform Commission report, had allev iated concerns its $1.611 billion r eserve fund would be completed by 2032, Algernon Cargill said a combination of improved compliance and changes to the wage ceiling/contribut ion rate were expected to drive contribution revenues for 2011 higher. T elling Tribune Business that NIB w as expecting to prosecute the same number of employers for non-payment of due contributions as it did in 2 010, a figure which totalled 1,300, Mr C argill said the social security systems m ain compliance/enforcement challenge continued to be with the selfe mployed. With self-employed persons now qualifying for industrial accident benefits, the NIB director said: Its to their benefit to pay contributions, as t hey qualify for all benefits apart from unemployment benefit. N IBs last figures, for its 2010 financial year, showed that the number of self-employed persons contributing to NIB increased year-over-year by 2.5 per cent, going from 5,440 in 2009 to 5 ,577 last year. Contributing employe rs, though, fell in number by 5.4 per c ent to 12,564 from 13,282. That is a possible sign of the recessions impact, but Mr Cargill said larger Bahamas-based employers were performing better at paying NIB contributions on time, having taken heed of its enforcement drive. The NIB prosecuted 1,200 delinq uent employers in 2009, and 1,300 last year, and Mr Cargill told Tribune B usiness: Its probably the same number in 2011. Were prosecuting fewer employers, because the biggest challenge were having is in the selfemployed sector......... The big boys a re paying now. N IB enjoyed a 4.9 per cent yearo ver-year jump in contribution income between 2009 and 2010, rising from $159.9 million to $167.8 million, and a larger increase is projected for 2011. Were projecting around $190 million, Mr Cargill told Tribune Business. Last year we did $167.8 mill ion. Its primarily because of increased compliance, and also changes in the contribution ceiling andc ontribution rate. All those are facB y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC expects to generate in excess of $10 million in operational cost savings for the year to end-March 2012, after purchasing its new 4G network for a price at least 25-40 per cent B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he chairman of recently renamed RND Holdings yesterday said the company was banking net cash flow of$ 25,000 per month after restructuring its debt and finding a new majority partn er, adding that it might gen erate a little more than last years $348,867 net incomei n 2011. S peaking ahead of thenow Colina Real Estate Funds annual general meet i ng (AGM Jerome Fitzgerald said that by bringing in Colina asm ajority shareholder and having them pay out the $2.904 million debt owed to F irstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas pany had completed its turnaround from a cash f low standpoint. He added that the compa ny had discussed paying a d ividend to reward long-suffering shareholders, who had stuck with it through dark t imes of annual losses, the sale of its cinema operations to Galleria and conversion into a real estate investment t rust. However, Colina Real Estate Funds Board had BTC VERY CONFIDENT ON $60-$80M TARGET C onfirms interconnect deal milestone with Cable Bahamas $42.8m 4G network to roll out over 18 months $53m NGN network to launch pre-Xmas SEE page 7B BTC TARGETS OVER $10M COST SAVINGS Buys 4G network -40% cheaper than if standalone Pledges two-thirds of -plus retail stores to be B ahamian owned Aim for 167% EzTop-Up expansion in 12 months 400 staff to depart, but new hirings to start in month SEE page 4B B AHAMAS T elecommunications Company CEOGeoff Houston. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff NIB TARGETS 13.2% CONTRIBUTIONS RISE Eyeing $190m for 2011, based on better c ompliance and ceiling/rate rises Expecting to prosecute another 1,300 employers in 2011 Aiming to shrug off Prime cut by generating investment returns to match last years $92m A LGERNON CARGILL SEE page 5B FORMER RND BANKS $25K CASH MONTHLY Mulling dividend after Colina deal causes cash flow turnaround Chair says share price doubles since he sold out Properties 95% leased SEE page 6B MAKE OR BREAK M EETING TO SAVE 60 EMPLOYEES Employer in last d itch talks with Grand Bahama Power Company SEE page 7B

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BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Yourwith ourWin6arechancesgreatpromotion P R O M O T I O N E N D S O N D E C E M B E R 1 5 T H 2 0 1 1The Odds Are With YouBe one of two lucky customers to win your mortgage or vehicle loan payment for 6 months*plus one year free insurance .* When you are approved for a mortgage or vehicle loan you can enter our Win 6 Promotion where you are eligible to win up to US $20,000 toward your mortgage or up to US $6,000 toward your vehicle loan payment. All approved customers will also receive a Gold or Platinum Credit Card with no joining fee, a free Visa Debit Card and free Internet Banking.Its only a draw away so call us at 502-6809 or visit www.cibcfcib.com Up to US $1500 towards your vehicle insurance and up to US $2500 towards your home insurance Valid upon approval of mortgage and/or vehicle loan Special conditions applyPersons approved for either vehicle and/or mortgage loans will be given one (1o be eligible to win, you must answer a general knowledge question on the given entry form. Prizes of 6 months payments will be drawn on March 15th 2012 from accumulated entries. Prizes are not transferable or redeemable for cash. Ask a Sales Specialist for full terms and conditions. The CIBC logo is a trademark of Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, used by FirstCaribbean International Bank under license. ACCIDENT RESPONDER LAUNCHES IN BAHAMAS A VEHICLE accident first-responder, ForenSys Bahamas, has been launched to insurance comp anies, insurance brokers a nd members of the Royal Bahamas Police Force. B orn in Curaao ForenS ys Bahamas connects the i nsurance industry to a cyber system. The company assesses v ehicle accident scenes, takes statements from those involved and enters the information in a data system that is accessible to insurance companies, brokers and the police. T his system stores inform ation on vehicular accident scenes, and can give insurance agents a historyo f drivers insured by them. Merlin Adderley, a longtime member of the insurance industry, will head up the ForenSys Bahamas team. It all started five years a go when I started r esearching a product that would be beneficial to the m otoring public, law e nforcement and the insur a nce industry of the Bahamas, Mr Adderley explained. Programme Through my research I f ound the Vision programme, which is a first r esponder programme that provides the assessment and data entry of vehiculara ccidents. I compared it with a similar product that already exists here in the Bahamas and found it to be far superior. I subsequently met with Robby Rodrigues of V ision, and travelled to C uraao so that I could see the product in full o peration. Elated about the prod u ct, I contacted our local police department and was granted permission forI nspector David Lockhart to accompany me to Curaao, so that our police would also have first-hand experience as to how the program works and the benefit it could bring tot he force. I nspector Lockhart and Mr Adderley became more familiar with howe ffective the Vision, now rebranded as ForenSys, product works. FORENSYS BAHAMAS Merlin Adderley, President, ForenSys Bahamas, is shown with guests at r ecent Product Launch. From left are: Merlin Adderley, Cpl. 22 Drexil Miller, Insp. Anthony Curtis, Insp. Edward Margarita Curacao Police Force and Sgt. 848 Roger Major. Photo/ Donald Knowles TOADVERTISEINTHETRIBUNECALL 502 2394

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THE BAHAMAS FINAN CIAL SERVICES BOARD (BFSB finalists as it nears the end of its process to select the 2011 Financial Services Student of the Year. They are:* Janeille R. Brathwaite BBA, Business Management Mandelia K. Morris BBA, Banking and Finance Candidates were selected from the 2011 graduating classof the College of the Bahamas (COB The student award pro gramme is in its ninth year, and is sponsored in collabora-tion with COB, the Profes sional Industry Association Working Group and the Central Bank of the Bahamas. Its objective is to recognise an outstanding graduating stu dent from within COBs School of Business. This includes all financial services relevant disciplines economics, banking and finance, accountancy and law.It has been extended as well to computer information systems, marketing and management and, this year, for the first time, to the School of Law. The criterion for initial selection is a GPA of 3.5 or above, with additional criteria also including COB and community involvement, an inter view by an industry panel, anda written submission. The student award programme is a part of BFSBs Financial Centre Focus (FCF programme, an ongoing initiative that aims to integrate the industry with the wider community. An essential part of the FCFs overall focus is to attract qualified professionals to the sector. The BFSBs chief executive and executive director, Wendy Warren, said: In this regard, particular attention is placed on high lighting the importance of quality human resources to the industry, and also on profiling outstanding individuals through the awards programmes. The 2011 FSI Student of the Year will be announced at BFSBs FSI Excellence Awards Ceremony on Novem ber 11, when BFSB also will present its Executive of the Year, Professional of the Year, Achiever of the Year, Mentor of the Year and Financial Services Development & Promotion awards. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A Bahamian financial services provider was yesterday grateful that its management buyout of the operation previously owned by Benelux bank, Dexia, took place some time befsore this weeks state bailout of the latter. EQUITY Trust Bahamas executives told Tribune Business that Dexias collapse had no impact on their operations, as a management buy-out had been initiated long before the latters current woes. Gilbert Cassar, Chairman of Equity Trust Bahamas, said: "It's two totally different things. We had a management buyout, an MBO, that was long before the troubles Dexia is having at the moment." Before the buyout Equity Trust Bahamas, formerly Experta Trust Bahamas, was a whollyowned subsidiary of Dexia bank. Mr Cassar explained: "It's two different things. "We were moving in this direction since 2009. The name changed in 2010 to Equity Trust Bahamas Limited. The issue with Dexia has had no impact on us, absolutely none." Dexia Group has agreed to nationalise its Belgian banking division, and secured state guarantees in steps taken through the plan of restructuring the overall bank. The Belgium government will reportedly pay $4 billion euros or US $5.4 billion to buy the division, which contains more than 80 billion euros of deposits. The sale would cut Dexias short-term funding requirements by more than $14 billion euros. The dismantling of Dexia, once one of the world's leading lenders to municipalities, became inevitable after concern over European sovereign debt holdings caused its short-term funding to evaporate. The Franco-Belgian bank fell victim to a liquidity squeeze prompted by the eurozone debt crisis. Dexias shares plummeted by 42 per cent last week, which led to marathon talks between the governments of France, Belgium and Luxembourg with the banks board of directors in a rescue bid. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 3B MANAGEMENT BUYOUT BENEFITS TRUST PROVIDER BFSB REVEALS TWO STUDENT FINALISTS The Bahamas Financial Services B oard (BFSB i ts annual Essay and Speech Compet ition, hosted as part of the National C areer Awareness Month. The 2011 event is being co-spons ored by Bahamas Business Solutions (BBSLr ise and KPMG. P articipating students from Grades 10-12 will have a choice of two topics: (1 ( 2) Was there a silver lining in the g lobal economic recession? They can a lso choose either one or both of the c ompetitions. Participating schools use an internal p rocess to select winners (one each the essay and speech competitions, tob e judged by an Industry Panel that s elects the overall winners. The competition ends on November 15, with the speech competition a nd presentations ceremony for winn ers in both the essay and speech cont ests. T he winner of the 2010 Essay Com petition was Shannon Williams, an 1 1th grade student at Faith Temple Christian Academy, with the schoola lso capturing the Speech Competit ion, represented by Justina Ferguson, a 10th grade student. BFSB SEEKS SCHOOL CONTEST ENTRANTS JANEILLE R. BRATHWAITE MANDELIA K. MORRIS

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tors. And, with NIBs total benefits expenditure expected tob e the same as last years $ 176 million, with no significant growth, its contribution income for 2011 was expected to exceed payouts and outflows. Among the recently enacte d NIB reforms was an i ncrease in the wage ceiling from $400 to $500, with a further rise to $600 to come in next year, and a 1 percentage point rise in the contribution r ate to 9.8 per cent. I mplementation of these r ecommendations, Mr Cargill said, were actually continuing to strengthen the Fund and its reserves through increased contributions,c ausing fears expressed in p revious actuarial reports that NIBs reserves would be exhausted by 2032 to recede. The next NIB actuarial report was due to be completed by end-2011, and released next year, and Mr Cargill said: We expect then ext actuarial report to reflect t hat, because weve implemented just about all recommendations in the previous t wo actuarial reports, the Fund continues to get stronger. In essence, whatw ere saying is not to worry. M eanwhile, despite the 75 basis point cut in the Bahamian Prime interest rate, Mr Cargill said NIBs 2011 investment income was expected to m atch the $91.5 million e arned during 2010, itself a 23.1 per cent rise over 2009. The interest rate cut had l owered by 0.75 per cent the returns NIB enjoyed on its huge portfolio of fixed income securities linked to Prime, namely bank deposits, government bonds, preference shares and the like, but MrC argill said diversification i nto equities and other investments would help to counter this. Disclosing that NIB would take around a $10 millionh it on its investment portfolio d ue to the Prime rate cut, Mr C argill said: We expect to be around 2010 levels. We are projecting to do what we did last year, notwithstanding the decrease in Prime. The Government investments are still doing very well, operating as agreed, and the investments in equities and the NAD debt; the NAD debt is a very strong performer,a bove market rates. The challenge for the investment manager is to look f or diversification, safe investments to bring us the same returns as last year. NIB is allowed to invest up to $25 million annually outside the Bahamas, last year placing $14.9 million in bondsi ssued by the US, Barbados a nd Cayman Islands governments. Mr Cargill confirmed the social security fund was receiving timely approvals for these investments. H elping to keep 2011 bene fits expenditure under cont rol was a reduction in unemployment benefit claims, while the introduction of the Med4 form -requiring employers to certify ane mployees absence from work with sickness or injury had helped to curtail benefit fraud. Pension claims, though, were likely to increase as NIBw as paying higher benefits to more persons, Mr Cargill said. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 5B and, most importantly, focused on our customers. Mr Houston said BTCs retail experie nce would be upgraded in every way. T he company needs to get visible points of presence to its easy for our customers to find us, and tourists. BTC, he added, was expecting to see significant demand from tourists seeking connectivity for their smart and iphonesv ia access to the companys new 4G wirel ess broadband network. We need to put in a way of doing business that makes it easier for customers todo business buy products and pay their bills, Mr Houston added. BTCs retail p hilosophy, he added, was focused on prese nce and service, with the entire concept d riven by the consumer. We feel its going to open up a lot of new, different opportunities as well, Mr Houston said of the retail plans. Stores in areas that we do not expect, partners com-i ng forward and adding value to the exper ience..... Were trying to create opportunities for entrepreneurs to add value to their product and our product, and which will be quite unique for our customers. Marlon Johnson, BTCs spokesman, said the company would be flexible and sensible in implementing its retail strategy, pointing out that Family Island locationsc ould be in the likes of grocery stores and g asoline station. As for BTCs new EZTOP-Up prepaid cellular format, which allows consumers t o add the precise value and number of minutes they want, Mr Johnson said the company now had well in excess of 150e lectronic top-up points in locations such a s gas stations/food stores. We want to get up to 400 points of presence, which is a minimum target, with the next year 12 months, Mr Johnson said, in response to Tribune Business quest ions. Over 10 per cent of top-ups are electronic. Were ahead of our projections, and hopefully will see a lot of growth. We want to empower our distributors to make s ure they have their margins and grow their market. A sked by this newspaper whether BTC had made a mistake in how it rolled-out its EZTop-Up technology and reduced distributor/retail margins, a move that hurt many street-level entrepreneurs and gavea mmunition to CWC critics, the BTC execu tives said the strategy had been misunderstood as the margin cuts were being phased-in. Mr Johnson acknowledged that when the initial EZTop-Up transition was unveiled, it looked on the surface like al ot of people vacated the market. H owever, many street vendors had since resumed selling BTC phone cards and prepaid top-up minutes, leading Mr Johnson to conclude that the distribution channel has come back and the initial shock has subsided. P ledging that BTC would do as much a s we can to empower legitimate vendors, Mr Johnson added: Were trying to ensure that as we prepare for competition, what we do in distribution mirrors best practice. Promising that BTC would invest more in marketing and promoting cell phone tops, both Mr Houston and Mr Johnson s aid the margin decrease would be phasedin. To compensate for this, they added that BTC, through new products and ser-v ices, would seek to increase the volume of consumer traffic visiting street vendors and EZTop-Up points, thus ensuring their revenues did not decline. The challenge is to run very quickly to provide additional products to offset that margin reduction, Mr Houston said. Weh ave to grow our business, create more opportunities. Its starting to bear fruit. We feel EZTop-Up has been very, very successful, and expect over time that it will become ever more popular. Were seeing a huge amount of usage coming t hrough from customers adapting very posi tively to the new way of topping up. BTC TARGETS OVER $10M FROM page 4B FROM page one NIB TARGETS 13.2% CONTRIBUTIONS RISE

PAGE 13

d ecided to defer a dividend payment until 2012, in a bid tob uild up its cash base to both deal with unexpected contingencies and provide a war chest to finance any real estate deals that arose. T elling Tribune Business that Colina Real Estates three properties the RND plazas on JFK Drive in Nassau, the Mall Drive in Freeport and the Abaco plaza were per cent occupied across the board, Mr Fitzgerald said the companys share price had almost doubled since he sold his majority stake toC olina. Explaining the rationale for doing so, Mr Fitzgerald, who is also a PLP Senator and the partys likely candidate for the Marathon seat at the upcoming election, said: Im very pleased with the financial perfor-m ance of the company, and essentially the turnaround from a cash flow standpoint. We were very tight for cash, struggling for cash, and at the time approached our financiers [FirstCaribbean] to review thef inancial situation and help our cash position. At the time, they werent willing to do that. As a result, Mr Fitzgerald decided to bring in a partner with the financial r esources to turn the thenR ND Holdings around, givi ng them a controlling interest to ensure they provided the necessary financing to restructure the debt a nd invest in other real e state and investment opportunities as they arose. H e alighted on Colina as t he saviour to ensure the c ompany recovered and other shareholders were protected. Through its Colina Mortgage Corporation affiliate, Colina Insurance Company repaid theF irstCaribbean debt with a new $3.7 million loan carrying a 9 per cent per annum interest rate. That rate is likely to have dropped to 8.25 per cent with the Prime cut. O ne immediate effect w as the improvement in the t hen-RND Holdings cash position (the company was only renamed in April 2011, so the 2010 figures are in RNDs name). After struggling with small four-f igure sums on the balance s heet for several years, and finishing 2009 with just $1,655 in cash, the company closed 2010 with a healthier$ 60,912 balance. The company is producing $60,000-$70,000 per month in cash, Mr Fitzgera ld told Tribune Business. Weve moved from a very light on cash position to w here were pulling in $ 25,000 a month in net c ash. The key is that the cashflow is here. C olina Real Estate Fund w as now investing this cash in return-earning opportun ities. The December 31, 2010, balance sheet showed $150,000 in investments that consisted of FOCOL preference shares. Weve considered payi ng a dividend very strongly, but made a decision to w ait until next year to build u p cash and ensure we have t he funds to weather any contingencies, Mr Fitzgerald told Tribune Business. Having sold his stake to Colina for $0.40 per share, he added that the share price had almost doubled s ince, the last trade taking place at $0.75 per share. Asked whether Colina Real Estate Fund was ont arget to match last years net income performance of just below $400,000, Mr Fitzgerald told TribuneB usiness: I suspect it will be around the same thing. It might be a little more,b ut it will definitely be in t hat region. Its been a good turnaround, a good story. The assets are strong, t he tenants are strong, the locations are good. We have a strong position onw hich to build. We have o ne vacancy at JFK Drive, but are still at about 95 per cent occupancy across the board when you look at square footage. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE $3'/,0,7('(PSOR\PHQWSSRUWXQLW\ *DWH,QWHUFKDQJH,QVSHFWRUV FROM page one FORMER RND BANKS $25K CASH MONTHLY J EROMEFITZGERALD

PAGE 14

both to prepare for competition and become customerfocused. Focusing on BTCs short to medium-term strategy, Mr Houston said: Our objective is to bring the absolute b est technology and the best r ange of services we can to the Bahamas. big part of our strategy is to focus on wireless, in particular wireless data, and to bring the Bahamas up to where it needs to be as a c ompetitive place to do busin ess. The 4G network is central t o this strategy, Mr Houston s aying it would bring superf ast broadband to all areas o f the Bahamas. Post-paid cellular customers would be able to access the Internet, v ia the handsets, at speeds of 8 MB (megabytes s econd, with pre-paid customers enjoying access at 2 MB per second. T hese speeds were consistent with those available to l andline broadband customers, enabling Bahamians to access the Internet where ver they were in the Bahamas. Thats just the s tart, Mr Houston said. As it evolves, we expect to continue to improve the service, and you will see the same speed on your mobile as you do at home on broad b and access to the Internet. The BTC chief executive said that with 80 per cent of Internet access projected tob e via wireless by 2020, it w as imperative to transform the former state-owned monopoly incumbent into ad ata carrier. We expect to place the Bahamas at the forefront of that evolution over the next 18 months,M r Houston said. All equipment to set up the 4G network was now in the Bahamas and being installed at key sites. The first call using the 4G net work was expected to take p lace next month, with the s ervice launched and rolledout in Grand Bahama preChristmas. The 4G Family Island roll-out will take place o ver the next 18 months, going into 2012. Meanwhile, BTC was still trying to reduce the number of dropped calls and increase the quality on its e xisting 2G cellular network. Were optimising quite a bit of the network, Mr H ouston added, with engin eering teams deployed to v arious sites and five new c ell sites added in the six m onths since CWC comp leted its acquisition of a 51 per cent stake in BTC. The 7 per cent increase in c ellular traffic volumes indicated that BTC was starting to solve some customer problems, although its not a perfect situation at the moment. Mr Houston added, t hough, that BTC had h elped to facilitate compet ition in the Bahamian communications market by con-c luding an interconnection a greement with Cable Bahamas and its Systems Resource Group (SRG affiliate, thus enabling calls originating with a customer on one companys network to flow seamlessly to a client o f the other. To be very clear, one of the things weve also closed i n the last few months was t hat we signed an intercon nection agreement with Cable Bahamas and SRG, he said. Were able to dob usiness with that company on commercial terms. That isa new milestone for facilit ating competition in the market. Mr Houston pledged that BTC would do whateverw e can to facilitate competit ion within the rules set down by sector regulator, the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA observers were yesterday quick to point out that com p etition still lacks a missing i ngredient, namely number portability, which would allow Bahamian customers to change service provider while still keeping the same phone number. T o enhance broadband Internet connectivity, Mr Houston said BTC had todate invested $53 million in rolling-out its Next Generation Network (NGN c ommitment is to fast-track d eployment of that network, and bring services to the cust omer, he added. T esting of the NGN netw ork, which promises conn ectivity speeds of up to 8 M B per second, has already t aken place in the Coral Harbour area, Mr Houston said BTC aimed to launch itb efore Christmas 2011. He acknowledged that the NGN networks three-year roll-out throughout the Bahamas w ould take slightly longer than the two-year 4G project. E xplaining BTCs move to s eek permission to charge 35 c ents per call for accessing directory inquiries, with cus-t omers getting three free c alls per month, Mr Houston said the company had to deal with areas where it was providing services below cost in its bid to prepare for competition. We have got an obligat ion to prepare the business f or competition in all forms. As part of that change, we n eeded to address some of t he nuances in the business that were there and not conducive to helping us to compete in the marketplace, MrH ouston said. These were services we were providing for free atr ates that were not competi tive or below cost. Those are areas we need to address inside the business. Charg i ng for information is one of t hem. He added that BTC was seeking a price that reflects the cost of providing the ser vice, but would also have little impact on the consumer. The onus was also on B TC to provide the best possible service. Mr Houston said BTC would be back to normal in another one-two weeks when it came to dealing with H urricane Irene-related d amage, with services 80 per cent restored on Abaco and C at Island, 97 per cent back o n Long Island, and fully r estored on Eleuthera. T ogether with the faults b acklog that had built up b efore the storm, Mr Houston said BTCs repair teams had to cope with an enor-m ous amount of 20,000 faults. He told Bahamian consumers to expect further p rice reductions and promotions prior to Christmas, saying this had already started t hrough initiatives such as e liminating the 18 cents per c all surcharge on inter-island cellular phone calls. A sked whether BTC was o n target to meet CWCs $60-$80 million EBITDA target for the year to endMarch 2012, Mr Houston said: BTC is a profitable business, and we expect BTC to make a profit this y ear. Were still very confid ent on the original EBIT DA target set by our parent.I think our parent company i s very pleased with our progress to date. Its still a long trek for us as we continue to reshapet he business, both in focus, size and operations. Thats a journey we will t ake over the next couple of years. Confirming that talks had started with BTCs unionso ver a new industrial agreem ent, Mr Houston said the company was aiming to become more flexible, much more nimble and s customer-focused oriented. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 7B Bahama and move what's left to our Lantana, Florida, operation. We will then unfortunately have to make the heart-wrenching decision to lay off 60-plus Bahamian workers. Mr Howes concluded: I don't see how Grand Bahama can ever recover from this disaster as the Internet has so much information (all negative f or any prospective investor who investigates and c arries out due diligence before investing in G rand Bahama. Maybe, after our Tuesday meeting, we will be able to report some positive news for an island that so desperately needs it. In a March 14, 2010, open letter to Grand Bahama residents, Mr Howes said Grand Bahama Power Company charged "six times the price" of electricity the company would be billed for in N orth Carolina, where it plans to relocate. In that U S state, it would be charged $0.058 per kilowatt hour. Blaming power outages, spikes and surges for destroying equipment important to the company, and accusing Grand Bahama Power Company of sending a "threatening letter" and "cease and desist demand" to stop Fenestration and Glass S ervices from running its own electricity generat ors, Mr Howes said he and his partner had "given up" on their Bahamian investment. T he meeting today will place more pressure on G rand Bahama Power Company, already effect ively under fire from all sides over the relatively h igh cost of power on the island, which is impacting household incomes and economic competitiveness. MAKE OR BREAK MEETING TO SAVE 60 EMPLOYEES FROM page one BTC VERY CONFIDENT ON $60-$80M TARGET FROM page one Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in thea rea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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NEW YORK Associated Press INVESTORSare bracing for a rough earnings season from banks. Turbulence in stock and bond markets, combined with waning confidence among business and consumers, hurt banks' business in the third quarter. IPOs were shelved, companies postponed plans to sell bonds, and acquisitions were put on ice. Consumers also held back on spending. The sharp drop in business activity hurt banks, which rely on borrowing by companies and consumers to make money. Most Wall Street analysts lowered their earnings estimates for large U.S. banks. JPMorgan Chase & Co. will be the first major bank to report results Thursday, followed by Citigroup, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Gold man Sachs the week after. The intense global market turmoil during the third quarter has already taken a toll on bank stocks. The KBW index of leading banks plunged 27 percent during the third quarter. Howard Chen, an analyst at Credit Suisse, estimates that mergers and acquisitions volume in the third quarter plummeted 34 percent from the prior quarter, while stock underwriting sank 54 percent. Chen said it was the weakest quarter for total debt issuance since the financial crisis. Overall debt and loan underwriting volume fell 27 percent from the previous quarter, leading to a 35 percent decrease in fees. Worries about Europe's debt problems continued to hang over U.S. banks in the third q uarter. Investors expect bank executives to offer more clarification on how exposed the banks are to the crisis when the banks host conference calls to discuss their earnings. Most large banks have dis closed the amount of European debt they own, but it's unclear how much exposure they have via more complex derivatives trades they conduct with their counterparts in Europe. For example, U.S. banks sell finan cial contracts that act as insurance to protect against defaults on riskier European bonds. Growth in U.S. business loans is expected to be a bright spot. According to the Federal Reserve, corporate borrowing grew rapidly during the third quarter. At the 25 largest banks by assets, commercial and industrial loans grew 15 percent, the Fed reported. Here are the consensus earnings forecasts and highlights for each of the large U.S. banks from analysts surveyed by FactSet: JPMorgan Chase & Co. reports Thursday. It is expected to earn 96 cents per share on revenue of $23.6 billion. Con sidered one of the strongest and most stable among the large banks, analysts expect JPMorgan to grab market share from competitors. However, it might be forced to once again to put aside more reserves to offset costs from increased litigation and repurchasing poorly written mortgage loans. Citigroup Inc. reports on Monday, Oct. 17. The New York bank is expected to report earnings of 84 cents per share on revenue of $19.3 billion. Barclays Capital analyst Jason Goldberg reduced his estimates by 11 cents because of weakness in investment banking and the increasingly uncertain global economy. Wells Fargo & Co. also reports Monday. The San Francisco bank is expected to earn 72 cents a share on revenue of $20.2 billion. Wells has one of the largest mortgage origination businesses of all banks and will likely have benefited from lower mortgage rates. Rates on 30-year mortgages hit a historic low of 4.08 percent in the third quarter. Bank of America Corp. reports Tuesday, Oct. 18. Analysts expect the Charlotte, N.C. bank to report earnings of 26 cents per share on revenue of $25.8 billion. The bank has been battling lawsuits related to mortgages. It paid out $12.7 billion to settle claims in the first half of the year. Its Merrill Lynch investment banking and brokerage division helped lift earnings in the first half of 2011, but Merrill is unlikely not be of much help this quarter because of low trading volumes. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. also releases results Tues day. It is expected to earn 23 cents per share on revenue of $5.3 billion. Chen, of Credit Suisse, is more negative than other analysts on the New York bank. Chen wrote in a report that the difficult market conditions and low appetite for risk among investment banking and trading clients could lead to a third quarter loss of 70 cents a share. If that happens, Chen notes that it would be only the second quarterly loss for Gold man since the bank went public in 1999. Morgan Stanley will report on Wednesday, Oct. 19. Analysts estimate it will earn 31 cents per share on revenue of $7.5 billion. A sharp downturn in the investment advisory business is expected to hurt Morgan Stanley. Wells Fargo analyst Matthew Burnell lowered his earnings estimate to 26 cents from 56 cents per share because of weakness in trad ing. Executives are expected to shed more light on the bank's exposure to European debt and derivatives during their conference call. Worries about Europe have spooked Morgan Stanley investors lately, helping send the stock down 44 per cent this year. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS 2009/CLE/QUI/o01436 IN THE SUPREME COURT EQUITY SIDE IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 A ND I N THE MATTER OF The Petition of Franklin Burnside AND I N THE MATTER OF ALLTHATtract of land c ontaining 4,973 square feet bring lot No. 23 Richville Subdivision NO.3 in the Southern District of t he Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. NOTICE THE PETITION OF FRANKLIN BURNSIDE in respect of: IN THE MATTER OFALLTHAT tract of land containing 4,973 square feet bring lot No. 23 Richville Subdivision NO.3 in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Franklin Burnside claim to be the owner of the unencumbered fee simple estate in possession of the said land and has madean application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3of the Quieting Ti tIes Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act. Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land can hours: East Street North, Nassau, Bahamas; 2. The Chambers of Commonwealth Law Advocates, Duncanson House, 79 Montrose Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition snaIl on or before the expiration of ents, tile in the Supreme COUlt or serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed a bar to such claims. COMMONWEALTH LAWADVOCATES Duncanson House 79 Montrose Avenue Nassau, Bahamas 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1480.0808.06.72% 1 0.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.00-0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .504.40Bank of Bahamas6.936.930.005000.2300.10030.11.44% 0 .530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2 .842.55Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.0300.09090.03.33% 1.961.77Fidelity Bank1.771.770.000.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas8.478.470.005000.2450.32034.63.78% 2.802.33Colina Holdings2.602.600.004200.4380.0405.91.54% 8 .508.33Commonwealth Brewery8.508.500.000.7400.00011.50.00% 7.006.21Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.656.650.002600.4960.32013.44.81% 2.001.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.741.72-0.020.1110.04515.52.62% 1.771.31Doctor's Hospital1.371.370.000.0740.04018.52.92% 5.504.75Famguard5.435.430.000.4980.24010.94.42% 8.405.35Finco5.395.390.002500.7570.0007.10.00% 9.457.75FirstCaribbean Bank8.218.210.002400.4940.35016.64.26% 6 .005.00Focol (S 5.335.330.008000.4350.22012.34.13% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.58ICD Utilities7.307.300.00400-0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.002400.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.001 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7 % I nterest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%F RIDAY, 7 OCTOBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,376.75 | CHG -0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -122.76 | YTD % -8.19B ISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)M aturity 1 9 October 2017 W W W.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%3 0 May 2013 20 November 2029 7 % RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0 .550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.72022.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.849313.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.18353.32%4.99% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.14202.10%4.31% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.18543.16%5.14% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.49859.8690Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.7396Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 31-Aug-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 31-Aug-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS31-Aug-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 (/,(&(=$/,(1RI 7Z\QXP$RII0DFNH\6WUHHW1$66$8%$+$0$6 1 $=$5(7+0,6&$/,1RI 3$YRFDGR6WUHHW3LQHZRRG*DUGHQV 1DVVDX%DKDPDV BANK EARNINGS TO REFLECT SLOWDOWN FROM 3Q TURMOIL

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y OCT OBER 1 1, 201 1, P AGE 9B B O D Y A N D M I N D By ALESHA CADET Tribu ne Featu res Repor ter AFTE R tea ch ing y og a for mo r e th a n te n ye ar s o n t he b e a c h e s o f S o u t h F l o r i d a B a h a m i a n b o rn K e m e t i c Y o g a i n stru c to r Au n kh A a kh u sa i d h e h o p e s t o b r i n g t h e s p e c ial ised y o ga practice t o the s ho re s of t he B a ha m a s. C er t i f i ed i n 20 0 0, A u n k h s a i d h e i s r e s p o n s i b l e a n d h o l d s c re d it f or c e r ti fy i n g t he la r g e st n u m b e r o f K e m e t i c Y o g a instr uc tor s in the w or ld. His e x p e r ti s e i n t h e a n c i e n t E g y p t i a n fo rm o f y og a h a s bro u gh t great s ucc es s to his F lor idab ased Na tural B ril lia nc e for L if e' yo g a s tu di o. E a r l i e r t h i s y e a r A u n k h h el d a le c ture an d wo rksho p at th e Na ti on al Ar t Ga lle ry e n t i t l e d Y o g a S e c r e t s R e v e al e d" Y o g a w a s p r a c t i c e d f o r t h o u s a n d s o f y e a rs a s a n a n c i e n t a r t f or m i n Ke m e t (t he n a me f or a n c i e n t E g y p t ). I t i s re p r e se n t e d in ma ny hieroglyph s pres e rv e d i n s t o n e a n d p a p y r u s b y t he K em e ti a ns A cc or d i n g t o A u n kh t he Keme ti c yoga pr o c e ss h elp s p a rti c i pa n ts c om e t o th e p ra c t i c a l a w a re n e s s a nd r e a l i sa t i o n t ha t y ou al re a dy h av e ev e ry thing y ou need to overcom e a n y c ha l le n ge t ha t y o u f ac e i n l i fe A u n k h s a i d t o k n o w w h o y o u t r u l y a r e i s t o e n d a l l e x c u s e s fo r me d io c ri ty a n d to b u il d y our em pire a nd y our grea tn e s s The la st tim e I wa s in th e B a ha m a s th e r e w a s a g r o up o f people t hat were inter ested, so if the i nte rest c ont inu es to d e v e l o p w e d e f i n i t e l y w i l l s t a r t I' m fro m th e B a ha ma s, so for m e i t w o u l d b e j u s t h e a r t w ar m in g t o a c t u a ll y h a v e pe o ple i n t he Baha mas connect w it h what I a m doing," said A unk h. We ha v e a stu dio he re i n Florida t ha t we are working o u t o f a n d w e a r e a c t u a l l y l oo k i n g t o e xp a n d t o o t h e r p l a c e s I f t h e r e i s e n o u g h m o me n t um to b ui l d s tu d io s i n o t h e r l o c a t i o n s l i k e t h e B a ha ma s th at w il l b e a g oo d t hin g, he sai d. Th e b en e f it s o f a y o g a p ra c t ic e c a n be ne ve r-e ndi ng b ut A u n k h n a r ro w s i t d o w n t o j u s t o n e w o rd : s c i e nc e H e sa y s i t' s m ost de fin ite ly a sc i en ce an d a t t h e c o re o f t h e s c i e n c e i s t h e i de a of de ve l op ing th e hu ma n b o d y m i n d a n d s p i ri t t o a s t a t e o f co mp le te e ase Tha t's si gn ifi ca nt be c au se t ha t stat e of e a se is ul tim at el y m a i nt e na n c e o f t he b od y te m p l e W h e n t h e e n e r g y i s a ll ow e d to ci rc ula te in pa rtic u l a r w a y s w e e x p e r i e n c e t h i n gs l i k e f l e x i bi l i t y s a i d A unk h. J ust the th ou gh t o f he lp in g p e o p l e p o s i t i v e l y b r e a k thr ough in their li ves bri ngs p e a c e t o t h e h a r d w o r k i n g y o g a i nstru c tor. O v e r a l l e v e r y t h i n g i m pr ov e s: ou r c l a ri ty m en t al l y imp r ove s ; t he t on in g o f ou r b o d y i m p r o v e s; o u r sk i n c l e a rs u p T h e r e a re s o m a n y b e n e f i t s t ha t a pe rson c an e xp eri en c e b y d e v e l o p i n g a d e c i p l i n e p r a c t ic e, he sai d. Wi t h Kem et i c y og a, ev en t h e im p os si bl e b e c om e s p o ssi b l e s a id A un kh Th e p ra c ti c e h e s a i d d e v e l o p s p h y s i c a l s t r e n g t h d i v i n e p o w e r b a l a n c e a n d f le x ib i li ty A c c o r d i n g t o K e m e t i c t e a c h i n g s a n a r t i c l e o n l i v e s tr on g c o m n o te s, K e m e t ic y o g a i s si mi la r t o th e p o pu la r f o rm s o f y o g a p r a c ti c e d t o d a y b u t t h e re a re si g n i f i c a n t d i f fe r e n c e s in th e hi sto ry a nd fo c u s. By KHRISNA VIRGIL M OMENTS after her birth on June 29, 2010, Kaylee Thomas was taken from her mother's arms and whisked away by doctors. It would be a few days before her mother, Kendra, was able to hold her baby. Whe n Ken dra was fin ally allo wed t o s e e h e r b a b y g i r l s h e s a i d s h e w a s sho ck ed a nd co n fu sed ". Ka yl ee had cl ub fe et, a defor m i ty that cau s e s an inf ant 's f eet t o rota te in ward. C h i l d r e n w i t h t h i s c o n d i t i o n o f t e n a pp e ar t o wa lk o n t he ir an kl es or th e si de s o f t h eir f eet Th e co nd it io n o f te n c au ses t h eir leg s t o gro w a bn o rmall y. K en d ra 's la st p re gn a n cy wa s n o d i f f e r e n t f ro m h er f irst t wo But she and her husband R olando h ad bra ced t h emsel ve s f or po ssib l e c omp li c a t i o n s b e c a u s e i n K e n d r a s f i r s t t w o pr e gnanc ie s she had su ffer ed f rom a m edica l con d it io n ca lle d p reecl amp sia. Th e c o ndition causes high blo od pr ess u r e during t he p regn ancy It ca n af fect th e m o th er a nd u n bo rn ch il d. Aft er an emergency C-sectio n 35 weeks in ba b y K ay le e wa s b orn It tu rn ed o u t th a t n o amo un t of p la nn in g fo r t he ev en tu ali tie s co ul d ha ve prep ared th em f or th e n ews ab ou t K ayl ee 's co n di t io n. K e n d r a s a i d s h e e x p e r i e n c e d a r o l l e r co ast e r o f emo t io n s. Sh e w on d ere d wh a t sh e co u ld ha ve do n e d if f ere nt ly to p rev en t K ay le e' s co n d it i on S he re min d ed h e rsel f t h a t t h i s h a p p e n i n g d o e s n t me a n I d i d so m e t hi ng wro n g. I t c ou ld h av e j ust b ee n ge n es." Ka ylee had to unde rg o im m ediate ther apy wi t h d oct o rs a t t he Prin ce ss M arga ret Ho sp i t a l s O r t h o p e d i c C l i n i c H e r l e g s w e r e p l a c e d i n c a s t s a n d s h e h a s w o r n t h e m a l m o s t e v e r s ince. They wer e replaced twice m on thly on a con t in uo u s b asis. "I was s o rt o f lo st b e cau se I di dn 't k n ow w hat it was at fir s t but when they ex p l ained it t o m e a nd t he co ur s e of t her a py to tr y and c or r ec t it I felt m or e c o m for table," sai d Rolando, Ka yle e' s f at he r. Af te r six mo nt h s, a t ea m o f th ree d oc to rs pe rfo rmed a surg ery t o h el p co rrec t t he con di t io n T he f a mil y o n l y h a d t o fo o t t h e b i ll for K aylee's $1,200 ank le f oot o r th os es, s ho es to h el p ke ep h er f ee t stra ig ht N ow K ayle e is an a ctiv e 15mon th -o ld t od dl er. Wh en giv en t h e cha nc e, she cra wl s an d s t ands, bu t still o n the sid es o f her feet B eing bo rn pre m a tu rel y, she ha s resp irat o ry p rob lem s an d exper ien c es tr o uble r o lling over, sitt ing up and c r aw li ng, bu t th e to ddl er c on tin ues to mak e pro gre ss, sa id h er mo t he r. T he fa m ily has a bi g oppo rt unity and a hug e cha ll en ge ah ea d o f th em. At a co st o f al m o st $2 3, 00 0, K ay le e n ow n e ed s t o t ra ve l t o th e Un i t e d S t a t e s f o r a s e c o n d s u r g e r y a t t h e Atl an ta F o o t a nd Leg C lin i cs. The Bah ama s h a s n o f a c i l i t y f o r t h e t y p e o f s u rg e ry s h e ne ed s. Wi th no heal th i ns ur anc e pr ovi der w ill ing to c o ver K aylee' s medical exp enses, and n eith er par ent having m ed i cal ins u r ance o f their own, fi nd in g t h e mon ey to gi ve K ay le e t he o p po rtu n it y o f a n o rmal l if e see ms li k e a n i nsu rm o u nt ab l e o b sta cle For K end r a a clerk at a l ocal cop ying company and Rolando, a mas s age ther apis t, good m e di cal i nsu ran ce is to o e xp en sive ". "T he fi nanc es ar e n't the re as the y s hould be wit h al l t h e o t he r t hi ng s we h av e t o d o, sa id R o l a n d o There is als o a high p r o bab ility t hat K aylee wil l n eed more su rge rie s t o co rrect he r con diti on. However, th e family s ai d the y ar e t akin g t h in gs o n e d a y a t a t ime T H E A R T O F K E M E T I C Y O G A BE NE FI TS : Th e re ar e s o m a n y b e ne f it s t ha t a pe r so n c a n e x p e ri e nc e by de v e l op i ng a d i sc i p li n e d p ra c ti c e' Aunkh Aakhu. FIGH T S F O R F O O T CU RE BABY KA YLEE COMPLICATIONS: Baby Kaylee Thomas was club feet, a de f o r mity that caus es an infant's fee t to rot a te inw ard.

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HIP dysplasia (simply put, a poorly formed hip joint) is very common in dogs, especially in large pure breds, although small dogs and mixed breeds can certainly have it as well. Labs, Rottweiler, Shepherds and Chows have traditionally had a high incidence of hip dysplasia but a better understanding of the contributing factors has helped decrease that incidence in recent years. In a normal hip, the head of the femur (the thigh bone) and the pelvis fit together in a snug ball and socket joint. In hip dysplasia the socket is shallow, or the ball is too small or to flat, or the ligaments holding the joint together are too loose. This allows the ball to slide around in the socket, causing a wobbly gait and pain. The problem can be so mild it is virtually undetectable, or it can be so severe that a puppy will limp even at a walk and have trouble pushing himself to a standing position when lying down. Over time, the wear and tear of the hip sliding back and forth causes arthritis to develop in the joint. Arthritis can start when a dog is as young as one year old; three factors are known to contribute to hip dysplasia: genetics, nutrition and exercise. GENETICS Genetics play a big role in hip dys plasia. Male and female dogs that do not have hip dysplasia are less likely to produce a puppy that has the disease. So you may want to have your breeding dogs hips x-rayed before you breed them and have your veterinarian grade these hips. It is reported that 30 to 40 per cent of Chows will develop hip dysplasia. NUTRITION OVERFEEDING large breed puppies or giving them calcium or vitamin D supplements increases the likelihood they will develop hip dysplasia. Excess calories promote too fast growth which strains a puppy developing bones and joints. Feeding puppies "rocket fuel "does not make them any bigger as adults. A puppy's ultimate height is determined by genetics, not by how fast it grows. Puppies should not be fed free choice or allowed unlimited amounts of food. They should be given a measured amount of food divided into two or three meals a day. EXERCISE Too much exercise can also strain developing bones and joints and worsen any inherited tendency towards hip dysplasia. Remember, puppies are babies. They need a lot of rest and the exercise they get should be gentle and fairly brief. Save the agility and the endurance events for after your puppy has fin ished growing. WOMAN P AGE 10B, TUESDA Y OCT OBER 1 1, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE DEE P VEIN THR OMBOSIS T O D A Y I w i s h t o s h a r e wi th m y reade rs an ar ti cl e t hat appea red i n t he Se pte mbe r 15 20 1 1 e d i t i o n o f A m er i ca n Wa y t h e i n f l i g h t m a g a z i n e o f A mer i c an Airlin es. T h e article addres ses a ver y i mport ant c o nd itio n th a t ma n y pe rs on s may have experienced or may j u s t n o t b e a w a r e o f d e e p vein thrombosis (DVT). WHAT IS DVT? A d e e p v e i n t h r o m b o s i s ( D V T ) i s a b l o o d c l o t t h a t devel ops i n a dee p v ei n, us ual l y i n a l e g T h i s i s a s er i ou s c on dition. Sometimes these clots c a n b r e a k a w a y a n d t r a v e l t h r o u g h th e b l o o d s t r e a m t o v i t a l o r g a n s a n d c a n c a u s e severe injury or death. POSSIBLE RISK FACTORS OF DVT P r o lo n g e d p h y si ca l im mo b i l i t y s u c h a s s it t i n g f o r a n ext ended per i od, is cons ide red in the medical co mmun it y to be a r i sk f ac to r as so ci at ed w i th D V T Pe o p l e w i t h c e r t a i n m e d ical condit ions or who are t aki ng s om e me di c at i on s m a y a l so be at hi gher ri sk of devel oping a D V T i n c l udi ng co nd i t i on s o r medicati on s t ha t affect bl o od fl o w al ter nor mal bl o odclot t i n g m e c h a n i s m s o r c a u s e s b l ood-ves sel d am age. So m e of these are: Blood-clotting disorders Cancer Increasing age or smoking Major illness with hospitali sation Obesity or heart disease Oral contraceptive use or hormone therapy Personal or family history of a DVT Pregnancy Recent major surgery or trauma POSSIBLE SYMPTOMS OF DVT Ma ny D V T s d o not pr odu ce a n y s y m p t o m s If s y m p t o m s occur, they may include pain, s w e l l i n g o r r e d n e s s i n t h e a f f e c t e d a r e a S e v e r e c h e s t p a i n o r p r o b l e m s b r e a t h i n g m a y in d ic a t e t h a t a c l o t h a s t r a v e l l e d t o t h e l u n g s A n y c on ce rn sh o uld b e ev alu ate d by a physician immediately. P O S S I B L E W A Y S T O R E D U C E T H E R I S K O F D V T American Way encourages all passengers to consult with their doctors about DVT and o th e r p e rs o n a l h e a l th is s u e s b e f o r e f l y i n g B e c a u s e t h e c au s e of a DV T is o fte n n ot k n o w n t h e b e s t m e t h o d s o f p r e v e n t i n g D V T a r e s t i l l unce rt ai n. T o tr y t o red uce t he ris k of DVT m an y pass engers may be advised by their doc tor s to t ak e th e f ol lo wi ng mea sures in flight: Reg ularly ch ang e le g p osit i o n a n d p e r i o d i c a l l y m o v e and stretch your legs and feet while seated. If conditions allow and the aisles are clear, you may want t o o cc a s i on a l l y ge t up an d w a l k a r o u n d B u t r e m e m b e r t h a t you must remain seated when t h e s e a t b e l t l i g h t i s o n a n d s h o u l d r e m a i n i n y o u r s e a t w it h y o u r se a t b e l t fa s t e n e d whenever po s sibl e, because of th e p oss ibility o f tu rb u l e n ce. A n d a l l p a s s e n g e r s a r e required to comply with crew member and/or FAA instruc t i ons es pe c i al l y t ho se r el a t i ng to remaining seated. A vo i d c ro ss in g t h e le g s a t the ankles or knees. S t a y h y d r a t e d d r in k a d e quate non-diuretic fluids such as water, juice and milk and minimi ze alcohol an d caffeine i n t a k e W e a r l o o s e f i t t i n g cl ot h i ng W e ar g r ad ua t e dc o m pression sock or stockings. It is p o ssib le tha t n o me asure i nt ended to pr event DV T wil l be ef fective. I t is als o poss i bl e t h a t s om e o f t he m e a s ur e s liste d a bo ve may n ot b e reco mme nd ed fo r so me p asse nge r s, d ep en di n g o n t he i r he al t h situations as assessed by their doctors. Bernade t te D. Gibson, a board cert if ied and l icen sed pedo r thi s t is t h e pro prie tor o f F oo t S olu tion s, a h e a lt h a n d w e l ln e s s f ra n c h i s e th a t f o cu se s on fo ot c are a nd prop er s h o e f it, l o c a te d in th e T r in i ty P l a z a We s t Ba y S tre e t, N a s s a u B a h a m a s w w w f o o t s o l u t i o n s c o m / n a s s a u The vie ws ex pre ss ed a re t h os e of t h e au tho r an d d oe s no t ne ce s sa r i ly rep r e sen t tho se o f F oot Solu t i o ns I n cor p or at ed or a ny o f i t s su b s id ia ry a n d/o r a ff ilia te d c o mp a nies Plea se direc t an y q ue stion s or co m me nts t o na ss au@fo otso l u tions .co m or 322 -FOO T (366 8). B y B E R N A D E T T E G I B S O N FOOT SOLUTIONS C A US ES OF HI P D Y SPL ASI A By DR BASIL SANDS By GET WELL BAHAMAS Special to The Tribune T HE 40 participants of NIB's Get Well Bahamas Phase II are not just losing weight and shaping up, they are also getting back in touch with nature thanks to a third component of the programme that focuses on organic gardening. This aspec t of the prog r a mme led by local f arming group Homegrown D e v e l o pm e n t e n c o u ra g e s p a rt i c i pa n t s t o grow th eir ow n b ac ky ard v e ge tab le gar de ns u s in g n at ur al m et hod s t ha t ar e f r ee o f s y nt h et ic p es t ic id es an d c he mi ca l fe rtili sers tha t may ha r m the e nvi r o nmen t an d the hum an b ody. To d ate, th e Get We ll Ch alle nge rs ha ve r e ceiv ed i ns truction on ho w to p r e pare r a ised beds, the art of c omp o s t in g s e e d i n g a n d tr a n s p l a n ti n g a n d m ost re ce ntl y, the y ta ck le d the fun dam enta ls of n atural pe s t co ntrol. Ch ad T h ompson, vi ce -preside nt of H om eg row n D e ve lo pme n t, e xp la in ed t h a t t h e te r m p e s t r e fe r s t o a n i n se c t o r a n i m a l t h at w i l l c a u se d a m a g e t o c ro p s o r a ny mic r o organ ism tha t wi ll c ause dis ease in plant s and hum ans. Pes ts i n c l u d e s u ch b a d g u y s a s s p i d e r m ites, a phid s snai ls, w hite flies, army w o rms a nd ca te rp il la rs tha t c a n w re ak h avo c i n a ga rden. On the o ther h and the t ypic al ga r d en e nv ironm en t a lso i nc lud es inse c ts th at a re be nefi cia l to hea lthy soil and p l an t g ro w th f or e x a mp le c e nt ip e de s, b umble bee s p arasitic wa sps, bee tles, l ady bugs a nd prayi ng m anti s "I f yo u se e t he se i ns ects in y our g arden, le ave em be. These are the g ood g uys," Mr Thom pson said He o utl ine d th ree ma in stra te gi es fo r n atu r a l pe st c ontrol. Do nothing. Let nature do its work. Identification of pests, patience, and manual or mechanical removal Homemade pesticides as a last line of defense THE LAISSEZ-FAIRE APPROACH Mr T hompson said healthy plants g i v e o u t h e a l t h y w a v e s i g n a l s t h a t deter bugs from attacking. He said a health y pr oductive garden envir onm e n t c a n b e f o st e r e d b y re g u l a r w a te ring, thinn ing o f plants and companion planting. "Don't just plant one crop that an ins ect will s ee as an all you can eat buffet. Diversify. Plant a poly-culture to confuse the insect so they may see tomatoes, but ri g h t n e x t d o o r i s s o m e th i n g t he y d o n t l i k e f o r e x a m p l e g a r l ic s o t h e y t e n d t o just fly off or buzz away. Give your pl ants a lo t o f sp ac e. B e c a r e ful n ot to crowd your plants. Always thin them o ut s o ai r can ci r cu la t e an d s o y ou don't h ave t hat hu mid envir onment that will create disease," he said. Mr Thompson said the goal should b e to cre ate a n e nv ironme nt tha t w el comes beneficial insects. "U s e i n s ect at t r act o r s T h es e a r e a ny brig htl y c olo ured fl ow e r s or flo w e r s t h a t p r o d u c e n e c t a r o r p o l l e n M a r i g o l d s p a n s i e s h i b i s c u s b o u g a i n v i l l e a wi l l m a k e b e n e f i ci a l i nse cts w ant to sta y aro und e ve n a fte r they've eaten the pests," he said. BEFORE YOU SPRAY I f a p e s t p r o b l e m d e v e l o p s M r T h o m p so n sa i d, i t i s i m po r t a n t t o id e n tify the insect causing the problem. Y o u d o n t w a n t t o j u s t r u s h i n there spraying because you may end u p k i l l i n g a l l o f t h e b e n e f i c i a l in s e c t s a s well a s the pest s. Even af ter you've id enti fie d t he bug or w hi ch ev er i nsec t or d is e ase is oc curring in y our g arden you actually want to wait a couple of days to let nature step in. This means t o a l l o w t h e l a d y b u g s t o c o m e i n o r t h e oth er pre dat ors to c om e in a nd at tac k t he i n se c t t h a t' s a l re a d y at t a c k in g y o ur plants," he said. If th e b e n ef ic ia l i n se c ts d on t ki c k i n after a couple of days Mr Thompson r ecom men ds man ua l or mech ani cal re mo v a l As p e s ts o f t e n e a t a l l n ig h t o r s t r i k e a t d a w n h e s a i d m o r n i n g i s good time to manually remove them. L o o k o n t h e u n d e r s i d e o f y o u r pl an ts lo ok on t h e gr o un d an d t he wa lk w ays and pick u p anythin g you see tha t shoul dn't be there S o if it's a c at erp ill ar g rab i t, squ ish it o r t hrow it in a cup of wate r so it drowns or ev en u s e y o u r h o s e t o j u s t w a s h o f f t h e i n s e c t s I f y ou h a v e a n y d i s e a s e d l e a v e s clip t he m off and put them on your compost pile," he said. WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS M r T h o m p s o n s a i d p e s t i c i d e s s h o u ld o n l y b e us ed a s a la s t l i ne o f d e f e n c e w h e n a p e s t i n f e s t at i o n i s o u t o f co n t r o l a nd e v en t h e n r e me d i e s s h o u l d b e n a t u r a l H e s a i d a n a t u r a l p e s t i c i d e s h o u l d c o n t a i n t h r ee t y p es o f i n g r e d i e n t s an o i l t o s u f f o c a t e t h e i n s e c t h e a t f o r ex ample, from c aye nne pepper and a s c en t li k e g ar li c o r m in t t h at r e pe l s p e s t s Y o u c a n u s e a c o m b i n a t i o n o f s p e ar m i n t p e pp e r an d h o r s e r ad i s h o r y o u ca n j u s t m i x p e p p e r g a r l i c and dishwashing liquid and s pray the s o l u t i o n o n t h e u n d e r s i d e o f y o u r p l an t No r m a ll y t ha t wi l l s uf f o c at e m o s t o f t h e s o f t b o d ie d i n s ec t s Bu t r e m e m b e r t h e p e s t i c i d e s n o t o n l y k il l th e ba d gu ys T h ey ki ll t h e g oo d g uy s t o o s o u s e t h e m s p ar i n g ly h e s a i d O t h e r h o m e m a d e s o l u t i o n s ? S t i c k y c a r d s a n d b e e r t r a p s ( c u p s f i l l e d w i t h b e e r o r v i n e g a r a n d p l a c e d i n t h e g r o u n d ) t o t r a p t o a t tr ac t u n wa r y s n a i ls a n d s l u gs Natural pest control strategies for a H E A L T H Y G A R D E N ORGANICALLY GROWN : Get Well Bahamas participants are learning how to grow their backyard vegetable gardens. HARVEST Organically grown zucchini squash.

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WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y OCT OBER 1 1, 201 1, P AGE 1 1B By BJOERN H. AMLAND and KARL RITTER Associated Press L E Y M A H Gb o we e c on f r o n t ed armed forces in Liberia to demand t h a t t h e y s t o p u s i n g r a p e a s a w e a p o n E l l e n J o h n s o n S i r l e a f became Africa's first woman to win a f r e e p r e s i d e n t i a l e l e c t i o n T awak ku l Kar m an b ega n pu s hi ng fo r ch an ge i n Y em en lo n g be f or e the Arab Spring The y s ha r e a c omm i t m e n t t o w o m e n s ri g ht s i n re g i on s w h ere opp res sio n is comm on, and o n F r i d a y t h e y s h a r e d t h e Nobel Peace Prize. T he No rweg ian No bel Com mit te e ho no ur e d wom en fo r th e f ir s t tim e i n sev en yea r s, and in s e lec ting K arman it also r e cog nised the Arab Sp r in g m ov eme nt ch am pi on ed by m i l l i on s o f of t e n a n o n y m o us a c ti v i s ts from Tunisia to Syria. MOVEMENT LEADERS Pri ze co mm itt ee c h ai rma n Tho rbj o e r n Ja g l a n d s a i d i t w o u l d h a v e b e e n d i f f i c u l t t o i d e n t i f y a l l t h e mo ve m en t 's l ea de r s a n d t h at t he c ommitte e w as making a n a dditiona l state me nt b y sele c ting K arm an to represent their cause. W e h a v e i n c l u d e d t h e A r a b S pring in this priz e, but w e hav e put it in a particular context," Jagland told reporters. "Namely, if one fails to inc lude the w omen in the r e volut ion a nd t he ne w d em oc ra ci es, the re will be no democracy." Karman is the first Arab woman ever to win the peace prize, which i nclud es a 10 mi llio n kr ono r ( $1.5 million) award that will be divided among the winners. No woma n or s u bSah ara n Af r ican had wo n t he prize since 2004, when the commit t e e honou red W angari M aa t hai of Kenya, who mobilised poor women t o f i gh t de f or es t a t io n by p la n t in g trees. "I am very, very happy about this prize," said Karman, who has been c a m p a i g n i n g f o r t h e o u s t e r o f Ye m e n' s au th or it ar ia n P re sid e nt A li Abdullah Saleh since 2006. "I give the prize to the youth of revolution in Ye men and the Ye meni pe ople." Si r l eaf 72, wo n L i be r ia 's p r es i dential election in 2005 and is cred it e d w it h h e l p in g th e c o un t ry e m e rg e from an especially brutal civil war. She is running for re-election Tues day in what has been a tough cam paign, but Jagland said that did not enter into the committee's decision to honor her. "T h is gi ve s m e a s t r on ge r c om mi tme n t to w ork f or re c on c ili a tio n, Si rleaf said F riday fr om he r home i n M onr ovi a, th e c a pit al. Sh e sai d Libe ria ns shou ld be p roud t ha t b oth she and Gbowee were honored. "L e ym ah Gb o wee wor ke d v er y h ar d wi th wome n in Li be ri a f ro m all wa lks o f li f e to c hall enge th e d ictatorship to sit in the sun a nd in the r ain advocating f or peac e," Sirleaf said. "I believe we both accept this o n be h a l f of th e Li b e ri a n pe o p le a nd the credit goes to them." G b o w e e w h o t o ok a f l ig h t t o N e w Y o r k o n F r i d a y s a i d s h e w a s shocked to learn she had won. "Everything I do is an act of sur v i va l f o r m ys el f f or t h e gr o u p of people that I work with," she said. "So if you are surviving, you don't ta k e y o u su rv i va l stra t e gi e s or t a c ti c s as anything worth of a Nobel." One of t he fir st people s he tol d was a fellow airline passenger. "Sa t b y a gu y f or f iv e ho ur s o n t h e f l i gh t an d w e n e v e r s p o k e t o ea ch o ther, bu t I had to ta p h im and say, 'S ir, I just won the N obel P e a c e Prize.'" G bo w ee 3 9, ha s l on g c a mp ai gn ed for the rights of women and against rap e, org ani zi ng C hristi an an d M u sl im wo me n t o c ha ll en ge L ib er i a 's warlords. In 2003, she led hundreds of female p r ote s te r s the "w omen in whit e" th rou gh Monr ovia t o dema nd sw ift disarma ment of fig hte r s w h o c o n t i n u e d to p re y o n w o m e n even though a peace deal ending 14 years of near-constant civil war had been reached months earlier. Yo u're su ppose d to be ou r l ibe ra t or s, b u t i f y o u f i n i sh e v e ry o n e w ho w ill you rule ?" Gb ow ee aske d r e bel o f f i ci a l S ek o u F o f an a d ur i ng o n e march that year. G b o w e e w a s h o n o u r e d b y t h e c o m m i t t e e f o r mo b i l i s i n g w o m e n "acro ss ethni c and reli gious dividing lines to bring an end to the long war in Liberia, and to ensure wom en's participation in elections." Gbo w ee w or ks in Ghana's capital as the director of Women Peace and Sec u rity Network A fri c a. The g r o up's we bsite say s she is a moth er of five. S h e s a i d t h a t a l t h o ug h s h e h ad never considered herself worthy of the prize, "women have important r o le s i n p ea ce a n d s e cu r i ty is s ue s and I think that this is an acknowl edgment of that." "The world is functioning on one side of its brain" because women's sk il ls an d in te ll ig en c e a re no t b e in g u s e d t o a d v an c e t h e ca u s e o f t he world," she said. T h e H a r v a r d e d u c a t e d S i r l e a f too k a diffe ren t p ath tow a r d c ha ng e in Liberia, a country created to set tle freed American slaves in 1847. IRON LADY' She worked her way through col lege in the United St a t es by mopp in g fl oo rs a n d w ai ti ng t ab le s. J a i le d at home and exiled abroad, she lost to warlor d C har les Taylor in ele ctio ns in 1997 bu t earned t he nickn a m e I r o n L a d y A r e b e l l i o n forced Taylor from power in 2003, and Sirleaf emerged victorious in a landslide vote in 2005. Ev en on a c ontin ent lon g pla gue d w i t h v i o le n c e t he c i v i l w a r i n L i be r i a st o od ou t f or i ts c r ue l t y. Ta y l or 's s ol die r s a te t he he arts of slain ene mies a n d e v e n d e c o ra t e d c h e c k p o i n t s w i t h human entrails. The c o nfl ic t ha d a mom en ta ry lu ll when Taylor ran for office in 1997 a n d w a s e l ec t ed pre si de nt Ma n y sa y t h e y v o t e d f o r h i m b e c a u s e t h e y were afraid of the chaos that would follow if he lost. Though Liberia is more peaceful t o d ay Si r l ea f h a s cr i t i c s a t ho m e who say she hasn't done enough to restore roads, electricity and other i nfrastru ctu re dev asta ted d uring th e c i v i l s t r i f e H e r o p p o n e n t s h a v e a c c u s e d h e r o f b u y i n g v o t e s a n d u s in g g ov e r n me n t f u n ds t o c a mp a i g n f o r r e e l e c t i o n c h a r g e s t h a t h e r camp denies. Liberia's truth and reconciliation commission recommended that she b e ba rre d fro m pub li c o ffi ce for pr ev i o u s l y g i v i n g u p t o $ 1 0 0 0 0 t o a r e b e l g r o u p h e a d e d b y T a y l o r L i b e r i a s l e g i s l a t u r e h a s n o t a p p rov e d t h at r e c om m e nd a ti on a n d Si r le af ha s s a id th at if s h e s ho ul d a p o l o g i se f o r a n y t h in g i t i s f o r b e i n g fooled" by Taylor in the past. A f r ica n a nd in t er n at io n al l u mi n a r i es w e l c o m e d S i r l e a f s h o n o r Many had gathered in Cape Town, Sou t h Afr i ca on F riday to ce lebrate N o b e l p ea ce l a ur e at e A r c hb i s ho p Desmond Tutu's 80th birthday. W h o ? J o h n so n S i rl e a f? Th e pr e sident of Liberia? Oooh," said Tutu, w ho w on the p ea ce p r i ze i n 198 4 for h i s n o n v i o l e n t c a m p a i g n a g a i n s t wh i t e r a ci s t r u l e in S o ut h A f r i c a. "She deser v es it many times over. S h e s b ro u g h t st a b i li t y t o a p l a c e th a t was going to hell." Three women share Nobel; led change in Africa, Mideast AFRICA'S first democratically elected female president, a Liberian peace activist and a woman who stood up to Yemen's authoritarian regime won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday October 7, 2011 for their work to secure women's rights, which the prize committee described as fundamental to advancing world peace. Seen in this combo from left: Tawakkul Karman of Yemen, Liberian peace activist Leymah Gbowee and Liberia's President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. (AP) HER pageant experience started off with a leg injury, causing her to miss the bus to the official swimsuit photo shoot. But a 45-minute cab ride to the location in Antigua, Guatemala, got Miss Teenager Bahamas Jasmine McIntosh back on track. There, she met the other contestants of the Miss Teenager Universe pageant filming the opening costume and swimsuit credits for the grand finale which was held Sunday. Although Jasmine was not crowned Miss Teenager Universe, she had an unforgettable experience. The 16-year-old honours graduate from Agape Christian School in Abaco met the president of Guatemala, lvaro Colom Caballeros, which was an experience she had been looking forward to. In Guatemala, the teen queen participated in a number of events. On the first day, Jasmine enjoyed a dinner with contestants, event organisers, sponsors and national directors representing each contestant. Pre-pageant photographs included evening gowns and national costumes. This was Jasmine's first official beauty pageant since childhood. Her managers said she handled the hectic schedule well and was truly a representative of the Bahamas and of her supporters in Abaco who worked to secure sponsorship for the trip. About 40 teenagers from around the world vied for the crown. It was Isabella Cazon Torres, 18, from Por tugal who ultimately won the crown. M I S S T E E N A G E R B A H A M A S C O M P E T E S I N G U A T E M A L A F O R T H E M I S S T E E NA G E R U N I V E R S E C R O W N

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F ASHION F AMIL Y TIES' THE TRIBUNE SECTION B TUESD A Y OCT OBER 11, 2011 By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter A CLOSE-knit family and hard work are the backbone of the ever-expanding Melissa Sears brand. Well-known for its school uni form centre, Melissa Sears is now synonymous with fashion, said store owner Janet Fowler. The co mpany starte d w ith on e s ma l l st ore o n E a st S tre e t n o r t h a n d a f t e r e x p a n d i n g ov e r t he y e ar s, it no w bo a st s a n e w b r a n c h a t t h e M a l l a t M a rathon Ope rate d by a moth er a nd her two da ughte rs th e M e lissa S e a rs F as hi o n S to re sta r te d a s a d r e a m m o r e t h a n t w o d e c a d e s a g o I t h a s n o w b e c o m e o n e o f N a s s a u s bigg est h ome-g rown c lothi ng s to r e s. W e h a v e e x p a n d e d i m m e n s e l y o v e r t h e y e a rs T h e s t o r e i s n a m e d a f t e r m y mom 's men tor an d ca re-g iv er who is dec eased. In fac t, w e s t a r t e d o f f w i t h t h e n a m e S ha n ty s F a s h i o n b e c a u s e m y b rother is T y and I'm Shan, b u t s h e w e n t w i t h M e l i s s a Sea r s," said ex ec utiv e ope rat io ns m anage r Sh andi a Per pall Ms Fow le r s daug hter. Ms Pe r p all w as in he r te en y e a r s w h e n M e l i s s a S e a r s d i e d R e f e r r i n g t o h e r a s a "nic e qui et wom an" M s Perp a l l s a i d s h e r e m e m b e r s M el i s s a S ea r s l i k e a gr a n d daug hter w ould re memb er a g r a n d m o t h e r The family bu siness s pans three ge ne rati ons. Ms Pe rpa ll s a i d h e r d a u g h t e r i s n o w w o r k i n g i n t h e s t o r e w h i l e s t u d y i n g m a r k e t i n g a t t h e s a me time B u s i n e s s e s a l w a y s h a v e the ir diffi c ult se ason s but th e f ac t t h a t M e l i s s a S e a r s i s a f a mily busines s, w e are able to pul l throu gh m uch be tter. T her e i s always so meone to lea n on, she sai d. The s u mmer se ason is the best tim e of the yea r for business, s a id Ms Perpa ll, noti ng t he inc r ea s e of summer uniform sa les as a trend ov er t he ye a rs. N ot o nl y d oe s th e c o mpany b ene fit, but so d oes the com munity We u s u a ll y h i r e a l ot o f s u mmer stud ents a nd w e are able to giv e jobs to the c ommu n it y O u r se a ms tre s se s c a rr y h o m e m o r e a r o u n d t h a t t ime and w e are able to get bo nu se s as w e l l, so e v ery b od y m a ke s a li t t l e mo r e a r o un d th a t ti m e o f t h e y e a r, sa i d Ms Perpal l. It is a l w a y s a ra c e b e c a us e u ni for m s ar e all ye ar r ou nd fo r us, b ut s um me r i s ou r h ig h s e a s o n W i t h f a s h i o n y o u have holi days a nd m or e festiv e ti me s a ll ye a r rou nd sh e s a id. Th e c om p an y s fo c us is c u rre n t l y o n t h e u p c o m i n g C h r i s t m a s s e a s o n w i t h p l a n s t o h a v e tr e n d y w i n t e r f a sh i o n s i n s to c k fo r th e c o mp a ny s "f la sh y an d chi c custom ers". "We have so met hing new t h a t w e ar e i nt r o d u ci n g f o r C h r i s t m a s t h a t p e o p l e c a n l ook fo rwar d to. We always b r i n g t h e n e w t r e n d s s h e s a i d I n s p i r a t i o n c o m e s f r o m m a ny pl ac es bu t f or e nt r e prene ur Sha ndia Perpa ll a nd her famil y it was m ainly the h a r d -w o r ki n g n at u r e o f th e f am ily m at ri ar ch th at d r ove them into the busine s s. M y m o m i s r e a l l y t h e b ac k bone. She is a ver y go dl y and wise p ers on. Sh e h as al w ay s b ee n e asy g oi ng mo re o f a plain Jane i n a sen se. I thi nk th e fa c t th a t b oth o f h er chi ldr en ar e work ing f or the b u s i n e s s i t w o r k s o u t M y b r ot h e r i s v e r y qu a l i f i ed i n h is f iel d, he m as te rs m ain ly i n b u s i n e s s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n I 'm t he buyer and I 've been h e r e e v e r s i n c e W e w o r k h a r d i t is o ur wa y o f l i f e ," s aid M s Per pall. Th e f am i ly ow ne d an d o per ate d M el is s a S ear s Fa sh i on S to re h as be c om e on e of N a ss au' s b igge st h om e grow n c lo th i n g c om pan i e s Businesses always have their difficult seasons, but the fact that Melissa Sears is a family business, we are able to pull thr ough much better There is always someone to lean on. Shandia Perpall FASHION BACKBONE: Melissa Sears Fashion Store has become well-known for its school uniform centre.

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A lthough hes still waiting for something tangible from the Bahamas government, Trevor Barry said he was appreciative of the accolades he received from the Bahamian people for his bronze medal feat in the men's high jump at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Barry ended his "Welcome Home" celebrations by attending a cocktail reception in the foyer of the Kendal Isaacs Gym last night. The event came on the heels of his visit to his alma mater at Aquinas College and St Thomas More where he got started in primary school. "I'm excited. Everyone came out and showed their support," Barry said. "I'm happy to see the country, my family and friends coming out here to support and congratulate me. I really appreciate this." Barry, flanked by his parents, Charles and Queenie Barry, expressed his gratitude to his personal coach Keith Parker and Ronald Cartwright, who assisted him to secure the medal in Daegu, South Korea, in August. He also thanked the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations, headed by president Mike Sands, team manager Ralf McKinney and the coaching staff for helping him to achieve his first goal. The next, he said, is to win a medal at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. As he gets set to go into his offseason training and his marriage next month, Barry said he's just waitingt o see what the government does for h im after he was promised by both Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard that he will get what he's due in short order. Maynard was scheduled to give remarks at the cocktail reception,o rganised by Barry's long-time finan cial supporter, Harrison Petty. But Timothy Munnings, the director of sports, filled in for Maynard, who was in the House of Assembly. While he advised the members of the IAAF team that competed in South Korea that the Bahamas is expecting them to continue their high standard of competition at the Olympics, Munnings also encouraged the many younger athletes in attendance to take a page out of Barry's book on perseverance to get the job done. Parker, who was booked to travel to the championships but got sick just the day before he was scheduled to leave, said it was by no accident that Barry achieved what he did. Having worked with him over the past three years, Parker admitted that Barry was probably one of the besta thletes in his camp and, despite not b eing there in Daegu, they went through his performance with a fine comb. With his unusual style of jumping, incorporating a routine of a gymnast and the techniques of a hurdler and triple jumper, Parker said while he attained his personal best of 7-feet, 7inches for the bronze, he predicts that Barry could carry the bar as high as 79 next year. Sands, in his remarks, said that Barry saved the day for the Bahamas because when everything went wrong in Daegu, his medal kept the streaka live of winning a medal at every c hampionship since Troy Kemp got it started with a gold in the men's high T HETRIBUNE SECTIONETUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 INSIDE TRAK T T U U R R N N T T O O 2 2 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 4 4 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 5 5 E E . . . NFL SUNDAY: U NBEATEN P ACKERS LOOKING AT GREATNESS EURO SOCCER: SCOTLAND HAS INJURY HEADACHES AHEAD OF CLASH WITH SPAIN NBA LOCKOUT: NEGOTIA TORS MEETING ON DEADLINE DAY IN LABOUR TALKS TENNIS: RODDICK BEATS LU IN 1ST ROUND OF ROLEX MASTERS BOXING: AGELESS HOPKINS SET FOR HIS LATEST TITLE DEFENSE T T U U R R N N T T O O 7 7 E E . T T U U R R N N T T O O 3 3 E E . . . By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net COULD touring pro Mark Knowles be coming to the end of his stellar tennis career? Having exited in the first round of his last two tournaments with two different partners, Knowles is seriously contemplating whether he should continue playing or retire. The 40-year-old Knowles, who turned pro in 1992, will have plenty of time to decide on his future as he has decided to shut down the remainder of his season after he and Lukasz Kubot were ousted yesterday at the Shanghai Rolex Masters. With the match in their hand in Shanghai, China, Knowles and Kubot fell apart in the second set and eventually lost 2-6, 7-6 (5 to the team of Marcel Granollers of Spain and Viktor Troicki of Serbia. Their defeat came a week after Knowles and Jurgen Melzer of Vienna, Austria, were sent packing with a 6-3, 6-4 decision at the expenses of Marin Cilic and Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia at the China Open in Beijing, China. This one was very disappointing. We played really well. We had total control of the match, leading 6-2, 54 and serving for the match, said Knowles during an interview with The Tribune from his hotel room. It was really a straight forward match but things turned around and, after losing the second set, we didnt get it done in the tie breaker. It was a match we should have won, but just didnt do it. Unlike yesterdays match, Knowles said the week before he and Melzer were just simply out-played in every facet of the game by Cilic and Lju bicic. It was tough. They just outplayed us. They were better than us, Knowles said. We played a good match, but they played an excellent match. That was a case where we just lost to a better team. As for the match-up against Granollers and Troicki, Knowles said he and Kubot were the better team, but they didnt live up to their expectations. We played ourselves in position, but we just didnt close the door, he said. Knowles, who is gearing up for the staging of his annual charity exhibition tournament at Atlantis in December, said his new doubles partner this year, Michal Mertinak, is still nursing a back injury and that has forced him to look elsewhere for a partner every tournament. It was very difficult, so I think Im going to take a break for a while and see how things go, Knowles said. The year has not been what Knowles had anticipated. He only managed to win one tournament when he teamed up with Xavier Malisse to take the Farmers Classic title in Los Angeles, California, in KN OWLES, KUB O T OUSTED IN 1ST ROUND OF SHANGHAI MASTERS MARK KNOWLES S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 E E By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas will once again be called upon as hosts to the international body for the world's most popular game, in an initiative aimed at the development of officiating. FIFA is scheduled to host its Referee Assistance Programme in the Bahamas October 14-18. The RAP was designed to unify the way the laws of the game are applied throughout the world, a process that FIFA instructors consider crucial to the development of the game. In the programme, referees are guided by the development officers through classroom sessions as well as practical exercises out on the pitch. The relatively young programme was founded in December of 2007 and has been well-received throughout the various confedera tions. "The future of our game is intrinsically linked with the quality of refereeing. Therefore, the Refereeing Assistance Programme is crucial for football," said FIFA president Joseph Blatter at the time of its release. "The deci sion to launch this programme is a milestone in the history of the game." In total, FIFA has invested approximately 40 million dollars into the programme, according to its website. The RAP has been credited with enhancing the environ ment in which referees devel op and work at both the national and international lev el. Also on the refereeing front, the BFA Referees Department has recognised BFA vice president and chair man of the Referees Com m ittee, Stanley Darville, who h as been appointed to the CONCACAF (Confederation FIFA Referee Assistance Programme starts on Friday S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 E E S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 E E Trevor Barry hopes PM will keep his promise TREVOR BARRY competes in high jump final during the 13th IAAF World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea, on September 1. He won the bronze. (AP

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SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS NFL SUNDAY NIGHT KNOWLES AND KUBOT OUSTED IN 1ST ROUND July. And for the second consecutive year, Knowles has failed to qualify for the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals in London, England, where the top eight teams in the world will compete starting on November 20. Im extremely disappointed with the year, he said. Its been a difficult time trying to find the right chemistry and getting some momentum going. Xavier and I got some momentum when we won the title, but we didnt get to con tinue because he didnt come to Asia. So Ive had to play with a lot of different partners and so things have not been what I expected. Married to Dawn and the proud father of three sons, Knowles said he will take a long break. After being one of the top players in the world, its just been tough going lately, something that Im not used to, he stated. I just have to decide because its really hard with a family of three kids. Its really hard to be away and its hard to rationalize those things, so I have to take stock. I dont want to miss my time with my family. So I just have to figure out what I will do from here. Having dedicated his entire life to tennis, after playing the sport since he was a young ster, Knowles said its going to be a long process for him to decide what course of direction his future will take. In the meantime, Knowles said he will definitely take the rest of the year off to recu perate and put his future into perspective. Throughout his career, Knowles has accumulated a 736-368 win-loss record with a total of 54 titles. However, he has gone 17-19 this year with just one title. of North, Central America and the Caribbean Football Federation) Elite Panel of Referee Assessors, and was recently appointed to the CONCACAF Gold Cup where he was selected as the Referee Assessor for the final match between Mexico and the US. Darville continues to receive numerous appointments to CONCACAF Champions League matches and FIFA World Cup qualifiers for the 2014 finals in Brazil. "This success we are pleased to announce speaks to the commitment demonstrated by him to referee development both locally and on the international scene," said BFA vice president Damian Neville. The department is also pleased to recognise the contribution made by Mrs Dianne Ferriera-James, a FIFA women's referee from Guyana and a former Women's World Cup referee who has been refereeing in our local leagues for the past two years. "The development of football to include refereeing continues to be a priority of our association president Mr Anton Sealey, whose moral and professional example continues to set the example both locally and internationally as he works to increase the participation and the development of the beautiful game in our country," Neville added. FIFA Referee Assistance Programme starts Friday LUKASZ KUBOT F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E PACKERS safety Charlie Peprah (2688 (AP Unbeaten Pack looking at greatness By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Pro Football Writer WITH Aaron Rodgers' MVPcaliber play leading the way, the Green Bay Packers are 5-0 for the seventh time in franchise history. Each of the previous six, the Packers went on to win an NFL title. That is, admittedly, a statistic that offers little insight for how this season will turn out: After all, none of Green Bay's current players even was born by 1965, the team's most recent such start. Still, with the way they've performed so far this season, the reigning Super Bowl champions sure do seem capable of big things. "5-0 feels great," cornerback Charles Woodson said, "but we're looking at greatness." Does that mean a second consecutive Lombardi Trophy? A 16-0 regular season? While it's waaaaaaay too early to be talking about either, the Packers couldn't be blamed for at least entertaining thoughts of both. They're on an 11-game winning streak, including the end of the 2010 regular season and the postseason. They've already beaten two other teams considered among the NFC's elite entering this season: the New Orleans Saints in Week 1, and the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday night. Some supposedly good teams in the conference are struggling, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles. Other NFC clubs with good r ecords the Detroit Lions, S an Francisco 49ers and Washi ngton Redskins have no recent important-game experience. Plus, the Packers didn't lose a ton of talent in the offseason defensive end Cullen Jenkins and guard Daryn Colledge were the most notable departures while they got to "add" players who missed the Super Bowl run because of injury and might very well be hungry to be a real part of that kind of success. Two key examples: tight end Jermichael Finley and running back Ryan Grant. After putting more than a dozen guys on injured reserve last season, then having Woodson and receiver Donald Driver get hurt during the Super Bowl itself, the Packers know a thing or two about getting by when p layers are sidelined, such as Pro B owl safety Nick Collins (done f or this season) and starting offensive tackles Chad Clifton and Bryan Bulaga (out with leg injuries). And, of course, they have an elite-as-can-be QB in Rodgers. "They certainly possess all the elements necessary to be able to repeat," said Joe Theismann, the former quarterback whose Redskins won the 1983 Super Bowl and nearly repeated but lost to the Raiders in the NFL championship game a year later. "The big question that looms is the health of their offensive line, but they can figure out ways to win when all the pieces aren't in place. That is one reason why I think they do have an opportunity to repeat. And No. 2, there isn't anybody in football at the end of l ast year and the beginning of t his year that's played better f ootball than Aaron Rodgers."



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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Straw vendorswarned to pay upVolume: 107 No.301 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SOMESUN, T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 79F By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net LESS than half of the 462 registered straw vendors were up to date with National Insurance and business licence payments up to the end of September, said Works Minister Neko Grant. He said that while no disci plinary action was taken, the vendors were warned over the last 24 months to make their payments current so they would be able to move into the new market on Bay Street. His comments came after he opened the debate on proposed regulations that will govern the new market. Under the suggested rules registered occupants of the market must ensure that their National Insurance Board contributions, and those of their helpers are up to date, in order to get their business and operation licenses renewed. Mr Grant also shot down outright lies that the new straw market cost the gov ernment $5 million more than the building proposed by for mer Prime Minister Perry Christie. The Lucaya MP said the work has come in on schedule and within budget and is expected to cost Government $15 million, inclusive of construction costs and settlement fees. He said this is seven million less than the cost of the proposed PLP straw market that was never built. It is wrong, it is a lie, it is misleadiang for the leader of the PLP to say that the final cost is $5 million more than the amount proposed by them, Mr Grant told Parliament yesterday. He was referring to statements Mr Christie made last week as he toured the unopened market with other PLP MPs. The work has been completed on schedule and well within budget. The anticipatLess than half are up to date with pa yments TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Debt$AVER LoanFidelity Bank Debt$AVER LoanBorrow & Save with Debt$AVER Fidelity-Bank-Bahamas-LtdFindUsOnFaceBook www.fidelitygroup.com *Offer applies to government workers only im lovin it POLICE SEARCH visitors at a cash for gold shop on Bay Street yesterday as part of a crackdown on scrap metal dealing. See full story on page 5 Photo: Felip Major /Tribune Staff By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Dr Jean Turnquest, chief psychiatrist at Grand Bahama Health Services, said marijuana use is linked to the high incidence of mental illness and psychiatric admissions at the institution. She noted that marijuana is more potent today than in times past, and should not be taken lightly because it is a very addictive drug that can have a devastating impact on an individuals mental health. In observance of World Mental Health Day observed on October 10, the Grand Bahama Health Services hosted a workshop for high school stu dents at the Foster Pestaina Hall on Monday, under the theme, The Great Push: By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham hinted at a possible decrease in the number of constituencies yesterday telling Parliament that the Constitution only mandates a minimum of 38 seats in the House of Assembly. He added that the Constituencies (Boundaries) Commission is expected to make its recommendations to Parliament by the end of this year and voters' cards should be issued by the start of 2012. The Constitution provides that the minimum number of seats in the House of Assembly shall be 38, said Mr Ingraham. There are currently 41 members of Parliament sitting in the House of Assembly. By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter Sbrown@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS Telecommunications Com pany will begin job recruit ment exercises in about three to four weeks, BTC officials said yesterday. Marlon Johnson, vice pres ident of sales and marketing, said the company is expected FASHIONFFAAMMIILLYY TTIIEESS BBEEHHIINNDDMMEELLIISSSSAA SSEEAARRSSSEEWOMAN SECTION 12B ATHLETICSBBAARRRRYY HHOOPPEESS PPMM WWIILLLLKKEEEEPP PPRROOMMIISSEESEESPORTSSECTIONE POLICE LAUNCH CRACKDOWN ON SCRAP METAL SALES CUTS AHEAD IN C ONSTITUENCIES? MARIJUANA LINK TO MENTAL ILLNESS BTC TO START RECRUITING SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF STAFF S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8

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By SANCHESKA BROWN Tribune Staff Reporter Sbrown@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS Telecommunications company expects to increase EZ TopUp retailers by over 160 per cent by the end of 2012, BTC officials said yesterday. While speaking to reporters, CEO Geoff Houston said while the initial public reaction to EZ Top Up was not good, it seems things have turned around for the better. The interesting thing is when we made the transition it was reported that the whole channel disappeared but if you go on the streets today you will find a lot of the persons who initially vacated the market are back. Not in the numberswesaw before but they are there. I am pleased to say the market has come back even at the street level. Marlon Johnson, vice pres ident of sales and marketing, said EZ TOP is doing so well that more than 150 businesses have now subscribed to the service. We have over 150 active locations. Some places are doing one or two transactions a day but we dont count them as active. Our goal is to have over 400 business minimum over the next 12 months. Right now 10 per cent of all our transactions are electronic, we hope to increase that number, he said. Initial feedback has been good. Bahamians love to be able to put $2.17 on their phone. We are far ahead of what we projected and we are working very closely with our partners to empower them and grow their market. BTC is moving toward completely eliminating phone cards by 2014, in a move the company says will increase efficiency and place them in line with international practices. The corporation has said it will spend $1 million in marketing support over the next 12 months to support distribution of its prepaid EZTopUp cell phone minutes. Mr Johnson said they hope that by 2014, at least 80 per cent of the market will be cardless. In the coming months, BTC plans to introduce a number of services, including the 4G network by December in New Providence and Grand Bahama. He said the company has invested .28 million. BTC also plans to launch the Next Generation Network (NGN) by the end of the year ata cost of $53 million. The network will cover the entire Bahamas and will take about three years to officially be rolled out. They are currently testing NGN in Coral Harbour. The corporation has said it will spend $1 million in marketing support over the next 12 months to support distribution of its prepaid EZTopUp cell phone minutes. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 3 By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net THE Court of Appeal yesterday dismissed a bid to overturn the sentence of a man found guilty of attacking his girlfriend stating that the ruling delivered in Magis trates Court was a suitable lesson for the applicant. And, the appellate court said, granting the appeal would have sent a bad message to the public about violence against women and the need for young men to control their anger. Court of Appeal president Anita Allen and justices Stanley John and Abdulai Conteh were satisfied that the two year, six month prison sentence handed down to 23year-old Travis Crossgill was more than fair given the extent of the injuries sus tained by his girlfriend. The injuries to her face, which were described as seri ous, included a broken nose, bruises and broken bones. On January 30, 2010, Crossgill was found guilty of causing grievous harm to his girlfriend and causing harm to the virtual complainants friend. He was sentenced to serve two years in prison on the first charge and six months on the second. His lawyer Krysta Smith argued that the sentence of a judge in the lower court was not appropriate as there was more than one way to give punishment. She also said the probation report, which discloses that the appellant had a troubled childhood was not taken into consideration. She said her client, who had no previous convictions, was remorseful about what he had done and had sought counselling on his own, in an attempt to get help that will not be available in prison. In response, Justice John said: I think prison would be a lesson to him that you cannot disrespect a woman in that fashion and that you cannot assault a woman. You have to send a message not only to him but other criminals out there. He said a significant proportion of the crime in the Bahamas is caused by young men who must learn that they have to contain their anger. Ms Smith said love often causes young people to do things, and cited the troubled relationship between her client and the virtual complainant. She claimed Crossgill was assaulted by his girlfriend on a number of occasions, but never hit back until the one time he lost control. Justice Allens response was: Love is not destructive. Love is not violent. Justice John added that there was absolutely no justification for this appellant acting in that matter towards that young lady and as I indi cated earlier, the medical report speaks for itself. Ms Smith then asked if the court was minded to grant a non-custodial sentence. Justice Conteh answered, nothing that her client faced six years on those counts and received less than half. Justice Allen added that there are consequences for everything we do in life. BTC CEO GEOFF HUSTON looks on as Vice-President of Marketing Marlin Johnson answers questions from the media. Photo: Tim Clarke / Tribune Staff SENTENCE SENDS A MESSAGE OVER VIOLENCE A GAINS TWOMEN BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY TO INCREASE RETAILERS BY MORE THAN 160% S S E E E E b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s s s e e c c t t i i o o n n f f o o r r m m o o r r e e o o n n B B T T C C to hire new employees by January. We do not know the exact number of people we will be hiring right now, but we do know that we will start recruiting new people soon. More than 300 people have already accepted the voluntary severance packages (VSEP) and we expect another 100 to leave before the year is out. When that process is done we will bring new people in, he said. BTC employees began accepting VSEPs in late July. The programme is a voluntary exercise where staff members can elect to separate or take early retirement from the company while benefiting from an incentive payment. Mr Johnson said: We will not be hiring 400 employees but it will be a significant number. We will place them mostly in customer service and in our new retail shops. He said BTC retail shops will be a shopping experience like never before offering Bahamians top notch customer service. Our objective is to deliver sales growth through a highly motivated workforce, providing exceptional customer service and operational excellence in a unique shopping environment, he said. We expect to have 50 retail stores covering the Bahamas in the next two years. Of that 50 at least 16 of them will be owned by entrepreneurs. How much they end up with is determined by the demand. But our goal is to empower young Bahamians and do as much as we can to prepare them for competition. BTC will also introduce full service flagships, mini-flagship stores, stand alone dealer owner stores and shop-inshop stores. These new branches will allow customers to experience a wider selection of products and simplify and increase the convenience of bill payment. f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e BTC TO START RECRUITING SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF STAFF

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EDITOR, The Tribune. THE UNITED STATES Republican Party has adopted a plan that everything Barack Obama puts forward, regardless how much sense it makes or how many people it benefits, they are going to object to it. This plan has now exposed many to be complete fools, because many of the new initiatives are what America desperately needs if they are to realize job growth, stimulate the economy and leveling of the playing field. The PLP, being the copycats that they are without really checking, has now gone down the same path as the Republican Party. They have devised a plan to demonise Rt Hon. Hubert Alexander Ingraham, and have been successful in causing the not so well intentioned to gravitate to their negative rhetoric. The plan by the PLP to say no to everything must be the most asinine game plan known to man. They objected to Prescription Drugs and to the Youth Empowerment Programme and now they are objecting to the latest crime initiatives. Remember they also said no to the people in Yamacraw Elizabeth, St Anns and Fox Hill for wanting good clean potable water too. The PLP has now rebranded themselves as the Party of No! They are so paranoid that when the FNM win this time that they would have sunken to third place, which I am sure would cause the party to disband. The very thought of this being Custers last stand must not be settling well. The slaughtering of each others character in plain view is so disgusting, that my PLP friends, off camera, are very disturbed Pitting one in leadership against the other has combined their problems; the people who are telling them one thing are telling others who are not in their party another thing. They have taken backstabbing to another level. The over zealousness of a wanna-be-leader has not only poisoned some of their most ardent supporters but has caused many to become so disgusted that many are threatening to stay home, rather than vote FNM. The PLP has now found them in a state of flux. The plan to sell, vitriol and venom to a still peaceful society will not bear fruit. Not all Bahamians thrive on hearing negative all of the time. Not all Bahamians could stomach having anyone speaking ill about a man who has contributed much and who has turned this country around. Many of us would quickly agree that whatever is good for the country is bad for the PLP. The idea to sell no must have come from a selfish, greedy all for me baby or nothing mentality. Does anyone in the PLP have any sense at all? Do they think that right thinking Bahamians cannot see for themselves? Does the PLP want to risk playing games this time. If they do, they do so at their own peril. Mr Christie will not be too pleased to know that there are plans to force him out of office before the election, or do precious little so the PLP could lose so that there would be another outcry for him to vacate the seat. The wannabe leaders will stop at nothing to have their say, one way or the other. But the plan to disagree with everything, especially things that Bahamians are now bragging about will only expedite the inevitable, when all PLP will sing so solemnly When I come the last mile of the way... Still fear Jesus Christ only, all others are powder puff. IVOINE W. INGRAHAM Nassau, October 5, 2011 EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 Circulation Department (242) 502-2386 Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608 Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm JAMAICA, which has been working hard to get its crime under control, seems to have taken a long slide backwards in recent months. Even more worrying is the corruption that Justice Minister Delroy Chuck in an address on Saturday to graduates of the Norman Manley Law School says has reached a formidable level in Jamaicas legal system. He told graduates, entering a system threatened by corruption, that one of his ministrys priorities under the Justice Reform Programme was to build trust and confidence in the justice system. There is corruption within the court and the justice system, where the police have been paid to say they cannot find a witness, or persons have been paid to have documents destroyed amongst many other things, he told the graduates. Cases languish on the books for years with very little progress, clients become frustrated and cannot move on with their lives, sometimes they appease their grievances by taking justice into their own hands, Mondays Daily Gleaner quoted Justice Minister Chuck as saying. Reported the Gleaner: He noted that developments in the system leave lawyers with a bad reputation as being of no help while the justice system gets a bad reputation of being of no use. Our judges are known for their integrity and fair play but so much more is required of them, Justice Chuck told the graduates, who he urged not to contribute to the problems when they go into practice. They (the judges) must assist in removing any taint of corruption, vulgarity or malpractice that may exist and they must help us to strengthen public trust and confidence in the justice system. He said hundreds of thousands of cases had been in the court system for eight months some even for years. Last year, said the justice minister, there were almost 460,000 cases before the courts with more than half being a backlog. He said that stemming the backlog was everybodys business as it posed a real threat to the nations economy. Many years ago, Sir Etienne Dupuch sounded like a broken record as he constantly urged, through this same column, that Bahamians get a handle on crime which at that time was nothing to what it is today. He warned that the Bahamas was following down the same dead-end path as Jamaica. According to the US International Safety and Travel alert violence and shootings occur regularly in certain areas of Kingston and Montego Bay. As for the Bahamas: The Bahamas has a high crime rate. New Providence Island in particular has experienced a spike in crime that has adversely affected the travelling public The Bahamas has the highest incidence of rape in the Caribbean according to a 2007 United Nations report on crime, violence, and development trends. In Jamaica recently, gangs not only kill, but behead their adversaries. They then hide the head, obviously to make identification more difficult. The Daily Gleaner reported a Jamaican police officer moaning: This haffi stop, it has to. But the justice system not working for us (police). You hold a man for murder, him go jail, and him get bail and is back on the road again. It cant work! Sound familiar? No, it cant work and it wont work. This is the very matter that will be discussed in the House of Assembly in this session as government prepares to crack down on criminals by amending the Criminal Procedure Code. The Bahamas cannot continue to follow in Jamaicas criminal shadow. PLP:the party that says no to everything LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Criminals Jamaica and Bahamas problems RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE CLERKResponsibilities include, but not limited to: Must have a pleasant telephone voice with a good command of the English Language and be customer service oriented. Good working knowledge of general oce procedures. Computer literate, knowledge of Accpac software working with A/Cs Receivable an asset. Scheduling customer work. Typing customer proposals and letters on Microsoft Oce. Filling new quotes and work completed. Credit stop lists and collections. Updating customer data base.ONLY APPLICANTS AGE 35 YEARS AND OLDER NEED APPLY.Please send resume to the following: Fax: 322-3969 or email jholm_tropex@coralwave.com P.O.Box N-1388, Nassau, Bahamas 127,&( 1HZWRUHKRXUVIRU 67$5'867'58*6 %OXH+LOOG HIIHFWLYH 2FWREHUWKRQXQGD\DPSP 3XEOLF+ROLGD\VDPSP EDITOR, The Tribune. Happy Discovery Month, Bahamas! Another October month is upon us, the five hundred and nineteenth (519th) since 1492. That cele brated Discovery for the Europeans through the lead sea captain and explorer, Christopher Columbus, was a new awareness to the Europeans, which established a new trading route and link between the old world and a new hemisphere, the Americas. This new world was always there, however, it was a discovery to the Europeans who acquired for the first time the knowledge of its existence. Discovery is the attainment of knowledge or awareness of things not known of before. People are discovering every day. Since fate has had it that one of the most significant discoveries in recent human history occurred in The Bahamas when Mr Columbus set foot for the first time in the new world on the island of Guanihani, which was renamed San Salvador, we in The Bahamas should make this whole month as a cele bration of Discovery. Not only commemorating the fateful day, October 12th, but using the month to rediscover who we are as a peo ple; reflecting on where we have come from; analysing where we are; and determining where we want to go or be in the future. Lets do it for us. Columbus act was an act of internationalism, it caused a new hemisphere to be widely known, the Americas, the most progressive part of the world today. The Bahamas was the start place for the new dispensation of globalisation and it continues to be a part of it. Bahamians today are mostly descendants of old world people, Africans and Europeans, who are the inhabitants who own and govern this new world state. There is a lot to be reflected on and to be resolved in our nation today, we can do a better job of coming up with solutions organising under the umbrel la of the oneness of Bahamians. Let us take this most significant month to us and the world to focus on building a better Bahamian and improved Bahamas, official ly. H RUDY SAWYER Freeport, Grand Bahama, October 5, 2011. Disco ver a better Bahamas

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By DANA SMITH POLICE are warning that metal thieves pose a threat to the water supply of entire communities. This comes after repeated attempts to make off with copper pipes worth $200 each from the New Providence well fields. Police believe the incidents are part of the lucrative scrap metal racket that continues to grow despite legislative attempts to curb it. Addressing the press at the National Crime Prevention Office at Police Headquarters yesterday, Superintendent Stephen Dean said metal theft isa matter that police deem of paramount importance. We are astonished and appalled by the level that some people in our country would go to for personal gain and self-interest without concern for the wider public, he said. He said the theft of water pipes can cause supply to be cut to homes, businesses and even whole neighbourhoods. When you go into the well fields in particular and steal the pipes, that can shut down major communities, Mr Dean said. Early this year we had an incident where persons went into the well fields and it shut down a section of New Providence. Earlier this year, the theft of pipes from the well fields resulted in supply being cut to Coral Harbour and other western New Providence areas. Not only the Water and Sewerage Corporation has been affected, Mr Dean said. We have had the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas and other news media companies (robbed of copper wire) these are essential services. There is a cost involved in this. When we steal from these places, the burden and the brunt of it goes on the customer and the wider Bahamian public. Also this year, the Grand Bahama Power Company reported the theft of several feet of copper wire, which caused power-outages and more than $250,000 in replacement costs. ZNS has suffered a string of copper wire thefts, one of which caused 1540AM radio to go off the air for three months. We want to talk directly to those persons out there who are going into these areas for personal gain, stealing copper, stealing metal, Mr Dean said. We say to you, persons of the criminal mind, please be aware the police will be targeting you. The police will remain vig ilant, the police are going to take a zero tolerance approach to these persons. We will spare no efforts to make sure that they are arrested, he said. Mr Dean said surveillance will be intensified in areas where essential services are located, such as Water and Sewerage Corporation properties and media companies. He added: Anyone found receiving these products, they too will be arrested. It is just as bad to receive as it is to steal. We send particularly a warning to these businesses that operate the scrap metals. You have an awesome responsibility, you cannot just look at the monetary gain from these items. If we find that you have these (illegal metals) on your premises, you too will be arrested. Mr Dean allowed that in some cases, scrap metal dealers cannot know that what is being sold to them is illegal. Its very difficult, we know, in some cases for them, because when these persons steal they dismantle it, they break it down. But if they see a large number of pieces of scrap metal coming in, they need to call the police to be sure, he said. In July, government issued a 90-day ban on copper and other scrap metal exports, and the Pawnbrokers and Sec ondhand Dealers Bill, which aims to tackle unregulated cash for gold and scrap metal businesses was tabled in parliament last week. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 5 COPPER THIEVES THREATENING WATER SUPPLY Sergeant Skipping along with Superintendent Stephen Dean address the media yesterdayPhotos: Flipe Major /Tribune Staff Superintendent Stephen Dean says metal theft is a matter that police deem of paramount importance Police inspect visitors to a cash for gold shop in downtown Nassau

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LAST week's published list of guidelines for vendors of the new straw market has led a number of opposition members to call for serious revision of the bill to establish a straw market authority. While, the opposition agrees that a number of the outlined clauses do benefit straw market vendors, they say the overall tone of the bill ridicules, disrespects and degrades vendors. The child of a straw vendor, the Oppositions lead speaker, Melanie Griffin, was a major advocate in the discussion for just treatment and fair guidelines for straw vendors in the House of Assembly yesterday. Despite the belief of many who think that straw market vendors have never been governed by guidelines and rules, Mrs Griffin said regulation is not new to them as they came internally. She strongly suggested that all vendors be given a hand book. Mrs Griffin noted that straw vendors worked close ly with the Ministry of Works on developing guidelines, but had no prior knowledge that it would be used for the legislation of the Bill nor that it would be published in the media. Speaking on behalf of straw vendors, Mrs Griffin said: No wonder they had to get in arms, no wonder they had to get concerned. If you are being impacted so greatly by a piece of legislation being put in place, dont you think it is only fair that you know about it? She also zeroed in on the clarity of the seemingly unknown authority that is referred to many times in the Bill. She questioned exactly who the authority is, how many persons would comprise the authority and how decisions would be made regarding vendors. Calling other stipulations harsh, the member of parliament expressed concern that failure to pay weekly rental fees would result in a $1,000 fine. If you can't pay a rental fee, how can you pay $1,000? she asked. Apart from harsh fines, she accused the government of stifling Bahamian culture and entrepreneurship by banning the sale of guineps and peanuts. Calling the vendors heroes and heroines, she praised them for major contributions to this country. In the midst of Bill discussions, St Cecelia MP Cynthia Pratt agreed that vendors could benefit from the Straw Market Authority Act, but urged the government to look at and refer to vendors with high acclaim. We don't seem to speak about straw vendors as we would lawyers, doctors, engineers or teachers. We tend to speak down as though they are less than the others, she said. Mrs Pratt, who also grew up in the straw market and could relate to many ven dors who have the challenge of meeting monthly bills, urged the government to understand why vendors go to great lengths to stand apart from their colleagues. Mrs Pratt said: When you have 15-20 vendors in one area and all selling the same thing you have to be creative, because I have to try and get a product that I believe can be sold so I can make a couple dollars and I'm the only one who has that product. Mrs Pratt called for adopting programmes in schools that teach straw work and agriculture to promote anything Bahamian. Mrs Pratt defended Bahamians who are married to foreigners and own stalls being allowed to let their husbands operate their stall for them should they fall ill or are otherwise unable to do so for themselves. She believes this aspect should be considered a must, as in many cases a spouse taking over the business is the only way for survival. As a way forward for vendors, she suggested the establishment of a credit union and scholarship fund for children interested in straw work. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Under The Patronage Of The Governor General His Excellency Sir Arthur A. Foulkes Dr. Myles Munroe & p resenta OCT OBER 9th-11th Reaching,Restoring&EmpoweringMenForPositiveActionMr. Ethan MossPresident Real Men Min. Event Coordinator SCHEDULEOFEVENTS SUNDAY, 9th OCTOBER 4:00PM 1) MARCH from Southern Recreational Grounds to Rawson Square for MISSION OUTREACH & RALLY 2) NATIONALADDRESS byGovernment,Church,Police&CivicLeaders in Rawson Square MEN ONLYADVANCEMENTEVENTS@The Diplomat Ct., Carmichael RoadMONDAY, 10thOCTOBER 9:00am-11:30am Young Men & Boys Empowerment Session 7:30pm9:30pm MEN ONLY Advancement & Action Event TUESDAY, 11thOCTOBER 9:00am-11:30am Men In Crisis Empowerment Session 7:30pm9:30pm MEN ONLY Advancement & Action Event Tel.461-6442/5or461-6471Fax341-6936Email:bfmadmin@bfmmm.com OPPONENTS SPEAK OUTON BEHALF OF VENDORS MELANIE GRIFFIN, the child of a straw vendor, is one of a number of voices to have spoken out about the list of guidelines for straw market vendors published last week N N o o w w o o n n d d e e r r t t h h e e y y h h a a d d t t o o g g e e t t i i n n a a r r m m s s , n n o o w w o o n n d d e e r r t t h h e e y y h h a a d d t t o o g g e e t t c c o o n n c c e e r r n n e e d d . I I f f y y o o u u a a r r e e b b e e i i n n g g i i m m p p a a c c t t e e d d s s o o g g r r e e a a t t l l y y b b y y a a p p i i e e c c e e o o f f l l e e g g i i s s l l a a t t i i o o n n b b e e i i n n g g p p u u t t i i n n p p l l a a c c e e , d d o o n n t t y y o o u u t t h h i i n n k k i i t t i i s s o o n n l l y y f f a a i i r r t t h h a a t t y y o o u u k k n n o o w w a a b b o o u u t t i i t t ? ? M M e e l l a a n n i i e e G G r r i i f f f f i i n n THENEW Straw Market in downtown Nassau

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 7 By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net THE Court of Appeal hearing of convicted paedophile Andre Birbal was delayed yesterday due to the applicant not having an attorney. Birbal, who was convicted in the Supreme Court earlier this year of having unnatural sex with two underage boys, told Justices Anita Allen, Abdulai Conteh and Stanley John that he was unable to afford an attorney. I wish to be appointed an attorney. I am unable to afford one as Ive been incarcerated for almost three years, he said. The former teacher, who was sentenced to 35 years in prison by Justice Hartman Longley, told appellate court president Justice Allen that he intends to appeal against conviction and sentence. Birbal was accused of having sexual intercourse with two former students. The incidents were alleged to have occurred between January 2002 to June 2007 with one boy, and from September 2002 to June 2005 with the second boy. On Wednesday, January 26, a jury of seven men and two women delivered guilty verdicts in six of the eight charges against the former art teacher. His sentencing was handed down six days later. Justice Allen acknowledged Birbals request for an attorney and noted that provisions would be made for an attorney to be appointed. The matter was adjourned to Thursday, October 27. LACK OF ATTORNEY DELAYS APPEAL

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His comments came after he confirmed the appoint ments to the Constituencies Commission. The Commission consists of Brent Symonette, MP for St Anne's, and Tommy Turnquest, Mount Moriah MP who have been selected to represent the government and Philip Davis, MP for Cat Island who will represent the Opposition. Speaker of the House Alvin Smith chairs the body while Supreme Court Justice Stephen Isaacs serves as deputy chairman. It is my hope that we con clude all matters relating to the work of the Commission, including approval by Parliament, during the course of this year so as to permit the Parliamentary Registration Department to begin the distribution of voters cards the first week of January, 2012. Mr Ingraham told Parliament. The last time the Commission made its report to the Governor-general was on March 13, 2007. A new Commission meets every five years to study the number of registered voters in constituencies and make adjustments where considered necessary. In densely populated areas it takes into account the number of persons in each constituency and tries to create a population balance and in less populated areas the geo graphical makeup and expanse of the area would be taken into consideration. As of October 7, there were approximately 134,000 registered voters in the country with the majority of them residing in the constituency of Blue Hills in New Providence. The prime minister also gave the following breakdown of Registered Voters in New Providence: Bain and Grants Town, 2,869; St Cecilia 3,105; Ft Charlotte 3,157; Farm Road & Centreville 3,218; Golden Isles 4,790; Sea Breeze 4,390; Elizabeth 4,290; and Blue Hills 5,085. In Grand Bahama and the Family Islands: West End & Bimini 2,619; High Rock 3,562; MICAL 1,160 and North Abaco 3,414. There are currently 41 constituencies in the country: 26 in New Providence; six in Grand Bahama and Bimini; two in Abaco; two in Eleuthera; two in Andros and the Berry Islands; one in the Exuma Cays; one in Long Island and Ragged Island; one in Cat Island and San Sal vador; and one in Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked Island, Ack lins and Long Cay. The prime minister urged eligible voters who have not yet registered to do so. In New Providence voter registration occurs between 10am and 4pm at the Marathon and Town Centre Malls, the General Post Office, the National Insurance Board headquarters, Princess Mar garet Hospital, College of the Bahamas and other locations. Between 5 and 7 pm, registration continues at the Mall at Marathon and the Parliamen tary Commissioners Office. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ed final account is approximately $12 million, including an estimated $600,000 in change orders," Mr Grant said. "It has been erroneously reported that the stop, review and improve action taken by this government has incurred a cost of $11 million. He added that the maximum the government will end up spending for the new market will total $15 million inclusive of construction costs and settlement fees and is $7.5 million less than the PLP's $22.5 proposed straw market. The Lucaya MP also said the regulations will crackdown on the area's current "flea market" appearance by outlawing "knock-off" products and souvenirs produced in other countries while encouraging the creation of Bahamian made products. Any vendor caught selling unapproved products may have their licenses revoked. Mr Grant said while it has always been public policy that only Bahamians, who are at least 18 years old be allowed to operate stalls in the market, over the years there have been incidents to the contrary. Section 3 of the regulations affirms current policy and mandates that only Bahamians over 18 can operate a stall while section 5 of the Bill mandates that every vendor and helper must wear an identification card while in the market. Another section of the legislation prohibits sub-leasing of stalls and any licensed vendor who hires an ineligible worker may have their licence suspended or cancelled. These regulations will be enforced by the Market Authority. The new market will require an estimated $1.2 million a year to operate. Government has set a lease rate of $5 per day or $35 per week for vendors for two years. The Ingraham administration has also approved $750,000 to be allocated to the market for start-up capital and training classes for vendors. The market is 34,000 sq ft at ground level with a 4,500 sq ft enclosed mezzanine accessible by elevator. The new market has space for 500 stalls for vendors, including 31 specialty stalls and 14 spaces for wood carvers. On the upper level there is also space for after-school care for the vendors' children, a kitchen and a multi-purpose room that can be used for meetings or training sessions. The new market will also have infrastructure to accept credit card payments if the vendors choose to use the service. Investing in Mental Health. In her presentation on Drugs and Addiction, Dr Turnquest noted that peer pressure and dealing with the stresses of school and home and family life are some reasons why students experiment with drugs. She said marijuana and prescription drugs are more commonly used by teens to get high. Dr Turnquest stated that marijuana has many street names, such as weed, grass, herb, chronic, and Mary Jane. She said smoking marijuana can cause mental problems such as confusion, anger, tiredness and suicidal thoughts. When I graduated some years agowe never saw people coming to the mental institution who had been smoking marijuana, but now there are much higher incidents of mental illness and psychiatric admissions connected with marijuana use, so we are talking about a major problem, Dr Turnquest stressed. She also warned that marijuana use can cause infertility problems in men and women. Dr Turnquest said the use of prescription drugs is a growing trend among teenagers because it is easily accessible. She noted that cough and cold syrups that can be found in most homes is now being used to get high. The syrup is mixed with soda or alcohol or jolly rancher candy. The mixture is associated with Hip-Hop rappers such as Lil Wayne, and it is referred to as syrup, sizzurp, juice, purple drank, purple and Texas tea. Dr Turnquest said it is a deadly mixture that can cause a heart attack. Some of the common side effects are confusion, dizziness and high blood pressure. She also pointed out that alcohol use contributes to half of all murders, suicides and accidents. Dr Turnquest said that inhalants are also dangerous and can result in death.Huffing is highly addictive and slows body functions and can cause loss of consciousness and brain damage. She also noted that cocaine also referred to as white lady, coke, Aunt Nora, big C, and candy cane causes mental depression. Persons can also contract HIV by sharing needles, she added. Dr Turnquest noted the success rate of helping drug addicts is not good, and encouraged students to stay away from drugs. She said students should seek help from teachers, guidance counsellors, social workers, psychologist and psychiatrists. Also speaking at the workshop was guest speaker Rev Dr Elvis Burrows of Central Zion Baptist Church, who commended the 20 nurses for completing mental health training. CUTS AHEAD IN CONSTITUENCIES? f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e o o n n e e By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE public should not have to bear the cost of politically motivated contract cancellations, the deputy leader of the Opposition said. Brave Davis, MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay, and San Salvador, said the resulting penalty fees should be paid by the individual who makes the determination to break a contract. The Cat Island MP criti cized the cancellation of the former project contracted by the Christie administration during his contribution to pro posed regulations for the new straw market in the House of Assembly yesterday. He added that the straw market project was not the only example of the public bearing the cost of projects that are cancelled as a result of political decisions. We talk about making decisions, the decisions have to be rational, thought out, and the consequences under stood, Mr Davis said. That was not done in this case and it is costing the Bahamian people. He added: I call on this parliament to consider how do we protect ourselves and ordinary Bahamians from having to pay for the silly decisions, hasty decisions, made on behalf of our people. The Christie administration awarded a $21,472,374.13 con tract to Woslee Dominion to construct a new straw market in 2007. In his debate contribution yesterday, Lucaya MP Neko Grant said that the contract included a client contingency of $1,073,618.71. Mr Grant said that the initial construction budget was $10 million. It must be recorded that this contract was executed without completed plans, Mr Davis said. Among the items not priced were stalls or booths. Contract for a straw market and not include stalls? Mr Grant said the Ingraham administration made the decision to cancel the project after an in-depth review of the contract. The most notable reason, he said, was the cost and its percentage of the governments capital budget. Mr Davis said: This government terminated the contract with Woslee Dominion, and decided that all reasonable contractual obligations to the contractor, architect, and other concerned with the project would be settled by the government. According to published reports, there is an unresolved legal dispute between the gov ernment, the architect, and contractor over the cancelled contract. PUBLIC SHOULD NOT BEAR COST OF PENALTY FEES MARIJUANA LINK TO MENTAL ILLNESS STRAW VENDORS WARNED TO PAY UP BRAVE DAVIS has hit out at the penalty fee payments for the Straw

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ByJOHN HEDDEN IN MY last article, I touched upon the use of technology in Bahamian agriculture; where its application has been most successful (Andros), and why (education). It is natural to follow on with a discussion of the advantages of a strong infrastructure both physical and logistical. First, I will deal with the physical side. This must include access to land, roads, transport and communications, utilities and energy, and equipment. Access to land is obvious and essential. Access to private land is usually not feasible unless the farmer uses or rents land, in which case the competition from real estate sales will be a factor. An example can be seen next to us in Florida, where the Homestead area has been changing from an agricultural community to a residential/ commercial area. Why? Simply because land owners can earn more money from selling real estate than using the land for farming. Here in the Bahamas, that pressure is possibly even greater. So, that leaves other types of land. In the southern coppice islands, generation and commonage properties allow indigenous people access to and use of the land, but never outright title. This in itself is restrictive because of competition for land from other members of the community. Again, these islands have little Crown land of agricultural value to offer for lease. In the northern islands, many thousands of acres of pine and previously forested land are available for farming, and fortunately most of this is public (Crown) land. Thousands of acres of previously cleared and farmed land are available on Andros, Abaco, and Grand Bahama; where ample fresh water is easily accessible for irrigation. So why has all this land not been taken up by farming enterprises? The first hurdle comes with the lease of the land from the government through the Ministry of Agriculture. There is apparently no sys temin place for proper legal leases to be prepared and issued to farmers; and farmers are reluctant to invest in an agricultural enterprise without the relevant documentation in hand. Of those that do farm the land, fewer still are prepared to build and live on the farm without that essential piece of paper. This means that travel between the settlement and the farm can be time consuming, expensive in terms of fuel costs, and can leave the property open to the two legged critters come harvest time. In addition, wild hogs, cattle and horses become pests in some farming areas. So the end result is little investment is made, and farmers try to implement the inherited and traditional slash-andburn system of subsistence production on a 25 acre block of previously cleared land leased from the Crown. This is much, much larger than the traditional task or quarter acre used in previous times. It does not, and cannot work. A more technologically advanced system demands more efficient communication and access to information and physical inputs. Again, these are sorely lacking and unavailable to the small farmer. Farm roads are mostly in very poor condition and subject to the vagaries of the politics of the day. Inter-island shipping through the contracted mail carriers is inefficient and unable to deliver any volume of perishable farm goods to the other end in good condition. The ministry runs outlets such as the produce exchange and fish and farm store, both on Potters Cay, and sadly neither operate in any way close to their intended purpose. Why? No real alternatives are presented, and the island packing house system has never functioned properly. For livestock production and processing, the situation is even more miser able. It doesnt even exist. The abattoir is exactly what its name implies, a place where slaughter and processing are prehistoric and often considered barbaric. No institution exists in any of the Out Islands to even remotely accommodate animal husbandry no veterinary services, no extension ser vices, no slaughter and processing facilities, and no storage or marketing services Access to utilities and energy is mostly absent in the designated farming areas. This naturally raises farm operation costs and limits access to timely infor mation. One example would be the need for on-farm power to access the internet for market prices and accessibility. As for energy, the cost of fuel is exorbitant for farmers using diesel for farm mechanisation, and gasoline for transportation. These factors, along with poor road conditions, put more stress on potential farm prices due to operating and maintenance costs. The use of equipment for farming is severely limited by the operators lack of financial capabilities. No land title means no collateral; means no financing; means no investment; means little income; means Big Problem. The co-operative system and government guaranteed loans have failed to help solve this because neither institution has been innovative in terms of agricultural enterprise. Both could have provided much of the logistical and physical infrastructure needed. On the logistical side of infra structure, farmer education and extension services are critical for advances in farming systems. Unfortunately, neither have been addressed and information on basic physical inputs such as crop irrigation and fertility regimes are not available to farmers. Many islands including Abaco do not even have a proper extension officer. At the other end, the farmer must actively seek out markets, which are often on another island where a population cen tre exists. This involves further expense with travel, accommodation and eventually shipping costs. Again, no information is available concerning market demands, prices, seasonality due to consumer numbers, and changes in product preference according to the time of year. For example, Bahamians do not eat many vegetables, but foreign visitors usually do. And, by the way, macaroni and cheese is not a vegetable dish. So these are some of the prob lems presented to the Bahamian with farming in the blood. Itis not therefore surprising to find minimal small farm pro duction in the islands even though there are several thousand registered farmers in the country. The obstacles to being suc cessful as a farmer are immense and daunting. In addition, the lack of departmental support amplifies the difficulties. This merry go round results in a vicious circle of negatives which actively prevent the establishment of any genuine homegrown small farming sector, even though the potential is there. Dont the politicians keep on pointing out to us that there is a $500,000,000 a year market out there, and we need to do more about it? Talk of self-sufficiency, food security, jobs, pride of production and endless platitudes abound, but prove to be little more than hot air. But my question remains: Where is the development of the infrastructural support systems for the agricultural industry? This can only come from the government, and it won't. We see periodic plans, as with the latest five-year plan from the Ministry of Agriculture now going into its second year. But nothing can be seen of this at ground level where most of us live. The only real impetus is coming from the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) which is trying to streamline itself under the direction of its chairman, himself a successful agricultural businessman. Andros is leading in this respect, and hopefully other islands will follow. As a final word in this article, I will say that the political rhetoric and the lip service paid to farming is huge, but unfortunately this does not translate to active input or support for the sector. Rather, our politicians would seem to encourage the foreign investor with the big agribusiness programmes, where Bahamians may be employed as with the mega resort projects still being promoted throughout the country. We havent lost that plantation mentality. Big agribusiness has not yet proved to be permanent, good for sustainable production, or even beneficial for the local entrepreneur. We still haven't cottoned on to the idea that small business enterprises, including agriculture, are the lifeblood of any economy. In my next article I will present arguments for and against the development of a viable agricultural sector including land usage (our one remaining untapped resource) and the deleterious effects of poorly managed and monitored agriculture on land and ecological systems. AGRICULTURE SERIES PART 3 INFRASTRUCTURE THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 9 )25(1725/($6( &ROOLQV$YH 6WRUHIURQW ,QUHDURI 0XOWL$XWRDUWV T)W*URXQG VT)W0H]]DQLQH )RULQIRUPDWLRQFDOO 3K GN-1313Cabinet Of fice THE BATTLE OF AGRICULTURE VERSUS REAL ESTATE The writer is a former horticulturist with botany degrees from UWI Mona campus and the University of Reading in the UK. Mr Hedden has worked for the Bahamas Ministry of Agriculture and on the USAID project, BARTAD Andros. He is now establishing a modern demonstration fruit and vegetable farm on 10 acres of Crown land in Abaco, where he has worked with farmers for the past 25 years. A TEAM from the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation admires healthy tomato plants, the product of the new drip irrigation and fertigation systems employed by North Andros farmer Caleb Evans. But farming in the Bahamas faces a key pressure the value of land for real estate versus the value of land for farming

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANYS (BTC) chief executive yesterday said he was very confident its would meet the $60-$80 million operating income target set by its London-based parent, having achieved a competition milestone by concluding an interconnection agreement with its main rival, Cable Bahamas. Pledging that Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC) goal was to bring the absolute best in technology and communications services to the Bahamas, Geoff Houston said BTCs $42.8 million investment in its 4G (fourth generation) network, set to be rolled out over the next two years, would ultimately give Bahamians the same Internet connectivity speed on their cell phones as they enjoyed at home. Adding that a 7 per cent increase in traffic on its existing 2G cellular network indicated that BTC was getting to grips with the dropped calls and other service issues plaguing it, Mr Houston said BTC still had a long track to go in its efforts to restructure and reshape its business, $4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $4.94 $5.50 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A GRAND BAHAMABASED employer is today set to have make or break talks with the islands monopoly power supplier in a last-ditch bid to save 60 jobs, telling Tribune Business it could not see how Freeport can ever recover from this disaster as it relates to power costs. Stephen Howes, the major shareholder in Queens Highway-based Fenestration and Glass services, in an e-mail sent to this newspaper said the company had slimmed its workforce considerably since its 300-strong maximum. Pointing out that Gregory Moss, the attorney and PLP candidate for Marco City was incorrect in stating that Fenestration had completely shut down and left Grand Bahama, Mr Howes said: Wehave in fact reduced our operation considerably, but as yet have not left Grand Bahama. Most of the problems we have experienced over the last four years are due to Grand Bahama Power Company and its inability to supply a quality product that doesn't destroy our equipment, and at a price that we can produce our product and remain com petitive. He added: We have a Tuesday, October 11, after noon meeting with Sarah MacDonald at Grand Bahama Power Company to see what their intentions are, and to see if we can work our problems out. If we can not, then we will have to leave Grand By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THENational Insurance Board (NIB) is expecting to generate a 13.2 per cent increase in year-over-year contribution income to $190 million, its director said yesterday, adding that its reserve fund remains strong for the medium and long-term. Emphasising that implementation of virtually all recommendations contained in NIBs last two actuarial reviews, plus the 2005 Social Security Reform Commission report, had alleviated concerns its $1.611 billion reserve fund would be completed by 2032, Algernon Cargill said a combination of improved compliance and changes to the wage ceiling/contribution rate were expected to drive contribution revenues for 2011 higher. Telling Tribune Business that NIB was expecting to prosecute the same number of employers for non-payment of due contributions as it did in 2010, a figure which totalled 1,300, Mr Cargill said the social security systems main compliance/enforcement challenge continued to be with the selfemployed. With self-employed persons now qualifying for industrial accident benefits, the NIB director said: Its to their benefit to pay contributions, as they qualify for all benefits apart from unemployment benefit. NIBs last figures, for its 2010 financial year, showed that the number of self-employed persons contributing to NIB increased year-over-year by 2.5 per cent, going from 5,440 in 2009 to 5,577 last year. Contributing employers, though, fell in number by 5.4 per cent to 12,564 from 13,282. That is a possible sign of the recessions impact, but Mr Cargill said larger Bahamas-based employers were performing better at paying NIB contributions on time, having taken heed of its enforcement drive. The NIB prosecuted 1,200 delinquent employers in 2009, and 1,300 last year, and Mr Cargill told Tribune Business: Its probably the same number in 2011. Were prosecuting fewer employers, because the biggest challenge were having is in the selfemployed sector......... The big boys are paying now. NIB enjoyed a 4.9 per cent yearover-year jump in contribution income between 2009 and 2010, rising from $159.9 million to $167.8 million, and a larger increase is projected for 2011. Were projecting around $190 million, Mr Cargill told Tribune Business. Last year we did $167.8 million. Its primarily because of increased compliance, and also changes in the contribution ceiling and contribution rate. All those are facBy NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) expects to generate in excess of $10 million in operational cost savings for the year to end-March 2012, after purchasing its new 4G network for a price at least 25-40 per cent By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The chairman of recently renamed RND Holdings yesterday said the company was banking net cash flow of $25,000 per month after restructuring its debt and finding a new majority partner, adding that it might gen erate a little more than last years $348,867 net income in 2011. Speaking ahead of thenow Colina Real Estate Funds annual general meet ing (AGM) on October 26, Jerome Fitzgerald said that by bringing in Colina as majority shareholder and having them pay out the $2.904 million debt owed to FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas), the com pany had completed its turnaround from a cash flow standpoint. He added that the compa ny had discussed paying a dividend to reward long-suffering shareholders, who had stuck with it through dark times of annual losses, the sale of its cinema operations to Galleria and conversion into a real estate investment trust. However, Colina Real Estate Funds Board had BTC VERY CONFIDENT ON $60-$80M TARGET *Confirms interconnect deal milestone with Cable Bahamas $42.8m 4G network to roll out over 18 months $53m NGN network to launch pre-Xmas SEE page 7B BTC TARGETS OVER $10M COST SAVINGS Buys 4G network -40% cheaper than if standalone Pledges two-thirds of -plus retail stores to be Bahamian owned Aim for 167% EzTop-Up expansion in 12 months 400 staff to depart, but new hirings to start in month SEE page 4B BAHAMAS Telecommunications CompanyCEO Geoff Houston. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff NIB TARGETS 13.2% CONTRIBUTIONS RISE Eyeing $190m for 2011, based on better compliance and ceiling/rate rises Expecting to prosecute another 1,300 employers in 2011 Aiming to shrug off Prime cut by generating investment returns to match last years $92m ALGERNON CARGILL SEE page 5B FORMER RND BANKS $25K CASH MONTHLY Mulling dividend after Colina deal causes cash flow turnaround Chair says share price doubles since he sold out Properties 95% leased SEE page 6B MAKE OR BREAK MEETING TO SAVE 60 EMPLOYEES Employer in last ditch talks with Grand Bahama Power Company SEE page 7B

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BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Yourwith ourWin6arechancesgreatpromotion PROMOTION ENDSON DECEMBER15TH, 2011The Odds Are With YouBe one of two lucky customers to win your mortgage or vehicle loan payment for 6 months*plus one year free insurance .* When you are approved for a mortgage or vehicle loan you can enter our Win 6 Promotion where you are eligible to win up to US $20,000 toward your mortgage or up to US $6,000 toward your vehicle loan payment. All approved customers will also receive a Gold or Platinum Credit Card with no joining fee, a free Visa Debit Card and free Internet Banking.Its only a draw away so call us at 502-6809 or visit www.cibcfcib.com Up to US $1500 towards your vehicle insurance and up to US $2500 towards your home insurance Valid upon approval of mortgage and/or vehicle loan Special conditions applyPersons approved for either vehicle and/or mortgage loans will be given one (1) entry form. To be eligible to win, you must answer a general knowledge question on the given entry form. Prizes of 6 months payments will be drawn on March 15th 2012 from accumulated entries. Prizes are not transferable or redeemable for cash. Ask a Sales Specialist for full terms and conditions. The CIBC logo is a trademark of Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, used by FirstCaribbean International Bank under license. ACCIDENT RESPONDER LAUNCHES IN BAHAMAS A VEHICLE accident first-responder, ForenSys Bahamas, has been launched to insurance companies, insurance brokers and members of the Royal Bahamas Police Force. Born in Curaao ForenSys Bahamas connects the insurance industry to a cyber system. The company assesses vehicle accident scenes, takes statements from those involved and enters the information in a data system that is accessible to insurance companies, brokers and the police. This system stores information on vehicular accident scenes, and can give insurance agents a history of drivers insured by them. Merlin Adderley, a longtime member of the insurance industry, will head up the ForenSys Bahamas team. It all started five years ago when I started researching a product that would be beneficial to the motoring public, law enforcement and the insur ance industry of the Bahamas, Mr Adderley explained. ProgrammeThrough my research I found the Vision programme, which is a first responder programme that provides the assessment and data entry of vehicular accidents. I compared it with a similar product that already exists here in the Bahamas and found it to be far superior. I subsequently met with Robby Rodrigues of Vision, and travelled to Curaao so that I could see the product in full operation. Elated about the prod uct, I contacted our local police department and was granted permission for Inspector David Lockhart to accompany me to Curaao, so that our police would also have first-hand experience as to how the program works and the benefit it could bring to the force. Inspector Lockhart and Mr Adderley became more familiar with how effective the Vision, now rebranded as ForenSys, product works. FORENSYS BAHAMAS Merlin Adderley, President, ForenSys Bahamas, is shown with guests at recent Product Launch. From left are: Merlin Adderley, Cpl. 22 Drexil Miller, Insp. Anthony Curtis, Insp. Edward Margarita Curacao Police Force and Sgt. 848 Roger Major. Photo/Donald Knowles TOADVERTISEINTHETRIBUNECALL 502 2394

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THE BAHAMAS FINANCIAL SERVICES BOARD (BFSB) has announced two finalists as it nears the end of its process to select the 2011 Financial Services Student of the Year. They are: Janeille R. Brathwaite BBA, Business Management Mandelia K. Morris BBA, Banking and Finance Candidates were selected from the 2011 graduating class of the College of the Bahamas (COB). The student award pro gramme is in its ninth year, and is sponsored in collaboration with COB, the Profes sional Industry Association Working Group and the Central Bank of the Bahamas. Its objective is to recognise an outstanding graduating stu dent from within COBs School of Business. This includes all financial services relevant disciplines economics, banking and finance, accountancy and law. It has been extended as well to computer information systems, marketing and management and, this year, for the first time, to the School of Law. The criterion for initial selection is a GPA of 3.5 or above, with additional criteria also including COB and community involvement, an inter view by an industry panel, and a written submission. The student award programme is a part of BFSBs Financial Centre Focus (FCF) programme, an ongoing initiative that aims to integrate the industry with the wider community. An essential part of the FCFs overall focus is to attract qualified professionals to the sector. The BFSBs chief executive and executive director, Wendy Warren, said: In this regard, particular attention is placed on high lighting the importance of quality human resources to the industry, and also on profiling outstanding individuals through the awards programmes. The 2011 FSI Student of the Year will be announced at BFSBs FSI Excellence Awards Ceremony on Novem ber 11, when BFSB also will present its Executive of the Year, Professional of the Year, Achiever of the Year, Mentor of the Year and Financial Services Development & Promotion awards. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A Bahamian financial services provider was yesterday grateful that its management buyout of the operation previously owned by Benelux bank, Dexia, took place some time befsore this weeks state bailout of the latter. EQUITY Trust Bahamas executives told Tribune Business that Dexias collapse had no impact on their operations, as a management buy-out had been initiated long before the latters current woes. Gilbert Cassar, Chairman of Equity Trust Bahamas, said: "It's two totally different things. We had a management buyout, an MBO, that was long before the troubles Dexia is having at the moment." Before the buyout Equity Trust Bahamas, formerly Experta Trust Bahamas, was a whollyowned subsidiary of Dexia bank. Mr Cassar explained: "It's two different things. "We were moving in this direction since 2009. The name changed in 2010 to Equity Trust Bahamas Limited. The issue with Dexia has had no impact on us, absolutely none." Dexia Group has agreed to nationalise its Belgian banking division, and secured state guarantees in steps taken through the plan of restructuring the overall bank. The Belgium government will reportedly pay $4 billion euros or US $5.4 billion to buy the division, which contains more than 80 billion euros of deposits. The sale would cut Dexias short-term funding requirements by more than $14 billion euros. The dismantling of Dexia, once one of the world's leading lenders to municipalities, became inevitable after concern over European sovereign debt holdings caused its short-term funding to evaporate. The Franco-Belgian bank fell victim to a liquidity squeeze prompted by the eurozone debt crisis. Dexias shares plummeted by 42 per cent last week, which led to marathon talks between the governments of France, Belgium and Luxembourg with the banks board of directors in a rescue bid. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 3B MANAGEMENT BUYOUT BENEFITS TRUST PROVIDER BFSB REVEALS TWO STUDENT FINALISTS The Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB) is accepting entries for its annual Essay and Speech Competition, hosted as part of the National Career Awareness Month. The 2011 event is being co-sponsored by Bahamas Business Solutions (BBSL), Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise and KPMG. Participating students from Grades 10-12 will have a choice of two topics: (1) Bahamas tax system reform; and (2) Was there a silver lining in the global economic recession? They can also choose either one or both of the competitions. Participating schools use an internal process to select winners (one each) in the essay and speech competitions, to be judged by an Industry Panel that selects the overall winners. The competition ends on November 15, with the speech competition and presentations ceremony for winners in both the essay and speech contests. The winner of the 2010 Essay Com petition was Shannon Williams, an 11th grade student at Faith Temple Christian Academy, with the school also capturing the Speech Competition, represented by Justina Ferguson, a 10th grade student. BFSB SEEKS SCHOOL CONTEST ENTRANTS JANEILLE R. BRATHWAITE MANDELIA K. MORRIS

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tors. And, with NIBs total benefits expenditure expected to be the same as last years $176 million, with no significant growth, its contribution income for 2011 was expected to exceed payouts and outflows. Among the recently enacted NIB reforms was an increase in the wage ceiling from $400 to $500, with a further rise to $600 to come in next year, and a 1 percentage point rise in the contribution rate to 9.8 per cent. Implementation of these recommendations, Mr Cargill said, were actually continuing to strengthen the Fund and its reserves through increased contributions, causing fears expressed in previous actuarial reports that NIBs reserves would be exhausted by 2032 to recede. The next NIB actuarial report was due to be completed by end-2011, and released next year, and Mr Cargill said: We expect the next actuarial report to reflect that, because weve implemented just about all recommendations in the previous two actuarial reports, the Fund continues to get stronger. In essence, what were saying is not to worry. Meanwhile, despite the 75 basis point cut in the Bahamian Prime interest rate, Mr Cargill said NIBs 2011 investment income was expected to match the $91.5 million earned during 2010, itself a 23.1 per cent rise over 2009. The interest rate cut had lowered by 0.75 per cent the returns NIB enjoyed on its huge portfolio of fixed income securities linked to Prime, namely bank deposits, government bonds, preference shares and the like, but Mr Cargill said diversification into equities and other investments would help to counter this. Disclosing that NIB would take around a $10 million hit on its investment portfolio due to the Prime rate cut, Mr Cargill said: We expect to be around 2010 levels. We are projecting to do what we did last year, notwithstanding the decrease in Prime. The Government investments are still doing very well, operating as agreed, and the investments in equities and the NAD debt; the NAD debt is a very strong performer, above market rates. The challenge for the investment manager is to look for diversification, safe investments to bring us the same returns as last year. NIB is allowed to invest up to $25 million annually outside the Bahamas, last year placing $14.9 million in bonds issued by the US, Barbados and Cayman Islands governments. Mr Cargill confirmed the social security fund was receiving timely approvals for these investments. Helping to keep 2011 benefits expenditure under control was a reduction in unemployment benefit claims, while the introduction of the Med4 form -requiring employers to certify an employees absence from work with sickness or injury had helped to curtail benefit fraud. Pension claims, though, were likely to increase as NIB was paying higher benefits to more persons, Mr Cargill said. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 5B and, most importantly, focused on our customers. Mr Houston said BTCs retail experience would be upgraded in every way. The company needs to get visible points of presence to its easy for our customers to find us, and tourists. BTC, he added, was expecting to see significant demand from tourists seeking connectivity for their smart and iphones via access to the companys new 4G wireless broadband network. We need to put in a way of doing business that makes it easier for customers to do business buy products and pay their bills, Mr Houston added. BTCs retail philosophy, he added, was focused on presence and service, with the entire concept driven by the consumer. We feel its going to open up a lot of new, different opportunities as well, Mr Houston said of the retail plans. Stores in areas that we do not expect, partners comingforward and adding value to the experience..... Were trying to create opportunities for entrepreneurs to add value to their product and our product, and which will be quite unique for our customers. Marlon Johnson, BTCs spokesman, said the company would be flexible and sensible in implementing its retail strategy, pointing out that Family Island locations could be in the likes of grocery stores and gasoline station. As for BTCs new EZTOP-Up prepaid cellular format, which allows consumers toadd the precise value and number of minutes they want, Mr Johnson said the company now had well in excess of 150 electronic top-up points in locations such as gas stations/food stores. We want to get up to 400 points of presence, which is a minimum target, with the next year 12 months, Mr Johnson said, in response to Tribune Business questions. Over 10 per cent of top-ups are electronic. Were ahead of our projections, and hopefully will see a lot of growth. We want to empower our distributors to make sure they have their margins and grow their market. Asked by this newspaper whether BTC had made a mistake in how it rolled-out its EZTop-Up technology and reduced distributor/retail margins, a move that hurt many street-level entrepreneurs and gave ammunition to CWC critics, the BTC executives said the strategy had been misunderstood as the margin cuts were being phased-in. Mr Johnson acknowledged that when the initial EZTop-Up transition was unveiled, it looked on the surface like a lot of people vacated the market. However, many street vendors had since resumed selling BTC phone cards and prepaid top-up minutes, leading Mr Johnson to conclude that the distribution channel has come back and the initial shock has subsided. Pledging that BTC would do as much as we can to empower legitimate vendors, Mr Johnson added: Were trying to ensure that as we prepare for competition, what we do in distribution mirrors best practice. Promising that BTC would invest more in marketing and promoting cell phone tops, both Mr Houston and Mr Johnson said the margin decrease would be phasedin. To compensate for this, they added that BTC, through new products and services, would seek to increase the volume of consumer traffic visiting street vendors and EZTop-Up points, thus ensuring their revenues did not decline. The challenge is to run very quickly to provide additional products to offset that margin reduction, Mr Houston said. We have to grow our business, create more opportunities. Its starting to bear fruit. We feel EZTop-Up has been very, very successful, and expect over time that it will become ever more popular. Were seeing a huge amount of usage coming through from customers adapting very positively to the new way of topping up. BTC TARGETS OVER $10M FROM page 4B FROM page one NIB TARGETS 13.2% CONTRIBUTIONS RISE

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decided to defer a dividend payment until 2012, in a bid to build up its cash base to both deal with unexpected contingencies and provide a war chest to finance any real estate deals that arose.Telling Tribune Business that Colina Real Estates three properties the RND plazas on JFK Drive in Nassau, the Mall Drive in Freeport and the Abaco plaza were per cent occupied across the board, Mr Fitzgerald said the companys share price had almost doubled since he sold his majority stake to Colina. Explaining the rationale for doing so, Mr Fitzgerald, who is also a PLP Senator and the partys likely candidate for the Marathon seat at the upcoming election, said: Im very pleased with the financial performance of the company, and essentially the turnaround from a cash flow standpoint. We were very tight for cash, struggling for cash, and at the time approached our financiers [FirstCaribbean] to review the financial situation and help our cash position. At the time, they werent willing to do that. As a result, Mr Fitzgerald decided to bring in a partner with the financial resources to turn the thenRND Holdings around, giving them a controlling interest to ensure they provided the necessary financing to restructure the debt and invest in other real estate and investment opportunities as they arose. He alighted on Colina as the saviour to ensure the company recovered and other shareholders were protected. Through its Colina Mortgage Corporation affiliate, Colina Insurance Company repaid the FirstCaribbean debt with a new $3.7 million loan carrying a 9 per cent per annum interest rate. That rate is likely to have dropped to 8.25 per cent with the Prime cut. One immediate effect was the improvement in the then-RND Holdings cash position (the company was only renamed in April 2011, so the 2010 figures are in RNDs name). After struggling with small fourfigure sums on the balance sheet for several years, and finishing 2009 with just $1,655 in cash, the company closed 2010 with a healthier $60,912 balance. The company is producing $60,000-$70,000 per month in cash, Mr Fitzgerald told Tribune Business. Weve moved from a very light on cash position to where were pulling in $25,000 a month in net cash. The key is that the cashflow is here. Colina Real Estate Fund was now investing this cash in return-earning opportunities. The December 31, 2010, balance sheet showed $150,000 in investments that consisted of FOCOL preference shares. Weve considered paying a dividend very strongly, but made a decision to wait until next year to build up cash and ensure we have the funds to weather any contingencies, Mr Fitzgerald told Tribune Business. Having sold his stake to Colina for $0.40 per share, he added that the share price had almost doubled since, the last trade taking place at $0.75 per share. Asked whether Colina Real Estate Fund was on target to match last years net income performance of just below $400,000, Mr Fitzgerald told Tribune Business: I suspect it will be around the same thing. It might be a little more, but it will definitely be in that region. Its been a good turnaround, a good story. The assets are strong, the tenants are strong, the locations are good. We have a strong position on which to build. We have one vacancy at JFK Drive, but are still at about 95 per cent occupancy across the board when you look at square footage. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE $3'/,0,7('(PSOR\PHQWSSRUWXQLW\ *DWH,QWHUFKDQJH,QVSHFWRUV FROM page one FORMER RND BANKS $25K CASH MONTHLY JEROMEFITZGERALD

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both to prepare for competition and become customerfocused.Focusing on BTCs short to medium-term strategy, Mr Houston said: Our objective is to bring the absolute best technology and the best range of services we can to the Bahamas. A big part of our strategy is to focus on wireless, in particular wireless data, and to bring the Bahamas up to where it needs to be as a competitive place to do business. The 4G network is central to this strategy, Mr Houston saying it would bring superfast broadband to all areas of the Bahamas. Post-paid cellular customers would be able to access the Internet, via the handsets, at speeds of 8 MB (megabytes) per second, with pre-paid customers enjoying access at 2 MB per second. These speeds were consistent with those available to landline broadband customers, enabling Bahamians to access the Internet wherever they were in the Bahamas. Thats just the start, Mr Houston said. As it evolves, we expect to continue to improve the service, and you will see the same speed on your mobile as you do at home on broad band access to the Internet. The BTC chief executive said that with 80 per cent of Internet access projected to be via wireless by 2020, it was imperative to transform the former state-owned monopoly incumbent into a data carrier. We expect to place the Bahamas at the forefront of that evolution over the next 18 months, Mr Houston said. All equipment to set up the 4G network was now in the Bahamas and being installed at key sites. The first call using the 4G net work was expected to take place next month, with the service launched and rolledout in Grand Bahama preChristmas. The 4G Family Island roll-out will take place over the next 18 months, going into 2012. Meanwhile, BTC was still trying to reduce the number of dropped calls and increase the quality on its existing 2G cellular network. Were optimising quite a bit of the network, Mr Houston added, with engineering teams deployed to various sites and five new cell sites added in the six months since CWC completed its acquisition of a 51 per cent stake in BTC. The 7 per cent increase in cellular traffic volumes indicated that BTC was starting to solve some customer problems, although its not a perfect situation at the moment. Mr Houston added, though, that BTC had helped to facilitate competition in the Bahamian communications market by concluding an interconnection agreement with Cable Bahamas and its Systems Resource Group (SRG) affiliate, thus enabling calls originating with a customer on one companys network to flow seamlessly to a client of the other. To be very clear, one of the things weve also closed in the last few months was that we signed an intercon nection agreement with Cable Bahamas and SRG, he said. Were able to do business with that company on commercial terms. That is a new milestone for facilitating competition in the market. Mr Houston pledged that BTC would do whatever we can to facilitate competition within the rules set down by sector regulator, the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA). However, observers were yesterday quick to point out that com petition still lacks a missing ingredient, namely number portability, which would allow Bahamian customers to change service provider while still keeping the same phone number. To enhance broadband Internet connectivity, Mr Houston said BTC had todate invested $53 million in rolling-out its Next Generation Network (NGN). Our commitment is to fast-track deployment of that network, and bring services to the customer, he added. Testing of the NGN network, which promises connectivity speeds of up to 8 MB per second, has already taken place in the Coral Harbour area, Mr Houston said BTC aimed to launch it before Christmas 2011. He acknowledged that the NGN networks three-year roll-out throughout the Bahamas would take slightly longer than the two-year 4G project. Explaining BTCs move to seek permission to charge 35 cents per call for accessing directory inquiries, with customers getting three free calls per month, Mr Houston said the company had to deal with areas where it was providing services below cost in its bid to prepare for competition. We have got an obligation to prepare the business for competition in all forms. As part of that change, we needed to address some of the nuances in the business that were there and not conducive to helping us to compete in the marketplace, Mr Houston said. These were services we were providing for free at rates that were not competi tive or below cost. Those are areas we need to address inside the business. Charg ing for information is one of them. He added that BTC was seeking a price that reflects the cost of providing the ser vice, but would also have little impact on the consumer. The onus was also on BTC to provide the best possible service. Mr Houston said BTC would be back to normal in another one-two weeks when it came to dealing with Hurricane Irene-related damage, with services 80 per cent restored on Abaco and Cat Island, 97 per cent back on Long Island, and fully restored on Eleuthera. Together with the faults backlog that had built up before the storm, Mr Houston said BTCs repair teams had to cope with an enormous amount of 20,000 faults. He told Bahamian consumers to expect further price reductions and promotions prior to Christmas, saying this had already started through initiatives such as eliminating the 18 cents per call surcharge on inter-island cellular phone calls. Asked whether BTC was on target to meet CWCs $60-$80 million EBITDA target for the year to endMarch 2012, Mr Houston said: BTC is a profitable business, and we expect BTC to make a profit this year. Were still very confident on the original EBIT DA target set by our parent. I think our parent company is very pleased with our progress to date. Its still a long trek for us as we continue to reshape the business, both in focus, size and operations. Thats a journey we will take over the next couple of years. Confirming that talks had started with BTCs unions over a new industrial agreement, Mr Houston said the company was aiming to become more flexible, much more nimble and s customer-focused oriented. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 11, 2011, PAGE 7B Bahama and move what's left to our Lantana, Florida, operation. We will then unfortunately have to make the heart-wrenching decision to lay off 60-plus Bahamian workers.Mr Howes concluded: I don't see how Grand Bahama can ever recover from this disaster as the Internet has so much information (all negative) for any prospective investor who investigates and carries out due diligence before investing in Grand Bahama. Maybe, after our Tuesday meeting, we will be able to report some positive news for an island that so desperately needs it. In a March 14, 2010, open letter to Grand Bahama residents, Mr Howes said Grand Bahama Power Company charged "six times the price" of electricity the company would be billed for in North Carolina, where it plans to relocate. In that US state, it would be charged $0.058 per kilowatt hour. Blaming power outages, spikes and surges for destroying equipment important to the company, and accusing Grand Bahama Power Company of sending a "threatening letter" and "cease and desist demand" to stop Fenestration and Glass Services from running its own electricity generators, Mr Howes said he and his partner had "given up" on their Bahamian investment. The meeting today will place more pressure on Grand Bahama Power Company, already effectively under fire from all sides over the relatively high cost of power on the island, which is impacting household incomes and economic competitiveness. MAKE OR BREAK MEETING TO SAVE 60 EMPLOYEES FROM page one BTC VERY CONFIDENT ON $60-$80M TARGET FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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NEW YORK Associated Press INVESTORSare bracing for a rough earnings season from banks. Turbulence in stock and bond markets, combined with waning confidence among business and consumers, hurt banks' business in the third quarter. IPOs were shelved, companies postponed plans to sell bonds, and acquisitions were put on ice. Consumers also held back on spending. The sharp drop in business activity hurt banks, which rely on borrowing by companies and consumers to make money. Most Wall Street analysts lowered their earnings estimates for large U.S. banks. JPMorgan Chase & Co. will be the first major bank to report results Thursday, followed by Citigroup, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Gold man Sachs the week after. The intense global market turmoil during the third quarter has already taken a toll on bank stocks. The KBW index of leading banks plunged 27 percent during the third quarter. Howard Chen, an analyst at Credit Suisse, estimates that mergers and acquisitions volume in the third quarter plummeted 34 percent from the prior quarter, while stock underwriting sank 54 percent. Chen said it was the weakest quarter for total debt issuance since the financial crisis. Overall debt and loan underwriting volume fell 27 percent from the previous quarter, leading to a 35 percent decrease in fees. Worries about Europe's debt problems continued to hang over U.S. banks in the third quarter. Investors expect bank executives to offer more clarification on how exposed the banks are to the crisis when the banks host conference calls to discuss their earnings. Most large banks have dis closed the amount of European debt they own, but it's unclear how much exposure they have via more complex derivatives trades they conduct with their counterparts in Europe. For example, U.S. banks sell finan cial contracts that act as insurance to protect against defaults on riskier European bonds. Growth in U.S. business loans is expected to be a bright spot. According to the Federal Reserve, corporate borrowing grew rapidly during the third quarter. At the 25 largest banks by assets, commercial and industrial loans grew 15 percent, the Fed reported. Here are the consensus earnings forecasts and highlights for each of the large U.S. banks from analysts surveyed by FactSet: JPMorgan Chase & Co. reports Thursday. It is expected to earn 96 cents per share on revenue of $23.6 billion. Considered one of the strongest and most stable among the large banks, analysts expect JPMorgan to grab market share from competitors. However, it might be forced to once again to put aside more reserves to offset costs from increased litigation and repurchasing poorly written mortgage loans. Citigroup Inc. reports on Monday, Oct. 17. The New York bank is expected to report earnings of 84 cents per share on revenue of $19.3 billion. Barclays Capital analyst Jason Goldberg reduced his estimates by 11 cents because of weakness in investment banking and the increasingly uncertain global economy. Wells Fargo & Co. also reports Monday. The San Francisco bank is expected to earn 72 cents a share on revenue of $20.2 billion. Wells has one of the largest mortgage origination businesses of all banks and will likely have benefited from lower mortgage rates. Rates on 30-year mortgages hit a historic low of 4.08 percent in the third quarter. Bank of America Corp. reports Tuesday, Oct. 18. Analysts expect the Charlotte, N.C. bank to report earnings of 26 cents per share on revenue of $25.8 billion. The bank has been battling lawsuits related to mortgages. It paid out $12.7 billion to settle claims in the first half of the year. Its Merrill Lynch investment banking and brokerage division helped lift earnings in the first half of 2011, but Merrill is unlikely not be of much help this quarter because of low trading volumes. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. also releases results Tuesday. It is expected to earn 23 cents per share on revenue of $5.3 billion. Chen, of Credit Suisse, is more negative than other analysts on the New York bank. Chen wrote in a report that the difficult market conditions and low appetite for risk among investment banking and trading clients could lead to a third quarter loss of 70 cents a share. If that happens, Chen notes that it would be only the second quarterly loss for Gold man since the bank went public in 1999. Morgan Stanley will report on Wednesday, Oct. 19. Analysts estimate it will earn 31 cents per share on revenue of $7.5 billion. A sharp downturn in the investment advisory business is expected to hurt Morgan Stanley. Wells Fargo analyst Matthew Burnell lowered his earnings estimate to 26 cents from 56 cents per share because of weakness in trad ing. Executives are expected to shed more light on the bank's exposure to European debt and derivatives during their conference call. Worries about Europe have spooked Morgan Stanley investors lately, helping send the stock down 44 per cent this year. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS 2009/CLE/QUI/o01436 IN THE SUPREME COURT EQUITY SIDE IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 AND IN THE MATTER OF ThePetition of Franklin Burnside AND INTHE MATTER OF ALLTHATtract of land containing 4,973 square feet bring lot No. 23 Richville Subdivision NO.3 in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. NOTICE THE PETITION OF FRANKLIN BURNSIDE in respect of: IN THE MATTER OFALLTHAT tract of land containing 4,973 square feet bring lot No. 23 Richville Subdivision NO.3 in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Franklin Burnside claim to be the owner of the unencumbered fee simple estate in possession of the said land and has madean application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Ti tIes Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act. Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land can hours: East Street North, Nassau, Bahamas; 2. The Chambers of Commonwealth Law Advocates, Duncanson House, 79 Montrose Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition snaIl on or before the expiration of ents, tile in the Supreme COUlt or serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed abarto such claims. COMMONWEALTH LAWADVOCATES Duncanson House 79 Montrose A venue Nassau, Bahamas 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1480.0808.06.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 -0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .50 4.40Bank of Bahamas 6.93 6.93 0.00 5000.2300.10030.11.44% 0 .53 0.17Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2 .84 2.55Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.0300.09090.03.33% 1.96 1.77Fidelity Bank 1.77 1.77 0.00 0.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas 8.47 8.47 0.00 5000.2450.32034.63.78% 2.80 2.33Colina Holdings 2.60 2.60 0.00 4200.4380.0405.91.54% 8 .50 8.33Commonwealth Brewery 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.7400.00011.50.00% 7.00 6.21Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.65 6.65 0.00 2600.4960.32013.44.81% 2.00 1.63Consolidated Water BDRs 1.74 1.72 -0.02 0.1110.04515.52.62% 1.77 1.31Doctor's Hospital 1.37 1.37 0.00 0.0740.04018.52.92% 5.50 4.75Famguard 5.43 5.43 0.00 0.4980.24010.94.42% 8.40 5.35Finco 5.39 5.39 0.00 2500.7570.0007.10.00% 9.45 7.75FirstCaribbean Bank 8.21 8.21 0.00 2400.4940.35016.64.26% 6.00 5.00Focol (S) 5.33 5.33 0.00 8000.4350.22012.34.13% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.30 5.58ICD Utilities 7.30 7.30 0.00 400-0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 2400.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.00BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%FRIDAY, 7 OCTOBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,376.75 | CHG -0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -122.76 | YTD % -8.19B ISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0 .550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.72022.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.849313.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.18353.32%4.99% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.14202.10%4.31% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.18543.16%5.14% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.49859.8690Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.7396Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 31-Aug-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 31-Aug-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS31-Aug-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 (/,(&(=$/,(1RI 7Z\QXP$YHRII0DFNH\6WUHHW1$66$8%$+$0$6 1$=$5(7+0,6&$/,1RI 3%2;6%$YRFDGR6WUHHW3LQHZRRG*DUGHQV 1DVVDX%DKDPDV BANK EARNINGS TO REFLECT SLOWDOWN FROM 3Q TURMOIL

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y OCT OBER 1 1, 201 1, P AGE 9B B O D Y A N D M I N D By ALESHA CADET Tribu ne Featu res Repor ter AFTE R tea ch ing y og a for mo r e th a n te n ye ar s o n t he b e a c h e s o f S o u t h F l o r i d a B a h a m i a n b o rn K e m e t i c Y o g a i n stru c to r Au n kh A a kh u sa i d h e h o p e s t o b r i n g t h e s p e c ial ised y o ga practice t o the s ho re s of t he B a ha m a s. C er t i f i ed i n 20 0 0, A u n k h s a i d h e i s r e s p o n s i b l e a n d h o l d s c re d it f or c e r ti fy i n g t he la r g e st n u m b e r o f K e m e t i c Y o g a instr uc tor s in the w or ld. His e x p e r ti s e i n t h e a n c i e n t E g y p t i a n fo rm o f y og a h a s bro u gh t great s ucc es s to his F lor idab ased Na tural B ril lia nc e for L if e' yo g a s tu di o. E a r l i e r t h i s y e a r A u n k h h el d a le c ture an d wo rksho p at th e Na ti on al Ar t Ga lle ry e n t i t l e d Y o g a S e c r e t s R e v e al e d Y o g a w a s p r a c t i c e d f o r t h o u s a n d s o f y e a rs a s a n a n c i e n t a r t f or m i n Ke m e t (t he n a me f or a n c i e n t E g y p t ). I t i s re p r e se n t e d in ma ny hieroglyph s pres e rv e d i n s t o n e a n d p a p y r u s b y t he K em e ti a ns A cc or d i n g t o A u n kh t he Keme ti c yoga pr o c e ss h elp s p a rti c i pa n ts c om e t o th e p ra c t i c a l a w a re n e s s a nd r e a l i sa t i o n t ha t y ou al re a dy h av e ev e ry thing y ou need to overcom e a n y c ha l le n ge t ha t y o u f ac e i n l i fe A u n k h s a i d t o k n o w w h o y o u t r u l y a r e i s t o e n d a l l e x c u s e s fo r me d io c ri ty a n d to b u il d y our em pire a nd y our grea tn e s s The la st tim e I wa s in th e B a ha m a s th e r e w a s a g r o up o f people t hat were inter ested, so if the i nte rest c ont inu es to d e v e l o p w e d e f i n i t e l y w i l l s t a r t I' m fro m th e B a ha ma s, so for m e i t w o u l d b e j u s t h e a r t w ar m in g t o a c t u a ll y h a v e pe o ple i n t he Baha mas connect w it h what I a m doing, said A unk h. We ha v e a stu dio he re i n Florida t ha t we are working o u t o f a n d w e a r e a c t u a l l y l oo k i n g t o e xp a n d t o o t h e r p l a c e s I f t h e r e i s e n o u g h m o me n t um to b ui l d s tu d io s i n o t h e r l o c a t i o n s l i k e t h e B a ha ma s th at w il l b e a g oo d t hin g, he sai d. Th e b en e f it s o f a y o g a p ra c t ic e c a n be ne ve r-e ndi ng b ut A u n k h n a r ro w s i t d o w n t o j u s t o n e w o rd : s c i e nc e H e sa y s i t' s m ost de fin ite ly a sc i en ce an d a t t h e c o re o f t h e s c i e n c e i s t h e i de a of de ve l op ing th e hu ma n b o d y m i n d a n d s p i ri t t o a s t a t e o f co mp le te e ase Tha t's si gn ifi ca nt be c au se t ha t stat e of e a se is ul tim at el y m a i nt e na n c e o f t he b od y te m p l e W h e n t h e e n e r g y i s a ll ow e d to ci rc ula te in pa rtic u l a r w a y s w e e x p e r i e n c e t h i n gs l i k e f l e x i bi l i t y s a i d A unk h. J ust the th ou gh t o f he lp in g p e o p l e p o s i t i v e l y b r e a k thr ough in their li ves bri ngs p e a c e t o t h e h a r d w o r k i n g y o g a i nstru c tor. O v e r a l l e v e r y t h i n g i m pr ov e s: ou r c l a ri ty m en t al l y imp r ove s ; t he t on in g o f ou r b o d y i m p r o v e s; o u r sk i n c l e a rs u p T h e r e a re s o m a n y b e n e f i t s t ha t a pe rson c an e xp eri en c e b y d e v e l o p i n g a d e c i p l i n e p r a c t ic e, he sai d. Wi t h Kem et i c y og a, ev en t h e im p os si bl e b e c om e s p o ssi b l e s a id A un kh Th e p ra c ti c e h e s a i d d e v e l o p s p h y s i c a l s t r e n g t h d i v i n e p o w e r b a l a n c e a n d f le x ib i li ty A c c o r d i n g t o K e m e t i c t e a c h i n g s a n a r t i c l e o n l i v e s tr on g c o m n o te s, K e m e t ic y o g a i s si mi la r t o th e p o pu la r f o rm s o f y o g a p r a c ti c e d t o d a y b u t t h e re a re si g n i f i c a n t d i f fe r e n c e s in th e hi sto ry a nd fo c u s. By KHRISNA VIRGIL MOMENTS after her birth on June 29, 2010, Kaylee Thomas was taken from her mothers arms and whisked away by doctors. It would be a few days before her mother, Kendra, was able to hold her baby.Whe n Ken dra was fin ally allo wed t o s e e h e r b a b y g i r l s h e s a i d s h e w a s sho ck ed a nd co n fu sed . Ka yl ee had cl ub fe et, a defor m i ty that cau s e s an inf ant s f eet t o rota te in ward. C h i l d r e n w i t h t h i s c o n d i t i o n o f t e n a pp e ar t o wa lk o n t he ir an kl es or th e si de s o f t h eir f eet Th e co nd it io n o f te n c au ses t h eir leg s t o gro w a bn o rmall y. K en d ra 's la st p re gn a n cy wa s n o d i f f e r e n t fro m h er f irst t wo But she and her husband R olando h ad bra ced t h emsel ve s f or po ssib l e c omp li c a t i o n s b e c a u s e i n K e n d r a s f i r s t t w o pr e gnanc ie s she had su ffer ed f rom a m edica l con d it io n ca lle d p reecl amp sia. Th e c o ndition causes high blo od pr ess u r e during t he p regn ancy It ca n af fect th e m o th er a nd u n bo rn ch il d. Aft er an emergency C-sectio n 35 weeks in ba b y K ay le e wa s b orn It tu rn ed o u t th a t n o amo un t of p la nn in g fo r t he ev en tu ali tie s co ul d ha ve prep ared th em f or th e n ews ab ou t K ayl ee s co n di t io n. K e n d r a s a i d s h e e x p e r i e n c e d a r o l l e r co ast e r o f emo t io n s. Sh e w on d ere d wh a t sh e co u ld ha ve do n e d if f ere nt ly to p rev en t K ay le e' s co n d it i on S he re min d ed h e rsel f t h a t t h i s h a p p e n i n g d o e s n t me a n I d i d so m e t hi ng wro n g. I t c ou ld h av e j ust b ee n ge n es." Ka ylee had to unde rg o im m ediate ther apy wi t h d oct o rs a t t he Prin ce ss M arga ret Ho sp i t a l s O r t h o p e d i c C l i n i c H e r l e g s w e r e p l a c e d i n c a s t s a n d s h e h a s w o r n t h e m a l m o s t e v e r s ince. They wer e replaced twice m on thly on a con t in uo u s b asis. "I was s o rt o f lo st b e cau se I di dn 't k n ow w hat it was at fir s t but when they ex p l ained it t o m e a nd t he co ur s e of t her a py to tr y and c or r ec t it I felt m or e c o m for table," sai d Rolando, Ka yle e s f at he r. Af te r six mo nt h s, a t ea m o f th ree d oc to rs pe rfo rmed a surg ery t o h el p co rrec t t he con di t io n T he f a mil y o n l y h a d t o fo o t t h e b i ll for K aylee's $1,200 ank le f oot o r th os es, s ho es to h el p ke ep h er f ee t stra ig ht N ow K ayle e is an a ctiv e 15mon th -o ld t od dl er. Wh en giv en t h e cha nc e, she cra wl s an d s t ands, bu t still o n the sid es o f her feet B eing bo rn pre m a tu rel y, she ha s resp irat o ry p rob lem s an d exper ien c es tr o uble r o lling over, sitt ing up and c r aw li ng, bu t th e to ddl er c on tin ues to mak e pro gre ss, sa id h er mo t he r. T he fa m ily has a bi g oppo rt unity and a hug e cha ll en ge ah ea d o f th em. At a co st o f al m o st $2 3, 00 0, K ay le e n ow n e ed s t o t ra ve l t o th e Un i t e d S t a t e s f o r a s e c o n d s u r g e r y a t t h e Atl an ta F o o t a nd Leg C lin i cs. The Bah ama s h a s n o f a c i l i t y f o r t h e t y p e o f s u rg e ry s h e ne ed s. Wi th no heal th i ns ur anc e pr ovi der w ill ing to c o ver K aylee' s medical exp enses, and n eith er par ent having m ed i cal ins u r ance o f their own, fi nd in g t h e mon ey to gi ve K ay le e t he o p po rtu n it y o f a n o rmal l if e see ms li k e a n i nsu rm o u nt ab l e o b sta cle For K end r a a clerk at a l ocal cop ying company and Rolando, a mas s age ther apis t, good m e di cal i nsu ran ce is to o e xp en sive . "T he fi nanc es ar e n't the re as the y s hould be wit h al l t h e o t he r t hi ng s we h av e t o d o, sa id R o l a n d o There is als o a high p r o bab ility t hat K aylee wil l n eed more su rge rie s t o co rrect he r con diti on. However, th e family s ai d the y ar e t akin g t h in gs o n e d a y a t a t ime T H E A R T O F K E M E T I C Y O G A BE NE FI TS : Th e re ar e s o m a n y b e ne f it s t ha t a pe r so n c a n e x p e ri e nc e by de v e l op i ng a d i sc i p li n e d p ra c ti c e Aunkh Aakhu. FIGH T S F O R F O O T CU REBABY KA YLEE COMPLICATIONS: Baby Kaylee Thomas was club feet, a de f o r mity that caus es an infants fee t to rot a te inw ard.

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HIP dysplasia (simply put, a poorly formed hip joint) is very common in dogs, especially in large pure breds, although small dogs and mixed breeds can certainly have it as well. Labs, Rottweiler, Shepherds and Chows have traditionally had a high incidence of hip dysplasia but a better understanding of the contributing factors has helped decrease that incidence in recent years. In a normal hip, the head of the femur (the thigh bone) and the pelvis fit together in a snug ball and socket joint. In hip dysplasia the socket is shallow, or the ball is too small or to flat, or the ligaments holding the joint together are too loose. This allows the ball to slide around in the socket, causing a wobbly gait and pain. The problem can be so mild it is virtually undetectable, or it can be so severe that a puppy will limp even at a walk and have trouble pushing himself to a standing position when lying down. Over time, the wear and tear of the hip sliding back and forth causes arthritis to develop in the joint. Arthritis can start when a dog is as young as one year old; three factors are known to contribute to hip dysplasia: genetics, nutrition and exercise.GENETICSGenetics play a big role in hip dys plasia. Male and female dogs that do not have hip dysplasia are less likely to produce a puppy that has the disease. So you may want to have your breeding dogs hips x-rayed before you breed them and have your veterinarian grade these hips. It is reported that 30 to 40 per cent of Chows will develop hip dysplasia.NUTRITIONOVERFEEDING large breed puppies or giving them calcium or vitamin D supplements increases the likelihood they will develop hip dysplasia. Excess calories promote too fast growth which strains a puppy developing bones and joints. Feeding puppies rocket fuel does not make them any bigger as adults. A puppys ultimate height is determined by genetics, not by how fast it grows. Puppies should not be fed free choice or allowed unlimited amounts of food. They should be given a measured amount of food divided into two or three meals a day.EXERCISEToo much exercise can also strain developing bones and joints and worsen any inherited tendency towards hip dysplasia. Remember, puppies are babies. They need a lot of rest and the exercise they get should be gentle and fairly brief. Save the agility and the endurance events for after your puppy has fin ished growing. WOMAN P AGE 10B, TUESDA Y OCT OBER 1 1, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE DEE P VEIN THR OMBOSIS T O D A Y I w i s h t o s h a r e wi th m y reade rs an ar ti cl e t hat appea red i n t he Se pte mbe r 15 20 1 1 e d i t i o n o f A m er i ca n Wa y t h e i n f l i g h t m a g a z i n e o f A mer i c an Airlin es. T h e article addres ses a ver y i mport ant c o nd itio n th a t ma n y pe rs on s may have experienced or may j u s t n o t b e a w a r e o f d e e p vein thrombosis (DVT).WHAT IS DVT?A d e e p v e i n t h r o m b o s i s ( D V T ) i s a b l o o d c l o t t h a t devel ops i n a dee p v ei n, us ual l y i n a l e g T h i s i s a s er i ou s c on dition. Sometimes these clots c a n b r e a k a w a y a n d t r a v e l t h r o u g h th e b l o o d s t r e a m t o v i t a l o r g a n s a n d c a n c a u s e severe injury or death.POSSIBLE RISK FACTORS OF DVTP r o lo n g e d p h y si ca l im mo b i l i t y s u c h a s s it t i n g f o r a n ext ended per i od, is cons ide red in the medical co mmun it y to be a r i sk f ac to r as so ci at ed w i th D V T Pe o p l e w i t h c e r t a i n m e d ical condit ions or who are t aki ng s om e me di c at i on s m a y a l so be at hi gher ri sk of devel oping a D V T i n c l udi ng co nd i t i on s o r medicati on s t ha t affect bl o od fl o w al ter nor mal bl o odclot t i n g m e c h a n i s m s o r c a u s e s b l ood-ves sel d am age. So m e of these are: Blood-clotting disorders Cancer Increasing age or smoking Major illness with hospitali sation Obesity or heart disease Oral contraceptive use or hormone therapy Personal or family history of a DVT Pregnancy Recent major surgery or traumaPOSSIBLE SYMPTOMS OF DVTMa ny D V T s d o not pr odu ce a n y s y m p t o m s If s y m p t o m s occur, they may include pain, s w e l l i n g o r r e d n e s s i n t h e a f f e c t e d a r e a S e v e r e c h e s t p a i n o r p r o b l e m s b r e a t h i n g m a y in d ic a t e t h a t a c l o t h a s t r a v e l l e d t o t h e l u n g s A n y c on ce rn sh o uld b e ev alu ate d by a physician immediately.P O S S I B L E W A Y S T O R E D U C E T H E R I S K O F D V TAmerican Way encourages all passengers to consult with their doctors about DVT and o th e r p e rs o n a l h e a l th is s u e s b e f o r e f l y i n g B e c a u s e t h e c au s e of a DV T is o fte n n ot k n o w n t h e b e s t m e t h o d s o f p r e v e n t i n g D V T a r e s t i l l unce rt ai n. T o tr y t o red uce t he ris k of DVT m an y pass engers may be advised by their doctor s to t ak e th e f ol lo wi ng mea sures in flight: Reg ularly ch ang e le g p osit i o n a n d p e r i o d i c a l l y m o v e and stretch your legs and feet while seated. If conditions allow and the aisles are clear, you may want t o o cc a s i on a l l y ge t up an d w a l k a r o u n d B u t r e m e m b e r t h a t you must remain seated when t h e s e a t b e l t l i g h t i s o n a n d s h o u l d r e m a i n i n y o u r s e a t w it h y o u r se a t b e l t fa s t e n e d whenever po s sibl e, because of th e p oss ibility o f tu rb u l e n ce. A n d a l l p a s s e n g e r s a r e required to comply with crew member and/or FAA instruct i ons es pe c i al l y t ho se r el a t i ng to remaining seated. A vo i d c ro ss in g t h e le g s a t the ankles or knees. S t a y h y d r a t e d d r in k a d e quate non-diuretic fluids such as water, juice and milk and minimi ze alcohol an d caffeine i n t a k e W e a r l o o s e f i t t i n g cl ot h i ng W e ar g r ad ua t e dc o m pression sock or stockings. It is p o ssib le tha t n o me asure i nt ended to pr event DV T wil l be ef fective. I t is als o poss i bl e t h a t s om e o f t he m e a s ur e s liste d a bo ve may n ot b e reco mme nd ed fo r so me p asse nge r s, d ep en di n g o n t he i r he al t h situations as assessed by their doctors. Bernade t te D. Gibson, a board cert if ied and l icen sed pedo r thi s t is t h e pro prie tor o f F oo t S olu tion s, a h e a lt h a n d w e l ln e s s f ra n c h i s e th a t f o cu se s on fo ot c are a nd prop er s h o e f it, l o c a te d in th e T r in i ty P l a z a We s t Ba y S tre e t, N a s s a u B a h a m a s w w w f o o t s o l u t i o n s c o m / n a s s a u The vie ws ex pre ss ed a re t h os e of t h e au tho r an d d oe s no t ne ce s sa r i ly rep r e sen t tho se o f F oot Solu t i o ns I n cor p or at ed or a ny o f i t s su b s id ia ry a n d/o r a ff ilia te d c o mp a nies Plea se direc t an y q ue stion s or co m me nts t o na ss au@fo otso l u tions .co m or 322 -FOO T (366 8). B y B E R N A D E T T E G I B S O NFOOT SOLUTIONS C A US ES OF HI P D Y SPL ASI A By DR BASIL SANDS By GET WELL BAHAMAS Special to The Tribune THE 40 participants of NIBs Get Well Bahamas Phase II are not just losing weight and shaping up, they are also getting back in touch with nature thanks to a third component of the programme that focuses on organic gardening. This aspec t of the prog r a mme led by local f arming group Homegrown D e v e l o pm e n t e n c o u ra g e s p a rt i c i pa n t s t o grow th eir ow n b ac ky ard v e ge tab le gar de ns u s in g n at ur al m et hod s t ha t ar e f r ee o f s y nt h et ic p es t ic id es an d c he mi ca l fe rtili sers tha t may ha r m the e nvi r o nmen t an d the hum an b ody. To d ate, th e Get We ll Ch alle nge rs ha ve r e ceiv ed i ns truction on ho w to p r e pare r a ised beds, the art of c omp o s t in g s e e d i n g a n d tr a n s p l a n ti n g a n d m ost re ce ntl y, the y ta ck le d the fun dam enta ls of n atural pe s t co ntrol. Ch ad T h ompson, vi ce -preside nt of H om eg row n D e ve lo pme n t, e xp la in ed t h a t t h e te r m p e s t r e fe r s t o a n i n se c t o r a n i m a l t h at w i l l c a u se d a m a g e t o c ro p s o r a ny mic r o organ ism tha t wi ll c ause dis ease in plant s and hum ans. Pes ts i n c l u d e s u ch b a d g u y s a s s p i d e r m ites, a phid s snai ls, w hite flies, army w o rms a nd ca te rp il la rs tha t c a n w re ak h avo c i n a ga rden. On the o ther h and the t ypic al ga r d en e nv ironm en t a lso i nc lud es inse c ts th at a re be nefi cia l to hea lthy soil and p l an t g ro w th f or e x a mp le c e nt ip e de s, b umble bee s p arasitic wa sps, bee tles, l ady bugs a nd prayi ng m anti s I f yo u se e t he se i ns ects in y our g arden, le ave em be. These are the g ood g uys, Mr Thom pson said He o utl ine d th ree ma in stra te gi es fo r n atu r a l pe st c ontrol. Do nothing. Let nature do its work. Identification of pests, patience, and manual or mechanical removal Homemade pesticides as a last line of defense THE LAISSEZ-FAIRE APPROACHMr T hompson said healthy plants g i v e o u t h e a l t h y w a v e s i g n a l s t h a t deter bugs from attacking. He said a health y pr oductive garden envir onm e n t c a n b e f o st e r e d b y re g u l a r w a te ring, thinn ing o f plants and companion planting. Dont just plant one crop that an ins ect will s ee as an all you can eat buffet. Diversify. Plant a poly-culture to confuse the insect so they may see tomatoes, but ri g h t n e x t d o o r i s s o m e th i n g t he y d o n t l i k e f o r e x a m p l e g a r l ic s o t h e y t e n d t o just fly off or buzz away. Give your pl ants a lo t o f sp ac e. B e c a r e ful n ot to crowd your plants. Always thin them o ut s o ai r can ci r cu la t e an d s o y ou dont h ave t hat hu mid envir onment that will create disease, he said. Mr Thompson said the goal should b e to cre ate a n e nv ironme nt tha t w el comes beneficial insects. U s e i n s ect at t r act o r s T h es e a r e a ny brig htl y c olo ured fl ow e r s or flo w e r s t h a t p r o d u c e n e c t a r o r p o l l e n M a r i g o l d s p a n s i e s h i b i s c u s b o u g a i n v i l l e a wi l l m a k e b e n e f i ci a l i nse cts w ant to sta y aro und e ve n a fte r theyve eaten the pests, he said.BEFORE YOU SPRAYI f a p e s t p r o b l e m d e v e l o p s M r T h o m p so n sa i d, i t i s i m po r t a n t t o id e n tify the insect causing the problem. Y o u d o n t w a n t t o j u s t r u s h i n there spraying because you may end u p k i l l i n g a l l o f t h e b e n e f i c i a l in s e c t s a s well a s the pest s. Even af ter youve id enti fie d t he bug or w hi ch ev er i nsec t or d is e ase is oc curring in y our g arden you actually want to wait a couple of days to let nature step in. This means t o a l l o w t h e l a d y b u g s t o c o m e i n o r t h e oth er pre dat ors to c om e in a nd at tac k t he i n se c t t h a t s a l re a d y at t a c k in g y o ur plants, he said. If th e b e n ef ic ia l i n se c ts d on t ki c k i n after a couple of days Mr Thompson r ecom men ds man ua l or mech ani cal re mo v a l As p e s ts o f t e n e a t a l l n ig h t o r s t r i k e a t d a w n h e s a i d m o r n i n g i s good time to manually remove them. L o o k o n t h e u n d e r s i d e o f y o u r pl an ts lo ok on t h e gr o un d an d t he wa lk w ays and pick u p anythin g you see tha t shoul dnt be there S o if its a c at erp ill ar g rab i t, squ ish it o r t hrow it in a cup of wate r so it drowns or ev en u s e y o u r h o s e t o j u s t w a s h o f f t h e i n s e c t s I f y ou h a v e a n y d i s e a s e d l e a v e s clip t he m off and put them on your compost pile, he said.WHEN ALL ELSE FAILSM r T h o m p s o n s a i d p e s t i c i d e s s h o u ld o n l y b e us ed a s a la s t l i ne o f d e f e n c e w h e n a p e s t i n f e s t at i o n i s o u t o f co n t r o l a nd e v en t h e n r e me d i e s s h o u l d b e n a t u r a l H e s a i d a n a t u r a l p e s t i c i d e s h o u l d c o n t a i n t h r ee t y p es o f i n g r e d i e n t s an o i l t o s u f f o c a t e t h e i n s e c t h e a t f o r ex ample, from c aye nne pepper and a s c en t li k e g ar li c o r m in t t h at r e pe l s p e s t s Y o u c a n u s e a c o m b i n a t i o n o f s p e ar m i n t p e pp e r an d h o r s e r ad i s h o r y o u ca n j u s t m i x p e p p e r g a r l i c and dishwashing liquid and s pray the s o l u t i o n o n t h e u n d e r s i d e o f y o u r p l an t No r m a ll y t ha t wi l l s uf f o c at e m o s t o f t h e s o f t b o d ie d i n s ec t s Bu t r e m e m b e r t h e p e s t i c i d e s n o t o n l y k il l th e ba d gu ys T h ey ki ll t h e g oo d g uy s t o o s o u s e t h e m s p ar i n g ly h e s a i d O t h e r h o m e m a d e s o l u t i o n s ? S t i c k y c a r d s a n d b e e r t r a p s ( c u p s f i l l e d w i t h b e e r o r v i n e g a r a n d p l a c e d i n t h e g r o u n d ) t o t r a p t o a t tr ac t u n wa r y s n a i ls a n d s l u gs .Natural pest control strategies for aH E A L T H Y G A R D E N ORGANICALLY GROWN: Get Well Bahamas participants are learning how to grow their backyard vegetable gardens. HARVEST Organically grown zucchini squash.

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WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y OCT OBER 1 1, 201 1, P AGE 1 1B By BJOERN H. AMLAND and KARL RITTER Associated Press L E Y M A H Gb o we e c on f r o n t ed armed forces in Liberia to demand t h a t t h e y s t o p u s i n g r a p e a s a w e a p o n E l l e n J o h n s o n S i r l e a f became Africa's first woman to win a f r e e p r e s i d e n t i a l e l e c t i o n T awak ku l Kar m an b ega n pu s hi ng fo r ch an ge i n Y em en lo n g be f or e the Arab Spring The y s ha r e a c omm i t m e n t t o w o m e n s ri g ht s i n re g i on s w h ere opp res sio n is comm on, and o n F r i d a y t h e y s h a r e d t h e Nobel Peace Prize. T he No rweg ian No bel Com mit te e ho no ur e d wom en fo r th e f ir s t tim e i n sev en yea r s, and in s e lec ting K arman it also r e cog nised the Arab Sp r in g m ov eme nt ch am pi on ed by m i l l i on s o f of t e n a n o n y m o us a c ti v i s ts from Tunisia to Syria.MOVEMENT LEADERSPri ze co mm itt ee c h ai rma n Tho rbj o e r n Ja g l a n d s a i d i t w o u l d h a v e b e e n d i f f i c u l t t o i d e n t i f y a l l t h e mo ve m en t 's l ea de r s a n d t h at t he c ommitte e w as making a n a dditiona l state me nt b y sele c ting K arm an to represent their cause. W e h a v e i n c l u d e d t h e A r a b S pring in this priz e, but w e hav e put it in a particular context," Jagland told reporters. "Namely, if one fails to inc lude the w omen in the r e volut ion a nd t he ne w d em oc ra ci es, the re will be no democracy." Karman is the first Arab woman ever to win the peace prize, which i nclud es a 10 mi llio n kr ono r ( $1.5 million) award that will be divided among the winners. No woma n or s u bSah ara n Af r ican had wo n t he prize since 2004, when the commit t e e honou red W angari M aa t hai of Kenya, who mobilised poor women t o f i gh t de f or es t a t io n by p la n t in g trees. "I am very, very happy about this prize," said Karman, who has been c a m p a i g n i n g f o r t h e o u s t e r o f Ye m e n' s au th or it ar ia n P re sid e nt A li Abdullah Saleh since 2006. "I give the prize to the youth of revolution in Ye men and the Ye meni pe ople." Si r l eaf 72, wo n L i be r ia 's p r es i dential election in 2005 and is cred it e d w it h h e l p in g th e c o un t ry e m e rg e from an especially brutal civil war. She is running for re-election Tues day in what has been a tough cam paign, but Jagland said that did not enter into the committee's decision to honor her. "T h is gi ve s m e a s t r on ge r c om mi tme n t to w ork f or re c on c ili a tio n, Si rleaf said F riday fr om he r home i n M onr ovi a, th e c a pit al. Sh e sai d Libe ria ns shou ld be p roud t ha t b oth she and Gbowee were honored. "L e ym ah Gb o wee wor ke d v er y h ar d wi th wome n in Li be ri a f ro m all wa lks o f li f e to c hall enge th e d ictatorship to sit in the sun a nd in the r ain advocating f or peac e," Sirleaf said. "I believe we both accept this o n be h a l f of th e Li b e ri a n pe o p le a nd the credit goes to them." G b o w e e w h o t o ok a f l ig h t t o N e w Y o r k o n F r i d a y s a i d s h e w a s shocked to learn she had won. "Everything I do is an act of sur v i va l f o r m ys el f f or t h e gr o u p of people that I work with," she said. "So if you are surviving, you don't ta k e y o u su rv i va l stra t e gi e s or t a c ti c s as anything worth of a Nobel." One of t he fir st people s he tol d was a fellow airline passenger. "Sa t b y a gu y f or f iv e ho ur s o n t h e f l i gh t an d w e n e v e r s p o k e t o ea ch o ther, bu t I had to ta p h im and say, 'S ir, I just won the N obel P e a c e Prize.'" G bo w ee 3 9, ha s l on g c a mp ai gn ed for the rights of women and against rap e, org ani zi ng C hristi an an d M u sl im wo me n t o c ha ll en ge L ib er i a 's warlords. In 2003, she led hundreds of female p r ote s te r s the "w omen in whit e" th rou gh Monr ovia t o dema nd sw ift disarma ment of fig hte r s w h o c o n t i n u e d to p re y o n w o m e n even though a peace deal ending 14 years of near-constant civil war had been reached months earlier. Yo u're su ppose d to be ou r l ibe ra t or s, b u t i f y o u f i n i sh e v e ry o n e w ho w ill you rule ?" Gb ow ee aske d r e bel o f f i ci a l S ek o u F o f an a d ur i ng o n e march that year. G b o w e e w a s h o n o u r e d b y t h e c o m m i t t e e f o r mo b i l i s i n g w o m e n "acro ss ethni c and reli gious dividing lines to bring an end to the long war in Liberia, and to ensure women's participation in elections." Gbo w ee w or ks in Ghana's capital as the director of Women Peace and Sec u rity Network A fri c a. The g r o up's we bsite say s she is a moth er of five. S h e s a i d t h a t a l t h o ug h s h e h ad never considered herself worthy of the prize, "women have important r o le s i n p ea ce a n d s e cu r i ty is s ue s and I think that this is an acknowledgment of that." "The world is functioning on one side of its brain" because women's sk il ls an d in te ll ig en c e a re no t b e in g u s e d t o a d v an c e t h e ca u s e o f t he world," she said. T h e H a r v a r d e d u c a t e d S i r l e a f too k a diffe ren t p ath tow a r d c ha ng e in Liberia, a country created to settle freed American slaves in 1847.IRON LADYShe worked her way through college in the United St a t es by mopp in g fl oo rs a n d w ai ti ng t ab le s. J a i le d at home and exiled abroad, she lost to warlor d C har les Taylor in ele ctio ns in 1997 bu t earned t he nickn a m e I r o n L a d y A r e b e l l i o n forced Taylor from power in 2003, and Sirleaf emerged victorious in a landslide vote in 2005. Ev en on a c ontin ent lon g pla gue d w i t h v i o le n c e t he c i v i l w a r i n L i be r i a st o od ou t f or i ts c r ue l t y. Ta y l or 's s ol die r s a te t he he arts of slain ene mies a n d e v e n d e c o ra t e d c h e c k p o i n t s w i t h human entrails. The c o nfl ic t ha d a mom en ta ry lu ll when Taylor ran for office in 1997 a n d w a s e l ec t ed pre si de nt Ma n y sa y t h e y v o t e d f o r h i m b e c a u s e t h e y were afraid of the chaos that would follow if he lost. Though Liberia is more peaceful t o d ay Si r l ea f h a s cr i t i c s a t ho m e who say she hasn't done enough to restore roads, electricity and other i nfrastru ctu re dev asta ted d uring th e c i v i l s t r i f e H e r o p p o n e n t s h a v e a c c u s e d h e r o f b u y i n g v o t e s a n d u s in g g ov e r n me n t f u n ds t o c a mp a i g n f o r r e e l e c t i o n c h a r g e s t h a t h e r camp denies. Liberia's truth and reconciliation commission recommended that she b e ba rre d fro m pub li c o ffi ce for pr ev i o u s l y g i v i n g u p t o $ 1 0 0 0 0 t o a r e b e l g r o u p h e a d e d b y T a y l o r L i b e r i a s l e g i s l a t u r e h a s n o t a p p rov e d t h at r e c om m e nd a ti on a n d Si r le af ha s s a id th at if s h e s ho ul d a p o l o g i se f o r a n y t h in g i t i s f o r b e i n g fooled" by Taylor in the past. A f r ica n a nd in t er n at io n al l u mi n a r i es w e l c o m e d S i r l e a f s h o n o r Many had gathered in Cape Town, Sou t h Afr i ca on F riday to ce lebrate N o b e l p ea ce l a ur e at e A r c hb i s ho p Desmond Tutu's 80th birthday. W h o ? J o h n so n S i rl e a f? Th e pr e sident of Liberia? Oooh," said Tutu, w ho w on the p ea ce p r i ze i n 198 4 for h i s n o n v i o l e n t c a m p a i g n a g a i n s t wh i t e r a ci s t r u l e in S o ut h A f r i c a. "She deser v es it many times over. S h e s b ro u g h t st a b i li t y t o a p l a c e th a t was going to hell." Three women share Nobel; led change in Africa, Mideast AFRICAS first democratically elected female president, a Liberian peace activist and a woman who stood up to Yemen's authoritarian regime won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday October 7, 2011 for their work to secure women's rights, which the prize committee described as fundamental to advancing world peace. Seen in this combo from left: Tawakkul Karman of Yemen, Liberian peace activist Leymah Gbowee and Liberia's President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. (AP) HER pageant experience started off with a leg injury, causing her to miss the bus to the official swimsuit photo shoot. But a 45-minute cab ride to the location in Antigua, Guatemala, got Miss Teenager Bahamas Jasmine McIntosh back on track. There, she met the other contestants of the Miss Teenager Universe pageant filming the opening costume and swimsuit credits for the grand finale which was held Sunday. Although Jasmine was not crowned Miss Teenager Universe, she had an unforgettable experience. The 16-year-old honours graduate from Agape Christian School in Abaco met the president of Guatemala, lvaro Colom Caballeros, which was an experience she had been looking forward to. In Guatemala, the teen queen participated in a number of events. On the first day, Jasmine enjoyed a dinner with contestants, event organisers, sponsors and national directors representing each contestant. Pre-pageant photographs included evening gowns and national costumes. This was Jasmines first official beauty pageant since childhood. Her managers said she handled the hectic schedule well and was truly a representative of the Bahamas and of her supporters in Abaco who worked to secure sponsorship for the trip. About 40 teenagers from around the world vied for the crown. It was Isabella Cazon Torres, 18, from Por tugal who ultimately won the crown. M I S S T E E N A G E R B A H A M A S C O M P E T E S I N G U A T E M A L A F O R T H E M I S S T E E NA G E R U N I V E R S E C R O W N

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F ASHION F AMIL Y TIES THE TRIBUNE SECTION B TUESD A Y OCT OBER 11, 2011 By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter ACLOSE-knit family and hard work are the backbone of the ever-expanding Melissa Sears brand. Well-known for its school uni form centre, Melissa Sears is now synonymous with fashion, said store owner Janet Fowler. The co mpany starte d w ith on e s ma l l st ore o n E a st S tre e t n o r t h a n d a f t e r e x p a n d i n g ov e r t he y e ar s, it no w bo a st s a n e w b r a n c h a t t h e M a l l a t M a rathon Ope rate d by a moth er a nd her two da ughte rs th e M e lissa S e a rs F as hi o n S to re sta r te d a s a d r e a m m o r e t h a n t w o d e c a d e s a g o I t h a s n o w b e c o m e o n e o f N a s s a u s bigg est h ome-g rown c lothi ng s to r e s. W e h a v e e x p a n d e d i m m e n s e l y o v e r t h e y e a rs T h e s t o r e i s n a m e d a f t e r m y mom 's men tor an d ca re-g iv er who is dec eased. In fac t, w e s t a r t e d o f f w i t h t h e n a m e S ha n ty s F a s h i o n b e c a u s e m y b rother is T y and I'm Shan, b u t s h e w e n t w i t h M e l i s s a Sea r s," said ex ec utiv e ope rat io ns m anage r Sh andi a Per pall Ms Fow le r s daug hter. Ms Pe r p all w as in he r te en y e a r s w h e n M e l i s s a S e a r s d i e d R e f e r r i n g t o h e r a s a nic e qui et wom an M s Perp a l l s a i d s h e r e m e m b e r s M el i s s a S ea r s l i k e a gr a n d daug hter w ould re memb er a g r a n d m o t h e r The family bu siness s pans three ge ne rati ons. Ms Pe rpa ll s a i d h e r d a u g h t e r i s n o w w o r k i n g i n t h e s t o r e w h i l e s t u d y i n g m a r k e t i n g a t t h e s a me time B u s i n e s s e s a l w a y s h a v e the ir diffi c ult se ason s but th e f ac t t h a t M e l i s s a S e a r s i s a f a mily busines s, w e are able to pul l throu gh m uch be tter. T her e i s always so meone to lea n on, she sai d. The s u mmer se ason is the best tim e of the yea r for business, s a id Ms Perpa ll, noti ng t he inc r ea s e of summer uniform sa les as a trend ov er t he ye a rs. N ot o nl y d oe s th e c o mpany b ene fit, but so d oes the com munity We u s u a ll y h i r e a l ot o f s u mmer stud ents a nd w e are able to giv e jobs to the c ommu n it y O u r se a ms tre s se s c a rr y h o m e m o r e a r o u n d t h a t t ime and w e are able to get bo nu se s as w e l l, so e v ery b od y m a ke s a li t t l e mo r e a r o un d th a t ti m e o f t h e y e a r, sa i d Ms Perpal l. It is a l w a y s a ra c e b e c a us e u ni for m s ar e all ye ar r ou nd fo r us, b ut s um me r i s ou r h ig h s e a s o n W i t h f a s h i o n y o u have holi days a nd m or e festiv e ti me s a ll ye a r rou nd sh e s a id. Th e c om p an y s fo c us is c u rre n t l y o n t h e u p c o m i n g C h r i s t m a s s e a s o n w i t h p l a n s t o h a v e tr e n d y w i n t e r f a sh i o n s i n s to c k fo r th e c o mp a ny s f la sh y an d chi c custom ers. We have so met hing new t h a t w e ar e i nt r o d u ci n g f o r C h r i s t m a s t h a t p e o p l e c a n l ook fo rwar d to. We always b r i n g t h e n e w t r e n d s s h e s a i d I n s p i r a t i o n c o m e s f r o m m a ny pl ac es bu t f or e nt r e prene ur Sha ndia Perpa ll a nd her famil y it was m ainly the h a r d -w o r ki n g n at u r e o f th e f am ily m at ri ar ch th at d r ove them into the busine s s. M y m o m i s r e a l l y t h e b ac k bone. She is a ver y go dl y and wise p ers on. Sh e h as al w ay s b ee n e asy g oi ng mo re o f a plain Jane i n a sen se. I thi nk th e fa c t th a t b oth o f h er chi ldr en ar e work ing f or the b u s i n e s s i t w o r k s o u t M y b r ot h e r i s v e r y qu a l i f i ed i n h is f iel d, he m as te rs m ain ly i n b u s i n e s s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n I 'm t he buyer and I 've been h e r e e v e r s i n c e W e w o r k h a r d i t is o ur wa y o f l i f e ," s aid M s Per pall. Th e f am i ly ow ne d an d o per ate d M el is s a S ear s Fa sh i on S to re h as be c om e on e of N a ss au s b igge st h om e grow n c lo th i n g c om pan i e s Businesses always have their difficult seasons, but the fact that Melissa Sears is a family business, we are able to pull thr ough much better There is always someone to lean on. Shandia Perpall FASHION BACKBONE: Melissa Sears Fashion Store has become well-known for its school uniform centre.

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.netAlthough hes still waiting for something tangible from the Bahamas government, Trevor Barry said he was appreciative of the accolades he received from the Bahamian people for his bronze medal feat in the men's high jump at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Barry ended his "Welcome Home" celebrations by attending a cocktail reception in the foyer of the Kendal Isaacs Gym last night. The event came on the heels of his visit to his alma mater at Aquinas College and St Thomas More where he got started in primary school. "I'm excited. Everyone came out and showed their support," Barry said. "I'm happy to see the country, my family and friends coming out here to support and congratulate me. I really appreciate this." Barry, flanked by his parents, Charles and Queenie Barry, expressed his gratitude to his personal coach Keith Parker and Ronald Cartwright, who assisted him to secure the medal in Daegu, South Korea, in August. He also thanked the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations, headed by president Mike Sands, team manager Ralf McKinney and the coaching staff for helping him to achieve his first goal. The next, he said, is to win a medal at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. As he gets set to go into his offseason training and his marriage next month, Barry said he's just waiting to see what the government does for him after he was promised by both Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard that he will get what he's due in short order. Maynard was scheduled to give remarks at the cocktail reception, organised by Barry's long-time finan cial supporter, Harrison Petty. But Timothy Munnings, the director of sports, filled in for Maynard, who was in the House of Assembly. While he advised the members of the IAAF team that competed in South Korea that the Bahamas is expecting them to continue their high standard of competition at the Olympics, Munnings also encouraged the many younger athletes in attendance to take a page out of Barry's book on perseverance to get the job done. Parker, who was booked to travel to the championships but got sick just the day before he was scheduled to leave, said it was by no accident that Barry achieved what he did. Having worked with him over the past three years, Parker admitted that Barry was probably one of the best athletes in his camp and, despite not being there in Daegu, they went through his performance with a fine comb. With his unusual style of jumping, incorporating a routine of a gymnast and the techniques of a hurdler and triple jumper, Parker said while he attained his personal best of 7-feet, 7inches for the bronze, he predicts that Barry could carry the bar as high as 79 next year. Sands, in his remarks, said that Barry saved the day for the Bahamas because when everything went wrong in Daegu, his medal kept the streak alive of winning a medal at every championship since Troy Kemp got it started with a gold in the men's high THETRIBUNE SECTIONE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 INSIDE TRAK TTUURRNN TTOO 22EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 44EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 55EE...... NFL SUNDAY: UNBEATEN PACKERS LOOKING AT GREATNESS EURO SOCCER: SCOTLAND HAS INJURY HEADACHES AHEAD OF CLASH WITH SPAINNBA LOCKOUT: NEGOTIATORS MEETING ON DEADLINE DAY IN LABOUR TALKSTENNIS: RODDICK BEATS LU IN 1ST ROUND OF ROLEX MASTERS BOXING: AGELESS HOPKINS SET FOR HIS LA TEST TITLE DEFENSE TTUURRNN TTOO 77EE.. TTUURRNN TTOO 33EE...... By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net COULD touring pro Mark Knowles be coming to the end of his stellar tennis career? Having exited in the first round of his last two tournaments with two different partners, Knowles is seriously contemplating whether he should continue playing or retire. The 40-year-old Knowles, who turned pro in 1992, will have plenty of time to decide on his future as he has decided to shut down the remainder of his season after he and Lukasz Kubot were ousted yesterday at the Shanghai Rolex Masters. With the match in their hand in Shanghai, China, Knowles and Kubot fell apart in the second set and eventually lost 2-6, 7-6 (5), 10-7 to the team of Marcel Granollers of Spain and Viktor Troicki of Serbia. Their defeat came a week after Knowles and Jurgen Melzer of Vienna, Austria, were sent packing with a 6-3, 6-4 decision at the expenses of Marin Cilic and Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia at the China Open in Beijing, China. This one was very disappointing. We played really well. We had total control of the match, leading 6-2, 54 and serving for the match, said Knowles during an interview with The Tribune from his hotel room. It was really a straight forward match but things turned around and, after losing the second set, we didnt get it done in the tie breaker. It was a match we should have won, but just didnt do it. Unlike yesterdays match, Knowles said the week before he and Melzer were just simply out-played in every facet of the game by Cilic and Lju bicic. It was tough. They just outplayed us. They were better than us, Knowles said. We played a good match, but they played an excellent match. That was a case where we just lost to a better team. As for the match-up against Granollers and Troicki, Knowles said he and Kubot were the better team, but they didnt live up to their expectations. We played ourselves in position, but we just didnt close the door, he said. Knowles, who is gearing up for the staging of his annual charity exhibition tournament at Atlantis in December, said his new doubles partner this year, Michal Mertinak, is still nursing a back injury and that has forced him to look elsewhere for a partner every tournament. It was very difficult, so I think Im going to take a break for a while and see how things go, Knowles said. The year has not been what Knowles had anticipated. He only managed to win one tournament when he teamed up with Xavier Malisse to take the Farmers Classic title in Los Angeles, California, in KNOWLES, KUBOT OUSTED IN 1ST ROUND OF SHANGHAI MASTERS MARK KNOWLES S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 E E By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas will once again be called upon as hosts to the international body for the world's most popular game, in an initiative aimed at the development of officiating. FIFA is scheduled to host its Referee Assistance Programme in the Bahamas October 14-18. The RAP was designed to unify the way the laws of the game are applied throughout the world, a process that FIFA instructors consider crucial to the development of the game. In the programme, referees are guided by the development officers through classroom sessions as well as practical exercises out on the pitch. The relatively young programme was founded in December of 2007 and has been well-received throughout the various confedera tions. "The future of our game is intrinsically linked with the quality of refereeing. Therefore, the Refereeing Assistance Programme is crucial for football," said FIFA president Joseph Blatter at the time of its release. "The deci sion to launch this programme is a milestone in the history of the game." In total, FIFA has invested approximately 40 million dollars into the programme, according to its website. The RAP has been credited with enhancing the environment in which referees devel op and work at both the national and international lev el. Also on the refereeing front, the BFA Referees Department has recognised BFA vice president and chair man of the Referees Com mittee, Stanley Darville, who has been appointed to the CONCACAF (Confederation FIFA Referee Assistance Programme starts on Friday S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 E E S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 E E Trevor Barry hopes PM will keep his promise TREVOR BARRY competes in high jump final during the 13th IAAF World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea, on September 1. He won the bronze. (AP)

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SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS NFLSUNDAY NIGHT KNOWLES AND KUBOT OUSTED IN 1ST ROUND July. And for the second consecutive year, Knowles has failed to qualify for the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals in London, England, where the top eight teams in the world will compete starting on November 20. Im extremely disappointed with the year, he said. Its been a difficult time trying to find the right chemistry and getting some momentum going. Xavier and I got some momentum when we won the title, but we didnt get to con tinue because he didnt come to Asia. So Ive had to play with a lot of different partners and so things have not been what I expected. Married to Dawn and the proud father of three sons, Knowles said he will take a long break. After being one of the top players in the world, its just been tough going lately, something that Im not used to, he stated. I just have to decide because its really hard with a family of three kids. Its really hard to be away and its hard to rationalize those things, so I have to take stock. I dont want to miss my time with my family. So I just have to figure out what I will do from here. Having dedicated his entire life to tennis, after playing the sport since he was a young ster, Knowles said its going to be a long process for him to decide what course of direction his future will take. In the meantime, Knowles said he will definitely take the rest of the year off to recu perate and put his future into perspective. Throughout his career, Knowles has accumulated a 736-368 win-loss record with a total of 54 titles. However, he has gone 17-19 this year with just one title. of North, Central America and the Caribbean Football Federation) Elite Panel of Referee Assessors, and was recently appointed to the CONCACAF Gold Cup where he was selected as the Referee Assessor for the final match between Mexico and the US. Darville continues to receive numerous appointments to CONCACAF Champions League matches and FIFA World Cup qualifiers for the 2014 finals in Brazil. "This success we are pleased to announce speaks to the commitment demonstrated by him to referee development both locally and on the international scene," said BFA vice president Damian Neville. The department is also pleased to recognise the contribution made by Mrs Dianne Ferriera-James, a FIFA women's referee from Guyana and a former Women's World Cup referee who has been refereeing in our local leagues for the past two years. "The development of football to include refereeing continues to be a priority of our association president Mr Anton Sealey, whose moral and professional example continues to set the example both locally and internationally as he works to increase the participation and the development of the beautiful game in our country," Neville added. FIFA Referee Assistance Programme starts Friday LUKASZ KUBOT F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E PACKERS safety Charlie Peprah (26) intercepts a pass intended for Atlanta Falcons' Tony Gonzalez (88) in the second half of a game Sunday in Atlanta. (AP)Unbeaten Pack looking at greatness By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Pro Football Writer WITH Aaron Rodgers' MVPcaliber play leading the way, the Green Bay Packers are 5-0 for the seventh time in franchise history. Each of the previous six, the Packers went on to win an NFL title. That is, admittedly, a statistic that offers little insight for how this season will turn out: After all, none of Green Bay's current players even was born by 1965, the team's most recent such start. Still, with the way they've performed so far this season, the reigning Super Bowl champions sure do seem capable of big things. "5-0 feels great," cornerback Charles Woodson said, "but we're looking at greatness." Does that mean a second consecutive Lombardi Trophy? A 16-0 regular season? While it's waaaaaaay too early to be talking about either, the Packers couldn't be blamed for at least entertaining thoughts of both. They're on an 11-game winning streak, including the end of the 2010 regular season and the postseason. They've already beaten two other teams considered among the NFC's elite entering this season: the New Orleans Saints in Week 1, and the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday night. Some supposedly good teams in the conference are struggling, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles. Other NFC clubs with good records the Detroit Lions, San Francisco 49ers and Washington Redskins have no recent important-game experience. Plus, the Packers didn't lose a ton of talent in the offseason defensive end Cullen Jenkins and guard Daryn Colledge were the most notable departures while they got to "add" players who missed the Super Bowl run because of injury and might very well be hungry to be a real part of that kind of success. Two key examples: tight end Jermichael Finley and running back Ryan Grant. After putting more than a dozen guys on injured reserve last season, then having Woodson and receiver Donald Driver get hurt during the Super Bowl itself, the Packers know a thing or two about getting by when players are sidelined, such as Pro Bowl safety Nick Collins (done for this season) and starting offensive tackles Chad Clifton and Bryan Bulaga (out with leg injuries). And, of course, they have an elite-as-can-be QB in Rodgers. "They certainly possess all the elements necessary to be able to repeat," said Joe Theismann, the former quarterback whose Redskins won the 1983 Super Bowl and nearly repeated but lost to the Raiders in the NFL championship game a year later. "The big question that looms is the health of their offensive line, but they can figure out ways to win when all the pieces aren't in place. That is one reason why I think they do have an opportunity to repeat. And No. 2, there isn't anybody in football at the end of last year and the beginning of this year that's played better football than Aaron Rodgers."