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The Tribune.
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03109
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 09-30-2011
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03109

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PAGE 1

N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Why didnt God save him? Volume: 107 No.253FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY, T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 78F B y LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net ONLY one desk and chair w as empty in the sixth grade class at Columbus Primary School yesterday. Exactly one week ago, a quiet but well-liked Marco Archer sat at that desk surrounded by a group of class m ates he interacted with until school was dismissed that day. H e was absent from that s eat for his favourite lessons in mathematics and language the following Monday, due to h is disappearance last Friday afternoon. And on Wednesday, stud ents and faculty at the school learned that Marco would never return to that seat after his lifeless body was discovered in bushes at the rear of an apartment complex in Cable Beach. The atmosphere at the school that abused and brutally murdered Marco attended was a somber one yester day. While wreaths were being hung around the Wulff Road and Collins Avenue campus, indicating the death and loss of a student and friend, the school did its best to go about a normal day without the sixth grader. However, sixth grade teacher of the deceased, RajF arrington, told T he Tribune his class and others are still taking the loss of their friend h ard. She said: The classmates, they took it really hard.T heyre still taking it hard. E ven this morning, they were praying for his soul and when they were being counseledt hey were asking questions. Two of the questions asked stood out to her, she said, but I could only answer one of them. They want to know why G od didnt save him and they asked Why do the authorities let bad people get away and let them out on bail? These are the childrens questions, not mine. I told them that I didnt have the answer to the latter question but in regards to their first question I told them that maybe God needs and wanted him (Marco Archer) in heaven with him, maybe thats why he didnt save him. I couldnt really think of any other answer to give them. TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM YOURNEWSPAPER YOURWEEKEND S EEPAGE2E FORDETAILS 1 ON SATURDAYS WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN . D A Y T O G O AS MARCO MURDER PROBE CONTINUES, HIS CLASSMATES ASK . SEE page two By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE THREE men assisting police with their investigations into the sexual assault and brutal murder of 11-yearold Marco Archer were still in custody last night. Police remained tightlipped over the details surrounding the discovery of the young boys body in bushes in Western New Providence on Wednesday. Last night, senior officers confirmed investigators are now trying to deter mine whether the suspect may be linked to additional crimes. CALLS for authorities to create a sex offenders register continued a day after 11year-old Marco Archer was found dead. Supporters of such a list feel it would protect the public from attacks by alerting them when a sexual offender is released from prison or when they move into a neighbourhood. However critics of the proposal said creating a public register would alienate convicts who have completed their prison terms, make it harder for them to reintegrate into society and make them targets for perse cution. Her Majestys Prison Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming said such a policy would be like placing additional prison time on inmates who have already served their allotBy PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net NOTING the cultural and psychological impact of foreign workers on the Bahamian society, Chinese Ambas sador Hu Shan said his Embassy has ensured that no more than 4,000 Chinese labourers will be in the Bahamas at any one time during the building of the $3.2 billion Baha Mar project. With 8,150 work permits already ear SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight SEX OFFENDERS REGIS TER OULD PROTECT PUBLIC O MORE THAN 4,000 CHINESE WORKERS IN B AHAMAS A T ONE TIME THREE S TILL IN CUS T ODY IN MARCO INVESTIGATION CHINESE AMB ASS ADOR: By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net VIOLENT offenders are not given a final mental evaluation before they are released from Fox Hill prison, a n official confirmed. P risoners must meet with a p re-release unit before the end of their sentence, howev er that panel only offers anger m anagement classes, help f inding a job and tips on deal ing with society, but does not assess mental health. There's no pre-release mental evaluation, said Her VIOLENT OFFENDERS OT GIVEN FINAL MENTAL EVALUATION BEFORE RELEASE FROM PRISON SEE page eight MARCOARCHERS desk was empty at Columbus P rimary yesterday. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 3F &RPER 25 0HJDHDO HQWULHVZLWK 3FSXUFKDVHf*5$1',=(75,3)25WRDOOLQFOXVLY %HDFKHVHVRUXUN &DLFRV,VODQGV$LUIDU FRXUWHV\RI%DKDPDVDLU%X\DQ\ 3FRU3F&RPER RU 3F 0HJ0HDO DQGHQWHUWRZLQEDFNSDFNZLWK VFKRROVXSSOLHVFHOOSKRQHVDQGODSWRSVWR JHWWKHVFKRRO\HDURIIWRJRRGVWDU)LOO RXW\RXUUHFHLSWDQVZHUWKHVNLOOTXHVWLRQ DQGSODFHLWLQWKHHQWU\ERSURYLGHGIRU FKDQFHWRZLQLQZHHNO\GUDZLQJV(17(52:,1 She says this tragedy is not one that anyone, especially h is classmates will ever forget. Even when they grow up and tell their children and g randchildren of Marcos life, their friend, up to the end, t hey will remember him. When asked how she felt about the ordeal of losing her student, Ms Farrington admitted it was really difficult to come to terms with what happened, from Marco going m issing last Friday to the gruesome discovery of his body f ive days later. Even after he had been missing for a few days, I still h ad hope. I still had that strong feeling that they would find him alive. I was hoping they would for his familys s ake. So it was a real shock for me and its really devast ating. Ms Farrington, like the murder victims family and the rest of the country, wants to know just one thing: Why would someone want to bring any harm to a young child like that? She said that Marco was a promising student who was never late or absent and got all of his spelling wordsc orrect. The school allowed The Tribune to visit the classroom where Marco studied his favourite subjects, mathematics a nd language arts. All sixteen of his classmates were present while a counselor was reading a book to them. However, there were no smiles on their faces or warmth in their eyes, only w orry, confusion and sadness as they frequently stole glances at the lone unoccupied desk and chair in the c lassroom which belonged to young Marco. His desk, one of six in three sectioned groups, was occupied by a potted plant and a composition book with his first writing assignment for the year, All about me, hanging out on a separate sheet of paper. T he paragraph read: My name is Marco Archer. I am 11 years old. I was born on August 22nd 2000 in P rincess Margaret Hospital. I live with my mom and dad o n Brougham Street. My favourite things to do are playing basketball and soccer. My favourite things about school are math and language. Around this time next year, I hope to go to junior high school. M arcia Roberts, the schools head teacher, said staff and pupils are still in shock over Marcos death and does not know if the sadness or somber feelings will go away a ny time soon. She said: Right now the entire school populace is in a s omber mood because of what happened. We had couns elors come to the school who talked to the students about death, we still have persons coming in. Ms Roberts doesnt know when the school will be able t o move past this tragedy, referring to an old saying time heals old wounds but said: Were hoping by the end of the year, that we will have definitely been able to move past this. T he head teacher spoke about her interactions with Marco, describing him as a child who was very much into sports, a model student who attended the school from t he first grade and since the beginning of the school semester has never been absent or late once. WHY DIDNT GOD SAVE HIM? FROM page one A WREATH o n the gates of C olumbus Primary School, which was attended by Marco Archer. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff PRINCIPAL OF COLUMBUS PRIMARY Marcia Roberts fixes wreath on the office of the school. MARCO ARCHERS sixth grade teacher Raj Farrington (above Mrs Farrington puts a wreath on the classroom door (below

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A NATIONAL call to action rally is being organised in response to the kidnapping, assault and murder of 11-year-old Marco Archer, it was announced yesterday. In announcing the event, activist group Bahamas Against Crime called the brutal killing yet another wakeup call for a country in grave danger. The question is, whether the Bahamas is ready to be awakened from its apparent state of apathy, indifference and selfishness, said BAC in a statement yesterday. It seems that people respond to crime only when their interest is threatened. Over the years, BAC has attempted to sensitise the public about the crisis that increasing crime will plunge the nation into. BAC president Dr William Thompson said: Periodically, Bahamas Against Crime organised a march, rally or other public opportunity for residents to demonstrate their commitment to take a stance against crime. In response to this tragic incident, Bahamas Against Crime in conjunction with the Bain Grants Town Advancement Association, will stage a National call to action rally on Sunday, October 9, 2011, at Rawson Square, beginning at 6pm. Public and private sector organisations are invited and individuals from every walk of life are urged to participate in this rally and send a powerful message to the government that it is now past time that this frightening situation is brought under control. Dr Thompson said the criminals must also be made to understand that the vast majority of Bahamians are not prepared to stand idly by and watch the destruction of a once peaceful society. Bahamas Against Crime extends deepest condolences to the family of little Marco Archer and the many others who have suffered greatly, and continue to suffer, as a result of the scourge of crime that is afflicting this nation, the statement said. B y LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net THE youth arm of the F ree National Movement is s peaking out on crime against young people in the Bahamas. In the wake of the brutal murder of 11-year-old Mar co Archer, the Torch Bear ers are calling on society to do its part in the fight against crime, especially as young people are increas ingly the victims. Jamal Moss, president of group, said: It was really disheartening to even hearin the news reports that he had gone missing. And now to know that his life was just taken away its not easy to swallow. Mr Moss said Marcos killing is the result of this societys failure to instil morals in children. Parents are not properly rearing their children and by enabling wrong behaviour in children, theyre breeding criminals. And when you do that, persons like Mr Archer become the unfortunate vic tims. If we know we have these individuals living inour society, we should report them to the police. What happened to that little boy should not have happened. I think we are now past the point where we as par ents, and that includes myself because Im a father, we have to protect our children by any means necessary. And when I say that, I mean within the law, he said. Jamal Miller, chairman of special projects, agreed with his president. He said: Its a tragic situ ation and I just hope that the perpetrators are brought to justice. cant imagine how his friends are feeling right now, the teachers, the family, the mother. We just want to extend our sincerest condolences to his family. He was only 11 years old. The groups public relations chairman, Paul Major II, said: We need to start hanging again, lethal injections or whatever it takes to show these criminals how serious we are against heinous crimes where the victims are not only the young people, but all Bahamians. T WO men appeared in Magistrates Court yesterday to face t he charge of attempted murder. Lavon Josey, 26, of Jasmine Gardens and Latorn Braynen, 18, of Aligeria Drive, were arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in connection with an attempted killing five days ago. T he prosecution alleges that on Sunday, September 25, the accused men, being concerned together, tried to kill Andronic Cash. The men, who were not represented during the arraignment, were not required to enter a plea to the charge due to the nature of the offence. A Voluntary Bill of Indictment will be served against them i n Court One, Bank Lane on Thursday, November 10 at 10am. This will forward the case directly to the Supreme Court for trial, bypassing a preliminary inquiry in the Magistrates Court. The accused men were remanded to Her Majestys Prison, Fox Hill. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 3 3(7(50F:,//,$0RI 3%2;:(67%$<675((71$66$8 %$+$0$6 B y AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net FIRST graders at Gerald Cash Prim ary yesterday memorialised a fellow student killed in a traffic accident earlier this week. F or some classmates, the tragic death of six-year-old Benji Cher-Frere o n Wednesday was their first experience with mortality. Cozetta Johnson, the schools prin c ipal, said: Everyone is holding up pretty well. These are only five and six-year-olds so the counsellors just spoke to them about death, tryingt ofind out what their meaning of it i s. Some children may have experi enced a death in their family before, but for some, it would have been the first death for them. Police reports say Benji was struck by a white 2007 Toyota Hilux truck shortly after school on W ednesday. B enji was playing with another c hild near Cowpen Road, east of Golden Isles Road, and ventured outi nto the street around 3.15pm. T he driver of the truck was travelling west when the incident occurred, and according to police, was visiblys haken. Benji's body was found lying on the southern side of Cowpen Road. Mrs Johnson said: Were only four w eeks in to the school year so (the students) were just getting to know one another, so its not as traumatis i ng. Of course Benjis teacher would have had a different experience with all of this, being an adult. His teacher is handling it well, shes maintaining her composure for t he students. M rs Johnson said Benjis older sib l ing also attended the school; however the third-grader is not expected tor eturn to class this week. I nger Brathwaite-Archer, Benjis teacher, said: Benji was extremely quiet, very shy. He came to us fromt he early readiness programme so he was still adjusting to being in a bigger class. Today the class made cards for h im to take home, so that whenever they feel sad, they can look at the card and reflect on his happy memo r y. THE FNMYOUTH ARM SPEAK S OUT ON CRIME TWO CHARGED WITH ATTEMPTED MURDER ALL TO ACTION RALLY AFTER MARCO ARCHER DEATH COURTNEWS PICTURED ABOVE is the desk of six-year-old Benji Cher-Frere. The young boy was killed in a traffic accident on Wednesday afternoon.

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PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts hailed the partys extraordinary new generation of candidates. Mr Roberts said the new faces on the PLPs slate for the upcoming election have energy, new ideas and a commitment to core Bahamian values. These young candidates are smart, passionate, committed, and fired up theyre ready to bring real change and real progress to all Bahamians, Mr Roberts said. Speaking at the PLPs job creation and empowerment summit on Wednesday, Mr Roberts said Bahamians are facing perhaps the most dif ficult and perplexing time since independence especially in terms of the high level of unemployment and underemployment. There are very few things that are more demoralising than being unemployed, he said. The FNM government loves to talk about the global economic crisis, and theres no question that hard economic times elsewhere have an impact on the Bahamas. But the real truth is, FNM policies have made this recession much worse for the Bahamas. The record will show that this government has always chosen to put pol itics first, never Bahamians. In fact, one of the first things the FNM did when it came to power was cancel legitimate contracts executed by Perry Christies government, resulting in far too many jobs delayed and deferred and lost forever. Jobs that families were counting on gone, because of petty politics, Mr Roberts said. He said the partys new candidates understand this and the other challenges facing the country, and are ready to fight the good fight. B y DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Murder a ccused Simon Simeon told t he Supreme Court he did not shoot Sylvanus Strachan, a nd denied telling police that h e had. After Senior Justice Hartman Longley told Simeon he could testify, remain silent, or give an unsworn statement, Simeon decided to give sworn evidence from the wit-n ess stand on Wednesday. D efence Attorney Mario G rey is representing Simeon. Before the defence opened i ts case, Prosecutors made an application for an amendment to the murder indictm ent, changing the date of t he incident from December 2 1, 2008 to December 29, 2 008. I t is alleged that Simeon shot 31-year-old Sylvanus S trachan at the Lodge Hall o n East Sunrise Highway. After having a few drinks a t a bar in Hawksbill, Simeon said, he contacted his friend Nigel to borrow some m oney. Nigel told me he was at a party and to come for it, he r ecalled. S imeon said he drove to the party at the Lodge Hall w ith his girlfriend, Lakita G ardiner, and two other male friends. A fter getting the money from Nigel, they all wenti nside for drinks, he said. Simeon said he was standi ng outside talking with his friend, but his girlfriend w anted to leave so he did not s tay long. The accused said he was at the party about 30 minutes. Did anything happen at t he party? Mr Grey asked. No, sir, he replied. Simeon, who lives in H awksbill, said after leaving home with his uncle on January 21, 2009, he was arrested by police. He said Sgt Darrell Rolle told him of his right to remain silent and asked himw hy he hadnt turned hims elf in. S imeon said he told Sgt Rolle that he did not turn himself in, because he didnt know he was wanted. The accused said he was very familiar with Sgt Rolle because the officer knew hisf amily well. He said Sgt Rolle allowed him to make a phone call to his aunt, who contacted a l awyer. Simeon told the court Sgt R olle took out a piece of paper and started writing on it. He told me to tell him what happened and he will see what he can do, he recalled. S imeon said Sgt Rolle told him everything would be finea nd told him to sign the statement. S imeon who was expelled from high school in the ninth grade said he cannot read, but trusted Sgt Rolle ands igned the document. According to Sgt Rolles testimony, Simeon gave thes tatement freely. He said the accused told him Strachan rushed at himw ith a knife and he pulled a gun from his waist and fired to scare him. S imeon said he saw his a ttorney the following day during an ID parade, when he was picked out as the gunman. During cross-examination, p rosecutor Erica Kemp asked Simeon if he and his girlfriend send text messages to each other. Simeon said he could not recall. She told this court that y ou text her and she text y ou, Ms Kemp said. You c an read and write and you signed a statement. She also asked him what time they arrived at the party. Although his girlfriend testified that they arrived between nine and 10pm,S imeon said he arrived at almost 11pm. Mrs Kemp asked Simeon if he saw someone grilling at t he party. He said Phillip Rolle, also known as Booga-l ou, was at the grill. Mrs Kemp suggested that Strachan and Simeon had ane xchange of words at the party. Boogalou tried to diffuse the situation. He got a good l ook at you. I am putting it to you that y ou saw Strachan go to a van and retrieve something from u nder the seat and put it in his shirt. Strachan was standing behind the grill. You were standing in front ofB oogalou and you pointed the gun at Strachan and fired, Ms Kemp said. S imeon disagreed with her assertions. The trial continues. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 5 B y CARA BRENNENB ETHEL cbrennen@tribunemedia.net P LP chairman Bradley R oberts unveiled his partys p lans for a rebuilding and support programme for business es affected by government r oad works and a massive housing development onA ndros to ensure more B ahamians have access to a ffordable real estate. These were just two of many initiatives the party dis c ussed on the first day of its three-part job creation and empowerment summit. Mr Roberts said the busi n ess rebuilding and support programme could include tax holidays and rebuilding incen tives for those whose liveli hood was affected by the New Providence Road Improve-m ent Project. Why should some businesses bear such a dispropor tionate burden? They deserve a chance to rebuild, to get back on their feet. What is amazing is that after all the pain and suffering Bahamians have endured dur-i ng these road works, taxpayers will have to bear cost overruns that total $25 million and g rowing, on an initial contract o f $120 million, he said. Mr Roberts also used the stage to hit out at the govern-i ng party, accusing the FNM of summarily dismissing longstanding Customs, Immigrat ion and Police officers jobs t hat families were relying on. They raised taxes on everything that moves, and s ome things that dont, like the Bible. They have presided over m assive mismanagement of p ublic funds. And theyve run up the national debt while forgetting the most importantt hing you, he said. Mr Roberts added that more must be done to ensure t hat young Bahamians have access to affordable real estate, which is why a PLP government would make C rown land available in Andros. Andros Island, the Big Yard, the largest land mass closest to New Providence,h as a sizable Crown land bank, which can be made available for the creation of a n ew city and extended housi ng. The natural resource of potable water is definitely nota n issue, as it is currently available nearly everywhere on Andros. The PLP will cause the d evelopment of a minimum of one-third acre lots on Andros. These subdivisions w ill be supported by commer cial centres, post offices, clinics, police stations, banks, ands chools. The guidelines for the grant of Crown land to qualified Bahamians and the timef rame for building homes will be clearly defined for efficient and regulatory progress. A low cost, scheduled fast ferry service will be intro duced to allow persons who embrace the offer to go to and f ro between New Providence and Andros with ease, Mr Roberts said. ROBERTS HAILS PLPS EXTRAORDINARY NEW GENERA TION OF C ANDIDATES BRADLEY ROBERTS PLP CHAIRMAN INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays MURDER ACCUSED DENIES TELLING POLICE HE SHOT STRACHAN PLP UNVEILS PROGRAMME TO HELP BUSINESSES AFFECTED BY ROAD WORKS, DEVELOPMENT T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f R OADWORKS WOES: P LP chairman Bradley Roberts unveiled his partys plans for a rebuilding and support programme for businesses affected by government road works (above COURT NEWS Simeon decides to give sworn evidence on stand

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 2 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 4 2 4 2 V]VScReZ`_ 4 V]VScReZ`_ 4 :LWKDOO-RKQVWRUHVSDUWLFLSDWLQJGRQWPLVVRXWRQ\RXUFKDQFH IRUKXJHVWRUHZLGHVDYLQJVRQDOO)RRWZHDU%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV LQFOXGLQJ RPHQVDQG&KLOGUHQVKRHV bIIDOO&ODUNVDQGLPEHUODQGUR:RUN%RRWV $OO%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV $OO)DVKLRQ-HZHOU\ 3/86HOHFWHGW\OHVDUNHG'RZQ%\b $QGGRQWIRUJHWZLWKHYHU\SXUFKDVH<28KDYHDFKDQFHWR *UDQGUL]H*LIW&HUWLFDWH $//$/(6$5( 12(;&+$1*(6()81'6 12/$<$:$<6 -2+1 6+2(6$1'$&&(6625,(6 526(77$ 526(77$ &$50,&+$(/ '& '& 2 '& 2 '& 4 '& 4 2 4 2 2 eY 2 '& eY '& 2 '& 2 eY 2 &RPHDQGFHOHEUDWHRXUWK$QQLYHUVDU\E\MRLQLQJXVIRUD 6725(:,'($/( 6HSWHPEHUWKFWREHUVW By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net AN electronics store located downtown was robbed by an armed man in broad daylight two buildings across from a police sta-t ion Tuesday afternoon. T he QBC Radio Shack, located on East Street north off Bay Street and seconds from the Central Police Station, had an undisclosed amount of cash and goods stolen from its store. The store manager spoke to The Tribune about the incident which occurred in her absence. S he said: A gentleman robbed the store of some cash and goods. W e dont know how much it was but its just mind boggling right now. S he said that the cashier, who w as seriously shaken up after being held up at gunpoint was assisting police officers with thei nvestigation in the matter. S he said she was in shock that an armed robbery occurred and in broad daylight. However, she was relieved that no one was physically hurt. O fficer in charge of the Central P olice Station, assistant Supt Leon B ethel, confirmed the store managers account. It happened shortly after noon, he said. A man entered the store and made inquiries about a BlackBerry cell phone. As hew as being handed the cellphone, he produced what appeared to be a handgun and demanded cash from the lone female cashier. ASP Bethel said that the armed robber made off with an undetermined amount of cash and a cell p hone. When asked about the officers patrolling the area at the time, he s aid: No police who were patrolling the area at the time reported to seeing anything suspic ious. H e explained that a number of o fficers were stationed at the S upreme Court at the time of the i ncident. N evertheless, he said police are continuing their investigations and will be looking at interviewing other persons who were in the area when the incident occurred. STORE ROBBED ACROSS FROM POLICE STATION POPULAR ELECTRONICS OUTLET HELD UP IN BROAD DAYLIGHT By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Hotel workers at the Grand Lucayan Resort walked off the job on Wednesday as two large tour buses of travel agents were on property for a Fam Trip hosted by Vision Airlines. As workers assembled in front of Manor House around noon to meet with union officials, police were called in to disperse the group. Hubert Saunders, treasurer at the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers, said workers had assembled in the area for a peaceful meeting on the property. The union executive said management is proposing to make a number of workers r edundant at the resort. Mr Saunders claims that the move is an attempt by management to rehire the workers as casual labourers. This would mean that they would not be entitled to any benefits undert he industrial agreement. He said the jobs of hundreds o f line staff workers will be affected in various areas, including Food & Beverage, Engineering, Spa, Housekeeping and Laundry. Last Monday, we met with management relating to some workers who they are trying to make redundant, and their position is that those persons will be going home, Mr Saun ders told The Tribune. Hotel officials could not be contacted for comments up to press time on Wednesday e vening. In March, some 200 hotel workers were laid off at the hotel in Lucaya. Management said the terminations were necessary to keep the hotel open and save the jobs of about 800w orkers. The hotel had been experie ncing low occupancy at the time. Hutchison Lucaya, the hotel operators, have been trying to drum up business investing a lot of money to promote the property. The Grand Lucayan Hotel and Vision Airlines have entered into a contract to start air service to the island from five major US cities on November 3. The hotel is hosting some 80 travel agents from Raleigh, North Carolina, that arrived o n the island on Tuesday aboard Vision Airlines. It is the first of five planned Fam Trips to Grand Bahama. Workers who walked off the job on Wednesday were told by management not to returnt o work. Mr Saunders said: They are n ot allowing persons who came to the meeting back to work. We tried to speak with management to ask why these workers are not being allowed back to work, but they refuse to meet with us. The union executive said the union has a right to meet with workers on the property. We are opposed to the redundancy of more workers. Right now, they (management are trying to make all areas redundant and so we are looking at some 500 employees, but they want to bring them back as casual workers. We want to make sure that doesnt happen, Mr Saunders said. The union official said casual workers are working five and six days compared to permanent workers who are only working one and two days. That is a major concern, and workers are also upset because they have learned they will not be getting a Christmas bonus and ham and turkey from the company this December, Mr Saunders said. Mr Saunders noted that hairstylists working in the Spa have been told that they can rent booths at the resort. Sandra Rollings, a hairstylist employed eight years at the resort, was one of the workers not allowed back to work. The thing about is that I didnt apply for this job, they came looking for me, and I closed my business to come work for them. We want to be treated fairly and with respect. I have been employed here for eight years and they do not abide by the contract. They dont give workers sufficient notice, she said. Mr Rollings said workers in the spa work above and beyond when providing service to visitors and customers. Mr Saunders said the union will file a labour dispute with the Department of Labour on Monday. He claims that employers are taking advantage of work ers in the downturn economy. There is no job security for workers on Grand Bahama and statements have been made that there is no work here so Grand Bahamians would do anything to work, he said. GRAND L UCAYAN WORKERS WALK OFF JOB D ARING: T he store front window of the QBC Radio Shack, located on East Street north off Bay Street and seconds from the Central Police Station. The store was robbed of an undisclosed amount of cash and goods. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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marked by the Bahamas government for the project, Ambassador Hu said theye xpect work to begin on the core part of the project on N ovember 1 of this year. D uring his exclusive interview with The Tribune at his residence on the EasternR oad, Ambassador Hu stressed the importance of the development receiving the best possible qualityw orkmanship and being completed within its budgeted timeframe. However, he said he found it interest-i ng the view expressed by some Bahamians against the foreign labour component. Although he quickly remarked he would likewise be protective of the Bahamas if he were a Bahamian, Ambassador Hu s tressed the quicker the proj ect is completed, the sooner will the 8,000 post-construc tion Baha Mar jobs be made a vailable to the Bahamian people. He said: I think it is fully understandable. If I am a cit i zen of the Bahamas I would have the same view. But I believe we can explain to them (Bahamianst he earlier the project would be completed, the earlier would the new jobs be cre ated. I believe the Bahamian people will understand this, because none of the workers will remain in the Bahamas after completing t heir jobs. So, the faster the b etter. Pointing to the successful completion of the newN ational Stadium, Embassy staff highlighted the majori ty of the workers have already left the country, witho nly 10 still remaining to do minor work on the building. It was also confirmed the project utilized $10 millioni n locally-purchased materials. Ambassador Hu said the Chinese labourers do not want to remain in the Bahamas, citing the language barrier, cultural differences, and the high cost of living. H owever, if a Bahamian w oman were to marry one of the Chinese workers, he said he could not in all goodc onscience force the worker to leave the Bahamas. However, he joked about the possibility of such ane vent as it appeared that local girls did not fancy his fellow countrymen. The Embassy has also o rganised training programmes to bring new work ers up to speed on local laws and customs in an effort to encourage positive experiences with their Bahamian co-workers. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Majesty's Prison Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming yesterday. When the end of an inmate's sentence approaches, t he pre-release board meets w ith the convict to prepare him or her for life outside prison walls. "We have a pre-release unit with a number of behavioura djustment programmes. The p erson is exposed to anger m anagement, substance abuse counselling, family reunification, employment skills training to help put a person in the best possible position to successfully reintegrate but t hey don't target a particular c ategory of offender. Even if an offender exhibits serious psychosis, the prison has no other option but to release them once they have finished their sentence. D r Rahming said: "We h ave no alternative once his sentence is complete there's no alternative but to release the inmate." The penitentiary needs a full-time mental health unit to monitor and evaluate psyc hotic inmates while in prison and before they are released, he added. "One of the hopes that I have, and I know the ministerh as been talking about this, is the need to create a mental h ealth unit within Her M ajesty's Prison and I anticipate that in the not too distant future we would have it. "A mental health unit would cater to sociopaths, psychopathic needs of certaini nmates. C urrently, psychiatrists from the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre visit the prison once a week to see inmates who are referred to them. This places limitations on the level of mental care i nmates receive, Dr Rahming said. "We have visiting psychologists that come to the prison from Sandilands but the factt hat they are visiting speaks to their limitations." A s detectives were trying to piece together the last moments of Marcos l ife, the boys sister Tancia Humes said: Were trying, were really trying to hold on. My mom is holding up but just barely. M arco was last seen leaving his h ome on Brougham Street, off Baillou H ill Road, last Friday between 4pm to 6 pm. After going to a neighbourhood shop for a few items for his mom, Marco asked if he could use the change to purchase candy. At the time of his disappearance he w as wearing a Bob Marley T-shirt and long khaki pants. T he sixth grader enjoyed video games, watching television and children's movies, and sports. Two weeks ago, he joined a boxing club after saving up his lunch money. F or the next five days, his family tirelessly searched their community as they feared the worst. A hunt theyf eel was not taken seriously by authori ties and the public until it was too late. The Bain and Grants Town Associ a tion posted a $2,000 reward for information leading to the apprehension and conviction of anyone connected to the matter. Upon the discovery of Marcos body, C B Moss, the associations president, said he was most disturbed byt he sluggish response of the community at the onset of his disappearance. In the days leading up to his discovery, Mr Moss called for the com m unity to band together against p redators to ensure the incident did not become a trend. He claimed another young boy from t he area had been reported missing for one day, three weeks ago, and was found walking along the Cable Beach strip. Police were said to be investigating the child's abduction. "We are very determined in this c ommunity to see that this does not become a trend because there are lots of children who move around in the area, sometimes unaccompanied, and t hereby are very vulnerable," Mr Moss s aid. Marcos badly decomposed body was discovered in bushes to the rear ofa n apartment complex off Yorkshire Street, Cable Beach, around 10am Wednesday. According to Tribune sources, the chief suspect is 33 and had been jailed for a similar offence. It is understood the suspect lives in a n apartment complex near where Marcos body was found. Marcos case has renewed public outcry for a registered sex offenders' l ist. ted sentences. "I hear this talk about developing some register that is easy in a big place like the United States but if a register is developed in Nassau then the court sentence effectively becomes a life sentence. "It means I could never hope to get a job or life again even if I have changed," said Prison Superintendent Elliston Rahming yesterday. The minister responsible for Social Services, Loretta Butler-Turner, said she began groundwork for a sex offenders register in the beginning of her term but shelved the idea. "When I first became a minister I felt very strongly about the implementation of a sexual offenders register. She said she understands the outcry but added that the idea must not be seen as a "panacea" for preventing sex crimes. "But I think many countries are finding that once you identify these people (as sexual offenders) many times they are rejected everywhere they go, so what do you do? "I think we have to weigh the pros and cons before we drive this as a panacea." Crime activist Rodney Moncur said he supports a sex offenders register for con victed paedophiles. He said: "I'm more particularly interested in a sex register in cases of children who are victims. "Children are vulnerable, are innocent children can't give consent." Police discovered Marco's partially decomposed body Wednesday morning in bush-es in western New Providence. A well-place source in the RBPF said the boy's body showed signs of sexual a ssault. Marco disappeared from his in Brougham Street last Friday afternoon. His mother said he left home to buy candy from a nearby gas station and never returned. Three men are assisting p olice in their investigations. FROM page one O MORE THAN 4,000 CHINESE WORKERS IN BAHAMAS AT ONE TIME THREE STILL IN CUSTODY IN MARCO INVESTIGATION F ROM page one SEX OFFENDERS REGISTER WOULD PROTECT PUBLIC FROM page one VIOLENT OFFENDERS NOT GIVEN FINAL MENTAL EVALUATION BEFORE RELEASE FROM PRISON FROM page one HER MAJESTY'S PRISON Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune BusinessR eporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE fishing industry lost a bout $3 million in crawfish ing apparatus due to Hurricane Irene, the BahamasC ommercial Fishermens Alliance (BCFA Adrian LaRoda, told Tri bune Business yesterday. Mr LaRoda called the $3 million figure conservative, saying ie could in fact be much higher. Overall in the industry we could have lost about $3 million in traps and condos, and thats putting it conservatively, he said. We expect it to be much, much higher than that. Damages to fleet were minimal. Everyone came in port. There was some loss to dinghies, but most of the damage was to harvesting apparatus. Mr LaRoda told Tribune Business: What has happened is we have suffered a tremendous loss of fishing traps and condos. He said one trap can cost $120 to $200 to make, and some fishermen use thousands. Fishermen have had to basically absorb the loss. Some people are still trying to recover. We have just had to absorb the loss and try and get back to work as quickly as possible, he added: A lot of fishermen are now deeper in debt. These types of apparatus, the traps and condos, are uninsurable. In some instances that kind of loss can be worse than losing a boat. Some of the smaller fisherman have had to go back to the old way of diving and spearing. So far the majority of the boats have only been able to do one trip since Irene. By next week or the week after next, we will be able to tell what the harvest is like. Mr LaRoda said he was pleased the Government had reinstated some tax breaks for fishing equipment. Some concessions have been reinstated, and that has $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.50 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A LEADINGBahamian aviation executive yesterday accused successive governm ents of playing Russian R oulette with the industrys health and that of the w ider economy by failing to implement key structural reforms demanded for moret han a decade. Pointing out that civil avi ation employed an estimate d 4,000 persons between Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA the various airlines thats erved it and other airports, Captain Randy Butler, pres ident and chief executive of S ky Bahamas, said both PLP and FNM governments had lacked the politicalw ill to overhaul the sectors r egulatory and safety struc tures. Captain Butler, who is a lso the Democratic National Alliance (DNA date for North Andros and t he Berry Islands, agreed with many of the recom mendations contained in an Inter-American Develop m ent Bank (IDB revealed by Tribune Busi ness yesterday, suggested t he Bahamas failed to appreciate just how critical the sector was to tourism and Family Island development. With the threat of US authorities downgrading the Bahamas Category One status still hanging over it, according to the IDB, Captain Butler argued that the Government appeared not to understand the potential negative consequences for aviation, airlift from the US and tourism. This is unfortunately where I believe the Government does not understand it is playing Russian Roulette here, Captain Butler told Tribune Busi ness. I dont believe we have full appreciation of how connected it is, and how important it is. We cannot be building Baha Mar and not taking GOVT PLAYING RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH AVIATION Bahamian airline c hief and DNA candid ate questions if political will theret o safeguard 4 ,000-job sector Says problems in IDB r eport have existed for decade CAPTAIN RANDY BUTLER SEE page 4B CABLE EYES 20% RISE IN KEY COSTS By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE BAHAMASis aiming to invest just north of $15 million in capital expenditure this year, Tribune Business was told yesterday, the BISX-listed communications providera lso eyeing a 20 per cent increase yearover-year in major expense lines. B arry Williams, Cable Bahamas senior vice-president of finance, said that while signal (programming regulatory fees had increased, the company was also experiencing positive top-line growth, with revenuesf rom its newly-acquired Systems R esource Group (SRG now more than 5 per cent ahead of pre-purchase levels. With SRGs prepaid card services r elaunched after interconnection capacity issues with the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTCw ere resolved, Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas was also ramping up for the 2011 fourth quarter launch of its R EVOICE fixed-line product. M eanwhile, digital box rental revenues rose 68 per cent during Cable Bahamas second quarter, with the3 8,000 boxes in the programme up 305 per cent over Junes 2010 figure. Mr Williams attributed the increase t o a combination of Cable Bahamas ongoing digitisation initiative, which was not quite at 50 per cent of the network yet. Were seeing some trac-t ion there. Thats accounting for some o f the growth there, he said. The rest of its coming from some of our customers coming back to then etwork. Back in 2008-2009 we saw a significant drop off, so what weve been seeing is some of those cus-t omers coming back on as well. M r Williams said the return of existing subscribers was the main factor accounting for the box rental revenue growth. He added that Cable Bahamas was probably anywhere from 3,000-4,000 customers back fromo ur hey-day in terms of total subscriber numbers, which peaked at around 77,000-78,000. Pay-per-view revenues were up 32 per cent in the 2011 second quarter, and Mr Williams said the company was just getting back towards its 28,000 premium subscriber peak. Its total REVTV revenues rose 1.9 perc ent to $24 million during the three m onths to end-June, with Cable Bahamas Prime Select, Plus and Extra products seeing revenueg rowth of 11 per cent, 10 per cent and 13 per cent respectively. As for capital expenditure, Mr W illiams said the company should i nvest north of $15 million during the 12 months to the December 31 year-end. He added that Cable Bahamas always did an assessment at the third quarter end (that comes todayd etermine where it was on capital spending, and where it wanted to be by year-end. If Christmas promotions kick in for us in terms of stimulating demand for more set-top boxes and services, the $15 million figure might increase. Asked whether cost increases experienced during the 2011 second quarter and first half would carry over for the last six months, Mr Williamsr esponded: Unfortunately, I have to s ay yes. Some of the costs incurred are variable, but once incurred they stay with you. The rate of increase year-over-year is in the neighbourhood of 20 per centplus on signal costs. Theyre very sig-n ificant costs and, of course, commun ications and regulatory fees come right off the top line revenues. We did have an increase in revenues, and that translates into an increase in fees.W ere looking towards what looks like being a 20 per cent increase this year. Mr Williams told Tribune Business that the relaunch of its SRG sub-s idiarys prepaid card business in July had gone well, and was starting to pick back up and show somep romise. He added: The SRG addition has b een a very good one. Its a decent r evenue stream. Its ahead of the point w here we acquired the company. The SRG voice revenues are certainly doing very well. Theyre probably in excess of 5 per cent beyond where they were when we picked it Aiming to invest $15m in capital spending during 2011 Sees over 5% revenue rise in SRG streams post-purchase Capacity issues with BTC resolved SEE page 4B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE BAHAMASwas yest erday urged to develop a medium to long-term plan to address its infrastructuren eeds that would take the politics out of it, a leading KPMG (Bahamas a dding that such projects could be pitched on a regional basis. With the Caribbean cur r ently having an estimated $20 billion in infrastructure needs, Simon Townend, a KPMG (Bahamas a nd managing director of its KPMG Corporate Finance arm, said that to attract the right private sector partners a nd financing it needed to gain scale and market itself as a region rather than ac ollection of small island states. Speaking to Tribune Busin ess about the main findings resulting from KPMGs Miami conference on the Caribbeans infrastructure challenge, held last week, Mr T ownend said: The major one was that no one has a proper long-term infrastruc BAHAMAS URGED: DEVELOP -YEAR PLUS STRATEGY ON INFRASTRUCTURE KPMG executive says move would tak e the politics out of it Summit urges scale and marketing Caribbeans $20bn needs as one to attract top bidders SEE page 4B SIMON T OWNEND B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net BUSINESS o wners impacted by the ongoing New Provi dence Road Improvement Project yesterday said revenues still r emain off by sometimes more than 50 per cent, with no r elief in sight for what has become a living nightmare. ROADWORKS REMAIN LIVING NIGHTMARE One f ir s average tsake drops from $7,000-$10,000 to $300-$400 Super V alue estimates losses to date at $2m SEE page 5B FISHERMEN FEAR $3M TRAP LOSSES SEE page 5B

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BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 3B B y SIMON COOPER Res Socius Every generation produces its own examples of g enius or, if you like, peop le who transcend collect ive thinking and move goalposts. These geniuses are often a thorn in the side of established interests, because they dare to challenge the status quo. The great business succ esses of recent decades a re the product of these e xceptional people, and we should all learn from them. Steve Jobs, the former c hief executive of Apple C omputer, will go down in history on account of his a bility to tilt at windmills a nd knock down rows of c orporate skittles. But are his ideas relevant to thes leepy business culture of t he Bahamas, where some wish that things might never change? These are some of the great mans thoughts to ponder. Business is a blend of a rt and science. In other words, a business college t extbook can never get y ou there completely. Succ ess is the child of creativity, not cold reason. Do not listen too caref ully to what other people s ay, for if you do then you will remain inside a pack of average people. Their rules ought not to be your master. Fear of failure is the w orlds greatest inhibitor, f or it both prevents us f rom daring and creates a self-fulfilling expectation that we could fail. Banish the word from your vocabulary forever. The way forward is never more than a trail t hrough a jungle of uncert ainty towards a sketch plan for the future. If you want a roadmap, then fol-l ow behind the rest and discover nothing new. Listen to the voice in y our own head. If it tells you that you are on the right track, obey it. All other voices lack your v ision, or might even pref er for you to fail. Expect a scary amount from yourself and from all others close to you. Fortune favours the bold, but it demands hard work, too. T en per cent inspiration a nd ninety per cent pers piration are about the right mix. Worry about succeeding, not being right, because being right involves following rules, and rules constrain us. The i mportant thing in golf is s coring birdies, not matching somebody elses perfect swing. Surround yourself with exceptional people, and never be scared of crea ting your own competition. This includes having the grace to move elsewhere when the day a rrives. Make sure you remain hungry for success by always moving your own goalposts, and never catch yourself thinking entirely logically. Thinking fooli shly in other peoples t erms is a pre-requisite for i nvention. The circle is incomplete and anything is possible in terms of groundbreaking brilliance and the extent of our determination, too. There are no b oxes to think outside. Ive been tracking the success of emergingn ations such as Brazil, India and Korea lately. They seem to be able to achieve spectacular g rowth, while others like a certain Caribbean nation remain trapped in a paradigm where the future is b ack-fitted into the past. I w onder what Steve Jobs would say if we appointed him chief executive of the Bahamas for the time that he may have left. I suspect that many things would have to c hange, including upendi ng a few of our overfed h oly cows? NB: Res Socius was founded by Simon Cooper in 2009, and is a business brokerage authorised by the Bahamas Investment Authority. He has extens ive private and public S ME experience, and was formerly chief executive ofa publicly traded investm ent company. He was awarded an MBA with distinction by Liverpool University in 2005. Contact h im on 636-8831 or write to simon.cooper@ressocius.com. REMOVING SACRED COWS A REAL JOBS SIMONCOOPER By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business R eporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Agriculture a nd Marine Resources, Larry Cartwright, told Tribune Business yesterday that the Government was presentlyv erifying its figures to determ ine how much Hurricane Irene has cost the Bahamian farming industry. M r Cartwright told Tribune Business: "Reports from the agricultural sector are still being processed. We haven'tc ome up with a final figure as yet. We are just going over the reports and verifying what wer eceived. We were gunning for October 5 when Parliament reopens to have it ready fort hen. We are still hoping to have it ready for then, but it is kind of doubtful right now. Certainly, within the next week, we will have a final report for the media." Mr Cartwright told Tribune Business that any assistancer endered by the Government to Bahamian farmers would be influenced by what thef inal figure look like. "We haven't finalised what will happen this go around because that's going tod epend on what the final figu re looks like. In the past we have cate gorised our farmers in three c ategories; small, medium and large farmers, Mr Cartwright said. In the past those farmers who suffered damage wouldh ave received $500 for the small farmers, $1,000 for the medium and $1,500 for the large farmers. Then they would have been given some fertilizer and some seeds, again based on the size of their farms, andi f they had lost fruit trees we would have provided some fruit trees as well. The fruitt ree program will probably be continued this time around. Many of the Bahamas f armers previously contacted b y Tribune Business reported major devastation to their farms, with farmers on theh ardest-hit Family Islands losing entire crops, particu larly citrus crops. GOVT STILL ASSESSING AGRICULTURE DAMAGE COMMONWEALTHBrewery suffered an almost 20 per cent decline in net income for the 2011 first half, its financials have revealed, with the drop from $9.515 million to $7.677 m illion driven largely by top-line slippage. T he liquor wholesaler/distributor saw revenues for the six months to June 30 fall by just 1 .1 per cent, from $55.609 million to $54.977 m illion, but the major drop was in the other i ncome category. This fell from $1.494 million to $59,095 year-over-year. As a consequence, total income dropped 3.6 p er cent to $55.036 million, compared to $57.103 million last year. This negated a slight decline in total expenses, which fell from $47.842 million in 2010 to $47.388 million.s B alance sheet cash fell by more than $10 million since the 2010 year-end, which may have been linked to the $17.653 million dividend paid before the companys initial publico ffering (IPO Some $11 million of that sum was paid on March 4, 2011, and the $6 million balance on April 4 the latter coming after the secondq uarter start. Both payments took place during the 2011 first half. Brewery sees 20 per cent profit fall L ARRY C ARTWRIGHT NEW YORK Associated Press OIL REBOUNDED Thursday following encouraging economic news in the U.S. and Europe. The Commerce Department said the U.S. economy grew a little faster in the spring than previously estimated, while the Labor Department said that the number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell sharply last week. Meanwhile, German lawmakers took a major step toward dealing with the region's debt crisis by strengthening a bailout fund. That eased worries that Europe's debt problems could spread and lead to another reces sion. Benchmark crude rose 93 cents to end the day at $82.14 per barrel in New York. Brent crude, which is used to price oil that's pro duced overseas, was 14 cents higher to finish at $103.95 a barrel in London. Thursday's rise continues the roller coaster ride for oil prices this month. Oil tumbled 8 percent from Wednesday to Friday last week, then rebounded 6 percent by Tuesday, then fell nearly 4 percent on Wednesday. Tepid economic growth in the U.S. and other major world economies has forced experts to backtrack on demand forecasts for this year. As concerns of another recession crept into energy markets, traders stayed focused on the European debt crisis and government reports on the state of the U.S. econ omy. "The fear factor has simply gone up," independent oil analyst Jim Ritterbusch said. "I've never seen volatility like this, and I've been watching oil for 28 years." An extended rise or drop in oil will eventually affect gasoline prices. So far, oil hasn't moved by much, wavering between about $80 and $90 a barrel for the past two months. In other energy trading, natural gas futures fell 5.2 cents to finish at $3.747 per 1,000 cubic feet. The government reported that the nation's natural gas supplies last week rose more than analysts expected. Heating oil was unchanged to finish at $2.8266 per gallon and gasoline futures lost 1.67 cents to end at $2.5586 per gallon. Oil r ebounds on encouraging economic ne ws

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Theres these [party elect ion] manifestos that say do this, do that in the next five years, but I dont think a single Caribbean countryhas a five-year plus plan. T here was no future set of l onger-term strategies. Caribbean ministers who attended the conference, among them Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, and Vincent Van-d erpool-Wallace, minister of t ourism and aviation, came to the consensus that this was the key issue. While many felt that constantly changing governments at every election w ould either prevent or u ndermine development of such a plan, as different administrations had different priorities, Mr Townend pointed out that the UK hadm anaged to create a fiveyear infrastructure plan ande stablish an infrastructure d evelopment group within government. I think for the Bahamas i t is a matter of giving some thought to a longer-term plan as a whole, Mr Townend told Tribune Business. What are the requirements today, what are they likely t o be in x years time. A cknowledging that it was a bit more difficult for the Bahamas, given that ith ad numerous inhabited islands, unlike other Caribbean states with justo ne territory, Mr Townend s aid the conference threw up the example of a Bahamian island with a 50strong population that had just receive a $13 million generator. The economics are not there, but it is critical to have a plan focused on all key areas, not just physical infrastructure but social infrastructure, he added, p ointing to the need to u pgrade schools hospitals, medical clinics and the prison. W ith an estimated $2-$2.1 b illion in infrastructure needs, the senior KPMG executive said, the Bahamas needed to take a strategic look at everything rathert han a piecemeal approach. Thats the main thing for the Bahamas. Thats not to say the Government is not prioritising the right things the airport, the port and the r oads. T he Miami conference had shown Caribbean nations faced similar infrastructure issues, one country facing exactly the same problem in that its containers hipping facilities were in l ocated in the heart of its main citys downtown. It wanted to relocate them, but moving all thec ompanies at once was provi ng a challenge, especially as the government there did n ot own all the land earm arked for their new home. A s a result, they were intere sted in the private-public partnership (PPP B ahamas had established to facilitate creation of the $70$ 80 million Arawak Cay p ort. Most people were look i ng at the Bahamas and thinking: Those guys are a step ahead of us. Whats happening in the Bahamas and how are they makingt hat happen? There were lots of favourable comments i n our general direction, M r Townend said of the Miami conference reaction. He added that one discussion had noted a lot of c ourage was required to develop a long-term infra structure plan and try to get a ll stakeholders on board. Pleasing everyone was viewed as an impossible utopia, given that there were a lot of vested interests that did not want ac hange in the status quo. You have to be coura geous and do what is right for the broader population, Mr Townend said of thec onferences conclusion. Referring again to the need for a medium to longterm infrastructure plan for the Bahamas, the KPMG executive added I can see it b eing adjusted from time to t ime, but generally if you take the politics out of it and look at the raw realities, I think we can come up with a plan. While the main Bahamia n political parties were l ikely to have different priorities, Mr Townend said they were likely to identify the same infrastructuren eeds. A nother key conference finding was the need to mark et the Caribbean as a w hole from an infrastructure p roject and development o pportunity, since as individual states its nations m ight not be attractive to private companies and f inanciers. C ompared to similar projects in the likes of Canada a nd the US, individual states such as Barbados were small beer in the scheme of things. Getting the right companies with expertise andf inancing has been difficult, Mr Townend told Tribune B usiness. Theres kind of a lack of scale on an individual basis. One of the things that also came out of it is that the Caribbean as a w hole needs to market its infrastructure requirements more effectively as a whole. Rather than the Bahamas say it has this project, that project, expand on w hat youre doing to bring out the whole regional basis. Attract them on a regionalr ather than a country basis. I ts a much larger opportu nity, and people were sayinsg: Lets develop a Caribbean strategy. Financing is not that easy. Youve got the regional banks, but for anything of substantial scale, the options are not huge and there are only a couple of places to go to. Its all about scale; scale of the opportunity. A gain advocating that PPPs were the way to go in dealing with the Bahamas infrastructure challenges, especially given the fiscal situation, Mr Townend said: When you look at places like Barbados with debt at1 00 per cent of GDP, were much better off, but theres still a lot of debt and its beyond the comfort zone of most Bahamians. BAHAMAS URGED: DEVELOP -YEAR PLUS STRATEGY ON INFRASTRUCTURE FROM page one care of the aviation sector that supports it. We cannot be expanding Atlantis and nott aking care of the aviation sector. We cannot talk about Family Island development. That does not make sense. If the Government does not understand the importance that aviation plays in d evelopment of this country and the Family Islands, we will have problems. Theyren ot planning for growth and t he expansion of the sector. You cant build hotels if there are no airports to bring them to. Noting that the IDB had identified the replacement ofL PIAs radar system as a pri ority for its proposed $50 million loan initiative, CaptainB utler said: I guess the IDB is as frustrated about this as I am....... The radar situation has been going from C A Smiths time through to Glenys Hanna-Martins time to now. The Sky Bahamas chief added that he understood the problems stemmed from the fact the radar system did not match the software acquired for it. Huge sums had already been spent in a bid to fix the problem, but to no avail, and Captain Butler said it was thanks to God that the air traffic controllers were doinga good job manually in directing air traffic when the radar system went down. They need upgraded equipment, hardware, software and training, all of those t hings, and its not been hap pening, he added. Its been identified, identified and identified. In the ICAO audit, t hey found the greatest fail ing was in the air traffic system. T he political aspirant warned that without the proper laws, regulations ands tructure for the aviation industry in place, the IDBs $50 million loan program would fail. Such reforms couldb e achieved at a stroke of a pen, Captain Butler said, but he added: The Government l acks the political will to fix it. Its been around a long time. U ntil civil aviation reforms appeared on the Parliamentary or Cabinet agendas, he said: No $50 million is going to start to solve the problem. Im not hopeful at all. There was a Green Paper and White Paper in the past as well. It all comes down to political will. These problems have been identified internally by us when I was at Civil Aviation, by consultants brought in by the Government, theyve been identified by IATA [International Air Transport Association], theyve been identified by ICAO, by the FAA, by the TSA, by the ICAO in the last 10 years. Nothing has been done by either government f or 10 years. Captain Butler backed the recommendations in the IDB p lan, especially getting pri vate sector management and capital involved with Family Island airports, and making t he Airport Authority autonomous from government, as excellent and one I ve been calling for for a long time. He added that the Airport A uthority should ultimately take over the operational responsibilities currently performed by Civil Aviation,l eaving the latter with regu latory oversight responsibility for the industry. N oting that upgrading Fam ily Island airports to interna tional standards would cost a m ulti-million dollar sum, Cap tain Butler suggested that, in Biminis case for example, management of its airport should be taken over by the Bimini Bay Resort. He that the number of international airports in the Family Islands should also be reduced. Captain Butler said Eleuthera and Abaco, for instance, should have just one, rather than the current two or three. The others should be transformed into domestic feeder airports, in a bid to conserve resources. Captain Butler also repeated his call for a long-term strategic plan to develop the aviation sector. FROM page one GOVT PLAYING RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH AVIATION u p. At the time we acquired it, it had no prepaid revenues. That business was put on hold because of an issue with capacity with BTC, which was sorted out. Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas did not anticipate a huge take-up of its new fixedline service, named REVOICE, until 2012 because the company was late getting that product out. Its still on for this quarter, the fourth quart er, and will be a good addition to the SRG services out there, he added of REVOICE. Its going to ramp up in the fourth quarter, when youre going to see it getting out to the public. Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas had a g ood idea of the level of damages/repairs it h ad incurred as a result of Hurricane Irene, but w as still doing its final assessments. We are going to suffer some loss, a bit in New Providence, but more in the Family Islands, he added. Eleuthera was one of them sain ones hit, and the off-air services we offer in the Family Islands had some damage and services out. Were mostly restored, but are working through some painful issues and smaller issuesw ith customers. Were hoping to be done with t hose in the next couple of weeks. FROM page one CABLE EYES 20% RISE IN KEY COSTS

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BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 5B %$+$0$6%/,& 6(59,&(6,21 $11281&(0(17 *RYHUQPHQW7UDLQLQJ&HQWUH +DVK +RWHO&RUSRUDWLRQ ,QWHUQDOHFXULW\ 0DEOH:DONHUULPDU\ 0LQLVWU\RI(GXFDWLRQ 0 LQLVWU\RI/DERXU 0LQLVWU\RI:RUNV 0LQLVWU\RI
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BERLIN A ssociated Press GERMANYhas kept alive hopes that the 17-nation euro currency can survive the sprawling debt crisis when l awmakers in Europe's largest economy voted overwhelmingly in favor of expanding the powers of the eurozone's bailout fund. T hursday's vote strengthened Chancellor Angela Merkel's center-right coali t ion, which had struggled to win support from a bloc of rebellious members, and could bolster her ability ton egotiate new European cris is measures. While many investors and experts believe new steps will be required in Europe, such as letting Greece write off more of its debt pile, Ger many's approval of the f und's new powers and scope w as necessary to avoid a new bout of massive market tur moil. "The support of the Bun destag is an important step for stabilizing the eurozone," Michael Kemmer, head of Germany's Bank Federation, told the news agency dapd. "With that, they have set a course that leads out of the debt crisis." The 440 billion ($600 billion) fund will be able to buy government bonds and lend money to banks and governments before they are in a full-blown crisis, making Europe's response to mar ket jitters more rapid and p re-emptive. Germany, which pays the lion's share of European bailouts, became the 13th member of the eurozone tos upport the expansion of the rescue fund, the so-called European Financial StabilityF acility, or EFSF. Cyprus and Estonia also passed the proposed expansion on Thursday. A ustria's parliament is w idely expected to pass the measure on Friday, the same day Germany's upper house of parliament is set to finalize Thursday's vote, while the Netherlands is expected to approve it in the first week ofO ctober. T he biggest remaining hur dle is the final country to vote Slovakia where the government will not have enough support to pass it if the leader of the junior coali tion Freedom and Solidari ty party follows through with threats to vote against the fund's expansion. Its parlia ment is to vote later in October. In Berlin, 523 lawmakers in parliament, the Bundestag, voted in favor of expanding German participation to guarantee loans of up to 211 billion, compared with 123 billion so far. Eighty-five voted against i t and three abstained. "It was a strong statement of Angela Merkel's position. She has the backing and the support of the coalition ands he is able to negotiate on the European level," Peter Altmeier, the parliamentaryw hip for Merkel's Christian Democrats, said after the tally was announced. Markets appeared calmer e ven before Thursday's v otes, following weeks of tur bulence triggered by uncertainty over Germany's position on the fund. The euro also traded slightly higher. "The overwhelming majority in the Bundestag isa good sign and will hopefull y mark a step change in Ger man commitment to bring ing the spiraling crisis under control," said Sony Kapoor of the Re-Define economic policy think tank. The lingering problem, however, is that investors are resigned to the fact that Greece will have to default that is, impose tougher losses on its bondholders. French President Nicolas Sarkozy will meet with Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou in Paris on Friday to discuss the debt crisis, the president's office said. Papandreou met Germany's Merkel for similar talks Tuesday. Germany and France combined represent about half of the 17-nation eurozone's economic output. Greece was saved from default by an initial 110 billion ($150 billion May last year before the EFSF was established to help any other countries in trou ble. A planned second rescue package for Greece this year includes a voluntary partici pation by private bondholders, who agreed to write off about 20 percent on their Greek debt holdings. Many experts say those writedowns should be closer to 50 percent. The debate among European leaders now is whether to allow such a move under controlled conditions, pro viding help to banks that may take heavy losses on Greek bonds they hold. Germany and the Nether lands are open to the option, with Merkel suggesting this week that Greece's second bailout deal might have to be renegotiated. France and the European Central Bank, however, oppose the idea. Greece's international debt inspectors returned to Athens on Thursday to complete a review. Merkel has said that any new decisions would depend upon the results of the i nspectors' report, which is not due for days. Forging consensus over new measures particularly something as delicate asi mposing more severe losses on Greece's creditors will likely be very difficult, how e ver. Indeed, the parliamentary debate on the EFSF in Berlin on Thursday was a feistyt hree-hour long affair, r eflecting how high tensions in Merkel's coalition were running over the idea of providing more backing to the eurozone's weakest members. Frank Schaeffler, a diss enter from the junior coalit ion partner, argued that bailout measures have wors ened Greece's economic situation. "Despite all arguments, the first bailout did not make the situation for Greece bet ter, but worse," said Schaeffler, a Free Democrat. "Expanding the fund will make the situation even worse." Schaeffler and others had long expressed their concerns, and opposition leaders had said going in to the vote that if Merkel's coalition had to rely on their votes, it would be a sign that her strife-prone and increasingly unpopular government is finished. Yet after a night of intense lobbying, Merkel's camp was able to secure a majority of 315 enough to have passed the measure even without support from the opposition parties. "This shows the clear determination of the coali tion on this issue," Rainer Bruederle, the Free Democrats' parliamentary leader. "We have made an impor tant decision for Europe." Any future changes to the current fund will also require parliamentary approval and maintaining that determination will be crucial to making swift, effective decisions to combat the crisis. In addition, the Bundestag will face another major vote early next year on the fund's permanent replacement, the European Stability Mechanism, which is due to take effect in 2013. Schaeffler has already vowed to rally his party to reject the ESM. Party leaders insist they are not worried by Schaeffler's plans, but many analysts have noted Merkel will have to hold her majority together, or Thursday may have only been the first in a series of nail-biting parliamentary showdowns over shoring up the euro. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 127,&( .81'(5$+2/',1*6/7' ,192/817$5
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takeover. While the valuation attributed to City Markets head office is helping to keep the Bahamas Supermarkets Profit Sharing Retirement Scheme solvent, it is an illiquid asset. Without regular revenues coming in from both leases, every time a qualifying employee is paid out, the funds pool is that bit more depleted. Tribune Business is not suggesting that plan benefi ciaries are in any immediate danger of seeing their investment evaporate, and Mr Finlayson has pledged to do what it takes to put matters right. This newspaper, though, was somewhat disappointed to see that for the moment, himself and City Markets chief financial officer Philip Kemp are the pension plan trustees, Mr Finlayson having told us earlier that those serving in those posts would be independent of the company. REGULATION The Securities Commission appears to be attempting to explain away why it has been unable to force City Markets to comply with the Securities Industry Act on holding annual general meetings (AGMs material, accurate financial information. Although it sought to pin blame on the inadequate legislation supporting it (and it is inadequate), the regulators statement merely illustrated how impotent it is to enforce compliance with even the most basic capital require ments. Thankfully, the new Securities Industry Act should have much more teeth and enforcement clout, yet it remains to be seen whether the Securities Commission will have the will to really implement it effectively. Its Wednesday statement sent a shocking message to the Bahamian capital markets, namely that offenders can currently expect to get only a slap on the wrist if caught and the latter is unlikely. Again, the AGM and timely disclosure of financial information issues largely took place under the former BSL Holdings ownership, but the fact they have been allowed to fester for so long can only undermine investor and issuer confidence in the probity of the Bahamian cap ital markets. The companys response, that it has more important things to concentrate on than spending $100,000 on an AGM and that shareholders already know everything that is going on, is an understand able but glib statement. As a public company it knows it has certain disclosure, fiduciary and corporate governance requirements to abide by, and cannot run away from them. City Markets investors have been on a rollercoaster ride for the past four years, and have suffered a spectac ular destruction of shareholder value under BSL Holdings. Whether the same will happen under Mr Finlaysons team remains to be seen, but there has been no improvement so far. The least they deserve, after such wealth loss, is some honesty and disclosure as to where the company is, and an opportunity to question management. If this does not happen it will be a terrible indictment on the Bahamian capital markets. l ic statements. There is cert ainly a recognition in Ingraham administration circles that something needs to be done about the national debt,and returning it to manageable levels, but no sign of ac redible plan at least yet o n how to achieve this goal. First, we must admit we have a problem and stop pretending that everything will work itself out as soon as theUS economy turns around, M r Halkitis says. Second, we must get a h andle on spending. The Gove rnment spends over $1.5 bill ion every year. Whose job is i t to ensure that we, the B ahamian public, get value for the money spent? If we c an save 10 per cent of this a mount through improved p rocurement processes and q uality control, that would translate into $160 million saved. No problem here. Tribune Business has long urged that f raud and waste in the public sector be tackled, and com b ined with cost/spending cuts w here possible. Top sugges tion from Mr Halkitis here, but can he agree to get all those entrenched trade u nions, with vested interests not to mention numerous general election votes, to share the private sectors paina nd agree to a 5 per cent a cross-the-board salary cut, for instance? There is no magic formula to cure our debt woes. Many of our problems are structural and have become e ntrenched over many years. T o work our way back to economic and financial health will take hard work and sacrifice. The first step, however, is to admit that we do have a very serious problem, the g ood Senator notes. Bang on again. The good S enator scores a bulls eye in his use of the world structural, fingering issues such asl abour productivity, work ethic, high utility costs, bureaucratic inefficiency.......... the list goes on. All have held, and continue to hold, the Bahamian economy back. He is also right in noting thea bsence of a magic formula to cure our woes, with any solution likely to involves ome pain that all of us have to bear. It would have been nice, t hough, if the Senator had s pelled out in precise terms how he, and his party, plan to tackle out structural ineffic iencies and debt burden, rather than point fingers at the Government all the time. Solutions, not procrastination, p lease. A nd it is understandable for some to argue that the Senator is being somewhatd isingenuous and hypocriti cal in attacking the Ingraham administrations fiscal polic ies, given the track record of t he 2002-2007 PLP administ ration, of which he was part. Mr Halkitis has already d efended himself on this score, pointing out that the Christie administrationsa nnual recurrent deficit over i ts five years averaged $79.6 million, compared to the F NMs $146.75 million aver age (his statistics conveniently ignores, of course, is the fact that theP LP government was in office during the peak of an economic boom, whereas the I ngraham administration has had to deal with one of the worst recessions in livingm emory. I n sum, it is not surprising that the Government has incurred widened fiscald eficits, given that it is only natural for revenues to drop and spending to increase dur i ng a recession. How, Senator, was it possible for the Christie government, during the years of plenty that fea t ured a supposed $20 billion in foreign direct investment inflows, not to consistently run a balanced Budget on the recurrent side? Answer that one, please. It is more than likely that, had they been in office, the PLP would have followed a s timulus script similar to the F NMs. Given the partys leftof-centre, socialist leanings, it is probable they would havel oosened the purse strings even more and run up a much higher national debt the $4 b illion-plus figure that is causi ng so much concern than t he Ingraham administration has done. M r Halkitis has already attempted to explain what the PLP would have done differ-e ntly. While he fell back on p olitics in referring to the supposed $80 million worth of g overnment contracts that the FNM cancelled on regaining office (the Ingraham admin istration alleges that only two o f these projects were any where near ready to go), the Senator does redeem himself i n identifying government housing as an area that should have been targeted, given thee mployment and spending i mpacts this would have gen erated for the domestic con struction industry. T he biggest issue is whether the political will exists in any of the political parties FNM,P LP, even the DNA to do what is required to set the public finances back on the right track. The Bahamas has n ever run a balanced Budget in its 38 years of indepen dence, something it must do to set the national debt back on a declining trajectory, illustrating how hard the task ahead is. Therein lies the rub for Mr Halkitis, who seems like a w illing, able chap from the g eneration who must supply the Bahamas with its new leaders. Can the good Sena-t or, for instance, overcome the tremendous opposition he will face to austerity and s pending cuts from among his C abinet colleagues and withi n his own party, should they regain office? Will he be able t o successfully bar the Ministry of Finance and Treasurys doors as fellow Ministers batter them remorselessl y in their search for pet proj ect funding? Can he resist the short-termist, siren song: Votes, votes votes: theres ane lection within five years? With all these forces ranged against him, it will be intere sting to see whether Mr H alkitis can turn rhetoric into r eality. Youve talked a good game, Senator, now you must w alk the walk. PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE t he Industries Encouragement Act is not a b ad one, although it must be done in a phased manner so as not to harm individual businesses. Providing ample warnings of such intentions, and consulting in advance, would help. 5. LEAVE FREEPORT ALONE. Rather t han constant threats of tinkering with its taxation structure, the second city needs to be given space to breathe, if it is to attain critical mass and provide the economic diversification it has long promised. 6 THE AUDITOR-GENERALS r eport a lways estimates that there is an evergrowing $400 million real property tax bill that the Government fails to collect year after year. This is a receivable. How about employing some creativity, and set up ana ccounts factoring type scheme, where t he Government sells the rights to collect this sum to a private sector entity. TheG overnment would get a purchase price, s ay $50 million, and leave the buyer with t he headache of trying to collect. May w ork, may not work. But just a Tribune Business thought on the type of creativity we need. 7. APPROVE REVENUE-GENERATING P ROJECTS s uch liquefied natural gas ( LNG). The opportunity of failing to approve the AES Ocean Express development, located on a man-made island far from major population centres, is coming back to bite. Such a project could have generated between $20-$50 million inv aluable revenues per year. It is unclear w hether these projects can be revived. 8. ON THE SPENDING FRONT, in line with Senator Michael Halkitis, Tribune Business would cut ministry and departm ent spending across the board by at l east 5 per cent. Put an end to all the u nnecessary freebies, jollies, consultants, outside meetings and meals, and travelling to every conference under the sun at the taxpayers expense. Efficiency, and doing more with less, are the name of the game. 9 IN SIMILAR VEIN, c ut public sector s alaries across the board by 5 per cent. It i s unfair for the private sector to take all the recessions pain. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham missed a golden opportunity tod o this in 2010-2011, after he had seized the moral high ground by cutting his salary, along with those for ministers andM Ps. The civil service, as we all know, is grossly overstaffed, so better to accept a salary cut rather than redundancies. 10. STOP EXPANDING THE SIZE OF GOVERNMENT. Review its structure, and e liminate departments and agencies that a re of no use. Avoid creating new bureaucracies. If we need to meet our obligations under agreements such as the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA ating a competition commission, then transform existing departments such as Price C ontrol into these animals. 11. GIVEN INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS SPREAD ACROSS MANY ISLANDS, and the absence of potential revenue-earning opportunities, the Government has always suffered from a capital account deficit. To address this, the Government must c ontinue the trend of privatisation and outsourcing to the private sector that it began with BTC. Potential functions for outsourcing could be the Registrar Generals Department, along with the loss-makingC orporations that continue to bleed the taxp ayer of between $40-$50 million per year. I ndeed, it is time to consider selling Bahamasair and the Water & Sewerage Corporation for whatever they will fetch, even if it is just $1 and the buyer assumingt heir liabilities. When it comes to infrastructure projects, there is little option other than to get privates ector capital and management involved through public-private partnerships (PPPs FROM page 19B FROM page 19B FROM page 20B BUSINESS REVIEW TRIBUNE BUSINESSS DEBT SOLUTION YOUVE TALKED THE TALK, NOW WALK THE WALK, MR SENATOR CIT Y MARKET S WOES EXPOSE MORE FLAWS Senator Michael H alkitis

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T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 19B BUSINESS REVIEW B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor S TANDup and take a bow, Senator M ichael Halkitis. For you are the first politician from either main party to bluntly state it cannot be business as usual when it comes to management of the Governments finances. H allelujah, praise the Lord, at last someone has spoken the truth. B ut........ and there is always a but. The Sena tor has spoken well, but Tribune Business hopes he will excuse us for not going overb oard just yet. For Mr Halkitis, the hardest p art is yet to come, namely translating words i nto deeds. Having talked the talk, he must now walk the walk. To be fair, the general features outlined by M r Halkitis in his Tribune Business column of September 14, 2011, dealing with Moodys downgrade of the Bahamas economic outl ook are not bad, even if they are short on s pecifics that lay out a plan for dealing with our n ational debt and fiscal deficit woes. Tribune Business is also not too sure about his schoolb uilding stimulus plan, and whether it would have the desired effect, although it wouldnt disagree with placing a focus on technology int he education system. B ut enough with the knocks, and on to the positive. Tribune Business agrees with the S enator that the Government appears not to have got the message, not just Moodys, but Standard & Poors and the International Mon etary Fund (IMD YOUVE TALKED THE TALK, NOW WALK THE WALK, MR SENATOR TRIBUNE BUSINESSS D EBT SOLUTION A m ulti-pronged approach must be i mplemented to tackle the Bahamas impending fiscal crisis, involving a combination of spending cuts and containment, revenue enforcement and creative, out-ofthe-box thinking. This is by no means ane xhaustive list. 1. BALANCE THE BUDGET on the recurrent s ide as rapidly as possible, so the Government can cover its fixed costs rent and wages with incoming revenues streams/cash flow. 2 NO NEW OR INCREASED TAXES. T his is the last thing we need, as to grow government revenues we need the Bahamian economy and p rivate sector to expand and grow our way out of recession. 3 INSTEAD, WHEN IT COMES TO THE REVE NUE FRONT, a ll governments must focus on m aximising collections from the existing system. Starting from the top, crack down on the f raud and tax evasion that everyone knows is t aking place. Stop giving favours to family, friends, the politically connected and the wealthy. N o one knows how much this is costing honest taxpayers, but some estimates place the leakage at $100-$150 million per fiscal year. Almost enough to close the fiscal gap by itself. 4 SIMPLIFY FURTHER THE DUTY STRUCTURE/TAX CODE. Close all loopholes, and review t he incentives and tax exemptions granted to numerous industries and businesses. Especially resorts, which must ultimately be graduated from all the tax breaks developers receive, so thei ndustry does not become a welfare sector. Employing the same model as the Ingraham administration used in graduating firms from SEE page nine SEE page nine Senator Halkitiss position on the public finances is welcome, but he and his partym ust now give us specifics, and turn rhetoric into reality

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THE COMPANY Some probably felt he was mad, others thought he had nothing to lose, while some believed he was merely preparing us for the fact the e nd is nigh. Whatever the intention, Mark Finlayson, principal of City Markets 78 per cent majority shareholder was not shy in making his feelings clear towards the majority of the Bahamian w holesale industry, accusing them of reneging on an agreement to deal with the debtsr un-up under the supermarket chains previous owners. It is never wise, from a posi t ion of weakness, to alienate s uppliers and those who you probably need to do some business with. But, somewhat ominously, Mr Finlayson effectively warned Bahamian wholesalers that they had no option but to work with City Markets on his terms, for if the company was put into liquidation they would never get a cent of the money owed back. The wholesale industrys position was probably summed up by this comment posted to The Tribunes website, which backs up the feelings privately expressed to this newspaper by sources in the sector. The comment, from an anonymous wholesaler, said: He is presenting the whole salers as the bad people. We DID work with him, and a few months back they came to us asked for a increased credit limit. We gave it to them...gave them the limit THEY asked for...all they ended up doing was maxing out the limit, then stopped paying and now we are even deeper into the problem then we would have been if we kept the limits lower. Similar sentiments were expressed publicly to Tribune Business by Bruce Thomp son, managing director of leading wholesaler Thompson Trading. In the circumstances it is difficult to see how relations between City Markets and Bahamian suppliers can ever be fully repaired, espe cially if the formers bills go unpaid, although Mr Fin layson was this week talking optimistically about re-establishing supply from several companies. It is also true that most wholesalers do not want to see a previously valuable client such as City Markets fail, given that this wouldl eave Super Value and R upert Roberts as the only real player in the mass mar ket food store business. Yet, in the final analysis, the public spat between suppliers and retail customer has done City Markets not one i ota of good in its continuing battle for survival. The onceproud 12 store chain, whicht urned out a consistent $5-$8 million annual net profit, has now been reduced (at least for the moment) to a threestore network, a shell of its former self. South Beach and Seagrapes may yet come back, and it was probably a good decision to largely exit the Grand Bahama market and concen trate on New Providence. But my, my, what a difference sixeight months make. The talk since January this year was acquisition, acquisition, first City Markets and then Robin Hood, coupled with expansive talk of new mega stores on JFK Drive, East-West Highway, at the airport, and in Freeport. Now the focus is on shrinking to survive, with the Lyford Cay, downtown Freeport and Eight Mile Rock stores closed permanently, and Rosetta Street joining the ranks of those said to be closed temporarily. Sceptics have been quick to point out that the ownership of City Markets by Mr Finlayson and his family appears to be following the same pattern they established at Solomons Mines, where helter-skelter expansion quickly turned into some rapid downsizing. To be absolutely fair, this is not all Mr Finlaysons fault. Today, he finds himself in a similar position to Barack Obama. Like the US president, he inherited a terrible mess from his predecessor (for George W. Bush read the BSL Holdings ownership group). But with almost one years ownership under Mr Finlaysons belt, any attempts to continually blame the mis takes of others for the pre sent predicament will soon start wearing pretty thin. For now, Mr Finlayson and h is management team will h ave to hunker down, cut costs and streamline the busi ness where they can, and move to ensure the remaining stores are fully stocked ina bid to win customers back. Tribune Business wishes them l uck, and hopes they succeed for the sake of us all. PENSION FUND Mr Finlayson says his hands are clean, and Tri bune Business agrees with him when it comes to the City Markets staff pension fund. What transpired under the former BSL Holdings owner ship highlighted the need for company-sponsored schemes to be overseen by indepen dent trustees, and for pensions-related legislation and regulation to be a priority. No payments have been made into the Bahamas Supermarkets Profit Sharing Retirement Scheme since 2007 as a result of the compa nys woes. This means its only sources of revenue have been lease payments on the EastWest Highway head office, which the pension plan owes, and on the Cable Beach store equipment and improvements that were sold to it, then leased back by City Markets. It is unclear whether the pension fund is receiving regular payments from both sources. The last audited financial statements for City Markets and its Bahamas Supermarkets parent, published for the 12 months to end-June 30, 2010, showed that the sums owed to the Bahamas Supermarkets Profit Sharing Retirement Scheme had increased from $518,898 at year-end 2009 to $971,452. This debt was racked up under the former BSL Hold ings group, but it is currently unknown whether Mr Finlayson and his team have been able to make good on this, or whether they have been paying what is due since their November 2010 Dont Blow It Received a Lump Sum?Let Royal Fidelitys seasoned investment professionals help you identify and reach your investment goals BUSINESS REVIEW PAGE 20B FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 YOUVE TALKED THE TALK, NOW W ALK THE WALK, MR SENATOR SEE PAGE 19B TRIBIUNE BUSINESS : MONTH IN REVIEW SEE PAGE 7B Ongoing survival fight highlights weaknesses in capital markets and pension regulation B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C ity Markets just cannot stay out of the headlines. Whether it be store closures, the staff pension fund or regulatory issues, the ongoing saga of the supermarket chain and its fight for survival continues to expose flaws in the Bahamian system. SEE page nine

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B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net C a rl Hield couldnt hold on to his lead and he made a quick exit in thef irst round of the mens w elterweight division of the AIBA World Boxing Championships in Baku, Azerbaijan. As the first of two competitors to r epresent the Bahamas at the 2012 Olympic Games qualifying tourna m ent yesterday, Hield lost 15-10 to Roy Sheehan of Ireland. Head coach Andre Seymour said Hield was leading 5-4 but Sheehan took over in the final two rounds. He fell behind and he was too s low in his movements, said Seym our as he described what went wrong with Hield. The first round he was very good. H e was ahead. He just stopped boxi ng and that was it. The second and the third round, the guy just came from behind. H ield was not available for comments when Tribune Sports contacted the team in Baku. B ut Seymour said he was disappointed in his performance. He thought that he should have performed better in the second and t hird rounds, he said. He expected a much better performance because he knew he was better than what hed id. Today, Valentino Knowles, the other member of the team, will be ina rematch of last years Commonwealth Games gold-medal match against Indian Manoj Kumar. Seymour said Knowles will have t o throw a lot of punches in order to prevail with the change in the scor ing system. Anybody who goes out there and falls behind, they will get left behind, he stated. Thats the new amateur boxing scoring right now. Its gone back to the old days. You just cant throw like the old days like professional boxing. In amateur boxing, you have to throw a lot of punches. If you do not do that, you will get left behind. Based on what they saw in Hield- s match, Seymour said he and assistant coach Floyd Seymour haveb een stressing to Knowles that he c ant get left behind. You have to keep ahead. With the new scoring out now, you have to throw a lot of punches, he said. You have to throw a lot of punches. Aint no waiting on one punch. You have to throw a lot of punches. Knowles, who last year had to settle for the bronze after he lost to Kumar in New Delhi, India, said hes confident that the outcome will be different today. Im in a frame of mind to go out there and win, Knowles said. I felth e only won that fight 3-1 on a h ometown decision. But this time, were not in India. Thats all Im telling myself and so this time, he doesnt have the home crowd to depend on. Looking back at Hields bout, Knowles said they are still trying to analyse exactly what went wrong in the second round. AIBA is changing up their rules every year, so its kind of hard to adapt, Knowles said. Youre training one way and you have to do your whole schedule and game plan righth ere in competition. But this isnt the place to just change everything. The rules just changed, so we have to adapt and do the best that we could. With a slight change in weather, Knowles noted that he suffered a slight case of the flu but he has been able to work through it and now hes just waiting to step into the ring. THETRIBUNE SECTIONEFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 INSIDE TRAK T T U U R R N N T T O O 3 3 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 4 4 E E . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 5 5 E E . . . JUNIOR OPTIMIST NATIONALS STARTS SAT. IN GRAND BAHAMA RUGBY WCUP PREVIEW: FRANCE UNDER STRAIN AHEAD OF TONGA MATCH USAIN BOLT IN CALIFORNIA TO RAISE MONEY FOR FOUNDATION TENNIS: SHARAPOVA HUR TS ANKLE, QUITS IN P AN PACIFIC OPEN QUARTERS UWC TRIA THLON BAHAMAS: KIDS AGE GROUP RESULTS T T U U R R N N T T O O 7 7 E E . T T U U R R N N T T O O 4 4 E E . . . CORPORATE sponsors contin ue to answer the call as more and more organisations pledge their support to Marathon Bahamas 2012. Within the past few weeks, several philanthropic groups and corporations have come on board to join the growing list of major sponsors. For the direct benefits of the run ners themselves, Nautilus water will provide their product at various points along the route. Nautilus Water will be provided at 20 check points along the route, a service the company calls "essential to both the safety and general wellbeing of athletes." Jason Evans, president of Nau tilus Water, said the company is proud to once again support Marathon Bahamas. The success of the event is evi dent by its participation growth and community awareness. Nautilus ful ly endorses Marathon Bahamas mis sion to raise funds which benefit cancer programmes in the Bahamas, including the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Bahamas BreastCancer Initiative (BBCI Society of The Bahamas, Sister Sis ter Breast Cancer Support Group and other womens health programmes. KRyS Global has also joined the list of contributors. Marathon participants can expect to receive a KRyS Global branded rally towel in their registrant bag to assist them at the race and beyond. We are thrilled to be able to sup port this event and by extension the worthwhile causes the funds will go to support, states Ed Rahming, managing director of KRyS Glob als Bahamas office. We look forward to the contin ued growth and success of this event and encourage everyone to come out and participate in what is sure to be a fun race weekend. On the international front, the Yellowbird Foundation out of Canada will also participate in this year's event. Comprised of members of the Canadian travel industry, Yellow bird is a non-profit organisation ded icated to improving the lives of children in the Caribbean through their commitment to promoting and supporting local educational pro grammes, in addition to providing financial and infrastructure support to schools. With golf as the main sporting event for many years among the travel industry members, we wanted to reach out and engage a new audience that we never had before and running was the perfect fit, said one of Yellowbirds founding members Gerry Kinasz. BTO team captain Earl Miller, boasts that the goal of the group is to compete and complete the marathon or half marathon and, at the end, check this accomplishment off of their bucket list. Each person crossing the finish line will be a winner and those com pleting the marathon will then be in the elite status one per cent of the worlds population who have achieved this accomplishment. For all of the participants, this will be their first venture in long-distance running and they are very proud to be making their statement at home, in the Bahamas, at Marathon Bahamas during the US Martin Luther King Birthday weekend. CORPORATE SPONSORS CONTINUE TO ANSWER MARATHON CALL Hield falls in 1st round of Olympic qualifier AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS CARL HIELD (file photo made a quick exit in the welterweight division of the AIBA World Boxing Championships.

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SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 3E SAILING: JUNIOR OPTIMIST NATIONALS T T E E N N N N I I S S : : M M A A R R K K K K N N O O W W L L E E S S C C E E L L E E B B R R I I T T Y Y I I N N V V I I T T . MARK Knowles is pleased to announce the annual Mark Knowles Celebrity Tennis Invitational is set to be held December 1-4 at the Atlantis resort by presenting sponsor MDC-Partners and organised by the Mark Knowles Man agement Group (MKMG This years featured players are Andy Roddick, Xavier Malisse and Sabine Lisicki with some additional stars to be announced at a later date. The organisers plan to hold a Pro/Am doubles tourna ment for platinum sponsors, a Pro Exhibition and an oppor tunity for top Bahamian junior tennis players to interact with the visiting pros. C C O O N N C C H H M M A A N N T T R R I I A A T T H H L L O O N N I I N N G G R R A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A THE 25th annual Conch man Triathlon is scheduled for Saturday, November 5 in Freeport, Grand Bahama. It will comprise of a one-kilometre swim, a 25k bike ride and a 5k run. Interested persons can reg ister by logging onto the Face book Event Page, e-mail organiser Bert Bell at bert bell@coralwave.com or calling him at 727-5886 or 7275381. B B E E R R L L I I N N M M A A R R A A T T H H O O N N D D E E S S O O U U Z Z A A P P A A R R T T I I C C I I P P A A T T E E D D CONTRARY to a report on Tuesday in Tribune Sports, Dr Kathryn de Souza did participate in the 38th BMW Berlin Marathon on Sunday. Dr de Souza, listed as an American, represented the Bahamas Roadmasters Club and clocked three hours, 45 minutes and 11 seconds for 133th place in the womens 45 age group category. The other Bahamians who participated were the husband and wife team of Carl and Shavonne Blades, Glen Bain, Linda Williams, Youlanda Deleveuax and Michelle Gibson. The Tribune apologises to Dr de Souza for the error. W W A A L L K K S S T T R R I I D D E E F F O O R R L L I I F F E E THE Cancer Society of the Bahamas is slated to hold a Stride for Life Fun Walk 6am Saturday. The honourary co-chairpersons for the event are Bishop Laish Boyd and Erin Brown. There is a registration fee for children under 13 years and those 14 years and older. All registered participants will receive a T-shirt and gift and all walkers will be eligible to win many exciting prizes. The route for the event is as follows: Start at the Cancer Caring Center, East Terrance, Cen treville (2 doors south of ZNS), south on East Terrance to 4th Terrace, west to Collins Avenue, to School Lane, north to Dowdeswell Street, east to Easy Bay Street, crossing to the new Paradise Island bridge, ascending to Beach Drive, Paradise Island Drive to the Golf Course, west on Paradise Island Drive to Casi no Drive, around the round-about to the old Paradise Island bridge, descending to East Bay Street, advancing to Mackey Street, south to Shirley Street, west to Collins Avenue, south to 2nd Terrace (now Rusty Bethel Drive east to East Terrance and south along East Terrace, concluding at the Cancer Car ing Center. V V O O L L L L E E Y Y B B A A L L L L N N P P V V A A A A C C T T I I O O N N THE New Providence Vol leyball Association will continue its regular season this weekend with a series of games on tap at the DW Davis Gymnasium. G G A A M M E E S S S S C C H H E E D D U U L L E E T T o o n n i i g g h h t t 7:30pm Cougars vs Lady Technicians (L 9pm Intruders vs Scotia Defenders (M S S u u n n d d a a y y 3:30pm COB Caribs vs Titans (L 5pm Saints vs Crusaders (M C C Y Y C C L L I I N N G G T T O O U U R R D D E E N N E E W W P P R R O O V V I I D D E E N N C C E E THE Tour de New Provi dence will be held over the weekend of October 29-30, starting and finishing at the Clifton Heritage Park parking lot at Clifton Pier. There will be a race for the competitive cyclists and noncompetitive cyclists. Prizes will also be presented to the oldest and youngest partici pants. For more information, interested persons can visit musgrovebarron@hotmail.co m or call 425-1057. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L B B I I S S H H O O P P E E L L L L I I S S S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L C C L L A A S S S S I I C C THE Baptist Sports Coun cil is scheduled to hold a meeting 6pm today under the pavilion at the Bahamas Baptist College for all churches interested in participating in the 2011 Bishop Neil C Ellis Softball Classic. The event, which was orig inally scheduled to start on Saturday, has been pushed back to Saturday, October 8, at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Competition will be held in the 19-and-under, co-ed and mens division. There is a reg istration fee per team in each division. For further information, interested persons can contact BSC director Brent Stubbs at stubbobs@gmail.com, bstub bo@yahoo.com or call 5022363. T T R R A A C C K K A A N N D D F F I I E E L L D D R R E E V V . B B A A C C K K F F O O R R D D C C L L A A S S S S I I C C THE Baptist Sports Council is slated to hold a meeting 6pm today under the pavilion at the Bahamas Baptist Coll ege, Jean Street, for all churches interested in participating in the 2011 Rev. Enoch Backford Track and Field Classic. The classic is scheduled for Saturday, October 22 at the Thomas A Robinson. Com petition will be held in the under-7, under-9, under-11, under-13, under-15, under-17 men and women divisions. There is a registration fee per athlete. For further information, interested persons can contact BSC director Brent Stubbs. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L N N P P S S A A A A C C T T I I O O N N THE New Providence Softball Association is all set to continue its regular season with another double header Friday and Saturday nights at the Bankers Field, Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. G G A A M M E E S S S S C C H H E E D D U U L L E E T T o o n n i i g g h h t t 7pm Island Luck Truck ers vs Dorsey Park Boyz (M 8:30pm Miller Rams vs New Breed (M S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 7pm Black Scorpions vs Bommer George (L 8 :30pm Dorin United Hit men vs New Breed (M P P O O W W E E R R L L I I F F T T I I N N G G N N A A T T I I O O N N A A L L C C H H A A M M P P I I O O N N S S H H I I P P S S THE Bahamas Powerlift ing Federation is scheduled to hold its National Power lifting Championships at L W Young Junior High School, starting 10am Saturday. A number of competitors are expected to strut their skills in the bench, squats and deadlift events during the championships. SPOR TS IN BRIEF SEVENTY-eight boats, including at least four from the CaymanI slands and others from around the Bahamas, are on course to cross the starting line in various divisions in what is expected to be a tight series of races in the hotly contested Bahamas Junior Optimist Nationals set for October 1-2. T he Nationals begin Saturday at the Taino Beach resort with about six races and concludes Sunday after the finals. It will be the first time in the five-year local history of the event that it will be held in Grand Bahama. The kids are really excited about t his for a number of reasons, said senior sailing instructor Robert Dunkley, now the official instructora fter years of volunteering with others who give countless afternoons and weekend hours to make the junior sailing programme possible. For most of these sailors, it will be their first time competing against Opti sailors from another countrya nd for many, especially those from Governor's Harbour, Harbour Island, Long Island, Abaco and Nas-s au, their first time in Grand Bahama. Hopefully, it will be a little bit of a much-needed boost for Grand Bahama as well and the w aters there are ideal for races like this. If Dunkley is hoping for an econ omic boost for the countrys second city, Daniel Gibson and Paul de Souza have other hopes. Gibson, 15, and a student at CR Walker, is the defending champion in the Blue Fleet, the championship class. D e Souza, a 7th grader at St Andrews, beat 44 boats to take first place last year in the Green Fleet, the novice class. This year hes moving up to Blue and plans to give Gibson a fight for first place. Both will have to out-sail and outperform hopefuls like S pencer Cartwright who is taking sailing so seriously hes studying sailing tactics. In sailing, its not just about physical strength, says the articulate Queens College 7th grader. You dont have to be fast. You dont have to be strong. You just have to know what youre doing. Its about being smart. C artwright says he has made a lot of good friends through the pro gramme but he doesnt plan to let f riendship stand in the way of winning. I came second last year and Im not coming second again. I plan to w in. But then so does Pedro Rahming, a 10th grader at CR Walker, event hough winning for him would mean leaving his best friend, defending champion Daniel Gibson, in his wake. Thats okay, he says. Well still be best friends. And Pedro has Daniel to thank f or getting him involved in the programme that he admits has changed his life for the better. I t has certainly changed Donico Brown's life, too. Once a junior sailor just hoping to cross the finish line first or at least walk away with a f ew respectable seconds and thirds in a large fleet, today hes a sailing instructor, paid by the organisation made up mostly of volunteers and sponsored in part by the Ministry of Tourism, Rotary, RBC, KFC, Odd y sey, Diane Phillips & Associates and private donors. Brown had the opportunity to sail i nternationally in larger boats and in 2009 represented the Bahamas in Brazil. I started in an Opti, just like these kids, he says, sweeping his hand across a bustling parking lot at the Nassau Yacht Club where the youngsters have gathered after a days practice. The first day out, I capsized and t hats when I knew I loved it. Someday, he hopes to get his captains license and helm a fast ferry.F or now, hell be coach, counselor and sailing instructor for a fleet of hopefuls, including his younger brother, all battling for the national Optimist sailing championship title. Sir Jack Hayward, an avid sailor and supporter of the Grand BahamaS ailing Club, shared his enthusiasm for the upcoming races. I think its wonderful that the Opti Nationals are coming to Grand Bahama. We have a large number of talented young sailors that participate regularly at the Yacht Club and Im excited to see how they will perf orm on their home turf, Sir Jack said. Chris Paine, co-founder of the S ailing Club in Freeport, said that he and his crew are delighted that the sport is coming to Grand Bahama. GBPA president Ian Rolle said the organisations support of the event is evidence of its continuedc ommitment to sponsoring and supporting programmes that build the islands youth. GBPA is pleased to support this event and others like it, as they provide excellent opportunities for the youth to gain new experiences and e xposure to competitive environments that challenge them beyond their everyday environments, said Rolle. We are excited that the Opti Nationals will be held here and we look forward to the races returning i n the future, he added. T he competition is held under the auspices of the Bahamas Sailing Association which is based in Nas sau. According to Mr Paine, the objec tive is to move the National Championships around the countryb ecause it is a national competition. T he sport of sailing, he noted, has grown tremendously in Grand Bahama from its inception in 2006, with more and more young people showing interest. He credited coach David Valen t ine with the inspiration of the sport of some students in afterschool pro grammes which he said are doing quite well. Large fleet of young sailors ready for tough competition on Grand Bahama this weekend PAUL DE SOUZA DANIEL GIBSON ROUNDING THE MARK: Sailors round the mark and head downwind in last year's Opti Nationals in Montagu Bay.

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SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 7E UWC TRIATHLON BAHAMAS: KIDS RESULTS F F E E M M A A L L E E A A G G E E G G R R O O U U P P : : 1 1 8 8 Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 23 229 Siena Holowesko 7 Nassau BAH 24:47 2 28 236 Chloe Richards 7 Nassau BAH 26:31 3 35 213 Charlotte Fernie 7 Nassau BAH 28:16 M M A A L L E E A A G G E E G G R R O O U U P P : : 1 1 8 8 Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 11 222 Oliver Townend 8 Nassau BAH 21:49 2 20 225 Thomas Bowers 7 Nassau BAH 23:53 3 25 221 Jackson Hood 8 25:30 4 37 224 Charlie Winner 7 Nassau BAH 30:28 5 38 238 Major Richards 7 Nassau BAH 31:16 6 40 223 Thomas Illing 8 Nassau BAH 32:33 F F E E M M A A L L E E A A G G E E G G R R O O U U P P : : 9 9 1 1 1 1 Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 6 207 Isabelle Winner 11 Nassau BAH 20:10 2 10 227 Alexandra Allan 9 Nassau BAH 21:48 3 13 212 Ella Holowesko 9 Nassau BAH 22:05 4 14 211 Katherine Slatter 9 Nassau BAH 22:57 5 22 209 Brennan Hood 10 24:45 6 24 228 Tamsin Nottage 9 Nassau BAH 24:51 7 27 226 Elliott Farrington 10 Nassau BAH 26:30 8 29 210 Julie Van Wyan 10 Nassau BAH 27:03 9 36 208 Victoria Russell 11 Nassau BAH 30:25 10 39 234 Isabella Anand 10 Nassau BAH 31:23 M M A A L L E E A A G G E E G G R R O O U U P P : : 9 9 1 1 1 1 Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 1 217 Liam Holowesko 11 Nassau BAH 17:41 2 3 216 Charles Allan 11 Nassau BAH 18:15 3 4 233 Trent Strachan 11 Nassau BAH 19:58 4 16 231 Gus Harper 10 Nassau BAH 23:47 5 17 220 Tristan Thompson 9 Nassau BAH 23:48 6 31 219 Mateo Blacquiere 10 27:52 7 32 232 Dante Cooper 10 Nassau BAH 27:57 8 33 218 Gabriel Moultrie 10 Nassau BAH 27:58 9 34 214 Whit Hazlewood 11 28:13 F F E E M M A A L L E E A A G G E E G G R R O O U U P P : : 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 4 Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 7 200 Alexandra Mittens 14 Nassau BAH 20:23 2 8 203 Olivia Hazlewood 13 Nassau BAH 21:34 3 9 202 Emma Van Wynen 13 Nassau BAH 21:47 4 15 204 Miranda Thompson 12 Nassau BAH 23:26 5 19 201 Raquel de Cardenas 14 Nassau BAH 23:52 6 26 205 Kaitlyn Slatter 12 Nassau BAH 26:15 M M A A L L E E A A G G E E G G R R O O U U P P : : 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 4 Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 5 215 Mitchell Blacquiere 13 20:05 2 30 230 Farion Cooper 13 Nassau BAH 27:47 TRI-ATHLETES can be seen at the start of UWC Triathlon Bahamas in Nassau over the weekend.



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NASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Why didnt God save him?Volume: 107 No.253 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SUNNY, T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 78F By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net ONLY one desk and chair was empty in the sixth grade class at Columbus Primary School yesterday. Exactly one week ago, a quiet but well-liked Marco Archer sat at that desk surrounded by a group of class mates he interacted with until school was dismissed that day. He was absent from that seat for his favourite lessons in mathematics and language the following Monday, due to his disappearance last Friday afternoon. And on Wednesday, students and faculty at the school learned that Marco would never return to that seat after his lifeless body was discovered in bushes at the rear of an apartment complex in Cable Beach. The atmosphere at the school that abused and brutally murdered Marco attended was a somber one yesterday. While wreaths were being hung around the Wulff Road and Collins Avenue campus, indicating the death and loss of a student and friend, the school did its best to go about a normal day without the sixth grader. However, sixth grade teacher of the deceased, Raj Farrington, told The Tribune his class and others are still taking the loss of their friend hard. She said: The classmates, they took it really hard. Theyre still taking it hard. Even this morning, they were praying for his soul and when they were being counseled they were asking questions. Two of the questions asked stood out to her, she said, but I could only answer one of them. They want to know why God didnt save him and they asked Why do the authorities let bad people get away and let them out on bail? These are the childrens questions, not mine. I told them that I didnt have the answer to the latter question but in regards to their first question I told them that maybe God needs and wanted him (Marco Archer) in heaven with him, maybe thats why he didnt save him. I couldnt really think of any other answer to give them. TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM YOURNEWSPAPERYOURWEEKENDSEEPAGE2E FORDETAILS 1 ON SATURDAYS WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN . DA Y TO GO AS MARCO MURDER PROBE CONTINUES, HIS CLASSMATES ASK . SEE page two By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE THREE men assisting police with their investigations into the sexual assault and brutal murder of 11-yearold Marco Archer were still in custody last night. Police remained tightlipped over the details surrounding the discovery of the young boys body in bushes in Western New Providence on Wednesday. Last night, senior officers confirmed investigators are now trying to deter mine whether the suspect may be linked to additional crimes. CALLS for authorities to create a sex offenders register continued a day after 11year-old Marco Archer was found dead. Supporters of such a list feel it would protect the public from attacks by alerting them when a sexual offender is released from prison or when they move into a neighbourhood. However critics of the proposal said creating a public register would alienate convicts who have completed their prison terms, make it harder for them to reintegrate into society and make them targets for perse cution. Her Majestys Prison Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming said such a policy would be like placing additional prison time on inmates who have already served their allotBy PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net NOTING the cultural and psychological impact of foreign workers on the Bahamian society, Chinese Ambas sador Hu Shan said his Embassy has ensured that no more than 4,000 Chinese labourers will be in the Bahamas at any one time during the building of the $3.2 billion Baha Mar project. With 8,150 work permits already ear SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight SEX OFFENDERS REGISTER WOULD PROTECT PUBLIC NO MORE THAN 4,000 CHINESE WORKERS IN BAHAMAS AT ONE TIME THREE STILL IN CUSTODY IN MARCO INVESTIGATION CHINESEAMBASSADOR: By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net VIOLENT offenders are not given a final mental evaluation before they are released from Fox Hill prison, an official confirmed. Prisoners must meet with a pre-release unit before the end of their sentence, howev er that panel only offers anger management classes, help finding a job and tips on deal ing with society, but does not assess mental health. There's no pre-release mental evaluation, said HerVIOLENT OFFENDERS NOT GIVEN FINAL MENTAL EVALUATION BEFORE RELEASE FROM PRISON SEE page eightMARCOARCHERS desk was empty at Columbus Primary yesterday. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 3FRUF &RPER 25 F 0HJDHDOHQWULHVZLWK 3FSXUFKDVHf*5$1',=(75,3)25WRDOOLQFOXVLYH %HDFKHVHVRUWXUNVt &DLFRV,VODQGV$LUIDUH FRXUWHV\RI%DKDPDVDLU%X\DQ\ 3FRU3F&RPER RU 3F 0HJD0HDO DQGHQWHUWRZLQEDFNSDFNVZLWK VFKRROVXSSOLHVFHOOSKRQHVDQGODSWRSVWR JHWWKHVFKRRO\HDURIIWRDJRRGVWDUW)LOO RXW\RXUUHFHLSWDQVZHUWKHVNLOOTXHVWLRQ DQGSODFHLWLQWKHHQWU\ER[SURYLGHGIRUD FKDQFHWRZLQLQZHHNO\GUDZLQJV(17(52:,1 She says this tragedy is not one that anyone, especially his classmates will ever forget. Even when they grow up and tell their children and grandchildren of Marcos life, their friend, up to the end, they will remember him. When asked how she felt about the ordeal of losing her student, Ms Farrington admitted it was really difficult to come to terms with what happened, from Marco going missing last Friday to the gruesome discovery of his body five days later. Even after he had been missing for a few days, I still had hope. I still had that strong feeling that they would find him alive. I was hoping they would for his familys sake. So it was a real shock for me and its really devastating. Ms Farrington, like the murder victims family and the rest of the country, wants to know just one thing: Why would someone want to bring any harm to a young child like that? She said that Marco was a promising student who was never late or absent and got all of his spelling words correct. The school allowed The Tribune to visit the classroom where Marco studied his favourite subjects, mathematics and language arts. All sixteen of his classmates were present while a counselor was reading a book to them. However, there were no smiles on their faces or warmth in their eyes, only worry, confusion and sadness as they frequently stole glances at the lone unoccupied desk and chair in the classroom which belonged to young Marco. His desk, one of six in three sectioned groups, was occupied by a potted plant and a composition book with his first writing assignment for the year, All about me, hanging out on a separate sheet of paper. The paragraph read: My name is Marco Archer. I am 11 years old. I was born on August 22nd 2000 in Princess Margaret Hospital. I live with my mom and dad on Brougham Street. My favourite things to do are playing basketball and soccer. My favourite things about school are math and language. Around this time next year, I hope to go to junior high school. Marcia Roberts, the schools head teacher, said staff and pupils are still in shock over Marcos death and does not know if the sadness or somber feelings will go away any time soon. She said: Right now the entire school populace is in a somber mood because of what happened. We had counselors come to the school who talked to the students about death, we still have persons coming in. Ms Roberts doesnt know when the school will be able to move past this tragedy, referring to an old saying time heals old wounds but said: Were hoping by the end of the year, that we will have definitely been able to move past this. The head teacher spoke about her interactions with Marco, describing him as a child who was very much into sports, a model student who attended the school from the first grade and since the beginning of the school semester has never been absent or late once. WHY DIDNT GOD SAVE HIM?FROM page oneAWREATH on the gates of Columbus Primary School, which was attended by Marco Archer. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff PRINCIPAL OF COLUMBUS PRIMARY Marcia Roberts fixes wreath on the office of the school. MARCO ARCHERS sixth grade teacher Raj Farrington (above). Mrs Farrington puts a wreath on the classroom door (below).

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A NATIONAL call to action rally is being organised in response to the kidnapping, assault and murder of 11-year-old Marco Archer, it was announced yesterday. In announcing the event, activist group Bahamas Against Crime called the brutal killing yet another wakeup call for a country in grave danger. The question is, whether the Bahamas is ready to be awakened from its apparent state of apathy, indifference and selfishness, said BAC in a statement yesterday. It seems that people respond to crime only when their interest is threatened. Over the years, BAC has attempted to sensitise the public about the crisis that increasing crime will plunge the nation into. BAC president Dr William Thompson said: Periodically, Bahamas Against Crime organised a march, rally or other public opportunity for residents to demonstrate their commitment to take a stance against crime. In response to this tragic incident, Bahamas Against Crime in conjunction with the Bain Grants Town Advancement Association, will stage a National call to action rally on Sunday, October 9, 2011, at Rawson Square, beginning at 6pm. Public and private sector organisations are invited and individuals from every walk of life are urged to participate in this rally and send a powerful message to the government that it is now past time that this frightening situation is brought under control. Dr Thompson said the criminals must also be made to understand that the vast majority of Bahamians are not prepared to stand idly by and watch the destruction of a once peaceful society. Bahamas Against Crime extends deepest condolences to the family of little Marco Archer and the many others who have suffered greatly, and continue to suffer, as a result of the scourge of crime that is afflicting this nation, the statement said. By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net THE youth arm of the Free National Movement is speaking out on crime against young people in the Bahamas. In the wake of the brutal murder of 11-year-old Mar co Archer, the Torch Bearers are calling on society to do its part in the fight against crime, especially as young people are increasingly the victims. Jamal Moss, president of group, said: It was really disheartening to even hear inthe news reports that he had gone missing. And now to know that his life was just taken away its not easy to swallow. Mr Moss said Marcos killing is the result of this societys failure to instil morals in children. Parents are not properly rearing their children and by enabling wrong behaviour in children, theyre breeding criminals. And when you do that, persons like Mr Archer become the unfortunate vic tims. If we know we have these individuals living in our society, we should report them to the police. What happened to that little boy should not have happened. I think we are now past the point where we as parents, and that includes myself because Im a father, we have to protect our children by any means necessary. And when I say that, I mean within the law, he said. Jamal Miller, chairman of special projects, agreed with his president. He said: Its a tragic situ ation and I just hope that the perpetrators are brought to justice. I cant imagine how his friends are feeling right now, the teachers, the family, the mother. We just want to extend our sincerest condolences to his family. He was only 11 years old. The groups public relations chairman, Paul Major II, said: We need to start hanging again, lethal injections or whatever it takes to show these criminals how serious we are against heinous crimes where the victims are not only the young people, but all Bahamians. TWO men appeared in Magistrates Court yesterday to face the charge of attempted murder. Lavon Josey, 26, of Jasmine Gardens and Latorn Braynen, 18, of Aligeria Drive, were arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in connection with an attempted killing five days ago. The prosecution alleges that on Sunday, September 25, the accused men, being concerned together, tried to kill Andronic Cash. The men, who were not represented during the arraignment, were not required to enter a plea to the charge due to the nature of the offence. A Voluntary Bill of Indictment will be served against them in Court One, Bank Lane on Thursday, November 10 at 10am. This will forward the case directly to the Supreme Court for trial, bypassing a preliminary inquiry in the Magistrates Court. The accused men were remanded to Her Majestys Prison, Fox Hill. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDA Y, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 3 3(7(50F:,//,$0RI 3%2;63:(67%$<675((71$66$8 %$+$0$6 By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net FIRST graders at Gerald Cash Primary yesterday memorialised a fellow student killed in a traffic accident earlier this week. For some classmates, the tragic death of six-year-old Benji Cher-Frere on Wednesday was their first experience with mortality. Cozetta Johnson, the schools prin cipal, said: Everyone is holding up pretty well. These are only five and six-year-olds so the counsellors just spoke to them about death, trying tofind out what their meaning of it is. Some children may have experienced a death in their family before, but for some, it would have been the first death for them. Police reports say Benji was struck by a white 2007 Toyota Hilux truck shortly after school on Wednesday. Benji was playing with another child near Cowpen Road, east of Golden Isles Road, and ventured out into the street around 3.15pm. The driver of the truck was travelling west when the incident occurred, and according to police, was visibly shaken. Benji's body was found lying on the southern side of Cowpen Road. Mrs Johnson said: Were only four weeks in to the school year so (the students) were just getting to know one another, so its not as traumatising. Of course Benjis teacher would have had a different experience with all of this, being an adult. His teacher is handling it well, shes maintaining her composure for the students. Mrs Johnson said Benjis older sib ling also attended the school; however the third-grader is not expected to return to class this week. Inger Brathwaite-Archer, Benjis teacher, said: Benji was extremely quiet, very shy. He came to us from the early readiness programme so he was still adjusting to being in a bigger class. Today the class made cards for him to take home, so that whenever they feel sad, they can look at the card and reflect on his happy memory. THE FNMYOUTH ARM SPEAKSOUTON CRIME TWO CHARGED WITH ATTEMPTED MURDER CALL TO ACTION RALLY AFTER MARCO ARCHER DEATH COURTNEWS PICTURED ABOVE is the desk of six-year-old Benji Cher-Frere. The young boy was killed in a traffic accident on Wednesday afternoon.

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PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts hailed the partys extraordinary new generation of candidates. Mr Roberts said the new faces on the PLPs slate for the upcoming election have energy, new ideas and a commitment to core Bahamian values. These young candidates are smart, passionate, committed, and fired up theyre ready to bring real change and real progress to all Bahamians, Mr Roberts said. Speaking at the PLPs job creation and empowerment summit on Wednesday, Mr Roberts said Bahamians are facing perhaps the most dif ficult and perplexing time since independence especially in terms of the high level of unemployment and underemployment. There are very few things that are more demoralising than being unemployed, he said. The FNM government loves to talk about the global economic crisis, and theres no question that hard economic times elsewhere have an impact on the Bahamas. But the real truth is, FNM policies have made this recession much worse for the Bahamas. The record will show that this government has always chosen to put pol itics first, never Bahamians. In fact, one of the first things the FNM did when it came to power was cancel legitimate contracts executed by Perry Christies government, resulting in far too many jobs delayed and deferred and lost forever. Jobs that families were counting on gone, because of petty politics, Mr Roberts said. He said the partys new candidates understand this and the other challenges facing the country, and are ready to fight the good fight. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Murder accused Simon Simeon told the Supreme Court he did not shoot Sylvanus Strachan, and denied telling police that hehad. After Senior Justice Hartman Longley told Simeon he could testify, remain silent, or give an unsworn statement, Simeon decided to give sworn evidence from the witness stand on Wednesday. Defence Attorney Mario Grey is representing Simeon. Before the defence opened its case, Prosecutors made an application for an amendment to the murder indictment, changing the date of the incident from December 21, 2008 to December 29, 2008. It is alleged that Simeon shot 31-year-old Sylvanus Strachan at the Lodge Hall on East Sunrise Highway. After having a few drinks ata bar in Hawksbill, Simeon said, he contacted his friend Nigel to borrow some money. Nigel told me he was at a party and to come for it, he recalled. Simeon said he drove to the party at the Lodge Hall with his girlfriend, Lakita Gardiner, and two other male friends. After getting the money from Nigel, they all went inside for drinks, he said. Simeon said he was standing outside talking with his friend, but his girlfriend wanted to leave so he did not stay long. The accused said he was at the party about 30 minutes. Did anything happen at the party? Mr Grey asked. No, sir, he replied. Simeon, who lives in Hawksbill, said after leaving home with his uncle on January 21, 2009, he was arrested by police. He said Sgt Darrell Rolle told him of his right to remain silent and asked him why he hadnt turned himself in. Simeon said he told Sgt Rolle that he did not turn himself in, because he didnt know he was wanted. The accused said he was very familiar with Sgt Rolle because the officer knew his family well. He said Sgt Rolle allowed him to make a phone call to his aunt, who contacted a lawyer. Simeon told the court Sgt Rolle took out a piece of paper and started writing on it. He told me to tell him what happened and he will see what he can do, he recalled. Simeon said Sgt Rolle told him everything would be fine and told him to sign the statement. Simeon who was expelled from high school in the ninth grade said he cannot read, but trusted Sgt Rolle and signed the document. According to Sgt Rolles testimony, Simeon gave the statement freely. He said the accused told him Strachan rushed at him with a knife and he pulled a gun from his waist and fired to scare him. Simeon said he saw his attorney the following day during an ID parade, when he was picked out as the gunman. During cross-examination, prosecutor Erica Kemp asked Simeon if he and his girlfriend send text messages to each other. Simeon said he could not recall. She told this court that you text her and she text you, Ms Kemp said. You can read and write and you signed a statement. She also asked him what time they arrived at the party. Although his girlfriend testified that they arrived between nine and 10pm, Simeon said he arrived at almost 11pm. Mrs Kemp asked Simeon if he saw someone grilling at the party. He said Phillip Rolle, also known as Boogalou, was at the grill. Mrs Kemp suggested that Strachan and Simeon had an exchange of words at the party. Boogalou tried to diffuse the situation. He got a good look at you. I am putting it to you that you saw Strachan go to a van and retrieve something from under the seat and put it in his shirt. Strachan was standing behind the grill. You were standing in front of Boogalou and you pointed the gun at Strachan and fired, Ms Kemp said. Simeon disagreed with her assertions. The trial continues. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDA Y, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 5 By CARA BRENNENBETHEL cbrennen@tribunemedia.net PLP chairman Bradley Roberts unveiled his partys plans for a rebuilding and support programme for business es affected by government road works and a massive housing development on Andros to ensure more Bahamians have access to affordable real estate. These were just two of many initiatives the party dis cussed on the first day of its three-part job creation and empowerment summit. Mr Roberts said the busi ness rebuilding and support programme could include tax holidays and rebuilding incen tives for those whose liveli hood was affected by the New Providence Road Improvement Project. Why should some businesses bear such a dispropor tionate burden? They deserve a chance to rebuild, to get back on their feet. What is amazing is that after all the pain and suffering Bahamians have endured during these road works, taxpayers will have to bear cost overruns that total $25 million and growing, on an initial contract of $120 million, he said. Mr Roberts also used the stage to hit out at the governing party, accusing the FNM of summarily dismissing longstanding Customs, Immigration and Police officers jobs that families were relying on. They raised taxes on everything that moves, and some things that dont, like the Bible. They have presided over massive mismanagement of public funds. And theyve run up the national debt while forgetting the most important thing you, he said. Mr Roberts added that more must be done to ensure that young Bahamians have access to affordable real estate, which is why a PLP government would make Crown land available in Andros. Andros Island, the Big Yard, the largest land mass closest to New Providence, has a sizable Crown land bank, which can be made available for the creation of a new city and extended housing. The natural resource of potable water is definitely not an issue, as it is currently available nearly everywhere on Andros. The PLP will cause the development of a minimum of one-third acre lots on Andros. These subdivisions will be supported by commer cial centres, post offices, clinics, police stations, banks, and schools. The guidelines for the grant of Crown land to qualified Bahamians and the time frame for building homes will be clearly defined for efficient and regulatory progress. A low cost, scheduled fast ferry service will be intro duced to allow persons who embrace the offer to go to and fro between New Providence and Andros with ease, Mr Roberts said.ROBERTS HAILS PLPS EXTRAORDINARY NEW GENERATION OF CANDIDATES BRADLEY ROBERTS PLP CHAIRMAN INSIGHTFor the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays MURDER ACCUSED DENIES TELLING POLICE HE SHOT STRACHAN PLP UNVEILS PROGRAMME TO HELP BUSINESSES AFFECTED BY ROAD WORKS, DEVELOPMENTTimClarke/Tribunestaff ROADWORKS WOES: PLP chairman Bradley Roberts unveiled his partys plans for a rebuilding and support programme for businesses affected by government road works (above) and a development on Andros. COURT NEWS Simeon decides to give sworn evidence on stand

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 2 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 4 2 4 2 V]VScReZ`_ 4 V]VScReZ`_ 4 :LWKDOO-RKQVVWRUHVSDUWLFLSDWLQJGRQWPLVVRXWRQ\RXUFKDQFH IRUKXJHVWRUHZLGHVDYLQJVRQDOO)RRWZHDU%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV LQFOXGLQJ bIIDOO:RPHQVHQVDQG&KLOGUHQVKRHV bIIDOO&ODUNVDQGLPEHUODQGUR:RUN%RRWV bII$OO%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV bI$OO)DVKLRQ-HZHOU\ 3/86HOHFWHGW\OHVDUNHG'RZQ%\b $QGGRQWIRUJHWZLWKHYHU\SXUFKDVH<28KDYHDFKDQFHWR :,1D*LIW&HUWLFDWHDVZHOODVUHJLVWHUWRZLQD *UDQGUL]H*LIW&HUWLFDWH $//$/(6$5(),1$/ 12(;&+$1*(6()81'6 12/$<$:$<6 -2+1 6+2(6$1'$&&(6625,(6 526(77$ 526(77$&$5(:($5f &$50,&+$(/$' '& '& 2 '& 2 '& 4 '& 4 2 4 2 2 eY 2 '& eY '& 2 '& 2 eY 2 &RPHDQGFHOHEUDWHRXUWK$QQLYHUVDU\E\MRLQLQJXVIRUD 6725(:,'($/( 6HSWHPEHUWKFWREHUVW By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net AN electronics store located downtown was robbed by an armed man in broad daylight two buildings across from a police station Tuesday afternoon. The QBC Radio Shack, located on East Street north off Bay Street and seconds from the Central Police Station, had an undisclosed amount of cash and goods stolen from its store. The store manager spoke to The Tribune about the incident which occurred in her absence. She said: A gentleman robbed the store of some cash and goods. We dont know how much it was but its just mind boggling right now. She said that the cashier, who was seriously shaken up after being held up at gunpoint was assisting police officers with the investigation in the matter. She said she was in shock that an armed robbery occurred and in broad daylight. However, she was relieved that no one was physically hurt. Officer in charge of the Central Police Station, assistant Supt Leon Bethel, confirmed the store managers account. It happened shortly after noon, he said. A man entered the store and made inquiries about a BlackBerry cell phone. As he was being handed the cellphone, he produced what appeared to be a handgun and demanded cash from the lone female cashier. ASP Bethel said that the armed robber made off with an undetermined amount of cash and a cell phone. When asked about the officers patrolling the area at the time, he said: No police who were patrolling the area at the time reported to seeing anything suspicious. He explained that a number of officers were stationed at the Supreme Court at the time of the incident. Nevertheless, he said police are continuing their investigations and will be looking at interviewing other persons who were in the area when the incident occurred.STORE ROBBED ACROSS FROM POLICE STATION POPULAR ELECTRONICS OUTLET HELD UP IN BROAD DAYLIGHT By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Hotel workers at the Grand Lucayan Resort walked off the job on Wednesday as two large tour buses of travel agents were on property for a Fam Trip hosted by Vision Airlines. As workers assembled in front of Manor House around noon to meet with union officials, police were called in to disperse the group. Hubert Saunders, treasurer at the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers, said workers had assembled in the area for a peaceful meeting on the property. The union executive said management is proposing to make a number of workers redundant at the resort. Mr Saunders claims that the move is an attempt by management to rehire the workers as casual labourers. This would mean that they would not be entitled to any benefits under the industrial agreement. He said the jobs of hundreds of line staff workers will be affected in various areas, including Food & Beverage, Engineering, Spa, Housekeeping and Laundry. Last Monday, we met with management relating to some workers who they are trying to make redundant, and their position is that those persons will be going home, Mr Saun ders told The Tribune. Hotel officials could not be contacted for comments up to press time on Wednesday evening. In March, some 200 hotel workers were laid off at the hotel in Lucaya. Management said the terminations were necessary to keep the hotel open and save the jobs of about 800 workers. The hotel had been experiencing low occupancy at the time. Hutchison Lucaya, the hotel operators, have been trying to drum up business investing a lot of money to promote the property. The Grand Lucayan Hotel and Vision Airlines have entered into a contract to start air service to the island from five major US cities on November 3. The hotel is hosting some 80 travel agents from Raleigh, North Carolina, that arrived on the island on Tuesday aboard Vision Airlines. It is the first of five planned Fam Trips to Grand Bahama. Workers who walked off the job on Wednesday were told by management not to return to work. Mr Saunders said: They are not allowing persons who came to the meeting back to work. We tried to speak with management to ask why these workers are not being allowed back to work, but they refuse to meet with us. The union executive said the union has a right to meet with workers on the property. We are opposed to the redundancy of more workers. Right now, they (management) are trying to make all areas redundant and so we are looking at some 500 employees, but they want to bring them back as casual workers. We want to make sure that doesnt happen, Mr Saunders said. The union official said casual workers are working five and six days compared to permanent workers who are only working one and two days. That is a major concern, and workers are also upset because they have learned they will not be getting a Christmas bonus and ham and turkey from the company this December, Mr Saunders said. Mr Saunders noted that hairstylists working in the Spa have been told that they can rent booths at the resort. Sandra Rollings, a hairstylist employed eight years at the resort, was one of the workers not allowed back to work. The thing about is that I didnt apply for this job, they came looking for me, and I closed my business to come work for them. We want to be treated fairly and with respect. I have been employed here for eight years and they do not abide by the contract. They dont give workers sufficient notice, she said. Mr Rollings said workers in the spa work above and beyond when providing service to visitors and customers. Mr Saunders said the union will file a labour dispute with the Department of Labour on Monday. He claims that employers are taking advantage of work ers in the downturn economy. There is no job security for workers on Grand Bahama and statements have been made that there is no work here so Grand Bahamians would do anything to work, he said. GRAND LUCAYAN WORKERS WALK OFF JOB DARING: The store front window of the QBC Radio Shack, located on East Street north off Bay Street and seconds from the Central Police Station. The store was robbed of an undisclosed amount of cash and goods.Felip Major/Tribune staff

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marked by the Bahamas government for the project, Ambassador Hu said they expect work to begin on the core part of the project on November 1 of this year. During his exclusive interview with The Tribune at his residence on the Eastern Road, Ambassador Hu stressed the importance of the development receiving the best possible quality workmanship and being completed within its budgeted timeframe. However, he said he found it interesting the view expressed by some Bahamians against the foreign labour component. Although he quickly remarked he would likewise be protective of the Bahamas if he were a Bahamian, Ambassador Hu stressed the quicker the project is completed, the sooner will the 8,000 post-construc tion Baha Mar jobs be made available to the Bahamian people. He said: I think it is fully understandable. If I am a cit izen of the Bahamas I would have the same view. But I believe we can explain to them (Bahamians) fully that the earlier the project would be completed, the earlier would the new jobs be cre ated. I believe the Bahamian people will understand this, because none of the workers will remain in the Bahamas after completing their jobs. So, the faster the better. Pointing to the successful completion of the new National Stadium, Embassy staff highlighted the majori ty of the workers have already left the country, with only 10 still remaining to do minor work on the building. It was also confirmed the project utilized $10 million in locally-purchased materials. Ambassador Hu said the Chinese labourers do not want to remain in the Bahamas, citing the language barrier, cultural differences, and the high cost of living. However, if a Bahamian woman were to marry one of the Chinese workers, he said he could not in all good conscience force the worker to leave the Bahamas. However, he joked about the possibility of such an event as it appeared that local girls did not fancy his fellow countrymen. The Embassy has also organised training programmes to bring new work ers up to speed on local laws and customs in an effort to encourage positive experiences with their Bahamian co-workers. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE r Majesty's Prison Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming yesterday. When the end of an inmate's sentence approaches, the pre-release board meets with the convict to prepare him or her for life outside prison walls. "We have a pre-release unit with a number of behaviour adjustment programmes. The person is exposed to anger management, substance abuse counselling, family reunification, employment skills training to help put a person in the best possible position to successfully reintegrate but they don't target a particular category of offender. Even if an offender exhibits serious psychosis, the prison has no other option but to release them once they have finished their sentence. Dr Rahming said: "We have no alternative once his sentence is complete there's no alternative but to release the inmate." The penitentiary needs a full-time mental health unit to monitor and evaluate psychotic inmates while in prison and before they are released, he added. "One of the hopes that I have, and I know the minister has been talking about this, is the need to create a mental health unit within Her Majesty's Prison and I anticipate that in the not too distant future we would have it. "A mental health unit would cater to sociopaths, psychopathic needs of certain inmates. Currently, psychiatrists from the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre visit the prison once a week to see inmates who are referred to them. This places limitations on the level of mental care inmates receive, Dr Rahming said. "We have visiting psychologists that come to the prison from Sandilands but the fact that they are visiting speaks to their limitations." As detectives were trying to piece together the last moments of Marcos life, the boys sister Tancia Humes said: Were trying, were really trying to hold on. My mom is holding up but just barely. Marco was last seen leaving his home on Brougham Street, off Baillou Hill Road, last Friday between 4pm to 6pm. After going to a neighbourhood shop for a few items for his mom, Marco asked if he could use the change to purchase candy. At the time of his disappearance he was wearing a Bob Marley T-shirt and long khaki pants. The sixth grader enjoyed video games, watching television and children's movies, and sports. Two weeks ago, he joined a boxing club after saving up his lunch money. For the next five days, his family tirelessly searched their community as they feared the worst. A hunt they feel was not taken seriously by authorities and the public until it was too late. The Bain and Grants Town Associ ation posted a $2,000 reward for information leading to the apprehension and conviction of anyone connected to the matter. Upon the discovery of Marcos body, C B Moss, the associations president, said he was most disturbed by the sluggish response of the community at the onset of his disappearance. In the days leading up to his discovery, Mr Moss called for the community to band together against predators to ensure the incident did not become a trend. He claimed another young boy from the area had been reported missing for one day, three weeks ago, and was found walking along the Cable Beach strip. Police were said to be investigating the child's abduction. "We are very determined in this community to see that this does not become a trend because there are lots of children who move around in the area, sometimes unaccompanied, and thereby are very vulnerable," Mr Moss said. Marcos badly decomposed body was discovered in bushes to the rear of an apartment complex off Yorkshire Street, Cable Beach, around 10am Wednesday. According to Tribune sources, the chief suspect is 33 and had been jailed for a similar offence. It is understood the suspect lives in an apartment complex near where Marcos body was found. Marcos case has renewed public outcry for a registered sex offenders' list. ted sentences. "I hear this talk about developing some register that is easy in a big place like the United States but if a register is developed in Nassau then the court sentence effectively becomes a life sentence. "It means I could never hope to get a job or life again even if I have changed," said Prison Superintendent Elliston Rahming yesterday. The minister responsible for Social Services, Loretta Butler-Turner, said she began groundwork for a sex offenders register in the beginning of her term but shelved the idea. "When I first became a minister I felt very strongly about the implementation of a sexual offenders register. She said she understands the outcry but added that the idea must not be seen as a "panacea" for preventing sex crimes. "But I think many countries are finding that once you identify these people (as sexual offenders) many times they are rejected everywhere they go, so what do you do? "I think we have to weigh the pros and cons before we drive this as a panacea." Crime activist Rodney Moncur said he supports a sex offenders register for con victed paedophiles. He said: "I'm more particularly interested in a sex register in cases of children who are victims. "Children are vulnerable, are innocent children can't give consent." Police discovered Marco's partially decomposed body Wednesday morning in bushes in western New Providence. A well-place source in the RBPF said the boy's body showed signs of sexual assault. Marco disappeared from his in Brougham Street last Friday afternoon. His mother said he left home to buy candy from a nearby gas station and never returned. Three men are assisting police in their investigations. FROM page one NOMORE THAN 4,000 CHINESE WORKERS IN BAHAMAS AT ONE TIME THREE STILL IN CUSTODY IN MARCO INVESTIGATION FROM page one SEXOFFENDERS REGISTER WOULD PROTECT PUBLIC FROM page one VIOLENT OFFENDERS NOT GIVEN FINAL MENTAL EVALUATION BEFORE RELEASE FROM PRISON FROM page one HER MAJESTY'S PRISON Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE fishing industry lost about $3 million in crawfish ing apparatus due to Hurricane Irene, the Bahamas Commercial Fishermens Alliance (BCFA) chief, Adrian LaRoda, told Tri bune Business yesterday. Mr LaRoda called the $3 million figure conservative, saying ie could in fact be much higher. Overall in the industry we could have lost about $3 million in traps and condos, and thats putting it conservatively, he said. We expect it to be much, much higher than that. Damages to fleet were minimal. Everyone came in port. There was some loss to dinghies, but most of the damage was to harvesting apparatus. Mr LaRoda told Tribune Business: What has happened is we have suffered a tremendous loss of fishing traps and condos. He said one trap can cost $120 to $200 to make, and some fishermen use thousands. Fishermen have had to basically absorb the loss. Some people are still trying to recover. We have just had to absorb the loss and try and get back to work as quickly as possible, he added: A lot of fishermen are now deeper in debt. These types of apparatus, the traps and condos, are uninsurable. In some instances that kind of loss can be worse than losing a boat. Some of the smaller fisherman have had to go back to the old way of diving and spearing. So far the majority of the boats have only been able to do one trip since Irene. By next week or the week after next, we will be able to tell what the harvest is like. Mr LaRoda said he was pleased the Government had reinstated some tax breaks for fishing equipment. Some concessions have been reinstated, and that has $4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.50 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A LEADINGBahamian aviation executive yesterday accused successive governments of playing Russian Roulette with the industrys health and that of the wider economy by failing to implement key structural reforms demanded for more than a decade. Pointing out that civil avi ation employed an estimated 4,000 persons between Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA) and the various airlines that served it and other airports, Captain Randy Butler, pres ident and chief executive of Sky Bahamas, said both PLP and FNM governments had lacked the political will to overhaul the sectors regulatory and safety structures. Captain Butler, who is also the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) candi date for North Andros and the Berry Islands, agreed with many of the recom mendations contained in an Inter-American Develop ment Bank (IDB) report revealed by Tribune Busi ness yesterday, suggested the Bahamas failed to appreciate just how critical the sector was to tourism and Family Island development. With the threat of US authorities downgrading the Bahamas Category One status still hanging over it, according to the IDB, Captain Butler argued that the Government appeared not to understand the potential negative consequences for aviation, airlift from the US and tourism. This is unfortunately where I believe the Government does not understand it is playing Russian Roulette here, Captain Butler told Tribune Busi ness. I dont believe we have full appreciation of how connected it is, and how important it is. We cannot be building Baha Mar and not taking GOVT PLAYING RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH AVIATION Bahamian airline chief and DNA candidate questions if political will there to safeguard 4,000-job sector Says problems in IDB report have existed for decade CAPTAIN RANDY BUTLER SEE page 4B CABLE EYES 20% RISE IN KEY COSTS By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE BAHAMASis aiming to invest just north of $15 million in capital expenditure this year, Tribune Business was told yesterday, the BISX-listed communications provider also eyeing a 20 per cent increase yearover-year in major expense lines. Barry Williams, Cable Bahamas senior vice-president of finance, said that while signal (programming) and regulatory fees had increased, the company was also experiencing positive top-line growth, with revenues from its newly-acquired Systems Resource Group (SRG) subsidiary now more than 5 per cent ahead of pre-purchase levels. With SRGs prepaid card services relaunched after interconnection capacity issues with the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) were resolved, Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas was also ramping up for the 2011 fourth quarter launch of its REVOICE fixed-line product. Meanwhile, digital box rental revenues rose 68 per cent during Cable Bahamas second quarter, with the 38,000 boxes in the programme up 305 per cent over Junes 2010 figure. Mr Williams attributed the increase toa combination of Cable Bahamas ongoing digitisation initiative, which was not quite at 50 per cent of the network yet. Were seeing some traction there. Thats accounting for some of the growth there, he said. The rest of its coming from some of our customers coming back to the network. Back in 2008-2009 we saw a significant drop off, so what weve been seeing is some of those customers coming back on as well. Mr Williams said the return of existing subscribers was the main factor accounting for the box rental revenue growth. He added that Cable Bahamas was probably anywhere from 3,000-4,000 customers back from our hey-day in terms of total subscriber numbers, which peaked at around 77,000-78,000. Pay-per-view revenues were up 32 per cent in the 2011 second quarter, and Mr Williams said the company was just getting back towards its 28,000 premium subscriber peak. Its total REVTV revenues rose 1.9 per cent to $24 million during the three months to end-June, with Cable Bahamas Prime Select, Plus and Extra products seeing revenue growth of 11 per cent, 10 per cent and 13 per cent respectively. As for capital expenditure, Mr Williams said the company should invest north of $15 million during the 12 months to the December 31 year-end. He added that Cable Bahamas always did an assessment at the third quarter end (that comes today) to determine where it was on capital spending, and where it wanted to be by year-end. If Christmas promotions kick in for us in terms of stimulating demand for more set-top boxes and services, the $15 million figure might increase. Asked whether cost increases experienced during the 2011 second quarter and first half would carry over for the last six months, Mr Williams responded: Unfortunately, I have to say yes. Some of the costs incurred are variable, but once incurred they stay with you. The rate of increase year-over-year is in the neighbourhood of 20 per centplus on signal costs. Theyre very significant costs and, of course, communications and regulatory fees come right off the top line revenues. We did have an increase in revenues, and that translates into an increase in fees. Were looking towards what looks like being a 20 per cent increase this year. Mr Williams told Tribune Business that the relaunch of its SRG subsidiarys prepaid card business in July had gone well, and was starting to pick back up and show some promise. He added: The SRG addition has been a very good one. Its a decent revenue stream. Its ahead of the point where we acquired the company. The SRG voice revenues are certainly doing very well. Theyre probably in excess of 5 per cent beyond where they were when we picked it Aiming to invest $15m in capital spending during 2011 Sees over 5% revenue rise in SRG streams post-purchase Capacity issues with BTC resolved SEE page 4B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BAHAMASwas yesterday urged to develop a medium to long-term plan to address its infrastructure needs that would take the politics out of it, a leading KPMG (Bahamas) executive adding that such projects could be pitched on a regional basis. With the Caribbean cur rently having an estimated $20 billion in infrastructure needs, Simon Townend, a KPMG (Bahamas) partner and managing director of its KPMG Corporate Finance arm, said that to attract the right private sector partners and financing it needed to gain scale and market itself as a region rather than a collection of small island states. Speaking to Tribune Business about the main findings resulting from KPMGs Miami conference on the Caribbeans infrastructure challenge, held last week, Mr Townend said: The major one was that no one has a proper long-term infrastruc BAHAMAS URGED: DEVELOP -YEAR PLUS STRATEGY ON INFRASTRUCTURE KPMG executive says move would tak e the politics out of it Summit urges scale and marketing Caribbeans $20bn needs as one to attract top bidders SEE page 4B SIMON TOWNEND By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net BUSINESS owners impacted by the ongoing New Providence Road Improvement Project yesterday said revenues still remain off by sometimes more than 50 per cent, with no relief in sight for what has become a living nightmare. ROADWORKS REMAIN LIVING NIGHTMARE One firm s average tsake drops from $7,000-$10,000 to $300-$400 Super Value estimates losses to date at $2m SEE page 5B FISHERMEN FEAR $3M TRAP LOSSES SEE page 5B

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 3B By SIMON COOPER Res Socius Every generation produces its own examples of genius or, if you like, people who transcend collective thinking and move goalposts. These geniuses are often a thorn in the side of established interests, because they dare to challenge the status quo. The great business successes of recent decades are the product of these exceptional people, and we should all learn from them. Steve Jobs, the former chief executive of Apple Computer, will go down in history on account of his ability to tilt at windmills and knock down rows of corporate skittles. But are his ideas relevant to the sleepy business culture of the Bahamas, where some wish that things might never change? These are some of the great mans thoughts to ponder. Business is a blend of art and science. In other words, a business college textbook can never get you there completely. Success is the child of creativity, not cold reason. Do not listen too carefully to what other people say, for if you do then you will remain inside a pack of average people. Their rules ought not to be your master. Fear of failure is the worlds greatest inhibitor, for it both prevents us from daring and creates a self-fulfilling expectation that we could fail. Banish the word from your vocabulary forever. The way forward is never more than a trail through a jungle of uncertainty towards a sketch plan for the future. If you want a roadmap, then follow behind the rest and discover nothing new. Listen to the voice in your own head. If it tells you that you are on the right track, obey it. All other voices lack your vision, or might even prefer for you to fail. Expect a scary amount from yourself and from all others close to you. Fortune favours the bold, but it demands hard work, too. Ten per cent inspiration and ninety per cent perspiration are about the right mix. Worry about succeeding, not being right, because being right involves following rules, and rules constrain us. The important thing in golf is scoring birdies, not matching somebody elses perfect swing. Surround yourself with exceptional people, and never be scared of creating your own competition. This includes having the grace to move elsewhere when the day arrives. Make sure you remain hungry for success by always moving your own goalposts, and never catch yourself thinking entirely logically. Thinking foolishly in other peoples terms is a pre-requisite for invention. The circle is incomplete and anything is possible in terms of groundbreaking brilliance and the extent of our determination, too. There are no boxes to think outside. Ive been tracking the success of emerging nations such as Brazil, India and Korea lately. They seem to be able to achieve spectacular growth, while others like a certain Caribbean nation remain trapped in a paradigm where the future is back-fitted into the past. I wonder what Steve Jobs would say if we appointed him chief executive of the Bahamas for the time that he may have left. I suspect that many things would have to change, including upending a few of our overfed holy cows? NB: Res Socius was founded by Simon Cooper in 2009, and is a business brokerage authorised by the Bahamas Investment Authority. He has extensive private and public SME experience, and was formerly chief executive of a publicly traded investment company. He was awarded an MBA with distinction by Liverpool University in 2005. Contact him on 636-8831 or write to simon.cooper@ressocius.com. REMOVING SACRED COWS A REAL JOBS SIMONCOOPER By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Agriculture and Marine Resources, Larry Cartwright, told Tribune Business yesterday that the Government was presently verifying its figures to determine how much Hurricane Irene has cost the Bahamian farming industry. Mr Cartwright told Tribune Business: "Reports from the agricultural sector are still being processed. We haven't come up with a final figure asyet. We are just going over the reports and verifying what we received. We were gunning for October 5 when Parliament reopens to have it ready for then. We are still hoping to have it ready for then, but it is kind of doubtful right now. Certainly, within the next week, we will have a final report for the media." Mr Cartwright told Tribune Business that any assistance rendered by the Government to Bahamian farmers would be influenced by what the final figure look like. "We haven't finalised what will happen this go around because that's going to depend on what the final figure looks like. In the past we have cate gorised our farmers in three categories; small, medium and large farmers, Mr Cartwright said. In the past those farmers who suffered damage would have received $500 for the small farmers, $1,000 for the medium and $1,500 for the large farmers. Then they would have been given some fertilizer and some seeds, again based on the size of their farms, and if they had lost fruit trees we would have provided some fruit trees as well. The fruit tree program will probably be continued this time around. Many of the Bahamas farmers previously contacted by Tribune Business reported major devastation to their farms, with farmers on the hardest-hit Family Islands losing entire crops, particu larly citrus crops. GOVT STILL ASSESSING AGRICULTURE DAMAGE COMMONWEALTHBrewery suffered an almost 20 per cent decline in net income for the 2011 first half, its financials have revealed, with the drop from $9.515 million to $7.677 million driven largely by top-line slippage. The liquor wholesaler/distributor saw revenues for the six months to June 30 fall by just 1.1 per cent, from $55.609 million to $54.977 million, but the major drop was in the other income category. This fell from $1.494 million to $59,095 year-over-year. As a consequence, total income dropped 3.6 per cent to $55.036 million, compared to $57.103 million last year. This negated a slight decline in total expenses, which fell from $47.842 million in 2010 to $47.388 million.s Balance sheet cash fell by more than $10 million since the 2010 year-end, which may have been linked to the $17.653 million dividend paid before the companys initial public offering (IPO). Some $11 million of that sum was paid on March 4, 2011, and the $6 million balance on April 4 the latter coming after the second quarter start. Both payments took place during the 2011 first half. Brewery sees 20 per cent profit fall LARRY CARTWRIGHT NEW YORK Associated Press OIL REBOUNDED Thursday following encouraging economic news in the U.S. and Europe. The Commerce Department said the U.S. economy grew a little faster in the spring than previously estimated, while the Labor Department said that the number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell sharply last week. Meanwhile, German lawmakers took a major step toward dealing with the region's debt crisis by strengthening a bailout fund. That eased worries that Europe's debt problems could spread and lead to another reces sion. Benchmark crude rose 93 cents to end the day at $82.14 per barrel in New York. Brent crude, which is used to price oil that's pro duced overseas, was 14 cents higher to finish at $103.95 a barrel in London. Thursday's rise continues the roller coaster ride for oil prices this month. Oil tumbled 8 percent from Wednesday to Friday last week, then rebounded 6 percent by Tuesday, then fell nearly 4 percent on Wednesday. Tepid economic growth in the U.S. and other major world economies has forced experts to backtrack on demand forecasts for this year. As concerns of another recession crept into energy markets, traders stayed focused on the European debt crisis and government reports on the state of the U.S. econ omy. "The fear factor has simply gone up," independent oil analyst Jim Ritterbusch said. "I've never seen volatility like this, and I've been watching oil for 28 years." An extended rise or drop in oil will eventually affect gasoline prices. So far, oil hasn't moved by much, wavering between about $80 and $90 a barrel for the past two months. In other energy trading, natural gas futures fell 5.2 cents to finish at $3.747 per 1,000 cubic feet. The government reported that the nation's natural gas supplies last week rose more than analysts expected. Heating oil was unchanged to finish at $2.8266 per gallon and gasoline futures lost 1.67 cents to end at $2.5586 per gallon. Oil rebounds on encouraging economic news

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fEfRIWKH$LUSRUW$XWKRULW\ $PHQGPHQWf5HJXODWLRQVWKDWWKH$LUSRUW$XWKRULW\DWDPHHWLQJRQWKH WKGD\RI6HSWHPEHULPSRVHGDQGRUYDULHGIHHVDQGFKDUJHVDWWKH /\QGHQLQGOLQJ,QWHUQDWLRQDO$LUSRUWDVIROORZV Aeronautical Fees Df/DQGLQJ)HHVLQFUHDVHb EfHUPLQDO)HHVLQFUHDVHb Ff$LUFUDIW/RDGLQJ%ULGJH)HHVLQFUHDVHb Gf$LUFUDIWDUNLQJ)HHVLQFUHDVHb ,WLVIXUWKHUQRWLHGWKDWWKHVDLGLPSRVLWLRQDQGRUYDULDWLRQRI)HHVDQG&KDUJHV VKDOOWDNHHIIHFWDWWKH/\QGHQ3LQGOLQJ,QWHUQDWLRQDO$LUSRUWQLQHW\GD\VIURP WKHGDWHRIUVWSXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH ture plan. Theres these [party election] manifestos that say do this, do that in the next five years, but I dont think a single Caribbean country hasa five-year plus plan. There was no future set of longer-term strategies. Caribbean ministers who attended the conference, among them Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, and Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, came to the consensus that this was the key issue. While many felt that constantly changing governments at every election would either prevent or undermine development of such a plan, as different administrations had different priorities, Mr Townend pointed out that the UK had managed to create a fiveyear infrastructure plan and establish an infrastructure development group within government. I think for the Bahamas itisa matter of giving some thought to a longer-term plan as a whole, Mr Townend told Tribune Business. What are the requirements today, what are they likely to be in x years time. Acknowledging that it was a bit more difficult for the Bahamas, given that it had numerous inhabited islands, unlike other Caribbean states with just one territory, Mr Townend said the conference threw up the example of a Bahamian island with a 50strong population that had just receive a $13 million generator. The economics are not there, but it is critical to have a plan focused on all key areas, not just physical infrastructure but social infrastructure, he added, pointing to the need to upgrade schools hospitals, medical clinics and the prison. With an estimated $2-$2.1 billion in infrastructure needs, the senior KPMG executive said, the Bahamas needed to take a strategic look at everything rather than a piecemeal approach. Thats the main thing for the Bahamas. Thats not to say the Government is not prioritising the right things the airport, the port and the roads. The Miami conference had shown Caribbean nations faced similar infrastructure issues, one country facing exactly the same problem in that its container shipping facilities were in located in the heart of its main citys downtown. It wanted to relocate them, but moving all the companies at once was proving a challenge, especially as the government there did not own all the land earmarked for their new home. Asa result, they were interested in the private-public partnership (PPP) the Bahamas had established to facilitate creation of the $70$80 million Arawak Cay port. Most people were look ing at the Bahamas and thinking: Those guys are a step ahead of us. Whats happening in the Bahamas and how are they making that happen? There were lots of favourable comments in our general direction, Mr Townend said of the Miami conference reaction. He added that one discussion had noted a lot of courage was required to develop a long-term infra structure plan and try to get all stakeholders on board. Pleasing everyone was viewed as an impossible utopia, given that there were a lot of vested interests that did not want a change in the status quo. You have to be coura geous and do what is right for the broader population, Mr Townend said of the conferences conclusion. Referring again to the need for a medium to longterm infrastructure plan for the Bahamas, the KPMG executive added I can see it being adjusted from time to time, but generally if you take the politics out of it and look at the raw realities, I think we can come up with a plan. While the main Bahamian political parties were likely to have different priorities, Mr Townend said they were likely to identify the same infrastructure needs. Another key conference finding was the need to market the Caribbean as a whole from an infrastructure project and development opportunity, since as individual states its nations might not be attractive to private companies and financiers. Compared to similar projects in the likes of Canada and the US, individual states such as Barbados were small beer in the scheme of things. Getting the right companies with expertise and financing has been difficult, Mr Townend told Tribune Business. Theres kind of a lack of scale on an individual basis. One of the things that also came out of it is that the Caribbean as a whole needs to market its infrastructure requirements more effectively as a whole. Rather than the Bahamas say it has this project, that project, expand on what youre doing to bring out the whole regional basis. Attract them on a regional rather than a country basis. Its a much larger opportu nity, and people were sayinsg: Lets develop a Caribbean strategy. Financing is not that easy. Youve got the regional banks, but for anything of substantial scale, the options are not huge and there are only a couple of places to go to. Its all about scale; scale of the opportunity. Again advocating that PPPs were the way to go in dealing with the Bahamas infrastructure challenges, especially given the fiscal situation, Mr Townend said: When you look at places like Barbados with debt at 100 per cent of GDP, were much better off, but theres still a lot of debt and its beyond the comfort zone of most Bahamians. BAHAMAS URGED: DEVELOP -YEAR PLUS STRATEGY ON INFRASTRUCTURE FROM page one care of the aviation sector that supports it. We cannot be expanding Atlantis and not taking care of the aviation sector. We cannot talk about Family Island development. That does not make sense. If the Government does not understand the importance that aviation plays in development of this country and the Family Islands, we will have problems. Theyre not planning for growth and the expansion of the sector. You cant build hotels if there are no airports to bring them to. Noting that the IDB had identified the replacement of LPIAs radar system as a pri ority for its proposed $50 million loan initiative, Captain Butler said: I guess the IDB is as frustrated about this as I am....... The radar situation has been going from C A Smiths time through to Glenys Hanna-Martins time to now. The Sky Bahamas chief added that he understood the problems stemmed from the fact the radar system did not match the software acquired for it. Huge sums had already been spent in a bid to fix the problem, but to no avail, and Captain Butler said it was thanks to God that the air traffic controllers were doing a good job manually in directing air traffic when the radar system went down. They need upgraded equipment, hardware, software and training, all of those things, and its not been happening, he added. Its been identified, identified and identified. In the ICAO audit, they found the greatest fail ing was in the air traffic system. The political aspirant warned that without the proper laws, regulations and structure for the aviation industry in place, the IDBs $50 million loan program would fail. Such reforms could be achieved at a stroke of a pen, Captain Butler said, but he added: The Government lacks the political will to fix it. Its been around a long time. Until civil aviation reforms appeared on the Parliamentary or Cabinet agendas, he said: No $50 million is going to start to solve the problem. Im not hopeful at all. There was a Green Paper and White Paper in the past as well. It all comes down to political will. These problems have been identified internally by us when I was at Civil Aviation, by consultants brought in by the Government, theyve been identified by IATA [International Air Transport Association], theyve been identified by ICAO, by the FAA, by the TSA, by the ICAO in the last 10 years. Nothing has been done by either government for 10 years. Captain Butler backed the recommendations in the IDB plan, especially getting pri vate sector management and capital involved with Family Island airports, and making the Airport Authority autonomous from government, as excellent and one Ive been calling for for a long time. He added that the Airport Authority should ultimately take over the operational responsibilities currently performed by Civil Aviation, leaving the latter with regu latory oversight responsibility for the industry. Noting that upgrading Family Island airports to international standards would cost a multi-million dollar sum, Cap tain Butler suggested that, in Biminis case for example, management of its airport should be taken over by the Bimini Bay Resort. He that the number of international airports in the Family Islands should also be reduced. Captain Butler said Eleuthera and Abaco, for instance, should have just one, rather than the current two or three. The others should be transformed into domestic feeder airports, in a bid to conserve resources. Captain Butler also repeated his call for a long-term strategic plan to develop the aviation sector. FROM page one GOVT PLAYING RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH AVIATION up. At the time we acquired it, it had no prepaid revenues. That business was put on hold because of an issue with capacity with BTC, which was sorted out. Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas did not anticipate a huge take-up of its new fixedline service, named REVOICE, until 2012 because the company was late getting that product out. Its still on for this quarter, the fourth quarter, and will be a good addition to the SRG services out there, he added of REVOICE. Its going to ramp up in the fourth quarter, when youre going to see it getting out to the public. Mr Williams said Cable Bahamas had a good idea of the level of damages/repairs it had incurred as a result of Hurricane Irene, but was still doing its final assessments. We are going to suffer some loss, a bit in New Providence, but more in the Family Islands, he added. Eleuthera was one of the msain ones hit, and the off-air services we offer in the Family Islands had some damage and services out. Were mostly restored, but are working through some painful issues and smaller issues with customers. Were hoping to be done with those in the next couple of weeks. FROM page one CABLE EYES 20% RISE IN KEY COSTS

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 5B %$+$0$6%/,& 6(59,&(6,21 $11281&(0(17 *RYHUQPHQW7UDLQLQJ&HQWUH +DVK +RWHO&RUSRUDWLRQ ,QWHUQDOHFXULW\ 0DEOH:DONHUULPDU\ 0LQLVWU\RI(GXFDWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI/DERXU 0LQLVWU\RI:RUNV 0LQLVWU\RI
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BERLIN Associated Press GERMANYhas kept alive hopes that the 17-nation euro currency can survive the sprawling debt crisis when lawmakers in Europe's largest economy voted overwhelmingly in favor of expanding the powers of the eurozone's bailout fund. Thursday's vote strengthened Chancellor Angela Merkel's center-right coali tion, which had struggled to win support from a bloc of rebellious members, and could bolster her ability to negotiate new European crisis measures. While many investors and experts believe new steps will be required in Europe, such as letting Greece write off more of its debt pile, Ger many's approval of the fund's new powers and scope was necessary to avoid a new bout of massive market tur moil. "The support of the Bun destag is an important step for stabilizing the eurozone," Michael Kemmer, head of Germany's Bank Federation, told the news agency dapd. "With that, they have set a course that leads out of the debt crisis." The 440 billion ($600 billion) fund will be able to buy government bonds and lend money to banks and governments before they are in a full-blown crisis, making Europe's response to mar ket jitters more rapid and pre-emptive. Germany, which pays the lion's share of European bailouts, became the 13th member of the eurozone to support the expansion of the rescue fund, the so-called European Financial Stability Facility, or EFSF. Cyprus and Estonia also passed the proposed expansion on Thursday. Austria's parliament is widely expected to pass the measure on Friday, the same day Germany's upper house of parliament is set to finalize Thursday's vote, while the Netherlands is expected to approve it in the first week of October. The biggest remaining hur dle is the final country to vote Slovakia where the government will not have enough support to pass it if the leader of the junior coali tion Freedom and Solidari ty party follows through with threats to vote against the fund's expansion. Its parlia ment is to vote later in October. In Berlin, 523 lawmakers in parliament, the Bundestag, voted in favor of expanding German participation to guarantee loans of up to 211 billion, compared with 123 billion so far. Eighty-five voted against it and three abstained. "It was a strong statement of Angela Merkel's position. She has the backing and the support of the coalition and she is able to negotiate on the European level," Peter Altmeier, the parliamentary whip for Merkel's Christian Democrats, said after the tally was announced. Markets appeared calmer even before Thursday's votes, following weeks of tur bulence triggered by uncertainty over Germany's position on the fund. The euro also traded slightly higher. "The overwhelming majority in the Bundestag is a good sign and will hopefully mark a step change in Ger man commitment to bring ing the spiraling crisis under control," said Sony Kapoor of the Re-Define economic policy think tank. The lingering problem, however, is that investors are resigned to the fact that Greece will have to default that is, impose tougher losses on its bondholders. French President Nicolas Sarkozy will meet with Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou in Paris on Friday to discuss the debt crisis, the president's office said. Papandreou met Germany's Merkel for similar talks Tuesday. Germany and France combined represent about half of the 17-nation eurozone's economic output. Greece was saved from default by an initial 110 billion ($150 billion) bailout in May last year before the EFSF was established to help any other countries in trou ble. A planned second rescue package for Greece this year includes a voluntary partici pation by private bondholders, who agreed to write off about 20 percent on their Greek debt holdings. Many experts say those writedowns should be closer to 50 percent. The debate among European leaders now is whether to allow such a move under controlled conditions, pro viding help to banks that may take heavy losses on Greek bonds they hold. Germany and the Nether lands are open to the option, with Merkel suggesting this week that Greece's second bailout deal might have to be renegotiated. France and the European Central Bank, however, oppose the idea. Greece's international debt inspectors returned to Athens on Thursday to complete a review. Merkel has said that any new decisions would depend upon the results of the inspectors' report, which is not due for days. Forging consensus over new measures particularly something as delicate as imposing more severe losses on Greece's creditors will likely be very difficult, how ever. Indeed, the parliamentary debate on the EFSF in Berlin on Thursday was a feisty three-hour long affair, reflecting how high tensions in Merkel's coalition were running over the idea of providing more backing to the eurozone's weakest members. Frank Schaeffler, a dissenter from the junior coalition partner, argued that bailout measures have wors ened Greece's economic situation. "Despite all arguments, the first bailout did not make the situation for Greece bet ter, but worse," said Schaeffler, a Free Democrat. "Expanding the fund will make the situation even worse." Schaeffler and others had long expressed their concerns, and opposition leaders had said going in to the vote that if Merkel's coalition had to rely on their votes, it would be a sign that her strife-prone and increasingly unpopular government is finished. Yet after a night of intense lobbying, Merkel's camp was able to secure a majority of 315 enough to have passed the measure even without support from the opposition parties. "This shows the clear determination of the coalition on this issue," Rainer Bruederle, the Free Democrats' parliamentary leader. "We have made an important decision for Europe." Any future changes to the current fund will also require parliamentary approval and maintaining that determination will be crucial to making swift, effective decisions to combat the crisis. In addition, the Bundestag will face another major vote early next year on the fund's permanent replacement, the European Stability Mechanism, which is due to take effect in 2013. Schaeffler has already vowed to rally his party to reject the ESM. Party leaders insist they are not worried by Schaeffler's plans, but many analysts have noted Merkel will have to hold her majority together, or Thursday may have only been the first in a series of nail-biting parliamentary showdowns over shoring up the euro. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 127,&( .81'(5$+2/',1*6/7' ,192/817$5
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takeover. While the valuation attributed to City Markets head office is helping to keep the Bahamas Supermarkets Profit Sharing Retirement Scheme solvent, it is an illiquid asset. Without regular revenues coming in from both leases, every time a qualifying employee is paid out, the funds pool is that bit more depleted. Tribune Business is not suggesting that plan benefi ciaries are in any immediate danger of seeing their investment evaporate, and Mr Finlayson has pledged to do what it takes to put matters right. This newspaper, though, was somewhat disappointed to see that for the moment, himself and City Markets chief financial officer Philip Kemp are the pension plan trustees, Mr Finlayson having told us earlier that those serving in those posts would be independent of the company.REGULATIONThe Securities Commission appears to be attempting to explain away why it has been unable to force City Markets to comply with the Securities Industry Act on holding annual general meetings (AGMs) and disclosure of material, accurate financial information. Although it sought to pin blame on the inadequate legislation supporting it (and it is inadequate), the regulators statement merely illustrated how impotent it is to enforce compliance with even the most basic capital requirements. Thankfully, the new Securities Industry Act should have much more teeth and enforcement clout, yet it remains to be seen whether the Securities Commission will have the will to really implement it effectively. Its Wednesday statement sent a shocking message to the Bahamian capital markets, namely that offenders can currently expect to get only a slap on the wrist if caught and the latter is unlikely. Again, the AGM and timely disclosure of financial information issues largely took place under the former BSL Holdings ownership, but the fact they have been allowed to fester for so long can only undermine investor and issuer confidence in the probity of the Bahamian cap ital markets. The companys response, that it has more important things to concentrate on than spending $100,000 on an AGM and that shareholders already know everything that is going on, is an understandable but glib statement. As a public company it knows it has certain disclosure, fiduciary and corporate governance requirements to abide by, and cannot run away from them. City Markets investors have been on a rollercoaster ride for the past four years, and have suffered a spectac ular destruction of shareholder value under BSL Holdings. Whether the same will happen under Mr Finlaysons team remains to be seen, but there has been no improvement so far. The least they deserve, after such wealth loss, is some honesty and disclosure as to where the company is, and an opportunity to question management. If this does not happen it will be a terrible indictment on the Bahamian capital markets. lic statements. There is certainly a recognition in Ingraham administration circles that something needs to be done about the national debt, and returning it to manageable levels, but no sign of a credible plan at least yet onhowto achieve this goal. First, we must admit we have a problem and stop pretending that everything will work itself out as soon as the US economy turns around, Mr Halkitis says. Second, we must get a handle on spending. The Government spends over $1.5 billion every year. Whose job is it to ensure that we, the Bahamian public, get value for the money spent? If we can save 10 per cent of this amount through improved procurement processes and quality control, that would translate into $160 million saved. No problem here. Tribune Business has long urged that fraud and waste in the public sector be tackled, and com bined with cost/spending cuts where possible. Top sugges tion from Mr Halkitis here, but can he agree to get all those entrenched trade unions, with vested interests not to mention numerous general election votes, to share the private sectors pain and agree to a 5 per cent across-the-board salary cut, for instance? There is no magic formula to cure our debt woes. Many of our problems are structural and have become entrenched over many years. To work our way back to economic and financial health will take hard work and sacrifice. The first step, however, is to admit that we do have a very serious problem, the good Senator notes. Bang on again. The good Senator scores a bulls eye in his use of the world structural, fingering issues such as labour productivity, work ethic, high utility costs, bureaucratic inefficiency.......... the list goes on. All have held, and continue to hold, the Bahamian economy back. He is also right in noting the absence of a magic formula to cure our woes, with any solution likely to involve some pain that all of us have to bear. It would have been nice, though, if the Senator had spelled out in precise terms how he, and his party, plan to tackle out structural inefficiencies and debt burden, rather than point fingers at the Government all the time. Solutions, not procrastination, please. And it is understandable for some to argue that the Senator is being somewhat disingenuous and hypocriti cal in attacking the Ingraham administrations fiscal policies, given the track record of the 2002-2007 PLP administration, of which he was part. Mr Halkitis has already defended himself on this score, pointing out that the Christie administrations annual recurrent deficit over its five years averaged $79.6 million, compared to the FNMs $146.75 million average (his statistics). What he conveniently ignores, of course, is the fact that the PLP government was in office during the peak of an economic boom, whereas the Ingraham administration has had to deal with one of the worst recessions in living memory. In sum, it is not surprising that the Government has incurred widened fiscal deficits, given that it is only natural for revenues to drop and spending to increase dur ing a recession. How, Senator, was it possible for the Christie government, during the years of plenty that featured a supposed $20 billion in foreign direct investment inflows, not to consistently run a balanced Budget on the recurrent side? Answer that one, please. It is more than likely that, had they been in office, the PLP would have followed a stimulus script similar to the FNMs. Given the partys leftof-centre, socialist leanings, it is probable they would have loosened the purse strings even more and run up a much higher national debt the $4 billion-plus figure that is causing so much concern than the Ingraham administration has done. Mr Halkitis has already attempted to explain what the PLP would have done differently. While he fell back on politics in referring to the supposed $80 million worth of government contracts that the FNM cancelled on regaining office (the Ingraham administration alleges that only two of these projects were any where near ready to go), the Senator does redeem himself in identifying government housing as an area that should have been targeted, given the employment and spending impacts this would have generated for the domestic construction industry. The biggest issue is whether the political will exists in any of the political parties FNM, PLP, even the DNA to do what is required to set the public finances back on the right track. The Bahamas has never run a balanced Budget in its 38 years of indepen dence, something it must do to set the national debt back on a declining trajectory, illustrating how hard the task ahead is. Therein lies the rub for Mr Halkitis, who seems like a willing, able chap from the generation who must supply the Bahamas with its new leaders. Can the good Senator, for instance, overcome the tremendous opposition he will face to austerity and spending cuts from among his Cabinet colleagues and within his own party, should they regain office? Will he be able to successfully bar the Ministry of Finance and Treasurys doors as fellow Ministers batter them remorselessly in their search for pet project funding? Can he resist the short-termist, siren song: Votes, votes votes: theres an election within five years? With all these forces ranged against him, it will be interesting to see whether Mr Halkitis can turn rhetoric into reality. Youve talked a good game, Senator, now you must walk the walk. PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE the Industries Encouragement Act is not a bad one, although it must be done in a phased manner so as not to harm individual businesses. Providing ample warnings of such intentions, and consulting in advance, would help. 5. LEAVE FREEPORT ALONE. Rather than constant threats of tinkering with its taxation structure, the second city needs to be given space to breathe, if it is to attain critical mass and provide the economic diversification it has long promised. 6. THE AUDITOR-GENERALS report always estimates that there is an evergrowing $400 million real property tax bill that the Government fails to collect year after year. This is a receivable. How about employing some creativity, and set up an accounts factoring type scheme, where the Government sells the rights to collect this sum to a private sector entity. The Government would get a purchase price, say $50 million, and leave the buyer with the headache of trying to collect. May work, may not work. But just a Tribune Business thought on the type of creativity we need. 7. APPROVE REVENUE-GENERATING PROJECTS such liquefied natural gas (LNG). The opportunity of failing to approve the AES Ocean Express development, located on a man-made island far from major population centres, is coming back to bite. Such a project could have generated between $20-$50 million in valuable revenues per year. It is unclear whether these projects can be revived. 8.ONTHE SPENDING FRONT, in line with Senator Michael Halkitis, Tribune Business would cut ministry and department spending across the board by at least 5 per cent. Put an end to all the unnecessary freebies, jollies, consultants, outside meetings and meals, and travelling to every conference under the sun at the taxpayers expense. Efficiency, and doing more with less, are the name of the game. 9. IN SIMILAR VEIN, cut public sector salaries across the board by 5 per cent. It is unfair for the private sector to take all the recessions pain. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham missed a golden opportunity to do this in 2010-2011, after he had seized the moral high ground by cutting his salary, along with those for ministers and MPs. The civil service, as we all know, is grossly overstaffed, so better to accept a salary cut rather than redundancies. 10. STOP EXPANDING THE SIZE OF GOVERNMENT. Review its structure, and eliminate departments and agencies that are of no use. Avoid creating new bureaucracies. If we need to meet our obligations under agreements such as the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA), such as creating a competition commission, then transform existing departments such as Price Control into these animals. 11. GIVEN INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS SPREAD ACROSS MANY ISLANDS, and the absence of potential revenue-earning opportunities, the Government has always suffered from a capital account deficit. To address this, the Government must continue the trend of privatisation and outsourcing to the private sector that it began with BTC. Potential functions for outsourcing could be the Registrar Generals Department, along with the loss-making Corporations that continue to bleed the taxpayer of between $40-$50 million per year. Indeed, it is time to consider selling Bahamasair and the Water & Sewerage Corporation for whatever they will fetch, even if it is just $1 and the buyer assuming their liabilities. When it comes to infrastructure projects, there is little option other than to get private sector capital and management involved through public-private partnerships (PPPs).FROM page 19B FROM page 19B FROM page 20B BUSINESS REVIEWTRIBUNE BUSINESSS DEBT SOLUTION YOUVE TALKED THE TALK, NOW WALK THE WALK, MR SENATOR CITYMARKETSWOES EXPOSE MORE FLAWS Senator Michael Halkitis

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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 19B BUSINESS REVIEWBy NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor STANDup and take a bow, Senator Michael Halkitis. For you are the first politician from either main party to bluntly state it cannot be business as usual when it comes to management of the Governments finances. Hallelujah, praise the Lord, at last someone has spoken the truth. But........ and there is always a but. The Senator has spoken well, but Tribune Business hopes he will excuse us for not going overboard just yet. For Mr Halkitis, the hardest part is yet to come, namely translating words into deeds. Having talked the talk, he must now walk the walk. To be fair, the general features outlined by Mr Halkitis in his Tribune Business column of September 14, 2011, dealing with Moodys downgrade of the Bahamas economic outlook are not bad, even if they are short on specifics that lay out a plan for dealing with our national debt and fiscal deficit woes. Tribune Business is also not too sure about his schoolbuilding stimulus plan, and whether it would have the desired effect, although it wouldnt disagree with placing a focus on technology in the education system. But enough with the knocks, and on to the positive. Tribune Business agrees with the Senator that the Government appears not to have got the message, not just Moodys, but Standard & Poors and the International Mon etary Fund (IMD), too, to judge from its pub-YOUVE TALKED THE TALK, NOW WALK THE WALK, MR SENATOR TRIBUNE BUSINESSS DEBT SOLUTIONAmulti-pronged approach must be implemented to tackle the Bahamas impending fiscal crisis, involving a combination of spending cuts and containment, revenue enforcement and creative, out-ofthe-box thinking. This is by no means an exhaustive list. 1. BALANCE THE BUDGET on the recurrent side as rapidly as possible, so the Government can cover its fixed costs rent and wages with incoming revenues streams/cash flow. 2. NO NEW OR INCREASED TAXES. This is the last thing we need, as to grow government revenues we need the Bahamian economy and private sector to expand and grow our way out of recession. 3. INSTEAD, WHEN IT COMES TO THE REVENUE FRONT, all governments must focus on maximising collections from the existing system. Starting from the top, crack down on the fraud and tax evasion that everyone knows is taking place. Stop giving favours to family, friends, the politically connected and the wealthy. No one knows how much this is costing honest taxpayers, but some estimates place the leakage at $100-$150 million per fiscal year. Almost enough to close the fiscal gap by itself. 4. SIMPLIFY FURTHER THE DUTY STRUCTURE/TAX CODE. Close all loopholes, and review the incentives and tax exemptions granted to numerous industries and businesses. Especially resorts, which must ultimately be graduated from all the tax breaks developers receive, so the industry does not become a welfare sector. Employing the same model as the Ingraham administration used in graduating firms fromSEE page nine SEE page nine Senator Halkitiss position on the public finances is welcome, but he and his party must now give us specifics, and turn rhetoric into reality

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THE COMPANYSome probably felt he was mad, others thought he had nothing to lose, while some believed he was merely preparing us for the fact the end is nigh. Whatever the intention, Mark Finlayson, principal of City Markets 78 per cent majority shareholder was not shy in making his feelings clear towards the majority of the Bahamian wholesale industry, accusing them of reneging on an agreement to deal with the debts run-up under the supermarket chains previous owners. It is never wise, from a posi tion of weakness, to alienate suppliers and those who you probably need to do some business with. But, somewhat ominously, Mr Finlayson effectively warned Bahamian wholesalers that they had no option but to work with City Markets on his terms, for if the company was put into liquidation they would never get a cent of the money owed back. The wholesale industrys position was probably summed up by this comment posted to The Tribunes website, which backs up the feelings privately expressed to this newspaper by sources in the sector. The comment, from an anonymous wholesaler, said: He is presenting the wholesalers as the bad people. We DID work with him, and a few months back they came to us asked for a increased credit limit. We gave it to them...gave them the limit THEY asked for...all they ended up doing was maxing out the limit, then stopped paying and now we are even deeper into the problem then we would have been if we kept the limits lower. Similar sentiments were expressed publicly to Tribune Business by Bruce Thomp son, managing director of leading wholesaler Thompson Trading. In the circumstances it is difficult to see how relations between City Markets and Bahamian suppliers can ever be fully repaired, especially if the formers bills go unpaid, although Mr Fin layson was this week talking optimistically about re-establishing supply from several companies. It is also true that most wholesalers do not want to see a previously valuable client such as City Markets fail, given that this would leave Super Value and Rupert Roberts as the only real player in the mass market food store business. Yet, in the final analysis, the public spat between suppliers and retail customer has done City Markets not one iota of good in its continuing battle for survival. The onceproud 12 store chain, which turned out a consistent $5-$8 million annual net profit, has now been reduced (at least for the moment) to a threestore network, a shell of its former self. South Beach and Seagrapes may yet come back, and it was probably a good decision to largely exit the Grand Bahama market and concentrate on New Providence. But my, my, what a difference sixeight months make. The talk since January this year was acquisition, acquisition, first City Markets and then Robin Hood, coupled with expansive talk of new mega stores on JFK Drive, East-West Highway, at the airport, and in Freeport. Now the focus is on shrinking to survive, with the Lyford Cay, downtown Freeport and Eight Mile Rock stores closed permanently, and Rosetta Street joining the ranks of those said to be closed temporarily. Sceptics have been quick to point out that the ownership of City Markets by Mr Finlayson and his family appears to be following the same pattern they established at Solomons Mines, where helter-skelter expansion quickly turned into some rapid downsizing. To be absolutely fair, this is not all Mr Finlaysons fault. Today, he finds himself in a similar position to Barack Obama. Like the US president, he inherited a terrible mess from his predecessor (for George W. Bush read the BSL Holdings ownership group). But with almost one years ownership under Mr Finlaysons belt, any attempts to continually blame the mis takes of others for the pre sent predicament will soon start wearing pretty thin. For now, Mr Finlayson and his management team will have to hunker down, cut costs and streamline the busi ness where they can, and move to ensure the remaining stores are fully stocked in a bid to win customers back. Tribune Business wishes them luck, and hopes they succeed for the sake of us all.PENSION FUNDMr Finlayson says his hands are clean, and Tri bune Business agrees with him when it comes to the City Markets staff pension fund. What transpired under the former BSL Holdings owner ship highlighted the need for company-sponsored schemes to be overseen by indepen dent trustees, and for pensions-related legislation and regulation to be a priority. No payments have been made into the Bahamas Supermarkets Profit Sharing Retirement Scheme since 2007 as a result of the compa nys woes. This means its only sources of revenue have been lease payments on the EastWest Highway head office, which the pension plan owes, and on the Cable Beach store equipment and improvements that were sold to it, then leased back by City Markets. It is unclear whether the pension fund is receiving regular payments from both sources. The last audited financial statements for City Markets and its Bahamas Supermarkets parent, published for the 12 months to end-June 30, 2010, showed that the sums owed to the Bahamas Supermarkets Profit Sharing Retirement Scheme had increased from $518,898 at year-end 2009 to $971,452. This debt was racked up under the former BSL Holdings group, but it is currently unknown whether Mr Finlayson and his team have been able to make good on this, or whether they have been paying what is due since their November 2010 Dont Blow It Received a Lump Sum?Let Royal Fidelitys seasoned investment professionals help you identify and reach your investment goals BUSINESS REVIEWPAGE 20B FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 YOUVE TALKED THE TALK, NOW WALK THE WALK, MR SENATOR SEE PAGE 19B TRIBIUNE BUSINESS : MONTH IN REVIEW SEE PAGE 7B Ongoing survival fight highlights weaknesses in capital markets and pension regulation By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor City Markets just cannot stay out of the headlines. Whether it be store closures, the staff pension fund or regulatory issues, the ongoing saga of the supermarket chain and its fight for survival continues to expose flaws in the Bahamian system.SEE page nine

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.netCarl Hield couldnt hold on to his lead and he made a quick exit in the first round of the mens welterweight division of the AIBA World Boxing Championships in Baku, Azerbaijan. As the first of two competitors to represent the Bahamas at the 2012 Olympic Games qualifying tournament yesterday, Hield lost 15-10 to Roy Sheehan of Ireland. Head coach Andre Seymour said Hield was leading 5-4 but Sheehan took over in the final two rounds. He fell behind and he was too slow in his movements, said Seymour as he described what went wrong with Hield. The first round he was very good. He was ahead. He just stopped boxing and that was it. The second and the third round, the guy just came from behind. Hield was not available for comments when Tribune Sports contacted the team in Baku. But Seymour said he was disappointed in his performance. He thought that he should have performed better in the second and third rounds, he said. He expected a much better performance because he knew he was better than what he did. Today, Valentino Knowles, the other member of the team, will be in a rematch of last years Commonwealth Games gold-medal match against Indian Manoj Kumar. Seymour said Knowles will have to throw a lot of punches in order to prevail with the change in the scoring system. Anybody who goes out there and falls behind, they will get left behind, he stated. Thats the new amateur boxing scoring right now. Its gone back to the old days. You just cant throw like the old days like professional boxing. In amateur boxing, you have to throw a lot of punches. If you do not do that, you will get left behind. Based on what they saw in Hield- s match, Seymour said he and assistant coach Floyd Seymour have been stressing to Knowles that he cant get left behind. You have to keep ahead. With the new scoring out now, you have to throw a lot of punches, he said. You have to throw a lot of punches. Aint no waiting on one punch. You have to throw a lot of punches. Knowles, who last year had to settle for the bronze after he lost to Kumar in New Delhi, India, said hes confident that the outcome will be different today. Im in a frame of mind to go out there and win, Knowles said. I felt he only won that fight 3-1 on a hometown decision. But this time, were not in India. Thats all Im telling myself and so this time, he doesnt have the home crowd to depend on. Looking back at Hields bout, Knowles said they are still trying to analyse exactly what went wrong in the second round. AIBA is changing up their rules every year, so its kind of hard to adapt, Knowles said. Youre training one way and you have to do your whole schedule and game plan right here in competition. But this isnt the place to just change everything. The rules just changed, so we have to adapt and do the best that we could. With a slight change in weather, Knowles noted that he suffered a slight case of the flu but he has been able to work through it and now hes just waiting to step into the ring. THETRIBUNE SECTIONE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 INSIDE TRAK TTUURRNN TTOO 33EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 44EE....TTUURRNN TTOO 55EE...... JUNIOR OPTIMIST NATIONALS STARTS SAT. IN GRAND BAHAMARUGBY WCUP PREVIEW: FRANCE UNDER STRAIN AHEAD OF TONGA MATCHUSAIN BOLT IN CALIFORNIA TO RAISE MONEY FOR FOUNDATIONTENNIS: SHARAPOVA HURTS ANKLE, QUITS IN P AN PACIFIC OPEN QUARTERS UWC TRIATHLON BAHAMAS: KIDS AGE GROUP RESUL TS TTUURRNN TTOO 77EE.. TTUURRNN TTOO 44EE...... CORPORATE sponsors contin ue to answer the call as more and more organisations pledge their support to Marathon Bahamas 2012. Within the past few weeks, several philanthropic groups and corporations have come on board to join the growing list of major sponsors. For the direct benefits of the run ners themselves, Nautilus water will provide their product at various points along the route. Nautilus Water will be provided at 20 check points along the route, a service the company calls "essential to both the safety and general wellbeing of athletes." Jason Evans, president of Nau tilus Water, said the company is proud to once again support Marathon Bahamas. The success of the event is evident by its participation growth and community awareness. Nautilus ful ly endorses Marathon Bahamas mis sion to raise funds which benefit cancer programmes in the Bahamas, including the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Bahamas BreastCancer Initiative (BBCI), Cancer Society of The Bahamas, Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group and other womens health programmes. KRyS Global has also joined the list of contributors. Marathon participants can expect to receive a KRyS Global branded rally towel in their registrant bag to assist them at the race and beyond. We are thrilled to be able to sup port this event and by extension the worthwhile causes the funds will go to support, states Ed Rahming, managing director of KRyS Glob als Bahamas office. We look forward to the continued growth and success of this event and encourage everyone to come out and participate in what is sure to be a fun race weekend. On the international front, the Yellowbird Foundation out of Canada will also participate in this year's event. Comprised of members of the Canadian travel industry, Yellow bird is a non-profit organisation ded icated to improving the lives of children in the Caribbean through their commitment to promoting and supporting local educational pro grammes, in addition to providing financial and infrastructure support to schools. With golf as the main sporting event for many years among the travel industry members, we wanted to reach out and engage a new audience that we never had before and running was the perfect fit, said one of Yellowbirds founding members Gerry Kinasz. BTO team captain Earl Miller, boasts that the goal of the group is to compete and complete the marathon or half marathon and, at the end, check this accomplishment off of their bucket list. Each person crossing the finish line will be a winner and those com pleting the marathon will then be in the elite status one per cent of the worlds population who have achieved this accomplishment. For all of the participants, this will be their first venture in long-distance running and they are very proud to be making their statement at home, in the Bahamas, at Marathon Bahamas during the US Martin Luther King Birthday weekend. CORPORATE SPONSORS CONTINUE TO ANSWER MARATHON CALL Hield falls in 1st round of Olympic qualifier AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS CARL HIELD (file photo) made a quick exit in the welterweight division of the AIBA World Boxing Championships.

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SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 3E SAILING: JUNIOR OPTIMIST NATIONALS T T E E N N N N I I S S : : M M A A R R K K K K N N O O W W L L E E S S C C E E L L E E B B R R I I T T Y Y I I N N V V I I T T . MARK Knowles is pleased to announce the annual Mark Knowles Celebrity Tennis Invitational is set to be held December 1-4 at the Atlantis resort by presenting sponsor MDC-Partners and organised by the Mark Knowles Man agement Group (MKMG). This years featured players are Andy Roddick, Xavier Malisse and Sabine Lisicki with some additional stars to be announced at a later date. The organisers plan to hold a Pro/Am doubles tourna ment for platinum sponsors, a Pro Exhibition and an oppor tunity for top Bahamian junior tennis players to interact with the visiting pros. C C O O N N C C H H M M A A N N T T R R I I A A T T H H L L O O N N I I N N G G R R A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A THE 25th annual Conch man Triathlon is scheduled for Saturday, November 5 in Freeport, Grand Bahama. It will comprise of a one-kilometre swim, a 25k bike ride and a 5k run. Interested persons can reg ister by logging onto the Face book Event Page, e-mail organiser Bert Bell at bert bell@coralwave.com or calling him at 727-5886 or 7275381. B B E E R R L L I I N N M M A A R R A A T T H H O O N N D D E E S S O O U U Z Z A A P P A A R R T T I I C C I I P P A A T T E E D D CONTRARY to a report on Tuesday in Tribune Sports, Dr Kathryn de Souza did participate in the 38th BMW Berlin Marathon on Sunday. Dr de Souza, listed as an American, represented the Bahamas Roadmasters Club and clocked three hours, 45 minutes and 11 seconds for 133th place in the womens 45 age group category. The other Bahamians who participated were the husband and wife team of Carl and Shavonne Blades, Glen Bain, Linda Williams, Youlanda Deleveuax and Michelle Gibson. The Tribune apologises to Dr de Souza for the error. W W A A L L K K S S T T R R I I D D E E F F O O R R L L I I F F E E THE Cancer Society of the Bahamas is slated to hold a Stride for Life Fun Walk 6am Saturday. The honourary co-chairpersons for the event are Bishop Laish Boyd and Erin Brown. There is a registration fee for children under 13 years and those 14 years and older. All registered participants will receive a T-shirt and gift and all walkers will be eligible to win many exciting prizes. The route for the event is as follows: Start at the Cancer Caring Center, East Terrance, Centreville (2 doors south of ZNS), south on East Terrance to 4th Terrace, west to Collins Avenue, to School Lane, north to Dowdeswell Street, east to Easy Bay Street, crossing to the new Paradise Island bridge, ascending to Beach Drive, Paradise Island Drive to the Golf Course, west on Paradise Island Drive to Casi no Drive, around the round-about to the old Paradise Island bridge, descending to East Bay Street, advancing to Mackey Street, south to Shirley Street, west to Collins Avenue, south to 2nd Terrace (now Rusty Bethel Drive), east to East Terrance and south along East Terrace, concluding at the Cancer Car ing Center. V V O O L L L L E E Y Y B B A A L L L L N N P P V V A A A A C C T T I I O O N N THE New Providence Vol leyball Association will continue its regular season this weekend with a series of games on tap at the DW Davis Gymnasium. G G A A M M E E S S S S C C H H E E D D U U L L E E T T o o n n i i g g h h t t 7:30pm Cougars vs Lady Technicians (L) 9pm Intruders vs Scotia Defenders (M) S S u u n n d d a a y y 3:30pm COB Caribs vs Titans (L) 5pm Saints vs Crusaders (M) C C Y Y C C L L I I N N G G T T O O U U R R D D E E N N E E W W P P R R O O V V I I D D E E N N C C E E THE Tour de New Providence will be held over the weekend of October 29-30, starting and finishing at the Clifton Heritage Park parking lot at Clifton Pier. There will be a race for the competitive cyclists and noncompetitive cyclists. Prizes will also be presented to the oldest and youngest partici pants. For more information, interested persons can visit musgrovebarron@hotmail.co m or call 425-1057. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L B B I I S S H H O O P P E E L L L L I I S S S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L C C L L A A S S S S I I C C THE Baptist Sports Council is scheduled to hold a meeting 6pm today under the pavilion at the Bahamas Baptist College for all churches interested in participating in the 2011 Bishop Neil C Ellis Softball Classic. The event, which was originally scheduled to start on Saturday, has been pushed back to Saturday, October 8, at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Competition will be held in the 19-and-under, co-ed and mens division. There is a reg istration fee per team in each division. For further information, interested persons can contact BSC director Brent Stubbs at stubbobs@gmail.com, bstubbo@yahoo.com or call 5022363. T T R R A A C C K K A A N N D D F F I I E E L L D D R R E E V V . B B A A C C K K F F O O R R D D C C L L A A S S S S I I C C THE Baptist Sports Council is slated to hold a meeting 6pm today under the pavilion at the Bahamas Baptist College, Jean Street, for all churches interested in participating in the 2011 Rev. Enoch Backford Track and Field Classic. The classic is scheduled for Saturday, October 22 at the Thomas A Robinson. Com petition will be held in the under-7, under-9, under-11, under-13, under-15, under-17 men and women divisions. There is a registration fee per athlete. For further information, interested persons can contact BSC director Brent Stubbs. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L N N P P S S A A A A C C T T I I O O N N THE New Providence Softball Association is all set to continue its regular season with another double header Friday and Saturday nights at the Bankers Field, Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. G G A A M M E E S S S S C C H H E E D D U U L L E E T T o o n n i i g g h h t t 7pm Island Luck Truckers vs Dorsey Park Boyz (M) 8:30pm Miller Rams vs New Breed (M) S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 7pm Black Scorpions vs Bommer George (L) 8:30pm Dorin United Hit men vs New Breed (M) P P O O W W E E R R L L I I F F T T I I N N G G N N A A T T I I O O N N A A L L C C H H A A M M P P I I O O N N S S H H I I P P S S THE Bahamas Powerlift ing Federation is scheduled to hold its National Power lifting Championships at L W Young Junior High School, starting 10am Saturday. A number of competitors are expected to strut their skills in the bench, squats and deadlift events during the championships. SPORTS INBRIEF SEVENTY-eight boats, including at least four from the Cayman Islands and others from around the Bahamas, are on course to cross the starting line in various divisions in what is expected to be a tight series of races in the hotly contested Bahamas Junior Optimist Nationals set for October 1-2. The Nationals begin Saturday at the Taino Beach resort with about six races and concludes Sunday after the finals. It will be the first time in the five-year local history of the event that it will be held in Grand Bahama. The kids are really excited about this for a number of reasons, said senior sailing instructor Robert Dunkley, now the official instructor after years of volunteering with others who give countless afternoons and weekend hours to make the junior sailing programme possible. For most of these sailors, it will be their first time competing against Opti sailors from another country and for many, especially those from Governor's Harbour, Harbour Island, Long Island, Abaco and Nassau, their first time in Grand Bahama. Hopefully, it will be a little bit of a much-needed boost for Grand Bahama as well and the waters there are ideal for races like this. If Dunkley is hoping for an economic boost for the countrys second city, Daniel Gibson and Paul de Souza have other hopes. Gibson, 15, and a student at CR Walker, is the defending champion in the Blue Fleet, the championship class. De Souza, a 7th grader at St Andrews, beat 44 boats to take first place last year in the Green Fleet, the novice class. This year hes moving up to Blue and plans to give Gibson a fight for first place. Both will have to out-sail and outperform hopefuls like Spencer Cartwright who is taking sailing so seriously hes studying sailing tactics. In sailing, its not just about physical strength, says the articulate Queens College 7th grader. You dont have to be fast. You dont have to be strong. You just have to know what youre doing. Its about being smart. Cartwright says he has made a lot of good friends through the pro gramme but he doesnt plan to let friendship stand in the way of winning. I came second last year and Im not coming second again. I plan to win. But then so does Pedro Rahming, a 10th grader at CR Walker, even though winning for him would mean leaving his best friend, defending champion Daniel Gibson, in his wake. Thats okay, he says. Well still be best friends. And Pedro has Daniel to thank for getting him involved in the programme that he admits has changed his life for the better. It has certainly changed Donico Brown's life, too. Once a junior sailor just hoping to cross the finish line first or at least walk away with a few respectable seconds and thirds in a large fleet, today hes a sailing instructor, paid by the organisation made up mostly of volunteers and sponsored in part by the Ministry of Tourism, Rotary, RBC, KFC, Oddysey, Diane Phillips & Associates and private donors. Brown had the opportunity to sail internationally in larger boats and in 2009 represented the Bahamas in Brazil. I started in an Opti, just like these kids, he says, sweeping his hand across a bustling parking lot at the Nassau Yacht Club where the youngsters have gathered after a days practice. The first day out, I capsized and thats when I knew I loved it. Someday, he hopes to get his captains license and helm a fast ferry. For now, hell be coach, counselor and sailing instructor for a fleet of hopefuls, including his younger brother, all battling for the national Optimist sailing championship title. Sir Jack Hayward, an avid sailor and supporter of the Grand Bahama Sailing Club, shared his enthusiasm for the upcoming races. I think its wonderful that the Opti Nationals are coming to Grand Bahama. We have a large number of talented young sailors that participate regularly at the Yacht Club and Im excited to see how they will perform on their home turf, Sir Jack said. Chris Paine, co-founder of the Sailing Club in Freeport, said that he and his crew are delighted that the sport is coming to Grand Bahama. GBPA president Ian Rolle said the organisations support of the event is evidence of its continued commitment to sponsoring and supporting programmes that build the islands youth. GBPA is pleased to support this event and others like it, as they provide excellent opportunities for the youth to gain new experiences and exposure to competitive environments that challenge them beyond their everyday environments, said Rolle. We are excited that the Opti Nationals will be held here and we look forward to the races returning in the future, he added. The competition is held under the auspices of the Bahamas Sailing Association which is based in Nassau. According to Mr Paine, the objec tive is to move the National Championships around the country because it is a national competition. The sport of sailing, he noted, has grown tremendously in Grand Bahama from its inception in 2006, with more and more young people showing interest. He credited coach David Valentine with the inspiration of the sport of some students in afterschool pro grammes which he said are doing quite well. Large fleet of young sailors ready for tough competition on Grand Bahama this weekend PAUL DE SOUZA DANIEL GIBSON ROUNDING THE MARK: Sailors round the mark and head downwind in last year's Opti Nationals in Montagu Bay.

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SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, PAGE 7E UWC TRIATHLON BAHAMAS: KIDS RESULTS FFEEMMAALLEE AAGGEE GGRROOUUPP:: 11 -88Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 23 229 Siena Holowesko 7 Nassau BAH 24:47 2 28 236 Chloe Richards 7 Nassau BAH 26:31 3 35 213 Charlotte Fernie 7 Nassau BAH 28:16 MMAALLEE AAGGEE GGRROOUUPP:: 11 -88Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 11 222 Oliver Townend 8 Nassau BAH 21:49 2 20 225 Thomas Bowers 7 Nassau BAH 23:53 3 25 221 Jackson Hood 8 25:30 4 37 224 Charlie Winner 7 Nassau BAH 30:28 5 38 238 Major Richards 7 Nassau BAH 31:16 6 40 223 Thomas Illing 8 Nassau BAH 32:33 FFEEMMAALLEE AAGGEE GGRROOUUPP:: 99 -1111Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 6 207 Isabelle Winner 11 Nassau BAH 20:10 2 10 227 Alexandra Allan 9 Nassau BAH 21:48 3 13 212 Ella Holowesko 9 Nassau BAH 22:05 4 14 211 Katherine Slatter 9 Nassau BAH 22:57 5 22 209 Brennan Hood 10 24:45 6 24 228 Tamsin Nottage 9 Nassau BAH 24:51 7 27 226 Elliott Farrington 10 Nassau BAH 26:30 8 29 210 Julie Van Wyan 10 Nassau BAH 27:03 9 36 208 Victoria Russell 11 Nassau BAH 30:25 10 39 234 Isabella Anand 10 Nassau BAH 31:23 MMAALLEE AAGGEE GGRROOUUPP:: 99 -1111Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 1 217 Liam Holowesko 11 Nassau BAH 17:41 2 3 216 Charles Allan 11 Nassau BAH 18:15 3 4 233 Trent Strachan 11 Nassau BAH 19:58 4 16 231 Gus Harper 10 Nassau BAH 23:47 5 17 220 Tristan Thompson 9 Nassau BAH 23:48 6 31 219 Mateo Blacquiere 10 27:52 7 32 232 Dante Cooper 10 Nassau BAH 27:57 8 33 218 Gabriel Moultrie 10 Nassau BAH 27:58 9 34 214 Whit Hazlewood 11 28:13 FFEEMMAALLEE AAGGEE GGRROOUUPP:: 1122 -1144Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 7 200 Alexandra Mittens 14 Nassau BAH 20:23 2 8 203 Olivia Hazlewood 13 Nassau BAH 21:34 3 9 202 Emma Van Wynen 13 Nassau BAH 21:47 4 15 204 Miranda Thompson 12 Nassau BAH 23:26 5 19 201 Raquel de Cardenas 14 Nassau BAH 23:52 6 26 205 Kaitlyn Slatter 12 Nassau BAH 26:15 MMAALLEE AAGGEE GGRROOUUPP:: 1122 -1144Place O'All No. Name Age City Sta Time ========================= === ======= 1 5 215 Mitchell Blacquiere 13 20:05 2 30 230 Farion Cooper 13 Nassau BAH 27:47 TRI-ATHLETES can be seen at the start of UWC Triathlon Bahamas in Nassau over the weekend.