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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03107
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 09-28-2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03107

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PAGE 1

N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Volume: 107 No.251WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNWITH T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 79F By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE mystery surround i ng the disappearance of Marco Archer deepened last night as CCTV footage r evealed that contrary to w hat his family believed, the 11-year-old did not walk to a nearby gas station near his home. P olice reviewed tapes from the Texaco gas station on Baillou Hill Road yes terday after it was reported h e had left home on Friday w ith the intention of pur chasing candy from the garage. However management at t he gas station confirmed the missing boy did not TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM YOURNEWSPAPER YOURWEEKEND S EEPAGE8B FORDETAILS 3 ONSATURDAYSWILLNEVERBE THESAMEAGAIN . ON SATURDAYS WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN . Mystery deepens over kidnap boy D A Y S T O G O FLYERS have been distributed in the search for missing Marco Archer (above (right awareness of the young boys disappearance. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f CCTV footage r e v eals c hild did not visit garage as first believed B y SANCHESKA BROWN FORMER Christian Council president Bishop S imeon Hall has come out i n support of N ational Security Minister Tommy Turnquests stance o n the granting o f bail to repeat offenders. Bishop Hall said while he h as the utmost respect for the judiciary, he feels Mr Turnq uest was dead on when he BISHOP SIMEON HALL VOICES SUPPORT FOR TURNQUEST STANCE SEE page nine SEE page nine By SANCHESKA BROWN TEACHERS at E P Roberts Primary School have walked off the job for the second time in a month infuriating parents who say their children are being sent to school to play. Angry parents contacted The Tribune yesterday morning to complain that for a second day in a row their children were watching cartoons in class instead of being taught. One mother said: This situation is so frustrating for me. From the time this school opened they have By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THERE are more than 300 Chinese labourers working on site at the Baha Mar development, according to com pany spokesman Robert Sands. Between 325 to 350 Chinese are now employed as technical support workers or other auxiliary staff, Mr Sands said. He said the bulk of the workers engaged on the project will not be in the country for another year. This number is small compared to By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FOOD and water testing at a Department of Environmental Health Services unit was never compromised because of infrastructure deficiencies, it was claimed yesterday. The comments came in response to an Inter-Development Bank report which said the department's Envi ronmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment Division (EMRAD operated out of a "condemned" TEACHERS WALK OFF JOB A T PRIMAR Y SCHOOL SEE page nine SEE page nine SEE page nine RESPONSETOIDBREPORT MOSTWORKERSWONTARRIVEFORANOTHERYEAR PARENTSANGERATSITUATION FOOD AND WATER TESTING WAS NOT COMPROMISED MORE THAN 300 CHINESE WORKERSA T B AHA MAR SITE By PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER President of the Chamber of Commerce Khaalis Rolle has been confirmed by the PLPs Candidates Committee as the partys standard bearer for the Pinewood constituency in the 2012 general election. Although he has yet to receive final ratification from the KHAALIS ROLLE NAMED PLP PINEWOOD CANDIDATE SEE page nine BISHOP SIMEONHALL

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BY KHRISNA VIRGIL A TEARFUL Loletha Heastie, her hands and feet covered in the dirt she hadb een spreading around her garden, expressed her thanks to the officers of the Police F ire Branch for installing a f ire alarm in her home. M s Heastie, an unemployed single mother of four, r eceived substantial damage to her home a few years ago in a fire. My son, he like play with m atches and light firecrackers, she explained. Speaking of the fire officers, she said: I am glad for w hat they are doing for us. M s Heastie is among 100 elderly and less fortunate p ersons receiving smoke detectors as a part of the RBDFs Fire Safety Week initiative. S ergeant 420 Elroy K nowles said the officers are aiming to send a clear mes s age to families throughout the island. We are trying to establish the fact that if every home had at least one working s moke detector, that would help in saving lives in this country, Sgt Knowles said. T he homes have been chos en based on the RBDFs data on fire prone areas. H aitian communities that have fallen victim to many structural fires will be targeted as well. We have some Creole p amphlets that we will be handing out to them, Sgt K nowles said. More smoke detectors will be given out on Thursday, along with pamphlets covering fire safety tips and proced ures. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE URBAN HOMES GET SMOKE DETECTORS SERGENT SKIPPINGS comforts an emotional Loletha Heastie yesterday as she was a recipient of a smoke detector in her home. Tim Clarke /Tribune Staff OFFICERS go door-to-door to help prevent house fires by putting up smoke alarms POLICE CONSTABLE 3144 KNOWLES installs a smoke detector in a home in Englerston yesterday.

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police Sergeant Darrell Rolle toldt he Supreme Court he caut ioned murder accused Simon Simeon before taking a state ment from him regarding the shooting death of SylvanusS trachan. S imeon, 26, is on trial for murder. It is alleged that he shot the victim while at a par ty at the Lodge Hall on East S unrise Highway on Decem b er 21, 2009. Sgt 1843 Rolle, the lead investigator, interviewed the a ccused shortly after his arrest, in the presence of Sgt Lorenzo Johnson. Sgt Rolle said he cautioned S imeon and told him he was s uspected of causing the death of Strachan, 31. While giving a statement to police, Sgt Rolle said, Simeon a dmitted to having a handgun o n the night in question. He read the statement and signed it, the officer said. Sgt Rolle said Simeon told him that Strachan came at h im with a knife, so he pulled out a gun and fired it to scare him. According to a pathologists report, a post mortem was conducted on January 2, 2009. Strachan sustained a gap ing entry wound in the upper abdomen and a secondarygaping exit wound to the back. He suffered massive abdominal haemorrhage and died as a result of complica-t ions, the report said. D r Anna Tancawan told t he court that the bullet trav elled from left to right in his b ody. She said the range of the gunshot could not be determined. When asked by Mario G rey, attorney for Simeon, w hether a projectile was found in the body, Mrs Tancawan said no. Also giving testimony was S gt 772 Lorenzo Johnson, w ho was present while Rolle i nterviewed the accused. He said Simeon appeared to be fine at the time. M r Grey asked Johnson if he knew whether Simeon could read. S gt Johnson said Sgt Rolle had asked if the accused could read and write, and he said yes. When asked if he had d enied Simeon access to his l awyer at the police station, Sgt Johnson said he had not. I am going to suggest that at no point during the interview did Simeon give the information in the statement, Mr Grey said. Sgt Johnson said Simeon gave Sgt Rolle his version of what occurred that night that he pulled out a gun and fired it to scare Strachan. Did Simeon indicate what type of handgun it was?a sked Mr Grey. S gt Johnson said he could n ot recall. When asked if he knew w hether any projectile was retrieved, Sgt Johnson said he did not. Lakita Gardiner, a former g irlfriend of the accused, said s he went to a party at the Lodge Hall with Simeon and two other men around 9 or 10pm on the night in ques t ion. They went inside to get s omething to drink and later w ent outside, she said. While standing in front of the building, she said, a friend w alked over to Simeon. The witness said she then walked off and went to the c ar. She said after about five minutes Simeon returned to the car as well. Prosecutor Erica Kemp a sked Ms Gardiner if Simeo n had ever spoken to her about what happened at the Lodge Hall. Ms Gardiner said she had heard about the shooting and asked Simeon if he was responsible. He said he didnt shoot anybody, she said. Did you see Simeon with a gun in his hand? asked Mr Grey. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 3 2 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 4 2 4 2 V]VScReZ`_ 4 V]VScReZ`_ 4 :LWKDOO-RKQVWRUHVSDUWLFLSDWLQJGRQWPLVVRXWRQ\RXUFKDQFH IRUKXJHVWRUHZLGHVDYLQJVRQDOO)RRWZHDU%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV LQFOXGLQJ RPHQVDQG&KLOGUHQVKRHV bIIDOO&ODUNVDQGLPEHUODQGUR:RUN%RRWV $OO%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV $OO)DVKLRQ-HZHOU\ 3/86HOHFWHGW\OHVDUNHG'RZQ%\b $QGGRQWIRUJHWZLWKHYHU\SXUFKDVH<28KDYHDFKDQFHWR *UDQGUL]H*LIW&HUWLFDWH $//$/(6$5( 12(;&+$1*(6()81'6 12/$<$:$<6 -2+1 6+2(6$1'$&&(6625,(6 526(77$ 526(77$ &$50,&+$(/ '& '& 2 '& 2 '& 4 '& 4 2 4 2 2 eY 2 '& eY '& 2 '& 2 eY 2 &RPHDQGFHOHEUDWHRXUWK$QQLYHUVDU\E\MRLQLQJXVIRUD 6725(:,'($/( 6HSWHPEHUWKFWREHUVW B y Khrisna Virgil A SHAKEN Princess Margaret Hospital patient yesterday contacted The Tribune c laiming she was in the Dialysis Unit when the roof collapsed. A reporter visited the unit yesterday and could see no sign of damage, but three patients who did not want tob e identified claimed they witnessed the cave-in. Before further inquiries could be made, a security guard was called and the reporter was escorted out of the hospital. A n irate senior housekeeping employee later claimed there was no collapsed roof, but refused to contact an administrator. The employee said the hosp ital would not comment on s omething that didnt happen. Y esterday afternoon, PMH i ssued a statement refuting the reports of a roof collapse. The hospital did admit that t he roof in the Female Surgical Ward had some plumbing issues, which caused minor l eaks in the Dialysis Unit b elow. Attempts to contact Minister of Health Dr Hubert Min-n is and Public Hospital Authority director Herbert Brown were unsuccessful. PMHDENIES REPORTS OF DIALYSIS UNIT ROOF COLLAPSE P RINCESS M ARGARET HOSPITAL where patients claimed a roof collapsed in the Dialysis Unit,a claim rejected b y hospital staff MURDER SUSPECT HAD GUN No, sir, she replied. Ms Gardiner said Simeon appeared normal when her eturned to the car that night. S he said she later went to the police station, but the offi-c ers would not let her see S imeon. Senior Justice Hartman Longley is presiding over the trial, which resumes today w hen the prosecution will call o ne more witness before clos ing its case. Police sergeant tells court accused admitted firing gun to scare victim

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Someone once said that Vision Unites and Where there is no Vision, t he people will Perish. UNEMPLOYMENT in the Bahamas is now at an all-time high. The latest figures pro-j ected unemployment at over 1 4 per cent, but phone card vendors who recently find themselves unemployed were i ncluded in this group. The vendors for the most part have ceased to exist because of newe merging technology by BTC. T he government though bragged about the 30,000w ork permits that they have i ssued over its term. Yes, thats 30,000 jobs that Bahamians need not apply for. Education in the Bahamas h as been steadily slipping for d ecades. Despite getting the lions share of the annual bud-g et, the national average has remained a D. Questions at the Ministry o f Education with regards to the loan education fund have gone unresolved and if r esolved, unpunished and u npublished. Our children are graduating from high school without the ability to read, let alone construct a proper parag raph. How can a child be allowed to go through school and finish with no BJC and no BGCSE passes? T he health system in the Bahamas has become stretched year over year. The mortality rate of our citizenry h as increased and we continue to import unsafe products at every turn. We are gettingr ecord numbers of heart disease, lung cancer and obesity patients. Our latest health concern has been the Dengue Fever outbreak. Bahamians s till dont know what is going on or what went on over the last several weeks. I mmigration in my view has been out of control since the H onourable A. Loftus Roker left the PLP Cabinet in the mid-1980s. Our policy back t hen and now is to repatriate illegal immigrants; how inadequate a policy. We dont even know how many illegal immigrants are in our country. New Providence is an island 21 by 7 miles and in this technological age we cant even d etect illegal immigrants entering our shores by sea in m akeshift vessels. When are we going to formulate a proper policy to deal with this major socio-economical issue? Teen pregnancy continues unabated. Despite the disad vantages of being a teenage parent, our youth have not taken heed to this message. We still see babies having babies. This contributes to all sorts of future problems in our country, including crime, m ore teenage pregnancy and the like. The roads in New Provid ence are in a total mess. Driv ing in New Providence before the road works began was nothing to be desired, but n ow it has got worse. There is total chaos in the inner city with regards to the road construction. Does the end justify the means? Seems so. Crime is totally out of control. Despite the gun court, R apid Strike, ankle bracelets and constant road blocks, we h ave seen another record year in the Bahamas with regards to the murder count. I wonderw hat the count is for persons who have been shot but have lived. We see the justice syst em falling down before our e yes. The Minister of National Security recently stated that magistrates and judges were contributing largely to the e scalating crime problem in the Bahamas by giving repeat offenders bail. What next? And the economy. Stand ard & Poors recently downg raded our outlook from stable to negative. We are borrowing money at an alarming r ate and our present debt to GDP ratio is nearing 50 per cent. This means that every dollar earned goes toward ourd ebt. The government would be hard pressed to obtain a loan from a commercial bank because your total debt service ratio has to be fewer than 44 per cent. Shouldnt we have been investing in other long-term sustainable industries? H ow do we fix our myriad of problems? Where do we start? Should we start witht he men hanging in bars daily and drinking themselves into oblivion? Should we start with the church which is facing a m oral and biblical crisis? S hould we start with the y oung men who carry illegal weapons daily? Should we start with the politicians whose policy decisions have caused us much despair? Ors hould we identify our moral compass and start from the g round up. Nothing in this c ountry will change for the better until we identify our stake and then build from t here. O ur leaders must possess t he moral base from which they can make these tough d ecisions. And they must h ave the capacity to lead. Otherwise, we will not be united and we will continue to perish. DEHAVILLAND MOSS Nassau, S eptember 26, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 I N MAY last year the Arbitration Act and the Arbitration (Foreign Arbitral A wards) Act was introduced in an attempt to put the Bahamas in a competitive position for recognition as an international business centre. T he hope was to establish the Bahamas a s a dispute resolution centre within five years to settle outside of the court sys t em both domestic and international matters. And so now is not the time to even cons ider abolishing the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council our highest court ofa ppeal, sitting in London which is one i nstitution that in addition to the prop osed arbitration services gives an aura o f stability to our local judicial system. If the Bahamas is to be considered a stable j urisdiction to attract international business, the Privy Council is one institutiont hat grounds us in legitimacy. As one B ahamian lawyer put it: It is one of the most respected courts in the world and brings international currency to our court system. Together the five Law Lords have more t han 100 years of legal experience to draw on. In addition removed from local p olitics, and petty prejudices litigants h ave confidence that their disputes are being treated objectively. This independence and removal from local contami n ation certainly inspires respect in the system, something that our own courts are lacking. One would be surprised at what weight t he existence of the Privy Council carries when an international business is being considered for relocation to the Bahamas. B usinesses not only want a stable govern ment, good communications, and efficient staff, but a sound judicial system. To busi-n ess leaders this is of paramount import ance. Our local courts are made to look impotent when adversaries can so play the system that one side in the dispute cannot get a hearing to present his com plaint. I n a recent international case, a lawyer pointed to what appears to be developing into a serious case of judge shopping. It would seem that the case cant get off theg round because the judges are being toppled like nine pins. Already three judges have stepped down from the case, and a fourth has been called on recuse himself soon there will be no judges left to try the case. From an outsider looking in, it appears that our court system is being made to look impotently foolish. O f course, there is still the Privy Council. When the local courts fail, the respecte d arbiter of justice stands solid to pick up the pieces. Bahamians would be foolish to agitate for its removal. Not only does the Privy Council make a vailable to Bahamians some of the w orlds most able and experienced judges, it does so at no cost. I n December 2006, the Judicial Committee made history when for the first time in over 170 years it left its perman ent London home to hold a five-day sitting in the Bahamas. The five Law Lordsw ere here again for a sitting in 2007 and 2 009. T here are those in the legal fraternity w ho have suggested that the Bahamas give up the Privy Council and throw its lot i n with the recently established Caribbean Court of Justice. Established in 2001 andb ased in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobag o, this court is in its embryonic stage. It has not been established long enough to have a track record or attract the international recognition that the Privy Council has had for hundreds of years. I f the only reason for opting for this court is to hope that our Caribbean b rothers will see eye-to-eye with us on c apital punishment is indeed to play Russ ian roulette with this countrys future. As explained in this column yesterday, manyC aribbean lawyers are also moving away from capital punishment in favour of life imprisonment. Of course, the weightiest consideration o f all is the cost. The Bahamas would have to make a financial contribution to be able to use the services of the C aribbean court. And the creation of a local court to replace the Privy Council cannot evenb e considered. It would be financially proh ibitive. Already we do not have enough lawyers to staff our present legal institu tions. The Attorney Generals office, which is inundated with cases going back years, is seriously understaffed. The courts can n ot keep up with the work load that they already have. A country as small as the Bahamas would never be able to pay what would be required to attract our bestl awyers from their private practices to sit on a high court bench. And even if we could there are not enough of them to match the calibre and resources of the Law Lords of London. It is now time for Bahamians to appre ciate what they have and start building on already well laid foundations. A Bahamas in chaos LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net The Privy Council to be or not to be $17+21<&+5,6723+(5&5($1 RI31$66$8%$+$0$6 E DITOR, The Tribune. Regarding the decision of t he Catholic Church in Eng l and and Wales to return, on September 16, 2011, to the practice of not eating meat on Fridays. I commend the Catholic bishops of England and Wales for returning, last week, to the obligatory practice of abstain i ng from eating meat on Friday. The allowance, after Vat ican II, for self-motivated sub stitutions to this rule, resulted i n the widespread belief that the rule itself had been relaxed. It was a case of our b ishops putting the cart b efore the horse. Sacred Scripture and Catholic tradition teach that fasting and abstinence is a great help to avoid sin and all that leads to it. We first hear of the commandment to fast in Genesis where man is pro h ibited from eating of the fruit of the tree of knowledge o f good and evil. After Adam and Eves expulsion from the garden fasting is proposed, in the stories of Ezra and Nineveh, as an instrument to restore our friendship with G od. In the New Testament J esus brings to light the true and most profound meaning o f fasting which is to do the w ill of the Heavenly Father who sees in secret and will reward you (Mt 6:18 Fasting and abstinence not only bring certain benefits to our physical well-being, they are, for Christians, primarily a means of mortifying our ego i sm, avoiding sin, and opening our hearts to the Love of God and our fellow man. Fasting and abstinence h elps us recognise the situation in which so many of our brothers and sisters live. They e nable us to become more like t he Good Samaritan. By freely engaging in acts of self-denial we makea a statement that those in need are not strangers but rather our brothers and sisters. This practice of marking Christs death on Friday with fasting and abstinence n eeds to be rediscovered and encouraged, not only in Engl and and Wales, but throughout the world. PAUL KOKOSKI Canada, September 20, 2011. Return to fasting EDITOR, The Tribune An open letter to Mr Tony Butler of Cable Bahamas. Dear Mr Butler, I write to you out of sheer frustration and in the hope that you will finally be able to give us television service that actually works and for which we pay in full and on time. Since May (the French Open Tennis Tournament), continuing through Wimbledon, and then the US Open, and now, finally, the US NFL season and the new Fall TV programming, I have phoned your Customer Service innumerable times and have gone through the routine (with the very nice, polite young ladies) of unplugging the TV set and having new signals sent through to our equipment to no avail. I have left innumerable messages which promise return calls but they never have materialised. We have had various service people (also very nice and polite) come to the house to try and sort out our problems, one of which managed to disrupt our internet service because he didnt re-install our booster (or whatever its called properly! The technician who came to sort out that problem told me that none of the previous service people had been technicians but merely installers. The problem at our end is that almost every day since May, some of the channels are Temporarily Out of OrderCheck Back Later. Usually the main US networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, and FOX) display that mes sage, along with many oth ers. And todays Out of Order channels may not be the same as yesterdays or tomorrows! Can you imagine how frustrating this problem has been for five months? There are many frustrat ed subscribers all over the island! I am told that one of the local suppliers of dish antennas has such a long list of customers switching from Cable Bahamas that he is unable to supply dishes for some weeks. I suggested to the last technician (who reported that our signal is excellent) that someone should check the cable from the road into our house. My son suggests that you realign your dishes to achieve maximum signal strength at your end. Whatever you do, please do it soon and fix our prob lem! FRUSTRATED CUSTOMER Nassau, September 25, 2011. Can we have a TV service that works?

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 7 B y CARA BRENNENBETHEL cbrennen@tribunemedia.net FOREIGN Affairs Minist er Brent Symonnette joined his regional counterparts in calling for global regulations on the trade of conventional small arms during a United Nations speech. Mr Symonette told the UN General Assembly that the Bahamas supports a strong, effective and non-discriminatory Arms TradeT reaty (ATT cover small arms and ammunition. The treaty has the support o f CARICOM. We express the hope that the instrument would also provide for an effective implem entation regime, Mr Symonette said. In his remarks, Jamaican Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade Minister Kenneth B augh said: Jamaica, like its Caribbean Community ( CARICOM) partners, continues to face severe threats to our long-term socio-economic development from the illicit trafficking in narcotic drugs, small arms and light weapons, and ammunition. He said that while the r egion has introduced measures to combat the affects of small arms, we firmly b elieve, however, that we will not see the full impact of these efforts without an intern ational regime that regulates the sale and transfer of conventional weapons. Mr Baugh said progress on the issue will not be possible w ithout international regulation, and urged member states t o build on existing accords. In his contribution, Mr Symonette also addressed the issue of migration, saying proper co-operation can help to ensure it occurs through safe and regulated channels to the benefit of both them igrant and the receiving state. Mr Symonette noted that m igration has been a positive force for development across the world, and welcomed i ncreased co-operation on international migration and development. In particular, he said, the Bahamas has benefited from m igrants contributions in education, health care, t ourism and financial services. Mr Symonette also told the General Assembly that the Bahamas is committed to playing a constructive role in the lead-up to the second high-level dialogue on International Migration andD evelopment, to be held in the General Assembly in 2013. SYMONETTE CALLS FOR RESTRICTIONS ON SALES OF SMALL ARMS IN UN SPEECH

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By LARRYSMITH THETFORD, Norfolk Probably few readers will know that the first black mayor of an English town specifically this town, a coach stop on the way from London to Norwich was a Bahamian physician named Alan Glaiser Minns. Of course, the term "black" depends on your perspective. Alan was the grandson of John Minns, who in 1800 "absconded from his apprenticeship" as a baker in Reading to be shipwrecked off Nassau. He subsequently married the African woman who saved his life a slave named Rosetta. Retired airline pilot Paul Aranha and Exuma civic leader Basil Minns number among their descendants today. John and Rosetta had several children. One grandson became the first non-white A nglican priest in the Bahamas. Two others trained as doctors in England, and both practised in Thetford. Pembroke Minns died here in 1912. His more illustrious brother Alan (who was born on Inagua in 1858), also died in England in 1930. Although not many Bahamians are aware of Dr Minns' place in English politic al history, Susan Ketchell at the Ancient House Museum on White Acre Street here certainly was. During my visit, she recalled a recent lecture and exhibit on the subject. Minns' three-year term as mayor (from 1904 been just a footnote to Thetford's 1500-year history, but he was considered an exem plary candidate. "The election of Dr Alan Glaiser Minns as mayor will be received with universal approval," the Thetford & Watton Times wrote glowingly in 1904. "He is in the prime of life and energy, well acquainted with the problems of local government...Though born in the West Indies he became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons and a licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians." Thetford has been a strategic settlement in eastern England since the Iron Age, when the Iceni tribe fortified a site now known as Castle Hill. It developed into an important medieval market town and was known as a seat of learn ing Thetford Grammar School having a list of headmasters stretching back a thousand years. One of the early 20th cen tury graduates of that ancient school was a prolific author of detective novels named Christopher Bush, who also wrote several fascinating books about life in his home village of Great Hockham, justa stone's throw from Thetford. Bush came from a family of poor farm labourers like my grandfather, Herbert Smith, who was also born in Hock ham. Legend They both attended the same village school, but Bush became a local legend by win ning a scholarship to Thetford Grammar and obtaining a degree from the University of London an unprecedented a chievement for a poor village boy of the day. He died in 1973 in his 90s, but in a book called Winter Harvest he offered a snapshot of Hockham at the turn of the 20th century, when my grandfather was a boy. "On all sides we were enclosed by the breckland heaths...there were three large farms and three smaller farms...most of the children left school as soon as the law allowed; boys to be absorbed somehow into the land and the girls to go into domestic service...The village lived by farming and most of its men were labourers...there was something almost of serfdom about it." During my visit to Hockham I stayed at one of the remaining farmhouses, which doubles today as a bed and breakfast. The proprietor, 72year-old Trevor Mason, is one of only a handful of people left in the village who were actu ally born there. The other few hundred residents are recent arrivals. Manor Farm was worked by Trevor's father and grandfather in their day, and the Masons were well acquainted with the Smith family. "We, in the wilds of breckland, were an island, remote and comfortably self-centred," Christopher Bush recalled in his book. "We grew our own vegeta bles and reared our own pork, and the heaths and the farm hedgerows provided the rab bits that went with it...There were two places of worship All Saint's Church and the Primitive Methodist chapel...Our water was drawn from wells and not one house had indoor sanitation...Our vil lage was also unique in having a threshing outfit." The threshing machine was a marvelous 18th century invention that separated grain from the stalks and husks, eliminating a lot of manual labour. We visited Burrell's engine works in Thetford, nowa museum where a half dozen of these early contraptions are on display, looking as if they had been made yesterday. Originally horse-drawn, by the late 19th century the threshing machine had become a clanking, complex piece of machinery powered by a massive steam tractor. They transformed agricultural production in Britain, until they were replaced by an even better machine known as the combine harvester in the mid20th century. My grandfather's father happened to be an engine driver meaning he operated the steam tractor that towed the threshing machine, a model of Victorian engineering. These machines were hired out to farms by independent con tractors, including the Henry Bird outfit in Hockham (which survived until the 1950s). My grandfather's rare ability to drive came from this connection, and he was able to parlay that skill into a job as a chauf feur during the Depression. Herbert Smith left Hock ham in 1914 to fight in the First World War (at Gallipoli and elsewhere in the Middle East) and never returned to the village other than for a brief visit. His alienation was symptomatic of the enormous changes caused by the war, and the social history of these times has always been a source of great fascination for me. That terrible conflict marked a decisive break with the past, disrupting ancient social hierarchies, unleashing new political ideas and stimulating profound technological changes. In the Bahamas, meanwhile, emigration to the United States peaked in the years prior to the first world war due to a dearth of economic opportunities at home. Our population in 1911 was only 55,000, with most living at or below subsistence level. Some 1800 Bahamians volunteered for service during the First World War (1914-18 were posted overseas. As former Tribune pub lisher Sir Etienne Dupuch recorded following his dis charge after the war: "I was a changed person when I returned to my island home at the age of 20 after seeing the people of Europe wallowing in a cesspit of human degradation." Much the same would have been said by my grandfather on returning to his vil lage. I clearly recall his stories about living on the edge of starvation while Britain ruled the world. In a 1974 letter to The Tri bune (prompted by one of Sir Etienne's editorials), he remarked on the poverty he endured in Hockham as a youth: "Our breakfast was a slice of bread with a few grains of sugar, or a small bowl of bread crusts with a nob of dripping upon which boiling water was poured. And this at a time when Britain was the richest country in the world. We were little more than serfs. The empire was fine for the people who controlled the wealth and power the same breed who prospered so patently in the slave trading days." At the end of the 19th cen tury more than a quarter of the British population was liv ing at or below subsistence level. In 1895 (the year of my grandfather's birth), the con ditions of farming villages like Hockham were appalling. Sir George Edwards, who organised the agricultural labourer's union in Norfolk, described how men laboured from dawn to dusk six days a week for a few shillings, often walking miles to and from the fields, and never seeing their children in daylight. And before 1895 these poor farm workers couldn't even vote in parliamentary elections. "The labourer's home is of the worst kind," Edwards wrote in his autobiography, "neither sanitary, water-tight nor wind-tight...But even those cottages, in spite of their wretched condition, the labourer has to hire under such conditions as cannot fail to put him in a position of the most abject slavery, and cause his wages to come down to the absolute minimum, stunt his intellect and affect his morals." Edwards himself had an amazing life story. Born to a dirt poor family in a village not far from Hockham, he started work at the age of six scaring crows in the fields, receiving no formal education at all. After a long, self-taught career as a labour organiser and Methodist lay preacher, he was elected to parliament in 1920 at the age of 70 and knighted in 1930. When he died three years later, his funeral was the largest ever held in the county of Norfolk. Rights Conditions were much the same in the Bahamas at the turn of the 20th century. A tiny affluent oligarchy ruled an ation of paupers and serfs with few rights or privileges, most of whom happened to be black former slaves. In their book Islanders in the Stream historians Michael Craton and Gail Saunders describe homes in over-the-hill Nassau as "boxes of boards raised on b oulders or sticks, or crude freestone constructions (that poignantly emphasize the hopeless poverty of the people and their home environment." In some respects, Hockham resembles the offshore Abaco settlement of Hope Town, which was the birthplace of my maternal grandfather. Although the Hockham peasantry relied on the land and Hope Town's settlers depended on the sea, the two communities share much in common. In 1903, according to a report by the Baltimore Geo graphical Society, Hope Town consisted of about a thousand whites and a dozen blacks jammed into a collection of poor shacks with an average of seven to a home. Today, these shacks are sought after by wealthy retirees and professionals, just like the worker cottages in Hockham. Both are now picture-post card communities that hearken back to a vanished age, while earning their bread and butter from tourism. What did I take back from my Norfolk vacation? Well, it brought home to me a vivid appreciation of the fact that in the relatively short space of time since my grandparents were young the world has changed immeasur ably. Geography and racial division may have complicated and delayed our social progress in the Bahamas, but the overall course ran much the same here as it did in Norfolk. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Which bank will give the Bahamas a $200, 000 grant for humanitarian relief in the aftermath of hurricane Irene? The Inter-American Development Bank BAHAMIAN WHO MADE HISTORY AS MAYOR OF AN ENGLISH TOWN T HESE FORMER WORKMAN'S COTTAGES i n the Norfolk farming village of Great Hockham are now sought-after homes for affluent retirees and professionals working in nearby towns. B URRELL'S ENGINE WORKS IN THETFORD a museum of Victorian steam tractors used (among other things) for towing threshing machines.

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Incensed by Marcos unexplained disappearance, community activists are calli ng on all residents of the a rea to band together in supp ort of the family and against possible predators. The Bain and Grants Town Association has organised a $2,000 rewardf or any information leading to the apprehension and conviction of anyone connected to the matter, president C B Moss said. Mr Moss said another young boy was reported m issing for one day, three w eeks ago, and police are i nvestigating the childs abduction. We are very determined in this community to see that this does not become a trend because there are lots of children who move around ( in the area), sometimes unaccompanied, and thereby are very vulnerable, Mr Moss said. According to family memb ers, Marco was last seen l eaving his home on B rougham Street, off Baillou Hill Road, on Friday afternoon between the hours of 4pm to 6pm. The sixth-grader enjoyed video games and had recently joined a boxing club after s aving up his school lunch money. Each day, Marcos parents and loved ones sit at home waiting and praying for him t o return. T ryphemia Meadows, M arcos mother, said: Every day I'm looking for him to come home. I can't even explain it. I dont feel good because I don't know what happened to him. I'm trying to hold on, I'm trying t o be strong. Ms Meadows, 51, said: I f eel like he's alive but he just can't get from where he is. I don't want to feel no other way. F amily members were conducting their own investigations which led them to a f arm off Joe Farrington R oad last night, but their e fforts were unsuccessful. A lthough the family was n ot well known in the area, M arcos disappearance has severely disturbed community members who feel that the same thing could have easily happened to one of their children. Mr Moss said families c ant protect all of their child ren from this type of incident as often times young o nes are sent out into the i mmediate area on errands. We cannot become prisoners in our own society, but we feel deeply for this fami-l y and for all other families that have experienced similar incidents, Mr Moss said. The greatest security we have is for the residents at l arge to stand up and say no w ay are we going to tolera te this and then the criminals are going to take notice. As long as criminals think their only adversaries are the police then they are going to feel comfortable. M r Moss said there have been incidents concerning young people who are detained against their will and subjected to various experiences. However, he said many a re not reported due to e mbarrassment or to prot ect the anonymity of the child. The reward fund will be made available to the police, and paid out once there has been confirmation fromi nvestigators. The associat ion has issued an appeal to t he public and private sect or for donations to the fund in an effort to make it more financially attractive. Mr Moss can be contacted at 325-7909. We must put a stop to this type of action, this is happening to boys and g irls, Mr Moss added. Were calling this nation out, to action, its not good e nough to talk about it, we have to do something about i t. People need to rise to t he occasion now. In the US, i f a child is missing anywhere in that great nation, an alert is raised. We take these kinds of things too casually. Anyone with information on Marcos whereabouts can c ontact police at 911, the S outhern police station at 322-3337, CDU at 502-9991, a nd Crime Stoppers at 328T IPS. National General Council (NGC it is believed that Mr Rolle will be rubber stamped within a short period of time. A t the NGC level, stalwart c ouncillors are allowed to raise a ny objections that they have with a particular candidate and if those objections cannot be satisfied the c andidate could face considerable opposition in getting their nomination. H owever, according to wellplaced sources within the party it is not believed that Mr Rolle will have any difficulty in this regard. In fact, these sources claimed that Mr Rolle was selected for his wellr espected business acumen, and is already b eing earmarked for a prominent Cabinet post in what they hope will be a new PLP administration. A s the chief marketing officer at Bahamas Fast Ferries, Mr Rolle also doubles as a part-t ime lecturer at the College of the Bahamas. Khaalis is in his late thirties, a respected businessman, and thek ind of candidate that the party n eeds to be attracting to win the seats that we need to win. We were n ot supposed to lose Pinewood in 2 007, and we are confident this time around that we will not lose again, another party insider explained. Based upon the work that Mr R olle has done at the Chamber over the past several years he w ould be a high flyer for any post in Finance, Transport, Air and Sea, and he is also in Tourism so he c ould be in almost any ministry that he chooses. But obviously we have a deep b ench with any number of persons w ho will play a vital role in the transformation o f this country, and the people of the Bahamas will hear more and see more from the party in t he coming months, the source explained. When The Tribune contacted Mr Rolle yest erday he opted not to confirm or deny the r eports of his upcoming candidacy with the PLP. been having problems and now the teachers are refus ing to teach. They are on strike again. I know they are having their issues with the school but what is supposed to happen to the students in the meantime? My daughter is in the fourth grade and she has nt had a teacher from last week. She has done nothing in school all week other than watch television and play. I sent her to school to learn, not to play she can do that at home. Something needs to be done about this. E P Roberts principal Kendal Burrows confirmed that teachers were sitting out, but said the issue should be resolved by today. The teachers withdrew their services on Monday and the first half of Tues day. By the afternoon we spoke with them and got them to agree to teach on Wednesday. Basically they are upset because there is a shortage of teachers and they are being stretched to their limit, he said. We need at least five more teachers for everything to run smoothly. We have letters from the Min istry indicating that teachers were sent here, however for some reason or another they did not show up. These are teachers that were transferred from other schools who did not come to perform their duties. I dont know why they didnt come. The Ministry of Educa tion says they are working on the problem so we just have to wait and see. Hopefully we get the teachers before the end of the week. This is the second time teachers at E P Roberts walked off the job. At the beginning of the term, they refused to teach for a week citing poor working conditions and a teacher shortage. Mr Burrows said infra structural problems have since been resolved. Calls to the Ministry of Education for comment were not answered. t he number of Bahamians working at the development, he added. We have about 325 to 350 Chinese workers here, most of them doing technical sup port work or working on the a spects of the 'man camp' or as support for some of the senior Chinese persons here, s aid Mr Sands. "When you look at that in terms of the how we had pro-j ected them to arrive, it's t rending lower in numbers against the backdrop that we have put to work 1,150B ahamians. "The significant amount of Chinese labour won't be here u ntil another 12 months from now." The Chinese workers live in on-site dormitories, and o fficials have said most of the food the workers eat will be imported from China. B aha Mar is constructing phase one of the dormitories. About 8,150 Chinese work ers will enter the country, in staggered amounts, to help construct the $2.6 billion C able Beach resort. Mr Sands said company road work on West BayS treet is still on schedule to be completed in early Novem ber. T he road work began over the summer at an estimated cost of $40 million. It is estimated the Baha M ar resort will cost about $3.4 billion. It will include almost 3,500 r ooms and residences, the largest casino in the Caribbean, the largest con v ention centre in the Bahamas, a Jack Nicklaus signature golf course, three spas, a 20-acre eco-water park, multiple restaurants, along with high-end retail and entertain ment venues. b uilding plagued with l eaks, leaving tests open to contamination. While confirming there have been leaks, an official at the department said all testing was sus-p ended until repairs were m ade. The official also said sensitive tests are not conducted in the building but are sent to accredited institutions in the US. Diana Lightbourne, a cting permanent secretary at the Ministry of Environment, said: "While it is true that there have been plumbing leaks in the past, duri ng such periods all testi ng activities were comp letely suspended until t he plumbing leaks were repaired and ceiling tiles r eplaced. "We do not consider that test results are compromised, as test results are conducted using cont rol samples for comparis on." T he ministry also shot d own the IDB's findings that EMRAD's main o ffices are housed in a "condemned building" but admitted the labn eeds upgrades to p lumbing and electrical systems. Ms Lightbourne said: "We are not aware that the building has been condemned. We considert he building to be sound." She added that staff have adapted to testing needs in spite of deficiencies in laboratory infras tructure. The IDB's assessment a lso said EMRAD suf fered from "insufficient resources and lowm orale", testing capacity w as limited and neither of its laboratories was accredited. T he IDB also found that because of conditions at EMRAD, water test i ng was turned over to the Water & Sewerage Corporation. However Ms Light b ourne said that several years ago officials decided that EMRAD would engage private companies to test quality control for local water producers fors tringent testing, but not because of the state of the agency's lab. said some of the judges are too lenient. Some judges are too merciful and accommodating to criminals and they need to be more forceful when carrying out the law, Bishop Hall said. We say a man is innocent until proven g uilty but how can a man be innocent after he has already been charged with other crimes and is out on bail? Some of these judges need to use their discretion and be more stern when it comes to granting or not granting bail, he said. Bishop Hall said the public should not hold Mr Turnquest fully responsible for the crime problem, just as the full blame should not be levelled at the judiciary. He does not deserve to be blamed. To s ay Tommy Turnquest is the cause of crime is like saying a pastor is the cause of the sin of his members. We are all in some way culpable for the crime problem. We all have to take responsi bility for the state of the crime problem in our country, he said. However, I think Mr Turnquest should l ead the charge in fixing some of the laws that would cause criminals to think twice before they commit a crime. He needs to bef irm in his ideas and take a stance on the crime issue. On Monday, Mr Turnquest defended his criticism of the judiciary, saying he felt hisa ctions were "right" as an elected represen tative of the Bahamian people. Last week, he said while he has no wish to encroach on the independence of the judi cial system, in his opinion some judges have been far too "liberal" when it comes to grant-i ng bail to career criminals and those accused o f serious offences. Mr Turnquest said he believes the police a nd the public agree with him. He also said he felt bail trends have contributed "greatly" to the country's escalating crime problem. Earlier this week, Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez refused to grant bail to a man accused of attempted murder, citing the rising levels of FOOD AND WATER TESTING WAS NOT COMPROMISED F ROM page one TEACHERS WALK JOB AT PRIMARY SCHOOL FROM page one BISHOP SIMEON HALL VOICES SUPPOR T FOR TURNQUEST STANCE FROM page one FROM page one MORE THAN 300 CHINESE WORKERS A T B AHA MAR SITE FROM page one KHAALIS ROLLE NAMED PLP PINEWOOD CANDIDATE KHAALISROLLE MYSTERY DEEPENS OVER KIDNAP BOY FROM page one

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE LOSANGELES, US Associated Press PROSECUTORS told jurors yesterday that Michael Jackson was killed by the actions of his personal physician, who used a dangerous anaesthetic without adequate safeguards and botched recovery efforts when hef ound the singer unconscious. Defense attorneys countered that Jackson caused his own death by taking the drug propofol after his doctor left the room in a desperate attempt to overcome his chronic inability to sleep. NothingDrConradMurray c ouldhavedonewouldhave savedtheKingofPop,defensea ttorneyEdChernofftoldthe p anel,becauseJacksonwas d esperatetoregainhisfame andneededrestaheadofhis comebackconcerts. The competing versions of J acksons death and Murrays role in it were laid out in opening statements at the physicians involuntary manslaughter trial. David Walgren, prosecuting, relied heavily on photosa nd audio recordings to make h is case that Murray was an inept and reckless caretaker of Jackson. H e showed a photo of a lifeless Jackson on a hospital gurney, and played a recording of Jackson speaking toM urray while the prosecutor said he was under the influence of an unknown substance roughly six weeksb efore his death. The singers speech was heavily slurred but recognis-a ble. He spoke of his hopes f or the upcoming concerts. We have to be phenome nal, Jackson is heard telling Murray. When people leave this show, when people leavem y show, I want them to say, Ive never seen nothing like t his in my life. Go. Go. I've never seen nothing like this. Go. Its amazing. Hes the greatest entertainer in the world. Murray is accused of giving J ackson a lethal dose of p ropofol in the bedroom of the singers rented mansion, but Chernoff said Jackson gave himself the fatal dose. H e claimed the singer swal l owed several pills of the sedative lorazepam on the morning of his death enough to put six people to sleep. He also said Jackson self-ingested propofol, and it killed him instantly. Jackson did not e ven have a chance to close his eyes, Chernoff said. Walgren said Murray was grossly negligent by provid-i ng Jackson propofol. The prosecutor said while work ing for Jackson, the doctor was shipped more than four gallons of the anaesthetic, DOCTORS USE OF ANAESTHETIC BLAMED FOR DEATH OF MICHAEL JACKSON T HE PROSECUTION s howed a picture of Michael Jacksons body d uring the Conrad Murray involuntary manslaughter trial in Los Angeles yesterday. JACKSONFAMILY members a ttending the hearing included R andy and Janet, above, and LaToya, below DRCONRAD MURRAY in c ourt yesterday, where he is accused of invol-u ntary manslaughter over the death of Michael Jackson which is normally given in hospital settings. H e said Jackson trusted Murray as his physician. Thatm isplaced trust in Conrad M urray cost Michael Jackson h is life, Walgren said. T he doctor had initially requested $5 million to work for the singer for a year, buta ccepted the lower rate of $150,000 a month, Walgrens aid. His contract to be Jacksons personal physician was never signed and he was never paid. He told jurors that Murray deceived paramedics ande mergency room doctors by n ot telling them he had been giving Jackson propofol as a sleep aid. He also called the doctor inept and said he repeatedly deviated from the standard of care by leaving the singer alone while unders edation and not immediately c alling 911 when he found the singer was unconscious. Murray never called emerg ency services himself, instead waiting more than 20 minutest o have one of Jacksons b odyguards make the call. Basic common sense r equires 911 be called immediately, Walgren said. Basic common sense. And we knowt hat was not done. Chernoff told jurors it was n ot their job to determine whether Murray was a good doctor. He said Murray and Jackson were actually friends, and Murray was trying to wean Jackson off of propofol. A number of Jacksons f amily members were in the courthouse, including his father Joseph, mother Kather ine, sisters LaToya and Janet, and brothers Jermaine, Randy and Tito. If convicted, Murray faces u p to four years in prison and t he loss of his medical license. SAUDI ARABIA Associated Press A SAUDI woman was sen tenced yesterday to be lashed 10 times with a whip for defy ing the kingdom's prohibition on female drivers, the first time a legal punishment has been handed down for a violation of the longtime ban inthe Muslim nation. Normally, police just stop female drivers, question themand let them go after they sign a pledge not to drive again. But dozens of women have continued to take to the roads since June in a campaign to break the taboo. Making Tuesdays sentence all the more upsetting to activists is that it came just two days after King Abdul lah promised to protect wom ens rights and decreed that women would be allowed to participate in municipal elections in 2015. Abdullah also promised to appoint women to a currently all-male advisory body known as the Shu ra Council. The mixed signals highlight the challenge for Abdullah, known as a reformer, in pushing gently for change without antagonising the powerful clergy and a conservative seg ment of the population. Abdullah said he had the backing of the official cleri cal council. But activists saw Tuesdays sentencing as a retaliation of sorts from the hard-line Saudi religious establishment that controls the courts and oversees the intrusive religious police. Our king doesn't deserve that, said Sohila Zein elAbydeen, a prominent female member of the governmental National Society for Human Rights. She burst into tears in a phone interview and said, The verdict is shocking to me, but we were expecting this kind of reaction. The driver, Shaima Jas taina, in her 30s, was found guilty of driving without permission, activist Samar Badawi said. The punishment is usually carried out withina month. It was not possible to reach Jastaina, but Badawi, in touch with Jastaina's fami ly, said she appealed the verdict. Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world that bans women both Saudi and for eign from driving. The prohibition forces families to hire live-in drivers, and those who cannot afford the $300 to $400a month for a driver must rely on male relatives to drive them to work, school, shopping or the doctor. There are no written laws that restrict women from driving. Rather, the ban is rooted in conservative traditions and religious views that hold giving freedom of movement to women would make them vulnerable to sins. Activists say the religious justification is irrelevant. How come women get flogged for driving while the maximum penalty for a traffic violation is a fine, not lash es? Zein el-Abydeen said. Even the Prophet (Muham mads) wives were riding camels and horses because these were the only means of transportation. Since June, dozens of women have led a campaign to try to break the taboo and impose a new status quo. The campaigns founder, Manal al-Sherif, who posted a video of herself driving on Facebook, was detained for more than 10 days. She was released after signing a pledge not to drive or speak to media. Since then, women have been appearing in the streets driving their cars once or twice a week. SAUDI WOMAN SENTENCED TO TEN LASHES FOR DRIVING CAR

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MURDER ACCUSED LIKE JESSICA RABBIT INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 11 2 0 1 0 C r e a t i v e E d g e MONTH ENDSEPTEMBERC ASH & CARRY!All Sales Final No Refund or Exchange SALE! 26 Cubic Ft Stainless Steel Refrigerator$1600Power Tools 15% (except net items)Generators 15% (except net items)Cement$9.85/BagWAREHOUSE CLEARANCE!Brick, Tiles, Paint, Lumber, 10%...15%...20%...UP TO30% SAVINGS!Super Deals on Damaged lumber as well as Damaged shingles Bifold doors Fiberglass doors Awning windows Gardenia Lawn & Garden Products Hushboard R11 M45 insulation PT V-Joint Moisture resistant drywall Versatex Angle iron Damaged regular drywall Ceiling tiles Formica (5x12188 Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas Open Mon-Fri 6:30am-4:00pm Saturday 6:30am-3:00pm Tel: (24273 or 326-3978 Fax: (2427Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.comLike usfollow us PLUS at Tiles 15% to20% O Granite Tops starting at $100.00 Granite Back splash starting at $50.00 Cement Tiles 24x 24 with conch shell print $9.95 each Bricks Pavers from $3.85 /sqft Brick cobble sheets From $5.00 Plastic tiles strips from $1.50 to $5.95 Marble Floor Medallions 30% o Decorative tiles borders from $1.00 (side walk sale)September 26 To October 1 PERUGIA, ITALY Associated Press A DEFENCE lawyer t old an Italian court yesterday that Amanda Knox, the American student con-v icted of killing her room mate, isn't a manipulating, sex-obsessed femmef atale as her accusers c harge, but is rather like Jessica Rabbit just drawn that way. I n closing arguments before an appeals court, lawyer Giulia Bongiornoc ompared Knox to the cartoon character, contending that Knox had been unfairly portrayed over thec ourse of the media-hyped, four-year case. She said the 24-year-old American i s instead a loving young woman who simply displayed immaturity and n aivete at the time of the 2 007 slaying. Knox was convicted of sexually assaulting and murdering Meredith Kercher, a British studenti n Perugia, on Nov 1, 2007, and sentenced to 26 years i n prison. Co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito, an Italian who was Knox's boyfriend at the time of the crime, was convicted o f the same charges and sentenced to 25 years. They both deny wrongd oing and have appealed their 2009 convictions. A verdict in the appeals case i s expected within a week possibly as early as Saturday. Bongiorno is Sollecito's l awyer, but, with the fates of the two defendants intertwined, she discussed K nox's role at length. AMANDA KNOX in c ourt in Italy, where a defence lawyer said she was no f emme fatale WASHINGTON, US Associated Press ONE CRISIS averted, on to the next. The day after Congress m anaged to avert a government shutdown again R epublicans and Democrats stared ahead yesterday at m ajor fights over spending that underscore a deep divide thats sure to define the fastapproaching national elections. On Monday night, lawmakers had postponed their dispute over whether billions for disaster aid must be paidf or with cuts elsewhere in the budget, finessing a pact to k eep the government operating. But tea party-driven Republicans are still insisting on significant spending cutst his fall, with some arguing t hat a hard-fought congress ional agreement this summer to fund the government at $ 1.043 trillion in 2012 was too g enerous. Democrats, many o f whom complained of too m any concessions and reductions in this years showdowns, are furiously trying to protect government programs. The next skirmish will be over how and where to spend the new year's budget, with a Nov 18 deadline for that legislation. But the next really big deal is the special 12member bipartisan supercommittee and whether it can come up with a plan to slash $1.5 trillion over 10 years by Nov 23 the day before Thanksgiving. These fights will unfold a gainst the backdrop of a feeble economy that President Barack Obama is desperate to jump-start as he pushes for a second term, and an exasperated electorate that looks a t Washington and dislikes what it sees. The heat will be on, the heat from the American peop le, said former Republican Sen Alan Simpson, who believes Americans strugglinge conomically will be asking, Why stretch us out like this? L awmakers also will be under pressure from political f actions demanding that they s tand firm for party beliefs. You have to support get ting control of excessive spending and debt, said Sal R usso, a longtime Republic an operative and founder of the Tea Party Express, a wellfunded wing of the populist movement. Are you helping to solve the problem or making it worse? Shortly after Senate votes on Monday, Sen Mary Landrieu, thanked party leaders for helping the Democratic Party find the backbone it needed to fight and win this debate. The disaster aid dispute that threatened to partially s hut down the government this weekend was resolved relatively quickly after a standoff between Democrats a nd Republicans. The fight, however, was an unpleasant r eminder to most Americans of the last-minute maneuver-i ng in April to avert a shutdown and the August showd own over raising the nation's borrowing authority that left financial markets unnerved. T his time, Democrats had spent weeks demanding additional disaster aid in response t o hurricanes, tornadoes and other natural disasters that h ad battered Americans from V ermont to Missouri. Republ icans had said the additional aid had to be offset by cuts in energy-related programs that D emocrats favored. The Fede ral Emergency Management Agency had warned that its accounts would be out of money early this week. A solution to keep the government operating seemed uncertain last week. Then word from the Obama administration that FEMA wasnt in as dire financial straits as many feared proved to be the answer. On Saturday, the administration told Senate Majority L eader Harry Reid (Democrat) and Sen. Chuck Schumer, (Democratthat FEMA could last until Thursday with the m oney it had. Specifically, an unknown contractor had come i n under budget, freeing some $40 million, said Democratica nd Republican congressional aides, leading to a deal on M onday in which Democrats and Republicans agreed on an emergency spending bill toa void a government shutdown. FEMA would get $2.65 billion in disaster relief assist ance in a one-week bill, $1 billion less than approved by t ea party Republicans. T he House, on recess this w eek, probably will back the one-week measure by voice vote tomorrow and vote sepa rately next week to keep the g overnment running through Nov 18. DEAL STRUCK TO AVOID SHUTDOWN BUT FURTHER CRISES LOOM IN US C AIRO, EGYPT Associated Press EGYPTS first parliament ary elections since the ouster o f Hosni Mubarak will begin on Nov 28, the countrys mil i tary rulers said yesterday in a n announcement greeted with little fanfare by activists who have grown deeply sus p icious of the generals comm itment to change. The military council, which took over from Mubarak as he stepped down in February, promised it would transfer power to civilian rule within s ix months, but no date was a nnounced for presidential elections that would bring an e nd to military rule. The concerns reflect the broader uncertainty overE gypts post-Mubarak course under a military council led by a man who served asM ubaraks defense minister for many years. Egypts new revolutionary groups say the council has done little to dis m antle Mubaraks legacy and bring figures of the old regime to account for corruption, h uman rights abuses and othe r crimes. The new parliament won't r eflect the real spirit of the revolution and will provide justification for the militaryc ouncil to continue to be present in the background of the political scene, said MustafaS hawki, a youth group leader. Even more troubling for the young activists who led the uprising againstM ubaraks rule, many believe the law governing the parliamentary election will enable r emnants of the former r egime to retain power in the post-uprising legislature. T he elections for parlia ments two chambers will be staggered over several months,w ith the vote for the legislative Peoples Assembly start ing Nov 28 and the less pow e rful Shura Council, the chamber's upper house, on Jan 29. Critics accuse the military of dragging out the process top rolong their time in power. EGYPT ANNOUNCES DATE FOR POST-MUBARAK ELECTION

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE MINISTER of the Environment Dr Earl Deveaux said the Bahamas must e ncourage development models that help mitigate the t hreat of climate change. Like other small island developing states (SIDS Bahamas is particularly vulnerable to the effects of clim ate change, particularly g lobal warming. A nd environmentalists h ave calculated that residual air and ocean pollution is the n umber-one threat to the survival of the 53 million peoplet hat live in SIDS. A definition of climate change is a change in climate which is attributed directly or indirectly to human activi ty that alters the composi t ion of the global atmosphere and which is in addition to t he natural climate variabilit y observed over compara ble time periods, Mr Deveaux explained whiles peaking at the College of t he Bahamas on September 22. Dr Deveaux said the countrys marine environment and integrated ecosystems are slowly being destroyed whilec oral reefs are showing signs of bleaching thanks to rising global temperatures. Climate change is already a ffecting and will continue to impact our coral reefs and integrated ecosystems, said D r Deveaux. Showing the audience a slide show of photos, he said: Here are some manifesta t ions of the effects of climate change exhibited primarily by hurricane damage. You see the effect on agri culture, on buildings, on infrastructure, and generally on human beings. The Bahamas is fortunate in one sense that we are bor dered on one side by deep Atlantic Ocean. But, the Great Bahama Bank and Little Bahama Bank, which provides for most of our fisheries, would be the most likely threatened environments of the increas ing of sea water temperature. Dr Deveaux said Bahami ans must choose to reduce the impact of climate change through increasing our resiliency to its effects. He used Schooner Bay, a resort in Abaco, as an example of appropriate development, along the lines of the 2010 Planning and Subdivi sion Act, which came into effect January 1, 2011. Our government has passed the comprehensive Physical Planning Act and Forestry Act and one Ive list ed is the Bahamas National Trust Act. These three pieces of legislation together are intended to inform individual deci sions, policy decisions, and regional decisions in respect to how we order development in our country, said Dr Deveaux. We can integrate our adaptation into development decisions. We have an example here of Schooner Bay, a development in Abaco. We have gamuts of con servation efforts exhibited in our living conditions, in our architecture, and we have the all-encompassing term appropriate development. That really summarises how we see the approach of our own adaptation to the adverse impacts of climate change in the Bahamas. The government has listed its practical efforts to address the adverse impacts of climate change. These include nature reserves such as Bird Pond in Andros, Victoria Pond in Exuma, and Adelaide Creek in New Providence. MINISTER ADVOCATES DEVELOPMENT MODELS TO HELP IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE MEMBERS OF the Antiques, Monuments, and Antiquities Division joined the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO M INISTER OF ENVIRONMENT Earl Deveaux discusses the governments strategy to combine legislative measures and appropriated evelopment to control and mitigate the effects of climate change and, right, he introduces a comic book produced by the BESTCommission to offer a simple explanation of climate change to Bahamian citizens Kristaan Ingraham /BIS PANELISTS Michael Pateman, Lisa Benjamin, and Arthur Rolle gave presentations on how SIDS can turn their weaknesses into opportunities.

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE GRAND BAHAMAChamber of Commerces president yesterday dismissed calls to end Freeports real property tax exemption as not making any sense, warning such a move could actually depress real estate values in the city. Arguing that the release of large land tracts could create a supply glut, K P Turnquest said it was dangerous to assume Freeport would be any different to Exuma or the Abacos, where residents especially second homeowners were vehemently complaining about their real property tax bills. The Chamber president told Tribune Business that imposing real property tax in Freeport after the current exemption expires in 2015 raised the spectre of double taxation, and whether the authority to charge property owners would shift from the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA ment. It really doesnt make sense, Mr Turnquest said of the suggestions contained in a letter submitted to him last week. The September 22 document, from a concerned citizen, argued that Freeports real estate market and val ues would be reinvigorat ed through the imposition of real property tax, as the $2,000-$10,000 annual car rying costs for sitting on $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.50 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITYS( GBPA) Board is today due to decide whether to appointa new chairman, with Tribune Business able to reveal that former Bahamas Financial S ervices Board (BFSB m an Ian Fair appears to be the leading contender for the r ole. Sources intimately familiar with developments in By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A companys work week is not necessarily the same as the Employment Acts seven day period for determining employee days off, a Supreme Court judge has ruled, in dismissing a claim by1 14 former and current staff against the Freeport Container Port. In throwing out the case that the Container Ports former four gang shift pattern breached the mandatory hours of rest and overtime pay mandated by the Employment Act, Justice Estelle Gray-E vans also clarified other provisions in the legislation that are vital to Bahamian e mployers and their rostering/payroll c osts. Dealing with the Acts hours of rest provision, Justice Gray-Evans said t hat while Bahamas-based employees were allowed one day off, or 24 consecutive hours of rest, during a seven-d ay period, the law did not mandate that they must be given two days off or two consecutive periods of 24 hours. Recalling the origins of the dispute, the judge said the employees had alleged the four gang shift pattern, implemented by Freeport Container Port betweenO ctober 2001 and February 2009, b reached their employment contract by requiring them to work eight hours per d ay, for seven consecutive days, without a day off. This, they had alleged, breached the Employment Act, but this was denied b y the Freeport Container Port, which a dded that overtime was paid as due in accordance with the law. Justice Gray-Evans said the first issue to be determined was what the seven day period in the Employment Act meant. Attorneys for the workers alleged this period started on the day when eachg ang was rostered to begin their shift p attern, which would mean that the relevant seven-day period would be differe nt for each gang and would commence on a different day of the week. They argued that since the Act does not stipulate when a week begins, an e mployer becomes legally bound to By NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A GRAND Bahama businessman yesterday said he was ready to fight the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCAs ome $3,000 in fees, arguing this sum could not be justified he was licensed instead by the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA R yan Bullard, owner of Complete Busi ness Systems, was one of three businesses listed by URCAs as owing annual fees andi nterest, the regulator having threatened to r evoke its licence unless these sums are paid within 14 days. Mr Bullard told Tribune Business yesterd ay: They have these fees and they are not defined. I am a licensee of the Port. They [URCA] say they are an agent for the Government, responsible for collecting government taxes/ If I am paying you for inspection, you cant just get up and say I have to pay these f ees and any outstanding interest and dont d efine them. Im prepared to go to court with them. I have my documents, they sent me theirs. Im ready to rumble. Their actm akes no sense. URCA just cannot justify their fees. Mr Bullard added: Why should I pay taxes when I pay $1,800 a year in license fees to t he Port Authority? Those guys dont scare me. I operate a piece of trunking equipment t hat was licensed by URCA. I have a license to do business in the Bahamas, to carry out the business of communication. I have a Portl icense to carry out the same business. With my license I can sell, repair and service communication apparatus. Why should I pay them any type of mon e y based on my general revenue? It makes no sense. The only license I have with them is for a trunking system. If they want to a ttach their revenue generation towards that then fine, I may not agree with it but I can By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIA TIONS(CBA t here was an element of truth to allegat ions that Bahamas-based financial institu tions had either increased or introduced n ew fees to compensate for bad loan losses, p ointing out that all businesses adopted such strategies to survive. Ian Jennings told Tribune Business that during recessions, when particular earningss treams fell and the bottom line declined, it was only natural for companies including commercial banks to develop new revenue avenues and cut costs to stay in business. He was responding after Dionisio DAguilar, president of the Superwash laundromat chain and a former Bahamas Cham b er of Commerce president, last week s lammed Bahamian commercial banks for implementing outrageous and astronomical fees to try and recoup some of the losses sustained over the past three years on their non-performing loan portfolios. Mr DAguilar also accused Bahamian c ommercial banks, all of whom are CBA m embers, of operating as a cartel. This c harge was rejected by Mr Jennings, who said there was lots of competition between t he banks, even though consumers busi nesses and individuals may not always feel it. Commenting on Mr DAguilars fee-relat e d claims, Mr Jennings said: Theres an e lement of truth in that, like theres an ele ment of truth in many things. Its a question of where you put the emphasis. T he Superwash president had railed against the 2 per cent excess penalty fee that CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamasc lients, on top of the normal 17 per cent overdraft fee. The former fee was being imposed on customers who went into over draft even for one day a month and had e stablished no such facilities with the bank. Mr DAguilar had alleged that the 2 per cent excess penalty fee amounted to ane ffective annual rate of 730 per cent per y ear if funds were borrowed for one day. FREEPOR T TAX BREAK END N ONSENSICAL Chamber chief warns end to real property tax exemption could depress real estate values by glut flooding market Expresses fears of double taxation; Port/Got conflict SEE page 4B ELEMENT OF TR UTH TO BANK FEE CLAIMS Clearing Banks head says natural for all businesses to compensate for earnings declines Denies sector operates as cartel, saying: Ther s lots of competition SEE page two FAIR EYED FOR PORT CHAIRMAN Board meeting set for today S EE page 5B B AHAMAS F inancial Services Board chairman Ian Fair UR CA DONT SCARE ME Licensee targeted for $3,000 debt says cant be justified, as based on licensing piece of equipment Fears double tax, as paying $1,800 annually to Port Authority SEE page 5B 114 STAFF SEE PORT SUIT THROWN OUT Ruling has key implications for all Bahamian e mployees, as a compans work week not a lways the same as Acts seven day period Judge confirms 48 hours of rest do not have to be two days off SEE page 4B

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B y NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.ne t SANDALS Royal B ahamian resort will reopen today following hurricane repairs, but the Manor building will remain closed for refurbishment over the next few months,a spokesman told Tribune Business yesterday. "We are definitely on schedule for reopening. B ecause of the opening most of the staff are coming back. There is a perc entage who want to stay i n Exuma a bit longer, and t hey have been given that option, but the majority oft he staff wanted to come b ack immediately and are back for the opening, Yasmina Cherquaoui said. She added: "The Manor building, which is the original building, is still under refurbishment. Over the next few months we are going to be refurbishing the rooms. Opening They'll be getting new bathrooms, and we are doing some other work to the rooms. We are openi ng the property, but it i s opening with the W indsor and the Royal V illage. T he Sandals spokespers on told Tribune Business that occupancy for the other two buildings on the Nassau property would be high. We have a large group coming in witin the next c ouple of days, she added. We are going to be pretty much full, or near to capacity, with the rooms that we have open. Because our occupancy is softer for the next couple months it has enabled us to close those rooms and refurbish them. The other two buildings w ould be full." The Manor building, she s aid, represents about 30 p er cent of the propertys room offering. S andals Royal Bahamia n resort closed its doors f or four weeks to "address structural and other dam-a ge" sustained from Hurr icane Irene. Persons who were booked to stay at the hotel were moved to its sister property, Sandals Emerald Bay in Exuma, along with some staff from the Nass au resort. BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE SANDALS REOPENS BUT 30% OF ROOMS REMAIN CLOSED Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. In an e-mailed reply to Tribune Businesss inquiries, M arie Rodland-Allen, CIBC FirstCaribbean International B ank (Bahamas o n the grounds that the situation involved a specific customer. The bank, she added, did not discuss individual client matters. While not commenting on the specifics of Mr D Aguilars case, since he was Commonwealth Banks managing director, Mr Jennings said commercial banks were required to give notice to customers when theres ac hange in fees. He pointed out that Bahamian banks generated fee revenues from both their loan and deposit products, but there was no cross-subsidisation between the two, meaningt hat loan customer fees did not subsidise deposit customer f ees and vice versa. Noting that fees would likely be incurred whenever human involvement in the increasingly automated bankingp rocess was required, Mr Jennings said the Bahamian commercial banking industry was not as advanced or aggressive as its US counterparts when it came to extracting fees. Theres still a fair amount of services we provide that are not being charged for, Mr Jennings told Tribune Business. In a recession, when loans are dragging your income d own, a bank has to do what it can to improve the bottom line, whether thats cutting costs or finding new revenue streams. Its part of the strategy of any company trying to raise r evenue and cut costs to stay in business. In this time, e veryone is finding it difficult, whether its an individual consumer or large institution. Costs The Clearing Banks Association (CBA that increased regulatory costs, coupled with the sector taking on increasing functions, had compounded the issue. Over the last few years theres been increasing regula tion of the banking industry, which is good for the consumer but does increase costs, Mr Jennings said. Taking the delegation of foreign exchange control administration to the commercial banking industry as an example, he added that this had transferred some of the overhead costs associated with this function from the Central Bank of the Bahamas to the industry. Everyones costs are going up, and we have to try to compensate, Mr Jennings explained. As for Mr DAguilars cartel claims against the Bahamian commercial banking industry, Mr Jennings said this again boiled down to a question of individual percep tion, and how the term was defined. Pointing out that the Bahamas was a relatively small market due to its population size, with many sectors dominated by a small group of between two-six major players, Mr Jennings told Tribune Business: I guess it depends on how and what you define as a cartel. The Bahamas is a very small environment. Overall, were regulated by the Central Bank. Theres competition between the banks, and you have half-adozen banks. He compared the Bahamian commercial banking industry to this nations petroleum industry, which had just three wholesale players in the form of Esso, Texaco and Shell, and the bakery sector that contained a similar number of participants. Turning to the newspaper industry, Mr Jennings sug gested there were two-and-a-half newspapers in the Bahamas. And he also asked whether Mr DAguilar would describe the Bahamian laundromat industry as a cartel, although thats not to be critical of him. He added: Its the perception, and maybe thats the truth the perception of it. We tend to look at it as more the individual against the banks, but theres a lot of competition between the banks thats not really seen. You may not always feel it. If youre looking at trying to get a loan, theres lots of competition between the banks on interest rates and things. The Clearing Banks Associations head said that apart from Central Bank oversight, consumers would also be reassured if Parliament passed the consumer legislation we keep talking about. ELEMENT OF TRUTH TO BANK FEE CLAIMS FROM page one

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BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 3B The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas Notice to Pensioners The National Insurance Board wishes to advise certain of its pensioners that recent developments at the Post Office Bank and the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) will impact the payment of their monthly pensions. Specifically, the closure of RBCs Bay & Victoria Branch means that payments that were earmarked for this Branch cannot be deposited. Similarly, the Post Office Bankhas advised that it can no longer accept pension payments for its customers. Consequently, pensioners whose monthly benefits and assistance payments were direct deposited into accounts at the Post Office Bank, and RBCs Bay & Victoria Branch are asked to visit the National Insurance Boards Pension Department tomake arrangements for payments to be deposited elsewhere. Affected pensioners are urged to act now to avoid the suspension of their October payments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y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net T HE Bahamas Bar Associations president, Ruth Bowe-Darville, while calling National Security Minister Tommy Turnquests attack on the judiciary unfortunate, told Tribune Business yesterday that the affair could also deter f oreign investment in the Bahamas. E xpressing concern that the wrong m essage may have been sent to potential a nd current investors through questioni ng the competency and fairness of the Bahamian judiciary, Mrs Bowe-Darville s aid: It is unfortunate because he has a ttacked a particular segment in this c ommunity which serves to protect the public. What he has done is lowered the e steem of the judiciary in the eyes of the public, so confidence is not there, whether locally or internationally. Since we have been trying to build o urselves as a relatively safe, competitive financial centre, I dont know how much of an impact his statements will really h ave on international litigants coming t o our courts to resolve their disputes, but I do know there probably will be many inquiries into the availability of the judges, their competency, and also the big question is their fairness in determ ining the matters before them. M r Turnquest last week attacked the j udiciary for its willingness to grant bail to repeat violent offenders, which he said has contributed "greatly" to the country's escalating crime problem. He said that while he has no wish to encroach on the independence of thej udicial system, in his opinion some judges have been far too "liberal" when it comes to granting bail to career criminals and those accused of serious offenses and he believes the police and the public agree with him. Mrs Bowe-Darville told Tribune Busin ess: The ministers comments were u nfortunate, and it came at a very critical time when we are trying to build our j udiciary and efforts are being put in to b roadening the scope of the bench, so we c an have sufficient judges to deal with criminal and civil matters which thei nternational public may have an interest i n. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedi.net FREEPORT RESIDENTS have demanded that the Grand Bahama Power Company show how it calculates its fuel surcharge, after it was proven that this electricity bill component was now 80 per cent higher than at the $140 per barrel oil price peak in mid-2008. A lot of anger and hostility were directed at the companys executives during a town meeting at the Foster B Pestaina Hall on Monday evening. Themeeting ended at 8.30pm, and Grand Bahama Power Compa ny officials left without providing answers to many of the questions posed. Tempers ran high as persons voiced their frustration over high electricity bills and exor bitant fuel surcharge costs. Bombarded by questions and complaints, Grand Bahama Power Company chief execu tive, Sarah MacDonald. did nothave a chance to respond. Accompanying her were Tony Lopez, chief financial officer, and Katherine Demeritte, director of customer service. Some FNM MPs and Sena tors were also present at the town meeting. Many customers complained of experiencing significant increases, with power bills amounting to $1,000 and, in some cases, $2,100 over a onemonth period. They called for transparency over the calculation of the fuel surcharge, which is often higher than the actual electricity usage. Ms MacDonald maintains that the company makes no profit from the fuel surcharge, which is set every month based on the fuel cost and plant efficiency. She previously noted that the hike in world energy prices has resulted in increased fuel surcharges for customers. However, at Mondays town meeting, a woman presented figures for the companys fuel surcharge costs in 2008 and 2011. In July 2008, the cost of oil was at $140 per barrel and the fuel surcharge was $13.35. When compared to July 2011, Grand Bahama Power Companys fuel surcharge was much higher at $24.06, while the cost of oil was lower at $96 per bar rel. The woman demanded an explanation for the inconsisten cy. I want to know what formula the company is using to calculate the fuel surcharge cost? she asked. Residents also wanted to know why the company was using No 2 diesel fuel, which is more expensive than diesel No.6 or Bunker C fuel. We should not have to pay for that or the inefficiency of company equipment, a resident said. Customers were also concerned about the estimation of bills, which executives said was an international industry standard practice. Attorney Osman Johnson disagreed. He said the estimation of power bills contradicts international industry standards, which dictate that companies make exact calculations of both meter reading and bill rates. I have direct experience from the UK, where customers are given the option of having their bills estimated, he said. Mr Johnson claimed that the Grand Bahama Power Company has caused reduced living standards on the island. He alleged that investors and international businesses have been deterred from doing business on Grand Bahama because of the high electricity cost. Ms MacDonald said residents with queries about their bills will be dealt with on an individual basis. While attempting to respond to questions, MacDonald was interrupted by community activist Troy Garvey, who demanded that she reduce the cost of electricity for customers. As Mr Garvey moved closer, shouting at executives, police officers moved in to bring order. Ms MacDonald and members of the executive team were escorted from the building by security and police officers. The Grand Bahama Port Authority is undertaking an independent audit of the Grand Bahama Power Companys billing system. The Port Authority, which acts as the municipal authority for Freeport, said an investigation will be conducted into the companys meter reading, billing procedures and fuel costs and that the findings will be made available to the public. Costs 80% higher than at 2008 oil price peak POWER FIRM BLASTED OVER FUEL SURCHARGE GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY chief executive, Sarah MacDonald

PAGE 14

e nsure that there is no period when an employee is required to work for seven consecutive d ays without then requisite mandatory 48 hours of rest. Yet the Freeport Container P orts attorneys argued that t he seven day period was simply the calendar week, and that just one consecutive 24-hour period of rest was mandated by the Employment Act. R eferring to those arguments, advanced by Robert Adams, attorney and partner at Graham Thompson & Co,J ustice Gray-Evans said: While I agree with Mr Adams that there has to be a s tart and a stop for every sev en-day period, I am not per suaded that those seven-day p eriods must necessarily c oincide with a calendar week or the defendants [Freeport Container Port]w ork week. It occurs to me that, applying Mr Adams con s truction, there is nothing to prevent an employer from s cheduling an employee to work 11 or 12 consecutive days in a 14-day period, pro v ided he allows the employee t o have a day off in each calendar week say, one at the b eginning of the first week and the other at the end of the second week. I do not believe that is the r esult intended by the legis lators. It also occurs to me that Parliament could easily h ave said in every calendar week or in every work week, rather than in everys even day period if it was intended that the seven-day periods could only relate to the calendar week or ane mployers work week. Given that the Employment Act does not specify w hen the seven-day period should begin, the onus is on the employer to ensure that there is no period in which t he employee is scheduled to work seven consecutive days without the mandatory 48h ours of rest. A ccordingly, Justice GrayEvans found that the every seven-day period, in relationt o the four gang shift patt ern, meant the first day when each gang was sched u led to begin its shift. However, she backed Mr Adams in that, while the Employment Act mandated e very employee was sup posed to get one day off or 24 consecutive hours of rest, there is no requirement for an employee to be allowed two consecutive periods of2 4 hours or two days unless they were tipped workers in an industry such as tourism. Turning to the Freeport C ontainer Port case, Justice Gray-Evans noted that there was no off day among the s even consecutive days each gang had been rostered to work. It therefore appeared that the staff did not get one d ay off as mandated by the Act. But a closer examination o f the work roster showed there were two 24-hour perio ds of rest within the sevend ay shift pattern for each gang. These were achieved when one gang finished its d ay shift at 4pm, and then did not have to report to work until 4pm the next day.I t was the same for completing a midnight shift, as workers in that gang did not have to report until midnight the following day. It appears that whether applying the meaning of every seven day period contended by the plaintiffs or that contended by the defen-d ant, workers affected by the f our gang shift pattern utilised by the defendant dur ing the relevant period were a fforded the requisite mandatory 48 hours of rest in every seven-day period,J ustice Gray-Evans said. I therefore find that the four gang shift pattern does not contravene the Act and is n ot illegal. Consequently, I am unable to find that the defendant has breached the c ontracts of employment of the plaintiffs by requiring them to work eight hours perd ay for seven consecutive d ays without the requisite hours of rest. Alonzo Lopez represente d the staff, Mr Adams and Dwayne Fernander the Freeport Container Port. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 7KH,QWHU$PHULFDQ,QVWLWXWHIRU&RRSHUDWLRQRQ$JULFXOWXUH,,&$fIFHLQ 7KH%DKDPDVLVLQYLWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUDIXOOWLPHSRVLWLRQDV 6867$,1$%/( $*5,&8/785((&,$/,67 %$&.*5281',1)250$7,21 ,,&$fLVDVSHFLDOL]HGDJHQF\RIWKH,QWHU$PHULFDQV\VWHP,WVSXUSRVHLV WRHQFRXUDJHDQGVXSSRUWWKHHIIRUWVRILWVPHPEHUVWDWHVWRIRVWHUDJULFXOWXUDO GHYHORSPHQWDQGUXUDOZHOOEHLQJLQWKHLUWHUULWRULHV7KHLQVWLWXWHFROODERUDWHV ZLWKWKHLQLVWU\RI$JULFXOWXUHDQGDULQHHVRXUFHVDQGUHODWHGVHFWRUVWKDW DUHLQYROYHGLQKROLVWLFDJULFXOWXUHDQGUXUDOGHYHORSPHQWLQ7KH%DKDPDV '87,(6$1'(63216,%,/,7,(6 7KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOO $VVLVWFOLHQWVLQWKHSODQQLQJt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l and would encourage people to instead develop their holdings. However, the Chamber president countered: You hear a cry from the Exumas, the second home owners, about the real property tax being charged there, a nd that theyre trying to get out. Y ou hear the cry from the Abac os, the second homeowners there, about the real property tax theyre being charged and wanti-ng out. Why do you think, charging real property tax in GrandB ahama, therell be this boom? M r Turnquest said he presumed the letter writer was largely targeting the Grand Bahama Development Company (Devco between Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA Group Ltd, and Hutchison Whampoa. Devco has in the past been accused of land banking and sitting on its holdings, rather than freeing them up for development. B ut Mr Turnquest said: All of a sudden, if Devcos subject to t he carrying costs for the land t hey hold, we may get benefits f rom the transfer over of land, b ut whats it going to do to property values? That needs a little more thought. The effect a glut of property on the market will have on our real estate industry overall has to be considered. Charges C ontinuing in this vein, Mr T urnquest told Tribune Business: What about double taxation? The Ports affiliate charges every property owner a service charge t o maintain the roads, verges and r est of it. Thats the same thing r eal property tax is supposed to fund. Are we saying take this power a way from the Port Authority and vest the Government with this authority? We know the great job they do in maintaining the environment in the Family Islands to date. It needs a lot of thought. The person that wrote the lett er has the impression that forcing land sales is the answer to the lack of progress and development, but I dont think thats the reason at all. There are much l arger issues than that the globa l economic situation and all k inds of other issues. Mr Turnquest further told Tribune Business: I dont think the Port Authority, Hutchison and D evco are holding land just for t he sake of holding it. I dont know what their goals a nd objectives are, but we have to a ssume theyre interested in seei ng the development of Grand Bahama, and a rise in the value oft heir properties, too, as much as t his will increase licensing and property fees to them. The letter sent to Mr Turnquest, which outlines arguments advanced to Tribune Business previously by several leading attorneys, says property values in F reeport have remained dormant at best for more than the past 20 years, while areas such as Abaco and its cays, Harbour Island, Paradise Island, Cable B each, Lyford Cay and Exuma h ave all seen theirs increase d espite having to pay real property taxes annually. Letter T he letter argues that the a bsence of real property taxes in F reeport has encouraged nonBahamians to sit on, rather thend evelop, the land they have a cquired. There is a school of thought that says one of the reasons property in Freeport has not enjoyed any boom, or even been invigorated in these past years, is because there is no real property tax imposed, the letter said. If there is no carrying cost for property-owning non-Bahamians in the Port area, there is no urgent need to develop and/or place property on the market at r easonable prices. Accordingly, it is maintained t hat real property tax imposition would be beneficial to cause movement and development by non-Bahamian owners. It would indeed benefit non-Bahamian and B ahamian property owners alike. A foreign owner will not sit on property that has a carrying cost of $2,000-$10,000 per annum. At present there is no carrying cost except for a small service charge. The letter concluded: The i rony of the matter is that the i mposition of real property tax w ill invigorate the real estate market in Freeport. But Mr Turnquest previously backed those urging the Government to renew Freeport's Busin ess Licence and real property t ax exemptions until 2054, argui ng that to do otherwise would shackle" the city's economy and d eter potential investors. In an earlier interview with Tribune Business, he said it was "unfair" to leave the issue ofw hether to extend both exemptions, which are currently set to expire in 2015, hanging until after the forthcoming general election g iven that the difficult global economic environment already made a ttracting investment difficult. FREEPORT TAX BREAK END NONSENSICAL FROM page one 114 STAFF SEE PORT SUIT THROWN OUT FROM page one

PAGE 15

BERLIN Associated Press S TOCK MARKETS soared around the world Tuesday amid hopes that Europe is finally finding a way out of its debt crisis. Greece passed an unpopular property t ax and German Chancellor A ngela Merkel pledged to offer the struggling country "all necessary assistance." It's unclear whether that will be enough to satisfy investors for long. Stocks improved following last w eek's turmoil as speculation grew that Greece's bailout creditors will look to impose bigger losses on Greece's pri-v ate bondholders as well as recapitalize Europe's banks and expand the eurozone's rescue fund. So far, there's been no confirmation from Europe's capitals that such a comprehensive solution isb eing planned. Financial markets closely watched a meeting between Merkel and Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou, but neither announced anyn ew measures ahead of their p rivate dinner at Berlin's chancellery on Tuesday evening. "Through the euro, we are closely bound together, and the weakness of one affects us all," Merkel said at a newsc onference. Germany, Europe's biggest economy, is seen as a key player in resolving the 17nation eurozone's debt crisis, b ut Merkel's government has repeatedly been accused over t he past 18 months of being a r eluctant leader of the rescue e fforts. Speaking earlier Tuesday alongside her economy m inister, Philip Roesler, Merkel reiterated her convic-t ion that there is no quick s olution, saying the crisis must b e dealt with "step by step." Greece must receive an euro8 billion ($11 billion cue loan before mid-October to stave off bankruptcy, a collapse that would send shockw aves through markets a round the world. But creditors have demanded more efforts to raise revenue. In response, Greek lawmakers approved a controversial new property tax Tuesday evening, passing it 154-1 43 in the 300-member parliament. The levy, in addition to public-sector reforms announced earlier, is expected to make up for lagging reve nues this year by providing more than euro2 billion ($2.76 b illion), or about 1 percent of G reece's annual gross domest ic product. Greek Finance Minister E vangelos Venizelos said his country will get the money." The disbursement will be d ecided in time, in line with t he course of our funding n eeds," he said. Greeks have been outraged b y tax and other austerity measures, and unions have responded with strikes andp rotests. Even as Venizelos spoke, protesting ministry employees and tax office workers chanted outside his d epartment in Athens. V enizelos said Greece had made great efforts to achieve i ts fiscal targets, but that a "hyper-effort" is necessary to fully meet its commitments. Venizelos said representatives from the International Monetary Fund, the European Commission and the European Central Bank will return to Athens this week.T he so-called troika suspende d its review in early September amid talk of missed targets and budget shortfalls. The current plan is to have Greece implement painful debt-reduction measures in exchange for rescue loans.G reece relies on funds from last year's euro110 billion ($149 billion European leaders also have agreed on a second euro109 b illion bailout, although some details of that remain to be w orked out. We want a strong Greece w ithin the eurozone, and Germany is prepared to offer all n ecessary assistance," Merkel said in Berlin. P apandreou, in return, p ledged to implement the r eforms demanded by G reece's international credi tors. Speaking through a t ranslator, he said this is a time "of great sacrifices for the Greek people. Thereforei t is of great importance to receive signals of support from our European partners." Ahead of the meeting b etween the two leaders, M erkel's government downplayed speculation of bold n ew moves to tackle Europe's sprawling sovereign debt crisis. German Finance Minister W olfgang Schaeuble ruled out increasing the eurozone's new euro440 billion ($595 billion r escue fund, calling it "a silly idea" that could ultimately e ndanger the AAA ratings of t he main creditor countries such as Germany and the N etherlands. Greece's new property tax will range from euro4.00 to euro20.00 ($5.50-$27.50 every square meter (10.7 s quare feet). It will be charged through electricity bills to m ake it easier for the state to collect, instead of going through Greece's unwieldya nd inefficient tax system. Those who refuse to pay willr isk having their power cut o ff. T he extra charge has deeply angered Greeks, who have already been through more t han a year of sharp austerity measures, including salary a nd pension cuts and higher t axes. State electricity company u nionists have threatened not to collect the tax. Public transport workers walked off the job Tuesday for two days, and were to be joined by taxi driv ers on Wednesday. Tax office and customs workers a lso were on strike. Police briefly scuffled with protesters outside parliaments hortly after Tuesday's vote there and used pepper sprayt o disperse one group of y ouths. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6$&7 +(5$/',17(51$7,21$//7' ,QROXQWDU\OLTXLGDWLRQ 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV $FWRI +(5$/',17(51$7,21$/ KDVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIIWKH5HJLVWHU DFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLILFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG WKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW %(+//$'t$/$<(*+ &KDUWHUHG$FFRXQWDQWV 8QLWHG$UDE(PLUDWHV /LTXLGDWRU NOTICE is hereby given that RENIQUE ZERALYNES, P.O. BOX E-46076, SEAGRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of SEPTEMBER, 2011 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas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ngela Merkel. (AP

PAGE 16

NEW YORK Associated Press CONSUMERS' confidence remained weak in S eptember after dropping to a post-recession low during the month before. That's left e conomists to wonder just w hat it'll take to get Americ ans feeling good about the economy again. A survey of consumer c onfidence shows that Americans who were worried in August because of a downgrade of U.S. longt erm debt, wild stock markets swings and other con cerns, continue to bes pooked. Economists say the p roblem is that not much h as changed to make consumers feel financiallys ecure. The stock market is s till volatile. Worries about the global economy persist. And perhaps worst of all for confidence, U.S. jobs are still scarce. "We are well below where we should be, and that'sb ecause the unemployment s ituation is so bad," said P aul Dales, senior U.S. e conomist at Capital Econ omics. "You have to have a h uge fall in the unemploym ent rate." Reading The Conference Board, a private research group, said Tuesday that its Consumer Confidence Index was at 45.4 in September. The n umber is slightly above the revised reading in August of 4 5.2, which was the lowest s ince April 2009. A reading of above 90 indicates the e conomy is on solid footing. "The pessimism that shrouded consumers last month has spilled over into September," said LynnF ranco, director of The Conference Board Cons umer Research Center in a statement. Economists, which watch t he index closely because consumer spending accounts for about 70 percent of U.S. e conomic activity, say it will t ake at least a year for cons umers' confidence to i mprove. The problem, they s ay, is that consumers still f eel like they're in a recession. It's not hard to see why consumers are freaked out about the U.S. economy. Net job creation came to a halt in August in the U.S. T he unemployment rate was f lat at 9.1 percent. Home prices remain weak. And c onsumers are facing higher p rices for everything from f ood to clothing as retailers try to offset their rising costs for labor and materials. C onsumers also don't feel good about their prospects. Those claiming jobs are "hard to get" increased to 50.0 percent, from 48.5 percent in The Conference Board's survey. And the p roportion of consumers a nticipating an increase in their income declined to 13.3 percent from 14.3 percent. F ranco, with The Conference Board, said that "does n ot bode well for spending." E conomists say sustained j ob growth monthly job g ains of at least 200,000 w ill be the most critical comp onent in raising consumers' confidence. A rallying stock market, rising home values and lower prices for gasoline, food and other things would also help lift shoppers' moods. Challenges Some economic chall enges are already starting t o ease. For instance, gas prices, while higher than last y ear, are starting to come down. Shoppers will also see prices on clothing and home furnishings start to comed own by next spring, says Scott Wren, equity strategist f or Wachovia Securities. Stores had raised prices on average of about 10 percent a s they tried to offset higher costs for labor and raw materials like cotton, but t hose cost pressures have s tarted to dissipate in recent m onths. That will help confidence a little," Wren said. A lthough the stock markets are still volatile, they are calming some. Since the first week of August, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has closed up or down more than 200 points a total o f 16 times. T he Dow remains down 12.8 percent from its recent p eak on July 21, and down 2 .3 percent for the year. A sustainable rebound in the stock market should send confidence back to ar eading of anywhere from 60 to 75, said Dales, with Capital Economics. But two other components that affect sentiment housing and the job mar k et aren't budging much. A ccording to a widely w atched Standard & P oor's/Case-Shiller index r eleased on Tuesday, home p rices rose for a fourth straight month in most major U.S. cities in July. But prices are expected to decline in the coming months after the buying season. Jobs And economists will c losely monitor the Septemb er jobs figures when they are to be released on Oct. 7 But unemployment rate is expected to remain unchanged at 9.1 percent with employers adding7 5,000 jobs. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 7B 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1550.0807.76.72% 1 0.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.00-0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .504.40Bank of Bahamas6.936.930.000.2300.10030.11.44% 0 .530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2 .842.55Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.0300.09090.03.33% 1.961.77Fidelity Bank1.771.770.000.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas8.478.470.0010,0000.2450.31034.63.66%2 .802.33Colina Holdings2.332.330.000.4380.0405.31.72% 8.508.33Commonwealth Brewery8.508.500.0010,8880.7400.00011.50.00% 7.006.21Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.446.440.0010,0000.4960.26013.04.04% 2.001.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.621.650.035,0000.1110.04514.92.73% 1.771.31Doctor's Hospital1.371.370.005,0000.0740.11018.58.03% 5.504.75Famguard5.435.430.000.4980.24010.94.42% 8.405.35Finco5.395.390.0010,0000.7570.0007.10.00% 9.457.75FirstCaribbean Bank8.218.210.0010,0000.4940.35016.64.26% 6 .005.00Focol (S 5.335.330.0010,0000.4350.22012.34.13% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7 .305.58ICD Utilities7.307.300.00-0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 9 9.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 P rime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%T UESDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,363.78 | CHG 0.03 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -135.73 | YTD % -9.05BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 2 9 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.18353.32%4.99% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.14202.10%4.31% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.18543.16%5.14% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 31-Aug-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 31-Aug-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS31-Aug-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 NOTICEIN THE ESTATE OF NEVILLE MINUS late of Caravel Beach in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send the same GXO\FHUWLHGLQZULWLQJWRWKH8QGHUVLJQHGRQ or before the 31st day of October, A.D. 2011, after which date the Co-Executors will proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims to which they shall then have had notice. AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned. MERIDIAN LAW CHAMBERS Attorneys for the Co-Executors Chambers, P.O. Box N-168, East Bay Shopping Center, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. CONSUMERS' CONFIDENCE REMAINS WEAK IN SEPTEMBER A SHOPPER r eading a product label at Costco Wholesale in Mountain View, Calif. Consumers' confidence in the economy remained weak in September after dropping to a post-recession low during the month before as Americans continue to worry about high unemployment and low wages. (AP BENTONVILLE, Arkansas A ssociated Press WAL-MART STORES INC. announced Tuesday that one of its key executives, Eduardo Castro-Wright, will retire in 2012. The world's biggest retailer said that Wright, 56, will retire from his role as vice chairman and CEO of its global ecommerce and global sourcing business on July 1. Wal-Mart aims to name a replacement by the end of January and have Castro-Wright assist in the transition. Castro-Wright joined Wal-Mart in 2001 and worked as the head of its business in Mexico before becoming president and CEO of its U.S. operations in 2005. In June 2010, Wal-Mart appointed Bill Simon, who had been chief operating officer, to take over its U.S. operations, shifting Castro-Wright to lead the retailer's global ecommerce and sourcing business. Wal-Mart said at the time that the move allowed CastroWright to relocate to California to be with his family, including his wife who was recovering from a heart transplant. It also helped Wal-Mart increase its emphasis on building its international online business. The executive moves occurred amid a slump at Wal-Mart's U.S. business as it grappled with tough economic times and mis takes it made in pricing and merchandising. Wal-Mart's U.S. business has had nine consecutive quarters of declines for a key revenue measure, the longest stretch in its history. The company has been re-introducing merchandise it cut during an overzealous bid to reduce clutter in its stores and has returned to offering "everyday low prices" at its stores. In August, it told investors it expects to reverse the declines by the fourth quarter. Wal-Mart has focused more on its international business from growth as sales in the U.S. have softened. The company's overseas business, which includes China, Brazil, Japan, Mexico and other countries, made up approximately 26 percent of the company's revenue in fiscal 2011. Wal-Mart, based in Bentonville, Arkansas, has more than 9,700 stores under its various banners in 28 countries. "(Castro-Wright and in every assignment has brought passion and commitment to the job. He has also built talented teams wherever he has led," the company's CEO Mike Duke said in a statement. Under Castro-Wright's leadership, Wal-Mart has notably expanded its online business overseas. Wal-Mart bought a minority stake in online company Yihaodian in China in May. It has added online shopping for home delivery in a number of countries as well. The company says expanding this business has been crucial to Wal-Mart because it provides people outside the biggest cities the same opportunities that Wal-Mart stores did 50 years ago when the company first brought products to rural areas of the U.S. Castro-Wright also has worked to help Wal-Mart to develop shopping opportunities for mobile devices and tapping into social networks. Under his stewardship, Wal-Mart bought social media company Kosmix in April to help strengthen its social and mobile commerce. Shares of Wal-Mart rose 42 cents to $52.25 in late afternoon trading. W AL -MART STORES SAYS KEY EXEC RETIRING

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LOC AL RELIEF C ONC ER TS HELP B RIN G HOPE AFT ER T HE ST ORM PE TER R UN KS BA RES H IS SOU L I N HI S L A T EST A LBU M TH E STRE E T BEA TS GRO UP COM E S TO GRAN D BAHAM A WEDNESD A Y SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 TH E T RI B U N E S E C TI O N C By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer T HE BAR to make people laugh uncontrollably has been set very high for the actors and creators of the "Stop Likin' Man" internet video series. Co l l age E n t ert ai n men t re le ased S to p L i k i n M an 3" th i s m o n th an d i t p o k e s j u st as m u ch f u n at s o me o f th e s i ll y t h i n gs B ah am ia n men i n p art i cu l ar d o F o r i n st an ce o n e sce n e o f t h e t wo a n d a h al f mi n u t e l o n g vi d eo p o k es fu n a t t h at fac t t h at so m e Bah a mi an s c an n o t l i ve wi t h o u t tec h n o l o gy. "W e d o n t co mmu n i c at e an ym o re a n d t h at sc en e d em o n st ra tes th at. W e ar e i n su ch a n a ge wh e re t h e o n l y t h i n g we w an t to d o i s s en d an emai l s en d a t ext m ess age o r a Bl ac k b err y me ss age. T h ese t h i n gs tak e th e h u m an as p ect o u t o f c o mmu n i ca ti o n an d w e w an t ed to s h ed a l i tt l e b i t o f l ig h t o n t h at sai d T yr o n e Bu r ro w s, o n e o f th e f o u n d er s o f Co l l age E n t ert ai n men t T h er e w ere s o me c h al len ges ge tt i n g t h e vi d eo o f f t h e gr o u n d li k e f i n d i n g c u rr en t s u b j ect mat t er an d t u rn i n g i t i n t o h u mo ro u s en t ert ai n me n t. Do i n g co m ed y i s ver y d i ff i cu l t I t t o o k u s a r eal l y l o n g wh i l e t o d o th i s t h i rd vi d eo T h e se co n d o n e w as s o f u n n y, an d t h e b ar w as s et h i gh so we k n ew we h ad to c o me u p wi t h so m et h i n g ver y fu n n y b ecau s e t h ere i s a h i gh l evel o f exp ec ta ti o n w e h ave t o meet Th e s eco n d v id e o f ea tu r ed mo s tl y s o ci al co mm en t ar y o n f as h i o n a n d we exh au s te d j u s t a b o u t al l o u r f ash io n r eso u r ces It wa s re al ly d if f ic u l t an d w e j u st h ad t o f i n al ly s i t d o w n an d j u st d o i t. S o met i mes l i f e go t in t h e w ay o f th i n gs b u t w e ar e sat i sf i ed wi t h th e o u t co m e, h e sa id W i t h th e s eri es M r B u rr o ws sai d t h e gro u p w an t ed t o sh i n e l i gh t o n s o me o f t h e si l l y th i n gs th at gu ys d o C u rr en t l y, Co l l age E n te rt ai n men t h as a s h o w t h at ai rs o n ZN S o n F ri d ay a t 8p m I n ad d i ti o n t o th e S to p L i k i n M an s eri es t h ei r web s i te i s lo a d ed wi t h o th er fu n vi d eo s fr o m t h e gr o u p Th er e i s a l o t in s to re f o r u s in t h e n ear f u tu r e. We wi l l c o n ti n u e t o mak e vi d eo s th a t ap p ea l t o B ah ami an s W e l i k e to k e ep th i n gs cu r ren t an d re p res en t t h e B ah ami an c u lt u r e in a h u m o ro u s w ay b e cau s e we l o ve o u r co u n t ry ," M r B u r ro w s sa id T h e "S t o p L ik i n M an s eri es b egan as a sh o r t vi d eo t o en c o u rage p ers o n s n o t to f o l l o w t h e cr o wd o r b o w t o p eer p r ess u re. I t t u rn e d in t o a B ah ami an p h en o m en o n wi t h p ers o n s f ro m al l w al k s o f li f e t el li n g o t h er s t o "st o p l ik in man an d h avi n g "t ags o n ever yt h in g S o me o f t h e t h in g s f eat u red i n t h e p as t vi d eo s are gu ys w ear i n g th ei r p an t s t u ck ed i n t o th e ir so c k s, b u yi n g Oak l ey s u n gl as ses to w ear wi t h o u t t h e l en se s, st ar i n g p eo p l e d o wn j u s t f o r f u n o f i t an d gu ys d res si n g al i k e b y w ear i n g t h e "co l o u r o f t h e d ay". T h ey al s o p o k ed fu n at gu ys wh o re fu s ed t o r emo v e th e l ab e ls fr o m t h ei r h at s an d c lo t h i n g, p ro m p ti n g t h e p h ra se "t ags o n ever yt h in g T h e "S t o p Li k i n M an co n c ep t cam e fr o m yo u t h p as to r Co r ey DJ Co u n sel l o r at B ah amas F ai th M i n i st ri es wh o w o u l d al ways t el l t h e Yo u t h A l i ve au d i en ce at t h e eve n t n o t t o f o l l o w f as h io n o r th e cro w d an d t o b e t h ems el ves T h e mes sa ge t o o k o f f an d gar n ere d a cu l t fo l l o w in g las t year p r o mp t i n g a se q u el a n d gen er at in g m ed i a at ten ti o n wh en a Go ver n men t mem b er i n t h e Ho u s e o f A s se mb l y sh o u t ed "s to p l i k in ma n to Op p o s i ti o n me mb er Gl en ys Han n aM ar ti n as sh e m ad e a co n t ri b u t i o n to a d e b ate o n c u l tu r e. C o l la ge en t ert ai n me n t i s m ad e u p o f 25 l o ca l an d i n t er n ati o n al ac to r s. T o vi ew S t o p L i k in M an 3 l o g o n t o c o l l a g e d e m c o m

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T H E T R I BU N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 02 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 T HE Street Beats Group, a team of young performers based in New York City, has been invited by the Grand Bahama Performing Arts Society (GBPAS) to put on two work shops, one for dance and the other for drumming. B oth w orkshops w ill b e hel d this Sa turday at the R eg enc y T h eatre Th a t sa m e d a y th e y w i l l be t h e fe a t u re act in Street Be ats" to help promote an d fun d th e soc i et y w hi ch assi sts yo uth i n t h e p e r fo rm i n g a rt s i n G r a n d B a h a m a "We are ver y excit ed abou t havin g th is g ro u p i n to w n N o t o nl y w i l l t he y be prov idin g a w on de rful sho w, alo ng w ith loc al danc ers, but they w ill be g ivin g o f t h eir time to work with loc al stude nts a nd performe r s in the tw o ma s te r c la s s wor ks h ops I t 's a n opp or t uni ty l ocal s should ta ke a dvantag e of," said Da lia F e l d m a n p r e s i d e n t a n d f o u n d e r o f GB PAS. B o t h wo r k s h o p s f o r b e g i n n e r s o r a d v a n c e d st u d e n ts w i ll t a k e p l a c e s i m ul tane ously a t 10 am at the theatre. The d ru m m in g w i l l b e w i th e v e ry d a y ob j e c t s, a nd the d anc e w ill be base d on hip ho p, bre ak dan ce ta p and ac roba tic s Indiv i d u a l s w i s hi n g t o p a r ti c i pa t e i n e it h e r o f the w orkshops a re a sked to c al l Gl oria Mc Glone of the G BPAS com mittee at 2 42-3 73 -288 7. Yo u do n 't ne e d to ow n a dr um se t to pa rtic ipate in our drum ming worksho p, as we u s e ever yd ay it em s l ike p las t ic bu cke ts, house hold broo ms, trash c ans, an d e ve n co m pu t er k ey bo ar d s s ai d Zo lo R uiz of The Stre et B ea ts Group The Soc ie ty is offe r i ng a spe c ial tic ket /wo rk sh op com bin at ion d is coun t to a t t e n d b o t h a w o r k sh o p a n d t h e s ho w o n the same da y fo r $5 off the com bine d pric e. S t r e e t B e a t s p r o m i s e s t o b e a n e n er g e t ic an d co l ou r f u l f i na l e t o t h e Grand Bahama Performing Arts Soci ety's third season. The GBPAS is a char itable organisation that was launched in January of 2009 by volunteers who are passionate a b ou t th e pe rf or m i ng a r ts T he o b j e c t iv e of this soc iety i s to prov ide its m emb ers and the community of Grand Bahama with a variety of international musical, t h e a t r i c a l a n d d a n c e p e r f o r m a n c e s throughout the year. They also seek to e n c o u r a g e a n d e x p o s e t h e G r a n d Baham i a n youth to the endless pos sib il it i es of a car e er in th e p er f or m in g a rts fi e ld th ro ug h t he pro v is io n o f sc h ol a rs h ip s t o l o c a l m u si c a n d d a n c e sc h oo l s as well as summer camps and colleges abroad. Drumm ing and dan ce worksh ops come t o G r an d Bah ama le d b y The S tre et Be ats Group of N Y C By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer S H A KES P EA RE i n Pa r a di se T h e a tre fe st iv a l is b a ck fo r a t hi rd y e a r wi th m ore ta le n t, d iv e rsi ty a nd e n te rta i nm e n t. T h i s y e a r Ju l i u s Ce a s a r i s th e si g n a t u re piece of the festival. There a r e tw o international pr oductions in the line-up this year. Sandra Riley's "Mariah Brown" tells t h e s to ry o f a n A f r i c a n B a h a m i a n w o m a n who wa s o ne o f t he p ion ee rs o f Cocon ut Grove. "Bard To G o" by the Grand V alley State University performing troupe will feature a 50-minute introduction to the works of Shakespeare. Th e si gn at ure Ba h am ia n pe rfo rma n c e i s D i s W e T i n g s 2 0 1 1 b y K a y l a Edw ard s a nd De re k B urro ws. Thi s sh ow will take centre stage on opening night this Friday. T h i s m u s i c a l p r o d u c t i o n s e e k s t o acquaint a n ew ge neration of Baha mians with their history and culture. Dis W e T ings or iginat ed in 1989 a n d it re m i n d s p e o p l e o f th e ir Ba h a m i a n s roots," said Philip Burrows, art director of Shakespeare in Paradise. Pa t R a h min g a li as Pa t Rah mi ng i s a one-man production featuring a classic mix of Pat Rahming poetry and music. "T h i s i s t h e t h i r d s e as on of S ha k espeare in Paradise and we try to have a broa d cross se ction of pla y s e ach y ea r t o give variety to our a udience," s a id Mr Burrows. Th e fe sti va l i s c o mm it ted to ex po sing Ba ha m ia n s to a r an g e of cla ssi ca l t he a tre tr a d i t i o n s f r o m a ro u n d t h e w o rl d a c co r d ing to fe stiv a l org an ise rs. Stu de nts se rve as a large t arget group for thi s education a l o bje ctiv e L a s t ye a r t h e f e s t i v a l h a d a g r e a t r e s p o n s e w i t h s o m e 3 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s in cl u di n g pr im a ry se co n d a ry a n d co l le g e lev e l st ude nt s a tte ndi ng Th e tr avellin g pr oduc tio n "B ard To G o wi l l b e s ta g e d a t S t A nd r e ws S ch o o l Ly fo rd C a y S c h o o l A q u i n a s Co l l e g e a n d C C Swe et ing H ig h Scho ol. So m e s c h o ol s t u d e nt s a r e r ea d i n g b oo ks o f c er ta in pl ays i n s c hoo l, s o it g iv e s th em th e op po rtun ity to se e it on s t a g e F o r e x a m p l e l a s t y e a r w e d i d W o m an T a k e T w o' a n d i t w a s gr e at b e ca u se m os t o f t he st u de n ts w e re stu d y i ng th at boo k at the tim e ," Mr Bu rrows t o l d Tri bun e Arts. Ex e cu tiv e s o f S ha k e sp e ar e i n P a ra di se a r e u r g i n g s c h o o l s t o b e m u c h m o r e r e c e p t i v e to t h e i r s t u d e n t s p a r ti c i p a t i n g i n t he a nn ua l fe stiv a l. We a lwa y s g e t pa rti c i pa ti on f rom the C a t h o l i c sc h o o ls We a l wa y s h a v e s ch o o l s l i k e C R W a l k e r H O Na s h a n d o t h e r p ri v a te scho ols. B u t whe n it com es to so me o f the go ve rnm en t sc h oo ls it is di fficul t g e ttin g t he m t o p arti c i pa te in the sho wc as es It s l ik e pu l li ng t ee t h t o g e t t he m to t ak e pa rt. Th e g o v er nm e nt sch oo ls n e e d t o g iv e t he i r stu de n ts a s m uch e xp o sur e to th e a t r i c s a n d d r a m a W e w a n t t o e x p o s e t h e m t o th i s a re n a s o t h e y m a y b e co m e a s p i r i n g a ct o rs p r o d u ce r s wr i t e rs T h e w h o l e p e r s on n e e ds to be ex p o sed sh e sa i d. S h ak e s p ea r e i n P a r ad i s e r u n s f r o m O ctob er 3 -8. For mo re in form a tion log o n to www .sh a ke sp e a rin p ara d is e. o rg SHAKE S PEARE IN P A R A DISE THEA T R E FES TIV AL IS BA CK F O R A THIRD Y EAR G r a n d B a h a m a beat the comes to THE Street Beats Group, a team of young performers based in New York City, has been invited by the Grand Bahama Performing Arts Society (GBPAS) to put on two workshops, one for dance and the other for drumming. September 29 Thursday A Night for Hope and Healing An evening to share poetry, songs, stories, visual art and music, as an expression of solidarity with the ongoing campaign to end sexual violence against women. The Bahamas Crisis Centre will host the event at Doongalik Studios/Jackson Burnside Ltd, Village Road, on Thursday, September 29, from 7pm 9 pm. Following the performances there will be an open discussion between with the artists and the audience. October 1 Saturday Bahamian Book Drive We all have unwanted books that are collecting dust on our shelves. We need to get those books into the hands of those who want and are in desperate need of them. Bring your new or "gently-used" books appropriate for children or young adults from grades K-12 to Xavier's Lower School Grounds, West Bay Street on October 1 from 1pm 7pm. The fair will feature good food and entertainment as well as booths that will display the work of Bahamian authors and publishers. The book drive is being organised by the Sandals Foundation. October 8 Saturday Hurricane Relief Concert & Family Fun Da y Make Em Listen presents "Getting Cat Island Back On Track" A Hurricane Relief Concert & Family Fun Day at the Carnival site, Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre from 12noon until; featuring over 18 artists including Ronnie But ler, KB, Ancient man and Terez Hepburn. The show will be hosted by Hope Shelly Anne and Sweet Island Gal. Music will be provided by Bighouse Play L DJ. There will be games, prizes and a kiddie corner. October 20 Thursday Doctors Hospital Lecture: Breast Cancer Doctors Hospital's lecture series hosts a free talk on breast cancer at the conference room, Doctors Hospital at 6pm. There will be free blood pressure, cholesterol and glu cose screenings between 5pm and 6pm. Refreshments will be provided. To ensure seating, RSVP at 302-4713 or email info@doctorshosp.com October 30 Sunday Miss Teen Plus Pageant Esteem Productions holds its Second Annual Miss Teen Plus Bahamas Pageant under the theme "Ladies-in-waiting" for girls aged 15-18. Entrants can win a scholarship and trav el opportunities. For more information call 393-2458 or email mtpbahamas@gmail.com T H I N G S 2 DO

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T H E T R I B UN E S E CT I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 03 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter T HE Bahamian entertainment industry is getting on board with hurricane relief efforts by organising a number concerts that are all set to take place in the upcoming weeks. J us t last month, Hur rica ne Ir ene made la n df a ll in th e B a h a ma s, de v a st a ti ng a n u mber of islands. Immediately after, several benefit relief concerts were organised. A few of them include "A Day of Fami ly a nd C ult ural E nte rta inm en t" by th e Re d Cros s Society of the B ahamas, the "Getting Cat Island Back On Track Hurricane R e l i e f Co n c e r t a n d t h e "T o g et h er We S ta n d C o n c e r t" a t th e S a l e m B a p ti s t c h u r c h Th e Re d C r os s f undr ais er will b e held this coming Saturday at Arawak Cay. ASSISTANCE O ne o f t he co or d i n at o r s of t h e ev en t J o a n n e P y f r o m o f D C T e c h n o l o g y e x p l a i n e d h e r re a so n s f o r g e t t i n g i n v o l v e d i n the e ve nt : W e sa id tha t N a ssau w as sp are d f ro m t h e h u r r i c a n e a n d t h e re w e re p e o p l e o n the Fam ily Islan ds tha t nee ded he lp. In an effort to provi de som e a s sista nce to th ese pe r so n s, DC T e c h no l o g y a l o ng w i t h a n um ber of c o nc er ned c o rpor ate citizens have p a r t ne r ed wi t h G EM S R ad i o T h e P il o t C l u b o f N a s s a u a n d o t h e r c o n c e r n e d B a h a m i a n s w h o w i s h t o p ro v i d e so m e fi n a n ci al re lief to th ose pe rs o ns affe cte d. We ha ve p artnere d w ith The B aha mas R ed Cr o s s, on e of t h e maj or em er ge ncy r e lief organisations in The B ahama s and they wil l be respon s i ble for the c oll ec tion and d istributi on of al l funds tha t hav e be en co llec ted from th is ev ent. M s P yf r om sa id t h e ent i r e day wi ll be fille d w ith famil y e nterta inme nt. I n a d d i ti o n t o th e l iv e e n t e rt a in m e n t f ro m l ocal Bah amia n ar tis t s t her e will b e face pain ting a b ounc y c astle free giv e-a wa ys, r a ffle s an d food an d drink s W h at w e d id w as a sk a n um be r o f a rti sts t o p e rf o r m f o r fr e e W e h a v e a b o u t 3 0 a rt i s ts wh o ha ve ag r e ed to pe rform," she s a id. Gettin g C at Islan d Ba ck On Trac k" is an ot he r hu rric a n e re li e f c on c ert t ha t w i ll b e taki ng p lac e nex t mon th. Accor di ng to t he pr omo tio n comp any, th e V e n d e t ta G r ou p C a t Is l a nd w a s o ne o f the man y island s tha t took on most of the b r u n t o f t h e s t o r m w h i c h r e s u l t e d i n unprec ed ente d le ve ls of d estruc tion." This sparke d the fla me in ve teran sho w an d a rti st p rom ot e r P a tri ci a Ch a tti of M ak e Em Listen who is al s o a C at Island na tive She be gan to orga nise an ev ent that wo uld a l l o w s o m e r e l i e f f o r t h e p eo p l e o f C a t I s l a n d Ms Chatti said: "It all began when K B and I ha d a c onve rs a tion i mme diat ely a fter the hu r ric an e and h e said to m e, Pa tric ia if yo u a re th in ki ng o f do in g so me thi ng I'm on board for tw o rea s o ns, C at I sla nd h as be en good to m e a nd I lo ve them, an d I kno w you wi ll do it the rig ht w ay '." T he co ncer t i s s et t o fe atu r e th e bes t in Bah ami an e nt er tai nm ent s uch a s R onn ie B u t l e r KB A n c i e n t M a n P ap a S mu r f J u l i a n S a s h a D u n n C h r i s t i a n M a s s i v e Te re z H epb ur n, Novi e Pi er r e, Ver on ica B i s h o p N i t a a n d W i l l i s a n d t h e I l l e s t B a n d The enti r e da y is i nten ded be o ne o f fun for th e e nt ire fa mi ly The re wi ll be bou nc e y ca stles, c artoon c ha r a cte rs a nd an a r e a set asid e for the kid s T h ere w il l al s o be a f ashio n sh ow o n th e st a ge f o r th e ni g h t t o a d d t o the festiv itie s a long w ith ca rd and dom ino gam es w ith ca s h priz es. Or ganiser s of t he T oget her We St and" e ve nt h ad ho pe d t o co ll ect ca nn ed f oo d and w at er fo r the re lie f e ffort, b ut th ey ha d t o can cel t he ir c on cer t l as t we ek du e t o l a ck o f p r o m o t i o n a m o n g s t t h e Ba p t i s t c o m m u n i t y R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s f r o m t h e Ki ngdom Dub Gro up, w h o or ganis ed the e v e n t i n c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h t h e B a p t i s t U n i o n s a i d t h e y w e r e d i s a p p o i n t e d ab out t he cancellat ion. DISAPPOINTMENT In the past they had great success with relief concerts collecting about three truck l o ad s af t er t h e ca t as t r o p hi c H ai t i e ar t h quake. I n a n i n te rv i e w w it h D J C o u n se l l o r d i r e c tor of the Kingdom Dub group, he said: "I am dis app oin ted b ecaus e it i s s om eth ing that shoul d h ave h appe ned w ee ks a fter the storm." W e d id o ne f or Ha it i tw o y ea rs a go w i th F aith T emple Schoo l. We h a d a b out 400 people in attendance. We collected about t h r e e t r u c k s f u l l f o r t h e R e d C r o s s o f canned goods and water," he said. Hope after the storm BAHAMIAN artist Sasha Dunn of the Vendetta Group is offering free down loads of his new album which is set to drop next month. To show appreciation for his supporters, the artist announced that fans can obtain pre-release copies of "The Dunn Epoch". The new album is said to encapsulate the best of the Bahamian underground hip hop movement. It will feature other local artists like Lady Millz; Mad Van; Baigon; Young Magic; A R; Crow; 1213; Dumbo, and Tru Story. "This project can be looked at as a direct evolution of Bahamian hip hop with futuristic sounds and rhythms. Most of them can be attributed to a talented young Bahamian producer Chad Rolle, who construct ed most of the beats and arrangements," said Sasha. "Overall the whole feel of the project is a sonic trip into the modern urban Bahamian experience," he said. The album follows on the heels of his most recent mixtape "The Epic of The Notorious". L AST T hu r sday, Gui nness and non-Gui nness dri n ker s a li k e met i n bars al l over the Bahamas to rais e a gl ass to Art h ur Gui nness, t he m an behind the Iri sh brew. About 17 b a rs parti ci p at ed i n the int ernati on al toast marki ng 252 year s of the p opul ar dr ink. L ocal event promot ers say Guinness does not surpass Hei n eken as a B ahami an favouri te, but i t is s ti ll a popu l ar drink local ly Wh i l e i t is t raditi on al l y known as a "m an's drink", m any w omen al so enjoy it T h e fi nal st op f o r t he G u i nness bar h op was C lub Luna for an al l Baham ian Reggae concert feat u r ing some of the hottes t Bahami an ar ti sts s uch as Ir ate, Bodi n e, M D eez and Mr Yagga. Ar thur Guinness ( 1725 1803) was an Iri sh b r ewer and at the age of 30 l aid the found at ions f o r the no w worl d f amous Guinness brewer y busi ness. Gui nness leas ed a brew ery in Lei xli p i n 1755. Then, f ive years lat er h e l eft hi s y o unger brot h er in charge of that enter pris e and moved on to ano t her in St James' Gate, Dubli n, at the end of 1759. He si gned a 9,000year leas e f or t he f our-acr e pr o per ty, eff ecti ve f rom Decem ber 31 1 7 5 9 S ASHA D UNN OFFE RING FRE E DOWNLOAD S FROM NE W ALBUM S ASHA D UNN L O CA L B A R S R A I S E T H E I R G L A S S E S T O THE ME MO R Y O F A RTHU R G U I NNES S ABOUT 17 bars participated in the international toast, marking 252 years of the popular drink. T H E f in a l s to p fo r th e Gu i nn e ss ba r h op wa s Cl ub Lu na fo r an all Bahamian Reggae concert featuring some of the hottest Bahamian artists such as Irate, Bodine (above), M Deez and Mr Yagga.

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C UCUMBERS, summer squash, winter squash and pump kins are all grown from seeds sown in hills', areas that have been enriched for the purpose. H ills are n o rm ally ab o u t 18 in ch es ac r o s s an d t h e s o il am en d ed wi t h c o m p o s t m an u r e o r p ea t m o s s p l u s fert iliser. If yo ur s oil i s s and y and w ell dr ai n ed t he h il l d oes n ot have t o b e r ais ed t o im p ro v e d r ai n age. I t i s u sual t o pla n t about fiv e see d s to a h il l, sp acing th em we ll apart a n d t hen t o remo ve t he two weake s t s ee d lings. Most cuc u m bers g rown in T he Bahamas are of the ridge variety: ch un k y, ab o u t six t o 10 in ch es lon g and usually slightly curved. There are English an d orien tal cucu mb er v a ri e ti es tha t be ne fi t from be i ng g r ow n on t r e l l i s e s t h e r e b y pr o d u c i n g s t r ai g h t f r u i t s R i d ge c u c u m bers have pronounced spines that c an be ea si l y rubbe d a wa y w he n the fruits are ripe. C u c u m b e r v i n e s g r ow q ui c k l y and fruits are produced in a very sh o r t t im e, of t e n ju st t en d ays f r o m flo w er to mat ur ity. Cuc urb its have both male and female flowers, the female ones growing from embry onic fruits. B e e s a r e t he m a i n p ol l i n a t o rs a n d i f t h e y a r e a bs e n t y o u m a y have to pollinate by hand. This is do ne b y takin g po l len fro m a m a le f l ow e r u si n g a n a rt i st s b ru sh or c ott on sw ab and dabbi ng i t onto the raised area within the female flower. Eq u a lly f as t g ro we r s ar e s u m me r s q u a s h y e l l o w c r o o k n e c k stra ig ht ne ck, zucc h i ni, patty pan, sc all o p an d m an y o t h e rs Th e f ru i t s a r e p r o d u c e d d i r e c t l y f r o m t h e plant instead of on vines. Summer squash can be prodigious so it is a g o od idea to e s tablish a h il l o r t w o at a t ime an d s ow s u cces sively f o u r weeks apart. W i n t e r s q u a s h b u t t e r n u t a c or n, s pa g he tt i, cr e nsh a w hub bard are so called because they h av e s u p er i o r k e ep i n g q u al it ie s an d i n e a r l i e r t i m e s w e r e s t o r e d i n au t u mn t o b e co n s um ed d u r in g t h e winter months. T h e f l e s h o f w i n t e r s q u a s h i s muc h d ri e r t ha n tha t of s umm e r squash and lends itself to baking. V i r t u a l l y t h e o n l y p u m p k i n g r o w n i n T h e B a h a m a s i s t h e Cuban pumpkin or calabaza. C a l a b a z a s a r e q u i t e s m a l l a s pumpkins go and can be round or slig h tly necke d wi t h pron oun c ed yellow and green skin. The seeds have to be obtained f ro m r ipe f ru its o n s al e i n s to res or f ro m ro adsid e ve n do rs rath er t han from a nursery. C a l a b a z a p um p ki n s sh ou l d be g r o w n i n i n di v i d u a l h i l l s s pa c e d a b ou t si x f e e t a p a r t T h e s e h i l l s s h o u ld b e wel l a way f r o m yo u r re gu la r gard en a s t h e vines pr od uced are en orm ou s. N o t o n l y t h at t h ey h av e t h e h a b i t o f wa lk i n g' s e t t i n g d o w n r o o t s a n d mo vi n g awa y f rom t heir original p la n t i n g p l ace. T h e f ru i t s are rip e wh en t he st em h old in g t h e m t o t h e vine d ries. C u c u r b i t s gr o w f a s t b u t d i e q u ic k ly t oo Calabaza p ump kin s c a n b e lef t to f ulf ill th eir n atu ral lif e s pan b ut it is a go od idea t o pu l l cucu mbe r s a n d s q u a s h a f te r th e i r fi r s t f l u s h o f f r u i t s E v e n t h e n t h e leaves, o n ce so gr ee n will b e lo ok in g s or ry and rav aged. The damage is c a u sed b y f un gus s p o r es a n d p o w d e r y m i l d e w l a n d in g o n wet l eaves du rin g t h e n ight a n d t h e n b e in g n u r t u r ed b y t h e m o r n in g s un A f un gi cid e can be a p plied in p owd e r or liqu id f or m to p ro lon g t he life of th e plant bu t I p refer t o r e ap and pu l l. Think ca r e f ully befo re plantin g c u c u m b e r s a nd s u m m e r s qu a s h T h eir h ar ves t s a re s o b o u n t if u l t h at yo u m ay e nd wit h f ar mo r e c uc um b ers an d s qu a s h t han you ca n h a n d le Tr y to so w ju st th e right nu mb er o f h ills f or you r f a m il y's needs a n d r e p l ac e t h e p l an t s e v er y m o n t h gardenerjack@coralwave.com T H E T R I BU N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 06 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 J us t a f e w i m a g e s o f w h a t w e t h e Bah amas l ooked l ike 40 .. 50 .. .6 0. .. years in the past The Bahamas once had a thriving boat building industry for Out-Island trading, fishing and transportation. BY ROLAND ROSE By GARDENER JACK GREEN SCENE CUCUMBERS SQUASH AN D P UMP KINS STRAIGHTNECK and butternut squash growing in close proximity.

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer R EGGAE artist Peter Runks is baring his soul in his third full length album "Words of Truth". Th e al b u m i s a co m p il at i o n o f 17 tr ack s fe a turing colla bora ti o ns w ith loca l and international artists. R unks w orke d wi th Ja m a ic a n s ing e r M ik ey Gen eral as wel l as fel lo w Bah amia n a r tist s La ndlord a nd A v a la nche f or this new CD. He also teamed up with the Pow Pow p ro d u cers an acco mp l is hed i nt ern at io n al sound system based in Germany. The artist told In Ya Ear that collabo ra ti n g w it h P o w P o w p r esen t ed an o p p o rtunity to work with international artists a n d s h ow c a s e B a ha m i a n t a le nt a t t he same time. T h e y sen t th e ri dd i m an d I f ell i n lo ve wit h it rig ht a wa y s o I wr ote the s on g "Why Should I", because I've noticed in life and also in this music industry that there are a lot of people who think they can start or stop your destiny. Only God has the power to control our destiny, so my point is we have to ask ourselves this q ue s ti o n, w h y s ho ul d I s it a n d w or r y ab o u t w h at o t h ers say o r t h in k w h en Go d is in control?' Runks said this album is a special one bec ause h e w as a b le t o ta p into a v ery vulnerable part of himself. "I put my life into this project. I went through some things in the past and I let everything out in this project. I feel very liberated now that I have used my music as an outlet," he said. ON A MISSION Runks said he is on a mission to con tinuously promote the message of hope a nd l ove H e wa nt s his m usic to r e a ch "the highways and by-ways, main streets a n d d us t y r o a d s p a v in g t he w a y w it h words of truth". "Anything that I sing about addresses t h e i s s u e s t ha t w e f a c e i n o u r s oc i e t y today. I want to show people the way. I w as r ai s e d i n t h e gh et t o b u t I w a n t p e o p l e t o k n o w th at th ey d o n t h a ve to b eco m e a v i c tim. I try to te ll peop le in m y music tha t s ight is just a function of the e ye s and they need to have a vision. Just the way I mad e it o t her p eo p le can mak e it ," he said. "Mam a I Love i s his fa vou rite song off the new the album and he has dedi cated it to his mother. "My mother passed away when I was y ou n g a n d I v e on l y s e e n h e r i n p ho to gr ap hs I d ed i cat ed t h i s so n g to h er, let tin g h e r kn ow th a t I lo v e her. I kn ow she would be proud to see how far I come," he said. W i t h a b r an d n ew al b u m av ai l a b l e f r o m al l maj o r d i gi t al o u t l et s as we l l a s s to r es i n t he C a ribb ea n a nd i n pa r ts o f the U S, R u n k s i s s h o w i n g n o s i g n o f s l o w i n g down. T h e W o r d s o f T r u t h a l b u m h a s re ceived po sitive r eviews from his n a ti v e Bahamas as well as from Jamaica, Hol land and the US. R un k s, wh o co n si der s h ims elf a d evo u t Christian, made his first big splash in the Bahamas wit h th e sin gle B a d n e ss Ou tta S tyle", w h ich tu rn ed i nt o a st ree t ant hem a ft e r it s init ia l re le a s e T he t ra c k i s so pop ular that Runk s a lso includ e d it o n the new album. T H E T R I B UN E S E CT I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 07 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 D A Y C H A R T S L I N E Rihanna CHEERS' "Life's too short to be sit ting around miserable. People gonna talk whether you doing bad or good, yeah. Got a drink on my mind and my mind on my money, yeah" T O P 1 0 P O P S O N G S I WANNA GO Britney Spears LAST FRIDAY NIGHT (T.G.I.F.) Katy Perry MOVES LIKE JAGGER Maroon 5 feat. Christina Aguilera LIGHTERS Bad Meets Evil feat. Bruno Mars SUPER BASS Nicki Minaj PARTY ROCK ANTHEM LMFAO Featuring Lauren Bennett & GoonRock PUMPED UP KICKS Foster The People GIVE ME EVERYTHING Pitbull feat. Ne-Yo, Afrojack & Nayer GOOD LIFE OneRepublic TONIGHT TONIGHT Hot Chelle Rae P et e r R u nks b are s hi s s o ul in ne w e st al b um W o rds o f T rut h By LESH R&B crooner Tyrese is back on the music s ce n e wit h a b rand new vi deo starri ng h is fo rmer "Baby Boy" co-star and friend Taraji P Henson. T h e t w o a r e k n o w n f o r t he i r on s c r e e n r o man ti c r ela ti o n sh i p as "Jo d y an d Yvet te" i n J o h n S i n g l et o n s 2 01 1 u r b a n d r am a f i l m "B ab y Boy." Th e vid e o for h is latest sin g l e "Stay" i s j ust t h e fi rst tas te o f wh at Tyr ese is set t o b r in g h is fan s wi th h is new a l bu m enti tled "O p en Invitation". It hits stores November 1. In t he vid eo, Taraji p lays th e ro le o f a w e l leducated woman who is being neglected by h e r bu sinessma n b oyfrie n d. Th e clip b e gins wi th t he a ctr e ss tell in g a g i rlfri e n d i n a p h on e con v ersa tio n th a t her re latio nship se ems to b e h it ting rock b ottom I t g oes on to show Tyr es e wa lk ing in o n her conv er sat io n and i nst ea d of c o n sol in g her, h e walk s ou t leavin g her in tears. A fed -up T a raji d e cid es t o pack h e r th ings, b u t b efo re leavin g th e h o u se T yrese yet aga i n walks in. This time he makes an attempt to work it out, trying to persuade her to stay. H e sing s: No one e v er s aid it'd be ea sy baby, yeah, woah, woah, yeah. Girl, I wanna take the time and thank you. Just for putting u p with m e. And I'm so rry th at y o u ev en h ad to d eal wi th me. E ven t ho u gh I made yo u cr y. I w ann a mak e i t ri gh t. Ju st g ive me so me t ime to make it right." Th e vi d e o go e s o n t o s h o w th e co u p l e w o r k in g out t he i r dif fe r e nc e s a nd it a ls o s how s flashbacks of the two having recurring argu ments. He sings: I go the extra mile to make you s mi l e an d j u s t t o ma k e yo u r d ay, I 'l l go o u t my way, I'll do whatever it takes. "Bab y p ro mi se yo u l l s tay, st ay. Bab y wo n t you stay? With me?" It h as b e en t en year s s i n ce T yr es e an d T ar aji made their debut on the big screen in the now cult classic "Baby Boy". In a letter to his fans, Tyrese said: "Now we're getting our grown and sexy on". B a h a m i a n f a ns sa y t he y l ov e t he B a b y B o y c h em i s t r y i n t h e n e w v i d eo T h e s m o o t h an d sexy" st yl e h as Tyr ese l oo k i n g li k e "b lac k chocolate," said one fan. Jac k i e T h o m as* sa id : T h ey b o t h l o o k g re at and th ey l oo k l ik e a rea l lif e co u pl e I l ik e t he fact that you can still see and notice the Jody a n d Y v e t t e c h e m i s t r y be t w e e n t h e m I t s almo st lik e t hey a re no t actin g an d th e l ove is real." A l so s peak in g of her l ove fo r th e on -s creen co u p le, Kayl a Si mms s aid : Th i s mi ght so u n d f u n n y b u t T yr e s e an d T a r aj i ca n b e c o n si d e r ed th e b l ack Ro meo an d Ju l i et. P eo p le m igh t n o t h av e l o v ed t h i s vi d e o as mu c h i f i t w e re n o t fo r their movie 'Baby Boy'." Following the release of the video, Tyrese expr essed ap p reci ati o n f o r h is f an s in an op en letter. He thanked them for inspiring him to get back in the studio and also for supporting his many non-musical projects such as his New York Times best-selling book "How To Get Out Of Your Own Way". Tyrese told fans to rest assured "that my first and only love is still music." "I've read your letters, tweets, Facebook, My S pa ce a nd e -ma ils. I 've lis tene d to y ou r v oi c e ma ils a nd more im p orta n tly I'v e run i n t o y o u i n p e rs o n an d yo u v e a l l w an t ed m e t o do it again. So come 11.1.11 my new album "Open Invitation" will be launched globally for you to listen and feel my heart and soul that I put into the album." Names have been changed J O D Y A ND YV ET T E' REU NI T E IN NE W T YRE SE V ID EO "S T A Y" C E L E B R I T Y N E W S A N D G O S S I P By TRACIE CONE Associated Press THE PUBLICIST for a lesbian actress and musician who says she was escorted off a flight for "one modest kiss" of her partner says the encounter was not a stunt for her band's upcoming breast cancer awareness tour. Leisha Hailey, best known for playing Alice Pieszecki in the now defunct Showtime lesbian life drama "The L Word," asked her Twitter followers to boycott Southwest Airlines after the encounter Monday. The airline responded that Hailey's display of affection was excessive and drew customer complaints. The actress and her partner, Camila Grey, denied in a statement released Tuesday that the affection they showed toward each other was inappropriate. "We want to make it clear we were not making out or creating any kind of spectacle of ourselves, it was one modest kiss," the written statement said. "We are responsible adult women who walk through the world with dignity. We were simply being affectionate like any normal couple." Hailey and Grey acknowledge they became upset after the flight attendant reprimanded them. They said the attendant told them that Southwest is a "family airline." "No matter how quietly homo phobia is whispered, it doesn't make it any less loud," the statement said. "You can't whisper hate. We ask this airline to teach their employees to not discriminate against any couple, ever, regardless of their own beliefs." Hailey and Gray said they plan to file a formal complaint with the airline. The incident resulted in a national media spotlight for the actress, who now is a part of the electro-pop duo Uh Huh Her. Publ ici st Li bby C off ey sai d Tuesday t hat t he encount er was real and was "absolut el y not done f or a t t e n t i o n AIRLINE: 'L WORD' S T AR R EM OV E D F O R EX CE SSIVE KISS

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T H E T R I BU N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 08 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 TWENTY years barely makes you an adult in human years, but in the world of cars, it makes you an antique. The Bahamas Antique Auto Club and the Friends of Distinction Riders Club (FODRC) held their second annual "Cruise to the Cure" car show and motorcade on September 12. The team joined the Cancer Society of the Bahamas to help create awareness of prostate cancer and provide screening for men. 1 9 5 6 F O R D F A I R L A N E OWNER MURRAY FORDE "It has a 292 Ford V8 engine. The same used in the Thunder Bird that year. It is my favourite. I always liked the design when I was younger. I used to say I would like to own one of them one day. Some people mistake it for a Chevy of the same year because it has a similar chrome trim and a lot of two-tone, but the body is very different. They were the every day man's car. More of them were made so more have survived. Back in the day this car was about $2,300 brand new." 1989 SEBRING MX, OWNER JEFFREY GIBSON "I always had a passion for the Cobra, so this particular car resembles a 427 Cobra. I built it myself and it took me almost a year to restore. It has a 427-stroke motor. When you see it, you know that's me. I spent hours and hours working night and day. You can't build an antique car rushed. It is a process that calls for time and patience. If you don't have patience, you might as well don't mess with an antique car. When I got it, it was in bad condition. The engine was not running good, the upholstery was bad, the floor was rotten, the windshield was broken. It was a mess." 1991 HUGGER, OWNER GEAN ALBURY "It has a Harley Davidson engine, 1200ccs. We actually built that bike. We took an old Harley Davidson engine, reconditioned it and reframed the frame. It was actually done in Daton, Ohio by some friends of mine. It is very unique. It was built just for me. I ride it every Sunday. I think people that know me professionally are a little bit shocked to know I own a bike." AMERICAN IRON HORSE LEGEND, OWNER HAL SHEARS "What is special about the American Iron Horse Legend? Well, the company is bankrupt right now. I like it because of the way it looks. It is just simple. When the front works are extended like that it is called a chopper. On corners you want to be a little more careful. I've been riding bikes for about 30 years. This bike I bring out when I want to talk to people."



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NASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Volume: 107 No.251 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SUNWITH T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 79F By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE mystery surround ing the disappearance of Marco Archer deepened last night as CCTV footage revealed that contrary to whathis family believed, the 11-year-old did not walk to a nearby gas station near his home. Police reviewed tapes from the Texaco gas station on Baillou Hill Road yes terday after it was reported he had left home on Friday with the intention of pur chasing candy from the garage. However management at the gas station confirmed the missing boy did not TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM YOURNEWSPAPERYOURWEEKENDSEEPAGE8B FORDETAILS 3 ONSATURDAYSWILLNEVERBE THESAMEAGAIN . ON SATURDAYS WILL NEVER BE THE SAME AGAIN . Mystery deepens over kidnap boyDAYS TO GO FLYERS have been distributed in the search for missing Marco Archer (above). Area resident Andrew Pennerman (right) posted Marcos flyer on his bicycle in an effort to raise awareness of the young boys disappearance. Felip Major/Tribune staff CCTV footage reveals child did not visit garage as first believed By SANCHESKA BROWN FORMER Christian Council president Bishop Simeon Hall has come out in support of National Security Minister Tommy Turnquests stance on the granting of bail to repeat offenders. Bishop Hall said while he has the utmost respect for the judiciary, he feels Mr Turnquest was dead on when heBISHOP SIMEON HALL VOICES SUPPORT FOR TURNQUEST STANCE SEE page nine SEE page nine By SANCHESKA BROWN TEACHERS at E P Roberts Primary School have walked off the job for the second time in a month infuriating parents who say their children are being sent to school to play. Angry parents contacted The Tribune yesterday morning to complain that for a second day in a row their children were watching cartoons in class instead of being taught. One mother said: This situation is so frustrating for me. From the time this school opened they have By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THERE are more than 300 Chinese labourers working on site at the Baha Mar development, according to company spokesman Robert Sands. Between 325 to 350 Chinese are now employed as technical support workers or other auxiliary staff, Mr Sands said. He said the bulk of the workers engaged on the project will not be in the country for another year. This number is small compared to By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FOOD and water testing at a Department of Environmental Health Services unit was never compromised because of infrastructure deficiencies, it was claimed yesterday. The comments came in response to an Inter-Development Bank report which said the department's Envi ronmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment Division (EMRAD) operated out of a "condemned" TEACHERS WALK OFF JOB AT PRIMARY SCHOOL SEE page nine SEE page nine SEE page nine RESPONSETOIDBREPORT MOSTWORKERSWONTARRIVEFORANOTHERYEAR PARENTSANGERATSITUATION FOOD AND WATER TESTING WAS NOT COMPROMISED MORE THAN 300 CHINESE WORKERS AT BAHA MAR SITE By PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER President of the Chamber of Commerce Khaalis Rolle has been confirmed by the PLPs Candidates Committee as the partys standard bearer for the Pinewood constituency in the 2012 general election. Although he has yet to receive final ratification from the KHAALIS ROLLE NAMED PLP PINEWOOD CANDIDATE SEE page nine BISHOP SIMEONHALL

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BY KHRISNA VIRGIL A TEARFUL Loletha Heastie, her hands and feet covered in the dirt she had been spreading around her garden, expressed her thanks to the officers of the Police Fire Branch for installing a fire alarm in her home. Ms Heastie, an unemployed single mother of four, received substantial damage to her home a few years ago in a fire. My son, he like play with matches and light firecrackers, she explained. Speaking of the fire officers, she said: I am glad for what they are doing for us. Ms Heastie is among 100 elderly and less fortunate persons receiving smoke detectors as a part of the RBDFs Fire Safety Week initiative. Sergeant 420 Elroy Knowles said the officers are aiming to send a clear mes sage to families throughout the island. We are trying to establish the fact that if every home had at least one working smoke detector, that would help in saving lives in this country, Sgt Knowles said. The homes have been chosen based on the RBDFs data on fire prone areas. Haitian communities that have fallen victim to many structural fires will be targeted as well. We have some Creole pamphlets that we will be handing out to them, Sgt Knowles said. More smoke detectors will be given out on Thursday, along with pamphlets covering fire safety tips and procedures. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE URBAN HOMES GET SMOKE DETECTORS SERGENT SKIPPINGS comforts an emotional Loletha Heastie yesterday as she was a recipient of a smoke detector in her home. Tim Clarke /Tribune Staff OFFICERS go door-to-door to help prevent house fires by putting up smoke alarms POLICE CONSTABLE 3144 KNOWLES installs a smoke detector in a home in Englerston yesterday.

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police Sergeant Darrell Rolle told the Supreme Court he cautioned murder accused Simon Simeon before taking a state ment from him regarding the shooting death of Sylvanus Strachan. Simeon, 26, is on trial for murder. It is alleged that he shot the victim while at a par ty at the Lodge Hall on East Sunrise Highway on December21, 2009. Sgt 1843 Rolle, the lead investigator, interviewed the accused shortly after his arrest, in the presence of Sgt Lorenzo Johnson. Sgt Rolle said he cautioned Simeon and told him he was suspected of causing the death of Strachan, 31. While giving a statement to police, Sgt Rolle said, Simeon admitted to having a handgun on the night in question. He read the statement and signed it, the officer said. Sgt Rolle said Simeon told him that Strachan came at him with a knife, so he pulled outa gun and fired it to scare him. According to a pathologists report, a post mortem was conducted on January 2, 2009. Strachan sustained a gap ing entry wound in the upper abdomen and a secondary gaping exit wound to the back. He suffered massive abdominal haemorrhage and died as a result of complications, the report said. Dr Anna Tancawan told the court that the bullet travelled from left to right in his body. She said the range of the gunshot could not be determined. When asked by Mario Grey, attorney for Simeon, whether a projectile was found in the body, Mrs Tancawan said no. Also giving testimony was Sgt 772 Lorenzo Johnson, who was present while Rolle interviewed the accused. He said Simeon appeared to be fine at the time. Mr Grey asked Johnson if he knew whether Simeon could read. Sgt Johnson said Sgt Rolle had asked if the accused could read and write, and he said yes. When asked if he had denied Simeon access to his lawyer at the police station, Sgt Johnson said he had not. I am going to suggest that at no point during the interview did Simeon give the information in the statement, Mr Grey said. Sgt Johnson said Simeon gave Sgt Rolle his version of what occurred that night that he pulled out a gun and fired it to scare Strachan. Did Simeon indicate what type of handgun it was? asked Mr Grey. Sgt Johnson said he could not recall. When asked if he knew whether any projectile was retrieved, Sgt Johnson said he did not. Lakita Gardiner, a former girlfriend of the accused, said she went to a party at the Lodge Hall with Simeon and two other men around 9 or 10pm on the night in ques tion. They went inside to get something to drink and later went outside, she said. While standing in front of the building, she said, a friend walked over to Simeon. The witness said she then walked off and went to the car. She said after about five minutes Simeon returned to the car as well. Prosecutor Erica Kemp asked Ms Gardiner if Simeon had ever spoken to her about what happened at the Lodge Hall. Ms Gardiner said she had heard about the shooting and asked Simeon if he was responsible. He said he didnt shoot anybody, she said. Did you see Simeon with a gun in his hand? asked Mr Grey. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 3 2 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 4 2 4 2 V]VScReZ`_ 4 V]VScReZ`_ 4 :LWKDOO-RKQVVWRUHVSDUWLFLSDWLQJGRQWPLVVRXWRQ\RXUFKDQFH IRUKXJHVWRUHZLGHVDYLQJVRQDOO)RRWZHDU%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV LQFOXGLQJ bIIDOO:RPHQVHQVDQG&KLOGUHQVKRHV bIIDOO&ODUNVDQGLPEHUODQGUR:RUN%RRWV bII$OO%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV bI$OO)DVKLRQ-HZHOU\ 3/86HOHFWHGW\OHVDUNHG'RZQ%\b $QGGRQWIRUJHWZLWKHYHU\SXUFKDVH<28KDYHDFKDQFHWR :,1D*LIW&HUWLFDWHDVZHOODVUHJLVWHUWRZLQD *UDQGUL]H*LIW&HUWLFDWH $//$/(6$5(),1$/ 12(;&+$1*(6()81'6 12/$<$:$<6 -2+1 6+2(6$1'$&&(6625,(6 526(77$ 526(77$&$5(:($5f &$50,&+$(/$' '& '& 2 '& 2 '& 4 '& 4 2 4 2 2 eY 2 '& eY '& 2 '& 2 eY 2 &RPHDQGFHOHEUDWHRXUWK$QQLYHUVDU\E\MRLQLQJXVIRUD 6725(:,'($/( 6HSWHPEHUWKFWREHUVW By Khrisna Virgil A SHAKEN Princess Margaret Hospital patient yesterday contacted The Tribune claiming she was in the Dialysis Unit when the roof collapsed. A reporter visited the unit yesterday and could see no sign of damage, but three patients who did not want to be identified claimed they witnessed the cave-in. Before further inquiries could be made, a security guard was called and the reporter was escorted out of the hospital. An irate senior housekeeping employee later claimed there was no collapsed roof, but refused to contact an administrator. The employee said the hospital would not comment on something that didnt happen. Yesterday afternoon, PMH issued a statement refuting the reports of a roof collapse. The hospital did admit that the roof in the Female Surgical Ward had some plumbing issues, which caused minor leaks in the Dialysis Unit below. Attempts to contact Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis and Public Hospital Authority director Herbert Brown were unsuccessful. PMHDENIES REPORTS OF DIALYSIS UNIT ROOF COLLAPSEPRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL where patients claimed a roof collapsed in the Dialysis Unit, a claim rejected by hospital staff MURDER SUSPECT HAD GUN No, sir, she replied. Ms Gardiner said Simeon appeared normal when he returned to the car that night. She said she later went to the police station, but the officers would not let her see Simeon. Senior Justice Hartman Longley is presiding over the trial, which resumes today when the prosecution will call one more witness before clos ing its case. Police sergeant tells court accused admitted firing gun to scare victim

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Someone once said that Vision Unites and Where there is no Vision, the people will Perish. UNEMPLOYMENT in the Bahamas is now at an all-time high. The latest figures projected unemployment at over 14 per cent, but phone card vendors who recently find themselves unemployed were included in this group. The vendors for the most part have ceased to exist because of new emerging technology by BTC. The government though bragged about the 30,000 work permits that they have issued over its term. Yes, thats 30,000 jobs that Bahamians need not apply for. Education in the Bahamas has been steadily slipping for decades. Despite getting the lions share of the annual budget, the national average has remained a D. Questions at the Ministry of Education with regards to the loan education fund have gone unresolved and if resolved, unpunished and unpublished. Our children are graduating from high school without the ability to read, let alone construct a proper paragraph. How can a child be allowed to go through school and finish with no BJC and no BGCSE passes? The health system in the Bahamas has become stretched year over year. The mortality rate of our citizenry has increased and we continue to import unsafe products at every turn. We are getting record numbers of heart disease, lung cancer and obesity patients. Our latest health concern has been the Dengue Fever outbreak. Bahamians still dont know what is going on or what went on over the last several weeks. Immigration in my view has been out of control since the Honourable A. Loftus Roker left the PLP Cabinet in the mid-1980s. Our policy back then and now is to repatriate illegal immigrants; how inadequate a policy. We dont even know how many illegal immigrants are in our country. New Providence is an island 21 by 7 miles and in this technological age we cant even detect illegal immigrants entering our shores by sea in makeshift vessels. When are we going to formulate a proper policy to deal with this major socio-economical issue? Teen pregnancy continues unabated. Despite the disadvantages of being a teenage parent, our youth have not taken heed to this message. We still see babies having babies. This contributes to all sorts of future problems in our country, including crime, more teenage pregnancy and the like. The roads in New Providence are in a total mess. Driving in New Providence before the road works began was nothing to be desired, but now it has got worse. There is total chaos in the inner city with regards to the road construction. Does the end justify the means? Seems so. Crime is totally out of control. Despite the gun court, Rapid Strike, ankle bracelets and constant road blocks, we have seen another record year in the Bahamas with regards to the murder count. I wonder what the count is for persons who have been shot but have lived. We see the justice system falling down before our eyes. The Minister of National Security recently stated that magistrates and judges were contributing largely to the escalating crime problem in the Bahamas by giving repeat offenders bail. What next? And the economy. Standard & Poors recently downgraded our outlook from stable to negative. We are borrowing money at an alarming rate and our present debt to GDP ratio is nearing 50 per cent. This means that every dollar earned goes toward our debt. The government would be hard pressed to obtain a loan from a commercial bank because your total debt service ratio has to be fewer than 44 per cent. Shouldnt we have been investing in other long-term sustainable industries? How do we fix our myriad of problems? Where do we start? Should we start with the men hanging in bars daily and drinking themselves into oblivion? Should we start with the church which is facing a moral and biblical crisis? Should we start with the young men who carry illegal weapons daily? Should we start with the politicians whose policy decisions have caused us much despair? Or should we identify our moral compass and start from the ground up. Nothing in this country will change for the better until we identify our stake and then build from there. Our leaders must possess the moral base from which they can make these tough decisions. And they must have the capacity to lead. Otherwise, we will not be united and we will continue to perish. DEHAVILLAND MOSS Nassau, September 26, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 Circulation Department (242) 502-2386 IN MAY last year the Arbitration Act and the Arbitration (Foreign Arbitral Awards) Act was introduced in an attempt to put the Bahamas in a competitive position for recognition as an international business centre. The hope was to establish the Bahamas asa dispute resolution centre within five years to settle outside of the court sys tem both domestic and international matters. And so now is not the time to even consider abolishing the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council our highest court of appeal, sitting in London which is one institution that in addition to the proposed arbitration services gives an aura of stability to our local judicial system. If the Bahamas is to be considered a stable jurisdiction to attract international business, the Privy Council is one institution that grounds us in legitimacy. As one Bahamian lawyer put it: It is one of the most respected courts in the world and brings international currency to our court system. Together the five Law Lords have more than 100 years of legal experience to draw on. In addition removed from local politics, and petty prejudices litigants have confidence that their disputes are being treated objectively. This independence and removal from local contami nation certainly inspires respect in the system, something that our own courts are lacking. One would be surprised at what weight the existence of the Privy Council carries when an international business is being considered for relocation to the Bahamas. Businesses not only want a stable govern ment, good communications, and efficient staff, but a sound judicial system. To business leaders this is of paramount importance. Our local courts are made to look impotent when adversaries can so play the system that one side in the dispute cannot get a hearing to present his com plaint. Ina recent international case, a lawyer pointed to what appears to be developing into a serious case of judge shopping. It would seem that the case cant get off the ground because the judges are being toppled like nine pins. Already three judges have stepped down from the case, and a fourth has been called on recuse himself soon there will be no judges left to try the case. From an outsider looking in, it appears that our court system is being madetolook impotently foolish. Of course, there is still the Privy Council. When the local courts fail, the respected arbiter of justice stands solid to pick up the pieces. Bahamians would be foolish to agitate for its removal. Not only does the Privy Council make available to Bahamians some of the worlds most able and experienced judges, it does so at no cost. In December 2006, the Judicial Committee made history when for the first time in over 170 years it left its permanent London home to hold a five-day sitting in the Bahamas. The five Law Lords were here again for a sitting in 2007 and 2009. There are those in the legal fraternity who have suggested that the Bahamas give up the Privy Council and throw its lot in with the recently established Caribbean Court of Justice. Established in 2001 and based in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, this court is in its embryonic stage. It has not been established long enough to have a track record or attract the international recognition that the Privy Council has had for hundreds of years. If the only reason for opting for this court is to hope that our Caribbean brothers will see eye-to-eye with us on capital punishment is indeed to play Russ ian roulette with this countrys future. As explained in this column yesterday, many Caribbean lawyers are also moving away from capital punishment in favour of life imprisonment. Of course, the weightiest consideration of all is the cost. The Bahamas would have to make a financial contribution to be able to use the services of the Caribbean court. And the creation of a local court to replace the Privy Council cannot even be considered. It would be financially prohibitive. Already we do not have enough lawyers to staff our present legal institutions. The Attorney Generals office, which is inundated with cases going back years, is seriously understaffed. The courts cannot keep up with the work load that they already have. A country as small as the Bahamas would never be able to pay what would be required to attract our best lawyers from their private practices to sit on a high court bench. And even if we could there are not enough of them to match the calibre and resources of the Law Lords of London. It is now time for Bahamians to appreciate what they have and start building on already well laid foundations. A Bahamas in chaos LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net The Privy Council to be or not to be $17+21<&+5,6723+(5&5($1 RI3%2;11$66$8%$+$0$6 EDITOR, The Tribune. Regarding the decision of the Catholic Church in England and Wales to return, on September 16, 2011, to the practice of not eating meat on Fridays. I commend the Catholic bishops of England and Wales for returning, last week, to the obligatory practice of abstain ing from eating meat on Friday. The allowance, after Vat ican II, for self-motivated substitutions to this rule, resulted in the widespread belief that the rule itself had been relaxed. It was a case of our bishops putting the cart before the horse. Sacred Scripture and Catholic tradition teach that fasting and abstinence is a great help to avoid sin and all that leads to it. We first hear of the commandment to fast in Genesis where man is prohibited from eating of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. After Adam and Eves expulsion from the garden fasting is proposed, in the stories of Ezra and Nineveh, as an instrument to restore our friendship with God. In the New Testament Jesus brings to light the true and most profound meaning of fasting which is to do the will of the Heavenly Father who sees in secret and will reward you (Mt 6:18). Fasting and abstinence not only bring certain benefits to our physical well-being, they are, for Christians, primarily a means of mortifying our ego ism, avoiding sin, and opening our hearts to the Love of God and our fellow man. Fasting and abstinence helps us recognise the situation in which so many of our brothers and sisters live. They enable us to become more like the Good Samaritan. By freely engaging in acts of self-denial we makea a statement that those in need are not strangers but rather our brothers and sisters. This practice of marking Christs death on Friday with fasting and abstinence needs to be rediscovered and encouraged, not only in England and Wales, but throughout the world. PAUL KOKOSKI Canada, September 20, 2011. Return to fasting EDITOR, The Tribune An open letter to Mr Tony Butler of Cable Bahamas. Dear Mr Butler, I write to you out of sheer frustration and in the hope that you will finally be able to give us television service that actually works and for which we pay in full and on time. Since May (the French Open Tennis Tournament), continuing through Wimbledon, and then the US Open, and now, finally, the US NFL season and the new Fall TV programming, I have phoned your Customer Service innumerable times and have gone through the routine (with the very nice, polite young ladies) of unplugging the TV set and having new signals sent through to our equipment to no avail. I have left innumerable messages which promise return calls but they never have materialised. We have had various service people (also very nice and polite) come to the house to try and sort out our problems, one of which managed to disrupt our internet service because he didnt re-install our booster (or whatever its called) properly! The technician who came to sort out that problem told me that none of the previous service people had been technicians but merely installers. The problem at our end is that almost every day since May, some of the channels are Temporarily Out of OrderCheck Back Later. Usually the main US networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, and FOX) display that message, along with many others. And todays Out of Order channels may not be the same as yesterdays or tomorrows! Can you imagine how frustrating this problem has been for five months? There are many frustrated subscribers all over the island! I am told that one of the local suppliers of dish antennas has such a long list of customers switching from Cable Bahamas that he is unable to supply dishes for some weeks. I suggested to the last technician (who reported that our signal is excellent) that someone should check the cable from the road into our house. My son suggests that you realign your dishes to achieve maximum signal strength at your end. Whatever you do, please do it soon and fix our problem! FRUSTRATED CUSTOMER Nassau, September 25, 2011. Can we have a TV service that works?

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 7 By CARA BRENNENBETHEL cbrennen@tribunemedia.net FOREIGN Affairs Minister Brent Symonnette joined his regional counterparts in calling for global regulations on the trade of conventional small arms during a United Nations speech. Mr Symonette told the UN General Assembly that the Bahamas supports a strong, effective and non-discriminatory Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) that would cover small arms and ammunition. The treaty has the support of CARICOM. We express the hope that the instrument would also provide for an effective implementation regime, Mr Symonette said. In his remarks, Jamaican Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade Minister Kenneth Baugh said: Jamaica, like its Caribbean Community (CARICOM) partners, continues to face severe threats to our long-term socio-economic development from the illicit trafficking in narcotic drugs, small arms and light weapons, and ammunition. He said that while the region has introduced measures to combat the affects of small arms, we firmly believe, however, that we will not see the full impact of these efforts without an international regime that regulates the sale and transfer of conventional weapons. Mr Baugh said progress on the issue will not be possible without international regulation, and urged member states to build on existing accords. In his contribution, Mr Symonette also addressed the issue of migration, saying proper co-operation can help to ensure it occurs through safe and regulated channels to the benefit of both the migrant and the receiving state. Mr Symonette noted that migration has been a positive force for development across the world, and welcomed increased co-operation on international migration and development. In particular, he said, the Bahamas has benefited from migrants contributions in education, health care, tourism and financial services. Mr Symonette also told the General Assembly that the Bahamas is committed to playing a constructive role in the lead-up to the second high-level dialogue on International Migration and Development, to be held in the General Assembly in 2013. SYMONETTE CALLS FOR RESTRICTIONS ON SALES OF SMALL ARMS IN UN SPEECH

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By LARRYSMITH THETFORD, Norfolk Probably few readers will know that the first black mayor of an English town specifically this town, a coach stop on the way from London to Norwich was a Bahamian physician named Alan Glaiser Minns. Of course, the term "black" depends on your perspective. Alan was the grandson of John Minns, who in 1800 "absconded from his apprenticeship" as a baker in Reading to be shipwrecked off Nassau. He subsequently married the African woman who saved his life a slave named Rosetta. Retired airline pilot Paul Aranha and Exuma civic leader Basil Minns number among their descendants today. John and Rosetta had several children. One grandson became the first non-white Anglican priest in the Bahamas. Two others trained as doctors in England, and both practised in Thetford. Pembroke Minns died here in 1912. His more illustrious brother Alan (who was born on Inagua in 1858), also died in England in 1930. Although not many Bahamians are aware of Dr Minns' place in English political history, Susan Ketchell at the Ancient House Museum on White Acre Street here certainly was. During my visit, she recalled a recent lecture and exhibit on the subject. Minns' three-year term as mayor (from 1904) may have been just a footnote to Thetford's 1500-year history, but he was considered an exem plary candidate. "The election of Dr Alan Glaiser Minns as mayor will be received with universal approval," the Thetford & Watton Times wrote glowingly in 1904. "He is in the prime of life and energy, well acquainted with the problems of local government...Though born in the West Indies he became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons and a licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians." Thetford has been a strategic settlement in eastern England since the Iron Age, when the Iceni tribe fortified a site now known as Castle Hill. It developed into an important medieval market town and was known as a seat of learn ing Thetford Grammar School having a list of headmasters stretching back a thousand years. One of the early 20th century graduates of that ancient school was a prolific author of detective novels named Christopher Bush, who also wrote several fascinating books about life in his home village of Great Hockham, just a stone's throw from Thetford. Bush came from a family of poor farm labourers like my grandfather, Herbert Smith, who was also born in Hock ham. LegendThey both attended the same village school, but Bush became a local legend by win ning a scholarship to Thetford Grammar and obtaining a degree from the University of London an unprecedented achievement for a poor village boy of the day. He died in 1973 in his 90s, but in a book called Winter Harvest he offered a snapshot of Hockham at the turn of the 20th century, when my grandfather was a boy. "On all sides we were enclosed by the breckland heaths...there were three large farms and three smaller farms...most of the children left school as soon as the law allowed; boys to be absorbed somehow into the land and the girls to go into domestic service...The village lived by farming and most of its men were labourers...there was something almost of serfdom about it." During my visit to Hockham I stayed at one of the remaining farmhouses, which doubles today as a bed and breakfast. The proprietor, 72year-old Trevor Mason, is one of only a handful of people left in the village who were actu ally born there. The other few hundred residents are recent arrivals. Manor Farm was worked by Trevor's father and grandfather in their day, and the Masons were well acquainted with the Smith family. "We, in the wilds of breckland, were an island, remote and comfortably self-centred," Christopher Bush recalled in his book. "We grew our own vegeta bles and reared our own pork, and the heaths and the farm hedgerows provided the rab bits that went with it...There were two places of worship All Saint's Church and the Primitive Methodist chapel...Our water was drawn from wells and not one house had indoor sanitation...Our vil lage was also unique in having a threshing outfit." The threshing machine was a marvelous 18th century invention that separated grain from the stalks and husks, eliminating a lot of manual labour. We visited Burrell's engine works in Thetford, now a museum where a half dozen of these early contraptions are on display, looking as if they had been made yesterday. Originally horse-drawn, by the late 19th century the threshing machine had become a clanking, complex piece of machinery powered by a massive steam tractor. They transformed agricultural production in Britain, until they were replaced by an even better machine known as the combine harvester in the mid20th century. My grandfather's father happened to be an engine driver meaning he operated the steam tractor that towed the threshing machine, a model of Victorian engineering. These machines were hired out to farms by independent con tractors, including the Henry Bird outfit in Hockham (which survived until the 1950s). My grandfather's rare ability to drive came from this connection, and he was able to parlay that skill into a job as a chauf feur during the Depression. Herbert Smith left Hock ham in 1914 to fight in the First World War (at Gallipoli and elsewhere in the Middle East) and never returned to the village other than for a brief visit. His alienation was symptomatic of the enormous changes caused by the war, and the social history of these times has always been a source of great fascination for me. That terrible conflict marked a decisive break with the past, disrupting ancient social hierarchies, unleashing new political ideas and stimulating profound technological changes. In the Bahamas, meanwhile, emigration to the United States peaked in the years prior to the first world war due to a dearth of economic opportunities at home. Our population in 1911 was only 55,000, with most living at or below subsistence level. Some 1800 Bahamians volunteered for service during the First World War (1914-18), and 700 were posted overseas. As former Tribune pub lisher Sir Etienne Dupuch recorded following his dis charge after the war: "I was a changed person when I returned to my island home at the age of 20 after seeing the people of Europe wallowing in a cesspit of human degradation." Much the same would have been said by my grandfather on returning to his vil lage. I clearly recall his stories about living on the edge of starvation while Britain ruled the world. In a 1974 letter to The Tri bune (prompted by one of Sir Etienne's editorials), he remarked on the poverty he endured in Hockham as a youth: "Our breakfast was a slice of bread with a few grains of sugar, or a small bowl of bread crusts with a nob of dripping upon which boiling water was poured. And this at a time when Britain was the richest country in the world. We were little more than serfs. The empire was fine for the people who controlled the wealth and power the same breed who prospered so patently in the slave trading days." At the end of the 19th cen tury more than a quarter of the British population was liv ing at or below subsistence level. In 1895 (the year of my grandfather's birth), the con ditions of farming villages like Hockham were appalling. Sir George Edwards, who organised the agricultural labourer's union in Norfolk, described how men laboured from dawn to dusk six days a week for a few shillings, often walking miles to and from the fields, and never seeing their children in daylight. And before 1895 these poor farm workers couldn't even vote in parliamentary elections. "The labourer's home is of the worst kind," Edwards wrote in his autobiography, "neither sanitary, water-tight nor wind-tight...But even those cottages, in spite of their wretched condition, the labourer has to hire under such conditions as cannot fail to put him in a position of the most abject slavery, and cause his wages to come down to the absolute minimum, stunt his intellect and affect his morals." Edwards himself had an amazing life story. Born to a dirt poor family in a village not far from Hockham, he started work at the age of six scaring crows in the fields, receiving no formal education at all. After a long, self-taught career as a labour organiser and Methodist lay preacher, he was elected to parliament in 1920 at the age of 70 and knighted in 1930. When he died three years later, his funeral was the largest ever held in the county of Norfolk.RightsConditions were much the same in the Bahamas at the turn of the 20th century. A tiny affluent oligarchy ruled a nation of paupers and serfs with few rights or privileges, most of whom happened to be black former slaves. In their book Islanders in the Stream historians Michael Craton and Gail Saunders describe homes in over-the-hill Nassau as "boxes of boards raised on boulders or sticks, or crude freestone constructions (that) poignantly emphasize the hopeless poverty of the people and their home environment." In some respects, Hockham resembles the offshore Abaco settlement of Hope Town, which was the birthplace of my maternal grandfather. Although the Hockham peasantry relied on the land and Hope Town's settlers depended on the sea, the two communities share much in common. In 1903, according to a report by the Baltimore Geo graphical Society, Hope Town consisted of about a thousand whites and a dozen blacks jammed into a collection of poor shacks with an average of seven to a home. Today, these shacks are sought after by wealthy retirees and professionals, just like the worker cottages in Hockham. Both are now picture-post card communities that hearken back to a vanished age, while earning their bread and butter from tourism. What did I take back from my Norfolk vacation? Well, it brought home to me a vivid appreciation of the fact that in the relatively short space of time since my grandparents were young the world has changed immeasur ably. Geography and racial division may have complicated and delayed our social progress in the Bahamas, but the overall course ran much the same here as it did in Norfolk. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Which bank will give the Bahamas a $200, 000 grant for humanitarian relief in the aftermath of hurricane Irene? The Inter-American Development Bank BAHAMIAN WHO MADE HISTORY AS MAYOR OF AN ENGLISH TOWN THESE FORMER WORKMAN'S COTTAGES in the Norfolk farming village of Great Hockham are now sought-after homes for affluent retirees and professionals working in nearby towns. BURRELL'S ENGINE WORKS IN THETFORD a museum of Victorian steam tractors used (among other things) for towing threshing machines.

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With the new 3.7L, 305 HP, V6 with Automatic Transmission, custom 17 inch alloy wheels, power windows, locks and mirrors, side curtain air bags, plus leather interior and the all new Sync System and all standard features, PLUS 3 years/36000 mile warranty assistance, 3 years rust protection, licence and inspection to birthday, full tank of gas, floor mats, first five services Reserve yours now available at I If f y yo ou u a ar re el lo oo ok ki in ng gf fo or r t th he eb be es st t v va al lu ue e a av va ai il la ab bl le e Y Yo ou u o ow we ei it t t to oy yo ou ur rs se el lf ft to ob bu uy y o on ne e appear on footage of the store and its surrounding area between Wednesday and Saturday. The gas station recently celebrated its grand opening on September 16 after it had been closed since last year. Incensed by Marcos unexplained disappearance, community activists are callingon all residents of the area to band together in support of the family and against possible predators. The Bain and Grants Town Association has organised a $2,000 reward for any information leading to the apprehension and conviction of anyone connected to the matter, president C B Moss said. Mr Moss said another young boy was reported missing for one day, three weeks ago, and police are investigating the childs abduction. We are very determined in this community to see that this does not become a trend because there are lots of children who move around (in the area), sometimes unaccompanied, and thereby are very vulnerable, Mr Moss said. According to family members, Marco was last seen leaving his home on Brougham Street, off Baillou Hill Road, on Friday afternoon between the hours of 4pm to 6pm. The sixth-grader enjoyed video games and had recently joined a boxing club after saving up his school lunch money. Each day, Marcos parents and loved ones sit at home waiting and praying for him to return. Tryphemia Meadows, Marcos mother, said: Every day I'm looking for him to come home. I can't even explain it. I dont feel good because I don't know what happened to him. I'm trying to hold on, I'm trying to be strong. Ms Meadows, 51, said: I feel like he's alive but he just can't get from where he is. I don't want to feel no other way. Family members were conducting their own investigations which led them to a farm off Joe Farrington Road last night, but their efforts were unsuccessful. Although the family was not well known in the area, Marcos disappearance has severely disturbed community members who feel that the same thing could have easily happened to one of their children. Mr Moss said families cant protect all of their children from this type of incident as often times young ones are sent out into the immediate area on errands. We cannot become prisoners in our own society, but we feel deeply for this family and for all other families that have experienced similar incidents, Mr Moss said. The greatest security we have is for the residents at large to stand up and say no way are we going to tolerate this and then the criminals are going to take notice. As long as criminals think their only adversaries are the police then they are going to feel comfortable. Mr Moss said there have been incidents concerning young people who are detained against their will and subjected to various experiences. However, he said many are not reported due to embarrassment or to protect the anonymity of the child. The reward fund will be made available to the police, and paid out once there has been confirmation from investigators. The association has issued an appeal to the public and private sector for donations to the fund in an effort to make it more financially attractive. Mr Moss can be contacted at 325-7909. We must put a stop to this type of action, this is happening to boys and girls, Mr Moss added. Were calling this nation out, to action, its not good enough to talk about it, we have to do something about it. People need to rise to the occasion now. In the US, ifa child is missing anywhere in that great nation, an alert is raised. We take these kinds of things too casually. Anyone with information on Marcos whereabouts can contact police at 911, the Southern police station at 322-3337, CDU at 502-9991, and Crime Stoppers at 328TIPS. National General Council (NGC), it is believed that Mr Rolle will be rubber stamped within a short period of time. At the NGC level, stalwart councillors are allowed to raise any objections that they have with a particular candidate and if those objections cannot be satisfied the candidate could face considerable opposition in getting their nomination. However, according to wellplaced sources within the party it is not believed that Mr Rolle will have any difficulty in this regard. In fact, these sources claimed that Mr Rolle was selected for his wellrespected business acumen, and is already being earmarked for a prominent Cabinet post in what they hope will be a new PLP administration. As the chief marketing officer at Bahamas Fast Ferries, Mr Rolle also doubles as a parttime lecturer at the College of the Bahamas. Khaalis is in his late thirties, a respected businessman, and the kind of candidate that the party needs to be attracting to win the seats that we need to win. We were not supposed to lose Pinewood in 2007, and we are confident this time around that we will not lose again, another party insider explained. Based upon the work that Mr Rolle has done at the Chamber over the past several years he would be a high flyer for any post in Finance, Transport, Air and Sea, and he is also in Tourism so he could be in almost any ministry that he chooses. But obviously we have a deep bench with any number of persons who will play a vital role in the transformation of this country, and the people of the Bahamas will hear more and see more from the party in the coming months, the source explained. When The Tribune contacted Mr Rolle yesterday he opted not to confirm or deny the reports of his upcoming candidacy with the PLP. been having problems and now the teachers are refus ing to teach. They are on strike again. I know they are having their issues with the school but what is supposed to happen to the students in the meantime? My daughter is in the fourth grade and she has nt had a teacher from last week. She has done nothing in school all week other than watch television and play. I sent her to school to learn, not to play she can do that at home. Something needs to be done about this. EP Roberts principal Kendal Burrows confirmed that teachers were sitting out, but said the issue should be resolved by today. The teachers withdrew their services on Monday and the first half of Tues day. By the afternoon we spoke with them and got them to agree to teach on Wednesday. Basically they are upset because there is a shortage of teachers and they are being stretched to their limit, he said. We need at least five more teachers for everything to run smoothly. We have letters from the Min istry indicating that teachers were sent here, however for some reason or another they did not show up. These are teachers that were transferred from other schools who did not come to perform their duties. I dont know why they didnt come. The Ministry of Educa tion says they are working on the problem so we just have to wait and see. Hopefully we get the teachers before the end of the week. This is the second time teachers at E P Roberts walked off the job. At the beginning of the term, they refused to teach for a week citing poor working conditions and a teacher shortage. Mr Burrows said infra structural problems have since been resolved. Calls to the Ministry of Education for comment were not answered. the number of Bahamians working at the development, he added. "We have about 325 to 350 Chinese workers here, most of them doing technical support work or working on the aspects of the 'man camp' or as support for some of the senior Chinese persons here, said Mr Sands. "When you look at that in terms of the how we had projected them to arrive, it's trending lower in numbers against the backdrop that we have put to work 1,150 Bahamians. "The significant amount of Chinese labour won't be here until another 12 months from now." The Chinese workers live in on-site dormitories, and officials have said most of the food the workers eat will be imported from China. Baha Mar is constructing phase one of the dormitories. About 8,150 Chinese work ers will enter the country, in staggered amounts, to help construct the $2.6 billion Cable Beach resort. Mr Sands said company road work on West Bay Street is still on schedule to be completed in early Novem ber. The road work began over the summer at an estimated cost of $40 million. It is estimated the Baha Mar resort will cost about $3.4 billion. It will include almost 3,500 rooms and residences, the largest casino in the Caribbean, the largest con vention centre in the Bahamas, a Jack Nicklaus signature golf course, three spas, a 20-acre eco-water park, multiple restaurants, along with high-end retail and entertain ment venues. building plagued with leaks, leaving tests open to contamination. While confirming there have been leaks, an official at the department said all testing was suspended until repairs were made. The official also said sensitive tests are not conducted in the building but are sent to accredited institutions in the US. Diana Lightbourne, acting permanent secretary at the Ministry of Environment, said: "While it is true that there have been plumbing leaks in the past, during such periods all testing activities were completely suspended until the plumbing leaks were repaired and ceiling tiles replaced. "We do not consider that test results are compromised, as test results are conducted using control samples for comparison." The ministry also shot down the IDB's findings that EMRAD's main offices are housed in a "condemned building" but admitted the lab needs upgrades to plumbing and electrical systems. Ms Lightbourne said: "We are not aware that the building has been condemned. We consider the building to be sound." She added that staff have adapted to testing needs in spite of deficiencies in laboratory infrastructure. The IDB's assessment also said EMRAD suf fered from "insufficient resources and low morale", testing capacity was limited and neither of its laboratories was accredited. The IDB also found that because of conditions at EMRAD, water test ing was turned over to the Water & Sewerage Corporation. However Ms Light bourne said that several years ago officials decided that EMRAD would engage private companies to test quality control for local water producers for stringent testing, but not because of the state of the agency's lab. said some of the judges are too lenient. Some judges are too merciful and accommodating to criminals and they need to be more forceful when carrying out the law, Bishop Hall said. We say a man is innocent until proven guilty but how can a man be innocent after he has already been charged with other crimes and is out on bail? Some of these judges need to use their discretion and be more stern when it comes to granting or not granting bail, he said. Bishop Hall said the public should not hold Mr Turnquest fully responsible for the crime problem, just as the full blame should not be levelled at the judiciary. He does not deserve to be blamed. To sayTommy Turnquest is the cause of crime is like saying a pastor is the cause of the sin of his members. We are all in some way culpable for the crime problem. We all have to take responsi bility for the state of the crime problem in our country, he said. However, I think Mr Turnquest should lead the charge in fixing some of the laws that would cause criminals to think twice before they commit a crime. He needs to be firm in his ideas and take a stance on the crime issue. On Monday, Mr Turnquest defended his criticism of the judiciary, saying he felt his actions were "right" as an elected representative of the Bahamian people. Last week, he said while he has no wish to encroach on the independence of the judicial system, in his opinion some judges have been far too "liberal" when it comes to granting bail to career criminals and those accused of serious offences. Mr Turnquest said he believes the police and the public agree with him. He also said he felt bail trends have contributed "greatly" to the country's escalating crime problem. Earlier this week, Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez refused to grant bail to a man accused of attempted murder, citing the rising levels of FOOD AND WATER TESTING WAS NOT COMPROMISED FROM page one TEACHERS WALK JOB AT PRIMARY SCHOOL FROM page one BISHOP SIMEON HALL VOICES SUPPORTFOR TURNQUEST STANCE FROM page one FROM page one MORE THAN 300 CHINESE WORKERS ATBAHA MAR SITE FROM page one KHAALIS ROLLE NAMED PLP PINEWOOD CANDIDATE KHAALISROLLE MYSTERY DEEPENS OVER KIDNAP BOY FROM page one

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INTERNA TIONAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE LOSANGELES, US Associated Press PROSECUTORS told jurors yesterday that Michael Jackson was killed by the actions of his personal physician, who used a dangerous anaesthetic without adequate safeguards and botched recovery efforts when he found the singer unconscious. Defense attorneys countered that Jackson caused his own death by taking the drug propofol after his doctor left the room in a desperate attempt to overcome his chronic inability to sleep. Nothing DrConradMurray couldhavedonewouldhave savedtheKingofPop,defense attorneyEdChernofftoldthe panel,becauseJacksonwas desperatetoregainhisfame andneededrestaheadofhis comebackconcerts. The competing versions of Jacksons death and Murrays role in it were laid out in opening statements at the physicians involuntary manslaughter trial. David Walgren, prosecuting, relied heavily on photos and audio recordings to make his case that Murray was an inept and reckless caretaker of Jackson. He showed a photo of a lifeless Jackson on a hospital gurney, and played a recording of Jackson speaking to Murray while the prosecutor said he was under the influence of an unknown substance roughly six weeks before his death. The singers speech was heavily slurred but recognisable. He spoke of his hopes for the upcoming concerts. We have to be phenomenal, Jackson is heard telling Murray. When people leave this show, when people leave my show, I want them to say, Ive never seen nothing like this in my life. Go. Go. I've never seen nothing like this. Go. Its amazing. Hes the greatest entertainer in the world. Murray is accused of giving Jackson a lethal dose of propofol in the bedroom of the singers rented mansion, but Chernoff said Jackson gave himself the fatal dose. He claimed the singer swal lowed several pills of the sedative lorazepam on the morning of his death enough to put six people to sleep. He also said Jackson self-ingested propofol, and it killed him instantly. Jackson did not even have a chance to close his eyes, Chernoff said. Walgren said Murray was grossly negligent by providing Jackson propofol. The prosecutor said while working for Jackson, the doctor was shipped more than four gallons of the anaesthetic, DOCTORS USE OF ANAESTHETIC BLAMED FOR DEATH OF MICHAEL JACKSON THE PROSECUTION showed a picture of Michael Jacksons body during the Conrad Murray involuntary manslaughter trial in Los Angeles yesterday. JACKSONFAMILY members attending the hearing included Randy and Janet, above, and LaToya, below DRCONRAD MURRAY in court yesterday, where he is accused of involuntary manslaughter over the death of Michael Jackson which is normally given in hospital settings. He said Jackson trusted Murray as his physician. That misplaced trust in Conrad Murray cost Michael Jackson his life, Walgren said. The doctor had initially requested $5 million to work for the singer for a year, but accepted the lower rate of $150,000 a month, Walgren said. His contract to be Jacksons personal physician was never signed and he was never paid. He told jurors that Murray deceived paramedics and emergency room doctors by not telling them he had been giving Jackson propofol as a sleep aid. He also called the doctor inept and said he repeatedly deviated from the standard of care by leaving the singer alone while under sedation and not immediately calling 911 when he found the singer was unconscious. Murray never called emergency services himself, instead waiting more than 20 minutes to have one of Jacksons bodyguards make the call. Basic common sense requires 911 be called immediately, Walgren said. Basic common sense. And we know that was not done. Chernoff told jurors it was not their job to determine whether Murray was a good doctor. He said Murray and Jackson were actually friends, and Murray was trying to wean Jackson off of propofol. A number of Jacksons family members were in the courthouse, including his father Joseph, mother Kather ine, sisters LaToya and Janet, and brothers Jermaine, Randy and Tito. If convicted, Murray faces up to four years in prison and the loss of his medical license. SAUDIARABIA Associated Press A SAUDI woman was sen tenced yesterday to be lashed 10 times with a whip for defy ing the kingdom's prohibition on female drivers, the first time a legal punishment has been handed down for a violation of the longtime ban in the Muslim nation. Normally, police just stop female drivers, question them andlet them go after they sign a pledge not to drive again. But dozens of women have continued to take to the roads since June in a campaign to break the taboo. Making Tuesdays sentence all the more upsetting to activists is that it came just two days after King Abdul lah promised to protect wom ens rights and decreed that women would be allowed to participate in municipal elections in 2015. Abdullah also promised to appoint women toa currently all-male advisory body known as the Shura Council. The mixed signals highlight the challenge for Abdullah, known as a reformer, in pushing gently for change without antagonising the powerful clergy and a conservative seg ment of the population. Abdullah said he had the backing of the official cleri cal council. But activists saw Tuesdays sentencing as a retaliation of sorts from the hard-line Saudi religious establishment that controls the courts and oversees the intrusive religious police. Our king doesn't deserve that, said Sohila Zein elAbydeen, a prominent female member of the governmental National Society for Human Rights. She burst into tears in a phone interview and said, The verdict is shocking to me, but we were expecting this kind of reaction. The driver, Shaima Jas taina, in her 30s, was found guilty of driving without permission, activist Samar Badawi said. The punishment is usually carried out within a month. It was not possible to reach Jastaina, but Badawi, in touch with Jastaina's fami ly, said she appealed the verdict. Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world that bans women both Saudi and for eign from driving. The prohibition forces families to hire live-in drivers, and those who cannot afford the $300 to $400 a month for a driver must rely on male relatives to drive them to work, school, shopping or the doctor. There are no written laws that restrict women from driving. Rather, the ban is rooted in conservative traditions and religious views that hold giving freedom of movement to women would make them vulnerable to sins. Activists say the religious justification is irrelevant. How come women get flogged for driving while the maximum penalty for a traffic violation is a fine, not lash es? Zein el-Abydeen said. Even the Prophet (Muhammads) wives were riding camels and horses because these were the only means of transportation. Since June, dozens of women have led a campaign to try to break the taboo and impose a new status quo. The campaigns founder, Manal al-Sherif, who posted a video of herself driving on Facebook, was detained for more than 10 days. She was released after signing a pledge not to drive or speak to media. Since then, women have been appearing in the streets driving their cars once or twice a week. SAUDI WOMAN SENTENCED TO TENLASHES FOR DRIVING CAR

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MURDER ACCUSED LIKE JESSICA RABBIT INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 11 Cr eativeEdge MONTH ENDSEPTEMBERC ASH & CARRY!All Sales Final No Refund or Exchange SALE! 26 Cubic Ft Stainless Steel Refrigerator$1600Power Tools 15% O (except net items)Generators 15% O (except net items)Cement$9.85/BagWAREHOUSE CLEARANCE!Brick, Tiles, Paint, Lumber, 10%...15%...20%...UP TO30% SAVINGS!Super Deals on Damaged lumber as well as Damaged shingles Bifold doors Fiberglass doors Awning windows Gardenia Lawn & Garden Products Hushboard R11 M45 insulation PT V-Joint Moisture resistant drywall Versatex Angle iron Damaged regular drywall Ceiling tiles Formica (5x12)188 Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas Open Mon-Fri 6:30am-4:00pm Saturday 6:30am-3:00pm Tel: (242) 323-3973 or 326-3978 Fax: (242) 322-3937Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.comLike usfollow us PLUS at Tiles 15% to20% O Granite Tops starting at $100.00 Granite Back splash starting at $50.00 Cement Tiles 24x 24 with conch shell print $9.95each Bricks Pavers from $3.85/sqft Brick cobble sheets From $5.00 Plastic tiles strips from $1.50 to $5.95 Marble Floor Medallions 30% o Decorative tiles borders from $1.00 (side walk sale)September 26 To October 1 PERUGIA, ITALY Associated Press A DEFENCE lawyer told an Italian court yesterday that Amanda Knox, the American student convicted of killing her room mate, isn't a manipulating, sex-obsessed femme fatale as her accusers charge, but is rather like Jessica Rabbit just drawn that way. In closing arguments before an appeals court, lawyer Giulia Bongiorno compared Knox to the cartoon character, contending that Knox had been unfairly portrayed over the course of the media-hyped, four-year case. She said the 24-year-old American is instead a loving young woman who simply displayed immaturity and naivete at the time of the 2007 slaying. Knox was convicted of sexually assaulting and murdering Meredith Kercher, a British student in Perugia, on Nov 1, 2007, and sentenced to 26 years in prison. Co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito, an Italian who was Knox's boyfriend at the time of the crime, was convicted of the same charges and sentenced to 25 years. They both deny wrongdoing and have appealed their 2009 convictions. A verdict in the appeals case is expected within a week possibly as early as Saturday. Bongiorno is Sollecito's lawyer, but, with the fates of the two defendants intertwined, she discussed Knox's role at length. AMANDA KNOX in court in Italy, where a defence lawyer said she was no femme fatale WASHINGTON, US Associated Press ONE CRISIS averted, on to the next. The day after Congress managed to avert a government shutdown again Republicans and Democrats stared ahead yesterday at major fights over spending that underscore a deep divide thats sure to define the fastapproaching national elections. On Monday night, lawmakers had postponed their dispute over whether billions for disaster aid must be paid for with cuts elsewhere in the budget, finessing a pact to keep the government operating. But tea party-driven Republicans are still insisting on significant spending cuts this fall, with some arguing that a hard-fought congressional agreement this summer to fund the government at $1.043 trillion in 2012 was too generous. Democrats, many of whom complained of too many concessions and reductions in this years showdowns, are furiously trying to protect government programs. The next skirmish will be over how and where to spend the new year's budget, with a Nov 18 deadline for that legislation. But the next really big deal is the special 12member bipartisan supercommittee and whether it can come up with a plan to slash $1.5 trillion over 10 years by Nov 23 the day before Thanksgiving. These fights will unfold against the backdrop of a feeble economy that President Barack Obama is desperate to jump-start as he pushes for a second term, and an exasperated electorate that looks at Washington and dislikes what it sees. The heat will be on, the heat from the American people, said former Republican Sen Alan Simpson, who believes Americans struggling economically will be asking, Why stretch us out like this? Lawmakers also will be under pressure from political factions demanding that they stand firm for party beliefs. You have to support getting control of excessive spending and debt, said Sal Russo, a longtime Republican operative and founder of the Tea Party Express, a wellfunded wing of the populist movement. Are you helping to solve the problem or making it worse? Shortly after Senate votes on Monday, Sen Mary Landrieu, thanked party leaders for helping the Democratic Party find the backbone it needed to fight and win this debate. The disaster aid dispute that threatened to partially shut down the government this weekend was resolved relatively quickly after a standoff between Democrats and Republicans. The fight, however, was an unpleasant reminder to most Americans of the last-minute maneuvering in April to avert a shutdown and the August showdown over raising the nation's borrowing authority that left financial markets unnerved. This time, Democrats had spent weeks demanding additional disaster aid in response to hurricanes, tornadoes and other natural disasters that had battered Americans from Vermont to Missouri. Republicans had said the additional aid had to be offset by cuts in energy-related programs that Democrats favored. The Federal Emergency Management Agency had warned that its accounts would be out of money early this week. A solution to keep the government operating seemed uncertain last week. Then word from the Obama administration that FEMA wasnt in as dire financial straits as many feared proved to be the answer. On Saturday, the administration told Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (Democrat) and Sen. Chuck Schumer, (Democrat) that FEMA could last until Thursday with the money it had. Specifically, an unknown contractor had come in under budget, freeing some $40 million, said Democratic and Republican congressional aides, leading to a deal on Monday in which Democrats and Republicans agreed on an emergency spending bill to avoid a government shutdown. FEMA would get $2.65 billion in disaster relief assistance in a one-week bill, $1 billion less than approved by tea party Republicans. The House, on recess this week, probably will back the one-week measure by voice vote tomorrow and vote separately next week to keep the government running through Nov 18. DEAL STRUCK TO AVOID SHUTDOWN BUT FURTHER CRISES LOOM IN US CAIRO, EGYPT Associated Press EGYPTS first parliamentary elections since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak will begin on Nov 28, the countrys military rulers said yesterday in an announcement greeted with little fanfare by activists who have grown deeply suspicious of the generals commitment to change. The military council, which took over from Mubarak as he stepped down in February, promised it would transfer power to civilian rule within six months, but no date was announced for presidential elections that would bring an end to military rule. The concerns reflect the broader uncertainty over Egypts post-Mubarak course under a military council led by a man who served as Mubaraks defense minister for many years. Egypts new revolutionary groups say the council has done little to dismantle Mubaraks legacy and bring figures of the old regime to account for corruption, human rights abuses and other crimes. The new parliament won't reflect the real spirit of the revolution and will provide justification for the military council to continue to be present in the background of the political scene, said Mustafa Shawki, a youth group leader. Even more troubling for the young activists who led the uprising against Mubaraks rule, many believe the law governing the parliamentary election will enable remnants of the former regime to retain power in the post-uprising legislature. The elections for parlia ments two chambers will be staggered over several months, with the vote for the legislative Peoples Assembly start ing Nov 28 and the less pow erful Shura Council, the chamber's upper house, on Jan 29. Critics accuse the military of dragging out the process to prolong their time in power. EGYPT ANNOUNCES DATE FOR POST-MUBARAK ELECTION

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE MINISTER of the Environment Dr Earl Deveaux said the Bahamas must encourage development models that help mitigate the threat of climate change. Like other small island developing states (SIDS), the Bahamas is particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change, particularly global warming. And environmentalists have calculated that residual air and ocean pollution is the number-one threat to the survival of the 53 million people that live in SIDS.A definition of climate change is a change in climate which is attributed directly or indirectly to human activity that alters the composi tion of the global atmosphere and which is in addition to the natural climate variability observed over compara ble time periods, Mr Deveaux explained while speaking at the College of the Bahamas on September 22.Dr Deveaux said the countrys marine environment and integrated ecosystems are slowly being destroyed while coral reefs are showing signs of bleaching thanks to rising global temperatures. Climate change is already affecting and will continue to impact our coral reefs and integrated ecosystems, said Dr Deveaux. Showing the audience a slide show of photos, he said: Here are some manifesta tions of the effects of climate change exhibited primarily by hurricane damage. You see the effect on agri culture, on buildings, on infrastructure, and generally on human beings. The Bahamas is fortunate in one sense that we are bordered on one side by deep Atlantic Ocean. But, the Great Bahama Bank and Little Bahama Bank, which provides for most of our fisheries, would be the most likely threatened environments of the increasing of sea water temperature. Dr Deveaux said Bahamians must choose to reduce the impact of climate change through increasing our resiliency to its effects. He used Schooner Bay, a resort in Abaco, as an example of appropriate development, along the lines of the 2010 Planning and Subdivi sion Act, which came into effect January 1, 2011. Our government has passed the comprehensive Physical Planning Act and Forestry Act and one Ive list ed is the Bahamas National Trust Act. These three pieces of legislation together are intended to inform individual decisions, policy decisions, and regional decisions in respect to how we order development in our country, said Dr Deveaux. We can integrate our adaptation into development decisions. We have an example here of Schooner Bay, a development in Abaco. We have gamuts of con servation efforts exhibited in our living conditions, in our architecture, and we have the all-encompassing term appropriate development. That really summarises how we see the approach of our own adaptation to the adverse impacts of climate change in the Bahamas. The government has listed its practical efforts to address the adverse impacts of climate change. These include nature reserves such as Bird Pond in Andros, Victoria Pond in Exuma, and Adelaide Creek in New Providence. MINISTER ADVOCATES DEVELOPMENT MODELS TO HELP IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE MEMBERS OF the Antiques, Monuments, and Antiquities Division joined the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) to hear the presentation MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT Earl Deveaux discusses the governments strategy to combine legislative measures and appropriate development to control and mitigate the effects of climate change and, right, he introduces a comic book produced by the BEST Commission to offer a simple explanation of climate change to Bahamian citizens Kristaan Ingraham /BIS PANELISTS Michael Pateman, Lisa Benjamin, and Arthur Rolle gave presentations on how SIDS can turn their weaknesses into opportunities.

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE GRAND BAHAMAChamber of Commerces president yesterday dismissed calls to end Freeports real property tax exemption as not making any sense, warning such a move could actually depress real estate values in the city. Arguing that the release of large land tracts could create a supply glut, K P Turnquest said it was dangerous to assume Freeport would be any different to Exuma or the Abacos, where residents especially second homeowners were vehemently complaining about their real property tax bills. The Chamber president told Tribune Business that imposing real property tax in Freeport after the current exemption expires in 2015 raised the spectre of double taxation, and whether the authority to charge property owners would shift from the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) to the Government. It really doesnt make sense, Mr Turnquest said of the suggestions contained in a letter submitted to him last week. The September 22 document, from a concerned citizen, argued that Freeports real estate market and val ues would be reinvigorat ed through the imposition of real property tax, as the $2,000-$10,000 annual car rying costs for sitting on $4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.50 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITYS (GBPA) Board is today due to decide whether to appoint a new chairman, with Tribune Business able to reveal that former Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB) chairman Ian Fair appears to be the leading contender for the role. Sources intimately familiar with developments in By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A companys work week is not necessarily the same as the Employment Acts seven day period for determining employee days off, a Supreme Court judge has ruled, in dismissing a claim by 114 former and current staff against the Freeport Container Port. In throwing out the case that the Container Ports former four gang shift pattern breached the mandatory hours of rest and overtime pay mandated by the Employment Act, Justice Estelle GrayEvans also clarified other provisions in the legislation that are vital to Bahamian employers and their rostering/payroll costs. Dealing with the Acts hours of rest provision, Justice Gray-Evans said that while Bahamas-based employees were allowed one day off, or 24 consecutive hours of rest, during a sevenday period, the law did not mandate that they must be given two days off or two consecutive periods of 24 hours. Recalling the origins of the dispute, the judge said the employees had alleged the four gang shift pattern, implemented by Freeport Container Port between October 2001 and February 2009, breached their employment contract by requiring them to work eight hours per day, for seven consecutive days, without a day off. This, they had alleged, breached the Employment Act, but this was denied by the Freeport Container Port, which added that overtime was paid as due in accordance with the law. Justice Gray-Evans said the first issue to be determined was what the seven day period in the Employment Act meant. Attorneys for the workers alleged this period started on the day when each gang was rostered to begin their shift pattern, which would mean that the relevant seven-day period would be different for each gang and would commence on a different day of the week. They argued that since the Act does not stipulate when a week begins, an employer becomes legally bound to By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A GRAND Bahama businessman yesterday said he was ready to fight the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA) in court over its allegation he owes some $3,000 in fees, arguing this sum could not be justified he was licensed instead by the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA). Ryan Bullard, owner of Complete Business Systems, was one of three businesses listed by URCAs as owing annual fees and interest, the regulator having threatened to revoke its licence unless these sums are paid within 14 days. Mr Bullard told Tribune Business yesterday: They have these fees and they are not defined. I am a licensee of the Port. They [URCA] say they are an agent for the Government, responsible for collecting government taxes/ If I am paying you for inspection, you cant just get up and say I have to pay these fees and any outstanding interest and dont define them. Im prepared to go to court with them. I have my documents, they sent me theirs. Im ready to rumble. Their act makes no sense. URCA just cannot justify their fees. Mr Bullard added: Why should I pay taxes when I pay $1,800 a year in license fees to the Port Authority? Those guys dont scare me. I operate a piece of trunking equipment that was licensed by URCA. I have a license to do business in the Bahamas, to carry out the business of communication. I have a Port license to carry out the same business. With my license I can sell, repair and service communication apparatus. Why should I pay them any type of mon ey based on my general revenue? It makes no sense. The only license I have with them is for a trunking system. If they want to attach their revenue generation towards that then fine, I may not agree with it but I can By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATIONS(CBA) head yesterday conceded there was an element of truth to allegations that Bahamas-based financial institutions had either increased or introduced new fees to compensate for bad loan losses, pointing out that all businesses adopted such strategies to survive. Ian Jennings told Tribune Business that during recessions, when particular earnings streams fell and the bottom line declined, it was only natural for companies including commercial banks to develop new revenue avenues and cut costs to stay in business. He was responding after Dionisio DAguilar, president of the Superwash laundromat chain and a former Bahamas Cham ber of Commerce president, last week slammed Bahamian commercial banks for implementing outrageous and astronomical fees to try and recoup some of the losses sustained over the past three years on their non-performing loan portfolios. Mr DAguilar also accused Bahamian commercial banks, all of whom are CBA members, of operating as a cartel. This charge was rejected by Mr Jennings, who said there was lots of competition between the banks, even though consumers businesses and individuals may not always feel it. Commenting on Mr DAguilars fee-relat ed claims, Mr Jennings said: Theres an element of truth in that, like theres an element of truth in many things. Its a question of where you put the emphasis. The Superwash president had railed against the 2 per cent excess penalty fee that CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) had begun imposing on clients, on top of the normal 17 per cent overdraft fee. The former fee was being imposed on customers who went into overdraft even for one day a month and had established no such facilities with the bank. Mr DAguilar had alleged that the 2 per cent excess penalty fee amounted to an effective annual rate of 730 per cent per year if funds were borrowed for one day. FREEPORTTAX BREAK END NONSENSICAL Chamber chief warns end to real property tax exemption could depress real estate values by glut flooding market Expresses fears of double taxation; Port/Govt conflict SEE page 4B ELEMENTOF TRUTH TO BANK FEE CLAIMS Clearing Banks head says natural for all businesses to compensate for earnings declines Denies sector operates as cartel, saying: Theres lots of competition SEE page two FAIR EYED FOR PORT CHAIRMAN Board meeting set for today SEE page 5B BAHAMAS Financial Services Board chairman Ian Fair URCA DONT SCARE ME Licensee targeted for $3,000 debt says cant be justified, as based on licensing piece of equipment Fears double tax, as paying $1,800 annually to Port Authority SEE page 5B 114 STAFF SEE PORT SUIT THROWN OUT Ruling has key implications for all Bahamian employees, as a companys work week not always the same as Acts seven day period Judge confirms 48 hours of rest do not have to be two days off SEE page 4B

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.ne t SANDALS Royal Bahamian resort will reopen today following hurricane repairs, but the Manor building will remain closed for refurbishment over the next few months, a spokesman told Tribune Business yesterday. "We are definitely on schedule for reopening. Because of the opening most of the staff are coming back. There is a percentage who want to stay in Exuma a bit longer, and they have been given that option, but the majority of the staff wanted to come back immediately and are back for the opening, Yasmina Cherquaoui said. She added: "The Manor building, which is the original building, is still under refurbishment. Over the next few months we are going to be refurbishing the rooms. OpeningThey'll be getting new bathrooms, and we are doing some other work to the rooms. We are opening the property, but it is opening with the Windsor and the Royal Village. The Sandals spokesperson told Tribune Business that occupancy for the other two buildings on the Nassau property would be high. We have a large group coming in witin the next couple of days, she added. We are going to be pretty much full, or near to capacity, with the rooms that we have open. Because our occupancy is softer for the next couple months it has enabled us to close those rooms and refurbish them. The other two buildings would be full." The Manor building, she said, represents about 30 per cent of the propertys room offering. Sandals Royal Bahamian resort closed its doors for four weeks to "address structural and other damage" sustained from Hurricane Irene. Persons who were booked to stay at the hotel were moved to its sister property, Sandals Emerald Bay in Exuma, along with some staff from the Nassau resort. BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE SANDALS REOPENS BUT 30% OFROOMS REMAIN CLOSED Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. In an e-mailed reply to Tribune Businesss inquiries, Marie Rodland-Allen, CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) managing director, declined to comment on the grounds that the situation involved a specific customer. The bank, she added, did not discuss individual client matters. While not commenting on the specifics of Mr DAguilars case, since he was Commonwealth Banks managing director, Mr Jennings said commercial banks were required to give notice to customers when theres a change in fees. He pointed out that Bahamian banks generated fee revenues from both their loan and deposit products, but there was no cross-subsidisation between the two, meaning that loan customer fees did not subsidise deposit customer fees and vice versa. Noting that fees would likely be incurred whenever human involvement in the increasingly automated banking process was required, Mr Jennings said the Bahamian commercial banking industry was not as advanced or aggressive as its US counterparts when it came to extracting fees. Theres still a fair amount of services we provide that are not being charged for, Mr Jennings told Tribune Business. In a recession, when loans are dragging your income down, a bank has to do what it can to improve the bottom line, whether thats cutting costs or finding new revenue streams. Its part of the strategy of any company trying to raise revenue and cut costs to stay in business. In this time, everyone is finding it difficult, whether its an individual consumer or large institution.CostsThe Clearing Banks Association (CBA) head added that increased regulatory costs, coupled with the sector taking on increasing functions, had compounded the issue. Over the last few years theres been increasing regula tion of the banking industry, which is good for the consumer but does increase costs, Mr Jennings said. Taking the delegation of foreign exchange control administration to the commercial banking industry as an example, he added that this had transferred some of the overhead costs associated with this function from the Central Bank of the Bahamas to the industry. Everyones costs are going up, and we have to try to compensate, Mr Jennings explained. As for Mr DAguilars cartel claims against the Bahamian commercial banking industry, Mr Jennings said this again boiled down to a question of individual percep tion, and how the term was defined. Pointing out that the Bahamas was a relatively small market due to its population size, with many sectors dominated by a small group of between two-six major players, Mr Jennings told Tribune Business: I guess it depends on how and what you define as a cartel. The Bahamas is a very small environment. Overall, were regulated by the Central Bank. Theres competition between the banks, and you have half-adozen banks. He compared the Bahamian commercial banking industry to this nations petroleum industry, which had just three wholesale players in the form of Esso, Texaco and Shell, and the bakery sector that contained a similar number of participants. Turning to the newspaper industry, Mr Jennings sug gested there were two-and-a-half newspapers in the Bahamas. And he also asked whether Mr DAguilar would describe the Bahamian laundromat industry as a cartel, although thats not to be critical of him. He added: Its the perception, and maybe thats the truth the perception of it. We tend to look at it as more the individual against the banks, but theres a lot of competition between the banks thats not really seen. You may not always feel it. If youre looking at trying to get a loan, theres lots of competition between the banks on interest rates and things. The Clearing Banks Associations head said that apart from Central Bank oversight, consumers would also be reassured if Parliament passed the consumer legislation we keep talking about. ELEMENT OF TRUTH TO BANK FEE CLAIMS FROM page one

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 3B The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas Notice to Pensioners The National Insurance Board wishes to advise certain of its pensioners that recent developments at the Post Office Bank and the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) will impact the payment of their monthly pensions. Specifically, the closure of RBCs Bay & Victoria Branch means that payments that were earmarked for this Branch cannot be deposited. Similarly, the Post Office Bankhas advised that it can no longer accept pension payments for its customers. Consequently, pensioners whose monthly benefits and assistance payments were direct deposited into accounts at the Post Office Bank, and RBCs Bay & Victoria Branch are asked to visit the National Insurance Boards Pension Department tomake arrangements for payments to be deposited elsewhere. Affected pensioners are urged to act now to avoid the suspension of their October payments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y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Bar Associations president, Ruth Bowe-Darville, while calling National Security Minister Tommy Turnquests attack on the judiciary unfortunate, told Tribune Business yesterday that the affair could also deter foreign investment in the Bahamas. Expressing concern that the wrong message may have been sent to potential and current investors through questioning the competency and fairness of the Bahamian judiciary, Mrs Bowe-Darville said: It is unfortunate because he has attacked a particular segment in this community which serves to protect the public. What he has done is lowered the esteem of the judiciary in the eyes of the public, so confidence is not there, whether locally or internationally. Since we have been trying to build ourselves as a relatively safe, competitive financial centre, I dont know how much of an impact his statements will really have on international litigants coming to our courts to resolve their disputes, but I do know there probably will be many inquiries into the availability of the judges, their competency, and also the big question is their fairness in determining the matters before them. Mr Turnquest last week attacked the judiciary for its willingness to grant bail to repeat violent offenders, which he said has contributed "greatly" to the country's escalating crime problem. He said that while he has no wish to encroach on the independence of the judicial system, in his opinion some judges have been far too "liberal" when it comes to granting bail to career criminals and those accused of serious offenses and he believes the police and the public agree with him. Mrs Bowe-Darville told Tribune Business: The ministers comments were unfortunate, and it came at a very critical time when we are trying to build our judiciary and efforts are being put in to broadening the scope of the bench, so we can have sufficient judges to deal with criminal and civil matters which the international public may have an interest in. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedi.net FREEPORT RESIDENTS have demanded that the Grand Bahama Power Company show how it calculates its fuel surcharge, after it was proven that this electricity bill component was now 80 per cent higher than at the $140 per barrel oil price peak in mid-2008. A lot of anger and hostility were directed at the companys executives during a town meeting at the Foster B Pestaina Hall on Monday evening. The meeting ended at 8.30pm, and Grand Bahama Power Compa ny officials left without providing answers to many of the questions posed. Tempers ran high as persons voiced their frustration over high electricity bills and exor bitant fuel surcharge costs. Bombarded by questions and complaints, Grand Bahama Power Company chief execu tive, Sarah MacDonald. did not havea chance to respond. Accompanying her were Tony Lopez, chief financial officer, and Katherine Demeritte, director of customer service. Some FNM MPs and Sena tors were also present at the town meeting. Many customers complained of experiencing significant increases, with power bills amounting to $1,000 and, in some cases, $2,100 over a onemonth period. They called for transparency over the calculation of the fuel surcharge, which is often higher than the actual electricity usage. Ms MacDonald maintains that the company makes no profit from the fuel surcharge, which is set every month based on the fuel cost and plant efficiency. She previously noted that the hike in world energy prices has resulted in increased fuel surcharges for customers. However, at Mondays town meeting, a woman presented figures for the companys fuel surcharge costs in 2008 and 2011. In July 2008, the cost of oil was at $140 per barrel and the fuel surcharge was $13.35. When compared to July 2011, Grand Bahama Power Companys fuel surcharge was much higher at $24.06, while the cost of oil was lower at $96 per bar rel. The woman demanded an explanation for the inconsisten cy. I want to know what formula the company is using to calculate the fuel surcharge cost? she asked. Residents also wanted to know why the company was using No 2 diesel fuel, which is more expensive than diesel No.6 or Bunker C fuel. We should not have to pay for that or the inefficiency of company equipment, a resident said. Customers were also concerned about the estimation of bills, which executives said was an international industry standard practice. Attorney Osman Johnson disagreed. He said the estimation of power bills contradicts international industry standards, which dictate that companies make exact calculations of both meter reading and bill rates. I have direct experience from the UK, where customers are given the option of having their bills estimated, he said. Mr Johnson claimed that the Grand Bahama Power Company has caused reduced living standards on the island. He alleged that investors and international businesses have been deterred from doing business on Grand Bahama because of the high electricity cost. Ms MacDonald said residents with queries about their bills will be dealt with on an individual basis. While attempting to respond to questions, MacDonald was interrupted by community activist Troy Garvey, who demanded that she reduce the cost of electricity for customers. As Mr Garvey moved closer, shouting at executives, police officers moved in to bring order. Ms MacDonald and members of the executive team were escorted from the building by security and police officers. The Grand Bahama Port Authority is undertaking an independent audit of the Grand Bahama Power Companys billing system. The Port Authority, which acts as the municipal authority for Freeport, said an investigation will be conducted into the companys meter reading, billing procedures and fuel costs and that the findings will be made available to the public. Costs 80% higher than at 2008 oil price peak POWER FIRM BLASTED OVER FUEL SURCHARGEGRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY chief executive, Sarah MacDonald

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ensure that there is no period when an employee is required to work for seven consecutive days without then requisite mandatory 48 hours of rest. Yet the Freeport Container Ports attorneys argued that the seven day period was simply the calendar week, and that just one consecutive 24-hour period of rest was mandated by the Employment Act. Referring to those arguments, advanced by Robert Adams, attorney and partner at Graham Thompson & Co, Justice Gray-Evans said: While I agree with Mr Adams that there has to be a start and a stop for every sev en-day period, I am not per suaded that those seven-day periods must necessarily coincide with a calendar week or the defendants [Freeport Container Port] work week. It occurs to me that, applying Mr Adams construction, there is nothing to prevent an employer from scheduling an employee to work 11 or 12 consecutive days in a 14-day period, pro vided he allows the employee to have a day off in each calendar week say, one at the beginning of the first week and the other at the end of the second week. I do not believe that is the result intended by the legis lators. It also occurs to me that Parliament could easily have said in every calendar week or in every work week, rather than in every seven day period if it was intended that the seven-day periods could only relate to the calendar week or an employers work week. Given that the Employment Act does not specify when the seven-day period should begin, the onus is on the employer to ensure that there is no period in which the employee is scheduled to work seven consecutive days without the mandatory 48 hours of rest. Accordingly, Justice GrayEvans found that the every seven-day period, in relation to the four gang shift pattern, meant the first day when each gang was sched uled to begin its shift. However, she backed Mr Adams in that, while the Employment Act mandated every employee was sup posed to get one day off or 24 consecutive hours of rest, there is no requirement for an employee to be allowed two consecutive periods of 24 hours or two days unless they were tipped workers in an industry such as tourism. Turning to the Freeport Container Port case, Justice Gray-Evans noted that there was no off day among the seven consecutive days each gang had been rostered to work. It therefore appeared that the staff did not get one day off as mandated by the Act. But a closer examination of the work roster showed there were two 24-hour periods of rest within the sevenday shift pattern for each gang. These were achieved when one gang finished its day shift at 4pm, and then did not have to report to work until 4pm the next day. It was the same for completing a midnight shift, as workers in that gang did not have to report until midnight the following day. It appears that whether applying the meaning of every seven day period contended by the plaintiffs or that contended by the defendant, workers affected by the four gang shift pattern utilised by the defendant dur ing the relevant period were afforded the requisite mandatory 48 hours of rest in every seven-day period, Justice Gray-Evans said. I therefore find that the four gang shift pattern does not contravene the Act and is not illegal. Consequently, I am unable to find that the defendant has breached the contracts of employment of the plaintiffs by requiring them to work eight hours per day for seven consecutive days without the requisite hours of rest. Alonzo Lopez represented the staff, Mr Adams and Dwayne Fernander the Freeport Container Port. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 7KH,QWHU$PHULFDQ,QVWLWXWHIRU&RRSHUDWLRQRQ$JULFXOWXUH,,&$fIFHLQ 7KH%DKDPDVLVLQYLWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUDIXOOWLPHSRVLWLRQDV 6867$,1$%/( $*5,&8/785((&,$/,67 %$&.*5281',1)250$7,21 ,,&$fLVDVSHFLDOL]HGDJHQF\RIWKH,QWHU$PHULFDQV\VWHP,WVSXUSRVHLV WRHQFRXUDJHDQGVXSSRUWWKHHIIRUWVRILWVPHPEHUVWDWHVWRIRVWHUDJULFXOWXUDO GHYHORSPHQWDQGUXUDOZHOOEHLQJLQWKHLUWHUULWRULHV7KHLQVWLWXWHFROODERUDWHV ZLWKWKHLQLVWU\RI$JULFXOWXUHDQGDULQHHVRXUFHVDQGUHODWHGVHFWRUVWKDW DUHLQYROYHGLQKROLVWLFDJULFXOWXUHDQGUXUDOGHYHORSPHQWLQ7KH%DKDPDV '87,(6$1'(63216,%,/,7,(6 7KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOO $VVLVWFOLHQWVLQWKHSODQQLQJtGHYHORSPHQWRIWKHLUEXVLQHVVHVWKURXJKWKH FKDQJHSURFHVVQHFHVVLWDWHGE\PDUNHWUHTXLUHPHQWV 8VHDUDQJHRIHIIHFWLYHPHWKRGRORJLHVLQFOXGLQJWKHXVHRIZHEEDVHG LQIRUPDWLRQGHOLYHU\SURJUDPVQHZVOHWWHUVDQGDFWLYLW\UHSRUWVWRDFKLHYH WHFKQRORJ\WUDQVIHUDQGVXVWDLQDEOHFOLHQWGHYHORSPHQW &RPDQDJHWKHOLEUDU\LQIRUPDWLRQUHVRXUFHFHQWHU :RUNZLWKSURGXFHUJURXSVDQGRWKHUVWDNHKROGHUVWRGULYHLQQRYDWLRQDQG DVVXUHWKHGHOLYHU\RIGHYHORSPHQWSURMHFWV 7KHLQFXPEHQWZLOOEHUHTXLUHGWRWUDYHOWRWKH)DPLO\,VODQGV+HVKHUHSRUWV WRWKHHSUHVHQWDWLYHDQGZLOOEHUHVSRQVLEOHIRUWKHPDQDJHPHQWRIWKHRIFH LQWKHDEVHQFHRIWKHHSUHVHQWDWLYH %$6,&$/,),&$7,216 4 7KHFDQGLGDWHKROGVDWOHDVWD%6FGHJUHHZLWKUHTXLUHGH[SHULHQFHLQWKHHOG RI$JULFXOWXUH$QLPDORUODQWFLHQFHV$JULFXOWXUDO(GXFDWLRQRULQDFORVHO\ UHODWHGGLVFLSOLQH'HPRQVWUDWHGNQRZOHGJHDQGH[SHULHQFHRIZHEEDVHG LQIRUPDWLRQGHOLYHU\SURJUDPVFRPSXWHUVDQGFRPPXQLFDWLRQHTXLSPHQWDV ZHOODVHIIHFWLYHZULWWHQDQGRUDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV0XVWEHVXSSRUWLYHRI ,,&$VYLVLRQPLVVLRQRISURPRWLQJVXVWDLQDEOHGHYHORSPHQWRIDJULFXOWXUHIRRG VHFXULW\DQGUXUDOSURVSHULW\ $SSOLFDWLRQ'HDGOLQHHSWHPEHURUXQWLOSRVLWLRQLVOOHG 3OHDVHVXEPLWFXUULFXOXPYLWDHWR +XPDQHVRXUFH'HSDUWPHQW 32%R[ 1$66$8%DKDPDV land would encourage people to instead develop their holdings. However, the Chamber president countered: You hear a cry from the Exumas, the second home owners, about the real property tax being charged there, and that theyre trying to get out. You hear the cry from the Abacos, the second homeowners there, about the real property tax theyre being charged and wanting out. Why do you think, charging real property tax in Grand Bahama, therell be this boom? Mr Turnquest said he presumed the letter writer was largely targeting the Grand Bahama Development Company (Devco), the 50/50 joint venture between Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) affiliate, Port Group Ltd, and Hutchison Whampoa. Devco has in the past been accused of land banking and sitting on its holdings, rather than freeing them up for development. But Mr Turnquest said: All of a sudden, if Devcos subject to the carrying costs for the land they hold, we may get benefits from the transfer over of land, but whats it going to do to property values? That needs a little more thought. The effect a glut of property on the market will have on our real estate industry overall has to be considered.ChargesContinuing in this vein, Mr Turnquest told Tribune Business: What about double taxation? The Ports affiliate charges every property owner a service charge to maintain the roads, verges and rest of it. Thats the same thing real property tax is supposed to fund. Are we saying take this power away from the Port Authority and vest the Government with this authority? We know the great job they do in maintaining the environment in the Family Islands to date. It needs a lot of thought. The person that wrote the letter has the impression that forcing land sales is the answer to the lack of progress and development, but I dont think thats the reason at all. There are much larger issues than that the global economic situation and all kinds of other issues. Mr Turnquest further told Tribune Business: I dont think the Port Authority, Hutchison and Devco are holding land just for the sake of holding it. I dont know what their goals and objectives are, but we have to assume theyre interested in seeing the development of Grand Bahama, and a rise in the value of their properties, too, as much as this will increase licensing and property fees to them. The letter sent to Mr Turnquest, which outlines arguments advanced to Tribune Business previously by several leading attorneys, says property values in Freeport have remained dormant at best for more than the past 20 years, while areas such as Abaco and its cays, Harbour Island, Paradise Island, Cable Beach, Lyford Cay and Exuma have all seen theirs increase despite having to pay real property taxes annually.LetterThe letter argues that the absence of real property taxes in Freeport has encouraged nonBahamians to sit on, rather then develop, the land they have acquired. There is a school of thought that says one of the reasons property in Freeport has not enjoyed any boom, or even been invigorated in these past years, is because there is no real property tax imposed, the letter said. If there is no carrying cost for property-owning non-Bahamians in the Port area, there is no urgent need to develop and/or place property on the market at reasonable prices. Accordingly, it is maintained that real property tax imposition would be beneficial to cause movement and development by non-Bahamian owners. It would indeed benefit non-Bahamian and Bahamian property owners alike. A foreign owner will not sit on property that has a carrying cost of $2,000-$10,000 per annum. At present there is no carrying cost except for a small service charge. The letter concluded: The irony of the matter is that the imposition of real property tax will invigorate the real estate market in Freeport. But Mr Turnquest previously backed those urging the Government to renew Freeport's Business Licence and real property tax exemptions until 2054, arguing that to do otherwise would "shackle" the city's economy and deter potential investors. In an earlier interview with Tribune Business, he said it was "unfair" to leave the issue of whether to extend both exemptions, which are currently set to expire in 2015, hanging until after the forthcoming general election given that the difficult global economic environment already made attracting investment difficult. FREEPORT TAX BREAK END NONSENSICAL FROM page one 114 STAFF SEE PORT SUIT THROWN OUT FROM page one

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BERLIN Associated Press STOCK MARKETS soared around the world Tuesday amid hopes that Europe is finally finding a way out of its debt crisis. Greece passed an unpopular property tax and German Chancellor Angela Merkel pledged to offer the struggling country "all necessary assistance." It's unclear whether that will be enough to satisfy investors for long. Stocks improved following last week's turmoil as speculation grew that Greece's bailout creditors will look to impose bigger losses on Greece's private bondholders as well as recapitalize Europe's banks and expand the eurozone's rescue fund. So far, there's beenno confirmation from Europe's capitals that such a comprehensive solution is being planned. Financial markets closely watched a meeting between Merkel and Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou, but neither announced any new measures ahead of their private dinner at Berlin's chancellery on Tuesday evening. "Through the euro, we are closely bound together, and the weakness of one affects us all," Merkel said at a news conference. Germany, Europe's biggest economy, is seen as a key player in resolving the 17nation eurozone's debt crisis, but Merkel's government has repeatedly been accused over the past 18 months of being a reluctant leader of the rescue efforts. Speaking earlier Tuesday alongside her economy minister, Philip Roesler, Merkel reiterated her conviction that there is no quick solution, saying the crisis must be dealt with "step by step." Greece must receive an euro8 billion ($11 billion) rescue loan before mid-October to stave off bankruptcy, a collapse that would send shock waves through markets around the world. But creditors have demanded more efforts to raise revenue. In response, Greek lawmakers approved a controversial new property tax Tuesday evening, passing it 154143 in the 300-member parliament. The levy, in addition to public-sector reforms announced earlier, is expected to make up for lagging revenues this year by providing more than euro2 billion ($2.76 billion), or about 1 percent of Greece's annual gross domestic product. Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos said his country will get the money. "The disbursement will be decided in time, in line with the course of our funding needs," he said. Greeks have been outraged by tax and other austerity measures, and unions have responded with strikes and protests. Even as Venizelos spoke, protesting ministry employees and tax office workers chanted outside his department in Athens. Venizelos said Greece had made great efforts to achieve its fiscal targets, but that a "hyper-effort" is necessary to fully meet its commitments. Venizelos said representatives from the International Monetary Fund, the European Commission and the European Central Bank will return to Athens this week. The so-called troika suspended its review in early September amid talk of missed targets and budget shortfalls. The current plan is to have Greece implement painful debt-reduction measures in exchange for rescue loans. Greece relies on funds from last year's euro110 billion ($149 billion) package, and European leaders also have agreed on a second euro109 billion bailout, although some details of that remain to be worked out. "We want a strong Greece within the eurozone, and Germany is prepared to offer all necessary assistance," Merkel said in Berlin. Papandreou, in return, pledged to implement the reforms demanded by Greece's international creditors. Speaking through a translator, he said this is a time "of great sacrifices for the Greek people. Therefore it is of great importance to receive signals of support from our European partners." Ahead of the meeting between the two leaders, Merkel's government downplayed speculation of bold new moves to tackle Europe's sprawling sovereign debt crisis. German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble ruled out increasing the eurozone's new euro440 billion ($595 billion) rescue fund, calling it "a silly idea" that could ultimately endanger the AAA ratings of the main creditor countries such as Germany and the Netherlands. Greece's new property tax will range from euro4.00 to euro20.00 ($5.50-$27.50) for every square meter (10.7 square feet). It will be charged through electricity bills to make it easier for the state to collect, instead of going through Greece's unwieldy and inefficient tax system. Those who refuse to pay will risk having their power cut off. The extra charge has deeply angered Greeks, who have already been through more than a year of sharp austerity measures, including salary and pension cuts and higher taxes. State electricity company unionists have threatened not to collect the tax. Public transport workers walked off the job Tuesday for two days, and were to be joined by taxi drivers on Wednesday. Tax office and customs workers also were on strike. Police briefly scuffled with protesters outside parliament shortly after Tuesday's vote there and used pepper spray to disperse one group of youths. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6$&7 RRIf +(5$/',17(51$7,21$//7' ,QROXQWDU\OLTXLGDWLRQ 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ fRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV $FWRRIf +(5$/',17(51$7,21$/ /7' KDVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIIWKH5HJLVWHU DFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLILFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG E\WKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKHQGGD\RI$XJXVW %(+//$'t$/$<(*+ &KDUWHUHG$FFRXQWDQWV 3%R['XEDL 8QLWHG$UDE(PLUDWHV /LTXLGDWRU NOTICE is hereby given that RENIQUE ZERALYNES, P.O. BOX E-46076, SEAGRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS isapplying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st dayof SEPTEMBER, 2011 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.NOTICE ,7$/,$),6,(1RI'81025( 675((7+$5%285,6/$1'(/(87+(5$%$+$0$6 /(6/,(3,(55(RI'81025( 675((7+$5%285,6/$1'(/(87+(5$%$+$0$6 .(16217,027+((RI62/',(5 &/26(1$66$8%$+$0$6 05&$59(/$1721($/&277 2)0F.,11(<'5,9(RII&$50,&+$(/52$'1$66$8 %$+$0$6 ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6$&7 RRIf '5<'21,1'8675,(6&253 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQfRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV$FWRRIf '5<'21 ,1'8675,(6&253 KDVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFN RIIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLILFDWHRI 'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGE\WKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKH WK GD\RI$XJXVW (VWHEDQ*DULERWWL $YGDRQVHQRURGULTXH] .P(GLILFLRDUDK,, $YGDRQVHQRURGULTXH] .P(GLILFLRDUDK,, $YGDRQVHQRURGULTXH] 'HSWR&LXGDGGHO(VWHDUDJXD\ /LTXLGDWRU ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6$&7 RRIf (85292,&(/,0,7(' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ fRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW RRIf (85292,&(/,0,7(' KDVEHHQ GLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJ WRWKH&HUWLILFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGE\WKH 5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKH WK GD\RI$XJXVW 70:LVGRP'LUHFWRUV/LPLWHG :DWHUIURQW'ULYH 5RDGRZQRUWROD %ULWLVKLUJLQ,VODQGV /LTXLGDWRU ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6$&7 RRIf +(,*+:$<(1785(6/,0,7(' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQfRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV$FWRRIf +(,*+:$< 9(1785(6/,0,7(' KDVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQG VWUXFNRIIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLILFDWH RI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGE\WKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQ WKH WK GD\RI$XJXVW -RKQ'RQQHOO\ 2IILFH%XLOGLQJ *DWHLOODJH%XLOGLQJ 'XEDL,QWHUQDWLRQDO)LQDQFH&HQWUH 'XEDL$( /LTXLGDWRU MERKEL: GERMANY WANTS 'STRONG GREECE' IN EUROZONE GERMAN CHANCELLOR Angela Merkel. (AP)

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NEW YORK Associated Press CONSUMERS' confidence remained weak in September after dropping to a post-recession low during the month before. That's left economists to wonder just what it'll take to get Americans feeling good about the economy again. A survey of consumer confidence shows that Americans who were worried in August because of a downgrade of U.S. longterm debt, wild stock markets swings and other concerns, continue to be spooked. Economists say the problem is that not much has changed to make consumers feel financially secure. The stock market is still volatile. Worries about the global economy persist. And perhaps worst of all for confidence, U.S. jobs are still scarce. "We are well below where we should be, and that's because the unemployment situation is so bad," said Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics. "You have to have a huge fall in the unemployment rate."ReadingThe Conference Board, a private research group, said Tuesday that its Consumer Confidence Index was at 45.4 in September. The number is slightly above the revised reading in August of 45.2, which was the lowest since April 2009. A reading of above 90 indicates the economy is on solid footing. "The pessimism that shrouded consumers last month has spilled over into September," said Lynn Franco, director of The Conference Board Consumer Research Center in a statement. Economists, which watch the index closely because consumer spending accounts for about 70 percent of U.S. economic activity, say it will take at least a year for consumers' confidence to improve. The problem, they say, is that consumers still feel like they're in a recession. It's not hard to see why consumers are freaked out about the U.S. economy. Net job creation came to a halt in August in the U.S. The unemployment rate was flat at 9.1 percent. Home prices remain weak. And consumers are facing higher prices for everything from food to clothing as retailers try to offset their rising costs for labor and materials. Consumers also don't feel good about their prospects. Those claiming jobs are "hard to get" increased to 50.0 percent, from 48.5 percent in The Conference Board's survey. And the proportion of consumers anticipating an increase in their income declined to 13.3 percent from 14.3 percent. Franco, with The Conference Board, said that "does not bode well for spending." Economists say sustained job growth monthly job gains of at least 200,000 will be the most critical component in raising consumers' confidence. A rallying stock market, rising home values and lower prices for gasoline, food and other things would also help lift shoppers' moods.ChallengesSome economic challenges are already starting to ease. For instance, gas prices, while higher than last year, are starting to come down. Shoppers will also see prices on clothing and home furnishings start to come down by next spring, says Scott Wren, equity strategist for Wachovia Securities. Stores had raised prices on average of about 10 percent as they tried to offset higher costs for labor and raw materials like cotton, but those cost pressures have started to dissipate in recent months. "That will help confidence a little," Wren said. Although the stock markets are still volatile, they are calming some. Since the first week of August, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has closed up or down more than 200 points a total of 16 times. The Dow remains down 12.8 percent from its recent peak on July 21, and down 2.3 percent for the year. A sustainable rebound in the stock market should send confidence back to a reading of anywhere from 60 to 75, said Dales, with Capital Economics. But two other components that affect sentiment housing and the job mar ket aren't budging much. According to a widely watched Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index released on Tuesday, home prices rose for a fourth straight month in most major U.S. cities in July. But prices are expected to decline in the coming months after the buying season. .JobsAnd economists will closely monitor the September jobs figures when they are to be released on Oct. 7. But unemployment rate is expected to remain unchanged at 9.1 percent with employers adding 75,000 jobs. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011, PAGE 7B 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.19 0.95AML Foods Limited 1.19 1.19 0.00 0.1550.0807.76.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 -0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .50 4.40Bank of Bahamas 6.93 6.93 0.00 0.2300.10030.11.44% 0 .53 0.17Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2 .84 2.55Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.0300.09090.03.33% 1.96 1.77Fidelity Bank 1.77 1.77 0.00 0.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas 8.47 8.47 0.0010,0000.2450.31034.63.66% 2 .80 2.33Colina Holdings 2.33 2.33 0.00 0.4380.0405.31.72% 8.50 8.33Commonwealth Brewery 8.50 8.50 0.0010,8880.7400.00011.50.00% 7.00 6.21Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.44 6.44 0.0010,0000.4960.26013.04.04% 2.00 1.63Consolidated Water BDRs 1.62 1.65 0.035,0000.1110.04514.92.73% 1.77 1.31Doctor's Hospital 1.37 1.37 0.005,0000.0740.11018.58.03% 5.50 4.75Famguard 5.43 5.43 0.00 0.4980.24010.94.42% 8.40 5.35Finco 5.39 5.39 0.0010,0000.7570.0007.10.00% 9.45 7.75FirstCaribbean Bank 8.21 8.21 0.0010,0000.4940.35016.64.26% 6.00 5.00Focol (S) 5.33 5.33 0.0010,0000.4350.22012.34.13% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7 .30 5.58ICD Utilities 7.30 7.30 0.00 -0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 0.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.00B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%T UESDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,363.78 | CHG 0.03 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -135.73 | YTD % -9.05BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.18353.32%4.99% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.14202.10%4.31% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.18543.16%5.14% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 31-Aug-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 31-Aug-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS31-Aug-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 NOTICEIN THE ESTATE OF NEVILLE MINUS late of Caravel Beach in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send the same GXO\FHUWLHGLQZULWLQJWRWKH8QGHUVLJQHGRQ or before the 31st day of October, A.D. 2011, after which date the Co-Executors will proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims to which they shall then have had notice. AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned. MERIDIAN LAW CHAMBERS Attorneys for the Co-Executors Chambers, P.O. Box N-168, East Bay Shopping Center, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. CONSUMERS' CONFIDENCE REMAINS WEAK IN SEPTEMBER A SHOPPER reading a product label at Costco Wholesale in Mountain View, Calif. Consumers' confidence in the economy remained weak in September after dropping to a post-recession low during the month before as Americans continue to worry about high unemployment and low wages. (AP) BENTONVILLE, Arkansas Associated Press WAL-MART STORES INC. announced Tuesday that one of its key executives, Eduardo Castro-Wright, will retire in 2012. The world's biggest retailer said that Wright, 56, will retire from his role as vice chairman and CEO of its global ecommerce and global sourcing business on July 1. Wal-Mart aims to name a replacement by the end of January and have Castro-Wright assist in the transition. Castro-Wright joined Wal-Mart in 2001 and worked as the head of its business in Mexico before becoming president and CEO of its U.S. operations in 2005. In June 2010, Wal-Mart appointed Bill Simon, who had been chief operating officer, to take over its U.S. operations, shifting Castro-Wright to lead the retailer's global ecommerce and sourcing business. Wal-Mart said at the time that the move allowed CastroWright to relocate to California to be with his family, including his wife who was recovering from a heart transplant. It also helped Wal-Mart increase its emphasis on building its international online business. The executive moves occurred amid a slump at Wal-Mart's U.S. business as it grappled with tough economic times and mis takes it made in pricing and merchandising. Wal-Mart's U.S. business has had nine consecutive quarters of declines for a key revenue measure, the longest stretch in its history. The company has been re-introducing merchandise it cut during an overzealous bid to reduce clutter in its stores and has returned to offering "everyday low prices" at its stores. In August, it told investors it expects to reverse the declines by the fourth quarter. Wal-Mart has focused more on its international business from growth as sales in the U.S. have softened. The company's overseas business, which includes China, Brazil, Japan, Mexico and other countries, made up approximately 26 percent of the company's revenue in fiscal 2011. Wal-Mart, based in Bentonville, Arkansas, has more than 9,700 stores under its various banners in 28 countries. "(Castro-Wright) has been a strong advocate for our customers and in every assignment has brought passion and commitment to the job. He has also built talented teams wherever he has led," the company's CEO Mike Duke said in a statement. Under Castro-Wright's leadership, Wal-Mart has notably expanded its online business overseas. Wal-Mart bought a minority stake in online company Yihaodian in China in May. It has added online shopping for home delivery in a number of countries as well. The company says expanding this business has been crucial to Wal-Mart because it provides people outside the biggest cities the same opportunities that Wal-Mart stores did 50 years ago when the company first brought products to rural areas of the U.S. Castro-Wright also has worked to help Wal-Mart to develop shopping opportunities for mobile devices and tapping into social networks. Under his stewardship, Wal-Mart bought social media company Kosmix in April to help strengthen its social and mobile commerce. Shares of Wal-Mart rose 42 cents to $52.25 in late afternoon trading. WAL-MART STORES SAYS KEY EXEC RETIRING

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LOC AL RELIEF C ONC ER TS HELP B RIN G HOPE AFT ER T HE ST ORM PE TER R UN KS BA RES H IS SOU L I N HI S L A T EST A LBU M TH E STRE E T BEA TS GRO UP COM E S TO GRAN D BAHAM A WEDNESD A Y SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 TH E T RI B U N E S E C TI O N CBy JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer THE BAR to make people laugh uncontrollably has been set very high for the actors and creators of the Stop Likin Man internet video series.Co l l age E n t ert ai n men t re le ased S to p L i k i n M an 3 th i s m o n th an d i t p o k e s j u st as m u ch f u n at s o me o f th e s i ll y t h i n gs B ah am ia n men i n p art i cu l ar d o F o r i n st an ce o n e sce n e o f t h e t wo a n d a h al f mi n u t e l o n g vi d eo p o k es fu n a t t h at fac t t h at so m e Bah a mi an s c an n o t l i ve wi t h o u t tec h n o l o gy. W e d o n t co mmu n i c at e an ym o re a n d t h at sc en e d em o n st ra tes th at. W e ar e i n su ch a n a ge wh e re t h e o n l y t h i n g we w an t to d o i s s en d an emai l s en d a t ext m ess age o r a Bl ac k b err y me ss age. T h ese t h i n gs tak e th e h u m an as p ect o u t o f c o mmu n i ca ti o n an d w e w an t ed to s h ed a l i tt l e b i t o f l ig h t o n t h at sai d T yr o n e Bu r ro w s, o n e o f th e f o u n d er s o f Co l l age E n t ert ai n men t T h er e w ere s o me c h al len ges ge tt i n g t h e vi d eo o f f t h e gr o u n d li k e f i n d i n g c u rr en t s u b j ect mat t er an d t u rn i n g i t i n t o h u mo ro u s en t ert ai n me n t. Do i n g co m ed y i s ver y d i ff i cu l t I t t o o k u s a r eal l y l o n g wh i l e t o d o th i s t h i rd vi d eo T h e se co n d o n e w as s o f u n n y, an d t h e b ar w as s et h i gh so we k n ew we h ad to c o me u p wi t h so m et h i n g ver y fu n n y b ecau s e t h ere i s a h i gh l evel o f exp ec ta ti o n w e h ave t o meet Th e s eco n d v id e o f ea tu r ed mo s tl y s o ci al co mm en t ar y o n f as h i o n a n d we exh au s te d j u s t a b o u t al l o u r f ash io n r eso u r ces It wa s re al ly d if f ic u l t an d w e j u st h ad t o f i n al ly s i t d o w n an d j u st d o i t. S o met i mes l i f e go t in t h e w ay o f th i n gs b u t w e ar e sat i sf i ed wi t h th e o u t co m e, h e sa id W i t h th e s eri es M r B u rr o ws sai d t h e gro u p w an t ed t o sh i n e l i gh t o n s o me o f t h e si l l y th i n gs th at gu ys d o C u rr en t l y, Co l l age E n te rt ai n men t h as a s h o w t h at ai rs o n ZN S o n F ri d ay a t 8p m I n ad d i ti o n t o th e S to p L i k i n M an s eri es t h ei r web s i te i s lo a d ed wi t h o th er fu n vi d eo s fr o m t h e gr o u p Th er e i s a l o t in s to re f o r u s in t h e n ear f u tu r e. We wi l l c o n ti n u e t o mak e vi d eo s th a t ap p ea l t o B ah ami an s W e l i k e to k e ep th i n gs cu r ren t an d re p res en t t h e B ah ami an c u lt u r e in a h u m o ro u s w ay b e cau s e we l o ve o u r co u n t ry , M r B u r ro w s sa id T h e S t o p L ik i n M an s eri es b egan as a sh o r t vi d eo t o en c o u rage p ers o n s n o t to f o l l o w t h e cr o wd o r b o w t o p eer p r ess u re. I t t u rn e d in t o a B ah ami an p h en o m en o n wi t h p ers o n s f ro m al l w al k s o f li f e t el li n g o t h er s t o "st o p l ik in man an d h avi n g "t ags o n ever yt h in g S o me o f t h e t h in g s f eat u red i n t h e p as t vi d eo s are gu ys w ear i n g th ei r p an t s t u ck ed i n t o th e ir so c k s, b u yi n g Oak l ey s u n gl as ses to w ear wi t h o u t t h e l en se s, st ar i n g p eo p l e d o wn j u s t f o r f u n o f i t an d gu ys d res si n g al i k e b y w ear i n g t h e co l o u r o f t h e d ay. T h ey al s o p o k ed fu n at gu ys wh o re fu s ed t o r emo v e th e l ab e ls fr o m t h ei r h at s an d c lo t h i n g, p ro m p ti n g t h e p h ra se "t ags o n ever yt h in g T h e S t o p Li k i n M an co n c ep t cam e fr o m yo u t h p as to r Co r ey DJ Co u n sel l o r at B ah amas F ai th M i n i st ri es wh o w o u l d al ways t el l t h e Yo u t h A l i ve au d i en ce at t h e eve n t n o t t o f o l l o w f as h io n o r th e cro w d an d t o b e t h ems el ves T h e mes sa ge t o o k o f f an d gar n ere d a cu l t fo l l o w in g las t year p r o mp t i n g a se q u el a n d gen er at in g m ed i a at ten ti o n wh en a Go ver n men t mem b er i n t h e Ho u s e o f A s se mb l y sh o u t ed "s to p l i k in ma n to Op p o s i ti o n me mb er Gl en ys Han n aM ar ti n as sh e m ad e a co n t ri b u t i o n to a d e b ate o n c u l tu r e. C o l la ge en t ert ai n me n t i s m ad e u p o f 25 l o ca l an d i n t er n ati o n al ac to r s. T o vi ew S t o p L i k in M an 3 l o g o n t o c o l l a g e d e m c o m

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T H E T R I BU N E S E C T I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T02 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 THE Street Beats Group, a team of young performers based in New York City, has been invited by the Grand Bahama Performing Arts Society (GBPAS) to put on two work shops, one for dance and the other for drumming.B oth w orkshops w ill b e hel d this Sa turday at the R eg enc y T h eatre Th a t sa m e d a y th e y w i l l be t h e fe a t u re act in Street Be ats to help promote an d fun d th e soc i et y w hi ch assi sts yo uth i n t h e p e r fo rm i n g a rt s i n G r a n d B a h a m a We are ver y excit ed abou t havin g th is g ro u p i n to w n N o t o nl y w i l l t he y be prov idin g a w on de rful sho w, alo ng w ith loc al danc ers, but they w ill be g ivin g o f t h eir time to work with loc al stude nts a nd performe r s in the tw o ma s te r c la s s wor ks h ops I t 's a n opp or t uni ty l ocal s should ta ke a dvantag e of, said Da lia F e l d m a n p r e s i d e n t a n d f o u n d e r o f GB PAS. B o t h wo r k s h o p s f o r b e g i n n e r s o r a d v a n c e d st u d e n ts w i ll t a k e p l a c e s i m ul tane ously a t 10 am at the theatre. The d ru m m in g w i l l b e w i th e v e ry d a y ob j e c t s, a nd the d anc e w ill be base d on hip ho p, bre ak dan ce ta p and ac roba tic s Indiv i d u a l s w i s hi n g t o p a r ti c i pa t e i n e it h e r o f the w orkshops a re a sked to c al l Gl oria Mc Glone of the G BPAS com mittee at 2 42-3 73 -288 7. Yo u do n t ne e d to ow n a dr um se t to pa rtic ipate in our drum ming worksho p, as we u s e ever yd ay it em s l ike p las t ic bu cke ts, house hold broo ms, trash c ans, an d e ve n co m pu t er k ey bo ar d s s ai d Zo lo R uiz of The Stre et B ea ts Group The Soc ie ty is offe r i ng a spe c ial tic ket /wo rk sh op com bin at ion d is coun t to a t t e n d b o t h a w o r k sh o p a n d t h e s ho w o n the same da y fo r $5 off the com bine d pric e. S t r e e t B e a t s p r o m i s e s t o b e a n e n er g e t ic an d co l ou r f u l f i na l e t o t h e Grand Bahama Performing Arts Societys third season. The GBPAS is a char itable organisation that was launched in January of 2009 by volunteers who are passionate a b ou t th e pe rf or m i ng a r ts T he o b j e c t iv e of this soc iety i s to prov ide its m emb ers and the community of Grand Bahama with a variety of international musical, t h e a t r i c a l a n d d a n c e p e r f o r m a n c e s throughout the year. They also seek to e n c o u r a g e a n d e x p o s e t h e G r a n d Baham i a n youth to the endless pos sib il it i es of a car e er in th e p er f or m in g a rts fi e ld th ro ug h t he pro v is io n o f sc h ol a rs h ip s t o l o c a l m u si c a n d d a n c e sc h oo l s as well as summer camps and colleges abroad.Drumm ing and dan ce worksh ops come t o G r an d Bah ama le d b y The S tre et Be ats Group of N Y CBy JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer S H A KES P EA RE i n Pa r a di se T h e a tre fe st iv a l is b a ck fo r a t hi rd y e a r wi th m ore ta le n t, d iv e rsi ty a nd e n te rta i nm e n t. T h i s y e a r Ju l i u s Ce a s a r i s th e si g n a t u re piece of the festival. There a r e tw o international pr oductions in the line-up this year. Sandra Riley's Mariah Brown tells t h e s to ry o f a n A f r i c a n B a h a m i a n w o m a n who wa s o ne o f t he p ion ee rs o f Cocon ut Grove. Bard To G o by the Grand V alley State University performing troupe will feature a 50-minute introduction to the works of Shakespeare. Th e si gn at ure Ba h am ia n pe rfo rma n c e i s D i s W e T i n g s 2 0 1 1 b y K a y l a Edw ard s a nd De re k B urro ws. Thi s sh ow will take centre stage on opening night this Friday. T h i s m u s i c a l p r o d u c t i o n s e e k s t o acquaint a n ew ge neration of Baha mians with their history and culture. Dis W e T ings or iginat ed in 1989 a n d it re m i n d s p e o p l e o f th e ir Ba h a m i a n s roots, said Philip Burrows, art director of Shakespeare in Paradise. Pa t R a h min g a li as Pa t Rah mi ng i s a one-man production featuring a classic mix of Pat Rahming poetry and music. T h i s i s t h e t h i r d s e as on of S ha k espeare in Paradise and we try to have a broa d cross se ction of pla y s e ach y ea r t o give variety to our a udience, s a id Mr Burrows. Th e fe sti va l i s c o mm it ted to ex po sing Ba ha m ia n s to a r an g e of cla ssi ca l t he a tre tr a d i t i o n s f r o m a ro u n d t h e w o rl d a c co r d ing to festiv a l org an ise rs. Stu de nts se rve as a large t arget group for thi s education a l o bje ctiv e L a s t ye a r t h e f e s t i v a l h a d a g r e a t r e s p o n s e w i t h s o m e 3 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s in cl u di n g pr im a ry se co n d a ry a n d co l le g e lev e l st ude nt s a tte ndi ng Th e tr avellin g pr oduc tio n B ard To G o wi l l b e s ta g e d a t S t A nd r e ws S ch o o l Ly fo rd C a y S c h o o l A q u i n a s Co l l e g e a n d C C Swe et ing H ig h Scho ol. So m e s c h o ol s t u d e nt s a r e r ea d i n g b oo ks o f c er ta in pl ays i n s c hoo l, s o it g iv e s th em th e op po rtun ity to se e it on s t a g e F o r e x a m p l e l a s t y e a r w e d i d W o m an T a k e T w o a n d i t w a s gr e at b e ca u se m os t o f t he st u de n ts w e re stu d y i ng th at boo k at the tim e , Mr Bu rrows t o l d Tri bun e Arts. Ex e cu tiv e s o f S ha k e sp e ar e i n P a ra di se a r e u r g i n g s c h o o l s t o b e m u c h m o r e r e c e p t i v e to t h e i r s t u d e n t s p a r ti c i p a t i n g i n t he a nn ua l fe stiv a l. We a lwa y s g e t pa rti c i pa ti on f rom the C a t h o l i c sc h o o ls We a l wa y s h a v e s ch o o l s l i k e C R W a l k e r H O Na s h a n d o t h e r p ri v a te scho ols. B u t whe n it com es to so me o f the go ve rnm en t sc h oo ls it is di fficul t g e ttin g t he m t o p arti c i pa te in the sho wc as es It s l ik e pu l li ng t ee t h t o g e t t he m to t ak e pa rt. Th e g o v er nm e nt sch oo ls n e e d t o g iv e t he i r stu de n ts a s m uch e xp o sur e to th e a t r i c s a n d d r a m a W e w a n t t o e x p o s e t h e m t o th i s a re n a s o t h e y m a y b e co m e a s p i r i n g a ct o rs p r o d u ce r s wr i t e rs T h e w h o l e p e r s on n e e ds to be ex p o sed sh e sa i d. S h ak e s p ea r e i n P a r ad i s e r u n s f r o m O ctob er 3 -8. For mo re in form a tion log o n to www .sh a ke sp e a rin p ara d is e. o rg .SHAKE S PEARE IN P A R A DISE THEA T R E FES TIV AL IS BA CK F O R A THIRD Y EARG r a n dB a h a m abeatthe comes to THE Street Beats Group, a team of young performers based in New York City, has been invited by the Grand Bahama Performing Arts Society (GBPAS) to put on two workshops, one for dance and the other for drumming. September 29 ThursdayA Night for Hope and Healing An evening to share poetry, songs, stories, visual art and music, as an expression of solidarity with the ongoing campaign to end sexual violence against women. The Bahamas Crisis Centre will host the event at Doongalik Studios/Jackson Burnside Ltd, Village Road, on Thursday, September 29, from 7pm 9 pm. Following the performances there will be an open discussion between with the artists and the audience. October 1 SaturdayBahamian Book Drive We all have unwanted books that are collecting dust on our shelves. We need to get those books into the hands of those who want and are in desperate need of them. Bring your new or "gently-used" books appropriate for children or young adults from grades K-12 to Xavier's Lower School Grounds, West Bay Street on October 1 from 1pm 7pm. The fair will feature good food and entertainment as well as booths that will display the work of Bahamian authors and publishers. The book drive is being organised by the Sandals Foundation.October 8 Saturday Hurricane Relief Concert & Family Fun Da y Make Em Listen presents "Getting Cat Island Back On Track" A Hurricane Relief Concert & Family Fun Day at the Carnival site, Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre from 12noon until; featuring over 18 artists including Ronnie But ler, KB, Ancient man and Terez Hepburn. The show will be hosted by Hope Shelly Anne and Sweet Island Gal. Music will be provided by Bighouse Play L DJ. There will be games, prizes and a kiddie corner. October 20 ThursdayDoctors Hospital Lecture: Breast Cancer Doctors Hospital's lecture series hosts a free talk on breast cancer at the conference room, Doctors Hospital at 6pm. There will be free blood pressure, cholesterol and glu cose screenings between 5pm and 6pm. Refreshments will be provided. To ensure seating, RSVP at 302-4713 or email info@doctorshosp.com October 30 SundayMiss Teen Plus Pageant Esteem Productions holds its Second Annual Miss Teen Plus Bahamas Pageant under the theme Ladies-in-waiting for girls aged 15-18. Entrants can win a scholarship and trav el opportunities. For more information call 393-2458 or email mtpbahamas@gmail.com T H I N G S 2 DO

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T H E T R I B UN E S E CT I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T03 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter THE Bahamian entertainment industry is getting on board with hurricane relief efforts by organising a number concerts that are all set to take place in the upcoming weeks.J us t last month, Hur rica ne Ir ene made la n df a ll in th e B a h a ma s, de v a st a ti ng a n u mber of islands. Immediately after, several benefit relief concerts were organised. A few of them include A Day of Family a nd C ult ural E nte rta inm en t by th e Re d Cros s Society of the B ahamas, the Getting Cat Island Back On Track Hurricane R e l i e f Co n c e r t a n d t h e T o g et h er We S ta n d C o n c e r t a t th e S a l e m B a p ti s t c h u r c h Th e Re d C r os s f undr ais er will b e held this coming Saturday at Arawak Cay.ASSISTANCEO ne o f t he co or d i n at o r s of t h e ev en t J o a n n e P y f r o m o f D C T e c h n o l o g y e x p l a i n e d h e r re a so n s f o r g e t t i n g i n v o l v e d i n the e ve nt : W e sa id tha t N a ssau w as sp are d f ro m t h e h u r r i c a n e a n d t h e re w e re p e o p l e o n the Fam ily Islan ds tha t nee ded he lp. In an effort to provi de som e a s sista nce to th ese pe r so n s, DC T e c h no l o g y a l o ng w i t h a n um ber of c o nc er ned c o rpor ate citizens have p a r t ne r ed wi t h G EM S R ad i o T h e P il o t C l u b o f N a s s a u a n d o t h e r c o n c e r n e d B a h a m i a n s w h o w i s h t o p ro v i d e so m e fi n a n ci al re lief to th ose pe rs o ns affe cte d. We ha ve p artnere d w ith The B aha mas R ed Cr o s s, on e of t h e maj or em er ge ncy r e lief organisations in The B ahama s and they wil l be respon s i ble for the c oll ec tion and d istributi on of al l funds tha t hav e be en co llec ted from th is ev ent. M s P yf r om sa id t h e ent i r e day wi ll be fille d w ith famil y e nterta inme nt. I n a d d i ti o n t o th e l iv e e n t e rt a in m e n t f ro m l ocal Bah amia n ar tis t s t her e will b e face pain ting a b ounc y c astle free giv e-a wa ys, r a ffle s an d food an d drink s W h at w e d id w as a sk a n um be r o f a rti sts t o p e rf o r m f o r fr e e W e h a v e a b o u t 3 0 a rt i s ts wh o ha ve ag r e ed to pe rform, she s a id. Gettin g C at Islan d Ba ck On Trac k is an ot he r hu rric a n e re li e f c on c ert t ha t w i ll b e taki ng p lac e nex t mon th. Accor di ng to t he pr omo tio n comp any, th e V e n d e t ta G r ou p C a t Is l a nd w a s o ne o f the man y island s tha t took on most of the b r u n t o f t h e s t o r m w h i c h r e s u l t e d i n unprec ed ente d le ve ls of d estruc tion. This sparke d the fla me in ve teran sho w an d a rti st p rom ot e r P a tri ci a Ch a tti of M ak e Em Listen who is al s o a C at Island na tive She be gan to orga nise an ev ent that wo uld a l l o w s o m e r e l i e f f o r t h e p eo p l e o f C a t I s l a n d Ms Chatti said: "It all began when K B and I ha d a c onve rs a tion i mme diat ely a fter the hu r ric an e and h e said to m e, Pa tric ia if yo u a re th in ki ng o f do in g so me thi ng Im on board for tw o rea s o ns, C at I sla nd h as be en good to m e a nd I lo ve them, an d I kno w you wi ll do it the rig ht w ay ." T he co ncer t i s s et t o fe atu r e th e bes t in Bah ami an e nt er tai nm ent s uch a s R onn ie B u t l e r KB A n c i e n t M a n P ap a S mu r f J u l i a n S a s h a D u n n C h r i s t i a n M a s s i v e Te re z H epb ur n, Novi e Pi er r e, Ver on ica B i s h o p N i t a a n d W i l l i s a n d t h e I l l e s t B a n d The enti r e da y is i nten ded be o ne o f fun for th e e nt ire fa mi ly The re wi ll be bou nc e y ca stles, c artoon c ha r a cte rs a nd an a r e a set asid e for the kid s T h ere w il l al s o be a f ashio n sh ow o n th e st a ge f o r th e ni g h t t o a d d t o the festiv itie s a long w ith ca rd and dom ino gam es w ith ca s h priz es. Or ganiser s of t he T oget her We St and e ve nt h ad ho pe d t o co ll ect ca nn ed f oo d and w at er fo r the re lie f e ffort, b ut th ey ha d t o can cel t he ir c on cer t l as t we ek du e t o l a ck o f p r o m o t i o n a m o n g s t t h e Ba p t i s t c o m m u n i t y R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s f r o m t h e Ki ngdom Dub Gro up, w h o or ganis ed the e v e n t i n c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h t h e B a p t i s t U n i o n s a i d t h e y w e r e d i s a p p o i n t e d ab out t he cancellat ion.DISAPPOINTMENTIn the past they had great success with relief concerts collecting about three truck l o ad s af t er t h e ca t as t r o p hi c H ai t i e ar t h quake. I n a n i n te rv i e w w it h D J C o u n se l l o r d i r e c tor of the Kingdom Dub group, he said: "I am dis app oin ted b ecaus e it i s s om eth ing that shoul d h ave h appe ned w ee ks a fter the storm. W e d id o ne f or Ha it i tw o y ea rs a go w i th F aith T emple Schoo l. We h a d a b out 400 people in attendance. We collected about t h r e e t r u c k s f u l l f o r t h e R e d C r o s s o f canned goods and water," he said. Hope after the storm BAHAMIAN artist Sasha Dunn of the Vendetta Group is offering free down loads of his new album which is set to drop next month. To show appreciation for his supporters, the artist announced that fans can obtain pre-release copies of The Dunn Epoch. The new album is said to encapsulate the best of the Bahamian underground hip hop movement. It will feature other local artists like Lady Millz; Mad Van; Baigon; Young Magic; A R; Crow; 1213; Dumbo, and Tru Story. This project can be looked at as a direct evolution of Bahamian hip hop with futuristic sounds and rhythms. Most of them can be attributed to a talented young Bahamian producer Chad Rolle, who construct ed most of the beats and arrangements, said Sasha. Overall the whole feel of the project is a sonic trip into the modern urban Bahamian experience, he said. The album follows on the heels of his most recent mixtape The Epic of The Notorious.L AST T hu r sday, Gui nness and non-Gui nness dri n ker s a li k e met i n bars al l over the Bahamas to rais e a gl ass to Art h ur Gui nness, t he m an behind the Iri sh brew. About 17 b a rs parti ci p at ed i n the int ernati on al toast marki ng 252 year s of the p opul ar dr ink. L ocal event promot ers say Guinness does not surpass Hei n eken as a B ahami an favouri te, but i t is s ti ll a popu l ar drink local ly Wh i l e i t is t raditi on al l y known as a m ans drink, m any w omen al so enjoy it T h e fi nal st op f o r t he G u i nness bar h op was C lub Luna for an al l Baham ian Reggae concert feat u r ing some of the hottes t Bahami an ar ti sts s uch as Ir ate, Bodi n e, M D eez and Mr Yagga. Ar thur Guinness ( 1725 1803) was an Iri sh b r ewer and at the age of 30 l aid the found at ions f o r the no w worl d f amous Guinness brewer y busi ness. Gui nness leas ed a brew ery in Lei xli p i n 1755. Then, f ive years lat er h e l eft hi s y o unger brot h er in charge of that enter pris e and moved on to ano t her in St James' Gate, Dubli n, at the end of 1759. He si gned a 9,000year leas e f or t he f our-acr e pr o per ty, eff ecti ve f rom Decem ber 31 1 7 5 9 S ASHA D UNN OFFE RING FRE E DOWNLOAD S FROM NE W ALBUM S ASHA D UNNL O CA L B A R S R A I S E T H E I R G L A S S E S T O THE ME MO R Y O F A RTHU R G U I NNES S ABOUT 17 bars participated in the international toast, marking 252 years of the popular drink. T H E f in a l s to p fo r th e Gu i nn e ss ba r h op wa s Cl ub Lu na fo r an all Bahamian Reggae concert featuring some of the hottest Bahamian artists such as Irate, Bodine (above), M Deez and Mr Yagga.

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CUCUMBERS, summer squash, winter squash and pump kins are all grown from seeds sown in hills, areas that have been enriched for the purpose. H ills are n o rm ally ab o u t 18 in ch es ac r o s s an d t h e s o il am en d ed wi t h c o m p o s t m an u r e o r p ea t m o s s p l u s fert iliser. If yo ur s oil i s s and y and w ell dr ai n ed t he h il l d oes n ot have t o b e r ais ed t o im p ro v e d r ai n age. I t i s u sual t o pla n t about fiv e see d s to a h il l, sp acing th em we ll apart a n d t hen t o remo ve t he two weake s t s ee d lings. Most cuc u m bers g rown in T he Bahamas are of the ridge variety: ch un k y, ab o u t six t o 10 in ch es lon g and usually slightly curved. There are English an d orien tal cucu mb er v a ri e ti es tha t be ne fi t from be i ng g r ow n on t r e l l i s e s t h e r e b y pr o d u c i n g s t r ai g h t f r u i t s R i d ge c u c u m bers have pronounced spines that c an be ea si l y rubbe d a wa y w he n the fruits are ripe. C u c u m b e r v i n e s g r ow q ui c k l y and fruits are produced in a very sh o r t t im e, of t e n ju st t en d ays f r o m flo w er to mat ur ity. Cuc urb its have both male and female flowers, the female ones growing from embry onic fruits. B e e s a r e t he m a i n p ol l i n a t o rs a n d i f t h e y a r e a bs e n t y o u m a y have to pollinate by hand. This is do ne b y takin g po l len fro m a m a le f l ow e r u si n g a n a rt i st s b ru sh or c ott on sw ab and dabbi ng i t onto the raised area within the female flower. Eq u a lly f as t g ro we r s ar e s u m me r s q u a s h y e l l o w c r o o k n e c k stra ig ht ne ck, zucc h i ni, patty pan, sc all o p an d m an y o t h e rs Th e f ru i t s a r e p r o d u c e d d i r e c t l y f r o m t h e plant instead of on vines. Summer squash can be prodigious so it is a g o od idea to e s tablish a h il l o r t w o at a t ime an d s ow s u cces sively f o u r weeks apart. W i n t e r s q u a s h b u t t e r n u t a c or n, s pa g he tt i, cr e nsh a w hub bard are so called because they h av e s u p er i o r k e ep i n g q u al it ie s an d i n e a r l i e r t i m e s w e r e s t o r e d i n au t u mn t o b e co n s um ed d u r in g t h e winter months. T h e f l e s h o f w i n t e r s q u a s h i s muc h d ri e r t ha n tha t of s umm e r squash and lends itself to baking. V i r t u a l l y t h e o n l y p u m p k i n g r o w n i n T h e B a h a m a s i s t h e Cuban pumpkin or calabaza. C a l a b a z a s a r e q u i t e s m a l l a s pumpkins go and can be round or sligh tly necke d wi t h pron oun c ed yellow and green skin. The seeds have to be obtained f ro m r ipe f ru its o n s al e i n s to res or f ro m ro adsid e ve n do rs rath er t han from a nursery. C a l a b a z a p um p ki n s sh ou l d be g r o w n i n i n di v i d u a l h i l l s s pa c e d a b ou t si x f e e t a p a r t T h e s e h i l l s s h o u ld b e wel l a way f r o m yo u r re gu la r gard en a s t h e vines pr od uced are en orm ou s. N o t o n l y t h at t h ey h av e t h e h a b i t o f wa lk i n g s e t t i n g d o w n r o o t s a n d mo vi n g awa y f rom t heir original p la n t i n g p l ace. T h e f ru i t s are rip e wh en t he st em h old in g t h e m t o t h e vine d ries. C u c u r b i t s gr o w f a s t b u t d i e q u ic k ly t oo Calabaza p ump kin s c a n b e lef t to f ulf ill th eir n atu ral lif e s pan b ut it is a go od idea t o pu l l cucu mbe r s a n d s q u a s h a f te r th e i r fi r s t f l u s h o f f r u i t s E v e n t h e n t h e leaves, o n ce so gr ee n will b e lo ok in g s or ry and rav aged. The damage is c a u sed b y f un gus s p o r es a n d p o w d e r y m i l d e w l a n d in g o n wet l eaves du rin g t h e n ight a n d t h e n b e in g n u r t u r ed b y t h e m o r n in g s un A f un gi cid e can be a p plied in p owd e r or liqu id f or m to p ro lon g t he life of th e plant bu t I p refer t o r e ap and pu l l. Think ca r e f ully befo re plantin g c u c u m b e r s a nd s u m m e r s qu a s h T h eir h ar ves t s a re s o b o u n t if u l t h at yo u m ay e nd wit h f ar mo r e c uc um b ers an d s qu a s h t han you ca n h a n d le Tr y to so w ju st th e right nu mb er o f h ills f or you r f a m il ys needs a n d r e p l ac e t h e p l an t s e v er y m o n t h gardenerjack@coralwave.com T H E T R I BU N E S E C T I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T06 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 Jus t a f e w i m a g e s o f w h a t w e t h e Bah amas l ooked l ike 40 .. 50 .. .6 0. .. years in the past The Bahamas once had a thriving boat building industry for Out-Island trading, fishing and transportation. BY ROLAND ROSE By GARDENER JACKGREEN SCENECUCUMBERS SQUASH AND P UMP KINS STRAIGHTNECK and butternut squash growing in close proximity.

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer REGGAE artist Peter Runks is baring his soul in his third full length album Words of Truth.Th e al b u m i s a co m p il at i o n o f 17 tr ack s fe a turing colla bora ti o ns w ith loca l and international artists. R unks w orke d wi th Ja m a ic a n s ing e r M ik ey Gen eral as wel l as fel lo w Bah amia n a r tist s La ndlord a nd A v a la nche f or this new CD. He also teamed up with the Pow Pow p ro d u cers an acco mp l is hed i nt ern at io n al sound system based in Germany. The artist told In Ya Ear that collabora ti n g w it h P o w P o w p r esen t ed an o p p o rtunity to work with international artists a n d s h ow c a s e B a ha m i a n t a le nt a t t he same time. T h e y sen t th e ri dd i m an d I f ell i n lo ve wit h it rig ht a wa y s o I wr ote the s on g Why Should I, because I've noticed in life and also in this music industry that there are a lot of people who think they can start or stop your destiny. Only God has the power to control our destiny, so my point is we have to ask ourselves this q ue s ti o n, w h y s ho ul d I s it a n d w or r y ab o u t w h at o t h ers say o r t h in k w h en Go d is in control? Runks said this album is a special one bec ause h e w as a b le t o ta p into a v ery vulnerable part of himself. I put my life into this project. I went through some things in the past and I let everything out in this project. I feel very liberated now that I have used my music as an outlet, he said.ON A MISSIONRunks said he is on a mission to con tinuously promote the message of hope a nd l ove H e wa nt s his m usic to r e a ch the highways and by-ways, main streets a n d d us t y r o a d s p a v in g t he w a y w it h words of truth. Anything that I sing about addresses t h e i s s u e s t ha t w e f a c e i n o u r s oc i e t y today. I want to show people the way. I w as r ai s e d i n t h e gh et t o b u t I w a n t p e o p l e t o k n o w th at th ey d o n t h a ve to b eco m e a v i c tim. I try to te ll people in m y music tha t s ight is just a function of the e ye s and they need to have a vision. Just the way I mad e it o t her p eo p le can mak e it , he said. Mam a I Love i s his fa vou rite song off the new the album and he has dedicated it to his mother. My mother passed away when I was y ou n g a n d I v e on l y s e e n h e r i n p ho to gr ap hs I d ed i cat ed t h i s so n g to h er, let tin g h e r kn ow th a t I lo v e her. I kn ow she would be proud to see how far I come, he said. W i t h a b r an d n ew al b u m av ai l a b l e f r o m al l maj o r d i gi t al o u t l et s as we l l a s s to r es i n t he C a ribb ea n a nd i n pa r ts o f the U S, R u n k s i s s h o w i n g n o s i g n o f s l o w i n g down. T h e W o r d s o f T r u t h a l b u m h a s re ceived po sitive r eviews from his n a ti v e Bahamas as well as from Jamaica, Holland and the US. R un k s, wh o co n si der s h ims elf a d evo u t Christian, made his first big splash in the Bahamas wit h th e sin gle B a d n e ss Ou tta S tyle, w h ich tu rn ed i nt o a st ree t ant hem a ft e r it s init ia l re le a s e T he t ra c k i s so pop ular that Runk s a lso includ e d it o n the new album. T H E T R I B UN E S E CT I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T07 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 D A Y C H A R T S L I N ERihannaCHEERSLifes too short to be sit ting around miserable. People gonna talk whether you doing bad or good, yeah. Got a drink on my mind and my mind on my money, yeahT O P 1 0 P O P S O N G SI WANNA GOBritney SpearsLAST FRIDAY NIGHT (T.G.I.F.)Katy PerryMOVES LIKE JAGGERMaroon 5 feat. Christina Aguilera LIGHTERSBad Meets Evil feat. Bruno MarsSUPER BASSNicki MinajPARTY ROCK ANTHEMLMFAO Featuring Lauren Bennett & GoonRockPUMPED UP KICKSFoster The PeopleGIVE ME EVERYTHINGPitbull feat. Ne-Yo, Afrojack & NayerGOOD LIFEOneRepublicTONIGHT TONIGHTHot Chelle RaeP et e r R u nks b are s hi s s o ul in ne w e st al b um W o rds o f T rut h By LESH R&B crooner Tyrese is back on the music s ce n e wit h a b rand new vi deo starri ng h is fo rmer "Baby Boy" co-star and friend Taraji P Henson. T h e t w o a r e k n o w n f o r t he i r on s c r e e n r o man ti c r ela ti o n sh i p as "Jo d y an d Yvet te" i n J o h n S i n g l et o n s 2 01 1 u r b a n d r am a f i l m "B ab y Boy." Th e vid e o for h is latest sin g l e Stay i s j ust t h e fi rst tas te o f wh at Tyr ese is set t o b r in g h is fan s wi th h is new a l bu m enti tled "O p en Invitation. It hits stores November 1. In t he vid eo, Taraji p lays th e ro le o f a w e l leducated woman who is being neglected by h e r bu sinessma n b oyfrie n d. Th e clip b e gins wi th t he a ctr e ss tell in g a g i rlfri e n d i n a p h on e con v ersa tio n th a t her re latio nship se ems to b e h it ting rock b ottom I t g oes on to show Tyr es e wa lk ing in o n her conv er sat io n and i nst ea d of c o n sol in g her, h e walk s ou t leavin g her in tears. A fed -up T a raji d e cid es t o pack h e r th ings, b u t b efo re leavin g th e h o u se T yrese yet aga i n walks in. This time he makes an attempt to work it out, trying to persuade her to stay. H e sing s: No one e v er s aid it'd be ea sy baby, yeah, woah, woah, yeah. Girl, I wanna take the time and thank you. Just for putting u p with m e. And I'm so rry th at y o u ev en h ad to d eal wi th me. E ven t ho u gh I made yo u cr y. I w ann a mak e i t ri gh t. Ju st g ive me so me t ime to make it right." Th e vi d e o go e s o n t o s h o w th e co u p l e w o r k in g out t he i r dif fe r e nc e s a nd it a ls o s how s flashbacks of the two having recurring arguments. He sings: I go the extra mile to make you s mi l e an d j u s t t o ma k e yo u r d ay, I 'l l go o u t my way, I'll do whatever it takes. Bab y p ro mi se yo u l l s tay, st ay. Bab y wo n t you stay? With me?" It h as b e en t en year s s i n ce T yr es e an d T ar aji made their debut on the big screen in the now cult classic Baby Boy. In a letter to his fans, Tyrese said: Now were getting our grown and sexy on. B a h a m i a n f a ns sa y t he y l ov e t he B a b y B o y c h em i s t r y i n t h e n e w v i d eo T h e s m o o t h an d sexy st yl e h as Tyr ese l oo k i n g li k e b lac k chocolate," said one fan. Jac k i e T h o m as* sa id : T h ey b o t h l o o k g re at and th ey l oo k l ik e a rea l lif e co u pl e I l ik e t he fact that you can still see and notice the Jody a n d Y v e t t e c h e m i s t r y be t w e e n t h e m I t s almo st lik e t hey a re no t actin g an d th e l ove is real." A l so s peak in g of her l ove fo r th e on -s creen co u p le, Kayl a Si mms s aid : Th i s mi ght so u n d f u n n y b u t T yr e s e an d T a r aj i ca n b e c o n si d e r ed th e b l ack Ro meo an d Ju l i et. P eo p le m igh t n o t h av e l o v ed t h i s vi d e o as mu c h i f i t w e re n o t fo r their movie 'Baby Boy'." Following the release of the video, Tyrese expr essed ap p reci ati o n f o r h is f an s in an op en letter. He thanked them for inspiring him to get back in the studio and also for supporting his many non-musical projects such as his New York Times best-selling book How To Get Out Of Your Own Way. Tyrese told fans to rest assured that my first and only love is still music." Ive read your letters, tweets, Facebook, My S pa ce a nd e -ma ils. I ve lis tene d to y ou r v oi c e ma ils a nd more im p orta n tly Iv e run i n t o y o u i n p e rs o n an d yo u v e a l l w an t ed m e t o do it again. So come 11.1.11 my new album Open Invitation will be launched globally for you to listen and feel my heart and soul that I put into the album." Names have been changedJ O D Y A ND YV ET T E REU NI T E IN NE W T YRE SE V ID EO "S T A Y"C E L E B R I T Y N E W S A N D G O S S I P By TRACIE CONE Associated Press THE PUBLICIST for a lesbian actress and musician who says she was escorted off a flight for "one modest kiss" of her partner says the encounter was not a stunt for her band's upcoming breast cancer awareness tour. Leisha Hailey, best known for playing Alice Pieszecki in the now defunct Showtime lesbian life drama "The L Word," asked her Twitter followers to boycott Southwest Airlines after the encounter Monday. The airline responded that Hailey's display of affection was excessive and drew customer complaints. The actress and her partner, Camila Grey, denied in a statement released Tuesday that the affection they showed toward each other was inappropriate. "We want to make it clear we were not making out or creating any kind of spectacle of ourselves, it was one modest kiss," the written statement said. "We are responsible adult women who walk through the world with dignity. We were simply being affectionate like any normal couple." Hailey and Grey acknowledge they became upset after the flight attendant reprimanded them. They said the attendant told them that Southwest is a "family airline." "No matter how quietly homo phobia is whispered, it doesn't make it any less loud," the statement said. "You can't whisper hate. We ask this airline to teach their employees to not discriminate against any couple, ever, regardless of their own beliefs." Hailey and Gray said they plan to file a formal complaint with the airline. The incident resulted in a national media spotlight for the actress, who now is a part of the electro-pop duo Uh Huh Her. Publ ici st Li bby C off ey sai d Tuesday t hat t he encount er was real and was "absolut el y not done f or a t t e n t i o n .AIRLINE: 'L WORD' S T AR R EM OV E D F O R EX CE SSIVE KISS

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T H E T R I BU N E S E C T I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T08 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011 TWENTY years barely makes you an adult in human years, but in the world of cars, it makes you an antique. The Bahamas Antique Auto Club and the Friends of Distinction Riders Club (FODRC) held their second annual Cruise to the Cure car show and motorcade on September 12. The team joined the Cancer Society of the Bahamas to help create awareness of prostate cancer and provide screening for men. 1 9 5 6 F O R D F A I R L A N E OWNER MURRAY FORDE It has a 292 Ford V8 engine. The same used in the Thunder Bird that year. It is my favourite. I always liked the design when I was younger. I used to say I would like to own one of them one day. Some people mistake it for a Chevy of the same year because it has a similar chrome trim and a lot of two-tone, but the body is very different. They were the every day man's car. More of them were made so more have survived. Back in the day this car was about $2,300 brand new. 1989 SEBRING MX, OWNER JEFFREY GIBSON I always had a passion for the Cobra, so this particular car resembles a 427 Cobra. I built it myself and it took me almost a year to restore. It has a 427-stroke motor. When you see it, you know that's me. I spent hours and hours working night and day. You can't build an antique car rushed. It is a process that calls for time and patience. If you don't have patience, you might as well dont mess with an antique car. When I got it, it was in bad condition. The engine was not running good, the upholstery was bad, the floor was rotten, the windshield was broken. It was a mess.1991 HUGGER, OWNER GEAN ALBURY "It has a Harley Davidson engine, 1200ccs. We actually built that bike. We took an old Harley Davidson engine, reconditioned it and reframed the frame. It was actually done in Daton, Ohio by some friends of mine. It is very unique. It was built just for me. I ride it every Sunday. I think people that know me professionally are a little bit shocked to know I own a bike. AMERICAN IRON HORSE LEGEND, OWNER HAL SHEARS "What is special about the American Iron Horse Legend? Well, the company is bankrupt right now. I like it because of the way it looks. It is just simple. When the front works are extended like that it is called a chopper. On corners you want to be a little more careful. I've been riding bikes for about 30 years. This bike I bring out when I want to talk to people.