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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03106
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 09-27-2011
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03106

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PAGE 1

N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Missing boy kidnap fears Volume: 107 No.250TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS, SUN, T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 78F THE family of a young boy who has been missing for four days believe he may have been kidnapped. And last night, they made an emotional plea for his abduc tors to set him free. Marco Archer, 11, has been m issing since last Friday. He was last seen leaving his home on Brougham Street, off Baillou Road, to buy candy ... he never returned. At the time he was wearing a grey Bob Marley shirt and long brown khaki pants. Last night, Marcos sister T ancia Humes said the young boy was happy and had no reason to run away, which makes the family believe he was kid napped. Ms Humes said: He went right across the road to get can dy from the gas station. He always goes there. Its a fiveminute walk there and back. He goes there so much thea ttendants call him double mint boy. Some sick person took my brother and we don't know why. The family isn't functioning. My mother can't sleep. It gets worse in the night and early in the morning. She goes to do things for him and then r emembers he is not there. I Famils emotional plea to abductor TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Apply for a Fidelity Back To School Loan* with a 90 Day Payment Holiday plus a Built-in Savings Plan you & your kids are good to go!Nassau: t 356.7764 Freeport: t 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: t 367.3135 BACKTOSCHOOLLOAN*Offer applies to government workers only WATER TESTING MAY HAVE BEEN CONTAMINATED, SAYS REPORT By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A REPORT by the InterDevelopment Bank found that a Department of Envi ronmental Health food and water testing unit operates out of a "condemned" building leaving tests open to con tamination. The IDB report on a $71 million loan to fix New YOURNEWSPAPER YOURWEEKEND S EEPAGE8E FORDETAILS 4 D A Y S T O G O By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net CHIEF Magistrate Roger Gomez yesterday refused to grant bail to a man accused of attempted murder, citing the high lev el of crime as the reason for his decision. After hearing submissions from both the prosecution and defence, Chief Magistrate Gomez denied bail to Earnest Forest, SEE page three SEE page seven COURTNEWS BAIL REFUSED FOR ATTEMPTED MURDER ACCUSED SEE page eight By SANCHESKA BROWN WITH a little over a week before the House of Assem b ly reconvenes, opposition m embers say they still havent seen the governments pro posed amendments to the p enal code and Bail Act. Leader of opposition busi ness Obie Wilchcombe said t hey are still waiting for National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest to hando ver the proposed amendments. We are still waiting for the documents to be delivered, hopefully we will get them in OPPOSITION YET T O SEE PR OPOSED B AIL ACT AMENDMENT SEE page seven F ROMLEFT: M other of Marco Archer, Tryphemia Meadows, and his sistersL asummer Archer, Tancia Humes and Valkisha Archer look at a flyer t hey have been putting up around their neighbourhood. Felip Major /Tribune staff By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net NATIONAL Security Minister Tommy Turnquest has defended his recent criticism of the judiciary, saying he felt his actions were right as an elected representative of the Bahamian people. Mr Turnquest reiterated the govern ments plan to table bail legislation yesterday amid widespread criticism over the sensitivity of his remarks with regard to the judiciary and the country's consecutive record murder count. I dont feel as if Im under fire, I feel that what Im doing is right and Ive been elected by the Bahamian people to TURNQUES T DEFENDS CRITICISM OF JUDICIAR Y SEE page seven MINISTER Tommy Turnquest By PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net ATTORNEY General and Minister of Legal Affairs John Delaney confirmed last night the government intends to bring a compre hensive and multi-pronged approach to the fight against crime when the Amendments to the Bail Act, the Criminal Procedure and the Penal Code are presented before Parliament next week. While the Bail Act which has attracted considerable criticism in the recent past with accused murderers ATTORNEY GENERAL CONFIRMS GOVT OMPREHENSIVE APPROACH TO FIGHT AGAINST CRIME SEE page eight

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B y KHRISNA VIRGIL W ITH the four children who died in fires this year still on the minds of many, t he Fire Safety Branch of the Royal B ahamas Police Force launched Fire Safety Week yesterday. The week held under the theme, Don't be in doubt, know two ways out is being used by Fire Branch officers to stress the importance of having at least t wo escape routes from your home planned out before af ire actually strikes. D irector of Fire Services J effrey Deleveaux said: Through lectures and drills, we will try to reduce the num-b er of fires. There are also plans to get into schools andt he work place. B etween January and A ugust of this year, 1,441 calls were made to Emergency Services to report fires. E ighteen people, including four children, have died in blazes so far this year. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE A, B, C!The insurance plan Im looking for. An agent who understands my goals.The insurance company I can depend on. Choosing Family Guardian for my life insurance is as elementary as A, B, C. LIFE INSURANCE / are you covered? A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating A member of the FamGuard Group of Companies CONTACT ONE OF OUR SALES REPRESENTATIVES AT AN OFFICE NEAREST YOU East Bay Street, Marathon Road, Thompson Boulevard, & Blue Hill Road (top hill +242 396-1300 I www.familyguardian.com STUDENTS OF Temple Christian school help to spread the message about fire safety, above, while little Khylee Butler meets one of the firefighters, left Felip Major/ Tribune Staff NATIONAL SECURITY MINISTER Tommy Turnquest is shown round the fire safety exhibition by Director of Fire Services Jeffrey Deleveaux STOPPING THE FIRES BY TEACHING THE YOUNG T T u u r r n n t t o o p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 A NEWRECRUIT looks at the fire safety exhibit

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By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net THE parents of a toddler who died in a traffic accident just over a month ago were arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday afternoon in connection with his death. Delano Coakley Sr, 25, and Nickessha Missick, 24, appeared before Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-Evans in Court Six, and were charged with manslaughter by negligence in the death of Delano Coakley Jr on Wednesday, August 24. They were not required to enter a plea to the charge. The matter was originally going to proceed with a preliminary inquiry to see if there was sufficient evidence to have the case go before the Supreme Court. However, the prosecution informed the judge of their intention to try the case before the higher court by presenting a Voluntary Bill of Indictment on Thursday, January 26, 2012. The prosecution offered no objection to bail when the issue was raised by the magistrate. Attorney Calvin Seymour, who represented Coakley Sra nd Missick during yesterdays arraignment, asked the judge for lenient bail conditions, noting that the parents are still grieving over the loss of their son and recovering from injuries sustained in the accident. Magistrate Vogt-Evans g ranted both of the accused $10,000 bail each with sureties. Coakley Sr, a resident of Bamboo Street, must report to the South Beach Police Station once a month before 7pm, while Missick, who lives on East Street and Andros Avenue, must report to the Quakoo Street Police Station. The judge told the defendants that signing in at the police station is a part of your bail conditions and you must comply. She warned that their bail would be revoked if they failed to do so. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 3 Institute of Business and Commerce TEL: 324-4625 General Principles of By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A key prosecution witness in the murder trial of Simon Simeon identified the defendant in court as the man who shot 29-year-old Sylvanus Strachan Jr in December, 2008. Philip Rolle also picked out the accused from among other eight persons in a police ID parade a month following the shooting, the Supreme Court heard on Monday. Senior Justice Hartman Longley is presiding over the trial, which is before a jury of seven women and five men. Erica Kemp and Olivia Blatch of the Attorney Generals Office are prosecuting on behalf of the Crown. MarioGrey is representing Simeon. Simeon, 26, is accused of shooting Strachan while at a party at the Lodge Hall on East Sunrise Highway on December 21, 2008. Rolle told the court that he was grilling at the Lodge Hall on the night in question when he saw the accused shoot Strachan. He said the area where the shooting occurred was well lit. He identified Simeon in court as the gunman. A ccording to his evidence, Simeon confronted Strachan. He said the accused pointed a chrome handgun at the deceased and said, Yall niggers dont know who yall dealing with. Rolle tried to calm the situation. I told him (Simeon d ont have to go through this, he recalled. Rolle said Simeon fired the gun once. He said Strachan was unarmed. Did you see Sylvanus advance towards the accused? Asked Mrs Kemp. No, replied Rolle. Statement Rolle took Strachan to the Rand Memorial Hospital after learning that he had been shot. He later went to the Central Police Station to give a statement to police. On January 22, 2009, Rolle attended an ID Parade at Central Police Station. He said several men were standing in a room with numbers affixed to them. He selected an individual wearing the number five, whom he identified in court as S imeon. During cross-examination, Mr Grey asked Rolle if he had seen Strachan with a weapon. You said that Strachan did not have anything in his hand. Do you recall your evidence in a matter in the magistrates court? Do you recall stating t hat Slyvanus had a knife in his hand? Rolle said he saw Strachan with a knife on one occasion, but that he did not have the knife when he was confronted by the accused. Do you remember the description you gave to police a s to who the shooter was? asked Mr Grey. Rolle said the shooter was five feet 11 inches tall, with a complexion a little darker than his. He said Simeon was wearing a green and white shirt and b lue washed out jeans. Do you remember what you and Strachan were wearing that night? Mr Grey asked. Rolle said he could not remember. He then asked Rolle if he had seen a photo of Simeon in the newspaper or on the news. Rolle said he had not. I am putting it to you that you never saw the defendant with a gun in his hand? Mr Grey said. Rolle disagreed. During re-examination, Mrs Kemp asked Rolle why was it that he could remember what the defendant was wearing? Rolle said that he was afraid for his life so he would have remembered the gunman. The body of Slyvanus Strachan was identified by his father on December 22, 2008. Arrested Simon Simeon was arrested by police on January 21, 2009 on West Atlantic Drive in the vicinity of Ruby Swiss Restaur ant. He was taken to Central Police Station and booked. Inspector Michael Brathwaite said he conducted an ID parade on January 22, 2009. He said informed Simeon that he was suspected of causing the death of Strachan and cautioned him. Inspector Brathwaite said Simeon did not object to participating in an ID parade as long his lawyer, Carlson Shurland, was present. He said the parade consisted of eight other men with similar height, build, hair, and description of the accused. He s aid the accused selected the position number five. Inspector Brathwaite said Mr Rolle, a witness in the shooting, selected number five as the gunman. Mr Grey asked Inspector Brathwaite whether Simeons lawyer had signed the ID p arade form. The inspector said that part of the form was not filled out. He asked who was respon sible for issuing photographs of wanted persons to the media. Mr Brathwaite said the officer in charge of Central Detect ive Unit or officer in charge of Crime Records Office. The trial resumes on Tues day. By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net OVER the weekend, police on Grand Bahama arrested 19 men and two women in connection with various offences. These included: housebreaking, stealing, causingh arm, threats of harm, possession of dangerous drugs, armed robbery, fraud and assault. Police said six of the men were detained on warrants issued by the Magistrates Court and another was arreste d for breach of a court order. 29, saying his decision was based on the rising levels of crime and high murder rate. He said the court must be extremely careful of granting bail in these matters. Forest, who is accused of attempting to kill Arlington Storr, was remanded to Her Majestys Prison, Fox Hill until the completion of his trial. The Lincoln Boulevard resident is accused of committing the offence on Sunday, April 10. Forest was not required to enter a plea to the charge, due to the nature of the offence. Before denying him bail, Chief Magistrate Gomez informed the accused that the prosecution will present a Voluntary Bill of Indictment in court, which will forward the case directly to the Supreme Court for trial. That Bill will be presented in court on Wednesday, November 9 at 10am. Chief Magistrate Gomez made his comments concern ing the crime rate when Forests attorney Alex Morley asked him to consider granting bail. Mr Morley said the jet ski operator and father of two girls had no pending matters before the courts. The attorney noted that Forest had previously appeared in court on charges of causing damage and harm. He told Chief Magistrate Gomez that the accused paid a $350 fine for the former offence and completed a sixmonth probation period for the latter. The prosecution objected to the accused being granted bail, citing the seriousness of the offence and their concern that Forest might interfere with witnesses and the virtual complainant. Mr Morley responded, saying there were no substantial grounds on which his client should be denied bail, or proof that he would interfere with witnesses. TODDLERS PARENTS ARRAIGNED IN CONNECTION WITH HIS DEATH COURTNEWS POLICE MAKE 19 WEEKEND ARRESTS I N GRAND BAHAMA DEFENDANT IDENTIFIED IN COURT AS MAN WHO SHOT MURDER VICTIM Key witness testifies in trial DENIEDBAIL: Earnest Forest outside of court yesterday. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff BAIL REFUSED FOR ATTEMPTED MURDER ACCUSED DECISION BASED ON THE RISING LEVELS OF CRIME Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhapsyou are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. FROM page one

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EDITOR, The Tribune. AT THIS point there is no need to elaborate on the level of crime in the country. The record speaks for itself. As government attempts to justify the current murder rate by mouthing off on statistics that a majority of murders are related to drugs, gang violence, or domestic problems, the fact remains that one murder is one too many. And as time goes on, more innocent people will be caught in the crossfire. I was alarmed this week to read an article in The Tribune where our Minister of National Security works 16-hour days. One has to wonder what the Minister is doing. Based on National Security in the country, it is my opinion that he might as well not show up to work. We all know that our crime problem was a seed planted a long time ago and now it is a dangerous vine that is killing everything in the garden. Yes crime stems from a culture of drugs, corruption, gang violence, teenage pregnancy, breakdown in the family, lack of education, lack of role models in the home, etc. However, like any uncontrollable vine in the garden, you have to relentlessly attack and weed it out. Succes-s ive governments have not shown the political will to weed the vine out. And what we have today is justice on the streets, instead of the courtroom. The police and the general public are fully aware that we have a minority group of thugs running wild on our streets. Sot he question is: How far will we allow these individuals to go before we decide to take action? It is being rammed down our throats for us to have compassion for the criminals, respect their feelings, be humane, be concerned on the length of time that they are in prison awaiting trial, or how the police treat them! So we have decided to be more concerned with the feel ings of the criminal and why theyc hose to blow someones head off, rather than worrying about what effect they are having on the country as a whole. We are choosing to sit by and hold the criminals hand, while we sing Kumbaya, and watch the coun try go to hell in a hand basket. The Privy Council is preaching to us to have more compassion, respect the criminal, and to be more humane. Whatever you do, dont hang! From their recent rulings, it is clear that no murder will ever be horrific enough to result in capital punishment. When is the last time you heard about one of the Lords having a gun put to their head, having a family member raped, or being involved in an armed robbery? But according to them, we should open up and have feelings for the criminal. No matter what the cause, no matter what the circumstance, we cannot allow any one individual to bring this country to its knees. There are too many upstanding citizens that have come from challenging backgrounds and have not chosen a life of crime. Yes, we need social reforms, yes we need educational reforms, yes we need to try and better educate our children. However, the country cannot be held hostage by a group of thugs whose life experiences have caused them toh ave no regard for human life. Now back to our minister and his government. In 2007 we were asked to join the trust agenda. We were told that the trust agenda was the better way. We were told that the trust agenda could be held to a higher standard. In 2007 crime was at an unacceptable level, not to mention what it is today. How long have we waited for the current administration to present changes in parliament to the criminal procedure code, the penal code, and the bail act? All we have gotten over the last four years is hot air! I propose to the minister that his government is responsible for the level of crime. They are responsible for crime, as they have neglected the voice of the Bahamian people. More impor tantly, they have neglected the word of God. This has led to a c omplete breakdown of law and order in this country. They told us to expect better in 2007. However, now in 2011 with a murder count over 100, many committed by repeat offenders and persons on bail, they went on a summer break without bringing the necessary changes to parliament. I suggest they bring the matter before the people via a referendum. Now the minister is going to blame the courts. Perhaps when this administration was returned to power in 2007, they should have ensured that the laws were so tight and so severe that the court system would have been prevented from pushing the liberal agenda. In some ways, you feel sorry for the minister. He is caught in an administration that obviously does not believe in capital punishment, is happy with the liberal agenda in protecting the criminals, and has no respect for the voice of the people. But when you make your bed hard, you lie hard! This administration willingly came and offered better to the Bahamian people, and better has not been received. There is so much frustration in this town now that if you strike a match in the wrong place the whole thing will blow! The minister was right with one thing, if judges had to stand f or election they would be chased out of town. Many of our countrys leaders need the same thing. But we have heard all of this before. And time longer than r ope, an election is coming. What have we accomplished with 16-hour work days? We may end up driving on nice roads, but we are as scared as hell when doing so! JEROME R PINDER Nassau, September 23, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama CRIME IS out of control. All of us are concerned, and naturally everyone wants a quick solution to something that has been a growing sickness for many years. As with all growing sicknesses, there is no quick fix. Sir Etienne Dupuch died 19 years ago, having stopped writing this column about four years before his death. But for years before that he was warning the Bahamianp eople that unless something were done t o reverse our social decay as far as crime was concerned the Bahamas was on a downward path in Jamaicas shadow. What we are complaining about today, he predicted in this column way back then. Solutions are needed, but they cant be found in an atmosphere of hysteria. What has to be faced is that society as a whole is to blame either by active participation, or by ignoring the signs in an attempt to insul ate itself against the threatening storm. O nly a united society can now overcome our problems. This week a group of pastors got together to express their concern about crime, especially about the spiralling, out of control murder rate. They blame government for not doing what is legally necessary to carry out capital punishment in cases of those convicted of murder. They believe that former and current governments have failed the count ry by allowing the Privy Council to force its 2006 interpretation of our constitution on us and continuing to govern as if nothing can be done about it. In short they want the return of capital punishment, and the disappearance of the Privy Council. What most people do not appreciate is that as one lawyer pointed out when the Privy Council had the opportunity to rule that capital punishment was uncon s titutional, it did not do so. However, what i t did rule unconstitutional was that hang ing was the mandatory sentence on a murder conviction. In other words there were no degrees of culpability for the crime. It was felt that instead of the mandatory sen tence, the presiding judge should consider each case on its own merits and decide which warranted death and which a lesser sentence. In other words it left us with capital punishment still on our statute books, but it forced the courts to put more thought into how the sentence was to be adminis tered. It is now up to our legislators to craft legislation that makes it clear what types of murders would warrant the noose. But we have to face the fact that capital punishment in this world is seeing its last days. Even in America, one of the last bastions of the death penalty, discussions are now underway about its abolition. Consciences are being pricked in the knowl edge that many innocents have been condemned to death by contaminated evidence and faulty judgments. Many Bahamians are calling for the Bahamas to cut all ties with the Privy Council so that our penal system can again start to hang em high. This of itself would be a capital blunder it would remove the most important plank that makes the Bahamas attractive as a commercial centre. Many international businesses would not locate here if our courtsd id not have the added attraction of the P rivy Council as the final court of appeal. As one international businessman despairing of his litigation in our court system commented: Thank God for the Privy Council! It is thank God for the Privy Council that gives our courts an aura of stability and is an added attraction for the Bahamas as a commercial centre. Without the Privy Council as our final a nd truly independent high court, where w ould we turn? The Bahamas certainly could neither afford nor mann a local high court with Bahamians. And who can guarantee that a panel of Caribbean judges at the Caribbean court would not rule in the same manner as the Privy Council law Lords in London when it comes to capital cases? Many of them are even now debating the abolition of capital punishment. And so, even with a regional court there is no guarantee that the Bahamas will be able t o hang em high. That is why we believe that the only way to keep the dangerous murderer away from society is to have a life sentence that truly lasts to the end of the convicts natural life. But even so the death penalty will continue to haunt the Bahamas. Through the FTA many trade agreements have social justice clauses to protect children, workers and many other groups. Many European c ountries will not enter into agreements w ith a country that imposes the death penalty. Some years ago we wrote in this col umn about a European ambassador who was paying us a courtesy call. At that time capital punishment was very much an issue. He wanted to know when the Bahamas was going to abandon capital punishment. When we told him of the feelings of the Bahamian people, his comment was that the European organisation to which his country was a member would force the issue the Bahamas would no longer qualify for loans. And so for those who want to be rid of the Privy Council so that they can hang their criminals, they would be advised to think long and hard. They will be denying this country one of its most valuable assets, the upkeep of which costs us nothing, in exchange for what? Certainly no guarantee that we shall be able to tie the hangmans noose around the neck of some unfortunate wretch. The danger of a 16-hour work day LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Acase for keeping the Privy Council r E DITOR, The Tribune THOUGH he may have been t he wrong messenger, National S ecurity Minister Tommy T urnquest had the right message in criticizing the Courts for the seeming ease with which alleged offenders are granted bail. The criticisms by the PLP that Minister Turnquest's com ments were cowardly, shame ful and baseless are utter non sense. His comments were actually quite courageous, in no way shameful, and based in r eality. The Minister voiced the concerns of many Bahamians w ho are shocked that someone w ho has a known criminal record can get bail so easily. The cowardly and shameful behaviour of which the PLP speaks can be laid squarely at the door of the Christie Gov ernment. Over five whole years they did nothing to substantially improve the criminal justice sys tem like increasing the amount of courts and judges. Shamefully, they did nothing of consequence on the Bail Act. The only swift thing the PLP did was talk about what should h ave been done. Had that latea gain crew acted rather than talked, over the last five years the justice system would have had additional tools and resources to act more speedily in dealing with alleged offend ers and repeat-offenders. H ad the PLP acted more vigorously from 2002 to 2007, our murder and crime rates would quite probably have been lower thant hey are today. Their failure to act then is haunting us now. T he Opposition is not only h ypocritical. They are dishonest and shameful for using the p ain and suffering associated with crime for their own selfish political ends especially since when they had a chance to act they failed miserably. Maybe somebody else should have said what Tommy Turnquest said. But at least, thank God, somebody had the courage to say it. Which is more than can be said for that useless bunch of scandal-rid den people Perry Christie had in his Government. CONCERNED CITIZEN Nassau, September 25, 2011. Tommy Turnquest's remarks indelicate, but on the mark

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A LOCAL eye care clinic i s the first in the world to offer a new technology that t emporarily corrects readi ng vision. A fter four years of clinical studies and numerous academic presentations and articles, the technology has been approved for use in 27 European countries. B ut the Nassau Vision Rejuvenation Centre in the Harbour Bay shopping cen tre has the distinction of b eing the worlds first opera tional clinic. D r Jonathan Rodgers p artnered with the developers of Vision Rejuvenation t o conduct clinical studies in t he Bahamas. M ore than 200 patients were treated during the studies for what is known as presbyopia, commonly called old eyes and hyperopia, or farsightedness. I decided to specialise in treatments of the eye because when I was in resi dency many years ago, I saw h ow remarkable it was for a person to have their eye s ight restored, said Dr R odgers. I wanted to make sure t hat my people had the best t reatment available and I k new that there was a need for my discipline. I jumped at the opportu nity to pioneer Vision Rejuvenation in the Bahamas. I have had so many peopleo ver the years tell me that they were tired of wearing reading glasses but they did not have the means fore xpensive surgeries to corr ect their sight, he said. V ision Rejuvenation i nvolves using a laser to microscopically adjust the c urvature of the cornea in a 9 0 second procedure. S ince there is no cutting of the eye, like in some other laser treatments, patients do not have a long recovery time and there are minimal to no side effects, DrR odgers said. The ideal person for Vision Rejuvenation is someone over 40 who hast rouble reading without g lasses, he said. I was almost legally blind w ithout my glasses, said David B, an accountant f rom Houston, Texas who p articipated in the studies. After one treatment, I was able to read without glasses with 20/20 vision. The cost of the procedure is same as a pair of glasses, making it affordable for thea verage person. More information on Vision Rejuvenation can be found by visiting 2020read-i ng.com or facebook.com/ 2 020reading. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 5 Scotiabank (BahamasIs seeking the services of:Centre Director, Scotia Private Client GroupPosition Summary:The Centre Director is responsible for establishing business plans for the SPCG Centre in The Bahamas and the branches in smaller, secondary markets also under their direction, and executing them through the dynamic leadership of teams of highly skilled professionals representing each of the Wealth Management business lines (Private B anking, International Investment Advisory, and where applicable, International Wealth Structuring). These objectives will be met through the promotion of the SPCG Centres in the marketplace and, internally throughout the Bank.Key Accountability:The primary purpose of the position is to increase protability through the development of the required skills and motivation within the teams to achieve increased consolidation of client assets, maximize cross-sell opportunities, increase client retention and satisfaction and ensure clients receive the products and services that best satisfy their nancial needs. This is achieved by leading their teams through sales and relationship management, directing consolidation, retention and coverage strategies, ensuring the required behaviours are instilled in, and consistently displayed by, each individual, and ensuring that sound business analysis and a shared client centric bias exists across the teams. The Centre Director is also responsible for building an effective business and community network, by developing and maintaining relationships with key business and community leaders and maintaining close relationships with inuential clients, to maximize business referral opportunities and introductions to potential clients. The Centre Director must also forge close working relationships with all Scotiabank partners in their market.Qualications: designation, are highly desirable. of tax-driven investments. as they relate to the High Net Worth clients; this includes features, benets, pricing policies and protability levers; The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Qualied candidates only should submit applications, via e-mail to: Manager, Manpower & Succession Planning at: hrbahamas@scotiabank.com on or before October 07, 2011. MORE than 500 people gathered on September 24 at R oyal Bank House on East Hill Street to participate in a fundraising walk/run to benefit the RBC Child Cancer Fund. The event, which was one of many fundraising initiatives sponsored by RBC across the Caribbean, has raised more than $20,000 to date to help families with children battlingc ancer. Funds will continue to be collected at all RBC banking centres until the end of September, and the total amount raised will be announced in early October. We are grateful for the tremendous turn-out and outpouring of support by our employees, their families and the community, said Nathaniel Beneby, RBC president and country head for the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos. September is Childrens Cancer Awareness Month, so were also pleased to aid in bringing awareness about pae-d iatric cancer. T he Childrens Cancer Fund provides support for children suffering from cancer across the Caribbean, including foreign testing of biopsy samples which results in quicker diagnosis and earlier treatment of cancer when identified. The fund has made a major difference in the lives of the families helped, said Mr Beneby. We sincerely thank our employees and partners for their role in executing this successful event and look forward to ongoing partnerships with the community as we support children who are fighting this terrible disease. E vent partners included: the AIDS Foundation of the Bahamas, Aquapure Water, ADRYSS Weight Loss Systems, the Bahamas Heart Association, the Bahamas Red Cross, the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Club One Fitness Centre, the Diabetic Association, DAlbenas Agency, Doctors Hospital, Inspired Fitness, Sister Sister Breast Cancer Group and Symetry Bahamas, After the walk/run, a breakfast was held for all the participants. Prizes were awarded to the following individuals: WINNERS, 15 AND UNDER C hristopher Rahming Jr Johnique Rolle Jerry Butler runner up WINNERS 15-25 Leonardo Forbes Hollie Rolle W inners 26-35 Sidney Collie Jessica Murray WINNERS 36-45 D avid Ferguson Cheryl Rolle WINNERS 46-59 Ashton Murray Denise Mortimer WINNERS (MALE OVER 60 Jeffrey Burnside winner Leslie Miller runner up F or more information, visit: givehopesavel ives.rbtt.com. MORE THAN 500 TURN OUT TO SUPPORT CHILD CANCER FUND NEW TECHNOLOGY OFFERS ALTERNATIVE TO READING GLASSES D R RODGERS S UPPORTING WELLNESS: A tlantic Medical Insurance recently presented a $5,000 cheque to NIB to support Get Well Bahamas Phase 2. Pictured from left to right: Darren Bastian, Business Development Manager, Atlantic Medical Insurance; Latisha Thompson, Manager, Body Zone Fitness; Tami Francis, Manager, NPDP; Janette Martin-Isaacs, President, Jemi Health and Wellness; Lynda Gibson, Executive Vice Presidenta nd General Manager, Atlantic Medical Insurance; Anastasia Francis, Director of Operations, Atlantic Medical; and Shane Albury, Communications Officer, Atlantic Medical. W e n d e l l C l e a r e / T C L P h o t o

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THE Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness was given a considerable boost in its effort to seriously tackle the stray dog and cat problem. A recent donation allowed Baark! to buy a new van just in time for the launch of a major spay and neuter campaign. The charity aims to sterilise up to 2,400 animals a year, and will begin this autumn. In conjunction with the group Stray Busters, a team of volun-teers will use the T-N-R (trapneuter-return) method for roaming community dogs. They will target one area of the island at a time, transporting dogs to be sterilised at participating veterinary clinics. The new van was branded free of charge thanks to Adworks and The Sign Man. Natalia Nunez from Stray Busters said: We are very excited to work with Baark! and start this programme. The van will enable us to carry up to five dogs per trip. We are trying to stop the vicious cycle of thousands of births and deaths of stray and unwanted animals in our community. Each trapped and sterilised dog or cat will be vaccinated, dewormed and treated for any medical ailments before being released back into their environment. As part of the campaign, Baark! will also be offering lowcost sterilisation for owned pets. Laura Kimble, president of Baark! said: Spay and neuter is viewed as the only way to solve animal overpopulation and improve the welfare of suffering animals. Following our successful smaller campaign in February 2011, Baark! feels that a large scale spay and neuter programme throughout the Bahamas will dramatically reduce the number of animals that have to be euthanised unnecessarily at the Canine Control Unit (Government Pound each year. In addition, spaying and neutering also drastically improve your pet's health and life expectancy, and make communities safer without aggressive dogs and overturned trash cans. Baark! is an entirely voluntary organisation with no government funding. Each spay or neuter operation costs $50 and the group relies solely on donations and fundraising efforts. On Saturday, October 1, Baark! will hold its second annual Strut Your Mutt walk-athon at Goodmans Bay. Registration begins at 8am. Participants will enjoy contests, a raffle, pet photos and dog adoptions. Coffee and a selection of pastries will be provided by Starbucks. The person who brings in the most sponsorship money will wina 32-inch Toshiba LED TV/DVD player. Pledge forms are available at select Dominos locations, CostRite, Solomons, the Bahamas Humane Society and Chives Caf. They can also be downloaded at www.baarkbahamas.org. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 2 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 4 2 4 2 V]VScReZ`_ 4 V]VScReZ`_ 4 :LWKDOO-RKQVWRUHVSDUWLFLSDWLQJGRQWPLVVRXWRQ\RXUFKDQFH IRUKXJHVWRUHZLGHVDYLQJVRQDOO)RRWZHDU%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV LQFOXGLQJ RPHQVDQG&KLOGUHQVKRHV bIIDOO&ODUNVDQGLPEHUODQGUR:RUN%RRWV $OO%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV $OO)DVKLRQ-HZHOU\ 3/86HOHFWHGW\OHVDUNHG'RZQ%\b $QGGRQWIRUJHWZLWKHYHU\SXUFKDVH<28KDYHDFKDQFHWR *UDQGUL]H*LIW&HUWLFDWH $//$/(6$5( 12(;&+$1*(6()81'6 12/$<$:$<6 -2+1 6+2(6$1'$&&(6625,(6 526(77$ 526(77$ &$50,&+$(/ '& '& 2 '& 2 '& 4 '& 4 2 4 2 2 eY 2 '& eY '& 2 '& 2 eY 2 &RPHDQGFHOHEUDWHRXUWK$QQLYHUVDU\E\MRLQLQJXVIRUD 6725(:,'($/( 6HSWHPEHUWKFWREHUVW BAARK! LAUNCHES SPAY AND NEUTER CAMPAIGN U S Ambassador Nicole A vant yesterday presented a $ 100,000 grant to the Bahamas National Drug Council as part o f the Caribbean Basin Secu rity Initiatives drug demand reduction programme. A mbassador Avant met with Camille Johnson, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, to discuss the goals of the grant and potential US-Bahamas partnerships aimed at reducing crime ands trengthening local communities under CBSI. The grant is part of the US g overnments commitment to t he Bahamas through CBSI totalling $1.6 million in 2011 t o support law narcotics interdiction, drug demand reduction and law enforcement professionalisation throughoutt he Caribbean, said the embassy in a statement. T he Bahamas National D rug Council said it will use t he funding to assess the level of illegal drug use, create and i mprove linkages with grass roots organisations, and create public service messagesd iscouraging the use of illegal drugs. During the meeting, Ambassador Avant applauded the council for its ongoing efforts to reduce demand through education pro g rammes aimed at young Bahamians. She also emphasised Presid ent Obamas support for i ncreased security co-ordination in the Caribbean, illus t rated through the recent announcement of $77 million in new CBSI funding that will be designated for a variety ofa ctivities throughout the region in the coming year. BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG COUNCIL RECEIVES $100,000 CBSI GRANT FROM US EMBASSY PARTNERSHIP: Camille Johnson, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of H ealth; United States Ambassador Nicole Avant; and Dr Bridgette Rolle, a dministrator, Bahamas National Drug Council. B IG HELP: T he Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness (BAARK! donation allowed them to buy a new van just in time for the launch ofa major spay and neuter campaign.

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the next couple of days. If that h appens we will have enough time to look it over before the debate begins. I am hoping however that i f we do get it, itll be before t omorrow. Mr Wilchcombe said d espite not knowing what the proposed amendments are, the PLP has been preparingf or the debate over the summer break. The truth is we are fully prepared for this debate. We have a overall aggressive plan to deal with crime because we believe it is a major issue thati s hurting us not only socially, but also economically, he said. The approach the governm ent has to crime is obvious ly not working, dismissing it b y saying the war is being fought between bad boys or saying its criminals hurting criminals is negative and is sending the wrong message. We are going to present a thorough and aggressive plan to deal with the crime problem, especially when it comes to bail. There are some major l oopholes in our justice syst em that we need to fix. There is no way someone with an extensive criminal history ora nyone that has committed a serious offense should getb ail. M r Wilchcombe said the P LP wants to meet with the government to come up witha bipartisan approach to c rime before the bills are presented in the House on Octo ber 5. We have taken the posit ion that you cannot blame any political party for the crime problem. What we are proposing is the oppositiona nd the government each c hoose at least three memb ers from their party to come together and form a committee to discuss the legislation. We need to make sure that what we present to thep ublic is bipartisan and strong enough to make a difference. Mr Wilchcombe said if both parties do not come together to fight crime nothing is going to change. H e said he hopes Mr Turnq uest agrees to meet so the PLP and the FNM can collectively get a handle on thec rime problem. serve and I intend to serve, Mr Turnquest said. The one thing I dont like are namby-pamby, wishy-washy politicians. You either stand for something or you dont. Last week, Mr Turnquest said while he has no wish to encroach on the independence of the judicial system, in his opinion some judges have been far too "liberal" when it comes to granting bail to career criminals and those accused of serious offences and he believes the police and the public agree with him. He said he felt the trend has contributed "greatly" to the country's escalating crime problem. I have a document where we have all of the murder victims for 2011 on one side of the page, on the other side of the page we have those cases where we have suspects, he said. It will astound you to see the number of criminals known to the police as both victims and suspects. Ive said what I had to say. I accept my responsibility as the minister of National Security, and the government of the Bahamas accepts its responsibility as being responsible for the 353,000 citizens of the Bahamas. Were going to do our job. In a statement released last week, opposition members said Mr Turnquests comments were an admission of the FNM government's paralysis in dealing with the crime crisis. PLP officials said instead of attacking the judiciary, the FNM government should be about ensuring the courts are supplied with the required resources, manpower and equipment to function efficiently. The Democratic National Alliance accused Mr Turnquest of passing the buck and called for his resignation. Yesterday, Mr Turnquest said: We are accountable to those people, we are going to do what is necessary, were going to be relentless in the fight against crime to make our country safer. In addition to investing millions of dollars, we want to ensure that we have the legislative framework in place so criminals do not get an easy ride in our country. Mr Turnquest said a package of Bills addressing the criminal justice system will be the first order of business when the House of Assembly reconvenes on October 5. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 7 7 KH ,QWHU$PHULFDQ,QVWLWXWHIRU&RRSHUDWLRQRQ$JULFXOWXUH,,&$fIFHLQ 7KH%DKDPDVLVLQYLWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUDIXOOWLPHSRVLWLRQDV 6867$,1$%/( $ *5,&8/785((&,$/,67 % $&.*5281',1)250$7,21 ,,&$fLVDVSHFLDOL]HGDJHQF\RIWKH,QWHU$PHULFDQV\VWHP,WVSXUSRVHLV WRHQFRXUDJHDQGVXSSRUWWKHHIIRUWVRILWVPHPEHUVWDWHVWRIRVWHUDJULFXOWXUDO GHYHORSPHQWDQGUXUDOZHOOEHLQJLQWKHLUWHUULWRULHV7KHLQVWLWXWHFROODERUDWHV ZLWKWKHLQLVWU\RI$JULFXOWXUHDQGDULQHHVRXUFHVDQGUHODWHGVHFWRUVWKDW DUHLQYROYHGLQKROLVWLFDJULFXOWXUHDQGUXUDOGHYHORSPHQWLQ7KH%DKDPDV '87,(6$1'(63216,%,/,7,(6 7KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOO $VVLVWFOLHQWVLQWKHSODQQLQJt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don't think she can survive if he doesn't come back home. Ms Humes said she hopes whoever took her brother would return him safe to his family. If you are reading this and you took my brother, please just let him come home. Marco is innocent and he deserves his life. If you have a heart please just bring him back. I just want my brother to come home. My mother wants herson back, she said. We don't care about anything else, we just want him back. Just drop him anywhere and he will find his way home. He will call us. Just please let him come home. Ms Humes described her brother as a quiet, scary little boy. She said he doesn't talk back, he doesn't keep company and his is very mannerly. She said: He is not like most young children his age. He stays home and plays games with his eight nieces and nephews. He is the youngest of six kids and all his brothers and sisters have children. So he has lots of friends. Someone sick had to take him. He is not the kind of child who would just wander off. He would not go with strangers. Ms Humes says the family is holding on to hope Marco is alive and will be returned to them safe and sound. Last night, a police spokesman said they are investigating. Anyone with any information on Marcos whereabouts can contact police on 911, 919, the Southern Police Station on 322-3337, 356-0228, the Central Detective Unit on 5029991, 502-9910 or Crime Stoppers on 328-TIPS. FROM page one TURNQUEST FROM page one MISSING BOY KIDNAPPED MARCOARCHER OPPOSITION YET TO SEE PROPOSED BAIL ACT AMENDMENT FROM page one

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and others continuing to commit crimes while out on bail is u ppermost in the minds of the public, Senator Delaney said the amendments to this Act will in fact be the smallest part of theg overnments package. In my opinion, he said, the government is preparing to put the Legislature in a positiont o go as far as it is felt that the Legislature can go. These Bills will be comprehensive. They will be attacking the challengef rom many different perspec tives. Bail is just one aspect of several aspects that will be addressed. There are many aspects of the criminal law that it is felt there is an opportunity to improve upon in the con-t ext of the challenges we currently face. A nd we are trying to, in the interest of our community, we are trying to embrace those several opportunities which will result in more effectiveness in terms ofp unishment for crime. According to sources in the Attorney Generals Office, the amendments to the Bail Act will be geared towards providing a clearer definition to how and if bail will be given in any particular case as is being practised in the courts today. Amendments to the Criminal Procedure Code and the Penal Code will include, a mong other things, increasing the sentencing for certain types of offences, and ensuring thes entence of life in prison would mean for nature life. O ther amendments will also seek to strengthen the powers of local magistrates, allowing them to pass stiffer sentences. We feel, said Senator Delaney, that an appropriate response must be more comprehensive than just the BailA mendment. And so therefore what you will see, and the PM will speak to it, is a multipronged approach to trying to r emedy some of the challenges we are having. While not wanting to pree mpt the Prime Minister on a nnouncing any new laws on punishment for illegal firearm possession and the like, Senator Delaney said this assumption would be a reasonable position for any o ne to make. This has been a major effort by all of the relevant aspects of my ministry, main l y the Department of Public Prosecutions, Law Reform and Revision, as well as Legislative Drafting, he said. This has been a major undertaking, a nd rightly so, because the consequences a re serious both in terms of not responding or not responding appropriately as well as the impact of the response. We have several things to weigh here punishment, fairness and the balancing of rights. Providence's water supply and sanitation systems said a second-floor leak at the Department of Environmental Health's Environmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment Division (EMRAD ing there open to possible fault. The units purpose is to test food, water and wastew ater to ensure they adhere t o industry standards and are not a risk to public health. Last night it was unclear if the unit was still responsible for food tests, however, officials confirmed that w ater testing responsibility h ad been turned over to the W ater and Sewerage Corporation. The EMRAD main o ffices and laboratory on New Providence are housed in a condemned building, where plumbing leaks from the second floor compromise the accuracy of bacteriological testing results in t he laboratory," said the r eport. S ubsequently responsibility for water testing was r eturned to the Water & S ewerage Corporation, said the report. The assessment also noted that EMRAD suffered from "insufficient resources and low morale," testing capacity was limited and neither of i ts laboratories was accredite d. There is no initiative to attain accreditation given the primitive lab conditions and lack of equipment and budget," said the IDB report, which was posted on September 20. Director of Environmental Health Melanie McKenzie yesterday said she was "unaware" of the claims in the report. A lthough she said she could not speak to the accuracy of the IDB's findings, she did say that "years ago" t here had been a leak in EMRAD's offices, but as far as she knew that was no l onger a problem. I don't really know b ecause I don't know that t here was any leak recently. As far as I know there is no leak now at one point there was a leak, years ago." She added that the responsibility for water testing now lies with the Water and S ewage Corporation, but not b ecause of the concerns r aised in the report. "Water testing has for some time been turned back to the Water and Sewerage Corporation but (the claims in the IDB report were) not the reason. We had monitored it for a number of years. .It had been our responsibility for doing it," said Ms McKenzie. S he said she did not know if EMRAD's facilities were condemned. "I don't know that the b uilding is condemned at all," said Ms McKenzie. She said that she had not seen t he report. S he did say that her d epartment is seeking new f acilities for EMRAD, but not because of the conditions outlined by the IDB. "We are trying to have a new setup for EMRAD, obviously we are looking into getting (a f or EMRAD not specificall y because of those condit ions, but because we have outgrown the space," she said. State Minister for the Environment, Phenton Neymour, could not comment on the report yesterday because he does not have oversight over EMRAD. That responsibility lies with Environment Minister Earl Deveaux, he said. H e did say that EMRAD was still functioning although he could not say which tests were carried out there or if t hey are open to compromise. Mr Deveaux was out of o ffice yesterday and could n ot be reached for comment. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE %DUWHQGHUV 6SDFH&OHDQHUV %DUXQQHUV (PDLOSKRWRIXOOERG\fWR $QQTXLHWWH#JPDLOFRP WATER TESTING MAY HAVE BEEN CONTAMINATED, SAYS REPORT FROM page one AG CONFIRMS GOVTS OMPREHENSIVE APPROACH T O FIGHT AGAINST CRIME F ROM page one ATTORNEY GENERAL J ohn Delaney

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LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 9 By MIKE LIGHTBOURN I NSPECTIONSare a p art of a growing number of real estate transactions, but their role is often misunderstood. There are some important points you should think about before ordering an inspection on a property you want to purc hase. R emember that a home i nspection is not a witchhunt! Its not a tool for finding flaws to allow you to renegotiate your offer. An inspection is an educational exercise that allowsb uyers and sellers to bett er understand the homes c ondition. An inspection c an alleviate the buyers anxiety while also provid-i ng a basis for repair sugg estions. Dont think that you wont need an inspection for new construction! Nobody wants any surprises when purchasing an older home, but imagine what c ould happen in a brand n ew one that hasnt even b een lived in? If youre c onsidering the purchase of a home under construction, a sk about phase inspections, which are completed at various stages in con struction, for your peace of mind. Finally, dont assume t hat inspections are exclusively the responsibility of the buyer. Many sellers h ave benefited from prel isting inspections that ident ify potential problems b efore the home is listed a nd the defects are discov e red. Both sides can use the inspection to make smart decisions and feel more confident about the transaction. If youre still uncertain, contact your local BREA professional with y our questions. (Mike Lightbourn is p resident of Coldwell B anker Lightbourn R ealty). ITS NOT A WITCH HUNT REALESTATE B y CONSTABLE 3011 MAKELLE PINDER JOGGINGis a great form of exercise that one can do at their leisure, however while enjoying this particular a ctivity, one has to take some f orm of precaution for their s afety. A frequent error that joggers or runners make is that they become so preoccupied in their physical activity; they fail to be alert and pay attention to their sur-r oundings. There are precautions one has to take ranging from all topics, which are list-e d below. A REA A lwaysmake sure to run in an area that you are familiar with and that is safe and do not jog or run near bushes, w hich can provide concealment. This way you will not get lost at you know the part icular area and also if it is s afe the crime rate will be l ow. Always jog or run with a k nown companion. M P3s A lot of joggers carry a music player along with them; make sure this is hidden as possible, by putting the wiresu nderneath clothing instead of out of it. Also do not cont inually get it out to change the song as this can attract t hieves. F urthermore, when jogging k eeping wires tucked inside o f clothing makes the risk of tripping over wires very slim. The headphone may come out of your ears and fall to the floor thus you trip over it, but when tucked in it will not do this. I n addition, always make s ure that you can hear background noise and never turn u p your player so that you c annot. DOGS Some runners are afraid of dogs, and may see a few dogs on their journey. If you are e xtremely afraid and dislike d ogs, try to avoid these situat ions. If you see a dog far off take a different route or stay as far away as possible. Inevitably sometimes you will encounter dogs on your jogging expedition. Make sure to keep calm and not be tempted to run away as they may chase you. If a dog does attack, try to "feed" it your workout jacket or other item of clothing. R emember to also carry some canine repellent just in case you are approached by a a ttacking dog. CLOTHING A lways make sure to wear a ppropriate clothing for the e nvironment. If it is a cold environment w ear clothing that will keep y ou warm such as a track suit. If it is a hot environment keep cool with light clothing that will keep you cool. In addition, choose appropriate footwear and make sure to tie the laces properly as you c an trip over them. W ATER I f you get thirsty easily or f or safety, it is best to carry a w ater bottle with you, this will keep you hydrated. Some people may get very thirsty and tired during their run so d rinking water will cool you d own. MISCELLANEOUS If you have asthma make sure to always carry your pump with you, even if you feel you may not need it. Also if you are carrying keys or a phone with you keep it in a safe place where it is not likely to fall out. When jogging, make sure to make the experience as pleasant as possible by taki ng these precautions. Always Remember the B Three As: Be Alert, Be A ware, and Be Attentive to y our surroundings at all times. S hould you be a victim of c rime while jogging, please d o not resist but take note of the description of the culprite .g. his appearance, clothing, h eight, physical details and the direction or mode of escape. Call the police as soon as it is safe to do so. If you come across any suspicious person(s around your business or have a ny information pertaining t o any crime, please do not h esitate to contact call the p olice emergency at or C rime Stoppers at 328-tips ( New Providence), 1-3008476 (Family Islands Royal Bahamas Police Force National Crime Prevention Office: Safety tips for joggers

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE S IRTE, LIBYA A ssociated Press HUNDREDS OF CIVILIANS fled Moammar Gadhafi's hometown yesterday to escape growing shortages off ood and medicine and escal ating fears that their homes will be struck during fighting between revolutionary forces and regime loyalists. Anti-Gadhafi fighters l aunched their offensive a gainst Sirte nearly two weeks a go, but have faced fierce resistance from loyalists holed up inside the city. After a bloody push into Sirte again over the weekend, revolu-t ionary fighters say they have p ulled back to plan their assault and allow civilians more time to flee. NATO, which has played a key role in decimating Gad-h afi's military during the Libyan civil war, has kept up its air campaign since the fall o f Tripoli last month. The alliance said yesterday its warplanes struck eight military targets near Sirte a day earlier, including an ammunition and vehicle storage facility and rocket launcher. S irte, 250 miles (400 kilometers) southeast of Tripoli on the Mediterranean coast, is o ne of the last remaining bastions of Gadhafi loyalists since revolutionary fighters s tormed into the capital last m onth, ending Gadhafi's nearly 42-year rule and sending him into hiding. The fugit ive leader's supporters also remain in control of the town of Bani Walid, southeast of T ripoli, and pockets of territ ory in the country's south. In a boost to the economy, Italian energy giant Eni said y esterday it has resumed oil production in Libya after months of interruption, tap p ing 15 wells and producing some 31,900 barrels of oil per day. French energy company Total said it restarted some p roduction last week. NAIROBI, KENYA Associated Press KENYA'S former president called her a mad woman. Seen as at hreat to the rich and p owerful, Wangari Maathai was beaten, arrested and vilified for the simple act of planting a tree, a natural won-d er Maathai believed c ould reduce poverty a nd conflict. Former students who planted saplings alongside her, world leaders charmed by her messagea nd African visionaries o n Monday rememb ered a woman some called the Tree Mother of Africa. Maathai, Africa's first female winner of the Nobel PeaceP rize, died late on Sunday in a Nairobi hospital f ollowing a battle with c ancer. She was 71. Maathai believed that a healthy environment i mproved lives by pro viding clean water and firewood for cooking,t hereby decreasing conf lict. The Kenyan organization she founded planted 30 million trees in hopes of improving t he chances for peace, a nd she inspired the UN to launch a worldwide campaign that resulted in 11 billion trees being planted. Maathai, a university p rofessor with a warm s mile and degrees from t he US, staged popular protests that bedeviled former President Daniel arap Moi, a repressiver uler who called her a mad woman who wasa threat to the security o f Kenya. I n the summer of 1998, the Kenyan gov ernment was giving land t o political allies in a protected forest on Nairobis outskirts. Maathai b egan a campaign to r eclaim the land, culmin ating in a confrontation with 200 hired thugs a rmed with machetes and bows and arrows. When Maathai tried to plant a tree, she and her c ohorts were attacked w ith whips, clubs and s tones. Maathai received a bloody gash on her head. Many said, She is j ust planting trees. But that was important, not only from an environm ental perspective, to s top the desert from spreading, but also as a way to activate womena nd fight the Daniel arap Moi regime, said Geir Lundestad, of the N obel Institute, which a warded Maathai the p eace prize in 2004. Maathai is survived b y three children. FIRST AFRICAN WOMAN TO WIN NOBEL PRIZE DIES WANGARI MAATHAI with her Nobel Prize C ONSERVATIONIST W angari Maathai in 2006 with B arrack Obama, now USpresident, in Nairobi, Kenya JOHANNESBURG, SOUTHAFRICA A ssociated Press SOUTH AFRICA officials may block the Dalai Lama from celebrating the 80th birthday of his friend and fellow Nobel Peace Laureate, Arch b ishop Desmond Tutu, amid fears over Chinese pressure. National newspapers are already drawing parallels b etween the situations of Tibetans under Chinese rule a nd black South Africans under the racist apartheid regime that ended in 1994. The t ensions over the Dalai Lamas v isa application also are a sign of how powerful Chinas influence has grown in Africa. T he Dalai Lama is to deliv er the inaugural Desmond Tutu International Peace lec-t ure, titled Peace and comp assion as catalyst for change, as part of the Oct. 6 -8 birthday celebrations for Tutu. The center that invited h im says he has faced repeated difficulty since first trying to apply for a visa in June. I n 2009, the South African g overnment outraged many by banning the Dalai Lama from attending a Nobel laur eates peace conference, say ing it would detract from the 2010 soccer World Cup. A spokesman for South A frica's foreign affairs depart ment denied there was any p ressure to block the Dalai Lamas visit this time around. SOUTH AFRIC A MAY BLOCK DALAI LAMA VISIT T HE DALAI LAMA, w ho may be prevented from visiting South Africa ARCHBISHOPDESMOND T UTU, w hose 80th birthday will be celebrated with a peace lec ture CIVILIANS FLEE FROM GADHAFI HOMETOWN

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LOCAL NEWS P AGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE A FIREFIGHTER shows grade three students of Temple Christ ian a picture of herself YOUNGSTERS from Temple Christian listen to safety advice during the event at Marathon Mall G RADE THREE s tudents of T emple Christian listen to National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest as part of an event to promote fire safety at the Mall at Marathon Felip Major /Tribune Staff STOPPING THE FIRES BY TEACHING THE YOUNG W ith these statistics in mind, National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest urged continuousp reparation and fire safety awaren ess. He said fire drills should be run until they become second nature. M r Turnquest also said $2.2 million has been budgeted for new fire trucks; $3 million for ane nhanced 919 system; and $1 million for a fire station in Grand Bahama. Fire Safety Week will come to a n end on Saturday with a funrun/walk. A fire safety awareness exhi b ition will remain on display until Friday in the main foyer of the Mall at Marathon. F F r r o o m m p p a a g g e e t t w w o o DIRECTOR OF FIRE SERVICES Jeffrey Deleveaux gives the vote of thanks as National Security Minis ter Tommy Turnquest listens FIREAWARENESSWEEK

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By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE REAL ESTATE p roject into which $73 million ofC LICO (Bahamas pumped suffered from very weak management controls, i t has been revealed, with the insolvent insurers Trinidadi an principal accused of e xtracting project managem ent fees way above mar ket norms. Michael Carballo, group f inance director for CLICO (Bahamas b ased parent, CL Financial, has questioned whether it was appropriate for LawrenceD uprey, the latters chairman, t o be a partner/shareholder in a company established to be project manager for theW ellington Preserve devel opment and other Floridabased real estate initiatives. I n his witness statement to the Trinidad-based Commis sion of Inquiry into CL Financials collapse, Mr Carballo q uestioned whether the use of DYL, which stood for Duprey, Yanopoulos and Leid (two of the formers partners), to manage Welling ton Preserves development w as cost efficient and provided for true accountability. His testimony sheds some l ight into the poor management and oversight structures that led not to just CLICO (Bahamas vency, and now Supreme Court-supervised liquidation, but the end of CL Financial, one of the regions largest pan-Caribbean conglomerates. Via its wholly-owned Bahamian subsidiary, CLICO Enterprises, the Bahamian life and health insurer advanced $73 million to develop Wellington Preserve, with the intention of devel oping the West Palm Beach$4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.50 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 nrrntb" nn(&" '!$!%"#!%! % % f!"#$! $$nfb# bnbrn [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 PersonalPensionPlanStrong investment performanceFlexible StructureCompetitive feesEfcient administration B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor WHILEunlikely to generate the $13$15 million oversubscription its placement agent felt possible last week, Fideli-t y Bank (Bahamas e nce share issue was yesterday said to have still been fully subscribed. M ichael Anderson, RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trusts president, speaking in his placement agent role, said thatw hile final figures were still being tallied he felt confident the BISX-listed commercial bank had raised enough new f inancing to bolster its critical Tier One c apital ratio to 21 per cent. T elling Tribune Business that the private placement had provided enough c apital to grow [Fidelity Bank (Bahamas Anderson said it hoped to list the pref-e rence shares on BISX by year-end. He added that initial expectations the o ffering would be oversubscribed had not come to fruition, saying it had impacted by the proximity of the $8 million Arawak Cay Port initial public offering (IPO the conditions attached to Tier One perpetual preference shares. Last week I was hoping wed end up with $13-$15 million out of it, but it will be less than that, Mr Anderson told Tribune Business of the $10 million preference share issue. Well get somewhere n orth of $10 million, and at least it will be fully subscribed. We got a lot of subscriptions early, and picked up a pile at the end. Im reasonably sure its fully subscribed, just not sure what the total amount is. At one stage I thought it would be heavily oversubscribed, but last week we kept hearing more and more people were keepingm onies for the Port transaction. This, the RoyalFidelity president said, showed the need to ensure no more than one major capital raising effort took B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor E NDINGFreeports r eal property tax exemp tion will reinvigorate the citys real estate market, the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerces presi dent has been told, as the a nnual $2,000-$10,000 carrying costs will prevent Bahamians and foreigners By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor BECOMINGa public company is certainly not on theh orizon for Caribbean Bott ling Company (Bahamas the short-term, its principal d escribing the partnership forged with its 30 per cent minority Barbadian investor as a model for other B ahamian firms to follow. Describing the excellent relationship with Banks Barbados Breweries, Walter Wells, the companys presi dent and chief executive, said t he arrangement showed B ahamians could partner with foreign groups who provided specialist skills and access tot echnology while remaining in control. Admitting that he and the investor group, including Banks, which bought the Coca-Cola bottler and dist ributor in 2006, had not e xpected to be sitting in their own multi-million dollar plant and head offices within five y ears, Mr Wells said the com pany planned to expand certain product lines and introd uce an energy drink within the next six months. Questioned by Tribune B usiness about the possibility of Caribbean Bottling going public and listing on the Bahamas International Secu-r ities Exchange (BISX Wells said: Ive been asked that question many times. Its certainly not on the horizon certainly not in the near term. Theres no rush to sell shares. H e explained that there were two driving forces for companies to go public, nei-t her of which were currently in play for Caribbean Bot tling. These were the need to raise capital, and also if a m ajor shareholder/share holders wanted to realise the value of their holdings and cash out. Neither one of those sce narios is necessary today, Mr GOING PUBLIC NOT ON HORIZON F OR COCA-COLA BOTTLER WALTER WELLS SEE page 5B CONTROLS ON $73M CLICO INVESTMENT VERY WEAK Insider accuses insolvent Bahamas i nsurers principal of extracting xcessive management fees Bahamian liquidator gains new lines of inquir y SEE page 4B FIDELITYS $13-$15M HOPES NOT REALISED $10m pref issue fully subscribed, but anticipated o versubscription does not materialise BISX-listed bank still raises enough capital to grow f or 3-5 year Set to list on exchange before 2011 year-end SEE page 6B M ICHAEL ANDERSON NEW CONCEPT ADDS 65 JOBS Commonwealth Building Supplies s ays 35,000sq ft plaza anchor a smaller version of Low B y NATARIO M cKENZIE T ribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net C OMMONWEALTH Building Supplies has crea ted 65 new jobs through t he opening of its 35,000 s quare foot anchor store in the Southwest Shopping Plaza, its generalm anager yesterday comparing the outlet to a smaller version of US hardware giant, Lowes. T elling Tribune Business that sales at the new location were increasing o n a daily basis, Brent B urrows said: Things are g oing quite well. We are i n our fourth week and h ave seen growth every day. We feel positive that when mid-October comes around things will really get busy. He added: The first week in September wasa bad time for business because there was the back to school rush, but we are pleased with the progress so far. Mr Burrows said the stores concept was new t o the almost 40 year-old b usiness, adding: This is a new concept, nothing l ike our Robinson Road l ocation. We have seas onal items, lawn and gardening supplies, as well as plumbing and electrical s upplies. Its like a smaller version of Lowes. T he store is situated in the $16 million Southwest SEE page 4B REINVIGORATE FREEPORT THROUGH TAX BREAK END A bsence of $2,000$10,000 ann ual carrying costs has eliminated de velopment incentive City s real estate pr ices dor mant at best f or 20 y e ar SEE page 6B

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BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 3B WE MUST STEP UP OUR GAME IN FRAGILE WORLD By LARRYGIBSON LAST WEEKwe witnessed a nother reminder of how fragile t he current economic recovery is as t he Dow Jones Industrial Average (Dow decline of 6.4 per cent on the week. It was the Dows worst weekly decline since October 6, 2008, when the index fell 18.2 per cent.F or the year to date, the Dow is down about 7 per cent, and off 15.9 per cent from its peak of 12,396 on April 29, 2011. Question The obvious question is: What h as changed since April? The simple answer is: Much. The global economy is struggling with little o r no growth in Europe and the US. The sovereign debt crisis is spreading within Europe, and c ountries such as the US, Japan a nd Italy have been downgraded in r ecent weeks. There are signs that e ven mighty China and other e merging market economies may n ot be growing as robustly as before. It is not clear whether the worst is over, and some are calling for another round of stimulus. For e xample, President Obama has recently proposed a $475 billion jobs program, which the Republicans are likely to reject. A different perspective Last week I came across an artic le entitled T he real recession never ended written by Anthony M irhaydari, a Seattle-based investm ent columnist for MSN Money, who argues that the crunch we are i n is rooted in stagnant pay cheques and payrolls a problem, he asserts, that is more than a decade old. This article ranks as a must share so it is condensed below. Mirhaydari writes: Economists tell us the economic recovery is m ore than two years old. Corpor ate profits have zoomed to record highs. Countries such as China and B razil have roared back. But by j ust about every other measure, it i s as if the 2007 recession never ended. Industrial production, retail sales, employment, home prices,c onstruction activity, inventories and retail sales are all below prerecession levels. In inflation adjust ed terms, the economy is smaller than it was before the downturn. That's nearly four years of no growth. The truth is, our problems are d eeper and go back further. One e xample: Stocks are coming off their worst 10-year performances ince the Great Depression, trad i ng at levels first reached in 1998. In fact, I'd argue that the real recession began a decade or more ago and hasn't ended. The key p roblem stagnant wages has o nly gotten worse. It hasn't matt ered who was in the White House or in control of Congress. Stagnant Wages Mirhaydari adds: The problem of stagnant wages is structural, andi t is related to globalisation and the rise of China. Employers, scared by the 2008 financial crisis, cut jobs more deeply than experts expected. They've gotten used to smaller workforces and the big profit margins that go with them, t hanks to outsourcing and automation. Incomes have been stagnant s ince the Clinton administration. Part of the reason wages stalled was technology. Mainly, though, i t was the rise of globalisation. Of t he 27 million jobs the US econom y created in the two decades b efore the latest recession began in 2 007, the vast majority were in non-tradable" sectors of the economy such as government, health care, construction, retail and hospitality, notes economist and Nobel laureate Michael Spence. T hese are positions that cannot be shipped overseas. Those gains have not offset job losses in tradable sectors such as manufacturing. Private sector pay-r olls are now at levels first reached in 1999, despite a steady increase in t he overall population. As a result, the employment-to-population r atio is at 1980s levels and still f alling. The result has been a drop in the marginal return to labour. Put simply, there are fewer American jobs to go around, so they pay less with predictable results. Adjusted for inflation, new data from the US Census Bureau show incomes are down to 1996 levels. I mplications for the Bahamas F irst, if real wages are not growi ng then consumer spending, which drives the US economy, stagnates. Remember, through June 30, 2011, US consumer spending was growing only at a 0.4 per cent annualised rate. This has obvious impli-c ations for a mass recovery in tourism travel, particularly from the US, in the foreseeable future. Does this indicate a continuation of heavily subsidised government promotion programs? Second, our traditional reliance o n foreign investment will continue to be severely impacted by the turmoil in global financial markets a nd the fragility of international banks. The only lenders seemingly prepared to fund large long-term p rojects in todays market are the C hinese. The Chinese are the most s ignificant lender to the US gove rnment (via their holdings of US g overnment debt) and, of late, the m ost willing lender to the entire Caribbean region. The cost of this massive Chinese largesse (of which the Bahamas seems to be a favoured beneficiary) remains to b e determined. Therefore, if we are to experie nce challenges in the two main drivers of our economy, tourism and foreign investment, it cannotb e business as usual for the next five years. Government revenues, w hich are already under considerable pressure, will most likely cont inue to be weak. Some tax-raising m easures will have to be implemented, and significant spending c uts will have to be enforced throughout the public sector. This will be bitter, but necessary, medicine. Further, if this economy is to grow, attention must be given to the fact that the entire region is competing for scarce tourism and f oreign investment flows and, in o rder to get our fair share, we will h ave to step up our game. Therefore, the Government must become more business friendly to encourage both domestic and international investors to mobilise capital in our economy. They willo nly do so if the Government demonstrates it is serious by taking resolute steps towards putting its fiscal affairs in order. Such action will send the right message to investors. I do believe that when Baha Mar s tarts to pop out of the ground in a fully visible way confidence in the Bahamian economy will rebound, i f supported by appropriate policies that encourage investment. Finally, I wish to remind local r eaders that such economic adjustm ents will not be confined to the B ahamas but will occur in all the m ajor economies throughout the w orld. U ntil next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is vicep resident pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas w holly-owned subsidiary of Colonial Group International, which owns Atlantic MedicalI nsurance and is a major shareholder of Security & General I nsurance Company in the Bahamas. T he views expressed are those o f the author and do not necessarily represent those of Colonial G roup International or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to Larry.Gibson@atlantichouse.com.bs FINANCIALFOCUS LARRYGIBSON WINWIN SOLUTION SOUGHT OVER ROYAL CARIBBEAN OUTLET B y NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net W ITH Bahamian vendors on Coco Cay effectively being driven out of businessd ue to what is being described as unfair competition from Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines, twoc ontenders seeking to b ecome the areas MP at the next general election yester day expressed hope that a win-win solution for both sides could be reached Straw vendors in the Berry Islands are arguing that the cruise lines newly-opened signature store on its private island will effectively put them out of business. The situation is being described by many as a prime example of unfair competition. Current MP for North Andros and the Berry Islands, Vincent Peet, told Tribune Business yesterday that the Government should revisit the decision to approve the logo shop on Coco Cay. Mr Peet said: I was trying to discourage Royal Caribbean from proceeding with the logo shop. I didnt support the logo shop because I realised the impact it would have on the vendors. It provides unfair competition. We appreciate and thank Royal Caribbean for their investment, and all we were asking is for them to be more sensitive to this aspect. The passengers on the ships, I am told, can use their room key to purchase itemso nce they get to the cay. This will undoubtedly discourage some of the passengers from bringing cash. The vendorso perate with cash; their sales a re cash. They have to pay for their stock, pay for babysitters and transportation to and from the cay. For them its all cash transactions; they dont operate with credit cards. I am still calling onR oyal Caribbean and the Government to revisit the approval for the logo shop. Formula And Mr Peet added: Going forward I am calling for a sit down between the vendors and Coco Cay man agement to find a working formula for a win-win situation. The vendors make a contribution and Royal Caribbean makes a contri bution. Randy Butler, chief executive and president of SkyBahamas, and DNA candidate for North Andros and the Berry Islands, told Tri bune Business yesterday he was seeking to meet with the representative for the vendors. Hopefully we can find some way for a win-win sit uation, he said. From whatI understand the passengers are coming off the ship without any cash; they are being told they dont need any. The vendors feel the ship is encouraging persons not to bring cash on to the cay. We u nderstand the benefits of having Royal Caribbean butour concern is for the liveli h ood of the vendors. Dr Jonathan Rodgers, the well known eye doctor and DNA activist, has alsow eighed in on the situation. I n a letter, he said: The pri mary complaint is that the prices of souvenirs in the signature store will undercut those of local merchants, and thus put them out of business. These complaints are justified, as there is no way that the local merchants can compete with this foreign corporate giant and, indeed, its only a matter of time before they are forced to close their doors. He added: Competition is to be expected in any business environment, but unfair competition is another story. This is certainly an exam ple of unfair competition, at its ugliest best. The cruise industry now either owns or controls six cays, four of which are designated ports. The cruise lines pay no import fees, work permit fees, business license fees, seabed fees or real property taxes. All of these same fees have to be paid by the local merchants who are competing in the same souvenir business. There is no way that local merchants can compete with the cruise lines, given their enormous buying power, as well as all of the above mentioned financial advantages. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net T HE DRAFT Contractors Bill is still u nder review but nearly complete, the Ministry of Public Works permanent secre tary said yesterday, as the sector anxiously a waits its passage into law. While not giving a timeline for when it would be ready, Colin Higgs told Tribune Business: Its still under review. There area number of Bills to be dealt with when Par liament opens. I know we have had a number of discussions with the Contractors Association and the Attorney Generals Office. W e have had discussions back and forth. I dont see it taking an inordinate amount of time, but it is not ready yet. It is nearly com plete. Calls plced to Attorney General John Delaney were not returned up to press time last evening. The Bahamian Contractors Association (BCA bune Business that the sooner the Bill can be r eady, the better. The Bill is extremely important. The sooner it can be addressed, the better it can be for the industry. Right now there is too much stupidity going on. Mr Forbes told Tribune Business. Since we had our last meeting with the Ministry of Works and the Attorney Gen erals Office two months ago there has not been any further communication with us.W hen we left the last meeting there were concerns over some parts of the Bill that we wanted to have adjusted and they were goingt o get back to us. That is the position we a re in at this time. We havent seen a final draft; we are waiting for them to get back to us. A ccording to Mr Higgs, the Bill contains provisions for the regulation of contractors based on their level of expertise. He said it also contains provisions for health and safety as well as consumer protection. Contractors Bill nearl y complete

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Shopping Plaza at the Blue Hill Road/Carmichael Road junction. The complex was b uilt by CGT Construction, owned by the Treco family, which is also the founder and owner of Common w ealth Building Supplies. M r Burrows told Tribune Business: We have just about 70 persons employed a t our Carmichael Road l ocation. Of that number about 65 persons are new employees. He said the fact that the Carmichael Road area has become more populated in recent years led to the com-p anys decision to establish a store in the area. We conducted a survey and research about foury ears ago, and decided it was a good area in which to expand our business. We feel as though we have posi-t ioned ourselves in the right location. We have been highly complimented on our cus t omer service and we offer convenient hours, Mr Burrows said. based project into a high-end residential and equestrian centre. An illiquid real estate d evelopment, Wellington Preserve ended up accounting for 63 per cent of CLICO (Bahamas ordinary level of inter-group( related party) financing crea ted liquidity problems and l eft the Bahamian insurer challenged to fund its daily operations, according to liquidators. The insurer was put into liquidation after CLICOE nterprises balance sheet showed liabilities of $129 million and assets of only $108 million, creating a $21 million solvency deficiency. The earlier collapse of its CL Financial parent meant a $58 million guarantee it had giv-e n on behalf of CLICO ( Bahamas), shoring up its balance sheet, was unlikely t o hold, while the US real estate market freefall meant W ellington Preserves valuation had dropped dramatic ally. A lluding to all these issues, Mr Carballo said CL F inancials CLICO subsidiary through its Bahamian and other affiliates had funded not just Wellington Preserve but three other m ajor Florida real estate developments. I am aware that CLICO e xpended hundreds of millions of dollars on these projects and, while these seemed feasible while property prices w ere rising sharply in Florida o ver the past 10 years, valuations suffered in the Florida p roperty crash at the end of 2008, Mr Carballo said in his statement to Trinidads i nquiry. I cannot comment on the quality of controls or over-s ight on these projects, but I s uspect that they were always very weak. The Florida investments consumed the majority of the time spent by Karen Gardier, CLICO ( Bahamas) chief executive and also chief financial offi cer of its CLICO parent. Describing the fancy o ffices of DYL on Brickell Avenue in Miami, which were frequently used as ab ase for Mr Duprey, Mr Carballo said that after making his own inquiries he learned the companys initials stood for Duprey, Yanopoulos and Leid. It was set up as project m anagers to manage the groups [CL Financial] real estate/property projects in Florida, Mr Carballo said. They earned project man-a gement fees, rumoured to b e way above general mark et rates. I was never clear as to the rationale for DYLs involvement, and whether it was cost-efficient for the group, as opposed to the useo f independent project mana gers that could be held truly accountable. I also understood that Geoffrey Leid, in particular, was drawing hefty Us dollar fees out of DYL............ M r Carballos comment o n excessive project mana gement fees relating to W ellington Preserve are likel y to interest CLICO ( Bahamas) liquidator, Baker T illy Gomez accountant and partner, Craig A. Tony G omez. I t could represent another p otential recovery source in h is efforts to recover assets for CLICO (Bahamas itors and investors, who according to his last report are facing a $14.58 million s olvency deficiency assets of $45.543 million exceeded b y some $60.722 million in l iabilities. This is likely to involve some kind of lawsuit being filed by Mr Gomez against M r Duprey, an action the l iquidator and his attorneys in the Bahamas, the US and T rinidad have been contemplating for some time. M r Gomez is also likely to be interested in the minutes of a CLICO investment committee meeting on April8 2008, which appear to indi cate that the company was financing another Florida real estate project through B ahamas-domiciled CLICO Enterprises. Under the heading Merr ick Park, the notes refer to Merrick Park jointly with CLICO Enterprises along s ide Karen Gardiers name, implying that CLICO (Bahamas owned affiliate was financ i ng more than just Welling ton Preserve. K Gardier explained the s et up now is that CLICO is funding Merrick Park via loan notes to CLICO Enterprises, the minutes state. T his could indicate anoth er source of recovery/asset to go after for Mr Gomez, as it implies that monies orig inating in the Bahamas with CLICO (Bahamas have potentially been invest e d with Merrick Park another Duprey, or DYL, controlled development. It also appears that CLICO was seeking a joint venture partner for Wellington Preserve, but this did not work out because the proposed partner was embroiled in a litigation mess. Wellington Preserve was to mature on time to put some proceeds from that into Merrick Park, the investment committee notes said, creating another inquiry line for Mr Gomez. Unfortunately, the trans action did not come through because the other party that was to join up with Welling ton Preserve, which would have led to an increase in the value of our land, got into legal battles with the persons they are leasing from cur rently. They eventually had to stay on with them to get out of the battles, as it was not feasible to go forward with the number of law suits. The final word on the sorry mess belongs to Mr Carballo. He told the Trinidad Commission of Inquiry: The group would have lost hundreds of millions of US dollars as a result of venturing into Florida real estate projects. Most of them were financed with relatively high leverage, and by the ending of 2008, with the drastic declines in Florida real estate values, borrowings were in excess of current valuations and the group was forced to give up projects........ such as Wellington Preserve as a result. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE )LQDQFLDO$QDO\VW 7KH%XUQV+RXVH*URXSRI&RPSDQLHVLVVHHNLQJWRHQKDQFHLWV)LQDQFH'HSDUWPHQW WKURXJKWKHDGGLWLRQRI)LQDQFLDO$QDO\VW7KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOOKDYHPDLQ U HVSRQVLELOLW\IRUWKHSURFHVVLQJRIQDQFLDOWUDQVDFWLRQVDQGUHSRUWVIRU%XUQV+RXVH *URXSRI&RPSDQLHVDQGLWV3DUHQW&RPSDQ\&RPPRQZHDOWK%UHZHU\SXEOLFO\ OLVWHGFRPSDQ\RI%,6;f -RE'HVFULSWLRQ 5HVSRQVLEOHIRUDOOGDWDXSORDGDQGUHSRUWLQJWRWKHUHJLRQDOFRUSRUDWHRIFH YLD&RPSDQ\,QIRUPDWLRQ/RJLVWLFVf 3UHSDUDWLRQRIPRQWKO\FRQVROLGDWHGQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWV 5HVSRQVLEOHIRUWKHEXVLQHVVDQDO\VLVUHSRUWVRINH\EXVLQHVVXQLWV URGXFWLRQ:KROHVDOHtHWDLOf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f/LPLWHGZKRVHDGGUHVVLV 6XLWH%D\SDUO%XLOGLQJ3DUOLDPHQW6WUHHW3 7KH%DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ) /$; ,19(670(17+2/',1*6/ $1,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1< 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHYROXQWDU\GLVVROX WLRQRIWKHDERYHFRPSDQ\FRPPHQFHGRQWKH GD\RI6HSWHPEHU$UWLFOHVRI'LVVR OXWLRQKDYHEHHQGXO\UHJLVWHUHGWKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDO3%R[6KLUOH\6WUHHW 1 DVVDX%DKDPDV7KH/LTXLGDWRULV&RUSR UDWH6HUYLFHV%DKDPDVf/LPLWHGZKRVHDGGUHVVLV 6 XLWH%D\SDUO%XLOGLQJ3DUOLDPHQW6WUHHW3 7KH%DKDPDV THE $409.5 MILLION Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA ment has been featured internationally as the first Bahamian infrastructure project to bef inanced by user fees. Participating in a KPMG Infrastructure Summit in Miami, the Nassau Airport Development Companys (NAD president and chief executive, S tewart Steeves, highlighted t he success of the companys financial model. During the panel, A Construction and Development Model for a SuccessfulP PP/Infrastructure Project Mr Steeves shared with the audience of more than 150 c ountry and corporate leade rs the elements of a successful Public Private Partnership (PPP There is a need for trust among partners, he said. The public sector partner determines what the project is, and trusts the private sectorp artner(s the project gets done. There is no question that our success has been occasioned by a public sector need for a major asset to be e xpanded and redeveloped, c oupled with the private sector belief that the long-term revenue streams from this asset will be viable and sustainable. That is a perfectm arriage." This framework is likely to be replicated to facilitate m ajor infrastructure projects t hat have long-term revenue streams. Airport project a perfect marriag N assau Airport Development Companys (NAD chief executive, Stewart Steeve NEW CONCEPT ADDS 65 JOBS F ROM page one CONTROLS ON $73M CLICO INVESTMENT VERY WEAK FROM page one

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BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 5B %$+$0$6%/,& 6(59,&(6,21 $11281&(0(17 RYHUQPHQW7UDLQLQJ&HQWUH +DVK +RWHO&RUSRUDWLRQ ,QWHUQDOHFXULW\ 0DEOH:DONHUULPDU\ 0 LQLVWU\RI(GXFDWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI/DERXU 0LQLVWU\RI:RUNV 0 LQLVWU\RI
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WASHINGTON Associated Press THEhome-buying season was a bust. March through August a re typically the peak buying months. But this time, Americans bought fewern ew homes in that stretch than in any other six-month period since record-keeping began a half-century ago. A nd sales of previously o ccupied homes didn't fare much better. They nearly matched 2009's total for thep eak buying months. And that was the worst since 1997. Combined, total sales this s pring and summer were the weakest on records dating to 1963. The figures under score how badly the hous i ng market is faring and suggest that a recovery is years away. Because the economy is barely growing and unemployment exceeds 9 percent, many people see a home purchase as too big a risk. Some worry about losing their jobs. Others can't afford the 20 percent down payment that most lenders now require. Not even shrunken home prices and the lowest mort gage rates in six decades are convincing would-be buyers. "The job engine has really sputtered out, and without jobs, Americans really can't purchase homes," said Celia Chen, a housing economist at Moody's Analytics. Plunging stock prices and renewed recession fears have led many economists to push back expectations for a housing recovery. Chen expects prices to bottom at the start of 2012. And she doesn't expect sales and prices to make a healthy recovery until 2015 at the earliest. In hard-hit areas such as California and Flori da, it could take decades for prices to return to normal, she said. Pierre Ellis, an analyst at Decision Economics, said that until wages increase and hiring picks up, sales will languish. The "bad news is the evident absence of optimism that sales will pick up to any degree," Ellis said. Roughly 168,000 new homes were sold from March through August, the Commerce Department said Monday. That's fewer than the 180,000 for the same period last year and last year's sales were boosted by a temporary buyer's tax credit. Over the same period in 2009, roughly 208,000 new h omes were sold. I n a healthy six-month b uying season, about 400,000 new homes would sell. A mong re-sales, about 2.8 million homes sold from March through August this year. That's roughly as manya s in the same periods in 2009 and 2010. In a healthy market, about 3.3 million would be sold in that six-m onth stretch. Michael McGrew, who runs McGrew Real Estatei n Lawrence, Kan., said m any families won't buy until the economy strength ens. Even in Lawrence, which had a low unemploy m ent rate of 6.4 percent in July and is home to the University of Kansas, people arew orried, McGrew said. What would help most w ould be a relocated comp any that's ready to hire in t he Lawrence area, McGrew says. But hopes for the housing market to turn arounds oon are dim, he said. "We're actually seeing more people trading down their home or trading out ofo ur market entirely," McGrew said. Nationally, prices are still falling. Prices for previouslyo ccupied homes have sunk more than 5 percent over the past year to a median of$ 168,300. New-home prices h ave fallen even further, by 7.7 percent, to $209,100. That suggests builders and Realtors are slashing pricest o compete with low-priced foreclosures and short sales. Short sales occur whenl enders allow homes to be sold for less than what's o wed on the mortgage. C ombined, foreclosures a nd short sales are selling at an average 20 percent discount. A nd they're lowering neighboring home values. Devan MacConnell, 28, an administrator at a nonprofiti n southeast Virginia, had b een renting for years b efore buying a short sale t his month a one-bed room condo in Virginia Beach overlooking theo cean. She picked it up for $215,000, about $35,000 less than neighboring apartments. It was a steal," she said. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 7B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1550.0807.76.72% 1 0.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.00-0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7.504.40Bank of Bahamas6.936.930.000.2300.10030.11.44% 0.530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2.842.55Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.0300.09090.03.33% 1 .961.77Fidelity Bank1.771.770.000.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas8.478.470.000.2450.31034.63.66% 2.802.33Colina Holdings2.332.330.000.4380.0405.31.72% 8.508.33Commonwealth Brewery8.508.500.000.7400.00011.50.00% 7.006.21Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.886.44-0.446,6350.4960.26013.04.04% 2.001.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.621.620.000.1110.04514.62.78% 1.771.31Doctor's Hospital1.371.370.000.0740.11018.58.03% 5.504.75Famguard5.435.430.000.4980.24010.94.42% 8.405.35Finco5.395.390.000.7570.0007.10.00% 9.747.75FirstCaribbean Bank8.218.210.000.4940.35016.64.26% 6.005.00Focol (S 5.335.330.000.4350.22012.34.13% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.58ICD Utilities7.307.300.00-0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%M ONDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 2011B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,363.75 | CHG -20.41 | %CHG -1.47 | YTD -135.76 | YTD % -9.05BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.18353.32%4.99% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.14202.10%4.31% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.18543.16%5.14% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 31-Aug-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 31-Aug-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS31-Aug-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 &KULVWLQD3LHUUHRI&RZSHQ 5RDG1HZ3URYLGHQFH%DKDPDV (OYH&KDUOHVRI0DUVK+DUERXU $EDFR%DKDPDV BERLIN Associated Press G ERMANofficials on Monday downplayed prospects of any quick and dramatic change of course in the eurozonedebt crisis, days before a parliamentary vote onb eefing up the continent's r escue fund. Weekend meetings of global financial leaders in Washington raised hopes of a change in strategy, with officials indicatingt hey would focus on furt her boosting the firepower of the ?440 billion ($595 billion perhaps by allowing it t o tap loans from the European Central Bankor otherwise leveraging its lending capacity. H opes for such a move boosted European stock markets on Monday, withG erman and French bank shares rising strongly. However, ahead of a p arliamentary vote Thursd ay on changes to the fund that eurozone leaders already agreed to inJ uly, Berlin was keen to underline its attachmentto its often-criticized stepb y-step approach. P resident Barack Obama, meanwhile speak ing Monday in California said the financial crisis rippling through Europe is "scaring the world" andt hat steps taken by Europ ean nations to stem the eurozone debt problem "haven't been as quick ast hey need to be." Obama said Europe never fully healed fromt he financial crisis in 2007, a nd its troubles have spilled beyond the conti nent and are affecting the U .S. economy as well. His comments were in response to a question p osed by a laid-off work er. Thursday's vote on expanding the powers of t he rescue fund, the socalled European Financial Stability Facility, will bef ollowed over the coming months by final decisions on a second bailout pack a ge for Greece and on a permanent rescue mechanism meant to replace the EFSF from 2013, FinanceM inistry spokesman Mar tin Kotthaus noted. "That is quite simply t he procedure that lies in front of us we will work through it step by s tep," Kotthaus said. When asked in Washington whether he supported the idea of lever aging the rescue fund, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said: "Of course we will use the EFSF in the most efficient way possible." The discussion about the new rescue fund powers is taking place amid speculation that Greece ultimately will be unable to pay its debts and will have to force heavy losses on bondholders. That would be beyond a 21 percent sacrifice agreed to under a second, ?109 billion bailout deal for Greece. Greek and other officials deny that will happen. In an interview with ntv television Monday, Schaueble was asked whether there is a plan to move up the effective July 2013 date of the long-term rescue mechanism, or ESM. Schaeuble pointed out that the process of estab lishing the ESM, which would allow a country togo bankrupt and default on its debts, takes time. "That doesn't go very fast," Schaeuble said. "If we could do it faster ... it would be good, but prob ably we will need the time that we have calculated." Some in Chancellor Angela Merkel's centerright coalition already find the beefing up of the EFSF by giving it new powers hard to swallow,and anything beyond that could be a hard sellamong its lawmakers. GERMANY DOWNPLAYS HOPES OF FAST NEW CRISIS COURSE HOME-BUYING SEASON THE WORST IN AT LEAST 50 YEARS IN THIS AUG. 22, 2011 PHOTO, a home-available sign is seen in front of a new home under construction in Apopka, Fla. Sales of new homes fell to a six-month low in August. The fourth straight monthly decline during the peak buying season suggests the housing market is years away from a recovery. (AP

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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Y O U R P A P E R . Y O U R W E E K E N D Y O U R P A P E R . Y O U R W E E K E N D COMING OCTOBER 1

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B O D Y A N D M I N D P AGE 8B, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 27, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter Y OGA enthusiasts in the Bahamas rolled out their mats last Saturday to join the global celebration of the autumnal equinox and demonstrate unity for World Peace Day. Cl u b On e was t ran sf o rmed i nt o a p eacef ul and serene sp ace fo r yo g a p ractit io n e r s to complete 108 sun salutations'. By the end of the event, participants left the gym with a new a n d i m pro v ed sense of "balance, strength, f lex i bil ity an d ag il ity", sa i d organisers. Yoga instructor and coordinator Janine C ar e y t o l d T r i b u n e He a l t h t h a t e ve r y s p r i n g an d au t u m n eq u i n o x a r o u n d t h e w o rl d p e o ple get together to do these 108 sun salu t at i o n s t o u sh er i n t h e c h an ge o f t h e s eas o n "It is consid e red a n imp ortant tim e o f t h e ye ar a n d i t s i gn i f i es a ch a n ge f ro m su mmer into the winter months," she said. "B a s ical l y w hen yo u d o a s u n sal u tat io n wh i ch i s 12 mo ve men t s, or 12 p o st u res i t i s l i k e a m i n i w o r k o u t Y o u r e al l y d o t ar g et a l l of the musc les o f your b ody b y w o rking on b a lance flex i bility and stre n g th Yo u e n d u p h a v i n g b e t t e r p o s t u r e b e c a u s e y o u're le ngthe nin g t h e s p ine a nd rolling the shoulders back, and you connect with yo u r b r ea t h s o t h at y o u h a ve d ee p e r i n h al a tions and exhalations," said Ms Carey. A bo u t 3 0 p e o pl e p a r t i c i p a t e d i n t h e ev en t M o n e y r ai s ed f r o m p ar t i c i p a n t d o n a tions was earmarked for community ser v i c e p r o g r a m m e s o r g a n i s e d b y t h e Rotaract Club of East Nassau. Yo ga i n st ru ct or El ain e Ker ry sh are d h er views o n t he event : "I th in k t hat t he in ten sity of a yoga practice pushes people to a certain ed g e. I sp e ak f or me an d th e masses when I say we gen e ral ly e n jo y o u r c o mfort zones in life a n d b y p a rticipa tin g i n s om e t hin g l ike t he su n s a l ut a ti ons ; it i s almost like a marathon of yoga. You are given the opportunity to go out of your comfort zone and take yourself to a new edge." "The fall equinox is like that sense of renewal. Traditionally, it is about shed d in g a n d get t in g ri d o f t h e o l d I n y o ga i t is al mo st li k e e xf o li atin g o f yo ur i n sid es and then you can really start again. It d oe s no t ma tter if y o u a re 10 y ea rs old or 95, you can start with where y o u'r e a t a nd whe r e y our b ody is and it becomes a journey." UNITY IN YOGA By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer BA HA M IA NS f lo ck ed to a s emin a r f e a t u r i n g t h e c o n t r o v e r s i al h e r b a l is t k n o w n as "Dr S eb i" to s eek cu res fo r a nu mb er o f h eal th ail men ts. T h e e v e n t a i m e d t o e d u c a t e B a ha m i a ns on the be ne f it s of t he alk al in e di et w hi ch co ns is ts o f n on sta rch b ased f o o d s. It al so emp h asi ses fres h f ru it s an d veget abl es. Th e semin ar was h o sted b y New Li fe E lect ri c Cel l F o o d s at B ahamas Fai th M in i st ries ear li er th i s mo n th J a m a l Mon cur founde r of N e w Li fe, sai d th e even t t u rn ed o u t to b e e ven mor e su ccessf u l th an o rgan isers h ad h o p ed T o s a y t h e l e c t u r e w a s w e l l re cei v ed i s an u nd e r statem en t. W e had ab o u t 1, 700 p eo p le at t he even t a nd th e re we re a n other 1,7 0 0 tha t sh o wed u p at o u r of fi ce. T ho s e wh o hav e us ed D r Sebi' s p r o ducts ar e res p on d i ng very wel l to t hem sayin g h o w it h as ex ceed ed th eir exp ectat io n s, he t ol d Tri b u ne He alt h M r M on cur s a i d mo re a n d more Bah amian s are ad o pt in g a n alk ali ne d i et. A l read y th er e are 2, 000 regu l ar cl ient s rece i vin g servi ce s f rom New L i f e Ou r b as i c p h i l o so p h y i s t h at fo o d sh ou ld be y o ur me d icin e and you r medi cin e sh ou ld b e you r fo o d. Th at i s ou r b a s ic p rin cip le. W hat e ver you put in y our m outh wil l d et e rm i ne yo ur st ate of h ealth We fin d in ou r r e s ea r c h t h a t w h a t e ve r y o u p u t i n s i d e y o u r m o ut h t ha t c on t a i n s s t a r c h, there is no pl a ce in y ou r bod y for t hat W e p ro vid e fo o d t h a t is co n si sten t wit h th e cell ul a r makeu p o f t he b o d y. If yo u h ave a d ef i ci en cy i n cal ci u m w e wi l l gi ve yo u s ea mo ss A nd yo u can u se th at to mak e ice cream; y o u c a n u s e t h a t t o b a k e b r e a d b e c a u s e i t h a s t h e s a m e b i n d i n g e f f ec t as yeast," said M r M o ncu r. The ba si c D r S eb i di et i s abo ut e l imin a ti ng acid ic foo ds from you r di e t and re p lacin g th em wi th alk a l i n e o r e l ec t r i c f o o d s C o mm o n ac i d i c fo od s in clu de ca rr ot s, ce l ery, g arl ic, be e ts oa ts c a ss a v a a nd p ota t oe s said M r M on cu r. Commo n alk a l in e food s in clude c allill o, qu inoa, wild rice a n d sea mo ss. D i s e a s e t h r i v e s o n a n a c i d i c bo dy" so the basic fo rm u la to ea t alk a l in e f oo d to resto re b a l ance to yo ur imm un e s ystem and al l ow yo u r bo d y to h eal i tself "Di seas e is cau sed wh en t her e i s a br eakd o wn o f t he mu cu s memb ran e an d d ep en di n g o n wh er e th at b reak do wn i s i t wil l determi ne y o u r d ise a se I f y our m u c us m e m br a ne is br ok en d ow n in yo ur b ro n ch ial tu b e th e di sea s e t hat wil l man ifest wil l b e bronc h it is. I f it is broke n down in t h e p a n c r e a t i c d u ct i t w i l l m an i f e s t a s di abetes. If th e break do wn is in th e join t s it w i ll ma n ife st a s arthritis," said M r M o ncu r. T h e m u c u s me m b r a n e i s d e s i g n e d to abs o r b a ll form s of a cid. Whe n y ou e a t a ci dic foods c onst a ntly i t eats aw ay t h e muc us membr ane an d ex p o ses th e c el l. On c e t h at o ccu rs th ere i s n o p r o t e c t i o n f o r t h e cell s," he said W hile t he a lka line d i e t h a s m a n y s u p p o rt ers, so me med i cal e x p e r t s h a v e q u e s t io ned wh e t her i t h a s a n y e f f e c t o n t h e b o d y D r S e b i s c l a i m s t hat h i s metho d s cu re c l i e n t s o f d i a b e t e s ; c a n c e r ; H I V / AI D S ; i m p o t en ce ; lu p u s; h e rpes; blin dne ss; sickle cell anemia; paral y s is; a s th m a ; Al z he i m e r s d i s e a s e; f i b r o i d t u m o r s A u t i s m, m en tal illnes s, hea rt dise as e a nd m o r e h a v e m a d e h i m a c o n t r o v e r s i a l h e r b a l i s t S u c h c l a i m s l e d t o D r S e b i s a p p e a r a n c e i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s S u p r e m e C o u r t i n 1 9 8 8 B u t t h e S u p rem e C o u r t o f N ew Yo r k u p h e l d h i s c la i ms af t er man y w i tn es se s c ame t o co u rt wi th th eir test imo ni a l s an d t h e i r me d i c al p a p e r s i n h an d t o p r o ve t hat th e i r d o cumen ted d iseases h ad d isap peared S e v e n t y s e v e n p a t i e n t s p r e s e n t e d th ei r d i agn o st ic sh eet s s h o w i n g t h a t t h e y we re c u r ed o f d i se ase s wh i ch med i ca l ex pe rt s h a d d e em e d i n c u r a b l e. A n e m p l o y e e a t B F M w h o d i d n o t w i s he d to b e na m e d s aid the sem inar was ve ry in fo rma t ive. The re we r e a ton o f p e o p l e a t t h i s e ve n t Th e med ici ne p a r t of the ev ent I w as tr u ly i mp res se d wi t h Th er e ar e s o m e p r o d u c t s t h at I am d e fin itely in ter ested i n pu rch a s in g If yo u t hi nk th e f o o d t h a t y o u a r e e a t i n g n o w i s h e al t h y, af t e r h e ar i n g t h at m an s p e ak yo u w i ll n o t t h in k so an y mo re Ho wev er, th e majo rit y o f th e fo od s th a t he said are h ealth y f or co n sump tio n ar e fou n d on th e o th e r sid e of th e wo rld ," she said Ne w Life Elec tric Ce ll Foo ds is a n e w B a h a m i a n c o m p a n y w h i c h f o c u s e s o n t e a c h i n g B a h a m i a n s h ow t o e a t r i g h t a n d l i v e l on g e r he a l thi e r liv e s Ba h a mi a ns fl oc k to se e he r b a li st D r Se bi DR SEBI Controversial Herbalist Heather Carey Photography/ Photos I think that the intensity of a yoga practice pushes people to a cer tain edge. Janine Carey

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I T IS custo ma r y f or some p e r s o n s w h o h a v e c e r t a i n h e a r t co n d i t i o n s a n d t h o s e wit h a r t if ic ial jo i nt s to t ake a n t i bi o t ic s be f o re so m e de n t a l treatments. Th e se p e o p l e m a y b e a t ri s k of developing an infection in the heart or at the site of the a rti fic ia l jo int The a nti bio tic s t a k e n b e f o re t h e se d e n ta l p ro cedures will reduce this risk. T he ac t of t ak i ng th e se a n ti bi o tic s be fore the de nta l p roce dures is called antibiotic pro phylaxis. De nt al he alt hcar e pr o fes si onals in T he Bahamas are g ui de d i n the ir pra ct ic e of th e science and ar t of dent ist ry, b y gu ide li ne s pro vi de d by th e Bahamas Dental Council. T he gu idel ines comm only r e c o m m e n d e d b y t h e B ah ama s D enta l Cou nc il fr e q ue nt ly m irro r t hose gi ve n b y r e c o g n i s e d i n t e r n a t i o n a l orga nis a tions. The America n Dental A ss ociat ion ( ADA ), American Heart Association (AHA) and Ame rica n Aca demy of Orthopedic Surgeons (A A OS) ar e s uch or gan is ations. T h e r e f o r e w h en t r e a t i ng p at ie nt s w i th he a rt c on dit io ns d e n ti st s c o m mo n l y f ol l o w r e c ommendations developed by t h e AH A w i th i np u t f r om t h e ADA. W h e n t re a t in g pa t i e nt s w h o ha ve total jo int replac ements they commonly refer to rec ommendations developed by AAOS. T h e A H A r e c o m m e n d a tion s f or per s ons w i th hear t c o n d i t i o n s a r e m e a n t t o r ed u ce t h e r i s k o f in f e ct i ve endocarditis. Infective endo c a r d itis (I E ) is a n infe cti on of the lining inside the heart or th e heart va lves wh ich ma kes the suff e r er very ill and c an r es ul t i n d eat h. I f n ot ma na g e d a p p r o p r i a t e l y t h e patient can die. In t h e pa st m a n y h e a rt c o n dit i ons wer e t ho ugh t t o p ut patients at ris k for developing IE. This is no longer the opinion of the AHA. T h e y a n a l y s e d p u b l i s h e d research and other scientific articles and determined that fe w er c ond ition s w ere assoc ia te d w i t h IE I t w a s c o n c l u d e d t hat th e risk s of b ad re ac tio ns to antibiotic s outwei ghed the b e n e f i t s o f p r o p h y l a x i s f o r mo s t p at i en t s ; p r o p h yl a c t i c a nti bio tic s did no t prev en t IE d e fin it iv el y a nd b ac t eri a fro m t h e m o u t h e n te r i ng t he b l oo d stream during daily brushing are mor e li kel y to c a us e I E t han a fter a de nta l t r e at men t. The likelihood of bacteria becoming resistant to antibi otic s as a result of over us ag e was also a major concern for the AHA. I t i s n o w a cc e pt e d t h at a s m a l l e r g r o u p o f p a t i e n ts n e e d t o u se p ro ph y la c t ic a nt ib i ot ic s before dental treatments. The current AHA recom mendations advise the use of preventive antibiotics before c ertain dental pr oc edures for people with: Artificial heart valves A history of infective endo carditis A cardiac transplant that develops a heart valve problem The following congenital (present from birth) heart condi tions: unrepaired or incompletely repaired cyanotic (showing bluish discoloration due to insufficient oxygen in the blood); congeni tal heart disease, including those with palliative shunts and conduits; a completely repaired congenital heart defect with prosthetic (synthetic) material or device, whether placed by surgery or by catheter (flexible tube) intervention, dur ing the first six months after the procedure, and any repaired congenital heart defect with residual defect at the site or adjacent to the site of a prosthetic patch or a prosthetic device. P eopl e who t ook pr oph yl act ic ant ib iot ics in th e pas t b u t n o l o n g e r n e e d t h e m i n c l u d e t h o s e w i t h : m i t r a l v a l v e p r o l a p s e ; r h e u m a t i c heart disease; bicuspid valve dise a se ; c al c ifi e d ao rti c ste n os is, a nd c ongenital hea r t cond i t i o n s s u c h a s v e n t r i c u l a r s e p t a l d e f e c t a t r i a l s e p t a l defect and hypertrophic car diomyopathy. T h e r e c o m m e n da ti o n s fr o m the AAOS apply to persons who have total joint replace m en t s T h e A A O S ai m s t o re d u c e th e ri s k o f i n fe c ti o n s a t the site of a n artifi ci al joi nt in p e r s o n s u n d er go i n g c er t ai n d e n t al pr oc ed u r e s P a t ie n t s with joint replacements who a r e h a v i n g i n v a s i v e p r o c e du re s o r w ho ha v e o th e r bo d y in f e c t i o n s a re a t i n c r e a s e d r is k of b a c te r ia in f e c ti n g t he i r a rti fic ial jo int. Pa tie nts wh o h av e pins, pl ates o r other or th opedic (bone related) hardware are not affected. A n t ib i o t ic pr op h yl a xi s a s described by the AAOS may b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r t h o s e patients who have had previ ou s p ro sth e t ic j oi n t i nf e c ti o n s. I t may als o be considered for t h os e wit h ot he r con d it i on s t h a t m a y p r e d i s p o s e t h e patient to infection. Some such conditions that you should be aware of are: All patients with prosthetic joint replacement Immune system compro mised/immune system suppressed patients Inflammatory arthropathies (for example rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) Drug-induced immune sys tem suppression Radiation-induced immune system suppression Patients with co-morbidities (for example diabetes, obesity, HIV, smokers) Previous prosthetic joint infections Malnourishment Haemophilia HIV infection Insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetes Malignancy A ll r e com me nd at io ns ar e t o e n s u r e t h e b e s t f o r t h e p at i en t I f yo u ar e no t s ur e whether or not you fall into o n e o f t h e s e c a t e g o r i e s a s d eter min ed by th e A HA o r t he A AO S check with you r m e d i c a l h e a l t h c a r e p r o f e s sional. It is also very impor tant to talk to your dentist to dete rmin e if an y of the a bov e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s a p p l y t o you Pl ease ta ke c are o f y our h e a r t yo u r j o i n t s a nd y o u r mouth. This article is for informa tional purposes only. It is not intended and may not be treated as, a substitute for profes sional medical/dental advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or dental professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical/dental con dition. Never disregard professional medical/dental advice or delay in seeking it because of a purely informational publica tion. Copyright 2011 by Dr. Andre R. Clarke. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this article, in whole or in part, is prohibited without written permission. If you have questions, please send e-mail to dr_andreclarke@hotmail.com. Dr AndrŽ R Clarke, DDS, MBBS Special Care Dentistry WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 27, 201 1, P AGE 9B P r o p h y l a c t i c a n t i b i o t i c s i n d e n t i s t r y B y A N D R E C L A R K E KEEPING YOUR MOUTH ALIVE What about flat feet? T H I S w e e k I c h o s e t h i s to p ic b ecau s e s o man y p er s o ns h a ve pr es e n t ed t o o u r e stab lish men t w it h t he c ond ition flat feet'. F l a t f e e t a l s o k n o w n a s p e s planus', is either acquired or inherited and it is one of the most common foot deformi t i e s e x p e r ie nc e d b y th e p u b li c I t ch ar act er is e d b y th e f lat t e n i n g o f t h e a r c h o n t h e medial (inside) of your feet. So met imes f lat f eet o ccur b e c a u s e y o u r a r c h e s d o n t de velop dur ing childhood, or i n o t h e r i n s t a n c e s f l a t f e e t ma y o cc u r na t u r al l y a s yo u age. Inherited Flatfoot A no rma l f la tf oo t is se en a s congenital and is believed to b e inhe r i ted. No r m al flat fe et a r e f unc tion a lly healthy and usually cause no discomfort, however they can sometimes cau s e s h oe f i tt i ng pr o bl em s be cause as the foot sits in the shoe it occ upies mor e spac e i n t h e m i d f o ot a r e a o f t he s h o e T h i s f i t t i n g p r e s e n t s more dir ect pres su re on the shank area. Acquired Flatfoot A cq u ir e d f l at f ee t on t he other hand can present more s e r i o u s p r o b l e m s S e v e r e p r o natio n (ou twa r d rota tion) o f the h eel a nd a pronoun ce d out-swing of the forefoot is a m a j o r c o n c e r n b e c a u s e i t affects one's natural balance. T h e ca us es o f acq u i r ed f l at f e e t a re ma n y b u t i n o ld e r a g e gr o u p s i t co m mo n l y r e s u l t s from decreased exercise and i n c r e a s e d w e i g h t w h i c h i n turn adds t o the mechanic al di s turban ces of the foot. This c an f urt her lead t o a s evere breakdown of the arch. The foot becomes d isto rted with an extremely depressed arch and a rolling-in and down at the inner ankle. How important is the arch? T h e a r c h o f t h e f o o t d i s tributes weight evenly across the feet and up the legs and c a n a f f e c t w a l k i n g A w e l l de v el o p ed ar ch i s ba l an c ed be t w een rigidity (for stability) and flexibility (for adapt ing to surfaces). Wh i l e acq u ir ed f la t f e et can be given relief by the use of orthotics, they are among the hardest-to-fit feet. Ordi n a r y s h o e s o n t h e s e f e e t quickly go out of shape, and h e n c e s p e c i a l o r t h o p e d i c footwear, plus highly skilled a n d e x pe ri e nc e d f it ti ng a bi l it y is r e qu i r ed f or s u ch f ee t I f y o u hav e been experi e n c ing pain in t he arch ar ea o f the foot you should seek profes s i o na l h e l p b e c a u s e y ou r a r c h es may b e fall ing and c o uld be sav ed by obtaining proper arch supports. Bernadette D Gibson, a Board certified and licensed pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Trinity Plaza, West Bay Street, Nassau. Bahamas www.footsolutions.com/nassau The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliat ed companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 322-FOOT (3668). B y B E R N A D E T T E G I B S O N FOOT SOLUTIONS By SPECIAL TO THE TRIBUNE Get Well Bahamas "Think of genes as loaded guns. It's your lifestyle that pulls the triggers and so you can actually reprogramme your genes." Dr Barry Russell T he year 2007 marked a turning point in ortho dontist Dr Barry Russell's life. In that year in the space of ten months he lost five family members to chronic non-communicable diseases. H is mot her Annie Rus sell died of a st roke i n January at the age of 78, fol l ow e d by hi s o l de s t b ro t he r C ol i n T at e m who als o suf fer ed a st roke i n M arch at the age of 62. I n J u n e h i s o l d e s t s i s t er B e v e r l y L o c k hart succumbed t o breast cancer at the a g e o f 5 6 a n d i n A u g u s t h i s c l o s e s t cousi n an d bel oved mentor Ph i l ip Rus se ll a l so d ie d af t er a ba tt l e w i t h pr ost at e cancer. T h e m on t h of Oct ober brought mo re tr ag edy as he l os t hi s y oung es t si s ter B renda R ussel l to breast c an c er. "T hat' s when i t hit home to me and I sai d, "I w il l not be a vict im o f my genes a nd y o u w o n t e i t h er D r R us s e l l s ha r e d r ec e nt l y w i t h 40 p ar t i ci pa nt s of G e t W el l Baham as Phase II "T hink of genes as l o aded gu ns I t' s your l i fest yle that pull s the tr iggers and so you can actual ly r e-program me your g e n e s. Yo u h a v e th e a b il ity w ith th e d e c i s i o n s y o u m a k e t o l i t e r a l l y t u r n genes on and o f f s o it' s t he sig n al s t hat y ou send to y ou r gen es th at will tu rn th e m o n an d of f. If y o u mak e a co nsci ous deci si on ri ght her e t o do thi ngs di ff er en tl y a s y ou' re bei ng ta ught i n t hi s w on de rf u l pr o gr a mm e yo u w i l l not h av e to l ive t he same l if esty le t h at your for efat hers did, D r R ussel l sai d. L i ke m o s t B a h am i an s D r R u s s e l l s a i d he enj oys go od food. As the s on of L oft o n Russel l, a chef w i t h a s u c c e s s f u l c a t e r i n g b u s i n e s s ( d ec e a s e d 12 y e a r s ) D r R u s s el l h a s b ee n around goo d t ast ing f o od al l of his l i fe and knows w hat it 's l ike to be t empt ed M y j o u r n e y s t a r t e d 1 5 y e a r s a g o when I w as 35. I s aid I w anted t o be in th e be st s hap e of m y l i f e a t age 40. I w as p r o babl y about 15 poun ds overw eight an d I w anted t o have m uscl es and look go od. I became passi onate to t he point wh er e I bec am e ob se ss i ve and I ov er di d it. I w as w orking out seven days a w eek an d runni n g 30 t o 40 m il es a week and li fti ng w eight s al most ever y day. It was fun and yo u know I achieved m y goal. At ag e 40 I w as i n t he best shape of m y l i f e b ut I b ur n t ou t s o b et w e e n 4 0 an d 4 7 I e x e r ci se d o c c a si o n a lly an d my d i e t went out t he wi ndo w so I gai ned abo ut 20 pounds," Dr R ussel l sai d. And the n the fa te ful t rag ic year 20 07 c ame a nd h e e xp er i e n ced th e p a i n fu l loss of f ive cl ose fam il y m embers i n t he space o f 10 mont h s "I rea li se d I w as com ing up on age 50 an d i f I d i d no t w a nt t o b e a vi c t i m o f m y gen es I w ould have to st art doing s o m e thi ngs di ff ere ntl y. I bec ame cons ci ousl y aware of heal th and t he r ole of food you see w e need t o t reat food l i ke medici ne. T he medi cal pr o f essi on is n t r eally know ledgeabl e enough. They aren't tr ai ne d i n n ut ri t i on. S o you hav e t o t a ke r e s p o ns i b i l i t y f o r y o u r o w n h e a l t h T h a t s w h e n I s t a r t e d r e a d i n g e v e r y t h in g I cou l d get my hands on and I real l y got into longevi ty, wel lness and anti -agi ng an d I f ound out f or m ysel f t he t ruth, Dr. R ussel l sai d. Af ter r eading up on al l of the w ell k now n di ets he sai d he chose a diet of lean meats vegetabl es, f rui ts and nuts wi th no star ch, s im il ar to w hat m ed i cal a n t h r o p o l o g i s t s a y o u r s u p r e m e l y h eal thy" preh i st oric ances tors at e. T his, he said, was bec au s e he gai ned an underst an di ng of how excess s tarches and sugar aff ect t h e body. "Th e late st re se arc h is fin din g t ha t chronic syst emi c i nfl ammat ion is what causes al l of t hese bad di seases that w e t a l k a b o u t t h e c a n c e r d i a b e t e s a nd h e a r t d ise ase s; whe n we ea t to o mu ch o f it (p ro c es s ed gr a i ns br e ad r i ce a nd s u ga r) what happens is t he sugar turns i nto fat and t ha t s w he n w e st a r t ge t t i ng bi g ge r Dr Russe ll sa id. He expl ained that s tarc hes and s u gar give the body an inst ant high of en er gy b ec ause t hey are quickl y broken d ow n int o glucos e and carr ied i nto t he bl o ods trea m, b ut for the sa me r ea son th ey of t e n l e av e u s f e el i ng s t a r v ed a g ai n w i t hi n an hou r o r so l ea di n g t o b i ng e e at i ng "A nd t hat s wh y yo u hea r pe opl e s a y, ma n I can't g et off th ese carbs'. It's beca use you'r e addict ed to i t. What has b e en fo u n d is t h a t t h e re c e p to r si te s cocaine addicts get addicted to cocaine from are the same rece ptor sites th at sugar attaches to so we see why it's so d i f f i c u l t t o b r e a k t h e h a b i t b e c a u s e yo u're fig htin g some th i n g ph ys iolo gic a l I t s no t j u s t a he a d g a m e. I t s n ot j u s t a mind power thing," Dr Russell said. Al t hou gh c onve nt i ona l d ie t i ci an s an d nu t ritionists wil l te l l y ou t h at yo u need car bo hy dra tes for e ne rgy Dr Rus sell sai d the fact of the matter is vegetables an d fruits ar e carb oh yd rates So whe n p eo ple say low-carb wh at th ey re al ly me a n is lo w st ar ch so w e ne ed to ge t o ur starch do w n W e do n't ne ed to c ut o ut carb oh ydr ates bec aus e we ne ed to eat as ma ny fru its an d ve ge t ab l e s a s w e ca n b ec a us e t h er e a r e a l ot of ph yto-n utrie nts and c anc er fi g htin g v it a m in s th a t y o u c a n o n ly g e t f r o m fruits an d ve ge t a ble s, he sa i d S imil a rly, Dr Russe ll said we do n't n ee d t o cu t m e at f r om our di e t s b ec au se lean meats a re an e xce ll e nt so urce o f p r o t e i n Me at ha s go tten a b ad r ep uta tion be cau se of the wa y it is pro ce ssed th e pro ble m is an imals are no t allowed to be g rass fed In stea d the y are fe d wi th gra in an d gr ain is wha t m esse s u s up be cau se gra i n cau ses an i m als to dev elop om ega 6 fa ts (b ad fats) a s op po sed to the goo d o meg a 3 fats," h e said. D r R u s s e l l s a i d b a d f a t s i n c r e a s e in f la m m a t io n in t h e b o d y a n d a r e a l ead ing c aus e of agi ng an d di s eas e, w i t h t he av er age di et con tai ni ng a r at i o of 30 bad fat s to one good fat As a resul t, h e said it i s n ece ssary to s up pleme nt ou r diets with g oo d fats. Dr Ru ssell ack no wl e dg ed th at ther e are d iff e ren t p ath s fo r eac h pe rson to ac hie v e his o r he r well ne ss go a ls bu t h e s a i d t h e i m p o r t a n t t h i n g i s t h a t eve ryo ne ta ke s resp on sibility for th eir own h ea l th I'm n ot te l lin g y ou this is the on ly way. T h is is wha t I've fo un d to be th e be st way f o r me You r e go ing to h av e to mak e a de cision o n what is the be st way for you ." D r Ru ssell to l d th e G et We l l Bah ama s particip an ts. DIS ARM IN G TH E L OADED GE NES One man's search for health

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WOMAN P AGE 10B, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 27, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE I f you went to a hospital and saw a man or woman in a white jacket with a stethoscope around their neck you would think they were a doctor. I f yo u s aw a veh ic le co ve r ed i n r i b b o n s a n d b a l l o o n s y o u w o u l d th ink that some one just got ma rr i ed or that a float parade was about to begin. It's easy to form opinions about situa tions just by looking a t a ppearanc es and it's just as easy to fo rm o pinio ns a bout pe ople Just reme mber, as we are making assumptions a b ou t o th e rs th e y w i ll no t h es it a te to return the favour. W h e n d e a l i n g w i t h t h i s t o u c h y s u b j e c t o n e m u s t r e m e m b e r t w o things: appearances do matter and appearances do not always tell the whole story. A t a b r a n d i n g s e m i n a r t h a t I a t t e n d e d d u r i n g t h e T h e o d o r e Elyet t' s M iss T een B a hamas Beau t y P agea nt ou r gues t s peak er s el f im ag e an d b ran di ng spe c ia li st S ta c ia Wi ll iams in fo rm ed us t hat p eop le make a t leas t 1 2 ass umptions about yo u j us t by th e way you lo ok As a t een am bas s ado r my d ail y d uty i s t o p r es ent n ot o nly m yse lf b ut als o to pr es en t a b ra nd. E ver y day I mu st m ake sur e that my h ai r, m ak eu p, a ttire a nd a ttit ude is fi ttin g for th e bran d I repr es ent. You may fee l as t ho ugh yo u d o n o t h a v e a b r a n d o r co m p a n y t o r epr es en t, bu t you do E a c h a n d e v e r y o n e o f u s a s t e e n a g e r s r e p r e s e n t s e i t h e r o u r s ch oo l or o u r f ami l y, bu t mo s t of al l, we re pr es ent our s el ves Th er e w i l l n e v e r b e a m o r e i m p o r t a n t b ran d th an y ou. E ver y t ime you w ear you r schoo l u n i f o r m y o u a r e r e p r e s e n t i n g a brand a nd y ou hav e a responsibility t o u ph old t hat br an d. T he w ay you c ar ry yours elf is the w ay y ou wi ll in fac t be t rea ted. This r u l e ap p l ie s t o bo t h y o u ng l a di e s and yo un g me n. W he n co r p or a t io n s s e le ct m an a ge r s a n d s a l e s p e r s o n s t h ey l o o k fo r pe rs o ns wh o loo k th e p ar t and th ey choo se t hos e who can han dle th e r es po ns ib il it y. P er s o nal it y and ap pe ar an ce a re l i k e y i n g a n d y a n g ; t h e y a r e t h e exact opp osi te, th e i nter ior and the e x t e r i o r B u t t h e y m e e t t o g e t h e r and cre ate b alan ce. F ar t oo many ti mes the r igh t per s on wil l mis s o ut o n t h a t r i g h t o p p o r t u n i t y o r j o b beca us e t hey o nl y had hal f o f the equ at ion In m y pe rso na l e x pe rie n ce I c om e i n t o c o n t a c t w i t h p e r s o n s w h o as s ume t hat I a m a mod el. T h is i s gr e a t b ec au s e i t m e an s t h a t I a m doi ng m y jo b and re pr es ent in g my b ra nd c o rre c tl y. A lth o ug h af te r th e y mak e t hi s as s um pt ion i t is my du ty no w t o al lo w m y in t el li ge nce an d p ers o nality to shine throug h. I must be a s s o cial and per s on abl e as p os si bl e. Whe neve r a per s on o bs er ves my a p p e a r a n c e a n d p e r s o n a l i t y t h e y s h o u l d b e a b l e t o s e e w h y I wa s se lect ed a s Th eod or e El yet t' s Mi s s Te en Ba ham as A lways r eme mber app ear ance wi l l ca t c h t h e a t t e n t i o n b u t p er so nal it y wil l ca ptu r e t he h ear t" I f yo u r a p p ea r an c e i s al r ea d y g r e a t th en get t ha t p er s on al it y i n or de r and vice ver s a. Yamease Swain, 18, is Theodore Elyett's Miss Teen Bahamas 2011/12; she beat out 16 competitors and was crowned at the pageant's grand finale last month. B y Y A M E A S E S W A I N SPEECH FROM THE THRONE WHA T DOES Y OU R BRA ND S A Y ABO UT Y OU? By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter SHE may be a gran dmot her, but t hat d oesn 't s top 60-year -old Dor othy Cor ene P oiti er f rom being a f ierce f ashi onis ta. With a pas sio n for fas hio n and a par ticul ar l ove of h ats Dor othy s aid when sh e dres s es, she d oes so t o imp res s. When s he goes to work at th e B an k of N o va Scoti a c af eter ia, she even st rut s her s tu ff i n high h e e l s M rs Poi tier s aid s he can bar ely c o unt t he num ber of hat s s he owns. Some ar e big, s ome ar e smal l, and whi le wearin g som e you can har dly s ee her eyes. "I 'm no t good at th e des igning part but I d o have lo ts of h ats I have two hat s in par ticul ar t hat c o st me $400 each. T hey are all som e nice hats I jus t l ove them ," she s aid. T his weekend, M rs P oitier will receive t he Silen t Woman of Inf luence awar d at t he annu al gradu ation c er emon y of t he E s th er F oundat ion. Ten f emale part icipant s i n the an nual yo uth developm e n t pr ogr amme of the foun datio n will gr aduat e on t he w e e k e n d M rs Po itier is kno w n for her no-n ons ense ap pro ac h and her jovial l augh. F rien ds s ay s he keeps everyon e laughin g as s he tr ies s omet imes to u se "mo dern w o rds th at s he is not famil iar w i th. S he is c al led "M s D" or "B i g Dot" b y her fr iends peer s and co-wor ker s an d "mom" or "mummy" b y the man y c h ildr en she h as r eared Or iginal ly fr om San Salvado r, Mr s P oit ier t ook u p her fir s t job in Nas sau as a do mest ic work er at the Sh oal Res taur ant. She lat er moved t o work ing in the cafet eri a at Scot iabank, Raw s on S quar e location and r emain e d ther e unt il her r eti remen t in 2007. Although she has many claims to fame, her love of hats is by far the most glamorous. Mrs Poitier is generous when it comes to her hats. She loans them to friends and family in need of a hat for special occasions. "I have lavender, purple, peach, green, there are so many. When the Prince William got married I went to the hat shop and got a hat made (for the wedding)." "Every dress I have, I would try to get a hat to match. Hats are my weakness, I have three closets that they occupy. My mother was the same way and I took right after her." Mrs Poitier is also an avid cook and she loves to bake. She has four children and five grandchildren. She resides in Nassau with her husband of 42 years and their youngest child. Although she is herself a senior citizen, Mrs Poitier spends her weekends caring for the elderly in the church and the community, cooking, washing and cleaning for them. By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer M U R D E R r even ge and l ove the fir st r om an ce t hril ler by upan d-com in g B aham ian au thor Ken dia Sm ith h as it al l. T h e n o v e l T he D a r k e s t T r u t h ta k e s r e a d e r s o n a n e m o t i o n a l r o l l er c o a s t e r of e ve n t s a l l c e nt e r e d a r ound a y oun g w om an 's u ndy in g quest to aven ge t h e m u r d ersuic i de of her pare nts T h e g o a l o f t hi s y o u ng w o m a n i s to tr ack d own an d kill th e m an r es ponsi bl e for her m othe r' s i nf id el it y, whi c h ul t i mat el y l ed to t he m u r d e r S pe a ki ng w i t h T r i bu n e W o m an M s Sm i t h s a i d t h e pl ot o f t h e b oo k w as ins pi red by her wi l d im agi natio n a n d so me p er so n al e x p er ie n c e s Th is b o o k is a bo u t a yo u n g w om an st r uggl i ng w it h her des ir e t o exact r even ge on t h e per son s r es ponsi bl e f or t he w ei ght she is c a r r y i n g T h e m a i n c h a r a c t e r m eet s a m an w i th a hi st or y and a p a s t f a r w o r s e t ha n h e r s a n d u n b e k n o wn s t to h e r t h e ir l i v e s a r e m ore ent w ine d t han ei t her one of t hem c an fat hom N eit her on e of t h e m i s i n t er e s t ed i n an yt h i n g o t he r t h a n r u n n i n g a w a y f r o m t h e p a s t t h at ha unt s t hem an d f i n al l y b ei n g a bl e to l iv e a peac eabl e l if e. Ms S mi th said he r own life is o ft en l i ke a m ovi e a nd s he d rew i ns pi rat i on fr om t hat. "I ha ve an i mag inat i on out of t hi s w orl d. M y i ns pi rat i on f or t he b o o k c a m e f r o m s o m e o f t h e e x p e r i ence s I w ent t hroug h and som e o f t h e e x p e r i e n c e s m y f r i e n d s w e nt t h rough I do n't necessaril y l ike c omi ng cl ose t o home w hen I am th i n k i n g o f i d e a s fo r m y b o o k h owe ver, it ins pi res m y im agi nat i on. I al l ow ever yt hin g to i m pact m e, she s ai d. T he hard est p art of w ri ti ng t his b ook, t he aut hor sai d, wa s fus i ng t oge ther t he rom ance and th ri l ler g enre s. P u t t i n g t h e s e t w o g e n r e s t o ge t her w a s t he mo s t ch al l e ngi n g part of wri ting th i s en ti re b oo k. R oma nce and thr i l le r d o not r eal l y g o tog et her so I had t o f i gure out how I cou ld m ake t hes e people 's liv es b lissf ully mise rab le," s he sai d. It w as cr i ti c al t o ma ke t he st ory f eel a s r eal as pos si bl e s o t hat her a u d ie n c e co u ld r e la te t o it M s Sm it h sa id. "In real li fe t h er e are no perfect r elatio ns hip s. Th ere are no ha ppy endi ngs al l the ti me and I w an t e d t o s h ow t h a t i n t hi s b oo k I w a nt e d i t t o b e r ea l a n d r e l a t a b l e s he sai d. S h e h o pe s re ad e r s a re e nt er ta ine d by th e s tor y a n d g et he r ove ral l mes sag e. Th e b o o k 's m e s s a g e i s t h a t w hen fac ed wi th adver si ty or an o th e rw is e u n p le a s an t sit u a tio n em ot ions becom e unr eli ab le a nd di s c er nm ent i s s om et i m es t ai nt e d, s o i t w o ul d be be st to l ook at y our f act s and l ook at t he pre sent s it ua ti o n a t f a ce v a lu e r a t h e r th a n m a k e a p r e j u d i c e d j u d g m e n t ba sed on for mer e xper ie nces a nd one 's own unde rs tand ing ." Ev er s i nce s he w as young, Ms Sm it h sa id s he had a pass i on for w ri t in g and she cre dit s her fa mi ly w i t h c r e a t i n g i n he r a ke e n i n t e r e s t i n th e cra ft "When I w as youn ger I di dn' t ha ve m any f ri ends and I w as the o l d e s t o f m y s i b l i n g s a n d c o u s i n s s o t he onl y out l et I had w as my pe n and my f aithf ul blac k and w hite s chool bo ok. I w rot e d own al l my f ee li ng s i n th ose books ; t hey w ere m y best f ri ends ." T h e D a r k e s t T r u t h w a s r el eas ed on Sept embe r 5. UPC O MI NG AUTH O R RELE AS E S NE W B O OK THE D AR KES T T R U T H KENDIA SMITH Bahamian Author For the love of hats HAT FA NATIC : 60-year-old D orothy Cor e ne P o it ie r (above) said s he can barely count the number of hats she owns.

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THE TRIBUNE SECTION B TUESD A Y SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer A W O MA N ru nn ing t h r o ugh th e w ind w it h a r ms l ift e d t r iump h an tl y t o wa r ds t h e sk y is t h e s ub jec t o f A s hl ey Po w el l' s aw a rd -w inn ing pa int in g ent it l ed "E l at io n." T he p a int ing wa s n a me d t he be s t p i e c e a t t h e o f fi ci a l o p en i n g o f t h e P u b li c Treasu ry Bah ama M ama A r t Exh ib i t i o n T h e ex h i b i ti o n f e at u re d 25 vi s u a l a n d l i t e r a r y a r t i s t s w h o w e r e a l l Bah am i an wo men un d e r 30. Th e p ub l ic l au nc h at th e n ewl y ren o vated Pu b l i c T r e a s u r y b ui l d i n g w a s h e l d l a s t n igh t. I am very ecstati c I wo n t hi s award s i m pl y be c a u s e th i s w a s on e o f t he pie c e s t ha t w a s t oug h," A shl e y told Tr ib un e W o ma n I di d no t t hin k I wou ld comp le t e th is p iece b ecaus e I th ou ght I was no t read y t o att emp t a pi ece o f th i s mag ni tu d e I wen t th rou gh a l ot o f t rial an d e rr o r At o n e p o i n t I h a d i t j u s t h a n g i n g t h ere i n co m p let e. M y f at h er s aw i t an d o nl y b ecaus e o f h is en cou rageme n t I was abl e to f in ish i t. Vi rgi n ia C art wr igh t t reas u rer at t h e P ub lic Treasu ry sa i d Ashl ey s p ain tin g was s e l ected b eca u se of i ts ex p ressi on o f freed om. "I l ik e th e t h eme an d w h at i t d ep ic ts a y o u ng l a d y embraci ng th e wo rld Th e pain ti n g sp ea k s to th e expr e s sio n o f f reedo m," she said A s h l e y s a i d h e r u n i q u e s t y l e o f painti ng constantly exposes her o wn vu l n er ab i l i t y a n d s tr en gt h S h e sa i d sh e tri es t o merge h er p o e t ry w ith v i br a n t i m a g e s B y u s i n g b r i g h t c o l o u r s m i x e d w i t h sh arp l i ne s an d str ik i n g pos ture s, she s a id s he suc ce eds in p r es enting realit y t hro u g h her o wn e y e s "Art h as always b e en in m e. I r e al i s e d m y t al e n t a f t er watch in g my sist er. S h e p ain ts a l so, a nd a ft e r s e e ing he r dr a w a n d se eing how good sh e wa s at it I tri ed my han d s a t it an d f ou n d th at we b oth had co mpl etely d if feren t st yles," Ashl ey said T ho u g h acryl ic o n ca n vas i s h e r stap le, sh e also dab bl es i n scu lp ti ng, cl a y and cerami c. T he su b jects i n man y of her p ieces ar e o f t en v er y f e mi n i n e, d ep i c t i n g As h ley's o wn b e l iefs an d in terests. As a Ch ri sti a n woman sh e l ik es t o i n co r p o rat e f ai t h an d th e id eas o f t ri al s and p erseverance in to h er p ieces. A s h l e y s a i d s h e a dm i r e s t he l a t e Amos F ergu son an d h i s cand i d way o f ex p r es s i n g h i s b e l i ef s t h r o u gh h i s p a i n t in gs; h e wou l d o ften claim, Go d to l d me wh at to p ain t." In m os t of m y pa in ti ng s I t ry to d ra w my in spi ratio n f rom my sp ir itu al be lie fs I me r ge my ins pira tion with f emi n i n i ty an d l o t s o f co l o u r, sh e sa i d A sh l ey w as gr ad u at ed f r o m Q u een s C o l le ge i n 2 00 7 a nd e nte re d the a rt p r o g r a m m e a t T h e C o l l e g e o f T h e Ba ha ma s wher e she st u die d for two ye ar s u n d e r t h e t u t el age o f S u e B en n e t W i l l i am s H ei n o S c h m i d J o h n C o x an d Katri na Cartwri ght S h e is p resent ly p ur sui ng a B a ch elo r's Degree i n grap hi c d esign a t t he Art In st itu te o f A t lan ta an d is exp ected to grad uate next S pri ng. AR T PIECES OF OTHER P AR TICIP ANTS OF THE BAHAMAS MAMA AR T EXHIBITION BAHAMIAN artist Ashley Powell. THE WINING piece of the Bahama Mama Public Trea sury Art Exhibition. Ashley Powell's Elation' won best piece at the Bahama Mama Art Exhibition.

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B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net F ans got a chance to s ee both ends of the spectrum at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex Monday as two s enior boys games were p layed to open the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools softball season. O n one end, it was a p itchers delight as David Nathan led the Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders to an impressive 15-4 win over the St Augustines CollegeB ig Red Machine in an abbreviated six-inning affair. O n the other end, the Tem ple Christian Suns and the F aith Temple Warriors engaged in a slug-fest that saw the Suns outshine the Warriors 24-19. C C r r u u s s a a d d e e r r s s 1 1 5 5 , B B i i g g R R e e d d M M a a c c h h i i n n e e 4 4 T he tall, slender Nathan had the SAC batters feasting o n a steady diet of pitches as he was working on a no-hit s hutout for the first four innings. It wasnt until the top of the fifth that Dwayne Davis led off with a single and eventua lly scooted home with the Big Red Machines first runo n Travis Pratts run-producing single. A batter later, Pratt caught a ride home on Aaron Woods RBI single. And with one out, Wood was driven home on Kyle Higgs RBI g round out. By then, the game was out o f reach as Nathan got all the support he needed from his t eam-mates as they came through with three runs in the first and another six in the fourth to surge out to a com fortable 9-0 cushion. We are just starting off, but we could have been bett er, Nathan said. We havent practiced for a long t ime, but once we get into our groove, you can expect a much better performance from us. After the Big Red Machine s tarted to get their offense clicking, Nathan said he was n t concerned. Because we have confi dence in ourselves that we could beat them. We beat them three years in a row, so we just came into the game thinking it wouldntb e any different. We just had to beat them, he added. Nobody was more confident than coach Ainsworth B eckford, who has coached the Crusaders to a playoff berth the last four years, including a trip to the final where they lost 2-1 in the best-o f-three series to the St Andrews Hurricanes. They performed as I e xpected. David was dominant on the mound, but I wasa little bit concerned about o ur defense, he said. We just need to tighten up s ome more and move our lazy feet. But its going to be a long s eason. Its a work in progress. But I expect us to do very w ell. Weve been going for four years trying to get thisB AISS championship. I told the boys that this is the last l ap of the 4 x 4 relay. Nathan finished with a five hit, 12 strike out performance for the win, while Blair Seymour gave 11 hits with sevens trike outs for the loss. SACs coach Reggie Forbes a ttributed the loss to first game jitters. Its basically a new team with 10th and 11th graders, he said. We have some s eniors, who are to be the nucleus of the team, but theya ll didnt perform well. We just simply had one m istake after the other. Were not going to make excuses. We just didnt perform up to our ability. Hats off to NCA. They hit the ball and their p itcher had our hitters trying to go for the big swing. S S u u n n s s 2 2 4 4 , W W a a r r r r i i o o r r s s 1 1 9 9 C ordero Greenslade helped his cause by ripping four home runs to go along with his winning performance on the mound for Temple Chris t ian. Ian Smith also banged out a p air of home runs, scoring four times, while J Albury s cored four times and Kyle Johnson came across the plate three times. First one was very shaky. We have a lot of guys that p lay in the different leagues, but Im trying to get them to p lay team ball, said Temple Christians coach Robbie C oakley. Its not only them. Its a whole team, so they have to play together as one. D ominic Rolle suffered the loss. Josrado Chrisolm andC hurton Munroe both scored three times, while Cody Cartwright came up with four runs. I think it was fairly good today. We just didnt go aftert he ball when we made the errors, said Warriors coach Ednol Rolle. But for the most part, Im s atisfied. We just have to go back to the drawing boarda nd be more aggressive in get ting the ball. T HETRIBUNE SECTIONETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 INSIDE TRAK T T U U R R N N T T O O 3 3 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 4 4 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 5 5 E E . . . ITALIAN TEAMS TOP O FFER TO K OBE IS ONEYEAR CONTRACT WORTH $5M WNBA: LYNX BEAT MERCURY TO REACH FIRST FINALS AQUINAS COLLEGE ACES TO CHRISTEN SOFTBALL FIELD THIS WEEK MAKAU SETS WORLD RECORD IN THE BERLIN MARATHON RUGBY WORLD CUP ACTION: W ALES OUSTS NAMIBIA 81-7 T T U U R R N N T T O O 7 7 E E . T T U U R R N N T T O O 3 3 E E . . . ON THE MOUND: Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders pitcher David Nathan in action yesterday. SEE MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 2E T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IN their toughest contest of the season, the Holland College Hurricanes relied on the talent of their superstar special teams standout to get them over the hump and remain undefeated. Demetrius Ferguson scored the gameclinching touchdown with a 105yard kickoff return in the Hurricanes 16-13 win over the Dalhousie Tigers in Atlantic Football League action at MacAdam Field on Saturday. It was Fergusons fourth kickoff return for a score and a team-leading sixth touchdown in just three games. Late in the fourth quarter, the Tigers scored their first touchdown of the game on a quarterback sneak from signal caller Brendan Fes teryga. After a failed extra point, they trailed just 9-6 with minutes left to play. Ferguson's heroics would come on the ensuing kick off to give the Hurricanes a 16-6 lead. Another late Tigers touchdown by running back Greg Pelly trimmed the lead to just three points with two minutes left to play before another Bahamian member of the Hurricanes roster would end any comeback hopes. Mark Barret came up with an interception on the final Tigers possession as time expired to give Hol land the win and a 3-0 record. Ferguson was awarded the APM Construction Services Player of the Game for Special Teams. In a defensive struggle, the first half ended scoreless for both teams. The Hurricanes reached the scoreboard first when the Hurricanes recorded a safety. Holland quarterback Nick Hunsley connected with Dave Clark on an 80-yard pass play in the middle of the fourth quarter for the game's first touchdown. Ferguson opened the season with three touchdowns a 107-yard kick return, a 40-yard punt return and a 75-yard interception return in a 62-0 rout over the UNB St John Seawolves in week one, and scored two touchdowns in the Hurricanes' 44-28 win over the UNB Red Bombers in week two. The Hurricanes are scheduled to travel to Bangor, Maine, where they are slated to meet the Husson University J.V. Eagles on Sunday, October 2. DEMETRIUS SCORES WINNER WITH 105-YARD KICKOFF RETURN Hur r icanes tak e 16-13 victor y o ver the Tigers ATLANTIC FOOTBALL LEAGUE DEMETRIUS PINDER Pitchers delight! David Nathan leads NCA Crusaders to victory over SAC Big Red Machine

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SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS P h o t o s b y T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f BAISS SENIOR BOYS SOFTBALL TEMPLE CHRISTIAN SUNS OUTSHINE FAITH TEMPLE WARRIORS 24-19 N C A CR US ADERS ROLL PAST SAC BIG RED MACHINE 15-4 DOUBLE ACTION: The Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools softball season opened at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex Monday. The Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders (BLUE got a 154 win over the St Augustines College Big Red Machine (RED while the Temple Christian Suns and Faith Temple Warriors engaged in a slug-fest that saw the Suns outshine the Warriors 24-19 (TOP

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By ANDREW DAMPF A P Sports Writer R OME (AP team Virtus Bologna says its t op offer to Kobe Bryant is a one-year contract worth $5 million. With NBA players locked out, Virtus hopes the Los A ngeles Lakers star agrees to a deal before he arrives in Italy t his week for a tour arranged by one of his sponsors. An Italian brand wellknown around the world" is prepared to provide cash for the deal, a person with knowl edge of the negotiations told T he Associated Press on Monday, indicating the unidentified c ompany is not Bologna's main sponsor, Canadian Solar. T he person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because negotiations are ongoing, said the other offers on the table include a two-month deal worth n early $2 million, a one-month contract for $1.3 million or $ 900,000 for only one game. All of the offers are pretax a nd would allow Bryant to return to the Lakers immedi ately if the lockout ends. Bryant spent part of his youth in Italy while his father played in the country and he speaks Italian, prompting Bologna to hope he might return for sentimental reasons. The person said there have been nightly conference calls between Bryant's agent, Rob Pelinka, and Bologna President Claudio Sabatini. The Turkish club Besiktas and at least one team in China have also expressed interest in the 33-year-old Bryant, who has won five NBA championships and been an All-Star 13 times. Bryant's father, Joe Bryant, played in Italy with Rieti, Reg gio Calabria, Pistoia and Reggiana from 1984-91. The elder Bryant now coaches the Los Angeles Sparks in the WNBA. Virtus also recently reached out to Manu Ginobili, who played with Bologna before joining the San Antonio Spurs in 2002. Denver Nuggets forward Danilo Gallinari rejoined his former Italian club Olimpia Milano last week. Other NBA players are also committing to play in leagues outside the United States. Nuggets free agents Wilson Chandler and J.R. Smith plan to play in China, Denver's Ty Lawson will play in Lithuania and New Jersey Nets All-Star Deron Williams signed with Besiktas. The NBA season usually begins in late October but owners and players have failed to agree on a new labour deal. The two sides are at odds over how to divide the league's revenue, a salary cap structure and the length of guaranteed con tracts. On Friday, the NBA postponed training camp indefinitely and cancelled 43 preseason games. Virtus has won 15 Italian l eague titles but none since 2001, when it also won theE uroleague for the second time. Bologna opens the Italian l eague against Roma on Octo ber 9. It did not qualify for this season's Euroleague, although the team has big ambitions after signing former Clemson point g uard Terrell McIntyre, who led Siena to four consecutiveI talian titles before transferring to Malaga in Spain for last sea s on. A A P P S S o o u u r r c c e e : : N N B B A A s s i i d d e e s s t t o o m m e e e e t t a a g g a a i i n n t t o o d d a a y y N EW YORK (AP person familiar with the plans s ays representatives for NBA players and owners will meet t oday and perhaps Wednesday. The players' association has cancelled a regional meeting with players Tuesday in Miami so its negotiators can meet with l eague officials in New York instead, the person told The A ssociated Press on Monday on condition of anonymity b ecause the details are supposed to remain confidential. T he bargaining session, first reported by CBSSports.com, comes just days after the league canceled 43 preseason games scheduled for October 9-15. By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net AQUINAS College knows t hat in order to be successful in the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools, they need the proper f acilities to ensure that their a thletes are properly prepared. Still in their infancy stage at their new home on Gladstone Road, the Aces coaching staff,l ed by Lawrence Irving and Sherline Moss, are looking forward to the christening of a new softball field on Wednesday. We are going to try to take i t from our junior level and then advance it to the senior league, said Irving who was busy yesterday putting some oft he finishing touches on the field. This is the third year that Aquinas College has been reloc ated from Madeira Street, but t his will mark the first time in more than 10 years that the Aces have participated in softball. I n what he called a developmental process, Irving said they are still busy completing the dugouts for both teams, although only the benches for the players to sit on will ber eady for their initial game against the Queens CollegeC omets. The roof for the dug-outs and the fences for the left and right field lines will come as the season progresses. Thats going to be a cracker. Were going to get indoctrinated come Wednesday because some of these girls are playing f or the first time, he said. But what we are doing this year is to just use the junior teams so that we can work on our developmental progress.W e will take it from the junior level and then move up to the senior level in a year or two. Moss, the female coach on s taff, said their appearance in softball was long overdue. Ive been here for a while and I wanted to do it, but we didnt have the facilities, shes aid. But now that we do, we have started the programme and we want to see how well the players will perform. Its a work in progress because its the first time that the girls are playing softball. But they are dedicated, so thats good. They have been comingo ut to practice every day and they are putting forth 110 per cent. Ahriana Cumberbatch, a ninth grader at Aquinas Coll ege, said although this is the f irst time she has played softb all, or any other sport for that m anner, shes eager to see how well they can perform. Its better for me, more of an advantage with us having our own field, she said. This i s our first time playing, but our c oach has been hard on us, so w e have been getting better in p ractice. We just want to see how we can do in a game. Principal Shona Knowles admitted that although the school is relatively new, they h ave already gotten their feet w et by hosting their home bask etball games on the campus l ast year. This year, the senior teams will have the luxury of playing their home games on a court with six new lights installed o ver the summer break on one o f the four fenced in venues. Were happy to have softb all added to our programme. We havent had it played in many years, she said. We got off to a late start getting the field ready, but we want to give our kids the exposure and tou se the skills that they have. While the softball field is almost completed, Knowles said there are a number of p lans on the drawing board that will certainly enhance Aquinas College and its current population of 465 students. Were hoping to put a certif ied track and field venue in place that will become a training site, said Knowles, who is working in conjunction with the B ahamas Association of Athletic Associations to complete the project. Additionally, there are plans for a soccer pitch on the insideo f the track and there is also going to be a swimming pool added to the sporting facilities that include Loyola Hall, which i s available to Aquinas College. The Catholic Archdiocese and the Catholic Board of Education is overseeing and funding the entire project along witht he Aquinas College Developmental Committee, made up of parents and former students. When its all completed, Knowles said they are hoping t hat Aquinas College will b ecome the envy of all of the s chools with a full-fledged s porting programme on their campus. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L / / T T R R A A C C K K B B S S C C A A C C T T I I V V I I T T I I E E S S THE Baptist Sports Council has announced the dates for the final two events on its sporting calendar. The 2011 Bishop Neil C. Ellis Softball Classic has been rescheduled to start on Saturday, October 8 at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. It will feature com petition in the men, co-ed and 19-and-under divisions. And Rev Enoch Backford Track and Field Classic will follow on Saturday, October 22, at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Persons interested in more details are asked to contact league president Brent Stubbs at stubbobs@gmail.com or secretary Jonique Webb at joniquewebb@hotmail.com B B O O X X I I N N G G A A M M A A T T E E U U R R T T E E A A M M I I N N B B A A K K U U THE Amateur Boxing Association of the Bahamas two-member team of Carl Hield and Valentino Knowles left their training site and are at the 2011 AIBA World Boxing Championships. The team, coached by Andre and Floyd Seymour have arrived for the championships, is scheduled to run through October 8 at Heydar Aliyev Sports and Exhibition Complex in Baku, Azerbaijan. The championships, featuring 685 boxers from 127 coun tries, serve as a qualifier for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. C C O O N N C C H H M M A A N N T T R R I I A A T T H H L L O O N N I I N N G G R R A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A THE 25th annual Conch man Triathlon is scheduled for Saturday, November 5 in Freeport, Grand Bahama. It will comprise of a one-kilo metre swim, a 25k bike ride and a 5k run. Interested persons can reg ister by logging onto the Facebook Event Page, e-mail organiser Bert Bell at bertbell@coralwave.com or calling him at 727-5886 or 7275381. SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 3E SPORTS IN BRIEF AQUINAS COLLEGE TO CHRISTEN NEW SOFTBALL FIELD T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f A QUINAS C ollege coaches are looking forward to the christening of a new softball field on Wednesday. Italian team offers Bryant 1-year contract worth $5m A BIG DEAL: Kobe Bryant can be seen before coaching a basketball clinic in Singapore. Bryant says he's still considering playing overseas as an owners lockout of players threatens to sabotage the upcoming NBA season. (AP



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NASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Missing boykidnap fearsVolume: 107 No.250 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER CLOUDS, SUN, T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 78F THE family of a young boy who has been missing for four days believe he may have been kidnapped. And last night, they made an emotional plea for his abduc tors to set him free. Marco Archer, 11, has been missing since last Friday. He was last seen leaving his home on Brougham Street, off Baillou Road, to buy candy ... he never returned. At the time he was wearing a grey Bob Marley shirt and long brown khaki pants. Last night, Marcos sister Tancia Humes said the young boy was happy and had no reason to run away, which makes the family believe he was kidnapped. Ms Humes said: He went right across the road to get can dy from the gas station. He always goes there. Its a fiveminute walk there and back. He goes there so much the attendants call him double mint boy. Some sick person took my brother and we don't know why. The family isn't functioning. My mother can't sleep. It gets worse in the night and early in the morning. She goes to do things for him and then remembers he is not there. I Familys emotional plea to abductors TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Apply for a Fidelity Back To School Loan* with a 90 Day Payment Holiday plus a Built-in Savings Plan you & your kids are good to go!Nassau: t 356.7764 Freeport: t 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: t 367.3135 BACKTOSCHOOLLOAN*Offer applies to government workers only WATER TESTING MAY HAVE BEEN CONTAMINATED, SAYS REPORT By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A REPORT by the InterDevelopment Bank found that a Department of Environmental Health food and water testing unit operates out of a "condemned" building leaving tests open to con tamination. The IDB report on a $71 million loan to fix New YOURNEWSPAPER YOURWEEKENDSEEPAGE8E FORDETAILS 4DAYS TO GO By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net CHIEF Magistrate Roger Gomez yesterday refused to grant bail to a man accused of attempted murder, citing the high level of crime as the reason for his decision. After hearing submissions from both the prosecution and defence, Chief Magistrate Gomez denied bail to Earnest Forest, SEE page three SEE page seven COURTNEWS BAIL REFUSED FOR ATTEMPTED MURDER ACCUSED SEE page eight By SANCHESKA BROWN WITH a little over a week before the House of Assembly reconvenes, opposition members say they still havent seen the governments pro posed amendments to the penal code and Bail Act. Leader of opposition business Obie Wilchcombe said they are still waiting for National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest to hand over the proposed amendments. We are still waiting for the documents to be delivered, hopefully we will get them in OPPOSITION YET TO SEE PROPOSED BAIL ACT AMENDMENTS SEE page seven FROMLEFT: Mother of Marco Archer, Tryphemia Meadows, and his sisters Lasummer Archer, Tancia Humes and Valkisha Archer look at a flyer they have been putting up around their neighbourhood.Felip Major /Tribune staff By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net NATIONAL Security Minister Tommy Turnquest has defended his recent criticism of the judiciary, saying he felt his actions were right as an elected representative of the Bahamian people. Mr Turnquest reiterated the govern ments plan to table bail legislation yesterday amid widespread criticism over the sensitivity of his remarks with regard to the judiciary and the country's consecutive record murder count. I dont feel as if Im under fire, I feel that what Im doing is right and Ive been elected by the Bahamian people to TURNQUES T DEFENDS CRITICISM OF JUDICIAR Y SEE page seven MINISTER Tommy Turnquest By PAUL G TURNQUEST Chief Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net ATTORNEY General and Minister of Legal Affairs John Delaney confirmed last night the government intends to bring a compre hensive and multi-pronged approach to the fight against crime when the Amendments to the Bail Act, the Criminal Procedure and the Penal Code are presented before Parliament next week. While the Bail Act which has attracted considerable criticism in the recent past with accused murderers ATTORNEY GENERAL CONFIRMS GOVTS COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH TO FIGHT AGAINST CRIME SEE page eight

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By KHRISNA VIRGIL WITH the four children who died in fires this year still on the minds of many, the Fire Safety Branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force launched Fire Safety Week yesterday. The week held under the theme, Don't be in doubt, know two ways out is being used by Fire Branch officers to stress the importance of having at least two escape routes from your home planned out before a fire actually strikes. Director of Fire Services Jeffrey Deleveaux said: Through lectures and drills, we will try to reduce the number of fires. There are also plans to get into schools and the work place. Between January and August of this year, 1,441 calls were made to Emergency Services to report fires. Eighteen people, including four children, have died in blazes so far this year. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE A, B, C!Theinsurance plan Im looking for. An agent who understands my goals. Theinsurance company I can depend on. Choosing FamilyGuardian for my life insurance is as elementary as A, B, C. LIFE INSURANCE /are you covered? A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating Amember of the FamGuard Group of Companies CONTACT ONE OF OUR SALES REPRESENTATIVES AT AN OFFICE NEAREST YOU East Bay Street, Marathon Road, Thompson Boulevard, & Blue Hill Road (top hill) +242 396-1300 I www.familyguardian.com STUDENTS OF Temple Christian school help to spread the message about fire safety, above, while little Khylee Butler meets one of the firefighters, left Felip Major/ Tribune Staff NATIONALSECURITY MINISTER Tommy Turnquest is shown round the fire safety exhibition by Director of Fire Services Jeffrey DeleveauxSTOPPING THE FIRES BY TEACHING THE YOUNG T T u u r r n n t t o o p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 ANEWRECRUIT looks at the fire safety exhibit

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By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net THE parents of a toddler who died in a traffic accident just over a month ago were arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday afternoon in connection with his death. Delano Coakley Sr, 25, and Nickessha Missick, 24, appeared before Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-Evans in Court Six, and were charged with manslaughter by negligence in the death of Delano Coakley Jr on Wednesday, August 24. They were not required to enter a plea to the charge. The matter was originally going to proceed with a preliminary inquiry to see if there was sufficient evidence to have the case go before the Supreme Court. However, the prosecution informed the judge of their intention to try the case before the higher court by presenting a Voluntary Bill of Indictment on Thursday, January 26, 2012. The prosecution offered no objection to bail when the issue was raised by the magistrate. Attorney Calvin Seymour, who represented Coakley Sr and Missick during yesterdays arraignment, asked the judge for lenient bail conditions, noting that the parents are still grieving over the loss of their son and recovering from injuries sustained in the accident. Magistrate Vogt-Evans granted both of the accused $10,000 bail each with sureties. Coakley Sr, a resident of Bamboo Street, must report to the South Beach Police Station once a month before 7pm, while Missick, who lives on East Street and Andros Avenue, must report to the Quakoo Street Police Station. The judge told the defendants that signing in at the police station is a part of your bail conditions and you must comply. She warned that their bail would be revoked if they failed to do so. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 3 Institute of Business and Commerce TEL: 324-4625 General Principles of By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A key prosecution witness in the murder trial of Simon Simeon identified the defendant in court as the man who shot 29-year-old Sylvanus Strachan Jr in December, 2008. Philip Rolle also picked out the accused from among other eight persons in a police ID parade a month following the shooting, the Supreme Court heard on Monday. Senior Justice Hartman Longley is presiding over the trial, which is before a jury of seven women and five men. Erica Kemp and Olivia Blatch of the Attorney Generals Office are prosecuting on behalf of the Crown. Mario Greyis representing Simeon. Simeon, 26, is accused of shooting Strachan while at a party at the Lodge Hall on East Sunrise Highway on December 21, 2008. Rolle told the court that he was grilling at the Lodge Hall on the night in question when he saw the accused shoot Strachan. He said the area where the shooting occurred was well lit. He identified Simeon in court as the gunman. According to his evidence, Simeon confronted Strachan. He said the accused pointed a chrome handgun at the deceased and said, Yall niggers dont know who yall dealing with. Rolle tried to calm the situation. I told him (Simeon) we dont have to go through this, he recalled. Rolle said Simeon fired the gun once. He said Strachan was unarmed. Did you see Sylvanus advance towards the accused? Asked Mrs Kemp. No, replied Rolle. StatementRolle took Strachan to the Rand Memorial Hospital after learning that he had been shot. He later went to the Central Police Station to give a statement to police. On January 22, 2009, Rolle attended an ID Parade at Central Police Station. He said several men were standing in a room with numbers affixed to them. He selected an individual wearing the number five, whom he identified in court as Simeon. During cross-examination, Mr Grey asked Rolle if he had seen Strachan with a weapon. You said that Strachan did not have anything in his hand. Do you recall your evidence in a matter in the magistrates court? Do you recall stating that Slyvanus had a knife in his hand? Rolle said he saw Strachan with a knife on one occasion, but that he did not have the knife when he was confronted by the accused. Do you remember the description you gave to police as to who the shooter was? asked Mr Grey. Rolle said the shooter was five feet 11 inches tall, with a complexion a little darker than his. He said Simeon was wearing a green and white shirt and blue washed out jeans. Do you remember what you and Strachan were wearing that night? Mr Grey asked. Rolle said he could not remember. He then asked Rolle if he had seen a photo of Simeon in the newspaper or on the news. Rolle said he had not. I am putting it to you that you never saw the defendant with a gun in his hand? Mr Grey said. Rolle disagreed. During re-examination, Mrs Kemp asked Rolle why was it that he could remember what the defendant was wearing? Rolle said that he was afraid for his life so he would have remembered the gunman. The body of Slyvanus Strachan was identified by his father on December 22, 2008. ArrestedSimon Simeon was arrested by police on January 21, 2009 on West Atlantic Drive in the vicinity of Ruby Swiss Restaurant. He was taken to Central Police Station and booked. Inspector Michael Brathwaite said he conducted an ID parade on January 22, 2009. He said informed Simeon that he was suspected of causing the death of Strachan and cautioned him. Inspector Brathwaite said Simeon did not object to participating in an ID parade as long his lawyer, Carlson Shurland, was present. He said the parade consisted of eight other men with similar height, build, hair, and description of the accused. He said the accused selected the position number five. Inspector Brathwaite said Mr Rolle, a witness in the shooting, selected number five as the gunman. Mr Grey asked Inspector Brathwaite whether Simeons lawyer had signed the ID parade form. The inspector said that part of the form was not filled out. He asked who was respon sible for issuing photographs of wanted persons to the media. Mr Brathwaite said the officer in charge of Central Detective Unit or officer in charge of Crime Records Office. The trial resumes on Tuesday. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net OVER the weekend, police on Grand Bahama arrested 19 men and two women in connection with various offences. These included: housebreaking, stealing, causing harm, threats of harm, possession of dangerous drugs, armed robbery, fraud and assault. Police said six of the men were detained on warrants issued by the Magistrates Court and another was arrested for breach of a court order. 29, saying his decision was based on the rising levels of crime and high murder rate. He said the court must be extremely careful of granting bail in these matters. Forest, who is accused of attempting to kill Arlington Storr, was remanded to Her Majestys Prison, Fox Hill until the completion of his trial. The Lincoln Boulevard resident is accused of committing the offence on Sunday, April 10. Forest was not required to enter a plea to the charge, due to the nature of the offence. Before denying him bail, Chief Magistrate Gomez informed the accused that the prosecution will present a Voluntary Bill of Indictment in court, which will forward the case directly to the Supreme Court for trial. That Bill will be presented in court on Wednesday, November 9 at 10am. Chief Magistrate Gomez made his comments concern ing the crime rate when Forests attorney Alex Morley asked him to consider granting bail. Mr Morley said the jet ski operator and father of two girls had no pending matters before the courts. The attorney noted that Forest had previously appeared in court on charges of causing damage and harm. He told Chief Magistrate Gomez that the accused paid a $350 fine for the former offence and completed a sixmonth probation period for the latter. The prosecution objected to the accused being granted bail, citing the seriousness of the offence and their concern that Forest might interfere with witnesses and the virtual complainant. Mr Morley responded, saying there were no substantial grounds on which his client should be denied bail, or proof that he would interfere with witnesses. TODDLERS PARENTS ARRAIGNED IN CONNECTION WITH HIS DEATH COURTNEWS POLICE MAKE 19 WEEKEND ARRESTS INGRAND BAHAMA DEFENDANT IDENTIFIED IN COURT ASMAN WHO SHOT MURDER VICTIM Key witness testifies in trial DENIEDBAIL: Earnest Forest outside of court yesterday. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff BAIL REFUSED FOR ATTEMPTED MURDER ACCUSEDDECISION BASED ON THE RISING LEVELS OF CRIME Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. FROM page one

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EDITOR, The Tribune. AT THIS point there is no need to elaborate on the level of crime in the country. The record speaks for itself. As government attempts to justify the current murder rate by mouthing off on statistics that a majority of murders are related to drugs, gang violence, or domestic problems, the fact remains that one murder is one too many. And as time goes on, more innocent people will be caught in the crossfire. I was alarmed this week to read an article in The Tribune where our Minister of National Security works 16-hour days. One has to wonder what the Minister is doing. Based on National Security in the country, it is my opinion that he might as well not show up to work. We all know that our crime problem was a seed planted a long time ago and now it is a dangerous vine that is killing everything in the garden. Yes crime stems from a culture of drugs, corruption, gang violence, teenage pregnancy, breakdown in the family, lack of education, lack of role models in the home, etc. However, like any uncontrollable vine in the garden, you have to relentlessly attack and weed it out. Successive governments have not shown the political will to weed the vine out. And what we have today is justice on the streets, instead of the courtroom. The police and the general public are fully aware that we have a minority group of thugs running wild on our streets. So the question is: How far will we allow these individuals to go before we decide to take action? It is being rammed down our throats for us to have compassion for the criminals, respect their feelings, be humane, be concerned on the length of time that they are in prison awaiting trial, or how the police treat them! So we have decided to be more concerned with the feel ings of the criminal and why they chose to blow someones head off, rather than worrying about what effect they are having on the country as a whole. We are choosing to sit by and hold the criminals hand, while we sing Kumbaya, and watch the country go to hell in a hand basket. The Privy Council is preaching to us to have more compassion, respect the criminal, and to be more humane. Whatever you do, dont hang! From their recent rulings, it is clear that no murder will ever be horrific enough to result in capital punishment. When is the last time you heard about one of the Lords having a gun put to their head, having a family member raped, or being involved in an armed robbery? But according to them, we should open up and have feelings for the criminal. No matter what the cause, no matter what the circumstance, we cannot allow any one individual to bring this country to its knees. There are too many upstanding citizens that have come from challenging backgrounds and have not chosen a life of crime. Yes, we need social reforms, yes we need educational reforms, yes we need to try and better educate our children. However, the country cannot be held hostage by a group of thugs whose life experiences have caused them to have no regard for human life. Now back to our minister and his government. In 2007 we were asked to join the trust agenda. We were told that the trust agenda was the better way. We were told that the trust agenda could be held to a higher standard. In 2007 crime was at an unacceptable level, not to mention what it is today. How long have we waited for the current administration to present changes in parliament to the criminal procedure code, the penal code, and the bail act? All we have gotten over the last four years is hot air! I propose to the minister that his government is responsible for the level of crime. They are responsible for crime, as they have neglected the voice of the Bahamian people. More impor tantly, they have neglected the word of God. This has led to a complete breakdown of law and order in this country. They told us to expect better in 2007. However, now in 2011 with a murder count over 100, many committed by repeat offenders and persons on bail, they went on a summer break without bringing the necessary changes to parliament. I suggest they bring the matter before the people via a referendum. Now the minister is going to blame the courts. Perhaps when this administration was returned to power in 2007, they should have ensured that the laws were so tight and so severe that the court system would have been prevented from pushing the liberal agenda. In some ways, you feel sorry for the minister. He is caught in an administration that obviously does not believe in capital punishment, is happy with the liberal agenda in protecting the criminals, and has no respect for the voice of the people. But when you make your bed hard, you lie hard! This administration willingly came and offered better to the Bahamian people, and better has not been received. There is so much frustration in this town now that if you strike a match in the wrong place the whole thing will blow! The minister was right with one thing, if judges had to stand for election they would be chased out of town. Many of our countrys leaders need the same thing. But we have heard all of this before. And time longer than rope, an election is coming. What have we accomplished with 16-hour work days? We may end up driving on nice roads, but we are as scared as hell when doing so! JEROME R PINDER Nassau, September 23, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama CRIME IS out of control. All of us are concerned, and naturally everyone wants a quick solution to something that has been a growing sickness for many years. As with all growing sicknesses, there is no quick fix. Sir Etienne Dupuch died 19 years ago, having stopped writing this column about four years before his death. But for years before that he was warning the Bahamian people that unless something were done to reverse our social decay as far as crime was concerned the Bahamas was on a downward path in Jamaicas shadow. What we are complaining about today, he predicted in this column way back then. Solutions are needed, but they cant be found in an atmosphere of hysteria. What has to be faced is that society as a whole is to blame either by active participation, or by ignoring the signs in an attempt to insulate itself against the threatening storm. Only a united society can now overcome our problems. This week a group of pastors got together to express their concern about crime, especially about the spiralling, out of control murder rate. They blame government for not doing what is legally necessary to carry out capital punishment in cases of those convicted of murder. They believe that former and current governments have failed the country by allowing the Privy Council to force its 2006 interpretation of our constitution on us and continuing to govern as if nothing can be done about it. In short they want the return of capital punishment, and the disappearance of the Privy Council. What most people do not appreciate is that as one lawyer pointed out when the Privy Council had the opportunity to rule that capital punishment was uncon stitutional, it did not do so. However, what it did rule unconstitutional was that hanging was the mandatory sentence on a murder conviction. In other words there were no degrees of culpability for the crime. It was felt that instead of the mandatory sen tence, the presiding judge should consider each case on its own merits and decide which warranted death and which a lesser sentence. In other words it left us with capital punishment still on our statute books, but it forced the courts to put more thought into how the sentence was to be administered. It is now up to our legislators to craft legislation that makes it clear what types of murders would warrant the noose. But we have to face the fact that capital punishment in this world is seeing its last days. Even in America, one of the last bastions of the death penalty, discussions are now underway about its abolition. Consciences are being pricked in the knowl edge that many innocents have been condemned to death by contaminated evidence and faulty judgments. Many Bahamians are calling for the Bahamas to cut all ties with the Privy Council so that our penal system can again start to hang em high. This of itself would be a capital blunder it would remove the most important plank that makes the Bahamas attractive as a commercial centre. Many international businesses would not locate here if our courts did not have the added attraction of the Privy Council as the final court of appeal. As one international businessman despairing of his litigation in our court system commented: Thank God for the Privy Council! It is thank God for the Privy Council that gives our courts an aura of stability and is an added attraction for the Bahamas as a commercial centre. Without the Privy Council as our final and truly independent high court, where would we turn? The Bahamas certainly could neither afford nor mann a local high court with Bahamians. And who can guarantee that a panel of Caribbean judges at the Caribbean court would not rule in the same manner as the Privy Council law Lords in London when it comes to capital cases? Many of them are even now debating the abolition of capital punishment. And so, even with a regional court there is no guarantee that the Bahamas will be able to hang em high. That is why we believe that the only way to keep the dangerous murderer away from society is to have a life sentence that truly lasts to the end of the convicts natural life. But even so the death penalty will continue to haunt the Bahamas. Through the FTA many trade agreements have social justice clauses to protect children, workers and many other groups. Many European countries will not enter into agreements with a country that imposes the death penalty. Some years ago we wrote in this col umn about a European ambassador who was paying us a courtesy call. At that time capital punishment was very much an issue. He wanted to know when the Bahamas was going to abandon capital punishment. When we told him of the feelings of the Bahamian people, his comment was that the European organisation to which his country was a member would force the issue the Bahamas would no longer qualify for loans. And so for those who want to be rid of the Privy Council so that they can hang their criminals, they would be advised to think long and hard. They will be denying this country one of its most valuable assets, the upkeep of which costs us nothing, in exchange for what? Certainly no guarantee that we shall be able to tie the hangmans noose around the neck of some unfortunate wretch. The danger of a 16-hour work day LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Acase for keeping the Privy Council rf EDITOR, The Tribune THOUGH he may have been the wrong messenger, National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest had the right message in criticizing the Courts for the seeming ease with which alleged offenders are granted bail. The criticisms by the PLP that Minister Turnquest's com ments were cowardly, shame ful and baseless are utter non sense. His comments were actually quite courageous, in no way shameful, and based in reality. The Minister voiced the concerns of many Bahamians who are shocked that someone who has a known criminal record can get bail so easily. The cowardly and shameful behaviour of which the PLP speaks can be laid squarely at the door of the Christie Gov ernment. Over five whole years they did nothing to substantially improve the criminal justice sys tem like increasing the amount of courts and judges. Shamefully, they did nothing of consequence on the Bail Act. The only swift thing the PLP did was talk about what should have been done. Had that lateagain crew acted rather than talked, over the last five years the justice system would have had additional tools and resources to act more speedily in dealing with alleged offend ers and repeat-offenders. Had the PLP acted more vigorously from 2002 to 2007, our murder and crime rates would quite probably have been lower than they are today. Their failure to act then is haunting us now. The Opposition is not only hypocritical. They are dishonest and shameful for using the pain and suffering associated with crime for their own selfish political ends especially since when they had a chance to act they failed miserably. Maybe somebody else should have said what Tommy Turnquest said. But at least, thank God, somebody had the courage to say it. Which is more than can be said for that useless bunch of scandal-ridden people Perry Christie had in his Government. CONCERNED CITIZEN Nassau, September 25, 2011. Tommy Turnquest's remarks indelicate, but on the mark

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A LOCAL eye care clinic is the first in the world to offer a new technology that temporarily corrects reading vision. After four years of clinical studies and numerous academic presentations and articles, the technology has been approved for use in 27 European countries. But the Nassau Vision Rejuvenation Centre in the Harbour Bay shopping cen tre has the distinction of being the worlds first operational clinic. Dr Jonathan Rodgers partnered with the developers of Vision Rejuvenation to conduct clinical studies in the Bahamas. More than 200 patients were treated during the studies for what is known as presbyopia, commonly called old eyes and hyperopia, or farsightedness. I decided to specialise in treatments of the eye because when I was in residency many years ago, I saw how remarkable it was for a person to have their eyesight restored, said Dr Rodgers. I wanted to make sure that my people had the best treatment available and I knew that there was a need for my discipline. I jumped at the opportu nity to pioneer Vision Rejuvenation in the Bahamas. I have had so many people over the years tell me that they were tired of wearing reading glasses but they did not have the means for expensive surgeries to correct their sight, he said. Vision Rejuvenation involves using a laser to microscopically adjust the curvature of the cornea in a 90 second procedure. Since there is no cutting of the eye, like in some other laser treatments, patients do not have a long recovery time and there are minimal to no side effects, Dr Rodgers said. The ideal person for Vision Rejuvenation is someone over 40 who has trouble reading without glasses, he said. I was almost legally blind without my glasses, said David B, an accountant from Houston, Texas who participated in the studies. After one treatment, I was able to read without glasses with 20/20 vision. The cost of the procedure is same as a pair of glasses, making it affordable for the average person. More information on Vision Rejuvenation can be found by visiting 2020reading.com or facebook.com/ 2020reading. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 5 Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.Is seeking the services of:Centre Director, Scotia Private Client GroupPosition Summary:The Centre Director is responsible for establishing business plans for the SPCG Centre in The Bahamas and the branches in smaller, secondary markets also under their direction, and executing them through the dynamic leadership of teams of highly skilled professionals representing each of the Wealth Management business lines (Private Banking, International Investment Advisory, and where applicable, International Wealth Structuring). These objectives will be met through the promotion of the SPCG Centres in the marketplace and, internally throughout the Bank.Key Accountability:The primary purpose of the position is to increase protability through the development of the required skills and motivation within the teams to achieve increased consolidation of client assets, maximize cross-sell opportunities, increase client retention and satisfaction and ensure clients receive the products and services that best satisfy their nancial needs. This is achieved by leading their teams through sales and relationship management, directing consolidation, retention and coverage strategies, ensuring the required behaviours are instilled in, and consistently displayed by, each individual, and ensuring that sound business analysis and a shared client centric bias exists across the teams. The Centre Director is also responsible for building an effective business and community network, by developing and maintaining relationships with key business and community leaders and maintaining close relationships with inuential clients, to maximize business referral opportunities and introductions to potential clients. The Centre Director must also forge close working relationships with all Scotiabank partners in their market.Qualications: designation, are highly desirable. of tax-driven investments. as they relate to the High Net Worth clients; this includes features, benets, pricing policies and protability levers; The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Qualied candidates only should submit applications, via e-mail to: Manager, Manpower & Succession Planning at: hrbahamas@scotiabank.com on or before October 07, 2011. MORE than 500 people gathered on September 24 at Royal Bank House on East Hill Street to participate in a fundraising walk/run to benefit the RBC Child Cancer Fund. The event, which was one of many fundraising initiatives sponsored by RBC across the Caribbean, has raised more than $20,000 to date to help families with children battling cancer. Funds will continue to be collected at all RBC banking centres until the end of September, and the total amount raised will be announced in early October. We are grateful for the tremendous turn-out and outpouring of support by our employees, their families and the community, said Nathaniel Beneby, RBC president and country head for the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos. September is Childrens Cancer Awareness Month, so were also pleased to aid in bringing awareness about paediatric cancer. The Childrens Cancer Fund provides support for children suffering from cancer across the Caribbean, including foreign testing of biopsy samples which results in quicker diagnosis and earlier treatment of cancer when identified. The fund has made a major difference in the lives of the families helped, said Mr Beneby. We sincerely thank our employees and partners for their role in executing this successful event and look forward to ongoing partnerships with the community as we support children who are fighting this terrible disease. Event partners included: the AIDS Foundation of the Bahamas, Aquapure Water, ADRYSS Weight Loss Systems, the Bahamas Heart Association, the Bahamas Red Cross, the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Club One Fitness Centre, the Diabetic Association, DAlbenas Agency, Doctors Hospital, Inspired Fitness, Sister Sister Breast Cancer Group and Symetry Bahamas, After the walk/run, a breakfast was held for all the participants. Prizes were awarded to the following individuals:WINNERS, 15 AND UNDER Christopher Rahming Jr Johnique Rolle Jerry Butler runner upWINNERS 15-25 Leonardo Forbes Hollie Rolle Winners 26-35 Sidney Collie Jessica MurrayWINNERS 36-45 David Ferguson Cheryl RolleWINNERS 46-59 Ashton Murray Denise MortimerWINNERS (MALE) OVER 60 Jeffrey Burnside winner Leslie Miller runner up For more information, visit: givehopesavel ives.rbtt.com. MORE THAN 500 TURN OUT TO SUPPORT CHILD CANCER FUNDNEW TECHNOLOGY OFFERS ALTERNATIVE TO READING GLASSES DR RODGERS SUPPORTING WELLNESS: Atlantic Medical Insurance recently presented a $5,000 cheque to NIB to support Get Well Bahamas Phase 2. Pictured from left to right: Darren Bastian, Business Development Manager, Atlantic Medical Insurance; Latisha Thompson, Manager, Body Zone Fitness; Tami Francis, Manager, NPDP; Janette Martin-Isaacs, President, Jemi Health and Wellness; Lynda Gibson, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Atlantic Medical Insurance; Anastasia Francis, Director of Operations, Atlantic Medical; and Shane Albury, Communications Officer, Atlantic Medical.WendellCleare/TCLPhoto

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THE Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness was given a considerable boost in its effort to seriously tackle the stray dog and cat problem. A recent donation allowed Baark! to buy a new van just in timefor the launch of a major spay and neuter campaign. The charity aims to sterilise up to 2,400 animals a year, and will begin this autumn. In conjunction with the group Stray Busters, a team of volunteers will use the T-N-R (trapneuter-return) method for roaming community dogs. They will target one area of the island at a time, transporting dogs to be sterilised at participating veterinary clinics. The new van was branded free of charge thanks to Adworks and The Sign Man. Natalia Nunez from Stray Busters said: We are very excited to work with Baark! and start this programme. The van will enable us to carry up to five dogs per trip. We are trying to stop the vicious cycle of thousands of births and deaths of stray and unwanted animals in our community. Each trapped and sterilised dog or cat will be vaccinated, dewormed and treated for any medical ailments before being released back into their environment. As part of the campaign, Baark! will also be offering lowcost sterilisation for owned pets. Laura Kimble, president of Baark! said: Spay and neuter is viewed as the only way to solve animal overpopulation and improve the welfare of suffering animals. Following our successful smaller campaign in February 2011, Baark! feels that a large scale spay and neuter programme throughout the Bahamas will dramatically reduce the number of animals that have to be euthanised unnecessarily at the Canine Control Unit (Government Pound) each year. In addition, spaying and neutering also drastically improve your pet's health and life expectancy, and make communities safer without aggressive dogs and overturned trash cans. Baark! is an entirely voluntary organisation with no government funding. Each spay or neuter operation costs $50 and the group relies solely on donations and fundraising efforts. On Saturday, October 1, Baark! will hold its second annual Strut Your Mutt walk-athon at Goodmans Bay. Registration begins at 8am. Participants will enjoy contests, a raffle, pet photos and dog adoptions. Coffee and a selection of pastries will be provided by Starbucks. The person who brings in the most sponsorship money will win a 32-inch Toshiba LED TV/DVD player. Pledge forms are available at select Dominos locations, CostRite, Solomons, the Bahamas Humane Society and Chives Caf. They can also be downloaded at www.baarkbahamas.org. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 2 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 __ZgVcdRcj 2 4 2 4 2 V]VScReZ`_ 4 V]VScReZ`_ 4 :LWKDOO-RKQVVWRUHVSDUWLFLSDWLQJGRQWPLVVRXWRQ\RXUFKDQFH IRUKXJHVWRUHZLGHVDYLQJVRQDOO)RRWZHDU%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV LQFOXGLQJ bIIDOO:RPHQVHQVDQG&KLOGUHQVKRHV bIIDOO&ODUNVDQGLPEHUODQGUR:RUN%RRWV bII$OO%DJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV bI$OO)DVKLRQ-HZHOU\ 3/86HOHFWHGW\OHVDUNHG'RZQ%\b $QGGRQWIRUJHWZLWKHYHU\SXUFKDVH<28KDYHDFKDQFHWR :,1D*LIW&HUWLFDWHDVZHOODVUHJLVWHUWRZLQD *UDQGUL]H*LIW&HUWLFDWH $//$/(6$5(),1$/ 12(;&+$1*(6()81'6 12/$<$:$<6 -2+1 6+2(6$1'$&&(6625,(6 526(77$ 526(77$&$5(:($5f &$50,&+$(/$' '& '& 2 '& 2 '& 4 '& 4 2 4 2 2 eY 2 '& eY '& 2 '& 2 eY 2 &RPHDQGFHOHEUDWHRXUWK$QQLYHUVDU\E\MRLQLQJXVIRUD 6725(:,'($/( 6HSWHPEHUWKFWREHUVW BAARK! LAUNCHES SPAY AND NEUTER CAMPAIGNUS Ambassador Nicole Avant yesterday presented a $100,000 grant to the Bahamas National Drug Council as part of the Caribbean Basin Secu rity Initiatives drug demand reduction programme. Ambassador Avant met with Camille Johnson, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, to discuss the goals of the grant and potential US-Bahamas partnerships aimed at reducing crime and strengthening local communities under CBSI. The grant is part of the US governments commitment to the Bahamas through CBSI totalling $1.6 million in 2011 to support law narcotics interdiction, drug demand reduction and law enforcement professionalisation throughout the Caribbean, said the embassy in a statement. The Bahamas National Drug Council said it will use the funding to assess the level of illegal drug use, create and improve linkages with grass roots organisations, and create public service messages discouraging the use of illegal drugs. During the meeting, Ambassador Avant applauded the council for its ongoing efforts to reduce demand through education pro grammes aimed at young Bahamians. She also emphasised President Obamas support for increased security co-ordination in the Caribbean, illus trated through the recent announcement of $77 million in new CBSI funding that will be designated for a variety of activities throughout the region in the coming year. BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG COUNCIL RECEIVES $100,000 CBSI GRANT FROM US EMBASSY PARTNERSHIP: Camille Johnson, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Health; United States Ambassador Nicole Avant; and Dr Bridgette Rolle, administrator, Bahamas National Drug Council. BIG HELP: The Bahamas Alliance for Animal Rights and Kindness (BAARK!)was given a considerable boost in its effort when a recent donation allowed them to buy a new van just in time for the launch of a major spay and neuter campaign.

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the next couple of days. If that happens we will have enough time to look it over before the debate begins. Iam hoping however that if we do get it, itll be before tomorrow. Mr Wilchcombe said despite not knowing what the proposed amendments are, the PLP has been preparing for the debate over the summer break. The truth is we are fully prepared for this debate. We have a overall aggressive plan to deal with crime because we believe it is a major issue that is hurting us not only socially, but also economically, he said. The approach the government has to crime is obvious lynot working, dismissing it by saying the war is being fought between bad boys or saying its criminals hurting criminals is negative and is sending the wrong message. We are going to present a thorough and aggressive plan to deal with the crime problem, especially when it comes to bail. There are some major loopholes in our justice system that we need to fix. There is no way someone with an extensive criminal history or anyone that has committed a serious offense should get bail. Mr Wilchcombe said the PLP wants to meet with the government to come up with a bipartisan approach to crime before the bills are presented in the House on Octo ber 5. We have taken the position that you cannot blame any political party for the crime problem. What we are proposing is the opposition and the government each choose at least three members from their party to come together and form a committee to discuss the legislation. We need to make sure that what we present to the public is bipartisan and strong enough to make a difference. Mr Wilchcombe said if both parties do not come together to fight crime nothing is going to change. He said he hopes Mr Turnquest agrees to meet so the PLP and the FNM can collectively get a handle on the crime problem. serve and I intend to serve, Mr Turnquest said. The one thing I dont like are namby-pamby, wishy-washy politicians. You either stand for something or you dont. Last week, Mr Turnquest said while he has no wish to encroach on the independence of the judicial system, in his opinion some judges have been far too "liberal" when it comes to granting bail to career criminals and those accused of serious offences and he believes the police and the public agree with him. He said he felt the trend has contributed "greatly" to the country's escalating crime problem. I have a document where we have all of the murder victims for 2011 on one side of the page, on the other side of the page we have those cases where we have suspects, he said. It will astound you to see the number of criminals known to the police as both victims and suspects. Ive said what I had to say. I accept my responsibility as the minister of National Security, and the government of the Bahamas accepts its responsibility as being responsible for the 353,000 citizens of the Bahamas. Were going to do our job. In a statement released last week, opposition members said Mr Turnquests comments were an admission of the FNM government's paralysis in dealing with the crime crisis. PLP officials said instead of attacking the judiciary, the FNM government should be about ensuring the courts are supplied with the required resources, manpower and equipment to function efficiently. The Democratic National Alliance accused Mr Turnquest of passing the buck and called for his resignation. Yesterday, Mr Turnquest said: We are accountable to those people, we are going to do what is necessary, were going to be relentless in the fight against crime to make our country safer. In addition to investing millions of dollars, we want to ensure that we have the legislative framework in place so criminals do not get an easy ride in our country. Mr Turnquest said a package of Bills addressing the criminal justice system will be the first order of business when the House of Assembly reconvenes on October 5. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 7 7KH,QWHU$PHULFDQ,QVWLWXWHIRU&RRSHUDWLRQRQ$JULFXOWXUH,,&$fIFHLQ 7KH%DKDPDVLVLQYLWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUDIXOOWLPHSRVLWLRQDV 6867$,1$%/( $*5,&8/785((&,$/,67 %$&.*5281',1)250$7,21 ,,&$fLVDVSHFLDOL]HGDJHQF\RIWKH,QWHU$PHULFDQV\VWHP,WVSXUSRVHLV WRHQFRXUDJHDQGVXSSRUWWKHHIIRUWVRILWVPHPEHUVWDWHVWRIRVWHUDJULFXOWXUDO GHYHORSPHQWDQGUXUDOZHOOEHLQJLQWKHLUWHUULWRULHV7KHLQVWLWXWHFROODERUDWHV ZLWKWKHLQLVWU\RI$JULFXOWXUHDQGDULQHHVRXUFHVDQGUHODWHGVHFWRUVWKDW DUHLQYROYHGLQKROLVWLFDJULFXOWXUHDQGUXUDOGHYHORSPHQWLQ7KH%DKDPDV '87,(6$1'(63216,%,/,7,(6 7KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOO $VVLVWFOLHQWVLQWKHSODQQLQJtGHYHORSPHQWRIWKHLUEXVLQHVVHVWKURXJKWKH FKDQJHSURFHVVQHFHVVLWDWHGE\PDUNHWUHTXLUHPHQWV 8VHDUDQJHRIHIIHFWLYHPHWKRGRORJLHVLQFOXGLQJWKHXVHRIZHEEDVHG LQIRUPDWLRQGHOLYHU\SURJUDPVQHZVOHWWHUVDQGDFWLYLW\UHSRUWVWRDFKLHYH WHFKQRORJ\WUDQVIHUDQGVXVWDLQDEOHFOLHQWGHYHORSPHQW &RPDQDJHWKHOLEUDU\LQIRUPDWLRQUHVRXUFHFHQWHU :RUNZLWKSURGXFHUJURXSVDQGRWKHUVWDNHKROGHUVWRGULYHLQQRYDWLRQDQG DVVXUHWKHGHOLYHU\RIGHYHORSPHQWSURMHFWV 7KHLQFXPEHQWZLOOEHUHTXLUHGWRWUDYHOWRWKH)DPLO\,VODQGV+HVKHUHSRUWV WRWKHHSUHVHQWDWLYHDQGZLOOEHUHVSRQVLEOHIRUWKHPDQDJHPHQWRIWKHRIFH LQWKHDEVHQFHRIWKHHSUHVHQWDWLYH %$6,&$/,),&$7,216 4 7KHFDQGLGDWHKROGVDWOHDVWD%6FGHJUHHZLWKUHTXLUHGH[SHULHQFHLQWKHHOG RI$JULFXOWXUH$QLPDORUODQWFLHQFHV$JULFXOWXUDO(GXFDWLRQRULQDFORVHO\ UHODWHGGLVFLSOLQH'HPRQVWUDWHGNQRZOHGJHDQGH[SHULHQFHRIZHEEDVHG LQIRUPDWLRQGHOLYHU\SURJUDPVFRPSXWHUVDQGFRPPXQLFDWLRQHTXLSPHQWDV ZHOODVHIIHFWLYHZULWWHQDQGRUDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV0XVWEHVXSSRUWLYHRI ,,&$VYLVLRQPLVVLRQRISURPRWLQJVXVWDLQDEOHGHYHORSPHQWRIDJULFXOWXUHIRRG VHFXULW\DQGUXUDOSURVSHULW\ $SSOLFDWLRQ'HDGOLQHHSWHPEHURUXQWLOSRVLWLRQLVOOHG 3OHDVHVXEPLWFXUULFXOXPYLWDHWR +XPDQHVRXUFH'HSDUWPHQW 32%R[ 1$66$8%DKDPDV don't think she can survive if he doesn't come back home. Ms Humes said she hopes whoever took her brother would return him safe to his family. If you are reading this and you took my brother, please just let him come home. Marco is innocent and he deserves his life. If you have a heart please just bring him back. I just want my brother to come home. My mother wants her son back, she said. We don't care about anything else, we just want him back. Just drop him anywhere and he will find his way home. He will call us. Just please let him come home. Ms Humes described her brother as a quiet, scary little boy. She said he doesn't talk back, he doesn't keep company and his is very mannerly. She said: He is not like most young children his age. He stays home and plays games with his eight nieces and nephews. He is the youngest of six kids and all his brothers and sisters have children. So he has lots of friends. Someone sick had to take him. He is not the kind of child who would just wander off. He would not go with strangers. Ms Humes says the family is holding on to hope Marco is alive and will be returned to them safe and sound. Last night, a police spokesman said they are investigating. Anyone with any information on Marcos whereabouts can contact police on 911, 919, the Southern Police Station on 322-3337, 356-0228, the Central Detective Unit on 5029991, 502-9910 or Crime Stoppers on 328-TIPS. FROM page one TURNQUEST FROM page one MISSING BOY KIDNAPPED MARCOARCHER OPPOSITION YET TO SEE PROPOSED BAIL ACT AMENDMENTS FROM page one

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and others continuing to commit crimes while out on bail is uppermost in the minds of the public, Senator Delaney said the amendments to this Act will in fact be the smallest part of the governments package. In my opinion, he said, the government is preparing to put the Legislature in a position to go as far as it is felt that the Legislature can go. These Bills will be comprehensive. They will be attacking the challenge from many different perspec tives. Bail is just one aspect of several aspects that will be addressed. There are many aspects of the criminal law that it is felt there is an opportunity to improve upon in the context of the challenges we currently face. And we are trying to, in the interest of our community, we are trying to embrace those several opportunities which will result in more effectiveness in terms of punishment for crime. According to sources in the Attorney Generals Office, the amendments to the Bail Act will be geared towards providing a clearer definition to how and if bail will be given in any particular case as is being practised in the courts today. Amendments to the Criminal Procedure Code and the Penal Code will include, among other things, increasing the sentencing for certain types of offences, and ensuring the sentence of life in prison would mean for nature life. Other amendments will also seek to strengthen the powers of local magistrates, allowing them to pass stiffer sentences. We feel, said Senator Delaney, that an appropriate response must be more comprehensive than just the Bail Amendment. And so therefore what you will see, and the PM will speak to it, is a multipronged approach to trying to remedy some of the challenges we are having. While not wanting to preempt the Prime Minister on announcing any new laws on punishment for illegal firearm possession and the like, Senator Delaney said this assumption would be a reasonable position for any one to make. This has been a major effort by all of the relevant aspects of my ministry, main ly the Department of Public Prosecutions, Law Reform and Revision, as well as Legislative Drafting, he said. This has been a major undertaking, and rightly so, because the consequences are serious both in terms of not responding or not responding appropriately as well as the impact of the response. We have several things to weigh here punishment, fairness and the balancing of rights. Providence's water supply and sanitation systems said a second-floor leak at the Department of Environmental Health's Environmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment Division (EMRAD) left testing there open to possible fault. The units purpose is to test food, water and wastewater to ensure they adhere to industry standards and are not a risk to public health. Last night it was unclear if the unit was still responsible for food tests, however, officials confirmed that water testing responsibility had been turned over to the Water and Sewerage Corporation. "The EMRAD main offices and laboratory on New Providence are housed in a condemned building, where plumbing leaks from the second floor compromise the accuracy of bacteriological testing results in the laboratory," said the report. Subsequently responsibility for water testing was returned to the Water & Sewerage Corporation, said the report. The assessment also noted that EMRAD suffered from "insufficient resources and low morale," testing capacity was limited and neither of its laboratories was accredited. "There is no initiative to attain accreditation given the primitive lab conditions and lack of equipment and budget," said the IDB report, which was posted on September 20. Director of Environmental Health Melanie McKenzie yesterday said she was "unaware" of the claims in the report. Although she said she could not speak to the accuracy of the IDB's findings, she did say that "years ago" there had been a leak in EMRAD's offices, but as far as she knew that was no longer a problem. "I don't really know because I don't know that there was any leak recently. As far as I know there is no leak now at one point there was a leak, years ago." She added that the responsibility for water testing now lies with the Water and Sewage Corporation, but not because of the concerns raised in the report. "Water testing has for some time been turned back to the Water and Sewerage Corporation but (the claims in the IDB report were) not the reason. We had monitored it for a number of years. .It had been our responsibility for doing it," said Ms McKenzie. She said she did not know if EMRAD's facilities were condemned. "I don't know that the building is condemned at all," said Ms McKenzie. She said that she had not seen the report. She did say that her department is seeking new facilities for EMRAD, but not because of the conditions outlined by the IDB. "We are trying to have a new setup for EMRAD, obviously we are looking into getting (a) new location for EMRAD not specifically because of those conditions, but because we have outgrown the space," she said. State Minister for the Environment, Phenton Neymour, could not comment on the report yesterday because he does not have oversight over EMRAD. That responsibility lies with Environment Minister Earl Deveaux, he said. He did say that EMRAD was still functioning although he could not say which tests were carried out there or if they are open to compromise. Mr Deveaux was out of office yesterday and could not be reached for comment. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 0DOHDQG)HPDOH %DUWHQGHUV 6SDFH&OHDQHUV %DUXQQHUV (PDLOSKRWRIXOOERG\fWR $QQTXLHWWH#JPDLOFRP E\ 2FWREHUUG WATER TESTING MAY HAVE BEEN CONTAMINATED, SAYS REPORT FROM page one AG CONFIRMS GOVTS COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH TO FIGHT AGAINST CRIME FROM page one ATTORNEYGENERAL John Delaney

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 9 By MIKE LIGHTBOURN INSPECTIONSare a part of a growing number of real estate transactions, but their role is often misunderstood. There are some important points you should think about before ordering an inspection on a property you want to purchase. Remember that a home inspection is not a witchhunt! Its not a tool for finding flaws to allow you to renegotiate your offer. An inspection is an educational exercise that allows buyers and sellers to better understand the homes condition. An inspection can alleviate the buyers anxiety while also providing a basis for repair suggestions. Dont think that you wont need an inspection for new construction! Nobody wants any surprises when purchasing an older home, but imagine what could happen in a brand new one that hasnt even been lived in? If youre considering the purchase of a home under construction, ask about phase inspections, which are completed at various stages in con struction, for your peace of mind. Finally, dont assume that inspections are exclusively the responsibility of the buyer. Many sellers have benefited from prelisting inspections that identify potential problems before the home is listed and the defects are discovered. Both sides can use the inspection to make smart decisions and feel more confident about the transaction. If youre still uncertain, contact your local BREA professional with your questions. (Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty). ITS NOT A WITCH HUNT REALESTATE By CONSTABLE 3011 MAKELLE PINDER JOGGINGis a great form of exercise that one can do at their leisure, however while enjoying this particular activity, one has to take some form of precaution for their safety. A frequent error that joggers or runners make is that they become so preoccupied in their physical activity; they fail to be alert and pay attention to their surroundings. There are precautions one has to take ranging from all topics, which are listed below. AREA Alwaysmake sure to run in an area that you are familiar with and that is safe and do not jog or run near bushes, which can provide concealment. This way you will not get lost at you know the particular area and also if it is safe the crime rate will be low. Always jog or run with a known companion. MP3s A lot of joggers carry a music player along with them; make sure this is hidden as possible, by putting the wires underneath clothing instead of out of it. Also do not continually get it out to change the song as this can attract thieves. Furthermore, when jogging keeping wires tucked inside of clothing makes the risk of tripping over wires very slim. The headphone may come out of your ears and fall to the floor thus you trip over it, but when tucked in it will not do this. In addition, always make sure that you can hear background noise and never turn up your player so that you cannot. DOGS Some runners are afraid of dogs, and may see a few dogs on their journey. If you are extremely afraid and dislike dogs, try to avoid these situations. If you see a dog far off take a different route or stay as far away as possible. Inevitably sometimes you will encounter dogs on your jogging expedition. Make sure to keep calm and not be tempted to run away as they may chase you. If a dog does attack, try to "feed" it your workout jacket or other item of clothing. Remember to also carry some canine repellent just in case you are approached by a attacking dog. CLOTHING Always make sure to wear appropriate clothing for the environment. If it is a cold environment wear clothing that will keep you warm such as a track suit. If it is a hot environment keep cool with light clothing that will keep you cool. In addition, choose appropriate footwear and make sure to tie the laces properly as you can trip over them. WATER If you get thirsty easily or for safety, it is best to carry a water bottle with you, this will keep you hydrated. Some people may get very thirsty and tired during their run so drinking water will cool you down. MISCELLANEOUS If you have asthma make sure to always carry your pump with you, even if you feel you may not need it. Also if you are carrying keys or a phone with you keep it in a safe place where it is not likely to fall out. When jogging, make sure to make the experience as pleasant as possible by taking these precautions. Always Remember the B Three As: Be Alert, Be Aware, and Be Attentive to your surroundings at all times. Should you be a victim of crime while jogging, please do not resist but take note of the description of the culprit e.g. his appearance, clothing, height, physical details and the direction or mode of escape. Call the police as soon as it is safe to do so. If you come across any suspicious person(s) loitering around your business or have any information pertaining to any crime, please do not hesitate to contact call the police emergency at or Crime Stoppers at 328-tips (New Providence), 1-3008476 (Family Islands) Royal Bahamas Police Force National Crime Prevention Office: Safety tips for joggers

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INTERNA TIONAL NEWS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE SIRTE, LIBYA Associated Press HUNDREDS OF CIVILIANS fled Moammar Gadhafi's hometown yesterday to escape growing shortages of food and medicine and escalating fears that their homes will be struck during fighting between revolutionary forces and regime loyalists. Anti-Gadhafi fighters launched their offensive against Sirte nearly two weeks ago, but have faced fierce resistance from loyalists holed up inside the city. After a bloody push into Sirte again over the weekend, revolutionary fighters say they have pulled back to plan their assault and allow civilians more time to flee. NATO, which has played a key role in decimating Gadhafi's military during the Libyan civil war, has kept up its air campaign since the fall of Tripoli last month. The alliance said yesterday its warplanes struck eight military targets near Sirte a day earlier, including an ammunition and vehicle storage facility and rocket launcher. Sirte, 250 miles (400 kilometers) southeast of Tripoli onthe Mediterranean coast, is one of the last remaining bastions of Gadhafi loyalists since revolutionary fighters stormed into the capital last month, ending Gadhafi's nearly 42-year rule and sending him into hiding. The fugitive leader's supporters also remain in control of the town of Bani Walid, southeast of Tripoli, and pockets of territoryinthe country's south. In a boost to the economy, Italian energy giant Eni said yesterday it has resumed oil production in Libya after months of interruption, tap ping 15 wells and producing some 31,900 barrels of oil per day. French energy company Total said it restarted some production last week. NAIROBI, KENYA Associated Press KENYA'S former president called her a mad woman. Seen as a threat to the rich and powerful, Wangari Maathai was beaten, arrested and vilified for the simple act of planting a tree, a natural wonder Maathai believed could reduce poverty and conflict. Former students who planted saplings alongside her, world leaders charmed by her message and African visionaries on Monday remembered a woman some called the Tree Mother of Africa. Maathai, Africa's first female winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, died late on Sunday in a Nairobi hospital following a battle with cancer. She was 71. Maathai believed that a healthy environment improved lives by pro viding clean water and firewood for cooking, thereby decreasing conflict. The Kenyan organization she founded planted 30 million trees in hopes of improving the chances for peace, and she inspired the UN to launch a worldwide campaign that resulted in 11 billion trees being planted. Maathai, a university professor with a warm smile and degrees from the US, staged popular protests that bedeviled former President Daniel arap Moi, a repressive ruler who called her a mad woman who was a threat to the security of Kenya. In the summer of 1998, the Kenyan gov ernment was giving land to political allies in a protected forest on Nairobis outskirts. Maathai began a campaign to reclaim the land, culminating in a confrontation with 200 hired thugs armed with machetes and bows and arrows. When Maathai tried to plant a tree, she and her cohorts were attacked with whips, clubs and stones. Maathai received a bloody gash on her head. Many said, She is just planting trees. But that was important, not only from an environmental perspective, to stop the desert from spreading, but also as a way to activate women and fight the Daniel arap Moi regime, said Geir Lundestad, of the Nobel Institute, which awarded Maathai the peace prize in 2004. Maathai is survived by three children. FIRST AFRICAN WOMAN TO WIN NOBEL PRIZE DIES WANGARI MAATHAI with her Nobel Prize CONSERVATIONIST Wangari Maathai in 2006 with Barrack Obama, now US president, in Nairobi, Kenya JOHANNESBURG, SOUTHAFRICA Associated Press SOUTH AFRICA officials may block the Dalai Lama from celebrating the 80th birthday of his friend and fellow Nobel Peace Laureate, Arch bishop Desmond Tutu, amid fears over Chinese pressure. National newspapers are already drawing parallels between the situations of Tibetans under Chinese rule and black South Africans under the racist apartheid regime that ended in 1994. The tensions over the Dalai Lamas visa application also are a sign of how powerful Chinas influence has grown in Africa. The Dalai Lama is to deliv er the inaugural Desmond Tutu International Peace lecture, titled Peace and compassion as catalyst for change, as part of the Oct. 6-8 birthday celebrations for Tutu. The center that invited him says he has faced repeated difficulty since first trying to apply for a visa in June. In 2009, the South African government outraged many by banning the Dalai Lama from attending a Nobel laureates peace conference, say ing it would detract from the 2010 soccer World Cup. A spokesman for South Africa's foreign affairs depart ment denied there was any pressure to block the Dalai Lamas visit this time around. SOUTH AFRIC A MAY BLOCK DALAI LAMA VISIT THE DALAI LAMA, who may be prevented from visiting South Africa ARCHBISHOPDESMOND TUTU, whose 80th birthday will be celebrated with a peace lecture CIVILIANS FLEE FROM GADHAFI HOMETOWN

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE AFIREFIGHTER shows grade three students of Temple Christian a picture of herself YOUNGSTERS from Temple Christian listen to safety advice during the event at Marathon Mall GRADE THREE students of Temple Christian listen to National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest as part of an event to promote fire safety at the Mall at Marathon Felip Major /Tribune Staff STOPPING THE FIRES BY TEACHING THE YOUNG With these statistics in mind, National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest urged continuous preparation and fire safety awareness. He said fire drills should be run until they become second nature. Mr Turnquest also said $2.2 million has been budgeted for new fire trucks; $3 million for an enhanced 919 system; and $1 million for a fire station in Grand Bahama. Fire Safety Week will come to an end on Saturday with a funrun/walk. A fire safety awareness exhi bition will remain on display until Friday in the main foyer of the Mall at Marathon. F F r r o o m m p p a a g g e e t t w w o o DIRECTOR OF FIRE SERVICES Jeffrey Deleveaux gives the vote of thanks as National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest listens FIREAWARENESSWEEK

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE REAL ESTATE project into which $73 million of CLICO (Bahamas) funds was pumped suffered from very weak management controls, it has been revealed, with the insolvent insurers Trinidadi an principal accused of extracting project management fees way above market norms. Michael Carballo, group finance director for CLICO (Bahamas) ultimate Trinidadbased parent, CL Financial, has questioned whether it was appropriate for Lawrence Duprey, the latters chairman, to be a partner/shareholder in a company established to be project manager for the Wellington Preserve devel opment and other Floridabased real estate initiatives. In his witness statement to the Trinidad-based Commission of Inquiry into CL Financials collapse, Mr Carballo questioned whether the use of DYL, which stood for Duprey, Yanopoulos and Leid (two of the formers partners), to manage Welling ton Preserves development was cost efficient and provided for true accountability. His testimony sheds some light into the poor management and oversight structures that led not to just CLICO (Bahamas) collapse into insolvency, and now Supreme Court-supervised liquidation, but the end of CL Financial, one of the regions largest pan-Caribbean conglomerates. Via its wholly-owned Bahamian subsidiary, CLICO Enterprises, the Bahamian life and health insurer advanced $73 million to develop Wellington Preserve, with the intention of devel oping the West Palm Beach$4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.50 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 nrrnttbf$#$" nn(#"##&#$"###"!##%&"# $!"!'!&#!#$$!%"#!"#!%! #!&!"!#&#!#$#!"r%! %!" f!"# !"$! $$ntfbr"#bt fbnbrn [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 PersonalPensionPlan Strong investment performance Flexible Structure Competitive fees Efcient administration By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor WHILEunlikely to generate the $13$15 million oversubscription its placement agent felt possible last week, Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) $10 million preference share issue was yesterday said to have still been fully subscribed. Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trusts president, speaking in his placement agent role, said that while final figures were still being tallied he felt confident the BISX-listed commercial bank had raised enough new financing to bolster its critical Tier One capital ratio to 21 per cent. Telling Tribune Business that the private placement had provided enough capital to grow [Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)] for three-five years, Mr Anderson said it hoped to list the preference shares on BISX by year-end. He added that initial expectations the offering would be oversubscribed had not come to fruition, saying it had impacted by the proximity of the $8 million Arawak Cay Port initial public offering (IPO) and investor unfamiliarity with the conditions attached to Tier One perpetual preference shares. Last week I was hoping wed end up with $13-$15 million out of it, but it will be less than that, Mr Anderson told Tribune Business of the $10 million preference share issue. Well get somewhere north of $10 million, and at least it will be fully subscribed. We got a lot of subscriptions early, and picked up a pile at the end. Im reasonably sure its fully subscribed, just not sure what the total amount is. At one stage I thought it would be heavily oversubscribed, but last week we kept hearing more and more people were keeping monies for the Port transaction. This, the RoyalFidelity president said, showed the need to ensure no more than one major capital raising effort took By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ENDINGFreeports real property tax exemp tion will reinvigorate the citys real estate market, the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerces president has been told, as the annual $2,000-$10,000 carrying costs will prevent Bahamians and foreigners By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BECOMINGa public company is certainly not on the horizon for Caribbean Bottling Company (Bahamas) in the short-term, its principal describing the partnership forged with its 30 per cent minority Barbadian investor as a model for other Bahamian firms to follow. Describing the excellent relationship with Banks Barbados Breweries, Walter Wells, the companys presi dent and chief executive, said the arrangement showed Bahamians could partner with foreign groups who provided specialist skills and access to technology while remaining in control. Admitting that he and the investor group, including Banks, which bought the Coca-Cola bottler and distributor in 2006, had not expected to be sitting in their own multi-million dollar plant and head offices within five years, Mr Wells said the com pany planned to expand certain product lines and introduce an energy drink within the next six months. Questioned by Tribune Business about the possibility of Caribbean Bottling going public and listing on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX), Mr Wells said: Ive been asked that question many times. Its certainly not on the horizon certainly not in the near term. Theres no rush to sell shares. He explained that there were two driving forces for companies to go public, neither of which were currently in play for Caribbean Bot tling. These were the need to raise capital, and also if a major shareholder/share holders wanted to realise the value of their holdings and cash out. Neither one of those scenarios is necessary today, Mr GOING PUBLIC NOT ON HORIZONFOR COCA-COLA BOTTLER WALTER WELLS SEE page 5B CONTROLS ON $73M CLICO INVESTMENT VERY WEAK Insider accuses insolvent Bahamas insurers principal of extracting e xcessive management fees Bahamian liquidator gains new lines of inquiry SEE page 4B FIDELITYS $13-$15M HOPES NOT REALISED $10m pref issue fully subscribed, but anticipated oversubscription does not materialise BISX-listed bank still raises enough capital to grow for 3-5 years Set to list on exchange before 2011 year-end SEE page 6B MICHAEL ANDERSON NEW CONCEPT ADDS 65 JOBSCommonwealth Building Supplies says 35,000sq ft plaza anchor a smaller version of Lowes By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net COMMONWEALTH Building Supplies has created 65 new jobs through the opening of its 35,000 square foot anchor store in the Southwest Shopping Plaza, its general manager yesterday comparing the outlet to a smaller version of US hardware giant, Lowes. Telling Tribune Business that sales at the new location were increasing ona daily basis, Brent Burrows said: Things are going quite well. We are in our fourth week and have seen growth every day. We feel positive that when mid-October comes around things will really get busy. He added: The first week in September was a bad time for business because there was the back to school rush, but we are pleased with the progress so far. Mr Burrows said the stores concept was new to the almost 40 year-old business, adding: This is a new concept, nothing like our Robinson Road location. We have seasonal items, lawn and gardening supplies, as well as plumbing and electrical supplies. Its like a smaller version of Lowes. The store is situated in the $16 million Southwest SEE page 4B REINVIGORATE FREEPORT THROUGH TAX BREAK END Absence of $2,000$10,000 annual carrying costs has eliminated development incentive City s real estate prices dormant at best for 20 y ears SEE page 6B

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 3B WE MUST STEP UP OUR GAME IN FRAGILE WORLD By LARRYGIBSON LAST WEEKwe witnessed another reminder of how fragile the current economic recovery is as the Dow Jones Industrial Average (Dow) fell 738 points to 10,771, a decline of 6.4 per cent on the week. It was the Dows worst weekly decline since October 6, 2008, when the index fell 18.2 per cent. For the year to date, the Dow is down about 7 per cent, and off 15.9 per cent from its peak of 12,396 on April 29, 2011. Question The obvious question is: What has changed since April? The simple answer is: Much. The global economy is struggling with little or no growth in Europe and the US. The sovereign debt crisis is spreading within Europe, and countries such as the US, Japan and Italy have been downgraded in recent weeks. There are signs that even mighty China and other emerging market economies may not be growing as robustly as before. It is not clear whether the worst is over, and some are calling for another round of stimulus. For example, President Obama has recently proposed a $475 billion jobs program, which the Republicans are likely to reject. A different perspective Last week I came across an article entitled The real recession never ended written by Anthony Mirhaydari, a Seattle-based investment columnist for MSN Money, who argues that the crunch we are inis rooted in stagnant pay cheques and payrolls a problem, he asserts, that is more than a decade old. This article ranks as a must share so it is condensed below. Mirhaydari writes: Economists tell us the economic recovery is more than two years old. Corporate profits have zoomed to record highs. Countries such as China and Brazil have roared back. But by just about every other measure, it is as if the 2007 recession never ended. Industrial production, retail sales, employment, home prices, construction activity, inventories and retail sales are all below prerecession levels. In inflation adjust ed terms, the economy is smaller than it was before the downturn. That's nearly four years of no growth. The truth is, our problems are deeper and go back further. One example: Stocks are coming off their worst 10-year performance since the Great Depression, trading at levels first reached in 1998. In fact, I'd argue that the real recession began a decade or more ago and hasn't ended. The key problem stagnant wages has only gotten worse. It hasn't mattered who was in the White House or in control of Congress. Stagnant Wages Mirhaydari adds: The problem of stagnant wages is structural, and it is related to globalisation and the rise of China. Employers, scared by the 2008 financial crisis, cut jobs more deeply than experts expected. They've gotten used to smaller workforces and the big profit margins that go with them, thanks to outsourcing and automation. Incomes have been stagnant since the Clinton administration. Part of the reason wages stalled was technology. Mainly, though, it was the rise of globalisation. Of the 27 million jobs the US economy created in the two decades before the latest recession began in 2007, the vast majority were in "non-tradable" sectors of the economy such as government, health care, construction, retail and hospitality, notes economist and Nobel laureate Michael Spence. These are positions that cannot be shipped overseas. Those gains have not offset job losses in tradable sectors such as manufacturing. Private sector payrolls are now at levels first reached in 1999, despite a steady increase in the overall population. As a result, the employment-to-population ratio is at 1980s levels and still falling. The result has been a drop in the marginal return to labour. Put simply, there are fewer American jobs to go around, so they pay less with predictable results. Adjusted for inflation, new data from the US Census Bureau show incomes are down to 1996 levels. Implications for the Bahamas First, if real wages are not growing then consumer spending, which drives the US economy, stagnates. Remember, through June 30, 2011, US consumer spending was growing only at a 0.4 per cent annualised rate. This has obvious implications for a mass recovery in tourism travel, particularly from the US, in the foreseeable future. Does this indicate a continuation of heavily subsidised government promotion programs? Second, our traditional reliance on foreign investment will continue to be severely impacted by the turmoil in global financial markets and the fragility of international banks. The only lenders seemingly prepared to fund large long-term projects in todays market are the Chinese. The Chinese are the most significant lender to the US government (via their holdings of US government debt) and, of late, the most willing lender to the entire Caribbean region. The cost of this massive Chinese largesse (of which the Bahamas seems to be a favoured beneficiary) remains to be determined. Therefore, if we are to experience challenges in the two main drivers of our economy, tourism and foreign investment, it cannot be business as usual for the next five years. Government revenues, which are already under considerable pressure, will most likely continue to be weak. Some tax-raising measures will have to be implemented, and significant spending cuts will have to be enforced throughout the public sector. This will be bitter, but necessary, medicine. Further, if this economy is to grow, attention must be given to the fact that the entire region is competing for scarce tourism and foreign investment flows and, in order to get our fair share, we will have to step up our game. Therefore, the Government must become more business friendly to encourage both domestic and international investors to mobilise capital in our economy. They will only do so if the Government demonstrates it is serious by taking resolute steps towards putting its fiscal affairs in order. Such action will send the right message to investors. I do believe that when Baha Mar starts to pop out of the ground in a fully visible way confidence in the Bahamian economy will rebound, if supported by appropriate policies that encourage investment. Finally, I wish to remind local readers that such economic adjustments will not be confined to the Bahamas but will occur in all the major economies throughout the world. Until next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is vicepresident pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Colonial Group International, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurance and is a major shareholder of Security & General Insurance Company in the Bahamas. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Colonial Group International or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to Larry.Gibson@atlantichouse.com.bs FINANCIALFOCUS LARRYGIBSON WIN-WIN SOLUTION SOUGHT OVER ROYAL CARIBBEAN OUTLET By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net WITH Bahamian vendors on Coco Cay effectively being driven out of business due to what is being described as unfair competition from Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines, two contenders seeking to become the areas MP at the next general election yester day expressed hope that a win-win solution for both sides could be reached Straw vendors in the Berry Islands are arguing that the cruise lines newly-opened signature store on its private island will effectively put them out of business. The situation is being described by many as a prime example of unfair competition. Current MP for North Andros and the Berry Islands, Vincent Peet, told Tribune Business yesterday that the Government should revisit the decision to approve the logo shop on Coco Cay. Mr Peet said: I was trying to discourage Royal Caribbean from proceeding with the logo shop. I didnt support the logo shop because I realised the impact it would have on the vendors. It provides unfair competition. We appreciate and thank Royal Caribbean for their investment, and all we were asking is for them to be more sensitive to this aspect. The passengers on the ships, I am told, can use their room key to purchase items once they get to the cay. This will undoubtedly discourage some of the passengers from bringing cash. The vendors operate with cash; their sales are cash. They have to pay for their stock, pay for babysitters and transportation to and from the cay. For them its all cash transactions; they dont operate with credit cards. I am still calling on Royal Caribbean and the Government to revisit the approval for the logo shop.FormulaAnd Mr Peet added: Going forward I am calling for a sit down between the vendors and Coco Cay man agement to find a working formula for a win-win situation. The vendors make a contribution and Royal Caribbean makes a contri bution. Randy Butler, chief executive and president of SkyBahamas, and DNA candidate for North Andros and the Berry Islands, told Tri bune Business yesterday he was seeking to meet with the representative for the vendors. Hopefully we can find some way for a win-win sit uation, he said. From what I understand the passengers are coming off the ship without any cash; they are being told they dont need any. The vendors feel the ship is encouraging persons not to bring cash on to the cay. We understand the benefits of having Royal Caribbean but our concern is for the liveli hood of the vendors. Dr Jonathan Rodgers, the well known eye doctor and DNA activist, has also weighed in on the situation. Ina letter, he said: The pri mary complaint is that the prices of souvenirs in the signature store will undercut those of local merchants, and thus put them out of business. These complaints are justified, as there is no way that the local merchants can compete with this foreign corporate giant and, indeed, its only a matter of time before they are forced to close their doors. He added: Competition is to be expected in any business environment, but unfair competition is another story. This is certainly an exam ple of unfair competition, at its ugliest best. The cruise industry now either owns or controls six cays, four of which are designated ports. The cruise lines pay no import fees, work permit fees, business license fees, seabed fees or real property taxes. All of these same fees have to be paid by the local merchants who are competing in the same souvenir business. There is no way that local merchants can compete with the cruise lines, given their enormous buying power, as well as all of the above mentioned financial advantages. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE DRAFT Contractors Bill is still under review but nearly complete, the Ministry of Public Works permanent secre tary said yesterday, as the sector anxiously awaits its passage into law. While not giving a timeline for when it would be ready, Colin Higgs told Tribune Business: Its still under review. There are a number of Bills to be dealt with when Par liament opens. I know we have had a number of discussions with the Contractors Association and the Attorney Generals Office. We have had discussions back and forth. I dont see it taking an inordinate amount of time, but it is not ready yet. It is nearly com plete. Calls plced to Attorney General John Delaney were not returned up to press time last evening. The Bahamian Contractors Association (BCA) president, Godfrey Forbes, told Tribune Business that the sooner the Bill can be ready, the better. The Bill is extremely important. The sooner it can be addressed, the better it can be for the industry. Right now there is too much stupidity going on. Mr Forbes told Tribune Business. Since we had our last meeting with the Ministry of Works and the Attorney Generals Office two months ago there has not been any further communication with us. When we left the last meeting there were concerns over some parts of the Bill that we wanted to have adjusted and they were going to get back to us. That is the position we are in at this time. We havent seen a final draft; we are waiting for them to get back to us. According to Mr Higgs, the Bill contains provisions for the regulation of contractors based on their level of expertise. He said it also contains provisions for health and safety as well as consumer protection. Contractors Bill nearl y complete

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Shopping Plaza at the Blue Hill Road/Carmichael Road junction. The complex was built by CGT Construction, owned by the Treco family, which is also the founder and owner of Common wealth Building Supplies. Mr Burrows told Tribune Business: We have just about 70 persons employed at our Carmichael Road location. Of that number about 65 persons are new employees. He said the fact that the Carmichael Road area has become more populated in recent years led to the companys decision to establish a store in the area. We conducted a survey and research about four years ago, and decided it was a good area in which to expand our business. We feel as though we have positioned ourselves in the right location. We have been highly complimented on our cus tomer service and we offer convenient hours, Mr Burrows said. based project into a high-end residential and equestrian centre. An illiquid real estate development, Wellington Preserve ended up accounting for 63 per cent of CLICO (Bahamas) assets. This extraordinary level of inter-group (related party) financing created liquidity problems and left the Bahamian insurer challenged to fund its daily operations, according to liquidators. The insurer was put into liquidation after CLICO Enterprises balance sheet showed liabilities of $129 million and assets of only $108 million, creating a $21 million solvency deficiency. The earlier collapse of its CL Financial parent meant a $58 million guarantee it had given on behalf of CLICO (Bahamas), shoring up its balance sheet, was unlikely to hold, while the US real estate market freefall meant Wellington Preserves valuation had dropped dramatically. Alluding to all these issues, Mr Carballo said CL Financials CLICO subsidiary through its Bahamian and other affiliates had funded not just Wellington Preserve but three other major Florida real estate developments. I am aware that CLICO expended hundreds of millions of dollars on these projects and, while these seemed feasible while property prices were rising sharply in Florida over the past 10 years, valuations suffered in the Florida property crash at the end of 2008, Mr Carballo said in his statement to Trinidads inquiry. I cannot comment on the quality of controls or oversight on these projects, but I suspect that they were always very weak. The Florida investments consumed the majority of the time spent by Karen Gardier, CLICO (Bahamas) chief executive and also chief financial officer of its CLICO parent. Describing the fancy offices of DYL on Brickell Avenue in Miami, which were frequently used as a base for Mr Duprey, Mr Carballo said that after making his own inquiries he learned the companys initials stood for Duprey, Yanopoulos and Leid. It was set up as project managers to manage the groups [CL Financial] real estate/property projects in Florida, Mr Carballo said. They earned project management fees, rumoured to be way above general market rates. I was never clear as to the rationale for DYLs involvement, and whether it was cost-efficient for the group, as opposed to the use of independent project managers that could be held truly accountable. I also understood that Geoffrey Leid, in particular, was drawing hefty Us dollar fees out of DYL............ Mr Carballos comment on excessive project management fees relating to Wellington Preserve are likely to interest CLICO (Bahamas) liquidator, Baker Tilly Gomez accountant and partner, Craig A. Tony Gomez. It could represent another potential recovery source in his efforts to recover assets for CLICO (Bahamas) creditors and investors, who according to his last report are facing a $14.58 million solvency deficiency assets of $45.543 million exceeded by some $60.722 million in liabilities. This is likely to involve some kind of lawsuit being filed by Mr Gomez against Mr Duprey, an action the liquidator and his attorneys in the Bahamas, the US and Trinidad have been contemplating for some time. Mr Gomez is also likely to be interested in the minutes of a CLICO investment committee meeting on April 8, 2008, which appear to indi cate that the company was financing another Florida real estate project through Bahamas-domiciled CLICO Enterprises. Under the heading Merrick Park, the notes refer to Merrick Park jointly with CLICO Enterprises alongside Karen Gardiers name, implying that CLICO (Bahamas) 100 per cent owned affiliate was financ ing more than just Wellington Preserve. K Gardier explained the set up now is that CLICO is funding Merrick Park via loan notes to CLICO Enterprises, the minutes state. This could indicate another source of recovery/asset to go after for Mr Gomez, as it implies that monies orig inating in the Bahamas with CLICO (Bahamas) may have potentially been invest ed with Merrick Park another Duprey, or DYL, controlled development. It also appears that CLICO was seeking a joint venture partner for Wellington Preserve, but this did not work out because the proposed partner was embroiled in a litigation mess. Wellington Preserve was to mature on time to put some proceeds from that into Merrick Park, the investment committee notes said, creating another inquiry line for Mr Gomez. Unfortunately, the trans action did not come through because the other party that was to join up with Welling ton Preserve, which would have led to an increase in the value of our land, got into legal battles with the persons they are leasing from cur rently. They eventually had to stay on with them to get out of the battles, as it was not feasible to go forward with the number of law suits. The final word on the sorry mess belongs to Mr Carballo. He told the Trinidad Commission of Inquiry: The group would have lost hundreds of millions of US dollars as a result of venturing into Florida real estate projects. Most of them were financed with relatively high leverage, and by the ending of 2008, with the drastic declines in Florida real estate values, borrowings were in excess of current valuations and the group was forced to give up projects........ such as Wellington Preserve as a result. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE )LQDQFLDO$QDO\VW 7KH%XUQV+RXVH*URXSRI&RPSDQLHVLVVHHNLQJWRHQKDQFHLWV)LQDQFH'HSDUWPHQW WKURXJKWKHDGGLWLRQRID)LQDQFLDO$QDO\VW7KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOOKDYHPDLQ UHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUWKHSURFHVVLQJRIQDQFLDOWUDQVDFWLRQVDQGUHSRUWVIRU%XUQV+RXVH *URXSRI&RPSDQLHVDQGLWV3DUHQW&RPSDQ\&RPPRQZHDOWK%UHZHU\/WGDSXEOLFO\ OLVWHGFRPSDQ\RI%,6;f -RE'HVFULSWLRQ 5HVSRQVLEOHIRUDOOGDWDXSORDGDQGUHSRUWLQJWRWKHUHJLRQDOFRUSRUDWHRIFH YLD&RPSDQ\,QIRUPDWLRQ/RJLVWLFVf 3UHSDUDWLRQRIPRQWKO\FRQVROLGDWHGQDQFLDOVWDWHPHQWV 5HVSRQVLEOHIRUWKHEXVLQHVVDQDO\VLVUHSRUWVRINH\EXVLQHVVXQLWV URGXFWLRQ:KROHVDOHtHWDLOf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f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f/LPLWHGZKRVHDGGUHVVLV 6XLWH%D\SDUO%XLOGLQJ3DUOLDPHQW6WUHHW3 2%R[$3DVVDX7KH%DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( )/$;,19(670(17+2/',1*6/7' $1,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1< 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHYROXQWDU\GLVVROX WLRQRIWKHDERYHFRPSDQ\FRPPHQFHGRQWKH UGGD\RI6HSWHPEHU$UWLFOHVRI'LVVR OXWLRQKDYHEHHQGXO\UHJLVWHUHGE\WKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDOVRIFH3%R[16KLUOH\6WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDV7KH/LTXLGDWRULV$-.&RUSR UDWH6HUYLFHV%DKDPDVf/LPLWHGZKRVHDGGUHVVLV 6XLWH%D\SDUO%XLOGLQJ3DUOLDPHQW6WUHHW3 2%R[$3DVVDX7KH%DKDPDV THE $409.5 MILLION Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA) redevelopment has been featured internationally as the first Bahamian infrastructure project to be financed by user fees. Participating in a KPMG Infrastructure Summit in Miami, the Nassau Airport Development Companys (NAD) president and chief executive, Stewart Steeves, highlighted the success of the companys financial model. During the panel, A Construction and Development Model for a Successful PPP/Infrastructure Project Mr Steeves shared with the audience of more than 150 country and corporate leaders the elements of a successful Public Private Partnership (PPP). There is a need for trust among partners, he said. The public sector partner determines what the project is, and trusts the private sector partner(s) to determine how the project gets done. There is no question that our success has been occasioned by a public sector need for a major asset to be expanded and redeveloped, coupled with the private sector belief that the long-term revenue streams from this asset will be viable and sustainable. That is a perfect marriage." This framework is likely to be replicated to facilitate major infrastructure projects that have long-term revenue streams. Airport project a perfect marriage Nassau Airport Development Companys (NAD) president and chief executive, Stewart Steeve NEW CONCEPT ADDS 65 JOBS FROM page one CONTROLS ON $73M CLICO INVESTMENT VERY WEAK FROM page one

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WASHINGTON Associated Press THEhome-buying season was a bust. March through August are typically the peak buying months. But this time, Americans bought fewer new homes in that stretch than in any other six-month period since record-keeping began a half-century ago. And sales of previously occupied homes didn't fare much better. They nearly matched 2009's total for the peak buying months. And that was the worst since 1997. Combined, total sales this spring and summer were the weakest on records dating to 1963. The figures underscore how badly the hous ing market is faring and suggest that a recovery is years away. Because the economy is barely growing and unemployment exceeds 9 percent, many people see a home purchase as too big a risk. Some worry about losing their jobs. Others can't afford the 20 percent down payment that most lenders now require. Not even shrunken home prices and the lowest mortgage rates in six decades are convincing would-be buyers. "The job engine has really sputtered out, and without jobs, Americans really can't purchase homes," said Celia Chen, a housing economist at Moody's Analytics. Plunging stock prices and renewed recession fears have led many economists to push back expectations for a housing recovery. Chen expects prices to bottom at the start of 2012. And she doesn't expect sales and prices to make a healthy recovery until 2015 at the earliest. In hard-hit areas such as California and Flori da, it could take decades for prices to return to normal, she said. Pierre Ellis, an analyst at Decision Economics, said that until wages increase and hiring picks up, sales will languish. The "bad news is the evident absence of optimism that sales will pick up to any degree," Ellis said. Roughly 168,000 new homes were sold from March through August, the Commerce Department said Monday. That's fewer than the 180,000 for the same period last year and last year's sales were boosted by a temporary buyer's tax credit. Over the same period in 2009, roughly 208,000 new homes were sold. Ina healthy six-month buying season, about 400,000 new homes would sell. Among re-sales, about 2.8 million homes sold from March through August this year. That's roughly as many as in the same periods in 2009 and 2010. In a healthy market, about 3.3 million would be sold in that sixmonth stretch. Michael McGrew, who runs McGrew Real Estate in Lawrence, Kan., said many families won't buy until the economy strength ens. Even in Lawrence, which had a low unemployment rate of 6.4 percent in July and is home to the University of Kansas, people are worried, McGrew said. What would help most would be a relocated company that's ready to hire in the Lawrence area, McGrew says. But hopes for the housing market to turn around soon are dim, he said. "We're actually seeing more people trading down their home or trading out of our market entirely," McGrew said. Nationally, prices are still falling. Prices for previously occupied homes have sunk more than 5 percent over the past year to a median of $168,300. New-home prices have fallen even further, by 7.7 percent, to $209,100. That suggests builders and Realtors are slashing prices to compete with low-priced foreclosures and short sales. Short sales occur when lenders allow homes to be sold for less than what's owed on the mortgage. Combined, foreclosures and short sales are selling at an average 20 percent discount. And they're lowering neighboring home values. Devan MacConnell, 28, an administrator at a nonprofit in southeast Virginia, had been renting for years before buying a short sale this month a one-bed room condo in Virginia Beach overlooking the ocean. She picked it up for $215,000, about $35,000 less than neighboring apartments. "It was a steal," she said. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 7B 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1550.0807.76.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 -0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7.50 4.40Bank of Bahamas 6.93 6.93 0.00 0.2300.10030.11.44% 0.53 0.17Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2.84 2.55Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.0300.09090.03.33% 1 .96 1.77Fidelity Bank 1.77 1.77 0.00 0.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas 8.47 8.47 0.00 0.2450.31034.63.66% 2.80 2.33Colina Holdings 2.33 2.33 0.00 0.4380.0405.31.72% 8.50 8.33Commonwealth Brewery 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.7400.00011.50.00% 7.00 6.21Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.88 6.44 -0.446,6350.4960.26013.04.04% 2.00 1.63Consolidated Water BDRs 1.62 1.62 0.00 0.1110.04514.62.78% 1.77 1.31Doctor's Hospital 1.37 1.37 0.00 0.0740.11018.58.03% 5.50 4.75Famguard 5.43 5.43 0.00 0.4980.24010.94.42% 8.40 5.35Finco 5.39 5.39 0.00 0.7570.0007.10.00% 9.74 7.75FirstCaribbean Bank 8.21 8.21 0.00 0.4940.35016.64.26% 6.00 5.00Focol (S) 5.33 5.33 0.00 0.4350.22012.34.13% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.30 5.58ICD Utilities 7.30 7.30 0.00 -0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 0.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.00BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%M ONDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,363.75 | CHG -20.41 | %CHG -1.47 | YTD -135.76 | YTD % -9.05BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.18353.32%4.99% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.14202.10%4.31% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.18543.16%5.14% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 31-Aug-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 31-Aug-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS31-Aug-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 &KULVWLQD3LHUUHRI&RZSHQ 5RDG1HZ3URYLGHQFH%DKDPDV (OYH&KDUOHVRI0DUVK+DUERXU $EDFR%DKDPDV BERLIN Associated Press GERMANofficials on Monday downplayed prospects of any quick and dramatic change of course in the eurozone debt crisis, days before a parliamentary vote on beefing up the continent's rescue fund. Weekend meetings of global financial leaders in Washington raised hopes ofa change in strategy, with officials indicating they would focus on further boosting the firepower of the ?440 billion ($595 billion) rescue fund perhaps by allowing it to tap loans from the European Central Bank or otherwise leveraging its lending capacity. Hopes for such a move boosted European stock markets on Monday, with German and French bank shares rising strongly. However, ahead of a parliamentary vote Thursdayon changes to the fund that eurozone leaders already agreed to in July, Berlin was keen to underline its attachment to its often-criticized stepby-step approach. President Barack Obama, meanwhile speak ing Monday in California said the financial crisis rippling through Europe is "scaring the world" and that steps taken by European nations to stem the eurozone debt problem "haven't been as quick as they need to be." Obama said Europe never fully healed from the financial crisis in 2007, and its troubles have spilled beyond the conti nent and are affecting the U.S. economy as well. His comments were in response to a question posed by a laid-off work er. Thursday's vote on expanding the powers of the rescue fund, the socalled European Financial Stability Facility, will be followed over the coming months by final decisions ona second bailout pack agefor Greece and on a permanent rescue mechanism meant to replace the EFSF from 2013, Finance Ministry spokesman Mar tin Kotthaus noted. "That is quite simply the procedure that lies in front of us we will work through it step by step," Kotthaus said. When asked in Washington whether he supported the idea of lever aging the rescue fund, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said: "Of course we will use the EFSF in the most efficient way possible." The discussion about thenew rescue fund powers is taking place amid speculation that Greece ultimately will be unable to pay its debts and will have to force heavy losses on bondholders. That would be beyond a 21 percent sacrifice agreed to under a second, ?109 billion bailout deal for Greece. Greek and other officials deny that will happen. In an interview with ntv television Monday, Schaueble was asked whether there is a plan to move up the effective July 2013 date of the long-term rescue mechanism, or ESM. Schaeuble pointed out that the process of estab lishing the ESM, which would allow a country to go bankrupt and default on its debts, takes time. "That doesn't go very fast," Schaeuble said. "If we could do it faster ... it would be good, but prob ably we will need the time that we have calculated." Some in Chancellor Angela Merkel's centerright coalition already find the beefing up of the EFSF by giving it new powers hard to swallow, and anything beyond that could be a hard sell among its lawmakers. GERMANY DOWNPLAYS HOPES OF FAST NEW CRISIS COURSE HOME-BUYING SEASON THE WORST IN AT LEAST 50 YEARS IN THIS AUG. 22, 2011 PHOTO, a home-available sign is seen in front of a new home under construction in Apopka, Fla. Sales of new homes fell to a six-month low in August. The fourth straight monthly decline during the peak buying season suggests the housing market is years away from a recovery. (AP)

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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Y OURPAPER...YOUR WEEKEND! YOUR PAPER... YOUR WEEKEND! COMINGOCTOBER 1

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B O D Y A N D M I N D P AGE 8B, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 27, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter YOGA enthusiasts in the Bahamas rolled out their mats last Saturday to join the global celebration of the autumnal equinox and demonstrate unity for World Peace Day.Cl u b On e was t ran sf o rmed i nt o a p eacef ul and serene sp ace fo r yo g a p ractit io n e r s to complete 108 sun salutations. By the end of the event, participants left the gym with a new a n d i m pro v ed sense of balance, strength, f lex i bil ity an d ag il ity, sa i d organisers. Yoga instructor and coordinator Janine C ar e y t o l d T r i b u n e He a l t h t h a t e ve r y s p r i n g an d au t u m n eq u i n o x a r o u n d t h e w o rl d p e o ple get together to do these 108 sun salut at i o n s t o u sh er i n t h e c h an ge o f t h e s eas o n It is consid e red a n imp ortant tim e o f t h e ye ar a n d i t s i gn i f i es a ch a n ge f ro m su mmer into the winter months, she said. B a s ical l y w hen yo u d o a s u n sal u tat io n wh i ch i s 12 mo ve men t s, or 12 p o st u res i t i s l i k e a m i n i w o r k o u t Y o u r e al l y d o t ar g et a l l of the musc les o f your b ody b y w o rking on b a lance flex i bility and stre n g th Yo u e n d u p h a v i n g b e t t e r p o s t u r e b e c a u s e y o ure le ngthe nin g t h e s p ine a nd rolling the shoulders back, and you connect with yo u r b r ea t h s o t h at y o u h a ve d ee p e r i n h al a tions and exhalations, said Ms Carey. A bo u t 3 0 p e o pl e p a r t i c i p a t e d i n t h e ev en t M o n e y r ai s ed f r o m p ar t i c i p a n t d o n a tions was earmarked for community serv i c e p r o g r a m m e s o r g a n i s e d b y t h e Rotaract Club of East Nassau. Yo ga i n st ru ct or El ain e Ker ry sh are d h er views o n t he event : "I th in k t hat t he in ten sity of a yoga practice pushes people to a certain ed g e. I sp e ak f or me an d th e masses when I say we gen e ral ly e n jo y o u r c o mfort zones in life a n d b y p a rticipa tin g i n s om e t hin g l ike t he su n s a l ut a ti ons ; it i s almost like a marathon of yoga. You are given the opportunity to go out of your comfort zone and take yourself to a new edge." "The fall equinox is like that sense of renewal. Traditionally, it is about shed d in g a n d get t in g ri d o f t h e o l d I n y o ga i t is al mo st li k e e xf o li atin g o f yo ur i n sid es and then you can really start again. It d oe s no t ma tter if y o u a re 10 y ea rs old or 95, you can start with where y o ur e a t a nd whe r e y our b ody is and it becomes a journey."UNITY IN YOGABy JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer BA HA M IA NS f lo ck ed to a s emin a r f e a t u r i n g t h e c o n t r o v e r s i al h e r b a l is t k n o w n as Dr S eb i to s eek cu res fo r a nu mb er o f h eal th ail men ts. T h e e v e n t a i m e d t o e d u c a t e B a ha m i a ns on the be ne f it s of t he alk al in e di et w hi ch co ns is ts o f n on sta rch b ased f o o d s. It al so emp h asi ses fres h f ru it s an d veget abl es. Th e semin ar was h o sted b y New Li fe E lect ri c Cel l F o o d s at B ahamas Fai th M in i st ries ear li er th i s mo n th J a m a l Mon cur founde r of N e w Li fe, sai d th e even t t u rn ed o u t to b e e ven mor e su ccessf u l th an o rgan isers h ad h o p ed T o s a y t h e l e c t u r e w a s w e l l re cei v ed i s an u nd e r statemen t. W e had ab o u t 1, 700 p eo p le at t he even t a nd th e re we re a n other 1,7 0 0 tha t sh o wed u p at o u r of fi ce. T ho s e wh o hav e us ed D r Sebi s p r o ducts ar e res p on d i ng very wel l to t hem sayin g h o w it h as ex ceed ed th eir exp ectat io n s, he t ol d Tri b u ne He alt h M r M on cur s a i d mo re a n d more Bah amian s are ad o pt in g a n alk ali ne d i et. A l read y th er e are 2, 000 regu l ar cl ient s rece i vin g servi ce s f rom New L i f e Ou r b as i c p h i l o so p h y i s t h at fo o d sh ou ld be y o ur me d icin e and you r medi cin e sh ou ld b e you r fo o d. Th at i s ou r b a s ic p rin cip le. W hat e ver you put in y our m outh wil l d et e rm i ne yo ur st ate of h ealth We fin d in ou r r e s ea r c h t h a t w h a t e ve r y o u p u t i n s i d e y o u r m o ut h t ha t c on t a i n s s t a r c h, there is no pl a ce in y ou r bod y for t hat W e p ro vid e fo o d t h a t is co n si sten t wit h th e cell ul a r makeu p o f t he b o d y. If yo u h ave a d ef i ci en cy i n cal ci u m w e wi l l gi ve yo u s ea mo ss A nd yo u can u se th at to mak e ice cream; y o u c a n u s e t h a t t o b a k e b r e a d b e c a u s e i t h a s t h e s a m e b i n d i n g e f f ec t as yeast, said M r M o ncu r. The ba si c D r S eb i di et i s abo ut e l imin a ti ng acid ic foo ds from you r di e t and re p lacin g th em wi th alk a l i n e o r e l ec t r i c f o o d s C o mm o n ac i d i c fo od s in clu de ca rr ot s, ce l ery, g arl ic, be e ts oa ts c a ss a v a a nd p ota t oe s said M r M on cu r. Commo n alk a l in e food s in clude c allill o, qu inoa, wild rice a n d sea mo ss. D i s e a s e t h r i v e s o n a n a c i d i c bo dy so the basic fo rm u la to ea t alk a l in e f oo d to resto re b a l ance to yo ur imm un e s ystem and al l ow yo u r bo d y to h eal i tself Di seas e is cau sed wh en t her e i s a br eakd o wn o f t he mu cu s memb ran e an d d ep en di n g o n wh er e th at b reak do wn i s i t wil l determi ne y o u r d ise a se I f y our m u c us m e m br a ne is br ok en d ow n in yo ur b ro n ch ial tu b e th e di sea s e t hat wil l man ifest wil l b e bronc h it is. I f it is broke n down in t h e p a n c r e a t i c d u ct i t w i l l m an i f e s t a s di abetes. If th e break do wn is in th e join t s it w i ll ma n ife st a s arthritis, said M r M o ncu r. T h e m u c u s me m b r a n e i s d e s i g n e d to abs o r b a ll form s of a cid. Whe n y ou e a t a ci dic foods c onst a ntly i t eats aw ay t h e muc us membr ane an d ex p o ses th e c el l. On c e t h at o ccu rs th ere i s n o p r o t e c t i o n f o r t h e cell s, he said W hile t he a lka line d i e t h a s m a n y s u p p o rt ers, so me med i cal e x p e r t s h a v e q u e s t io ned wh e t her i t h a s a n y e f f e c t o n t h e b o d y D r S e b i s c l a i m s t hat h i s metho d s cu re c l i e n t s o f d i a b e t e s ; c a n c e r ; H I V / AI D S ; i m p o t en ce ; lu p u s; h e rpes; blin dne ss; sickle cell anemia; paral y s is; a s th m a ; Al z he i m e r s d i s e a s e; f i b r o i d t u m o r s A u t i s m, m en tal illnes s, hea rt dise as e a nd m o r e h a v e m a d e h i m a c o n t r o v e r s i a l h e r b a l i s t S u c h c l a i m s l e d t o D r S e b i s a p p e a r a n c e i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s S u p r e m e C o u r t i n 1 9 8 8 B u t t h e S u p rem e C o u r t o f N ew Yo r k u p h e l d h i s c la i ms af t er man y w i tn es se s c ame t o co u rt wi th th eir test imo ni a l s an d t h e i r me d i c al p a p e r s i n h an d t o p r o ve t hat th e i r d o cumen ted d iseases h ad d isap peared S e v e n t y s e v e n p a t i e n t s p r e s e n t e d th ei r d i agn o st ic sh eet s s h o w i n g t h a t t h e y we re c u r ed o f d i se ase s wh i ch med i ca l ex pe rt s h a d d e em e d i n c u r a b l e. A n e m p l o y e e a t B F M w h o d i d n o t w i s he d to b e na m e d s aid the sem inar was ve ry in fo rma t ive. The re we r e a ton o f p e o p l e a t t h i s e ve n t Th e med ici ne p a r t of the ev ent I w as tr u ly i mp res se d wi t h Th er e ar e s o m e p r o d u c t s t h at I am d e fin itely in ter ested i n pu rch a s in g If yo u t hi nk th e f o o d t h a t y o u a r e e a t i n g n o w i s h e al t h y, af t e r h e ar i n g t h at m an s p e ak yo u w i ll n o t t h in k so an y mo re Ho wev er, th e majo rit y o f th e fo od s th a t he said are h ealth y f or co n sump tio n ar e fou n d on th e o th e r sid e of th e wo rld , she said Ne w Life Elec tric Ce ll Foo ds is a n e w B a h a m i a n c o m p a n y w h i c h f o c u s e s o n t e a c h i n g B a h a m i a n s h ow t o e a t r i g h t a n d l i v e l on g e r he a l thi e r liv e s Ba h a mi a ns fl oc k to se e he r b a li st D r Se bi DR SEBI Controversial Herbalist Heather Carey Photography/ PhotosI think that the intensity of a yoga practice pushes people to a cer tain edge. Janine Carey

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I T IS custo ma r y f or some p e r s o n s w h o h a v e c e r t a i n h e a r t co n d i t i o n s a n d t h o s e wit h a r t if ic ial jo i nt s to t ake a n t i bi o t ic s be f o re so m e de n t a l treatments. Th e se p e o p l e m a y b e a t ri s k of developing an infection in the heart or at the site of the a rti fic ia l jo int The a nti bio tic s t a k e n b e f o re t h e se d e n ta l p ro cedures will reduce this risk. T he ac t of t ak i ng th e se a n ti bi o tic s be fore the de nta l p roce dures is called antibiotic pro phylaxis. De nt al he alt hcar e pr o fes si onals in T he Bahamas are g ui de d i n the ir pra ct ic e of th e science and ar t of dent ist ry, b y gu ide li ne s pro vi de d by th e Bahamas Dental Council. T he gu idel ines comm only r e c o m m e n d e d b y t h e B ah ama s D enta l Cou nc il fr e q ue nt ly m irro r t hose gi ve n b y r e c o g n i s e d i n t e r n a t i o n a l orga nis a tions. The America n Dental A ss ociat ion ( ADA ), American Heart Association (AHA) and Ame rica n Aca demy of Orthopedic Surgeons (A A OS) ar e s uch or gan is ations. T h e r e f o r e w h en t r e a t i ng p at ie nt s w i th he a rt c on dit io ns d e n ti st s c o m mo n l y f ol l o w r e c ommendations developed by t h e AH A w i th i np u t f r om t h e ADA. W h e n t re a t in g pa t i e nt s w h o ha ve total jo int replac ements they commonly refer to recommendations developed by AAOS. T h e A H A r e c o m m e n d a tion s f or per s ons w i th hear t c o n d i t i o n s a r e m e a n t t o r ed u ce t h e r i s k o f in f e ct i ve endocarditis. Infective endoc a r d itis (I E ) is a n infe cti on of the lining inside the heart or th e heart va lves wh ich ma kes the suff e r er very ill and c an r es ul t i n d eat h. I f n ot ma na g e d a p p r o p r i a t e l y t h e patient can die. In t h e pa st m a n y h e a rt c o n dit i ons wer e t ho ugh t t o p ut patients at ris k for developing IE. This is no longer the opinion of the AHA. T h e y a n a l y s e d p u b l i s h e d research and other scientific articles and determined that fe w er c ond ition s w ere assoc ia te d w i t h IE I t w a s c o n c l u d e d t hat th e risk s of b ad re ac tio ns to antibiotic s outwei ghed the b e n e f i t s o f p r o p h y l a x i s f o r mo s t p at i en t s ; p r o p h yl a c t i c a nti bio tic s did no t prev en t IE d e fin it iv el y a nd b ac t eri a fro m t h e m o u t h e n te r i ng t he b l oo d stream during daily brushing are mor e li kel y to c a us e I E t han a fter a de nta l t r e at men t. The likelihood of bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotic s as a result of over us ag e was also a major concern for the AHA. I t i s n o w a cc e pt e d t h at a s m a l l e r g r o u p o f p a t i e n ts n e e d t o u se p ro ph y la c t ic a nt ib i ot ic s before dental treatments. The current AHA recommendations advise the use of preventive antibiotics before c ertain dental pr oc edures for people with: Artificial heart valves A history of infective endo carditis A cardiac transplant that develops a heart valve problem The following congenital (present from birth) heart condi tions: unrepaired or incompletely repaired cyanotic (showing bluish discoloration due to insufficient oxygen in the blood); congeni tal heart disease, including those with palliative shunts and conduits; a completely repaired congenital heart defect with prosthetic (synthetic) material or device, whether placed by surgery or by catheter (flexible tube) intervention, dur ing the first six months after the procedure, and any repaired congenital heart defect with residual defect at the site or adjacent to the site of a prosthetic patch or a prosthetic device. P eopl e who t ook pr oph yl act ic ant ib iot ics in th e pas t b u t n o l o n g e r n e e d t h e m i n c l u d e t h o s e w i t h : m i t r a l v a l v e p r o l a p s e ; r h e u m a t i c heart disease; bicuspid valve dise a se ; c al c ifi e d ao rti c ste n os is, a nd c ongenital hea r t cond i t i o n s s u c h a s v e n t r i c u l a r s e p t a l d e f e c t a t r i a l s e p t a l defect and hypertrophic car diomyopathy. T h e r e c o m m e n da ti o n s fr o m the AAOS apply to persons who have total joint replace m en t s T h e A A O S ai m s t o re d u c e th e ri s k o f i n fe c ti o n s a t the site of a n artifi ci al joi nt in p e r s o n s u n d er go i n g c er t ai n d e n t al pr oc ed u r e s P a t ie n t s with joint replacements who a r e h a v i n g i n v a s i v e p r o c e du re s o r w ho ha v e o th e r bo d y in f e c t i o n s a re a t i n c r e a s e d r is k of b a c te r ia in f e c ti n g t he i r a rti fic ial jo int. Pa tie nts wh o h av e pins, pl ates o r other or th opedic (bone related) hardware are not affected. A n t ib i o t ic pr op h yl a xi s a s described by the AAOS may b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r t h o s e patients who have had previ ou s p ro sth e t ic j oi n t i nf e c ti o n s. I t may als o be considered for t h os e wit h ot he r con d it i on s t h a t m a y p r e d i s p o s e t h e patient to infection. Some such conditions that you should be aware of are: All patients with prosthetic joint replacement Immune system compro mised/immune system suppressed patients Inflammatory arthropathies (for example rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) Drug-induced immune sys tem suppression Radiation-induced immune system suppression Patients with co-morbidities (for example diabetes, obesity, HIV, smokers) Previous prosthetic joint infections Malnourishment Haemophilia HIV infection Insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetes Malignancy A ll r e com me nd at io ns ar e t o e n s u r e t h e b e s t f o r t h e p at i en t I f yo u ar e no t s ur e whether or not you fall into o n e o f t h e s e c a t e g o r i e s a s d eter min ed by th e A HA o r t he A AO S check with you r m e d i c a l h e a l t h c a r e p r o f e s sional. It is also very impor tant to talk to your dentist to dete rmin e if an y of the a bov e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s a p p l y t o you Pl ease ta ke c are o f y our h e a r t yo u r j o i n t s a nd y o u r mouth. This article is for informa tional purposes only. It is not intended and may not be treated as, a substitute for profes sional medical/dental advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or dental professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical/dental con dition. Never disregard professional medical/dental advice or delay in seeking it because of a purely informational publica tion. Copyright 2011 by Dr. Andre R. Clarke. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this article, in whole or in part, is prohibited without written permission. If you have questions, please send e-mail to dr_andreclarke@hotmail.com. Dr Andr R Clarke, DDS, MBBS Special Care Dentistry WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 27, 201 1, P AGE 9B P r o p h y l a c t i c a n t i b i o t i c s i n d e n t i s t r y B y A N D R E C L A R K EKEEPING YOUR MOUTH ALIVE What about flat feet?T H I S w e e k I c h o s e t h i s to p ic b ecau s e s o man y p er s o ns h a ve pr es e n t ed t o o u r e stab lish men t w it h t he c ond ition flat feet. F l a t f e e t a l s o k n o w n a s p e s planus', is either acquired or inherited and it is one of the most common foot deformit i e s e x p e r ie nc e d b y th e p u b li c I t ch ar act er is e d b y th e f lat t e n i n g o f t h e a r c h o n t h e medial (inside) of your feet. So met imes f lat f eet o ccur b e c a u s e y o u r a r c h e s d o n t de velop dur ing childhood, or i n o t h e r i n s t a n c e s f l a t f e e t ma y o cc u r na t u r al l y a s yo u age. Inherited Flatfoot A no rma l f la tf oo t is se en a s congenital and is believed to b e inhe r i ted. No r m al flat fe et a r e f unc tion a lly healthy and usually cause no discomfort, however they can sometimes cau s e s h oe f i tt i ng pr o bl em s be cause as the foot sits in the shoe it occ upies mor e spac e i n t h e m i d f o ot a r e a o f t he s h o e T h i s f i t t i n g p r e s e n t s more dir ect pres su re on the shank area. Acquired Flatfoot A cq u ir e d f l at f ee t on t he other hand can present more s e r i o u s p r o b l e m s S e v e r e p r o natio n (ou twa r d rota tion) o f the h eel a nd a pronoun ce d out-swing of the forefoot is a m a j o r c o n c e r n b e c a u s e i t affects ones natural balance. T h e ca us es o f acq u i r ed f l at f e e t a re ma n y b u t i n o ld e r a g e gr o u p s i t co m mo n l y r e s u l t s from decreased exercise and i n c r e a s e d w e i g h t w h i c h i n turn adds t o the mechanic al di s turban ces of the foot. This c an f urt her lead t o a s evere breakdown of the arch. The foot becomes d isto rted with an extremely depressed arch and a rolling-in and down at the inner ankle. How important is the arch? T h e a r c h o f t h e f o o t d i s tributes weight evenly across the feet and up the legs and c a n a f f e c t w a l k i n g A w e l l de v el o p ed ar ch i s ba l an c ed be t w een rigidity (for stability) and flexibility (for adapting to surfaces). Wh i l e acq u ir ed f la t f e et can be given relief by the use of orthotics, they are among the hardest-to-fit feet. Ordin a r y s h o e s o n t h e s e f e e t quickly go out of shape, and h e n c e s p e c i a l o r t h o p e d i c footwear, plus highly skilled a n d e x pe ri e nc e d f it ti ng a bi l it y is r e qu i r ed f or s u ch f ee t I f y o u hav e been experi e n c ing pain in t he arch ar ea o f the foot you should seek profess i o na l h e l p b e c a u s e y ou r a r c h es may b e fall ing and c o uld be sav ed by obtaining proper arch supports. Bernadette D Gibson, a Board certified and licensed pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Trinity Plaza, West Bay Street, Nassau. Bahamas www.footsolutions.com/nassau The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliat ed companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 322-FOOT (3668). B y B E R N A D E T T E G I B S O NFOOT SOLUTIONS By SPECIAL TO THE TRIBUNE Get Well Bahamas Think of genes as loaded guns. Its your lifestyle that pulls the triggers and so you can actually reprogramme your genes. Dr Barry RussellThe year 2007 marked a turning point in ortho dontist Dr Barry Russells life. In that year in the space of ten months he lost five family members to chronic non-communicable diseases. H is mot her Annie Rus sell died of a st roke i n January at the age of 78, fol l ow e d by hi s o l de s t b ro t he r C ol i n T at e m who als o suf fer ed a st roke i n M arch at the age of 62. I n J u n e h i s o l d e s t s i s t er B e v e r l y L o c k hart succumbed t o breast cancer at the a g e o f 5 6 a n d i n A u g u s t h i s c l o s e s t cousi n an d bel oved mentor Ph i l ip Rus se ll a l so d ie d af t er a ba tt l e w i t h pr ost at e cancer. T h e m on t h of Oct ober brought mo re tr ag edy as he l os t hi s y oung es t si s ter B renda R ussel l to breast c an c er. T hat s when i t hit home to me and I sai d, I w il l not be a vict im o f my genes a nd y o u w o n t e i t h er D r R us s e l l s ha r e d r ec e nt l y w i t h 40 p ar t i ci pa nt s of G e t W el l Baham as Phase II T hink of genes as l o aded gu ns I t s your l i fest yle that pull s the tr iggers and so you can actual ly r e-program me your g e n e s. Yo u h a v e th e a b il ity w ith th e d e c i s i o n s y o u m a k e t o l i t e r a l l y t u r n genes on and o f f s o it s t he sig n al s t hat y ou send to y ou r gen es th at will tu rn th e m o n an d of f. If y o u mak e a co nsci ous deci si on ri ght her e t o do thi ngs di ff er en tl y a s y ou re bei ng ta ught i n t hi s w on de rf u l pr o gr a mm e yo u w i l l not h av e to l ive t he same l if esty le t h at your for efat hers did, D r R ussel l sai d. L i ke m o s t B a h am i an s D r R u s s e l l s a i d he enj oys go od food. As the s on of L oft o n Russel l, a chef w i t h a s u c c e s s f u l c a t e r i n g b u s i n e s s ( d ec e a s e d 12 y e a r s ) D r R u s s el l h a s b ee n around goo d t ast ing f o od al l of his l i fe and knows w hat it s l ike to be t empt ed M y j o u r n e y s t a r t e d 1 5 y e a r s a g o when I w as 35. I s aid I w anted t o be in th e be st s hap e of m y l i f e a t age 40. I w as p r o babl y about 15 poun ds overw eight an d I w anted t o have m uscl es and look go od. I became passi onate to t he point wh er e I bec am e ob se ss i ve and I ov er di d it. I w as w orking out seven days a w eek an d runni n g 30 t o 40 m il es a week and li fti ng w eight s al most ever y day. It was fun and yo u know I achieved m y goal. At ag e 40 I w as i n t he best shape of m y l i f e b ut I b ur n t ou t s o b et w e e n 4 0 an d 4 7 I e x e r ci se d o c c a si o n a lly an d my d i e t went out t he wi ndo w so I gai ned abo ut 20 pounds, Dr R ussel l sai d. And the n the fa te ful t rag ic year 20 07 c ame a nd h e e xp er i e n ced th e p a i n fu l loss of f ive cl ose fam il y m embers i n t he space o f 10 mont h s I rea li se d I w as com ing up on age 50 an d i f I d i d no t w a nt t o b e a vi c t i m o f m y gen es I w ould have to st art doing s o m e thi ngs di ff ere ntl y. I bec ame cons ci ousl y aware of heal th and t he r ole of food you see w e need t o t reat food l i ke medici ne. T he medi cal pr o f essi on is n t r eally know ledgeabl e enough. They arent tr ai ne d i n n ut ri t i on. S o you hav e t o t a ke r e s p o ns i b i l i t y f o r y o u r o w n h e a l t h T h a t s w h e n I s t a r t e d r e a d i n g e v e r y t h in g I cou l d get my hands on and I real l y got into longevi ty, wel lness and anti -agi ng an d I f ound out f or m ysel f t he t ruth, Dr. R ussel l sai d. Af ter r eading up on al l of the w ell k now n di ets he sai d he chose a diet of lean meats vegetabl es, f rui ts and nuts wi th no star ch, s im il ar to w hat m ed i cal a n t h r o p o l o g i s t s a y o u r s u p r e m e l y h eal thy preh i st oric ances tors at e. T his, he said, was bec au s e he gai ned an underst an di ng of how excess s tarches and sugar aff ect t h e body. Th e late st re se arc h is fin din g t ha t chronic syst emi c i nfl ammat ion is what causes al l of t hese bad di seases that w e t a l k a b o u t t h e c a n c e r d i a b e t e s a nd h e a r t d ise ase s; whe n we ea t to o mu ch o f it (p ro c es s ed gr a i ns br e ad r i ce a nd s u ga r) what happens is t he sugar turns i nto fat and t ha t s w he n w e st a r t ge t t i ng bi g ge r Dr Russe ll sa id. He expl ained that s tarc hes and s u gar give the body an inst ant high of en er gy b ec ause t hey are quickl y broken d ow n int o glucos e and carr ied i nto t he bl o ods trea m, b ut for the sa me r ea son th ey of t e n l e av e u s f e el i ng s t a r v ed a g ai n w i t hi n an hou r o r so l ea di n g t o b i ng e e at i ng A nd t hat s wh y yo u hea r pe opl e s a y, ma n I cant g et off th ese carbs. Its beca use your e addict ed to i t. What has b e en fo u n d is t h a t t h e re c e p to r si te s cocaine addicts get addicted to cocaine from are the same rece ptor sites th at sugar attaches to so we see why its so d i f f i c u l t t o b r e a k t h e h a b i t b e c a u s e yo ure fig htin g some th i n g ph ys iolo gic a l I t s no t j u s t a he a d g a m e. I t s n ot j u s t a mind power thing, Dr Russell said. Al t hou gh c onve nt i ona l d ie t i ci an s an d nu t ritionists wil l te l l y ou t h at yo u need car bo hy dra tes for e ne rgy Dr Rus sell sai d the fact of the matter is vegetables an d fruits ar e carb oh yd rates So whe n p eo ple say low-carb wh at th ey re al ly me a n is lo w st ar ch so w e ne ed to ge t o ur starch do w n W e do nt ne ed to c ut o ut carb oh ydr ates bec aus e we ne ed to eat as ma ny fru its an d ve ge t ab l e s a s w e ca n b ec a us e t h er e a r e a l ot of ph yto-n utrie nts and c anc er fi g htin g v it a m in s th a t y o u c a n o n ly g e t f r o m fruits an d ve ge t a ble s, he sa i d S imil a rly, Dr Russe ll said we do nt n ee d t o cu t m e at f r om our di e t s b ec au se lean meats a re an e xce ll e nt so urce o f p r o t e i n Me at ha s go tten a b ad r ep uta tion be cau se of the wa y it is pro ce ssed th e pro ble m is an imals are no t allowed to be g rass fed In stea d the y are fe d wi th gra in an d gr ain is wha t m esse s u s up be cau se gra i n cau ses an i m als to dev elop om ega 6 fa ts (b ad fats) a s op po sed to the goo d o meg a 3 fats, h e said. D r R u s s e l l s a i d b a d f a t s i n c r e a s e in f la m m a t io n in t h e b o d y a n d a r e a l ead ing c aus e of agi ng an d di s eas e, w i t h t he av er age di et con tai ni ng a r at i o of 30 bad fat s to one good fat As a resul t, h e said it i s n ece ssary to s up pleme nt ou r diets with g oo d fats. Dr Ru ssell ack no wl e dg ed th at ther e are d iff e ren t p ath s fo r eac h pe rson to ac hie v e his o r he r well ne ss go a ls bu t h e s a i d t h e i m p o r t a n t t h i n g i s t h a t eve ryo ne ta ke s resp on sibility for th eir own h ea l th Im n ot te l lin g y ou this is the on ly way. T h is is wha t Ive fo un d to be th e be st way f o r me You r e go ing to h av e to mak e a de cision o n what is the be st way for you . D r Ru ssell to l d th e G et We l l Bah ama s particip an ts.DIS ARM ING TH E L OADED GE NESOne mans search for health

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WOMAN P AGE 10B, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 27, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE If you went to a hospital and saw a man or woman in a white jacket with a stethoscope around their neck you would think they were a doctor. I f yo u s aw a veh ic le co ve r ed i n r i b b o n s a n d b a l l o o n s y o u w o u l d th ink that some one just got ma rr i ed or that a float parade was about to begin. Its easy to form opinions about situa tions just by looking a t a ppearanc es and its just as easy to fo rm o pinio ns a bout pe ople Just reme mber, as we are making assumptions a b ou t o th e rs th e y w i ll no t h es it a te to return the favour. W h e n d e a l i n g w i t h t h i s t o u c h y s u b j e c t o n e m u s t r e m e m b e r t w o things: appearances do matter and appearances do not always tell the whole story. A t a b r a n d i n g s e m i n a r t h a t I a t t e n d e d d u r i n g t h e T h e o d o r e Elyet t s M iss T een B a hamas Beau t y P agea nt ou r gues t s peak er s el f im ag e an d b ran di ng spe c ia li st S ta c ia Wi ll iams in fo rm ed us t hat p eop le make a t leas t 1 2 ass umptions about yo u j us t by th e way you lo ok As a t een am bas s ado r my d ail y d uty i s t o p r es ent n ot o nly m yse lf b ut als o to pr es en t a b ra nd. E ver y day I mu st m ake sur e that my h ai r, m ak eu p, a ttire a nd a ttit ude is fi ttin g for th e bran d I repr es ent. You may fee l as t ho ugh yo u d o n o t h a v e a b r a n d o r co m p a n y t o r epr es en t, bu t you do E a c h a n d e v e r y o n e o f u s a s t e e n a g e r s r e p r e s e n t s e i t h e r o u r s ch oo l or o u r f ami l y, bu t mo s t of al l, we re pr es ent our s el ves Th er e w i l l n e v e r b e a m o r e i m p o r t a n t b ran d th an y ou. E ver y t ime you w ear you r schoo l u n i f o r m y o u a r e r e p r e s e n t i n g a brand a nd y ou hav e a responsibility t o u ph old t hat br an d. T he w ay you c ar ry yours elf is the w ay y ou wi ll in fac t be t rea ted. This r u l e ap p l ie s t o bo t h y o u ng l a di e s and yo un g me n. W he n co r p or a t io n s s e le ct m an a ge r s a n d s a l e s p e r s o n s t h ey l o o k fo r pe rs o ns wh o loo k th e p ar t and th ey choo se t hos e who can han dle th e r es po ns ib il it y. P er s o nal it y and ap pe ar an ce a re l i k e y i n g a n d y a n g ; t h e y a r e t h e exact opp osi te, th e i nter ior and the e x t e r i o r B u t t h e y m e e t t o g e t h e r and cre ate b alan ce. F ar t oo many ti mes the r igh t per s on wil l mis s o ut o n t h a t r i g h t o p p o r t u n i t y o r j o b beca us e t hey o nl y had hal f o f the equ at ion In m y pe rso na l e x pe rie n ce I c om e i n t o c o n t a c t w i t h p e r s o n s w h o as s ume t hat I a m a mod el. T h is i s gr e a t b ec au s e i t m e an s t h a t I a m doi ng m y jo b and re pr es ent in g my b ra nd c o rre c tl y. A lth o ug h af te r th e y mak e t hi s as s um pt ion i t is my du ty no w t o al lo w m y in t el li ge nce an d p ers o nality to shine throug h. I must be a s s o cial and per s on abl e as p os si bl e. Whe neve r a per s on o bs er ves my a p p e a r a n c e a n d p e r s o n a l i t y t h e y s h o u l d b e a b l e t o s e e w h y I wa s se lect ed a s Th eod or e El yet t s Mi s s Te en Ba ham as A lways r eme mber app ear ance wi l l ca t c h t h e a t t e n t i o n b u t p er so nal it y wil l ca ptu r e t he h ear t I f yo u r a p p ea r an c e i s al r ea d y g r e a t th en get t ha t p er s on al it y i n or de r and vice ver s a. Yamease Swain, 18, is Theodore Elyetts Miss Teen Bahamas 2011/12; she beat out 16 competitors and was crowned at the pageants grand finale last month. B y Y A M E A S E S W A I NSPEECH FROM THE THRONE WHA T DOES Y OU R BRA ND S A Y ABO UT Y OU? By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter SHE may be a gran dmot her, but t hat d oesn t s top 60-year -old Dor othy Cor ene P oiti er f rom being a f ierce f ashi onis ta. With a pas sio n for fas hio n and a par ticul ar l ove of h ats Dor othy s aid when sh e dres s es, she d oes so t o imp res s. When s he goes to work at th e B an k of N o va Scoti a c af eter ia, she even st rut s her s tu ff i n high h e e l s M rs Poi tier s aid s he can bar ely c o unt t he num ber of hat s s he owns. Some ar e big, s ome ar e smal l, and whi le wearin g som e you can har dly s ee her eyes. I m no t good at th e des igning part but I d o have lo ts of h ats I have two hat s in par ticul ar t hat c o st me $400 each. T hey are all som e nice hats I jus t l ove them ," she s aid. T his weekend, M rs P oitier will receive t he Silen t Woman of Inf luence awar d at t he annu al gradu ation c er emon y of t he E s th er F oundat ion. Ten f emale part icipant s i n the an nual yo uth developm e n t pr ogr amme of the foun datio n will gr aduat e on t he w e e k e n d M rs Po itier is kno w n for her no-n ons ense ap pro ac h and her jovial l augh. F rien ds s ay s he keeps everyon e laughin g as s he tr ies s omet imes to u se mo dern w o rds th at s he is not famil iar w i th. S he is c al led M s D or B i g Dot b y her fr iends peer s and co-wor ker s an d mom or mummy b y the man y c h ildr en she h as r eared Or iginal ly fr om San Salvado r, Mr s P oit ier t ook u p her fir s t job in Nas sau as a do mest ic work er at the Sh oal Res taur ant. She lat er moved t o work ing in the cafet eri a at Scot iabank, Raw s on S quar e location and r emain e d ther e unt il her r eti remen t in 2007. Although she has many claims to fame, her love of hats is by far the most glamorous. Mrs Poitier is generous when it comes to her hats. She loans them to friends and family in need of a hat for special occasions. I have lavender, purple, peach, green, there are so many. When the Prince William got married I went to the hat shop and got a hat made (for the wedding)." "Every dress I have, I would try to get a hat to match. Hats are my weakness, I have three closets that they occupy. My mother was the same way and I took right after her." Mrs Poitier is also an avid cook and she loves to bake. She has four children and five grandchildren. She resides in Nassau with her husband of 42 years and their youngest child. Although she is herself a senior citizen, Mrs Poitier spends her weekends caring for the elderly in the church and the community, cooking, washing and cleaning for them. By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer MU R D E R r even ge and l ove the fir st r om an ce t hril ler by upan d-com in g B aham ian au thor Ken dia Sm ith h as it al l.T h e n o v e l T he D a r k e s t T r u t h ta k e s r e a d e r s o n a n e m o t i o n a l r o l l er c o a s t e r of e ve n t s a l l c e nt e r e d a r ound a y oun g w om an s u ndy in g quest to aven ge t h e m u r d ersuic i de of her pare nts T h e g o a l o f t hi s y o u ng w o m a n i s to tr ack d own an d kill th e m an r es ponsi bl e for her m othe r s i nf id el it y, whi c h ul t i mat el y l ed to t he m u r d e r S pe a ki ng w i t h T r i bu n e W o m an M s Sm i t h s a i d t h e pl ot o f t h e b oo k w as ins pi red by her wi l d im agi natio n a n d so me p er so n al e x p er ie n c e s Th is b o o k is a bo u t a yo u n g w om an st r uggl i ng w it h her des ir e t o exact r even ge on t h e per son s r es ponsi bl e f or t he w ei ght she is c a r r y i n g T h e m a i n c h a r a c t e r m eet s a m an w i th a hi st or y and a p a s t f a r w o r s e t ha n h e r s a n d u n b e k n o wn s t to h e r t h e ir l i v e s a r e m ore ent w ine d t han ei t her one of t hem c an fat hom N eit her on e of t h e m i s i n t er e s t ed i n an yt h i n g o t he r t h a n r u n n i n g a w a y f r o m t h e p a s t t h at ha unt s t hem an d f i n al l y b ei n g a bl e to l iv e a peac eabl e l if e. Ms S mi th said he r own life is o ft en l i ke a m ovi e a nd s he d rew i ns pi rat i on fr om t hat. I ha ve an i mag inat i on out of t hi s w orl d. M y i ns pi rat i on f or t he b o o k c a m e f r o m s o m e o f t h e e x p e r i ence s I w ent t hroug h and som e o f t h e e x p e r i e n c e s m y f r i e n d s w e nt t h rough. I do nt necessaril y l ike c omi ng cl ose t o home w hen I am th i n k i n g o f i d e a s fo r m y b o o k h owe ver, it ins pi res m y im agi nat i on. I al l ow ever yt hin g to i m pact m e, she s ai d. T he hard est p art of w ri ti ng t his b ook, t he aut hor sai d, wa s fus i ng t oge ther t he rom ance and th ri l ler g enre s. P u t t i n g t h e s e t w o g e n r e s t o ge t her w a s t he mo s t ch al l e ngi n g part of wri ting th i s en ti re b oo k. R oma nce and thr i l le r d o not r eal l y g o tog et her so I had t o f i gure out how I cou ld m ake t hes e people s liv es b lissf ully mise rab le, s he sai d. It w as cr i ti c al t o ma ke t he st ory f eel a s r eal as pos si bl e s o t hat her a u d ie n c e co u ld r e la te t o it M s Sm it h sa id. In real li fe t h er e are no perfect r elatio ns hip s. Th ere are no ha ppy endi ngs al l the ti me and I w an t e d t o s h ow t h a t i n t hi s b oo k I w a nt e d i t t o b e r ea l a n d r e l a t a b l e s he sai d. S h e h o pe s re ad e r s a re e nt er ta ine d by th e s tor y a n d g et he r ove ral l mes sag e. Th e b o o k s m e s s a g e i s t h a t w hen fac ed wi th adver si ty or an o th e rw is e u n p le a s an t sit u a tio n em ot ions becom e unr eli ab le a nd di s c er nm ent i s s om et i m es t ai nt e d, s o i t w o ul d be be st to l ook at y our f act s and l ook at t he pre sent s it ua ti o n a t f a ce v a lu e r a t h e r th a n m a k e a p r e j u d i c e d j u d g m e n t ba sed on for mer e xper ie nces a nd one s own unde rs tand ing . Ev er s i nce s he w as young, Ms Sm it h sa id s he had a pass i on for w ri t in g and she cre dit s her fa mi ly w i t h c r e a t i n g i n he r a ke e n i n t e r e s t i n th e cra ft When I w as youn ger I di dn t ha ve m any f ri ends and I w as the o l d e s t o f m y s i b l i n g s a n d c o u s i n s s o t he onl y out l et I had w as my pe n and my f aithf ul blac k and w hite s chool bo ok. I w rot e d own al l my f ee li ng s i n th ose books ; t hey w ere m y best f ri ends . T h e D a r k e s t T r u t h w a s r el eas ed on Sept embe r 5.UPC O MI NG AUTH O R RELE AS E S NE W B O OK THE D AR KES TT R U T H KENDIA SMITH Bahamian AuthorFor the love of hats HAT FA NATIC : 60-year-old D orothy Cor e ne P o it ie r (above) said s he can barely count the number of hats she owns.

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THE TRIBUNE SECTION B TUESD A Y SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer AW O MA N ru nn ing t h r o ugh th e w ind w it h a r ms l ift e d t r iump h an tl y t o wa r ds t h e sk y is t h e s ub jec t o f A s hl ey Po w el l s aw a rd -w inn ing pa int in g ent it l ed E l at io n.T he p a int ing wa s n a me d t he be s t p i e c e a t t h e o f fi ci a l o p en i n g o f t h e P u b li c Treasu ry Bah ama M ama A r t Exh ib i t i o n T h e ex h i b i ti o n f e at u re d 25 vi s u a l a n d l i t e r a r y a r t i s t s w h o w e r e a l l Bah am i an wo men un d e r 30. Th e p ub l ic l au nc h at th e n ewl y ren o vated Pu b l i c T r e a s u r y b ui l d i n g w a s h e l d l a s t n igh t. I am very ecstati c I wo n t hi s award s i m pl y be c a u s e th i s w a s on e o f t he pie c e s t ha t w a s t oug h, A shl e y told Tr ib un e W o ma n I di d no t t hin k I wou ld comp le t e th is p iece b ecaus e I th ou ght I was no t read y t o att emp t a pi ece o f th i s mag ni tu d e I wen t th rou gh a l ot o f t rial an d e rr o r At o n e p o i n t I h a d i t j u s t h a n g i n g t h ere i n co m p let e. M y f at h er s aw i t an d o nl y b ecaus e o f h is en cou rageme n t I was abl e to f in ish i t. Vi rgi n ia C art wr igh t t reas u rer at t h e P ub lic Treasu ry sa i d Ashl ey s p ain tin g was s e l ected b eca u se of i ts ex p ressi on o f freed om. I l ik e th e t h eme an d w h at i t d ep ic ts a y o u ng l a d y embraci ng th e wo rld Th e pain ti n g sp ea k s to th e expr e s sio n o f f reedo m, she said A s h l e y s a i d h e r u n i q u e s t y l e o f painti ng constantly exposes her o wn vu l n er ab i l i t y a n d s tr en gt h S h e sa i d sh e tri es t o merge h er p o e t ry w ith v i br a n t i m a g e s B y u s i n g b r i g h t c o l o u r s m i x e d w i t h sh arp l i ne s an d str ik i n g pos ture s, she s a id s he suc ce eds in p r es enting realit y t hro u g h her o wn e y e s Art h as always b e en in m e. I r e al i s e d m y t al e n t a f t er watch in g my sist er. S h e p ain ts a l so, a nd a ft e r s e e ing he r dr a w a n d se eing how good sh e wa s at it I tri ed my han d s a t it an d f ou n d th at we b oth had co mpl etely d if feren t st yles, Ashl ey said T ho u g h acryl ic o n ca n vas i s h e r stap le, sh e also dab bl es i n scu lp ti ng, cl a y and cerami c. T he su b jects i n man y of her p ieces ar e o f t en v er y f e mi n i n e, d ep i c t i n g As h leys o wn b e l iefs an d in terests. As a Ch ri sti a n woman sh e l ik es t o i n co r p o rat e f ai t h an d th e id eas o f t ri al s and p erseverance in to h er p ieces. A s h l e y s a i d s h e a dm i r e s t he l a t e Amos F ergu son an d h i s cand i d way o f ex p r es s i n g h i s b e l i ef s t h r o u gh h i s p a i n t in gs; h e wou l d o ften claim, Go d to l d me wh at to p ain t. In m os t of m y pa in ti ng s I t ry to d ra w my in spi ratio n f rom my sp ir itu al be lie fs I me r ge my ins pira tion with f emi n i n i ty an d l o t s o f co l o u r, sh e sa i d A sh l ey w as gr ad u at ed f r o m Q u een s C o l le ge i n 2 00 7 a nd e nte re d the a rt p r o g r a m m e a t T h e C o l l e g e o f T h e Ba ha ma s wher e she st u die d for two ye ar s u n d e r t h e t u t el age o f S u e B en n e t W i l l i am s H ei n o S c h m i d J o h n C o x an d Katri na Cartwri ght S h e is p resent ly p ur sui ng a B a ch elo rs Degree i n grap hi c d esign a t t he Art In st itu te o f A t lan ta an d is exp ected to grad uate next S pri ng. AR T PIECES OF OTHER P AR TICIP ANTS OF THE BAHAMAS MAMA AR T EXHIBITION BAHAMIAN artist Ashley Powell. THE WINING piece of the Bahama Mama Public Trea sury Art Exhibition. Ashley Powells Elation won best piece at the Bahama Mama Art Exhibition.

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.netFans got a chance to see both ends of the spectrum at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex Monday as two senior boys games were played to open the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools softball season. On one end, it was a pitchers delight as David Nathan led the Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders to an impressive 15-4 win over the St Augustines College Big Red Machine in an abbreviated six-inning affair. On the other end, the Tem ple Christian Suns and the Faith Temple Warriors engaged in a slug-fest that saw the Suns outshine the Warriors 24-19. C C r r u u s s a a d d e e r r s s 1 1 5 5 , B B i i g g R R e e d d M M a a c c h h i i n n e e 4 4 The tall, slender Nathan had the SAC batters feasting on a steady diet of pitches as he was working on a no-hit shutout for the first four innings. It wasnt until the top of the fifth that Dwayne Davis led off with a single and eventually scooted home with the Big Red Machines first run on Travis Pratts run-producing single. A batter later, Pratt caught a ride home on Aaron Woods RBI single. And with one out, Wood was driven home on Kyle Higgs RBI ground out. By then, the game was out of reach as Nathan got all the support he needed from his team-mates as they came through with three runs in the first and another six in the fourth to surge out to a comfortable 9-0 cushion. We are just starting off, but we could have been better, Nathan said. We havent practiced for a long time, but once we get into our groove, you can expect a much better performance from us. After the Big Red Machine started to get their offense clicking, Nathan said he wasnt concerned. Because we have confi dence in ourselves that we could beat them. We beat them three years in a row, so we just came into the game thinking it wouldnt be any different. We just had to beat them, he added. Nobody was more confident than coach Ainsworth Beckford, who has coached the Crusaders to a playoff berth the last four years, including a trip to the final where they lost 2-1 in the bestof-three series to the St Andrews Hurricanes. They performed as I expected. David was dominant on the mound, but I was a little bit concerned about our defense, he said. We just need to tighten up some more and move our lazy feet. But its going to be a long season. Its a work in progress. But I expect us to do very well. Weve been going for four years trying to get this BAISS championship. I told the boys that this is the last lap of the 4 x 4 relay. Nathan finished with a five hit, 12 strike out performance for the win, while Blair Seymour gave 11 hits with seven strike outs for the loss. SACs coach Reggie Forbes attributed the loss to first game jitters. Its basically a new team with 10th and 11th graders, he said. We have some seniors, who are to be the nucleus of the team, but they all didnt perform well. We just simply had one mistake after the other. Were not going to make excuses. We just didnt perform up to our ability. Hats off to NCA. They hit the ball and their pitcher had our hitters trying to go for the big swing. S S u u n n s s 2 2 4 4 , W W a a r r r r i i o o r r s s 1 1 9 9 Cordero Greenslade helped his cause by ripping four home runs to go along with his winning performance on the mound for Temple Chris tian. Ian Smith also banged out a pair of home runs, scoring four times, while J Albury scored four times and Kyle Johnson came across the plate three times. First one was very shaky. We have a lot of guys that play in the different leagues, but Im trying to get them to play team ball, said Temple Christians coach Robbie Coakley. Its not only them. Its a whole team, so they have to play together as one. Dominic Rolle suffered the loss. Josrado Chrisolm and Churton Munroe both scored three times, while Cody Cartwright came up with four runs. I think it was fairly good today. We just didnt go after the ball when we made the errors, said Warriors coach Ednol Rolle. But for the most part, Im satisfied. We just have to go back to the drawing board and be more aggressive in get ting the ball. THETRIBUNE SECTIONE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 INSIDE TRAK TTUURRNN TTOO 33EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 44EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 55EE...... ITALIAN TEAMS TOP OFFER TO KOBE IS ONEYEAR CONTRACT WORTH $5MWNBA: LYNX BEAT MERCURY TO REACH FIRST FINALSAQUINAS COLLEGE ACES TO CHRISTEN SOFTBALL FIELD THIS WEEK MAKAU SETS WORLD RECORD IN THE BERLIN MARA THON RUGBY WORLD CUP ACTION: WALES OUSTS NAMIBIA 81-7 TTUURRNN TTOO 77EE.. TTUURRNN TTOO 33EE...... ON THE MOUND: Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders pitcher David Nathan in action yesterday. SEE MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 2E Tim Clarke/Tribune staff By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IN their toughest contest of the season, the Holland College Hurricanes relied on the talent of their superstar special teams standout to get them over the hump and remain undefeated. Demetrius Ferguson scored the gameclinching touchdown with a 105yard kickoff return in the Hurricanes 16-13 win over the Dalhousie Tigers in Atlantic Football League action at MacAdam Field on Saturday. It was Fergusons fourth kickoff return for a score and a team-leading sixth touchdown in just three games. Late in the fourth quarter, the Tigers scored their first touchdown of the game on a quarterback sneak from signal caller Brendan Fes teryga. After a failed extra point, they trailed just 9-6 with minutes left to play. Ferguson's heroics would come on the ensuing kick off to give the Hurricanes a 16-6 lead. Another late Tigers touchdown by running back Greg Pelly trimmed the lead to just three points with two minutes left to play before another Bahamian member of the Hurricanes roster would end any comeback hopes. Mark Barret came up with an interception on the final Tigers possession as time expired to give Holland the win and a 3-0 record. Ferguson was awarded the APM Construction Services Player of the Game for Special Teams. In a defensive struggle, the first half ended scoreless for both teams. The Hurricanes reached the scoreboard first when the Hurricanes recorded a safety. Holland quarterback Nick Hunsley connected with Dave Clark on an 80-yard pass play in the middle of the fourth quarter for the game's first touchdown. Ferguson opened the season with three touchdowns a 107-yard kick return, a 40-yard punt return and a 75-yard interception return in a 62-0 rout over the UNB St John Seawolves in week one, and scored two touchdowns in the Hurricanes' 44-28 win over the UNB Red Bombers in week two. The Hurricanes are scheduled to travel to Bangor, Maine, where they are slated to meet the Husson University J.V. Eagles on Sunday, October 2. DEMETRIUS SCORES WINNER WITH 105-YARD KICKOFF RETURN Hurricanes take 16-13 victory over the Tigers ATLANTIC FOOTBALL LEAGUE DEMETRIUS PINDER Pitchers delight! David Nathan leads NCA Crusaders to victory over SAC Big Red Machine

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SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS Photosby TimClarke/Tribunestaff BAISS SENIOR BOYS SOFTBALL TEMPLE CHRISTIAN SUNS OUTSHINE FAITH TEMPLE WARRIORS 24-19 NCA CRUSADERS ROLL PAST SAC BIG RED MACHINE 15-4 DOUBLE ACTION: The Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools softball season opened at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex Monday. The Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders (BLUE) got a 154 win over the St Augustines College Big Red Machine (RED) while the Temple Christian Suns and Faith Temple Warriors engaged in a slug-fest that saw the Suns outshine the Warriors 24-19 (TOP).

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By ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer ROME (AP) The Italian team Virtus Bologna says its top offer to Kobe Bryant is a one-year contract worth $5 million. With NBA players locked out, Virtus hopes the Los Angeles Lakers star agrees to a deal before he arrives in Italy this week for a tour arranged by one of his sponsors. "An Italian brand wellknown around the world" is prepared to provide cash for the deal, a person with knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press on Monday, indicating the unidentified company is not Bologna's main sponsor, Canadian Solar. The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because negotiations are ongoing, said the other offers on the table include a two-month deal worth nearly $2 million, a one-month contract for $1.3 million or $900,000 for only one game. All of the offers are pretax and would allow Bryant to return to the Lakers immedi ately if the lockout ends. Bryant spent part of his youth in Italy while his father played in the country and he speaks Italian, prompting Bologna to hope he might return for sentimental reasons. The person said there have been nightly conference calls between Bryant's agent, Rob Pelinka, and Bologna President Claudio Sabatini. The Turkish club Besiktas and at least one team in China have also expressed interest in the 33-year-old Bryant, who has won five NBA championships and been an All-Star 13 times. Bryant's father, Joe Bryant, played in Italy with Rieti, Reg gio Calabria, Pistoia and Reggiana from 1984-91. The elder Bryant now coaches the Los Angeles Sparks in the WNBA. Virtus also recently reached out to Manu Ginobili, who played with Bologna before joining the San Antonio Spurs in 2002. Denver Nuggets forward Danilo Gallinari rejoined his former Italian club Olimpia Milano last week. Other NBA players are also committing to play in leagues outside the United States. Nuggets free agents Wilson Chandler and J.R. Smith plan to play in China, Denver's Ty Lawson will play in Lithuania and New Jersey Nets All-Star Deron Williams signed with Besiktas. The NBA season usually begins in late October but owners and players have failed to agree on a new labour deal. The two sides are at odds over how to divide the league's revenue, a salary cap structure and the length of guaranteed contracts. On Friday, the NBA postponed training camp indefinitely and cancelled 43 preseason games. Virtus has won 15 Italian league titles but none since 2001, when it also won the Euroleague for the second time. Bologna opens the Italian league against Roma on October 9. It did not qualify for this season's Euroleague, although the team has big ambitions after signing former Clemson point guard Terrell McIntyre, who led Siena to four consecutive Italian titles before transferring to Malaga in Spain for last sea son. A A P P S S o o u u r r c c e e : : N N B B A A s s i i d d e e s s t t o o m m e e e e t t a a g g a a i i n n t t o o d d a a y y NEW YORK (AP) A person familiar with the plans says representatives for NBA players and owners will meet today and perhaps Wednesday. The players' association has cancelled a regional meeting with players Tuesday in Miami so its negotiators can meet with league officials in New York instead, the person told The Associated Press on Monday on condition of anonymity because the details are supposed to remain confidential. The bargaining session, first reported by CBSSports.com, comes just days after the league canceled 43 preseason games scheduled for October 9-15. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AQUINAS College knows that in order to be successful in the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools, they need the proper facilities to ensure that their athletes are properly prepared. Still in their infancy stage at their new home on Gladstone Road, the Aces coaching staff, led by Lawrence Irving and Sherline Moss, are looking forward to the christening of a new softball field on Wednesday. We are going to try to take it from our junior level and then advance it to the senior league, said Irving who was busy yesterday putting some of the finishing touches on the field. This is the third year that Aquinas College has been relocated from Madeira Street, but this will mark the first time in more than 10 years that the Aces have participated in softball. In what he called a developmental process, Irving said they are still busy completing the dugouts for both teams, although only the benches for the players to sit on will be ready for their initial game against the Queens College Comets. The roof for the dug-outs and the fences for the left and right field lines will come as the season progresses. Thats going to be a cracker. Were going to get indoctrinated come Wednesday because some of these girls are playing for the first time, he said. But what we are doing this year is to just use the junior teams so that we can work on our developmental progress. We will take it from the junior level and then move up to the senior level in a year or two. Moss, the female coach on staff, said their appearance in softball was long overdue. Ive been here for a while and I wanted to do it, but we didnt have the facilities, she said. But now that we do, we have started the programme and we want to see how well the players will perform. Its a work in progress because its the first time that the girls are playing softball. But they are dedicated, so thats good. They have been coming out to practice every day and they are putting forth 110 per cent. Ahriana Cumberbatch, a ninth grader at Aquinas College, said although this is the first time she has played softball, or any other sport for that manner, shes eager to see how well they can perform. Its better for me, more of an advantage with us having our own field, she said. This is our first time playing, but our coach has been hard on us, so we have been getting better in practice. We just want to see how we can do in a game. Principal Shona Knowles admitted that although the school is relatively new, they have already gotten their feet wet by hosting their home basketball games on the campus last year. This year, the senior teams will have the luxury of playing their home games on a court with six new lights installed over the summer break on one of the four fenced in venues. Were happy to have softball added to our programme. We havent had it played in many years, she said. We got off to a late start getting the field ready, but we want to give our kids the exposure and to use the skills that they have. While the softball field is almost completed, Knowles said there are a number of plans on the drawing board that will certainly enhance Aquinas College and its current population of 465 students. Were hoping to put a certified track and field venue in place that will become a training site, said Knowles, who is working in conjunction with the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations to complete the project. Additionally, there are plans for a soccer pitch on the inside of the track and there is also going to be a swimming pool added to the sporting facilities that include Loyola Hall, which is available to Aquinas College. The Catholic Archdiocese and the Catholic Board of Education is overseeing and funding the entire project along with the Aquinas College Developmental Committee, made up of parents and former students. When its all completed, Knowles said they are hoping that Aquinas College will become the envy of all of the schools with a full-fledged sporting programme on their campus. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L / / T T R R A A C C K K B B S S C C A A C C T T I I V V I I T T I I E E S S THE Baptist Sports Council has announced the dates for the final two events on its sporting calendar. The 2011 Bishop Neil C. Ellis Softball Classic has been rescheduled to start on Saturday, October 8 at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. It will feature com petition in the men, co-ed and 19-and-under divisions. And Rev Enoch Backford Track and Field Classic will follow on Saturday, October 22, at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Persons interested in more details are asked to contact league president Brent Stubbs at stubbobs@gmail.com or secretary Jonique Webb at joniquewebb@hotmail.com B B O O X X I I N N G G A A M M A A T T E E U U R R T T E E A A M M I I N N B B A A K K U U THE Amateur Boxing Association of the Bahamas two-member team of Carl Hield and Valentino Knowles left their training site and are at the 2011 AIBA World Boxing Championships. The team, coached by Andre and Floyd Seymour have arrived for the championships, is scheduled to run through October 8 at Heydar Aliyev Sports and Exhibition Complex in Baku, Azerbaijan. The championships, featuring 685 boxers from 127 coun tries, serve as a qualifier for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. C C O O N N C C H H M M A A N N T T R R I I A A T T H H L L O O N N I I N N G G R R A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A THE 25th annual Conch man Triathlon is scheduled for Saturday, November 5 in Freeport, Grand Bahama. It will comprise of a one-kilo metre swim, a 25k bike ride and a 5k run. Interested persons can reg ister by logging onto the Facebook Event Page, e-mail organiser Bert Bell at bertbell@coralwave.com or calling him at 727-5886 or 7275381. SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011, PAGE 3E SPORTS INBRIEF AQUINAS COLLEGE TO CHRISTEN NEW SOFTBALL FIELDTim Clarke/Tribune staff AQUINAS College coaches are looking forward to the christening of a new softball field on Wednesday. Italian team offers Bryant 1-year contract worth $5m A BIG DEAL: Kobe Bryant can be seen before coaching a basketball clinic in Singapore. Bryant says he's still considering playing overseas as an owners lockout of players threatens to sabotage the upcoming NBA season. (AP)