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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03096
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 09-15-2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03096

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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Bank workers vote to strike Volume: 107 No.240THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 92F LOW 79F By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter a turnquest@tribunemedia.net UNION officials representing First Caribbean International Bank employ ees declared a victory last night as 61 per cent of its m embership voted in favour of a strike. Members of the Bahamas F inancial Services Union, which represents around 400 employees, now have thea bility strike once they o btain a strike certificate from the Ministry of Labour and go through the cooling off period. According to the unofficial count, only 13 members voted against a strike. The strike vote comes after months of unsuccessful" negotiations with the bank over an expired indus trial agreement and money it claimed is due to fired workers, according to Theresa Mortimer, union president. "The biggest issue, said Ms Mortimer, is the seven p ersons getting their severa nce, and the bank inviting the union to the table to dis cuss the industrial agree m ent. "We don't want it waiting until January when these benefits should be in place, and then (First Caribbean say 'we haven't discussed them with the union yet so w e can't say anything'. (The union) don't want that. We want it to be done before h and so come December the (staff pening in January. "These are supposed to be your staff workers, they work for you, she said. (First Caribbean have (the staffs ests at heart and get to the table. (Staff themselves, the union speaks for them. That's all we're asking, for (First Caribbean come to the table and talk to us." Voting ended at 5.30pm. Calls to bank officials were not returned up to press time. Union of ficials declare victor TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B U U T T N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B E E A A T T S S T T H H E E T T R R I I B B U U N N E E I I N N S S I I D D E E T T O O D D A A Y Y C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! J J O O B B S S A A N N D D H H E E L L P P W W A A N N T T E E D D THE TRIBUNE REVEALS. . INSIDE SEEPAGE19 ARCHDEACON KINGSLEY KNOWLES ( left), a cousin and the familys priest, said family members were shocked by the death of Amanda Seymour Burrows and her five-year-o ld daughter Kaysha (above B y CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL cbrennen@tribunemedia.net THEFNM government will bring the eagerly-awaited F reedom of Information Act t o Parliament before it ends its term in office, vowed Health Minister Dr HubertM innis, who admitted that one failure of his government has been a lack of communication with the public. D iscussing the issue of transparency yesterday on a radio talk show, Dr Minnis a lso promised that as soon as his ministry completes its investigation into the denguef ever outbreak, the report will be presented to Parliament and made public. I can say that we will be p ushing for a communication report to be presented to Par liament so that the publick nows exactly what has hap pened. Me nor this government is in the business of hiding information from the publ ic and that is why I am a full complete proponent of the Freedom of Information Act.I think the public needs to know what is happening, he T I M C L A R K E / T R I B U N E S T A F F By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE mysterious drown ing of a mother and her 5year-old child has shaken a small and tight-knit family to its core. Family members of Amanda Seymour Burrows and her five-year-old daughter Kaysha were shocked by the incident, Archdeacon Kingsley Knowles, a cousin and the familys priest, said. "She came (to St Georges Anglican Church) because she wanted a church home. (Ms Burrows and her husband came here for counselling as well. I mar ried them, I baptised their child, so we had that type of bonding relationship." "There is no doubt that (Ms Burrows loved her daughter, said the archdeacon. They travelled everywhere together, anywhere you found her, you found her daughter." The bodies of Ms Seymour Burrows, 32, and pyjama-clad Kaysha were pulled from waters behind Elizabeth and Bay Plaza by Defence Force officers last week. Their deaths have baffled both family members and the police, who have made very little details of the case public. The family is probably between anger, not too sure how they feel about life, and hearing all kinds of stories. It's a confusing situation because you're not too sure what really happened, not too sure whether it was suicidal, said Archdeacon Knowles. Mrs Burrows was the youngest of three children, all of whom were very close to the archdeacons mother, their grandaunt. Although her immediate SEE page 13 FAMILYOF TRAGIC MOM, DAUGHTER SHAKEN TO THE CORE A N O T H E R T R I B U N E E X C L U S I V E FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT IN PARLIAMENT BEFORE END OF FNM TERM D RHUBERTMINNIS: By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FORMER Cabinet Minis ter Loftus Roker called on sitting members of Parliament to comply with public disclosure laws. Legislators who fail to adhere to their own rules should not expect an ordinary citizen not to break the law, Mr Roker said. "Crime in the Bahamas is considered to be out of control. It has to be out of control when leaders (who law, then ignore the law and expect the lil' fella on the street to obey the law. "How many parliamentarians have obeyed the law regarding the Public Disclosure Act to this day? And if they haven't, why don't they SEE page 14 MPS BREAKING R ULES CANT EXPECT CITIZENS NOT TO BREAK THE L A W SEE page 14 F ORMERCABINETMINISTER:

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating SENIOR APPOINTMENTSPatricia Hermanns,President & CEO of Family Guardian,has announced the appointment of Stuart Kelly to the position of Vice P resident,Finance Department and Necka Wells to the position of Assistant Vice President, Group Operations, BahamaHealth. S tuart Kelly,BComm, CPA, FLMIVice President, Finance Department M r.KellyjoinedFamilyGuardianin2000andmostrecentlyheld thepositionofFinancialController.Inhisexpandedrole,hewill functions. from (FLMI. N ecka Wells,MBA, FLMIAssistant Vice President, Group Operations Mrs.Wells joined Family Guardian in 2010 and most recently held the from (FLMI,which she achieved with distinction,the AIAA,the ACSin addition to a a lso completed with distinction. promotions.NASSAUIFREEPORTIABACOIELEUTHERAIEXUMAIFINANCIAL CENTREICORPORATE CENTREI A member of the FamGuard Group of Companies By CELESTE NIXON T ribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net CHINESE Ambassador to the Bahamas Hu Shan donat ed 10 laptop computers and two printers to C I Gibson Senior High School at a presentation ceremony yester day. Reflecting on the impor tance of teachers, Ambassador Hu said the continuity of human development depends on the work of educators from generation to generation. Teachers are the engineers of civilisation, he told the students whom he referred to as the future of their coun try. Ambassador Hu told them to use the new computers to study hard so they can one day give back to the Bahamas. Education Minister Desmond Bannister said the computers are yet another example of Chinas commitment to help educate young Bahamians. Today, we are grateful for the generosity being displayed to education in the Bahamas, and specifically to the stu dents of C I Gibson Senior High School by the Peoples R epublic of China to the B ahamas, said Mr Bannister. He said the equipment will b e set up in the schools media centre, making technology and research more accessible to students while also allowing them to develop essential computer skills. Speaking to the students, Mr Bannister said we live in an age where almost everything is driven by technology, so it is imperative that you are exposed to computers and their usage. Todays employers are requiring students be equipped with basic computer skills for entry into the workforce. Mr Bannister noted that since 1997, Bahamians have been reaping benefits through the multifaceted relationship that has developed with China whether through that countrys numerous donations and scholarships, the gift of the National Sports Complex or help with infrastructure works. He added that the best way students can show their gratitude is to become productive citizens of the Bahamas and the world. CHINESE EMB ASS Y DON ATES TO B AHAMIAN S TUDENT S TO ADVERTISE CALL GODFREY ARTHUR AT 502-2394 C I GIBSON Students attended a special assembly yesterday where laptops and printers were donated to the school from the Chinese Ambassador. AMBASSADOR of the Peoples Republic of China to the Bahamas H u Shan presents computer equipment to the CI Gibson school yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f CI GIBSON RECEIVES COMPUTERS

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By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter c nixon@tribunemedia.net M INISTER of Education D esmond Bannister said rumours that there are teacher shortages in some government schools are completely unfounded. According to Mr Bannist er, while certain subject a reas are lacking specialised educators, the schools are sufficiently staffed. There is no teacher shortage, said Mr Bannister. What we have is a bunch of rumours that continue to fly around about teacher shorta ges; we have a whole new group of teachers that have been assigned to the schools. H e explained that while some teachers have been relocated, and there may be fewer teachers at a particular school than in previous years, this does not mean the standard of one teacher to 30s tudents has been violated. However, Mr Bannister added that he has been pointi ng out for more than a year that the educational system is lacking in specialist teach-e rs with expertise in subjects s uch as agriculture, mathematics and the sciences. We need teachers in a few areas, specialist teachers, and as a country we have not been producing them, saidM r Bannister. Another point of concern, according to the minister, is that some Bahamian teache rs refuse to work in the Family Islands. We want our children in the Family Islands to have t he same quality of education a s those in New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco, he said. M r Bannister said the children of Acklins, Crooked Island, Mayaguana and San S alvador deserve a high level o f education and he pledged to ensure they have good teachers. If anyone decides they are too good for the children in those islands, the ministry will n ot be hiring them, he said. A dmitting that some schools such as RM Bailey High School, Uriah McPheeP rimary and EP Roberts Primary suffered avoidable problems at the beginning of t he term, Mr Bannister said c redit is also due for the successful launch of a new school year. H e added that those responsible for the few probl ems that did occur will be held accountable for those circumstances which I do not take lightly at all. However, he said, the public should keep in mind that the vast majority of the 160 government schools opened without a hitch, despite a cat-e gory three hurricane hitting the Bahamas just one week before classes started. It would be good if we l ooked at all the positive things that have happened notwithstanding the hurric ane and damage to many schools we have been able to have an outstanding group of teachers report to the classroom and look after the interest of the students, he said. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 3 This Course is a study of law and practice relating to JPs and is especiallydesigned for newly appointed JPs or as a r efresher course.Registration Deadline 16th September, 2011.Institute of Business and CommerceT el: 324-4625CERTIFICATE COURSEPrinciples of Law for Justices of the Peace By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net A FIGHT between a murd er victim and one of three men charged with his stabbing death was initiated by the victim, his wife told the Supreme Court yesterday. T amara Smith, widow of 28year-old Jason Smith, testified that her husband who she said was intoxicated at the time was involved in a fist fight with Daryl Rolle on the evening of September 13,2 008. This occurred, she said, before a separate altercationwith another of the men accused of Smiths murder. W itness Rolles attorney Terrel Butl er suggested to the witness t hat a fight did not take place between Rolle and the victim, a nd further suggested that her c lient walked away from S mith after being threatened w ith being punched. Mrs Smith denied this, insisting that a fist fight took place, started by her husband w hen he hit him in the stoma ch area. It just went kind of fast, s he said. Mrs Smith told the court that Rolle disappeared after the fight, and only reappeared to prevent another of the a ccused, Edney Burrows, 26, from further attacking her. According to testimony give n yesterday by prosecution witness Police Constable 269 Marvin Hepburn, Burrows received treatment at the Princess Margaret Hospital for a gash on his right palm and stab wounds to the lowerb ack and shoulder, sustained in an altercation with the vic tim on that evening. D uring questioning by Bur rows lawyer Elliot Lochkart, the widow said her husband,w hose well-being she was conc erned for, did not listen to her pleas to walk away from an argument with Burrows a fter the accused had left and reappeared coming from the direction of a church anda nother building near the scene of the altercation. She said the argument turned physical after Burrows g rabbed Smith around the waist and Smith retaliated by pushing Burrows against a w all. All of this took place in the presence of their daughter, who was four years old at thet ime, Mrs Smith said. Edney then got Jason into a headlock, she said. A t this point, Mr Lockhart suggested to the widow that Smith stabbed Burrows in the back and hand. No sir, she replied. I did nt see a weapon at this time. Mrs Smith said her sight was obscured by a crowd of three to four people and she could not see exactly what was happening. Involvement She denied touching or attacking Burrows with a bot tle during the fight. didnt touch any of them, she said. I was trying to get Jason to leave the scene because I didnt want him to get hurt. As to the involvement of Andre Dieujuste, 27, the third man accused along with Rolle and Burrows, Mrs Smith told the court that Dieujuste, also known as Pepsi, did run off and return with a cutlass but she could not say if he had actually used it. When asked by Dieujustes attorney Christina Galanos if she saw him chap or spank anybody with the cutlass, Mrs Smith said No. When the trial resumes today, prosecutor Jillian Williams and the defence attorneys will continue questioning Sgt 1298 Antoine Rah ming. The case is being heard before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs. S CHOOLSARESUFFICIENTLYSTAFFED EDUCATION MINISTER: REPORTS OF TEACHER SHORTAGES ARE UNTRUE V ICTIMS WIFE TESTIFIES THAT HER HUSBAND INITIATED FIGHT INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays We need teachers in a few areas, specialist teachers, and as a country we have not been producing them. Desmond Bannister M INISTER o f Education Desmond Bannister speaks to the students of C I Gibson yesterday. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff

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EDITOR, The Tribune. WOULDyou please allow a layman to give his views in your prestigious d aily on why the governm ent is struggling to pay its m assive debt. Perhaps all of the opposition parties will pummel the Ingraham administrat ion over the recent downg rade of our economys outlook from stable to nega tive by the international c redit rating agency M oodys. This action by Moodys comes as no surprise to me. What surprisedm e, though, was the fact that it took this long to happen. Moodys has expressed concerns over t his nations ability to service its massive national debt, which has already c limbed over the 4.1 billion d ollar mark. The FNM has a lready borrowed $1.5 billion since coming to officei n 2007. The PLP governm ent borrowed $800 million between 2002 and 2007. In just nine years the national debt has increased by $2.3 billion. I dont believe that any Bahamian government can e ver reduce the national debt to zero. The government has been running massive deficits in recent years because of its inabili t y to raise enough revenue to meet its financial obligations. Too many big busi nesses owe the government u npaid taxes and other fees, but they are never really pressured to payt heir bills. How many of t he large hotels in Nassau owes BEC and Water and Sewerage? How many busi ness persons have avoidedp aying their National Insurance contributions? This has been a perenni a l problem in this country for many years; and it has taken a tremendous toll on the Treasury. The FNMg overnment is between a p roverbial rock and a hard place. If PM Ingraham raises taxes like he did last year, he will be lambasted by the PLP for placing an additional burden on the middle-class and poor. If he doesn't raise taxes, then agencies like Moodys will continue to breath down his neck for not doing enough to raise revenues. If PM Ingraham resorts to reducing the size of the massive civil service, he will l ose the election. When PM I ngraham cut the staff at the Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas, he was heavily criticised by many. Even the church took exception to the downsizing exercise at Z NS. If PM Ingraham d oesnt downsize the bloate d civil service or raise taxe s, then this economy will c ontinue along this destruct ive path. Any government that lays off hundreds of its workers would be committing political suicide. Prime Minister Ingraham is well aware of this. The government has to m eet a huge payroll each month for nearly 20,000 civil servants. Additionall y, the government is set to h ire some 3,000 unem p loyed Bahamians for one year through its NationalJ ob Readiness and Traini ng Programme. This will cost $25 million. The Ingraham administration has already given away nearly$ 22 million to over 15,000 unemployed Bahamians through its Government Unemployment BenefitsP rogramme. Even today there are hundreds, if not thousands of unemployedB ahamians who are depending on food vouchers from Social Services. I know of persons whoseu tilities are being paid by S ocial Services. Furthermore, there are thousands of retirees ands enior citizens who receive a pension every month from the Treasury. There are many former Memberso f Parliament, government ministers and senators who are also receiving a hand some pension every month. Some of these former officials are getting as much as $8,000. The government also has to find money in order to maintain all of its hospitals, clinics, schools, administrative offices, embassies, airports, harbours, roads, police and fire stations and packing houses. Let us not forget Fox Hill Prison. There are approximately 1200 inmates at that prison. It costs the government around $15,000 a year to maintain each prison inmate. Corporations like BEC, Water and Sewerage, ZNS and Bahamasair have all been a financial drain on the Treasury for years. B ahamasair has never m ade one farthing for this c ountry, yet over 600 or so Bahamians are employed at that airline. If Bahamasair was owned by a private c itizen, they would have f olded up shop long ago. But successive governments h ave kept the financially s trapped airline in business f or the past three decades. This makes absolutely no sense at all. Moreover, theg overnment is repeatedly harassed by civil service unions for pay increases, financial bonuses and other i ncrements. If the government fails to meet their demands, then it will pay d early at the polls. The T reasury has also lost a round $100 million in the Educational GuaranteedL oan Programme. That p rogramme has been suspended by the government; because many of the of loan holders are either unwilling or unable to repay their obligation (Hon. Desmond Bannist er). The civil service in this country is just too massive. The Bahamas government is simply unsustainable.T his country can no longer afford it. We can no longer afford to pay 41 Members of Parliament, 16 senatorsa nd 17 cabinet ministers. A bloated government has caused The Bahamas toh ead down this slippery s lope of financial ruin. Both the FNM and the PLP must bear some responsibility for the financial downgrade.T hey increased the size of government over the last 40 plus years. ManyB ahamians were given gov ernment jobs by their MPs for supporting them on election day. T here are only two things t hat the Ingraham admin istration can do to get this nations finances on the right path again. But I seriously doubt that the FNM government will even consider doing any of them. That would cost them the election. In the final analy sis, PM Ingraham is caught between a rock and a hard place. This is from a Bahamian who is disillusioned with big government. KEVIN EVANS Nassau, September 4, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 F reeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm WHILE Britons agonize over their broken society that erupted in senseless rioting, burning and destruction on August 6, and Bahamians become more anxious to find a solution to their escalating crime, a writer in The Economist of London hit t he nail on the head when he wrote: The confidence trick at the heart of the s ocial order was violently laid bare: it turns out that if sufficient numbers of criminals want to create havoc on the streets, they can. In the absence of internal, moral restraints, external ones can only do so much The late Sir Etienne Dupuch, publisher o f this newspaper, was a true believer in this and it was this conviction that influe nced his decision not to press for legislation after he took his stand in the House of Assembly in 1956 to break down racial discrimination in public places. In his Res olution, which caused the break up in confusion of the House of Assembly on the night of January 23, 1956, Sir Etienne had recommended eliminating this evil by legislation or otherwise if it could not bedone through moral conviction. In other words if his Resolution of moral persua sion did not work, he would move for legislation. Three days later the hotels had put advertisements in The Tribune announcing that their doors were open and all persons were welcome regardless of race. It was not long before others followed their lead. There was no need for legislation. I pointed out, Sir Etienne told his critics who were pressing for legislation and a debate that would open old wounds, that a lawyer could always find a way around the law, but no one would dare break a custom. Recently, we received a letter from a die-hard PLP stating that it was not Sir Etiennes Resolution that had broken down racial discrimination, but rather the PLP who had incorporated the anti-dis crimination clause into the 1973 Constitution 17 years after discrimination in public places no longer existed in the Bahamas! It was so much of a non-issue in 1 973 that when the Constitution came into force no mention was made of this clause, b ecause no one had noticed it. It didnt even get a mention in The Tribune. At the time, and over the years, certain PLP leaders have lied about the events of that time in an effort to make Bahamians believe that the PLP had opened the doors to public places for all Bahamians. Of course, it must be remembered that this could not have been done without the t remendous support of the Bahamian people both black and white. And their s how of support in the public square that night, and their determination to be treat ed as equal citizens made it clear to the leaders of the time that the Resolution for which Sir Etienne was doing battle in the House had to pass. Only one PLP voted for it because at that time the PLP had o nly one member in the House. Although the Resolution was defeated, the moral l aw prevailed and discrimination in public places was at an end. Recently in the Senate Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said that in his opinion Bahamianisation started when the first non-discriminatory bill was promulgated and introduced in the House of Assembly in 1956 by the late Sir Etienne Dupuch. In fact it was a Resolution, a Bill never became necessary. And now non-discrim ination is a part of our Constitution. But, we have strayed from the subject on which we had intended to write. The worlds lawlessness not just in the Bahamas stems from broken, non-functional homes. Homes in which children have no role models, in which they just growed like Topsy without guidance or any moral restraints. No one respects them, and they respect no one. They feel that society has given them the rawest of deals and they have no compunction about returning the favour. They have had no breeding in a dysfunctional home, and so without an inner conscience to help them differentiate between right and wrong, a law imposed by the state means nothing to them. They exact their own justice ignoring the state, they take their own vengeance outside of the law and they thumb their noses at all forms of decency and civility until, living by the gun, a gun brings them down. A nd so it is true that in the absence of moral restraints, external ones can only d o much. This is societys main problem to which a solution has to be found. Prime Minister between a rock and a hard place LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Without moral restraints social order collapses

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THE Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation has pledged to help Grand Bahama farmers whose crops were wiped out by Hurricane Irene. From what I saw, the f armers suffered extensive d amage, said BAIC execut ive chairman Edison Key. We came to see what kind of assistance we can give them. We will discuss it with the Ministry of Agriculture and make some recommendations to the government w ith respect to what BAIC c an do to help them get b ack on their feet. M r Key led a high level B AIC delegation on an inspection of damaged farms in eastern Grand Bahama this week. BAIC general manager Benjamin Rahming and assistant general managers A rnold Dorsett (agriculture a nd Vernita Rhodenwalt ( human resources) accomp anied him. M r Key also examined B AICs new Freeport office complex and craft centre, and met with staff to determine how best to bring the facility into full operation. Much of the crop damage resulted from high winds a nd extensive sea water flooding. Several acres of bananas, plantains, pineapp les, guavas, sugar apples a nd peppers were destroyed. Some of the farms are poorly located and every time there is a hurricanet hey get flooded out with salt water and lose all their crops, Mr Key said. We are advising them to relo c ate to higher ground. He noted that the Ministry of Agriculture has available farm land awayf rom flood-prone areas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page seven AGAINST THE BACKDROP of a guava field destroyed by Hurricane Irene, the BAIC executive team h ears from Grand Bahama farmers during an inspection tour Tuesday. G ladstone Thurston / BIS

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A NEW book by The Trib unes f ormer managing edit or offers fascinating insights i nto the political history of the Bahamas over the last 40 years. Long Hot Summer by J ohn Marquis reflects on the e ditors 14 years in Bahamas j ournalism, including his 10 years at The Tribunes helm between 1999-2009. It includes personal a ppraisals of some of the c ountrys leading political f igures, notably the late prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling, FNM leader Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield and Labour leader Sir Randol F awkes. This is not a formal history, Mr Marquis said from his home in England, it is a highly personal account of a very interesting period in the Bahamas when the c ountry experienced a social and political revolution. M r Marquis first worked i n the Bahamas between 1 966-69 as a political reporter on both The Nass au Guardian a nd T he Trib une. D uring this period, he covered the 1967 general election in which the PLP came to power for the first time and got to know many of the politicians who were later to become major politi cal figures. H e then returned to Britain to work in Fleet Street as a Reuters sub-editor and international sports writer for the Thomson n ewspaper empire before becoming editor of a West Country media group. Hea lso won one of Britains top awards for investigative r eporting. B ut it was during his 10y ear stint as T he Tribunes m anaging editor that he b ecame known for his cont roversial INSIGHT articles a nd h is numerous confrontations with the PLP g overnment. L ong Hot Summer r evisits s everal of the most controversial stories of his time in Nassau, including thef amous front-page picture spread featuring former immigration minister Shane Gibson and the late American starlet Anna Nicole Smith. The book reveals how the s tory came to be written and t he impact it had in the i nternational media. T he T ribunes f ront page was p ublished in major titles t hroughout the world. The book also reveals the background to the controversial story of ChaunceyT ynes Snr, whose disclosures linking Sir Lynden Pindling with internationald rug traffickers caused a major furore shortly b efore Mr Marquiss retirement in 2009. During his time as m anaging editor, Mr M arquis was subjected to a Labour Department i nquiry after several leadi ng politicians called for h is deportation. In addition, four public demonstrations were staged o utside T he Tribunes o ffice demanding his removal. Apart from politics, his new book deals with several c auses Mr Marquis pursued during his Tribune years, including his exposure of c orrupt lawyers and his camp aigns on behalf of Bahamia ns who had been denied justice. It also reveals howh is infamous Aces and Joke rs articles came to be written. He said: I hope the book adds something, however modest, to the stockpile of knowledge about modern Bahamian politics and socie ty in general. Though much o f it will cause offence to some, Im sure most B ahamians will see it as a p ositive contribution to the n ational debate. Long Hot Summer is available from F irst Edition at firsteditionpress.co.uk LOCAL NEWS 6&+('8/($(59,&(2'$ LQIR#PVLEDKDPDVFRP 7 $ ,5&21',7,21,1* (/(&75,&$/ %/'*$,17(1$1&( EX-EDITORS NEW BOOK WILL CAUSE OFFENCE TO SOME, HE ADMITS THE TRIBUNES former managing editor John Marquis h as released his new b ook L ong Hot Summer. PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE

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LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 7 I trust that this trip will be very beneficial t o farmers, said Mr Key. When we complete our report, hopefully we can get some a ssistance to them. Those who need to relocate are definitely going to need assistance with landp reparation, seeds, plants, fertiliser and other items to get their projects operational. O nce I get the funds I will rescue every one of them. Dwight Sawyer is a major Grand Bahama f armer. This is the eighth time he has been wiped out by flooding, but he remains determined. intend to come back bigger and bett er, he said. B ut how fast he can get ready for the win t er season ahead depends on the level of a ssistance from government. And I am not talking about a hand-out. What you see here that I lost, I produced that without any funding. If I get some sort of assistance, I can go a lot further but I am going whether I get that assistance or not, he said. As a matter of fact, I am going now because I am already preparing land in other areas that were not flooded so I can plant vegetables. Mr Dorsett, BAICs executive for agri c ulture, was moved. I like Mr Sawyers spirit, he said. This is the kind of person I would want to assistb ecause he has a desire to come back and he knows what he needs. He simply needs some immediate assistance. F ROM page five B AIC TO ASSIST FARMERS ON GRAND BAHAMA BAIC EXECUTIVES show off their new Grand Bahama office and craft centre during a tour on T uesday. Pictured from left are: assistant general manager (northern Bahamas g eneral manager Benjamin Rahming; executive chairman Edison Key; assistant general manager (human resources manager (agriculture FARMER DWIGHT S AWYER ( centre) lost his entire b anana crop. Also p ictured during an i nspection tour of Freeport farms onT uesday are BAIC e xecutive chairman Edison Key (right and assistant general manager (agriculture) Arnold Dorsett. G ladstone T hurston / BIS

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TOP: Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham (centre Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith (left dock where pre-existing dama ge was exacerbated by Hurricane Irene. Mr Ingraham visited North Eleuthera on T uesday and toured Central a nd South Eleuthera yesterd ay. A BOVE: M usic students in N orth Eleuthera are treated to a visit by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. Kristaan Ingraham /BIS PM VISITS ELEUTHERA

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ,Q$FFRUGDQFHZLWK &RQVWLWXWLRQ7KH%DKDPDVXEOLFHUYLFHV 8QLRQZLOOKROGWKH7UL$QQXDO*HQHUDO 0HPEHUVKLSHHWLQJRQ $XGLWRUVHSRUWVZLOOEHSUHVHQWHG $OOPHPEHUVDUHXUJHGWRDWWHQG DQGEHRQWLPH 5HIUHVKPHQWVZLOOEHVHUYHGDIWHUWKHPHHWLQJ T HE Ministry of the Envir onment and the Departm ent of Environmental Health Services have issued an apology to the public for any inconvenience experie nced due to poor and i nadequate garbage collection in recent weeks. In a statement issued yesterday, the department said it is in the process of finalising arrangements for the collection of all solid waste in New Providence over the next seven days. The department will deploy its fleet and contract w ith Impac, United Sanitation, and Bahamas Waste to collect the residential waste that has accumulated particularly following Hurricane Irene and the subsequent rains, the statement said. It said the public will be a dvised through the media of a new collection timetablea nd are encouraged to bag t heir refuse and place it by t he roadside on the schedu led days. Since Hurricane Irene p assed near New Providence three weeks ago, The Tribune has received a number of angry calls from personsw ho said trash has been piling up outside their houses. Many noted that the capi t al is trying to cope with a dengue fever outbreak at the moment, and uncollected g arbage is an ideal habitat f or the mosquitos that s pread the virus. Earlier this week, the Pan A merican Health Organisat ion issued a series of recommendations on how the B ahamas could better fight dengue fever outbreaks. Among these was the sug g estion that government ensure all garbage is collect e d in a timely fashion. MINISTRY ISSUES APOLOGY OVER POOR AND INADEQUATE GARBAGE COLLECTION T HE DEPARTMENT o f Environmental Health Services said it is in t he process of finalising arrangements for the collection of all solid waste in New Providence over the next seven days.

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LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 11

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VOLUNTEERS across the B ahamas are preparing to take p art in the Ocean Conservanc ys 26th annual International C oastal Clean-up on Saturday, September 24. Every year in September, more than half-am illion people in 100 countries r emove millions of pounds of t rash from beaches and waterw ays all over the world. Over the last quarter-century, the ICC has grown froma single clean-up on a Texas beach to a worldwide movement. The Bahamas has participated for many years in the Ocean Conservancys International Coastal Clean-up and we will again this year to make a difference to ourm arine environment, said R analdo Smith, education supervisor for Dolphin E ncounters and ICC co-ordi nator for the Bahamas. Last year, a record number of volunteers in New Providence alone collected 39 tons of trash which is an extraordinary accomplishment. This year, we wanted to expand the clean-up area and will be focusing on Yamacraw Beach and South Beach to be cleaned from 8am until 1pma nd we encourage members o f the public to join us. Please wear closed-in shoes, bring a water bottle, sunscreen and gardening gloves. Abaco and Grand Bahama are also participating and are hosting clean-ups of their beaches, he said. See tomorrows Tribune for a list of ICC events in the Bahamas LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE VOLUNTEERS PREPARE FOR ANNUAL COASTAL CLEAN-UP CAMPAIGN LEFT: Volunteers getting the job done in the clean up effort. R IGHT: R BDFRangers sign up for the Ocean Conservancys 26th annual International Coastal Clean-up.

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family is very small, Archdeacon Knowles said that her extended family, the Knowles-Majors, were quite large in number. He said t hat his cousin was quiet and r eserved, not unlike most of his family, most of whom are very private. I think everyones really shocked, Archdeacon Knowles added. She was a wonderful person, easy to get along with, e asy to communicate with. I saw her as a very committ ed person to whatever she had to do. She tried to fur-t her her education, she tried t o maximize her potential. Kaysha, who had been baptized by the archdeacon, was described as a very mannerly and disciplined child. Despite her young age, A rchdeacon Knowles said s he was very respectful to her seniors and that the trait w as due to her mothers s trong influence. D uring their marriage, Ms Burrows and her husband attended church regularly.H owever, said the archdeacon, her attendance became sporadic after the couple had become estranged a bout two years ago. According to sources close to the investigation, p olice discovered evidence t hat suggested that Ms Burr ows was depressed at the time of her death. I n an interview with The T ribune yesterday, Archdeacon Knowles said that he knew Ms Burrowshad kept a diary and was v ery methodical in her writing. She kept everything, her thoughts, she kept them written down as she spoke, as she acted, as she went through life. "It's in the hands of the l aw right now, under investigation, but there seems not to be any clarity. It's not clear (to the family at this point what really happened." A utopsy reports conf irmed that Ms Burrows and h er daughter had been alive when they went into thew ater, and subsequently d rowned. T here are also unans wered questions about the d iscovery of Ms Burrows' Nissan Sentra, which was spotted intact at theC ricket Club on Wednesday by a passing jogger. However, police said that suggestions that the car was d riven by someone after the mother and daughter died does not necessarily mean t hey were murdered. A ccording to police, there h as not been any evidence of wrongdoing. This is when you wonder w hat is truth, said Archdeacon Knowles, I guess they're taking a while to come up with something that can cause you to feel relaxed, to say okay it's sui cidal but you don't knoww hat it is, I don't think it's c lear, regardless of what you've been hearing." U p to press time, it could n ot be confirmed whether t he case had been handed over to the coroner for his court to decide the cause oft heir deaths. Anyone with information about the incident is askedt o contact CDU at 5 02-9991 or emergency services at 919 LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 13 FAMILYOF TRAGIC MOTHER AND DAUGHTER SHAKEN TO THE CORE FROM page one

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE &$5((5,7,(6 ',5(&7252))22't%(9(5$*( ( GXFDWLRQtXDOLILFDWLRQV ([SHULHQFHZLWK.QRZOHGJHNLOOVDQG$ELOLWLHV +($'2)63$6(59,&(6 &DQGLGDWHVKRXOGSRVVHVVWKHIROORZLQJPLQLPXPUHTXLUHPHQWV ([SHULHQFHZLWK.QRZOHGJHNLOOVDQG$ELOLWLHV 5HVXPHVVKRXOGEHIRUZDUGHGRQRUEHIRUHHSWHPEHU 7RDGV#JUDQGOXFD\DQFRP )UHHSRUW*UDQG%DKDPD British-American Insurance Company Limited (In Judicial ManagementT raditional Life Insurance Portfolio in the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union (ECCU Notice of SALERequest for Interested Parties registration for the SALE of B ritish-American Insurance Companys traditional life insurance portfolio in the ECCUBritish-American Insurance Company Limited (In Judicial Management) (BAICO or the Company) is seeking interested parties to acquire its traditionallife insurance portfolio in the ECCU (the Portfolio BAICO is a Bahamian company, incorporated in the Bahamas in 1920. In 2009 BAICO and its branchesin the ECCU were placed into Judicial Management or similar statutory control. As part of the planned restructuring of the Companys ECCU operations, the Judicial Manager (JMto sell the Portfolio. The sale is being supported by the Governments of the member countries of the ECCU (the EC Governments) who have agreed, subject to qualifying criteria, to provide cash to fund the Portfolios liabilities at the point of transfer. The Portfolio consists of approximately 19,000 active policies with coverage in the eight countries of the ECCU (Anguilla,Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. K itts & Nevis, St. Lucia and St. Vincent & the Grenadines). The sale represents a unique opportunity for a new market entrant to access an existing and well established customer base with excellent coverage across the ECCU, or alternatively intended that, subject to satisfying applicable regulatory requirements, the successful purchaser of the Portfolio will be granted all relevant licenses where necessary to allow it to continue to operate the Portfolio in each of the eight ECCU countries. BAICO has been one of the leading life insurance operators in the ECCU over the last two decades, and it is anticipated that the new operator of the Portfolio will be in a position to a ttain similar market leadership post transfer. expected annual premiums in excess of EC$23.7 million businesses in the relevant EC jurisdictions (subject to meeting local regulatory criteria) their own product offering that does not require extensive investment in business development to develop existing customer base at the point of transfer the extensive historical records available for them (all policies were established prior to Judicial Management in 2009) transfer processes from the outset of ownership of the Portfolio Interested parties must experience to operate a life insurance business from within the ECCU within the ECCU Interested parties should be able to demonstrate that they can bring many, if not all of the region continue to support and serve BAICOs Life Insurance Policy customers Interested parties are invited to register for the sales process through the submission 2011. nigelrouse@kpmg.com.bs or Erin Bethell at ebethell@kpmg.com.bs for a copy of the registration form. Package) whichcontains additional details on the process and a list of information requirements with respect to the investor/consortium for evaluation by the Judicial before October 18, 2011 Should the relevant party not be chosen by the JM or the EC process, this fee will become non-refundable. Parties who breachany of the bid terms will not receive a refund, whether they are invited to participate in the due diligence phase or not. including access to a data room, an information memorandumand a presentation on the details of the Portfolio and history thereof. After the due diligence phase, investors/ consortiums will be invited to submit binding bids. As BAICO is in Judicial Management, said. You need transparency and accountability. Only then c an the country move forward. Dr Minnis stressed the legislation is an important item on governments agenda. The government is not reluctant to bring this legislat ion to Parliament. I can say with confidence that it is coming. Dr Minnis said Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is am an of his word who promised that (the FOIA coming, and it will come. When pressed by host Ortland Bodie on whether the government, consideringe verything it had on its plate, would be able to bring and pass the act before the next election, Dr Minnis said there was adequate time to bring forward the act. T he minister did however a dmit the government has not b een successful in communicating its messages and goals to the public. He acknowledged that people are frustrated by the inconvenience of the ongoing road works, the challenges ofg arbage collection and the stray dog population among other challenges which callers to the programme raised, and may feel the government is not interested in their concerns. I think that we are listening t o the people, but I think our public relations is poor. I would be the first to admit that. Both in the FNM, the government, and the ministries. We may not have e xplained to them appropriately what is happening theref ore it will be the perception t hat if I dont know then you cant be listening to me. Comm unication is poor and I find c ommunication is poor not o nly in the FNM but in the g overnment, in the ministry a nd its a problem that B ahamians spell with a small c and not a capital C, and we must improve on communication. We are employed by the people, we have a five-year contract and every five yearsw e go back to the people and seek employment. As employees it is essential that we listen to the people. I think where we have failed, and I will admit that, is in communication. We have failed in communicatinga nd explaining things appropriately. I think that that needs to be improved and once we do that then we have a better country and better communication and you have less stress a nd anxiety once an individual understands and knows w hat you are trying to do and y ou can get their feedback as to whether or not that is the a ppropriate direction. We are doing our best to p repare the country for tomorr ow, he added. h ave the courage to repeal that law if they decide that they don't want to obey the law. If not, they in breach of the law just like the lil' hungry boy who steals the guinep," said Mr Roker, a former government minister in the Pindling administration, yesterday. U nder the Public Disclosure Act before t he first day of March each year all senators and members of the House of Assembly must declare their income, assets and liabilities, as well as those of their spouses and children for the previous year. B y law this information should be publ ished in a national gazette. T he disclosures were last published in November 2010 and only contained information up to the end of 2007. Yesterday it was not clear how many members of Parliament have complied witht he Public Disclosure Act. A Public Disclosure Commission, chaired by Oswald Isaacs, is charged with ensuring compliance with the Act. Messages left for Mr Isaacs were not returned yesterday. The Tribune was told Mr Isaacs would not h ave the information yet because it is still b eing processed within the Cabinet O ffice. Cabinet Secretary Anita Bernard said she did not have the information on hand yesterday and could not reveal any details on how many politicians had submitted records before the data is published in a gazette. I n February 2010, Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham said he was among the group of politicians who had not complied with the law on yearly public disclosures. ". . The Public Disclosures Act is not being adhered to by members of Parliament," Mr Ingraham said last year. H e said he was in the process of preparing t he necessary documents and explained that his last public disclosure was in 2007 when he ran for the North Abaco constituency in the last general election. He later made a public apology for his d elinquency. FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT IN PARLIAMENT BEFORE THE END OF FNM TERM MPS BREAKING RULES ANT EXPECT CITIZENS NOT TO BREAK THE LAW FROM page one FROM page one

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$4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.38 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 Sleep well while your money grows. By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business E ditor T HE BAHAMIAN e conomy is not creating j obs fast enough to absorb the annual 5,000 s chool leavers, let alone almost 12,000 discouraged workers, the B ahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employe rs Confederations (BCCEC warning: We still have al ong, uphill battle to climb. I n a recent interview with Tribune Business, W inston Rolle said data c ontained in the Central Bank of the Bahamas r eport on July financial and economic developments showed just how w eak the labour market and many Bahamianowned businesses were, indicating the economyw as still mired in recession and not out of the woods yet. N oting the $2.6 million contraction in loans to Bahamian businesses dur ing July, and $19.6 mill ion growth in the private s ectors loan arrears, Mr Rolle said: Its very con cerning. That shows the s tate of the economy, and that some businesses havea real challenge in meet ing their obligations. T he Chamber chairman, though, pointed out that economic activity traditionally slowed down during the summer, as tourist numbers started By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor KEY PARTICIPANTSin a coll apsed Bahamas-based investment s tructure, which owes more than C dn$400 million, have been accused by the liquidator of engaging in sham transactions designed to retain control of remaining assets a nd prevent their return to out-ofp ocket investors. R aymond Massi, who is the joint l iquidator with Bahamas-based a ccountant, BDO Mann Judds C lifford Culmer, for the Olympus Univest fund and its manager, the Canadian-based Norshield Financ ial Group, has alleged that the latters Bahamas-based director, Thomas Muir, and fellow principal Lowell Holden engaged in activit ies of a highly questionable nature t hat contributed to investor losses a nd the structures ultimate failure. T he receivers 15th report to the C anadian courts, which has been o btained by Tribune Business, a lleges that Holden created a Minnesota-based company, Mendota, to merge with Comprehensive Investor Services (CIS B ahamas-domiciled company that p reviously played a key role in the O lympus Univest and Norshield s tructure. M r Massi alleged that CIS was m aking a $48.7 million claim in the N orshield/Olympus liquidation, n otwithstanding the fact that Mend ota which was claiming to have been assigned CISs debts was making exactly the same claim. Commenting on the Mendota/CIS merger, the liquidator alleged: The purpose behind this transaction appears to have been to remove CISs assets from the N orshield Financial Group, settle w ith its creditors and retain any resulting value for the beneficial owners of the new company. Commenting on the role played by Mr Muir, who was a well-known By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A PLP MP yesterday renewed his call for intervention to save the beleaguered City Markets food store chain, telling Tribune Business the company was worth saving. Acknowledging his concern over the supermarket chains fate, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell said that apart from the inter ests of City Markets principal, Mark Finlayson and his family, and the 22 per cent minority shareholders, the fate of several hundred employees was boundu p with the company. Hinting that he believed the Ingraham administration was unlikely to intervene to ensure City Markets survival, Mr Mitchell said the Opposition would support doing whatever is necessary to achieve this out come. Im just watching very carefully what theyre doing, the former foreign minister said of City Markets yesterday. I dont know what degrees of concern you can have, but I can say that Im quite concerned because of the large number of people involved in it. thought Mr Finlayson was quite brave to take this on, andI wish it to succeed and not fail. Its not just his fortune riding on it, but all the employees, a number of whom are constituents of mine. Concerns over City Markets survival prospects have intensified since Monday this week, when Mr Finlayson told Tribune Business the chain was mulling the closure of its Seagrapes Shopping Centre and South Beach outlets to resolve $2.5 million worth of refrigeration and infrastructure woes. That would leave the company with just two New Provi dence stores at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre and Cable Beach, and market sources have indicated it could be looking at a deal to sell its three Grand Bahama-based stores to another buyer. Shoppers visiting the four New Providence stores have all commented on how sparsely stocked they are, leading some By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THEminister of tourism s ays he and his team have never worked harder inm onitoring and reacting to travel trends, with the B ahamas individual and l eisure tourist business By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor S TAMP DUTYamendments should improve the Treasurys cash flow while n ot disrupting legitimate real estate transactions, a leadi ng attorney said yesterday, while urging the Government to be more transpar e nt and involve the private sector more on this issue. A ndrew OBrien, a partn er in Glinton, Sweeting & O Brien, said the package of S tamp Act amendments passed in the wake of the 2011-2012 Budget appeared designed to close loopholes and encourage quicker payment of Stamp Duty relating to real estate t ransactions. CITY MARKETS ORTH SAVING MP pushes for i ntervention, as ortunes of hundreds bound u p with firs fate SEE page 5B STAMP ACT CHANGES TARGET LOOPHOLES Amendments seek faster real estate deal payments Purchase options, escrow sales targeted But attorney says legitimate transactions will not be impacted S EE page 7B T OURIST BOOKINGS YRATING LIKE STOCK MARKETS Minister says never worked harder to keepo n top of inconsistent travel trends SEE page 5B V INCENT V ANDERPOOL-WALLACE RECEIVER: ABUSIVE $49M CLAIM OVER FUND COLLAPSE Blasts role played by well-known Bahamas-based d irector of $400m collapsed investment group Alleges transactions designed to keep assets out o f his and investors hands S EE page 3B ECONOMY NOT CREATING JOBS FAST ENOUGH SEE page 4B Cant accommodate 3 ,500 annual school leavers, plus 38,000 unemployed and discouraged workers Chamber chief: e have a long, uphill battle to climb

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By DEIDRE A. BASTIAN MANYhigh school students interested in a graphic design career wonder if it is really necessary to pursue a degree or certificate in the p rofession. Do you really n eed a graphic design d egree if you are already artistic to begin with, they ask? They then say they are great at sketching, painting, and have some good experience working with software such as Photoshop, Illustrator and Flash. S uch questions and sentim ents are expressed to me r epetitively, and it seems as if the jury is still out on this issue. Many understandably f eel that since they have e very version of Adobe P hotoshop since inception in their possession, and have gone through many graphic design tutorials, a graphic design degree is not necessary. Let me announce that g raphic design is not just a bout creativity and/or mast ering software. Nor is it about knowing some great tutorials. Graphic design is about visual problem solving and meeting the needs o f your client. It is not about making something look cool, but instead selling a product or an idea visually in a c aptivating way. A good g raphic design schooling s hould mold and shape students to achieve just that, as there is no rest for the weary when it comes to keeping up with technology. I will go out on a limb and say that Graphic School is a lways a good option, but it i s not necessary, as it d epends on your aptitude and knowledge. (Ouch..that was difficult for me to say, as I am a stickler for training and education). Let me e xplain: You will have to be highly motivated, naturally talented and loaded with knowledge to make a career o ut of design without an e ducation. But, if you are p lanning to strike out on your own as a graphic designer, you can learn enough about the field to be successful, providing you start out with realistic goals. Typically, degree prog rammes cover studio art, d esign principles, compute rised design and production, and printing techniques. In my experience it was not the actual coursework itself that taught me a l ot, but rather my interaction with professors and classmates, being patient a nd enduring fair and honest f eedback and critiques. It w as a diverse knowledge t hat helped me to unders tand that design is simply n ot just a pretty picture but a piece of visual communication that is to eventually be consumed by millions of people. Thus it needed to be taken seriously. Even though I found my sweet s pot, which was creativity, I s till realised I needed a good base in design principles as w ell. B ut cant I learn this stuff o n my own? Some people, I suppose, can do this if they have fantastic organisings kills. I have friends who have their own businesses and write code for websites from scratch without ever having gone to college. If you are disciplined enough you can go through all of the d esign theory, typography a nd art history needed to be a ble to discern a good design from bad. Often, though, itc an be hard to know where to prioritise your time and efforts. Bear in mind there are some people that haved one everything on their o wn, fluked it, landed top jobs and earn lots of money. Hard to believe, but it is true. W ithout a graphic design s chool or programme, what would I be missing? Well, t here are a few potentially strong elements that would b e neglected. Primarily, your classes would be filled with l ike-minded people. You w ill most likely miss some o f the teamwork aspects, w hich can be really important. Besides, all good graphic design programmes will be geared towards building a portfolio of work to present to potential employers, as schools almost a lways have a partnership with graphic design schools. Whats more, you are give n the opportunity to ask y our educators or classmates q uestions about anything you are unsure of. You can receive feedback and cri t iques, learn and grow a lot faster in a class environ ment. Sadly, in a solo envi r onment, you have no real w ay to measure how good or bad you are, whether you are on track or missing the mark. C an I create my own portf olio? If you are lucky, s ome companies will hire you after seeing your work ,especially if your portfolio demonstrates creativity and design knowledge in the best way possible. Hey, but if Im good e nough, do I really need p aper. Is that fair? Well, w hen hiring a graphic designer, an employer wants to know you understand the entire process of graphic design. They want to know if y ou will be able to work with other members of the team and understand design p rinciples, typography, c olour and the art of selling. W e are all aware there are m any people who claim to b e self-taught graphic d esigners, but I cannot comment on the extent of their knowledge. What I would say is that a Graphic Arts degree is absolutely vital only if you really wish to make a serious career out of g raphic designing. Think a bout it this way: Why would an employer choose y ou over someone who has s imilar talent backed by a s ound college education? Does a degree really matter to employers? Many oft he top design firms will only hire those with a degree. And often only those witha degree from a top school, and who also possesses top grades. Sounds disingenu ous but it is true. A graphicd esign degree or certificate f rom a recognised school, a nd a reference, can give them peace of mind that thep erson they are hiring will most likely have the foun dation to do well and suc ceed. It will win you points i n the eyes of employers, BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE A RTOF G RAPHIX D EIDRE BASTIAN SEE page eight Degrees of qualification

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figure in the Bahamian financial services industry during the late 1990s and e arly part of this century, M r Massi alleged he played a significant role in Norshields Bahamian entities, acting as a director for most of them. He was said to have run most of them from the same office, with the same a ddress, fax and phone n umber, and PO Box numb er appearing on all correspondence involving money transfers between different Norshield entities. The role played by Muir i n the Bahamas was likely intended to give the appearance that the companies with which he was associated were unconnected to the Norshield FinancialG roup, the liquidators report alleged. The activities of Muir are consistent with attempts t o impede the proper process of distribution of funds to investors in the different entities in the Norshield Financial Group. In his conclusion, Mr Massi urged the Canadian c ourts to disallow and dism iss Mendotas $48.7 mill ion claim, alleging that he believed it was an unfounded and abusive attempt to appropriate the p roceeds of realisations a chieved by the receiver, a nd to frustrate the recoveries of the victims of the Norshield fraud. The supposed merger of Mendota and CIS, as at January 5, 2005, appears to be artificial in that the receiver has seen no evidence to establish that Holden gave any consideration to acquire the assets of CIS that supposedly i ncluded a $48.7 million c laim. In addition, CIS continued to act as a distinct entity, as evidenced by the filing of the CIS Proof of D ebt in the liquidation proc eedings of Mosaic in the B ahamas and the initiation of legal proceedings in New York. The attempt by CIS and Mendota to make what appears to be the same claims in the Mosaic liquidation proceedings in the Bahamas, and in the respondents proceedings in Canada, is evidence of the frivolous nature of both c laims. T races of Norshield, O lympus Univest and their Bahamian counterparties linger on in this nation some seven years after the structure collapsed. Olympuss key counterparty, Mosaic, still holds a majority 51 per cent stake i n BISX-listed Premier C ommercial Real Estate I nvestment Corporation, a holding described as one of the best sources of recovery for investors by the liquidators once it is sold. Olympuss Bahamasbased investment fund administrator, Cardinal I nternational, closed down a round the same time that N orshield and Olympus went into receivership, then liquidation. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 3B FROM page one RECEIVER: ABUSIVE $49 MILLION CLAIM OVER FUND COLLAPSE

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t o decrease and many Bahamas residents went on vacation. This, he explained, might have exacerbated the difficulties many small andm edium-sized Bahamian b usinesses were facing in meeting their debt repayment obligations, pushing some into arrears. The issue now was whether they w ould be able to change t he status of the whole equat ion by becoming current with their lenders oncea gain, now summer was over. Still, Mr Rolle conceded o f many Bahamian compan ies: Their financial health i s not good, and what were s eeing from small and mediu m-sized enterprises is just h ow fragile they are. Thats all the more reason why some of the things were doing for small and medium-sized enterprises are so important, so theyre not as c hallenged as much as now. Apart from working with t he Government to cons truct its Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Develo pment Bill, Mr Rolle said this weeks Grand Bahama w orkshop, held in conjunction with the International Labour Organisation (ILO w as intended to give Bahamian entrepreneurs the skills and tool sets they need, so they are better equipped to tackle very challenging times. But even more disconcerting was talk of a double dip recession in the US a nd other advanced e conomies, the Chamber c hairman adding: For those businesses in difficulties, such a prolonged recession would put them out of business. On the labour front, the tourism and construction industries have traditionally provided the main employment avenues for unskilled Bahamian labour. However, both have been hit hardb y the downturn, shedding hundreds of jobs and closing off these routes. The Central Bank of the B ahamas said there was considerable slack in the Bahamian labour market in i ts July report, not surprising g iven that the Department o f Statistics May 2011 Labour Force Survey foundt here were almost 26,000 u nemployed Bahamians and a further 12,000 discouraged workers. As a result, almost 38,000 Bahamians either cannot find work or are not looking for it and they arej oined, every year, by at a c onservative estimate some 3 ,500 high school leavers. All that is a sign of a s tagnant, very slow econom y, Mr Rolle agreed. As the economy grows, businesses need more labour and persons get hired. That is another indicator that were still in recession and not out of the woods yet. The Chamber chairman, though, indicated that the Bahamas labour woes were a s much structural as recess ion-driven. It goes back to n ot only opportunity but education, he said. When you start to look at some of those persons entering the workforce in the informal sector, in many instances they are unskilled labour. The construction jobs are just not there to employ them. When a school leaver comes out, with all those dis-c ouraged workers, jobs just are not being created fast enough to absorb them. Mr Rolle also echoed the s entiments expressed by the Department of Statistics, which noted that the inform al sector of the Bahamian e conomy grew by 32 per c ent between 2009 and 2011, adding 4,140 persons andg enerating 70 per cent of t otal labour force growth. H owever, the Statistics Department pointed out that the informal economy paid little to no taxes, and was not monitored or regulated by government. Employees here had little job security, as there were no employment contracts, a nd no benefits such as sick o r maternity pay. Obviously the entrepreneurial spirit of Bahamians is coming into play, and people have gone into survival mode and done whatever they need to survive, Mr Rolle agreed. But there are several factors to it. They do not contribute to the tax base significantly, as they are not paying NIB and thoset hings. And what is there to sustain those businesses? Using the fate of many BTC phone card street vend ors as an example, Mr Rolle said of the margin changes: Overnight, hund reds of persons were affecte d, because they were not b uilt on a very sound model. Anyone entering into a c ontract knows the terms a nd conditions, and when i ts going to expire. For them it changed overnight, and they were virtually crippled. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE rrb rb rrtb btbrtbrrrt rrtrnbbbrbttrtt bnrbtrbtt trrbrrrtrrbn rbtbbtt r f ttbtbrtnrrnttt n rttbtbrrr rtrrrtn rtrrtrrbtbr rrtbbtb rtbrrrtrr trnbbbrbttrttbnr btrbtttrrbr rrbn tbtbrbbttr bfbbbrrtbbr nbtbrtrrrr trntbrrtbtb bttbtbtttbbr btbtttttrntb nbtbtrbtttt rnbtrbbrt rbrtrbtbtbrrnb nbbrrtbbrb tnbbrfrtfrr b btrrtr bnbtt r trrrtrftt rtbbbtrbr btrnbrrbbt tbtbrrftbtbrrbtn fttbtbrrtttb btrrtrttbtbr rtnbttrbbbt bfbfnbtt t brrtttr bbrftbtbrrbt nfttbtbrrttr tb trr rtftt tttbtbr (VWDEOLVKHGZKROHVDOHFRPSDQ\LV DFFHSWLQJUHVXPHVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI *HQHUDODQDJHU ULYHDQGDPELWLRQDUHPXVW 6XFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHVKRXOGKDYHDW OHDVW\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQWRSOHYHO PDQDJHPHQW &RPSHQVDWLRQZLOOEHFRPPHQVXUDWH Z LWKH[SHULHQFHDQGWLHGWRSHUIRUPDQFH ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVKRXOG VHQGWKHLUUHVXPHWR ZKROHVDOHFDUHHUV#JPDLOFRP 127,&( ,6/$0,&7$.$)2/$1'(7$.$)2/ %$+$0$6f&203$1
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gyrating almost as much as recent swings in world stockm arkets. I n a recent interview with Tribune Business, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said forw ard booking patterns for the Bahamian tourism and hotel industry did not confirm anyk ind of substantive trend one w ay or another. Its one of those things we want to monitor, and the best way to monitor it is by looking at bookings year-overyear for the same period, them inister told this newspaper. Weve seen the same kind of swings similar to what we see happening in the stock m arket. At the moment, we see no particular position that can be sustained. Its the indi-v idual business that continues to gyrate, and not give us any long-term pattern. U ncertainty remains the watchword for the Bahamian tourism industry, as with glob al stock markets, given that t he number one determinant of vacation demand and tourist spend remains cons umer confidence. With the US accounting for between 80-85 per cent of thisn ations tourists, that confi d ence has been dented by a string of events, such as the cliffhanger over the US debtc eiling increase; the Standard & Poors downgrade; and a slew of gloomy reports onA merican jobs and economic growth. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace a cknowledged that these were the sort of developments that give us a bit of the jitters, given the fragility of consumer confidence. One factor counting against the Bahamian tourism indus try during this global recession, he added, was the increasing tendency of tourists to fly to lower cost destinations and search for a dealon price. The Bahamas, though, remains at the upper end of the price scale, mak ing it more difficult to cut and compete on cost. However, Mr VanderpoolWallace told Tribune Business that short-term bookings and tourism/hotel performance were certainly bet ter looking than the same periods in 2o10, these vacations having been booked before recent events. Bahamian hotels were in some cases, ahead of last year on occupancies and room rates, Mr VanderpoolWallace said. While group bookings were likely to remain unaffected, the min ister warned that the economic environment might induce them to bring fewer people when they came. He added that, unlike last year, Kerzner International was keeping its Beach Towers open during the slower Sep tember and October months, while Baha Mar was doing similar at the Wyndham. Such moves are likely to mitigate the loss of room inventory through the SuperClubs Breezes and Sandals Royal Bahamian closures for hurri cane repairs, even though the properties are pitched at dif ferent markets. We used to be able to look much further afield, but now its on a weekly or monthly basis, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace told Tribune Business. Every opportunity we are p ursuing vigorously, because o bviously we have inventory t hat is not occupied. Weve never worked harde r in terms of looking at busi ness trends and continuity, reacting to it and gettingt ogether with the private sector. Weve never worked harder. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added that the Ministry of Tourism was not working on any initiatives likely to create a major surge in tourism business in the short-term, the major projects currently u nderway being likely to c ome to fruition in the mediu m term. There are a number of o ther things we are working on, but it really is process stuff as opposed to large increasesi n business, he explained. There are a couple of things were looking at, but theyre at least a year out. Theres nothing in the short-term which is going to add significantly to growth in business. observers to predict the imminent demise of what was once a fixture in the Bahamian business and retail landscape unless Mr Finlayson and his management get things turned around quickly. Mr Mitchell, meanwhile, said he had been contacted by several beneficiaries of City Markets employee pension plan, all concerned as to the fate of their long-term retirement savings. I have had a number of pensioners who have been in touch with me about their pension payments and entitlements, theMP and attorney confirmed, adding that some might be existing employees seeking to retire. Ive given them an undertaking to try and resolve this issue for them. Any intervention by the Government to rescue a company such as City Markets is likely to be fraught with difficulties and complications, and is highly unlikely to happen. No such state rescue effort has taken place on behalf of supermarket chains in other capitalist economies, and immediate concerns would be whether the Government was simply throwing good money after bad. The fiscal position is another of many impediments too numerous to mention, and if the Government bails out one business a dangerous precedent has been set it will be looked upon to bail out all. Im not sure this government is minded to do interventions, Mr Mitchell conceded, while adding that another route for salvation would lie in City Markets finding a buyer or outside investor with deep capital pockets to inject new equity. Some, though, might argue that City Markets is past the point where it is worth saving. Having racked up around $28 million in collective net losses during the 2006-2011 BSL Holdings ownership, the supermarket chain as revealed by Tribune Business made a $14 million operating loss in its last financial year, three quarters of which were under Mr Finlayson and his Trans-Island Traders vehicle. I dont know what their circumstances are other than what Ive read in the papers, but I think the company is certainly worth saving, Mr Mitchell told Tribune Business. The country is terribly depressed at the moment, and does not need any more bad news. Im praying for City Markets, Mr Finlayson and all the employees, and will do what I can. Mr Mitchell also urged the Minister of Labour, Dion Foulkes, to meet with City Markets to gain an insight into the situation and prepare for any redundancy fall-out. He also called on him to speak with his Cabinet colleagues to ensure they do what they can to make the company survive. Whatever is necessary to ensure the company survives we [the PLP] would support, Mr Mitchell added. Meanwhile, rival retailers speaking to Tribune Business on condition of anonymity said numerous City Markets staff had been applying to them in search of jobs. And industry sources said that any hopes Mr Finlayson had of selling City Markets to SuperValue owner Rupert Roberts, or getting him to take over some of the store sites/leases, were likely to be dashed. It is understood that Mr Roberts is not interested in taking over City Markets existing debt, or the expenses associated with its store leases. There are too many headaches associated with that, and given the current economic cycle with reduced consumer incomes, Mr Roberts sees no need for expansion, sources said, preferring to let any extra business volume come to him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fZLWKWKHDELOLW\WRZRUNLQGHSHQGHQWO\ SUFLHQF\LQLFURVRIWIFHDSSOLFDWLRQVLV UHTXLUHGf 0DLQWDLQVDELOLW\WRZRUNH[LEOHKRXUVLIDQGZKHQ UHTXLUHGf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page one FROM page one CITY MARKETS WORTH SAVING FREDMITCHELL

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W ASHINGTON Associated Press U.S. CONSUMERSgrew more cautious last month amid wild stock market swings, zero job growth and heightened concerns that the economy has weakened. R etail sales were flat in August. At the same time, wholesale inflation leveled off. The latest data could give the Federal Reserve more impetusto adopt additional stimulus next week. "The combination of those two reports sets the stage for, and warrants, additional action by the Fed," said Michelle Meyer, an economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Wall Street looked past the weak retail sales data. Growing optimism that European leaders would be able to contain their debt crisis drove stocks higher. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 140 points for the day. In August, consumers spent less on autos, clothing and furniture, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. Hurricane Irene disrupted sales along the East Coast, analysts said. But many consumers were also spooked after a grim month that renewed recession fears. The government reported that the economy barely grew in the first half of the year. Lawmakers fought over raising the debt ceiling. Standard & Poor's downgraded long-term U.S. debt for the first time in history. Stocks tumbled the Dow lost nearly 16 percent of its value from July 21 through Aug. 10. As a result, consumer confidence fell in August to its lowest level since April 2009, when the economy was still in recession. And employers added no net jobs during the month. The government retail sales report is the first major read on consumer spending for August. Consumer spending is important because it accounts for 70 percent of economic activity. The economy's weakness is h elping to keep prices in check. The Labor Department said its Producer Price Index, which measures price changes before they reach the consumer, was unchanged in August after a 0.2 percent rise in July. A drop in energy prices in August offset higher food costs. The price of oil, cotton and other commodities have come down in recent months, after pushing up most measures of inflation earlier this year. Slow inflation gives the Fed more room to take steps to boost the economy. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke acknowledged last week that inflation rose sharply in the spring. But he repeated his belief that the increase was temporary and that price pressures would moderate soon. Fed policymakers meet for two days next week. Many economists expect they will decide to shift money out of short-term mortgage-backed securities and into longer-term Treasury bonds. The move could push down longer-term interest rates, including rates on mortgages, auto loans and other consumer and business borrowing. The central bank could take other steps, such as cutting the interest rate it pays on ther eserves banks hold at the Fed. That could encourage banks to lend the money rather than keeping it parked at the Fed. President Barack Obama has proposed a $447 billion job-creation package. He wants to cut Social Security taxes for workers, extend unemployment benefits, cut taxes for small businesses and spend more federal money to build roads, bridges and other public works projects. The president's plan faces opposition from Republicans, particularly because he wants to pay for it with higher taxes on wealthier households, hedge fund managers and oil companies. The government retail sales report offered a contrast to more upbeat data from major retailers and auto dealers. Luxury chains like Nordstrom Inc. and Saks Inc. said affluent shoppers kept spending. And discounters such as Target Corp. and Costco Wholesale Corp. got a boost from shoppers buying batteries, bottled water and others upplies to prepare for Hurricane Irene. S till, Best Buy Co., the largest U.S. consumer electronics retailer, reported Tuesday that its second-quarter profits plunged 30 percent. "We're still facing an uncertain (economic with volatile consumer shopping behavior, and this was evident in our results," Brian Dunn, CEO of Best Buy, said during a call with investors Tuesday. Auto sales fell 0.3 percent in August, according to the government report. Earlier this month, major automakers reported healthy sales increases in August, largely because dealers introduced new models and offered cheaper financing. The disparity could be explained, in part, because industry figures compare the current month to the same month a year ago, while the government's figures are month to month. B ut dealers who sell foreign cars continued to see a shortage o f popular models because of supply chain disruptions caused by the March 11 earthquake in Japan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t&RPPXQLFDWLRQDQDJHPHQW )ORULGD &.XSHUYLVRU\DQDJHPHQW 'RPLQLFD 3HUIRUPDQFHHYLHZ-RE(YDOXDWLRQfDQDJHPHQW 'RPLQLFD $QWLRQH\/DXQGHULQJ&RPSOLDQFHURFHGXUHV 6WDDUWHQ 3HUIRUPDQFHHYLHZ-RE(YDOXDWLRQfDQDJHPHQW 6WDDUWHQ 9,6,7ZZZ FRKHQDQGNOHLQFRP )25$,1,1*/2&$7,216&2856(/,1(6 &2676$1'+(5'(7$,/6(0$,/$7&2//(&7#*$7((7 $OO7UDLQLQJ&RXUVHVFRPPHQFH LQYLWHVDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUDQDWWRUQH\IRURXU $ EDFRIFH $ SSOLFDQWVPXVWKDYHPLQLPXPRI\HDUV H[SHULHQFHLQ/LWLJDWLRQDQG5HDO(VWDWH G HPRQVWUDWHDQDELOLW\WRZRUNLQGHSHQGHQWO\ DQGSRVVHVVWKRURXJKZRUNLQJNQRZOHGJHDQG WHFKQLFDOFRPSHWHQFHLQWKHDUHDVPHQWLRQHG $SSOLFDQWVZLWKH[SHULHQFHLQRQO\RQHRIWKH PHQWLRQHGDUHDVPD\DOVRDSSO\f 6XFFHVVIXODSSOLFDQWVFDQORRNIRUZDUGWR FRPSHWLWLYHUHPXQHUDWLRQDQGEHQHWV $SSO\LQFRQGHQFHWR 9DFDQF\ 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV RUYLDHPDLODW JEDVWLDQ#KLJJVMRKQVRQFRP J # JJ M +,**6t-2+1621 &RXQVHOt$WWRUQH\VDW/DZ CAUTIOUS CONSUMERS PULL BACK ON RETAIL SPENDING FED CHAIRMAN Ben Bernanke

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Describing the amendments as reasonable, and unlikely to impede legitimate t ransactions, Mr OBrien t old Tribune Business: Hopefully, this will create more compliance and greater clarity in the sale of property. However, he urged the Government to be more transparent when it came to s uch amendments, involving t he private sector in their c rafting and informing it of when they would be implemented. Several realtors spoken to by Tribune Business said t hey were unaware of the changes made by the Government to the Stamp Duty Act when contacted by Tribune Business, not the first time the private sector hasb een caught unawares by legislative amendments bound up with the annual Budget. Thats the next step in the progress of our legislative process; greater opport unity for feedback from the p rivate sector and greater n otice for people to prepare, e specially where it involves real property transactions, M r OBrien said. We really need at least t hree months, because the average transaction takes that long. A 90-day window i s reasonable to expect something to be completed. If the law could have an effective date of 90 days after its passed, thats ideal because it would allow people to plan. Among the amendments identified in a bulletin sent o ut to its clients by the Higg s & Johnson law firm were that the Treasurer can ignore t he characterisation or s teps taken in a transaction if they are contrived, or do not r eflect the true value, in a b id to avoid Stamp Duty. F or real estate, in particular, the Act was amended top revent the avoidance of S tamp Duty through paperless transactions that lacked conveyances, with tax now deemed payable and a deal completed where enjoyment and control of a par-t icular property had passed to the purchaser. T he Government also moved to prevent the evasion, or long-term deferral, of Stamp Duty payments by real estate deals that hid behind purchase options or sales in escrow. In the formers case, the option is deemed to be exercised and taxes due once the grantee enjoys the powe rs, rights and benefits of a p urchaser. The option does not have to be formerly e xercised. A nd sales in escrow are deemed to be completed, a nd Stamp Duty due, on the e scrows first anniversary. H owever, there are exceptions to this the sale wasc ancelled, completed or the T reasurer is satisfied that continuing the escrow is not to delay or avoid tax payments. The amendments also seek to clarify market value, stating that this is defined as the value of the land on the date the conveyancing is presented for Stamping. Parties to a real estate transaction, provided they b ring the conveyancing forw ard within six months of its execution, will see market v alue determined on the d ate it was executed. This appears to be another effort t o ensure conveyancings are b rought forward quickly for S tamping, improving the Governments cash flow. M r OBrien, the immedia te past head of the Bar Associations real estate committee, told Tribune Business of the amendments: They have enough flexibility that legitimate commercial transactions should be able to proceed, and transactions designed solely for the purpose of avoidance or deferring Stamp Tax can be caught. I dont think theyll disc ourage any transactions, a nd perhaps theyll just encourage quicker payment o f Stamp Duty. Hopefully, t his will create more compliance and greater clarity in the sale of property. A nd he added: There are c ertainly abuses by some d evelopers in the Bahamas, especially with unsuspecting foreign purchasers who rely upon the integrity of the developer and their attorney. Im aware of developments that have abused the ignorance of purchasers by setting up schemes that are structured so as not to record a conveyance. People pay money thinki ng theyre protected, only t o find out many years later t heir conveyance is not recorded. It leaves a mess that has uncertainties, and which requires unnecessary expense. Is someone liablet o personally pay taxes if a c onveyance is not recorde d? BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 7B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1550.0807.76.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.00-0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7.504.40Bank of Bahamas6.926.930.015,0000.2300.10030.11.44%0 .530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2.842.55Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.0300.09090.03.33% 1.961.77Fidelity Bank1.771.770.000.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas8.478.470.000.2450.31034.63.66% 2.802.35Colina Holdings2.552.550.000.4380.0405.81.57% 8.508.33Commonwealth Brewery8.508.500.000.7400.00011.50.00% 7.006.21Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.886.880.000.4960.26013.93.78% 2.001.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.651.650.000.1110.04514.92.73% 1.771.31Doctor's Hospital1.371.370.000.0740.11018.58.03% 5.504.75Famguard5.435.430.000.4980.24010.94.42% 8.505.35Finco5.395.390.001,0000.7570.0007.10.00% 9.747.75FirstCaribbean Bank8.218.210.000.4940.35016.64.26% 6.005.00Focol (S 5.755.750.000.4350.22013.23.83% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.50ICD Utilities7.307.300.00-0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%TUESDAY, 13 SEPTEMBER 2011B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,393.63 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -105.88 | YTD % -7.06BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.17492.48%5.16% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.13431.41%5.17% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.17642.38%5.39% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221 NAV Date 31-May-11 30-Jun-11 & 20021:($/ ,1+((0(&2857 & 20021/$$1'(48,7< %(7:((1 %$+$0$6'(9(/230(17%$1. 3ODLQWLII $1' &+5,6723+(5&855< VUXFNLQJf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t,QGLDQD/DQH &RQGRPLQLXPVLQDVHUHQHDUHDRYHUORRNLQJ 7KHHHI*ROI&RXUVH/XFD\D*UDQG%DKDPD &RQGRPLQLXPVEHLQJVROGDVLVDVIROORZV %HGURRPXQLWVDW ($&+ %HGURRPXQLWVDW 12($/7256,192/9(' ,QWHUHVWHGSDUWLHVSOHDVHFRQWDFW 7 3 (PDLODGGUHVVGDYLGSKDPLOWRQ#EDWHOQHWEV )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ )25 )25 )25 )25 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ 6$ )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 )25 / ( (0,&2'$921.(03 R I 2+1 R I 675((73%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6
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BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE $ 0' 0$'-*#$0 -02'$1(6+-,2'1$,#$#*7t2'$-1.(2 *0$.-021"-,1-*(# 2$#,$2(,"-+$-%+(**(-,-0"$,21.$01' 0$"-+. 0$#2-"$,21.$01' 0$ % -02'$1 +$.$0(-#* 127$ 0 $20$4$,3$-4$02'$1(6+-,2'.$0(-#(,"0$ 1$#!7+(**(-,-0"-+. 0$#2-2'$1 +$.$0(-#* 127$ 0'$1$"-,#/3 02$0"-+. 0$#5(2'2'$1 +$2'0$$+-,2'1 127$ 01 5 ,(,"0$ 1$-%+(**(-,-0r 2($,2# 71 0$fr"-+. 0$#2-* 127$ 0-0 (,"0$ 1$-2 *$6.$,1$1(,"0$ 1$#!7+(**(-,-0r-4$02'$1 +$ 1 (6+-,2'.$0(-# '$"-,2(,3$#5$ ),$11(,2'$*-" *$"-,-+7 ,#(,"0$ 1(,&$6.$,1$10$+ (,1 "' **$,&$%-02'$-1.(2 *'(*$" 1'%*-50$+ (,1120-,&5$0$+ (,4(&(* ,2(,+-,(2-0(,&$6.$,1$1 ,#"-,2(,3$2-*--)%-0-..-023,(2($12-(+.0-4$1$04("$ ,#0$4$,3$ 5-3*#*($2-2' ,)-301' 0$'-*#$0-"( 2$1.'71("( ,1 ,#4-*3,2$$01%-02'$(0*-7 *27 ,##$#(" 2(-,2--"2-01-1.(2 f -"2-01-1.(2 *$ *2'12$+(+(2$# DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated BalanceSheet J u ly 31, 2011with comparative figuresat January 31,2011 ( Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31, 2011January 31, 2011 AssetsCurrent assets: Cash andcash equivalents $5,596 5,483 Accounts receivablepatients, net (note 2) 958 503 Accounts receivablethird partypayors, net (note 2) 3,929 4,187 Inventories 1,526 1,319 Other assets 843 815 12,852 12,307 N on-current assets: Investments 30 30 Goodwill, net 431 431 O ther intangible assets 1,492 1,738 Investment property 4,291 4,373 Property, plantand equipment 11,969 11,312 18,213 17,884 Total assets $31,065 30,191 Liabilities and Shareholders EquityCurrent liabilities: Accounts payable and otherliabilities$ 2,921 2,915 Totalliabilities$ 2,921 2,915 Shareholders equity: Share capital: A uthorized 12,500,000 common sharesat par value o f B$0.04each (January 31, 2011 12,500, 000 shares) Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares (January 31, 2011 9,971,634shares) 399 399 C ontributed surplus 12,358 12,358 Retained earnings 15,387 14,519 28,144 27,276 Total liabilitiesand shareholders equity $31,065 30,191 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of RevenueandExpenses Six months ended July 31, 2011with comparativefigures for thesixmonths endedJuly 31, 2010 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31,2011 July31, 2010 Revenues Patient service revenue, net$ 21,867 20,300 Other 595 747 Total revenues 22,462 21,047 E xpenses Salaries andbenefits 8,973 8,509 Medical supplies andservices 6,032 5,738 Depreciation andamortization 1,560 1,420 O ther operating 1,107 1,037 Bad debt expense, net of recoveries 863 370 Utilities 758 643 Government taxes and fees 495 586 Insurance 363 361 Outside services 356 394 Repairs andmaintenance 369 406 Dietary expenses 193 177 Rent 211 199 Legal expenses 115 67 Total expenses 21,395 19,907 Income beforeinterest 1,067 1,140 Interest expense Net income for the period$1,067 1,140 Earningsper common share(expressed in Bahamiandollars): Basic and fully diluted$ 0.11 0.11 (Unaudited) DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of Changes inEquity Six months ended July 31, 2011 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)NumberofsharesShare capitalContributed surplusRetained earnings Balance at January 31, 20119,971,634$399$12,358$14,519 Net income for the period---1,067 Dividendspaid (199) Balance at July 31, 20119,971,634$399$12,358$15,387 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDNotes to InterimConsolidated Financial Statements Six monthsendedJuly 31, 2011 1. Significantaccountingpolicies These interim financial statements have been preparedin accordancewithInternational Accounting Standard No. 34, Interim FinancialReporting, usingthe same accounting policies applied inthe January 31, 2011 audited consolidated financial statements.2.Accounts receivable Accounts receivableare stated net of provisions for doubtfulaccounts of$2.9million.3.Dividends paid Declared and paid on ordinary shares$0.02 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of RevenueandExpenses Six months ended July 31, 2011with comparativefigures for the threemonths ended July 31, 2010 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31, 2011 July 31, 2010 R evenues Patient service revenue, net $10,715 9,920 Other 310 357 Total revenues 11,025 10,277 Expenses S alaries andbenefits 4,439 4,319 Medical supplies andservices 2,947 2,814 Depreciation andamortization 810 744 Other operating 530 495 Utilities 393 325 Bad debt expense, net of recoveries 587 256 Government taxes and fees 247 287 Insurance 183 180 Outside services 171 206 Repairs andmaintenance 233 266 Rent 105 101 Dietary expenses 97 94 Legal expenses 62 26 Total expenses 10,804 10,113 Income beforeinterest 221 164 I nterest expense Net income for the period$221 164 Earningsper common share(expressed in Bahamiandollars): B asic and fully diluted $0.02 0.02 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of Cash Flows Six months ended July 31, 2011with comparativefigures for thesixmonths ended July31, 2010 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31, 2011 July 31, 2010 Cashflows from operating activities N et income $1,067 1,140 Adjustments toreconcilenet income tonet cash provided by operatingactivities: Depreciation andamortization 1,560 1,420 P rovision for doubtful accounts 863 370 Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment (17) 3,490 2,913 Changes in operatingassetsand liabilities: (Increase) decreasein accounts receivable (1,061) (220) Increase in inventories (207) (85) Increase inprepaid expenses andotherassets (27) (206) Increase (decrease) inaccountspayable andotherliabilities 6 (144) Cash provided by operatingactivities 2,201 2,258 C ash flows frominvesting activities P urchase of property,plant andequipment (1,861) (2,445) Purchase ofintangible assets (28) (513) Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment Cash used ininvestingactivities (1,889) (2,958) Cashflows from financing activities Repayment oflong-term debt D ividends paid to shareholders (199) (399) Cashused in financingactivities (199) (399 Increase (decrease)in cash and cash equivalents 113 (1,099) Cash andcash equivalents at beginningof period 5,483 6,352 Cash andcash equivalents atend of period$ 5,596 5,253 Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and inhand, short-term deposits withan original maturity ofsix months orless. (Unaudited) a nd you stand a better chance of earning a higher salary if you increase your formal education. Nevertheless, businesses sometimes feel that hiring someone who has done it all o n their own is a big risk. T hey really just have to take t he word of the person being interviewed, and most employers do not want to t ake a leap of faith like that. I f you simply want to work for yourself a degree is not mandatory, so my advice is to gain as much knowledge as possible. Do you 100 p er cent need a degree? N o but the choice is optional. Although you do not really need the degree i tself, I believe having one w ill most likely get you noticed very, very quickly on a job hunt. Keeping a strong and powerful portfolio on hand i s a step in the right direct ion, and will speak much louder than a resume or degree, giving potential e mployers at least some a ssurance that you possess the professional training required. So, until we meet again, have fun, enjoy your life and s tay on top of your game. NB: The columnist welcomes feedback at deedee2111@hotmail.com About the Columnist: M s Bastian is an extensivel y qualified graphic designe r with M.Sc., B.Sc., A.Sc qualifdications. She has trained at: Miami Lakes Technical Centre, Success Training College, College of the Bahamas, NovaS outheastern University, Learning Tree International, Langevine International and Synergy Bahamas. FEEDBACK: D ear Deidre, I just read your column i n the Tribune on Graphic Criticism, and it was educational and informative. It's just great reading. Keep up the great job! D esiree Clarke Nassau, Bahamas FROM page two DEGREES OF QUALIFICATION

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By JEFF ARAH GIBSON T ribune Features Writer T HE Christian community was hit with another sex scandal last week when a Freeport pastor was found guilty of unlawful sexual inter course with a minor. Alber t Alexander Whyley 59, a local clergyman and fruit vendor was charged with having unlawful sex with a nineyear -old girl on Febr uary 6, 2011. Wh yle y had b een co nvi cted of t he same offence almost 18 years ago. He will be sentenced on November 11. Members of the Christian community weighed in on the scandal sur r ounding the pastor T ameka Grant told T ribune Religion she was outraged after hearing of Mr Whyley' s conviction. "I was sick to my stomach when I heard about that. My God she is just nine years old and he was supposed to be looking after her and he went and did that to her She will be tramautised for the rest of her life. Sometimes I wonder how people like him sleep at night. That situation is just sad and these are the peo ple that you trust your children with," said Ms Grant. "I do not know what is with these pas tors, when they ar e not gay they molest ing little childr en. How could you be min istering to someone and in the back of y ou r m i nd y ou a r e fa nt as i s in g ab ou t t hem, th at is a bun c h of fooli shn ess "(And to think) he did it before. I do not know what we are going to do with this countr y All we could do is pray ," she said. Cl eop ha s D ar li ng *, f ol lo wer of th e Baptist faith and a r egular church-goer s aid the actions of the c o nvic t ed sex of fender can never be justified, and he must now seek for giveness for his trans gr ession. "Its a very unfortunate situation. The only way out of a situation like that would be to repent and ask God to for give you because no sin can be for given if you do not confess your sins." He went on to explain that although pastors ar e respected highly by society they too, sin and fall short. "Even though you are a pastor you can still fall into sin. People fail to understand that a pastor is just a pastor He is not God and he is still in reach of the devil. Being a pastor does not mean you do not have feelings. As a pastor your tempta tion is even greater however it is no excuse for wrongdoing. The only thing he could do is look to God for help," he said. Speaking with T ribune Religion on the condition of anonymity one woman said, "if you do the crime you pay the time". "If he did the crime then he needs to be punished and put to shame openly Just because he is a pastor that does not mean he can escape judgment. Therefor e you do the crime you pay the time and that' s my five cents," she said. The case of Mr Whyley is not the first t o r ock t h e re li gio us com mu ni ty On October 4, the fate of Bishop Earl Randy F r a s e r w il l b e d e te r m i n ed w h en h i s unlawful sex trial comes to a close. It is al le ged t ha t F r as er p as t or of P i lg r i m B ap t is t T e m pl e o n St Ja me s Road, had an unlawful sexual relation ship with a girl between July 2005 and Februar y 2006. A d d i t i o n a l l y an At lan tabas ed man r epor tedly raised in the Bahamas was the fifth accuser in the sex scandal sur r ound in g A meri c an r eligi ous l eader Bis hop Eddie Long, according to news r eports in the US. Last September four young men, all former members of New Birth Church, sued Mr Long, accusing the bishop of lav ishing money trips and gifts on them while having sexual relations with the men. Mr Long publicly denied the allega tions. Earlier this year the matter was set tled out of court and the lawsuits against the pastor were dropped. *Names have been changed. RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS R E L I G I O N S E C T I O N C P G 2 8 THURSDA Y SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 T H E T R I B U N E S P A S T O R' S ABUSE OF PO WER C O NDEMNED S CAN DAL : A lb e rt A le x a n de r W hy l e y (c en tr e ), a l o ca l c le rg y m an was c h a rge d wi th ha v i ng u nl a wfu l s e x wi th a ni n eye a r -o ld g irl o n Fe b ru ary 6 2 01 1

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LU KE 2 2: 31 3 2 "A n d the Lo r d s a id S imo n S imo n b e h old Sa ta n h a th de s i re d t o h a v e y o u, th at he ma y s ift y o u a s wh e a t. B u t I h a ve pr a y e d fo r th e e th at th y fa ith fa il n o t: a n d wh e n th ou a r t co n v e r t ed s tr e ng th e n th y b r e t h r e n T his w or d c on v e rte d tr an s la te d in to G r e e k is : e p is tr e ph o ep -e e -s tr e f'-o ; wh ic h ha s s e v e r al m e an in g s s uc h a s 1 ) to r e v e r t, 2 ) to c o me or g o ag a in 3 ) to r e t u r n a b ou t, o r a g a i n Of ten w he n a c hu r c h le ad e r h as b e e n p u b lic ly dis g r a c e d th is q ue s tio n is al wa y s as k e d "H o w a ma n o f Go d c ou ld be a c c u s ed o f do in g s u c h a thi ng ? T h e s imp le an s w er to s uc h a q u es ti on is th is : "H e ha s n t b e en c o n v e r te d a s y e t." I d a re to s a y th a t th er e ma n y be lie v e r s with in the b od y of C hr is t /Me s s ia h wh o ha v e no t y e t b e en c o nv e r te d ; th e y'v e a llo we d o r a r e a llo win g r el ig ion a nd tr a di tion s o f m e n to hi nd e r t he c on v e r s io n p r oc e s s o f t he ir r e l a tio ns h ip w ith Him W a tc h th is S a ta n kn e w S imo n v ia h is p a s t li fe a nd h a d a p a s s io na te d e s ir e o f h a vi ng S imo n on c e ag a in a s a me mb e r o f h is r e g ime a nd w a s in ten d in g to ma k e hi m p a y fo r le a vi ng H e r e s Y a h s h u a s s umma tion of S ata n' s pl an s for S imo n : "A nd the Lo r d s a id S imo n Si mo n, b e h ol d, S a ta n h a th de s ir e d to ha v e yo u th a t h e ma y s ift y ou a s w h ea t." Up o n s tud y in g th e s c r ip tu r e s a nd th e life o f the Apo s tle P e te r o n e wo u ld c le ar ly s ee a n d v e r y e a s ily c on c lu d e th a t e ve n as h e wa lk e d c lo s e ly wit h th e Me s s ia h h e ( Pe te r ) y e t h a d ma n y i ss u e s Be in g th e a ll k no w ing on e tha t He is he r e s wh a t Y ah s h ua Me s s ia h ( a ka J e s u s th e Ch r is t) s ai d to P e te r : "B u t I h a ve p r a ye d f or the e th at th y fa ith fa il n ot: a n d wh en t h ou ar t con ve rte d, s t r en gthe n thy b r e t h re n I t s t ime f o r conv ers i o n t o take place a mong t h e ho us eho l d of f a i th For t o o l o ng we v e allow the de vil t o h ave h i s way a mong th ose of u s who n ame the n ame of C hr i s t. W e r e p re ac hing, teac hing a nd doin g a lot of g ood thing s i n the n ame of the L ord b ut if th e t r uth be to l d ma ny o f us a r e n ot ho ne stly l iv i n g what we'r e pr e a c h i n g a nd tea ch i n g. Eve ry time a c hu rc h lead er falls it wea ke ns the fait h of so me be li e ve rs wh o wer e loo king to the ch urc h for str e n g t h a nd s up por t i n t h es e tr ying times Ig nor a nce and rel i gious s t upi di t y woul d say "If a b e l i e v e r s faith i s wea ke ned b y the fall of a c h u r c h lea der it s n ot the le ade r' s fa ult ; the b eli e ve r sh ould b e tr us t in g in the Lo rd an d n ot the ch ur ch le ade r ." A g ain, I ca l l s uc h s ayin gs i g nor an ce an d re l ig i o us stup i d i ty I n t h e se cu lar wo rld an d es pe cially amo ng t h e For tune 5 00 co mpa nies it is sa id a nd it is also a pro ve n fac t t h at ev er ythin g r i s e s a nd f a ll s upo n lea der s hip. Think it not str ang e t h at Y ah shu a sa id to Pe t e r whe n tho u ar t c o n v e r te d, stre ng t h en thy br e t h r en I s tod ay s c hu rc h a bou t s tre ngth ening the b re t h r en o r ab ou t bu i ld i n g up a nd p r o m o t i n g the r eligio us le ade r? I n s tudy ing t h e s cr iptur es after the da y o f Pen t e co st a nd the outpo ur i n g of the Holy Spir i t the s aints wer e s t r en gthe ned and bold i n the thing s of God; the y we re united the y l o ve d and c ar ed for o ne a nothe r an d had a ll t h i n gs co mmon. Acts 2: 4 4-45 : "And all tha t believ ed wer e t o g e t h e r an d had a ll thing s co mmon; And so l d the i r p os se ss ions a nd go ods an d p ar t e d t h em to all men, a s e ver y ma n ha d ne ed." Be i n g co nv er t e d or c onv er s i o n i s at its bes t wh en s t a rte d f r om t h e he ad, f r om the l eadershi p whi ch ul t i mat ely benef it s t he e n t i r e bo dy H e re s ano t h er c l a ss ic exa mple of co nv er sion at wor k in a Holy Spir i t led c hu r c h Acts 4: 34 3 5: "Ne it h er was t h er e a ny amon g the m t h at lac ked : fo r a s ma ny a s w e r e po ss es s or s of land s or ho use s s old t h em, an d br ou ght the p ric es of t h e thing s t h at we re s old; An d la i d them do wn a t the apo stles f e et: and distr i b ution wa s ma de unto e ve ry m a n a cc or ding a s h e ha d ne ed." N o w her e s t h e layo ut o f t o da y' s r e l i g i o u s c h u r c h: 8 0 t o 90 pe r ce nt of b eliev er s a r e in g r e at la ck. The o t h er p er ce ntag e th at h ave s ubs tan ce (lan ds h ous e s, mon ey etc) loo k d own t h eir nos es a t t h os e tha t do n' t h av e. Wha t e ve r finan cia l o f fe ring i s take n a t the g athe ring i s c oll e cte d an d s t o re d aw ay a nd is p rimar il y use d to ca t e r to t h e ne eds of the r eligiou s lea de r T he o ppo si t e of t ru e c onv ersi o n i s h ypo cr isy w hich g ive s wa y to ev er y kin d of u ngo dly s pirit su ch a s lying d ec eitf u l p ra ctice s, gr ee d an d s elfi s hn es s. W a t c h this The man y lies tha t a re be ing t o l d in the L o rd s name a nd d ec eitf u l pr ac t ic es that a re tak i n g p l a ce in toda y' s c hur c h ar e abo ut to b e ex pos ed as f o l low s. A c ts 5 :1-5: "Bu t a ce rta i n man n ame d Ana nias with Sa pph i r a h i s wi fe s old a po ss es sio n, And k ept bac k pa rt o f the pr ice his wife also b eing pr ivy to i t, a nd br ou ght a ce rtain par t, and laid it, at the a pos tles fe et. But Pe ter s aid, Anan ias wh y hath Sa tan fil le d thine he ar t to l ie t o t h e Ho l y Ghos t, and to k eep bac k pa rt of t h e pr ice o f the l a nd? Whiles it r ema ined was it n ot thine own? And after it w as so l d was it not in thine ow n p ower ? Why ha st th ou co nce ive d this thing in thine hea rt? t h ou h as t n ot lied unto me n, b ut unto Go d. And Ana nias he ar ing the se w o r d s f e ll do wn, and g av e up the gh os t : an d g r e at fea r ca me o n a ll t h em tha t he ar d the se t h i n g s W h en tho u ar t con ve rted Fo r qu e s tio n s o r c o mm e n ts c o nt a ct u s a t e m a i l s : p a s t o r m a l l e n @ y a h o o c o m o r k m f c i @ l i v e c o m o r t el e ph o n e n u mb e r 2 4 2 -44 1 2 0 2 1 or 3 P a s to rs Ma tth e w a n d Br en d a le e A ll en K in g d om Mi nd e d F e ll ow s h ip C e nt er In te rn a tio n a l. The T ribune Thursday September 15, 201 1 PG 29 RELIGION THE Ea ster n Ne w Pr ovide nc e Distr i c t of t h e C hur ch of Go d, Ba hama s and the T u r k s and Ca i c os I sla nds un der the lea de rs hip of Dis trict Ove rs ee r Bish op V ic t o r Jo hn son w i ll be h olding its n i n t h a nn ual dis t r ict co nv en t io n f r om S eptemb er 20 25 S e r v ice s will be held at 7.3 0pm nightly a t t he N ew G oo dw i l l Ch urch of G od i n P e a r d ale. This y ea r' s theme is "T ou chin g Live s" a nd the sc rip t u re te xt is Phili p pian s 2 : 4 Loo k n ot e ver y man on his own things b ut e v e r y ma n als o on t h e things of othe rs ." C h u r c h r e p r es en tati v es s aid the re will a g r e at l ine -up of ac ti v it ies an d se rv ice s be ginnin g wit h a pr e-co nve ntion r ally on T u e s d a y wh i c h wil l featur e pr es en tati o ns fr om t h e Y outh, Life Bu i ld er s /Men and W o m e n s M i ni st ries as w el l as f rom t he East ern Distr i c t Bra ss Ban d. O n W edn esd ay ni g ht t he D i st r ic t O v e r s e e r Bis ho p J ohn so n, will delive r t h e op en i n g mes s age Rev Ju l ia Ba i n pa stor o f t h e Ch ur ch of G o d, Be r n a r d Road will br ing t h e W o r d on Thur s day nigh t a nd o n Su nda y e ve ning A d mi n i s tra ti v e Bish op Dr J ohn Hume s will delive r the se rmon Sp ec i a l p ra ye r s es sion s will b e he ld ea ch night be twee n the h our s o f 6 .30 pm an d 7p m. H ealt h t a l ks wi ll al s o be g i ven by Drs Char les Jo hns on a nd T ia W ilso n. Sp eci a l si ngi n g w i l l com e f ro m t he E a s t e r n Distr i c t Pr ais e T e am, the Ea ster n D is trict, t h e Be r n a r d Roa d and t h e New G ood wi l l Church choi rs as w el l as t he G o sp el Flas hligh t s A g ala ba nq uet i s plan ned for Fr i d ay d ur i n g wh i c h 2 0 pe rs on s fr om the chu rc he s in t h e d i s tric t wil l be hon our e d for e xc ellenc e i n min i s try Th i s eve nt wi ll be he ld at the W i lliam M Jo hnson Au di to riu m o n Joe Far r i n g t o n R o a d "T his ye ar s c onv ention pr omis es to be exc it in g, sp i r itfil le d an d ins pir ati o na l All a r e invited to a t te nd. Come w ors hip a nd f e l lo wsh i p w i th u s. Let us t o uc h t h e Lor d t o gethe r a nd the n lea ve mo t iv ated to tou ch some on e els e," the chu rc h s aid. SPEAKERS: W ednesday : Bishop Victor A. Johnson Eastern District Overseer Thursday: Rev Julia BainSr Pastor Bernard Road Church of God Sunday Night: Bishop John N. HumesAdministrative Bishop Church of God Bahamas, T urks & Caicos Is. AND WHE N T HO U AR T C ONV ER TED CH UR CH O F GO D EAS TERN D IS TRICT C O N VENTIO N T O BE H E L D NEXT W E EK DISTRICT Overseer Bishop Victor Johnson REV Julia Bain, pastor of the Chur ch of God, Bernard Road P AST OR MA TTHEW ALLEN

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A S T H E n e w s ch o o l a nd co l l eg e t e r m b e gi n s t o un f o l d, i t is g oo d f o r us t o r ef l ec t o n ho w Je s u s m o de l s f o r u s t h e p r a ye r t h a t m ay b e o f f e r ed f o r t h o s e w h o wi l l b e a wa y f r o m u s f or a p e r i od o f t i m e. A s t h e L o r d pr e p a r es t o l e av e Hi s d is c ip l e s fo r t h e l as t t i m e H i s p r a y er i s li k e a m ot h e r s p r a ye r f o r h er c h il d r e n i f s h e i s l ea v in g t h e m f o r an y l e n gt h of t i m e. T h e m ot h e r h e n wi t h w i ng s ar o u n d h e r ch i ck s i s t h e im a ge us ed b y Je s u s t o d e p ic t h i s d es i r e t o h a ve lo v ed a nd p r o t e c t e d J e r u s a l e m i f h e h a d b e e n a l lo w ed t o d o s o b y t h e J ews T h i s is wh a t m ak e s t h e h e ar t s o f p ar e n t s an d t e ac he r s e i t he r s a d o r gl a d w h en t he y t h i n k o f t h e i r c h il d r e n I t al l d ep e n ds o n t h e c ho i ce s t h at t h e c h i l d r e n m ak e I f t h ey c an b e p r o u d o f t h em an d f ee l t h a t G od i s pl e as ed t h ey ce l eb r a t e wi t h a li g h t h e ar t I f t h e y ar e d i s a p po i n t ed a n d f e el t h a t G o d i s d is pl e as e d i t i s a d i f fi c ul t t hi n g n o t t o h av e a h e av y h e ar t P a r e n t s w i t h s e v e r a l c h i l d r e n a n d t e ac h er s wi t h a wh o l e cl as s of t e n h av e m i xe d f e e li n g s d e p en d i ng on wh a t d i f f e r e nt o n es a r e d o in g o r h av e d o n e wi t h t h e ir l i ve s B y t h e t im e o f t h e A s c en s i o n o ur L o r d ha s l o s t o n l y Ju d as T h e o t h er s s ee m t o ha v e co m e b ac k w it h a s t r o n g f a i t h. A f t er t h e y wi t n e s s t h e L o r d s g oi n g u p i n t o t h e cl o u ds t h ey r e t u r n t o t h e r oo m u p s t ai r s o r t h e "u p p er r o om as w e u s u al l y r e f er t o i t T h e 1 1 d is ci pl e s ar e li s t e d b y n a me a n d t h e n we a r e t o ld : "A l l t h er e we r e c o n s t a n t l y d e v o t i n g t h e m s e l v e s t o p r a y e r t o g e t h e r w i t h c e r t a i n w o m e n i n cl u d in g M a r y t h e M o t h e r o f Jes us as w el l as h i s b r o t h e r s ( A ct s 1 :1 4 ) P e n t ec os t w il l c o me t o t h os e wh o w ai t an d pr ay t o g et h e r A l l w i ll b e wi t n es s es T h ey we r e s e nt t o t he e n ds o f t h e r e gi o n s k n ow n t o t h em a s t h e en d s o f t h e ea r t h F o r u s o ur en d s o f t he ea r t h m ay b e I n ag u a, B im i n i or A n dr os o r Q u ar r y M i s s i o n Ro a d Bl ac k V i l la g e, F o x H i ll an d Ba in T o wn as we l l a s t he r es t o f t h e wo r l d W e h av e t h e s a m e p o wer o f t h e H ol y S p i r i t W e h av e t h e p ot e n t i al t o b e f ol l o we r s o f t h e c o m m a n d o f t h e G r e a t Co m m is s io n as w e gr ee t e a ch t o u r i s t I n t h e l et t e r s o f t h e a p o s t l es t h a t ar e r e c o r d ed i n t h e Ne w T e s t a me n t t h e y a r e l i k e p a r e n t s t e a c h i n g t h e i r "b e l ov e d" t o s t a n d f i r m S t P et e r f o r ex am p l e, in s t r uc t s h i s r e ad e r s t o r ej o i ce a n d n ot b e s u r p r i s ed wh e n t h e y a r e p e r s e c u t e d f o r d o i n g wh a t i s r ig h t r at h e r t h e y ar e t o r e c o g n is e i t a s a b l es s in g i f t h ey s uf f e r T he y ar e t o g l o r i f y G o d b ec au s e t h e y b ea r t h e n am e of Ch r i s t i a n n o t c o ns id er in g i t a d i s gr ac e t o s uf f e r f or i t A s w e r e l ea s e o ur c h il d r e n i n t o t h e c a r e of o t h er co n ce r n ed a du l t s t h ei r t ea ch e r s l e t u s ce l eb r a t e t h e pr oc es s o f t r a in i n g, n ur t u r i n g a n d d i s ci p l in g f o r l if e T he c ar r yi n g o f a ch i ld i n t h e wo m b i s h ow G o d c ar r ie s u s i n G o d s H ea r t W e l e a r n a b o ut l o ve f r o m t he wa y i n wh i ch G od lo v es u s W e l e ar n ab o u t p r a ye r f r o m t he m an n e r i n w h ic h Je s u s p r ay s f o r u s W e l e a r n a b o u t e n c o u r a g i n g f r o m t h e e x am p l es w e h a ve h ad i n o ur l i f e T e ac hi n g an d p ar e n t i ng i nv o l ve : s ac r i f i c e c o m m i t m e n t p e r s e v e r a n c e p a t ie n ce an d l o ve T h i s s c h oo l y ea r l e t a p r a y e r b e o n t h e l i p s o f e v e r y C h r i s t i a n p a r e n t a n d t e a c h e r l i p s t h r o u gh o u t e ac h da y A s c hi l d r en g e t o l d e r t h e m o r e w e n e ed t o p r a y F o r t h e r es t o f u s l e t u s k e ep i n o u r p r a ye r s t h e t e ac h er s an d pa r e n t s of t h i s n at i o n a n d o f t h e wo r l d MEDIT A TION The T ribune PG 30 Thursday September 15, 201 1 RELIGION Teaching and Parenting REV ANGELA C BOSFIELD P ALA CIOUS Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your stor y As we release our chil dren into the car e of other concerned adults, their teachers, let us cel ebrate the process of training, nur turing and discipling' for life.



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N ASSA U AND B AHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSP APER Bank workers vote to strikeVolume: 107 No.240 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 92F LOW 79F By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net UNION officials representing First Caribbean International Bank employ ees declared a victory last night as 61 per cent of its membership voted in favour of a strike. Members of the Bahamas Financial Services Union, which represents around 400 employees, now have the ability strike once they obtain a strike certificate from the Ministry of Labour and go through the cooling off period. According to the unofficial count, only 13 members voted against a strike. The strike vote comes after months of unsuccessful" negotiations with the bank over an expired indus trial agreement and money it claimed is due to fired workers, according to Theresa Mortimer, union president. "The biggest issue, said Ms Mortimer, is the seven persons getting their severance, and the bank inviting the union to the table to dis cuss the industrial agree ment. "We don't want it waiting until January when these benefits should be in place, and then (First Caribbean) say 'we haven't discussed them with the union yet so we can't say anything'. (The union) don't want that. We want it to be done before hand so come December the (staff) can know what's happening in January. "These are supposed to be your staff workers, they work for you, she said. (First Caribbean) need to have (the staffs) best interests at heart and get to the table. (Staff) don't speak for themselves, the union speaks for them. That's all we're asking, for (First Caribbean) come to the table and talk to us." Voting ended at 5.30pm. Calls to bank officials were not returned up to press time. Union officials declare victory TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NNOOBBOODDYY BBUUTTNNOOBBOODDYY BBEEAATTSSTTHHEETTRRIIBBUUNNEEIINNSSIIDDEETTOODDAAYY CCAARRSS!! CCAARRSS!!CCAARRSS!! JJOOBBSSAANNDDHHEELLPPWWAANNTTEEDD THE TRIBUNE REVEALS. .INSIDESEE P AGE 19 ARCHDEACON KINGSLEY KNOWLES (left), a cousin and the familys priest, said family members were shocked by the death of Amanda Seymour Burrows and her five-yearold daughter Kaysha (above). By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL cbrennen@tribunemedia.net THE FNM government will bring the eagerly-awaited Freedom of Information Act to Parliament before it ends its term in office, vowed Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis, who admitted that one failure of his government has been a lack of communication with the public. Discussing the issue of transparency yesterday on a radio talk show, Dr Minnis also promised that as soon as his ministry completes its investigation into the dengue fever outbreak, the report will be presented to Parliament and made public. I can say that we will be pushing for a communication report to be presented to Par liament so that the public knows exactly what has hap pened. Me nor this government is in the business of hiding information from the public and that is why I am a full complete proponent of the Freedom of Information Act. I think the public needs to know what is happening, heTIM CLARKE/TRIBUNE STAFF By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE mysterious drown ing of a mother and her 5year-old child has shaken a small and tight-knit family to its core. Family members of Amanda Seymour Burrows and her five-year-old daughter Kaysha were shocked by the incident, Archdeacon Kingsley Knowles, a cousin and the familys priest, said. "She came (to St Georges Anglican Church) because she wanted a church home. (Ms Burrows and her husband) came here for counselling as well. I mar ried them, I baptised their child, so we had that type of bonding relationship." "There is no doubt that (Ms Burrows) loved her daughter, said the archdeacon. They travelled everywhere together, anywhere you found her, you found her daughter." The bodies of Ms Seymour Burrows, 32, and pyjama-clad Kaysha were pulled from waters behind Elizabeth and Bay Plaza by Defence Force officers last week. Their deaths have baffled both family members and the police, who have made very little details of the case public. The family is probably between anger, not too sure how they feel about life, and hearing all kinds of stories. It's a confusing situation because you're not too sure what really happened, not too sure whether it was suicidal, said Archdeacon Knowles. Mrs Burrows was the youngest of three children, all of whom were very close to the archdeacons mother, their grandaunt. Although her immediate SEE page 13 F AMIL Y OF TRA GIC MOM, D AUGHTER SHAKEN T O THE C ORE ANOTHERTRIBUNEEXCLUSIVE FREEDOM OF INF ORMA TION A CT IN P ARLIAMENT BEF ORE END OF FNM TERMDR HUBER T MINNIS: By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FORMER Cabinet Minis ter Loftus Roker called on sitting members of Parliament to comply with public disclosure laws. Legislators who fail to adhere to their own rules should not expect an ordinary citizen not to break the law, Mr Roker said. "Crime in the Bahamas is considered to be out of control. It has to be out of control when leaders (who) pass the law, then ignore the law and expect the lil' fella on the street to obey the law. "How many parliamentarians have obeyed the law regarding the Public Disclosure Act to this day? And if they haven't, why don't they SEE page 14 MPS BREAKING R ULES CANT EXPECT CITIZENS NOT TO BREAK THE L A W SEE page 14 F ORMER C ABINET MINIS TER:

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating SENIOR APPOINTMENTSPatricia Hermanns,President & CEO of Family Guardian,has announced the appointment of Stuart Kelly totheposition of Vice President,Finance Department and Necka Wells to the position of Assistant Vice President, Group Operations, BahamaHealth. Stuart Kelly,BComm, CPA, FLMIVice President, Finance Department M r.KellyjoinedFamilyGuardianin2000andmostrecentlyheld thepositionofFinancialController.Inhisexpandedrole,hewill functions. from (FLMI). Necka Wells,MBA, FLMIAssistant Vice President, Group Operations Mrs.Wells joined Family Guardian in 2010 and most recently held the from (FLMI),which she achieved with distinction,the AIAA,the ACSin addition to a also completed with distinction. promotions.NASSAUIFREEPORTIABACOIELEUTHERAIEXUMAIFINANCIAL CENTREICORPORATE CENTREI Amember of the FamGuard Group of Companies By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net CHINESE Ambassador to the Bahamas Hu Shan donat ed 10 laptop computers and two printers to C I Gibson Senior High School at a presentation ceremony yester day. Reflecting on the impor tance of teachers, Ambassador Hu said the continuity of human development depends on the work of educators from generation to generation. Teachers are the engineers of civilisation, he told the students whom he referred to as the future of their coun try. Ambassador Hu told them to use the new computers to study hard so they can one day give back to the Bahamas. Education Minister Desmond Bannister said the computers are yet another example of Chinas commitment to help educate young Bahamians. Today, we are grateful for the generosity being displayed to education in the Bahamas, and specifically to the stu dents of C I Gibson Senior High School by the Peoples Republic of China to the Bahamas, said Mr Bannister. He said the equipment will be set up in the schools media centre, making technology and research more accessible to students while also allowing them to develop essential computer skills. Speaking to the students, Mr Bannister said we live in an age where almost everything is driven by technology, so it is imperative that you are exposed to computers and their usage. Todays employers are requiring students be equipped with basic computer skills for entry into the workforce. Mr Bannister noted that since 1997, Bahamians have been reaping benefits through the multifaceted relationship that has developed with China whether through that countrys numerous donations and scholarships, the gift of the National Sports Complex or help with infrastructure works. He added that the best way students can show their gratitude is to become productive citizens of the Bahamas and the world. CHINESE EMBASSY DONATES TO BAHAMIAN STUDENTS TO ADVERTISE CALL GODFREY ARTHUR AT 502-2394 CI GIBSON Students attended a special assembly yesterday where laptops and printers were donated to the school from the Chinese Ambassador. AMBASSADOR of the Peoples Republic of China to the Bahamas Hu Shan presents computer equipment to the CI Gibson school yesterday.T imClarke/T ribunestaffCI GIBSON RECEIVES COMPUTERS

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By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Education Desmond Bannister said rumours that there are teacher shortages in some government schools are completely unfounded. According to Mr Bannister, while certain subject areas are lacking specialised educators, the schools are sufficiently staffed. There is no teacher shortage, said Mr Bannister. What we have is a bunch of rumours that continue to fly around about teacher shortages; we have a whole new group of teachers that have been assigned to the schools. He explained that while some teachers have been relocated, and there may be fewer teachers at a particular school than in previous years, this does not mean the standard of one teacher to 30 students has been violated. However, Mr Bannister added that he has been pointing out for more than a year that the educational system is lacking in specialist teachers with expertise in subjects such as agriculture, mathematics and the sciences. We need teachers in a few areas, specialist teachers, and asa country we have not been producing them, said Mr Bannister. Another point of concern, according to the minister, is that some Bahamian teachers refuse to work in the Family Islands. We want our children in the Family Islands to have the same quality of education as those in New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco, he said. Mr Bannister said the children of Acklins, Crooked Island, Mayaguana and San Salvador deserve a high level of education and he pledged to ensure they have good teachers. If anyone decides they are too good for the children in those islands, the ministry will not be hiring them, he said. Admitting that some schools such as RM Bailey High School, Uriah McPhee Primary and EP Roberts Primary suffered avoidable problems at the beginning of the term, Mr Bannister said credit is also due for the successful launch of a new school year. He added that those responsible for the few problems that did occur will be held accountable for those circumstances which I do not take lightly at all. However, he said, the public should keep in mind that the vast majority of the 160 government schools opened without a hitch, despite a category three hurricane hitting the Bahamas just one week before classes started. It would be good if we looked at all the positive things that have happened notwithstanding the hurricane and damage to many schools we have been able to have an outstanding group of teachers report to the classroom and look after the interest of the students, he said. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 3 This Course is a study of law and practice relating to JPs and is especiallydesigned for newly appointed JPs or as a refresher course.Registration Deadline 16th September, 2011.Institute of Business and CommerceTel: 324-4625CERTIFICATE COURSEPrinciples of Law for Justices of the Peace By LAMECH JOHNSON ljohnson@tribunemedia.net A FIGHT between a murder victim and one of three men charged with his stabbing death was initiated by the victim, his wife told the Supreme Court yesterday. Tamara Smith, widow of 28year-old Jason Smith, testified that her husband who she said was intoxicated at the time was involved in a fist fight with Daryl Rolle on the evening of September 13, 2008. This occurred, she said, before a separate altercation with another of the men accused of Smiths murder.WitnessRolles attorney Terrel Butler suggested to the witness that a fight did not take place between Rolle and the victim, and further suggested that her client walked away from Smith after being threatened with being punched. Mrs Smith denied this, insisting that a fist fight took place, started by her husband when he hit him in the stomach area. It just went kind of fast, she said. Mrs Smith told the court that Rolle disappeared after the fight, and only reappeared to prevent another of the accused, Edney Burrows, 26, from further attacking her. According to testimony given yesterday by prosecution witness Police Constable 269 Marvin Hepburn, Burrows received treatment at the Princess Margaret Hospital for a gash on his right palm and stab wounds to the lower back and shoulder, sustained inan altercation with the vic tim on that evening. During questioning by Bur rows lawyer Elliot Lochkart, the widow said her husband, whose well-being she was concerned for, did not listen to her pleas to walk away from an argument with Burrows after the accused had left and reappeared coming from the direction of a church and another building near the scene of the altercation. She said the argument turned physical after Burrows grabbed Smith around the waist and Smith retaliated by pushing Burrows against a wall. All of this took place in the presence of their daughter, who was four years old at the time, Mrs Smith said. Edney then got Jason into a headlock, she said. At this point, Mr Lockhart suggested to the widow that Smith stabbed Burrows in the back and hand. No sir, she replied. I did nt see a weapon at this time. Mrs Smith said her sight was obscured by a crowd of three to four people and she could not see exactly what was happening.InvolvementShe denied touching or attacking Burrows with a bot tle during the fight. Ididnt touch any of them, she said. I was trying to get Jason to leave the scene because I didnt want him to get hurt. As to the involvement of Andre Dieujuste, 27, the third man accused along with Rolle and Burrows, Mrs Smith told the court that Dieujuste, also known as Pepsi, did run off and return with a cutlass but she could not say if he had actually used it. When asked by Dieujustes attorney Christina Galanos if she saw him chap or spank anybody with the cutlass, Mrs Smith said No. Whenthe trial resumes today, prosecutor Jillian Williams and the defence attorneys will continue questioning Sgt 1298 Antoine Rah ming. The case is being heard before Senior Justice Jon Isaacs.SCHOOLSARESUFFICIENTLYSTAFFED EDUCATION MINISTER: REPORTS OF TEACHER SHORTAGES ARE UNTRUE VICTIMS WIFE TESTIFIES THAT HER HUSBAND INITIATED FIGHT INSIGHTFor the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays We need teachers in a few areas, specialist teachers, and as a country we have not been producing them. Desmond Bannister MINISTER of Education Desmond Bannister speaks to the students of CI Gibson yesterday. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff

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EDITOR, The Tribune. WOULDyou please allow a layman to give his views in your prestigious daily on why the government is struggling to pay its massive debt. Perhaps all of the opposition parties will pummel the Ingraham administration over the recent downgrade of our economys outlook from stable to negative by the international credit rating agency Moodys. This action by Moodys comes as no surprise to me. What surprised me, though, was the fact that it took this long to happen. Moodys has expressed concerns over this nations ability to service its massive national debt, which has already climbed over the 4.1 billion dollar mark. The FNM has already borrowed $1.5 billion since coming to office in 2007. The PLP government borrowed $800 million between 2002 and 2007. In just nine years the national debt has increased by $2.3 billion. I dont believe that any Bahamian government can ever reduce the national debt to zero. The government has been running massive deficits in recent years because of its inabili ty to raise enough revenue to meet its financial obligations. Too many big busi nesses owe the government unpaid taxes and other fees, but they are never really pressured to pay their bills. How many of the large hotels in Nassau owes BEC and Water and Sewerage? How many business persons have avoided paying their National Insurance contributions? This has been a perenni al problem in this country for many years; and it has taken a tremendous toll on the Treasury. The FNM government is between a proverbial rock and a hard place. If PM Ingraham raises taxes like he did last year, he will be lambasted by the PLP for placing an additional burden on the middle-class and poor. If he doesn't raise taxes, then agencies like Moodys will continue to breath down his neck for not doing enough to raise revenues. If PM Ingraham resorts to reducing the size of the massive civil service, he will lose the election. When PM Ingraham cut the staff at the Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas, he was heavily criticised by many. Even the church took exception to the downsizing exercise at ZNS. If PM Ingraham doesnt downsize the bloated civil service or raise taxes, then this economy will continue along this destructive path. Any government that lays off hundreds of its workers would be committing political suicide. Prime Minister Ingraham is well aware of this. The government has to meet a huge payroll each month for nearly 20,000 civil servants. Additionally, the government is set to hire some 3,000 unem ployed Bahamians for one year through its National Job Readiness and Training Programme. This will cost $25 million. The Ingraham administration has already given away nearly $22 million to over 15,000 unemployed Bahamians through its Government Unemployment Benefits Programme. Even today there are hundreds, if not thousands of unemployed Bahamians who are depending on food vouchers from Social Services. I know of persons whose utilities are being paid by Social Services. Furthermore, there are thousands of retirees and senior citizens who receive a pension every month from the Treasury. There are many former Members of Parliament, government ministers and senators who are also receiving a hand some pension every month. Some of these former officials are getting as much as $8,000. The government also has to find money in order to maintain all of its hospitals, clinics, schools, administrative offices, embassies, airports, harbours, roads, police and fire stations and packing houses. Let us not forget Fox Hill Prison. There are approximately 1200 inmates at that prison. It costs the government around $15,000 a year to maintain each prison inmate. Corporations like BEC, Water and Sewerage, ZNS and Bahamasair have all been a financial drain on the Treasury for years. Bahamasair has never made one farthing for this country, yet over 600 or so Bahamians are employed at that airline. If Bahamasair was owned by a private citizen, they would have folded up shop long ago. But successive governments have kept the financially strapped airline in business for the past three decades. This makes absolutely no sense at all. Moreover, the government is repeatedly harassed by civil service unions for pay increases, financial bonuses and other increments. If the government fails to meet their demands, then it will pay dearly at the polls. The Treasury has also lost around $100 million in the Educational Guaranteed Loan Programme. That programme has been suspended by the government; because many of the of loan holders are either unwilling or unable to repay their obligation (Hon. Desmond Bannister). The civil service in this country is just too massive. The Bahamas government is simply unsustainable. This country can no longer afford it. We can no longer afford to pay 41 Members of Parliament, 16 senators and 17 cabinet ministers. A bloated government has caused The Bahamas to head down this slippery slope of financial ruin. Both the FNM and the PLP must bear some responsibility for the financial downgrade. They increased the size of government over the last 40 plus years. Many Bahamians were given gov ernment jobs by their MPs for supporting them on election day. There are only two things that the Ingraham admin istration can do to get this nations finances on the right path again. But I seriously doubt that the FNM government will even consider doing any of them. That would cost them the election. In the final analy sis, PM Ingraham is caught between a rock and a hard place. This is from a Bahamian who is disillusioned with big government. KEVIN EVANS Nassau, September 4, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 Circulation Department (242) 502-2386 Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608 Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm WHILE Britons agonize over their broken society that erupted in senseless rioting, burning and destruction on August 6, and Bahamians become more anxious to find a solution to their escalating crime, a writer in The Economist of London hit the nail on the head when he wrote: The confidence trick at the heart of the social order was violently laid bare: it turns out that if sufficient numbers of criminals want to create havoc on the streets, they can. In the absence of internal, moral restraints, external ones can only do so much . The late Sir Etienne Dupuch, publisher of this newspaper, was a true believer in this and it was this conviction that influencedhis decision not to press for legislation after he took his stand in the House of Assembly in 1956 to break down racial discrimination in public places. In his Res olution, which caused the break up in confusion of the House of Assembly on the night of January 23, 1956, Sir Etienne had recommended eliminating this evil by legislation or otherwise if it could not be done through moral conviction. In other words if his Resolution of moral persua sion did not work, he would move for legislation. Three days later the hotels had put advertisements in The Tribune announcing that their doors were open and all persons were welcome regardless of race. It was not long before others followed their lead. There was no need for legislation. I pointed out, Sir Etienne told his critics who were pressing for legislation and a debate that would open old wounds, that a lawyer could always find a way around the law, but no one would dare break a custom. Recently, we received a letter from a die-hard PLP stating that it was not Sir Etiennes Resolution that had broken down racial discrimination, but rather the PLP who had incorporated the anti-dis crimination clause into the 1973 Constitution 17 years after discrimination in public places no longer existed in the Bahamas! It was so much of a non-issue in 1973 that when the Constitution came into force no mention was made of this clause, because no one had noticed it. It didnt even get a mention in The Tribune. At the time, and over the years, certain PLP leaders have lied about the events of that time in an effort to make Bahamians believe that the PLP had opened the doors to public places for all Bahamians. Of course, it must be remembered that this could not have been done without the tremendous support of the Bahamian people both black and white. And their show of support in the public square that night, and their determination to be treat ed as equal citizens made it clear to the leaders of the time that the Resolution for which Sir Etienne was doing battle in the House had to pass. Only one PLP voted for it because at that time the PLP had only one member in the House. Although the Resolution was defeated, the moral law prevailed and discrimination in public places was at an end. Recently in the Senate Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said that in his opinion Bahamianisation started when the first non-discriminatory bill was promulgated and introduced in the House of Assembly in 1956 by the late Sir Etienne Dupuch. In fact it was a Resolution, a Bill never became necessary. And now non-discrim ination is a part of our Constitution. But, we have strayed from the subject on which we had intended to write. The worlds lawlessness not just in the Bahamas stems from broken, non-functional homes. Homes in which children have no role models, in which they just growed like Topsy without guidance or any moral restraints. No one respects them, and they respect no one. They feel that society has given them the rawest of deals and they have no compunction about returning the favour. They have had no breeding in a dysfunctional home, and so without an inner conscience to help them differentiate between right and wrong, a law imposed by the state means nothing to them. They exact their own justice ignoring the state, they take their own vengeance outside of the law and they thumb their noses at all forms of decency and civility until, living by the gun, a gun brings them down. And so it is true that in the absence of moral restraints, external ones can only do much. This is societys main problem to which a solution has to be found. Prime Minister between a rock and a hard place LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Without moral restraints social order collapses

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THE Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation has pledged to help Grand Bahama farmers whose crops were wiped out by Hurricane Irene. From what I saw, the farmers suffered extensive damage, said BAIC executive chairman Edison Key. We came to see what kind of assistance we can give them. We will discuss it with the Ministry of Agriculture and make some recommendations to the government with respect to what BAIC can do to help them get back on their feet. Mr Key led a high level BAIC delegation on an inspection of damaged farms in eastern Grand Bahama this week. BAIC general manager Benjamin Rahming and assistant general managers Arnold Dorsett (agriculture) and Vernita Rhodenwalt (human resources) accompanied him. Mr Key also examined BAICs new Freeport office complex and craft centre, and met with staff to determine how best to bring the facility into full operation. Much of the crop damage resulted from high winds and extensive sea water flooding. Several acres of bananas, plantains, pineapples, guavas, sugar apples and peppers were destroyed. Some of the farms are poorly located and every time there is a hurricane they get flooded out with salt water and lose all their crops, Mr Key said. We are advising them to relo cate to higher ground. He noted that the Ministry of Agriculture has available farm land away from flood-prone areas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page seven AGAINST THE BACKDROP of a guava field destroyed by Hurricane Irene, the BAIC executive team hears from Grand Bahama farmers during an inspection tour Tuesday. Gladstone Thurston /BIS

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A NEW book by The Tribunes former managing editor offers fascinating insights into the political history of the Bahamas over the last 40 years. Long Hot Summer by John Marquis reflects on the editors 14 years in Bahamas journalism, including his 10 years at The Tribunes helm between 1999-2009. It includes personal appraisals of some of the countrys leading political figures, notably the late prime minister Sir Lynden Pindling, FNM leader Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield and Labour leader Sir Randol Fawkes. This is not a formal history, Mr Marquis said from his home in England, it is a highly personal account of a very interesting period in the Bahamas when the country experienced a social and political revolution. Mr Marquis first worked in the Bahamas between 1966-69 as a political reporter on both The Nassau Guardian and The Tribune. During this period, he covered the 1967 general election in which the PLP came to power for the first time and got to know many of the politicians who were later to become major political figures. He then returned to Britain to work in Fleet Street as a Reuters sub-editor and international sports writer for the Thomson newspaper empire before becoming editor of a West Country media group. He also won one of Britains top awards for investigative reporting. But it was during his 10year stint as The Tribunes managing editor that he became known for his controversial INSIGHT articles and his numerous confrontations with the PLP government. Long Hot Summer revisits several of the most controversial stories of his time in Nassau, including the famous front-page picture spread featuring former immigration minister Shane Gibson and the late American starlet Anna Nicole Smith. The book reveals how the story came to be written and the impact it had in the international media. The Tribunes front page was published in major titles throughout the world. The book also reveals the background to the controversial story of Chauncey Tynes Snr, whose disclosures linking Sir Lynden Pindling with international drug traffickers caused a major furore shortly before Mr Marquiss retirement in 2009. During his time as managing editor, Mr Marquis was subjected to a Labour Department inquiry after several leading politicians called for his deportation. In addition, four public demonstrations were staged outside The Tribunes office demanding his removal. Apart from politics, his new book deals with several causes Mr Marquis pursued during his Tribune years, including his exposure of corrupt lawyers and his campaigns on behalf of Bahamians who had been denied justice. It also reveals how his infamous Aces and Jokers articles came to be written. He said: I hope the book adds something, however modest, to the stockpile of knowledge about modern Bahamian politics and society in general. Though much of it will cause offence to some, Im sure most Bahamians will see it as a positive contribution to the national debate. Long Hot Summer is available from First Edition at firsteditionpress.co.uk LOCAL NEWS 6&+('8/($(59,&(2'$< LQIR#PVLEDKDPDVFRP 7HO $,5&21',7,21,1* (/(&75,&$/ %/'*$,17(1$1&( EX-EDITORS NEW BOOK WILL CAUSE OFFENCE TO SOME, HE ADMITSTHE TRIBUNES former managing editor John Marquis has released his new book Long Hot Summer. PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 7 I trust that this trip will be very beneficial to farmers, said Mr Key. When we complete our report, hopefully we can get some assistance to them. Those who need to relocate are definitely going to need assistance with land preparation, seeds, plants, fertiliser and other items to get their projects operational. Once I get the funds I will rescue every one of them. Dwight Sawyer is a major Grand Bahama farmer. This is the eighth time he has been wiped out by flooding, but he remains determined. I intend to come back bigger and better, he said. But how fast he can get ready for the win ter season ahead depends on the level of assistance from government. And I am not talking about a hand-out. What you see here that I lost, I produced that without any funding. If I get some sort of assistance, I can go a lot further but I am going whether I get that assistance or not, he said. As a matter of fact, I am going now because I am already preparing land in other areas that were not flooded so I can plant vegetables. Mr Dorsett, BAICs executive for agri culture, was moved. I like Mr Sawyers spirit, he said. This is the kind of person I would want to assist because he has a desire to come back and he knows what he needs. He simply needs some immediate assistance. FROM page five BAIC TO ASSIST FARMERS ON GRAND BAHAMA BAIC EXECUTIVES show off their new Grand Bahama office and craft centre during a tour on Tuesday. Pictured from left are: assistant general manager (northern Bahamas) Rudy Sawyer; general manager Benjamin Rahming; executive chairman Edison Key; assistant general manager (human resources) Vernita Rhodenwalt; deputy chairman Ronald Darville and assistant general manager (agriculture) Arnold Dorsett. FARMER DWIGHT SAWYER (centre) lost his entire banana crop. Also pictured during an inspection tour of Freeport farms on Tuesday are BAIC executive chairman Edison Key (right) and assistant general manager (agriculture) Arnold Dorsett.Gladstone Thurston/BIS

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TOP: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham (centre) and North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith (left) visit a North Eleuthera dock where pre-existing damage was exacerbated by Hurricane Irene. Mr Ingraham visited North Eleuthera on Tuesday and toured Central and South Eleuthera yesterday. ABOVE: Music students in North Eleuthera are treated to a visit by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. Kristaan Ingraham /BIS PM VISITS ELEUTHERA

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ,Q$FFRUGDQFHZLWK$UWLFOHfRIWKHQLRQV &RQVWLWXWLRQ7KH%DKDPDVXEOLFHUYLFHV 8QLRQZLOOKROGWKH7UL$QQXDO*HQHUDO 0HPEHUVKLSHHWLQJRQ %HJLQQLQJDWSPDWWKH $XGLWRUVHSRUWVZLOOEHSUHVHQWHG $OOPHPEHUVDUHXUJHGWRDWWHQG DQGEHRQWLPH 5HIUHVKPHQWVZLOOEHVHUYHGDIWHUWKHPHHWLQJ THE Ministry of the Environment and the Department of Environmental Health Services have issued an apology to the public for any inconvenience experienced due to poor and inadequate garbage collection in recent weeks. In a statement issued yesterday, the department said it is in the process of finalising arrangements for the collection of all solid waste in New Providence over the next seven days. The department will deploy its fleet and contract with Impac, United Sanitation, and Bahamas Waste to collect the residential waste that has accumulated particularly following Hurricane Irene and the subsequent rains, the statement said. It said the public will be advised through the media of a new collection timetable and are encouraged to bag their refuse and place it by the roadside on the scheduled days. Since Hurricane Irene passed near New Providence three weeks ago, The Tribune has received a number of angry calls from persons who said trash has been piling up outside their houses. Many noted that the capi tal is trying to cope with a dengue fever outbreak at the moment, and uncollected garbage is an ideal habitat for the mosquitos that spread the virus. Earlier this week, the Pan American Health Organisation issued a series of recommendations on how the Bahamas could better fight dengue fever outbreaks. Among these was the suggestion that government ensure all garbage is collect ed in a timely fashion.MINISTRY ISSUES APOLOGY OVER POOR ANDINADEQUATE GARBAGE COLLECTION THE DEPARTMENT of Environmental Health Services said it is in the process of finalising arrangements for the collection of all solid waste in New Providence over the next seven days.

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 11

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VOLUNTEERS across the Bahamas are preparing to take part in the Ocean Conservancys 26th annual International Coastal Clean-up on Saturday, September 24. Every year in September, more than half-amillion people in 100 countries remove millions of pounds of trash from beaches and waterways all over the world. Over the last quarter-century, the ICC has grown from a single clean-up on a Texas beach to a worldwide movement. The Bahamas has participated for many years in the Ocean Conservancys International Coastal Clean-up and we will again this year to make a difference to our marine environment, said Ranaldo Smith, education supervisor for Dolphin Encounters and ICC co-ordi nator for the Bahamas. Last year, a record number of volunteers in New Providence alone collected 39 tons of trash which is an extraordinary accomplishment. This year, we wanted to expand the clean-up area and will be focusing on Yamacraw Beach and South Beach to be cleaned from 8am until 1pm and we encourage members of the public to join us. Please wear closed-in shoes, bring a water bottle, sunscreen and gardening gloves. Abaco and Grand Bahama are also participating and are hosting clean-ups of their beaches, he said. See tomorrows Tribune for a list of ICC events in the Bahamas LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE VOLUNTEERS PREPARE FOR ANNUAL COASTAL CLEAN-UP CAMPAIGN LEFT: Volunteers getting the job done in the clean up effort. RIGHT: RBDFRangers sign up for the Ocean Conservancys 26th annual International Coastal Clean-up.

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family is very small, Archdeacon Knowles said that her extended family, the Knowles-Majors, were quite large in number. He said that his cousin was quiet and reserved, not unlike most of his family, most of whom are very private. I think everyones really shocked, Archdeacon Knowles added. She was a wonderful person, easy to get along with, easy to communicate with. I saw her as a very committed person to whatever she had to do. She tried to further her education, she tried to maximize her potential. Kaysha, who had been baptized by the archdeacon, was described as a very mannerly and disciplined child. Despite her young age, Archdeacon Knowles said she was very respectful to her seniors and that the trait was due to her mothers strong influence. During their marriage, Ms Burrows and her husband attended church regularly. However, said the archdeacon, her attendance became sporadic after the couple had become estranged about two years ago. According to sources close to the investigation, police discovered evidence that suggested that Ms Burrows was depressed at the time of her death. In an interview with The Tribune yesterday, Archdeacon Knowles said that he knew Ms Burrows had kept a diary and was very methodical in her writing. She kept everything, her thoughts, she kept them written down as she spoke, as she acted, as she went through life. "It's in the hands of the law right now, under investigation, but there seems not to be any clarity. It's not clear (to the family), even at this point what really happened." Autopsy reports confirmed that Ms Burrows and her daughter had been alive when they went into the water, and subsequently drowned. There are also unanswered questions about the discovery of Ms Burrows' Nissan Sentra, which was spotted intact at the Cricket Club on Wednesday by a passing jogger. However, police said that suggestions that the car was driven by someone after the mother and daughter died does not necessarily mean they were murdered. According to police, there has not been any evidence of wrongdoing. "This is when you wonder what is truth, said Archdeacon Knowles, I guess they're taking a while to come up with something that can cause you to feel relaxed, to say okay it's suicidal but you don't know what it is, I don't think it's clear, regardless of what you've been hearing." Up to press time, it could not be confirmed whether the case had been handed over to the coroner for his court to decide the cause of their deaths. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact CDU at 502-9991 or emergency services at 919. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 13 FAMILYOF TRAGIC MOTHER AND DAUGHTER SHAKEN TO THE CORE FROM page one

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE &$5((5,7,(6 ',5(&7252))22't%(9(5$*( (GXFDWLRQtXDOLILFDWLRQV ([SHULHQFHZLWK.QRZOHGJHNLOOVDQG$ELOLWLHV +($'2)63$6(59,&(6 &DQGLGDWHVKRXOGSRVVHVVWKHIROORZLQJPLQLPXPUHTXLUHPHQWV ([SHULHQFHZLWK.QRZOHGJHNLOOVDQG$ELOLWLHV 5HVXPHVVKRXOGEHIRUZDUGHGRQRUEHIRUHHSWHPEHU 7RDGV#JUDQGOXFD\DQFRP )UHHSRUW*UDQG%DKDPD British-American Insurance Company Limited (In Judicial Management)Traditional Life Insurance Portfolio in the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union (ECCU) Notice of SALERequest for Interested Parties registration for the SALE of British-American Insurance Companys traditional life insurance portfolio in the ECCUBritish-American Insurance Company Limited (In Judicial Management) (BAICO or the Company) is seeking interested parties to acquire its traditionallife insurance portfolio in the ECCU (the Portfolio). BAICO is a Bahamian company, incorporated in the Bahamas in 1920. In 2009 BAICO and its branchesin the ECCU were placed into Judicial Management or similar statutory control. As part of the planned restructuring of the Companys ECCU operations, the Judicial Manager (JM) is intending to sell the Portfolio. The sale is being supported by the Governments of the member countries of the ECCU (the EC Governments) who have agreed, subject to qualifying criteria, to provide cash to fund the Portfolios liabilities at the point of transfer. The Portfolio consists of approximately 19,000 active policies with coverage in the eight countries of the ECCU (Anguilla,Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia and St. Vincent & the Grenadines). The sale represents a unique opportunity for a new market entrant to access an existing and well established customer base with excellent coverage across the ECCU, or alternatively intended that, subject to satisfying applicable regulatory requirements, the successful purchaser of the Portfolio will be granted all relevant licenses where necessary to allow it to continue to operate the Portfolio in each of the eight ECCU countries. BAICO has been one of the leading life insurance operators in the ECCU over the last two decades, and it is anticipated that the new operator of the Portfolio will be in a position to attain similar market leadership post transfer. expected annual premiums in excess of EC$23.7 million businesses in the relevant EC jurisdictions (subject to meeting local regulatory criteria) their own product offering that does not require extensive investment in business development to develop existing customer base at the point of transfer the extensive historical records available for them (all policies were established prior to Judicial Management in 2009) transfer processes from the outset of ownership of the Portfolio Interested parties must experience to operate a life insurance business from within the ECCU within the ECCU Interested parties should be able to demonstrate that they can bring many, if not all of the region continue to support and serve BAICOs Life Insurance Policy customers Interested parties are invited to register for the sales process through the submission 2011. nigelrouse@kpmg.com.bs orErin Bethell at ebethell@kpmg.com.bs for a copy of the registration form. Package) whichcontains additional details on the process and a list of information requirements with respect to the investor/consortium for evaluation by the Judicial before October 18, 2011.Should the relevant party not be chosen by the JM or the EC process, this fee will become non-refundable. Parties who breachany of the bid terms will not receive a refund, whether they are invited to participate in the due diligence phase or not. including access to a data room, an information memorandumand a presentation on the details of the Portfolio and history thereof. After the due diligence phase, investors/ consortiums will be invited to submit binding bids. As BAICO is in Judicial Management, said. You need transparency and accountability. Only then can the country move forward. Dr Minnis stressed the legislation is an important item on governments agenda. The government is not reluctant to bring this legislation to Parliament. I can say with confidence that it is coming. Dr Minnis said Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is a man of his word who promised that (the FOIA) is coming, and it will come. When pressed by host Ortland Bodie on whether the government, considering everything it had on its plate, would be able to bring and pass the act before the next election, Dr Minnis said there was adequate time to bring forward the act. The minister did however admit the government has not been successful in communicating its messages and goals to the public. He acknowledged that people are frustrated by the inconvenience of the ongoing road works, the challenges of garbage collection and the stray dog population among other challenges which callers to the programme raised, and may feel the government is not interested in their concerns. I think that we are listening to the people, but I think our public relations is poor. I would be the first to admit that. Both in the FNM, the government, and the ministries. We may not have explained to them appropriately what is happening therefore it will be the perception that if I dont know then you cant be listening to me. Communication is poor and I find communication is poor not only in the FNM but in the government, in the ministry and its a problem that Bahamians spell with a small c and not a capital C, and we must improve on communication. We are employed by the people, we have a five-year contract and every five years we go back to the people and seek employment. As employees it is essential that we listen to the people. I think where we have failed, and I will admit that, is in communication. We have failed in communicating and explaining things appropriately. I think that that needs to be improved and once we do that then we have a better country and better communication and you have less stress and anxiety once an individual understands and knows what you are trying to do and you can get their feedback as to whether or not that is the appropriate direction. We are doing our best to prepare the country for tomorrow, he added. have the courage to repeal that law if they decide that they don't want to obey the law. If not, they in breach of the law just like the lil' hungry boy who steals the guinep," said Mr Roker, a former government minister in the Pindling administration, yesterday. Under the Public Disclosure Act before the first day of March each year all senators and members of the House of Assembly must declare their income, assets and liabilities, as well as those of their spouses and children for the previous year. By law this information should be publishedina national gazette. The disclosures were last published in November 2010 and only contained information up to the end of 2007. Yesterday it was not clear how many members of Parliament have complied with the Public Disclosure Act. A Public Disclosure Commission, chaired by Oswald Isaacs, is charged with ensuring compliance with the Act. Messages left for Mr Isaacs were not returned yesterday. The Tribune was told Mr Isaacs would not have the information yet because it is still being processed within the Cabinet Office. Cabinet Secretary Anita Bernard said she did not have the information on hand yesterday and could not reveal any details on how many politicians had submitted records before the data is published in a gazette. In February 2010, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said he was among the group of politicians who had not complied with the law on yearly public disclosures. ". . The Public Disclosures Act is not being adhered to by members of Parliament," Mr Ingraham said last year. He said he was in the process of preparing the necessary documents and explained that his last public disclosure was in 2007 when he ran for the North Abaco constituency in the last general election. He later made a public apology for his delinquency. FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT IN PARLIAMENT BEFORE THE END OF FNM TERM MPS BREAKING RULES CANT EXPECT CITIZENS NOT TO BREAK THE LAW FROM page one FROM page one

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$4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.38 $5.38 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTHURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 Sleep well while your money grows. By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BAHAMIAN economy is not creating jobs fast enough to absorb the annual 5,000 school leavers, let alone almost 12,000 discouraged workers, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employers Confederations (BCCEC) chairman warning: We still have a long, uphill battle to climb. Ina recent interview with Tribune Business, Winston Rolle said data contained in the Central Bank of the Bahamas report on July financial and economic developments showed just how weak the labour market and many Bahamianowned businesses were, indicating the economy was still mired in recession and not out of the woods yet. Noting the $2.6 million contraction in loans to Bahamian businesses dur ing July, and $19.6 million growth in the private sectors loan arrears, Mr Rolle said: Its very con cerning. That shows the state of the economy, and that some businesses have a real challenge in meeting their obligations. The Chamber chairman, though, pointed out that economic activity traditionally slowed down during the summer, as tourist numbers started By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor KEY PARTICIPANTSin a collapsed Bahamas-based investment structure, which owes more than Cdn$400 million, have been accused by the liquidator of engaging in sham transactions designed to retain control of remaining assets and prevent their return to out-ofpocket investors. Raymond Massi, who is the joint liquidator with Bahamas-based accountant, BDO Mann Judds Clifford Culmer, for the Olympus Univest fund and its manager, the Canadian-based Norshield Financial Group, has alleged that the latters Bahamas-based director, Thomas Muir, and fellow principal Lowell Holden engaged in activities of a highly questionable nature that contributed to investor losses and the structures ultimate failure. The receivers 15th report to the Canadian courts, which has been obtained by Tribune Business, alleges that Holden created a Minnesota-based company, Mendota, to merge with Comprehensive Investor Services (CIS), a Bahamas-domiciled company that previously played a key role in the Olympus Univest and Norshield structure. Mr Massi alleged that CIS was making a $48.7 million claim in the Norshield/Olympus liquidation, notwithstanding the fact that Mendota which was claiming to have been assigned CISs debts was making exactly the same claim. Commenting on the Mendota/CIS merger, the liquidator alleged: The purpose behind this transaction appears to have been to remove CISs assets from the Norshield Financial Group, settle with its creditors and retain any resulting value for the beneficial owners of the new company. Commenting on the role played by Mr Muir, who was a well-known By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A PLP MP yesterday renewed his call for intervention to save the beleaguered City Markets food store chain, telling Tribune Business the company was worth saving. Acknowledging his concern over the supermarket chains fate, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell said that apart from the inter ests of City Markets principal, Mark Finlayson and his family, and the 22 per cent minority shareholders, the fate of several hundred employees was bound up with the company. Hinting that he believed the Ingraham administration was unlikely to intervene to ensure City Markets survival, Mr Mitchell said the Opposition would support doing whatever is necessary to achieve this out come. Im just watching very carefully what theyre doing, the former foreign minister said of City Markets yesterday. I dont know what degrees of concern you can have, but I can say that Im quite concerned because of the large number of people involved in it. I thought Mr Finlayson was quite brave to take this on, and I wish it to succeed and not fail. Its not just his fortune riding on it, but all the employees, a number of whom are constituents of mine. Concerns over City Markets survival prospects have intensified since Monday this week, when Mr Finlayson told Tribune Business the chain was mulling the closure of its Seagrapes Shopping Centre and South Beach outlets to resolve $2.5 million worth of refrigeration and infrastructure woes. That would leave the company with just two New Provi dence stores at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre and Cable Beach, and market sources have indicated it could be looking at a deal to sell its three Grand Bahama-based stores to another buyer. Shoppers visiting the four New Providence stores have all commented on how sparsely stocked they are, leading some By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THEminister of tourism says he and his team have never worked harder in monitoring and reacting to travel trends, with the Bahamas individual and leisure tourist business By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor STAMP DUTYamendments should improve the Treasurys cash flow while not disrupting legitimate real estate transactions, a leading attorney said yesterday, while urging the Government to be more transpar ent and involve the private sector more on this issue. Andrew OBrien, a partner in Glinton, Sweeting & OBrien, said the package of Stamp Act amendments passed in the wake of the 2011-2012 Budget appeared designed to close loopholes and encourage quicker payment of Stamp Duty relating to real estate transactions. CITY MARKETS WORTH SAVING MP pushes for intervention, as fortunes of hundreds bound up with firms fate SEE page 5B STAMP ACT CHANGES TARGET LOOPHOLES Amendments seek faster real estate deal payments Purchase options, escrow sales targeted But attorney says legitimate transactions will not be impacted SEE page 7B TOURIST BOOKINGS GYRATING LIKE STOCK MARKETS Minister says never worked harder to keep on top of inconsistent travel trends SEE page 5B VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE RECEIVER: ABUSIVE $49M CLAIM OVER FUND COLLAPSE Blasts role played by well-known Bahamas-based director of $400m collapsed investment group Alleges transactions designed to keep assets out of his and investors hands SEE page 3B ECONOMY NOT CREATING JOBS FAST ENOUGH SEE page 4B Cant accommodate 3,500 annual school leavers, plus 38,000 unemployed and discouraged workers Chamber chief: We have a long, uphill battle to climb

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By DEIDRE A. BASTIAN MANYhigh school students interested in a graphic design career wonder if it is really necessary to pursue a degree or certificate in the profession. Do you really need a graphic design degree if you are already artistic to begin with, they ask? They then say they are great at sketching, painting, and have some good experience working with software such as Photoshop, Illustrator and Flash. Such questions and sentiments are expressed to me repetitively, and it seems as if the jury is still out on this issue. Many understandably feel that since they have every version of Adobe Photoshop since inception in their possession, and have gone through many graphic design tutorials, a graphic design degree is not necessary. Let me announce that graphic design is not just about creativity and/or mastering software. Nor is it about knowing some great tutorials. Graphic design is about visual problem solving and meeting the needs of your client. It is not about making something look cool, but instead selling a product or an idea visually in a captivating way. A good graphic design schooling should mold and shape students to achieve just that, as there is no rest for the weary when it comes to keeping up with technology. I will go out on a limb and say that Graphic School is always a good option, but it is not necessary, as it depends on your aptitude and knowledge. (Ouch..that was difficult for me to say, as I am a stickler for training and education). Let me explain: You will have to be highly motivated, naturally talented and loaded with knowledge to make a career out of design without an education. But, if you are planning to strike out on your own as a graphic designer, you can learn enough about the field to be successful, providing you start out with realistic goals. Typically, degree programmes cover studio art, design principles, computerised design and production, and printing techniques. In my experience it was not the actual coursework itself that taught me a lot, but rather my interaction with professors and classmates, being patient and enduring fair and honest feedback and critiques. It was a diverse knowledge that helped me to understand that design is simply not just a pretty picture but a piece of visual communication that is to eventually be consumed by millions of people. Thus it needed to be taken seriously. Even though I found my sweet spot, which was creativity, I still realised I needed a good base in design principles as well. But cant I learn this stuff on my own? Some people, I suppose, can do this if they have fantastic organising skills. I have friends who have their own businesses and write code for websites from scratch without ever having gone to college. If you are disciplined enough you can go through all of the design theory, typography and art history needed to be able to discern a good design from bad. Often, though, it can be hard to know where to prioritise your time and efforts. Bear in mind there are some people that have done everything on their own, fluked it, landed top jobs and earn lots of money. Hard to believe, but it is true. Without a graphic design school or programme, what would I be missing? Well, there are a few potentially strong elements that would be neglected. Primarily, your classes would be filled with like-minded people. You will most likely miss some of the teamwork aspects, which can be really important. Besides, all good graphic design programmes will be geared towards building a portfolio of work to present to potential employers, as schools almost always have a partnership with graphic design schools. Whats more, you are given the opportunity to ask your educators or classmates questions about anything you are unsure of. You can receive feedback and cri tiques, learn and grow a lot faster in a class environ ment. Sadly, in a solo environment, you have no real way to measure how good or bad you are, whether you are on track or missing the mark. Can I create my own portfolio? If you are lucky, some companies will hire you after seeing your work ,especially if your portfolio demonstrates creativity and design knowledge in the best way possible. Hey, but if Im good enough, do I really need paper. Is that fair? Well, when hiring a graphic designer, an employer wants to know you understand the entire process of graphic design. They want to know if you will be able to work with other members of the team and understand design principles, typography, colour and the art of selling. We are all aware there are many people who claim to be self-taught graphic designers, but I cannot comment on the extent of their knowledge. What I would say is that a Graphic Arts degree is absolutely vital only if you really wish to make a serious career out of graphic designing. Think about it this way: Why would an employer choose you over someone who has similar talent backed by a sound college education? Does a degree really matter to employers? Many of the top design firms will only hire those with a degree. And often only those with a degree from a top school, and who also possesses top grades. Sounds disingenu ous but it is true. A graphic design degree or certificate from a recognised school, and a reference, can give them peace of mind that the person they are hiring will most likely have the foun dation to do well and suc ceed. It will win you points in the eyes of employers, BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ARTOFGRAPHIX DEIDRE BASTIAN SEE page eight Degrees of qualification

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figure in the Bahamian financial services industry during the late 1990s and early part of this century, Mr Massi alleged he played a significant role in Norshields Bahamian entities, acting as a director for most of them. He was said to have run most of them from the same office, with the same address, fax and phone number, and PO Box number appearing on all correspondence involving money transfers between different Norshield entities. The role played by Muir inthe Bahamas was likely intended to give the appearance that the companies with which he was associated were unconnected to the Norshield Financial Group, the liquidators report alleged. The activities of Muir are consistent with attempts to impede the proper process of distribution of funds to investors in the different entities in the Norshield Financial Group. In his conclusion, Mr Massi urged the Canadian courts to disallow and dismiss Mendotas $48.7 million claim, alleging that he believed it was an unfounded and abusive attempt to appropriate the proceeds of realisations achieved by the receiver, and to frustrate the recoveries of the victims of the Norshield fraud. The supposed merger of Mendota and CIS, as at January 5, 2005, appears to be artificial in that the receiver has seen no evidence to establish that Holden gave any consideration to acquire the assets of CIS that supposedly included a $48.7 million claim. In addition, CIS continued to act as a distinct entity, as evidenced by the filing of the CIS Proof of Debt in the liquidation proceedings of Mosaic in the Bahamas and the initiation of legal proceedings in New York. The attempt by CIS and Mendota to make what appears to be the same claims in the Mosaic liquidation proceedings in the Bahamas, and in the respondents proceedings in Canada, is evidence of the frivolous nature of both claims. Traces of Norshield, Olympus Univest and their Bahamian counterparties linger on in this nation some seven years after the structure collapsed. Olympuss key counterparty, Mosaic, still holds a majority 51 per cent stake in BISX-listed Premier Commercial Real Estate Investment Corporation, a holding described as one of the best sources of recovery for investors by the liquidators once it is sold. Olympuss Bahamasbased investment fund administrator, Cardinal International, closed down around the same time that Norshield and Olympus went into receivership, then liquidation. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 3B FROM page one RECEIVER: ABUSIVE $49 MILLION CLAIM OVER FUND COLLAPSE

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to decrease and many Bahamas residents went on vacation. This, he explained, might have exacerbated the difficulties many small and medium-sized Bahamian businesses were facing in meeting their debt repayment obligations, pushing some into arrears. The issue now was whether they would be able to change the status of the whole equation by becoming current with their lenders once again, now summer was over. Still, Mr Rolle conceded of many Bahamian companies: Their financial health is not good, and what were seeing from small and medium-sized enterprises is just how fragile they are. Thats all the more reason why some of the things were doing for small and medium-sized enterprises are so important, so theyre not as challenged as much as now. Apart from working with the Government to construct its Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Development Bill, Mr Rolle said this weeks Grand Bahama workshop, held in conjunction with the International Labour Organisation (ILO), was intended to give Bahamian entrepreneurs the skills and tool sets they need, so they are better equipped to tackle very challenging times. But even more disconcerting was talk of a double dip recession in the US and other advanced economies, the Chamber chairman adding: For those businesses in difficulties, such a prolonged recession would put them out of business. On the labour front, the tourism and construction industries have traditionally provided the main employment avenues for unskilled Bahamian labour. However, both have been hit hard by the downturn, shedding hundreds of jobs and closing off these routes. The Central Bank of the Bahamas said there was considerable slack in the Bahamian labour market in its July report, not surprising given that the Department of Statistics May 2011 Labour Force Survey found there were almost 26,000 unemployed Bahamians and a further 12,000 discouraged workers. As a result, almost 38,000 Bahamians either cannot find work or are not looking for it and they are joined, every year, by at a conservative estimate some 3,500 high school leavers. All that is a sign of a stagnant, very slow economy, Mr Rolle agreed. As the economy grows, businesses need more labour and persons get hired. That is another indicator that were still in recession and not out of the woods yet. The Chamber chairman, though, indicated that the Bahamas labour woes were as much structural as recession-driven. It goes back to not only opportunity but education, he said. When you start to look at some of those persons entering the workforce in the informal sector, in many instances they are unskilled labour. The construction jobs are just not there to employ them. When a school leaver comes out, with all those discouraged workers, jobs just are not being created fast enough to absorb them. Mr Rolle also echoed the sentiments expressed by the Department of Statistics, which noted that the informal sector of the Bahamian economy grew by 32 per cent between 2009 and 2011, adding 4,140 persons and generating 70 per cent of total labour force growth. However, the Statistics Department pointed out that the informal economy paid little to no taxes, and was not monitored or regulated by government. Employees here had little job security, as there were no employment contracts, and no benefits such as sick or maternity pay. Obviously the entrepreneurial spirit of Bahamians is coming into play, and people have gone into survival mode and done whatever they need to survive, Mr Rolle agreed. But there are several factors to it. They do not contribute to the tax base significantly, as they are not paying NIB and those things. And what is there to sustain those businesses? Using the fate of many BTC phone card street vendors as an example, Mr Rolle said of the margin changes: Overnight, hundreds of persons were affected, because they were not built on a very sound model. Anyone entering into a contract knows the terms and conditions, and when its going to expire. For them it changed overnight, and they were virtually crippled. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE rfrrntb rbb rfnrtb btbrtnrtbrrfrtn rrtrnbbbrbttrtt bnrfbtttnrbtt rtrfrbrrnrtnrfrbn rftbtbbtt rfttbtbrrfttrnrfrtntntt nrfttbtbrrfrf rftnrftnrrftn rftrrtrfrbtbt r f rfnrtbbtb rtnrtbrrfrtnrr trnbbbrbttrttbnrf btttnrbttrtrfrbr rnrtnrfrbn tbtbrbbtrtr bfbbrbrrftbnbrfnn nbtbrtrrtrfrr trfntbrrftbtb btttrbtbttrtbnbrfn btbtnnttntttrfntbn nnnbtbtrfbttrtnt rtbrnbttrbbrrfttt rbrftrbtrbtbrrnb nnbbrrftbnbrfnb tnnbrrbrfrttfrr b btrfrtnrr bnbtttrt rf trrrttrffttt rtbbbttrbrr bttrrrnbrtrbnbt tbtbrrrfrtbtbrrfbtn fttbtbrrfttttbn btrfrtnrttbtbr rrtnbntttrfbbbt bnfrbnfnbttrnt bt brfrtrntttrf bbrrfrtbtbrrfbt nfttbtbrrfttr ttrb trr rttrffttt ttrfrttbtbr (VWDEOLVKHGZKROHVDOHFRPSDQ\LV DFFHSWLQJUHVXPHVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI *HQHUDODQDJHU 'ULYHDQGDPELWLRQDUHDPXVW 6XFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHVKRXOGKDYHDW OHDVW\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQWRSOHYHO PDQDJHPHQW &RPSHQVDWLRQZLOOEHFRPPHQVXUDWH ZLWKH[SHULHQFHDQGWLHGWRSHUIRUPDQFH ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVKRXOG VHQGWKHLUUHVXPHWR ZKROHVDOHFDUHHUV#JPDLOFRP 127,&( ,6/$0,&7$.$)2/$1'(7$.$)2/ %$+$0$6f&203$1
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gyrating almost as much as recent swings in world stock markets. Ina recent interview with Tribune Business, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said forward booking patterns for the Bahamian tourism and hotel industry did not confirm any kind of substantive trend one way or another. Its one of those things we wantto monitor, and the best way to monitor it is by looking at bookings year-overyear for the same period, the minister told this newspaper. Weve seen the same kind of swings similar to what we see happening in the stock market. At the moment, we see no particular position that can be sustained. Its the individual business that continues to gyrate, and not give us any long-term pattern. Uncertainty remains the watchword for the Bahamian tourism industry, as with glob al stock markets, given that the number one determinant of vacation demand and tourist spend remains consumer confidence. With the US accounting for between 80-85 per cent of this nations tourists, that confi dencehas been dented by a string of events, such as the cliffhanger over the US debt ceiling increase; the Standard & Poors downgrade; and a slew of gloomy reports on American jobs and economic growth. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace acknowledged that these were the sort of developments that give us a bit of the jitters, given the fragility of consumer confidence. One factor counting against the Bahamian tourism indus try during this global recession, he added, was the increasing tendency of tourists to fly to lower cost destinations and search for a deal on price. The Bahamas, though, remains at the upper endof the price scale, making it more difficult to cut and compete on cost. However, Mr VanderpoolWallace told Tribune Business that short-term bookings and tourism/hotel performance were certainly bet ter looking than the same periods in 2o10, these vacations having been booked before recent events. Bahamian hotels were in some cases, ahead of last year on occupancies and room rates, Mr VanderpoolWallace said. While group bookings were likely to remain unaffected, the min ister warned that the economic environment might induce them to bring fewer people when they came. He added that, unlike last year, Kerzner International was keeping its Beach Towers open during the slower Sep tember and October months, while Baha Mar was doing similar at the Wyndham. Such moves are likely to mitigate the loss of room inventory through the SuperClubs Breezes and Sandals Royal Bahamian closures for hurricane repairs, even though the properties are pitched at different markets. We used to be able to look much further afield, but now its on a weekly or monthly basis, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace told Tribune Business. Every opportunity we are pursuing vigorously, because obviously we have inventory that is not occupied. Weve never worked harderin terms of looking at busi ness trends and continuity, reacting to it and getting together with the private sector. Weve never worked harder. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added that the Ministry of Tourism was not working on any initiatives likely to create a major surge in tourism business in the short-term, the major projects currently underway being likely to come to fruition in the medium term. There are a number of other things we are working on, but it really is process stuff as opposed to large increases in business, he explained. There are a couple of things were looking at, but theyre at least a year out. Theres nothing in the short-term which is going to add significantly to growth in business. observers to predict the imminent demise of what was once a fixture in the Bahamian business and retail landscape unless Mr Finlayson and his management get things turned around quickly. Mr Mitchell, meanwhile, said he had been contacted by several beneficiaries of City Markets employee pension plan, all concerned as to the fate of their long-term retirement savings. I have had a number of pensioners who have been in touch with me about their pension payments and entitlements, the MPand attorney confirmed, adding that some might be existing employees seeking to retire. Ive given them an undertaking to try and resolve this issue for them. Any intervention by the Government to rescue a company such as City Markets is likely to be fraught with difficulties and complications, and is highly unlikely to happen. No such state rescue effort has taken place on behalf of supermarket chains in other capitalist economies, and immediate concerns would be whether the Government was simply throwing good money after bad. The fiscal position is another of many impediments too numerous to mention, and if the Government bails out one business a dangerous precedent has been set it will be looked upon to bail out all. Im not sure this government is minded to do interventions, Mr Mitchell conceded, while adding that another route for salvation would lie in City Markets finding a buyer or outside investor with deep capital pockets to inject new equity. Some, though, might argue that City Markets is past the point where it is worth saving. Having racked up around $28 million in collective net losses during the 2006-2011 BSL Holdings ownership, the supermarket chain as revealed by Tribune Business made a $14 million operating loss in its last financial year, three quarters of which were under Mr Finlayson and his Trans-Island Traders vehicle. I dont know what their circumstances are other than what Ive read in the papers, but I think the company is certainly worth saving, Mr Mitchell told Tribune Business. The country is terribly depressed at the moment, and does not need any more bad news. Im praying for City Markets, Mr Finlayson and all the employees, and will do what I can. Mr Mitchell also urged the Minister of Labour, Dion Foulkes, to meet with City Markets to gain an insight into the situation and prepare for any redundancy fall-out. He also called on him to speak with his Cabinet colleagues to ensure they do what they can to make the company survive. Whatever is necessary to ensure the company survives we [the PLP] would support, Mr Mitchell added. Meanwhile, rival retailers speaking to Tribune Business on condition of anonymity said numerous City Markets staff had been applying to them in search of jobs. And industry sources said that any hopes Mr Finlayson had of selling City Markets to SuperValue owner Rupert Roberts, or getting him to take over some of the store sites/leases, were likely to be dashed. It is understood that Mr Roberts is not interested in taking over City Markets existing debt, or the expenses associated with its store leases. There are too many headaches associated with that, and given the current economic cycle with reduced consumer incomes, Mr Roberts sees no need for expansion, sources said, preferring to let any extra business volume come to him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fZLWKWKHDELOLW\WRZRUNLQGHSHQGHQWO\ SURFLHQF\LQLFURVRIWIFHDSSOLFDWLRQVLV UHTXLUHGf 0DLQWDLQVDELOLW\WRZRUNH[LEOHKRXUVLIDQGZKHQ UHTXLUHGf 0LQLPXP(GXFDWLRQDQG([SHULHQFHHTXLUHPHQWV S T $VVRFLDWHVGHJUHHLQEXVLQHVVDGPLQLVWUDWLRQRUDUHODWHG HOGSOXVYHf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
PAGE 19

WASHINGTON Associated Press U.S. CONSUMERSgrew more cautious last month amid wild stock market swings, zero job growth and heightened concerns that the economy has weakened. Retail sales were flat in August. At the same time, wholesale inflation leveled off. The latest data could give the Federal Reserve more impetus to adopt additional stimulus next week. "The combination of those two reports sets the stage for, and warrants, additional action by the Fed," said Michelle Meyer, an economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Wall Street looked past the weak retail sales data. Growing optimism that European leaders would be able to contain their debt crisis drove stocks higher. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 140 points for the day. In August, consumers spent less on autos, clothing and furniture, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. Hurricane Irene disrupted sales along the East Coast, analysts said. But many consumers were also spooked after a grim month that renewed recession fears. The government reported that the economy barely grew in the first half of the year. Lawmakers fought over raising the debt ceiling. Standard & Poor's downgraded long-term U.S. debt for the first time in history. Stocks tumbled the Dow lost nearly 16 percent of its value from July 21 through Aug. 10. As a result, consumer confidence fell in August to its lowest level since April 2009, when the economy was still in recession. And employers added no net jobs during the month. The government retail sales report is the first major read on consumer spending for August. Consumer spending is important because it accounts for 70 percent of economic activity. The economy's weakness is helping to keep prices in check. The Labor Department said its Producer Price Index, which measures price changes before they reach the consumer, was unchanged in August after a 0.2 percent rise in July. A drop in energy prices in August offset higher food costs. The price of oil, cotton and other commodities have come down in recent months, after pushing up most measures of inflation earlier this year. Slow inflation gives the Fed more room to take steps to boost the economy. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke acknowledged last week that inflation rose sharply in the spring. But he repeated his belief that the increase was temporary and that price pressures would moderate soon. Fed policymakers meet for two days next week. Many economists expect they will decide to shift money out of short-term mortgage-backed securities and into longer-term Treasury bonds. The move could push down longer-term interest rates, including rates on mortgages, auto loans and other consumer and business borrowing. The central bank could take other steps, such as cutting the interest rate it pays on the reserves banks hold at the Fed. That could encourage banks to lend the money rather than keeping it parked at the Fed. President Barack Obama has proposed a $447 billion job-creation package. He wants to cut Social Security taxes for workers, extend unemployment benefits, cut taxes for small businesses and spend more federal money to build roads, bridges and other public works projects. The president's plan faces opposition from Republicans, particularly because he wants to pay for it with higher taxes on wealthier households, hedge fund managers and oil companies. The government retail sales report offered a contrast to more upbeat data from major retailers and auto dealers. Luxury chains like Nordstrom Inc. and Saks Inc. said affluent shoppers kept spending. And discounters such as Target Corp. and Costco Wholesale Corp. got a boost from shoppers buying batteries, bottled water and other supplies to prepare for Hurricane Irene. Still, Best Buy Co., the largest U.S. consumer electronics retailer, reported Tuesday that its second-quarter profits plunged 30 percent. "We're still facing an uncertain (economic) environment with volatile consumer shopping behavior, and this was evident in our results," Brian Dunn, CEO of Best Buy, said during a call with investors Tuesday. Auto sales fell 0.3 percent in August, according to the government report. Earlier this month, major automakers reported healthy sales increases in August, largely because dealers introduced new models and offered cheaper financing. The disparity could be explained, in part, because industry figures compare the current month to the same month a year ago, while the government's figures are month to month. But dealers who sell foreign cars continued to see a shortage of popular models because of supply chain disruptions caused by the March 11 earthquake in Japan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PAGE 20

Describing the amendments as reasonable, and unlikely to impede legitimate transactions, Mr OBrien told Tribune Business: Hopefully, this will create more compliance and greater clarity in the sale of property. However, he urged the Government to be more transparent when it came to such amendments, involving the private sector in their crafting and informing it of when they would be implemented. Several realtors spoken to by Tribune Business said they were unaware of the changes made by the Government to the Stamp Duty Act when contacted by Tribune Business, not the first time the private sector has been caught unawares by legislative amendments bound up with the annual Budget. Thats the next step in the progress of our legislative process; greater opportunity for feedback from the private sector and greater notice for people to prepare, especially where it involves real property transactions, Mr OBrien said. We really need at least three months, because the average transaction takes that long. A 90-day window is reasonable to expect something to be completed. If the law could have an effective date of 90 days after its passed, thats ideal because it would allow people to plan. Among the amendments identified in a bulletin sent out to its clients by the Higgs& Johnson law firm were that the Treasurer can ignore the characterisation or steps taken in a transaction if they are contrived, or do not reflect the true value, in a bid to avoid Stamp Duty. For real estate, in particular, the Act was amended to prevent the avoidance of Stamp Duty through paperless transactions that lacked conveyances, with tax now deemed payable and a deal completed where enjoyment and control of a particular property had passed to the purchaser. The Government also moved to prevent the evasion, or long-term deferral, of Stamp Duty payments by real estate deals that hid behind purchase options or sales in escrow. In the formers case, the option is deemed to be exercised and taxes due once the grantee enjoys the powers, rights and benefits of a purchaser. The option does not have to be formerly exercised. And sales in escrow are deemed to be completed, and Stamp Duty due, on the escrows first anniversary. However, there are exceptions to this the sale was cancelled, completed or the Treasurer is satisfied that continuing the escrow is not to delay or avoid tax payments. The amendments also seek to clarify market value, stating that this is defined as the value of the land on the date the conveyancing is presented for Stamping. Parties to a real estate transaction, provided they bring the conveyancing forward within six months of its execution, will see market value determined on the date it was executed. This appears to be another effort to ensure conveyancings are brought forward quickly for Stamping, improving the Governments cash flow. Mr OBrien, the immediate past head of the Bar Associations real estate committee, told Tribune Business of the amendments: They have enough flexibility that legitimate commercial transactions should be able to proceed, and transactions designed solely for the purpose of avoidance or deferring Stamp Tax can be caught. I dont think theyll discourage any transactions, and perhaps theyll just encourage quicker payment of Stamp Duty. Hopefully, this will create more compliance and greater clarity in the sale of property. And he added: There are certainly abuses by some developers in the Bahamas, especially with unsuspecting foreign purchasers who rely upon the integrity of the developer and their attorney. Im aware of developments that have abused the ignorance of purchasers by setting up schemes that are structured so as not to record a conveyance. People pay money thinking theyre protected, only to find out many years later their conveyance is not recorded. It leaves a mess that has uncertainties, and which requires unnecessary expense. Is someone liable to personally pay taxes if a conveyance is not recorded? BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011, PAGE 7B 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.19 0.95AML Foods Limited 1.19 1.19 0.00 0.1550.0807.76.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 -0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7.50 4.40Bank of Bahamas 6.92 6.93 0.015,0000.2300.10030.11.44% 0 .53 0.17Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2.84 2.55Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.0300.09090.03.33% 1.96 1.77Fidelity Bank 1.77 1.77 0.00 0.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas 8.47 8.47 0.00 0.2450.31034.63.66% 2.80 2.35Colina Holdings 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.4380.0405.81.57% 8.50 8.33Commonwealth Brewery 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.7400.00011.50.00% 7.00 6.21Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.88 6.88 0.00 0.4960.26013.93.78% 2.00 1.63Consolidated Water BDRs 1.65 1.65 0.00 0.1110.04514.92.73% 1.77 1.31Doctor's Hospital 1.37 1.37 0.00 0.0740.11018.58.03% 5.50 4.75Famguard 5.43 5.43 0.00 0.4980.24010.94.42% 8.50 5.35Finco 5.39 5.39 0.001,0000.7570.0007.10.00% 9.74 7.75FirstCaribbean Bank 8.21 8.21 0.00 0.4940.35016.64.26% 6.00 5.00Focol (S) 5.75 5.75 0.00 0.4350.22013.23.83% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.30 5.50ICD Utilities 7.30 7.30 0.00 -0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 0.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.00F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%TUESDAY, 13 SEPTEMBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,393.63 | CHG 0.12 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -105.88 | YTD % -7.06BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.06 5.01Bahamas Supermarkets N/A N/A 14.00 -2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.0010.000256.60.00% 41.00 29.00ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.5400.0009.030.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.65 0.75 0.40 0.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Fund Name NAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund 1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5398Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund 114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund 118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.17492.48%5.16% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund 1.13431.41%5.17% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.17642.38%5.39% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221 NAV Date 31-May-11 30-Jun-11 &20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 ,1+((0(&2857 &20021/$:$1'(48,7<',9,6,21&/(*(1 %(7:((1 %$+$0$6'(9(/230(17%$1. 3ODLQWLII $1' &+5,6723+(5&855< WD&XUU\VUXFNLQJf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fGD\VEHIRUHWKHGDWHDERYH PHQWLRQHGDFRS\RIDQ\$IGDYLWLQWHQGHG WREHXVHG '$7(' WKLV WK GD\RI-XO\$' 5(*,675$5 7KLV6XPPRQVZDVWDNHQRXWE\0HVVUV *LEVRQ5LJE\t&R&KDPEHUV.LDOH[ +RXVH'RZGHVZHOO6WUHHW1DVVDX7KH %DKDPDV$WWRUQH\VIRUWKHODLQWLII ,1',$1$*$5'(16&21'20,1,806 6LWXDWHDW/RWVt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BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 THE TRIBUNE $ 0' 0$'-*#$0 -02'$1(6+-,2'1$,#$#*7tb2'$-1.(2 *0$.-021"-,1-*(# 2$#,$2(,"-+$-%+(**(-,-0"$,21.$01' 0$"-+. 0$#2-"$,21.$01' 0$ %-02'$1 +$.$0(-#* 127$ 0 $20$4$,3$-4$02'$1(6+-,2'.$0(-#(,"0$ 1$#!7n+(**(-,-0fr"-+. 0$#2-2'$1 +$.$0(-#* 127$ 0'$1$"-,#/3 02$0"-+. 0$#5(2'2'$1 +$2'0$$+-,2'1 127$ 01 5 ,(,"0$ 1$-%r+(**(-,-0rt 2($,2# 71 0$rfr"-+. 0$#2-b* 127$ 0-0 r(,"0$ 1$-2 *$6.$,1$1(,"0$ 1$#!7+(**(-,-0r-4$02'$1 +$ 1(6+-,2'.$0(-# '$"-,2(,3$#5$ ),$11(,2'$*-" *$"-,-+7 ,#(,"0$ 1(,&$6.$,1$10$+ (,1 "' **$,&$%-02'$-1.(2 *'(*$" 1'%*-50$+ (,1120-,&5$0$+ (,4(&(* ,2(,+-,(2-0(,&$6.$,1$1 ,#"-,2(,3$2-*--)%-0-..-023,(2($12-(+.0-4$1$04("$ ,#0$4$,3$ 5-3*#*()$2-2' ,)-301' 0$'-*#$01-"( 2$1.'71("( ,1 ,#4-*3,2$$01%-02'$(0*-7 *27 ,##$#(" 2(-,2--"2-01-1.(2 nbtfn bfrb nnrtn-"2-01-1.(2 *$ *2'12$+(+(2$# DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated BalanceSheet J u ly 31, 2011with comparative figuresat January 31,2011 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31, 2011 January 31, 2011 AssetsCurrent assets: Cash andcash equivalents $5,596 5,483 Accounts receivablepatients, net (note 2) 958 503 Accounts receivablethird partypayors, net (note 2) 3,929 4,187 Inventories 1,526 1,319 Other assets 843 815 12,852 12,307 N on-current assets: Investments 30 30 Goodwill, net 431 431 O ther intangible assets 1,492 1,738 Investment property 4,291 4,373 Property, plantand equipment 11,969 11,312 18,213 17,884 Total assets $31,065 30,191 Liabilities and Shareholders EquityCurrent liabilities: Accounts payable and otherliabilities $ 2,921 2,915 Totalliabilities $ 2,921 2,915 Shareholders equity: Share capital: A uthorized 12,500,000 common sharesat par value of B$0.04each (January 31, 2011 12,500, 000 shares) Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares (January 31, 2011 9,971,634shares) 399 399 C ontributed surplus 12,358 12,358 Retained earnings 15,387 14,519 28,144 27,276 Total liabilitiesand shareholders equity $31,065 30,191 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of RevenueandExpenses Six months ended July 31, 2011with comparativefigures for thesixmonths endedJuly 31, 2010 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31,2011 July31, 2010 Revenues Patient service revenue, net $ 21,867 20,300 Other 595 747 Total revenues 22,462 21,047 E xpenses Salaries andbenefits 8,973 8,509 Medical supplies andservices 6,032 5,738 Depreciation andamortization 1,560 1,420 O ther operating 1,107 1,037 Bad debt expense, net of recoveries 863 370 Utilities 758 643 Government taxes and fees 495 586 Insurance 363 361 Outside services 356 394 Repairs andmaintenance 369 406 Dietary expenses 193 177 Rent 211 199 Legal expenses 115 67 Total expenses 21,395 19,907 Income beforeinterest 1,067 1,140 Interest expense Net income for the period $1,067 1,140 Earningsper common share(expressed in Bahamiandollars): Basic and fully diluted$ 0.11 0.11 (Unaudited) DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of Changes inEquity Six months ended July 31, 2011 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)NumberofsharesShare capitalContributed surplusRetained earnings Balance at January 31, 2011 9,971,634$399 $12,358$14,519 Net income for the period 1,067 Dividendspaid (199) Balance at July 31, 2011 9,971,634$399 $12,358$15,387 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDNotes to InterimConsolidated Financial Statements Six monthsendedJuly 31, 2011 1. Significantaccountingpolicies These interim financial statements have been preparedin accordancewithInternational Accounting Standard No. 34, Interim FinancialReporting, usingthe same accounting policies applied inthe January 31, 2011 audited consolidated financial statements.2.Accounts receivable Accounts receivableare stated net of provisions for doubtfulaccounts of$2.9million.3.Dividends paid Declared and paid on ordinary shares$0.02 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of RevenueandExpenses Six months ended July 31, 2011with comparativefigures for the threemonths ended July 31, 2010 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31, 2011 July 31, 2010 R evenues Patient service revenue, net $10,715 9,920 Other 310 357 Total revenues 11,025 10,277 Expenses S alaries andbenefits 4,439 4,319 Medical supplies andservices 2,947 2,814 Depreciation andamortization 810 744 Other operating 530 495 Utilities 393 325 Bad debt expense, net of recoveries 587 256 Government taxes and fees 247 287 Insurance 183 180 Outside services 171 206 Repairs andmaintenance 233 266 Rent 105 101 Dietary expenses 97 94 Legal expenses 62 26 Total expenses 10,804 10,113 Income beforeinterest 221 164 I nterest expense Net income for the period $221 164 Earningsper common share(expressed in Bahamiandollars): B asic and fully diluted $0.02 0.02 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITEDConsolidated Statement of Cash Flows Six months ended July 31, 2011with comparativefigures for thesixmonths ended July31, 2010 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)July 31, 2011 July 31, 2010 Cashflows from operating activities N et income $1,067 1,140 Adjustments toreconcilenet income tonet cash provided by operatingactivities: Depreciation andamortization 1,560 1,420 P rovision for doubtful accounts 863 370 Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment (17) 3,490 2,913 Changes in operatingassetsand liabilities: (Increase) decreasein accounts receivable (1,061) (220) Increase in inventories (207) (85) Increase inprepaid expenses andotherassets (27) (206) Increase (decrease) inaccountspayable andotherliabilities 6 (144) Cash provided by operatingactivities 2,201 2,258 C ash flows frominvesting activities P urchase of property,plant andequipment (1,861) (2,445) Purchase ofintangible assets (28) (513) Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment Cash used ininvestingactivities (1,889) (2,958) Cashflows from financing activities Repayment oflong-term debt D ividends paid to shareholders (199) (399) Cashused in financingactivities (199) (399 Increase (decrease)in cash and cash equivalents 113 (1,099) Cash andcash equivalents at beginningof period 5,483 6,352 Cash andcash equivalents atend of period $ 5,596 5,253 Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and inhand, short-term deposits withan original maturity ofsix months orless. (Unaudited) and you stand a better chance of earning a higher salary if you increase your formal education. Nevertheless, businesses sometimes feel that hiring someone who has done it all on their own is a big risk. They really just have to take the word of the person being interviewed, and most employers do not want to take a leap of faith like that. If you simply want to work for yourself a degree is not mandatory, so my advice is to gain as much knowledge as possible. Do you 100 per cent need a degree? No but the choice is optional. Although you do not really need the degree itself, I believe having one will most likely get you noticed very, very quickly on a job hunt. Keeping a strong and powerful portfolio on hand isa step in the right direction, and will speak much louder than a resume or degree, giving potential employers at least some assurance that you possess the professional training required. So, until we meet again, have fun, enjoy your life and stay on top of your game. NB: The columnist welcomes feedback at deedee2111@hotmail.com About the Columnist: Ms Bastian is an extensively qualified graphic designer with M.Sc., B.Sc., A.Sc qualifdications. She has trained at: Miami Lakes Technical Centre, Success Training College, College of the Bahamas, Nova Southeastern University, Learning Tree International, Langevine International and Synergy Bahamas. FEEDBACK: Dear Deidre, I just read your column in the Tribune on Graphic Criticism, and it was educational and informative. It's just great reading. Keep up the great job! Desiree Clarke Nassau, Bahamas FROM page two DEGREES OF QUALIFICATION

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By JEFF ARAH GIBSON T ribune Features Writer THE Christian community was hit with another sex scandal last week when a Freeport pastor was found guilty of unlawful sexual inter course with a minor. Alber t Alexander Whyley 59, a local clergyman and fruit vendor was charged with having unlawful sex with a nineyear -old girl on Febr uary 6, 2011. Wh yle y had b een co nvi cted of t he same offence almost 18 years ago. He will be sentenced on November 11. Members of the Christian community weighed in on the scandal surrounding the pastor T ameka Grant told T ribune Religion she was outraged after hearing of Mr Whyley s conviction. I was sick to my stomach when I heard about that. My God she is just nine years old and he was supposed to be looking after her and he went and did that to her She will be tramautised for the rest of her life. Sometimes I wonder how people like him sleep at night. That situation is just sad and these are the peo ple that you trust your children with, said Ms Grant. I do not know what is with these pas tors, when they ar e not gay they molest ing little childr en. How could you be min istering to someone and in the back of y ou r m i nd y ou a r e fa nt as i s in g ab ou t t hem, th at is a bun c h of fooli shn ess (And to think) he did it before. I do not know what we are going to do with this countr y All we could do is pray , she said. Cl eop ha s D ar li ng *, f ol lo wer of th e Baptist faith and a r egular church-goer s aid the actions of the c o nvic t ed sex of fender can never be justified, and he must now seek for giveness for his trans gr ession. Its a very unfortunate situation. The only way out of a situation like that would be to repent and ask God to for give you because no sin can be for given if you do not confess your sins. He went on to explain that although pastors ar e respected highly by society they too, sin and fall short. Even though you are a pastor you can still fall into sin. People fail to understand that a pastor is just a pastor He is not God and he is still in reach of the devil. Being a pastor does not mean you do not have feelings. As a pastor your tempta tion is even greater however it is no excuse for wrongdoing. The only thing he could do is look to God for help, he said. Speaking with T ribune Religion on the condition of anonymity one woman said, if you do the crime you pay the time. If he did the crime then he needs to be punished and put to shame openly Just because he is a pastor that does not mean he can escape judgment. Therefor e you do the crime you pay the time and that s my five cents, she said. The case of Mr Whyley is not the first t o r ock t h e re li gio us com mu ni ty On October 4, the fate of Bishop Earl Randy F r a s e r w il l b e d e te r m i n ed w h en h i s unlawful sex trial comes to a close. It is al le ged t ha t F r as er p as t or of P i lg r i m B ap t is t T e m pl e o n St Ja me s Road, had an unlawful sexual relationship with a girl between July 2005 and Februar y 2006. A d d i t i o n a l l y an At lan tabas ed man repor tedly raised in the Bahamas was the fifth accuser in the sex scandal sur roundin g A meri c an r eligi ous l eader Bis hop Eddie Long, according to news r eports in the US. Last September four young men, all former members of New Birth Church, sued Mr Long, accusing the bishop of lav ishing money trips and gifts on them while having sexual relations with the men. Mr Long publicly denied the allegations. Earlier this year the matter was set tled out of court and the lawsuits against the pastor were dropped. *Names have been changed. RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTSR E L I G I O N S E C T I O N C P G 2 8 THURSDA Y SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 T H E T R I B U N E SP A S T O R S ABUSE OF POWER C O NDEMNED S CAN DAL : A lb e rt A le x a n de r W hy l e y (c en tr e ), a l o ca l c le rg y m an was c h a rge d wi th ha v i ng u nl a wfu l s e x wi th a ni n eye a r -o ld g irl o n Fe b ru ary 6 2 01 1

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LU KE 2 2: 31 3 2 A n d the Lo r d s a id S imo n S imo n b e h old Sa ta n h a th de s i re d t o h a v e y o u, th at he ma y s ift y o u a s wh e a t. B u t I h a ve pr a y e d fo r th e e th at th y fa ith fa il n o t: a n d wh e n th ou a r t co n v e rt ed s tr e ng th e n th y b r e t h r e n T his w or d c on v e rte d tr an s la te d in to G re e k is : e p is tr e ph o ep -e e -s tr e f'-o ; wh ic h ha s s e v e r al m e an in g s s uc h a s 1 ) to r e v e r t, 2 ) to c o me or g o ag a in 3 ) to r e t u r n a b ou t, o r a g a i n Of ten w he n a c hu r c h le ad e r h as b e e n p u b lic ly dis g r a c e d th is q ue s tio n is al wa y s as k e d H o w a ma n o f Go d c ou ld be a c c u s ed o f do in g s u c h a thi ng ? T h e s imp le an s w er to s uc h a q u es ti on is th is : H e ha s n t b e en c o n v e r te d a s y e t. I d a re to s a y th a t th er e ma n y be lie v e r s with in the b od y of C hr is t /Me s s ia h wh o ha v e no t y e t b e en c o nv e r te d ; th e yv e a llo we d o r a re a llo win g r el ig ion a nd tr a di tion s o f m e n to hi nd e r t he c on v e r s io n p r oc e s s o f t he ir r e l a tio ns h ip w ith Him W a tc h th is S a ta n kn e w S imo n v ia h is p a s t li fe a nd h a d a p a s s io na te d e s ir e o f h a vi ng S imo n on c e ag a in a s a me mb e r o f h is r e g ime a nd w a s in ten d in g to ma k e hi m p a y fo r le a vi ng H e r e s Y a h s h u a s s umma tion of S ata n s pl an s for S imo n : A nd the Lo r d s a id S imo n Si mo n, b e h ol d, S a ta n h a th de s ir e d to ha v e yo u th a t h e ma y s ift y ou a s w h ea t. Up o n s tud y in g th e s c r ip tu r e s a nd th e life o f the Apo s tle P e te r o n e wo u ld c le ar ly s ee a n d v e r y e a s ily c on c lu d e th a t e ve n as h e wa lk e d c lo s e ly wit h th e Me s s ia h h e ( Pe te r ) y e t h a d ma n y i ss u e s Be in g th e a ll k no w ing on e tha t He is he r e s wh a t Y ah s h ua Me s s ia h ( a ka J e s u s th e Ch r is t) s ai d to P e te r : B u t I h a ve p r a ye d f or the e th at th y fa ith fa il n ot: a n d wh en t h ou ar t con ve rte d, s t r en gthe n thy b r e t h re n I t s t ime f o r conv ers i o n t o take place a mong t h e ho us eho l d of f a i th For t o o l o ng we v e allow the de vil t o h ave h i s way a mong th ose of u s who n ame the n ame of C hr i s t. W e re p re ac hing, teac hing a nd doin g a lot of g ood thing s i n the n ame of the L ord b ut if th e t r uth be to l d ma ny o f us a re n ot ho ne stly l iv i n g what wer e pr e a c h i n g a nd tea ch i n g. Eve ry time a c hu rc h lead er falls it wea ke ns the fait h of so me be li e ve rs wh o wer e loo king to the ch urc h for str e n g t h a nd s up por t i n t h es e tr ying times Ig nor a nce and rel i gious s t upi di t y woul d say If a b e l i e v e r s faith i s wea ke ned b y the fall of a c h u rc h lea der it s n ot the le ade r s fa ult ; the b eli e ve r sh ould b e tr us t in g in the Lo rd an d n ot the ch ur ch le ade r . A g ain, I ca l l s uc h s ayin gs i g nor an ce an d re l ig i o us stup i d i ty I n t h e se cu lar wo rld an d es pe cially amo ng t h e For tune 5 00 co mpa nies it is sa id a nd it is also a pro ve n fac t t h at ev er ythin g r i s e s a nd f a ll s upo n lea der s hip. Think it not str ang e t h at Y ah shu a sa id to Pe t e r whe n tho u ar t c o n v e r te d, stre ng t h en thy br e t h ren I s tod ay s c hu rc h a bou t s tre ngth ening the b re t h ren o r ab ou t bu i ld i n g up a nd p r o m o t i n g the r eligio us le ade r? I n s tudy ing t h e s cr iptur es after the da y o f Pen t e co st a nd the outpo ur i n g of the Holy Spir i t the s aints wer e s t r en gthe ned and bold i n the thing s of God; the y we re united the y l o ve d and c ar ed for o ne a nothe r an d had a ll t h i n gs co mmon. Acts 2: 4 4-45 : And all tha t believ ed wer e t o g e t h e r an d had a ll thing s co mmon; And so l d the i r p os se ss ions a nd go ods an d p ar t e d t h em to all men, a s e ver y ma n ha d ne ed. Be i n g co nv er t e d or c onv er s i o n i s at its bes t wh en s t a rte d f r om t h e he ad, f r om the l eadershi p whi ch ul t i mat ely benef it s t he e n t i re bo dy H e re s ano t h er c l a ss ic exa mple of co nv er sion at wor k in a Holy Spir i t led c hu r c h Acts 4: 34 3 5: Ne it h er was t h er e a ny amon g the m t h at lac ked : fo r a s ma ny a s w e re po ss es s or s of land s or ho use s s old t h em, an d br ou ght the p ric es of t h e thing s t h at we re s old; An d la i d them do wn a t the apo stles f e et: and distr i b ution wa s ma de unto e ve ry m a n a cc or ding a s h e ha d ne ed. N o w her e s t h e layo ut o f t o da y s r e l i g i o u s c h u r c h: 8 0 t o 90 pe r ce nt of b eliev er s a r e in g re at la ck. The o t h er p er ce ntag e th at h ave s ubs tan ce (lan ds h ous e s, mon ey etc) loo k d own t h eir nos es a t t h os e tha t do n t h av e. Wha t e ve r finan cia l o f fe ring i s take n a t the g athe ring i s c oll e cte d an d s t o re d aw ay a nd is p rimar il y use d to ca t e r to t h e ne eds of the r eligiou s lea de r T he o ppo si t e of t ru e c onv ersi o n i s h ypo cr isy w hich g ive s wa y to ev er y kin d of u ngo dly s pirit su ch a s lying d ec eitf u l p ra ctice s, gr ee d an d s elfi s hn es s. W a t c h this The man y lies tha t a re be ing t o l d in the L o rd s name a nd d ec eitf u l pr ac t ic es that a re tak i n g p l a ce in toda y s c hur c h ar e abo ut to b e ex pos ed as f o l low s. A c ts 5 :1-5: Bu t a ce rta i n man n ame d Ana nias with Sa pph i r a h i s wi fe s old a po ss es sio n, And k ept bac k pa rt o f the pr ice his wife also b eing pr ivy to i t, a nd br ou ght a ce rtain par t, and laid it, at the a pos tles fe et. But Pe ter s aid, Anan ias wh y hath Sa tan fil le d thine he ar t to l ie t o t h e Ho l y Ghos t, and to k eep bac k pa rt of t h e pr ice o f the l a nd? Whiles it r ema ined was it n ot thine own? And after it w as so l d was it not in thine ow n p ower ? Why ha st th ou co nce ive d this thing in thine hea rt? t h ou h as t n ot lied unto me n, b ut unto Go d. And Ana nias he ar ing the se w o rd s f e ll do wn, and g av e up the gh os t : an d g re at fea r ca me o n a ll t h em tha t he ar d the se t h i n g s W h en tho u ar t con ve rted Fo r qu e s tio n s o r c o mm e n ts c o nt a ct u s a t e m a i l s : p a s t o r m a l l e n @ y a h o o c o m o r k m f c i @ l i v e c o m o r t el e ph o n e n u mb e r 2 4 2 -44 1 2 0 2 1 or 3 P a s to rs Ma tth e w a n d Br en d a le e A ll en K in g d om Mi nd e d F e ll ow s h ip C e nt er In te rn a tio n a l. The T ribuneThursday September 15, 201 1PG 29RELIGIONTHE Ea ster n Ne w Pr ovide nc e Distr i c t of t h e C hur ch of Go d, Ba hama s and the T u r k s and Ca i c os I sla nds un der the lea de rs hip of Dis trict Ove rs ee r Bish op V ic t o r Jo hn son w i ll be h olding its n i n t h a nn ual dis t r ict co nv en t io n f r om S eptemb er 20 25 S e rv ice s will be held at 7.3 0pm nightly a t t he N ew G oo dw i l l Ch urch of G od i n P e a rd ale. This y ea r s theme is T ou chin g Live s a nd the sc rip t u re te xt is Phili p pian s 2 : 4 Loo k n ot e ver y man on his own things b ut e v e ry ma n als o on t h e things of othe rs . C h u rc h r e p res en tati v es s aid the re will a g re at l ine -up of ac ti v it ies an d se rv ice s be ginnin g wit h a pr e-co nve ntion r ally on T u e s d a y wh i c h wil l featur e pr es en tati o ns fr om t h e Y outh, Life Bu i ld er s /Men and W o m e n s M i ni st ries as w el l as f rom t he East ern Distr i c t Bra ss Ban d. O n W edn esd ay ni g ht t he D i st r ic t O v e r s e e r Bis ho p J ohn so n, will delive r t h e op en i n g mes s age Rev Ju l ia Ba i n pa stor o f t h e Ch ur ch of G o d, Be r n a rd Road will br ing t h e W o rd on Thur s day nigh t a nd o n Su nda y e ve ning A d mi n i s tra ti v e Bish op Dr J ohn Hume s will delive r the se rmon Sp ec i a l p ra ye r s es sion s will b e he ld ea ch night be twee n the h our s o f 6 .30 pm an d 7p m. H ealt h t a l ks wi ll al s o be g i ven by Drs Char les Jo hns on a nd T ia W ilso n. Sp eci a l si ngi n g w i l l com e f ro m t he E a s t e r n Distr i c t Pr ais e T e am, the Ea ster n D is trict, t h e Be r n a r d Roa d and t h e New G ood wi l l Church choi rs as w el l as t he G o sp el Flas hligh t s A g ala ba nq uet i s plan ned for Fr i d ay d ur i n g wh i c h 2 0 pe rs on s fr om the chu rc he s in t h e d i s tric t wil l be hon our e d for e xc ellenc e i n min i s try Th i s eve nt wi ll be he ld at the W i lliam M Jo hnson Au di to riu m o n Joe Farr i n g t o n R o a d T his ye ar s c onv ention pr omis es to be exc it in g, sp i r itfil le d an d ins pir ati o na l All a re invited to a t te nd. Come w orship a nd f e l lo wsh i p w i th u s. Let us t o uc h t h e Lor d t o gethe r a nd the n lea ve mo t iv ated to tou ch some on e els e, the chu rc h s aid.SPEAKERS:Wednesday : Bishop Victor A. Johnson Eastern District Overseer Thursday: Rev Julia BainSr Pastor Bernard Road Church of God Sunday Night: Bishop John N. HumesAdministrative Bishop Church of God Bahamas, T urks & Caicos Is.AND WHE N T HO U AR T C ONV ER TED CH UR CH O F GO D EAS TERN D IS TRICT C O N VENTIO N T O BE H E L D NEXT W E EK DISTRICT Overseer Bishop Victor Johnson REV Julia Bain, pastor of the Chur ch of God, Bernard Road P AST OR MA TTHEW ALLEN

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A S T H E n e w s ch o o l a nd co l l eg e t e r m b e gi n s t o un f o l d, i t is g oo d f o r us t o r ef l ec t o n ho w Je s u s m o de l s f o r u s t h e p r a ye r t h a t m ay b e o f f e r ed f o r t h o s e w h o wi l l b e a wa y f r o m u s f or a p e r i od o f t i m e. A s t h e L o r d pr e p a r es t o l e av e Hi s d is c ip l e s fo r t h e l as t t i m e H i s p r a y er i s li k e a m ot h e r s p r a ye r f o r h er c h il d r e n i f s h e i s l ea v in g t h e m f o r an y l e n gt h of t i m e. T h e m ot h e r h e n wi t h w i ng s ar o u n d h e r ch i ck s i s t h e im a ge us ed b y Je s u s t o d e p ic t h i s d es i r e t o h a ve lo v ed a nd p r o t e c t e d J e r u s a l e m i f h e h a d b e e n a l lo w ed t o d o s o b y t h e J ews T h i s is wh a t m ak e s t h e h e ar t s o f p ar e n t s an d t e ac he r s e i t he r s a d o r gl a d w h en t he y t h i n k o f t h e i r c h il d r e n I t al l d ep e n ds o n t h e c ho i ce s t h at t h e c h i l d r e n m ak e I f t h ey c an b e p r o u d o f t h em an d f ee l t h a t G od i s pl e as ed t h ey ce l eb r a t e wi t h a li g h t h e ar t I f t h e y ar e d i s a p po i n t ed a n d f e el t h a t G o d i s d is pl e as e d i t i s a d i f fi c ul t t hi n g n o t t o h av e a h e av y h e ar t P a r e n t s w i t h s e v e r a l c h i l d r e n a n d t e ac h er s wi t h a wh o l e cl as s of t e n h av e m i xe d f e e li n g s d e p en d i ng on wh a t d i f f e r e nt o n es a r e d o in g o r h av e d o n e wi t h t h e ir l i ve s B y t h e t im e o f t h e A s c en s i o n o ur L o r d ha s l o s t o n l y Ju d as T h e o t h er s s ee m t o ha v e co m e b ac k w it h a s t r o n g f a i t h. A f t er t h e y wi t n e s s t h e L o r d s g oi n g u p i n t o t h e cl o u ds t h ey r e t u r n t o t h e r oo m u p s t ai r s o r t h e u p p er r o om as w e u s u al l y r e f er t o i t T h e 1 1 d is ci pl e s ar e li s t e d b y n a me a n d t h e n we a r e t o ld : A l l t h er e we r e c o n s t a n t l y d e v o t i n g t h e m s e l v e s t o p r a y e r t o g e t h e r w i t h c e r t a i n w o m e n i n cl u d in g M a r y t h e M o t h e r o f Jes us as w el l as h i s b r o t h e r s ( A ct s 1 :1 4 ) P e n t ec os t w il l c o me t o t h os e wh o w ai t an d pr ay t o g et h e r A l l w i ll b e wi t n es s es T h ey we r e s e nt t o t he e n ds o f t h e r e gi o n s k n ow n t o t h em a s t h e en d s o f t h e ea r t h F o r u s o ur en d s o f t he ea r t h m ay b e I n ag u a, B im i n i or A n dr os o r Q u ar r y M i s s i o n Ro a d Bl ac k V i l la g e, F o x H i ll an d Ba in T o wn as we l l a s t he r es t o f t h e wo r l d W e h av e t h e s a m e p o wer o f t h e H ol y S p i r i t W e h av e t h e p ot e n t i al t o b e f ol l o we r s o f t h e c o m m a n d o f t h e G r e a t Co m m is s io n as w e gr ee t e a ch t o u r i s t I n t h e l et t e r s o f t h e a p o s t l es t h a t ar e r e c o r d ed i n t h e Ne w T e s t a me n t t h e y a r e l i k e p a r e n t s t e a c h i n g t h e i r b e l ov e d t o s t a n d f i r m S t P et e r f o r ex am p l e, in s t r uc t s h i s r e ad e r s t o r ej o i ce a n d n ot b e s u r p r i s ed wh e n t h e y a r e p e r s e c u t e d f o r d o i n g wh a t i s r ig h t r at h e r t h e y ar e t o r e c o gn is e i t a s a b l es s in g i f t h ey s uf f e r T he y ar e t o g l o r i f y G o d b ec au s e t h e y b ea r t h e n am e of Ch r i s t i a n n o t c o ns id er in g i t a d i s gr ac e t o s uf f e r f or i t A s w e r e l ea s e o ur c h il d r e n i n t o t h e c a r e of o t h er co n ce r n ed a du l t s t h ei r t ea ch e r s l e t u s ce l eb r a t e t h e pr oc es s o f t r a in i n g, n ur t u r i n g a n d d i s ci p l in g f o r l if e T he c ar r yi n g o f a ch i ld i n t h e wo m b i s h ow G o d c ar r ie s u s i n G o d s H ea r t W e l e a r n a b o ut l o ve f r o m t he wa y i n wh i ch G od lo v es u s W e l e ar n ab o u t p r a ye r f r o m t he m an n e r i n w h ic h Je s u s p r ay s f o r u s W e l e a r n a b o u t e n c o u r a g i n g f r o m t h e e x am p l es w e h a ve h ad i n o ur l i f e T e ac hi n g an d p ar e n t i ng i nv o l ve : s ac r i f i c e c o m m i t m e n t p e r s e v e r a n c e p a t ie n ce an d l o ve T h i s s c h oo l y ea r l e t a p r a y e r b e o n t h e l i p s o f e v e r y C h r i s t i a n p a r e n t a n d t e a c h e r l i p s t h r o u gh o u t e ac h da y A s c hi l d r en g e t o l d e r t h e m o r e w e n e ed t o p r a y F o r t h e r es t o f u s l e t u s k e ep i n o u r p r a ye r s t h e t e ac h er s an d pa r e n t s of t h i s n at i o n a n d o f t h e wo r l d MEDIT A TION The T ribunePG 30Thursday September 15, 201 1RELIGION Teaching and Parenting REV ANGELA C BOSFIELD P ALA CIOUS Share your newsThe T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your stor y .As we release our children into the car e of other concerned adults, their teachers, let us cel ebrate the process of training, nur turing and discipling for life.


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